WorldWideScience

Sample records for shock melt glasses

  1. Melting under shock compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, B.I.

    1980-10-01

    A simple model, using experimentally measured shock and particle velocities, is applied to the Lindemann melting formula to predict the density, temperature, and pressure at which a material will melt when shocked from room temperature and zero pressure initial conditions

  2. Waste glass melting stages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, L.D.; Dennis, T.; Elliott, M.L.; Hrma, P.

    1994-01-01

    Three simulated nuclear waste glass feeds, consisting of dried waste and glass frit, were heat treated for 1 hour in a gradient furnace at temperatures ranging from approximately 600 degrees C to 1000 degrees C. Simulated melter feeds from the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP), the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), and Kernforschungszentru Karlsruhe (KfK) in Germany were used. The samples were thin sectioned and examined by optical microscopy to investigate the stages of the conversion from feed to glass. Various phenomena were seen, such as frit softening, bubble formation, foaming, bubble motion and removal, convective mixing, and homogenization. The behavior of different feeds was similar, although the degree of gas generation and melt homogenization varied. 2 refs., 8 tabs

  3. Waste glass melting stages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, L.D.; Dennis, T.; Elliott, M.L.; Hrma, P.

    1993-04-01

    Three different simulated nuclear waste glass feeds, consisting of dried waste and glass frit, were heat treated for 1 hour in a gradient furnace at temperatures ranging from approximately 600 degrees C--1000 degrees C. Simulated melter feeds from the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP), the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), and Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) in Germany were used. The samples were thin-sectioned and examined by optical microscopy to investigate the stages of the conversion from feed to glass. Various phenomena were seen, such as frit softening, bubble formation, foaming, bubble motion and removal, convective mixing, and homogenization. Behavior of different feeds was similar, although the degree of gas generation and melt homogenization varied

  4. Evolution of Shock Melt Compositions in Lunar Agglutinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, A. M.; Christoffersen, R.; Keller, L. P.

    2015-01-01

    Lunar agglutinates are aggregates of regolith grains fused together in a glassy matrix of shock melt produced during smaller-scale (mostly micrometeorite) impacts. Agglutinate formation is a key space weathering process under which the optically-active component of nanophase metallic Fe (npFe(sup 0)) is added to the lunar regolith. Here we have used energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) compositional spectrum imaging in the SEM to quantify the chemical homogeneity of agglutinitic glass, correlate its homogeneity to its parent soil maturity, and identify the principle chemical components contributing to the shock melt compositional variations.

  5. GLASS MELTING PHENOMENA, THEIR ORDERING AND MELTING SPACE UTILISATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Němec L.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Four aspects of effective glass melting have been defined – namely the fast kinetics of partial melting phenomena, a consideration of the melting phenomena ordering, high utilisation of the melting space, and effective utilisation of the supplied energy. The relations were defined for the specific melting performance and specific energy consumption of the glass melting process which involve the four mentioned aspects of the process and indicate the potentials of effective melting. The quantity “space utilisation” has been treated in more detail as an aspect not considered in practice till this time. The space utilisation was quantitatively defined and its values have been determined for the industrial melting facility by mathematical modelling. The definitions of the specific melting performance and specific energy consumption have been used for assessment of the potential impact of a controlled melt flow and high space utilisation on the melting process efficiency on the industrial scale. The results have shown that even the partial control of the melt flow, leading to the partial increase of the space utilisation, may considerably increase the melting performance, whereas a decrease of the specific energy consumption was determined to be between 10 - 15 %.

  6. Shock induced melting of lead (experimental study)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mabire, Catherine; Hereil, Pierre L.

    2002-01-01

    To investigate melting on release of lead, two shock compression measurements have been carried out at 51 GPa. In the first one, a pyrometric measurement has been performed at the Pb/LiF interface. In the second one, the Pb/LiF interface velocity has been recorded using VISAR measurement technique. VISAR and radiance profile are in good agreement and seem to show melting on release of lead

  7. Evolution of Shock Melt Compositions in Lunar Regoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, A. M.; Christoffersen, R.; Keller, L. P.; Berger, E. L.; Noble, S. K.

    2016-01-01

    Space weathering processes - driven primarily by solar wind ion and micrometeorite bombardment, are constantly changing the surface regoliths of airless bodies, such as the Moon. It is essential to study lunar soils in order to fully under-stand the processes of space weathering, and how they alter the optical reflectance spectral properties of the lunar surface relative to bedrock. Lunar agglutinates are aggregates of regolith grains fused together in a glassy matrix of shock melt produced during micrometeorite impacts into the lunar regolith. The formation of the shock melt component in agglutinates involves reduction of Fe in the target material to generate nm-scale spherules of metallic Fe (nanophase Fe0 or npFe0). The ratio of elemental Fe, in the form of npFe0, to FeO in a given bulk soil indicates its maturity, which increases with length of surface exposure as well as being typically higher in the finer-size fraction of soils. The melting and mixing process in agglutinate formation remain poorly understood. This includes incomplete knowledge regarding how the homogeneity and overall compositional trends of the agglutinate glass portions (agglutinitic glass) evolve with maturity. The aim of this study is to use sub-micrometer scale X-ray compositional mapping and image analysis to quantify the chemical homogeneity of agglutinitic glass, correlate its homogeneity to its parent soil maturity, and identify the principal chemical components contributing to the shock melt composition variations. An additional focus is to see if agglutinitic glass contains anomalously high Fe sub-micron scale compositional domains similar to those recently reported in glassy patina coatings on lunar rocks.

  8. Glass forming ability of calcium aluminosilicate melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesgaard, Mette; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2011-01-01

    The glass forming ability (GFA) of two series of calcium aluminosilicate melts is studied by measuring their viscous behavior and crystallization tendency. The first series consists of five compositions on the joining line between the eutectic point of anorthite-wollastonite-tridymite and that of......The glass forming ability (GFA) of two series of calcium aluminosilicate melts is studied by measuring their viscous behavior and crystallization tendency. The first series consists of five compositions on the joining line between the eutectic point of anorthite......-wollastonite-tridymite and that of anorthite-wollastonite-gehlenite. The series includes the eutectic compositions as end members. The second series consists of five compositions on a line parallel to the joining line on the alumina rich side. In the present work, GFA is described in terms of glass stability, i.e., the ability of a glass...... to resist crystallization during reheating. In addition, the fragility index (m) is derived by fitting the viscosity data with the Avramov-Milchev equation. The results show that m is inversely proportional to the glass stability for the two series of melts, implying that m is an indirect measure of GFA...

  9. Prediction of waste glass melt rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, L.

    1987-01-01

    Under contract to the Department of Energy, the Du Pont Company has begun construction of a Defense Waste Processing Facility to immobilize radioactive wastes now stored as liquids at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant. The immobilization process solidifies waste sludge by vitrification into a leach-resistant borosilicate glass. Development of this process has been the responsibility of the Savannah River Laboratory. As part of the development, a simple model was developed to predict the melt rates for the waste glass melter. This model is based on an energy balance for the cold cap and gives very good agreement with melt rate data obtained from experimental campaigns in smaller scale waste glass melters

  10. Analysis of elementary process steps in industrial glass melting tanks: some ideas on innovations in industrial glass melting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerkens, R.G.C.

    2008-01-01

    Conventional industrial glass furnaces show broad glass melt residence time distributions in the melting tanks and average residence times may be up to more than two days for high quality glass products, such as float glass or TV glass, despite the minimum residence times of 8-10 hours (or even less

  11. Detection of structural heterogeneity of glass melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yue, Yuanzheng

    2004-01-01

    The structural heterogeneity of both supercooled liquid and molten states of silicate has been studied using calorimetric method. The objects of this study are basaltic glasses and liquids. Two experimental approaches are taken to detect the structural heterogeneity of the liquids. One is the hyp......The structural heterogeneity of both supercooled liquid and molten states of silicate has been studied using calorimetric method. The objects of this study are basaltic glasses and liquids. Two experimental approaches are taken to detect the structural heterogeneity of the liquids. One...... is the hyperquench-anneal-calorimetric scan approach, by which the structural information of a basaltic supercooled liquid and three binary silicate liquids is acquired. Another is the calorimetrically repeated up- and downscanning approach, by which the structural heterogeneity, the intermediate range order...... is discussed. The ordered structure of glass melts above the liquidus temperature is indirectly characterized by use of X-ray diffraction method. The new approaches are of importance for monitoring the glass melting and forming process and for improving the physical properties of glasses and glass fibers....

  12. Modeling of evaporation processes in glass melting furnaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limpt, van J.A.C.

    2007-01-01

    The majority of glass furnaces worldwide, apply fossil fuel combustion to transfer heat directly by radiation from the combustion processes to the melting batch and glass melt. During these high temperature melting processes, some glass components, such as: sodium, potassium, boron and lead species

  13. On-line redox sensors in industrial glass melting tanks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laimböck, P.R.; Beerkens, R.G.C.; Schaaf, van der J.; Kieffer, J.

