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Sample records for shock tube material

  1. The shock tube as wave reactor for kinetic studies and material systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhaskaran, K.A. [Indian Institute of Technology, Chennai (India). Department of Mechanical Engineering; Roth, P. [Gerhard Mercator Universitat, Duisberg (Germany). Institut fur Verbrennung und Gasdynamik

    2002-07-01

    Several important reviews of shock tube kinetics have appeared earlier, prominent among them being 'Shock Tube Technique in Chemical Kinetics' by Belford and Strehlow (Ann Rev Phys Chem 20 (1969) 247), 'Chemical Reaction of Shock Waves' by Wagner (Proceedings of the Eighth International Shock Tube Symposium (1971) 4/1), 'Shock Tube and Shock Wave Research' by Bauer and Lewis (Proceedings of the 11th International Symposium on Shock Tubes and Waves (1977) 269), 'Shock Waves in Chemistry' edited by Assa Lifshitz (Shock Waves in Chemistry, 1981) and 'Shock Tube Techniques in Chemical Kinetics' by Wing Tsang and Assa Lifshitz (Annu Rev Phys Chem 41 (1990) 559). A critical analysis of the different shock tube techniques, their limitations and suggestions to improve the accuracy of the data produced are contained in these reviews. The purpose of this article is to present the current status of kinetic research with emphasis on the diagnostic techniques. Selected studies on homogeneous and dispersed systems are presented to bring out the versatility of the shock tube technique. The use of the shock tube as high temperature wave reactor for gas phase material synthesis is also highlighted. (author)

  2. Shock tube Multiphase Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middlebrooks, John; Allen, Roy; Paudel, Manoj; Young, Calvin; Musick, Ben; McFarland, Jacob

    2017-11-01

    Shock driven multiphase instabilities (SDMI) are unique physical phenomena that have far-reaching practical applications in engineering and science. The instability is present in high energy explosions, scramjet combustors, and supernovae events. The SDMI arises when a multiphase interface is impulsively accelerated by the passage of a shockwave. It is similar in development to the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability however, particle-to-gas coupling is the driving mechanism of the SDMI. As particle effects such as lag and phase change become more prominent, the SDMI's development begins to significantly deviate from the RM instability. We have developed an experiment for studying the SDMI in our shock tube facility. In our experiments, a multiphase interface is created using a laminar jet and flowed into the shock tube where it is accelerated by the passage of a planar shockwave. The interface development is captured using CCD cameras synchronized with planar laser illumination. This talk will give an overview of new experiments conducted to examine the development of a shocked cylindrical multiphase interface. The effects of Atwood number, particle size, and a second acceleration (reshock) of the interface will be discussed.

  3. Miniature shock tube for laser driven shocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busquet, Michel; Barroso, Patrice; Melse, Thierry; Bauduin, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    We describe in this paper the design of a miniature shock tube (smaller than 1 cm(3)) that can be placed in a vacuum vessel and allows transverse optical probing and longitudinal backside extreme ultraviolet emission spectroscopy in the 100-500 A range. Typical application is the study of laser launched radiative shocks, in the framework of what is called "laboratory astrophysics."

  4. Free Piston Double Diaphragm Shock Tube

    OpenAIRE

    OGURA, Eiji; FUNABIKI, Katsushi; SATO, Shunichi; ABE, Takashi; 小倉, 栄二; 船曳, 勝之; 佐藤, 俊逸; 安部, 隆士

    1997-01-01

    A free piston double diaphragm shock tube was newly developed for generation of high Mach number shock wave. Its characteristics was investigated for various operation parameters; such as a strength of the diaphragm at the end of the comparession tube, an initial pressure of low pressure tube, an initial pressure of medium pressure tube and the volume of compression tube. Under the restriction of fixed pressures for the driver high pressure tube (32×10^5Pa) and the low pressure tube (40Pa) in...

  5. SPECIAL PURPOSE SHOCK TUBE for BLAST ASSESSMENT

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This device is a specially designed shock tube for testing fabric samples in a controlled environment. The device determines the appropriate types of sensors to be...

  6. Shock Tube Measurements for Liquid Fuels Combustion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hanson, Ronald K

    2006-01-01

    ...) fundamental studies of fuel spray evaporation rates and ignition times of low-vapor pressure fuels such as JP-8, diesel fuel and normal alkane surrogates in a new aerosol shock tube using state...

  7. Shock Tube Ignition Delay Data Affected by Localized Ignition Phenomena

    KAUST Repository

    Javed, Tamour; Badra, J.; Jaasim, Mohammed; Es-sebbar, Et-touhami; Labastida, M.F.; Chung, Suk-Ho; Im, Hong G.; Farooq, Aamir

    2016-01-01

    Shock tubes have conventionally been used for measuring high-temperature ignition delay times ~ O(1 ms). In the last decade or so, the operating regime of shock tubes has been extended to lower temperatures by accessing longer observation times

  8. Shock Tube as an Impulsive Application Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Ranjan Nanda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Current investigations solely focus on application of an impulse facility in diverse area of high-speed aerodynamics and structural mechanics. Shock tube, the fundamental impulse facility, is specially designed and calibrated for present objectives. Force measurement experiments are performed on a hemispherical test model integrated with the stress wave force balance. Similar test model is considered for heat transfer measurements using coaxial thermocouple. Force and heat transfer experiments demonstrated that the strain gauge and thermocouple have lag time of 11.5 and 9 microseconds, respectively. Response time of these sensors in measuring the peak load is also measured successfully using shock tube facility. As an outcome, these sensors are found to be suitable for impulse testing. Lastly, the response of aluminum plates subjected to impulsive loading is analyzed by measuring the in-plane strain produced during deformation. Thus, possibility of forming tests in shock is also confirmed.

  9. Chemical kinetics studies at high temperatures using shock tubes

    OpenAIRE

    Rajakumar, B; Anandraj, D; Reddy, KPJ; Arunan, E

    2002-01-01

    Shock tube is an unique facility to create temperature gradients exceeding million degrees Kelvin per second. We have established two shock tubes for measuring the kinetic reaction rates at high temperatures with two different but complementary detection techniques. The first one is a single pulse shock tube, in which the reflected shock is used to heat the molecules. The equilibrated products are analyzed by gas chromatograph and infrared spectrometer. The second one uses laser-schlieren sys...

  10. Experimental study of micro-shock tube flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Ouk; Kim, Gyu Wan; Rasel, Md. Alim Iftakhar [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Heuy Dong [Fire Research Center, Korea Institute of Civil Engineering and Building Technology, Hwasung (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    The flow characteristics in micro shock tube are investigated experimentally. Studies were carried out using a stainless steel micro shock tube. Shock and expansion wave was measured using 8 pressure sensors. The initial pressure ratio was varied from 4.3 to 30.5, and the diameter of tube was also changed from 3 mm to 6 mm. Diaphragm conditions were varied using two types of diaphragms. The results obtained show that the shock strength in the tube becomes stronger for an increase in the initial pressure ratio and diameter of tube. For the thinner diaphragm, the highest shock strength was found among varied diaphragm condition. Shock attenuation was highly influenced by the diameter of tube.

  11. Study on Reflected Shock Wave/Boundary Layer Interaction in a Shock Tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Wook; Kim, Tae Ho; Kim, Heuy Dong [Andong Nat’l Univ., Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    The interaction between a shock wave and a boundary layer causes boundary layer separation, shock train, and in some cases, strong unsteadiness in the flow field. Such a situation is also observed in a shock tube, where the reflected shock wave interacts with the unsteady boundary layer. However, only a few studies have been conducted to investigate the shock train phenomenon in a shock tube. In the present study, numerical studies were conducted using the two-dimensional axisymmetric domain of a shock tube, and compressible Navier-Stokes equations were solved to clarify the flow characteristics of shock train phenomenon inside a shock tube. A detailed wave diagram was developed based on the present computational results, which were validated with existing experimental data.

  12. Flash photolysis-shock tube studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael, J.V. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Even though this project in the past has concentrated on the measurement of thermal bimolecular reactions of atomic species with stable molecules by the flash or laser photolysis-shock tube (FP- or LP-ST) method using atomic resonance absorption spectrometry (ARAS) as the diagnostic technique, during the past year the authors have concentrated on studies of the thermal decompositions of selected chlorocarbon molecules. These studies are necessary if the degradation of chlorine containing organic molecules by incineration are to be understood at the molecular level. Clearly, destruction of these molecules will not only involve abstraction reactions, when possible, but also thermal decomposition followed by secondary reactions of the initially formed atoms and radicals. Studies on the thermal decomposition of CH{sub 3}Cl are complete, and the curve-of-growth for Cl-atom atomic resonance absorption has been determined. The new thermal decomposition studies are similar to those already reported for CH{sub 3}Cl.

  13. Phase velocity enhancement of linear explosive shock tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loiseau, Jason; Serge, Matthew; Szirti, Daniel; Higgins, Andrew; Tanguay, Vincent

    2011-06-01

    Strong, high density shocks can be generated by sequentially detonating a hollow cylinder of explosives surrounding a thin-walled, pressurized tube. Implosion of the tube results in a pinch that travels at the detonation velocity of the explosive and acts like a piston to drive a shock into the gas ahead of it. In order to increase the maximum shock velocities that can be obtained, a phase velocity generator can be used to drag an oblique detonation wave along the gas tube at a velocity much higher than the base detonation velocity of the explosive. Since yielding and failure of the gas tube is the primary limitation of these devices, it is desirable to retain the dynamic confinement effects of a heavy-walled tamper without interfering with operation of the phase velocity generator. This was accomplished by cutting a slit into the tamper and introducing a phased detonation wave such that it asymmetrically wraps around the gas tube. This type of configuration has been previously experimentally verified to produce very strong shocks but the post-shock pressure and shock velocity limits have not been investigated. This study measured the shock trajectory for various fill pressures and phase velocities to ascertain the limiting effects of tube yield, detonation obliquity and pinch aspect ratio.

  14. Optimal Design of Shock Tube Experiments for Parameter Inference

    KAUST Repository

    Bisetti, Fabrizio; Knio, Omar

    2014-01-01

    We develop a Bayesian framework for the optimal experimental design of the shock tube experiments which are being carried out at the KAUST Clean Combustion Research Center. The unknown parameters are the pre-exponential parameters and the activation

  15. Shock compression of geological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, S; Braithwaite, C; Williamson, D; Jardine, A

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the shock compression of geological materials is important for many applications, and is particularly important to the mining industry. During blast mining the response to shock loading determines the wave propagation speed and resulting fragmentation of the rock. The present work has studied the Hugoniot of two geological materials; Lake Quarry Granite and Gosford Sandstone. For samples of these materials, the composition was characterised in detail. The Hugoniot of Lake Quarry Granite was predicted from this information as the material is fully dense and was found to be in good agreement with the measured Hugoniot. Gosford Sandstone is porous and undergoes compaction during shock loading. Such behaviour is similar to other granular material and we show how it can be described using a P-a compaction model.

  16. A strong shock tube problem calculated by different numerical schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wen Ho; Clancy, Sean P.

    1996-05-01

    Calculated results are presented for the solution of a very strong shock tube problem on a coarse mesh using (1) MESA code, (2) UNICORN code, (3) Schulz hydro, and (4) modified TVD scheme. The first two codes are written in Eulerian coordinates, whereas methods (3) and (4) are in Lagrangian coordinates. MESA and UNICORN codes are both of second order and use different monotonic advection method to avoid the Gibbs phenomena. Code (3) uses typical artificial viscosity for inviscid flow, whereas code (4) uses a modified TVD scheme. The test problem is a strong shock tube problem with a pressure ratio of 109 and density ratio of 103 in an ideal gas. For no mass-matching case, Schulz hydro is better than TVD scheme. In the case of mass-matching, there is no difference between them. MESA and UNICORN results are nearly the same. However, the computed positions such as the contact discontinuity (i.e. the material interface) are not as accurate as the Lagrangian methods.

  17. A strong shock tube problem calculated by different numerical schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.H.; Clancy, S.P.

    1996-01-01

    Calculated results are presented for the solution of a very strong shock tube problem on a coarse mesh using (1) MESA code, (2) UNICORN code, (3) Schulz hydro, and (4) modified TVD scheme. The first two codes are written in Eulerian coordinates, whereas methods (3) and (4) are in Lagrangian coordinates. MESA and UNICORN codes are both of second order and use different monotonic advection method to avoid the Gibbs phenomena. Code (3) uses typical artificial viscosity for inviscid flow, whereas code (4) uses a modified TVD scheme. The test problem is a strong shock tube problem with a pressure ratio of 10 9 and density ratio of 10 3 in an ideal gas. For no mass-matching case, Schulz hydro is better than TVD scheme. In the case of mass-matching, there is no difference between them. MESA and UNICORN results are nearly the same. However, the computed positions such as the contact discontinuity (i.e. the material interface) are not as accurate as the Lagrangian methods. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  18. On Poor Separation in Magnetically Driven Shock Tube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, C.T.

    1973-01-01

    Observations made at steady-state running conditions in a magnetically driven shock tube, with parallel-plate electrodes, showed that for a given discharge voltage, sufficient separation between the shock and the current-sheet occurred only at relatively high discharge pressures. As a comparison......, poor separations were also noted in conventional diaphragm-type shock tubes running at low initial pressures. It is demonstrated that the observed poor separation can be explained by a mass leakage, instead of through the wall boundary layer, but through the current-sheet itself....

  19. High-speed imaging of inhomogeneous ignition in a shock tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulgestke, A. M.; Johnson, S. E.; Davidson, D. F.; Hanson, R. K.

    2018-05-01

    Homogeneous and inhomogeneous ignition of real and surrogate fuels were imaged in two Stanford shock tubes, revealing the influence of small particle fragmentation. n-Heptane, iso-octane, and Jet A were studied, each mixed in an oxidizer containing 21% oxygen and ignited at low temperatures (900-1000 K), low pressures (1-2 atm), with an equivalence ratio of 0.5. Visible images (350-1050 nm) were captured through the shock tube endwall using a high-speed camera. Particles were found to arrive near the endwalls of the shock tubes approximately 5 ms after reflection of the incident shock wave. Reflected shock wave experiments using diaphragm materials of Lexan and steel were investigated. Particles collected from the shock tubes after each experiment were found to match the material of the diaphragm burst during the experiment. Following each experiment, the shock tubes were cleaned by scrubbing with cotton cloths soaked with acetone. Particles were observed to fragment after arrival near the endwall, often leading to inhomogeneous ignition of the fuel. Distinctly more particles were observed during experiments using steel diaphragms. In experiments exhibiting inhomogeneous ignition, flames were observed to grow radially until all the fuel within the cross section of the shock tube had been consumed. The influence of diluent gas (argon or helium) was also investigated. The use of He diluent gas was found to suppress the number of particles capable of causing inhomogeneous flames. The use of He thus allowed time history studies of ignition to extend past the test times that would have been limited by inhomogeneous ignition.

  20. General Physical Problems Related to MHD. Shock Tubes. Introduction to Papers in Section 1-b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1966-10-15

    The papers which will be considered here are Nos. SM-74/26, 134, 172, 182 and 219. Each of the five papers will be discussed in turn, but before beginning this discussion, some general comments concerning shock tube studies of MHD generator plasmas seem in order. There is little doubt that the shock tube is an excellent facility-for the study of the basic processes which occur in the bulk of the plasma. It provides a large flow of uniform plasma with well-controlled properties. Because of the very short operating times, the materials problems, which plague continuously operating facilities, are eliminated. Depending upon the mode of operation of the shock tube, the gas dynamic conditions of an MHD generator may also be simulated more or less well. Three different modes have been used by the authors of the present papers. Abbas and Howatson have carried out their measurements in the driver plasma of an electrical shock tube. Both Zauderer and Mori, Kawada, Yamamoto and Imani have used the more conventional technique of experimenting in the plasma produced by the incident shock. Louis uses the plasma produced by reflection of the shock wave from the tube-end as a plasma source for the MHD channel.

  1. THE EFFECTS OF AREA CONTRACTION ON SHOCK WAVE STRENGTH AND PEAK PRESSURE IN SHOCK TUBE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Mohsen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental investigation into the effects of area contraction on shock wave strength and peak pressure in a shock tube. The shock tube is an important component of the short duration, high speed fluid flow test facility, available at the Universiti Tenaga Nasional (UNITEN, Malaysia. The area contraction was facilitated by positioning a bush adjacent to the primary diaphragm section, which separates the driver and driven sections. Experimental measurements were performed with and without the presence of the bush, at various diaphragm pressure ratios, which is the ratio of air pressure between the driver (high pressure and driven (low pressure sections. The instantaneous static pressure variations were measured at two locations close to the driven tube end wall, using high sensitivity pressure sensors, which allow the shock wave strength, shock wave speed and peak pressure to be analysed. The results reveal that the area contraction significantly reduces the shock wave strength, shock wave speed and peak pressure. At a diaphragm pressure ratio of 10, the shock wave strength decreases by 18%, the peak pressure decreases by 30% and the shock wave speed decreases by 8%.

  2. Shock tubes: compressions in the low pressure chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schins, H.; Giuliani, S.

    1986-01-01

    The gas shock tube used in these experiments consists of a low pressure chamber and a high pressure chamber, divided by a metal-diaphragm-to-rupture. In contrast to the shock mode of operation, where incident and reflected shocks in the low pressure chamber are studied which occur within 3.5 ms, in this work the compression mode of operation was studied, whose maxima occur (in the low pressure chamber) about 9 ms after rupture. Theoretical analysis was done with the finite element computer code EURDYN-1M, where the computation was carried out to 30 ms

  3. Shock Tube Ignition Delay Data Affected by Localized Ignition Phenomena

    KAUST Repository

    Javed, Tamour

    2016-12-29

    Shock tubes have conventionally been used for measuring high-temperature ignition delay times ~ O(1 ms). In the last decade or so, the operating regime of shock tubes has been extended to lower temperatures by accessing longer observation times. Such measurements may potentially be affected by some non-ideal phenomena. The purpose of this work is to measure long ignition delay times for fuels exhibiting negative temperature coefficient (NTC) and to assess the impact of shock tube non-idealities on ignition delay data. Ignition delay times of n-heptane and n-hexane were measured over the temperature range of 650 – 1250 K and pressures near 1.5 atm. Driver gas tailoring and long length of shock tube driver section were utilized to measure ignition delay times as long as 32 ms. Measured ignition delay times agree with chemical kinetic models at high (> 1100 K) and low (< 700 K) temperatures. In the intermediate temperature range (700 – 1100 K), however, significant discrepancies are observed between the measurements and homogeneous ignition delay simulations. It is postulated, based on experimental observations, that localized ignition kernels could affect the ignition delay times at the intermediate temperatures, which lead to compression (and heating) of the bulk gas and result in expediting the overall ignition event. The postulate is validated through simple representative computational fluid dynamic simulations of post-shock gas mixtures which exhibit ignition advancement via a hot spot. The results of the current work show that ignition delay times measured by shock tubes may be affected by non-ideal phenomena for certain conditions of temperature, pressure and fuel reactivity. Care must, therefore, be exercised in using such data for chemical kinetic model development and validation.

  4. Calibration of PCB-132 Sensors in a Shock Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berridge, Dennis C.; Schneider, Steven P.

    2012-01-01

    While PCB-132 sensors have proven useful for measuring second-mode instability waves in many hypersonic wind tunnels, they are currently limited by their calibration. Until now, the factory calibration has been all that was available, which is a single-point calibration at an amplitude three orders of magnitude higher than a second-mode wave. In addition, little information has been available about the frequency response or spatial resolution of the sensors, which is important for measuring high-frequency instability waves. These shortcomings make it difficult to compare measurements at different conditions and between different sensors. If accurate quantitative measurements could be performed, comparisons of the growth and breakdown of instability waves could be made in different facilities, possibly leading to a method of predicting the amplitude at which the waves break down into turbulence, improving transition prediction. A method for calibrating the sensors is proposed using a newly-built shock tube at Purdue University. This shock tube, essentially a half-scale version of the 6-Inch shock tube at the Graduate Aerospace Laboratories at Caltech, has been designed to attain a moderate vacuum in the driven section. Low driven pressures should allow the creation of very weak, yet still relatively thin shock waves. It is expected that static pressure rises within the range of second-mode amplitudes should be possible. The shock tube has been designed to create clean, planar shock waves with a laminar boundary layer to allow for accurate calibrations. Stronger shock waves can be used to identify the frequency response of the sensors out to hundreds of kilohertz.

  5. Origami interleaved tube cellular materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, Kenneth C; Tachi, Tomohiro; Calisch, Sam; Miura, Koryo

    2014-01-01

    A novel origami cellular material based on a deployable cellular origami structure is described. The structure is bi-directionally flat-foldable in two orthogonal (x and y) directions and is relatively stiff in the third orthogonal (z) direction. While such mechanical orthotropicity is well known in cellular materials with extruded two dimensional geometry, the interleaved tube geometry presented here consists of two orthogonal axes of interleaved tubes with high interfacial surface area and relative volume that changes with fold-state. In addition, the foldability still allows for fabrication by a flat lamination process, similar to methods used for conventional expanded two dimensional cellular materials. This article presents the geometric characteristics of the structure together with corresponding kinematic and mechanical modeling, explaining the orthotropic elastic behavior of the structure with classical dimensional scaling analysis. (paper)

  6. Origami interleaved tube cellular materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Kenneth C.; Tachi, Tomohiro; Calisch, Sam; Miura, Koryo

    2014-09-01

    A novel origami cellular material based on a deployable cellular origami structure is described. The structure is bi-directionally flat-foldable in two orthogonal (x and y) directions and is relatively stiff in the third orthogonal (z) direction. While such mechanical orthotropicity is well known in cellular materials with extruded two dimensional geometry, the interleaved tube geometry presented here consists of two orthogonal axes of interleaved tubes with high interfacial surface area and relative volume that changes with fold-state. In addition, the foldability still allows for fabrication by a flat lamination process, similar to methods used for conventional expanded two dimensional cellular materials. This article presents the geometric characteristics of the structure together with corresponding kinematic and mechanical modeling, explaining the orthotropic elastic behavior of the structure with classical dimensional scaling analysis.

  7. Acoustic waves in shock tunnels and expansion tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paull, A.; Stalker, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that disturbances in shock and expansion tubes can be modelled as lateral acoustic waves. The ratio of sound speed across the driver-test gas interface is shown to govern the quantity of noise in the test gas. Frequency 'focusing' which is fundamental to centered unsteady expansions is discussed and displayed in centerline pitot pressure measurements.

  8. Improvement of pump tubes for gas guns and shock tube drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanoff, D. W.

    1990-01-01

    In a pump tube, a gas is mechanically compressed, producing very high pressures and sound speeds. The intensely heated gas produced in such a tube can be used to drive light gas guns and shock tubes. Three concepts are presented that have the potential to allow substantial reductions in the size and mass of the pump tube to be achieved. The first concept involves the use of one or more diaphragms in the pump tube, thus replacing a single compression process by multiple, successive compressions. The second concept involves a radical reduction in the length-to-diameter ratio of the pump tube and the pump tube piston. The third concept involves shock heating of the working gas by high explosives in a cyclindrical geometry reusable device. Preliminary design analyses are performed on all three concepts and they appear to be quite feasible. Reductions in the length and mass of the pump tube by factors up to about 11 and about 7, respectively, are predicted, relative to a benchmark conventional pump tube.

  9. Shock-tube study of fusion plasma-wall interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, R.A.; Tien, J.K.; Jensen, B.; Panayotou, N.F.; Feinberg, B.

    1977-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies have been made of phenomena which occur when a hot (T 1 approximately equal to 6 x 10 6 0 K), dense (n approximately equal to 10 16 cm -3 ), deuterium plasma containing a transverse magnetic field is brought into sudden contact with a cold metal wall. These studies are motivated by the need to understand plasma and metallurgical conditions at the first-wall of a fusion reactor. Experiments were carried out in the Columbia high energy electromagnetic shock tube. Computational simulation was used to investigate the detailed physics of the fusion plasma boundary layer which develops at the wall. The rate of energy transfer from the plasma to the wall was calculated and conditions under which surface melting occurs are estimated. Experimental measurements of plasma-wall heat transfer rates up to 3 x 10 5 watts/cm 2 were obtained and agreement with computed values are good. Fusion reactor first-wall materials have been exposed to 6.0 x 10 21 eV cm -2 (1,000 shots) of deuterium plasma bombardment. Scanning electron micrograph photographs show preferential erosion at grain boundaries, formation of deuterium surface blisters, and evidence of local surface melting. Some cracking is observed along grain boundaries, and a decrease in tensile ductiity is measured

  10. Optimal Design of Shock Tube Experiments for Parameter Inference

    KAUST Repository

    Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2014-01-06

    We develop a Bayesian framework for the optimal experimental design of the shock tube experiments which are being carried out at the KAUST Clean Combustion Research Center. The unknown parameters are the pre-exponential parameters and the activation energies in the reaction rate expressions. The control parameters are the initial mixture composition and the temperature. The approach is based on first building a polynomial based surrogate model for the observables relevant to the shock tube experiments. Based on these surrogates, a novel MAP based approach is used to estimate the expected information gain in the proposed experiments, and to select the best experimental set-ups yielding the optimal expected information gains. The validity of the approach is tested using synthetic data generated by sampling the PC surrogate. We finally outline a methodology for validation using actual laboratory experiments, and extending experimental design methodology to the cases where the control parameters are noisy.

  11. Shock-induced chemistry in organic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dattelbaum, Dana M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheffield, Steve [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Engelke, Ray [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Manner, Virginia [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chellappa, Raja [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yoo, Choong - Shik [WASHINGTON STATE UNIV

    2011-01-20

    The combined 'extreme' environments of high pressure, temperature, and strain rates, encountered under shock loading, offer enormous potential for the discovery of new paradigms in chemical reactivity not possible under more benign conditions. All organic materials are expected to react under these conditions, yet we currently understand very little about the first bond-breaking steps behind the shock front, such as in the shock initiation of explosives, or shock-induced reactivity of other relevant materials. Here, I will present recent experimental results of shock-induced chemistry in a variety of organic materials under sustained shock conditions. A comparison between the reactivity of different structures is given, and a perspective on the kinetics of reaction completion under shock drives.

  12. Numerical calculation of two phase flow in a shock tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, W.C.; Travis, J.R.; Torrey, M.D.

    1976-01-01

    Numerical calculations of the dynamics of initially saturated water-steam mixtures in a shock tube demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of a new solution technique for the transient, two-dimensional, two-fluid equations. The dependence of the calculated results on time step and cell size are investigated. The effects of boiling and condensation on the flow physics suggest the merits of basic fluid dynamic measurements for the determination and evaluation of mass exchange models

  13. Shock waves and shock tubes; Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Symposium, Berkeley, CA, July 28-August 2, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bershader, D.; Hanson, R.

    1986-01-01

    A detailed survey is presented of shock tube experiments, theoretical developments, and applications being carried out worldwide. The discussions explore shock tube physics and the related chemical, physical and biological science and technology. Extensive attention is devoted to shock wave phenomena in dusty gases and other multiphase and heterogeneous systems, including chemically reactive mixtures. Consideration is given to techniques for measuring, visualizing and theoretically modeling flowfield, shock wave and rarefaction wave characteristics. Numerical modeling is explored in terms of the application of computational fluid dynamics techniques to describing flowfields in shock tubes. Shock interactions and propagation, in both solids, fluids, gases and mixed media are investigated, along with the behavior of shocks in condensed matter. Finally, chemical reactions that are initiated as the result of passage of a shock wave are discussed, together with methods of controlling the evolution of laminar separated flows at concave corners on advanced reentry vehicles

  14. Molten fuel/coolant interaction studies: some results obtained with the Windscale small shock tube rig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higham, E.J.; Vaughan, G.J.

    1978-02-01

    Experiments are described in which water has been brought into contact with various molten metals in a shock tube, thus simulating the fall of coolant into molten uranium dioxide in a postulated reactor accident. Impact velocities of the water on to the molten material were in the range 5 to 7 m/s. Shock-pulse pressures in the water column after impact and particle size distributions of the dispersed resolidified material that was recovered were measured. The proportion of dispersed material and the size of the shock pulse (by comparison with that expected from water hammer alone) have been used as criteria for the occurrence of a molten fuel/coolant interaction and such interactions of varying degrees of violence have been found for water/aluminium, water/bismuth, water/tin, over a range of temperatures from 350 0 C to 950 0 C, for water/boric oxide, but not for water/magnesium. (author)

  15. Tube Formation in Nanoscale Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Chenglin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The formation of tubular nanostructures normally requires layered, anisotropic, or pseudo-layered crystal structures, while inorganic compounds typically do not possess such structures, inorganic nanotubes thus have been a hot topic in the past decade. In this article, we review recent research activities on nanotubes fabrication and focus on three novel synthetic strategies for generating nanotubes from inorganic materials that do not have a layered structure. Specifically, thermal oxidation method based on gas–solid reaction to porous CuO nanotubes has been successfully established, semiconductor ZnS and Nb2O5nanotubes have been prepared by employing sacrificial template strategy based on liquid–solid reaction, and an in situ template method has been developed for the preparation of ZnO taper tubes through a chemical etching reaction. We have described the nanotube formation processes and illustrated the detailed key factors during their growth. The proposed mechanisms are presented for nanotube fabrication and the important pioneering studies are discussed on the rational design and fabrication of functional materials with tubular structures. It is the intention of this contribution to provide a brief account of these research activities.

  16. Fuel-coolant interactions in a shock-tube geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segev, A.; Henry, R.E.; Bankoff, S.G.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal interactions were studied in a shock tube configuration using different pairs of liquids. Large pressures were obtained for systems of water-Wood's metal and butanol-Wood's metal. Different types of interactions were observed, depending on the hot liquid temperature. It was found that thehydrodynamic component alone may account for the measured pressure in the lower temperature range. A combination of thermal and hydrodynamic interactions accounts for the pressures at high temperatures. Experiments with water and molten salt (LiCl + KCl) produced small scale explosions. All interactions were suppressed when driving pressure increased. (author)

  17. Investigation of pressure transients in nuclear filtration systems: construction details of a large shock tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.R.; Gregory, W.S.

    1980-04-01

    This report documents the construction of a 0.914-m (36-in.)-dia. shock tube on the New Mexico State University caompus. Highly variable low-grade explosions can be simulated with the shock tube. We plan to investigate the response of nuclear facility ventilation system components to low-grade explosions. Components of particular interest are high-capacity, high efficiency paticulate air (HEPA) filters. Shock tube construction details, operating principles, firing sequence, and preliminary results are reported

  18. Comparisons of Air Radiation Model with Shock Tube Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Deepak; McCorkle, Evan; Bogdanoff, David W.; Allen, Gary A., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment of the predictive capability of shock layer radiation model appropriate for NASA s Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle lunar return entry. A detailed set of spectrally resolved radiation intensity comparisons are made with recently conducted tests in the Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility at NASA Ames Research Center. The spectral range spanned from vacuum ultraviolet wavelength of 115 nm to infrared wavelength of 1400 nm. The analysis is done for 9.5-10.5 km/s shock passing through room temperature synthetic air at 0.2, 0.3 and 0.7 Torr. The comparisons between model and measurements show discrepancies in the level of background continuum radiation and intensities of atomic lines. Impurities in the EAST facility in the form of carbon bearing species are also modeled to estimate the level of contaminants and their impact on the comparisons. The discrepancies, although large is some cases, exhibit order and consistency. A set of tests and analyses improvements are proposed as forward work plan in order to confirm or reject various proposed reasons for the observed discrepancies.

  19. In-tube shock wave driven by atmospheric millimeter-wave plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Yasuhisa; Kajiwara, Ken; Takahashi, Koji; Kasugai, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Keishi; Komurasaki, Kimiya

    2009-01-01

    A shock wave in a tube supported by atmospheric millimeter-wave plasma is discussed. After atmospheric breakdown, the shock wave supported by the millimeter wave propagates at a constant velocity in the tube. In this study, a driving model of the millimeter-wave shock wave is proposed. The model consists of a normal shock wave supported by a propagating heat-supply area in which an ionization front is located. The flow properties predicted by the model show good agreement with the measured properties of the shock wave generated in the tube using a 170 GHz millimeter wave beam. The shock propagation velocity U shock is identical to the propagation velocity of the ionization front U ioniz when U ioniz is supersonic. Then the pressure increment at the tube end is independent of the power density. (author)

  20. Physics of IED blast shock tube simulations for mTBI research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mediavilla Varas, J.; Philippens, M.M.G.M.; Meijer, S.R.; Berg, A.C. van den; Sibma, P.C.; Bree, J.L.M.J. van; Vries, D.V.W.M. de

    2011-01-01

    Shock tube experiments and simulations are conducted with a spherical gelatin filled skull- brain surrogate, in order to study the mechanisms leading to blast induced mild traumatic brain injury. A shock tube including sensor system is optimized to simulate realistic impro-vised explosive device

  1. Approximating a free-field blast environment in the test section of an explosively driven conical shock tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, J. B.

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents experimental data on incident overpressures and the corresponding impulses obtained in the test section of an explosively driven 10° (full angle) conical shock tube. Due to the shock tube's steel walls approximating the boundary conditions seen by a spherical sector cut out of a detonating sphere of energetic material, a 5.3-g pentolite shock tube driver charge produces peak overpressures corresponding to a free-field detonation from an 816-g sphere of pentolite. The four test section geometries investigated in this paper (open air, cylindrical, 10° inscribed square frustum, and 10° circumscribed square frustum) provide a variety of different time histories for the incident overpressures and impulses, with a circumscribed square frustum yielding the best approximation of the estimated blast environment that would have been produced by a free-field detonation.

  2. Handbook of Supersonic Aerodynamics. Section 18. Shock Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1959-12-01

    u) a 2 p. The ab-ve concept is illustrated in Fig. 2.1-1. Consider a piston held by a peg in the duct as shown. At t = 0 the peg is released and the...8217a.. L..- LaL 142 Performance of Simple Constant-Area Shock Tubes Fig. 2.1-1 peg (B) (A) Piston 7 t /PB> PA T T o - Duct of Uniform Cross-Section...3.679 3 4358 3. 100 3 5876 3.825 1 3350 2622 1 4700 3.663 2 4800 3.034 4 5893 3.794-3.819 3 4105 2576 3 4798 3.65b 3 5000 3.062 2 b140 3.815 1 4280 2574 2

  3. Geometric theory of flexible and expandable tubes conveying fluid: equations, solutions and shock waves

    OpenAIRE

    Gay-Balmaz, François; Putkaradze, Vakhtang

    2018-01-01

    We present a theory for the three-dimensional evolution of tubes with expandable walls conveying fluid. Our theory can accommodate arbitrary deformations of the tube, arbitrary elasticity of the walls, and both compressible and incompressible flows inside the tube. We also present the theory of propagation of shock waves in such tubes and derive the conservation laws and Rankine-Hugoniot conditions in arbitrary spatial configuration of the tubes, and compute several examples of particular sol...

  4. Shock interaction with a two-gas interface in a novel dual-driver shock tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labenski, John R.

    Fluid instabilities exist at the interface between two fluids having different densities if the flow velocity and density gradient are anti-parallel or if a shock wave crosses the boundary. The former case is called the Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability and the latter, the Richtmyer-Meshkov (R-M) instability. Small initial perturbations on the interface destabilize and grow into larger amplitude structures leading to turbulent mixing. Instabilities of this type are seen in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, laser produced plasmas, supernova explosions, and detonations. A novel dual-driver shock tube was used to investigate the growth rate of the R-M instability. One driver is used to create an argon-refrigerant interface, and the other at the opposite end of the driven section generates a shock to force the interface with compressible flows behind the shock. The refrigerant gas in the first driver is seeded with sub-micron oil droplets for visualization of the interface. The interface travels down the driven section past the test section for a fixed amount of time. A stronger shock of Mach 1.1 to 1.3 drives the interface back past the test section where flow diagnostics are positioned. Two schlieren systems record the density fluctuations while light scattering detectors record the density of the refrigerant as a function of position over the interface. A pair of digital cameras take stereo images of the interface, as mapped out by the tracer particles under illumination by a Q-switched ruby laser. The amount of time that the interface is allowed to travel up the driven section determines the interaction time as a control. Comparisons made between the schlieren signals, light scattering detector outputs, and the images quantify the fingered characteristics of the interface and its growth due to shock forcing. The results show that the interface has a distribution of thickness and that the interaction with a shock further broadens the interface. The

  5. Shock interactions with heterogeneous energetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarrington, Cole D.; Wixom, Ryan R.; Damm, David L.

    2018-03-01

    The complex physical phenomenon of shock wave interaction with material heterogeneities has significant importance and nevertheless remains little understood. In many materials, the observed macroscale response to shock loading is governed by characteristics of the microstructure. Yet, the majority of computational studies aimed at predicting phenomena affected by these processes, such as the initiation and propagation of detonation waves in explosives or shock propagation in geological materials, employ continuum material and reactive burn model treatment. In an effort to highlight the grain-scale processes that underlie the observable effects in an energetic system, a grain-scale model for hexanitrostilbene (HNS) has been developed. The measured microstructures were used to produce synthetic computational representations of the pore structure, and a density functional theory molecular dynamics derived equation of state (EOS) was used for the fully dense HNS matrix. The explicit inclusion of the microstructure along with a fully dense EOS resulted in close agreement with historical shock compression experiments. More recent experiments on the dynamic reaction threshold were also reproduced by inclusion of a global kinetics model. The complete model was shown to reproduce accurately the expected response of this heterogeneous material to shock loading. Mesoscale simulations were shown to provide a clear insight into the nature of threshold behavior and are a way to understand complex physical phenomena.

  6. CANDU steam generator tubing material service experience and allied development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, A.E.; Lesurf, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    This paper covers the following aspects for the tube materials in CANDU-PHW steam generators: inservice performance with respect to tube leaks and coolant activity attributable to boiler tube corrosion, selection of tube materials for use with non-boiling and boiling primary coolants, supporting development on corrosion, vibration, fretting wear, tube inspection, leak detection and plugging of defective tubes. (author)

  7. Materials and structures under shock and impact

    CERN Document Server

    Bailly, Patrice

    2013-01-01

    In risk studies, engineers often have to consider the consequences of an accident leading to a shock on a construction. This can concern the impact of a ground vehicle or aircraft, or the effects of an explosion on an industrial site.This book presents a didactic approach starting with the theoretical elements of the mechanics of materials and structures, in order to develop their applications in the cases of shocks and impacts. The latter are studied on a local scale at first. They lead to stresses and strains in the form of waves propagating through the material, this movement then extending

  8. MEASUREMENTS OF SHOCK WAVE FORCE IN SHOCK TUBE WITH INDIRECT METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Dobrilović

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Tests have been conducted at the “Laboratory for testing of civil explosives, detonators, electrical detonators and pyrotechnical materials”, Department for mining and geotechnics of the Faculty of mining, geology and petroleum engineering, University of Zagreb with the purpose of designing a detonator that would unite advantages of a non-electric system and the precision in regulation of time delay in electronic initiation system. Sum of energy released by the wave force in shock tube is a pre-condition for operation of the new detonator, and measurement of wave force is the first step in determining the sum of energy. The sum of energy is measured indirectly, based on two principles: movement sensors and strain.

  9. Sensitive Mid-IR Laser Sensor Development and Mass Spectrometric Measurements in Shock Tube and Flames

    KAUST Repository

    Alquaity, Awad

    2016-01-01

    CRDS technique was utilized to develop an ultra-fast, high sensitivity diagnostic to monitor trace concentrations of ethylene in shock tube pyrolysis experiments. This diagnostic represented the first ever successful application of CRDS technique

  10. Supports for shock, vibration and seismic isolation for tube networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prisecaru, Ilie; Serban, Viorel; Sandrea Madalina

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents a solution for diminishing the shocks, vibrations and seismic movements in pipe networks, with a simultaneous reduction in the general stress conditions in piping and supports. Total removal or reduction of vibrations is a hard problem which was not yet tackled either theoretically, in the sense of an analytical procedure for the analysis of occurrence and development of shocks and vibrations in complex systems, or practically, since the current supports and dampers cannot provide enough damping within all the frequency ranges met in the technical domain. Stiffness of classical supports do not allow always satisfactory source isolation to prevent propagation from environment of shocks and vibrations, Considering the actual condition met in the nuclear power plants, power plants and thermal power plants, etc. this paper represents a major practical aid because it provides new solutions for diminishing shocks, vibrations and seismic movements. Aiming at diminishing the effects of vibrations in pipe networks, this paper presents the results obtained in the design, construction and testing of new types of supports that include sandwich type components made up of elastic blade packages with controlled distortion provided by the central and peripheral stiff parts called SERB. With the new type of supports, the control of the distortion at static and dynamic loads and the thermal displacements is achieved by the relative movement among the sandwich structure subassemblies and by the sandwich structure distortion controlled by the central and peripheral distorting parts that generate a non - linear geometric response which has an easily controllable stiffness and damping, due to their non - linear geometric behavior. The supports of the new type are adjustable to the load and distortion level without overstressing the component material, due to a non - linear geometric behavior while the contact pressure among the blades is limited to pre-set values. Due

  11. Morphological characterization of shocked porous material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Aiguo; Zhang Guangcai; Pan, X F; Zhang Ping; Zhu Jianshi

    2009-01-01

    Morphological measures are introduced to probe the complex procedure of shock wave reaction on porous material. They characterize the geometry and the topology of the pixelized map of a state variable like temperature. The relevance to thermodynamical properties of a material is revealed and various experimental conditions are simulated. Numerical results indicate that the shock wave reaction results in a complicated sequence of compressions and rarefactions in porous material. The increasing rate of the total fractional white area A roughly gives the velocity D of a compressive-wave series. When a velocity D is mentioned, the corresponding threshold contour level of the state variable, such as temperature, should also be stated. When the threshold contour level increases, D becomes smaller. The area A increases parabolically with time t during the initial period. The A(t) curve goes back to being linear in the following three cases: (i) when the porosity δ approaches 1, (ii) when the initial shock becomes stronger and (iii) when the contour level approaches the minimum value of the state variable. The area with high temperature may continue to increase even after the early compressive waves have arrived at the downstream free surface and some rarefactive waves have come back into the target body. In the case of energetic material needing a higher temperature for initiation, a higher porosity is preferred and the material may be initiated after the precursory compressive waves have scanned the entire target body. In some cases we need scattered hot spots, but in others we need connected ones. One may desire the fabrication of a porous body and choose the appropriate shock strength according to what is needed. With the Minkowski measures, the dependence on experimental conditions is reflected simply by a few coefficients. They may be used as order parameters to classify the maps of physical variables in a similar way to thermodynamic phase transitions.

  12. Shock tube measurements of the branching ratios of propene + OH -> products

    KAUST Repository

    Khaled, Fathi; Badra, Jihad Ahmad; Giri, Binod; Farooq, Aamir

    2014-01-01

    in a shock tube behind reflected shock conditions over the temperature range of 812 K – 1460 K and pressures near 1 atm. The reaction progress was followed by monitoring OH radical near 306.7 nm using UV laser absorption. The first experimental

  13. Effects of MHD slow shocks propagating along magnetic flux tubes in a dipole magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Erkaev

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Variations of the plasma pressure in a magnetic flux tube can produce MHD waves evolving into shocks. In the case of a low plasma beta, plasma pressure pulses in the magnetic flux tube generate MHD slow shocks propagating along the tube. For converging magnetic field lines, such as in a dipole magnetic field, the cross section of the magnetic flux tube decreases enormously with increasing magnetic field strength. In such a case, the propagation of MHD waves along magnetic flux tubes is rather different from that in the case of uniform magnetic fields. In this paper, the propagation of MHD slow shocks is studied numerically using the ideal MHD equations in an approximation suitable for a thin magnetic flux tube with a low plasma beta. The results obtained in the numerical study show that the jumps in the plasma parameters at the MHD slow shock increase greatly while the shock is propagating in the narrowing magnetic flux tube. The results are applied to the case of the interaction between Jupiter and its satellite Io, the latter being considered as a source of plasma pressure pulses.

  14. Side-Pinch Effect of a Magnetically Driven Shock Tube with Parallel Plate Electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, C. T.; Korsbech, Uffe C C; Mondrup, K.

    1969-01-01

    To study the possible effect of the side pinch on the steady-state current and the steady-state shock speed of a magnetically driven shock tube, a semiempirical model is formulated. The time history of the current, the radial and the translational motion of the current-carrying region are expressed...... by three interacting nonlinear equations with five adjustable parameters describing the variation of the electric circuit elements, the geometry of the shock tube, and the initial running conditions. Within the range of practical interest for values of the parameters investigated, computational results...

  15. Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry and spectroscopies of laser shocked materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcgrane, Shawn David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bolme, Cindy B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whitley, Von H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moore, David S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Ultrafast ellipsometry and transient absorption spectroscopies are used to measure material dynamics under extreme conditions of temperature, pressure, and volumetric compression induced by shock wave loading with a chirped, spectrally clipped shock drive pulse.

  16. Kinetic modeling of methyl butanoate in shock tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Lam K; Lin, Kuang C; Violi, Angela

    2008-12-25

    during the pyrolysis of MB as well as to investigate the autoignition of MB in a shock tube reactor at different temperatures and pressures. The computed results agree very well with experimental data present in the literature. Sensitivity and flux (rate-of-production) analyses are carried out for the CO(2) formation with the new MB mechanism, together with available reaction mechanisms, to assess the importance of various kinetic pathways for each regime. With the new mechanism, the flux analyses for the formation of C(2)H species, one of the most important species for ignition delay time, are also presented at different conditions. In addition to giving a better chemical insight of the pyrolysis/oxidation of MB, the results suggest ways to improve the mechanism's capability to predict CO(2) formation and ignition delay times in pyrolysis and oxidation conditions.

  17. Investigation of Heat Transfer to a Flat Plate in a Shock Tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    2 Objectives and Scope . . . . . .. .. .. .... 5 11. Theory ............... ....... 7 Shock Tube Principles........... 7 Boundary Layer Theory ...in *excess of theory , but the rounded edge flat plate exhibited data which matched or was less than what theory predicted for each Mach number tested...normal shock advancing along an infinite flat plate. For x< Ugt there is a region of interaction between the downstream influence of the leading edge

  18. Shock Tube/Laser Absorption Studies of Jet Fuels at Low Temperatures (600-1200K)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-27

    Davidson, Ronald K. Hanson. A second-generation aerosol shock tube and its use in studying ignition delay times of large biodiesel surrogates, 28th... Biodiesel Surrogate behind Reflected Shock Waves,” 8th US National Combustion Meeting, Paper 070RK-0008 Park City, UT 5/2013.   These  studies provide...www.elsevier .com/locate / fuel 1. Introduction Normal alkanes have been widely used as fuels and are major components of many commercial transportation fuels

  19. Corrosion performance of tube support materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malagola, P.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of denting in steam generators leads to change in the conception of the tube support plates. A new material is now used for this component, a 13% Cr steel, which composition has been adjusted for weldability and mechanical resistance criteria. The geometry of trefoil support plate (TSP) has also been improved, using a broached TSP (quadrifoiled holes) instead of a drilled TSP. Tests have been performed on 13% Cr and C-steel broached TSP, and drilled TSP, to confirm the better resistance to denting of this new configuration

  20. Evolution of wave patterns and temperature field in shock-tube flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiverin, A. D.; Yakovenko, I. S.

    2018-05-01

    The paper is devoted to the numerical analysis of wave patterns behind a shock wave propagating in a tube filled with a gaseous mixture. It is shown that the flow inside the boundary layer behind the shock wave is unstable, and the way the instability develops fully corresponds to the solution obtained for the boundary layer over a flat plate. Vortical perturbations inside the boundary layer determine the nonuniformity of the temperature field. In turn, exactly these nonuniformities define the way the ignition kernels arise in the combustible mixture after the reflected shock interaction with the boundary layer. In particular, the temperature nonuniformity determines the spatial limitations of probable ignition kernel position relative to the end wall and side walls of the tube. In the case of low-intensity incident shocks the ignition could start not farther than the point of first interaction between the reflected shock wave and roller vortices formed in the process of boundary layer development. Proposed physical mechanisms are formulated in general terms and can be used for interpretation of the experimental data in any systems with a delayed exothermal reaction start. It is also shown that contact surface thickening occurs due to its interaction with Tollmien-Schlichting waves. This conclusion is of importance for understanding the features of ignition in shock tubes operating in the over-tailored regime.

  1. Numerical simulations of a nonequilibrium argon plasma in a shock-tube experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambier, Jean-Luc

    1991-01-01

    A code developed for the numerical modeling of nonequilibrium radiative plasmas is applied to the simulation of the propagation of strong ionizing shock waves in argon gas. The simulations attempt to reproduce a series of shock-tube experiments which will be used to validate the numerical models and procedures. The ability to perform unsteady simulations makes it possible to observe some fluctuations in the shock propagation, coupled to the kinetic processes. A coupling mechanism by pressure waves, reminiscent of oscillation mechanisms observed in detonation waves, is described. The effect of upper atomic levels is also briefly discussed.

  2. The rates of production of CO and CO2 from the combustion of pulverized coal particles in a shock tube

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Commissaris, F.A.C.M.; Banine, V.Y.; Roekaerts, D.J.E.M.; Veefkind, A.

    1998-01-01

    This work presents some results of experiments on coal combustion in a shock tube, as well as a time-dependent model of the boundary layer of a single, burning char particle under similar conditions. The partial pressure of O2 in a shock tube was varied between 0 and 10 bar, with gas temperatures

  3. On possible structures of normal ionizing shock waves in electromagnetic shock tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liberman, M.A.; Synakh, V.S.; Zakajdakhov, V.V.; Velikovich, A.L.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of possible structures of normal ionizing shock waves is studied. On the basis of the general theory of ionizing shock waves in magnetic fields, a similarity solution of the piston problem for an impenetrable piston and a magnetic piston is described and a numerical solution of the non-stationary piston problem is obtained. It is shown that precursor photo-ionization of the neutral gas by the radiation of the shock-heated gas is the dominant factor in shaping normal ionizing shock structures. In particular, it is shown that the strong overheating of atoms and ions in shock fronts is due to the tensor form of Ohm's law in the precursor region. (author)

  4. Shock-resistant gamma-ray detector tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    A simple durable scintillation detector is described which, it is claimed, offers a solution to the shock resistance problems encountered when gamma detectors are used for deep bore hole well logging or in space vehicles. The shock resistant detector consists of an elongate sodium iodide scintillation crystal and rigid metal container with a round glass optical window at one end of the container and a metal end closure cap at the opposite end. An elastic rubber compression pad is provided between the end cap and the scintillation crystal to bias the crystal axially toward the glass window. An extension transparent silicone rubber light pipe of substantial axial thickness permanently couples the optical window to the crystal while allowing substantial movement under high g forces. (U.K.)

  5. Mixed butanols addition to gasoline surrogates: Shock tube ignition delay time measurements and chemical kinetic modeling

    KAUST Repository

    AlRamadan, Abdullah S.; Badra, Jihad; Javed, Tamour; Alabbad, Mohammed; Bokhumseen, Nehal; Gaillard, Patrick; Babiker, Hassan; Farooq, Aamir; Sarathy, Mani

    2015-01-01

    work, the effect of mixed butanols addition to gasoline surrogates has been investigated in a high-pressure shock tube facility. The ignition delay times of mixed butanols stoichiometric mixtures were measured at 20 and 40bar over a temperature range

  6. Optimal Design and Model Validation for Combustion Experiments in a Shock Tube

    KAUST Repository

    Long, Quan; Kim, Daesang; Tempone, Raul; Bisetti, Fabrizio; Farooq, Aamir; Knio, Omar; Prudhomme, Serge

    2014-01-01

    in the reaction rate functions. The control parameters are the initial hydrogen concentration and the temperature. First, we build a polynomial based surrogate model for the observable related to the reactions in the shock tube. Second, we use a novel MAP based

  7. The computation of pressure waves in shock tubes by a finite difference procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbaro, M.

    1988-09-01

    A finite difference solution of one-dimensional unsteady isentropic compressible flow equations is presented. The computer program has been tested by solving some cases of the Riemann shock tube problem. Predictions are in good agreement with those presented by other authors. Some inaccuracies may be attributed to the wave smearing consequent of the finite-difference treatment. (author)

  8. A composite model for a class of electric-discharge shock tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, R. T.; Baganoff, D.

    1973-01-01

    A gasdynamic model is presented and analyzed for a class of shock tubes that utilize both Joule heating and electromagnetic forces to produce high-speed shock waves. The model consists of several stages of acceleration in which acceleration to sonic conditions is achieved principally through heating, and further acceleration of the supersonic flow is obtained principally through use of electromagnetic forces. The utility of the model results from the fact that it predicts a quasi-steady flow process, mathematical analysis is straightforward, and it is even possible to remove one or more component stages and still have the model related to a possible shock-tube flow. Initial experiments have been performed where the electrical discharge configuration and current level were such that Joule heating was the dominant form of energy addition present. These experiments indicate that the predictions of the model dealing with heat addition correspond quite closely to reality. The experimental data together with the theory show that heat addition to the flowing driver gas after diaphragm rupture (approach used in the model) is much more effective in producing high-speed shock waves than heating the gas in the driver before diaphragm rupture, as in the case of the arc-driven shock tube.

  9. Vortex ring formation at the open end of a shock tube: A particle image velocimetry study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakeri, J. H.; Das, D.; Krothapalli, A.; Lourenco, L.

    2004-04-01

    The vortex ring generated subsequent to the diffraction of a shock wave from the open end of a shock tube is studied using particle image velocimetry. We examine the early evolution of the compressible vortex ring for three-exit shock Mach numbers, 1.1, 1.2, and 1.3. For the three cases studied, the ring formation is complete at about tUb/D=2, where t is time, Ub is fluid velocity behind shock as it exits the tube and D is tube diameter. Unlike in the case of piston generated incompressible vortex rings where the piston velocity variation with time is usually trapezoidal, in the shock-generated vortex ring case the exit fluid velocity doubles from its initial value Ub before it slowly decays to zero. At the end of the ring formation, its translation speed is observed to be about 0.7 Ub. During initial formation and propagation, a jet-like flow exists behind the vortex ring. The vortex ring detachment from the tailing jet, commonly referred to as pinch-off, is briefly discussed.

  10. Propagating Structure Of A Microwave Driven Shock wave Inside A Tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Yutaka; Shibata, Teppei; Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Oda, Yasuhisa; Kajiwara, Ken; Takahashi, Koji; Kasugai, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Keishi; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

    2010-01-01

    The thrust generation process of a microwave rocket is similar to a pulse detonation engine, and understanding the interactions between microwave plasma and shock waves is important. Shadowgraph images of the microwave plasma generated in a tube under atmospheric air were taken. The observed plasma and shock wave were propagating one-dimensionally at constant velocity inside the tube. In order to understand the flow field inside the rocket, one-dimensional CFD analysis was conducted. With the change of microwave power density, the structure of the flow field was classified into two regimes: Microwave Supported Combustion (MSC), and Microwave Supported Detonation (MSD). The structure of the MSD was different from the structure of a chemical detonation, which implied the existence of a preheating in front of the shock wave. Furthermore, the flight performance was estimated by calculating the momentum coupling coefficient. It was confirmed that the efficiency was nearly constant in the MSD regime, with the increase of microwave power density.

  11. Chemical kinetics modeling of the influence of molecular structure on shock tube ignition delay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J.

    1985-07-01

    The current capabilities of kinetic modeling of hydrocarbon oxidation in shock waves are discussed. The influence of molecular size and structure on ignition delay times are stressed. The n-paraffin fuels from CH 4 to n-C 5 H 12 are examined under shock tube conditions, as well as the branched chain fuel isobutane, and the computed results are compared with available experimental data. The modeling results show that it is important in the reaction mechanism to distinguish between abstraction of primary, secondary and tertiary H atom sites from the fuel molecule. This is due to the fact that both the rates and the product distributions of the subsequent alkyl radical decomposition reactions depend on which H atoms were abstracted. Applications of the reaction mechanisms to shock tube problems and to other practical problems such as engine knock are discussed

  12. Shock resistance of composite material pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pays, M.F.

    1995-01-01

    Composite materials have found a wide range of applications for EDF nuclear plants. Applications include fire pipework, demineralized water, service water, and emergency-supplied service water piping. Some of those pipework is classified nuclear safety, their integrity (resistance to water aging and earthquakes or accidental excess pressure (water hammer)) must be safeguarded. As composite materials generally suffer damage for low energy impacts (under 10 J), the pipes planned for the Civaux power plant have been studied for their resistance to a low speed shock (0 to 50 m/s) and of a 0 to 110 J energy level. For three representative diameters (20, 150, 600 mm), the minimum impact energy that leads to a leak has been determined to be respectively 18, 20 and 48 J. Then the leak rate versus impact energy was plotted; until roughly 90 J, the leak rate remains stable at less than 25 cm 3 /h and raises to higher values (300 cm 3 /h) afterwards. The level of leakage in the range of impact energy tested always stays within the limits set by the Safety Authorities for metallic pipes. These results have been linked to destructive examinations, to clarify the damage mechanisms. Other tests are still ongoing to follow the evolution of the damage and of the leak rate while the pipe is maintained under service pressure during one year

  13. High density turbulent plasma processes from a shock tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyedeji, O.; Johnson, J.A. III

    1991-01-01

    We have finished the first stages of our experimental and theoretical investigations on models for energy and momentum transport and for photon-particle collision processes in a turbulent quasi-stationary high density plasma. The system is explored by beginning to determine the turbulence phenomenology associated with an ionizing shock wave. The theoretical underpinnings are explored for phonon particle collisions by determining the collisional redistribution function, using Lioville Space Green's Function, which will characterize the inelastic scattering of the radiation from one frequency to another. We have observed that a weak magnetic field tends to increase the apparent random-like behaviors in a collisional turbulent plasma. On the theoretical side, we have been able to achieve a form for the collisional redistribution function. It remains to apply these concepts to a stationary turbulent plasma in the reflected ionizing shock wave and to exercise the implications of evaluations of the collisional redistribution function for such a system when it is probed by a strong radiation source. These results are discussed in detail in the publications, which have resulted from the this effort, cited at the end of the report

  14. A soap film shock tube to study two-dimensional compressible flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, C.Y.; Chen, Y.M.; Chang-Jian, S.K. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Da-Yeh University Chang-Hwa (Taiwan)

    2001-07-01

    A new experimental approach to the study of the two-dimensional compressible flow phenomena is presented. In this technique, a variety of compressible flows were generated by bursting plane vertical soap films. An aureole and a ''shock wave'' preceding the rim of the expanding hole were clearly observed using traditional high-speed flash photography and a fast line-scan charge coupled device (CCD) camera. The moving shock wave images obtained from the line-scan CCD camera were similar to the x-t diagrams in gas dynamics. The moving shock waves cause thickness jumps and induce supersonic flows. Photographs of the supersonic flows over a cylinder and a wedge are presented. The results suggest clearly the feasibility of the ''soap film shock tube''. (orig.)

  15. Shock tube/time-of-flight mass spectrometer for high temperature kinetic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tranter, Robert S.; Giri, Binod R.; Kiefer, John H.

    2007-01-01

    A shock tube (ST) with online, time-of-flight mass spectrometric (TOF-MS) detection has been constructed for the study of elementary reactions at high temperature. The ST and TOF-MS are coupled by a differentially pumped molecular beam sampling interface, which ensures that the samples entering the TOF-MS are not contaminated by gases drawn from the cold end wall thermal boundary layer in the ST. Additionally, the interface allows a large range of postshock pressures to be used in the shock tube while maintaining high vacuum in the TOF-MS. The apparatus and the details of the sampling system are described along with an analysis in which cooling of the sampled gases and minimization of thermal boundary layer effects are discussed. The accuracy of kinetic measurements made with the apparatus has been tested by investigating the thermal unimolecular dissociation of cyclohexene to ethylene and 1,3-butadiene, a well characterized reaction for which considerable literature data that are in good agreement exist. The experiments were performed at nominal reflected shock wave pressures of 600 and 1300 Torr, and temperatures ranging from 1260 to 1430 K. The rate coefficients obtained are compared with the earlier shock tube studies and are found to be in very good agreement. As expected no significant difference is observed in the rate constant between pressures of 600 and 1300 Torr

  16. Design of a high-pressure single pulse shock tube for chemical kinetic investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tranter, R. S.; Brezinsky, K.; Fulle, D.

    2001-01-01

    A single pulse shock tube has been designed and constructed in order to achieve extremely high pressures and temperatures to facilitate gas-phase chemical kinetic experiments. Postshock pressures of greater than 1000 atmospheres have been obtained. Temperatures greater than 1400 K have been achieved and, in principle, temperatures greater than 2000 K are easily attainable. These high temperatures and pressures permit the investigation of hydrocarbon species pyrolysis and oxidation reactions. Since these reactions occur on the time scale of 0.5--2 ms the shock tube has been constructed with an adjustable length driven section that permits variation of reaction viewing times. For any given reaction viewing time, samples can be withdrawn through a specially constructed automated sampling apparatus for subsequent species analysis with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The details of the design and construction that have permitted the successful generation of very high-pressure shocks in this unique apparatus are described. Additional information is provided concerning the diaphragms used in the high-pressure shock tube

  17. Experiments in a Combustion-Driven Shock Tube with an Area Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, B. E.; Bobbitt, B.; Parziale, N. J.; Shepherd, J. E.

    Shock tubes are versatile and useful tools for studying high temperature gas dynamics and the production of hypervelocity flows. High shock speeds are desirable for creating higher enthalpy, pressure, and temperature in the test gas which makes the study of thermo-chemical effects on fluid dynamics possible. Independent of construction and operational cost, free-piston drivers, such as the one used in the T5 facility at Caltech, give the best performance [3]. The high operational cost and long turnaround time of such a facility make a more economical option desirable for smaller-scale testing.

  18. Modeling multiscale evolution of numerous voids in shocked brittle material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yin; Wang, Wenqiang; He, Hongliang; Lu, Tiecheng

    2014-04-01

    The influence of the evolution of numerous voids on macroscopic properties of materials is a multiscale problem that challenges computational research. A shock-wave compression model for brittle material, which can obtain both microscopic evolution and macroscopic shock properties, was developed using discrete element methods (lattice model). Using a model interaction-parameter-mapping procedure, qualitative features, as well as trends in the calculated shock-wave profiles, are shown to agree with experimental results. The shock wave splits into an elastic wave and a deformation wave in porous brittle materials, indicating significant shock plasticity. Void collapses in the deformation wave were the natural reason for volume shrinkage and deformation. However, media slippage and rotation deformations indicated by complex vortex patterns composed of relative velocity vectors were also confirmed as an important source of shock plasticity. With increasing pressure, the contribution from slippage deformation to the final plastic strain increased. Porosity was found to determine the amplitude of the elastic wave; porosity and shock stress together determine propagation speed of the deformation wave, as well as stress and strain on the final equilibrium state. Thus, shock behaviors of porous brittle material can be systematically designed for specific applications.