    2002-01-01

    The oxidation state or partial oxygen pressure (pO2) of the glass melt influences many glass melt and glass product properties such as fining and foaming behavior, radiant heat transfer, forming characteristics via (a color-dependent) cooling rate, and the glass color of the final product. For these

  14. Setting of the Optimal Parameters of Melted Glass

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Luptáková, Natália; Matejíčka, L.; Krečmer, N.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 1 (2015), s. 73-79 ISSN 1802-2308 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Striae * Glass * Glass melting * Regression * Optimal parameters Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  15. Reaction of soda-lime-silica glass melt with water vapour at melting temperatures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vernerová, Miroslava; Kloužek, Jaroslav; Němec, Lubomír

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 416, MAY 15 (2015), s. 21-30 ISSN 0022-3093 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01010844 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : glass melt * sulfate * water vapour * bubble nucleation * melt foaming * glass melting Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.825, year: 2015

  16. Monitoring device for glass melting furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Noboru; Asano, Naoki; Higuchi, Tatsuo; Koyama, Mayumi; Hanado, Shinji.

    1995-01-01

    The device of the present invention can monitor, from a remote place, a liquid surface in a glass melting furnace for use in a solidification treatment, for example, of high level radioactive wastes. Namely, a vertical sleeve is disposed penetrating a ceiling wall of a melting vessel. A reflection mirror is disposed above the vertical sleeve and flex an optical axis. A monitoring means is disposed on the optical axis of the reflecting mirror at a spaced position. The monitoring means may have an optical telescopic means, a monitoring camera by way of a half mirror and an illumination means. The reflection mirror may be made of a metal. The monitoring device thus constituted suffer from no effects of high temperature and high radiation dose rate, thereby enabling to easily monitor the liquid surface in the melting furnace. (I.S.)

  17. Effect of stirring on striae in glass melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2012-01-01

    Chemical striae have often negative effect on the glass properties, and hence, elimination of striae has been a key issue in glass science and technology. To produce highly homogeneous glasses, it is necessary to stir melts during the melting process. To explore the physical origin of the stria...

  18. Shear Melting of a Colloidal Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenmann, Christoph; Kim, Chanjoong; Mattsson, Johan; Weitz, David A.

    2010-01-01

    We use confocal microscopy to explore shear melting of colloidal glasses, which occurs at strains of ˜0.08, coinciding with a strongly non-Gaussian step size distribution. For larger strains, the particle mean square displacement increases linearly with strain and the step size distribution becomes Gaussian. The effective diffusion coefficient varies approximately linearly with shear rate, consistent with a modified Stokes-Einstein relationship in which thermal energy is replaced by shear energy and the length scale is set by the size of cooperatively moving regions consisting of ˜3 particles.

  19. Industrial opportunities of controlled melt flow during glass melting, part 1: Melt flow evaluation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dyrčíková, Petra; Hrbek, Lukáš; Němec, Lubomír

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 2 (2014), s. 111-117 ISSN 0862-5468 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01010844 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : glass melting * controlled flow * space utilization Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.435, year: 2014 http://www.ceramics-silikaty.cz/2014/pdf/2014_02_111.pdf

  20. Energy Efficient Glass Melting - The Next Generation Melter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Rue

    2008-03-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate a high intensity glass melter, based on the submerged combustion melting technology. This melter will serve as the melting and homogenization section of a segmented, lower-capital cost, energy-efficient Next Generation Glass Melting System (NGMS). After this project, the melter will be ready to move toward commercial trials for some glasses needing little refining (fiberglass, etc.). For other glasses, a second project Phase or glass industry research is anticipated to develop the fining stage of the NGMS process.

  1. Modelling of the controlled melt flow in a glass melting space – Its melting performance and heat losses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jebavá, Marcela; Dyrčíková, Petra; Němec, Lubomír

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 430, DEC 15 (2015), s. 52-63 ISSN 0022-3093 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : glass melt flow * mathematical modelling * energy distribution * space utilizatios * melting performance Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.825, year: 2015

  2. Melt-quenched glasses of metal-organic frameworks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, T.D.; Yue, Yuanzheng; Li, P.

    2016-01-01

    Crystalline solids dominate the field of metal−organic frameworks (MOFs), with access to the liquid and glass states of matter usually prohibited by relatively low temperatures of thermal decomposition. In this work, we give due consideration to framework chemistry and topology to expand...... of other MOFs. The glasses formed upon vitrification are chemically and structurally distinct from the three other existing categories of melt-quenched glasses (inorganic nonmetallic, organic, and metallic), and retain the basic metal−ligand connectivity of crystalline MOFs, which connects their mechanical...... the phenomenon of the melting of 3D MOFs, linking crystal chemistry to framework melting temperature and kinetic fragility of the glass-forming liquids. Here we show that melting temperatures can be lowered by altering the chemistry of the crystalline MOF state, which provides a route to facilitate the melting...

  3. Electrical conductivity and viscosity of borosilicate glasses and melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehrt, Doris; Keding, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    , 0 to 62·5 mol% B2O3, and 25 to 85 mol% SiO2. The glass samples were characterised by different methods. Refractive indices, density and thermal expansion were measured. Phase separation effects were investigated by electron microscopy. The electrical conductivity of glasses and melts were determined......Simple sodium borosilicate and silicate glasses were melted on a very large scale (35 l Pt crucible) to prepare model glasses of optical quality in order to investigate various properties depending on their structure. The composition of the glass samples varied in a wide range: 3 to 33·3 mol% Na2O...... by impedance measurements in a wide temperature range (250 to 1450°C). The activation energies were calculated by Arrhenius plots in various temperature regions: below the glass transition temperature, Tg, above the melting point, Tl, and between Tg and Tl. Viscosity measurements were carried out...

  4. Shock melting and vaporization of lunar rocks and minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, T. J.; O'Keefe, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    The entropy associated with the thermodynamic states produced by hypervelocity meteoroid impacts at various velocities are calculated for a series of lunar rocks and minerals and compared with the entropy values required for melting and vaporization. Taking into account shock-induced phase changes in the silicates, we calculate that iron meteorites impacting at speeds varying from 4 to 6 km/sec will produce shock melting in quartz, plagioclase, olivine, and pyroxene. Although calculated with less certainty, impact speeds required for incipient vaporization vary from 7 to 11 km/sec for the range of minerals going from quartz to periclase for aluminum (silicate-like) projectiles. The impact velocities, which are required to induce melting in a soil, are calculated to be in the range of 3 to 4 km/sec, provided thermal equilibrium is achieved in the shock state.

  5. Oxycarbonitride glass formation by melt solidification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imon, M M; Risbud, S H

    1986-04-01

    Experimental results are presented from the synthesis and characterization of multianion oxycarbonitride glasses composed of MgSiAlON glass powders with SiC additions of 5, 10, or 15 wt pct. Nitrogen additions to the oxide MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 glasses increased devitrification resistance, but carbon additions to MgSiAlON glasses promote crystal nucleation. These properties are relevant to the oxycarbonitride glasses use in refractory glass-ceramic and ceramic-ceramic composite systems with good elevated temperature performance. 9 references.

  6. Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 4, commercial glass melting and associated air emission issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    This document serves as a manual for a workshop on commercial glass melting and associated air emission issues. Areas covered include: An overview of the glass industry; Furnace design and construction practices; Melting furnace operation; Energy input methods and controls; Air legislation and regulations; Soda lime emission mechanisms; and, Post furnace emission controls. Supporting papers are also included

  7. Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 4, commercial glass melting and associated air emission issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    This document serves as a manual for a workshop on commercial glass melting and associated air emission issues. Areas covered include: An overview of the glass industry; Furnace design and construction practices; Melting furnace operation; Energy input methods and controls; Air legislation and regulations; Soda lime emission mechanisms; and, Post furnace emission controls. Supporting papers are also included.

  8. Vanadium K Xanes Studies of EET79001 Impact-Melt Glasses Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, S. R.; Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, L. E.; Ross, D. K.

    2016-01-01

    Some impact-melt glasses in shergottites are rich in Martian atmospheric noble gases and sulfur suggesting a possible association with regolith-derived secondary mineral assemblages in the shocked samples. Previously, we studied two glasses, # 506 (Lith C in Lith A) and # 507 (Lith C in Lith B) from EET79001 [1,2] and suggested that sulfur initially existed as sulfate in the glass precursor materials and, on shock-melting of the precursors, the sulfate was reduced to sulfides in the shock glasses. To examine the validity of this hypothesis, we used V K microXANES techniques to measure the valence states of vanadium in the Lith C glasses from Lith A and Lith B in EET79001 [3] to complement and com-pare with previous analogous measurements on,78 glass (Lith C in Lith A) [4,5]. We reported the preliminary results in [3]. Vanadium is ideal for addressing the redox issue because it has multiple valence states and is a well-studied element. Vanadium in basalts exists mostly as V(sup 3+), V(sup 4+) and V(sup 5+) in terrestrial samples, mainly as V(sup 3+) with minor V(sup 2+) and minor V(sup 4+) in lunar samples and as roughly equal mixtures of V(sup 3+) and V(sup 4+) in Martian meteorites. In this report, we discuss the application of the V K XANES results to decipher the nature of shock reduction occurring in the silicate glasses during the impact process.

  9. Shock melting method to determine melting curve by molecular dynamics: Cu, Pd, and Al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Zhong-Li; Zhang, Xiu-Lu; Cai, Ling-Cang

    2015-01-01

    A melting simulation method, the shock melting (SM) method, is proposed and proved to be able to determine the melting curves of materials accurately and efficiently. The SM method, which is based on the multi-scale shock technique, determines melting curves by preheating and/or prepressurizing materials before shock. This strategy was extensively verified using both classical and ab initio molecular dynamics (MD). First, the SM method yielded the same satisfactory melting curve of Cu with only 360 atoms using classical MD, compared to the results from the Z-method and the two-phase coexistence method. Then, it also produced a satisfactory melting curve of Pd with only 756 atoms. Finally, the SM method combined with ab initio MD cheaply achieved a good melting curve of Al with only 180 atoms, which agrees well with the experimental data and the calculated results from other methods. It turned out that the SM method is an alternative efficient method for calculating the melting curves of materials

  10. Shock melting method to determine melting curve by molecular dynamics: Cu, Pd, and Al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhong-Li; Zhang, Xiu-Lu; Cai, Ling-Cang

    2015-09-21

    A melting simulation method, the shock melting (SM) method, is proposed and proved to be able to determine the melting curves of materials accurately and efficiently. The SM method, which is based on the multi-scale shock technique, determines melting curves by preheating and/or prepressurizing materials before shock. This strategy was extensively verified using both classical and ab initio molecular dynamics (MD). First, the SM method yielded the same satisfactory melting curve of Cu with only 360 atoms using classical MD, compared to the results from the Z-method and the two-phase coexistence method. Then, it also produced a satisfactory melting curve of Pd with only 756 atoms. Finally, the SM method combined with ab initio MD cheaply achieved a good melting curve of Al with only 180 atoms, which agrees well with the experimental data and the calculated results from other methods. It turned out that the SM method is an alternative efficient method for calculating the melting curves of materials.

  11. Bubble removal from glass melts with slow vertical circulation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jebavá, M.; Němec, Lubomír

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 3 (2011), s. 232-239 ISSN 0862-5468 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : bubbles * glass-melt circulation * pot furnace * mathematical modelling * fining efficiency Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.382, year: 2011

  12. Melting of glass by direct induction heating in ceramic container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ooka, Kazuo; Oguino, Naohiko; Kawanishi, Nobuo

    1981-01-01

    The direct induction melting, a process of glass melting by high frequency induction heating, was found to be the effective way of glass melting, especially desirable for the vitrification of High Level Radioactive Liquid Wastes, HLLW. A test instrument in the cold level was equipped with a high frequency oscillator of 65 kW anode output. The direct induction melting was successfully performed with two frequencies of 400 kHz and 3 MHz, and the operation conditions were determined in the five cases of ceramic pot inner diameters of 170, 200, 230, 280 and 325 mm. The start-up of the direct induction melting was carried out by induction heating using a silicon carbide rod which was inserted in raw material powders in the ceramic pot. After the raw material powders partly melted down and the direct induction in the melt began, the start-up rod was removed out of the melt. At this stage, the direct induction melting was successively performed by adjusting the output power of the oscillator and by supplying the raw materials. It was also found that the capacity of this type of melting was reasonably large and the operation could be remotely controlled. Both applied frequencies of 400 kHz and 3 MHz was found to be successful with this melting system, especially in the case of lower frequency which proved more preferable for the in-cell work. (author)

  13. Underwater electrical wire explosion: Shock wave from melting being overtaken by shock wave from vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liuxia; Qian, Dun; Zou, Xiaobing; Wang, Xinxin

    2018-05-01

    The shock waves generated by an underwater electrical wire explosion were investigated. A microsecond time-scale pulsed current source was used to trigger the electrical explosion of copper wires with a length of 5 cm and a diameter of 200 μm. The energy-storage capacitor was charged to a relatively low energy so that the energy deposited onto the wire was not large enough to fully vaporize the whole wire. Two shock waves were recorded with a piezoelectric gauge that was located at a position of 100 mm from the exploding wire. The first and weak shock wave was confirmed to be the contribution from wire melting, while the second and stronger shock wave was the contribution from wire vaporization. The phenomenon whereby the first shock wave generated by melting being overtaken by the shock wave due to vaporization was observed.

  14. Thermal shock behaviour of SiC-fibre-reinforced glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klug, T.; Reichert, J.; Brueckner, R.

    1992-01-01

    The preparation of two SiC-fibre-reinforced glasses with very different thermal expansion coefficients and glass transition temperatures is described and the influence of long-time temperature and thermal shock behaviour of these composites on the mechanical properties is investigated by means of bending test experiments before and after thermal treatments. It will be shown from experiments and calculations on stresses due to thermal expansion mismatch between fibre and glass matrix that not only best mechanical properties but also best thermal shock behaviour are connected with low tensile intrinsic stresses produced by thermal expansion mismatch during preparation. The thermal shock resistance of the best composite (SiC fibre/DURAN glass) does not show a significant decrease of flexural strength even after 60 shocks from 550 to 25deg C in water, while the bulk glass sample of the same dimension was destroyed by one thermal shock from 350deg C. (orig.) [de

  15. Devitrification of defense nuclear waste glasses: role of melt insolubles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickford, D.F.; Jantzen, C.M.

    1985-01-01

    Time-temperature-transformation (TTT) curves have been determined for simulated nuclear waste glasses bounding the compositional range in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Formulations include all of the minor chemical elements such as ruthenium and chromium which have limited solubility in borosilicate glasses. Heterogeneous nucleation of spinel on ruthenium dioxide, and subsequent nucleation of acmite on spinel is the major devitrification path. Heterogeneous nucleation on melt insolubles causes more rapid growth of crystalline devitrification phases, than in glass free of melt insolubles. These studies point out the importance of simulating waste glass composition and processing as accurately as possible to obtain reliable estimates of glass performance. 11 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  16. Wetting and surface tension of bismate glass melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Seung-Bo; Kim, Dong-Sun; Hwang, Seongjin; Kim, Hyungsun

    2009-01-01

    Lead oxide glass frits are used widely in the electronics industry for low-temperature firing. On the other hand, one of the low-sintering and low-melting lead-free glass systems available, the bismate glass system, is considered to be an alternative to lead oxide glass. In order to extend the applications of Bi 2 O 3 glasses, this study examined the thermophysical properties of low-melting Bi 2 O 3 -B 2 O 3 -ZnO-BaO-Al 2 O 3 -SiO 2 glass frits with various ZnO/B 2 O 3 ratios. The fundamental thermal properties, such as glass transition temperature and softening point, were examined by differential thermal analysis and a glass softening point determination system. The wetting angles, viscosities and surface tension of the various bismate glasses on an alumina substrate were measured using hot-stage microscopy and the sessile drop method. These thermophysical properties will be helpful in understanding the work of adhesion and the liquid spread kinetics of glass frits.

  17. Origin of Inhomogeneity in Glass Melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin; Keding, Ralf; Yue, Yuanzheng

    The homogeneity of a glass plays a crucial role in many applications as the inhomogeneities can provide local changes in mechanical properties, optical properties, and thermal expansion coefficient. Homogeneity is not a single property of the glass, instead, it consists of several factors...... such as bubbles, striae, trace element concentration, undissolved species, and crystallised species. As it is not possible to address all the factors in a single study, this work focuses on one of the major factors: chemical striae. Up to now, the quantification of chemical striae in glasses, particularly......, in less transparent glasses, has been a challenge due to the lack of an applicable method. In this study, we have established a simple and accurate method for quantifying the extent of the striae, which is based on the scanning and picture processing through the Fourier transformation. By performing...

  18. Recycling of post-consumer glass: energy savings, CO2 emission reduction, effects on glass quality and glass melting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerkens, R.G.C.; Kers, G.; Santen, E. van

    2011-01-01

    This presentation shows the advantages of re-melting post-consumer glass, but also the potential risks of using contaminated cullet in the raw material batch of glass furnaces (e.g. container glass furnaces). As an example of potential advantages: increasing the cullet % in the batch of an efficient

  19. Evaporation experiments and modelling for glass melts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limpt, J.A.C. van; Beerkens, R.G.C.