  19. Considerations in selecting tubing materials for CANDU steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemmings, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    Corrosion resistance is the major consideration in selecting tubing material for CANDU steam generators. Corrosion, and additional considerations, lead to the following steam generator tubing material recommendations: for CANDU-BPHWR's (boiling pressurized heavy water reactors) low-cobalt Incoloy-800; for CANDU-PHWR's (pressurized, non-boiling, heavy water reactors), low-cobalt Monel-400

  20. Optimal Design and Model Validation for Combustion Experiments in a Shock Tube

    KAUST Repository

    Long, Quan

    2014-01-06

    We develop a Bayesian framework for the optimal experimental design of the shock tube experiments which are being carried out at the KAUST Clean Combustion Center. The unknown parameters are the pre-exponential parameters and the activation energies in the reaction rate functions. The control parameters are the initial hydrogen concentration and the temperature. First, we build a polynomial based surrogate model for the observable related to the reactions in the shock tube. Second, we use a novel MAP based approach to estimate the expected information gain in the proposed experiments and select the best experimental set-ups corresponding to the optimal expected information gains. Third, we use the synthetic data to carry out virtual validation of our methodology.

  1. Methodology for the investigation of ignition near hot surfaces in a high-pressure shock tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niegemann, P.; Fikri, M.; Wlokas, I.; Röder, M.; Schulz, C.

    2018-05-01

    Autoignition of fuel/air mixtures is a determining process in internal combustion engines. Ignition can start either homogeneously in the gas phase after compression or in the vicinity of hot surfaces. While ignition properties of commercial fuels are conventionally described by a single quantity (octane number), it is known that some fuels have a varying propensity to the two processes. We present a new experimental concept that generates well-controlled temperature inhomogeneities in the shock-heated gases of a high-pressure shock tube. A shock-heated reactive mixture is brought into contact with a heated silicon nitride ceramic glow plug. The glow-plug temperature can be set up to 1200 K, higher than the post-reflected-shock gas temperatures (650-1050 K). High-repetition-rate chemiluminescence imaging is used to localize the onset of ignition in the vicinity of the hot surface. In experiments with ethanol, the results show that in most cases under shock-heated conditions, the ignition begins inhomogeneously in the vicinity of the glow plug and is favored because of the high wall temperature. Additionally, the interaction of geometry, external heating, and gas-dynamic effects was investigated by numerical simulations of the shock wave in a non-reactive flow.

  2. Shock Tube and Ballistic Range Facilities at NASA Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinstead, Jay H.; Wilder, Michael C.; Reda, Daniel C.; Cornelison, Charles J.; Cruden, Brett A.; Bogdanoff, David W.

    2010-01-01

    The Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility and the Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility (HFFAF) at NASA Ames Research Center are described. These facilities have been in operation since the 1960s and have supported many NASA missions and technology development initiatives. The facilities have world-unique capabilities that enable experimental studies of real-gas aerothermal, gas dynamic, and kinetic phenomena of atmospheric entry.

  3. Numerical simulation of heat fluxes in a two-temperature plasma at shock tube walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, E A; Poniaev, S A

    2015-01-01

    Numerical simulation of a two-temperature three-component Xenon plasma flow is presented. A solver based on the OpenFOAM CFD software package is developed. The heat flux at the shock tube end wall is calculated and compared with experimental data. It is shown that the heat flux due to electrons can be as high as 14% of the total heat flux. (paper)

  4. Numerical simulation of heat fluxes in a two-temperature plasma at shock tube walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, E. A.; Poniaev, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical simulation of a two-temperature three-component Xenon plasma flow is presented. A solver based on the OpenFOAM CFD software package is developed. The heat flux at the shock tube end wall is calculated and compared with experimental data. It is shown that the heat flux due to electrons can be as high as 14% of the total heat flux.

  5. Fuel-coolant interaction in a shock tube with initially-established film boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharon, A.; Bankoff, S.G.

    1979-01-01

    A new mode of thermal interaction has been employed, in which liquid metal is melted in a crucible within a shock tube; the coolant level is raised to overflow the crucible and establish subcooled film boiling with known bulk metal temperature; and a pressure shock is then initiated. With water and lead-tin alloy an initial splash of metal may be obtained after the vapor film has collapsed, due primarily to thermal interaction, followed by a successive cycle of bubble growth and collapse. To obtain large interactions, the interfacial contact temperature must exceed the spontaneous nucleation temperature of the coolant. Other cutoff behavior is observed with respect to the initial system pressure and temperatures and with the shock pressure and rise time. Experiments with butanol and lead-tin alloy show only relatively mild interactions. Qualitative explanations are proposed for the different behaviors of the two liquids

  6. The effects of area contraction on the performance of UNITEN's shock tube: Numerical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohsen, A M; Yusoff, M Z; Al-Falahi, A

    2013-01-01

    Numerical study into the effects of area contraction on shock tube performance has been reported in this paper. The shock tube is an important component of high speed fluid flow test facility was designed and built at the Universiti Tenaga Nasional (UNITEN). In the above mentioned facility, a small area contraction, in form of a bush, was placed adjacent to the diaphragm section to facilitate the diaphragm rupturing process when the pressure ratio across the diaphragm increases to a certain value. To investigate the effects of the small area contraction on facility performance, numerical simulations were conducted at different operating conditions (diaphragm pressure ratios P 4 /P 1 of 10, 15, and 20). A two-dimensional time-accurate Navier-Stokes CFD solver was used to simulate the transient flow in the facility with and without area contraction. The numerical results show that the facility performance is influenced by area contraction in the diaphragm section. For instance, when operating the facility with area contraction using diaphragm pressure ratio (P 4 /P 1 ) of 10, the shock wave strength and shock wave speed decrease by 18% and 8% respectively.

  7. Sensitive Mid-IR Laser Sensor Development and Mass Spectrometric Measurements in Shock Tube and Flames

    KAUST Repository

    Alquaity, Awad

    2016-11-01

    With global emission regulations becoming stringent, development of new combustion technologies that meet future emission regulations is essential. In this vein, this dissertation presents the application of sensitive diagnostic tools to validate and improve chemical kinetic mechanisms that play a fundamental role in the design of new combustion technologies. First, a novel high sensitivity laser-based sensor with a wide frequency tuning range (900 – 1000 cm-1) was developed utilizing pulsed cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS) technique. The novel laser-based sensor was illustrated by measuring trace amounts of multiple combustion intermediates, namely ethylene, propene, allene, and 1-butene in a static cell at ambient conditions. Subsequently, pulsed CRDS technique was utilized to develop an ultra-fast, high sensitivity diagnostic to monitor trace concentrations of ethylene in shock tube pyrolysis experiments. This diagnostic represented the first ever successful application of CRDS technique to transient species measurements in a shock tube. The high sensitivity and fast time response (10μs) diagnostic may be utilized for measuring other key neutrals and radicals which are crucial in the oxidation chemistry of practical fuels. Secondly, a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) was employed to measure relative cation mole fractions in atmospheric and low-pressure (30 Torr) flames of methane/oxygen diluted in argon. Lean, stoichiometric and rich flames were 4 examined to evaluate the dependence of ion chemistry on flame stoichiometry. Spatial distribution of cations was compared with predictions of an existing ion chemistry model. Based on the extensive measurements carried out in this work, modifications were suggested to improve the ion chemistry model to enhance the fidelity of such mechanisms. In-depth understanding of flame ion chemistry is vital to model the interaction of flames with electric fields and thereby pave the way to enable active combustion control

  8. Shock wave equation of state of powder material

    OpenAIRE

    Dijken, D.K.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    1994-01-01

    A model is proposed to predict the following quantities for powder materials compacted by shock waves: the pressure, the specific volume, the internal energy behind the shock wave, and the shock-wave velocity U-s. They are calculated as a function of flyerplate velocity u(p) and initial powder specific volume V-00. The model is tested on Cu, Al2024, and Fe. Calculated U-s vs u(p) curves agree well with experiments provided V-00 is smaller than about two times the solid specific volume. The mo...

  9. Dynamic loads on human and animal surrogates at different test locations in compressed-gas-driven shock tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alay, E.; Skotak, M.; Misistia, A.; Chandra, N.

    2018-01-01

    Dynamic loads on specimens in live-fire conditions as well as at different locations within and outside compressed-gas-driven shock tubes are determined by both static and total blast overpressure-time pressure pulses. The biomechanical loading on the specimen is determined by surface pressures that combine the effects of static, dynamic, and reflected pressures and specimen geometry. Surface pressure is both space and time dependent; it varies as a function of size, shape, and external contour of the specimens. In this work, we used two sets of specimens: (1) anthropometric dummy head and (2) a surrogate rodent headform instrumented with pressure sensors and subjected them to blast waves in the interior and at the exit of the shock tube. We demonstrate in this work that while inside the shock tube the biomechanical loading as determined by various pressure measures closely aligns with live-fire data and shock wave theory, significant deviations are found when tests are performed outside.

  10. Experimental Study of the Effect of Water Mist Location On Blast Overpressure Attenuation in A Shock Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mataradze, Edgar; Chikhradze, Nikoloz; Bochorishvili, Nika; Akhvlediani, Irakli; Tatishvili, Dimitri

    2017-12-01

    Explosion protection technologies are based on the formation of a shock wave mitigation barrier between the protection site and the explosion site. Contemporary protective systems use water mist as an extinguishing barrier. To achieve high effectiveness of the protective system, proper selection of water mist characteristics is important. The main factors defining shock wave attenuation in water mist include droplet size distribution, water concentration in the mist, droplet velocity and geometric properties of mist. This paper examines the process of attenuation of shock waves in mist with droplets ranging from 25 to 400 microns under different conditions of water mist location. Experiments were conducted at the Mining Institute with the use of a shock tube to study the processes of explosion suppression by a water mist barrier. The shock tube consists of a blast chamber, a tube, a system for the dosed supply of water, sensors, data recording equipment, and a process control module. Shock wave overpressure reduction coefficient was studied in the shock tube under two different locations of water mist: a) when water mist is created in direct contact with blast chamber and b) the blast chamber and the mist are separated by air space. It is established that in conditions when the air space distance between the blast chamber and the mist is 1 meter, overpressure reduction coefficient is 1.5-1.6 times higher than in conditions when water mist is created in direct contact with blast chamber.

  11. Thermal shock behaviour of mullite-cordierite refractory materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boccaccini, D. N.; Leonelli, C.; Romagnoli, M.; Pellacani, G. C.; Veronesi, P.; Dlouhý, Ivo; Boccaccini, A. R.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 106, č. 3 (2007), s. 142-148 ISSN 1743-6753 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA200410502 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : refraktory materials * thermal shock * fracutre toughness Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.074, year: 2007

  12. Characteristics of Pilger Die Materials for Nuclear Zirconium Alloy Tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ki Bum; Kim, In Kyu; Park, Min Young; Kahng, Jong Yeol; Kim, Sun Doo

    2011-01-01

    KEPCO Nuclear Fuel Company's (KEPCO NF) tube manufacturing facility, Techno Special Alloy (TSA) Plant, has started cold pilgering operation since 2008. It is obvious that the cold pilgering process is one of the key processes controlling the quality and the characteristics of the tubes manufactured, i.e. nuclear zirconium alloy tube in KEPCO NF. Cold pilgering is a rolling process for forming metal tubes in which diameter and wall thickness are reduced in a number of forming steps, using ring dies at outside of the tube and a curved mandrel at inside to reduce tube cross sections by up to 90 percent. The OD size of tube is reduced by a pair of dies, and ID size and wall thickness is controlled simultaneously by mandrel. During the cold pilgering process, both tools are the critical components for providing qualified tube. Development of pilger die and mandrel has been a significant importance in the zirconium tube manufacturing and a major goal of KEPCO NF. The objective of this study is to evaluate the life time of pilger die during pilgering. Therefore, a comparison of the heat treatment and mechanical properties of between AISI 52100 and AISI H13 materials was made in this study

  13. New light sources on the basis of electromagnetic shock T and H tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basov, Yu. G.; Sereda, N.I.; Skvortsov, B.V.; Sysun, V.V.

    Experimental investigation of plasma light emission was carried out on electromagnetic shock tubes filled with xenon to initial pressure of 10-100 mm Hg. T - and H- discharge devices were connected to the low-inductive discharge circuit (C=12 μF, L=0.43 μH, U=10 - 30 kV). The discharge growth was observed with a high-speed photorecorder. In the course of the investigation lighting parameters of the devices were measured as a function of xenon initial pressure and discharge energy

  14. Simulation Study of Shock Reaction on Porous Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Aiguo; Zhang Guangcai; Pan Xiaofei; Zhu Jianshi

    2009-01-01

    Direct modeling of porous materials under shock is a complex issue. We investigate such a system via the newly developed material-point method. The effects of shock strength and porosity size are the main concerns. For the same porosity, the effects of mean-void-size are checked. It is found that local turbulence mixing and volume dissipation are two important mechanisms for transformation of kinetic energy to heat. When the porosity is very small, the shocked portion may arrive at a dynamical steady state; the voids in the downstream portion reflect back rarefactive waves and result in slight oscillations of mean density and pressure; for the same value of porosity, a larger mean-void-size makes a higher mean temperature. When the porosity becomes large, hydrodynamic quantities vary with time during the whole shock-loading procedure: after the initial stage, the mean density and pressure decrease, but the temperature increases with a higher rate. The distributions of local density, pressure, temperature and particle-velocity are generally non-Gaussian and vary with time. The changing rates depend on the porosity value, mean-void-size and shock strength. The stronger the loaded shock, the stronger the porosity effects. This work provides a supplement to experiments for the very quick procedures and reveals more fundamental mechanisms in energy and momentum transportation. (general)

  15. Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry and spectroscopy of laser shocked materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcgrane, Shawn David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bolme, Cindy B [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Whitley, Von H [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Moore, David S [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Shock waves create extreme states of matter with very high pressures, temperatures, and volumetric compressions, at an exceedingly rapid rate of change. We review how to use a beamsplitter and a note card to turn a typical chirp pulse amplified femtosecond laser system into an ultrafast shock dynamics machine. Open scientific questions that can be addressed with such an apparatus are described. We report on the development of several single shot time resolved diagnostics needed to answer these questions. These single shot diagnostics are expected to be broadly applicable to other types of laser ablation experiments. Experimental results measured from shocked material dynamics of several systems are detailed. Finally, we report on progress towards using transient absorption as a measure of electronic excitation and coherent Raman as a picosecond probe of temperature in shock compressed condensed matter.

  16. Shock tubes and waves; Proceedings of the Sixteenth International Symposium, Rheinisch-Westfaelische Technische Hochschule, Aachen, Federal Republic of Germany, July 26-31, 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenig, Hans

    Topics discussed in this volume include shock wave structure, propagation, and interaction; shocks in condensed matter, dusty gases, and multiphase media; chemical processes and related combustion and detonation phenomena; shock wave reflection, diffraction, and focusing; computational fluid dynamic code development and shock wave application; blast and detonation waves; advanced shock tube technology and measuring technique; and shock wave applications. Papers are presented on dust explosions, the dynamics of shock waves in certain dense gases, studies of condensation kinetics behind incident shock waves, the autoignition mechanism of n-butane behind a reflected shock wave, and a numerical simulation of the focusing process of reflected shock waves. Attention is also given to the equilibrium shock tube flow of real gases, blast waves generated by planar detonations, modern diagnostic methods for high-speed flows, and interaction between induced waves and electric discharge in a very high repetition rate excimer laser.

  17. Development of a novel miniature detonation-driven shock tube assembly that uses in situ generated oxyhydrogen mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janardhanraj, S.; Jagadeesh, G., E-mail: jaggie@aero.iisc.ernet.in [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2016-08-15

    A novel concept to generate miniature shockwaves in a safe, repeatable, and controllable manner in laboratory confinements using an in situ oxyhydrogen generator has been proposed and demonstrated. This method proves to be more advantageous than existing methods because there is flexibility to vary strength of the shockwave, there is no need for storage of high pressure gases, and there is minimal waste disposal. The required amount of oxyhydrogen mixture is generated using alkaline electrolysis that produces hydrogen and oxygen gases in stoichiometric quantity. The rate of oxyhydrogen mixture production for the newly designed oxyhydrogen generator is found to be around 8 ml/s experimentally. The oxyhydrogen generator is connected to the driver section of a specially designed 10 mm square miniature shock tube assembly. A numerical code that uses CANTERA software package is used to predict the properties of the driver gas in the miniature shock tube. This prediction along with the 1-D shock tube theory is used to calculate the properties of the generated shockwave and matches reasonably well with the experimentally obtained values for oxyhydrogen mixture fill pressures less than 2.5 bars. The miniature shock tube employs a modified tri-clover clamp assembly to facilitate quick changing of diaphragm and replaces the more cumbersome nut and bolt system of fastening components. The versatile nature of oxyhydrogen detonation-driven miniature shock tube opens up new horizons for shockwave-assisted interdisciplinary applications.

  18. Development of a novel miniature detonation-driven shock tube assembly that uses in situ generated oxyhydrogen mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janardhanraj, S.; Jagadeesh, G.

    2016-01-01

    A novel concept to generate miniature shockwaves in a safe, repeatable, and controllable manner in laboratory confinements using an in situ oxyhydrogen generator has been proposed and demonstrated. This method proves to be more advantageous than existing methods because there is flexibility to vary strength of the shockwave, there is no need for storage of high pressure gases, and there is minimal waste disposal. The required amount of oxyhydrogen mixture is generated using alkaline electrolysis that produces hydrogen and oxygen gases in stoichiometric quantity. The rate of oxyhydrogen mixture production for the newly designed oxyhydrogen generator is found to be around 8 ml/s experimentally. The oxyhydrogen generator is connected to the driver section of a specially designed 10 mm square miniature shock tube assembly. A numerical code that uses CANTERA software package is used to predict the properties of the driver gas in the miniature shock tube. This prediction along with the 1-D shock tube theory is used to calculate the properties of the generated shockwave and matches reasonably well with the experimentally obtained values for oxyhydrogen mixture fill pressures less than 2.5 bars. The miniature shock tube employs a modified tri-clover clamp assembly to facilitate quick changing of diaphragm and replaces the more cumbersome nut and bolt system of fastening components. The versatile nature of oxyhydrogen detonation-driven miniature shock tube opens up new horizons for shockwave-assisted interdisciplinary applications.

  19. Prediction and validation of burnout curves for Goettelborn char using reaction kinetics determined in shock tube experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moors, J.H.J.; Banin, V.E.; Haas, J.H.P.; Weber, R.; Veefkind, A. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven (Netherlands). Dept. of Applied Physics

    1999-01-01

    Using a shock tube facility the combustion characteristics of pulverised char ({lt} 10 {mu}m) were measured. A prediction was made for the burnout behaviour of a commercial sized char particle (75-90 {mu}m) in different ambient conditions using a `pseudo kinetic` approach. In this approach the kinetic rate of a surface containing micro pores is determined and these `pseudo kinetics` are then applied to the larger particle not taking into account the micro pores. Comparison of the predictions with measurements done with an isothermal plug flow reactor showed this approach to be valid within experimental error for low burnout. A linear decrease of the kinetic reaction rate with burnout is shown to predict the burnout behaviour in the complete range of burnout. A possible explanation for this linear decrease could be a growing fraction of non-combustible material in the char particles during burnout. 11 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Control of adverse effects of explosive blasting in mines by using shock tube (non-electric) initiation systems and its future challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, P.D. [Maharashtra Explosives Ltd., Nagpur (India)

    2000-04-01

    Every kind of blasting in mines produces some adverse effects on environment, such as ground vibration, noise, fly rock etc. Presently, for restricting these adverse effects, use of shock tube (non-electric) initiation systems are gaining momentum. There are some inherent shortcomings of this initiation system regarding chances of misfires. This paper discusses the various adverse effects of blasting, advantages of shock tube initiation system and the shortcomings of shock tube initiation system regarding chances of misfire and how misfire arises out of failure of shock tube initiation system is different and more dangerous than the misfire occurring due to failure of conventional system (with detonating fuse and cord relays). 1 tab.

  1. High temperature shock tube experiments and kinetic modeling study of diisopropyl ketone ignition and pyrolysis

    KAUST Repository

    Barari, Ghazal

    2017-03-10

    Diisopropyl ketone (DIPK) is a promising biofuel candidate, which is produced using endophytic fungal conversion. In this work, a high temperature detailed combustion kinetic model for DIPK was developed using the reaction class approach. DIPK ignition and pyrolysis experiments were performed using the UCF shock tube. The shock tube oxidation experiments were conducted between 1093K and 1630K for different reactant compositions, equivalence ratios (φ=0.5–2.0), and pressures (1–6atm). In addition, methane concentration time-histories were measured during 2% DIPK pyrolysis in argon using cw laser absorption near 3400nm at temperatures between 1300 and 1400K near 1atm. To the best of our knowledge, current ignition delay times (above 1050K) and methane time histories are the first such experiments performed in DIPK at high temperatures. Present data were used as validation targets for the new kinetic model and simulation results showed fair agreement compared to the experiments. The reaction rates corresponding to the main consumption pathways of DIPK were found to have high sensitivity in controlling the reactivity, so these were adjusted to attain better agreement between the simulation and experimental data. A correlation was developed based on the experimental data to predict the ignition delay times using the temperature, pressure, fuel concentration and oxygen concentration.

  2. Failure analysis of glass-ceramic insulators of shock tested vacuum (neutron) tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spears, R.K.

    1980-01-01

    Eight investigative techniques were used to examine the glass-ceramic insulators in vacuum (neutron) tubes. The insulators were extracted from units that had been subjected to low temperature mechanical shock tests. Two of the three units showed reduced neutron output after these tests and an insulator on one of these two was cracked completely through which probably occurred during shock testing. The objective of this study was to determine if any major differences existed between the insulators of these tubes. After eight analyses, it was concluded that no appreciable differences existed. It appeared that cracking of the one glass-ceramic sample was initiated at inner-sleeve interface voids. For this sample, the interface void density was much higher than is presently acceptable. All insulators were made with glass-ceramic having a Na 2 O content of 4.6 wt%. An increased Na 2 O content will cause an increase in the coefficient of expansion and will reduce the residual stress level since the molybdenum has a higher coefficient of thermal expansion than the insulator. Thus, it is believed that a decrease in interface voids and an increase in Na 2 O should aid in reduced cracking of the insulator during these tests

  3. High temperature shock tube experiments and kinetic modeling study of diisopropyl ketone ignition and pyrolysis

    KAUST Repository

    Barari, Ghazal; Pryor, Owen; Koroglu, Batikan; Sarathy, Mani; Masunov, Artë m E.; Vasu, Subith S.

    2017-01-01

    Diisopropyl ketone (DIPK) is a promising biofuel candidate, which is produced using endophytic fungal conversion. In this work, a high temperature detailed combustion kinetic model for DIPK was developed using the reaction class approach. DIPK ignition and pyrolysis experiments were performed using the UCF shock tube. The shock tube oxidation experiments were conducted between 1093K and 1630K for different reactant compositions, equivalence ratios (φ=0.5–2.0), and pressures (1–6atm). In addition, methane concentration time-histories were measured during 2% DIPK pyrolysis in argon using cw laser absorption near 3400nm at temperatures between 1300 and 1400K near 1atm. To the best of our knowledge, current ignition delay times (above 1050K) and methane time histories are the first such experiments performed in DIPK at high temperatures. Present data were used as validation targets for the new kinetic model and simulation results showed fair agreement compared to the experiments. The reaction rates corresponding to the main consumption pathways of DIPK were found to have high sensitivity in controlling the reactivity, so these were adjusted to attain better agreement between the simulation and experimental data. A correlation was developed based on the experimental data to predict the ignition delay times using the temperature, pressure, fuel concentration and oxygen concentration.

  4. A theoretical and shock tube kinetic study on hydrogen abstraction from phenyl formate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Hongbo; Liu, Dapeng; Wu, Junjun; Ma, Liuhao; Ren, Wei; Farooq, Aamir

    2018-06-12

    The hydrogen abstraction reactions of phenyl formate (PF) by different radicals (H/O(3P)/OH/HO2) were theoretically investigated. We calculated the reaction energetics for PF + H/O/OH using the composite method ROCBS-QB3//M06-2X/cc-pVTZ and that for PF + HO2 at the M06-2X/cc-pVTZ level of theory. The high-pressure limit rate constants were calculated using the transition state theory in conjunction with the 1-D hindered rotor approximation and tunneling correction. Three-parameter Arrhenius expressions of rate constants were provided over the temperature range of 500-2000 K. To validate the theoretical calculations, the overall rate constants of PF + OH → Products were measured in shock tube experiments at 968-1128 K and 1.16-1.25 atm using OH laser absorption. The predicted overall rate constants agree well with the shock tube data (within 15%) over the entire experimental conditions. Rate constant analysis indicates that the H-abstraction at the formic acid site dominates the PF consumption, whereas the contribution of H-abstractions at the aromatic ring increases with temperature. Additionally, comparisons of site-specific H-abstractions from PF with methyl formate, ethyl formate, benzene, and toluene were performed to understand the effects of the aromatic ring and side-chain substituent on H-abstraction rate constants.

  5. Shock-induced synthesis of high temperature superconducting materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginley, D.S.; Graham, R.A.; Morosin, B.; Venturini, E.L.

    1987-06-18

    It has now been determined that the unique features of the high pressure shock method, especially the shock-induced chemical synthesis technique, are fully applicable to high temperature superconducting materials. Extraordinarily high yields are achievable in accordance with this invention, e.g., generally in the range from about 20% to about 99%, often in the range from about 50% to about 90%, lower and higher yields, of course, also being possible. The method of this invention involves the application of a controlled high pressure shock compression pulse which can be produced in any conventional manner, e.g., by detonation of a high explosive material, the impact of a high speed projectile or the effect of intense pulsed radiation sources such as lasers or electron beams. Examples and a discussion are presented.

  6. Advanced Spectroscopic and Thermal Imaging Instrumentation for Shock Tube and Ballistic Range Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinstead, Jay H.; Wilder, Michael C.; Reda, Daniel C.; Cruden, Brett A.; Bogdanoff, David W.

    2010-01-01

    The Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility and Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility (HFFAF, an aeroballistic range) at NASA Ames support basic research in aerothermodynamic phenomena of atmospheric entry, specifically shock layer radiation spectroscopy, convective and radiative heat transfer, and transition to turbulence. Innovative optical instrumentation has been developed and implemented to meet the challenges posed from obtaining such data in these impulse facilities. Spatially and spectrally resolved measurements of absolute radiance of a travelling shock wave in EAST are acquired using multiplexed, time-gated imaging spectrographs. Nearly complete spectral coverage from the vacuum ultraviolet to the near infrared is possible in a single experiment. Time-gated thermal imaging of ballistic range models in flight enables quantitative, global measurements of surface temperature. These images can be interpreted to determine convective heat transfer rates and reveal transition to turbulence due to isolated and distributed surface roughness at hypersonic velocities. The focus of this paper is a detailed description of the optical instrumentation currently in use in the EAST and HFFAF.

  7. Interaction of a CO2 laser beam with a shock-tube plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Box, S.J.C.; John, P.K.; Byszewski, W.W.

    1977-01-01

    The results of experimental investigations of the interaction of a CO 2 laser beam with plasma produced in an electromagnetic shock tube are presented. The interaction was investigated in two different configurations: with the laser beam perpendicular to the direction of propagation of the shock wave and with the laser beam parallel to the direction of the shock wave. The laser energy was 0.3 J in a 180-nsec pulse. The plasma density was in the range 10 17 --10 18 cm -3 and temperature was around 2 eV. Spectroscopic methods were used in the measurement of density and temperature. Direct observation of the path of the laser beam through the plasma was made by an image-convertor camera in conjunction with a narrow-band interference filter. The propagation of the laser through the plasma and energy absorption are discussed. The observed maximum increase in electron temperature due to the laser in the first configuration was 0.4 eV and the estimated temperature increase in the second configuration was about 2 eV

  8. Minimize corrosion degradation of steam generator tube materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Y.

    2006-01-01

    As part of a coordinated program, AECL is developing a set of tools to aid with the prediction and management of steam generator performance. Although stress corrosion cracking (of Alloy 800) has not been detected in any operating steam generator, for life management it is necessary to develop mechanistic models to predict the conditions under which stress corrosion cracking is plausible. Experimental data suggest that all steam generator tube materials are susceptible to corrosion degradation under some specific off-specification conditions. The tolerance to the chemistry upset for each steam generator tube alloy is different. Electrochemical corrosion behaviors of major steam generator tube alloys were studied under the plausible aggressive crevice chemistry conditions. The potential hazardous conditions leading to steam generator tube degradation and the conditions, which can minimize steam generator tube degradation have been determined. Recommended electrochemical corrosion potential/pH zones were defined for all major steam generator tube materials, including Alloys 600, 800, 690 and 400, under CANDU steam generator operating and startup conditions. Stress corrosion cracking tests and accelerated corrosion tests were carried out to verify and revise the recommended electrochemical corrosion potential/pH zones. Based on this information, utilities can prevent steam generator material degradation surprises by appropriate steam generator water chemistry management and increase the reliability of nuclear power generating stations. (author)

  9. Shock compression synthesis of hard materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willson, C.G. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this research was to adapt the high explosives technology that was developed in conjunction with nuclear weapons programs to subjecting materials to ultra-high pressures and to explore the utility of this technique for the synthesis of hard materials. The research was conducted in collaboration with researchers at the University of Texas, Texas Tech University and Pantex (Mason and Hanger Corp.). The group designed, modeled, built, and tested a new device that allows quantitative recovery of grams of material that have been subjected to unprecedented pressures. The modeling work was done at Texas Tech and Pantex. The metal parts and material samples were made at the University of Texas, and Pantex machined the explosives, assembled the devices and conducted the detonations. Sample characterization was carried out at the University of Texas and Texas Tech.

  10. Ferromagnetic material inspection for feedwater heater and condenser tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    In recent years, special ferritic stainless steels, such as AL29-4C/sup TM/, Sea-Cure/sup TM/, E-Brite/sup TM/, 439, and similar alloys have been introduced as tube material in condensers, feedwater heaters, moisture separator/reheaters, and other heat exchangers. In addition, carbon steel tubes are widely used in feedwater heaters and heat exchangers in chemical plants. The main problem with the in-service inspection of these ferritic alloys and carbon steel tubes lies in their highly ferromagnetic properties. These properties severely limit the application of the standard eddy current techniques. The effort was undertaken under EPRI sponsorship to develop a reliable technique for in-service inspection of ferromagnetic tubes. The new method combines the measurement of magnetic flux leakage generated around the defects with measurement of total flux in the tube wall. The heart of the inspection system is a special ID probe that magnetizes the tube and generates signals for any tube defect. A permanent record of inspection is provided with a strip-chart or magnetic tape recorder. The laboratory and field evaluation of this new system demonstrated its very good sensitivity to small defects, its reliability, and its ruggedness. Defects as small as 10% external wall loss in heavy wall carbon steel tube were detected. Tubes in the power plant were inspected at a rate of 300-500 tubes per eight-hour shift. The other advantages of this newly developed technique are its simplicity, low cost of instrumentation, easy data interpretation, and full portability

  11. Propagation and dispersion of shock waves in magnetoelastic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crum, R. S.; Domann, J. P.; Carman, G. P.; Gupta, V.

    2017-12-01

    Previous studies examining the response of magnetoelastic materials to shock waves have predominantly focused on applications involving pulsed power generation, with limited attention given to the actual wave propagation characteristics. This study provides detailed magnetic and mechanical measurements of magnetoelastic shock wave propagation and dispersion. Laser generated rarefacted shock waves exceeding 3 GPa with rise times of 10 ns were introduced to samples of the magnetoelastic material Galfenol. The resulting mechanical measurements reveal the evolution of the shock into a compressive acoustic front with lateral release waves. Importantly, the wave continues to disperse even after it has decayed into an acoustic wave, due in large part to magnetoelastic coupling. The magnetic data reveal predominantly shear wave mediated magnetoelastic coupling, and were also used to noninvasively measure the wave speed. The external magnetic field controlled a 30% increase in wave propagation speed, attributed to a 70% increase in average stiffness. Finally, magnetic signals propagating along the sample over 20× faster than the mechanical wave were measured, indicating these materials can act as passive antennas that transmit information in response to mechanical stimuli.

  12. Grid-converged solution and analysis of the unsteady viscous flow in a two-dimensional shock tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guangzhao; Xu, Kun; Liu, Feng

    2018-01-01

    The flow in a shock tube is extremely complex with dynamic multi-scale structures of sharp fronts, flow separation, and vortices due to the interaction of the shock wave, the contact surface, and the boundary layer over the side wall of the tube. Prediction and understanding of the complex fluid dynamics are of theoretical and practical importance. It is also an extremely challenging problem for numerical simulation, especially at relatively high Reynolds numbers. Daru and Tenaud ["Evaluation of TVD high resolution schemes for unsteady viscous shocked flows," Comput. Fluids 30, 89-113 (2001)] proposed a two-dimensional model problem as a numerical test case for high-resolution schemes to simulate the flow field in a square closed shock tube. Though many researchers attempted this problem using a variety of computational methods, there is not yet an agreed-upon grid-converged solution of the problem at the Reynolds number of 1000. This paper presents a rigorous grid-convergence study and the resulting grid-converged solutions for this problem by using a newly developed, efficient, and high-order gas-kinetic scheme. Critical data extracted from the converged solutions are documented as benchmark data. The complex fluid dynamics of the flow at Re = 1000 are discussed and analyzed in detail. Major phenomena revealed by the numerical computations include the downward concentration of the fluid through the curved shock, the formation of the vortices, the mechanism of the shock wave bifurcation, the structure of the jet along the bottom wall, and the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability near the contact surface. Presentation and analysis of those flow processes provide important physical insight into the complex flow physics occurring in a shock tube.

  13. Measurement and interpretation of growth and evaporation of monodispersed droplets in a shock tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, F.; Paikert, B.

    1994-01-01

    A special gasdynamic shock tube process in combination with a Mie light scattering method is used to study growth and subsequent evaporation of monodispersed droplets carried in argon or air. The droplets are generated by homogeneous nucleation and observed in the micrometer range (0.15-6 micrometer radius). Droplet concentrations range from 10-1000/cu mm. Four different substances, i.e. water, n-propanol, methanol and n-hexane are tested for a wide range of properties. A model covering the entire range between large (Kn much greater than 1) and small Knudsen numbers (K much less than 1) is applied to interpret the experimental data. Excellent agreement is found.

  14. Mixed butanols addition to gasoline surrogates: Shock tube ignition delay time measurements and chemical kinetic modeling

    KAUST Repository

    AlRamadan, Abdullah S.

    2015-10-01

    The demand for fuels with high anti-knock quality has historically been rising, and will continue to increase with the development of downsized and turbocharged spark-ignition engines. Butanol isomers, such as 2-butanol and tert-butanol, have high octane ratings (RON of 105 and 107, respectively), and thus mixed butanols (68.8% by volume of 2-butanol and 31.2% by volume of tert-butanol) can be added to the conventional petroleum-derived gasoline fuels to improve octane performance. In the present work, the effect of mixed butanols addition to gasoline surrogates has been investigated in a high-pressure shock tube facility. The ignition delay times of mixed butanols stoichiometric mixtures were measured at 20 and 40bar over a temperature range of 800-1200K. Next, 10vol% and 20vol% of mixed butanols (MB) were blended with two different toluene/n-heptane/iso-octane (TPRF) fuel blends having octane ratings of RON 90/MON 81.7 and RON 84.6/MON 79.3. These MB/TPRF mixtures were investigated in the shock tube conditions similar to those mentioned above. A chemical kinetic model was developed to simulate the low- and high-temperature oxidation of mixed butanols and MB/TPRF blends. The proposed model is in good agreement with the experimental data with some deviations at low temperatures. The effect of mixed butanols addition to TPRFs is marginal when examining the ignition delay times at high temperatures. However, when extended to lower temperatures (T < 850K), the model shows that the mixed butanols addition to TPRFs causes the ignition delay times to increase and hence behaves like an octane booster at engine-like conditions. © 2015 The Combustion Institute.

  15. Reaction-time-resolved measurements of laser-induced fluorescence in a shock tube with a single laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabeti, S.; Fikri, M.; Schulz, C.

    2017-11-01

    Shock tubes allow for the study of ultra-fast gas-phase reactions on the microsecond time scale. Because the repetition rate of the experiments is low, it is crucial to gain as much information as possible from each individual measurement. While reaction-time-resolved species concentration and temperature measurements with fast absorption methods are established, conventional laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements with pulsed lasers provide data only at a single reaction time. Therefore, fluorescence methods have rarely been used in shock-tube diagnostics. In this paper, a novel experimental concept is presented that allows reaction-time-resolved LIF measurements with one single laser pulse using a test section that is equipped with several optical ports. After the passage of the shock wave, the reactive mixture is excited along the center of the tube with a 266-nm laser beam directed through a window in the end wall of the shock tube. The emitted LIF signal is collected through elongated sidewall windows and focused onto the entrance slit of an imaging spectrometer coupled to an intensified CCD camera. The one-dimensional spatial resolution of the measurement translates into a reaction-time-resolved measurement while the species information can be gained from the spectral axis of the detected two-dimensional image. Anisole pyrolysis was selected as the benchmark reaction to demonstrate the new apparatus.

  16. Shock-Tube Measurement of Acetone Dissociation Using Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy of CO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengkai; Sun, Kai; Davidson, David F; Jeffries, Jay B; Hanson, Ronald K

    2015-07-16

    A direct measurement for the rate constant of the acetone dissociation reaction (CH3COCH3 = CH3CO + CH3) was conducted behind reflected shock wave, utilizing a sub-ppm sensitivity CO diagnostic achieved by cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS). The current experiment eliminated the influence from secondary reactions and temperature change by investigating the clean pyrolysis of <20 ppm acetone in argon. For the first time, the acetone dissociation rate constant (k1) was directly measured over 5.5 orders of magnitude with a high degree of accuracy: k1 (1004-1494 K, 1.6 atm) = 4.39 × 10(55) T(-11.394) exp(-52 140K/T) ± 24% s(-1). This result was seen to agree with most previous studies and has bridged the gap between their temperature and pressure conditions. The current work also served as an example demonstration of the potential of using the CEAS technique in shock-tube kinetics studies.

  17. Shock tube measurements of the branching ratios of propene + OH -> products

    KAUST Repository

    Khaled, Fathi

    2014-07-25

    Absolute rate coefficients for the reaction of OH radical with propene (C3H6) and five deutrated isotopes, propene-1-d1 (CDHCHCH3), propene-1,1-d2 (CD2CHCH3), propene-2-d1 (CH2CDCH3), propene-3,3,3-d3 (CH2CHCD3), and propene-d6 (C3D6), were measured in a shock tube behind reflected shock conditions over the temperature range of 812 K – 1460 K and pressures near 1 atm. The reaction progress was followed by monitoring OH radical near 306.7 nm using UV laser absorption. The first experimental measurements for the branching ratio of the title reaction are reported and compared with theoretical calculations. The allylic H atom abstraction of propene by OH radicals was found to be the most dominant reaction pathway followed by propen-1-yl and propen-2-yl channels over the entire temperature range of this study which is in line with theoretical predictions. Arrhenius parameters for various site-specific rate coefficients are provided for kinetic modeling.

  18. New tube fitting range can slash assembly time, reduce tube material costs and eliminate hot work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2008-09-15

    Parker Instrumentation has developed a permanent tube connection technology known as Phastite for use in high pressure applications such as in the offshore oil and gas sector. The Phastite push-fit connector offers major savings over traditional permanent and higher pressure connection techniques such as welded or cone-and-thread tube fittings. It also reduces assembly times by 20-fold or more and eliminates the need for hot work permits. The fittings are designed to withstand working pressures up to 1,379 bar. Phastite tube fittings can be used on offshore platforms, as well as on support vessels,, subsea equipment and ROVs such as hydraulic systems for wellhead control, emergency shut down, chemical injection, pumping packages, gas booster systems and test equipment. The connectors offer considerable savings in material cost and weight because they do not need to be used with more expensive tubing with extra thickness to accommodate a thread. Phastite is also resistant to vibration and does not need any anti-vibration accessories. A joint can be made in a matter of seconds with a simple handheld hydraulic tool that makes the push-fit connection. A sealing mechanism based on a series of defined internal ridges creates a secure seal by radial compression. The ridges grip in a way that retains all of the tubing's strength. An additional characteristic is the maintenance free nature of the Phastite connection. 1 fig.

  19. Nano-material aspects of shock absorption in bone joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tributsch, H; Copf, F; Copf, P; Hindenlang, U; Niethard, F U; Schneider, R

    2010-01-01

    This theoretical study is based on a nano-technological evaluation of the effect of pressure on the composite bone fine structure. It turned out, that the well known macroscopic mechano-elastic performance of bones in combination with muscles and tendons is just one functional aspect which is critically supported by additional micro- and nano- shock damping technology aimed at minimising local bone material damage within the joints and supporting spongy bone material. The identified mechanisms comprise essentially three phenomena localised within the three-dimensional spongy structure with channels and so called perforated flexible tensulae membranes of different dimensions intersecting and linking them. Kinetic energy of a mechanical shock may be dissipated within the solid-liquid composite bone structure into heat via the generation of quasi-chaotic hydromechanic micro-turbulence. It may generate electro-kinetic energy in terms of electric currents and potentials. And the resulting specific structural and surface electrochemical changes may induce the compressible intra-osseal liquid to build up pressure dependent free chemical energy. Innovative bone joint prostheses will have to consider and to be adapted to the nano-material aspects of shock absorption in the operated bones.

  20. TEM examination of irradiated zircaloy-2 pressure tube material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, D.; Tewari, R.; Dey, G.K.; Sharma, B.P.; Sah, D.N.; Banerjee, Suparna; Sahoo, K.C.

    2005-09-01

    In the present work, microstructure of the zircaloy-2 pressure tube material irradiated in the Indian Pressurized Heavy Water RAPP-1. Reactor (PHWR) has been examined for the first time using transmission electron microscope (TEM). The samples were obtained from a zircaloy-2 pressure tube, which had been in operation in the high flux region of Rajasthan Atomic Power Station Unit -1, for a period for 6.77 effective full power years (EFPYs) and expected to have a cumulative radiation damage of about 3 dpa. In this study irradiated microstructure has been characterized and compared it with the microstructure of the unirradiated pressure tube samples. The effect of irradiation on the hydriding behaviour is also studied. (author)

  1. Microstructural examination of irradiated zircaloy-2 pressure tube material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, D.; Tewari, R.; Dey, G.K.; Sah, D.N.; Banerjee, S.

    2005-01-01

    Irradiation induced microstructural changes in Zr alloys strongly influence the creep, growth and mechanical properties of pressure tube material. Since dimensional changes and mechanical property degradation can limit the life of pressure tube, it is essential to study and develop an understanding of the microstructure produced by neutron irradiation, by examining samples taken from the irradiated components. In the present work, an effort has been made to examine, microstructure of the Zircaloy-2 pressure tube material irradiated in the Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR). The present work is a first step towards a comprehensive program of characterization of microstructure of reactor materials after irradiation to different fluence levels in power reactors. In this study, samples from a Zircaloy-2 pressure tube, which had been in operation in the high flux region of Rajasthan Atomic Power Station Unit 1, for a period for 6.77 effective full power years (EFPYs), have been prepared and examined. The samples selected from the tube are expected to have a cumulative radiation damage of about 3 dpa. Samples prepared from the off cuts of RAPS-1 pressure tubes were also studied for examining the unirradiated microstructure of the material. The samples were examined in a 200kV JEOL 2000 FX microscope. This paper presents the distinct features observed in irradiated sample and a comprehensive comparison of the microstructures of the unirradiated and irradiated material. The effect of annealing on the annihilation of the defects generated during irradiation has been also studied. The bright field micrographs revealed that microstructure of the irradiated samples was different in many respects from the microstructure of the unirradiated samples. The presence of defect structure in the form of loops etc could be seen in the irradiated sample. These loops were mostly c-type loops lying in the basal plane. The dissolution and redistribution of the precipitates were

  2. Shock tube and modeling study of 2,7-dimethyloctane pyrolysis and oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Sijie; Sarathy, Mani; Davidson, David Frank; Hanson, Ronald Kenneth; Westbrook, Charles K.

    2015-01-01

    High molecular weight iso-paraffinic molecules are found in conventional petroleum, Fischer-Tropsch (FT), and other alternative hydrocarbon fuels, yet fundamental combustion studies on this class of compounds are lacking. In the present work, ignition delay time measurements in 2,7-dimethyloctane/air were carried out behind reflected shock waves using conventional and constrained reaction volume (CRV) methods. The ignition delay time measurements covered the temperature range 666-1216K, pressure range 12-27atm, and equivalence ratio of 0.5 and 1. The ignition delay time temperatures span the low-, intermediate- and high-temperature regimes for 2,7-dimethyloctane (2,7-DMO) oxidation. Clear evidence of negative temperature coefficient behavior was observed near 800K. Fuel time-history measurements were also carried out in pyrolysis experiments in mixtures of 2000ppm 2,7-DMO/argon at pressures near 16 and 35atm, and in the temperature range of 1126-1455K. Based on the fuel removal rates, the overall 2,7-DMO decomposition rate constant can be represented with k =4.47×105 exp(-23.4[kcal/mol]/RT) [1/s]. Ethylene time-history measurements in pyrolysis experiments at 16atm are also provided. The current shock tube dataset was simulated using a novel chemical kinetic model for 2,7-DMO. The reaction mechanism includes comprehensive low- and high-temperature reaction classes with rate constants assigned using established rules. Comparisons between the simulated and experimental data show simulations reproduce the qualitative trends across the entire range of conditions tested. However, the present kinetic modeling simulations cannot quantitatively reproduce a number of experimental data points, and these are analyzed herein.

  3. Shock tube studies of methyl butanoate pyrolysis with relevance to biodiesel

    KAUST Repository

    Farooq, Aamir

    2012-11-01

    Methyl butanoate pyrolysis and decomposition pathways were studied in detail by measuring concentration time-histories of CO, CO 2, CH 3, and C 2H 4 using shock tube/laser absorption methods. Experiments were conducted behind reflected shock waves at temperatures of 1200-1800K and pressures near 1.5atm using mixtures of 0.1%, 0.5%, and 1% methyl butanoate in Argon. A novel laser diagnostic was developed to measure CO in the ν 1 fundamental vibrational band near 4.56μm using a new generation of quantum-cascade lasers. Wavelength modulation spectroscopy with second-harmonic detection (WMS-2f) was used to measure CO 2 near 2752nm. Methyl radical was measured using UV laser absorption near 216nm, and ethylene was monitored using IR gas laser absorption near 10.53μm. An accurate methyl butanoate model is critical in the development of mechanisms for larger methyl esters, and the measured time-histories provide kinetic targets and strong constraints for the refinement of the methyl butanoate reaction mechanism. Measured CO mole fractions reach plateau values that are the same as the initial fuel mole fraction at temperatures higher than 1500K over the maximum measurement time of 2ms or less. Two recent kinetic mechanisms are compared with the measured data and the possible reasons for this 1:1 ratio between MB and CO are discussed. Based on these discussions, it is expected that similar CO/fuel and CO 2/fuel ratios for biodiesel molecules, particularly saturated components of biodiesel, should occur. © 2012 The Combustion Institute.

  4. Shock tube and modeling study of 2,7-dimethyloctane pyrolysis and oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Sijie

    2015-05-01

    High molecular weight iso-paraffinic molecules are found in conventional petroleum, Fischer-Tropsch (FT), and other alternative hydrocarbon fuels, yet fundamental combustion studies on this class of compounds are lacking. In the present work, ignition delay time measurements in 2,7-dimethyloctane/air were carried out behind reflected shock waves using conventional and constrained reaction volume (CRV) methods. The ignition delay time measurements covered the temperature range 666-1216K, pressure range 12-27atm, and equivalence ratio of 0.5 and 1. The ignition delay time temperatures span the low-, intermediate- and high-temperature regimes for 2,7-dimethyloctane (2,7-DMO) oxidation. Clear evidence of negative temperature coefficient behavior was observed near 800K. Fuel time-history measurements were also carried out in pyrolysis experiments in mixtures of 2000ppm 2,7-DMO/argon at pressures near 16 and 35atm, and in the temperature range of 1126-1455K. Based on the fuel removal rates, the overall 2,7-DMO decomposition rate constant can be represented with k =4.47×105 exp(-23.4[kcal/mol]/RT) [1/s]. Ethylene time-history measurements in pyrolysis experiments at 16atm are also provided. The current shock tube dataset was simulated using a novel chemical kinetic model for 2,7-DMO. The reaction mechanism includes comprehensive low- and high-temperature reaction classes with rate constants assigned using established rules. Comparisons between the simulated and experimental data show simulations reproduce the qualitative trends across the entire range of conditions tested. However, the present kinetic modeling simulations cannot quantitatively reproduce a number of experimental data points, and these are analyzed herein.

  5. Shock enhancement of cellular materials subjected to intensive pulse loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Fan, J.; Wang, Z.; Zhao, L.; Li, Z.

    2018-03-01

    Cellular materials can dissipate a large amount of energy due to their considerable stress plateau, which contributes to their extensive applications in structural design for crashworthiness. However, in some experiments with specimens subjected to intense impact loads, transmitted stress enhancement has been observed, leading to severe damage to the objects protected. Transmitted stress through two-dimensional Voronoi cellular materials as a protective device is qualitatively studied in this paper. Dimensionless parameters of material properties and loading parameters are defined to give critical conditions for shock enhancement and clarify the correlation between the deformations and stress enhancement. The effect of relative density on this amplifying phenomenon is investigated as well. In addition, local strain fields are calculated by using the optimal local deformation gradient, which gives a clear presentation of deformations and possible local non-uniformity in the crushing process. This research provides valuable insight into the reliability of cellular materials as protective structures.

  6. Influence of test tube material on subcooled flow boiling critical heat flux in short vertical tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hata, Koichi; Shiotsu, Masahiro; Noda, Nobuaki

    2007-01-01

    The steady state subcooled flow boiling critical heat flux (CHF) for the flow velocities (u=4.0 to 13.3 m/s), the inlet subcoolings (ΔT sub,in =48.6 to 154.7 K), the inlet pressure (P in =735.2 to 969.0 kPa) and the increasing heat input (Q 0 exp(t/τ), τ=10, 20 and 33.3 s) are systematically measured with the experimental water loop. The 304 Stainless Steel (SUS304) test tube of inner diameter (d=6 mm), heated length (L=66 mm) and L/d=11 with the inner surface of rough finished (Surface roughness, Ra=3.18 μm), the Cupro Nickel (Cu-Ni 30%) test tube of d=6 mm, L=60 mm and L/d=10 with Ra=0.18 μm and the Platinum (Pt) test tubes of d=3 and 6 mm, L=66.5 and 69.6 mm, and L/d=22.2 and 11.6 respectively with Ra=0.45 μm are used in this work. The CHF data for the SUS304, Cu-Ni 30% and Pt test tubes were compared with SUS304 ones for the wide ranges of d and L/d previously obtained and the values calculated by the authors' published steady state CHF correlations against outlet and inlet subcoolings. The influence of the test tube material on CHF is investigated into details and the dominant mechanism of subcooled flow boiling critical heat flux is discussed. (author)

  7. Influence of Test Tube Material on Subcooled Flow Boiling Critical Heat Flux in Short Vertical Tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koichi Hata; Masahiro Shiotsu; Nobuaki Noda

    2006-01-01

    The steady state subcooled flow boiling critical heat flux (CHF) for the flow velocities (u = 4.0 to 13.3 m/s), the inlet subcooling (ΔT sub,in = 48.6 to 154.7 K), the inlet pressure (P in = 735.2 to 969.0 kPa) and the increasing heat input (Q 0 exp(t/t), t = 10, 20 and 33.3 s) are systematically measured with the experimental water loop. The 304 Stainless Steel (SUS304) test tubes of inner diameters (d = 6 mm), heated lengths (L = 66 mm) and L/d = 11 with the inner surface of rough finished (Surface roughness, R a = 3.18 μm), the Cupro Nickel (Cu-Ni 30%) test tubes of d = 6 mm, L = 60 mm and L/d = 10 with R a = 0.18 μm and the Platinum (Pt) test tubes of d = 3 and 6 mm, L = 66.5 and 69.6 mm, and L/d 22.2 and 11.6 respectively with R a = 0.45 μm are used in this work. The CHF data for the SUS304, Cu-Ni 30% and Pt test tubes were compared with SUS304 ones for the wide ranges of d and L/d previously obtained and the values calculated by the authors' published steady state CHF correlations against outlet and inlet subcooling. The influence of the test tube material on CHF is investigated into details and the dominant mechanism of subcooled flow boiling critical heat flux is discussed. (authors)

  8. Heat exchanger tubing materials for CANDU nuclear generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, G.F.

    1977-07-01

    The performance of steam generator tubing (nickel-chromium-iron alloy in NPD and nickel-copper alloy in Douglas Point and Pickering generating stations) has been outstanding and no corrosion-induced failures have occurred. The primary coolant will be allowed to boil in the 600 MW (electrical) CANDU-PHW reactors. An iron-nickel-chromium alloy has been selected for the steam generator tubing because it will result in lower radiation fields than the alloys used before. It is also more resistant than nickel-chromium-iron alloy to stress corrosion cracking in the high purity water of the primary circuit, an unlikely but conceivable hazard associated with higher operating temperatures. Austenitic alloy and ferritic-austenitic stainless steel tubing have been selected for the moderator coolers in CANDU reactors being designed and under construction. These materials will reduce the radiation fields around the moderator circuit while retaining the good resistance to corrosion in service water that has characterized the copper-nickel alloys now in use. Brass and bronze tubes in feedwater heaters and condensers have given satisfactory service but do, however, complicate corrosion control in the steam cycle and, to reduce the transport of corrosion products from the feedtrain to the steam generator, stainless steel is preferred for feedwater heaters and stainlss steel or titanium for condensers. (author)

  9. Material Evidence for Ocean Impact from Shock-Metamorphic Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Y.; Takayama, K.; Iancu, O. G.

    1993-07-01

    Continental impact reveals an excavated crater that has few fresh fine ejecta showing major high shock metamorphism due to weathering [1]. A giant ocean impact rarely remains as an excavated crater mainly due to crushing by dynamic plate-tectonic movements on the crust [2]. However, all impact materials, including fine-grained ejecta, can be obtained with artificial impact experiments [3]. The purpose of this study is to discuss material evidence for ocean impact based on shock-metamorphic experiments. Artificial impact experiments indicate that fine shocked quartz (SQ) aggregates can be formed on several target rocks (Table 1) [1]. It is found in Table 1 that (1) the largest-density deviation of SQ grain is found not at the wall-rock or the impact crater but at fine-grained ejecta, and (2) silica-poor rocks of basalt, gabbro, and anorthosite can also make fine SQ aggregates by impact. Table 1, which appears here in the hard copy, shows formations of fine shocked quartz aggregates from ocean-floor rocks of basalt, gabbroic anorthosite, and granite [3]. An asteroid (about 10 km across) hits the Earth ~65 m.y. ago [4] to result in global catastrophe by titanic explosion and climate change. But shocked quartz grains found in the K/T boundary layer were considered to come from crystalline continental rocks [5]. The present result as listed in Table 1 indicates that fine SQ aggregates can also be formed at sea-floor basaltic and gabbroic rocks [3]. The present result of formation of the SQ grains from sea- floor target rocks is nearly consistent with the finding of a sea-impact crater at the K/T boundary near the Caribbean [6]. Impact-induced volcanism at the K/T boundary can explained by the penetration from thin ocean crust to upper mantle reservoirs, if giant impact of a 10-km- diameter asteroid hit the ocean [2,7]. The present result can explain "phreatomagmatic (magmatic vapor) explosion," which is created by abrupt boiling between high-temperature magma and cold

  10. Theoretical and Shock Tube Study of the Rate Constants for Hydrogen Abstraction Reactions of Ethyl Formate

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Junjun; Khaled, Fathi; Ning, Hongbo; Ma, Liuhao; Farooq, Aamir; Ren, Wei

    2017-01-01

    We report a systematic chemical kinetics study of the H-atom abstractions from ethyl formate (EF) by H, O(3P), CH3, OH, and HO2 radicals. The geometry optimization and frequency calculation of all the species were conducted using the M06 method and the cc-pVTZ basis set. The one-dimensional hindered rotor treatment of the reactants and transition states and the intrinsic reaction coordinate analysis were also performed at the M06/cc-pVTZ level of theory. The relative electronic energies were calculated at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVXZ (where X = D, T) level of theory and further extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. Rate constants for the tittle reactions were calculated over the temperature range of 500‒2500 K by the transition state theory (TST) in conjunction with asymmetric Eckart tunneling effect. In addition, the rate constants of H-abstraction by hydroxyl radical were measured in shock tube experiments at 900‒1321 K and 1.4‒2.0 atm. Our theoretical rate constants of OH + EF → Products agree well with the experimental results within 15% over the experimental temperature range of 900‒1321 K. Branching ratios for the five types of H-abstraction reactions were also determined from their individual site-specific rate constants.

  11. Shock tube and chemical kinetic modeling study of the oxidation of 2,5-dimethylfuran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirjean, Baptiste; Fournet, René; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Wang, Weijing; Oehlschlaeger, Matthew A

    2013-02-21

    A detailed kinetic model describing the oxidation of 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF), a potential second-generation biofuel, is proposed. The kinetic model is based upon quantum chemical calculations for the initial DMF consumption reactions and important reactions of intermediates. The model is validated by comparison to new DMF shock tube ignition delay time measurements (over the temperature range 1300-1831 K and at nominal pressures of 1 and 4 bar) and the DMF pyrolysis speciation measurements of Lifshitz et al. [ J. Phys. Chem. A 1998 , 102 ( 52 ), 10655 - 10670 ]. Globally, modeling predictions are in good agreement with the considered experimental targets. In particular, ignition delay times are predicted well by the new model, with model-experiment deviations of at most a factor of 2, and DMF pyrolysis conversion is predicted well, to within experimental scatter of the Lifshitz et al. data. Additionally, comparisons of measured and model predicted pyrolysis speciation provides validation of theoretically calculated channels for the oxidation of DMF. Sensitivity and reaction flux analyses highlight important reactions as well as the primary reaction pathways responsible for the decomposition of DMF and formation and destruction of key intermediate and product species.

  12. Theoretical and Shock Tube Study of the Rate Constants for Hydrogen Abstraction Reactions of Ethyl Formate

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Junjun

    2017-08-03

    We report a systematic chemical kinetics study of the H-atom abstractions from ethyl formate (EF) by H, O(3P), CH3, OH, and HO2 radicals. The geometry optimization and frequency calculation of all the species were conducted using the M06 method and the cc-pVTZ basis set. The one-dimensional hindered rotor treatment of the reactants and transition states and the intrinsic reaction coordinate analysis were also performed at the M06/cc-pVTZ level of theory. The relative electronic energies were calculated at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVXZ (where X = D, T) level of theory and further extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. Rate constants for the tittle reactions were calculated over the temperature range of 500‒2500 K by the transition state theory (TST) in conjunction with asymmetric Eckart tunneling effect. In addition, the rate constants of H-abstraction by hydroxyl radical were measured in shock tube experiments at 900‒1321 K and 1.4‒2.0 atm. Our theoretical rate constants of OH + EF → Products agree well with the experimental results within 15% over the experimental temperature range of 900‒1321 K. Branching ratios for the five types of H-abstraction reactions were also determined from their individual site-specific rate constants.

  13. Fracture Toughness Round Robin Test International in pressure tube materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villagarcia, M.P.; Liendo, M.F.

    1993-01-01

    Part of the pressure tubes surveillance program of CANDU type reactors is to determine the fracture toughness using a special fracture specimen and test procedure. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited decided to hold a Round Robin Test International and 9 laboratories participated worldwide in which several pressure tube materials were selected: Zircaloy-2, Zr-2.5%Nb cold worked and Zr-2.5%Nb heat treated. The small specimens used held back the thickness and curvature of the tube. J-R curves at room temperature were obtained and the crack extension values were determined by electrical potential drop techniques. These values were compared with results generated from other laboratories and a bid scatter was founded. It could be due to slight variations in the test method or inhomogeneity of the materials and a statistical study must be done to see if there is any pattern. The next step for the Round Robin Test would be to make some modifications in the test method in order to reduce the scatter. (Author)

  14. High density turbulent plasma processes from a shock tube. Final performance report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.A. III.

    1997-01-01

    A broad-based set of measurements has begun on high density turbulent plasma processes. This includes determinations of new plasma physics and the initiation of work on new diagnostics for collisional plasmas as follows: (1) A transient increase is observed in both the spectral energy decay rate and the degree of chaotic complexity at the interface of a shock wave and a turbulent ionized gas. Even though the gas is apparently brought to rest by the shock wave, no evidence is found either of prompt relaminarization or of any systematic influence of end-wall material thermal conductivities on the turbulence parameters. (2) Point fluorescence emissions and averaged spectral line evolutions in turbulent plasmas produced in both the primary and the reflected shock wave flows exhibit ergodicity in the standard turbulence parameters. The data show first evidence of a reverse energy cascade in the collisional turbulent plasma. This suggests that the fully turbulent environment can be described using a stationary state formulation. In these same data, the author finds compelling evidence for a turbulent Stark effect on neutral emission lines in these data which is associated with evidence of large coherent structures and dominant modes in the Fourier analyses of the fluctuations in the optical spectra. (3) A neutral beam generator has been assembled by coupling a Colutron Ion Gun to a charge exchange chamber. Beam-target collisions where the target species is neutral and the beam is either singly charged or neutral have been performed using argon as the working gas. Spectral analysis of the emission shows specific radiative transitions characteristic of both Ar I and Ar II, indicating that some ionization of the target gas results. Gas and plasma parameters such as density, pressure, temperature and flow velocity and their fluctuations can now be followed in real time by spectroscopic analysis of carefully chosen radiative emissions

  15. Assessment of Blasting Performance Using Electronic Vis-à-Vis Shock Tube Detonators in Strong Garnet Biotite Sillimanite Gneiss Formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Suresh Kumar; Rai, Piyush

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a comparative investigation of the shock tube and electronic detonating systems practised in bench blasting. The blast trials were conducted on overburden rocks of Garnet Biotite Sillimanite Gneiss formations in one of the largest metalliferous mine of India. The study revealed that the choice of detonating system was crucial in deciding the fragment size and its distribution within the blasted muck-piles. The fragment size and its distribution affected the digging rate of excavators. Also, the shape of the blasted muck-pile was found to be related to the degree of fragmentation. From the present work, it may be inferred that in electronic detonation system, timely release of explosive energy resulted in better overall blasting performance. Hence, the precision in delay time must be considered in designing blast rounds in such overburden rock formations. State-of-art image analysis, GPS based muck-pile profile plotting techniques were rigorously used in the investigation. The study revealed that a mean fragment size (K50) value for shock tube detonated blasts (0.55-0.59 m) was higher than that of electronically detonated blasts (0.43-0.45 m). The digging rate of designated shovels (34 m3) with electronically detonated blasts was consistently more than 5000 t/h, which was almost 13 % higher in comparison to shock tube detonated blasts. Furthermore, favourable muck-pile shapes were witnessed in electronically detonated blasts from the observations made on the dozer performance.