    2007-01-01

    A laboratory test facility has been developed to measure evaporation rates of different volatile components from commercial and model glass compositions. In the set-up the furnace atmosphere, temperature level, gas velocity and batch composition are controlled. Evaporation rates have been measured

  20. Low melting high lithia glass compositions and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Pickett, John B.; Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Marra, James C.

    2000-01-01

    The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste streams, sludge solids, mixtures of aqueous supernate and sludge solids, combinations of spent filter aids from waste water treatment and waste sludges, supernate alone, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, or combinations thereof, geological mine tailings and sludges, asbestos, inorganic filter media, cement waste forms in need of remediation, spent or partially spent ion exchange resins or zeolites, contaminated soils, lead paint, etc. The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

  1. The role of sulfur in glass melting processes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Arkosiová, Miroslava; Kloužek, Jaroslav; Němec, Lubomír

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 3 (2008), s. 155-159 ISSN 0862-5468 R&D Projects: GA MPO 2A-1TP1/063 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : sulphur * glass melting * buble nucleation Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.644, year: 2008

  2. Modeling the kinetics of volatilization from glass melts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerkens, R.G.C.

    2001-01-01

    A model description for the evaporation kinetics from glass melts in direct contact with static atmospheres or flowing gas phases is presented. The derived models and equations are based on the solution of the second Ficks' diffusion law and quasi-steady-state mass transfer relations, taking into

  3. Shock-induced decomposition of a high density glass (ZF6)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xianming; Liu, Xun; Li, Jiabo; Li, Jun; Cao, Xiuxia

    2011-07-01

    The dynamic high-pressure behavior of a high density glass (ZF6) was investigated in this study. The Hugoniot data, shock temperature (TH) and release sound velocity (C) of ZF6 were measured by a time-resolved multi-channel pyrometer in the shock pressure (PH) range of 50-170 GPa. The Hugoniot data is in accord with the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) shock Hugoniot data and shows a good linearity over 21 GPa. Polymorphic phase transitions were identified by the kinks in the measured TH-PH and C-PH relationships. The onset pressures of the transformations are ˜75 and ˜128 GPa, respectively. A thermodynamic calculation suggests that the phase transition at 75 GPa is its disproportionation to massicot (high pressure phase of PbO) and melted silica while the transition at 128 GPa is from the melting of massicot.

  4. Glass Transition, Crystallization of Glass-Forming Melts, and Entropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürn W. P. Schmelzer

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A critical analysis of possible (including some newly proposed definitions of the vitreous state and the glass transition is performed and an overview of kinetic criteria of vitrification is presented. On the basis of these results, recent controversial discussions on the possible values of the residual entropy of glasses are reviewed. Our conclusion is that the treatment of vitrification as a process of continuously breaking ergodicity with entropy loss and a residual entropy tending to zero in the limit of zero absolute temperature is in disagreement with the absolute majority of experimental and theoretical investigations of this process and the nature of the vitreous state. This conclusion is illustrated by model computations. In addition to the main conclusion derived from these computations, they are employed as a test for several suggestions concerning the behavior of thermodynamic coefficients in the glass transition range. Further, a brief review is given on possible ways of resolving the Kauzmann paradox and its implications with respect to the validity of the third law of thermodynamics. It is shown that neither in its primary formulations nor in its consequences does the Kauzmann paradox result in contradictions with any basic laws of nature. Such contradictions are excluded by either crystallization (not associated with a pseudospinodal as suggested by Kauzmann or a conventional (and not an ideal glass transition. Some further so far widely unexplored directions of research on the interplay between crystallization and glass transition are anticipated, in which entropy may play—beyond the topics widely discussed and reviewed here—a major role.

  5. Redox reaction and foaming in nuclear waste glass melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, J.L.

    1995-08-01

    This document was prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and is an attempt to analyze and estimate the effects of feed composition variables and reducing agent variables on the expected chemistry of reactions occurring in the cold cap and in the glass melt in the nuclear waste glass Slurry-fed, joule-heated melters as they might affect foaming during the glass-making process. Numerous redox reactions of waste glass components and potential feed additives, and the effects of other feed variables on these reactions are reviewed with regard to their potential effect on glass foaming. A major emphasis of this report is to examine the potential positive or negative aspects of adjusting feed with formic acid as opposed to other feed modification techniques including but not limited to use of other reducing agents. Feed modification techniques other than the use of reductants that should influence foaming behavior include control of glass melter feed pH through use of nitric acid. They also include partial replacement of sodium salts by lithium salts. This latter action (b) apparently lowers glass viscosity and raises surface tension. This replacement should decrease foaming by decreasing foam stability.

  6. A Unified Theory of Melting, Crystallization and Glass Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cotterill, R. M. J.; Jensen, F. J.; Damgaard Kristensen, W.

    1975-01-01

    In recent years, dislocations have been involved in theories of melting, in models of the liquid state, and in calculations of the viscosity of glasses. Particularly noteworthy are the Mott-Gurney model of a liquid as a polycrystal with a grain size (i. e. a dislocation network size) of near......-atomic dimensions, and the demonstration by Kotze and Kuhlmann-Wilsdorf that the solid-liquid interfacial energy is proportional to the grain boundary energy for a number of elements. These developments suggest the possibility of a relatively simple picture of crystallization and glass formation. In the liquid...... state dislocations, at the saturation density, are in constant motion and the microscopic grain boundary structure that they form is constantly changing due to dislocation-dislocation interaction. As the liquid is cooled below the melting point the free energy favors the crystalline form and grains...

  7. Electrical resistivities of glass melts containing simulated SRP waste sludges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiley, J.R.

    1978-08-01

    One option for the long-term management of radioactive waste at the Savannah River Plant is to solidify the waste in borosilicate glass by using a continuous, joule-heated, ceramic melter. Electrical resistivities that are needed for melter design were measured for melts of two borosilicate, glass-forming mixtures, each of which was combined with various amounts of several simulated-waste sludges. The simulated sludge spanned the composition range of actual sludges sampled from SRP waste tanks. Resistivities ranged from 6 to 10 ohm-cm at 500 0 C. Melt composition and temperature were correlated with resistivity. Resistivity was not a simple function of viscosity. 15 figures, 4 tables

  8. Effect of glass-batch makeup on the melting process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Humrickhouse, Carissa J.; Moody, J. Adam; Tate, Rachel M.; Rainsdon, Timothy T.; Tegrotenhuis, Nathan E.; Arrigoni, Benjamin M.; Marcial, Jose; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Tincher, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    The response of a glass batch to heating is determined by the batch makeup and in turn determines the rate of melting. Batches formulated for a high-alumina nuclear waste to be vitrified in an all-electric melter were heated at a constant temperature-increase rate to determine changes in melting behavior in response to the selection of batch chemicals and silica grain-size as well as the addition of heat-generating reactants. The type of batch materials and the size of silica grains determine how much, if any, primary foam occurs during melting. Small quartz grains, 5 (micro)m in size, caused extensive foaming because their major portion dissolved at temperatures 800 C when batch gases no longer evolved. The exothermal reaction of nitrates with sucrose was ignited at a temperature as low as 160 C and caused a temporary jump in temperature of several hundred degrees. Secondary foam, the source of which is oxygen from redox reactions, occurred in all batches of a limited composition variation involving five oxides, B 2 O 3 , CaO, Li 2 O, MgO, and Na 2 O. The foam volume at the maximum volume-increase rate was a weak function of temperature and melt basicity. Neither the batch makeup nor the change in glass composition had a significant impact on the dissolution of silica grains. The impacts of primary foam generation on glass homogeneity and the rate of melting in large-scale continuous furnaces have yet to be established via mathematical modeling and melter experiments.

  9. Effect Of Glass-Batch Makeup On The Melting Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.; Hrma, P.

    2010-01-01

    The response of a glass batch to heating is determined by the batch makeup and in turn determines the rate of melting. Batches formulated for a high-alumina nuclear waste to be vitrified in an all-electric melter were heated at a constant temperature-increase rate to determine changes in melting behavior in response to the selection of batch chemicals and silica grain-size as well as the addition of heat-generating reactants. The type of batch materials and the size of silica grains determine how much, if any, primary foam occurs during melting. Small quartz grains, 5 (micro)m in size, caused extensive foaming because their major portion dissolved at temperatures 800 C when batch gases no longer evolved. The exothermal reaction of nitrates with sucrose was ignited at a temperature as low as 160 C and caused a temporary jump in temperature of several hundred degrees. Secondary foam, the source of which is oxygen from redox reactions, occurred in all batches of a limited composition variation involving five oxides, B 2 O 3 , CaO, Li 2 O, MgO, and Na 2 O. The foam volume at the maximum volume-increase rate was a weak function of temperature and melt basicity. Neither the batch makeup nor the change in glass composition had a significant impact on the dissolution of silica grains. The impacts of primary foam generation on glass homogeneity and the rate of melting in large-scale continuous furnaces have yet to be established via mathematical modeling and melter experiments.

  10. Bubble removal and sand dissolution in an electrically heated glass melting channel with defined melt flow examined by mathematical modelling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrbek, L.; Kocourková, P.; Jebavá, Marcela; Cincibusová, P.; Němec, Lubomír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 456, JAN 15 (2017), s. 101-113 ISSN 0022-3093 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : glass melt flow * mathematical modelling * energy distribution * space utilization * melting performance Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass OBOR OECD: Ceramics Impact factor: 2.124, year: 2016

  11. Communication: Glass transition and melting lines of an ionic liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Thamires A.; Faria, Luiz F. O.; Paschoal, Vitor H.; Ribeiro, Mauro C. C.

    2018-05-01

    The phase diagram of the ionic liquid 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesufonyl)imide, [Pyrr1,4][NTf2], was explored by synchroton X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering measurements as a function of temperature and pressure. Glass transition Tg(p) and melting Tm(p) temperatures were obtained from atmospheric pressure up to ca. 2.0 GPa. We found that both the Tg(p) and Tm(p) curves follow essentially the same pressure dependence. The similarity of pressure coefficients, dTg/dp ≈ dTm/dp, is explained within the non-equilibrium thermodynamics approach for the glass transition by assuming that one of the Ehrenfest equations is appropriated for Tg(p), whereas Tm(p) follows the Clausius-Clapeyron equation valid for the first-order transitions. The results highlight that ionic liquids are excellent model systems to address fundamental questions related to the glass transition.

  12. Melting Behaviour of Mo by Shock Wave Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiu-Lu, Zhang; Ling-Cang, Cai; Jun, Chen; Ji-An, Xu; Fu-Qian, Jing

    2008-01-01

    In order to clarify the apparent discrepancy in determinations of melting temperature T m of Mo between diamond-anvil cell (DAC) measurements from 0 to about 100 GPa and shock wave (SW) measurement at only one pressure of about 390 GPa by comparison with visual extrapolation, we perform SW experiments to replenish more T m data on purpose to make this comparison more directly and rationally as well. The techniques adopted consist of Hügoniot sound velocity measurement for porous Mo and shock-induced release T m measurements for both solid and porous Mo. Totally five SW T m data, which extends the measured pressure range from previous about 390 GPa down to about 136 GPa that is close to the highest pressure (about 100 GPa) attained by previous DAC experiments, are therefore obtained. These measured Tm data, other than the extrapolated as mentioned above, exhibit a manner of continuous variation with pressure and can be fitted well with Lindemann melting description. More significantly, the measured T m data at lowest pressure are still much higher than that of the DACs and the overall trend of these T m data is against to the two-segment melting curve model, with a sudden change in dT m /d P at about 210 GPa, previously proposed by Errandonea [Physica B 357 (2005) 356]. Though the problem of large discrepancy in T m data measured between DAC and SW has not been completely explained, our knowledge on this matter achieves indubitable progress since it is of value to programme the next clarification. Some suggestions for further clarifying the issue of large discrepancy between DAC and SW measurements are also proposed. (condensed matter: structure, mechanical and thermal properties)

  13. On melting dynamics and the glass transition. II. Glassy dynamics as a melting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzakala, Florent; Zdeborová, Lenka

    2011-01-21

    There are deep analogies between the melting dynamics in systems with a first-order phase transition and the dynamics from equilibrium in super-cooled liquids. For a class of Ising spin models undergoing a first-order transition--namely p-spin models on the so-called Nishimori line--it can be shown that the melting dynamics can be exactly mapped to the equilibrium dynamics. In this mapping the dynamical--or mode-coupling--glass transition corresponds to the spinodal point, while the Kauzmann transition corresponds to the first-order phase transition itself. Both in mean field and finite dimensional models this mapping provides an exact realization of the random first-order theory scenario for the glass transition. The corresponding glassy phenomenology can then be understood in the framework of a standard first-order phase transition.

  14. Behaviour of ruthenium dioxide particles in borosilicate glasses and melts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pflieger, Rachel [DEN/DTCD-SCDV/CEA Valrho, Centre de Marcoule, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Institut de Chimie Separative de Marcoule, UMR5257, Centre de Marcoule, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France)], E-mail: rachel_pflieger@yahoo.fr; Lefebvre, Leila [DEN/DTCD-SCDV/CEA Valrho, Centre de Marcoule, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Malki, Mohammed [CNRS/CEMHTI-1D Av. de la Recherche Scientifique, 45701 Orleans cedex 2 (France); Polytech Orleans, Universite d' Orleans, 8 rue Leonard de Vinci, 45072 Orleans cedex 2 (France); Allix, Mathieu [CNRS/CEMHTI-1D Av. de la Recherche Scientifique, 45701 Orleans cedex 2 (France); Grandjean, Agnes [DEN/DTCD-SCDV/CEA Valrho, Centre de Marcoule, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Institut de Chimie Separative de Marcoule, UMR5257, Centre de Marcoule, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France)

    2009-06-01

    Ruthenium-glass systems are formed during the vitrification of nuclear waste. They are also widely used in micro-electronics because of their unique electrical properties. However, the interaction of this element with the glass matrix remains poorly understood. This work focuses on a RuO{sub 2} particles-nuclear alumino-borosilicate glass system in which the electrical conductivity is known to vary considerably with the RuO{sub 2} content and to become electronic above about 0.5-0.7 vol.% RuO{sub 2} [R. Pflieger, M. Malki, Y. Guari, J. Larionova, A. Grandjean, J. Am. Ceram. Soc., accepted for publication]. Some RuO{sub 2} segregation was observed in SEM/TEM investigations but no continuous chain of RuO{sub 2} particles could be seen. Electron relays between the particles are then necessary for a low-rate percolation, such as the nanoclusters suggested by Adachi et al. [K. Adachi, S. Iida, K. Hayashi, J. Mater. Res. 9 (7) (1994) 1866; K. Adachi, H. Kuno, J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 83 (10) (2000) 2441], which could consist in dissolved ruthenium. Indeed, several observations made here clearly indicate the presence of dissolved ruthenium in the glass matrix, like the modification of the glass density in presence of RuO{sub 2} particles or the diffusion-limited growth of RuO{sub 2} particles in the melt.

  15. Fining of glass melts: what we know about fining processes today

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerkens, R.G.C.

    2009-01-01

    The paper addresses the mechanisms of fining (removal of gases from melt) and the effect of batch composition, oxidation state of the melt and furnace atmosphere on bubble removal processes for commercial glass types, such as float glass and container glass compositions. The mechanisms of the

  16. Development of continuous glass melting for production of Nd-doped phosphate glasses for the NIF and LMJ laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J. H.; Ficini-Dorn, G.; Hawley-Fedder, R.; McLean, M. J.; Suratwala, T.; Trombert, J. H.

    1998-01-01

    The NIF and LMJ laser systems require about 3380 and 4752 Nd-doped laser glass slabs, respectively. Continuous laser glass melting and forming will be used for the first time to manufacture these slabs. Two vendors have been chosen to produce the glass: Hoya Corporation and Schott Glass Technologies. The laser glass melting systems that each of these two vendors have designed, built and tested are arguably the most advanced in the world. Production of the laser glass will begin on a pilot scale in the fall of 1999

  17. Melting, solidification, remelting, and separation of glass and metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebadian, M.A.; Xin, R.C.; Liu, Y.Z.

    1998-01-01

    Several high-temperature vitrification technologies have been developed for the treatment of a wide range of mixed waste types in both the low-level waste and transuranic (TRU) mixed waste categories currently in storage at DOE sites throughout the nation. The products of these processes are an oxide slag phase and a reduced metal phase. The metal phase has the potential to be recycled within the DOE Complex. Enhanced slag/metal separation methods are needed to support these processes. This research project involves an experimental investigation of the melting, solidification, remelting, and separation of glass and metal and the development of an efficient separation technology. The ultimate goal of this project is to find an efficient way to separate the slag phase from the metal phase in the molten state. This two-year project commenced in October 1995 (FY96). In the first fiscal year, the following tasks were accomplished: (1) A literature review and an assessment of the baseline glass and metal separation technologies were performed. The results indicated that the baseline technology yields a high percentage of glass in the metal phase, requiring further separation. (2) The main melting and solidification system setup was established. A number of melting and solidification tests were conducted. (3) Temperature distribution, solidification patterns, and flow field in the molten metal pool were simulated numerically for the solidification processes of molten aluminum and iron steel. (4) Initial designs of the laboratory-scale DCS and CS technologies were also completed. The principal demonstration separation units were constructed. (5) An application for a patent for an innovative liquid-liquid separation technology was submitted and is pending