  16. New Bayesian inference method using two steps of Markov chain Monte Carlo and its application to shock tube experiment data of Furan oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Daesang; El Gharamti, Iman; Bisetti, Fabrizio; Farooq, Aamir; Knio, Omar

    2016-01-01

    A new Bayesian inference method has been developed and applied to Furan shock tube experimental data for efficient statistical inferences of the Arrhenius parameters of two OH radical consumption reactions. The collected experimental data, which

  17. A shock tube and laser absorption study of ignition delay times and OH reaction rates of ketones: 2-Butanone and 3-buten-2-one

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad; Elwardani, Ahmed Elsaid; Khaled, Fathi; Vasu, Subith S.; Farooq, Aamir

    2014-01-01

    Ketones are potential biofuel candidates and are also formed as intermediate products during the oxidation of large hydrocarbons or oxygenated fuels, such as alcohols and esters. This paper presents shock tube ignition delay times and OH reaction

  18. A hierarchical method for Bayesian inference of rate parameters from shock tube data: Application to the study of the reaction of hydroxyl with 2-methylfuran

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Daesang; El Gharamti, Iman; Hantouche, Mireille; Elwardani, Ahmed Elsaid; Farooq, Aamir; Bisetti, Fabrizio; Knio, Omar

    2017-01-01

    We developed a novel two-step hierarchical method for the Bayesian inference of the rate parameters of a target reaction from time-resolved concentration measurements in shock tubes. The method was applied to the calibration of the parameters

  19. Material model validation for laser shock peening process simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amarchinta, H K; Grandhi, R V; Langer, K; Stargel, D S

    2009-01-01

    Advanced mechanical surface enhancement techniques have been used successfully to increase the fatigue life of metallic components. These techniques impart deep compressive residual stresses into the component to counter potentially damage-inducing tensile stresses generated under service loading. Laser shock peening (LSP) is an advanced mechanical surface enhancement technique used predominantly in the aircraft industry. To reduce costs and make the technique available on a large-scale basis for industrial applications, simulation of the LSP process is required. Accurate simulation of the LSP process is a challenging task, because the process has many parameters such as laser spot size, pressure profile and material model that must be precisely determined. This work focuses on investigating the appropriate material model that could be used in simulation and design. In the LSP process material is subjected to strain rates of 10 6  s −1 , which is very high compared with conventional strain rates. The importance of an accurate material model increases because the material behaves significantly different at such high strain rates. This work investigates the effect of multiple nonlinear material models for representing the elastic–plastic behavior of materials. Elastic perfectly plastic, Johnson–Cook and Zerilli–Armstrong models are used, and the performance of each model is compared with available experimental results

  20. Shock tube/laser absorption studies of the decomposition of methyl formate

    KAUST Repository

    Ren, Wei; Lam, Kingyiu; Pyun, Sunghyun; Farooq, Aamir; Davidson, David Frank; Hanson, Ronald Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Reaction rate coefficients for the major high-temperature methyl formate (MF, CH3OCHO) decomposition pathways, MF → CH3OH + CO (1), MF →CH2O+CH2O (2), and MF→ CH4 + CO2 (3), were directly measured in a shock tube using laser absorption of CO (4.6 μm), CH2O (306 nm) and CH4 (3.4 μm). Experimental conditions ranged from 1202 to 1607 K and 1.36 to 1.72 atm, with mixtures varying in initial fuel concentration from 0.1% to 3% MF diluted in argon. The decomposition rate coefficients were determined by monitoring the formation rate of each target species immediately behind the reflected shock waves and modeling the species time-histories with a detailed kinetic mechanism [12]. The three measured rate coefficients can be well-described using two-parameter Arrhenius expressions over the temperature range in the present study: k1 = 1.1 × 1013 exp(-29556/T, K) s -1, k2 = 2.6 × 1012 exp(-32052/T, K) s-1, and k3 = 4.4 × 1011 exp(-29 078/T, K) s-1, all thought to be near their high-pressure limits. Uncertainties in the k1, k2 and k3 measurements were estimated to be ±25%, ±35%, and ±40%, respectively. We believe that these are the first direct high-temperature rate measurements for MF decomposition and all are in excellent agreement with the Dooley et al. [12] mechanism. In addition, by also monitoring methanol (CH3OH) and MF concentration histories using a tunable CO2 gas laser operating at 9.67 and 9.23 μm, respectively, all the major oxygen-carrying molecules were quantitatively detected in the reaction system. An oxygen balance analysis during MF decomposition shows that the multi-wavelength laser absorption strategy used in this study was able to track more than 97% of the initial oxygen atoms in the fuel. © 2012 The Combustion Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparative Shock-Tube Study of Autoignition and Plasma-Assisted Ignition of C2-Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosarev, Ilya; Kindysheva, Svetlana; Plastinin, Eugeny; Aleksandrov, Nikolay; Starikovskiy, Andrey

    2015-09-01

    The dynamics of pulsed picosecond and nanosecond discharge development in liquid water, ethanol and hexane Using a shock tube with a discharge cell, ignition delay time was measured in a lean (φ = 0.5) C2H6:O2:Ar mixture and in lean (φ = 0.5) and stoichiometric C2H4:O2:Ar mixtures with a high-voltage nanosecond discharge and without it. The measured results were compared with the measurements made previously with the same setup for C2H6-, C2H5OH- and C2H2-containing mixtures. It was shown that the effect of plasma on ignition is almost the same for C2H6, C2H4 and C2H5OH. The reduction in time is smaller for C2H2, the fuel that is well ignited even without the discharge. Autoignition delay time was independent of the stoichiometric ratio for C2H6 and C2H4, whereas this time in stoichiometric C2H2- and C2H5OH-containing mixtures was noticeably shorter than that in the lean mixtures. Ignition after the discharge was not affected by a change in the stoichiometric ratio for C2H2 and C2H4, whereas the plasma-assisted ignition delay time for C2H6 and C2H5OH decreased as the equivalence ratio changed from 1 to 0.5. Ignition delay time was calculated in C2-hydrocarbon-containing mixtures under study by simulating separately discharge and ignition processes. Good agreement was obtained between new measurements and calculated ignition delay times.

  2. Investigating pyroclast ejection dynamics using shock-tube experiments: temperature, grain size and vent geometry effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigala, V.; Kueppers, U.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions eject large quantities of gas and particles into the atmosphere. The portion directly above the vent commonly shows characteristics of underexpanded jets. Understanding the factors that influence the initial pyroclast ejection dynamics is necessary in order to better assess the resulting near- and far-field hazards. Field observations are often insufficient for the characterization of volcanic explosions due to lack of safe access to such environments. Fortunately, their dynamics can be simulated in the laboratory where experiments are performed under controlled conditions. We ejected loose natural particles from a shock-tube while controlling temperature (25˚ and 500˚C), overpressure (15MPa), starting grain size distribution (1-2 mm, 0.5-1 mm and 0.125-0.250 mm), sample-to-vent distance and vent geometry. For each explosion we quantified the velocity of individual particles, the jet spreading angle and the production of fines. Further, we varied the setup to allow for different sample-to-gas ratios and deployed four different vent geometries: 1) cylindrical, 2) funnel with a flaring of 30˚, 3) funnel with a flaring of 15˚ and 4) nozzle. The results showed maximum particle velocities up to 296 m/s, gas spreading angles varying from 21˚ to 37˚ and particle spreading angles from 3˚ to 40˚. Moreover we observed dynamically evolving ejection characteristics and variations in the production of fines during the course of individual experiments. Our experiments mechanistically mimic the process of pyroclast ejection. Thus the capability for constraining the effects of input parameters (fragmentation conditions) and conduit/vent geometry on ballistic pyroclastic plumes has been clearly established. These data obtained in the presence of well-documented conduit and vent conditions, should greatly enhance our ability to numerically model explosive ejecta in nature.

  3. Shock tube experiments on nitromethane and Promotion of chemical reactions by non-thermal plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seljeskog, Morten

    2002-06-01

    This dissertation was undertaken to study two different subjects both related to molecular decomposition by applying a shock tube and non-thermal plasma to decompose selected hydrocarbons. The first approach to molecular decomposition concerned thermal decomposition and oxidation of highly diluted nitromethane (NM) in a shock tube. Reflected shock tube experiments on NM decomposition, using mixtures of 0.2 to 1.5 vol% NM in nitrogen or argon were performed over the temperature range 850-1550 K and pressure range 190-900 kPa, with 46 experiments diluted in nitrogen and 44 diluted in argon. By residual error analysis of the measured decomposition profiles it was found that NM decomposition (CH{sub 3}NO{sub 2} + M {yields} CH{sub 3} + NO{sub 2} + M, where M = N{sub 2} /Ar) corresponds well to a law of first order. Arrhenius expressions corresponding to NM diluted either in N{sub 2} or in Ar were found as k{sub N2} = 10{sup 17.011} * exp(- 182.6 kJ/mole / R*T) and k{sub Ar} = 10{sup 17.574}*exp(-207 kJ/mole / R*T ) , respectively. A new reaction mechanism was then proposed, based on new experimental data for NM decomposition both in Ar and N{sub 2} and on three previously developed mechanisms. The new mechanism predicts well the decomposition of NM diluted in both N{sub 2} and Ar within the pressure and temperature range covered by the experiments. In parallel to, and following the decomposition experiments, oxidative experiments on the ignition delay times of NM/O{sub 2}/Ar mixtures were investigated over high temperature and low to high pressure ranges. These experiments were carried out with eight different mixtures of gaseous NM and oxygen diluted in argon, with pressures ranging between 44.3-600 kPa, and temperatures ranging between 842-1378 K. The oxidation experiments were divided into different categories according to the type of decomposition signals achieved. For signals with and without emission, the apparent quasi

  4. Development of technology on the material surveillance of CANDU pressure tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Kye Hoh; Han, Jung Hoh; Lee, Duk Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-05-01

    Material degradation of pressure tubes, which are the most important components in CANDU fuel channel, can only be evaluated by removing and examining them(material surveillance). This study aimed at establishment of overall evaluation technology including the evaluation of the material degradation for the integrity of pressure tubes of Wolsung units. Material tests for pressure tubes were performed as follows; (1) Evaluation on life limiting factors of pressure tubes (2) Review on leak-before-break and integrity maintenance technology of pressure tubes (3) Survey on selection criteria for tubes to be inspected and on related regulations for material surveillance (4) Analysis of material surveillance test procedure (5) Basic examinations of Wolsung unit 1 pressure tube material(TEM, texture, chemical component etc) (6) Manufacture of test equipments and test (DHCV, hydriding, grip and tensile specimen etc). 23 figs, 6 tabs, 59 refs. (Author).

  5. Development of technology on the material surveillance of CANDU pressure tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, Kye Hoh; Han, Jung Hoh; Lee, Duk Hyun

    1995-05-01

    Material degradation of pressure tubes, which are the most important components in CANDU fuel channel, can only be evaluated by removing and examining them(material surveillance). This study aimed at establishment of overall evaluation technology including the evaluation of the material degradation for the integrity of pressure tubes of Wolsung units. Material tests for pressure tubes were performed as follows; (1) Evaluation on life limiting factors of pressure tubes (2) Review on leak-before-break and integrity maintenance technology of pressure tubes (3) Survey on selection criteria for tubes to be inspected and on related regulations for material surveillance (4) Analysis of material surveillance test procedure (5) Basic examinations of Wolsung unit 1 pressure tube material(TEM, texture, chemical component etc) (6) Manufacture of test equipments and test (DHCV, hydriding, grip and tensile specimen etc). 23 figs, 6 tabs, 59 refs. (Author)

  6. Predictive value of low tube voltage and dual-energy CT for successful shock wave lithotripsy: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Largo, Remo; Stolzmann, Paul; Fankhauser, Christian D; Poyet, Cédric; Wolfsgruber, Pirmin; Sulser, Tullio; Alkadhi, Hatem; Winklhofer, Sebastian

    2016-06-01

    This study investigates the capabilities of low tube voltage computed tomography (CT) and dual-energy CT (DECT) for predicting successful shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) of urinary stones in vitro. A total of 33 urinary calculi (six different chemical compositions; mean size 6 ± 3 mm) were scanned using a dual-source CT machine with single- (120 kVp) and dual-energy settings (80/150, 100/150 Sn kVp) resulting in six different datasets. The attenuation (Hounsfield Units) of calculi was measured on single-energy CT images and the dual-energy indices (DEIs) were calculated from DECT acquisitions. Calculi underwent SWL and the number of shock waves for successful disintegration was recorded. The prediction of required shock waves regarding stone attenuation/DEI was calculated using regression analysis (adjusted for stone size and composition) and the correlation between CT attenuation/DEI and the number of shock waves was assessed for all datasets. The median number of shock waves for successful stone disintegration was 72 (interquartile range 30-361). CT attenuation/DEI of stones was a significant, independent predictor (P waves with the best prediction at 80 kVp (β estimate 0.576) (P waves ranged between ρ = 0.31 and 0.68 showing the best correlation at 80 kVp (P < 0.001). The attenuation of urinary stones at low tube voltage CT is the best predictor for successful stone disintegration, being independent of stone composition and size. DECT shows no added value for predicting the success of SWL.

  7. Fatigue life prediction of autofrettage tubes using actual material behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahed, Hamid; Farshi, Behrooz; Hosseini, Mohammad

    2006-01-01

    There is a profound Bauschinger effect in the behaviour of high-strength steels used in autofrettaged tubes. This has led to development of methods capable of considering experimentally obtained (actual) material behaviour in residual stress calculations. The extension of these methods to life calculations is presented here. To estimate the life of autofrettaged tubes with a longitudinal surface crack emanating from the bore more accurately, instead of using idealized models, the experimental loading-unloading stress-strain behaviour is employed. The resulting stresses are then used to calculate stress intensity factors by the weight function method as input to fatigue life determination. Fatigue lives obtained using the actual material behaviour are then compared with the results of frequently used ideal models including those considering Bauschinger effect factors and strain hardening in unloading. Using standard fatigue crack growth relationships, life of the vessel is then calculated based on recommended initial and final crack length. It is shown that the life gain due to autofrettage above 70% overstrain is considerable

  8. Some techniques and results from high-pressure shock-wave experiments utilizing the radiation from shocked transparent materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McQueen, R.G.; Fritz, J.N.

    1981-01-01

    It has been known for many years that some transparent materials emit radiation when shocked to high pressures. This property was used to determine the temperature of shocked fused and crystal quartz, which in turn allowed the thermal expansion of SiO 2 at high pressure and also the specific heat to be calculated. Once the radiative energy as a function of pressure is known for one material it is shown how this can be used to determine the temperature of other transparent materials. By the nature of the experiments very accurate shock velocities can be measured and hence high quality equation of state data obtained. Some techniques and results are presented on measuring sound velocities from symmetrical impact of nontransparent materials using radiation emitting transparent analyzers, and on nonsymmetrical impact experiments on transparent materials. Because of special requirements in the later experiments, techniques were developed that lead to very high-precision shock-wave data. Preliminary results, using these techniques are presented for making estimates of the melting region and the yield strength of some metals under strong shock conditions

  9. On the high-temperature combustion of n-butanol: Shock tube data and an improved kinetic model

    KAUST Repository

    Vasu, Subith S.

    2013-11-21

    The combustion of n-butanol has received significant interest in recent years, because of its potential use in transportation applications. Researchers have extensively studied its combustion chemistry, using both experimental and theoretical methods; however, additional work is needed under specific conditions to improve our understanding of n-butanol combustion. In this study, we report new OH time-history data during the high-temperature oxidation of n-butanol behind reflected shock waves over the temperature range of 1300-1550 K and at pressures near 2 atm. These data were obtained at Stanford University, using narrow-line-width ring dye laser absorption of the R1(5) line of OH near 306.7 nm. Measured OH time histories were modeled using comprehensive n-butanol literature mechanisms. It was found that n-butanol unimolecular decomposition rate constants commonly used in chemical kinetic models, as well as those determined from theoretical studies, are unable to predict the data presented herein. Therefore, an improved high-temperature mechanism is presented here, which incorporates recently reported rate constants measured in a single pulse shock tube [C. M. Rosado-Reyes and W. Tsang, J. Phys. Chem. A 2012, 116, 9825-9831]. Discussions are presented on the validity of the proposed mechanism against other literature shock tube experiments. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  10. Shock wave interaction with turbulence: Pseudospectral simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckingham, A.C.

    1986-01-01

    Shock waves amplify pre-existing turbulence. Shock tube and shock wave boundary layer interaction experiments provide qualitative confirmation. However, shock pressure, temperature, and rapid transit complicate direct measurement. Computational simulations supplement the experimental data base and help isolate the mechanisms responsible. Simulations and experiments, particularly under reflected shock wave conditions, significantly influence material mixing. In these pseudospectral Navier-Stokes simulations the shock wave is treated as either a moving (tracked or fitted) domain boundary. The simulations assist development of code mix models. Shock Mach number and pre-existing turbulence intensity initially emerge as key parameters. 20 refs., 8 figs

  11. Material reliability of Ni alloy electrodeposition for steam generator tube repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Jin; Kim, Myong Jin; Kim, Joung Soo; Kim, Hong Pyo

    2007-01-01

    Due to the occasional occurrences of Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) in steam generator tubing (Alloy 600), degraded tubes are removed from service by plugging or are repaired for re-use. Since electrodeposition inside a tube dose not entail parent tube deformation, residual stress in the tube can be minimized. In this work, tube restoration via electrodeposition inside a steam generator tubing was performed after developing the following: an anode probe to be installed inside a tube, a degreasing condition to remove dirt and grease, an activation condition for surface oxide elimination, a tightly adhered strike layer forming condition between the electroforming layer and the Alloy 600 tube, and the condition for an electroforming layer. The reliability of the electrodeposited material, with a variation of material properties, was evaluated as a function of the electrodeposit position in the vertical direction of a tube using the developed anode. It has been noted that the variation of the material properties along the electrodeposit length was acceptable in a process margin. To improve the reliability of a material property, the causes of the variation occurrence were presumed, and an attempt to minimize the variation has been made. A Ni alloy electrodeposition process is suggested as a Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC) mitigation method for various components, including steam generator tubes. The Ni alloy electrodeposit formed inside a tube by using the installed assembly shows proper material properties as well as an excellent SCC resistance

  12. A study of shock mitigating materials in a split Hopkinson bar configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, V.I.; Bell, R.G. III; Brown, F.A.; Hansen, N.R.

    1996-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) designs mechanical systems with electronics that must survive high shock environments. These mechanical systems include penetrators that must survive soil, rock, and ice penetration, nuclear transportation casks that must survive transportation environments, and laydown weapons that must survive delivery impact of 125-fps. These mechanical systems contain electronics that may operate during and after the high shock environment and that must be protected from the high shock environments. A study has been started to improve the packaging techniques for the advanced electronics utilized in these mechanical systems because current packaging techniques are inadequate for these more sensitive electronics. In many cases, it has been found that the packaging techniques currently used not only do not mitigate the shock environment but actually amplify the shock environment. An ambitious goal for this packaging study is to avoid amplification and possibly attenuate the shock environment before it reaches the electronics contained in the various mechanical system. As part of the investigation of packaging techniques, a two part study of shock mitigating materials is being conducted. This paper reports the first part of the shock mitigating materials study. A study to compare three thicknesses (0.125, 0.250, and 0.500 in.) of seventeen, unconfined materials for their shock mitigating characteristics has been completed with a split Hopkinson bar configuration. The nominal input as measured by strain gages on the incident Hopkinson bar is 50 fps at sign 100 micros for these tests. It is hypothesized that a shock mitigating material has four purposes: to lengthen the shock pulse, to attenuate the shock pulse, to mitigate high frequency content in the shock pulse, and to absorb energy. Both time domain and frequency domain analyses of the split Hopkinson bar data have been performed to compare the materials' achievement of these purposes

  13. Fragmentation of Solid Materials Using Shock Tubes. Part 2: First Test Series in a Large Diameter Shock Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    series used improved experimental techniques to reduce obscuration due to smoke and fire which, again, increased the number of observed fragments (iii...minimally-reinforced concrete masonry unit (CMU) wall, and one 8-ft x 8-ft reinforced concrete panel, each carefully fabricated and mounted to replicate...develops a vertical compressive force that resists horizontal flexure. Figure 4. A view of CMU sample set-up used in Test 20. 6 Figure 5

  14. Fragmentation of Solid Materials Using Shock Tubes. Part 1: First Test Series in a Small Diameter Shock Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    spreadsheet output. More specifically, two passes were made in Excel. In the first pass, logic functions and VBA code were used to enforce a lower limit...2006. [2] Pacific Supply, [Online]. Available: http://pacificsupply.paccoast.com/index.html. [ Accessed 15 October 2015]. [3] CR Laurence, [Online...Available: http://www.crlaurence.com/apps/contentloader/ default.aspx?content=www.crlaurence.com/adv/glass_and_glazing/index_us.html. [ Accessed

  15. Criticality conditions of heterogeneous energetic materials under shock loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, Anas; Rai, Nirmal Kumar; Sen, Oishik; Udaykumar, H. S.

    2017-06-01

    Shock interaction with the microstructural heterogeneities of energetic materials can lead to the formation of locally heated regions known as hot spots. These hot spots are the potential sites where chemical reaction may be initiated. However, the ability of a hot spot to initiate chemical reaction depends on its size, shape and strength (temperature). Previous study by Tarver et al. has shown that there exists a critical size and temperature for a given shape (spherical, cylindrical, and planar) of the hot spot above which reaction initiation is imminent. Tarver et al. assumed a constant temperature variation in the hot spot. However, the meso-scale simulations show that the temperature distribution within a hot spot formed from processes such as void collapse is seldom constant. Also, the shape of a hot spot can be arbitrary. This work is an attempt towards development of a critical hot spot curve which is a function of loading strength, duration and void morphology. To achieve the aforementioned goal, mesoscale simulations are conducted on porous HMX material. The process is repeated for different loading conditions and void sizes. The hot spots formed in the process are examined for criticality depending on whether they will ignite or not. The metamodel is used to obtain criticality curves and is compared with the critical hot spot curve of Tarver et al.

  16. Shocked materials at the intersection of experiment and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenzana, H. E.; Belak, J. F.; Bradley, K. S.; Bringa, E. M.; Budil, K. S.; Cazamias, J. U.; El-Dasher, B.; Hawreliak, J. A.; Hessler, J.; Kadau, K.; Kalantar, D. H.; McNaney, J. M.; Milathianaki, D.; Rosolankova, K.; Swift, D. C.; Taravillo, M.; Van Buuren, T. W.; Wark, J. S.; de la Rubia, T. Diaz

    2008-04-01

    Understanding the dynamic lattice response of solids under the extreme conditions of pressure, temperature and strain rate is a scientific quest that spans nearly a century. Critical to developing this understanding is the ability to probe and model the spatial and temporal evolution of the material microstructure and properties at the scale of the relevant physical phenomena-nanometers to micrometers and picoseconds to nanoseconds. While experimental investigations over this range of spatial and temporal scales were unimaginable just a decade ago, new technologies and facilities currently under development and on the horizon have brought these goals within reach for the first time. The equivalent advancements in simulation capabilities now mean that we can conduct simulations and experiments at overlapping temporal and spatial scales. In this article, we describe some of our studies which exploit existing and new generation ultrabright, ultrafast x-ray sources and large scale molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the real-time physical phenomena that control the dynamic response of shocked materials.

  17. Shocked materials at the intersection of experiment and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadau, Kai [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the dynamic lattice response of solids under the extreme conditions of pressure, temperature and strain rate is a scientific quest that spans nearly a century. Critical to developing this understanding is the ability to probe and model the spatial and temporal evolution of the material microstructure and properties at the scale of the relevant physical phenomena -- nanometers to micrometers and picoseconds to nanoseconds. While experimental investigations over this range of spatial and temporal scales were unimaginable just a decade ago, new technologies and facilities currently under development and on the horizon have brought these goals within reach for the first time. The equivalent advancements in simulation capabilities now mean that we can conduct simulations and experiments at overlapping temporal and spatial scales. In this article, we describe some of our studies which exploit existing and new generation ultrabright, ultrafast x-ray sources and large scale molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the real-time physical phenomena that control the dynamic response of shocked materials.

  18. Evaluation of thermal shock strengths for graphite materials using a laser irradiation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Hoon; Lee, Young Shin; Kim, Duck Hoi; Park, No Seok; Suh, Jeong; Kim, Jeng O.; Il Moon, Soon

    2004-01-01

    Thermal shock is a physical phenomenon that occurs during the exposure to rapidly high temperature and pressure changes or during quenching of a material. The rocket nozzle throat is exposed to combustion gas of high temperature. Therefore, it is important to select suitable materials having the appropriate thermal shock resistance and to evaluate these materials for rocket nozzle design. The material of this study is ATJ graphite, which is the candidate material for rocket nozzle throat. This study presents an experimental method to evaluate the thermal shock resistance and thermal shock fracture toughness of ATJ graphite using laser irradiation. In particular, thermal shock resistance tests are conducted with changes of specimen thickness, with laser source irradiated at the center of the specimen. Temperature distributions on the specimen surface are detected using type K and C thermocouples. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) is used to observe the thermal cracks on specimen surface

  19. Material physical properties of 11Cr-ferritic/martensitic steel (PNC-FMS) wrapper tube materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Yasuhide; Kaito, Takeji; Ohtsuka, Satoshi; Tanno, Takashi; Uwaba, Tomoyuki; Koyama, Shinichi

    2012-09-01

    It is necessary to develop core materials for fast reactors in order to achieve high-burnup. Ferritic steels are expected to be good candidate core materials to achieve this objective because of their excellent void swelling resistance. Therefore, oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel and 11Cr-ferritic/martensitic steel (PNC-FMS) have been respectively developed for cladding and wrapper tube materials in Japan Atomic Energy Agency. In this study, various physical properties of PNC-FMS wrapper materials were measured and equations and future standard measurement technique of physical properties for the design and evaluation were conducted. (author)

  20. Thermal shock resistances of a bonding material of C/C composite and copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurumada, Akira; Oku, Tatsuo; Kawamata, Kiyohiro; Motojima, Osamu; Noda, Nobuaki; McEnaney, B.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to contribute to the development and the safety design of plasma facing components for fusion reactor devices. We evaluated the thermal shock resistance and the thermal shock fracture toughness of a bonding material which was jointed a carbon-fiber-reinforced carbon composite (C/C composite) to oxygen-free copper. We also examined the microstructures of the bonding layers using a scanning electron microscope before and after thermal shock tests. The bonding material did not fracture during thermal shock tests. However, thermal cracks and delamination cracks were observed in the bonding layers. (author)

  1. Adaptive mesh refinement for shocks and material interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, William Wenlong [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    There are three kinds of adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) in structured meshes. Block-based AMR sometimes over refines meshes. Cell-based AMR treats cells cell by cell and thus loses the advantage of the nature of structured meshes. Patch-based AMR is intended to combine advantages of block- and cell-based AMR, i.e., the nature of structured meshes and sharp regions of refinement. But, patch-based AMR has its own difficulties. For example, patch-based AMR typically cannot preserve symmetries of physics problems. In this paper, we will present an approach for a patch-based AMR for hydrodynamics simulations. The approach consists of clustering, symmetry preserving, mesh continuity, flux correction, communications, management of patches, and load balance. The special features of this patch-based AMR include symmetry preserving, efficiency of refinement across shock fronts and material interfaces, special implementation of flux correction, and patch management in parallel computing environments. To demonstrate the capability of the AMR framework, we will show both two- and three-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations with many levels of refinement.

  2. Kinetics of the Thermal Decomposition of Tetramethylsilane behind the Reflected Shock Waves in a Single Pulse Shock Tube (SPST) and Modeling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parandaman, A.; Sudhakar, G.; Rajakumar, B.

    Thermal reactions of Tetramethylsilane (TMS) diluted in argon were studied behind the reflected shock waves in a single-pulse shock tube (SPST) over the temperature range of 1085-1221 K and pressures varied between 10.6 and 22.8 atm. The stable products resulting from the decomposition of TMS were identified and quantified using gas chromatography and also verified with Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. The major reaction products are methane (CH4) and ethylene (C2H4). The minor reaction products are ethane (C2H6) and propylene (C3H6). The initiation of mechanism in the decomposition of TMS takes plays via the Si-C bond scission by ejecting the methyl radicals (CH3) and trimethylsilyl radicals ((CH3)3Si). The measured temperature dependent rate coefficient for the total decomposition of TMS was to be ktotal = 1.66 ×1015 exp (-64.46/RT) s-1 and for the formation of CH4 reaction channel was to be k = 2.20 × 1014 exp (-60.15/RT) s-1, where the activation energies are given in kcal mol-1. A kinetic scheme containing 17 species and 28 elementary reactions was used for the simulation using chemical kinetic simulator over the temperature range of 1085-1221 K. The agreement between the experimental and simulated results was satisfactory.

  3. Mechanical strength evaluation of the glass base material in the JRR-3 neutron guide tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Tetsuya [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-02-01

    The lifetime of the thermal neutron guide tube installed JRR-3 was investigated after 6 years from their first installation. And it was confirmed that a crack had been piercing into the glass base material of the side plate of the neutron guide tube. The cause of the crack was estimated as a static fatigue of the guide tube where an inside of the tube had been evacuated and stressed as well as an embrittlement of the glass base material by gamma ray irradiation. In this report, we evaluate the mechanical strength of the glass base material and estimate the time when the base material gets fatigue fracture. Furthermore, we evaluate a lifetime of the neutron guide tube and confirm the validity of update timing in 2000 and 2001 when the thermal neutron guide tubes T1 and T2 were exchanged into those using the super mirror. (author)

  4. A microstructural investigation of shock-loading effects in FCC materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohatgi, Aashish

    A systematic investigation of the influence of stacking fault energy (SFE) on shock loading effects in Cu and Cu-Al alloys has been conducted. Shock deformation in many materials is known to produce dislocation density in excess of that produced by quasi-static deformation to an equivalent strain. If the shock pressure is high enough and/or the SFE of the material is low enough, shock loading may also generate deformation twins. Both dislocations and deformation twins contribute to the post-shock strength of the material. Cu and a series of Cu-Al alloys with increasing Al contents were shock deformed at pressures of 10 and 35 GPa with a pulse duration of 1 mus each. The materials showed shock-strengthening which decreased with decreasing SFE. The twin component of post-shock strength was found to increase with decreasing SFE, while the dislocation component concurrently decreased. Since slip and twinning are competing phenomena, a greater propensity for twinning at lower SFE results in the shock-strain in low SFE materials being accommodated preferentially by twinning than by slip. Thus, the dislocation density in a twinned material is lower than if the deformation was accommodated entirely by slip. Additionally, as low SFE hinders cross-slip, a low SFE material shows a large Bauschinger effect and is unable to store additional dislocation line-length resulting in a lower dislocation density than in a similarly deformed high SFE material. The stored energy of materials shock-deformed to the same peak shock pressure was measured using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and was found to decrease with decreasing SFE. Using the stored energy data and a known value of energy per unit length of a dislocation, the stored dislocation density was found to decrease with decreasing SFE. It is suggested that the deformation twin boundaries are not as effective strengtheners, as dislocation-dislocation interactions. As a result of the lower strengthening efficiency but a

  5. Unusual behaviour of usual materials in shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanel, G I

    2014-01-01

    Exotic results of investigations of inelastic deformation and fracture under shock wave loading are presented and briefly discussed. Temperature effects on the flow stress at high strain rate may differ even in sign from those we observe at low and moderate strain rates. Investigations of the temperature-rate dependence of the yield stress at shock compression demonstrate intense multiplication of dislocations. At the highest strain rates, so-called ideal (ultimate) shear and tensile strength is reached in experiments with picosecond durations of shock loading. Although grain boundaries, in general, reduce resistance to fracture as compared to single crystals, the spall strength of ultra-fine-grained metals usually slightly exceeds that of coarse-grain samples. Failure wave phenomena have been observed in shock-compressed glasses.

  6. Crack resistance curves determination of tube cladding material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertsch, J. [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)]. E-mail: johannes.bertsch@psi.ch; Hoffelner, W. [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2006-06-30

    Zirconium based alloys have been in use as fuel cladding material in light water reactors since many years. As claddings change their mechanical properties during service, it is essential for the assessment of mechanical integrity to provide parameters for potential rupture behaviour. Usually, fracture mechanics parameters like the fracture toughness K {sub IC} or, for high plastic strains, the J-integral based elastic-plastic fracture toughness J {sub IC} are employed. In claddings with a very small wall thickness the determination of toughness needs the extension of the J-concept beyond limits of standards. In the paper a new method based on the traditional J approach is presented. Crack resistance curves (J-R curves) were created for unirradiated thin walled Zircaloy-4 and aluminium cladding tube pieces at room temperature using the single sample method. The procedure of creating sharp fatigue starter cracks with respect to optical recording was optimized. It is shown that the chosen test method is appropriate for the determination of complete J-R curves including the values J {sub 0.2} (J at 0.2 mm crack length), J {sub m} (J corresponding to the maximum load) and the slope of the curve.

  7. Influence of Test Section Geometry on the Blast Environment in an Explosively Driven Conical Shock Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-30

    ARL-TR-8335•MAR 2018 US Army Research Laboratory Influence of Test Section Geometry on theBlast Environment in an Explosively DrivenConical Shock...ARL-TR-8335•MAR 2018 US Army Research Laboratory Influence of Test Section Geometry on theBlast Environment in an Explosively DrivenConical Shock...TITLE AND SUBTITLE    5a. CONTRACT NUMBER  5b. GRANT NUMBER  5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S)    5d.  PROJECT  NUMBER  5e. TASK NUMBER  5f

  8. Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of Shock-Induced Reactions in Energetic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kay, Jeffrey J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Park, Samuel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kohl, Ian Thomas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Knepper, Robert [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Farrow, Darcie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Tappan, Alexander S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    In this work, shock-induced reactions in high explosives and their chemical mechanisms were investigated using state-of-the-art experimental and theoretical techniques. Experimentally, ultrafast shock interrogation (USI, an ultrafast interferometry technique) and ultrafast absorption spectroscopy were used to interrogate shock compression and initiation of reaction on the picosecond timescale. The experiments yielded important new data that appear to indicate reaction of high explosives on the timescale of tens of picoseconds in response to shock compression, potentially setting new upper limits on the timescale of reaction. Theoretically, chemical mechanisms of shock-induced reactions were investigated using density functional theory. The calculations generated important insights regarding the ability of several hypothesized mechanisms to account for shock-induced reactions in explosive materials. The results of this work constitute significant advances in our understanding of the fundamental chemical reaction mechanisms that control explosive sensitivity and initiation of detonation.

  9. Synthesis of Carbon Nano tubes: A Revolution in Material Science for the Twenty-First Century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allaf, Abd. W.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work is to explain the preparation procedures of single walled carbon nano tubes using arc discharge technique. The optimum conditions of carbon nano tubes synthesis are given. It should be pointed out that this sort of materials would be the twenty-first century materials

  10. Correlation of physical properties of ceramic materials with resistance to fracture by thermal shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidman, W G; Bobrowsky, A R

    1949-01-01

    An analysis is made to determine which properties of materials affect their resistance to fracture by thermal stresses.From this analysis, a parameter is evaluated that is correlated with the resistance of ceramic materials to fracture by thermal shock as experimentally determined. This parameter may be used to predict qualitatively the resistance of a material to fracture by thermal shock. Resistance to fracture by thermal shock is shown to be dependent upon the following material properties: thermal conductivity, tensile strength, thermal expansion, and ductility modulus. For qualitative prediction of resistance of materials to fracture by thermal shock, the parameter may be expressed as the product of thermal conductivity and tensile strength divided by the product of linear coefficient of thermal expansion and ductility modulus of the specimen.

  11. Packaging material and flexible medical tubing containing thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A packaging material or flexible medical tubing containing a modified graphite oxide material, which is a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 m.sup.2/g to 2600 m.sup.2/g.

  12. Shock-Induced and Shock-Assisted Reaction Synthesis of Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thadhani, N. N

    1997-01-01

    The beneficial effects of shock-compression of powders and solid-state chemical reactions were utilized to synthesize Ti-Si and Ti-A1 intermetallics, Ti-B and Ti-C ceramics, and Ti-Si:Ti-A1 composites...

  13. A study of shock mitigating materials in a split Hopkinson bar configuration. Phase 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.; Hansen, N.R.

    1997-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) designs mechanical systems with electronics that must survive high shock environments. These mechanical systems include penetrators that must survive soil and rock penetration, nuclear transportation casks that must survive transportation environments, and laydown weapons that must survive delivery impact. These mechanical systems contain electronics that may operate during and after the high shock environment and that must be protected from the high shock environments. A study has been started to improve the packaging techniques for the advanced electronics utilized in these mechanical systems because current packaging techniques are inadequate for these sensitive electronics. In many cases, it has been found that the packaging techniques currently used not only do not mitigate the shock environment but actually amplify the shock environment. An ambitious goal for this packaging study is to avoid amplification and possibly attenuate the shock environment before it reached the electronics contained in the various mechanical systems. Here, a study to compare two thickness values, 0.125 and 0.250 in. of five materials, GE RTV 630, HS II Silicone, Polysulfide Rubber, Sylgard 184, and Teflon for their shock mitigating characteristics with a split Hopkinson bar configuration has been completed. The five materials have been tested in both unconfined and confined conditions at ambient temperature and with two applied loads of 750 με peak (25 fps peak) with a 100 micros duration, measured at 10% amplitude, and 1500 με peak (50 fps peak) with a 100 micros duration, measured at 10% amplitude. The five materials have been tested at ambient, cold (-65 F), and hot (+165 F) for the unconfined condition with the 750 με peak (25 fps peak) applied load. Time domain and frequency domain analyses of the split Hopkinson bar data have been performed to compare how these materials lengthen the shock pulse, attenuate the shock pulse, reflect high

  14. A study of shock mitigating materials in a split Hopkinson bar configuration. Phase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.; Hansen, N.R.

    1998-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) designs mechanical systems with electronics that must survive high shock environments. These mechanical systems include penetrators that must survive soil, rock, and ice penetration, nuclear transportation casks that must survive transportation environments, and laydown weapons that must survive delivery impact of 125 fps. These mechanical systems contain electronics that may operate during and after the high shock environment and that must be protected from the high shock environments. A study has been started to improve the packaging techniques for the advanced electronics utilized in these mechanical systems because current packaging techniques are inadequate for these more sensitive electronics. In many cases, it has been found that the packaging techniques currently used not only do not mitigate the shock environment but actually amplify the shock environment. An ambitious goal for this packaging study is to avoid amplification and possibly attenuate the shock environment before it reaches the electronics contained in the various mechanical systems. As part of the investigation of packaging techniques, a two phase study of shock mitigating materials is being conducted. The purpose of the first phase reported here is to examine the performance of a joint that consists of shock mitigating material sandwiched in between steel and to compare the performance of the shock mitigating materials. A split Hopkinson bar experimental configuration simulates this joint and has been used to study the shock mitigating characteristics of seventeen, unconfined materials. The nominal input for these tests is an incident compressive wave with 50 fps peak (1,500 micro var-epsilon peak) amplitude and a 100 micros duration (measured at 10% amplitude)

  15. Development of a General Shocked-Materials-Response Description for Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven M. Valone

    2000-07-01

    This report outlines broad modeling issues pertaining to polymeric materials behavior under detonation conditions. Models applicable system wide are necessary to cope with the broad range of polymers and complex composite forms that can appear in Laboratory weapons systems. Nine major topics are discussed to span the breadth of materials, forms, and physical phenomena encountered when shocking polymers and foams over wide ranges of temperatures, pressures, shock strengths, confinement conditions, and geometries. The recommendations for directions of more intensive investigation consider physical fidelity, computational complexity, and application over widely varying physical conditions of temperature, pressure, and shock strength.

  16. Precise optical observation of 0.5-GPa shock waves in condensed materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Kunihito; Mori, Yasuhito

    1999-06-01

    Precision optical observation method was developed to study impact-generated high-pressure shock waves in condensed materials. The present method makes it possible to sensitively detect the shock waves of the relatively low shock stress around 0.5 GPa. The principle of the present method is based on the use of total internal reflection by triangular prisms placed on the free surface of a target assembly. When a plane shock wave arrives at the free surface, the light reflected from the prisms extinguishes instantaneously. The reason is that the total internal reflection changes to the reflection depending on micron roughness of the free surface after the shock arrival. The shock arrival at the bottom face of the prisms can be detected here by two kinds of methods, i.e., a photographic method and a gauge method. The photographic method is an inclined prism method of using a high-speed streak camera. The shock velocity and the shock tilt angle can be estimated accurately from an obtained streak photograph. While in the gauge method, an in-material PVDF stress gauge is combined with an optical prism-pin. The PVDF gauge records electrically the stress profile behind the shockwave front, and the Hugoniot data can be precisely measured by combining the prism pin with the PVDF gauge.

  17. Biophysical analysis of bacterial and viral systems. A shock tube study of bio-aerosols and a correlated AFM/nanosims investigation of vaccinia virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gates, Sean Damien [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2013-05-01

    The work presented herein is concerned with the development of biophysical methodology designed to address pertinent questions regarding the behavior and structure of select pathogenic agents. Two distinct studies are documented: a shock tube analysis of endospore-laden bio-aerosols and a correlated AFM/NanoSIMS study of the structure of vaccinia virus.

  18. The Shock and Vibration Bulletin. Part 4. Dynamic Properties of Materials, Applications of Materials, Shock and Blast, Fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    individual m.crophone readings using the following standard formula: SPI- AVE " ,0 LOG ( S lOSPM/lo/n) i*I ’ where: SPLAVE " Sound pressure...Godes- berg 1975 |4| NEIER-DemBERG. K.-E.i ’Reference Pa- rameters for Shock Inputs and Shock Tolerance Limits. ACARO Conference Proceedings No...occurrence In the Polsson counting process, equals v.{t), the av - erage barrier crossing rate of the response ran- dom process for a barrier with

  19. Study of a nonlinear system with shocks under broadband excitation. Application to a steam generator tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thenint, Th.

    2011-01-01

    The steam generator is a heat exchanger and participates to the nuclear safety. Energy is transferred from the primary to the secondary fluid through many U-tubes maintained vertically by support plates. A sludge deposit tends to modify the boundary conditions and the secondary fluid flow. A fluid-elastic instability can then occur and lead to quick tube ruin. This thesis seeks a better understanding of the effect of contact nonlinearity on the dynamics of a tube in-air intermittently impacting the support plates and its consequences in regards with instability. The use of discretized contact conditions with circular obstacles distributed over the thickness of the plates and the use of enriched reduction bases allow quick and relevant nonlinear numerical simulations. These simulations are well correlated with experimental measurements and valid even with strong nonlinearity or negative modal damping. The evolution of power spectral densities (PSD) with growing excitation amplitude is analyzed: padding of the anti-resonances, peak shift and spread. It is then shown that an apparent stiffness associated with a permanent bilateral contact is pertinent to describe these transitions. In the case of an unstable linear system, one demonstrates that the nonlinearity keeps the responses bounded or stabilised, thus paving the way for future work with real or simulated fluid flows. (author)

  20. Efek Perbedaan Jumlah dan Material Tube pada Distribusi Temperatur Tube Heat Exchanger dalam Kompor (Studi Kasus Di Industri Tempe Kecamatan Tenggilis Mejoyo Surabaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putu Angga Kristyawan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Pemakaian heat exchanger pada kompor industri tempe di kelurahan Tenggilis Mejoyo Surabaya mengaplikasikan tube heat exchanger dengan jumlah tube 4 dan material tembaga. Pada pemakaian awal mampu memperlama penggunaan bahan bakar hingga 3 hari. Proses produksi heat exchanger memerlukan biaya hingga 2,5 juta rupiah. Untuk dapat mengatasi masalah tersebut maka dilakukan penelitian tentang performansi heat exchanger dengan memvariasikan material dan jumlah tube. Masalah ini disimulasikan dengan computational fluid dynamics. Simulasi dilakukan pada jumlah grid 388149 dan model turbulensi dengan nilai deviasi terhadap temperatur ukur sebesar 1,0%. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa performansi dengan jumlah tube 6 dan material besi memiliki performansi yang hanya berbeda sebesar 2395,188 Watt dan nilai temperatur keluaran hanya berbeda 2,338 K dengan 4 tube tembaga. Nilai investasi 6 tube besi juga lebih rendah dibandingkan dengan 4 tube tembaga senilai Rp 4.335.866,00 dan perbedaan nilai payback period hingga 4,22 bulan.

  1. Self-consistent technique for estimating the dynamic yield strength of a shock-loaded material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asay, J.R.; Lipkin, J.

    1978-01-01

    A technique is described for estimating the dynamic yield stress in a shocked material. This method employs reloading and unloading data from a shocked state along with a general assumption of yield and hardening behavior to estimate the yield stress in the precompressed state. No other data are necessary for this evaluation, and, therefore, the method has general applicability at high shock pressures and in materials undergoing phase transitions. In some special cases, it is also possible to estimate the complete state of stress in a shocked state. Using this method, the dynamic yield strength of aluminum at 2.06 GPa has been estimated to be 0.26 GPa. This value agrees reasonably well with previous estimates

  2. A survey on the corrosion susceptibility of Alloy 800 CANDU steam generator tubing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Y.C.; Dupuis, M.; Burns, D.

    2008-01-01

    To provide support for a proactive steam generator (SG) aging management strategy, a survey on the corrosion susceptibility of the archived Alloy 800 tubing from CANDU SGs under plausible crevice chemistry conditions was conducted to assess the potential material degradation issues in CANDU SGs. Archived Alloy 800 samples were collected from four CANDU utilities. High-temperature electrochemical analysis was carried out to assess the corrosion susceptibility of the archived SG tubing under simulated CANDU crevice chemistry conditions at both 150 o C and 300 o C. The potentiodynamic polarization results obtained from the archived CANDU SG tubes were compared to the data from ex-service tubes removed from Darlington Nuclear Generating Station (DNGS) SGs and a reference nuclear grade Alloy 800 tubing. It was found that the removed Darlington SG tubes, with signs of in-service degradation, were more susceptible to pitting corrosion than the reference nuclear grade Alloy 800 tubing. At 150 o C, under the same neutral crevice chemistry conditions, the potentiodynamic polarization curve of the ex-service Darlington SG tubing has an active peak, which is a sign of propensity to crevice/underdeposit corrosion. This active peak was not observed in any of the potentiodynamic polarization curves of all archived Alloy 800 CANDU SG tubing indicating that archived CANDU SG tubes are less susceptible to the underdeposit corrosion under SG startup conditions. The corrosion behaviour of the archived Alloy 800 tubes from CANDU SG was similar to that of the reference nuclear grade Alloy 800 tubing. The results of this survey suggest that the Alloy 800 tubing materials used in the existing CANDU utilities (other than ex-service DNGS tubing) will continue to have reliable performance under specified CANDU operating conditions. Ex-service SG tubing from DNGS, although showing lower than average corrosion resistance, still has a wide acceptable operating margin and the in

  3. Dynamical Effects in Metal-Organic Frameworks: The Microporous Materials as Shock Absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banlusan, Kiettipong; Strachan, Alejandro

    2017-06-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are a class of nano-porous crystalline solids consisting of inorganic units coordinated to organic linkers. The unique molecular structures and outstanding properties with ultra-high porosity and tunable chemical functionality by various choices of metal clusters and organic ligands make this class of materials attractive for many applications. The complex and quite unique responses of these materials to mechanical loading including void collapse make them attractive for applications in energy absorption and storage. We will present using large-scale molecular dynamics simulations to investigate shock propagation in zeolitic imidazolate framework ZIF-8 and MOF-5. We find that for shock strengths above a threshold a two-wave structure develops with a leading elastic precursor followed by a second wave of structural collapse to relax the stress. Structural transition of MOFs in response to shock waves corresponds to the transition between two Hugoniot curves, and results in abrupt change in temperature. The pore-collapse wave propagates at slower velocity than the leading wave and weakens it, resulting in shock attenuation. Increasing piston speed results in faster propagation of pore-collapse wave, but the leading elastic wave remains unchanged below the overdriven regime. We discuss how the molecular structure of the MOFs and shock propagation direction affect the response of the materials and their ability to weaken shocks. Office of Naval Research, MURI 2012 02341 01.

  4. Delayed hydride cracking and elastic properties of Excel, a candidate CANDU-SCWR pressure tube material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Z.L.

    2010-01-01

    Excel, a Zr alloy which contains 3.5%Sn, 0.8%Nb and 0.8%Mo, shows high strength, good corrosion resistance, excellent creep-resistance and dimension stability and thus is selected as a candidate pressure tube material for CANDU-SCWR. In the present work, the delayed hydride cracking properties (K IH and the DHC growth rates), the hydrogen solubility and elastic modulus were measured in the irradiated and unirradiated Excel pressure tube material. (author)

  5. A hierarchical method for Bayesian inference of rate parameters from shock tube data: Application to the study of the reaction of hydroxyl with 2-methylfuran

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Daesang

    2017-06-22

    We developed a novel two-step hierarchical method for the Bayesian inference of the rate parameters of a target reaction from time-resolved concentration measurements in shock tubes. The method was applied to the calibration of the parameters of the reaction of hydroxyl with 2-methylfuran, which is studied experimentally via absorption measurements of the OH radical\\'s concentration following shock-heating. In the first step of the approach, each shock tube experiment is treated independently to infer the posterior distribution of the rate constant and error hyper-parameter that best explains the OH signal. In the second step, these posterior distributions are sampled to calibrate the parameters appearing in the Arrhenius reaction model for the rate constant. Furthermore, the second step is modified and repeated in order to explore alternative rate constant models and to assess the effect of uncertainties in the reflected shock\\'s temperature. Comparisons of the estimates obtained via the proposed methodology against the common least squares approach are presented. The relative merits of the novel Bayesian framework are highlighted, especially with respect to the opportunity to utilize the posterior distributions of the parameters in future uncertainty quantification studies.

  6. Violent flows in aqueous foams III: physical multi-phase model comparison with aqueous foam shock tube experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redford, J. A.; Ghidaglia, J.-M.; Faure, S.

    2018-06-01

    Mitigation of blast waves in aqueous foams is a problem that has a strong dependence on multi-phase effects. Here, a simplified model is developed from the previous articles treating violent flows (D'Alesio et al. in Eur J Mech B Fluids 54:105-124, 2015; Faure and Ghidaglia in Eur J Mech B Fluids 30:341-359, 2011) to capture the essential phenomena. The key is to have two fluids with separate velocities to represent the liquid and gas phases. This allows for the interaction between the two phases, which may include terms for drag, heat transfer, mass transfer due to phase change, added mass effects, to be included explicitly in the model. A good test for the proposed model is provided by two experimental data sets that use a specially designed shock tube. The first experiment has a test section filled with spray droplets, and the second has a range of aqueous foams in the test section. A substantial attenuation of the shock wave is seen in both cases, but a large difference is observed in the sound speeds. The droplets cause no observable change from the air sound speed, while the foams have a reduced sound speed of approximately 50-75 m/s . In the model given here, an added mass term is introduced in the governing equations to capture the low sound speed. The match between simulation and experiment is found to be satisfactory for both droplets and the foam. This is especially good when considering the complexity of the physics and the effects that are unaccounted for, such as three-dimensionality and droplet atomisation. The resulting statistics illuminate the processes occurring in such flows.

  7. Optimal Bayesian experimental design for priors of compact support with application to shock-tube experiments for combustion kinetics

    KAUST Repository

    Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2016-01-12

    The analysis of reactive systems in combustion science and technology relies on detailed models comprising many chemical reactions that describe the conversion of fuel and oxidizer into products and the formation of pollutants. Shock-tube experiments are a convenient setting for measuring the rate parameters of individual reactions. The temperature, pressure, and concentration of reactants are chosen to maximize the sensitivity of the measured quantities to the rate parameter of the target reaction. In this study, we optimize the experimental setup computationally by optimal experimental design (OED) in a Bayesian framework. We approximate the posterior probability density functions (pdf) using truncated Gaussian distributions in order to account for the bounded domain of the uniform prior pdf of the parameters. The underlying Gaussian distribution is obtained in the spirit of the Laplace method, more precisely, the mode is chosen as the maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimate, and the covariance is chosen as the negative inverse of the Hessian of the misfit function at the MAP estimate. The model related entities are obtained from a polynomial surrogate. The optimality, quantified by the information gain measures, can be estimated efficiently by a rejection sampling algorithm against the underlying Gaussian probability distribution, rather than against the true posterior. This approach offers a significant error reduction when the magnitude of the invariants of the posterior covariance are comparable to the size of the bounded domain of the prior. We demonstrate the accuracy and superior computational efficiency of our method for shock-tube experiments aiming to measure the model parameters of a key reaction which is part of the complex kinetic network describing the hydrocarbon oxidation. In the experiments, the initial temperature and fuel concentration are optimized with respect to the expected information gain in the estimation of the parameters of the target

  8. Study on thermal and mechanical properties of U-tube materials for steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rheu, Woo Suk; Kang, Young Hwan; Park, Jong Man; Joo, Ki Nam; Kim, Sung Soo; Maeng, Wan Young; Park, Se Jin

    1993-01-01

    Most of domestic nuclear plants have used I600 TT material for steam generator U-tube, and piled up the field experience. I600 HTMA and I690 TT, however, are recommended for an alternative of U-tube by ABB-CE since YK-3 and 4. Field experience of I600 HTMA and I690 TT have not compiled in the country, so it is concerned to select the future materials for U-tube. Thus, database on the thermal and mechanical properties of U-tube materials is very necessary for design documentations. In this study, the thermal, mechanical and metallugical properties were tested and evaluated to establish the database for steam generator U-tube. In addition, thermal conductivity of I600 and I690 was measured and compared statistically, providing a basic document for applying I690 to U-tube. The results will be used to improve the manufacturing process in order to increase the integrity of U-tube. (Author)

  9. Influence of edge conditions on material ejection from periodic grooves in laser shock-loaded tin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rességuier, T. de; Roland, C. [Institut PPRIME, UPR 3346, CNRS, ENSMA, Université de Poitiers, 1 ave. Clément Ader, 86961 Futuroscope Cedex (France); Prudhomme, G.; Lescoute, E.; Mercier, P. [CEA, DAM, DIF, 91297 Arpajon (France); Loison, D. [Institut de Physique de Rennes, CNRS, Université de Rennes 1, 35042 Rennes (France)

    2016-05-14

    In a material subjected to high dynamic compression, the breakout of a shock wave at a rough free surface can lead to the ejection of high velocity debris. Anticipating the ballistic properties of such debris is a key safety issue in many applications involving shock loading, including pyrotechnics and inertial confinement fusion experiments. In this paper, we use laser driven shocks to investigate particle ejection from calibrated grooves of micrometric dimensions and approximately sinusoidal profile in tin samples, with various boundary conditions at the groove edges, including single groove and periodic patterns. Fast transverse shadowgraphy provides ejection velocities after shock breakout. They are found to depend not only on the groove depth and wavelength, as predicted theoretically and already observed in the past, but also, unexpectedly, on the edge conditions, with a jet tip velocity significantly lower in the case of a single groove than behind a periodic pattern.

  10. The velocity of the arterial pulse wave: a viscous-fluid shock wave in an elastic tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Page R

    2008-07-29

    The arterial pulse is a viscous-fluid shock wave that is initiated by blood ejected from the heart. This wave travels away from the heart at a speed termed the pulse wave velocity (PWV). The PWV increases during the course of a number of diseases, and this increase is often attributed to arterial stiffness. As the pulse wave approaches a point in an artery, the pressure rises as does the pressure gradient. This pressure gradient increases the rate of blood flow ahead of the wave. The rate of blood flow ahead of the wave decreases with distance because the pressure gradient also decreases with distance ahead of the wave. Consequently, the amount of blood per unit length in a segment of an artery increases ahead of the wave, and this increase stretches the wall of the artery. As a result, the tension in the wall increases, and this results in an increase in the pressure of blood in the artery. An expression for the PWV is derived from an equation describing the flow-pressure coupling (FPC) for a pulse wave in an incompressible, viscous fluid in an elastic tube. The initial increase in force of the fluid in the tube is described by an increasing exponential function of time. The relationship between force gradient and fluid flow is approximated by an expression known to hold for a rigid tube. For large arteries, the PWV derived by this method agrees with the Korteweg-Moens equation for the PWV in a non-viscous fluid. For small arteries, the PWV is approximately proportional to the Korteweg-Moens velocity divided by the radius of the artery. The PWV in small arteries is also predicted to increase when the specific rate of increase in pressure as a function of time decreases. This rate decreases with increasing myocardial ischemia, suggesting an explanation for the observation that an increase in the PWV is a predictor of future myocardial infarction. The derivation of the equation for the PWV that has been used for more than fifty years is analyzed and shown to yield

  11. A Shock Tube Study of the CO + OH Reaction Near the Low-Pressure Limit

    KAUST Repository

    Nasir, Ehson Fawad; Farooq, Aamir

    2016-01-01

    Rate coefficients for the reaction between carbon monoxide and hydroxyl radical were measured behind reflected shock waves over 700 – 1230 K and 1.2 – 9.8 bar. The temperature/pressure conditions correspond to the predicted low-pressure limit of this reaction, where the channel leading to carbon dioxide formation is dominant. The reaction rate coefficients were inferred by measuring the formation of carbon dioxide using quantum cascade laser absorption near 4.2 µm. Experiments were performed under pseudo-first order conditions with tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) as the OH precursor. Using ultraviolet laser absorption by OH radicals, the TBHP decomposition rate was measured to quantify potential facility effects under extremely dilute conditions used here. The measured CO + OH rate coefficients are provided in Arrhenius form for three different pressure ranges: kCO+OH (1.2 – 1.6 bar) = 9.14 x 10-13 exp(-1265/T) cm3 molecule-1 s-1 kCO+OH (4.3 – 5.1 bar) = 8.70 x 10-13 exp(-1156/T) cm3 molecule-1 s-1 kCO+OH (9.6 – 9.8 bar) = 7.48 x 10-13 exp(-929/T) cm3 molecule-1 s-1 The measured rate coefficients are found to be lower than the master equation modeling results by Weston et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A, 117 (2013) 821] at 819 K and in closer agreement with the expression provided by Joshi and Wang [Int. J. Chem. Kinet., 38 (2006) 57].

  12. A Shock Tube Study of the CO + OH Reaction Near the Low-Pressure Limit

    KAUST Repository

    Nasir, Ehson Fawad

    2016-05-16

    Rate coefficients for the reaction between carbon monoxide and hydroxyl radical were measured behind reflected shock waves over 700 – 1230 K and 1.2 – 9.8 bar. The temperature/pressure conditions correspond to the predicted low-pressure limit of this reaction, where the channel leading to carbon dioxide formation is dominant. The reaction rate coefficients were inferred by measuring the formation of carbon dioxide using quantum cascade laser absorption near 4.2 µm. Experiments were performed under pseudo-first order conditions with tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) as the OH precursor. Using ultraviolet laser absorption by OH radicals, the TBHP decomposition rate was measured to quantify potential facility effects under extremely dilute conditions used here. The measured CO + OH rate coefficients are provided in Arrhenius form for three different pressure ranges: kCO+OH (1.2 – 1.6 bar) = 9.14 x 10-13 exp(-1265/T) cm3 molecule-1 s-1 kCO+OH (4.3 – 5.1 bar) = 8.70 x 10-13 exp(-1156/T) cm3 molecule-1 s-1 kCO+OH (9.6 – 9.8 bar) = 7.48 x 10-13 exp(-929/T) cm3 molecule-1 s-1 The measured rate coefficients are found to be lower than the master equation modeling results by Weston et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A, 117 (2013) 821] at 819 K and in closer agreement with the expression provided by Joshi and Wang [Int. J. Chem. Kinet., 38 (2006) 57].

  13. An FSI Simulation of the Metal Panel Deflection in a Shock Tube Using Illinois Rocstar Simulation Suite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jung Hun; Sa, Jeong Hwan; Kim, Han Gi; Cho, Keum Won [Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    As the recent development of computing architecture and application software technology, real world simulation, which is the ultimate destination of computer simulation, is emerging as a practical issue in several research sectors. In this paper, metal plate motion in a square shock tube for small time interval was calculated using a supercomputing-based fluid-structure-combustion multi-physics simulation tool called Illinois Rocstar, developed in a US national R and D program at the University of Illinois. Afterwards, the simulation results were compared with those from experiments. The coupled solvers for unsteady compressible fluid dynamics and for structural analysis were based on the finite volume structured grid system and the large deformation linear elastic model, respectively. In addition, a strong correlation between calculation and experiment was shown, probably because of the predictor corrector time-integration scheme framework. In the future, additional validation studies and code improvements for higher accuracy will be conducted to obtain a reliable open-source software research tool.

  14. Anisotropic deformation of Zr–2.5Nb pressure tube material at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fong, R.W.L., E-mail: fongr@aecl.ca [Fuel and Fuel Channel Safety Branch, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-09-15

    Zr–2.5Nb alloy is used for the pressure tubes in CANDU® reactor fuel channels. In reactor, the pressure tube normally operates at 300 °C and experiences a primary coolant fluid internal pressure of approximately 10 MPa. Manufacturing and processing procedures generate an anisotropic state in the pressure tube which makes the tube stronger in the hoop (transverse) direction than in the axial (longitudinal) direction. This anisotropy condition is present for temperatures less than 500 °C. During postulated accident conditions where the material temperature could reach 1000 °C, it might be assumed that the high temperature and subsequent phase change would reduce the inherent anisotropy, and thus affect the deformation behaviour (ballooning) of the pressure tube. From constant-load, rapid-temperature-ramp, uniaxial deformation tests, the deformation rate in the longitudinal direction of the tube behaves differently than the deformation rate in the transverse direction of the tube. This anisotropic mechanical behaviour appears to persist at temperatures up to 1000 °C. This paper presents the results of high-temperature deformation tests using longitudinal and transverse specimens taken from as-received Zr–2.5Nb pressure tubes. It is shown that the anisotropic deformation behaviour observed at high temperatures is largely due to the stable crystallographic texture of the α-Zr phase constituent in the material that was previously observed by neutron diffraction measurements during heating at temperatures up to 1050 °C. The deformation behaviour is also influenced by the phase transformation occurring at high temperatures during heating. The effects of texture and phase transformation on the anisotropic deformation of as-received Zr–2.5Nb pressure tube material are discussed in the context of the tube ballooning behaviour. Because of the high temperatures in postulated accident scenarios, any irradiation damage will be annealed from the pressure tube material

  15. Unimolecular decomposition of formic and acetic acids: A shock tube/laser absorption study

    KAUST Repository

    Elwardany, A.