  18. Sulphate Incorporation in Borosilicate Glasses and Melts: a Kinetic Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenoir, M. [CEA, DEN, Laboratoire d' etude et de Developpement de Matrices de Conditionnement, Centre de Marcoule, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Physique des Mineraux et Magmas, UMR 7047, CNRS- Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, 7 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris 05 (France); Grandjean, A. [Institut de Chimie Separative de Marcoule, UMR 5257, Laboratoire des Nanomateriaux Autoreparants, Marcoule, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Dussossoy, J.L. [CEA, DEN, Laboratoire d' etude et de Developpement de Matrices de Conditionnement, Centre de Marcoule, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Neuville, D.R. [Physique des Mineraux et Magmas, UMR 7047, CNRS- Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, 7 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris 05 (France)

    2008-07-01

    The kinetics of sulphate departure in a sodium borosilicate melt were studied using in situ Raman spectroscopy. This technique allows the quantification of the amount of sulphate dissolved in a borosilicate glass as a function of heating time by comparison with measurements obtained by microprobe wavelength dispersive spectrometry. To quantify the sulphate content obtained with Raman spectroscopy, the integrated intensity of the sulphate band at 990 cm{sup -1} was scaled to the sum of the integrated bands between 800 and 1200 cm{sup -1}, bands that are assigned to Qn silica units on the basis of previous literature. Calibration curves were then determined for two different samples. An evaluation of the kinetics of departure of sulphate could thus be made as a function of the viscosity of the borosilicate glass, showing that the kinetics were controlled by the diffusion of sulphate and its volatilization from the melt. This experimental method allows in situ measurements of sulphate content at high temperature which cannot be obtained by any other simple technique. (authors)

  19. Transparent phosphosilicate glasses containing crystals formed during cooling of melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, S. J.; Zhang, Yanfei; He, W.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of P2O5-SiO2 substitution on spontaneous crystallization of SiO2-Al2O3-P2O5- Na2O-MgO melts during cooling was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and rotation viscometry. Results show that addition of P2O5 leads...... to amorphous phase separation (APS), i.e., phosphate- and silicate-rich phases. It is due to the tendency of Mg2+ to form [MgO4] linking with [SiO4]. Molar substitution of P2O5 for SiO2 enhances the network polymerization of silicate-rich phase in the melts, and thereby the spontaneous crystallization of cubic...... Na2MgSiO4 is also enhanced during cooling of the melts. In addition, the sizes of the local crystalline and separated glassy domains are smaller than the wavelength of the visible light, and this leads to the transparency of the obtained glasses containing crystals....

  20. A slow atomic diffusion process in high-entropy glass-forming metallic melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Changjiu; Wong, Kaikin; Krishnan, Rithin P.; Embs, Jan P.; Chathoth, Suresh M.

    2018-04-01

    Quasi-elastic neutron scattering has been used to study atomic relaxation processes in high-entropy glass-forming metallic melts with different glass-forming ability (GFA). The momentum transfer dependence of mean relaxation time shows a highly collective atomic transport process in the alloy melts with the highest and lowest GFA. However, a jump diffusion process is the long-range atomic transport process in the intermediate GFA alloy melt. Nevertheless, atomic mobility close to the melting temperature of these alloy melts is quite similar, and the temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficient exhibits a non-Arrhenius behavior. The atomic mobility in these high-entropy melts is much slower than that of the best glass-forming melts at their respective melting temperatures.

  1. Viscosity and electrical conductivity of glass melts as a function of waste composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plodinec, M.J.; Wiley, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    Radioactive waste at the Savannah River Plant contains high concentrations of nonradioactive compounds of iron and aluminum. Simulated waste compositions containing varying ratios of iron to aluminum were added to glass melts to determine the effect on the melt properties. Waste containing high-aluminum increased the melt viscosity, but waste containing high-iron reduced the melt viscosity. Aluminum and iron both reduced the melt conductivity

  2. Shear viscosity of glass-forming melts in the liquid-glass transition region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanditov, D. S.

    2010-01-01

    A new approach to interpreting the hole-activation model of a viscous flow of glass-forming liquids is proposed. This model underlies the development of the concept on the exponential temperature dependence of the free energy of activation of a flow within the range of the liquid-glass transition in complete agreement with available experimental data. The 'formation of a fluctuation hole' in high-heat glass-forming melts is considered as a small-scale low-activation local deformation of a structural network, i.e., the quasi-lattice necessary for the switching of the valence bond, which is the main elementary event of viscous flow of glasses and their melts. In this sense, the hole formation is a conditioned process. A drastic increase in the activation free energy of viscous flow in the liquid-glass transition region is explained by a structural transformation that is reduced to a limiting local elastic deformation of the structural network, which, in turn, originates from the excitation (critical displacement) of a bridging atom like the oxygen atom in the Si-O-Si bridge. At elevated temperatures, as a rule, a necessary amount of excited bridging atoms (locally deformed regions of the structural network) always exists, and the activation free energy of viscous flow is almost independent of temperature. The hole-activation model is closely connected with a number of well-known models describing the viscous flow of glass-forming liquids (the Avramov-Milchev, Nemilov, Ojovan, and other models).

  3. Temperature Effects on Aluminoborosilicate Glass and Melt Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J.; Stebbins, J. F.

    2008-12-01

    Quantitative determination of the atomic-scale structure of multi-component oxide melts, and the effects of temperature on them, is a complex problem. Ca- and Na- aluminoborosilicates are especially interesting, not only because of their major role in widespread technical applications (flat-panel computer displays, fiber composites, etc.), but because the coordination environments of two of their main network cations (Al3+ and B3+) change markedly with composition and temperature is ways that may in part be analogous to processes in silicate melts at high pressures in the Earth. Here we examine a series of such glasses with different cooling rates, chosen to evaluate the role modifier cation field strength (Ca2+ vs. Na+) and of non-bridging oxygen (NBO) content. To explore the effects of fictive temperature, fast quenched and annealed samples were compared. We have used B-11 and Al-27 MAS NMR to measure the different B and Al coordinations and calculated the contents of non-bridging oxygens (NBO). Lower cooling rates increase the fraction of [4]B species in all compositions. The conversion of [3]B to [4]B is also expected to convert NBO to bridging oxygens, which should affect thermodynamic properties such as configurational entropy and configurational heat capacity. For four compositions with widely varying compositions and initial NBO contents, analysis of the speciation changes with the same, simple reaction [3]B = [4]B + NBO yields similar enthalpy values of 25±7 kJ/mol. B-11 triple quantum MAS NMR allows as well the proportions of [3]B boroxol ring and non-ring sites to be determined, and reveals more [3]B boroxol ring structures present in annealed (lower temperature) glasses. In situ, high-temperature MAS NMR spectra have been collected on one of the Na-aluminoborosilicate and on a sodium borate glass at 14.1 T. The exchange of boron between the 3- and 4-coordinated sites is clearly observed well above the glass transition temperatures, confirming the

  4. Gas release and foam formation during melting and fining of glass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerkens, R.G.C.; Schaaf, van der J.

    2006-01-01

    A method for the prediction of gas evolution from a glass melt during fining processes has been described. This procedure is based on the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium conditions between the species in the glass melt and co-existing gas phases. The method has been applied to estimate (a)

  5. Modelling the evaporation of boron species. Part 1: Alkali-free borosilicate glass melts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limpt, J.A.C. van; Beerkens, R.G.C.; Cook, S.; O'Connor, R.; Simon, J.

    2011-01-01

    A laboratory test facility has been used to measure the boron evaporation rates from borosilicate glass melts. The impact of furnace atmosphere composition and glass melt composition on the temperature dependent boron evaporation rates has been investigated experimentally. In Part 1 of this paper

  6. High-temperature oxidation of tungsten covered by layer of glass-enamel melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasnetsova, V.B.; Shardakov, N.T.; Kudyakov, V.Ya.; Deryabin, V.A.

    1997-01-01

    Corrosion losses of tungsten covered by the layer of glass-enamel melt were determined at 800, 850, 900, 950 deg C. It is shown that the rate of high-temperature oxidation of tungsten decreases after application of glass-enamel melt on its surface. This is probably conditioned by reduction of area of metal interaction with oxidizing atmosphere

  7. The effects of defects on copper melting under hydrostatic and shock loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Shengnian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; An, Qi [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, Timothy C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Han, Li - Bo [USTC

    2009-07-24

    With molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we investigate the effects of defects on Cu melting under hydrostatic and shock wave loading. We explore preexistent defects including vacancies, stacking faults and grain boundaries, as well as shock-induced defects. Depending on defect characteristics (energy and concentration), defects may have negligible or considerable effects on melting at MD scales However, it is expected that defects have more pronounced effects at heating rates lower than the MD rates.

  8. REACTION PRODUCTS AND CORROSION OF MOLYBDENUM ELECTRODE IN GLASS MELT CONTAINING ANTIMONY OXIDES AND SODIUM SULFATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JIŘÍ MATĚJ

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The products on the interface of a molybdenum electrode and glass melt were investigated primarily at 1400°C in three model glass melts without ingredients, with 1 % Sb2O3 and with 1 % Sb2O3 and 0.5 % SO3 (wt. %, both under and without load by alternating current. Corrosion of the molybdenum electrode in glass melt without AC load is higher by one order of magnitude if antimony oxides are present. The corrosion continues to increase if sulfate is present in addition to antimony oxides. Isolated antimony droplets largely occur on the electrode-glass melt interface, and numerous droplets are also dissipated in the surrounding glass if only antimony oxides are present in the glass melt. A comparatively continuous layer of antimony occurs on the interface if SO3 is also present, antimony being always in contact with molybdenum sulfide. Almost no antimony droplets are dissipated in the glass melt. The total amount of precipitated antimony also increases. The presence of sulfide on the interface likely facilitates antimony precipitation. The reaction of molybdenum with antimony oxides is inhibited in sites covered by an antimony layer. The composition of sulfide layers formed at 1400°C approximates that of Mo2S3. At 1100°C, the sulfide composition approximates that of MoS4. Corrosion multiplies in the glass melt without additions through the effect of AC current, most molybdenum being separated in the form of metallic particles. Corrosion also increases in the glass melt containing antimony oxides. This is due to increased corrosion in the neighborhood of the separated antimony droplets. This mechanism also results in the loosening of molybdenum particles. The amount of precipitated antimony also increases through the effect of the AC current. AC exerts no appreciable effect on either corrosion, the character of the electrode-glass interface, or antimony precipitation in the glass melt containing SO3.

  9. Influence of glass furnace operational conditions on the evaporation from soda-lime and borosilicate glass melts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerkens, R.G.C.

    2000-01-01

    The evaporation of sodium and boron species from the melts in industrial glass furnaces leads to emissions of particulates (dust) and to furnace atmospheres containing reactive evaporation products. These reactive species, especially alkali vapors, can react with the superstructure refractories

  10. The shock response of float-glass laminates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourne, N.K.

    2005-01-01

    Interfaces within glass targets give rise to variations in the mode of failure of material components. The wide use of such laminates merits further investigation of the failure mechanism. It is already known that when shocked above a threshold of 4 GPa, glass fails under compression behind a propagating front following the compression front. Work is presented which indicates how this failure process is altered by bonding together two plates to introduce an interface, rather than leaving a monolithic target. After crossing an internal interface, the failure wave propagates only after a delay in soda-lime glass and the failed strength of the material is increased at the inner interface compared with that at the impact face. Addition of a second interface illustrates these effects. Recent work has shown that failure of more than two plates bonded together during impact shapes the pulse transmitted through materials. Indeed it has been suggested that glass sheets bonded together show some of the features of polycrystalline brittle materials. In this work, the stress has been monitored at different stations in the laminate to ascertain the effect of varying the number of tiles within the laminate. It is found that the pulse rises to ca. 4 GPa quickly and then is ramped more gradually as the number of glass sheets is increased

  11. Exploration of the fragmentation of laser shock-melted aluminum using x-ray backlighting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Zhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The fragmentation of shock-melted metal material is an important scientific problem in shock physics and is suitable for experimentally investigating by the laser-driven x-ray backlighting technique. This letter reports on the exploration of laser shock-melted aluminum fragmentation by means of x-ray backlighting at the SGII high energy facility in China. High-quality and high-resolution radiographs with negligible motion blur were obtained and these images enabled analysis of the mass distribution of the fragmentation product.

  12. Glass Melting under microgravity. ; Space experiment by Mori astronaut. Mujuryokuka deno glass yoyu. ; Morisan no uchu jikken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makihara, M. (Osaka National Research Institute, Osaka (Japan))

    1993-03-01

    A space experiment on glass melting under microgravity was performed in a space shuttle in September 1992. The experiment has been intended to make glass from glass material floating in air by heating and melting it with light and an acoustic levitation furnace. The acoustic levitation furnace used in the experiment has been arranged so that a sound wave from a speaker makes a steady wave in a cylindrical quartz glass core tube with a length of 16 cm and a diameter of 4 cm, and a test sample can be retained floating in a valley of central wave pressures. The test sample retained floating has been collected and heated by light from a 500-W halogen lamp. Behavior of molten glass liquid under microgravity has been investigated. The glass material powder spheres have been melted completely and made into glass without crystallization. With regard to flows generated in the test sample placed in the acoustic levitation furnace, a glass spot containing cobalt oxide has been attached onto part of the test sample surface for observation. As a result, the spot has been incorporated in the glass without developing diffusion. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Numerical modelling of an industrial glass-melting furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, S C [Brigham Young Univ., Advanced Combustion Engineering Research Center, Provo, UT (United States); Webb, B W; McQuay, M Q [Brigham Young Univ., Mechanical Engineering Dept., Provo, UT (United States); Newbold, J [Lockheed Aerospace, Denver, CO (United States)

    2000-03-01

    The predictive capability of two comprehensive combustion codes, PCGC-3 and FLUENT, to simulate local flame structure and combustion characteristics in a industrial gas-fired, flat-glass furnace is investigated. Model predictions are compared with experimental data from the furnace for profiles of velocity, species concentrations, temperatures, and wall-incident radiative heat flux. Predictions from both codes show agreement with the measured mean velocity profiles and incident radiant flux on the crown. However, significant differences between the code predictions and measurements are observed for the flame-ozone temperatures and species concentrations. The observed discrepancies may be explained by (i) uncertainties in the distributions of mean velocity and turbulence in the portneck, (ii) uncertainties in the port-by-port stoichiometry, (iii) different grid-based approximations to the furnace geometry made in the two codes, (iv) the assumption of infinitely fast chemistry made in the chemical reaction model of both codes, and (v) simplifying assumptions made in the simulations regarding the complex coupling between the combustion space, batch blanket, and melt tank. The study illustrates the critical need for accurate boundary conditions (inlet air and fuel flow distributions, boundary surface temperatures, etc.) and the importance of representative furnace geometry in simulating these complex industrial combustion systems. (Author)

  14. Investigation of platinum alloys for melting of inclusion free laser glass: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumitani, T.; Toratani, H.; Meissner, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this work is to evaluate the suitability of Pt alloys as crucible materials for melting LHG-8 phosphate laser glass. The tendency of forming metallic inclusions and ionic dissolution of alloy components in the glass is to be compared with that of pure Pt. Ionic Pt is introduced into the glass melt by direct dissolution of Pt at the crucible-melt interface and by vapor phase transport. It was felt that a Pt-alloy may behave sufficiently differently from Pt that a number of alloys should be studied. Pt inclusions may originate from Pt which reprecipitates from the glass melt on cooling or change in redox-conditions; from volatilized Pt which deposits in colder zones of the melting environment as crystallites which may drop back into the glass melt; and/or from Pt particles which are mechanically removed from the crucible and drop into the glass melt. Besides pure Pt, the following alloys have been tested: Pt/ 10 Ir, Pt/ 10 Rh, Pt/ 5 Au, Pt-ZGS, Pt/ 5 Au-ZGS, Pt/ 10 Rh-ZGS

  15. Evaluation of Foaming Behavior of Glass Melts by High-Temperature Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2016-01-01

    Optical monitoring techniques can record in situ the size of glass samples during a dynamic heating process. This allowed us to study sintering and expansion rate of panel glass from cathode ray tube using MnO2 as foaming agent. We show the maximum expansion rate of glass melt foaming (in situ va...... such as type and concentration of foaming agent, glass composition and particle size to obtain foam glass with high porosity and closed pores. Using this approach we show that the foaming of bottle glass is preferentially conducted at a SiC concentration of 1‒4 wt%....

  16. Structure of dense shock-melted alkali halides: Evidence for a continuous pressure-induced structural transition in the melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, M.; Rogers, F.J.

    1985-01-01

    Hypernetted-chain equation calculations have been made for the ion-ion pair distribution functions in shock-melted CsI, CsBr, KBr, KCl, NaCl, and LiF. The results show that the melt undergoes a gradual pressure-induced structural change from an open NaCl-like structure with six nearest neighbors of opposite charge to one that has a rare-gas close-packed-like arrangement containing about 12 neighbors of mixed charge. These effects are most pronounced for the larger ions in which the short-range repulsions are stronger relative to long-range Coulomb attractions

  17. Structural and morphological studies lead borate glasses by melt quenching technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jetruth Mary Alphonsa, K.; Sumathi, T.

    2013-01-01

    The studies of oxide glasses have gained attention due to their structural features. This type of glass has some remarkable features such as low melting temperature, impressive wide glass formation region, high resistance against devitrification and high refractive index. 60B 2 O 3 -(30-x) PbO-xK 2 O/Li 2 O glasses were prepared using the melt quenching technique because of its rapid glass forming ability. The amorphous nature of the prepared glass samples were confirmed by XRD (X-Ray diffraction technique) and SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy). The quantitative analysis has been carried out in order to obtain more information about the structure of these glasses using FT-IR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy). (author)

  18. Tomographic location of potential melt-bearing phenocrysts in lunar glass spherules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebel, D.S.; Fogel, R.A.; Rivers, M.L.