    2014-07-16

    The thermal decomposition of formic acid (HCOOH) and acetic acid (CH3COOH), two carboxylic acids which play an important role in oxygenate combustion chemistry, were investigated behind reflected shock waves using laser absorption. The rate constants of the primary decomposition pathways of these acids:(HCOOH → CO + H2 O (R 1); HCOOH → CO2 + H2 (R 2); CH3 COOH → CH4 + CO2 (R 3); CH3 COOH → CH2 CO + H2 O (R 4)) were measured using simultaneous infrared laser absorption of CO, CO2 and H2O at wavelengths of 4.56, 4.18 and 2.93 microns, respectively. Reaction test conditions covered temperatures from 1230 to 1821 K and pressures from 1.0 to 6.5 atm for dilute mixtures of acids (0.25-0.6%) in argon. The rate constants of dehydration (R1) and decarboxylation (R2) reactions of formic acid were calculated by fitting exponential functions to the measured CO, CO2 and H2O time-history profiles. These two decomposition channels were found to be in the fall-off region and have a branching ratio, k1/k2, of approximately 20 over the range of pressures studied here. The best-fit Arrhenius expressions of the first-order rates of R1 and R2 were found to be:(k1 (1 atm) = 1.03 × 1011 exp (- 25651 / T) s- 1 (± 37 %); k1 (6.5 atm) = 9.12 × 1012 exp (- 30275 / T) s- 1 (± 32 %); k2 (1 atm) = 1.79 × 108 exp (- 21133 / T) s- 1 (± 41 %); k2 (6.5 atm) = 2.73 × 108 exp (- 20074 / T) s- 1 (± 37 %)). The rate constants for acetic acid decomposition were obtained by fitting simulated profiles, using an acetic acid pyrolysis mechanism, to the measured species time-histories. The branching ratio, k4/k3, was found to be approximately 2. The decarboxylation and dehydration reactions of acetic acid appear to be in the falloff region over the tested pressure range:(k3 (1 atm) = 3.18 × 1011 exp (- 28679 / T) s- 1 (± 30 %); k3 (6 atm) = 3.51 × 1012 exp (- 31330 / T) s- 1 (± 26 %); k4 (1 atm) = 7.9 × 1011 exp (- 29056 / T) s- 1 (± 34 %); k4 (6 atm) = 6.34 × 1012 exp (- 31330 / T) s

  16. A shock tube study of C4–C6 straight chain alkenes + OH reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Khaled, Fathi

    2016-06-28

    Alkenes are known to be good octane boosters and they are major components of commercial fuels. Detailed theoretical calculations and direct kinetic measurements of elementary reactions of alkenes with combustion radicals are scarce for C4 alkenes and they are practically absent for C5 and larger alkenes. The overall rate coefficients for the reaction of OH radical with 1-butene (CH CHCH CH, k ), 1-pentene (CH CHCH CH-CH, k ), cis/trans 2-pentene (CH CHCHCH CH, k and k ), 1-hexene (CH CHCH CH CH CH, k ) and cis/trans 2-hexene (CH CHCHCH CH CH, k and k ) were measured behind reflected shock waves over the temperature range of 833-1377K and pressures near 1.5atm. The reaction progress was followed by measuring mole fraction of OH radicals near 306.7nm using UV laser absorption technique. It is found that the rate coefficients of OH+trans-2-alkenes are larger than those of OH+cis-2-alkenes, followed by OH+1-alkenes. The derived Arrhenius expressions for the overall rate coefficients (in cm.mol.s) are:. kI=(4.83±0.03)104.T2.72±0.01.exp(940.8±2.9cal/molRT)(946K-1256K) + kII=(5.66±0.54)10-1.T4.14±0.80.exp(4334±227cal/molRT)(875K-1379K) + kIII=(3.25±0.12)104.T2.76±0.5.exp(1962±83cal/molRT)(877K-1336K) + kIV=(3.42±0.09)104.T2.76±0.5.exp(1995±59cal/molRT)(833K-1265K) + kV=(7.65±0.58)10-4.T5±1.exp(5840±175cal/molRT)(836K-1387K) + kVI=(2.58±0.06)106.T2.17±0.37.exp(1461±55cal/molRT)(891K-1357K) + kVII=(3.08±0.05)106.T2.18±0.37.exp(1317±38cal/molRT)(881K-1377K) +

  17. Unimolecular decomposition of formic and acetic acids: A shock tube/laser absorption study

    KAUST Repository

    Elwardany, A.; Nasir, E.F.; Es-sebbar, Et-touhami; Farooq, Aamir

    2014-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of formic acid (HCOOH) and acetic acid (CH3COOH), two carboxylic acids which play an important role in oxygenate combustion chemistry, were investigated behind reflected shock waves using laser absorption. The rate constants of the primary decomposition pathways of these acids:(HCOOH → CO + H2 O (R 1); HCOOH → CO2 + H2 (R 2); CH3 COOH → CH4 + CO2 (R 3); CH3 COOH → CH2 CO + H2 O (R 4)) were measured using simultaneous infrared laser absorption of CO, CO2 and H2O at wavelengths of 4.56, 4.18 and 2.93 microns, respectively. Reaction test conditions covered temperatures from 1230 to 1821 K and pressures from 1.0 to 6.5 atm for dilute mixtures of acids (0.25-0.6%) in argon. The rate constants of dehydration (R1) and decarboxylation (R2) reactions of formic acid were calculated by fitting exponential functions to the measured CO, CO2 and H2O time-history profiles. These two decomposition channels were found to be in the fall-off region and have a branching ratio, k1/k2, of approximately 20 over the range of pressures studied here. The best-fit Arrhenius expressions of the first-order rates of R1 and R2 were found to be:(k1 (1 atm) = 1.03 × 1011 exp (- 25651 / T) s- 1 (± 37 %); k1 (6.5 atm) = 9.12 × 1012 exp (- 30275 / T) s- 1 (± 32 %); k2 (1 atm) = 1.79 × 108 exp (- 21133 / T) s- 1 (± 41 %); k2 (6.5 atm) = 2.73 × 108 exp (- 20074 / T) s- 1 (± 37 %)). The rate constants for acetic acid decomposition were obtained by fitting simulated profiles, using an acetic acid pyrolysis mechanism, to the measured species time-histories. The branching ratio, k4/k3, was found to be approximately 2. The decarboxylation and dehydration reactions of acetic acid appear to be in the falloff region over the tested pressure range:(k3 (1 atm) = 3.18 × 1011 exp (- 28679 / T) s- 1 (± 30 %); k3 (6 atm) = 3.51 × 1012 exp (- 31330 / T) s- 1 (± 26 %); k4 (1 atm) = 7.9 × 1011 exp (- 29056 / T) s- 1 (± 34 %); k4 (6 atm) = 6.34 × 1012 exp (- 31330 / T) s

  18. Shock tube measurements of the rate constants for seven large alkanes+OH

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad

    2015-01-01

    Reaction rate constants for seven large alkanes + hydroxyl (OH) radicals were measured behind reflected shock waves using OH laser absorption. The alkanes, n-hexane, 2-methyl-pentane, 3-methyl-pentane, 2,2-dimethyl-butane, 2,3-dimethyl-butane, 2-methyl-heptane, and 4-methyl-heptane, were selected to investigate the rates of site-specific H-abstraction by OH at secondary and tertiary carbons. Hydroxyl radicals were monitored using narrow-line-width ring-dye laser absorption of the R1(5) transition of the OH spectrum near 306.7 nm. The high sensitivity of the diagnostic enabled the use of low reactant concentrations and pseudo-first-order kinetics. Rate constants were measured at temperatures ranging from 880 K to 1440 K and pressures near 1.5 atm. High-temperature measurements of the rate constants for OH + n-hexane and OH + 2,2-dimethyl-butane are in agreement with earlier studies, and the rate constants of the five other alkanes with OH, we believe, are the first direct measurements at combustion temperatures. Using these measurements and the site-specific H-abstraction measurements of Sivaramakrishnan and Michael (2009) [1,2], general expressions for three secondary and two tertiary abstraction rates were determined as follows (the subscripts indicate the number of carbon atoms bonded to the next-nearest-neighbor carbon): S20=1.58×10-11exp(-1550K/T)cm3molecule-1s-1(887-1327K)S30=2.37×10-11exp(-1850K/T)cm3molecule-1s-1(887-1327K)S21=4.5×10-12exp(-793.7K/T)cm3molecule-1s-1(833-1440K)T100=2.85×10-11exp(-1138.3K/T)cm3molecule-1s-1(878-1375K)T101=7.16×10-12exp(-993K/T)cm3molecule-1s-1(883-1362K) © 2014 The Combustion Institute.

  19. A shock tube study of the branching ratios of propene + OH reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad

    2014-12-01

    Absolute rate coefficients for the reaction of the OH radical with propene (C3H6) and five deuterated isotopes, propene-1-D1 (CDHCHCH3), propene-1,1-D2 (CD2CHCH3), propene-1,1,2-D3 (CD2CDCH3), propene-3,3,3-D3 (CH2CHCD3), and propene-D6 (C3D6), were measured behind reflected shock waves over the temperature range of 818-1460 K and pressures near 1 atm. The reaction progress was followed by monitoring the OH radical near 306.7 nm using UV laser absorption. Kinetic isotope effects in the measured rate coefficients are discussed and rationalized for the site-specific H-abstraction by the OH radical. The first experimental measurements for the branching ratio of the title reaction are reported and compared with transition state theory calculations. The allylic H-atom abstraction of propene by OH radicals was found to be the most dominant reaction pathway followed by propen-1-yl and propen-2-yl channels over the entire temperature range of this study. The derived Arrhenius expressions for various site-specific rate coefficients over 818-1442 K are (the subscript in the rate coefficient identifies the position of H or D atom according to the IUPAC nomenclature of alkenes):k3,H = 2.32 × 10-11 exp(-2341 K/T) cm3 molecule-1 s-1k3,D = 1.96 × 10-11 exp(-2420 K/T) cm3 molecule-1 s-1k1,H = 1.39 × 10-11 exp(-2270 K/T) cm3 molecule-1 s-1k1,D = 1.95 × 10-11 exp(-2868 K/T) cm3 molecule-1 s-1k2,H = 7.2 × 10-12 exp(-2282 K/T) cm3 molecule-1 s-1k2,D = 7.69 × 10-12 exp(-2575 K/T) cm3 molecule-1 s-1 This journal is

  20. A shock tube study of C4–C6 straight chain alkenes + OH reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Khaled, Fathi; Badra, Jihad; Farooq, Aamir

    2016-01-01

    Alkenes are known to be good octane boosters and they are major components of commercial fuels. Detailed theoretical calculations and direct kinetic measurements of elementary reactions of alkenes with combustion radicals are scarce for C4 alkenes and they are practically absent for C5 and larger alkenes. The overall rate coefficients for the reaction of OH radical with 1-butene (CH CHCH CH, k ), 1-pentene (CH CHCH CH-CH, k ), cis/trans 2-pentene (CH CHCHCH CH, k and k ), 1-hexene (CH CHCH CH CH CH, k ) and cis/trans 2-hexene (CH CHCHCH CH CH, k and k ) were measured behind reflected shock waves over the temperature range of 833-1377K and pressures near 1.5atm. The reaction progress was followed by measuring mole fraction of OH radicals near 306.7nm using UV laser absorption technique. It is found that the rate coefficients of OH+trans-2-alkenes are larger than those of OH+cis-2-alkenes, followed by OH+1-alkenes. The derived Arrhenius expressions for the overall rate coefficients (in cm.mol.s) are:. kI=(4.83±0.03)104.T2.72±0.01.exp(940.8±2.9cal/molRT)(946K-1256K) + kII=(5.66±0.54)10-1.T4.14±0.80.exp(4334±227cal/molRT)(875K-1379K) + kIII=(3.25±0.12)104.T2.76±0.5.exp(1962±83cal/molRT)(877K-1336K) + kIV=(3.42±0.09)104.T2.76±0.5.exp(1995±59cal/molRT)(833K-1265K) + kV=(7.65±0.58)10-4.T5±1.exp(5840±175cal/molRT)(836K-1387K) + kVI=(2.58±0.06)106.T2.17±0.37.exp(1461±55cal/molRT)(891K-1357K) + kVII=(3.08±0.05)106.T2.18±0.37.exp(1317±38cal/molRT)(881K-1377K) +

  1. A Comparative Study of the Behaviour of Five Dense Glass Materials Under Shock Loading Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radford, Darren D.; Proud, William G.; Field, John E.

    2001-06-01

    Previous work at the Cavendish Laboratory on the properties of glasses under shock loading has demonstrated that the material response is highly dependent upon the composition of the glass. The shock response of glass materials with an open structure, such as borosilicate, exhibits a ramping behaviour in the longitudinal stress histories due to structural collapse. Glass materials with a “filled” microstructure, as in the case of Type-D, Extra Dense Flint (DEDF) do not exhibit a ramping behaviour and behave in a manner similar to polycrystalline ceramics [1]. The current investigation compares the behaviour of five such glasses (SF15, DEDF, LACA, SF57 and DEDF-927210) under shock loading conditions. It is observed that slight changes in material composition can have a large affect on the inelastic behaviour. Principal Hugoniot and shear strength data are presented for all of the materials for pressures ranging from 2 to 14 GPa. Evidence of the so-called failure-front [2] is presented via lateral stress histories measured using manganin stress gauges and confirmed with high-speed photography. 1. Bourne, N.K., Millett, J.C.F., and Field, J.E., “On the strength of shocked glasses” Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 455 (1999) 1275-1282 2. Brar, N.S., “Failure Waves in Glass and Ceramics Under Shock Compression”, in "Shock Compression of Condensed Matter 1999", ed. M.D. Furnish, L.C. Chhabildas, and R.S. Hixson, American Institute of Physics, Woodbury, New York, (1999) 601-606

  2. Evaluation on mechanical and corrosion properties of steam generator tubing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Sup; Lee, Byong Whi; Lee, Sang Kyu; Lee, Young Ho; Kim, Jun Whan; Lee, Ju Seok; Kwon, Hyuk Sang; Kim, Su Jung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-06-15

    Steam generator is one of the major components of nuclear reactor pressure boundary. It's main function os transferring heat which generated in the reactor to turbine generator through steam generator tube. In these days, steam generator tubing materials of operating plant are used Inconel 600 alloys. But according to the operation time, there are many degradation phenomena which included mechanical damage due to flow induced vibration and corrosion damage due to PWSCC, IGA/SCC and pitting etc. Recently Inconel 690 alloys are selected as new and replacement steam generator tubes for domestic nuclear power plant. But there are few study about mechanical and corrosion properties of Inconel 600 and 690. The objectives of this study is to evaluate and compare mechanical and corrosion propertied of steam generator tube materials.

  3. Evaluation on mechanical and corrosion properties of steam generator tubing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In Sup; Lee, Byong Whi; Lee, Sang Kyu; Lee, Young Ho; Kim, Jun Whan; Lee, Ju Seok; Kwon, Hyuk Sang; Kim, Su Jung

    1998-06-01

    Steam generator is one of the major components of nuclear reactor pressure boundary. It's main function os transferring heat which generated in the reactor to turbine generator through steam generator tube. In these days, steam generator tubing materials of operating plant are used Inconel 600 alloys. But according to the operation time, there are many degradation phenomena which included mechanical damage due to flow induced vibration and corrosion damage due to PWSCC, IGA/SCC and pitting etc. Recently Inconel 690 alloys are selected as new and replacement steam generator tubes for domestic nuclear power plant. But there are few study about mechanical and corrosion properties of Inconel 600 and 690. The objectives of this study is to evaluate and compare mechanical and corrosion propertied of steam generator tube materials

  4. Laser-shocked energetic materials with metal additives: evaluation of detonation performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottfried, Jennifer; Bukowski, Eric

    A focused, nanosecond-pulsed laser with sufficient energy to exceed the breakdown threshold of a material generates a laser-induced plasma with high peak temperatures, pressures, and shock velocities. Depending on the laser parameters and material properties, nanograms to micrograms of material is ablated, atomized, ionized and excited in the laser-induced plasma. The subsequent shock wave expansion into the air above the sample has been monitored using high-speed schlieren imaging in a recently developed technique, laser-induced air shock from energetic materials (LASEM). The estimated detonation velocities using LASEM agree well with published experimental values. A comparison of the measured shock velocities for various energetic materials including RDX, DNTF, and LLM-172 doped with Al or B to the detonation velocities predicted by CHEETAH for inert or active metal participation demonstrates that LASEM has potential for predicting the early time participation of metal additives in detonation events. The LASEM results show that reducing the amount of hydrogen present in B formulations increases the resulting detonation velocities

  5. High-energy synchrotron X-ray radiography of shock-compressed materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Michael E.; Chapman, David J.; Collinson, Mark A.; Jones, David R.; Music, Jasmina; Stafford, Samuel J. P.; Tear, Gareth R.; White, Thomas G.; Winters, John B. R.; Drakopoulos, Michael; Eakins, Daniel E.

    2015-06-01

    This presentation will discuss the development and application of a high-energy (50 to 250 keV) synchrotron X-ray imaging method to study shock-compressed, high-Z samples at Beamline I12 at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron (Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, UK). Shock waves are driven into materials using a portable, single-stage gas gun designed by the Institute of Shock Physics. Following plate impact, material deformation is probed in-situ by white-beam X-ray radiography and complimentary velocimetry diagnostics. The high energies, large beam size (13 x 13 mm), and appreciable sample volumes (~ 1 cm3) viable for study at Beamline I12 compliment existing in-house pulsed X-ray capabilities and studies at the Dynamic Compression Sector. The authors gratefully acknowledge the ongoing support of Imperial College London, EPSRC, STFC and the Diamond Light Source, and AWE Plc.

  6. Experimental validation of GASDECOM for High Heating Value Processed Gas mixtures (58 MJ/m3) by specialized shock tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botros, K.K.; Geerligs, J.; Carlson, L.; Reed, M.

    2013-01-01

    One of the fundamental requirements of the design of pipelines is the control of propagating ductile fracture, in which the Battelle two-curve method still forms the basis of the analytical framework used throughout the industry. The GASDECOM (GAS DECOMpression) tool is typically used for calculating decompression wave speed, which is one of these two curves. It uses the BWRS (Benedict–Webb–Rubin–Starling) equation of state to idealize the decompression process as isentropic and one-dimensional. While this equation of state was developed and validated against a quite restricted range of gas compositions, GASDECOM continues to perform relatively well for compositions slightly outside the original range of BWRS. The present research was focused on examining the performance of GASDECOM for mixture compositions up to a High (gross) Heating Value (HHV) of 58 MJ/m 3 . Four tests were conducted using a specialized high pressure shock tube (42 m long, I.D. = 38.1 mm) to experimentally determine the decompression wave speeds and compare them to the predictions by GASDECOM. Two tests were conducted on a gas mixture of HHV = 52 MJ/m 3 and the other two on even richer gas mixture of HHV = 58 MJ/m 3 , all were from nominal initial pressures of 15 MPa and initial temperatures of 40 °C. The results from these tests show that decompression wave speeds are consistent with predictions of GASDECOM for gases of HHV typical of the previously validated range of BWRS. Predictions of the saturation pressure represented by the plateau pressure in the decompression wave speed curve were also in good agreement with measurements despite the fact that they occurred close to the critical point of the respective mixture compositions. -- Highlights: • Performance of GASDECOM for mixture up to HHV of 58 MJ/m3 was examined. • Experiments were conducted using a specialized high pressure shock. • Results show that decompression speeds are consistent with predictions of GASDECOM.

  7. Towards a smoothed particle hydrodynamics algorithm for shocks through layered materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zisis, I.A.; Linden, van der B.J.; Giannopapa, C.G.

    2013-01-01

    Hypervelocity impacts (HVIs) are collisions at velocities greater than the target object’s speed of sound. Such impacts produce pressure waves that generate sharp and sudden changes in the density of the materials. These are propagated as shock waves. Previous computational research has given

  8. Thermodynamic model of the compaction of powder materials by shock waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijken, Durandus; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    1994-01-01

    For powder materials a model is proposed to predict the mean temperature behind the shock wave, the ratio between the increase of thermal energy and increase of total internal energy, as well as the mean final temperature after release of adiabatic pressure. Further, the change of pressure, specific

  9. Stability of Balloon-Retention Gastrostomy Tubes with Different Concentrations of Contrast Material: In Vitro Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopera, Jorge E.; Alvarez, Alex; Trimmer, Clayton; Josephs, Shellie; Anderson, Matthew; Dolmatch, Bart

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the performance of two balloon-retention-type gastrostomy tubes when the balloons are inflated with two types of contrast materials at different concentrations. Two commonly used balloon-retention-type tubes (MIC and Tri-Funnel) were inflated to the manufacturer's recommended volumes (4 and 20 cm 3 , respectively) with normal saline or normal saline plus different concentrations of contrast material. Five tubes of each brand were inflated with normal saline and 0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% contrast material dilutions, using either nonionic hyperosmolar contrast, or nonionic iso-osmolar contrast. The tubes were submerged in a glass basin containing a solution with a pH of 4. Every week the tubes were visually inspected to determine the integrity of the balloons, and the diameter of the balloons was measured with a caliper. The tests were repeated every week for a total of 12 weeks. The MIC balloons deflated slightly faster over time than the Tri-Funnel balloons. The Tri-Funnel balloons remained relatively stable over the study period for the different concentrations of contrast materials. The deflation rates of the MIC balloons were proportionally related to the concentration of saline and inversely related to the concentration of the contrast material. At high contrast material concentrations, solidification of the balloons was observed. In conclusion, this in vitro study confirms that the use of diluted amounts of nonionic contrast materials is safe for inflating the balloons of two types of balloon-retention feeding tubes. High concentrations of contrast could result in solidification of the balloons and should be avoided.

  10. Characterization of shock-absorbing material for packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourao, Rogerio Pimenta

    2007-01-01

    Since 2001 Brazil has been participating in a regional effort with other Latin American countries which operate research reactors to improve its capability in the management of spent fuel elements from these reactors. One of the options considered is the long-term dry storage of the spent fuel in a dual purpose cask, i.e., a package for the transport and storage of radioactive material. In the scope of an IAEA-sponsored project, a cask was designed and a half-scale model for test was built. The cask consists of a sturdy cylindrical body provided with internal cavity to accommodate a basket holding the spent fuel elements, a double lid system, and external impact limiters. The cask is provided with top and bottom impact limiters, which are structures made of an external stainless steel skin and an energy-absorbing filling material. The filling material chosen was the wood composite denominated Oriented Strand Board (OSB), which is an engineered, mat-formed panel product made of strands, flakes or wafers sliced from small diameter, round wood logs and bonded with a binder under heat and pressure. The characterization of this material was carried in the scope of the cask project at the CDTN's laboratories. The tests conducted were the quasi-static compression, impact, shear-bending and edgewise shear tests. The compression, shear-bending and edgewise shear tests were carried out in a standard compression test machine and the impact test at a drop test tower equipped with a sturdy base and a drop weight. The main parameters of the material, like the Young and shear moduli, as well as the static and dynamic stress-strain curves and the specific energy absorbed, were determined during the test campaign. (author)

  11. Characterization of shock-absorbing material for packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mourao, Rogerio Pimenta [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mail: mouraor@cdtn.br

    2007-07-01

    Since 2001 Brazil has been participating in a regional effort with other Latin American countries which operate research reactors to improve its capability in the management of spent fuel elements from these reactors. One of the options considered is the long-term dry storage of the spent fuel in a dual purpose cask, i.e., a package for the transport and storage of radioactive material. In the scope of an IAEA-sponsored project, a cask was designed and a half-scale model for test was built. The cask consists of a sturdy cylindrical body provided with internal cavity to accommodate a basket holding the spent fuel elements, a double lid system, and external impact limiters. The cask is provided with top and bottom impact limiters, which are structures made of an external stainless steel skin and an energy-absorbing filling material. The filling material chosen was the wood composite denominated Oriented Strand Board (OSB), which is an engineered, mat-formed panel product made of strands, flakes or wafers sliced from small diameter, round wood logs and bonded with a binder under heat and pressure. The characterization of this material was carried in the scope of the cask project at the CDTN's laboratories. The tests conducted were the quasi-static compression, impact, shear-bending and edgewise shear tests. The compression, shear-bending and edgewise shear tests were carried out in a standard compression test machine and the impact test at a drop test tower equipped with a sturdy base and a drop weight. The main parameters of the material, like the Young and shear moduli, as well as the static and dynamic stress-strain curves and the specific energy absorbed, were determined during the test campaign. (author)

  12. Properties of the chalcogenide–carbon nano tubes and graphene composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Abhay Kumar; Kim, JunHo; Park, Jong Tae; Sangunni, K.S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Chalcogenides. • Melt quenched. • Composite materials. • Multi walled carbon nano tubes. • Bilayer graphene. - Abstract: Composite can deliver more than the individual elemental property of the material. Specifically chalcogenide- multi walled carbon nano tubes and chalcogenide- bilayer graphene composite materials could be interesting for the investigation, which have been less covered by the investigators. We describe micro structural properties of Se 55 Te 25 Ge 20, Se 55 Te 25 Ge 20 + 0.025% multi walled carbon nano tubes and Se 55 Te 25 Ge 20 + 0.025% bilayer graphene materials. This gives realization of the alloying constituents inclusion/or diffusion inside the multi walled carbon nano tubes and bilayer graphene under the homogeneous parent alloy configuration. Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV/Visible spectroscopy and Fourier transmission infrared spectroscopy have also been carried out under the discussion. A considerable core energy levels peak shifts have been noticed for the composite materials by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The optical energy band gaps are measured to be varied in between 1.2 and 1.3 eV. In comparison to parent (Se 55 Te 25 Ge 20 ) alloy a higher infrared transmission has been observed for the composite materials. Subsequently, variation in physical properties has been explained on the basis of bond formation in solids

  13. Development of in situ time-resolved Raman spectroscopy facility for dynamic shock loading in materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaurasia, S.; Rastogi, V.; Rao, U.; Sijoy, C. D.; Mishra, V.; Deo, M. N.

    2017-11-01

    The transient state of excitation and relaxation processes in materials under shock compression can be investigated by coupling the laser driven shock facility with Raman spectroscopy. For this purpose, a time resolved Raman spectroscopy setup has been developed to monitor the physical and the chemical changes such as phase transitions, chemical reactions, molecular kinetics etc., under shock compression with nanosecond time resolution. This system consist of mainly three parts, a 2 J/8 ns Nd:YAG laser system used for generation of pump and probe beams, a Raman spectrometer with temporal and spectral resolution of 1.2 ns and 3 cm-1 respectively and a target holder in confinement geometry assembly. Detailed simulation for the optimization of confinement geometry targets is performed. Time resolved measurement of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) targets at focused laser intensity of 2.2 GW/cm2 has been done. The corresponding pressure in the Aluminum and PTFE are 3.6 and 1.7 GPa respectively. At 1.7 GPa in PTFE, a red shift of 5 cm-1 is observed for the CF2 twisting mode (291 cm-1). Shock velocity in PTFE is calculated by measuring rate of change of ratios of the intensity of Raman lines scattered from shocked volume to total volume of sample in the laser focal spot along the laser axis. The calculated shock velocity in PTFE is found to be 1.64 ± 0.16 km/s at shock pressure of 1.7 GPa, for present experimental conditions.

  14. Stress corrosion cracking of the tubing materials for nuclear steam generators in an environment containing lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung Mo; Kim, Uh Chul; Lee, Eun Hee; Hwang, Seong Sik

    2004-01-01

    Steam generator tube materials show a high susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in an environment containing lead species and some nuclear power plants currently have degradation problems associated with lead-induced stress corrosion cracking in a caustic solution. Effects of an applied potential on SCC is tested for middle-annealed Alloy 600 specimens since their corrosion potential can be changed when lead oxide coexists with other oxidizing species like copper oxide in the sludge. In addition, all the steam generator tubing materials used for nuclear power plants being operated and currently under construction in Korea are tested in a caustic solution with lead oxide. (author)

  15. Improved superheater tubing material - Ti and Nb bearing austenitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, K.; Mimino, T.; Minegishi, I.

    1975-01-01

    A newly developed 18 Cr-8 Ni stainless steel modified with small amounts of Ti and Nb has considerably high stress-rupture strength and is considered to be suitable for superheater material for power boilers. Data for stress-rupture and creep for long times, the strength of welded joints, the changes of characteristics due to exposure to high temperatures, etc., are presented and discussed. Some investigations after trial services indicate that the experimental data are applicable to actual applications. (author)

  16. Shock-Driven Hydrodynamic Instability Growth Near Phase Boundaries and Material Property Transitions: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peralta, Pedro [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Fortin, Elizabeth [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Opie, Saul [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Gautam, Sudrishti [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Gopalakrishnan, Ashish [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Lynch, Jenna [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Chen, Yan [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Loomis, Eric [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Activities for this grant included: 1) Development of dynamic impact experiments to probe strength and phase transition influence on dynamic deformation, 2) development of modern strength and phase aware simulation capabilities, 3) and post-processing of experimental data with simulation and closed form analytical techniques. Two different dynamic experiments were developed to probe material strengths in solid metals (largely copper and iron in this effort). In the first experiment a flyer plate impacts a flat target with an opposite rippled surface that is partially supported by a weaker window material. Post mortem analysis of the target sample showed a strong and repeatable residual plastic deformation dependence on grain orientation. Yield strengths for strain rates near 105 s-1 and plastic strains near ~50% were estimated to be around 180 to 240 MPa, varying in this range with grain orientation. Unfortunately dynamic real-time measurements were difficult with this setup due to diagnostic laser scattering; hence, an additional experimental setup was developed to complement these results. In the second set of experiments a rippled surface was ablated by a controlled laser pulsed, which launched a rippled shock front to an opposite initially flat diagnostic surface that was monitored in real-time with spatially resolved velocimetry techniques, e.g., line VISAR in addition to Transient Imaging Displacement Interferometry (TIDI) displacement measurements. This setup limited the displacements at the diagnostic surface to a reasonable level for TIDI measurements (~ less than one micrometer). These experiments coupled with analytical and numerical solutions provided evidence that viscous and elastic deviatoric strength affect shock front perturbation evolution in clearly different ways. Particularly, normalized shock front perturbation amplitudes evolve with viscosity (η) and perturbation wavelength (λ) as η/λ, such that increasing viscosity

  17. Externally finned circular tube immerse in a phase-change material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, C.L.F.; Ismail, K.A.R.

    1985-01-01

    In an attempt to increase the heat transfer rate and reduce the convective currents during the freezing of phase change materials (PCM) in storage tanks, externally finned circular tubes are studied experimentally. The parameters analysed in this work include number of fins, fin length, initial degree of superheat and freezing time

  18. A QUANTITATIVE STUDY OF THE EVOLUTION OF GASES FROM ELECTRON TUBES AND MATERIALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A continuous quantitative and qualitative gas analysis system has been designed, built and calibrated. The system incorporates an omegatron mass...processing and materials parameters as they affect the kinds and quantities of gases evolved by electron tubes. CO2, CO, and H2 in roughly equal

  19. Producing of Impedance Tube for Measurement of Acoustic Absorption Coefficient of Some Sound Absorber Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Golmohammadi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Noise is one of the most important harmful agents in work environment. In spit of industrial improvements, exposure with over permissible limit of noise is counted as one of the health complication of workers. In Iran, do not exact information of the absorption coefficient of acoustic materials. Iranian manufacturer have not laboratory for measured of sound absorbance of their products, therefore using of sound absorber is limited for noise control in industrial and non industrial constructions. The goal of this study was to design an impedance tube based on pressure method for measurement of the sound absorption coefficient of acoustic materials.Materials & Methods: In this study designing of measuring system and method of calculation of sound absorption based on a available equipment and relatively easy for measurement of the sound absorption coefficient related to ISO10534-1 was performed. Measuring system consist of heavy asbestos tube, a pure tone sound generator, calibrated sound level meter for measuring of some commonly of sound absorber materials was used. Results: In this study sound absorption coefficient of 23 types of available acoustic material in Iran was tested. Reliability of results by three repeat of measurement was tested. Results showed that the standard deviation of sound absorption coefficient of study materials was smaller than .Conclusion: The present study performed a necessary technology of designing and producing of impedance tube for determining of acoustical materials absorption coefficient in Iran.

  20. Wear behavior of 2-1/4 Cr-1Mo tubing against alloy 718 tube-support material in sodium-cooled steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, W.L.

    1983-05-01

    A series of prototypic steam generator 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo tube/alloy 718 tube support plate wear tests were conducted in direct support of the Westinghouse Nuclear Components Division -- Breeder Reactor Components Project Large Scale steam Generator design. The initial objective was to verify the acceptable wear behavior of softer, ''over-aged'' alloy 718 support plate material. For all interfaces under all test conditions, resultant wear damage was adhesive in nature with varying amounts of 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo tube material being adhesively transferred to the alloy 718 tube supports. Maximum tube wear depths exceeded the initially established design allowable limit of 127 μm (.005 in.) at 17 of the 18 interfaces tested. A decrease in contact stresses produced acceptable tube wear depths below a readjusted maximum design allowable value of 381 μm (.015 in.). Additional conservatisms associated with the simulation of a 40-year lifetime of rubbing in a one-week laboratory test provided further confidence that the 381 μm maximum tube wear allowance would not be exceeded in service. Softer, ''over-aged'' alloy 718 material was found to produce slightly less wear damage on 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo tubing than fully age hardened material. Also, air formed oxide films on the alloy 718 reduced initial tube wear and delayed the onset of adhesive surface damage. However, at high surface stress levels, these films were not sufficiently stable to provide adequate long term protection from adhesive wear. The results of the present work and those of previous test programs suggest that the successful in-sodium tribological performance of 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo/alloy 718 rubbing couples is dependent upon the presence of lubricative surface films, such as oxides and/or surface reaction or deposition products. 11 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs

  1. Material failure and inertial instabilities in a shocked imploded cylindrical aluminum sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandler, E.A.; Egan, P.; Stokes, J.

    1998-01-01

    The authors have used the LANL Pegasus Z-pinch facility to drive a thin cylindrically-convergent Al liner to ∼3 km/s to launch ∼30 GPa shocks in a 3-mm thick 10-mm-i.d. aluminum cylinder whose interior is filled with 1 atm Xe gas. The subsequent material motion of the metal and gas is diagnosed with both radial and axial flash x-rays and with optical framing cameras. Instabilities are seeded by implanting wires of assorted higher density metal parallel to the cylinder axis. The authors have done two shots, varying the target from Al 1100-O to Al 6061-T6 to explore the effect of changing material strength. The images show the spallation failure of the metal-gas interface on shock release and the effect of the seeded instabilities

  2. Improving formability of tube bending for a copper material using finite element simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Duc Toan; Nnuyen, Dinh Thanh [Hungyen University of Technology and Education, Hungyen (Viet Nam); Kim, Young Suk [Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Bending tubes are key products in many industries. The geometric parameters of the bending process are considered according to Taguchi's orthogonal array and then coupled with finite element simulation to predict and improve the formability of the tube bending process for copper JIS25A material. Three parameters, namely, mandrel diameter, distance between mandrel rings, and distance from the tip of the mandrel bar to the center of the base die, are selected to study their effects on the quality of the bending process. The variance analysis shows that the effect distribution of each parameter to bending quality is determined, and optimal conditions are adopted to conduct experiments.

  3. Experimental creep behaviour determination of cladding tube materials under multi-axial loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosjean, Catherine; Poquillon, Dominique; Salabura, Jean-Claude; Cloue, Jean-Marc

    2009-01-01

    Cladding tubes are structural parts of nuclear plants, submitted to complex thermomechanical loadings. Thus, it is necessary to know and predict their behaviour to preserve their integrity and to enhance their lifetime. Therefore, a new experimental device has been developed to control the load path under multi-axial load conditions. The apparatus is designed to determine the thermomechanical behaviour of zirconium alloys used for cladding tubes. First results are presented. Creep tests with different biaxial loadings were performed. Results are analysed in terms of thermal expansion and of creep strain. The anisotropy of the material is revealed and iso-creep strain curves are given.

  4. Classifying the mechanisms of electrochemical shock in ion-intercalation materials

    OpenAIRE

    Woodford, William; Carter, W. Craig; Chiang, Yet-Ming

    2014-01-01

    “Electrochemical shock” – the electrochemical cycling-induced fracture of materials – contributes to impedance growth and performance degradation in ion-intercalation batteries, such as lithium-ion. Using a combination of micromechanical models and acoustic emission experiments, the mechanisms of electrochemical shock are identified, classified, and modeled in targeted model systems with different composition and microstructure. A particular emphasis is placed on mechanical degradation occurr...

  5. Dynamic analysis to establish normal shock and vibration of radioactive material shipping packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fields, S.R.

    1980-01-01

    A computer model, CARDS (Cask-Railcar Dynamic Simulator) was developed to provide input data for a broad range of radioactive material package-tiedown structural assessments. CARDS simulates the dynamic behavior of shipping packages and their transporters during normal transport conditions. The model will be used to identify parameters which significantly affect the normal shock and vibration environments which, in turn, provide the basis for determining the forces transmitted to the packages

  6. Machine learning to analyze images of shocked materials for precise and accurate measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dresselhaus-Cooper, Leora; Howard, Marylesa; Hock, Margaret C.; Meehan, B. T.; Ramos, Kyle J.; Bolme, Cindy A.; Sandberg, Richard L.; Nelson, Keith A.

    2017-09-14

    A supervised machine learning algorithm, called locally adaptive discriminant analysis (LADA), has been developed to locate boundaries between identifiable image features that have varying intensities. LADA is an adaptation of image segmentation, which includes techniques that find the positions of image features (classes) using statistical intensity distributions for each class in the image. In order to place a pixel in the proper class, LADA considers the intensity at that pixel and the distribution of intensities in local (nearby) pixels. This paper presents the use of LADA to provide, with statistical uncertainties, the positions and shapes of features within ultrafast images of shock waves. We demonstrate the ability to locate image features including crystals, density changes associated with shock waves, and material jetting caused by shock waves. This algorithm can analyze images that exhibit a wide range of physical phenomena because it does not rely on comparison to a model. LADA enables analysis of images from shock physics with statistical rigor independent of underlying models or simulations.

  7. A quality assessment of cardiac auscultation material on YouTube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camm, Christian F; Sunderland, Nicholas; Camm, A John

    2013-02-01

    YouTube is a highly utilized Web site that contains a large amount of medical educational material. Although some studies have assessed the education material contained on the Web site, little analysis of cardiology content has been made. This study aimed to assess the quality of videos relating to heart sounds and murmurs contained on YouTube. We hypothesized that the quality of video files purporting to provide education on heart auscultation would be highly variable. Videos were searched for using the terms "heart sounds," "heart murmur," and "heart auscultation." A built-in educational filter was employed, and manual rejection of non-English language and nonrelated videos was undertaken. Remaining videos were analyzed for content, and suitable videos were scored using a purpose-built tool. YouTube search located 3350 videos in total, and of these, 22 were considered suitable for scoring. The average score was 4.07 out of 7 (standard deviation, 1.35). Six videos scored 5.5 or greater and 5 videos scoring 2.5 or less. There was no correlation between video score and YouTube indices of preference (hits, likes, dislikes, or search page). The quality of videos found in this study was highly variable. YouTube indications of preference were of no value in determining the value of video content. Therefore, teaching institutions or professional societies should endeavor to identify and highlight good online teaching resources. YouTube contains many videos relating to cardiac auscultation, but very few are valuable education resources. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Finite Element Modeling of Dieless Tube Drawing of Strain Rate Sensitive Material with Coupled Thermo-Mechanical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furushima, Tsuyoshi; Sakai, Takashi; Manabe, Ken-ichi

    2004-06-01

    Dieless drawing is a unique deformation process without conventional dies, which can achieve a great reduction of wire and tube metals in single pass by means of local heating and cooling approach. In this study, for microtube forming, the dieless drawing process applying superplastic behavior was analyzed by finite element method (FEM) in order to clarify the effect of dieless tube drawing conditions such as tensile speed, moving speed of heating and cooling system, and material properties on deformation behavior of the tube. In the calculation, the material properties were dealt in a special subroutine, whose constitutive equation was defined as σ = Kɛnɛ˙m, and was linked to the solver. A coupled thermo-mechanical analysis was performed for the dieless tube drawing using the FEM. In the thermal analysis of dieless tube drawing, heat transfer was introduced to calculate the heat flux between heating coil and tube surface, and heat conduction in a tube. The influence of dieless tube drawing conditions on deformation behavior was clarified. As a result, for the strain rate sensitive material, the maximum reduction of area and the minimum outer diameter in single pass attain to 90.9% and 2.56mm, respectively. From the result, it is concluded that the dieless tube drawing is essential to produce an extrafine microtube by reason of keeping cylindrical tube diameter ratio constant with extremely high reduction.

  9. Shock tube study of the reactions of the hydroxyl radical with combustion species and pollutants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, N.; Koffend, J.B.

    1998-02-01

    Shock heating t-butyl hydroperoxide behind a reflected shock wave has proved to be as a convenient source of hydroxyl radicals at temperatures near 1000 K. We applied this technique to the measurement of reaction rate coefficients of OH with several species of interest in combustion chemistry, and developed a thermochemical kinetics/transition state theory (TK-TST) model for predicting the temperature dependence of OH rate coefficients.

  10. Mechanical to electrical energy conversion by shock wave effect in a ferro-electric material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, Jean

    1977-01-01

    The shock wave propagation through a polarized ferroelectric ceramic changes or destroys remanent polarization and this way allows to get, in adequate electrical circuit, a volume energy of about 2 J/ cm 3 , during a time of the order of 0,4 μs; which corresponds to a peak - power of 5 MW/cm 3 . The present report has for objective to specify the optimum working conditions of this mechanical to electrical conversion from ceramic characteristics, load circuit connected to its electrodes and from the characteristics of the pressure wave which travels through the materials which constitute the converter. After a few lines about the ferroelectric materials and about the shock waves, the shock generator, the used setting and measures are described. A mathematical model which exhibits the transducer operation and a computation of the allowable electrical energy are given. For ending, the released electrical energies by industrial and laboratory ceramics are compared to the estimated computations and a thermodynamical balance is carried out. (author) [fr

  11. Relationship of material properties to seismic coupling. Part I. Shock wave studies of rock and rock-like materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, D.B.; Rodean, H.C.

    1975-01-01

    Our research seeks an understanding of the relationship of material properties to explosive-energy coupling in various earth media by integrating experimental observations with computer calculational models to obtain a predictive capability. The procedure chosen consists of: first, selecting materials exhibiting interesting values of the properties that are believed to control coupling; second, experimentally determining material behavior under various types of loading and unloading; third, development of constitutive relationships; fourth, adapting these constitutive relationships to computer calculational models; and fifth, verifying the calculational models through comparison with small-scale and field high-strain-rate experiments. The object of this report is to present the shock-wave data and to make a preliminary evaluation of the results in terms of material properties, coupling, and their interactions. (U.S.)

  12. New Bayesian inference method using two steps of Markov chain Monte Carlo and its application to shock tube experiment data of Furan oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Daesang

    2016-01-06

    A new Bayesian inference method has been developed and applied to Furan shock tube experimental data for efficient statistical inferences of the Arrhenius parameters of two OH radical consumption reactions. The collected experimental data, which consist of time series signals of OH radical concentrations of 14 shock tube experiments, may require several days for MCMC computations even with the support of a fast surrogate of the combustion simulation model, while the new method reduces it to several hours by splitting the process into two steps of MCMC: the first inference of rate constants and the second inference of the Arrhenius parameters. Each step has low dimensional parameter spaces and the second step does not need the executions of the combustion simulation. Furthermore, the new approach has more flexibility in choosing the ranges of the inference parameters, and the higher speed and flexibility enable the more accurate inferences and the analyses of the propagation of errors in the measured temperatures and the alignment of the experimental time to the inference results.

  13. Large-Scale Reactive Atomistic Simulation of Shock-induced Initiation Processes in Energetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Aidan

    2013-06-01

    Initiation in energetic materials is fundamentally dependent on the interaction between a host of complex chemical and mechanical processes, occurring on scales ranging from intramolecular vibrations through molecular crystal plasticity up to hydrodynamic phenomena at the mesoscale. A variety of methods (e.g. quantum electronic structure methods (QM), non-reactive classical molecular dynamics (MD), mesoscopic continuum mechanics) exist to study processes occurring on each of these scales in isolation, but cannot describe how these processes interact with each other. In contrast, the ReaxFF reactive force field, implemented in the LAMMPS parallel MD code, allows us to routinely perform multimillion-atom reactive MD simulations of shock-induced initiation in a variety of energetic materials. This is done either by explicitly driving a shock-wave through the structure (NEMD) or by imposing thermodynamic constraints on the collective dynamics of the simulation cell e.g. using the Multiscale Shock Technique (MSST). These MD simulations allow us to directly observe how energy is transferred from the shockwave into other processes, including intramolecular vibrational modes, plastic deformation of the crystal, and hydrodynamic jetting at interfaces. These processes in turn cause thermal excitation of chemical bonds leading to initial chemical reactions, and ultimately to exothermic formation of product species. Results will be presented on the application of this approach to several important energetic materials, including pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) and ammonium nitrate/fuel oil (ANFO). In both cases, we validate the ReaxFF parameterizations against QM and experimental data. For PETN, we observe initiation occurring via different chemical pathways, depending on the shock direction. For PETN containing spherical voids, we observe enhanced sensitivity due to jetting, void collapse, and hotspot formation, with sensitivity increasing with void size. For ANFO, we

  14. Area effect on galvanic corrosion of condenser materials with titanium tubes in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Seong Sik; Kim, Joung Soo; Kim, Uh Chul

    1993-01-01

    Titanium tubes have recently been used in condensers of nuclear power plants since titanium has very good corrosion resistance to seawater. However, when it is connected to Cu alloys as tube sheet materials and these Cu alloys are connected to carbon steels as water box materials, it makes significant galvanic corrosion on connected materials. It is expected from electrochemical tests that the corrosion rate of carbon steel will increase when it is galvanically coupled with Ti or Cu in sea water and the corrosion rate of Cu will increase when it is coupled with Ti, of this couple is exposed to sea water for a long time. It is also expected that the surface area ratios, R 1 (surface area of carbon steel/surface area of Ti) and R 2 (surface area of carbon steel/surface area of Cu) are very improtant for the galvanic corrosion of carbon steel and that these should not be kept to low values in order to minimize the galvanic corrosion on the carbon steel of the water box. Immersed galvanic corrosion tests show that the corrosion rate of carbon steel is 4.4 mpy when this ratio is 10 -2 . The galvanic corrosion rate of this carbon steel is increased from 4.4 mpy to 13 mpy at this area ratio, 1, when this connected galvanic specimen is galvanically coupled with a Ti tube. This can be rationalized by the combined effects of R 1 and R 2 on the polarization curve. (Author)

  15. Comparison of different ligature materials used for T-tube esophageal exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y C; Luh, S P; Tsai, C C; Hsu, H C; Chu, S H

    1992-03-01

    Four different ligature materials--plain catgut, chromic catgut, dexon and silk--were used for ligature of the distal arm during T-tube exclusion of the cervical esophagus in 12 dogs. Ligature by plain catgut was maintained for only a short period, but the duration of esophageal occlusion with the other three ligature materials was around 10 days. Ligated esophageal segments were examined grossly and histologically two months after the procedure. The diameter of the esophageal lumen in the ligated segments had become smaller compared with the neighboring normal esophageal lumen. The most prominent histologic changes were atrophy and fibrosis of the muscle coat, vessel congestion and inflammatory cell infiltration in the ligated segments. These tissue reactions were more severe in the chromic catgut and silk ligatures. Among the 11 evaluable dogs, four had symptoms of dysphagia after removal of the T-tube. All four dogs had a sinus discharge and granuloma formation at the T-tube esophagostoma. The diameter of the esophageal lumen was more constricted in dogs with dysphagia. Among the four ligature materials, dexon had the advantages of a long duration of occlusion, less tissue fibrosis and little sequel of esophageal stenosis, making it the most suitable for ligature during esophageal exclusion.

  16. Tube plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafred, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    The tube plug comprises a one piece mechanical plug having one open end and one closed end which is capable of being inserted in a heat exchange tube and internally expanded into contact with the inside surface of the heat exchange tube for preventing flow of a coolant through the heat exchange tube. The tube plug also comprises a groove extending around the outside circumference thereof which has an elastomeric material disposed in the groove for enhancing the seal between the tube plug and the tube

  17. Oxide growth and exfoliation of materials in steam tubing. Lesson 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooley, R. Barry; Bursik, Albert

    2011-04-15

    University 101 courses are typically designed to help incoming first-year undergraduate students to adjust to the university, develop a better understanding of the college environment, and acquire essential academic success skills. Why are we offering a special Boiler and HRSG Tube Failures PPChem 101? The answer is simple, yet very conclusive: - There is a lack of knowledge on the identification of tube failure mechanisms and for the implementation of adequate counteractions in many power plants, particularly at industrial power and steam generators. - There is a lack of knowledge to prevent repeat tube failures. The vast majority of BTF/HTF have been, and continue to be, repeat failures. It is hoped that the information about the failure mechanisms of BTF supplied in this course will help to put plant engineers and chemists on the right track. The major goal of this course is the avoidance of repeat BTF. This ninth lesson is focused on Oxide Growth and Exfoliation of Materials in Steam Tubing. (orig.)

  18. Methods of Investigation of Equations that Describe Waves in Tubes with Elastic Walls and Application of the Theory of Reversible and Weak Dissipative Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakholdin, Igor

    2018-02-01

    Various models of a tube with elastic walls are investigated: with controlled pressure, filled with incompressible fluid, filled with compressible gas. The non-linear theory of hyperelasticity is applied. The walls of a tube are described with complete membrane model. It is proposed to use linear model of plate in order to take the bending resistance of walls into account. The walls of the tube were treated previously as inviscid and incompressible. Compressibility of material of walls and viscosity of material, either gas or liquid are considered. Equations are solved numerically. Three-layer time and space centered reversible numerical scheme and similar two-layer space reversible numerical scheme with approximation of time derivatives by Runge-Kutta method are used. A method of correction of numerical schemes by inclusion of terms with highorder derivatives is developed. Simplified hyperbolic equations are derived.

  19. Dedicated new descaling method to characterize corrosion and cation release of SG tubing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clauzel, Maryline; Guillodo, Michael; Foucault, Marc; Engler, Nathalie; Chahma, Farah

    2012-09-01

    PWR steam generators (SGs), due to the huge wetted surface, are the main source of corrosion product release in the primary coolant circuit. Corrosion products may be transported throughout the whole circuit, activated in the core, and redeposited all over circuit surfaces, resulting in an increase of activity buildup. Understanding the phenomena leading to corrosion product release from SG tubing materials is of primary importance to minimize the global dose integrated by workers and to optimize the reactor shutdown duration and environment releases. Lab scale testing devices are a way to investigate cation release and propose mitigation measures. The descaling technique is based on the specific dissolution of the oxides making possible, by gravimetry, to directly evaluate the total quantity of corroded metal and the quantity of released elements. This technique allows for a statistical study as several SG coupons are exposed in one single test and is usually well-adapted to tubing materials having high or medium cation release behaviors, but has been proven too less accurate for the most recent manufactured SG tubes having low cation release rates. An optimized descaling technique has been developed to allow for the study of low-releasing SG tubing materials. Several steps of the process have been reconsidered. The electropolishing of the coupon is now performed after a careful determination of the thickness of the perturbed layer on the tube outer and/or inner surface to completely remove it so as to limit as much as possible the release of electro-polished faces which are not matter of the study. The number of coupons exposed in the autoclave has been reduced to avoid any saturation of the water primary chemistry, and two kinds of control coupons have been prepared instead of one in the former descaling method to take into account the uncertainties due to the descaling process as well as the CP possible redeposition on the coupons during exposure. Another

  20. Melting of Nanoprticle-Enhanced Phase Change Material inside Shell and Tube Heat Exchanger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiyed Mohammad Javad Hosseini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a numerical study of melting of Nanoprticle-Enhanced phase change material (NEPCM inside a shell and tube heat exchanger using RT50 and copper particles as base material and nanoparticle, respectively. In this study, the effects of nanoparticles dispersion (, 0.03, and 0.05 on melting time, liquid fraction, and penetration length are investigated. The results show that the melting time decreases to 14.6% and the penetration length increases to 146% with increasing volume fraction of nanoparticle up to .

  1. Factors in the selection of broiler tube materials for a civil fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyzack, C; Chitty, A

    1975-07-01

    This paper briefly considers some of the factors which must be balanced in the selection of a boiler tube material for a Civil Fast Reactor. The merits and possible demerits of low alloy ferritic steels and the austenitic Alloy 800 are compared with respect to waterside corrosion resistance, mechanical properties, fabrication and weldability and possible effects of exposure to the sodium environment under normal and fault conditions. It is pointed out that although there is operational experience of most of the materials in boiler superheater applications there is little or none in evaporative regimes. (author)

  2. An investigation into the relationship between thermal shock resistance and ballistic performance of ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Robert

    Currently, there are no reliable methods for screening potential armour materials and hence full-scale ballistic trials are needed. These are both costly and time-consuming in terms of the actual test and also in the materials development that needs to take place to produce sufficient material to give a meaningful result. Whilst it will not be possible to dispense with ballistic trials before material deployment in armour applications, the ability to shorten the development cycle would be advantageous. The thermal shock performance of ceramic armour materials has been highlighted as potential marker for ballistic performance. Hence the purpose of this study was to investigate this further. A new thermal shock technique that reproduced features relevant to ballistic testing was sought. As it would be beneficial to have a simple test that did not use much material, a water-drop method was adopted. This was combined with a variety of characterisation techniques, administered pre- and post-shock. The methods included measurement of the amplitude of ultrasonic wave transmission through the sample alongside residual strength testing using a biaxial ball-on-ball configuration and reflected light and confocal microscopy. Once the protocols had been refined the testing regime was applied to a group of ceramic materials. The materials selected were from two broad groups: alumina and carbide materials. Carbide ceramics show superior performance to alumina ceramics in ballistic applications so it was essential that any screening test would be easily able to differentiate the two groups. Within the alumina family, two commercially available materials, AD995 and Sintox FA, were selected. These were tested alongside three developmental silicon carbide-boron carbide composites, which had identical chemical compositions but different microstructures and thus presented more of a challenge in terms of differentiation. The results from the various tests were used to make predictions

  3. Long term testing of materials for tube shielding, stage 2; Laangtidsprovning av tubskyddsmaterial, etapp 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norling, Rikard; Hjoernhede, Anders; Mattsson, Mattias

    2012-02-15

    Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) boilers are commonly used for combustion of biomass and are used to some extent for Waste-to-Energy (WtE) plants as well. The superheaters of the latter are for obvious reasons more prone to suffer from high temperature corrosion caused by the corrosive species in the fuel, mainly chlorides. Frequently the final (hottest) superheater is positioned in the loop seal, where the circulating bed material is returned to the furnace after being separated from the flue gas by a cyclone. The environment in the loop seal is relatively free of chlorides, since these primarily follow the flue gas into the convection pass. Hence, higher steam temperature can be allowed without excessive damage to the final superheater. On the other hand the superheaters, which are located in the convection pass, are more exposed to the corrosive species of the flue gas. Further, they are eroded by particles entrained in the gas flow. Particles and condensing gaseous species are to a large extent deposited on the superheaters, which limits the heat transfer and promotes corrosion. The deposits are regularly removed e.g. by soot blowers. The pressurized steam from soot blowers causes additional erosion damage to that caused by entrained particles. It shall be noted that the actual damage is caused by a combined mechanism of erosion and corrosion denoted erosion-corrosion, which usually results in dramatically accelerated wear. To avoid excessive erosion damage on the superheater tubes the first tube row of each bundle is protected by tube shielding. In its simplest form the shields are made from a steel sheet that has been bent into a semi-circular half-cylinder shell. These shields are attached onto the wind-side of the tubes by hangers. A typical material for tube shielding is the austenitic high temperature resistant stainless steel 253MA. Life of tube shielding depends on numerous factors such as boiler design, superheater location, fuel and operating

  4. Shock and rarefaction waves in a hyperbolic model of incompressible materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso Ruggeri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present paper is to investigate shock and rarefaction waves in a hyperbolic model of incompressible materials. To this aim, we use the so-called extended quasi-thermal-incompressible (EQTI model, recently proposed by Gouin & Ruggeri (H. Gouin, T. Ruggeri, Internat. J. Non-Linear Mech. 47 688–693 (2012. In particular, we use as constitutive equation a variant of the well-known Bousinnesq approximation in which the specific volume depends not only on the temperature but also on the pressure. The limit case of ideal incompressibility, namely when the thermal expansion coefficient and the compressibility factor vanish, is also considered.

  5. Empirical Model Development for Predicting Shock Response on Composite Materials Subjected to Pyroshock Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentz, Steven J.; Ordway, David O; Parsons, David S.; Garrison, Craig M.; Rodgers, C. Steven; Collins, Brian W.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) received a request to develop an analysis model based on both frequency response and wave propagation analyses for predicting shock response spectrum (SRS) on composite materials subjected to pyroshock loading. The model would account for near-field environment (approx. 9 inches from the source) dominated by direct wave propagation, mid-field environment (approx. 2 feet from the source) characterized by wave propagation and structural resonances, and far-field environment dominated by lower frequency bending waves in the structure. This report documents the outcome of the assessment.

  6. Modelling of thermal shock experiments of carbon based materials in JUDITH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogorodnikova, O.V.; Pestchanyi, S.; Koza, Y.; Linke, J.

    2005-01-01

    The interaction of hot plasma with material in fusion devices can result in material erosion and irreversible damage. Carbon based materials are proposed for ITER divertor armour. To simulate carbon erosion under high heat fluxes, electron beam heating in the JUDITH facility has been used. In this paper, carbon erosion under energetic electron impact is modeled by the 3D thermomechanics code 'PEGASUS-3D'. The code is based on a crack generation induced by thermal stress. The particle emission observed in thermal shock experiments is a result of breaking bonds between grains caused by thermal stress. The comparison of calculations with experimental data from JUDITH shows good agreement for various incident power densities and pulse durations. A realistic mean failure stress has been found. Pre-heating of test specimens results in earlier onset of brittle destruction and enhanced particle loss in agreement with experiments

  7. Modelling of thermal shock experiments of carbon based materials in JUDITH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogorodnikova, O.V. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, EURATOM-Association, IWV-2, 52425 Juelich (Germany)]. E-mail: o.ogorodnikova@fz-juelich.de; Pestchanyi, S. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, EURATOM-Associaton, IHM, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Koza, Y. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, EURATOM-Association, IWV-2, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Linke, J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, EURATOM-Association, IWV-2, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2005-03-01

    The interaction of hot plasma with material in fusion devices can result in material erosion and irreversible damage. Carbon based materials are proposed for ITER divertor armour. To simulate carbon erosion under high heat fluxes, electron beam heating in the JUDITH facility has been used. In this paper, carbon erosion under energetic electron impact is modeled by the 3D thermomechanics code 'PEGASUS-3D'. The code is based on a crack generation induced by thermal stress. The particle emission observed in thermal shock experiments is a result of breaking bonds between grains caused by thermal stress. The comparison of calculations with experimental data from JUDITH shows good agreement for various incident power densities and pulse durations. A realistic mean failure stress has been found. Pre-heating of test specimens results in earlier onset of brittle destruction and enhanced particle loss in agreement with experiments.

  8. Modelling of thermal shock experiments of carbon based materials in JUDITH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogorodnikova, O. V.; Pestchanyi, S.; Koza, Y.; Linke, J.

    2005-03-01

    The interaction of hot plasma with material in fusion devices can result in material erosion and irreversible damage. Carbon based materials are proposed for ITER divertor armour. To simulate carbon erosion under high heat fluxes, electron beam heating in the JUDITH facility has been used. In this paper, carbon erosion under energetic electron impact is modeled by the 3D thermomechanics code 'PEGASUS-3D'. The code is based on a crack generation induced by thermal stress. The particle emission observed in thermal shock experiments is a result of breaking bonds between grains caused by thermal stress. The comparison of calculations with experimental data from JUDITH shows good agreement for various incident power densities and pulse durations. A realistic mean failure stress has been found. Pre-heating of test specimens results in earlier onset of brittle destruction and enhanced particle loss in agreement with experiments.

  9. Thermal shock tests to qualify different tungsten grades as plasma facing material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtz, M.; Linke, J.; Loewenhoff, Th; Pintsuk, G.; Uytdenhouwen, I.

    2016-02-01

    The electron beam device JUDITH 1 was used to establish a testing procedure for the qualification of tungsten as plasma facing material. Absorbed power densities of 0.19 and 0.38 GW m-2 for an edge localized mode-like pulse duration of 1 ms were chosen. Furthermore, base temperatures of room temperature, 400 °C and 1000 °C allow investigating the thermal shock performance in the brittle, ductile and high temperature regime. Finally, applying 100 pulses under all mentioned conditions helps qualifying the general damage behaviour while with 1000 pulses for the higher power density the influence of thermal fatigue is addressed. The investigated reference material is a tungsten product produced according to the ITER material specifications. The obtained results provide a general overview of the damage behaviour with quantified damage characteristics and thresholds. In particular, it is shown that the damage strongly depends on the microstructure and related thermo-mechanical properties.

  10. Meso-scale modelling of the heat conductivity effect on the shock response of a porous material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnyansky, A. D.

    2017-06-01

    Understanding of deformation mechanisms of porous materials under shock compression is important for tailoring material properties at the shock manufacturing of advanced materials from substrate powders and for studying the response of porous materials under shock loading. Numerical set-up of the present work considers a set of solid particles separated by air representing a volume of porous material. Condensed material in the meso-scale set-up is simulated with a viscoelastic rate sensitive material model with heat conduction formulated from the principles of irreversible thermodynamics. The model is implemented in the CTH shock physics code. The meso-scale CTH simulation of the shock loading of the representative volume reveals the mechanism of pore collapse and shows in detail the transition from a high porosity case typical for abnormal Hugoniot response to a moderate porosity case typical for conventional Hugoniot response. Results of the analysis agree with previous analytical considerations and support hypotheses used in the two-phase approach.

  11. Probabilistic analysis of degradation incubation time of steam generator tubing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, M.D.; Jyrkama, M.I.; Lu, Y.; Chi, L.

    2012-01-01

    The prediction of degradation free lifetime of steam generator (SG) tubing material is an important step in the life cycle management and decision for replacement of steam generators during the refurbishment of a nuclear station. Therefore, an extensive experimental research program has been undertaken by the Canadian Nuclear Industry to investigate the degradation of widely-used SG tubing alloys, namely, Alloy 600 TT, Alloy 690 TT, and Alloy 800. The corrosion related degradations of passive metals, such as pitting, crevice corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) etc. are assumed to start with the break down of the passive film at the tube-environment interface, which is characterized by the incubation time for passivity breakdown and then the degradation growth rate, and both are influenced by the chemical environment and coolant temperature. Since the incubation time and growth rate exhibit significant variability in the laboratory tests used to simulate these degradation processes, the use of probabilistic modeling is warranted. A pit is initiated with the breakdown of the passive film on the SG tubing surface. Upon exposure to aggressive environments, pitting corrosion may not initiate immediately, or may initiate and then re-passivate. The time required to initiate pitting corrosion is called the pitting incubation time, and that can be used to characterize the corrosion resistance of a material under specific test conditions. Pitting may be the precursor to other corrosion degradation mechanisms, such as environmentally-assisted cracking. This paper will provide an overview of the results of the first stage of experimental program in which samples of Alloy 600 TT, Alloy 690 TT, and Alloy 800 were tested under various temperatures and potentials and simulated crevice environments. The testing environment was chosen to represent layup, startup, and full operating conditions of the steam generators. Degradation incubation times for over 80 samples were

  12. Simultaneous measurements of acetylene and soot during the pyrolysis of ethylene and benzene in a shock tube

    KAUST Repository

    KC, Utsav; Beshir, Mohamed; Farooq, Aamir

    2016-01-01

    reflected shock waves at temperatures of 1600-2200. K and pressures of 3-5. bar. Acetylene mole fraction time-histories are measured from the absorption of a quantum-cascade laser operating around 13.6. μm. The soot volume fraction, particle size and number

  13. Surface instabilities in shock loaded granular media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandan, K.; Khaderi, S. N.; Wadley, H. N. G.; Deshpande, V. S.

    2017-12-01

    The initiation and growth of instabilities in granular materials loaded by air shock waves are investigated via shock-tube experiments and numerical calculations. Three types of granular media, dry sand, water-saturated sand and a granular solid comprising PTFE spheres were experimentally investigated by air shock loading slugs of these materials in a transparent shock tube. Under all shock pressures considered here, the free-standing dry sand slugs remained stable while the shock loaded surface of the water-saturated sand slug became unstable resulting in mixing of the shocked air and the granular material. By contrast, the PTFE slugs were stable at low pressures but displayed instabilities similar to the water-saturated sand slugs at higher shock pressures. The distal surfaces of the slugs remained stable under all conditions considered here. Eulerian fluid/solid interaction calculations, with the granular material modelled as a Drucker-Prager solid, reproduced the onset of the instabilities as seen in the experiments to a high level of accuracy. These calculations showed that the shock pressures to initiate instabilities increased with increasing material friction and decreasing yield strain. Moreover, the high Atwood number for this problem implied that fluid/solid interaction effects were small, and the initiation of the instability is adequately captured by directly applying a pressure on the slug surface. Lagrangian calculations with the directly applied pressures demonstrated that the instability was caused by spatial pressure gradients created by initial surface perturbations. Surface instabilities are also shown to exist in shock loaded rear-supported granular slugs: these experiments and calculations are used to infer the velocity that free-standing slugs need to acquire to initiate instabilities on their front surfaces. The results presented here, while in an idealised one-dimensional setting, provide physical understanding of the conditions required to

  14. Materials tests and analyses of Faraday shield tubes for ICRF [ion cyclotron resonant frequency] antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, J.F.; Baity, F.W.; Hoffman, D.J.; Walls, J.C.; Taylor, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    The ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) antennas for heating fusion plasmas require careful analysis of the materials selected for the design and the successful fabrication of high integrity braze bonds. Graphite tiles are brazed to Inconel 625 Faraday shield tubes to protect the antenna from the plasma. The bond between the graphite and Inconel tube is difficult to achieve due to the different coefficients of thermal expansion. A 2-D stress analysis showed the graphite could be bonded to Inconel with a Ag-Cu-Ti braze alloy without cracking the graphite. Brazing procedures and nondestructive examination methods have been developed for these joints. This paper presents the results of our joining development and proof testing. 2 refs., 3 figs

  15. High-temperature shock tube and modeling studies on the reactions of methanol with D-atoms and CH3-radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peukert, S L; Michael, J V

    2013-10-10

    The shock tube technique has been used to study the hydrogen abstraction reactions D + CH3OH → CH2O + H + HD (A) and CH3 + CH3OH → CH2O + H + CH4 (B). For reaction A, the experiments span a T-range of 1016 K ≤ T ≤ 1325 K, at pressures 0.25 bar ≤ P ≤ 0.46 bar. The experiments on reaction B, CH3 + CH3OH, cover a T-range of 1138 K ≤ T ≤ 1270 K, at pressures around 0.40 bar. Reflected shock tube experiments, monitoring the depletion of D-atoms by applying D-atom atomic resonance absorption spectrometry (ARAS), were performed on reaction A using gas mixtures of C2D5I and CH3OH in Kr bath gas. C2D5I was used as precursor for D-atoms. For reaction B, reflected shock tube experiments monitoring H-atom formation with H-ARAS, were carried out using gas mixtures of diacetyl ((CH3CO)2) and CH3OH in Kr bath gas. (CH3CO)2 was used as the source of CH3-radicals. Detailed reaction models were assembled to fit the D-atom and H-atom time profiles in order to obtain experimental rate constants for reactions A and B. Total rate constants from the present experiments on D + CH3OH and CH3 + CH3OH can be represented by the Arrhenius equations kA(T) = 1.51 × 10(-10) exp(-3843 K/T) cm(3) molecules(-1) s(-1) (1016 K ≤ T ≤ 1325 K) and kB(T) = 9.62 × 10(-12) exp(-7477 K/T) cm(3) molecules(-1) s(-1) (1138 K ≤ T ≤ 1270 K). The experimentally obtained rate constants were compared with available rate data from the literature. The results from quantum chemical studies on reaction A were found to be in good agreement with the present results. The present work represents the first direct experimental study on these bimolecular reactions at combustion temperatures and is important to the high-temperature oxidation of CH3OH.

  16. Computed tomographic images using tube source of x rays: interior properties of the material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Donepudi V.; Takeda, Tohoru; Itai, Yuji; Seltzer, S. M.; Hubbell, John H.; Zeniya, Tsutomu; Akatsuka, Takao; Cesareo, Roberto; Brunetti, Antonio; Gigante, Giovanni E.

    2002-01-01

    An image intensifier based computed tomography scanner and a tube source of x-rays are used to obtain the images of small objects, plastics, wood and soft materials in order to know the interior properties of the material. A new method is developed to estimate the degree of monochromacy, total solid angle, efficiency and geometrical effects of the measuring system and the way to produce monoenergetic radiation. The flux emitted by the x-ray tube is filtered using the appropriate filters at the chosen optimum energy and reasonable monochromacy is achieved and the images are acceptably distinct. Much attention has been focused on the imaging of small objects of weakly attenuating materials at optimum value. At optimum value it is possible to calculate the three-dimensional representation of inner and outer surfaces of the object. The image contrast between soft materials could be significantly enhanced by optimal selection of the energy of the x-rays by Monte Carlo methods. The imaging system is compact, reasonably economic, has a good contrast resolution, simple operation and routine availability and explores the use of optimizing tomography for various applications.

  17. Numerical results from a study of LiH: the proposed standard material for the high pressure shock experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, F.J.

    1975-01-01

    It is proposed to send a high pressure shock wave through a layer of LiH and then into a sample of high Z-material, resulting in a reflected shock wave back into the LiH. If the Hugoniot and some reflected Hugoniots for LiH are known the EOS of the sample can be obtained from the ''impedance matching method.'' The theory and its range of validity are described

  18. Effect of heat treatment and composition on stress corrosion cracking of steam generation tubing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H. P.; Hwang, S. S.; Kuk, I. H.; Kim, J. S.; Oh, C. Y.

    1998-01-01

    Effects of heat treatment and alloy composition on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of steam generator tubing materials have been studied in 40% NaOH at 315.deg.C at potential of +200mV above corrosion potential using C-ring specimen and reverse U bend specimen. The tubing materials used were commercial Alloy 600, Alloy 690 and laboratory alloys, Ni-χCr-10Fe. Commercial Alloy 600, Alloy 690 were mill annealed or thermally treated.Laboratory alloy Ni-χCr-10Fe, and some of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 were solution annealed. Polarization curves were measured to find out any relationship between SCC susceptibility and electrochemical behaviour. The variation in thermal treatment of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 had no effect on polarization behaviour probably due to small area fraction of carbide and Cr depletion zone near grain boundary. In anodic polarization curves, the first and second anodic peaks at about 170mV and about at 260mV, respectively, above corrosion potential were independent of Cr content, whereas the third peak at 750mV above corrosion potential and passive current density in-creased with Cr content. SCC susceptibility decreased with Cr content and thermal treatment producing semicontinuous grain boundary decoration. Examination of cross sectional area of C-ring specimen showed deep SCC cracks for the alloys with less than 17%Cr and many shallow attacks for alloy 690. The role of Cr content in steam generator tubing materials and grain boundary carbide on SCC were discussed

  19. Attenuation of hydrogen radicals traveling under flowing gas conditions through tubes of different materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grubbs, R.K.; George, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen radical concentrations traveling under flowing gas conditions through tubes of different materials were measured using a dual thermocouple probe. The source of the hydrogen radicals was a toroidal radio frequency plasma source operating at 2.0 and 3.3 kW for H 2 pressures of 250 and 500 mTorr, respectively. The dual thermocouple probe was comprised of exposed and covered Pt/Pt13%Rh thermocouples. Hydrogen radicals recombined efficiently on the exposed thermocouple and the energy of formation of H 2 heated the thermocouple. The second thermocouple was covered by glass and was heated primarily by the ambient gas. The dual thermocouple probe was translated and measured temperatures at different distances from the hydrogen radical source. These temperature measurements were conducted at H 2 flow rates of 35 and 75 SCCM (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP) inside cylindrical tubes made of stainless steel, aluminum, quartz, and Pyrex. The hydrogen radical concentrations were obtained from the temperatures of the exposed and covered thermocouples. The hydrogen concentration decreased versus distance from the plasma source. After correcting for the H 2 gas flow using a reference frame transformation, the hydrogen radical concentration profiles yielded the atomic hydrogen recombination coefficient, γ, for the four materials. The methodology of measuring the hydrogen radical concentrations, the analysis of the results under flowing gas conditions, and the determination of the atomic hydrogen recombination coefficients for various materials will help facilitate the use of hydrogen radicals for thin film growth processes

  20. Shock-tube study of the decomposition of tetramethylsilane using gas chromatography and high-repetition-rate time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sela, P; Peukert, S; Herzler, J; Fikri, M; Schulz, C

    2018-04-25

    The decomposition of tetramethylsilane was studied in shock-tube experiments in a temperature range of 1270-1580 K and pressures ranging from 1.5 to 2.3 bar behind reflected shock waves combining gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and high-repetition-rate time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HRR-TOF-MS). The main observed products were methane (CH4), ethylene (C2H4), ethane (C2H6), and acetylene (C2H2). In addition, the formation of a solid deposit was observed, which was identified to consist of silicon- and carbon-containing nanoparticles. A kinetics sub-mechanism with 13 silicon species and 20 silicon-containing reactions was developed. It was combined with the USC_MechII mechanism for hydrocarbons, which was able to simulate the experimental observations. The main decomposition channel of TMS is the Si-C bond scission forming methyl (CH3) and trimethylsilyl radicals (Si(CH3)3). The rate constant for TMS decomposition is represented by the Arrhenius expression ktotal[TMS → products] = 5.9 × 1012 exp(-267 kJ mol-1/RT) s-1.

  1. Numerical studies on heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of flat finned tube bundles with various fin materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Y.; Zhang, S. J.; Shen, F.; Wang, X. B.; Yang, X. R.; Yang, L. J.

    2017-11-01

    The air-cooled heat exchanger plays an important role in the field of industry like for example in thermal power plants. On the other hand, it can be used to remove core decay heat out of containment passively in case of a severe accident circumstance. Thus, research on the performance of fins in air-cooled heat exchangers can benefit the optimal design and operation of cooling systems in nuclear power plants. In this study, a CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamic) method is implemented to investigate the effects of inlet velocity, fin spacing and tube pitch on the flow and the heat transfer characteristics of flat fins constructed of various materials (316L stainless steel, copper-nickel alloy and aluminium). A three dimensional geometric model of flat finned tube bundles with fixed longitudinal tube pitch and transverse tube pitch is established. Results for the variation of the average convective heat transfer coefficient with respect to cooling air inlet velocity, fin spacing, tube pitch and fin material are obtained, as well as for the pressure drop of the cooling air passing through finned tube. It is shown that the increase of cooling air inlet velocity results in enhanced average convective heat transfer coefficient and decreasing pressure drop. Both fin spacing and tube pitch engender positive effects on pressure drop and have negative effects on heat transfer characteristics. Concerning the fin material, the heat transfer performance of copper-nickel alloy is superior to 316L stainless steel and inferior to aluminium.

  2. Multiscale modeling, coarse-graining and shock wave computer simulationsin materials science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin O. Steinhauser

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available My intention in this review article is to briefly discuss several major topics of presentdaycomputational materials science in order to show their importance for state-of-the-art materialsmodeling and computer simulation. The topics I discuss are multiscale modeling approaches forhierarchical systems such as biological macromolecules and related coarse-graining techniques, whichprovide an effcient means to investigate systems on the mesoscale, and shock wave physics whichhas many important and interesting multi- and interdisciplinary applications in research areas wherephysics, biology, chemistry, computer science, medicine and even engineering meet. In fact, recently,as a new emerging field, the use of coarse-grained approaches for the simulation of biologicalmacromolecules such as lipids and bilayer membranes and the investigation of their interaction withshock waves has become very popular. This emerging area of research may contribute not only toan improved understanding of the microscopic details of molecular self-assembly but may also leadto enhanced medical tumor treatments which are based on the destructive effects of High IntensityFocused Ultrasound (HIFU or shock waves when interacting with biological cells and tissue; theseare treatments which have been used in medicine for many years, but which are not well understoodfrom a fundamental physical point of view.

  3. Associated-particle sealed-tube neutron probe: Detection of explosives, contraband, and nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, E.; Dickerman, C.E.

    1996-01-01

    Continued research and development of the APSTNG shows the potential for practical field use of this technology for detection of explosives, contraband, and nuclear materials. The APSTNG (associated-particle sealed-tube generator) inspects the item to be examined using penetrating 14-MeV neutrons generated by the deuterium-tritium reaction inside a compact accelerator tube. An alpha detector built into the sealed tube detects the alpha-particle associated with each neutron emitted in a cone encompassing the volume to be inspected. Penetrating high-energy gamma-rays from the resulting neutron reactions identify specific nuclides inside the volume. Flight-times determined from the detection times of gamma-rays and alpha-particles separate the prompt and delayed gamma-ray spectra and allow a coarse 3-D image to be obtained of nuclides identified in the prompt spectrum. The generator and detectors can be on the same side of the inspected object, on opposite sides, or with intermediate orientations. Thus, spaces behind walls and other confined regions can be inspected. Signals from container walls can be discriminated against using the flight-time technique. No collimators or shielding are required, the neutron generator is relatively small, and commercial-grade electronics are employed. The use of 14-MeV neutrons yields a much higher cross-section for detecting nitrogen than that for systems based on thermal-neutron reactions alone, and the broad range of elements with significant 14-MeV neutron cross-sections extends explosives detection to other elements including low-nitrogen compounds, and allows detection of many other substances. Proof-of-concept experiments have been successfully performed for conventional explosives, chemical warfare agents, cocaine, and fissionable materials

  4. Deformation behavior of irradiated Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Himbeault, D.D.; Chow, C.K.; Puls, M.P.

    1994-01-01

    A study of the deformation behavior of irradiated highly textured Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube material in the temperature range of 30 degree C to 300 degree C was undertaken to understand better the mechanism for the deterioration of the fracture toughness with neutron irradiation. Strain localization behavior, believed to be a main contributor to reduced toughness, was observed in irradiated transverse tensile specimens at temperature greater than 100 degree C. The strain localization behavior was found to occur by the cooperative twinning of the highly textured grains of the material, resulting in a local softening of the material, where the flow than localizes. It is believed that the effect of the irradiation is to favor twinning at the expense of slip in the early stages of deformation. This effect becomes more pronounced at higher temperature, thus leading to the high-temperature strain localization behavior of the material. A limited amount of dislocation channeling was also observed; however, it is not considered to have a major role in the strain localization behavior of the material. Contrary to previous reports on irradiated zirconium alloys, static strain aging is observed in the irradiated material in the temperature range of 150 degree C to 300 degree C

  5. Stress corrosion cracking of steam generator tubing materials in lead containing solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H.P.; Hwang, S.S.; Kim, J.S.; Hong, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in lead (Pb) containing environments has been one of key issues in the nuclear power industry since Pb had been identified as a cause of the SCC of steam generator (SG) tubing materials in some power plants. To mitigate or prevent degradation of SG tubing materials, a mechanistic understanding of SCC in Pb containing environment is needed, along with an understanding of the source and transport behaviors of Pb species in the secondary circuit. In this work, SCC behaviors of Alloy 600 in Pb containing environments were studied. Influences of microstructures of Alloy 600 and the inhibitive additives were investigated using the C-ring and the slow strain rate tests in caustic solution and demineralized water at 315 o C. Microstructures of Alloy 600 were varied by heat treatment at different temperatures. The additives examined were nickel boride (NiB) and cerium boride (CeB 6 ). The surface films were analyzed using Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). The SCC mode varied with microstructure. Effectiveness of the additives in Pb containing environments is discussed. (author)

  6. Scaling impact and shock-compression response for porous materials: Application to planetary formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanloz, R.

    2016-12-01

    A thermodynamic model based on the Mie-Grüneisen equation of state does a good job of describing the response of porous materials to impact, so can provide insights into the accretion and cohesion of planetesimals too small to be significantly held together by gravity (e.g., tens of km or less in average diameter). The model identifies an offset in Hugoniot pressure (ΔPH) due to porosity that is found to be in agreement with experimental shock-compression measurements for samples having a wide range of initial porosities. Assuming the Grüneisen parameter (γ) is proportional to volume (γ/V = constant), the relative offset in Hugoniot pressure as a function of initial porosity (φ = 1 - V0/V0por) and compression (η = 1 - V/V0) is ΔPH/PH = γ0 φ/[2(1 - φ) - γ0 (φ + η(1 - φ))] where subscripts 0 and por represent zero-pressure (non-porous) conditions and a porous sample, respectively. This additional thermal pressure at a given volume is due to the extra internal energy and corresponding temperature increase associated with collapsing pores (Fig. 1: near-identical curves for φ = 0.001 and 0.01). This result can be interpreted as indicating that upon collapse individual pores create hot spots with temperatures of order 103-104K above the background, suggesting that impact into an initially porous target can result in cohesion due to partial melting and vaporization. Moreover, the waste heat associated with pore closure far exceeds the dissipation in shock loading of non-porous material, reflecting the ability of a porous target to absorb and dissipate impact energy. The Mie-Grüneisen model along with analysis of waste heat thus provides a scaling for planetesimal impact that might explain how rock and regolith accrete into a gravitationally bound planet. Fig. 1. Porosity-induced anomaly in Hugoniot temperature per unit of porosity, shown as a function of compression for samples with initial porosity φ = 0.001 (green), 0.01 (blue) and 0.1 (gold) assuming

  7. Observation of the shock wave propagation induced by a high-power laser irradiation into an epoxy material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ecault, Romain; Boustie, Michel; Touchard, Fabienne; Berthe, Laurent; Lescoute, Emilien; Sollier, Arnaud; Mercier, Patrick; Benier, Jacky

    2013-01-01

    The propagation of laser-induced shock waves in a transparent epoxy sample is investigated by optical shadowgraphy. The shock waves are generated by a focused laser (3 ns pulse duration—1.2 to 3.4 TW cm −2 ) producing pressure from 44 to 98.9 GPa. It is observed that the shock wave and the release wave created by the shock reverberation at the rear face are both followed by a dark zone in the pictures. This corresponds to the creation of a tensile zone resulting from the crossing on the loading axis of the release waves coming from the edge of the impact area (2D effects). After the laser shock experiment, the residual stresses in the targets are identified and quantified through a photoelasticimetry analysis of the recovered samples. This work results in a new set of original data which can be directly used to validate numerical models implemented to reproduce the behaviour of epoxy under extreme strain rate loading. The residual stresses observed prove that the high-pressure shocks can modify the pure epoxy properties, which could have an influence on the use made of these materials. (paper)

  8. Fracture-mechanics data deduced from thermal-shock and related experiments with LWR pressure-vessel material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheverton, R.D.; Canonico, D.A.; Iskander, S.K.; Bolt, S.E.; Holz, P.P.; Nanstad, R.K.; Stelzman, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    Pressurized water reactors (PWRs) are susceptible to certain types of hypothetical accidents that can subject the reactor pressure vessel to severe thermal shock, that is, a rapid cooling of the inner surface of the vessel wall. The thermal-shock loading, coupled with the radiation-induced reduction in the material fracture toughness, introduces the possibility of propagation of preexistent flaws and what at one time were regarded as somewhat unique fracture-oriented conditions. Several postulated reactor accidents have been analyzed to discover flaw behavior trends; seven intermediate-scale thermal-shock experiments with steel cylinders have been conducted; and corresponding materials characterization studies have been performed. Flaw behavior trends and related fracture-mechanics data deduced from these studies are discussed

  9. Development of velocity interferometer and its application to piston motion measurement in a compression tube of freepiston shock tube; Sokudo kanshokei no kaihatsu to sono jiyu piston shogekihakan no asshuku kannai no piston undo no keisoku eno oyo ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koremoto, K.; Hashimoto, T. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Takayama, K. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Inst. of Fluid Science; Ito, K [National Aerospace Laboratory, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-10-25

    A free piston shock tunnel has been intensively used as a hypersonic flow ground test facility and its characteristics depend sensitively upon the piston motion in its compression tube. The continuous measurement of the piston motion in its compression tube was studied in an analogue facility in which a piston motion in a 50mm dia. and 2000mm long compression tube was measured continuously and accurately from its start to the collision with bumper section. To achieve it a velocity interferometer was developed particularly to measure the piston speed in it. Then piston motions were successfully measured and result agreed very well with numerical result. (author)

  10. Transferability of decompression wave speed measured by a small-diameter shock tube to full size pipelines and implications for determining required fracture propagation resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botros, K.K.; Geerligs, J.; Rothwell, Brian; Carlson, Lorne; Fletcher, Leigh; Venton, Philip

    2010-01-01

    The control of propagating ductile (or tearing) fracture is a fundamental requirement in the fracture control design of pipelines. The Battelle two-curve method developed in the early 1970s still forms the basis of the analytical framework used throughout the industry. GASDECOM is typically used for calculating decompression speed, and idealizes the decompression process as isentropic and one-dimensional, taking no account of frictional effects. While this approximation appears not to have been a major issue for large-diameter pipes and for moderate pressures (up to 12 MPa), there have been several recent full-scale burst tests at higher pressures and smaller diameters for which the measured decompression velocity has deviated progressively from the predicted values, in general towards lower velocities. The present research was focused on determining whether pipe diameter was a major factor that could limit the applicability of frictionless models such as GASDECOM. Since potential diameter effects are primarily related to wall friction, which in turn is related to the ratio of surface roughness-to-diameter, an experimental approach was developed based on keeping the diameter constant, at a sufficiently small value to allow for an economical experimental arrangement, and varying the internal roughness. A series of tests covering a range of nominal initial pressures from 10 to 21 MPa, and involving a very lean gas and three progressively richer compositions, were conducted using two specialized high-pressure shock tubes (42 m long, I.D. = 38.1 mm). The first is honed to an extremely smooth surface finish, in order to minimize frictional effects and better simulate the behaviour of larger-diameter pipelines, while the second has a higher internal surface roughness. The results show that decompression wave speeds in the rough tube are consistently slower than those in the smooth tube under the same conditions of mixture composition and initial pressure and temperature

  11. Tensile properties and flow behavior analysis of modified 9Cr–1Mo steel clad tube material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Kanwarjeet, E-mail: kanwar722@yahoo.com; Latha, S.; Nandagopal, M.; Mathew, M.D.; Laha, K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2014-11-15

    The tensile properties and flow behavior of modified 9Cr–1Mo steel clad tube have been investigated in the framework of various constitutive equations for a wide range of temperatures (300–923 K) and strain rates (3 × 10{sup −3} s{sup −1}, 3 × 10{sup −4} s{sup −1} and 3 × 10{sup −5} s{sup −1}). The tensile flow behavior of modified 9Cr–1Mo steel clad tube was most accurately described by Voce equation. The variation of instantaneous work hardening rate (θ = dσ/dε) and σθ with stress (σ) indicated two stage behavior characterized by rapid decrease at low stresses (transient stage) followed by a gradual decrease in high stresses (Stage III). The variation of work hardening parameters and work hardening rate in terms of θ vs. σ and σθ vs. σ with temperature exhibited three distinct regimes. Rapid decrease in flow stress and work hardening parameters and rapid shift of θ vs. σ and σθ vs. σ towards low stresses with increase in temperature indicated dynamic recovery at high temperatures. Tensile properties of the material have been best predicted from Voce equation.

  12. Tensile properties and flow behavior analysis of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel clad tube material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kanwarjeet; Latha, S.; Nandagopal, M.; Mathew, M. D.; Laha, K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2014-11-01

    The tensile properties and flow behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel clad tube have been investigated in the framework of various constitutive equations for a wide range of temperatures (300-923 K) and strain rates (3 × 10-3 s-1, 3 × 10-4 s-1 and 3 × 10-5 s-1). The tensile flow behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel clad tube was most accurately described by Voce equation. The variation of instantaneous work hardening rate (θ = dσ/dε) and σθ with stress (σ) indicated two stage behavior characterized by rapid decrease at low stresses (transient stage) followed by a gradual decrease in high stresses (Stage III). The variation of work hardening parameters and work hardening rate in terms of θ vs. σ and σθ vs. σ with temperature exhibited three distinct regimes. Rapid decrease in flow stress and work hardening parameters and rapid shift of θ vs. σ and σθ vs. σ towards low stresses with increase in temperature indicated dynamic recovery at high temperatures. Tensile properties of the material have been best predicted from Voce equation.

  13. Suppressing hydrogen ingress during aqueous corrosion of CANDU Zr-2.5 Nb pressure tube material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmoselhi, M.B.; Donner, A.; Brennenstuhl, A.; Warr, B.D.; Ellis, P.J.; Evans, D.W.

    2002-01-01

    As a result of their special properties, including low neutron cross-section and intrinsic corrosion resistance, Zr alloys are used in the fabrication of nuclear core components, particularly fuel cladding (in most reactor types) and also Zr-2.5 Nb pressure tubes in CANDU trademark (Canada Deuterium Uranium) reactors. Corrosion and H uptake during service can limit the life of these components. Therefore, remedial action may be appropriate to slow the H uptake rate and prolong the working life of these reactor components. This work has explored the possibility of reducing H uptake in pressure tube material by incorporating an inhibiting agent into the corrosion environment. Two approaches have been tested, depositing a thin metallic film on the initial oxide surface and adding an inhibiting agent to the solution. The latter approach appears more practical. Screening experiments were conducted in short-term (∝30 day) exposures in high temperature (340 C) aqueous out-reactor environments, simulating the CANDU trademark heat transport coolant with various chemistries. Compounds tested included aluminum acetate, aluminum nitrate, lithium nitrate, rhodium nitrate and yttrium nitrate. Comparison of results from the aluminum nitrate additives and aluminum acetate additives suggests that the nitrate anion is the effective ingredient for H ingress inhibition. The nitrate anion appears to reduce the rate of H ingress regardless of the associated cation. However, each cation appears to affect the rate of corrosion differently. These cations were found to be incorporated in the oxide film. (authors)

  14. Tensile properties and flow behavior analysis of modified 9Cr–1Mo steel clad tube material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Kanwarjeet; Latha, S.; Nandagopal, M.; Mathew, M.D.; Laha, K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2014-01-01

    The tensile properties and flow behavior of modified 9Cr–1Mo steel clad tube have been investigated in the framework of various constitutive equations for a wide range of temperatures (300–923 K) and strain rates (3 × 10 −3 s −1 , 3 × 10 −4 s −1 and 3 × 10 −5 s −1 ). The tensile flow behavior of modified 9Cr–1Mo steel clad tube was most accurately described by Voce equation. The variation of instantaneous work hardening rate (θ = dσ/dε) and σθ with stress (σ) indicated two stage behavior characterized by rapid decrease at low stresses (transient stage) followed by a gradual decrease in high stresses (Stage III). The variation of work hardening parameters and work hardening rate in terms of θ vs. σ and σθ vs. σ with temperature exhibited three distinct regimes. Rapid decrease in flow stress and work hardening parameters and rapid shift of θ vs. σ and σθ vs. σ towards low stresses with increase in temperature indicated dynamic recovery at high temperatures. Tensile properties of the material have been best predicted from Voce equation

  15. Laser shocks: A tool for experimental simulation of damage into materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boustie, M.; Cuq Lelandais, J. P.; Berthe, L.; Ecault, R. [Institut PPRIME, Departement Physique et Mecanique des Materiaux, CNRS-ENSMA-Universite de Poitiers, 1 av Clement Ader, 86961 FUTUROSCOPE Cedex (France); CEA-DAM Valduc, 21120 Is-sur-Tille (France); Laboratoire Procedes et Ingenierie en Mecanique et Materiaux (CNRS), Arts et Metiers ParisTech, 151 bd de l' Hopital, 75013 PARIS (France); Institut PPRIME, Departement Physique et Mecanique des Materiaux, CNRS-ENSMA-Universite de Poitiers, 1 av Clement Ader, 86961 FUTUROSCOPE Cedex (France)

    2012-07-30

    High power laser irradiation of solids results in a strong shock wave propagation, driving very high amplitude pressure loadings with very short durations. These particular characteristics offer the possibility to study the behaviour of matter under extreme dynamic conditions in continuity with what is possible with the conventional generators of shock (launchers of projectiles, explosives). An advantage of laser shocks is a possible recovery of the shocked samples presenting the metallurgical effects of the shock in most cases. We introduce the principle of the laser shock generation, the characterization of these shocks, the principal mechanisms and effects associated with their propagation in the solids. We show how laser shocks can be a laboratory tool for simulating shock effects at ultra high strain rate, providing a high in information experimental layout for validation of damage modelling on an extended strain rate range compared to conventional shock generators. New data have been obtained with ultra short femtosecond range irradiation. Experimental data gathered through post mortem observation, time resolved velocity measurement are shown along with numerical associated simulations, showing the possibility to predict the damage behaviour of metallic targets under extreme strain rate up to 10{sup 8} s{sup -1}.

  16. Preparation and Characterization of Carbon Nano tube-based Electrochromic Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad Shahazmi Mohd Zambri; Norani Muti Mohamed; Kait, C.F.

    2011-01-01

    Electrochromic materials that can change their optical properties reversibly for an applied potential due to electrochemical oxidation and reduction have been used in various applications of electrochromic windows or smart glass. Conducting polymer like poly aniline (PANI) is one of the most promising electrochromic materials because of its ease of synthesis and environmental stability. However, the electrochemically deposited poly aniline exhibit substantial resistivity which is attributed to the lack of conducting pathways at the nano scale associated with random deposition morphology. This paper describes the study in developing electrochromic material that will exhibit higher conductivity by using carbon nano tubes (CNTs) as the filler. Preparation of electrochromic material on ITO and FTO glass substrate was done by electrochemical process using mixture of CNTs and PANI in H 2 SO 4 at several loading of CNTs, voltage applied and duration of the process. PANI and PANI/ CNTs films produced were then characterized using SEM and Hall Effect measurement. From the study, highly conductive PANI/ CNTs film can be obtained by using optimum condition of the process parameters. PANI film deposited on FTO glass substrate was also found to be of good quality with conductivity two orders of magnitude higher than the film deposited on ITO glass substrate. (author)

  17. Single cells for forensic DNA analysis--from evidence material to test tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brück, Simon; Evers, Heidrun; Heidorn, Frank; Müller, Ute; Kilper, Roland; Verhoff, Marcel A

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop a method that, while providing morphological quality control, allows single cells to be obtained from the surfaces of various evidence materials and be made available for DNA analysis in cases where only small amounts of cell material are present or where only mixed traces are found. With the SteREO Lumar.V12 stereomicroscope and UV unit from Zeiss, it was possible to detect and assess single epithelial cells on the surfaces of various objects (e.g., glass, plastic, metal). A digitally operated micromanipulator developed by aura optik was used to lift a single cell from the surface of evidence material and to transfer it to a conventional PCR tube or to an AmpliGrid(®) from Advalytix. The actual lifting of the cells was performed with microglobes that acted as carriers. The microglobes were held with microtweezers and were transferred to the DNA analysis receptacles along with the adhering cells. In a next step, the PCR can be carried out in this receptacle without removing the microglobe. Our method allows a single cell to be isolated directly from evidence material and be made available for forensic DNA analysis. © 2010 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  18. Investigation of the dynamic behavior in materials submitted to sub-picosecond laser driven shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuq-Lelandais, Jean-Paul

    2010-01-01

    Laser driven shocks allow to investigate materials behavior at high strain rate and present a great interest for research and industrial applications. The latest laser technologies evolutions provide an access to shorter regimes in duration, below the picosecond. This work, which results from a collaboration between the P' institute, the PIMM laboratory and the CEA-DAM, is dedicated to the characterization of the metallic material behavior in this ultra-short mode (aluminium, tantalum), leading to extreme dynamic solicitation in the target (>10 7 s -1 ). The study includes the validation of experimental results obtained on the LULI 100 TW facility by comparison with numerical model. First, the study is orientated to the femtosecond (fs) laser-matter interaction, which is different from what happens in nanosecond regime. Indeed, the characteristic duration scale is comparable to several molecular phenomena like non-equilibrium electrons-ions states. The aim is to determine the equivalent pressure loading induced by the laser pulse on the target. Then, the shock wave propagation within the target has been studied and particularly its pressure decay, notably strong in this regime. In this configuration, the spalls observed are thin, a few μm order, and show a planar rupture morphology. The results obtained by post-mortem observation show that the spall thickness is thinner if the target thickness is reduced. The spalls are characterized by the VISAR measurement. Within the framework of dynamic damage modeling and rupture criteria dimensioning, particularly those which have been validated in the ns regime as Kanel, shots with different thicknesses have been carried out to determine the damage properties in function of strain rate and validate the parameters by prolongation to the ultra-shorts modes. Then, the study has been generalized to the 2D propagation waves, which can explain the spall diameter evolutions. Meanwhile, microscopic simulations of ultra-short laser

  19. Ferrocyanide safety program: Final report on adiabatic calorimetry and tube propagation tests with synthetic ferrocyanide materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauske, H.F.; Meacham, J.E.; Cash, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    Based on Fauske and Associates, Inc. Reactive System Screening Tool tests, the onset or initiation temperature for a ferrocyanide-nitrate propagating reaction is about 250 degrees Celcius. This is at about 200 degrees Celcius higher than current waste temperatures in the highest temperature ferrocyanide tanks. Furthermore, for current ambient waste temperatures, the tube propagation tests show that a ferrocyanide concentration of 15.5 wt% or more is required to sustain a propagation reaction in the complete absence of free water. Ignoring the presence of free water, this finding rules out propagating reactions for all the Hanford flowsheet materials with the exception of the ferrocyanide waste produced by the original In Farm flowsheet

  20. The wet destruction of dry organic material in a closed quartz tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faanhof, A.; Das, H.A.

    1977-01-01

    Quantitative, rapid destruction of dry organic materials is necessary in many cases. The application of wet mineralization in a closed quartz tube and the optimization of destruction conditions are described. The procedure takes approximately 3.5 hours for 20 samples. The method was checked by radiotracer and activation experiments. The ratio of the Hg-203 count-rates of spiked and destructed samples to that of standards is 0.991+-0.014. The results of the instrumental analysis for tobacco and standard kale are: tobacco (84+-13) ng.g -1 , standard kale (155+-7)ng.g -1 . The average of the data for kale, reported in literature, is (150+-8)ng.g -1 . Results after destruction are: tobacco (82+-6)ng.g -1 , standard kale (158+-16)ng.g -1 . (N.L.Gy.)

  1. Drilling and boring of a tube in composite Kevlar-epoxy material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souverain, J.

    1984-01-01

    The search coils for the high-precision measurement of the magnetic field of the LEP magnets have to be carried on a support tube of high specific modulus, in order to maintain the accuracy required. An aromatic polyamide fibre (aramide), Kevlar 49, in an epoxy matrix was chosen as the most suitable material. However, the manufacture of the supports involves the drilling of holes with high precision, and initial trials in the ISR (LEP) workshop produced poor results. Special tools were then successfully designed and manufactured on the basis of an analysis of the difficulties encountered. This report presents the cutting principles adopted and demonstrates the results obtained in the final product. (orig.)

  2. Young’s modulus evaluation and thermal shock behavior of a porous SiC/cordierite composite material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pošarac-Marković M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Porous SiC/Cordierite Composite Material with graphite content (10% was synthesized. Evaluation of Young modulus of elasticity and thermal shock behavior of these samples was presented. Thermal shock behavior was monitored using water quench test, and non destructive methods such are UPVT and image analysis were also used for accompaniment the level of destruction of the samples during water quench test. Based on the level of destruction graphical modeling of critical number of cycles was given. This approach was implemented on discussion of the influence of the graphite content on thermal stability behavior of the samples. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 45012

  3. Investigation of material efficient fin patterns for cost-effective operation of fin and tube heat exchanger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Shobhana; Sørensen, Kim; Condra, Thomas Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Design management of a thermal energy system is a critical part of identifying basic designs that meet large scale user demand under certain operating characteristics. Fin and tube heat exchangers are among the most commonly used thermal energy systems which are generating considerable interest...... and tube heat exchanger. Computational fluid dynamic models of fin and tube heat exchanger with different fin patterns are developed to investigate the fin pattern behavior on heat transfer and pressure loss performance data. In addition, the numerical results are utilized to analyze the engineering design...... scale-up heat exchanger configurations with each fin pattern focusing on the application of chosen fin and tube heat exchanger in marine exhaust gas boiler. The analysis highlights the impact of material efficient fin patterns investigated and predicts that the polynomial and sinusoidal fin patterns...

  4. Corrosion tests in Baltic sea water on heat exchanger tubes of various metallic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henrikson, S.; Knutsson, L.

    1975-05-01

    Seventeen different tube materials have been exposed to continuous and intermittent flow in Baltic Sea water (0.4 % Cl - ) at 50 deg C for a maximum of 15 000 hours. During testing the specimens have been examined at certain intervals. After testing the specimens have been examined visually and metallographically. The following materials were completely resistant: titanium, CuNi30Mn1Fe, Alloy 825 and the austenitic steels Cr18Ni24Mo4.5, Cr20Ni25Mo4.5Cu and Cr24Ni24Mo2Ti. The ferritic-austenitic steels Cr18Ni5Mo2Si and Cr25Ni5Mo1.5 on the other hand, seem to be attacked by local intercrystalline corrosion in the vicinity of the welds. The same type of attack occurs, against expectations, even in the entirely ferritic steels, especially in Cr21Mo3Ti; this attack was however shown to be caused by surface carburization. Admiralty brass (2.5 m/s), aluminium brass (3.0 m/s) and CuNi10Fe1Mn (3.5 m/s) have been attacked by erosion corrosion. The same type of attack, although to a considerably smaller extent, has also been observed for the three aluminium materials (2.5 m/s). (author)

  5. Proliferation attractiveness of nuclear material in a small modular pressure tube SCWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, M.; Pencer, J., E-mail: mcdonamh@aecl.ca, E-mail: pencerj@aecl.ca [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    The SuperSafe© Reactor (SSR), has been recently proposed as a small modular version of the Canadian supercritical water cooled reactor (SCWR). This reactor is a heavy water moderated, pressure tube reactor using supercritical light water as coolant. The current SSR design is to generate 300 MWe taking advantage of the expected high thermal efficiency (assumed 45%). As one of the reactor types being considered by the Generation-IV International Forum, it is expected that this SCWR design will feature enhanced proliferation resistance over current generation technologies. Proliferation resistance assessments are wide-ranging, multidisciplinary efforts that are typically performed at a number of levels, from a state level down to a specific facility level. One small, but particularly important, sub-assessment is that of nuclear material attractiveness, that is, assessing the quality of nuclear materials throughout the fuel cycle for use in making a nuclear explosive device. The attractiveness of materials for three different SSR fuel options is examined in this work. (author)

  6. Glovebox-contained forty-millimeter gun system for the study of one-dimensional shock waves in toxic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honodel, C.A.

    1975-01-01

    A new gun system is being constructed at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory for studies of the behavior of toxic materials under shock-loaded conditions. Due to the extreme toxicity of some materials, such as plutonium, the entire gun system must be enclosed in gloveboxes. Some of the experimental requirements that affected the design of the system, various diagnostic techniques that will be employed with the system, and some details of the final design that is presently under assembly are presented

  7. Simultaneous measurements of acetylene and soot during the pyrolysis of ethylene and benzene in a shock tube

    KAUST Repository

    KC, Utsav

    2016-10-12

    Acetylene is one of the most important precursors of soot and contributes to soot growth by the hydrogen-abstraction acetylene-addition (HACA) mechanism. In this work, we undertake time-resolved simultaneous measurements of acetylene and soot behind reflected shock waves at temperatures of 1600-2200. K and pressures of 3-5. bar. Acetylene mole fraction time-histories are measured from the absorption of a quantum-cascade laser operating around 13.6. μm. The soot volume fraction, particle size and number densities are calculated from the extinction and scattering of a cw Nd:Yag laser at 532. nm. Acetylene and soot are generated from the pyrolysis of 1% benzene in argon, 2.35% ethylene in argon, and binary mixtures of ethylene with propane/methane in argon. We note that acetylene time-histories exhibit a two-stage growth during the pyrolysis of benzene, which can be correlated to the initial rapid increase of soot volume fraction and a later plateauing. In comparison to ethylene pyrolysis, the pyrolysis of benzene results in larger values of the soot volume fraction, particle diameter and number density. We compare the measured data against the values simulated using the method-of-moments routine in Chemkin-Pro and a detailed PAH mechanism based on KM2 [1] and AramcoMech 1.3 [2]. Large discrepancies are observed between the measured and predicted values of the soot parameters. The data obtained from our experiments may assist future validation and development of soot mechanisms.

  8. A high-temperature shock tube kinetic study for the branching ratios of isobutene+OH reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Khaled, Fathi

    2016-10-11

    Isobutene is an important intermediate formed during the oxidation of branched alkanes. It also appears as a byproduct during the combustion of methyl-tert-butyl-ether (MTBE) which is used as octane enhancer in gasolines. To understand better the oxidation kinetics of isobutene, we have measured the rate coefficients for the reaction of OH radicals with isobutene (HCC(CH)) behind reflected shock waves over the temperature range of 830-1289K and pressures near 1.5atm. The reaction progress was followed by measuring mole fraction of OH radicals near 306.7nm using UV laser absorption technique. Three deuterated isotopes, isobutene-1-d2 (DCC(CH)), isobutene-3-d6 (HCC(CD)) and isobutene-d8 (DCC(CD)) were employed to elucidate branching ratios of the allylic and vinylic H-abstraction from isobutene by OH radicals. H-abstraction from the allylic sites was found to be dominant and constituted about 75% of the total rate in the entire temperature range of the current work. The derived three-parameter Arrhenius expressions for site-specific H- and D- abstraction rates over 830-1289K are (units:cm mol s):k3,H=6.98×106(TK)1.77exp(-136.6KT) k3,D=4.42×106(TK)1.8exp(-361.7KT) k1,H=6.25×105(TK)2.16exp(-711.6KT) k1,D=3.13×107(TK)1.67exp(-1814KT) The subscript of . k identifies the position of H or D atom in isobutene according to the IUPAC nomenclature of alkenes.

  9. A high-temperature shock tube kinetic study for the branching ratios of isobutene+OH reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Khaled, Fathi; Giri, Binod; Farooq, Aamir

    2016-01-01

    Isobutene is an important intermediate formed during the oxidation of branched alkanes. It also appears as a byproduct during the combustion of methyl-tert-butyl-ether (MTBE) which is used as octane enhancer in gasolines. To understand better the oxidation kinetics of isobutene, we have measured the rate coefficients for the reaction of OH radicals with isobutene (HCC(CH)) behind reflected shock waves over the temperature range of 830-1289K and pressures near 1.5atm. The reaction progress was followed by measuring mole fraction of OH radicals near 306.7nm using UV laser absorption technique. Three deuterated isotopes, isobutene-1-d2 (DCC(CH)), isobutene-3-d6 (HCC(CD)) and isobutene-d8 (DCC(CD)) were employed to elucidate branching ratios of the allylic and vinylic H-abstraction from isobutene by OH radicals. H-abstraction from the allylic sites was found to be dominant and constituted about 75% of the total rate in the entire temperature range of the current work. The derived three-parameter Arrhenius expressions for site-specific H- and D- abstraction rates over 830-1289K are (units:cm mol s):k3,H=6.98×106(TK)1.77exp(-136.6KT) k3,D=4.42×106(TK)1.8exp(-361.7KT) k1,H=6.25×105(TK)2.16exp(-711.6KT) k1,D=3.13×107(TK)1.67exp(-1814KT) The subscript of . k identifies the position of H or D atom in isobutene according to the IUPAC nomenclature of alkenes.

  10. Numerical studies of cavitation erosion on an elastic-plastic material caused by shock-induced bubble collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turangan, C. K.; Ball, G. J.; Jamaluddin, A. R.; Leighton, T. G.

    2017-09-01

    We present a study of shock-induced collapse of single bubbles near/attached to an elastic-plastic solid using the free-Lagrange method, which forms the latest part of our shock-induced collapse studies. We simulated the collapse of 40 μm radius single bubbles near/attached to rigid and aluminium walls by a 60 MPa lithotripter shock for various scenarios based on bubble-wall separations, and the collapse of a 255 μm radius bubble attached to aluminium foil with a 65 MPa lithotripter shock. The coupling of the multi-phases, compressibility, axisymmetric geometry and elastic-plastic material model within a single solver has enabled us to examine the impingement of high-speed liquid jets from the shock-induced collapsing bubbles, which imposes an extreme compression in the aluminium that leads to pitting and plastic deformation. For certain scenarios, instead of the high-speed jet, a radially inwards flow along the aluminium surface contracts the bubble to produce a `mushroom shape'. This work provides methods for quantifying which parameters (e.g. bubble sizes and separations from the solid) might promote or inhibit erosion on solid surfaces.

  11. Measurement of impulse peak insertion loss from two acoustic test fixtures and four hearing protector conditions with an acoustic shock tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, William J.; Fackler, Cameron J.; Berger, Elliott H.; Shaw, Peter B.; Stergar, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Impulse peak insertion loss (IPIL) was studied with two acoustic test fixtures and four hearing protector conditions at the E-A-RCAL Laboratory. IPIL is the difference between the maximum estimated pressure for the open-ear condition and the maximum pressure measured when a hearing protector is placed on an acoustic test fixture (ATF). Two models of an ATF manufactured by the French-German Research Institute of Saint-Louis (ISL) were evaluated with high-level acoustic impulses created by an acoustic shock tube at levels of 134 decibels (dB), 150 dB, and 168 dB. The fixtures were identical except that the E-A-RCAL ISL fixture had ear canals that were 3 mm longer than the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) ISL fixture. Four hearing protection conditions were tested: Combat Arms earplug with the valve open, ETYPlugs® earplug, TacticalPro headset, and a dual-protector ETYPlugs earplug with TacticalPro earmuff. The IPILs measured for the E-A-RCAL fixture were 1.4 dB greater than the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) ISL ATF. For the E-A-RCAL ISL ATF, the left ear IPIL was 2.0 dB greater than the right ear IPIL. For the NIOSH ATF, the right ear IPIL was 0.3 dB greater than the left ear IPIL. PMID:26356380

  12. The role of strain localization in the fracture of irradiated pressure tube material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutton, R.

    1989-04-01

    This report reviews those phenomena that lead to strain localization in zirconium alloys, with particular reference to the role played by the formation of shear bands in fracture processes. The important influence of plastic deformation, in general, on fracture mechanisms is emphasized. This is to be expected when elastic-plastic fracture mechanics is the chosen analytical technique. Intensely inhomogeneous characteristics of strain localization cause an abrupt bifurcation in the evolution of deformation strain and lead to plastic instability linked with intrinsic material behaviour (e.g., work softening) or of geometric origin (e.g., localized necking). Both of these effects are discussed in relation to measurable deformation parameters, such as the work hardening rate and strain rate sensitivity, which determine the degree of resistance to plastic instability. The modifying effect of irradiation on these quantities is given specific attention, the appropriate literature pertaining to Zircaloy and Zr-2.5% Nb being reviewed. Recommendations are made for a combined experimental and theoretical program to characterize strain localization and reduced ductility in irradiated cold-worked Zr-2.5% Nb pressure tube material. The relationship between the deformation properties and the fracture behaviour is discussed

  13. Mechanical Tests Plan after Neutron Irradiation for SMART SG Tube Materials in a Hot Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Sang Bok; Baik, Seung Jai; Kim, Do Sik; Yoo, Byung Ok; Jung, Yang Hong; Song, Woong Sub; Choo, Kee Nam; Park, Jin Seok; Lee, Yong Sun; Ryu, Woo Seog

    2010-01-01

    An advanced integral PWR, SMART (System- Integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor) is being developed in KAERI. It has compact size and a relatively small power rating compared to a conventional reactor. The main components such as the steam generators, main circulation pumps are located in the reactor vessel. Therefore they are damaged from neutron irradiations generated from nuclear fuel fissions during operation. The SMART SG tubes which are 17 mm in a diameter and 2.5 mm in a thickness will be made of Alloy 690. To ensure the operation safety the post irradiation examinations is necessary to evaluate the deterioration levels of various original properties. Specially the amount of mechanical properties change should be reflected and revised to design data. For that tensile, fracture, hardness test are planned and under preparations. In this paper the detailed plans are reviewed. Three kinds of materials having different heat treatment procedures are prepared to fabricate specimens. The capsules installed the specimens are going to be irradiated in HANARO. Finally the tests for them will be performed in IMEF, Irradiated Materials Examination Facility at KAERI

  14. Drop Weight Device Fabrication and Tests for a Dynamic Material Property of Shock-Absorbing Material and Structure in Transportation Package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Woo Seok; Jeon, Jea Eon; Han, Sang Hyeok; Lee, Sang Hoon; Seo, Ki Seok

    2009-01-01

    A radioactive material transportation package consists of canister and impact limiters. IAEA Safety Standard Series No. TS-R-1 recommends a drop test to evaluate the structural integrity of a transportation package under a hypothetical accident condition. The free drop test of a transportation package from 9 m height simulates one of accident conditions. The transportation package has a potential energy corresponding to 9 m drop height, and this energy changes to a kinetic energy when it impacts on the target. The energy is absorbed by a deformation of shock-absorbing material so that the minimum energy is transferred to canister. Accordingly, the shock-absorbing material is a very important part in transportation package design. Since the data for shock-absorbing material characteristics is acquired by a static test in general, it is quite different to that of dynamic characteristics. And the dynamic characteristics data is hardly found in literature. In this study, a drop weight facility was designed and fabricated which produces an impact speed like that of free drop of 9 m height. Several materials considered for an impact limiter and impact limiter structures were tested by a drop weight facility to acquire a dynamic material characteristics data

  15. Drop Weight Device Fabrication and Tests for a Dynamic Material Property of Shock-Absorbing Material and Structure in Transportation Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Woo Seok; Jeon, Jea Eon; Han, Sang Hyeok; Lee, Sang Hoon; Seo, Ki Seok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    A radioactive material transportation package consists of canister and impact limiters. IAEA Safety Standard Series No. TS-R-1 recommends a drop test to evaluate the structural integrity of a transportation package under a hypothetical accident condition. The free drop test of a transportation package from 9 m height simulates one of accident conditions. The transportation package has a potential energy corresponding to 9 m drop height, and this energy changes to a kinetic energy when it impacts on the target. The energy is absorbed by a deformation of shock-absorbing material so that the minimum energy is transferred to canister. Accordingly, the shock-absorbing material is a very important part in transportation package design. Since the data for shock-absorbing material characteristics is acquired by a static test in general, it is quite different to that of dynamic characteristics. And the dynamic characteristics data is hardly found in literature. In this study, a drop weight facility was designed and fabricated which produces an impact speed like that of free drop of 9 m height. Several materials considered for an impact limiter and impact limiter structures were tested by a drop weight facility to acquire a dynamic material characteristics data.

  16. Wastage Behavior of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel Tube Material by Sodium-Water Reaction (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Ji Young; Kim, Jong Man; Kim, Tae Joon; Choi, Jong Hyeun; Kim, Byung Ho; Lee, Yong Bum; Park, Nam Cook

    2010-01-01

    The Korea Advanced LIquid MEtal Reactor (KALIMER) steam generator is a helical coil, vertically oriented, shell-and-tube type heat exchanger with fixed tube-sheet. The conceptual design and outline drawing of the steam generator are shown. Flow is counter-current, with sodium on the shell side and water/steam on the tube side. Sodium flow enters the steam generator through the upper inlet nozzles and then flows down through the tube bundle. Feedwater enters the steam generator through the feedwater nozzles at the bottom of steam generator. Therefore, if there is a hole or a crack in a heat transfer tube, a leakage of water/steam into the sodium may occur, resulting in a sodium-water reaction. When such a leak occurs, so-called 'wastage' is the result which may cause damage to or a failure of the adjacent tubes. If a steam generator is operated for some time in this condition, it is possible that it might create an intermediate leak state which would then give rise to the problems of a multi-target wastage in a very short time. Therefore, it is very important to predict these phenomena quantitatively from the view of designing a steam generator and its leak detection systems. The objective of this study is a basic investigating of the sodium-water reaction phenomena by small water/steam leaks. For this, wastage tests for modified 9Cr-1Mo steel tube material were conducted, and an empirical formula of the wastage rate for this material was obtained from the results

  17. Rechargeable biofilm-controlling tubing materials for use in dental unit water lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jie; Porteous, Nuala; Sun, Yuyu

    2011-08-01

    A simple and practical surface grafting approach was developed to introduce rechargeable N-halamine-based antimicrobial functionality onto the inner surfaces of continuous small-bore polyurethane (PU) dental unit waterline (DUWL) tubing. In this approach, tetrahydrofuran (THF) solution of a free-radical initiator, dicumyl peroxide (DCP), flowed through the PU tubing (inner diameter of 1/16 in., or 1.6 mm) to diffuse DCP into the tubing's inner walls, which was used as initiator in the subsequent grafting polymerization of methacrylamide (MAA) onto the tubing. Upon chlorine bleach treatment, the amide groups of the grafted MAA side chains were transformed into acyclic N-halamines. The reactions were confirmed with attenuated total reflectance infrared (ATR) spectra and iodometric titration. The mechanical properties of the tubing were not significantly affected by the grafting reactions. The biofilm-controlling function of the new N-halamine-based PU tubing was evaluated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa), one of the most isolated water bacteria from DUWLs, in a continuous bacterial flow model. Bacteria culturing and SEM studies showed that the inner surfaces of the new N-halamine-based PU tubing completely prevented bacterial biofilm formation for at least three to four weeks. After that, bacteria began to colonize the tubing surface. However, the lost function was fully regenerated by exposing the tubing inner surfaces to diluted chlorine bleach. The recharging process could be repeated periodically to further extend the biofilm-controlling duration for long-term applications.

  18. The use of a masticatory robot to analyze the shock absorption capacity of different restorative materials for implant prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Menini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present research was to measure in vitro the chewing load forces transmitted through crowns made of different prosthetic restorative materials onto the dental implant. A masticatory robot that is able to reproduce the mandibular movements and the forces exerted during mastication was used. The forces transmitted to the simulated periimplant bone during the robot mastication were analysis of variance (ANOVA was used. The zirconia and the ceramic crowns transmitted significantly greater forces (p-value < 0.0001 than the other crowns tested. Dental materials with lower elastic modulus were better able to ansorb shock from acclusal forces than more rigid materials.

  19. Theoretical study of the porosity effects on the shock response of graphitic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pineau Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a theoretical study of the shock compression of porous graphite by means of combined Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations using the LCBOPII potential. The results show that the Hugoniostat methods can be used with “pole” properties calculated from porous models to reproduce the experimental Hugoniot of pure graphite and diamond with good accuracy. The computed shock temperatures show a sharp increase for weak shocks which we analyze as the heating associated with the closure of the initial porosity. After this initial phase, the temperature increases with shock intensity at a rate comparable to monocrystalline graphite and diamond. These simulations data can be exploited in view to build a full equation of state for use in hydrodynamic simulations.

  20. Laser Induced Shock Waves and Vaporization in Biological System and Material Science

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gerstman, Bernard S

    2008-01-01

    .... We have developed a computational model that allows the calculation of damage resulting from a laser pulse of any duration or energy due to temperature rise, explosive bubble formation, and shock wave production...

  1. Theoretical model of an evacuated tube heat pipe solar collector integrated with phase change material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naghavi, M.S.; Ong, K.S.; Badruddin, I.A.; Mehrali, M.; Silakhori, M.; Metselaar, H.S.C.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to model theoretically a solar hot water system consisting of an array of ETHPSC (evacuated tube heat pipe solar collectors) connected to a common manifold filled with phase change material and acting as a LHTES (latent heat thermal energy storage) tank. Solar energy incident on the ETHPSC is collected and stored in the LHTES tank. The stored heat is then transferred to the domestic hot water supply via a finned heat exchanger pipe placed inside the tank. A combination of mathematical algorithms is used to model a complete process of the heat absorption, storage and release modes of the proposed system. The results show that for a large range of flow rates, the thermal performance of the ETHPSC-LHTES system is higher than that of a similar system without latent heat storage. Furthermore, the analysis shows that the efficiency of the introduced system is less sensitive to the draw off water flowrate than a conventional system. Analysis indicates that this system could be applicable as a complementary part to conventional ETHPSC systems to be able to produce hot water at night time or at times with weak radiation. - Highlights: • The ETHPSC is integrated with PCM at manifold side for night hot water demands. • The thermal performance of the ETHPSC-PCM is often higher than the baseline model. • The efficiency of the proposed model is stable for different flow rates. • Using PCM as thermal storage increases reliability on the performance of the system.

  2. Improve the material absorption of light and enhance the laser tube bending process utilizing laser softening heat treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhan, Khalil Ibraheem; Baharudin, B. T. H. T.; Zakaria, Azmi; Ismail, Mohd Idris Shah B.; Alsabti, Naseer Mahdi Hadi; Ahmad, Ahmad Kamal

    2018-02-01

    Laser forming is a flexible control process that has a wide spectrum of applications; particularly, laser tube bending. It offers the perfect solution for many industrial fields, such as aerospace, engines, heat exchangers, and air conditioners. A high power pulsed Nd-YAG laser with a maximum average power of 300 W emitting at 1064 nm and fiber-coupled is used to irradiate stainless steel 304 (SS304) tubes of 12.7 mm diameter, 0.6 mm thickness and 70 mm length. Moreover, a motorized rotation stage with a computer controller is employed to hold and rotate the tube. In this paper, an experimental investigation is carried out to improve the laser tube bending process by enhancing the absorption coefficient of the material and the mechanical formability using laser softening heat treatment. The material surface is coated with an oxidization layer; hence, the material absorption of laser light is increased and the temperature rapidly rises. The processing speed is enhanced and the output bending angle is increased to 1.9° with an increment of 70% after the laser softening heat treatment.

  3. Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of steam generator tube materials in AVT (all volatile treatment) chemistry contaminated with lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez Briceno, D.; Castano, M.L.; Garcia, M.S.

    1996-01-01

    Alloy 600 steam generator tubing has shown a high susceptibility to stress corrosion degradation at the operation conditions of pressurized water reactors. Several contaminants, such as lead, have been postulated as being responsible for producing the secondary side stress corrosion cracking that has occurred mainly at the location where these contaminants can concentrate. An extensive experimental work has been carried out in order to better understand the effects of lead on the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of steam generator tube materials, namely Alloys 600, 690 and 800. This paper presents the experimental work conducted with a view to determining the influence of lead oxide concentration in AVT (all volatile treatment) conditions on the stress corrosion resistance of nickel alloys used in the fabrication of steam generator tubing. (orig.)

  4. Shock absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Housman, J.J.

    1978-01-01

    A shock absorber is described for use in a hostile environment at the end of a blind passage for absorbing impact loads. The shock absorber includes at least one element which occupies the passage and which is comprised of a porous brittle material which is substantially non-degradable in the hostile environment. A void volume is provided in the element to enable the element to absorb a predetermined level of energy upon being crushed due to impact loading

  5. Planar shock focusing through perfect gas lens: First experimental demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biamino, Laurent; Mariani, Christian; Jourdan, Georges; Houas, Lazhar; Vandenboomgaerde, Marc; Souffland, Denis

    2014-01-01

    When a shock wave crosses an interface between two materials, this interface becomes unstable and the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability develops. Such instability has been extensively studied in the planar case, and numerous results were presented during the previous workshops. But the Richtmyer-Meshkov (Richtmyer, 1960, 'Taylor Instability in Shock Acceleration of Compressible Fluids,' Commun. Pure Appl. Math., 13(2), pp. 297-319; Meshkov, 1969, 'Interface of Two Gases Accelerated by a Shock Wave,' Fluid Dyn., 4(5), pp. 101-104) instability also occurs in a spherical case where the convergence effects must be taken into account. As far as we know, no conventional (straight section) shock tube facility has been used to experimentally study the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in spherical geometry. The idea originally proposed by Dimotakis and Samtaney (2006, 'Planar Shock Cylindrical Focusing by a Perfect-Gas Lens,' Phys. Fluid., 18(3), pp. 031705-031708) and later generalized by Vandenboomgaerde and Aymard (2011, 'Analytical Theory for Planar Shock Focusing Through Perfect Gas Lens and Shock Tube Experiment Designs,' Phys. Fluid., 23(1), pp. 016101-016113) was to retain the flexibility of a conventional shock tube to convert a planar shock wave into a cylindrical one through a perfect gas lens. This can be done when a planar shock wave passes through a shaped interface between two gases. By coupling the shape with the impedance mismatch at the interface, it is possible to generate a circular transmitted shock wave. In order to experimentally check the feasibility of this approach, we have implemented the gas lens technique on a conventional shock tube with the help of a convergent test section, an elliptic stereo lithographed grid, and a nitrocellulose membrane. First experimental sequences of Schlieren images have been obtained for an incident shock wave Mach number equal to 1.15 and an air/SF_6-shaped interface. Experimental results indicate that the shock that moves

  6. Oscillating nonlinear acoustic shock waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaididei, Yuri; Rasmussen, Anders Rønne; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    2016-01-01

    We investigate oscillating shock waves in a tube using a higher order weakly nonlinear acoustic model. The model includes thermoviscous effects and is non isentropic. The oscillating shock waves are generated at one end of the tube by a sinusoidal driver. Numerical simulations show that at resona......We investigate oscillating shock waves in a tube using a higher order weakly nonlinear acoustic model. The model includes thermoviscous effects and is non isentropic. The oscillating shock waves are generated at one end of the tube by a sinusoidal driver. Numerical simulations show...... polynomial in the space and time variables, we find analytical approximations to the observed single shock waves in an infinitely long tube. Using perturbation theory for the driven acoustic system approximative analytical solutions for the off resonant case are determined....

  7. Apparatus for reducing shock and overpressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, C.E.

    1975-01-28

    An apparatus for reducing shock and overpressure is particularly useful in connection with the sequential detonation of a series of nuclear explosives under ground. A coupling and decoupling arrangement between adjacent nuclear explosives in the tubing string utilized to emplace the explosives is able to support lower elements on the string but yields in a manner which absorbs energy when subjected to the shock wave produced upon detonation of one of the explosives. Overpressure is accomodated by an arrangement in the string which provides an additional space into which the pressurized material can expand at a predetermined overpressure. (10 claims)

  8. Effects caused by thermal shocks in plasma sprayed protective coatings from materials based on Al2O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorski, L.; Wolski, T.; Gostynski, D.

    1996-01-01

    Plasma sprayed coatings from the materials based on Al 2 O 3 with addition of NiO and TiO 2 have been studied. Thermal shock resistance of these coatings has been tested on special experimental arrangement in the stream of hot and cold gases. Changes in coating microstructure has been determined by light microscopy methods. Phase transition caused by the experiments are revealed by X-ray diffraction methods. The resistance for thermal fatigue processes depends on used coatings materials. (author). 21 refs, 21 figs, 1 tab

  9. Tube failures due to cooling process problem and foreign materials in power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, J. [Kapar Energy Ventures Sdn Bhd, Jalan Tok Muda, Kapar 42200 (Malaysia); Purbolaksono, J., E-mail: judha@uniten.edu.m [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Tenaga Nasional, Km 7 Jalan Kajang-Puchong, Kajang 43009, Selangor (Malaysia); Beng, L.C. [Kapar Energy Ventures Sdn Bhd, Jalan Tok Muda, Kapar 42200 (Malaysia)

    2010-07-15

    Cooling process which uses water for heat transfer is an essential factor in coal-fired and nuclear plants. Loss of cooling upset can force the plants to shut down. In particular, this paper reports visual inspections and metallurgical examinations on the failed SA210-A1 right-hand side (RHS) water wall tube of a coal-fired plant. The water wall tube showed the abnormal outer surface colour and has failed with wide-open ductile rupture and thin edges indicating typical signs of short-term overheating. Metallurgical examinations confirmed the failed tube experiencing higher temperature operation. Water flow starvation due to restriction inside the upstream tube is identified as the main root cause of failure. The findings are important to take failure mitigation actions in the future operation. Discussion on the typical problems related to the cooling process in nuclear power plants is also presented.

  10. Tube failures due to cooling process problem and foreign materials in power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, J.; Purbolaksono, J.; Beng, L.C.

    2010-01-01

    Cooling process which uses water for heat transfer is an essential factor in coal-fired and nuclear plants. Loss of cooling upset can force the plants to shut down. In particular, this paper reports visual inspections and metallurgical examinations on the failed SA210-A1 right-hand side (RHS) water wall tube of a coal-fired plant. The water wall tube showed the abnormal outer surface colour and has failed with wide-open ductile rupture and thin edges indicating typical signs of short-term overheating. Metallurgical examinations confirmed the failed tube experiencing higher temperature operation. Water flow starvation due to restriction inside the upstream tube is identified as the main root cause of failure. The findings are important to take failure mitigation actions in the future operation. Discussion on the typical problems related to the cooling process in nuclear power plants is also presented.

  11. Finite Element Modeling of Material Fatigue and Cracking Problems for Steam Power System HP Devices Exposed to Thermal Shocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawlicki Jakub

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a detailed analysis of the material damaging process due to low-cycle fatigue and subsequent crack growth under thermal shocks and high pressure. Finite Element Method (FEM model of a high pressure (HP by-pass valve body and a steam turbine rotor shaft (used in a coal power plant is presented. The main damaging factor in both cases is fatigue due to cycles of rapid temperature changes. The crack initiation, occurring at a relatively low number of load cycles, depends on alternating or alternating-incremental changes in plastic strains. The crack propagation is determined by the classic fracture mechanics, based on finite element models and the most dangerous case of brittle fracture. This example shows the adaptation of the structure to work in the ultimate conditions of high pressure, thermal shocks and cracking.

  12. Wastage-resistant characteristics of 12Cr steel tube material. Small leak sodium-water reaction test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimoyama, Kazuhito

    2004-03-01

    In the water leak accident of a steam generator designed for a sodium cooled reactor in the Feasibility Study, the localization of tube failure propagation by using an advanced water leak detector will be required from the viewpoints of the safety and economical efficiency of the plant. So far, the conventional knowledge and analytical tools have been used in the investigation and evaluation of water leak phenomenon; nevertheless, there was neither test data nor the study of quantitative evaluation on the corrosion behavior, so-called wastage-resistant characteristics, of 12Cr steel tube material in sodium-water reactions. Wastage tests for the 12Cr steel tube material were conducted in small water leaks by use of the Sodium-Water Reaction Test Rig (SWAT-1R), and the data of wastage rate were obtained in the parameter of water leak rate under the constant sodium temperature and distance between leak and target tubes. The test results lead to the following conclusions: (1) The wastage-resistibility of 12Cr steel is 1.6 times greater than that of 9Cr steel and is 2.7 times greater than that of 2.25Cr-1Mo steel. (2)The wastage-resistibility of 12Cr steel increases in smaller water leaks; especially in water leak rates of 1 g/sec or less, it is more excellent than that of SUS321 stainless steel used as Monju superheater tube material. (3) Based on the correlation of wastage rate for the 9Cr steel, the correlation for the 12Cr steel has been obtained to be used for the evaluation of tube failure propagation. As the correlation of wastage rate for the 12Cr steel is based on the correlation for the 9Cr steel, it gives enough conservatism in smaller water leaks. To serve in accurately evaluating the tube failure propagation in smaller water leaks, it is necessary to obtain new correlation of wastage rate for the 12Cr steel based on the data in the wide range of water leak rates. (author)

  13. Melting under shock compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, B.I.

    1980-10-01

    A simple model, using experimentally measured shock and particle velocities, is applied to the Lindemann melting formula to predict the density, temperature, and pressure at which a material will melt when shocked from room temperature and zero pressure initial conditions

  14. Study of alternative materials to minimize erosion in heat exchanger tubes used in thermoelectric generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnt, A.B.C.; Paula, M.M. da S. Paula; Rocha, M.R. da; Angioletto, E.; Zanini, L.C.; Miranda, R.; Zanelatto, C.C. [Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense (UNESC), Criciuma, SC (Brazil)], e-mails: anb@unesc.net, mms@unesc.net, marcio2r@terra.com.br, an@unesc.net, elucaslcz@yahoo.com.br, frdgmiranda@hotmail.com, gcrisrincao20@yahoo.com.br; Felippe, L. [Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense (UNESC), Capivari de Baixo, SC (Brazil)], e-mail: hlfelippe@tractebelenergia.com.br

    2007-07-01

    The machinery used in coal thermo electrical plants usually is submitted to erosive wear. The erosive wear occurs mainly in the metallic pipe set of heat exchangers due the flow of hot gases carrying erosive particles. Jaguar Ludicrous thermo electrical complex at Capivari de Baixo city holds seven power units, where two units use approximately 20 000 ASTM A178 heat pipes. The set is submitted to a semester maintenance schedule (preventive and corrective) where the damaged pipes are changed. So, in this work a set of erosive wear accelerated tests according ASTM G76 were performed in order to develop and specify materials and methods to diminish the erosive action caused by the combustion gases over the heat pipes. Specimens were coated with WC12Co and Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-25NiCr alloys using the HVOF technique and the coated specimens were tested at 450 deg C, the heat pipes working temperature. Silica was used as abrasive material at 30 deg and 45 deg impact angles, simulating a harder erosive condition than the real condition. The best performance coating at laboratory scale was later used in field condition. The results showed the coated specimen performance is better than the ASTM A178 alloy. The erosion resistance of the Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-25NiCr and WC12Co coatings is eight times higher than the uncoated alloy, and the coatings also presented a better corrosion resistance. This feature is important, because despite the erosive action the circulating gases also present a large amount of sulfur in their composition. Sulfur at lower temperatures forms H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, causing intense corrosion of the pipes located at the heat exchangers colder parts. Based on the results and considering the coating costs the Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-25NiCr alloy was selected to coat a set of pipes mounted at the region of the heat exchanger with the most intense erosive wear. At the moment these coated tubes are in field operation and under observation regarding their performance in

  15. Transport containers for radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doroszlai, P.; Ferroni, F.

    1984-01-01

    A cylindrical container for the transportation of radioactive reactor elements includes a top end, a bottom end and a pair of removable outwardly curved shock absorbers, each including a double-shelled construction having an internal shell with a convex intrados configuration and an external shell with a convex extrados configuration, the shock absorbers being filled with a low density energy-absorbing material and mounted at the top end and the bottom end of the container, respectively, and each of the shock absorbers having a toroidal configuration, and deformable tubes disposed within the shock absorbers and extending in the axial direction of the container

  16. Mitigation of caustic stress corrosion cracking of steam generator tube materials by blowdown -a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, Anu; Patwegar, I.A.; Chaki, S.K.; Venkat Raj, V.

    2000-01-01

    The vertical U-tube steam generators are among the most important equipment in nuclear power plants as they form the vital link between the reactor and the turbogenerator. Over ∼ 35 years of operating experience of water cooled reactor has demonstrated that steam generator tubes are susceptible to various forms of degradation. This degradation leads to failure and outages of the power plant. A majority of these failures have been attributed to concentrated alkali attacks in the low flow areas such as crevices in the tube to tube sheet joints, baffle plate location and the areas of sludge deposits. Free hydroxides can be produced by improper maintenance of phosphate chemical control in the secondary side of the steam generators and also by the thermal decomposition of impurities present in the condenser cooling water which may leak into the feed water through the condenser tubes. The free hydroxides concentrate in the low flow areas. This buildup of free hydroxide in combination with residual stress leads to caustic stress corrosion cracking. In order to mitigate caustic stress corrosion cracking of Inconel 600 tubes, the trend is to avoid phosphate dosing. Instead All Volatile Treatment (AVT) for secondary water is used backed by full flow condensate polishing. Sodium hydroxide concentration is now being considered as the basis for steam generator blowdown. A methodology has been established for determining the blowdown requirement in order to mitigate caustic stress corrosion cracking in the secondary side of the vertical U-tube natural circulation steam generator. A case study has been carried out for zero solid treatment (AVT coupled with full flow condensate polishing plant) water chemistry. Only continuous blowdown schemes have been studied based on maximum caustic concentration permissible in the secondary side of the steam generator. The methodology established can also be used for deciding concentration of any other impurities

  17. Temperature measurements of shocked translucent materials by time-resolved infrared radiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Holle, W.G.

    1981-01-01

    Infrared emission in the range 2 to 5.5 μm has been used to measure temperatures in shock-compressed states of nitromethane, cyclohexane and benzene and in polycrystalline KBr. Polymethylmethacrylate shows anomolous emission probably associated with some heterogeneity

  18. Microstructural characterization and mechanical properties of Excel alloy pressure tube material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattari, Mohammad

    Microstructural characterization and mechanical properties of Excel (Zr-3.5%Sn-0.8%Mo-0.8%Nb), a dual phase alphaZr -hcp and betaZr-bcc pressure tube material, is discussed in the current study which is presented in manuscript format. Chapter 3 discusses phase transformation temperatures using different techniques such as quantitative metallography, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and electrical resistivity. It was found that the alphaZr → alphaZr+beta Zr and alphaZr+betaZr → betaZr transformation temperatures are in the range of 600-690°C and 960-970°C respectively. Also it was observed that upon quenching from temperatures below ˜860°C the martensitic transformation of betaZr to alpha'--hcp is halted and instead the microstructure transforms into retained Zr with o hexagonal precipitates inside betaZr grains. Chapter 4 deals with aging response of Excel alloy. Precipitation hardening was observed in samples water-quenched from high in the alphaZr+beta Zr or betaZr regions followed by aging. The optimum aging conditions were found to be 450°C for 1 hour. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed dispersion of fine precipitates (˜10nm) inside the martensitic phase. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) showed the chemical composition of precipitates to be Zr-30wt%Mo-25wt%Nb-2wt%Fe. Electron crystallography using whole pattern symmetry of the convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) patterns together with selected area diffraction (SAD) polycrystalline ring patterns, suggests the -6m2 point group for the precipitates belonging to hexagonal crystal structure, with a= 2.936 A and c=4.481 A, i.e. c/a =1.526. Crystallographic texture and high temperature tensile properties as well as creep-rupture properties of different microstructures are discussed in Chapter 5. Texture analysis showed that solution treatment high in the alpha Zr+betaZr or betaZr regions followed by water quenching or air cooling results in a more random texture compared

  19. Wastage Behavior of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel Tube Material by Sodium-Water Reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Ji Young; Kim, Jong Man; Kim, Tae Joon; Choi, Jong Hyeun; Kim, Byung Ho; Park, Nam Cook

    2009-01-01

    The development of a sodium-heated steam generator with safety and reliability is an essential requirement from the viewpoint of the economic efficiency of a sodium-cooled fast reactor. In most cases, these steam generators, which are in the process of development or operating, are of a shell-in tube type, with a high pressure water/steam inside the tubes and low pressure sodium on the shell-side, with a single wall tube as a barrier between these fluids. Therefore, if there is a hole or a crack in a heat transfer tube, a leakage of water/steam into the sodium may occur, resulting in a sodium-water reaction. When such a leak occurs, so-called 'wastage' is the result which may cause damage to or a failure of the adjacent tubes. If a steam generator is operated for some time in this condition, it is possible that it might create an intermediate leak state which would then give rise to the problems of a multi-target wastage in a very short time. Therefore, it is very important to predict these phenomena quantitatively from the view of designing a steam generator and its leak detection systems. The objective of this study is a basic investigating of the sodium-water reaction phenomena by small water/steam leaks. For this, wastage tests for modified 9Cr-1Mo steel were conducted

  20. Wastage Characteristics of a Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel Tube Material for a SFR SG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Ji-Young; Kim, Jong-Man; Kim, Tae-Joon; Choi, Jong-Hyeun; Kim, Byung-Ho; Park, Nam-Cook

    2009-01-01

    The development of a sodium heated steam generator with a safety and reliability is an essential requirement from the viewpoint of the economical efficiency of a sodium cooled fast reactor. In most cases these steam generators which are in the process of development, or operating, are of a shell-in tube type, with a high pressure water/steam inside the tubes and low pressure sodium on the shell-side, with a single wall tube as a barrier between these fluids. Therefore, if there is a hole or a crack in a heat transfer tube, a leakage of water/steam into the sodium may occur, resulting in a sodium-water reaction. When such a leak occurs, important phenomena, so-called 'wastage' is the result which may cause damage to or a failure of the adjacent tubes. If a steam generator is operated for some time with this condition, it is possible that it might create an intermediate leak state which would then give rise to the problems of a multi-target wastage in a very short time. Therefore, it is very important to predict these phenomena quantitatively from the view of designing a steam generator and its leak detection systems. The objective of this study is a basic investigating of the sodium-water reaction phenomena by small water/steam leaks. For this, wastage tests for modified 9Cr-1Mo steel are being prepared

  1. A shock tube and laser absorption study of ignition delay times and OH reaction rates of ketones: 2-Butanone and 3-buten-2-one

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad

    2014-03-01

    Ketones are potential biofuel candidates and are also formed as intermediate products during the oxidation of large hydrocarbons or oxygenated fuels, such as alcohols and esters. This paper presents shock tube ignition delay times and OH reaction rates of 2-butanone (C2H5COCH3) and 3-buten-2-one (C2H3COCH3). Ignition delay measurements were carried out over temperatures of 1100-1400K, pressures of 3-6.5atm, and at equivalence ratios (F{cyrillic}) of 0.5 and 1. Ignition delay times were monitored using two different techniques: pressure time history and OH absorption near 306nm. The reaction rates of hydroxyl radicals (OH) with these two ketones were measured over the temperature range of 950-1400K near 1.5atm. The OH profiles were monitored by the narrow-line-width ring-dye laser absorption of the well-characterized R1(5) line in the OH A-X (0, 0) band near 306.69nm. We found that the ignition delay times of 2-butanone and 3-buten-2-one mixtures scale with pressure as P-0.42 and P-0.52, respectively. The ignition delay times of 3-buten-2-one were longer than that of 2-butanone for stoichiometric mixtures, however, for lean mixtures (F{cyrillic}=0.5), 2-butanone had longer ignition delay times. The chemical kinetic mechanism of Serinyel et al. [1] over-predicted the ignition delay times of 2-butanone at all tested conditions, however, the discrepancies were smaller at higher pressures. The mechanism was updated with recent rate measurements to decrease discrepancy with the experimental data. A detailed chemistry for the oxidation of 3-buten-2-one was developed using rate estimation method and reasonable agreements were obtained with the measured ignition delay data. The measured reaction rate of 2-butanone with OH agreed well with the literature data, while we present the first high-temperature measurements for the reaction of OH with 3-buten-2-one. The following Arrhenius expressions are suggested over the temperature range of 950-1450K: kC2H5COCH3+OH=6.78×1013exp

  2. Analysis of the ways to decrease residual stresses on heat exchanging tubes and steam generator collector surfaces for reducing the material corrosion damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanov, G.V.; Kharchenko, V.V.; Shatco, A.A.; Dranchenko, V.V.; Titov, V.F.

    1994-01-01

    Computer simulations have been carried out to analyze the effect of heat exchanger tube pressing forming process into a steam generator collector, on its residual stresses and strains. The program takes into consideration kinetic process peculiarities, material non-linear rheological properties, separate deformation of tubes and collectors in the presence of a clearance and their contact interaction, damage and crack appearance. 4 figs

  3. Empirical Model Development for Predicting Shock Response on Composite Materials Subjected to Pyroshock Loading. Volume 2, Part 1; Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentz, Steven J.; Ordway, David O.; Parsons, David S.; Garrison, Craig M.; Rodgers, C. Steven; Collins, Brian W.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) received a request to develop an analysis model based on both frequency response and wave propagation analyses for predicting shock response spectrum (SRS) on composite materials subjected to pyroshock loading. The model would account for near-field environment (approximately 9 inches from the source) dominated by direct wave propagation, mid-field environment (approximately 2 feet from the source) characterized by wave propagation and structural resonances, and far-field environment dominated by lower frequency bending waves in the structure. This document contains appendices to the Volume I report.

  4. Elucidation of the Dynamics for Hot-Spot Initiation at Nonuniform Interfaces of Highly Shocked Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-07

    with nonuniform interfaces plays an essential role in the interfacial instabilities in iner- tial confinement fusion (ICF), in shock-induced...involved in interfacial instabilities at the atomic scale, providing insights on such phenomenon. Thus ReaxFF provides the possibility of realistic...on the IPDI and DOA to determine the charges and structures for the binder model. These QM results and model preparation procedure are provided as part

  5. Computerized simulation of the mechanical behavior of wood-filled shock absorbers of radioactive materials transport casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumann, Martin; Wille, Frank

    2011-01-01

    In Germany the mechanical component inspection of transport containers for radioactive materials is performed by BAM (Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung) under consideration of national and international standards and guidelines. Experimental and calculative (analytical and numerical) techniques combined with material and/or component testing are the basis of assessment concepts according the state of the art. The authors describe the experiences of BAM concerning assessment and description of the mechanical behavior of shock absorbing components, including modeling strategies, material models, drop tests and experiment-calculation comparison. Energy absorbing components are used to reduce the impact forces at the container in case of a transport accident. In Germany wood filled thin-walled constructions are used. The deformation behavior of the wood is a main part of the calculative simulation procedures in comparison with experimental tests.

  6. Primary carcinoma of fallopian tubes in the material of the Institute of Oncology in Gliwice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franek, K; Zielonka, I; Kwasniewska-Rokicinska, C [Instytut Onkologii, Gliwice (Poland)

    1976-01-01

    The survival of 17 patients treated with postoperative radiotherapy at the Institute of Oncology in Gliwice for primary fallopian tube carcinoma is analysed. The causes of therapeutic failures and short survival (within 2 years) were - too far advanced disease at the time of main treatment which was due to diagnostic difficulties and too late reference of patients for surgery.

  7. Laser Shock Processing of Metallic Materials: Coupling of Laser-Plasma Interaction and Material Behaviour Models for the Assessment of Key Process Issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocana, J. L.; Morales, M.; Molpeceres, C.; Porro, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Profiting by the increasing availability of laser sources delivering intensities above 109 W/cm 2 with pulse energies in the range of several Joules and pulse widths in the range of nanoseconds, laser shock processing (LSP) is consolidating as an effective technology for the improvement of surface mechanical and corrosion resistance properties of metals. The main advantage of the laser shock processing technique consists on its capability of inducing a relatively deep compression residual stresses field into metallic alloy pieces allowing an improved mechanical behaviour, explicitly, the life improvement of the treated specimens against wear, crack growth and stress corrosion cracking. Although significant work from the experimental side has been contributed to explore the optimum conditions of application of the treatments and to assess their ultimate capability to provide enhanced mechanical behaviour to work-pieces of typical materials, only limited attempts have been developed in the way of full comprehension and predictive assessment of the characteristic physical processes and material transformations with a specific consideration of real material properties. In the present paper, a review on the physical issues dominating the development of LSP processes from a high intensity laser-matter interaction point of view is presented along with the theoretical and computational methods developed by the authors for their predictive assessment and practical results at laboratory scale on the application of the technique to different materials.

  8. Lay out and materials for in pile tritium transport testing of breeder-inside-tube pin assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvani, C.; Casadio, S.; Mancini, M.R.; Nannetti, C.A.; Avon, J.; Ravel, S.; Pruzzo, G.; Terrosi; Roux, N.; Terlain, A.; and others.

    1994-01-01

    An irradiation experiment (90 FPD in SILOE reactor) has been designed in order to evaluate the in-situ effect of red-ox power of sweeping gas (helium with 100 vpm of H 2 /H 2 O with relative concentrations varying from pure H 2 to pure H 2 O ) on tritium removal from LiAlO 2 and Li 2 ZrO 3 ; and tritium permeation through AlSl-316L SS tubes with bare and coated surfaces. The conditions and materials explored were selected in order to test possible improvements with respect to critical issues for the 'Breeder Inside Tube' (BIT) blanket concept development. (author) 6 refs.; 4 figs.; 2 tabs

  9. Performance of low-upper-shelf material under pressurized-thermal-shock loading (PTSE-2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, R.H.; Corwin, W.R.; Bass, B.R.; Nanstad, R.K.; Bolt, S.E.; Merkle, J.G.; Bryson, J.W.; Robinson, G.C.

    1988-01-01

    The second pressurized-thermal-shock experiment (Pse-2) of the Heavy-Section Steel Technology Program was conceived to investigate fracture behavior of steel with low ductile-tearing resistance. The experiment was performed in the pressurized-thermal-shock test facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. PTSE-2 was designed primarily to reveal the interaction of ductile and brittle modes of fracture and secondarily to investigate the effects of warm pre-stressing. A test vessel was prepared by inserting a crack-like flaw of well-defined geometry on the outside surface of the vessel. The flaw was 1 m long by ∼ 15 mm deep. The instrumented vessel was placed in the test facility in which it ws initially heated to a uniform temperature and was then concurrently cooled on the outside and pressurized on the inside. These actions produced an evolution of temperature, toughness, and stress gradients relative to the prepared flaw that was appropriate to the planned objectives. The experiment was conducted in two separate transients, each one starting with the vessel nearly isothermal. The first transient induced a warm-prestressed state, during which K I first exceeded K Ic . This was followed by re-pressurization until a cleavage fracture propagated and arrested. The final transient was designed to produce and investigate a cleavage crack propagation followed by unstable tearing. During this transient, the fracture events occurred as had been planned. (author)

  10. Delayed hydride cracking velocity and crack growth measurement using DCPD technique in Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.N.; Kishore, R.; Roychaudhury, S.; Unnikrishnan, M.; Sinha, T.K.; De, P.K.; Banerjee, S.; Kumar, Santosh

    2000-12-01

    Nuclear structural materials have to perform under most demanding and exotic environmental conditions. Due to its unique properties dilute zirconium alloys are the only choice for in-core structural materials in water cooled nuclear reactors. Hydrogen related problems have been recognized as the life-limiting factor for the core components of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWR). Delayed Hydride Cracking (Dhc) is one of them. In this study, Dhc crack growth has been monitored using Direct Current Potential Drop (Dcp) technique. Calibration curve between normalized Dcp output and normalized crack length was established at different test temperatures. Dhc velocity was measured along the axial direction of the Zirconium-2.5Niobium pressure tube material at 203 and 250 degree C. (author)

  11. Solidification of refractory materials processed in the ultra high vacuum drop tube at the CEREM-Grenoble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinet, B.; Cini, E.; Tournier, S.; Cortella, L.

    1994-01-01

    Undercooling experiments have been performed on refractory materials by processing in a high drop-tube. Emphasis is put on general aspects of surface and bulk microstructures of solidified droplets, including pure metals (W, Re, Ta, Mo, Nb, Ir, Zr) and alloys (W-Re, Mo-Re, Ta-Zr). It is shown that recrystallization often causes polycrystallinity. Moreover, the microstructure is closely related to undercooling amount prior solidification. The effect of secondary cooling on microstructure can also be studied by quenching the samples in solid tin at the end of free-fall. (authors). 20 refs., 11 figs

  12. Flow behaviour of autoclaved, 20% cold worked, Zr-2.5Nb alloy pressure tube material in the temperature range of room temperature to 800 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dureja, A.K.; Sinha, S.K.; Srivastava, Ankit; Sinha, R.K.; Chakravartty, J.K.; Seshu, P.; Pawaskar, D.N.

    2011-01-01

    Pressure tube material of Indian Heavy Water Reactors is 20% cold-worked and stress relieved Zr-2.5Nb alloy. Inherent variability in the process parameters during the fabrication stages of pressure tube and also along the length of component have their effect on micro-structural and texture properties of the material, which in turn affect its strength parameters (yield strength and ultimate tensile strength) and flow characteristics. Data of tensile tests carried out in the temperature range from room temperature to 800 deg. C using the samples taken out from a single pressure tube have been used to develop correlations for characterizing the strength parameters' variation as a function of axial location along length of the tube and the test temperature. Applicability of Ramberg-Osgood, Holloman and Voce's correlations for defining the post yield behaviour of the material has been investigated. Effect of strain rate change on the deformation behaviour has also been studied.

  13. Dynamics of explosively imploded pressurized tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szirti, Daniel; Loiseau, Jason; Higgins, Andrew; Tanguay, Vincent

    2011-04-01

    The detonation of an explosive layer surrounding a pressurized thin-walled tube causes the formation of a virtual piston that drives a precursor shock wave ahead of the detonation, generating very high temperatures and pressures in the gas contained within the tube. Such a device can be used as the driver for a high energy density shock tube or hypervelocity gas gun. The dynamics of the precursor shock wave were investigated for different tube sizes and initial fill pressures. Shock velocity and standoff distance were found to decrease with increasing fill pressure, mainly due to radial expansion of the tube. Adding a tamper can reduce this effect, but may increase jetting. A simple analytical model based on acoustic wave interactions was developed to calculate pump tube expansion and the resulting effect on the shock velocity and standoff distance. Results from this model agree quite well with experimental data.

  14. MARTINS: A foam/film flow model for molten material relocation in HWRs with U-Al-fueled multi-tube assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalimullah.

    1994-01-01

    Some special purpose heavy-water reactors (EM) are made of assemblies consisting of a number of coaxial aluminum-clad U-Al alloy fuel tubes and an outer Al sleeve surrounding the fuel tubes. The heavy water coolant flows in the annular gaps between the circular tubes. Analysis of severe accidents in such reactors requires a model for predicting the behavior of the fuel tubes as they melt and disrupt. This paper describes a detailed, mechanistic model for fuel tube heatup, melting, freezing, and molten material relocation, called MARTINS (Melting and Relocation of Tubes in Nuclear subassembly). The paper presents the modeling of the phenomena in MARTINS, and an application of the model to analysis of a reactivity insertion accident. Some models are being developed to compute gradual downward relocation of molten material at decay-heat power levels via candling along intact tubes, neglecting coolant vapor hydrodynamic forces on molten material. These models are inadequate for high power accident sequences involving significant hydrodynamic forces. These forces are included in MARTINS

  15. Fracture toughness behaviour using small CCT specimen of Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Dong Joon; Kim, Young Suk; Ahn, Sang Bok; Im, Kyung Soo; Kwon, Sang Chul; Cheong, Yong Mu

    2001-03-01

    Fracture toughness of Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube is the essential data to estimate the CCL(critical crack length) for the concept of LBB(Leak-Before-Break) in PHWR. Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes could be degraded due to the absorption of hydrogen from coolant and the irradiation. To investigate the fracture toughness behaviour such as J-resistance curves, dJ/da, and CCL of some Zr-alloys (CANDU-double, -quad, CW-E125, TMT-E125, E-635), the transverse tensile test and the fracture toughness test of small CCT (Curved Compact Tension) specimen with 17 mm width were carried out with the variation of testing temperature at different testing condition. To define the fracture mechanism of degradation, the fractographic comparison of fracture surface was performed using the stereoscope and SEM. In addition, the effect of non-uniformed pre-fatigue crack was also studied. In conclusion, CANDU double-melted was less tougher than CANDU quad-melted and the hydrogen embrittlement was found at room temperature. Finally, while the effect of non-uniformed pre-fatigue crack was considerable at room temperature, this effect was disappeared at 250-300 .deg. C

  16. Synthesis of irregular graphene oxide tubes using green chemistry and their potential use as reinforcement materials for biomedical applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángel Serrano-Aroca

    Full Text Available Micrometer length tubes of graphene oxide (GO with irregular form were synthesised following facile and green metal complexation reactions. These materials were obtained by crosslinking of GO with calcium, zinc or strontium chlorides at three different temperatures (24, 34 and 55°C using distilled water as solvent for the compounds and following a remarkably simple and low-cost synthetic method, which employs no hazardous substances and is conducted without consumption of thermal or sonic energy. These irregular continuous GO networks showed a very particular interconnected structure by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy-Disperse X-Ray Spectroscopy for elemental analysis and High-resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy with Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope Dark Field Imaging, and were analysed by Raman Spectroscopy. To demonstrate the potential use of these 3D GO networks as reinforcement materials for biomedical applications, two composites of calcium alginate with irregular tubes of GO and with single GO nanosheets were prepared with the same amount of GO and divalent atoms and analysed. Thus, the dynamic-mechanical modulus of the composites synthesised with the 3D crosslinked GO networks showed a very significant mechanical improvement due to marked microstructural changes confirmed by confocal microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

  17. Elastic, Frictional, Strength and Dynamic Characteristics of the Bell Shape Shock Absorbers Made of MR Wire Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazutkin, G. V.; Davydov, D. P.; Boyarov, K. V.; Volkova, T. V.

    2018-01-01

    The results of the mechanical characteristic experimental studies are presented for the shock absorbers of DKU type with the elastic elements of the bell shape made of MR material and obtained by the cold pressing of mutually crossing wire spirals with their inclusion in the array of reinforcing wire harnesses. The design analysis and the technology of MR production based on the methods of similarity theory and dimensional analysis revealed the dimensionless determined and determining parameters of elastic frictional, dynamic and strength characteristics under the static and dynamic loading of vibration isolators. The main similarity criteria of mechanical characteristics for vibration isolators and their graphical and analytical representation are determined, taking into account the coefficients of these (affine) transformations of the hysteresis loop family field.

  18. Shock compression behavior of bi-material powder composites with disparate melting temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, Kyle T.; Swift, Damian; Barham, Matthew; Stölken, James; Kuntz, Joshua; Kumar, Mukul

    2014-01-01

    Laser driven experiments were used to investigate the shock compression behavior of powder processed Bismuth/Tungsten (Bi/W) composite samples. The constituents provide different functionality to the composite behavior as Bi could be shock melted at the pressures attained in this work, while the W could not. Samples were prepared by uniaxial pressing, and the relative density was measured as a function of particle size, applied pressure, and composition for both hot and cold pressing conditions. This resulted in sample densities between 73% and 99% of the theoretical maximum density, and also noticeable differences in microstructure in the hot and cold pressed samples. The compression waves were generated with a 1.3 × 1.3 mm square spot directly onto the surface of the sample, using irradiances between 10 12 and 10 13  W/cm 2 , which resulted in calculated peak pressures between 50 and 150 GPa within a few micrometers. Sample recovery and post-mortem analysis revealed the formation of a crater on the laser drive surface, and the depth of this crater corresponded to the depth to which the Bi had been melted. The melt depth was found to be primarily a function of residual porosity and composition, and ranged from 167 to 528 μm. In general, a higher porosity led to a larger melt depth. Direct numerical simulations were performed, and indicated that the observed increase in melt depth for low-porosity samples could be largely attributed to increased heating associated with work done for pore collapse. However, the relative scaling was sensitive to composition, with low volume fraction Bi samples exhibiting a much stronger dependence on porosity than high Bi content samples. Select samples were repeated using an Al foil ablator, but there were no noticeable differences ensuring that the observed melting was indeed pressure-driven and was not a result of direct laser heating. The resultant microstructures and damage near the spall surface were also investigated

  19. Recording of X-ray diffraction patterns for the investigation of transient changes in the crystalline structure of materials subjected to the action of shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamet, F.; Thomer, G.

    An arrangement including a flash X-ray tube and an image intensifier has been designed and built in order to record X-ray diffraction patterns with exposure times of the order of 100nsec. This arrangement allows Laue patterns (polychromatic radiation) as well as powder patterns (copper K(α) radiation) to be recorded. Examples for record are shown. As an application to the investigation of transient changes in crystalline structures, the Debye-Scherrer patterns of potassium chloride undergoing the dynamic action of shock waves were recorded. The first results achieved are discussed [fr

  20. Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Z

    2005-01-01

    The International Symposium on Shock Waves (ISSW) is a well established series of conferences held every two years in a different location. A unique feature of the ISSW is the emphasis on bridging the gap between physicists and engineers working in fields as different as gas dynamics, fluid mechanics and materials sciences. The main results presented at these meetings constitute valuable proceedings that offer anyone working in this field an authoritative and comprehensive source of reference.

  1. Development and Execution of a Large-scale DDT Tube Test for IHE Material Qualification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Gary Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Broilo, Robert M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lopez-Pulliam, Ian Daniel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vaughan, Larry Dean [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-10-24

    Insensitive High Explosive (IHE) Materials are defined in Chapter IX of the DOE Explosive Safety Standard (DOE-STD-1212-2012) as being materials that are massdetonable explosives that are so insensitive that the probability of accidental initiation or transition from burning to detonation is negligible1. There are currently a number of tests included in the standard that are required to qualify a material as IHE, however, none of the tests directly evaluate for the transition from burning to detonation (aka deflagration-to-detonation transition, DDT). Currently, there is a DOE complex-wide effort to revisit the IHE definition in DOE-STD-1212-2012 and change the qualification requirements. The proposal lays out a new approach, requiring fewer, but more appropriate tests, for IHE Material qualification. One of these new tests is the Deflagration-to-Detonation Test. According to the redefinition proposal, the purpose of the new deflagration-todetonation test is “to demonstrate that an IHE material will not undergo deflagration-to-detonation under stockpile relevant conditions of scale, confinement, and material condition. Inherent in this test design is the assumption that ignition does occur, with onset of deflagration. The test design will incorporate large margins and replicates to account for the stochastic nature of DDT events.” In short, the philosophy behind this approach is that if a material fails to undergo DDT in a significant over-test, then it is extremely unlikely to do so in realistic conditions. This effort will be valuable for the B61 LEP to satisfy their need qualify the new production lots of PBX 9502. The work described in this report is intended as a preliminary investigation to support the proposed design of an overly conservative, easily fielded DDT test for updated IHE Material Qualification standard. Specifically, we evaluated the aspects of confinement, geometry, material morphology and temperature. We also developed and tested a

  2. Indoor Solar Thermal Energy Saving Time with Phase Change Material in a Horizontal Shell and Finned-Tube Heat Exchanger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Paria

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental as well as numerical investigation was conducted on the melting/solidification processes of a stationary phase change material (PCM in a shell around a finned-tube heat exchanger system. The PCM was stored in the horizontal annular space between a shell and finned-tube where distilled water was employed as the heat transfer fluid (HTF. The focus of this study was on the behavior of PCM for storage (charging or melting and removal (discharging or solidification, as well as the effect of flow rate on the charged and discharged solar thermal energy. The impact of the Reynolds number was determined and the results were compared with each other to reveal the changes in amount of stored thermal energy with the variation of heat transfer fluid flow rates. The results showed that, by increasing the Reynolds number from 1000 to 2000, the total melting time decreases by 58%. The process of solidification also will speed up with increasing Reynolds number in the discharging process. The results also indicated that the fluctuation of gradient temperature decreased and became smooth with increasing Reynolds number. As a result, by increasing the Reynolds number in the charging process, the theoretical efficiency rises.

  3. Indoor solar thermal energy saving time with phase change material in a horizontal shell and finned-tube heat exchanger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paria, S; Sarhan, A A D; Goodarzi, M S; Baradaran, S; Rahmanian, B; Yarmand, H; Alavi, M A; Kazi, S N; Metselaar, H S C

    2015-01-01

    An experimental as well as numerical investigation was conducted on the melting/solidification processes of a stationary phase change material (PCM) in a shell around a finned-tube heat exchanger system. The PCM was stored in the horizontal annular space between a shell and finned-tube where distilled water was employed as the heat transfer fluid (HTF). The focus of this study was on the behavior of PCM for storage (charging or melting) and removal (discharging or solidification), as well as the effect of flow rate on the charged and discharged solar thermal energy. The impact of the Reynolds number was determined and the results were compared with each other to reveal the changes in amount of stored thermal energy with the variation of heat transfer fluid flow rates. The results showed that, by increasing the Reynolds number from 1000 to 2000, the total melting time decreases by 58%. The process of solidification also will speed up with increasing Reynolds number in the discharging process. The results also indicated that the fluctuation of gradient temperature decreased and became smooth with increasing Reynolds number. As a result, by increasing the Reynolds number in the charging process, the theoretical efficiency rises.

  4. High-pressure {sup 4}He drift tubes for fissile material detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhehui, E-mail: zwang@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Morris, Christopher L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Gray, F.E. [Regis University, Denver, CO 80221 (United States); Bacon, J.D.; Brockwell, M.I.; Chang, D.Y.; Chung, K.; Dai, W.G.; Greene, S.J.; Hogan, G.E.; Lisowski, P.W.; Makela, M.F.; Mariam, F.G.; McGaughey, P.L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Mendenhall, M. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Milner, E.C.; Miyadera, H.; Murray, M.M.; Perry, J.O.; Roybal, J.D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); and others

    2013-03-01

    A detector efficiency model based on energy extraction from neutrons is described and used to compare {sup 4}He detectors with liquid scintillators (EJ301/NE-213). Detector efficiency can be divided into three regimes: single neutron scattering, multiple neutron scattering, and a transition regime in-between. For an average fission neutron of 2 MeV, the amount of {sup 4}He needed would be about 1/4 of the amount of the mass of EJ301/NE-213 in the single-scattering regime. For about 50% neutron energy extraction (1 MeV out of 2 MeV), the two types of detectors ({sup 4}He in the transition regime, EJ301 still in the single-scattering regime) have comparable mass, but {sup 4}He detectors can be much larger depending on the number density. A six-tube 11-bar-pressure {sup 4}He detector prototype is built and tested. Individual electrical pulses from the detector are recorded using a 12-bit digitizer. Differences in pulse rise time and amplitudes, due to different energy loss of neutrons and gamma rays, are used for neutron/gamma separation. Several energy spectra are also obtained and analyzed.

  5. Facility for simulating the corrosion fatigue process of steam generator tube materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talpa, I.; Rosypal, F.

    1987-01-01

    A system is described for testing corrosion fatigue properties at parameters simulating the real loading of steam generator tubes. The test sample is fitted in an electrohydraulic pulsator controlled with an ADT 4500 control processor. The system of mechanical loading consists of a supply of pressure oil of a rated pressure of 25 MPa and a maximal delivered amount of 63 l/min, a cooling circuit of a maximum output of 180 l/min at a minimal pressure of 0.25 MPa, provided with a high capacity cooling equipment. The water circuit for the system of corrosion loading consists of elements for pressurizing, heating, circulation and measurement of corrosion medium quality. Demineralized water of required chemical composition is treated using a system of ion exchangers. Argon at a pressure of 20 kPa is used as cover gas. At a testing temperature of 340 degC the operating pressure in the water circuit is 16.0 MPa. An auxiliary circuit is used for controlling the quality of the corrosion medium in which pH (8.5 - 9.0), dissolved oxygen (7 - 700 ppb) and conductivity at 25 degC (2 μS/cm) are monitored. Both testing systems may operate autonomously. (J.B.). 2 figs., 1 tab., 16 refs

  6. The elastic properties of zirconium alloy fuel cladding and pressure tubing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosinger, H.E.; Northwood, D.O.

    1979-01-01

    A knowledge of the elastic properties of zirconium alloys is required in the mathematical modelling of cladding and pressure tubing performance. Until recently, little of this type of data was available, particularly at elevated temperatures. The dynamic elastic moduli of zircaloy-2, zircaloy-4, the alloys Zr-1.0 wt%Nb, Zr-2.5 wt%Nb and Marz grade zirconium have therefore been determined over the temperature range 275 to 1000 K. Young's modulus and shear modulus for all the zirconium alloys decrease with temperature and are expressed by empirical relations fitted to the data. The elastic properties are texture dependent and a detailed study has been conducted on the effect of texture on the elastic properties of Zr-1.0 wt% Nb over the temperature range 275 to 775 K. The results are compared with polycrystalline elastic constants computed from single crystal elastic constants, and the effect of texture on the dynamic elastic moduli is discussed in detail. (Auth.)

  7. Attenuation of surface waves in porous media: Shock wave experiments and modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chao, G.E; Smeulders, D.M.J.; Dongen, van M.E.H.

    2005-01-01

    In this project we conduct experimental and numerical investigations on the attenuation mechanisms of surface waves in poroelastic materials. Viscous dissipation effects are modelled in the framework of Biot's theory. The experiments are performed using a shock tube technique. Quantitative agreement

  8. Wide range scaling laws for radiation driven shock speed, wall albedo and ablation parameters for high-Z materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Gaurav; Ghosh, Karabi; Ray, Aditi; Gupta, N. K.

    2018-06-01

    Radiation hydrodynamic (RHD) simulations for four different potential high-Z hohlraum materials, namely Tungsten (W), Gold (Au), Lead (Pb), and Uranium (U) are performed in order to investigate their performance with respect to x-ray absorption, re-emission and ablation properties, when irradiated by constant temperature drives. A universal functional form is derived for estimating time dependent wall albedo for high-Z materials. Among the high-Z materials studied, it is observed that for a fixed simulation time the albedo is maximum for Au below 250 eV, whereas it is maximum for U above 250 eV. New scaling laws for shock speed vs drive temperature, applicable over a wide temperature range of 100 eV to 500 eV, are proposed based on the physics of x-ray driven stationary ablation. The resulting scaling relation for a reference material Aluminium (Al), shows good agreement with that of Kauffman's power law for temperatures ranging from 100 eV to 275 eV. New scaling relations are also obtained for temperature dependent mass ablation rate and ablation pressure, through RHD simulation. Finally, our study reveals that for temperatures above 250 eV, U serves as a better hohlraum material since it offers maximum re-emission for x-rays along with comparable mass ablation rate. Nevertheless, traditional choice, Au works well for temperatures below 250 eV. Besides inertial confinement fusion (ICF), the new scaling relations may find its application in view-factor codes, which generally ignore atomic physics calculations of opacities and emissivities, details of laser-plasma interaction and hydrodynamic motions.

  9. Parametric study on the performance of automotive MR shock absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gołdasz, J.; Dzierżek, S.

    2016-09-01

    The paper contains the results of a parametric study to explore the influence of various quantities on the performance range of semi-active automotive shock absorbers using the magnetorheological (MR) fluid under steady-state and transient excitations. The analysis was performed with simulated data and using a standard single-tube shock absorber configuration with a single-gap MR valve. Additionally, the impact of material variables and valves geometry was examined as the parameters were varied and its dynamic range studied.

  10. A fractographic study of cracks produced by thermal shocks in 20MnMoNi55 and comparable weld material in water environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toerroenen, K.; Rintamaa, R.; Kemppainen, M.

    1983-04-01

    This report gives the results of a fractographic study of cracks produced by thermal shocks in 20MnMoNi55 and comparable weld material in water environment. The basic crack growth mechanism is shown to be by mechanical fatigue, but after some crack growth indications of environmentally assisted cyclic crack growth is seen. (author)

  11. Stress effects in cylindrical tubes of austenitic and ferritic/martensitic steels with oxide scales. Materials selection for a HPLWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, H.

    2002-11-01

    In the frame of the studies for a high performance concept of a light water reactor (LWR) different materials for the cladding are investigated, among them are austenitic and ferritic/martensitic (f/m) steels of different Cr content. Due to the envisaged very extended life times of the fuel elements in the reactor, corrosion problems may arise. Thus, cracking and/or spalling effects in oxide scales on metallic components may play an important role in the corrosion process as they lead, in general, to a drastic enhancement in the oxidation rates. Analytical models for different fundamental stress problems in the compound oxide scale/metallic substrate have been developed and implemented in the computer code OXSPA. These models concern the growth stresses in the cylindrical tubes, the stresses due to temperature changes and radial temperature gradients and the stresses due to inside and outside pressures. (orig.)

  12. Current status of materials development of nuclear fuel cladding tubes for light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Zhengang, E-mail: duan_zg@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Yang, Huilong [Department of Nuclear Engineering, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Nakagun, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Satoh, Yuhki [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Murakami, Kenta; Kano, Sho; Zhao, Zishou; Shen, Jingjie [Department of Nuclear Engineering, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Nakagun, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Abe, Hiroaki, E-mail: abe.hiroaki@n.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Nuclear Engineering, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Nakagun, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan)

    2017-05-15

    Zirconium-based (Zr-based) alloys have been widely used as materials for the key components in light water reactors (LWRs), such as fuel claddings which suffer from waterside corrosion, hydrogen uptakes and strength loss at elevated temperature, especially during accident scenarios like the lost-of-coolant accident (LOCA). For the purpose of providing a safer, nuclear leakage resistant and economically viable LWRs, three general approaches have been proposed so far to develop the accident tolerant fuel (ATF) claddings: optimization of metallurgical composition and processing of Zr-based alloys, coatings on existing Zr-based alloys and replacement of current Zr-based alloys. In this manuscript, an attempt has been made to systematically present the historic development of Zr-based cladding, including the impacts of alloying elements on the material properties. Subsequently, the research investigations on coating layer on the surface of Zr-based claddings, mainly referring coating materials and fabrication methods, have been broadly reviewed. The last section of this review provides the introduction to alternative materials (Non-Zr) to Zr-based alloys for LWRs, such as advanced steels, Mo-based, and SiC-based materials.

  13. Current status of materials development of nuclear fuel cladding tubes for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, Zhengang; Yang, Huilong; Satoh, Yuhki; Murakami, Kenta; Kano, Sho; Zhao, Zishou; Shen, Jingjie; Abe, Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    Zirconium-based (Zr-based) alloys have been widely used as materials for the key components in light water reactors (LWRs), such as fuel claddings which suffer from waterside corrosion, hydrogen uptakes and strength loss at elevated temperature, especially during accident scenarios like the lost-of-coolant accident (LOCA). For the purpose of providing a safer, nuclear leakage resistant and economically viable LWRs, three general approaches have been proposed so far to develop the accident tolerant fuel (ATF) claddings: optimization of metallurgical composition and processing of Zr-based alloys, coatings on existing Zr-based alloys and replacement of current Zr-based alloys. In this manuscript, an attempt has been made to systematically present the historic development of Zr-based cladding, including the impacts of alloying elements on the material properties. Subsequently, the research investigations on coating layer on the surface of Zr-based claddings, mainly referring coating materials and fabrication methods, have been broadly reviewed. The last section of this review provides the introduction to alternative materials (Non-Zr) to Zr-based alloys for LWRs, such as advanced steels, Mo-based, and SiC-based materials.

  14. Facile Fabrication of Electrically Conductive Low-Density Polyethylene/Carbon Fiber Tubes for Novel Smart Materials via Multiaxial Orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yijun; Nie, Min; Wang, Qi

    2018-01-10

    Electromechanical sensors are indispensable components in functional devices and robotics application. However, the fabrication of the sensors still maintains a challenging issue that high percolation threshold and easy failure of conductive network are derived from uniaxial orientation of conductive fillers in practical melt processing. Herein, we reported a facile fabrication method to prepare a multiaxial low-density polyethylene (LDPE)/carbon fibers (CFs) tube with bidirectional controllable electrical conductivity and sensitive strain-responsive performance via rotation extrusion technology. The multidimensional helical flow is confirmed in the reverse rotation extrusion, and the CFs readily respond to the flow field leading to a multiaxial orientation in the LDPE matrix. In contrast to uniaxial LDPE/CF composites, which perform a "head to head" conjunction, multiaxial-orientated CF networks exhibit a unique multilayer structure in which the CFs with distinct orientation direction intersect in the interface, endowing the LDPE/CF composites with a low percolation threshold (15 wt %) to those of the uniaxial ones (∼35 wt %). The angles between two axes play a vital role in determining the density of the conductive networks in the interface, which is predominant in tuning the bending-responsive behaviors with a gauge factor range from 12.5 to 56.3 and the corresponding linear respond region from ∼15 to ∼1%. Such a superior performance of conductive LDPE/CF tube confirms that the design of multiaxial orientation paves a novel way to facile fabrication of advanced cost-effective CF-based smart materials, shedding light on promising applications such as smart materials and intelligent engineering monitoring.

  15. Multi-scale modelling of thermal shock damage in refractory materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özdemir, I.

    2009-01-01

    Refractories are high-temperature resistant materials used extensively in many engineering structures and assemblies in a wide spectrum of applications ranging from metallurgical furnace linings to thermal barrier coatings. Such structures are often exposed to severe thermal loading conditions in

  16. Measurement with corrugated tubes of early-age autogenous shrinkage of cement-based material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Qian; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2009-01-01

    The use of a special corrugated mould enables transformation of volume strain into horizontal, linear strain measurement in the fluid stage. This allows continuous measurement of the autogenous shrinkage of cement-based materials since casting, and also effectively eliminates unwanted influence...

  17. A new certified reference material for benzene measurement in air on a sorbent tube: development and proficiency testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caurant, A. [Laboratoire National de Metrologie et d' Essais, Paris (France); Universite Paris 12 et CNRS (UMR 7583), Faculte des Sciences et Technologie, Laboratoire Inter-universitaire des Systemes Atmospheriques, Unite Mixte de Recherche Universite Paris 7 (France); Lalere, B.; Schbath, M.C.; Stumpf, C.; Sutour, C.; Mace, T.; Vaslin-Reimann, S. [Laboratoire National de Metrologie et d' Essais, Paris (France); Quisefit, J.P.; Doussin, J.F. [Universite Paris 12 et CNRS (UMR 7583), Faculte des Sciences et Technologie, Laboratoire Inter-universitaire des Systemes Atmospheriques, Unite Mixte de Recherche Universite Paris 7 (France)

    2010-11-15

    A certified matrix reference material (CRM) for the measurement of benzene in ambient air has been developed at Laboratoire National de Metrologie et d'Essais. The production of these CRMs was conducted using a gravimetric method fully traceable to the International System of Units. The CRMs were prepared by sampling an accurate mass of a gaseous primary reference material of benzene, using a high-precision laminar flowmeter and a mass flow controller, with a PerkinElmer sampler filled with Carbopack trademark X sorbent. The relative standard deviations obtained for the preparation of a batch of 20 tubes loaded with 500 ng of benzene were below 0.2%. Each CRM is considered independent from the others and with its own certified value and an expanded uncertainty estimated to be within 0.5%, lower than the uncertainties of benzene CRMs already available worldwide. The stability of these materials was also established up to 12 months. These CRMs were implemented during proficiency testing, to evaluate the analytical performances of seven French laboratories involved in benzene air monitoring. (orig.)

  18. Corrosion aspects of Ni-Cr-Fe based and Ni-Cu based steam generator tube materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, R.S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews corrosion related issues of Ni-Cr-Fe based (in a general sense) and Ni-Cu based steam generator tube materials for nuclear power plants those have been dealt with for last more than four decades along with some updated information on corrosion research. The materials include austenitic stainless steels (SSs), Alloy 600, Monel 400, Alloy 800 and Alloy 690. Compatibility related issues of these alloys are briefly discussed along with the alloy chemistry and microstructure. For austenitic SSs, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour in high temperature aqueous environments is discussed. For Alloy 600, intergranular cracking in high temperature water including hydrogen-induced intergranular cracking is highlighted along with the interactions of material in various environments. In case of Monel 400, intergranular corrosion and pitting corrosion at ambient temperature and SCC behaviour at elevated temperature are briefly described. For Alloy 800, the discussion covers SCC behaviour, surface characterization and microstructural aspects of pitting, whereas hydrogen-related issues are also highlighted for Alloy 690.

  19. Understanding the Effects of Blast Wave on the Intracranial Pressure and Traumatic Brain Injury in Rodents and Humans Using Experimental Shock Tube and Numerical Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    populated ( train stations) region or in public events (Boston marathon ) to inflict maximum civilian casualties [15, 17]. Figure 2.2: Percentage of...and understand the biomechanical loading experienced by the animal at different placement locations along the tube in order to recreate field loading...Boston Marathon and mass-casualty events. New England journal of medicine, 2013. 368(21): p. 1958-1960. 16. Wilson, C. Improvised explosive devices

  20. Equation of state and shock compression of carbon-hydrogen and other ablator materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S.; Militzer, B.; Whitley, H.

    2017-12-01

    Dynamic compression experiments in planetary interior studies and fusion sciences often implement carbon-hydrogen or other low-Z elements or compounds as ablators. Accurate quantum simulations of these materials enables theoretical investigation of the equation of state (EOS) over temperatures and pressures that are difficult to access experimentally, and can help guide the design of targets for future experiments. In this work, we use path integral Monte Carlo and density functional molecular dynamics to calculate the equation of state of a series of hydrocarbons and other low-Z materials (B, B4C, and BN). For the hydrocarbon with C:H=1:1, we predict the pressure-compression profile to agree remarkably with experiments at low pressures. At high pressures, we find the Hugoniot curve displays a single compression maximum of 4.7 that corresponds to K-shell ionization. This is slightly higher than that of glow-discharge polymers but both occur at the same pressure (0.47 Gbar). We study the linear mixing approximation for the EOS of hydrocarbons and demonstrate its validity at stellar core conditions. We examine the sensitivity of the fusion yield to the EOS of these candidate ablator materials in radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of a direct-drive implosion. We also make detailed comparisons of the EOS and atomic and electronic structure of C and BN, which is useful for systematic improvement of existing EOS models. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Shock Response of Boron Carbide

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dandekar, D. P. (Dattatraya Purushottam)

    2001-01-01

    .... The present work was undertaken to determine tensile/spall strength of boron carbide under plane shock wave loading and to analyze all available shock compression data on boron carbide materials...

  2. Tube-in-shell heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, J.

    1976-01-01

    Tube-in-shell heat exchangers normally comprise a bundle of parallel tubes within a shell container, with a fluid arranged to flow through the tubes in heat exchange with a second fluid flowing through the shell. The tubes are usually end supported by the tube plates that separate the two fluids, and in use the tube attachments to the tube plates and the tube plates can be subject to severe stress by thermal shock and frequent inspection and servicing are required. Where the heat exchangers are immersed in a coolant such as liquid Na such inspection is difficult. In the arrangement described a longitudinally extending central tube is provided incorporating axially spaced cylindrical tube plates to which the opposite ends of the tubes are attached. Within this tube there is a tubular baffle that slidably seals against the wall of the tube between the cylindrical tube plates to define two co-axial flow ducts. These ducts are interconnected at the closed end of the tube by the heat exchange tubes and the baffle comprises inner and outer spaced walls with the interspace containing Ar. The baffle is easily removable and can be withdrawn to enable insertion of equipment for inspecting the wall of the tube and tube attachments and to facilitate plugging of defective tubes. Cylindrical tube plates are believed to be superior for carrying pressure loads and resisting the effects of thermal shock. Some protection against thermal shock can be effected by arranging that the secondary heat exchange fluid is on the tube side, and by providing a thermal baffle to prevent direct impingement of hot primary fluid on to the cylindrical tube plates. The inner wall of the tubular baffle may have flexible expansible region. Some nuclear reactor constructions incorporating such an arrangement are described, including liquid metal reactors. (U.K.)

  3. Practical consideration in the selection of X-ray fluorescence tube targets for analysis of geological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attawiya, M.Y.; El-Behay, A.Z.; Khattab, F.M.

    1985-01-01

    Four X-ray fluorescence tubes with different targets (Cr, W, Mo and Rh) were compared for their suitability to analyze twelve of the most common major and trace elements in some geological samples. The major elements and Si, Al, Ca, K, Ti, and S. All elements having wavelengths higher than that of the iron K-absorption edge, gave significantly higher intensities of their characteristic fluorescence radiations when using a Cr-anode tube compared to W, Mo and Rh anode tubes. However, for the light elements (Si and Al) the Rh-anode tube of equal efficiency as the Cr-anode tube. The highest Ka-line intensity of Fe was obtained by the W-anode tube. The lowest detection limits (highest sensitivity) for the trace elements Rb, Sr, Zr, and Nb are obtained using both the Mo and Rh tubes. (author)

  4. Low carbon content and carbon-free refractory materials with high thermal shock resistance; Thermoschockbestaendige feuerfeste Erzeugnisse mit geringerem Kohlenstoffgehalt bzw. kohlenstofffreie Erzeugnisse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brachhold, Nora; Aneziris, C.G.; Stein, Volker; Roungos, Vasileios; Moritz, Kirsten [TU Bergakademie Freiberg (TUBAF) (DE). Inst. fuer Keramik, Glas- und Baustofftechnik (IKGB)

    2012-07-01

    Carbon bonded refractories are essential for steelmaking due to their excellent thermal shock resistance. The research on carbon reduced and carbon-free materials is necessary to manufacture high quality stainless steels tending carbon pick-up in contact to conventional refractory materials. Further advantages are reduced emissions of CO{sub 2} and energy saving potentials due to better heat insulation properties. The challenge is to develop alternative materials with lower carbon contents but with the necessary thermal shock resistance. The Priority Programme 1418 funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG) concentrates on this problem. In this article two materials are presented. First, the carbon content could be reduced by nanoscaled additives resulting in better bonding between matrix and oxidic components. Second, an AL{sub 2}O{sub 3}-rich carbon-free material is presented showing a very good thermal shock resistance due to its designed microstructure. Finally, a steel casting simulator is introduced to test the new materials under nearly real conditions. (orig.)

  5. Cladding tube materials for advanced nuclear facilities with closed fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartosova, I. [Slovenska technicka univerzita v Bratislave, Fakulta elektrotechniky a informatiky, Ustav jadroveho a fyzikalneho inzinierstva, 81219 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2013-04-16

    The paper is aimed on perspective materials for fuel cladding in advanced nuclear reactors. Samples of Eurofer and ODS Eurofer were studied by various techniques such as Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy, Vickers Hardness and Coincidence Doppler Broadening. After studying the samples by these methods, we implanted them by Helium atoms to simulate irradiation damage. Samples were then remeasured by Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy to determine the affect of implantation on its behavior. (authors)

  6. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Shock Tubes and Waves (12th) Held at Jerusalem on 16-19 July 1979.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-01

    Jets (Research and Development) Ltd., Rept. No. 2202/x 41 (1955). 7. Peter K. Doerfler, "Comprex Supercharging of Vehicle Diesel 5igic," Soc. of...LL CONTOUR . Zec x6106 -0.4 - SHOCKTUE: Ne *SHOCK UBE: 6 Re - 2 x 10 D .-- RI3 T -0.2 WALL TEST SECTION 0 No 8 - .83 \\ 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1. \\0.84~/c 6...FLAT-PLATE BOUNDARY-LAYER FLOWS IN IONIZING ARGON IRVINE ISRAEL GLASS. WILLIAM SHIUN Liu*, KAZuVOSHI TAKAYAMA** and PETER IRVING BRIMELnWwt Institute

  7. Mechanical Behavior of Nanostructured and Ultrafine Grained Materials under Shock Wave Loadings. Experimental Data and Results of Computer Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skripnyak, Vladimir

    2011-06-01

    Features of mechanical behavior of nanostructured (NS) and ultrafine grained (UFG) metal and ceramic materials under quasistatic and shock wave loadings are discussed in this report. Multilevel models developed within the approach of computational mechanics of materials were used for simulation mechanical behavior of UFG and NS metals and ceramics. Comparisons of simulation results with experimental data are presented. Models of mechanical behavior of nanostructured metal alloys takes into account a several structural factors influencing on the mechanical behavior of materials (type of a crystal lattice, density of dislocations, a size of dislocation substructures, concentration and size of phase precipitation, and distribution of grains sizes). Results show the strain rate sensitivity of the yield stress of UFG and polycrystalline alloys is various in a range from 103 up to 106 1/s. But the difference of the Hugoniot elastic limits of a UFG and coarse-grained alloys may be not considerable. The spall strength, the yield stress of UFG and NS alloys are depend not only on grains size, but a number of factors such as a distribution of grains sizes, a concentration and sizes of voids and cracks, a concentration and sizes of phase precipitation. Some titanium alloys with grain sizes from 300 to 500 nm have the quasi-static yield strength and the tensile strength twice higher than that of coarse grained counterparts. But the spall strength of the UFG titanium alloys is only 10 percents above than that of coarse grained alloys. At the same time it was found the spall strength of the bulk UFG aluminium and magnesium alloys with precipitation strengthening is essentially higher in comparison of coarse-grained counterparts. The considerable decreasing of the strain before failure of UFG alloys was predicted at high strain rates. The Hugoniot elastic limits of oxide nanoceramics depend not only on the porosity, but also on sizes and volume distribution of voids.

  8. Corrosion behaviour of boiler tube materials during combustion of fuels containing Zn and Pb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bankiewicz, D.

    2012-11-01

    Many power plants burning challenging fuels such as waste-derived fuels experience failures of the superheaters and/or increased waterwall corrosion due to aggressive fuel components already at low temperatures. To minimize corrosion problems in waste-fired boilers, the steam temperature is currently kept at a relatively low level which drastically limits power production efficiency. The elements found in deposits of waste and waste-derived fuels burning boilers that are most frequently associated with high-temperature corrosion are: Cl, S, and there are also indications of Br; alkali metals, mainly K and Na, and heavy metals such as Pb and Zn. The low steam pressure and temperature in waste-fired boilers also influence the temperature of the waterwall steel which is nowadays kept in the range of 300 deg C - 400 deg C. Alkali chloride (KCl, NaCl) induced high-temperature corrosion has not been reported to be particularly relevant at such low material temperatures, but the presence of Zn and Pb compounds in the deposits have been found to induce corrosion already in the 300 deg C - 400 deg C temperature range. Upon combustion, Zn and Pb may react with Cl and S to form chlorides and sulphates in the flue gases. These specific heavy metal compounds are of special concern due to the formation of low melting salt mixtures. These low melting, gaseous or solid compounds are entrained in the flue gases and may stick or condense on colder surfaces of furnace walls and superheaters when passing the convective parts of the boiler, thereby forming an aggressive deposit. A deposit rich in heavy metal (Zn, Pb) chlorides and sulphates increases the risk for corrosion which can be additionally enhanced by the presence of a molten phase. The objective of this study was to obtain better insight into high-temperature corrosion induced by Zn and Pb and to estimate the behaviour and resistance of some boiler superheater and waterwall materials in environments rich in those heavy metals

  9. Metallographic preparation of Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube material for examination of inclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockley, A.J.

    1994-11-01

    The traditional final polish of Zr-2.5Nb alloy comprises an attack polish that contains a 0.05 μm alumina or fly-ash slurry with dilute hydrofluoric acid. This polish preferentially etches the material adjacent to the inclusions and distorts or removes the inclusions. A final polish has been developed that uses a caustic alumina slurry to produce a chemical-mechanical polish that keeps the inclusions intact. This preparation is reproducible, suitable for automation, and retains smaller inclusions. (author). 2 refs., 5 figs

  10. Assessing mesoscale material response under shock & isentropic compression via high-resolution line-imaging VISAR.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Clint Allen; Furnish, Michael David; Podsednik, Jason W.; Reinhart, William Dodd; Trott, Wayne Merle; Mason, Joshua

    2003-10-01

    Of special promise for providing dynamic mesoscale response data is the line-imaging VISAR, an instrument for providing spatially resolved velocity histories in dynamic experiments. We have prepared two line-imaging VISAR systems capable of spatial resolution in the 10-20 micron range, at the Z and STAR facilities. We have applied this instrument to selected experiments on a compressed gas gun, chosen to provide initial data for several problems of interest, including: (1) pore-collapse in copper (two variations: 70 micron diameter hole in single-crystal copper) and (2) response of a welded joint in dissimilar materials (Ta, Nb) to ramp loading relative to that of a compression joint. The instrument is capable of resolving details such as the volume and collapse history of a collapsing isolated pore.

  11. Investigation of the Use of Laser Shock Peening for Enhancing Fatigue and Stress Corrosion Cracking Resistance of Nuclear Energy Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasudevan, Vijay K. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Jackson, John [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Teysseyre, Sebastien [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Alexandreanu, Bogdan [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chen, Yiren [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-03-07

    The objective of this project, which includes close collaboration with scientists from INL and ANL, is to investigate and demonstrate the use of advanced mechanical surface treatments like laser shock peening (LSP) and ultrasonic nanocrystal surface modification (UNSM) and establish baseline parameters for enhancing the fatigue properties and SCC resistance of nuclear materials like nickel-based alloy 600 and 304 stainless steel. The research program includes the following key elements/tasks: 1) Procurement of Alloy 600 and 304 SS, heat treatment studies; 2) LSP and UNSM processing of base metal and welds/HAZ of alloys 600 and 304; (3) measurement and mapping of surface and sub-surface residual strains/stresses and microstructural changes as a function of process parameters using novel methods; (4) determination of thermal relaxation of residual stresses (macro and micro) and microstructure evolution with time at high temperatures typical of service conditions and modeling of the kinetics of relaxation; (5) evaluation of the effects of residual stress, near surface microstructure and temperature on SCC and fatigue resistance and associated microstructural mechanisms; and (6) studies of the effects of bulk and surface grain boundary engineering on improvements in the SCC resistance and associated microstructural and cracking mechanisms

  12. Combined electron beam and vacuum ARC melting for barrier tube shell material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worcester, S.A.; Woods, C.R.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes a process of the type wherein zirconium tetrachloride is reduced to produce a metallic zirconium sponge. The sponge is distilled to generally remove residual magnesium and magnesium chloride, and the distilled sponge is melted to produce an ingot, the improvement for making a non-crystal bar material for use in lining the interior of zirconium alloy fuel element cladding which comprises: a. forming the distilled sponge into a consumable electrode; b. melting the consumable electrode in a multiple swept beam electron furnace with a feed rate between 1 and 20 inches per hour to form an intermediate ingot; and c. vacuum arc melting the intermediate ingot to produce a homogeneous final ingot, having 50-500 ppm iron

  13. High insulation foam glass material from waste cathode ray tube panel glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    König, Jakob; Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; Yue, Yuanzheng

    . In general CRT consists of two types of glasses: barium/strontium containing glass (panel glass) and lead containing glass (funnel and panel glass). In this work we present the possibility to produce high performance insulation material from the recycled lead-free glass. We studied the influence of foaming...... between 750 and 850°C. We investigated the influence of milling time, particle size, foaming and oxidizing agent concentrations, temperature and time on the foaming process, foam density, foam porosity and homogeneity. Only moderate foaming was observed in carbon containing samples, while the addition...... of the oxidizing agent greatly improved the foaming quality. The results showed that the amount of oxygen available from the glass is not sufficient to combust all of the added carbon, therefore, additional oxygen was supplied via manganese reduction. In general, a minimum in the foam glass density was observed...

  14. Study on anti-emission materials for non-emitting grid applications in microwave power tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, J.; Jiang, B.Y.; Ren, C.X.; Zhang, F.M.; Feng, T.; Wang, X.; Liu, X.H.; Zou, S.C.

    2006-01-01

    Hafnium and platinum were deposited onto molybdenum grids by ion-beam assisted deposition method. Electron-emission characteristics from molybdenum grids with Hf and Pt films, which were contaminated by active electron-emission substances (Ba, BaO) of the cathode, were measured using analogous diode method. The surfaces of grids were analyzed by X-ray diffraction. The results revealed that the reaction between BaO and Hf formed BaHfO 3 compound, which greatly reduced the accumulation of BaO on the surface and accordingly decreased grid emission. In contrast, Ba were formed by the decomposition of BaO on the surface of Pt film under high temperature and re-evaporated from its surface, which reduced the active electron-emission substances on the surface of the grid and effectively restrained grid emission. Their mechanisms for grid-emission suppression are discussed and a good method to develop new grid-coating materials is suggested

  15. Why incoloy 800 was selected as tube material for the new steam generators of Doel 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stubbe, J.; Wolters, F.; Somville, P.; De Ranter, K.

    1990-01-01

    Incoloy 800 or Inconel 690. This was the basic question for the SG of DOEL 3, to be replaced in 1993. A comparative evaluation was made, focused on the service behaviour, more particularly the corrosion resistance. It was concluded that both materials may be considered for SG replacement. They are indeed substantially superior to alloy 600, but none of them is really better than the other one: - they are both nearly completely immune to primary water stress corrosion cracking; - they are both susceptible to some types of attack from the secondary side. To the 690 credit are the globally better performances in the secondary side corrosion tests. However if the aggressive environments which are unlikely to occur at DOEL 3 are discarded, it appears that the margin between 690 and 800 is small. To the 800 credit is the favourable service experience except the secondary side wastage due to phosphate conditioning. 800 was finally selected not only because of favourable economic arguments, but also because of the important weight attributed to the service behaviour by the Belgian Utilities [fr

  16. Low tube voltage and low contrast material volume cerebral CT angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Song; Zhang, Long Jiang; Lu, Guang Ming; Meinel, Felix G.; McQuiston, Andrew D.; Zhou, Chang Sheng; Qi, Li; Schoepf, U.J.

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the image quality, radiation dose and diagnostic accuracy of low kVp and low contrast material volume cerebral CT angiography (CTA) in intracranial aneurysm detection. One hundred twenty patients were randomly divided into three groups (n = 40 for each): Group A, 70 ml iodinated contrast agent/120 kVp; group B, 30 ml/100 kVp; group C, 30 ml/80 kVp. The CT numbers, noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were measured in the internal carotid artery (ICA) and middle cerebral artery (MCA). Subjective image quality was evaluated. For patients undergoing DSA, diagnostic accuracy of CTA was calculated with DSA as reference standard and compared. CT numbers of ICA and MCA were higher in groups B and C than in group A (P < 0.01). SNR and CNR in groups A and B were higher than in group C (both P < 0.05). There was no difference in subjective image quality among the three groups (P = 0.939). Diagnostic accuracy for aneurysm detection among these groups had no statistical difference (P = 1.00). Compared with group A, the radiation dose of groups B and C was decreased by 45 % and 74 %. Cerebral CTA at 100 or 80 kVp using 30 ml contrast agent can obtain diagnostic image quality with a low radiation dose while maintaining the same diagnostic accuracy for aneurysm detection. (orig.)

  17. Quantitative texture determination in pressure tube (Zr-2.5 Wt% Nb alloy) material as a function of cold work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, G.K.; Tewari, R.; Srivastava, D.; De, P.K.; Banerjee, S.; Kiran Kumar, M.; Samajdar, I.

    2003-06-01

    The texture studies on the pressure tube Zr-2.5 Nb alloy have mainly been confined to the determination of the basal pole distribution along certain direction or the inverse pole presentation in the material. This information though useful does not provide an insight into micro-textural development upon cold working. In the present study, complete bulk as well as micro texture development as a function of cold work has been obtained by determining orientation distribution function. In this work, two distinct starting microstructures of Zr-2.5 wt% Nb have been used -(a) single-phase α(hcp) martensitic structure and (b) two-phase, β(bcc) + α, Widmanstaetten structure. In the second case, the α phase was present in lamellar morphology and β stringers were sandwiched between these a lamella. In some instances single-phase α were present. However, both microstructures had similar starting crystallographic texture. Samples were deformed by unidirectional and cross rolling at room temperature. In the two-phase structure the changes in the bulk texture on cold rolling was found to be insignificant, while in the single-phase material noticeable textural changes were observed. Taylor type deformation texture models predicted textural changes in single-phase structure but failed to predict the observed lack of textural development in the two-phase material. Microtexture observations showed that a plates remained approximately single crystalline after cold rolling, while the β matrix underwent significant orientational changes. Based on microstructural and microtextural observations, a simple model is proposed in which the plastic flow is mainly confined to the β matrix within which the α plates are subjected to in-plane rigid body rotation. The model explains the observed lack of textural developments in the two-phase structure. (author)

  18. An experimental investigation of shell and tube latent heat storage for solar dryer using paraffin wax as heat storage material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Agarwal

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the presented study the shell and tube type latent heat storage (LHS has been designed for solar dryer and paraffin wax is used as heat storage material. In the first part of the study, the thermal and heat transfer characteristics of the latent heat storage system have been evaluated during charging and discharging process using air as heat transfer fluid (HTF. In the last section of the study the effectiveness of the use of an LHS for drying of food product and also on the drying kinetics of a food product has been determined. A series of experiments were conducted to study the effects of flow rate and temperature of HTF on the charging and discharging process of LHS. The temperature distribution along the radial and longitudinal directions was obtained at different time during charging process to analyze the heat transfer phenomenon in the LHS. Thermal performance of the system is evaluated in terms of cumulative energy charged and discharged, during the charging and discharging process of LHS, respectively. Experimental results show that the LHS is suitable to supply the hot air for drying of food product during non-sunshine hours or when the intensity of solar energy is very low. Temperature gain of air in the range of 17 °C to 5 °C for approximately 10 hrs duration was achieved during discharging of LHS.

  19. High temperature mechanical behavior of tube stackings – Part I: Microstructural and mechanical characterization of Inconel® 600 constitutive material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcadon, V., E-mail: Vincent.Marcadon@onera.fr [Onera – The French Aerospace Lab, F-92322 Châtillon (France); Davoine, C.; Lévêque, D.; Rafray, A.; Popoff, F.; Horezan, N.; Boivin, D. [Onera – The French Aerospace Lab, F-92322 Châtillon (France)

    2016-11-20

    This paper is the first part of a set of two papers dedicated to the mechanical behavior of cellular materials at high temperatures. For that purpose, cellular materials made of brazed tube stacking cores have been considered here. This paper addresses the characterization of the elasto-viscoplastic properties of the constitutive material of the tubes, Inconel®600, by means of tensile tests. Various temperatures and strain rates were investigated, from room temperature to 800 °C, in order to study the influence of both the brazing heat treatment and the test temperature on the mechanical properties of Inconel®600. Whereas the heat treatment drastically decreases the strength of the tubes, a significant viscous effect is revealed at 800 °C. Electron backscattered diffraction analyses carried out post-mortem on samples showed that both dynamic recrystallization and recovery occurred during tensile tests performed at 800 °C, especially at lower strain rates. In contrast, a highly deformed and textured microstructure was observed for the tubes loaded at lower temperatures.

  20. Effects of Gas-Wall Partitioning in Teflon Tubing, Instrumentation and Other Materials on Time-Resolved Measurements of Gas-Phase Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagonis, D.; Deming, B.; Krechmer, J. E.; De Gouw, J. A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Ziemann, P. J.

    2017-12-01

    Recently it has been shown that gas-phase organic compounds partition to and from the walls of Teflon environmental chambers. This process is fast, reversible, and can be modeled as absorptive partitioning. Here these studies were extended to investigate gas-wall partitioning inside Teflon tubing by introducing step function changes in the concentration of compounds being sampled and measuring the delay in the response of a proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometer (PTR-MS). We find that these delays are significant for compounds with a saturation vapor concentration (c*) below 106 μg m-3, and that the Teflon tubing and the PTR-MS both contribute to the delays. Tubing delays range from minutes to hours under common sampling conditions and can be accurately predicted by a simple chromatography model across a range of tubing lengths and diameters, flow rates, compound functional groups, and c*. This method also allows one to determine the volatility-dependent response function of an instrument, which can be convolved with the output of the tubing model to correct for delays in instrument response time for these "sticky" compounds. This correction is expected to be of particular interest to researchers utilizing and developing chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) techniques, since many of the multifunctional organic compounds detected by CIMS show significant tubing and instrument delays. These results also enable better design of sampling systems, in particular when fast instrument response is needed, such as for rapid transients, aircraft, or eddy covariance measurements. Additional results presented here extend this method to quantify the relative sorptive capacities for other commonly used tubing materials, including PFA, FEP, PTFE, PEEK, glass, copper, stainless steel, and passivated steel.

  1. Shock tube/laser absorption measurements of methane, acetylene and ethylene during the pyrolysis of n-pentane and iso-pentane

    KAUST Repository

    Sajid, Muhammad Bilal

    2015-11-09

    Pentane isomers are important constituents of distillate gasoline, compressed natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas. Pentane chemistry is integral component of the chemical kinetic mechanisms of larger hydrocarbons. Existing kinetic mechanisms differ in their predictions of the oxidative and pyrolysis behavior of pentane isomers. This work provides new species time-history data to validate and improve pentane chemistry models. Methane, acetylene and ethylene are measured during the high-temperature pyrolysis of n-pentane and iso-pentane. Experiments are performed behind reflected shock waves over 1400–2100 K and pressures near 1 atm. Methane and acetylene are measured using a quantum cascade laser operating near 8 µm, whereas ethylene is measured with a CO2 gas laser operating near 10.6 µm. A two-color technique is used to eliminate broadband interference caused by large hydrocarbons. Measurements are compared with predictions of existing chemical kinetic mechanisms which underpredict the formation of methane and acetylene but overpredict ethylene formation.

  2. Measurement of the rate of hydrogen peroxide thermal decomposition in a shock tube using quantum cascade laser absorption near 7.7 μm

    KAUST Repository

    Sajid, Muhammad Bilal

    2013-10-24

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is formed during hydrocarbon combustion and controls the system reactivity under intermediate temperature conditions. Here, we measured the rate of hydrogen peroxide decomposition behind reflected shock waves using midinfrared absorption of H2O 2 near 7.7 μm. We performed the experiments in diluted H 2O2/Ar mixtures between 930 and 1235 K and at three different pressures (1, 2, and 10 atm). Under these conditions, the decay of hydrogen peroxide is sensitive only to the decomposition reaction rate, H 2O2 + M → 2OH + M (k1). The second-order rate coefficient at low pressures (1 and 2 atm) did not exhibit any pressure dependence, suggesting that the reaction was in the low-pressure limit. The rate data measured at 10 atm exhibited falloff behavior. The measured decomposition rates can be expressed in Arrhenius forms as follows: k1(1 and 2 atm)=10(16.29±0.12)× exp (-21993±301/T)(cm 3 mol -1s-1) k1(10 atm)=10(15.24±0.10)× exp (-19955±247/T)(cm 3 mol -1s-1) © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Experimental methods of shock wave research

    CERN Document Server

    Seiler, Friedrich

    2016-01-01

    This comprehensive and carefully edited volume presents a variety of experimental methods used in Shock Waves research. In 14 self contained chapters this 9th volume of the “Shock Wave Science and Technology Reference Library” presents the experimental methods used in Shock Tubes, Shock Tunnels and Expansion Tubes facilities. Also described is their set-up and operation. The uses of an arc heated wind tunnel and a gun tunnel are also contained in this volume. Whenever possible, in addition to the technical description some typical scientific results obtained using such facilities are described. Additionally, this authoritative book includes techniques for measuring physical properties of blast waves and laser generated shock waves. Information about active shock wave laboratories at different locations around the world that are not described in the chapters herein is given in the Appendix, making this book useful for every researcher involved in shock/blast wave phenomena.

  4. Influence of hydride orientation on fracture toughness of CWSR Zr-2.5%Nb pressure tube material between RT and 300 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Rishi K. [Engineering Directorate, Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited, Mumbai 400094 (India); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India); Sunil, Saurav; Kumawat, B.K. [Mechanical Metallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Singh, R.N., E-mail: rnsingh@barc.gov.in [Mechanical Metallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Tewari, Asim [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India); Kashyap, B.P. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India)

    2017-05-15

    An experimental setup was designed, fabricated and used to form radial hydrides in Zr-2.5%Nb alloy pressure tube spool. The design of setup was based on ensuring a hoop stress in the spool greater than threshold stress for reorientation of hydrides in this alloy, which was achieved by manipulating the thermal expansion coefficient of the plunger and pressure tube material and diametral interference between them. The experimental setup was loaded on a universal testing machine (UTM) fitted with an environmental chamber and subjected to a temperature cycle for the stress reorientation treatment. The metallographic examination of the hydrogen charged spools subjected to stress re-orientation treatment using this set up revealed formation of predominantly radial hydrides. The variation of fracture toughness of material containing radial hydride with test temperature showed typical ‘S’ curve behavior with transition temperatures more than that of the material containing circumferential hydride.

  5. Shock formation of HCO+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elitzur, M.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that shocks propagating in dense molecular regions will lead to a decrease in HCO + relative abundance, in agreement with previous results by Iglesias and Silk. The shock enhancement of HCO + detected in the supernova remnant IC 443 by Dickenson et al. is due to enhanced ionization in the shocked material. This is the result of the material penetrating the remnant cavity where it becomes exposed to the trapped cosmic rays. A similar enhancement appears to have been detected by Wootten in W28 and is explained by the same model

  6. Fabrication of tubed functionally graded material by slurry dipping process. Thickness control of dip-coated layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Ryuzo

    1997-03-01

    In order to obtain long life fuel cladding tubes for the fast breeder reactor, the concept of functionally graded material was applied for the material combination of Molybdenum/stainless steel/Titanium, in which Titanium and Molybdenum were placed at the inner and outer sides, respectively. Slurry dipping method was employed because of its capability of shape forming and microstructural control. We have hitherto reported the design criteria for the graded layers, preparation of the slurry, and microstructural control of the dip-coated layers. In the present report, the thickness control of the dip-coated layer is described in detail. The thickness of the dip-coated layer depends primarily on the viscosity of the slurry. Nevertheless, for the stable dispersion of the powder in the slurry, which dominates the microstructural homogeneity, an optimum viscosity value is present for the individual slurries. With stable slurries of Ti, Mo, stainless steel powders and their mixtures, the thicknesses of dip-coated layers were controlled in dependence of their viscosities and yield values. For Ti and stainless steel powders and their mixture a PAANa was used as a dispersing agent. A NaHMP was found to be effective for the dispersion of Mo powder and Mo/stainless steel powder mixture. For all slurries tested in the present investigation PVA addition was helpful for the viscosity control. Dip-coating maps have been drawn for the stabilization of the slurries and for the formation of films with a sufficient strength for further manipulation for the slurries with low viscosity (∼10 mPa s). The final film thickness for the low-viscosity slurry with the optimum condition was about 200 μm. The slurries with high viscosities of several hundreds mPa s had a good stability and the yield value was easy to be controlled. The film thickness was able to be adjusted in the size range between several tens and several hundreds μm. The final thickness of the graded layer was determined

  7. Factors determining the choice of the beam tube material and the vacuum chamber design for a superconducting high energy storage accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggus, J.; Edwards, D. Jr.; Halama, H.J.; Herrera, J.

    1979-01-01

    The factors which determine the choice of the material and the basic design for the vacuum chamber of the ISABELLE Colliding Storage Accelerator are reviewed. When the physical, thermal, electrical, and mechanical properties of the bulk material, as well as the various surface characteristics, are considered, it appears that a stainless tube covered with a copper sleeve is the best choice for the chambers in the magnet lattice of the rings. Aluminum is probably the most desirable material for those chambers in the experimental straight sections

  8. photomultiplier tubes

    CERN Multimedia

    photomultiplier tubes. A device to convert light into an electric signal (the name is often abbreviated to PM). Photomultipliers are used in all detectors based on scintillating material (i.e. based on large numbers of fibres which produce scintillation light at the passage of a charged particle). A photomultiplier consists of 3 main parts: firstly, a photocathode where photons are converted into electrons by the photoelectric effect; secondly, a multiplier chain consisting of a serie of dynodes which multiply the number of electron; finally, an anode, which collects the resulting current.

  9. photomultiplier tube

    CERN Multimedia

    photomultiplier tubes. A device to convert light into an electric signal (the name is often abbreviated to PM). Photomultipliers are used in all detectors based on scintillating material (i.e. based on large numbers of fibres which produce scintillation light at the passage of a charged particle). A photomultiplier consists of 3 main parts: firstly, a photocathode where photons are converted into electrons by the photoelectric effect; secondly, a multiplier chain consisting of a serie of dynodes which multiply the number of electron; finally, an anode, which collects the resulting current.

  10. Tubing For Sampling Hydrazine Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, Josh; Taffe, Patricia S.; Rose-Pehrsson, Susan L.; Wyatt, Jeffrey R.

    1993-01-01

    Report evaluates flexible tubing used for transporting such hypergolic vapors as those of hydrazines for quantitative analysis. Describes experiments in which variety of tubing materials, chosen for their known compatibility with hydrazine, flexibility, and resistance to heat.

  11. Effect of beta phase composition and surface machining on the oxidation behavior of Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nouduru, S.K.; Kiran Kumar, M.; Kain, V.; Khanna, A.S.

    2015-01-01

    Zr-2.5Nb is commonly used as the pressure tube material in pressurized heavy water reactors. it is also the pressure tube material for Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) being developed indigenously in India with light water as coolant and water chemistry similar to Boiling Water Reactors (BWR). Oxidation of the pressure tube depends on various factors like material composition, microstructure, fabrication route, and water chemistry. In the present research, the role of the composition and morphology of second phase β on the high temperature and pressure oxidation behavior of Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube material in steam was systematically studied. The as-received pressure tube material (fabricated through cold worked and stress relieved, CWSR route) was subjected to selective heat treatments to generate microstructures containing predominantly β(Zr) (∼ 20% Nb) and β(Nb) (∼ 80% Nb) phases. The presence of such phases was characterized by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy. Subsequently both the heat treated materials were subjected to surface machining. The Zr-2.5Nb material in different microstructural conditions was subjected to accelerated oxidation exposures in steam at 400 C. degrees, and 10 MPa pressure up to 30 days. Raman spectroscopy was carried out on the oxide surfaces to observe the variation in tetragonal versus monoclinic phase fractions with oxidation duration. The microstructure consisting of predominantly β(Nb) showed a relatively improved oxidation resistance as compared to the one with predominantly β(Zr). The tetragonal phase fraction in the oxide film decreased with oxidation time in all microstructural conditions and was found to be the least in the microstructure containing β(Zr) after 10 days of exposures. The explanation for the observed higher oxidation resistance of β(Nb) microstructure lies in the context of depleted matrix Nb content in the case of β(Nb). Surface machining

  12. Selective molecularly imprinted polymer combined with restricted access material for in-tube SPME/UHPLC-MS/MS of parabens in breast milk samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Israel D.; Melo, Lidervan P.; Jardim, Isabel C.S.F.; Monteiro, Juliana C.S.; Nakano, Ana Marcia S.; Queiroz, Maria Eugênia C.

    2016-01-01

    A new molecularly imprinted polymer modified with restricted access material (a hydrophilic external layer), (MIP-RAM) was synthesized via polymerization in situ in an open fused silica capillary. This stationary phase was used as sorbent for in-tube solid phase microextraction (in-tube SPME) to determine parabens in breast milk samples by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). Scanning electron micrographs (SEM) illustrate MIP surface modification after glycerol dimethacrylate (hydrophilic monomer) incorporation. The interaction between parabens and MIP-RAM was investigated by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The Scatchard plot for MIP-RAM presented two linear parts with different slopes, illustrating binding sites with high- and low-affinity. Endogenous compounds exclusion from the MIP-RAM capillary was demonstrated by in-tube SPME/LC-UV assays carried out with blank milk samples. The in-tube SPME/UHPLC-MS/MS method presented linear range from 10 ng mL"−"1 (LLOQ) to 400 ng mL"−"1 with coefficients of determination higher than 0.99, inter-assay precision with coefficient of variation (CV) values ranging from 2 to 15%, and inter-assay accuracy with relative standard deviation (RSD) values ranging from −1% to 19%. Analytical validation parameters attested that in-tube SPME/UHPLC-MS/MS is an appropriate method to determine parabens in human milk samples to assess human exposure to these compounds. Analysis of breast milk samples from lactating women demonstrated that the proposed method is effective. - Highlights: • Molecularly imprinted polymer modified with a hydrophilic external layer (RAM-MIP) was synthesized in a silica capillary. • RAM-MIP capillary, used as sorbent for in-tube SPME, established specific interaction with parabens present in milk samples. • The matrix components that interacted only with the hydrophilic external layer (non-adsorptive network) were excluded. • The

  13. Selective molecularly imprinted polymer combined with restricted access material for in-tube SPME/UHPLC-MS/MS of parabens in breast milk samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Israel D.; Melo, Lidervan P. [Departamento de Química, Faculdade de Filosofia Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Jardim, Isabel C.S.F. [Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Monteiro, Juliana C.S.; Nakano, Ana Marcia S. [Escola de Enfermagem de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Queiroz, Maria Eugênia C., E-mail: mariaeqn@ffclrp.usp.br [Departamento de Química, Faculdade de Filosofia Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2016-08-17

    A new molecularly imprinted polymer modified with restricted access material (a hydrophilic external layer), (MIP-RAM) was synthesized via polymerization in situ in an open fused silica capillary. This stationary phase was used as sorbent for in-tube solid phase microextraction (in-tube SPME) to determine parabens in breast milk samples by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). Scanning electron micrographs (SEM) illustrate MIP surface modification after glycerol dimethacrylate (hydrophilic monomer) incorporation. The interaction between parabens and MIP-RAM was investigated by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The Scatchard plot for MIP-RAM presented two linear parts with different slopes, illustrating binding sites with high- and low-affinity. Endogenous compounds exclusion from the MIP-RAM capillary was demonstrated by in-tube SPME/LC-UV assays carried out with blank milk samples. The in-tube SPME/UHPLC-MS/MS method presented linear range from 10 ng mL{sup −1} (LLOQ) to 400 ng mL{sup −1} with coefficients of determination higher than 0.99, inter-assay precision with coefficient of variation (CV) values ranging from 2 to 15%, and inter-assay accuracy with relative standard deviation (RSD) values ranging from −1% to 19%. Analytical validation parameters attested that in-tube SPME/UHPLC-MS/MS is an appropriate method to determine parabens in human milk samples to assess human exposure to these compounds. Analysis of breast milk samples from lactating women demonstrated that the proposed method is effective. - Highlights: • Molecularly imprinted polymer modified with a hydrophilic external layer (RAM-MIP) was synthesized in a silica capillary. • RAM-MIP capillary, used as sorbent for in-tube SPME, established specific interaction with parabens present in milk samples. • The matrix components that interacted only with the hydrophilic external layer (non-adsorptive network) were excluded.

  14. Effect of nano-ZrO2 addition on microstructure, mechanical property and thermal shock behaviour of dense chromic oxide refractory material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Lixia; Ding, Chunhui; Zhanga, Chi; Yanga, De'an; Di, Lizhi

    2015-01-01

    To obtain a good performance hot-face lining material in gasifier, nano-ZrO 2 , up to 5 wt %, was added into chromic oxide powder with 3 wt % TiO 2 followed by sintering at 1500°C for 2.5 h. The effect of nano-ZrO 2 addition on microstructure, mechanical property and thermal shock behaviour was studied. ZrO 2 promoted densification at contents higher than 1 wt %. Microcracks and phase transformation toughened the dense chromic oxide refractory material. The main reason for decrease of strength was the existence microcracks in specimens and weakening of intergranular fracture. Dense chromic oxide refractory material with 2∼3 wt % nano-ZrO 2 possessed good densification, uniform microstructure, normal mechanical property and proper thermal shock resistance. The rupture strength retention ratio was nearly twice than that of chromic oxide material without ZrO 2 after three cycles of quenching test from 950°C to cold water. (author)

  15. Influence of deuterium content on tensile behavior of Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube material in the temperature range of ambient to 300 degC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bind, A.K.; Singh, R.N.; Chakravartty, J.K.; Dhandharia, Priyesh; Ghosh, Agnish; More, Nitin S.; Chhatre, A.G.; Vijayakumar, S.

    2011-08-01

    Tensile properties of autoclaved zirconium-2.5 wt. % niobium pressure tube material were evaluated by uniaxial tension tests at temperatures between 25 and 300 degC and under strain-rates of 1.075 x 10 -4 /s. Six number of Zr-2.5Nb alloy pressure tube spools of length 130 mm were obtained from pressure tube number 19-2557-2. Five spools were polished with abrasive paper to remove the oxide layer. These spools were gaseously charged with controlled amount of deuterium. The target deuterium concentrations were 25, 50, 75, 100 and 200 wppm of hydrogen equivalent. Ten samples were machined by EDM wire cutting from every spool. The tensile specimen axis was oriented along longitudinal direction of the tube. Metallographic examination of the deuterium charged samples suggested that the deuterides were predominantly circumferential deuterides. Analysis of tensile results showed that both yield and ultimate tensile strengths of this alloy decreased monotonically with increasing test temperatures. The tensile ductility decreased marginally with increase in test temperature from ambient to 300 degC. It was also observed that both strength and ductility appear to be unaffected by deuterium content at all temperatures, thereby suggesting that at least up to 200 wppm (Heq.) of deuterium tensile properties are not influenced by deuterium. (author)

  16. 29th International Symposium on Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Ranjan, Devesh

    2015-01-01

    This proceedings present the results of the 29th International Symposium on Shock Waves (ISSW29) which was held in Madison, Wisconsin, U.S.A., from July 14 to July 19, 2013. It was organized by the Wisconsin Shock Tube Laboratory, which is part of the College of Engineering of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The ISSW29 focused on the following areas: Blast Waves, Chemically Reactive Flows, Detonation and Combustion,  Facilities, Flow Visualization, Hypersonic Flow, Ignition, Impact and Compaction, Industrial Applications, Magnetohydrodynamics, Medical and Biological Applications, Nozzle Flow, Numerical Methods, Plasmas, Propulsion, Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability, Shock-Boundary Layer Interaction, Shock Propagation and Reflection, Shock Vortex Interaction, Shock Waves in Condensed Matter, Shock Waves in Multiphase Flow, as well as Shock Waves in Rarefield Flow. The two Volumes contain the papers presented at the symposium and serve as a reference for the participants of the ISSW 29 and individuals interes...

  17. Ablative stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities resulting from a laser-driven radiative shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, C. M.; Shimony, A.; Trantham, M.; Kuranz, C. C.; Shvarts, D.; Di Stefano, C. A.; Doss, F. W.; Drake, R. P.; Flippo, K. A.; Kalantar, D. H.; Klein, S. R.; Kline, J. L.; MacLaren, S. A.; Malamud, G.; Miles, A. R.; Prisbrey, S. T.; Raman, K. S.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Wan, W. C.; Park, H.-S.

    2018-05-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability is a common occurrence in nature, notably in astrophysical systems like supernovae, where it serves to mix the dense layers of the interior of an exploding star with the low-density stellar wind surrounding it, and in inertial confinement fusion experiments, where it mixes cooler materials with the central hot spot in an imploding capsule and stifles the desired nuclear reactions. In both of these examples, the radiative flux generated by strong shocks in the system may play a role in partially stabilizing RT instabilities. Here, we present experiments performed on the National Ignition Facility, designed to isolate and study the role of radiation and heat conduction from a shock front in the stabilization of hydrodynamic instabilities. By varying the laser power delivered to a shock-tube target with an embedded, unstable interface, the radiative fluxes generated at the shock front could be controlled. We observe decreased RT growth when the shock significantly heats the medium around it, in contrast to a system where the shock did not produce significant heating. Both systems are modeled with a modified set of buoyancy-drag equations accounting for ablative stabilization, and the experimental results are consistent with ablative stabilization when the shock is radiative. This result has important implications for our understanding of astrophysical radiative shocks and supernova radiative hydrodynamics [Kuranz et al., Nature Communications 9(1), 1564 (2018)].

  18. Field survey and laboratory tests on composite materials case of GRP (Glass Fiber Reinforced Polyester tubes for water suply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Hariga

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In the Moldova land, were made two lines of water adduction, having 6000 m length and 40 m slope, or 1/150 slope. The water supply component tubes were disposed under the plant: The tubes are made of glass – reinforced thermosetting plastics (GRP. After about 180 days of operation, one of the lines showed severe deterioration of the quality pipe components. This paper deals with some laboratory tests in order to detect the failure cases of the pipelines components.

  19. Lunar Lava Tube Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Cheryl Lynn; Walden, Bryce; Billings, Thomas L.; Reeder, P. Douglas

    1992-01-01

    Large (greater than 300 m diameter) lava tube caverns appear to exist on the Moon and could provide substantial safety and cost benefits for lunar bases. Over 40 m of basalt and regolith constitute the lava tube roof and would protect both construction and operations. Constant temperatures of -20 C reduce thermal stress on structures and machines. Base designs need not incorporate heavy shielding, so lightweight materials can be used and construction can be expedited. Identification and characterization of lava tube caverns can be incorporated into current precursor lunar mission plans. Some searches can even be done from Earth. Specific recommendations for lunar lava tube search and exploration are (1) an Earth-based radar interferometer, (2) an Earth-penetrating radar (EPR) orbiter, (3) kinetic penetrators for lunar lava tube confirmation, (4) a 'Moon Bat' hovering rocket vehicle, and (5) the use of other proposed landers and orbiters to help find lunar lava tubes.

  20. Gastrostomy Tube (G-Tube)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... any of these problems: a dislodged tube a blocked or clogged tube any signs of infection (including redness, swelling, or warmth at the tube site; discharge that's yellow, green, or foul-smelling; fever) excessive bleeding or drainage from the tube site severe abdominal pain lasting ...

  1. Shock-induced borehole waves and fracture effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fan, H.; Smeulders, D.M.J.

    2012-01-01

    We perform wave experiments using a vertical shock tube setup. Shock waves are generated by the rupture of a thin membrane. In the test section the incident pressure waves generate borehole-guided waves along water-saturated samples. The tube is equipped with side wall gages and a mobile pressure

  2. Nonequilibrium effects on shock-layer radiometry during earth entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, J. O.; Whiting, E. E.

    1973-01-01

    Radiative enhancement factors for the CN violet and N2(+) first negative band systems caused by nonequilibrium thermochemistry in the shock layer of a blunt-nosed vehicle during earth entry are reported. The results are based on radiometric measurements obtained with the aid of a combustion-driven shock tube. The technique of converting the shock-tube measurements into predictions of the enhancement factors for the blunt-body case is described, showing it to be useful for similar applications of other shock-tube measurements.

  3. Selective molecularly imprinted polymer combined with restricted access material for in-tube SPME/UHPLC-MS/MS of parabens in breast milk samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Israel D; Melo, Lidervan P; Jardim, Isabel C S F; Monteiro, Juliana C S; Nakano, Ana Marcia S; Queiroz, Maria Eugênia C

    2016-08-17

    A new molecularly imprinted polymer modified with restricted access material (a hydrophilic external layer), (MIP-RAM) was synthesized via polymerization in situ in an open fused silica capillary. This stationary phase was used as sorbent for in-tube solid phase microextraction (in-tube SPME) to determine parabens in breast milk samples by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). Scanning electron micrographs (SEM) illustrate MIP surface modification after glycerol dimethacrylate (hydrophilic monomer) incorporation. The interaction between parabens and MIP-RAM was investigated by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The Scatchard plot for MIP-RAM presented two linear parts with different slopes, illustrating binding sites with high- and low-affinity. Endogenous compounds exclusion from the MIP-RAM capillary was demonstrated by in-tube SPME/LC-UV assays carried out with blank milk samples. The in-tube SPME/UHPLC-MS/MS method presented linear range from 10 ng mL(-1) (LLOQ) to 400 ng mL(-1) with coefficients of determination higher than 0.99, inter-assay precision with coefficient of variation (CV) values ranging from 2 to 15%, and inter-assay accuracy with relative standard deviation (RSD) values ranging from -1% to 19%. Analytical validation parameters attested that in-tube SPME/UHPLC-MS/MS is an appropriate method to determine parabens in human milk samples to assess human exposure to these compounds. Analysis of breast milk samples from lactating women demonstrated that the proposed method is effective. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A catheter friction tester using balance sensor: Combined evaluation of the effects of mechanical properties of tubing materials and surface coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Røn, Troels; Jacobsen, Kristina Pilgaard; Lee, Seunghwan

    2018-04-24

    In this study, we introduce a new experimental approach to characterize the forces emerging from simulated catherization. This setup allows for a linear translation of urinary catheters in vertical direction as controlled by an actuator. By employing silicone-based elastomer with a duct of comparable diameter with catheters as urethra model, sliding contacts during the translation of catheters along the duct is generated. A most unique design and operation feature of this setup is that a digital balance was employed as the sensor to detect emerging forces from simulated catherization. Moreover, the possibility to give a variation in environment (ambient air vs. water), clearance, elasticity, and curvature of silicone-based urethra model allows for the detection of forces arising from diverse simulated catherization conditions. Two types of commercially available catheters varying in tubing materials and surface coatings were tested together with their respective uncoated catheter tubing. The first set of testing on the catheter samples showed that this setup can probe the combined effect from flexural strain of bulk tubing materials and slipperiness of surface coatings, both of which are expected to affect the comfort and smooth gliding in clinical catherization. We argue that this new experimental setup can provide unique and valuable information in preclinical friction testing of urinary catheters. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of shock compressed heterogeneous materials. II. The graphite/diamond transition case for astrophysics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineau, N.; Soulard, L.; Colombet, L.; Carrard, T.; Pellé, A.; Gillet, Ph.; Clérouin, J.

    2015-03-01

    We present a series of molecular dynamics simulations of the shock compression of copper matrices containing a single graphite inclusion: these model systems can be related to some specific carbon-rich rocks which, after a meteoritic impact, are found to contain small fractions of nanodiamonds embedded in graphite in the vicinity of high impedance minerals. We show that the graphite to diamond transformation occurs readily for nanometer-sized graphite inclusions, via a shock accumulation process, provided the pressure threshold of the bulk graphite/diamond transition is overcome, independently of the shape or size of the inclusion. Although high diamond yields (˜80%) are found after a few picoseconds in all cases, the transition is non-isotropic and depends substantially on the relative orientation of the graphite stack with respect to the shock propagation, leading to distinct nucleation processes and size-distributions of the diamond grains. A substantial regraphitization process occurs upon release and only inclusions with favorable orientations likely lead to the preservation of a fraction of this diamond phase. These results agree qualitatively well with the recent experimental observations of meteoritic impact samples.

  6. Mechanical properties of Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube material manufactured employing forging routes for PHWR700 - Part 1: tensile behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bind, A.K.; Singh, R.N.; Sunil, Saurav; Chakravartty, J.K.; Ghosh, Agnish; Dhandharia, Priyesh; More, Nitin S.; Vijayakumar, S.; Chhatre, A.G.

    2012-01-01

    Tensile properties of Zr-2.5Nb alloy tubes produced employing forging to break the cast structure were evaluated by carrying out uni-axial tension test at temperatures between 25 and 325 degC and under strain-rate of 1.075 x 10 -4 /s for both longitudinal and transverse specimens. Both strength and elongation values were comparable for the samples obtained from front and back end of the tube. Transverse samples showed higher strength and lower uniform elongation values as compared to longitudinal samples. The yield strength of double forged material at 25 degC is higher than the PHWR700 specification of a maximum value of 586 MPa. (author)

  7. Detection and evaluation of embedded mild steel can material into 18 Cr-oxide dispersion strengthened steel tubes by magnetic Barkhausen emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, G. V. K.; Kumar, Anish; Rajkumar, K. V.; Purnachandra Rao, B.; Pramanik, Debabrata; Kapoor, Komal; Jha, Sanjay Kumar

    2017-12-01

    The paper presents a new methodology for detection and evaluation of mild steel (MS) can material embedded into oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel tubes by magnetic Barkhausen emission (MBE) technique. The high frequency MBE measurements (125 Hz sweep frequency and 70-200 kHz analyzing frequency) are found to be very sensitive for detection of presence of MS on the surface of the ODS steel tube. However, due to a shallow depth of information from the high frequency MBE measurements, it cannot be used for evaluation of the thickness of the embedded MS. The low frequency MBE measurements (0.5 Hz sweep frequency and 2-20 kHz analyzing frequency) indicate presence of two MBE RMS voltage peaks corresponding to the MS and the ODS steel. The ratio of the two peaks changes with the thickness of the MS and hence, can be used for measurement of the thickness of the MS layer.

  8. Survey of existing literature in the field of shock-absorbing materials with a view to subsequent adaptation of plastic deformation codes. Phase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draulans, J.; Fabry, J.P.; Lafontaine, I.; Richel, H.; Guyette, M.

    1985-01-01

    Shock-absorbing materials and structures can be used as part of the transport container structure or of the truck equipment. An extensive survey of the literature has provided much information. Investigation has been made to define the required experimental procedures necessary to measure the misssing material properties. Three codes had been selected: EURDYN, MARC-CDC and SAMCEF. For code evaluation, a schematic container model has been considered to serve as a benchmark for the evaluation of plastic deformation. For the shock-calculation, the container falls from a height of 9 meters along the direction of its cylinder axis on an unyielded flat surface. The EURDYN computer code, has been selected first as it is especially designed to handle dynamic problems, preferably plastic ones. Indeed, EURDYN uses an explicit integration scheme versus time, which makes it quite efficient to run short deformation processes such as absorber collapses. The SAMCEF computer code could not readily calculate the benchmark, also a visco-plastic flow model has been added to it. The MARC computer code was supposed to be a candidate to run shock-calculation but extensive computing time and engineering efforts would be required, it was replaced by the PLEXUS code. The results obtained using the SAMCEF programme confirm those obtained with EURDYN. The PLEXUS results are in between. The proposed benchmark calculation is at the border of the capabilities of the most advanced computer codes for plastic-dynamic calculations. Indeed, a complex energy absorption process seems to take place in a narrow region, moving versus time, where very large shape inversions occur. That requires an accurate modelling of the system in the deformed regions and a skilful choice of the numerical parameters of the computer run. The three tested codes gave qualitatively consistent results and confirm some scarce experimental results

  9. Heat transfer characteristics of thermal energy storage for PCM (phase change material) melting in horizontal tube: Numerical and experimental investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aadmi, Moussa; Karkri, Mustapha; El Hammouti, Mimoun

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the experimental and numerical study of the storage and release of thermal heat during melting and solidification of PCM (phase change material). Heat transfer enhancement techniques such as the use of conductors like graphite and metal tubes have been proven to be effective. The material used for thermal energy storage systems is a composite based on epoxy resin loaded with metal hollow tubes filled with paraffin wax. Differential Scanning Calorimetry has been used for measurement of melting enthalpy and determination of heat capacity. The thermophysical properties of the prepared composite phase change material have been characterized using a new transient hot plate apparatus. The results have shown that most important thermal properties of these composites at the solid and liquid states are the ‘‘apparent’’ thermal conductivity, the heat storage capacity and the latent heat of fusion. These experimental results have been simulated using numerical Comsol ® Multiphysics 4.3 based models with success. The results of the experimental investigation are compared favorably with the numerical results and thus serve to validate the numerical approach. - Highlights: • Phase change materials based on cylindrical used as new energy storage system. • Thermophysical properties and the melting process of composites were investigated. • All experimental results have been simulated using Comsol ® Multiphysiques. • The ability to store and release the thermal energy were investigated. • Good improvement in the thermal conductivity of composites

  10. Self-wastage Behavior of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel as Heat Transfer Tube Material for a SFR SG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Ji-Young; Kim, Tae-Joon; Kim, Jong-Man; Choi, Jong-Hyeun; Kim, Byung-Ho; Park, Nam-Cook

    2008-01-01

    Sodium cooled fast reactors adopt sodium heated steam generators in a secondary sodium circuit to raise the steam to drive the turbine. In most cases these steam generators are of a shell-in tube type, with a high pressure water/steam inside the tubes and low pressure sodium on the shell-side, with a single wall tube as a barrier between these fluids. Therefore, if there is a hole or a crack in a heat transfer tube, a leakage of water/steam into the sodium may occur, resulting in a sodium-water reaction. When such a leak occurs, there results an important phenomena, so-called 'self-wastage' which may cause damage to the inside of the leakage site itself. If a steam generator is operated for some time with this condition, it is possible that it will damage the leak hole itself, which may eventually become a much larger opening. There is a danger that the resultant leak rate caused by a self-wastage might create the state of a small leak, or even an intermediate leak which would then give rise to the problems of a multi-target wastage. It has been observed in this study and others that the diameter of the nozzle hole grows to become a larger size in a very short time. Therefore, it is very important to predict these phenomena quantitatively from the view of designing a steam generator and its leak detection systems. The objective this study is a basic investigating of the sodium water reaction phenomena by small water/steam leaks

  11. Modelling flow and work hardening behaviour of cold worked Zr–2.5Nb pressure tube material in the temperature range of 30–600 oC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dureja, A.K.; Sinha, S.K.; Pawaskar, D.N.; Seshu, P.; Chakravartty, J.K.; Sinha, R.K.

    2014-01-01

    Under a postulated accident scenario of loss of cooling medium in an Indian Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor (IPHWR), temperature of the pressure tubes can rise and lead to large deformations. In order to investigate the modes of deformation of pressure tube – calandria tube assembly, material property data defining the flow behaviour over a temperature range from room temperature (RT) to 800 o C are needed. It is of practical importance to formulate mathematical equations to describe the stress–strain relationships of a material for a variety of reasons, such as the analysis of forming operations and the assessment of component's performance in service. A number of constitutive relations of empirical nature have been proposed and they have been found very suitable to describe the behaviour of a material. Although these relations are of empirical nature, various metallurgical factors appear to decide applicability of each of these relations. For example, grain size influences mainly the friction stress while the strain hardening is governed by dislocation density. In a recent work, tensile deformation behaviour of pressure tube material of IPHWR has been carried out over a range of temperature and strain rates (Dureja et al., 2011). It has been found that the strength parameters (yield and ultimate tensile strength) vary along the length of the tube with higher strength at the trailing end as compared to the leading end. This stems from cooling of the billet during the extrusion process which results in the variation of microstructure, texture and dislocation density from the leading to the trailing end. In addition, the variation in metallurgical parameters is also expected to influence the work hardening behaviour, which is known to control the plastic instability (related to uniform strain). In the present investigation, the tensile flow and work-hardening behaviour of a cold worked Zr–2.5Nb pressure tube material of IPHWRs has been studied over the

  12. Shock Wave Dynamics in Weakly Ionized Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Joseph A., III

    1999-01-01

    An investigation of the dynamics of shock waves in weakly ionized argon plasmas has been performed using a pressure ruptured shock tube. The velocity of the shock is observed to increase when the shock traverses the plasma. The observed increases cannot be accounted for by thermal effects alone. Possible mechanisms that could explain the anomalous behavior include a vibrational/translational relaxation in the nonequilibrium plasma, electron diffusion across the shock front resulting from high electron mobility, and the propagation of ion-acoustic waves generated at the shock front. Using a turbulence model based on reduced kinetic theory, analysis of the observed results suggest a role for turbulence in anomalous shock dynamics in weakly ionized media and plasma-induced hypersonic drag reduction.

  13. Effect of error in crack length measurement on maximum load fracture toughness of Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bind, A.K.; Sunil, Saurav; Singh, R.N.; Chakravartty, J.K.

    2016-03-01

    Recently it was found that maximum load toughness (J max ) for Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube material was practically unaffected by error in Δ a . To check the sensitivity of the J max to error in Δ a measurement, the J max was calculated assuming no crack growth up to the maximum load (P max ) for as received and hydrogen charged Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube material. For load up to the P max , the J values calculated assuming no crack growth (J NC ) were slightly higher than that calculated based on Δ a measured using DCPD technique (JDCPD). In general, error in the J calculation found to be increased exponentially with Δ a . The error in J max calculation was increased with an increase in Δ a and a decrease in J max . Based on deformation theory of J, an analytic criterion was developed to check the insensitivity of the J max to error in Δ a . There was very good linear relation was found between the J max calculated based on Δ a measured using DCPD technique and the J max calculated assuming no crack growth. This relation will be very useful to calculate J max without measuring the crack growth during fracture test especially for irradiated material. (author)

  14. Use of Zircaloy 4 material for the pressure vessels of hot and cold neutron sources and beam tubes for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheuer, A.; Gutsmiedl, E.

    1999-01-01

    The material Zircaloy 4 can be used for the pressure retaining walls for the cold and hot neutron sources and beam tubes. For the research reactor FRM-II of the Technical University Munich, Germany, the material Zircaloy 4 were chosen for the vessels of the cold and hot neutron source and for the beam tube No. 6. The sheets and forgings of Zircaloy 4 were examined in the temperature range between -256 deg. C and 250 deg. C. The thickness of the sheets are 3, 4, 5 and 10 mm, the maximum diameter of the forgings was 560 mm. This great forging diameters are not be treated in the ASTM rule B 351 for nuclear material, so a special approval with independent experts was necessary. The requirements for the material examinations were specified in a material specification and material test sheets which based on the ASTM rules B 351 and B 352 with additional restriction and additional requirements of the basic safety concept for nuclear power plants in Germany, which was take into consideration in the nuclear licensing procedure. Charpy-V samples were carried out in the temperature range between -256 deg. C and 150 deg. C to get more information on the ductile behaviour of the Zircaloy 4. The results of the sheet examination confirm the requirements of the specifications, the results of the forging examination in the tangential testing direction are lower than specified and expected for the tensile strength. The axial and transverse values confirm the specification requirements. For the strength calculation of the pressure retaining wall a reduced material value for the forgings has to take into consideration. The material behaviour of Zircaloy 4 under irradiation up to a fluence of ∼ 1x10 22 n/cm 2 was investigated. The loss of ductility was determined. As an additional criteria the variation of the fracture toughness was studies. Fracture mechanic calculations of the material were carried out in the licensing procedure with the focus to fulfill the leak before rupture

  15. Use of Zircaloy 4 material for the pressure vessels of hot and cold neutron sources and beam tubes for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutsmiedl, Erwin

    2001-01-01

    The material Zircaloy 4 can be used for the pressure retaining walls for the cold and hot neutron sources and beam tubes. For the research reactor FRM-II of the Technical University Munich, Germany, the material Zircaloy 4 were chosen for the vessels of the cold and hot neutron source and for the beam tube No. 6. The sheets and forgings of Zircaloy 4 were examined in the temperature range between -256degC and 250degC. The thickness of the sheets are 3, 4, 5 and 10 mm, the maximum diameter of the forgings was 560 mm. This great forging diameters are not be treated in the ASTM rule B 351 for nuclear material, so a special approval with independent experts was necessary. The requirements for the material examinations were specified in a material specification and material test sheets which based on the ASTM rules B 351 and B 352 with additional restriction and additional requirements of the basic safety concept for nuclear power plants in Germany, which was taken into consideration in the nuclear licensing procedure. Charpy-V samples were carried out in the temperature range between -256degC and 150degC to get more information on the ductile behaviour of the Zircaloy 4. The results of the sheet examination confirm the requirements of the specifications, the results of the forging examination in the tangential testing direction are lower than specified and expected for the tensile strength. The axial and transverse values confirm the specification requirements. For the strength calculation of the pressure retaining wall a reduced material value for the forgings has to taken into consideration. The material behaviour of Zircaloy 4 under irradiation up to a fluence of ∼1·10 22 n/cm 2 was investigated. The loss of ductility was determined. As an additional criteria the variation of the fracture toughness was studies. Fracture mechanic calculations of the material were carried out in the licensing procedure with the focus to fulfill the leak before rupture criteria of

  16. Molybdenum Tube Characterization report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaux II, Miles Frank [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Usov, Igor Olegovich [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-07

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques have been utilized to produce free-standing molybdenum tubes with the end goal of nuclear fuel clad applications. In order to produce tubes with properties desirable for this application, deposition rates were lowered requiring long deposition durations on the order of 50 hours. Standard CVD methods as well as fluidized-bed CVD (FBCVD) methods were applied towards these objectives. Characterization of the tubes produced in this manner revealed material suitable for fuel clad applications, but lacking necessary uniformity across the length of the tubes. The production of freestanding Mo tubes that possess the desired properties across their entire length represents an engineering challenge that can be overcome in a next iteration of the deposition system.

  17. Shock absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemeth, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    A shock absorber for the support of piping and components in a nuclear power plant is described. It combines a high degree of stiffness under sudden shocks, e.g. seismic disturbances, with the ability to allow for thermal expansion without resistance when so required. (JIW)

  18. Gravitational shock waves and extreme magnetomaterial shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichnerowicz, Andre.

    1975-01-01

    Within an astrophysical context corresponding to high densities, a self-gravitating model is studied, which is the set of an extreme material medium of infinite conductivity and of a magnetic field. Corresponding shock waves generate necessarily, in general, gravitational shock waves [fr

  19. Acceleration mechanisms flares, magnetic reconnection and shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colgate, S.A.

    1979-01-01

    Several mechanisms are briefly discussed for the acceleration of particles in the astrophysical environment. Included are hydrodynamic acceleration, spherically convergent shocks, shock and a density gradient, coherent electromagnetic acceleration, the flux tube origin, symmetries and instabilities, reconnection, galactic flares, intergalactic acceleration, stochastic acceleration, and astrophysical shocks. It is noted that the supernova shock wave models still depend critically on the presupernova star structure and the assumption of highly compact presupernova models for type I supernovae. 37 references

  20. Multi-layer protective armour for underwater shock wave mitigation

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed Hawass; Hosam Mostafa; Ahmed Elbeih

    2015-01-01

    The effect of underwater shock wave on different target plates has been studied. An underwater shock wave generator (shock tube) was used to study the interactions between water and different constructed targets which act as shock wave mitigation. Target plates, composed of sandwich of two aluminum sheets with rubber and foam in between, were prepared and studied. For comparison, the target plates composed of triple aluminum sheets were tested. The study includes the testing of the selected p...

  1. Optimization of Tube Current in Cone-beam Computed Tomography for the Detection of Vertical Root Fractures with Different Intracanal Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaêta-Araujo, Hugo; Silva de Souza, Gabriela Queiroz; Freitas, Deborah Queiroz; de Oliveira-Santos, Christiano

    2017-10-01

    There is no consensus about the accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) for detecting vertical root fractures (VRFs), nor is there certainty about the isolated effect of different tube current parameters on the diagnosis of VRF through CBCT scans. This study aimed to evaluate how tube current affects the detection of VRF on CBCT examinations in the absence of intracanal materials and in the presence of gutta-percha (GP) and metal (MP) or fiberglass (FP) intracanal posts. The sample consisted of 320 CBCT scans of tooth roots with and without VRF divided into 8 groups: no fracture/no intracanal material; no fracture + GP; no fracture + MP; no fracture + FP; fracture/no intracanal material; fracture + GP; fracture + MP; fracture + FP. The scans were acquired with an OP300 unit using 4 different milliamperes (4 mA, 8 mA, 10 mA, 13 mA). Five oral radiologists analyzed the images. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Az), sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and interobserver agreement were calculated. Diagnostic performance for the different milliamperes tested was similar for teeth without root filling materials or with FP. Teeth with GP and MP showed the highest Az values for 8 mA and 10 mA, respectively. For teeth with MP, specificity was significantly higher when 10 mA was used. For teeth without root filling materials or with FP, the use of a reduced milliampere does not seem to influence the detection of VRF in a significant manner. For teeth with GP and MP, an increased milliampere may lead to increased diagnostic performance. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Corrosion behaviour of a stream generator tube material in simulated steam generator feedwater containing chlorides and sulphates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bojinov, M.; Kinnunen, P.; Laitinen, T.; Maekelae, K.; Saario, T.; Sirkiae, P.; Yliniemi, K. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland); Buddas, T.; Halin, M.; Tompuri, K. [Fortum Power and Heat Oy, Loviisa Power Plant (Finland)

    2002-07-01

    The goal of the present work has been to assess the effect of relatively high concentrations of anionic impurities (Cl{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) on the corrosion behaviour of Ti-stabilised stainless steel SG tubes in simulated steam generator feed-water. The main observations of this work can be summarised as follows: Sulphate ions seem to be more aggressive than chloride ions towards the primary passive film on 08X18H10T stainless steel. The results may indicate that it is more important to have a low concentration of sulphate ions than of chloride ions in secondary side water when the effects of chemical conditions on tube degradation are considered. The presence of chloride ions seems to weaken the detrimental effect of sulphate ions on the stability of oxide films growing on 08X18H10T stainless steel. No localised corrosion features of 08X18H10T stainless steel were detected in the voltammetric and impedance measurements in solutions containing up to 5000 ppb sulphates, chlorides or both of the anions. (authors)

  3. Corrosion behaviour of a stream generator tube material in simulated steam generator feedwater containing chlorides and sulphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojinov, M.; Kinnunen, P.; Laitinen, T.; Maekelae, K.; Saario, T.; Sirkiae, P.; Yliniemi, K.; Buddas, T.; Halin, M.; Tompuri, K.

    2002-01-01

    The goal of the present work has been to assess the effect of relatively high concentrations of anionic impurities (Cl - , SO 4 2- ) on the corrosion behaviour of Ti-stabilised stainless steel SG tubes in simulated steam generator feed-water. The main observations of this work can be summarised as follows: Sulphate ions seem to be more aggressive than chloride ions towards the primary passive film on 08X18H10T stainless steel. The results may indicate that it is more important to have a low concentration of sulphate ions than of chloride ions in secondary side water when the effects of chemical conditions on tube degradation are considered. The presence of chloride ions seems to weaken the detrimental effect of sulphate ions on the stability of oxide films growing on 08X18H10T stainless steel. No localised corrosion features of 08X18H10T stainless steel were detected in the voltammetric and impedance measurements in solutions containing up to 5000 ppb sulphates, chlorides or both of the anions. (authors)

  4. Constrained reaction volume approach for studying chemical kinetics behind reflected shock waves

    KAUST Repository

    Hanson, Ronald K.; Pang, Genny A.; Chakraborty, Sreyashi; Ren, Wei; Wang, Shengkai; Davidson, David Frank

    2013-01-01

    We report a constrained-reaction-volume strategy for conducting kinetics experiments behind reflected shock waves, achieved in the present work by staged filling in a shock tube. Using hydrogen-oxygen ignition experiments as an example, we

  5. Probabilistic modeling of material resistance to crack initiation due to hydrided region overloads in CANDU Zr-2.5%Nb pressure tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutkin, L.; Scarth, D.A.

    2014-01-01

    Zr-2.5%Nb pressure tubes in CANDU nuclear reactors are susceptible to hydride-assisted cracking at the locations of stress concentration, such as in-service flaws. Probabilistic methodology is being developed to evaluate such flaws for crack initiation due to hydrided region overloads, which occur when the applied stress acting on a flaw with an existing hydrided region at its tip exceeds the stress at which the hydrided region is formed. As part of this development, probabilistic modeling of pressure tube material resistance to overload crack initiation has been performed on the basis of a set of test data specifically designed to study the effects of non-ratcheting hydride formation conditions and load reduction prior to hydride formation. In the modeling framework, the overload resistance is represented as a power-law function of the material resistance to initiation of delayed hydride cracking under constant loading, where both the overload crack initiation coefficient and the overload crack initiation exponent vary with the flaw geometry. In addition, the overload crack initiation coefficient varies with the extent of load reduction prior to hydride formation as well as the number of non-ratcheting hydride formation thermal cycles. (author)

  6. Probabilistic modeling of material resistance to crack initiation due to hydrided region overloads in CANDU Zr-2.5%Nb pressure tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutkin, L.; Scarth, D.A. [Kinectrics Inc., Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Zr-2.5%Nb pressure tubes in CANDU nuclear reactors are susceptible to hydride-assisted cracking at the locations of stress concentration, such as in-service flaws. Probabilistic methodology is being developed to evaluate such flaws for crack initiation due to hydrided region overloads, which occur when the applied stress acting on a flaw with an existing hydrided region at its tip exceeds the stress at which the hydrided region is formed. As part of this development, probabilistic modeling of pressure tube material resistance to overload crack initiation has been performed on the basis of a set of test data specifically designed to study the effects of non-ratcheting hydride formation conditions and load reduction prior to hydride formation. In the modeling framework, the overload resistance is represented as a power-law function of the material resistance to initiation of delayed hydride cracking under constant loading, where both the overload crack initiation coefficient and the overload crack initiation exponent vary with the flaw geometry. In addition, the overload crack initiation coefficient varies with the extent of load reduction prior to hydride formation as well as the number of non-ratcheting hydride formation thermal cycles. (author)

  7. demystifying the shock of shocking

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (with a pulse), atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter. The energy dose in cardioversion is less (0.5. - 2 J/kg) than in defibrillation (2 - 4 J/kg). In cardioversion the shock is discharged synchronously with the native R wave of the patient. Without synchronisation,. VF can be induced if a shock is delivered during the refractory period ...

  8. Analysis of mechanical effects caused by plasma disruptions in the European breeder out of tube solid breeder blanket design with MANET as structural material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boccaccini, L.V.; Ruatto, P.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we deal with some aspects related to the mechanical behaviour of the European breeder out of tube solid breeder blanket for the DEMO reactor during plasma disruptions. The first aspect regards the properties of the martensitic steel MANET which has been chosen as structural material. MANET is a magnetic material and its fracture toughness properties degrade considerably under irradiation. These two features have been taken into account in the calculation of magentic forces and in the assessment of conditions of unstable crack propagation respectively. As second aspect, a comparison between an electrically segmented and a continuous blanket design has been performed. The analysis reveals lower mechanical stresses for the second design during the DEMO reference disruption and in case of faster disruptions. (orig.)

  9. Technique for joining metal tubing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, H. W.

    1976-01-01

    Uniform wall thickness and uninterrupted heat transfer is achieved by using shaped metal insert as wall material for joint. Insert acts as support during brazing, after which excess material is ground away to bring joint to original tubing size.

  10. Nuclear technology and materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olander, D.R.

    1992-01-01

    Current and expected problems in the materials of nuclear technology are reviewed. In the fuel elements of LWRs, cladding waterside corrosion, secondary hydriding and pellet-cladding interaction may be significant impediments to extended burnup. In the fuel, fission gas release remains a key issue. Materials issues in the structural alloys of the primary system include stress-corrosion cracking of steel, corrosion of steam generator tubing and pressurized thermal shock of the reactor vessel. Prediction of core behavior in severe accidents requires basic data and models for fuel liquefaction, aerosol formation, fission product transport and core-concrete interaction. Materials questions in nuclear waste management and fusion technology are briefly reviewed. (author)

  11. Hypovolemic shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the person's position unless they are in immediate danger. Do not give fluids by mouth. If person ... the patient with shock. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  12. Radiation damage and thermal shock response of carbon-fiber-reinforced materials to intense high-energy proton beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Simos

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive study on the effects of energetic protons on carbon-fiber composites and compounds under consideration for use as low-Z pion production targets in future high-power accelerators and low-impedance collimating elements for intercepting TeV-level protons at the Large Hadron Collider has been undertaken addressing two key areas, namely, thermal shock absorption and resistance to irradiation damage. Carbon-fiber composites of various fiber weaves have been widely used in aerospace industries due to their unique combination of high temperature stability, low density, and high strength. The performance of carbon-carbon composites and compounds under intense proton beams and long-term irradiation have been studied in a series of experiments and compared with the performance of graphite. The 24-GeV proton beam experiments confirmed the inherent ability of a 3D C/C fiber composite to withstand a thermal shock. A series of irradiation damage campaigns explored the response of different C/C structures as a function of the proton fluence and irradiating environment. Radiolytic oxidation resulting from the interaction of oxygen molecules, the result of beam-induced radiolysis encountered during some of the irradiation campaigns, with carbon atoms during irradiation with the presence of a water coolant emerged as a dominant contributor to the observed structural integrity loss at proton fluences ≥5×10^{20}  p/cm^{2}. The carbon-fiber composites were shown to exhibit significant anisotropy in their dimensional stability driven by the fiber weave and the microstructural behavior of the fiber and carbon matrix accompanied by the presence of manufacturing porosity and defects. Carbon-fiber-reinforced molybdenum-graphite compounds (MoGRCF selected for their impedance properties in the Large Hadron Collider beam collimation exhibited significant decrease in postirradiation load-displacement behavior even after low dose levels (∼5×10^{18}

  13. PIV tracer behavior on propagating shock fronts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glazyrin, Fyodor N; Mursenkova, Irina V; Znamenskaya, Irina A

    2016-01-01

    The present work was aimed at the quantitative particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurement of a velocity field near the front of a propagating shock wave and the study of the dynamics of liquid tracers crossing the shock front. For this goal, a shock tube with a rectangular cross-section (48  ×  24 mm) was used. The flat shock wave with Mach numbers M  =  1.4–2.0 propagating inside the tube channel was studied as well as an expanding shock wave propagating outside the channel with M  =  1.2–1.8 at its main axis. The PIV imaging of the shock fronts was carried out with an aerosol of dioctyl sebacate (DEHS) as tracer particles. The pressures of the gas in front of the shock waves studied ranged from 0.013 Mpa to 0.1 MPa in the series of experiments. The processed PIV data, compared to the 1D normal shock theory, yielded consistent values of wake velocity immediately behind the plain shock wave. Special attention was paid to the blurring of the velocity jump on the shock front due to the inertial particle lag and peculiarities of the PIV technique. A numerical algorithm was developed for analysis and correction of the PIV data on the shock fronts, based on equations of particle-flow interaction. By application of this algorithm, the effective particle diameter of the DEHS aerosol tracers was estimated as 1.03  ±  0.12 μm. A number of different formulations for particle drag were tested with this algorithm, with varying success. The results show consistency with previously reported experimental data obtained for cases of stationary shock waves. (paper)

  14. Diaphragmless shock wave generators for industrial applications of shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariharan, M. S.; Janardhanraj, S.; Saravanan, S.; Jagadeesh, G.

    2011-06-01

    The prime focus of this study is to design a 50 mm internal diameter diaphragmless shock tube that can be used in an industrial facility for repeated loading of shock waves. The instantaneous rise in pressure and temperature of a medium can be used in a variety of industrial applications. We designed, fabricated and tested three different shock wave generators of which one system employs a highly elastic rubber membrane and the other systems use a fast acting pneumatic valve instead of conventional metal diaphragms. The valve opening speed is obtained with the help of a high speed camera. For shock generation systems with a pneumatic cylinder, it ranges from 0.325 to 1.15 m/s while it is around 8.3 m/s for the rubber membrane. Experiments are conducted using the three diaphragmless systems and the results obtained are analyzed carefully to obtain a relation between the opening speed of the valve and the amount of gas that is actually utilized in the generation of the shock wave for each system. The rubber membrane is not suitable for industrial applications because it needs to be replaced regularly and cannot withstand high driver pressures. The maximum shock Mach number obtained using the new diaphragmless system that uses the pneumatic valve is 2.125 ± 0.2%. This system shows much promise for automation in an industrial environment.

  15. The shock behaviour of a SiO2-Li2O transparent glass-ceramic armour material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickup, I.M.; Millett, J.C.F.; Bourne, N.K.

    2004-01-01

    The dynamic behaviour of a transparent glass-ceramic material, Transarm, developed by Alstom UK for the UK MoD has been studied. Plate impact experiments have been used to measure the materials Hugoniot characteristics and failure behaviour. Longitudinal stresses have been measured using embedded and back surface mounted Manganin gauges. Above a threshold stress of ca. 4 GPa, the longitudinal stress histories exhibit a significant secondary rise, prior to attaining their Hugoniot stress. Lateral stresses were also measured by embedding Manganin gauges in longitudinal cuts. Significant secondary rises in stress were observed when the applied longitudinal stress exceeded the 4 GPa threshold, indicating the presence of a failure front. The dynamic shear strength of the glass has been measured using the longitudinal and lateral data. Even though significant strength drops have been measured before and behind the failure front, the material has a high post-failure strength compared to non- crystalline glasses

  16. The Shock Behaviour of a SiO2-Li2O Transparent Glass-Ceramic Armour Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickup, I. M.; Millett, J. C. F.; Bourne, N. K.

    2004-07-01

    The dynamic behaviour of a transparent glass-ceramic material, Transarm, developed by Alstom UK for the UK MoD has been studied. Plate impact experiments have been used to measure the materials Hugoniot characteristics and failure behaviour. Longitudinal stresses have been measured using embedded and back surface mounted Manganin gauges. Above a threshold stress of ca. 4 GPa, the longitudinal stress histories exhibit a significant secondary rise, prior to attaining their Hugoniot stress. Lateral stresses were also measured by embedding Manganin gauges in longitudinal cuts. Significant secondary rises in stress were observed when the applied longitudinal stress exceeded the 4 GPa threshold, indicating the presence of a failure front. The dynamic shear strength of the glass has been measured using the longitudinal and lateral data. Even though significant strength drops have been measured before and behind the failure front, the material has a high post-failure strength compared to non- crystalline glasses.

  17. Heat Exchanger Tube to Tube Sheet Joints Corrosion Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Iancu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Paper presents the studies made by the authors above the tube to tube sheet fittings of heat exchanger with fixed covers from hydrofining oil reforming unit. Tube fittings are critical zones for heat exchangers failures. On a device made from material tube and tube sheet at real joints dimensions were establish axial compression force and traction force at which tube is extracted from expanded joint. Were used two shapes joints with two types of fittings surfaces, one with smooth hole of tube sheet and other in which on boring surface we made a groove. From extracted expanded tube zones were made samples for corrosion tests in order to establish the corrosion rate, corrosion potential and corrosion current in working mediums such as hydrofining oil and industrial water at different temperatures. The corrosion rate values and the temperature influence are important to evaluate joints durability and also the results obtained shows that the boring tube sheet shape with a groove on hole tube shape presents a better corrosion behavior then the shape with smooth hole tube sheet.

  18. Dynamic shock compaction of a ZrO2-RuO2 electronic nanocomposite: toward functionally graded materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zyl, W.E.; Carton, Erik P.; Raming, T.P.; ten Elshof, Johan E.; Verweij, H.

    2005-01-01

    An electronic ZrO2-RuO2 nanocomposite was fabricated by dynamic compaction (DC) at 1.5 GPa resulting in a maximum relative density of 88% in the material. The DC process formed pristine elongated conical-shaped compacts 3 cm in length. The compacts retained their original nanometer-sized grains (~20

  19. Study on antioxidant experiment on forged steel tube sheet and tube hole for steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zong Hai; Wang Detai; Ding Yang

    2012-01-01

    Antioxidant experiment on forged steel tube sheet and tube hole for steam generator was studied and the influence of different simulated heat treatments on the antioxidant performance of tube sheet and tube hole was made. The influence of different antioxidant methods on the size of tube hole was drawn. Furthermore, the change of size and weight of 18MnD5 forged steel tube sheet on the condition of different simulated heat treatments was also studied. The analytical results have proved reference information for the use of 18MnD5 material and for key processes of processing tube hole and wearing and expanding U-style tube. (authors)

  20. Fabrication of seamless calandria tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saibaba, N.; Phanibabu, C.; Bhaskara Rao, C.V.; Kalidas, R.; Ganguly, C.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Calandria tube is a large diameter, thin walled zircaloy-4 tube and is an important structural component of PHWR type of reactors. These tubes are lifetime components and remain during the full life of the reactor. Calandria tubes are classified as extremely thin walled tubes with a diameter to wall thickness ratio of around 96. Such thin walled tubes are conventionally produced by seam welded route comprising of extrusion of slabs followed by a series of hot and rolling passes, shaping into O-shape and eventual welding. An alternative and superior method of fabricating the calandria tubes, the seamless route, has been developed, which involves hot extrusion of mother blanks followed by three successive cold pilger reductions. Eccentricity correction of the extruded blanks is carried out on a special purpose grinding equipment to bring the wall thickness variation within permissible limits. Predominant wall thickness reductions are given during cold pilgering to ensure high Q-factor values. The texture in the finished tubes could be closely, controlled with an average f r value of 0.65. Pilgering parameters and tube guiding system have been specially designed to facilities rolling of thin walled tubes. Seamless calandria tubes have distinct advantages over welded tubes. In addition to the absence of weld, they are dimensionally more stable, lighter in weight and possess uniform grains with superior grain size. The cycle time from billet to finished product is substantially reduced and the product is amenable to high level of quality assurance. The most significant feature of the seamless route is its material recovery over welded route. Residual stresses measured in the tubes indicate that these are negligible and uniform along the length of the tube. In view of their superior quality, the first charge of seamless calandria tubes will be rolled into the first 500 MWe Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor at Tarapur

  1. Prestressed Carbon Fiber Composite Overwrapped Gun Tube

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Littlefield, Andrew; Hyland, Edward

    2006-01-01

    .... Using composite materials not only directly removes weight from the gun tube but, by better balancing the tube, allows the use of smaller drive systems, thus further enhancing the system weight loss...

  2. Feeding Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... feeding therapies have been exhausted. Please review product brand and method of placement carefully with your physician ... Total Parenteral Nutrition. Resources: Oley Foundation Feeding Tube Awareness Foundation Children’s Medical Nutrition Alliance APFED’s Educational Webinar ...

  3. Tube-Super Dielectric Materials: Electrostatic Capacitors with Energy Density Greater than 200 J·cm-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Francisco Javier Quintero; Phillips, Jonathan

    2015-09-17

    The construction and performance of a second generation of super dielectric material based electrostatic capacitors (EC), with energy density greater than 200 J·cm - ³, which rival the best reported energy density of electric double layer capacitors (EDLC), also known as supercapacitors, are reported. The first generation super dielectric materials (SDM) are multi-material mixtures with dielectric constants greater than 1.0 × 10⁵, composed of a porous, electrically insulating powder filled with a polarizable, ion-containing liquid. Second-generation SDMs (TSDM), introduced here, are anodic titania nanotube arrays filled with concentrated aqueous salt solutions. Capacitors using TiO₂ based TSDM were found to have dielectric constants at ~0 Hz greater than 10⁷ in all cases, a maximum operating voltage of greater than 2 volts and remarkable energy density that surpasses the highest previously reported for EC capacitors by approximately one order of magnitude. A simple model based on the classic ponderable media model was shown to be largely consistent with data from nine EC type capacitors employing TSDM.

  4. Tube-Super Dielectric Materials: Electrostatic Capacitors with Energy Density Greater than 200 J·cm−3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier Quintero Cortes

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The construction and performance of a second generation of super dielectric material based electrostatic capacitors (EC, with energy density greater than 200 J·cm−3, which rival the best reported energy density of electric double layer capacitors (EDLC, also known as supercapacitors, are reported. The first generation super dielectric materials (SDM are multi-material mixtures with dielectric constants greater than 1.0 × 105, composed of a porous, electrically insulating powder filled with a polarizable, ion-containing liquid. Second-generation SDMs (TSDM, introduced here, are anodic titania nanotube arrays filled with concentrated aqueous salt solutions. Capacitors using TiO2 based TSDM were found to have dielectric constants at ~0 Hz greater than 107 in all cases, a maximum operating voltage of greater than 2 volts and remarkable energy density that surpasses the highest previously reported for EC capacitors by approximately one order of magnitude. A simple model based on the classic ponderable media model was shown to be largely consistent with data from nine EC type capacitors employing TSDM.

  5. Operating performance of CANDU pressure tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheadle, B.A.; Price, E.G.

    1989-04-01

    The performance of Zircaloy-2 and Zr-2.5 Nb pressure tubes in CANDU reactors is reviewed. The accelerated hydriding of Zircaloy-2 in reducing water chemistries can lower the toughness of this material and it is essential that defect-initiating phenomena, such as hydride blister formation from pressure tube to calandria tube contact, be prevented. Zr-2.5 Nb pressure tubes are performing well with low rates of hydrogen pick-up and good retention of material properties

  6. Comparative study on the migration of di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) and tri-2-ethylhexyl trimellitate (TOTM) into blood from PVC tubing material of a heart-lung machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Elisabeth; Münch, Frank; Göen, Thomas; Purbojo, Ariawan; Müller, Johannes; Cesnjevar, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Medical devices like blood tubing often consist of PVC material that requires the addition of plasticizers. These plasticizers may migrate into the blood leading to an exposure of the patients. In this study the migration behavior of three different blood tubing sets (PVC material with two different plasticizers and silicone as control material) applied on a heart-lung machine standardly used for cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in children was studied. We analyzed the total plasticizer migration by analysis of both, the parent compounds as well as their primary degradation products in blood. Additionally, the total mass loss of the tubing over perfusion time was examined. The PVC tubing plasticized with DEHP (di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate) was found to have the highest mass loss over time and showed a high plasticizer migration rate. In comparison, the migration of TOTM (tri-2-ethylhexyl trimellitate) and its primary degradation products was found to be distinctly lower (by a factor of approx. 350). Moreover, it was observed that the storage time of the tubing affects the plasticizer migration rates. In conclusion, the DEHP substitute TOTM promises to be an effective alternative plasticizer for PVC medical devices particularly regarding the decreased migration rate during medical procedures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Toxic shock syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome; Toxic shock-like syndrome; TSLS ... Toxic shock syndrome is caused by a toxin produced by some types of staphylococcus bacteria. A similar problem, called toxic shock- ...

  8. Characterization of tube support alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaia, A.R.

    1985-01-01

    The involvement and relationship of carbon steel corrosion products in the tube denting phenomenon promoted an intensive research effort to: 1) understand, reproduce, and arrest the denting process, and 2) evaluate alternative tube support materials to provide additional corrosion resistance. The paper summarizes a corrosion testing program for the verification of type 405 stainless steel under acid or all volatile treatment conditions

  9. Assessment of the Polyacrylic Acid for an Ammonia Water Treatment and for Alloy 800NG SG Tube Material in Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamouroux, Christine; You, Dominique; Plancque, Gabriel; Roy, Marc; Laire, Charles; Schnongs, Philippe

    2012-09-01

    To prevent the Steam Generators (SG) fouling by corrosion products or the Tube Support Plate (TSP) blockage the on-line injection of a dispersant such the Polyacrylic Acid (PAA) could be a relevant water treatment. Long-term trials performed in PWRs have shown that the PAA, injected at the SG inlet, facilitate the evacuation of the iron oxides by the SG blowdown. Given the ammonia treatment of the secondary water of the Belgian PWRs, the R and D program carried out was devoted to: - Verify the innocuousness of the PAA and its degradation products versus Alloy 800NG SCC susceptibility in case of over concentrations and sludge presence, - Assess the potential impact of the PAA and its thermal degradation products on the specific NH 3 water treatment. The main results can be summarized as following: The corrosion tests performed with PAA in case of over concentrations and sludge couldn't point out any negative effect of the dispersant on the SCC susceptibility of tubing materials such as Alloy 800NG. No significant modification of the tube oxide layer has been observed. At the SG operating temperature, the PAA is decomposed and a large spectrum from high to lower molecular weights polymers than the initial PAA arises. The fragmentation of the polymer into low molecular weight polyacrylic acids is obtained within 20 minutes and the average molecular weight is reduced by 50% from the original one. The thermal degradation products, their quantity and their kinetic of appearance, have been determined. The generated acetate concentration during the on-line dispersant application should remain low compared to the current values observed in the SG water. From the numerical simulation based on acetate concentration and on the kinetic law deduced from the experimental work, it can be concluded that in a 2-phase medium, the margin on the water pH compared to the neutral pH remains high. At 180 deg. C, no impact on the water pH is identified, taking into account realistic

  10. Steam generator tube extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delorme, H.

    1985-05-01

    To enable tube examination on steam generators in service, Framatome has now developed a process for removing sections of steam generator tubes. Tube sections can be removed without being damaged for treating the tube section expanded in the tube sheet

  11. Radiation-resistant camera tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwahata, Takao; Manabe, Sohei; Makishima, Yasuhiro

    1982-01-01

    It was a long time ago that Toshiba launched on manufacturing black-and-white radiation-resistant camera tubes employing nonbrowning face-plate glass for ITV cameras used in nuclear power plants. Now in compliance with the increasing demand in nuclear power field, the Company is at grips with the development of radiation-resistant single color-camera tubes incorporating a color-stripe filter for color ITV cameras used under radiation environment. Herein represented are the results of experiments on characteristics of materials for single color-camera tubes and prospects for commercialization of the tubes. (author)

  12. Shock waves in helium at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liepmann, H.W.; Torczynski, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    Results are reported from studies of the properties of low temperature He-4 using shock waves as a probe. Ideal shock tube theory is used to show that sonic speeds of Mach 40 are attainable in He at 300 K. Viscosity reductions at lower temperatures minimize boundary layer effects at the side walls. A two-fluid model is described to account for the phase transition which He undergoes at temperatures below 2.2 K, after which the quantum fluid (He II) and the normal compressed superfluid (He I) coexist. Analytic models are provided for pressure-induced shocks in He I and temperature-induced shock waves (called second sound) which appear in He II. The vapor-fluid interface of He I is capable of reflecting second and gasdynamic sound shocks, which can therefore be used as probes for studying phase transitions between He I and He II. 17 references

  13. Steam generator tube integrity program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dierks, D.R.; Shack, W.J.; Muscara, J.

    1996-01-01

    A new research program on steam generator tubing degradation is being sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at Argonne National Laboratory. This program is intended to support a performance-based steam generator tube integrity rule. Critical areas addressed by the program include evaluation of the processes used for the in-service inspection of steam generator tubes and recommendations for improving the reliability and accuracy of inspections; validation and improvement of correlations for evaluating integrity and leakage of degraded steam generator tubes, and validation and improvement of correlations and models for predicting degradation in steam generator tubes as aging occurs. The studies will focus on mill-annealed Alloy 600 tubing, however, tests will also be performed on replacement materials such as thermally-treated Alloy 600 or 690. An overview of the technical work planned for the program is given

  14. Enstrophy generation in a shock-dominated turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Hideaki.

    1995-09-01

    A mechanism of enstrophy generation is investigated numerically in a shock-dominated turbulence driven by a random external force which has only the compressible component. Enstrophy is generated, especially on collision of shock, as a pair of vortex tube of opposite sense of rotation behind curved shocks. The roles of various terms in enstrophy equation are clarified in enstrophy generation process. Generation of enstrophy is enhanced by strong alignment of each term of the enstrophy equation with the vorticity vector. (author)

  15. Shock resistance testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pouard, M.

    1984-03-01

    In the framework of mechanical tests and to answer the different requests for tests, the T.C.R (Transport Conditionnement et Retraitement) laboratory got test facilities. These installations allow to carry out tests of resistance to shocks, mainly at the safety level of components of nuclear power plants, mockups of transport casks for fuel elements and transport containers for radioactive materials. They include a tower and a catapult. This paper give a decription of the facilities and explain their operation way [fr

  16. Design basis for resistance to shock and vibration of radioactive material packages greater than one ton in truck transport (draft standard for trial use and comment)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    This standard specifies minimum design values for shock and vibration in highway transport, by truck or by tractor-trailer combination, for fuel and irradiation experiments when package weight exceeds one ton. Shock values correspond to normal transport over rough roads and to minor accidents such as backing into a loading dock. Vibration values correspond to normal transport; any large-amplitude vibration resulting from rough road conditions or a minor accident is treated as shock. This standard includes recommended methods of application to the design of packaging and tiedown systems

  17. Ear Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the ear drum or eustachian tube, Down Syndrome, cleft palate, and barotrauma (injury to the middle ear caused by a reduction of air pressure, ... specialist) may be warranted if you or your child has experienced repeated ... fluid in the middle ear, barotrauma, or have an anatomic abnormality that ...

  18. Tubo de PVC liso com diferentes envoltórios como material alternativo na drenagem subterrânea Smooth PVC tube with different envelopes as an alternative material in the subsurface drainage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florício P. de Almeida

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Em regiões áridas e semi-áridas irrigadas a drenagem é, freqüentemente, necessária para prevenir o encharcamento do solo e o controle da salinidade. Um dos principais obstáculos na instalação de um sistema de drenagem subterrânea é o alto custo do investimento inicial. Assim, alguma contribuição que reduza o custo da instalação dos drenos e também do material usado, é altamente vantajosa. Diante disso, o objetivo desta pesquisa foi avaliar, em condições de laboratório, o desempenho hidráulico do sistema drenante constituído pelo tubo de PVC liso, próprio para esgoto doméstico, de 50,0 mm de diâmetro nominal e área aberta de 23,0 cm² m-1, e por três tipos de envoltório. O desempenho do tubo drenante de PVC liso demonstrou que esse material é tecnicamente viável para drenagem agrícola, principalmente com o uso de brita como envoltório.In irrigated arid and semi-arid regions the drainage is, frequently, necessary to prevent the waterlogging of the soil and to control the salinity. One of the main obstacles in the installation of a subsurface drainage system is the high cost of the initial investment. Thus, some contribution that reduces the cost of the installation of the drains and also of the material used is highly advantageous. The objective of this research was to evaluate, under laboratory conditions, the hydraulic performance of the drainage system constituted by smooth PVC tube used for sewer with 50.0 mm of nominal diameter and open area of 23.0 cm² m-1 and different types of envelopes, as an alternative material for subsurface drainage. The performance of the smooth PVC tube demonstrated that this material is technically viable for agricultural drainage principally when used with single stones as envelope.

  19. Influences of Alloying Element and Annealing on the Microstructure and Corrosion Resistance of Steam Generator Tubing Materials of Nuclear Power Plant (I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Sik; Pari, Yong Soo; Kuk, Il Hiun

    1996-01-01

    Influences of alloying elements and annealing heat treatments on Alloy 690 and Alloy 600 for steam generator tubing materials of nuclear power plants were studied. OM, SEM, TEM, and XRD analyses were used to study the microstructural changes of the alloys. Mechanical properties were investigated by means of tension tests and Rockwell hardness tests, and corrosion resistance was evaluated using the anodic polarization tests and the 65% boiling nitric acid immersion tests. Increasing the carbon content of Alloy 690, the hardness and tensile strength were increased, but the elongation and grain size were decreased. However, increasing the annealing temperature, the tensile strength and hardness were decreased, but the elongation and grain size were increased. Increasing the carbon content of Alloy 690, the results of the anodic polarization tests and the nitric acid immersion tests showed that the annealing temperature to reveal a minimum corrosion rate was increased. This behavior seemed to be due to the combination of the solid solution of carbon in the matrix and grain growth with annealing. In this work, the corrosion properties of Alloy 690 were better than that of Alloy 600, and the range of the optimum annealing temperature of Alloy 690 was from 1100 .deg. C to 1150 .deg. C

  20. Cladding tube manufacturing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, R.; Jeong, Y. H.; Baek, B. J.; Kim, K. H.; Kim, S. J.; Choi, B. K.; Kim, J. M.

    1999-04-01

    This report gives an overview of the manufacturing routine of PWR cladding tubes. The routine essentially consists of a series of deformation and annealing processes which are necessary to transform the ingot geometry to tube dimensions. By changing shape, microstructure and structure-related properties are altered simultaneously. First, a short overview of the basics of that part of deformation geometry is given which is related to tube reducing operations. Then those processes of the manufacturing routine which change the microstructure are depicted, and the influence of certain process parameters on microstructure and material properties are shown. The influence of the resulting microstructure on material properties is not discussed in detail, since it is described in my previous report A lloy Development for High Burnup Cladding . Because of their paramount importance still up to now, and because manufacturing data and their influence on properties for other alloys are not so well established or published, the descriptions are mostly related to Zry4 tube manufacturing, and are only in short for other alloys. (author). 9 refs., 46 figs

  1. Cladding tube manufacturing technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, R. [Kraftwerk Union AG, Mulheim (Germany); Jeong, Y.H.; Baek, B.J.; Kim, K.H.; Kim, S.J.; Choi, B.K.; Kim, J.M. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-04-01

    This report gives an overview of the manufacturing routine of PWR cladding tubes. The routine essentially consists of a series of deformation and annealing processes which are necessary to transform the ingot geometry to tube dimensions. By changing shape, microstructure and structure-related properties are altered simultaneously. First, a short overview of the basics of that part of deformation geometry is given which is related to tube reducing operations. Then those processes of the manufacturing routine which change the microstructure are depicted, and the influence of certain process parameters on microstructure and material properties are shown. The influence of the resulting microstructure on material properties is not discussed in detail, since it is described in my previous report 'Alloy Development for High Burnup Cladding.' Because of their paramount importance still up to now, and because manufacturing data and their influence on properties for other alloys are not so well established or published, the descriptions are mostly related to Zry4 tube manufacturing, and are only in short for other alloys. (author). 9 refs., 46 figs.

  2. A Shocking Solar Nebula?

    OpenAIRE

    Liffman, Kurt

    2009-01-01

    It has been suggested that shock waves in the solar nebula formed the high temperature materials observed in meteorites and comets. It is shown that the temperatures at the inner rim of the solar nebula could have been high enough over a sufficient length of time to produce chondrules, CAIs, refractory dust grains and other high-temperature materials observed in comets and meteorites. The solar bipolar jet flow may have produced an enrichment of 16O in the solar nebula over time and the chond...

  3. Bifurcation parameters of a reflected shock wave in cylindrical channels of different roughnesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penyazkov, O.; Skilandz, A.

    2018-03-01

    To investigate the effect of bifurcation on the induction time in cylindrical shock tubes used for chemical kinetic experiments, one should know the parameters of the bifurcation structure of a reflected shock wave. The dynamics and parameters of the shock wave bifurcation, which are caused by reflected shock wave-boundary layer interactions, are studied experimentally in argon, in air, and in a hydrogen-nitrogen mixture for Mach numbers M = 1.3-3.5 in a 76-mm-diameter shock tube without any ramp. Measurements were taken at a constant gas density behind the reflected shock wave. Over a wide range of experimental conditions, we studied the axial projection of the oblique shock wave and the pressure distribution in the vicinity of the triple Mach configuration at 50, 150, and 250 mm from the endwall, using side-wall schlieren and pressure measurements. Experiments on a polished shock tube and a shock tube with a surface roughness of 20 {μ }m Ra were carried out. The surface roughness was used for initiating small-scale turbulence in the boundary layer behind the incident shock wave. The effect of small-scale turbulence on the homogenization of the transition zone from the laminar to turbulent boundary layer along the shock tube perimeter was assessed, assuming its influence on a subsequent stabilization of the bifurcation structure size versus incident shock wave Mach number, as well as local flow parameters behind the reflected shock wave. The influence of surface roughness on the bifurcation development and pressure fluctuations near the wall, as well as on the Mach number, at which the bifurcation first develops, was analyzed. It was found that even small additional surface roughness can lead to an overshoot in pressure growth by a factor of two, but it can stabilize the bifurcation structure along the shock tube perimeter.

  4. High dynamic range emission measurements of shocked energetic materials: Octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Will P.; Dlott, Dana D.

    2016-06-01

    A new emission apparatus with high time resolution and high dynamic range was used to study shock-induced ignition of octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine in the form of ultrafine powder (4 ± 3 μm particle size), over a range of impact velocities (0.8-4.3 km s-1) and impact durations (2.5-16 ns). A graybody model was used to extract graybody emissivities and time-dependent temperatures from a few ns to 100 μs. The emission transients consisted of three parts: a 6700 K nanosecond burst during the shocks, a 4000-4500 K temperature spike near 0.3 μs followed by a ˜3300 K tail extending out to ˜100 μs. These temperatures varied remarkably little with impact velocity and duration, while the emission intensities and emissivities changed by over an order of magnitude. The emissivity changes were interpreted with a hot spot model, where hot spot temperatures reached a maximum of 6700 K and the hot spot volume fractions increased from 5% to 100% as impact velocity increased from 1 to 3 km s-1. Changing shock durations in the 2.5-16 ns range had noticeable effects on the microsecond emission. The 0.3 μs temperature spike was much smaller or absent with 2.5 ns shocks, but prominent with longer durations. An explanation for these effects was put forth that invoked the formation of carbon-rich clusters during the shock. In this view, cluster formation was minimal with 2.5 ns shocks, but longer-duration shocks produced increasingly larger clusters, and the 0.3 μs temperature spikes represented cluster ignition.

  5. Electron tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyama, Motohiro [Hamamatsu, JP; Fukasawa, Atsuhito [Hamamatsu, JP; Arisaka, Katsushi [Los Angeles, CA; Wang, Hanguo [North Hills, CA

    2011-12-20

    An electron tube of the present invention includes: a vacuum vessel including a face plate portion made of synthetic silica and having a surface on which a photoelectric surface is provided, a stem portion arranged facing the photoelectric surface and made of synthetic silica, and a side tube portion having one end connected to the face plate portion and the other end connected to the stem portion and made of synthetic silica; a projection portion arranged in the vacuum vessel, extending from the stem portion toward the photoelectric surface, and made of synthetic silica; and an electron detector arranged on the projection portion, for detecting electrons from the photoelectric surface, and made of silicon.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulation of laser shock phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukumoto, Ichirou [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Kansai Research Establishment, Advanced Photon Research Center, Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan).

    2001-10-01

    Recently, ultrashort-pulse lasers with high peak power have been developed, and their application to materials processing is expected as a tool of precision microfabrication. When a high power laser irradiates, a shock wave propagates into the material and dislocations are generated. In this paper, laser shock phenomena of the metal were analyzed using the modified molecular dynamics method, which has been developed by Ohmura and Fukumoto. The main results obtained are summarized as follows: (1) The shock wave induced by the Gaussian beam irradiation propagates radially from the surface to the interior. (2) A lot of dislocations are generated at the solid-liquid interface by the propagation of a shock wave. (3) Some dislocations are moved instantaneously with the velocity of the longitudinal wave when the shock wave passes, and their velocity is not larger than the transverse velocity after the shock wave has passed. (author)

  7. Set-up for steam generator tube bundle washing after explosion expanding the tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osipov, S.I.; Kal'nin, A.Ya.; Mazanenko, M.F.

    1985-01-01

    Set-up for steam generator tube bundle washing after the explosion expanding of tubes is described. Washing is accomplished by distillate. Steam is added to distillate for heating, and compersed air for preventing hydraulic shock. The set-up is equiped by control equipment. Set-up performances are presented. Time for one steam generator washing constitutes 8-12 h. High economic efficiency is realized due to the set-up introduction

  8. Undercuts by Laser Shock Forming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wielage, Hanna; Vollertsen, Frank

    2011-01-01

    In laser shock forming TEA-CO 2 -laser induced shock waves are used to form metal foils, such as aluminum or copper. The process utilizes an initiated plasma shock wave on the target surface, which leads to a forming of the foil. A challenge in forming technologies is the manufacturing of undercuts. By conventional forming methods these special forms are not feasible. In this article, it is presented that undercuts in the micro range can be produced by laser shock deep drawing. Different drawing die diameters, drawing die depths and the material aluminum in the thicknesses 20 and 50 μm were investigated. It will be presented that smaller die diameters facilitate undercuts compared to bigger die diameters. The phenomena can be explained by Barlow's formula. Furthermore, it is shown which maximum undercut depth at different die diameters can be reached. To this end, cross-sections of the different parameter combinations are displayed.

  9. Chest tube insertion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chest drainage tube insertion; Insertion of tube into chest; Tube thoracostomy; Pericardial drain ... Be careful there are no kinks in your tube. The drainage system should always sit upright and be placed ...

  10. Shock Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    The electrician pictured is installing a General Electric Ground Fault Interrupter (GFI), a device which provides protection against electrical shock in the home or in industrial facilities. Shocks due to defective wiring in home appliances or other electrical equipment can cause severe burns, even death. As a result, the National Electrical Code now requires GFIs in all new homes constructed. This particular type of GFI employs a sensing element which derives from technology acquired in space projects by SCI Systems, Inc., Huntsville, Alabama, producer of sensors for GE and other manufacturers of GFI equipment. The sensor is based on the company's experience in developing miniaturized circuitry for space telemetry and other spacecraft electrical systems; this experience enabled SCI to package interruptor circuitry in the extremely limited space available and to produce sensory devices at practicable cost. The tiny sensor measures the strength of the electrical current and detects current differentials that indicate a fault in the functioning of an electrical system. The sensing element then triggers a signal to a disconnect mechanism in the GFI, which cuts off the current in the faulty circuit.

  11. Cathode ray tube screens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cockayne, B.; Robbins, D.J.; Glasper, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    An improved cathode ray tube screen is described which consists of a single- or a poly-crystalline slice of a material such as yttrium aluminium garnet in which dopants such as Tb 3 + , Eu 3 + , Ce 3 + or Tm 3 + are ion implanted to different depths or in different areas of the screen. Annealing the screen removes lattice damage caused by the ion implanting and assists the diffusion of the dopant into the crystal. (U.K.)

  12. Insight into magnetorheological shock absorbers

    CERN Document Server

    Gołdasz, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    This book deals with magnetorheological fluid theory, modeling and applications of automotive magnetorheological dampers. On the theoretical side a review of MR fluid compositions and key factors affecting the characteristics of these fluids is followed by a description of existing applications in the area of vibration isolation and flow-mode shock absorbers in particular. As a majority of existing magnetorheological devices operates in a so-called flow mode a critical review is carried out in that regard. Specifically, the authors highlight common configurations of flow-mode magnetorheological shock absorbers, or so-called MR dampers that have been considered by the automotive industry for controlled chassis applications. The authors focus on single-tube dampers utilizing a piston assembly with one coil or multiple coils and at least one annular flow channel in the piston.

  13. Expansion and compression shock wave calculation in pipes with the C.V.M. numerical method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raymond, P.; Caumette, P.; Le Coq, G.; Libmann, M.

    1983-03-01

    The Control Variables Method for fluid transients computations has been used to compute expansion and compression shock waves propagations. In this paper, first analytical solutions for shock wave and rarefaction wave propagation are detailed. Then after a rapid description of the C.V.M. technique and its stability and monotonicity properties, we will present some results about standard shock tube problem, reflection of shock wave, finally a comparison between experimental results obtained on the ELF facility and calculations is given

  14. Using Fast Hot Shock Wave Consolidation Technology to Produce Superconducting MgB2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Gegechkori

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The original hot shock wave assisted consolidation method combining high temperature was applied with the two-stage explosive process without any further sintering to produce superconducting materials with high density and integrity. The consolidation of MgB2 billets was performed at temperatures above the Mg melting point and up to 1000oC in partially liquid condition of Mg-2B blend powders. The influence of the type of boron (B isotope in the composition on critical temperature and superconductive properties was evaluated. An example of a hybrid Cu-MgB2–Cu superconducting tube is demonstrated and conclusions are discussed.

  15. Characterization of shocked beryllium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papin P.A.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available While numerous studies have investigated the low-strain-rate constitutive response of beryllium, the combined influence of high strain rate and temperature on the mechanical behavior and microstructure of beryllium has received limited attention over the last 40 years. In the current work, high strain rate tests were conducted using both explosive drive and a gas gun to accelerate the material. Prior studies have focused on tensile loading behavior, or limited conditions of dynamic strain rate and/or temperature. Two constitutive strength (plasticity models, the Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW and Mechanical Threshold Stress (MTS models, were calibrated using common quasi-static and Hopkinson bar data. However, simulations with the two models give noticeably different results when compared with the measured experimental wave profiles. The experimental results indicate that, even if fractured by the initial shock loading, the Be remains sufficiently intact to support a shear stress following partial release and subsequent shock re-loading. Additional “arrested” drive shots were designed and tested to minimize the reflected tensile pulse in the sample. These tests were done to both validate the model and to put large shock induced compressive loads into the beryllium sample.

  16. Importance of crevices formed between tubes and tube plate for the operational behaviour of heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achten, N.; Herbsleb, G.; Wieling, N.

    1986-01-01

    It must be guaranteed by construction and manufacture of heat exchangers that primary and secondary medium are completely separated from each other. When this requirement is fullfilled, the operational use of heat exchangers can be impaired by corrosion reactions within the crevice formed between tube and tube plate which may result in corrosion damage. The various techniques which are in use to connect tubes and tube plate and which are described in the present report, must be valued with respect to the tightness of the connection as well as to the formation of crevices between tubes and tube plate. Corrosion resistant copperbase alloys and stainless steels are the most important materials which are in use for the construction of heat exchangers. The mechanisms of crevice corrosion with unalloyed and low alloy carbon steels, stainless steels, and mixed connections between tube and tube plate with these materials are described in detail. Crevice corrosion may be caused also by the formation of galvanic cells between materials of differing electrochemical response. Furthermore, the concentration of aggressive media in crevices between tubes and tube plate can lead to corrosion damage of heat exchanger tubes. For the service operation of heat exchangers without any hazard of corrosion damage in crevices between tubes and tube plate, such crevices must be avoided by proper construction and manufacture. As a model for suitable measures to avoid crevices, the manufacture of steam generators for PWR's is described. (orig.) [de

  17. Condensed matter at high shock pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nellis, W.J.; Holmes, N.C.; Mitchell, A.C.; Radousky, H.B.; Hamilton, D.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental techniques are described for shock waves in liquids: Hugoniot equation-of-state, shock temperature and emission spectroscopy, electrical conductivity, and Raman spectroscopy. Experimental data are reviewed and presented in terms of phenomena that occur at high densities and temperatures in shocked He, Ar, N 2 , CO, SiO 2 -aerogel, H 2 O, and C 6 H 6 . The superconducting properties of Nb metal shocked to 100 GPa (1 Mbar) and recovered intact are discussed in terms of prospects for synthesizing novel, metastable materials. Ultrahigh pressure data for Cu is reviewed in the range 0.3 to 6TPa (3 to 60 Mbar). 56 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  18. Shock compression of simulated adobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, C. H.; Church, P. D.; Gould, P. J.; Stewart, B.; Jardine, A. P.

    2017-01-01

    A series of plate impact experiments were conducted to investigate the shock response of a simulant for adobe, a traditional form of building material widely used around the world. Air dried bricks were sourced from the London brick company, dry machined and impacted at a range of velocities in a single stage gas gun. The shock Hugoniot was determined (Us =2.26up+0.37) as well as release information. The material was found to behave in a manner which was similar to that of loose sand and considerably less stiff than a weak porous sandstone. The effect of any cementing of the grains was examined by shocking powdered samples contained within a cell arrangement.

  19. Collisionless electrostatic shocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H.K.; Andersen, S.A.; Jensen, Vagn Orla

    1970-01-01

    An attempt was made in the laboratory to observe the standing collisionless electrostatic shocks in connection with the bow shock of the earth......An attempt was made in the laboratory to observe the standing collisionless electrostatic shocks in connection with the bow shock of the earth...

  20. Effect of kinetic parameters on simultaneous ramp reactivity insertion plus beam tube flooding accident in a typical low enriched U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al fuel-based material testing reactor-type research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasir, Rubina; Mirza, Nasir M. [Dept. of, Physics, Air University, Islamabad (Pakistan); Mirza, Sikander M. [Dept. of, Physics and Applied Mathematics, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Post Office Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2017-06-15

    This work looks at the effect of changes in kinetic parameters on simultaneous reactivity insertions and beam tube flooding in a typical material testing reactor-type research reactor with low enriched high density (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al) fuel. Using a modified PARET code, various ramp reactivity insertions (from $0.1/0.5 s to $1.3/0.5 s) plus beam tube flooding ($0.5/0.25 s) accidents under uncontrolled conditions were analyzed to find their effects on peak power, net reactivity, and temperature. Then, the effects of changes in kinetic parameters including the Doppler coefficient, prompt neutron lifetime, and delayed neutron fractions on simultaneous reactivity insertion and beam tube flooding accidents were analyzed. Results show that the power peak values are significantly sensitive to the Doppler coefficient of the system in coupled accidents. The material testing reactor-type system under such a coupled accident is not very sensitive to changes in the prompt neutron life time; the core under such a coupled transient is not very sensitive to changes in the effective delayed neutron fraction.

  1. Geometrical shock dynamics for magnetohydrodynamic fast shocks

    KAUST Repository

    Mostert, W.; Pullin, D. I.; Samtaney, Ravi; Wheatley, V.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a formulation of two-dimensional geometrical shock dynamics (GSD) suitable for ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fast shocks under magnetic fields of general strength and orientation. The resulting area–Mach-number–shock-angle relation is then incorporated into a numerical method using pseudospectral differentiation. The MHD-GSD model is verified by comparison with results from nonlinear finite-volume solution of the complete ideal MHD equations applied to a shock implosion flow in the presence of an oblique and spatially varying magnetic field ahead of the shock. Results from application of the MHD-GSD equations to the stability of fast MHD shocks in two dimensions are presented. It is shown that the time to formation of triple points for both perturbed MHD and gas-dynamic shocks increases as (Formula presented.), where (Formula presented.) is a measure of the initial Mach-number perturbation. Symmetry breaking in the MHD case is demonstrated. In cylindrical converging geometry, in the presence of an azimuthal field produced by a line current, the MHD shock behaves in the mean as in Pullin et al. (Phys. Fluids, vol. 26, 2014, 097103), but suffers a greater relative pressure fluctuation along the shock than the gas-dynamic shock. © 2016 Cambridge University Press

  2. Geometrical shock dynamics for magnetohydrodynamic fast shocks

    KAUST Repository

    Mostert, W.

    2016-12-12

    We describe a formulation of two-dimensional geometrical shock dynamics (GSD) suitable for ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fast shocks under magnetic fields of general strength and orientation. The resulting area–Mach-number–shock-angle relation is then incorporated into a numerical method using pseudospectral differentiation. The MHD-GSD model is verified by comparison with results from nonlinear finite-volume solution of the complete ideal MHD equations applied to a shock implosion flow in the presence of an oblique and spatially varying magnetic field ahead of the shock. Results from application of the MHD-GSD equations to the stability of fast MHD shocks in two dimensions are presented. It is shown that the time to formation of triple points for both perturbed MHD and gas-dynamic shocks increases as (Formula presented.), where (Formula presented.) is a measure of the initial Mach-number perturbation. Symmetry breaking in the MHD case is demonstrated. In cylindrical converging geometry, in the presence of an azimuthal field produced by a line current, the MHD shock behaves in the mean as in Pullin et al. (Phys. Fluids, vol. 26, 2014, 097103), but suffers a greater relative pressure fluctuation along the shock than the gas-dynamic shock. © 2016 Cambridge University Press

  3. Computerized simulation of the mechanical behavior of wood-filled shock absorbers of radioactive materials transport casks; Rechnerische Simulation des mechanischen Verhaltens von holzgefuellten Stossdaempfern von Transportbehaeltern fuer radioaktive Stoffe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, Martin; Wille, Frank [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung (BAM), Berlin (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    In Germany the mechanical component inspection of transport containers for radioactive materials is performed by BAM (Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung) under consideration of national and international standards and guidelines. Experimental and calculative (analytical and numerical) techniques combined with material and/or component testing are the basis of assessment concepts according the state of the art. The authors describe the experiences of BAM concerning assessment and description of the mechanical behavior of shock absorbing components, including modeling strategies, material models, drop tests and experiment-calculation comparison. Energy absorbing components are used to reduce the impact forces at the container in case of a transport accident. In Germany wood filled thin-walled constructions are used. The deformation behavior of the wood is a main part of the calculative simulation procedures in comparison with experimental tests.

  4. Development and performance evaluation of an electromagnetic-type shock wave generator for lipolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, S. M., E-mail: liangsm@cc.feu.edu.tw; Yang, Z. Y. [Department of Industrial Design, Far East University, No. 49, Zhonghua Road, Xinshi District, Tainan City 744, Taiwan (China); Chang, M. H. [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, East District, Tainan City 701, Taiwan (China)

    2014-01-15

    This study aims at the design and development of electromagnetic-type intermittent shock wave generation in a liquid. The shock wave generated is focused at a focal point through an acoustic lens. This hardware device mainly consists of a full-wave bridge rectifier, 6 capacitors, a spark gap, and a flat coil. A metal disk is mounted in a liquid-filled tube and is placed in close proximity to the flat coil. Due to the repulsive force existing between the coil and disk shock waves are generated, while an eddy current is induced in the metal disk. Some components and materials associated with the device are also described. By increasing the capacitance content to enhance electric energy level, a highly focused pressure can be achieved at the focal point through an acoustic lens in order to lyse fat tissue. Focused pressures were measured at the focal point and its vicinity for different operation voltages. The designed shock wave generator with an energy intensity of 0.0016 mJ/mm{sup 2} (at 4 kV) and 2000 firings or higher energy intensities with 1000 firings is found to be able to disrupt pig fat tissue.

  5. Development and performance evaluation of an electromagnetic-type shock wave generator for lipolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, S M; Chang, M H; Yang, Z Y

    2014-01-01

    This study aims at the design and development of electromagnetic-type intermittent shock wave generation in a liquid. The shock wave generated is focused at a focal point through an acoustic lens. This hardware device mainly consists of a full-wave bridge rectifier, 6 capacitors, a spark gap, and a flat coil. A metal disk is mounted in a liquid-filled tube and is placed in close proximity to the flat coil. Due to the repulsive force existing between the coil and disk shock waves are generated, while an eddy current is induced in the metal disk. Some components and materials associated with the device are also described. By increasing the capacitance content to enhance electric energy level, a highly focused pressure can be achieved at the focal point through an acoustic lens in order to lyse fat tissue. Focused pressures were measured at the focal point and its vicinity for different operation voltages. The designed shock wave generator with an energy intensity of 0.0016 mJ/mm(2) (at 4 kV) and 2000 firings or higher energy intensities with 1000 firings is found to be able to disrupt pig fat tissue.

  6. Cation disorder in shocked orthopyroxene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundon, R. W.; Hafner, S. S.

    1971-01-01

    The study of cation distributions over nonequivalent lattice sites in minerals may reveal information on the history of temperature and pressure in rocks. Chemically homogeneous orthopyroxene specimens were shocked under well-controlled conditions in the laboratory in order to provide a basis for the interpretation of more complex natural materials. As a result of the investigation it is concluded that the distribution of magnesium and iron over the M1 and M2 positions in Bamle enstatite shocked at 1 megabar is highly disordered. It corresponds to an equilibrium distribution of at least 1000 C.

  7. The creep and stress-rupture behaviour under internal pressure of tubes made from austenitic stainless steel X8 CrNiMoNb 1616 (Material No. 1.4981)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, L.; Polifka, F.; Kempe, H.

    1979-05-01

    Creep and stress rupture tests have been performed at 600, 650, 700 and 750 0 C on tubes made from three different heats from the austenitic stainless steel X8 CrNiMoNb 1616 (Material No. 1.4981). The tubes were loaded by internal pressure and the tangential (hoop) creep strain was measured continuously. The results are presented in form of creep curves, stress-time to rupture curves and curves for a creep limit. The average and minimum creep rates as a function of the applied stress have been evaluated and are described with a creep law analogous to Norton's creep law. An interpolation and extrapolation of the stress-rupture-strength and the creep strength are possible using the time-temperature-parameter-plot after Larson and Miller. (orig.) [de

  8. Eustachian tube patency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eustachian tube patency refers to how much the eustachian tube is open. The eustachian tube runs between the middle ear and the throat. It controls the pressure behind the eardrum and middle ear space. This helps keep ...

  9. Feeding tube - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007235.htm Feeding tube - infants To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A feeding tube is a small, soft, plastic tube placed ...

  10. Fundamental structure of steady plastic shock waves in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molinari, A.; Ravichandran, G.

    2004-01-01

    The propagation of steady plane shock waves in metallic materials is considered. Following the constitutive framework adopted by R. J. Clifton [Shock Waves and the Mechanical Properties of Solids, edited by J. J. Burke and V. Weiss (Syracuse University Press, Syracuse, N.Y., 1971), p. 73] for analyzing elastic-plastic transient waves, an analytical solution of the steady state propagation of plastic shocks is proposed. The problem is formulated in a Lagrangian setting appropriate for large deformations. The material response is characterized by a quasistatic tensile (compression) test (providing the isothermal strain hardening law). In addition the elastic response is determined up to second order elastic constants by ultrasonic measurements. Based on this simple information, it is shown that the shock kinetics can be quite well described for moderate shocks in aluminum with stress amplitude up to 10 GPa. Under the later assumption, the elastic response is assumed to be isentropic, and thermomechanical coupling is neglected. The model material considered here is aluminum, but the analysis is general and can be applied to any viscoplastic material subjected to moderate amplitude shocks. Comparisons with experimental data are made for the shock velocity, the particle velocity and the shock structure. The shock structure is obtained by quadrature of a first order differential equation, which provides analytical results under certain simplifying assumptions. The effects of material parameters and loading conditions on the shock kinetics and shock structure are discussed. The shock width is characterized by assuming an overstress formulation for the viscoplastic response. The effects on the shock structure of strain rate sensitivity are analyzed and the rationale for the J. W. Swegle and D. E. Grady [J. Appl. Phys. 58, 692 (1985)] universal scaling law for homogeneous materials is explored. Finally, the ability to deduce information on the viscoplastic response of

  11. Fundamental structure of steady plastic shock waves in metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, A.; Ravichandran, G.

    2004-02-01

    The propagation of steady plane shock waves in metallic materials is considered. Following the constitutive framework adopted by R. J. Clifton [Shock Waves and the Mechanical Properties of Solids, edited by J. J. Burke and V. Weiss (Syracuse University Press, Syracuse, N.Y., 1971), p. 73] for analyzing elastic-plastic transient waves, an analytical solution of the steady state propagation of plastic shocks is proposed. The problem is formulated in a Lagrangian setting appropriate for large deformations. The material response is characterized by a quasistatic tensile (compression) test (providing the isothermal strain hardening law). In addition the elastic response is determined up to second order elastic constants by ultrasonic measurements. Based on this simple information, it is shown that the shock kinetics can be quite well described for moderate shocks in aluminum with stress amplitude up to 10 GPa. Under the later assumption, the elastic response is assumed to be isentropic, and thermomechanical coupling is neglected. The model material considered here is aluminum, but the analysis is general and can be applied to any viscoplastic material subjected to moderate amplitude shocks. Comparisons with experimental data are made for the shock velocity, the particle velocity and the shock structure. The shock structure is obtained by quadrature of a first order differential equation, which provides analytical results under certain simplifying assumptions. The effects of material parameters and loading conditions on the shock kinetics and shock structure are discussed. The shock width is characterized by assuming an overstress formulation for the viscoplastic response. The effects on the shock structure of strain rate sensitivity are analyzed and the rationale for the J. W. Swegle and D. E. Grady [J. Appl. Phys. 58, 692 (1985)] universal scaling law for homogeneous materials is explored. Finally, the ability to deduce information on the viscoplastic response of

  12. Tube sheet design for PFBR steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chellapandi, P.; Chetal, S.C.; Bhoje, S.B.

    1991-01-01

    Top and bottom tube sheets of PFBR Steam Generators have been analysed with 3D and axisymmetric models using CASTEM Programs. Analysis indicates that the effects of piping reactions at the inlet/outlet nozzles on the primary stresses in the tube sheets are negligible and the asymmetricity of the deformation pattern introduced in the tube sheet by the presence of inlet/outlet and manhole nozzles is insignificant. The minimum tube sheet thicknesses for evaporator and reheater are 135 mm and 75 mm respectively. Further analysis has indicated the minimum fillet radius at the junction of tube sheet and dished end should be 20 mm. Simplified methodology has been developed to arrive at the number of thermal baffles required to protect the tube sheet against fatigue damage due to thermal transient. This method has been applied to PFBR steam generators to determine the required number of thermal baffles. For protecting the bottom tube sheet of evaporator against the thermal shock due to feed water and secondary pump trip, one thermal shield is found to be sufficient. Further analysis is required to decide upon the actual number to take care of the severe thermal transient, following the event of sudden dumping of water/steam, immediately after the sodium-water reaction. (author)

  13. Tube holding system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, R.C.

    1978-01-01

    A tube holding rig is described for the lateral support of tubes arranged in tight parcels in a heat exchanger. This tube holding rig includes not less than two tube supporting assemblies, with a space between them, located crosswise with respect to the tubes, each supporting assembly comprising a first set of parallel components in contact with the tubes, whilst a second set of components is also in contact with the tubes. These two sets of parts together define apertures through which the tubes pass [fr

  14. Underwater Shock Wave Research Applied to Therapeutic Device Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, K.; Yamamoto, H.; Shimokawa, H.

    2013-07-01

    The chronological development of underwater shock wave research performed at the Shock Wave Research Center of the Institute of Fluid Science at the Tohoku University is presented. Firstly, the generation of planar underwater shock waves in shock tubes and their visualization by using the conventional shadowgraph and schlieren methods are described. Secondly, the generation of spherical underwater shock waves by exploding lead azide pellets weighing from several tens of micrograms to 100 mg, that were ignited by irradiating with a Q-switched laser beam, and their visualization by using double exposure holographic interferometry are presented. The initiation, propagation, reflection, focusing of underwater shock waves, and their interaction with various interfaces, in particular, with air bubbles, are visualized quantitatively. Based on such a fundamental underwater shock wave research, collaboration with the School of Medicine at the Tohoku University was started for developing a shock wave assisted therapeutic device, which was named an extracorporeal shock wave lithotripter (ESWL). Miniature shock waves created by irradiation with Q-switched HO:YAG laser beams are studied, as applied to damaged dysfunctional nerve cells in the myocardium in a precisely controlled manner, and are effectively used to design a catheter for treating arrhythmia.

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF COILED TUBING STRESS ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davorin Matanović

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of coiled tubing is increasing rapidly with drilling of horizontal wells. To satisfy all requirements (larger mechanical stresses, larger fluid capacities the production of larger sizes and better material qualities was developed. Stresses due to axial forces and pressures that coiled tubing is subjected are close to its performance limits. So it is really important to know and understand the behaviour of coiled tubing to avoid its break, burst or collapse in the well.

  16. A Method to Establishing Tube Plugging Criterion for Heat Exchangers with Straight Tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyungnam [KHNP CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The difference of thermal expansion coefficients between the shell and tube materials causes the stress in axial direction of tube. Because of the axial stress due to thermal load, the straight tubes are used for heat exchangers operated in low temperature such as CCW (Component Cooling Water) heat exchangers and condensers. It is inevitable for the materials of the components to be degraded as the power plants become older. The degradation accompanies increasing maintenance cost as well as creating safety issues. The materials and wall thickness of heat exchanger tubes in nuclear power plants are selected to withstand system temperature, pressure, and corrosion. There are many codes and standards to be referred for calculating the minimum thickness of the heat exchanger tube in the designing stage. However, the codes and standards related to show the tube plugging criteria may not exist currently. In this paper, a method to establish the tube plugging criteria of BOP heat exchangers, which is based on the USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.121, is introduced and the tube plugging criteria for the TPCCW heat exchanger of Yonggwang NPP No. 1 and 2. A method to establish the tube plugging criteria of heat exchangers with straight tubes are introduced based on the USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.121. As an example, the tube plugging criterion for the CCW heat exchanger of a nuclear power plant is provided.

  17. Improvement of an installation to generate shock waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1974-04-29

    An installation to generate a shock wave in a fluid layer is described. A water projectile is moved at a high velocity. It leaves behind an underpressure in which the adjacent water implodes, therby generating the desired shock wave. The installation is characterized by a tube-shaped hull in which a piston can move freely. One side of the hull is connected to the pressure-generator chamber of the piston. (6 claims)

  18. Converging shocks in elastic-plastic solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, A López; Lombardini, M; Hill, D J

    2011-11-01

    We present an approximate description of the behavior of an elastic-plastic material processed by a cylindrically or spherically symmetric converging shock, following Whitham's shock dynamics theory. Originally applied with success to various gas dynamics problems, this theory is presently derived for solid media, in both elastic and plastic regimes. The exact solutions of the shock dynamics equations obtained reproduce well the results obtained by high-resolution numerical simulations. The examined constitutive laws share a compressible neo-Hookean structure for the internal energy e=e(s)(I(1))+e(h)(ρ,ς), where e(s) accounts for shear through the first invariant of the Cauchy-Green tensor, and e(h) represents the hydrostatic contribution as a function of the density ρ and entropy ς. In the strong-shock limit, reached as the shock approaches the axis or origin r=0, we show that compression effects are dominant over shear deformations. For an isothermal constitutive law, i.e., e(h)=e(h)(ρ), with a power-law dependence e(h) is proportional to ρ(α), shock dynamics predicts that for a converging shock located at r=R(t) at time t, the Mach number increases as M is proportional to [log(1/R)](α), independently of the space index s, where s=2 in cylindrical geometry and 3 in spherical geometry. An alternative isothermal constitutive law with p(ρ) of the arctanh type, which enforces a finite density in the strong-shock limit, leads to M is proportional to R(-(s-1)) for strong shocks. A nonisothermal constitutive law, whose hydrostatic part e(h) is that of an ideal gas, is also tested, recovering the strong-shock limit M is proportional to R(-(s-1)/n(γ)) originally derived by Whitham for perfect gases, where γ is inherently related to the maximum compression ratio that the material can reach, (γ+1)/(γ-1). From these strong-shock limits, we also estimate analytically the density, radial velocity, pressure, and sound speed immediately behind the shock. While the

  19. Sleeve type repair of degraded nuclear steam generator tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayres, P.S.; Stark, L.E.; Feldstein, J.G.; Fu, T.

    1986-01-01

    A sealable sleeve is described for insertion into the repair of a degraded tube which consists of: a hollow core inner member of the same material as the degraded tube; a thinner outer member of substantially pure nickel and resistant to corrosive attack, the outer member being metallurgically bonded with the inner member; an expanded portion of the sleeve at one end for positioning in the tube within a tube sheet; a multiplicity of grooves formed in and adjacent to the other end of the sleeve which extends into the free-standing portion of the tube beyond the tube sheet, and a noble metal braze material contained in the grooves

  20. Influence of interface scattering on shock waves in heterogeneous solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang Shiming; Ravichandran, Guruswami; Grady, Dennis E.

    2002-01-01

    In heterogeneous media, the scattering due to interfaces between dissimilar materials play an important role in shock wave dissipation and dispersion. In this work the influence of interface scattering effect on shock waves was studied by impacting flyer plates onto periodically layered polycarbonate/6061 aluminum, polycarbonate/304 stainless steel and polycarbonate/glass composites. The experimental results (using VISAR and stress gauges) indicate that the rise time of the shock front decreases with increasing shock strength, and increases with increasing mechanical impedance mismatch between layers; the strain rate at the shock front increases by about the square of the shock stress. Experimental and numerical results also show that due to interface scattering effect the shock wave velocity in periodically layered composites decreases. In some cases the shock velocity of a layered heterogeneous composite can be lower than that of either of its components