    2005-01-01

    Apollo 17 orange glass spherules contain olivine phenocrysts with melt inclusions from depth. Tomography ( 200 spherules located 1 phenocryst. We will try to find melt inclusions and obtain original magma volatiles and compositions. In 1971, Apollo 17 astronauts collected a 10 cm soil sample (74220) comprised almost entirely of orange glass spherules. Below this, a double drive-tube core sampled a 68 cm thick horizon comprised of orange glass and black beads (crystallized equivalents of orange glass). Primitive lunar glass spherules (e.g.-A17 orange glasses) are thought to represent ejecta from lunar mare fire fountains. The fire-fountains were apparently driven by a combination of C-O gas exsolution from orange glass melt and the oxidation of graphite. Upon eruption, magmas lost their volatiles (e.g., S, CO, CO 2 ) to space. Evidence for volatile escape remains as volatile-rich coatings on the exteriors of many spherules. Moreover, it showed that Type I and II Fe-Ni-rich metal particles found within orange glass olivine phenocrysts, or free-floating in the glass itself, are powerful evidence for the volatile driving force for lunar fire fountains. More direct evidence for the volatile mechanism has yet to be uncovered. Issues remaining include: the exact composition of magmatic volatiles; the hypothesized existence of graphite in the magma; the oxygen fugacity of the magma and of the lunar interior. In 1996 reported a single ∼450 micron, equant olivine phenocryst, containing four glassy melt inclusions (or inclusion cores), the largest ∼30micron in size, in a thin section of the 74001/2 drill core. The melt is assumed to sample the parent magma of the lunar basalts at depth, evidenced by the S content of the inclusion (600 ppm) which is 400 ppm greater than that of the orange glass host. Such melts potentially contain a full complement of the volatile components of the parent magma, which can be analyzed by infrared spectroscopy. Although the A17 orange glass

  19. Influence of fining agents on glass melting: A review, Part 2

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hujová, Miroslava; Vernerová, Miroslava

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 3 (2017), s. 202-208 ISSN 0862-5468 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : glass melting * sodium sulphate * chemical reactions * gas evolution * dissolution * fining * bubble nucleation * foaming Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass OBOR OECD: Ceramics Impact factor: 0.439, year: 2016

  20. Influence of fining agents on glass melting: A review, Part 1

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hujová, Miroslava; Vernerová, Miroslava

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 2 (2017), s. 119-126 ISSN 0862-5468 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : glass melting * sodium sulphate * chemical reactions * gas evolution * dissolution * fining * bubble nucleation * foaming Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass OBOR OECD: Ceramics Impact factor: 0.439, year: 2016

  1. Outlooks for mathematical modelling of the glass melting process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waal, H. de [TNO Institute of Applied Physics, Delft (Netherlands)

    1997-12-31

    Mathematical modelling is nowadays a standard tool for major producers of float glass, T.V. glass and fiberglass. Also for container glass furnaces, glass tank modelling proves to be a valuable method to optimize process conditions. Mathematical modelling is no longer just a way to visualize the flow patterns and to provide data on heat transfer. It can also predict glass quality in relation to process parameters, because all chemical and physical phenomena are included in the latest generation of models, based on experimental and theoretical research on these phenomena.

  2. Corrosion of inconel in high-temperature borosilicate glass melts containing simulant nuclear waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xianhe; Yuan, Xiaoning; Brigden, Clive T.; Tao, Jun; Hyatt, Neil C.; Miekina, Michal

    2017-10-01

    The corrosion behaviors of Inconel 601 in the borosilicate glass (MW glass) containing 25 wt.% of simulant Magnox waste, and in ZnO, Mn2O3 and Fe2O3 modified Mg/Ca borosilicate glasses (MZMF and CZMF glasses) containing 15 wt.% of simulant POCO waste, were evaluated by dimensional changes, the formation of internal defects and changes in alloy composition near corrosion surfaces. In all three kinds of glass melts, Cr at the inconel surface forms a protective Cr2O3 scale between the metal surface and the glass, and alumina precipitates penetrate from the metal surface or formed in-situ. The corrosion depths of inconel 601 in MW waste glass melt are greater than those in the other two glass melts. In MW glass, the Cr2O3 layer between inconel and glass is fragmented because of the reaction between MgO and Cr2O3, which forms the crystal phase MgCr2O4. In MZMF and CZMF waste glasses the layers are continuous and a thin (Zn, Fe, Ni, B)-containing layer forms on the surface of the chromium oxide layer and prevents Cr2O3 from reacting with MgO or other constituents. MgCr2O4 was observed in the XRD analysis of the bulk MW waste glass after the corrosion test, and ZrSiO4 in the MZMF waste glass, and ZrSiO4 and CaMoO4 in the CZMF waste glass.

  3. Melting of Nb2O5 glass in a RF furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aranha, N.; Barbosa, L.C.

    1987-01-01

    Nd 2 O 5 were sucessfully melted in a furnace under He inert atmosphere. After melting, the glasses presented refractive index about 1,73 +- 0,01, free of bubbles with good homogeneity. The only problem was the yellow colour produced by impurities originating in the niobium. To Brazil, this glass has strategic importance, because the world largest niobum resources are founded in Brazil and other glass components, as P 2 O 5 and PbO are also easily founded. (Author) [pt

  4. An innovative energy-saving in-flight melting technology and its application to glass production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaochun Yao et al

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The conventional method used for glass melting is air-fuel firing, which is inefficient, energy-intensive and time-consuming. In this study, an innovative in-flight melting technology was developed and applied to glass production for the purposes of energy conservation and environmental protection. Three types of heating sources, radio-frequency (RF plasma, a 12-phase alternating current (ac arc and an oxygen burner, were used to investigate the in-flight melting behavior of granulated powders. Results show that the melted particles are spherical with a smooth surface and compact structure. The diameter of the melted particles is about 50% of that of the original powders. The decomposition and vitrification degrees of the prepared powders decrease in the order of powders prepared by RF plasma, the 12-phase ac arc and the oxygen burner. The largest heat transfer is from RF plasma to particles, which results in the highest particle temperature (1810 °C and the greatest vitrification degree of the raw material. The high decomposition and vitrification degrees, which are achieved in milliseconds, shorten the melting and fining times of the glass considerably. Our results indicate that the proposed in-flight melting technology is a promising method for use in the glass industry.

  5. DETERMINATION OF HLW GLASS MELT RATE USING X-RAY COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, A.; Miller, D.; Immel, D.

    2011-10-06

    The purpose of the high-level waste (HLW) glass melt rate study is two-fold: (1) to gain a better understanding of the impact of feed chemistry on melt rate through bench-scale testing, and (2) to develop a predictive tool for melt rate in support of the on-going frit development efforts for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). In particular, the focus is on predicting relative melt rates, not the absolute melt rates, of various HLW glass formulations solely based on feed chemistry, i.e., the chemistry of both waste and glass-forming frit for DWPF. Critical to the successful melt rate modeling is the accurate determination of the melting rates of various HLW glass formulations. The baseline procedure being used at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is to; (1) heat a 4 inch-diameter stainless steel beaker containing a mixture of dried sludge and frit in a furnace for a preset period of time, (2) section the cooled beaker along its diameter, and (3) measure the average glass height across the sectioned face using a ruler. As illustrated in Figure 1-1, the glass height is measured for each of the 16 horizontal segments up to the red lines where relatively large-sized bubbles begin to appear. The linear melt rate (LMR) is determined as the average of all 16 glass height readings divided by the time during which the sample was kept in the furnace. This 'visual' method has proved useful in identifying melting accelerants such as alkalis and sulfate and further ranking the relative melt rates of candidate frits for a given sludge batch. However, one of the inherent technical difficulties of this method is to determine the glass height in the presence of numerous gas bubbles of varying sizes, which is prevalent especially for the higher-waste-loading glasses. That is, how the red lines are drawn in Figure 1-1 can be subjective and, therefore, may influence the resulting melt rates significantly. For example, if the red lines are drawn too low

  6. An ordered metallic glass solid solution phase that grows from the melt like a crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, Karena W.; Chupas, Peter J.; Long, Gabrielle G.; Bendersky, Leonid A.; Levine, Lyle E.; Mompiou, Frédéric; Stalick, Judith K.; Cahn, John W.

    2014-01-01

    We report structural studies of an Al–Fe–Si glassy solid that is a solid solution phase in the classical thermodynamic sense. We demonstrate that it is neither a frozen melt nor nanocrystalline. The glass has a well-defined solubility limit and rejects Al during formation from the melt. The pair distribution function of the glass reveals chemical ordering out to at least 12 Å that resembles the ordering within a stable crystalline intermetallic phase of neighboring composition. Under isothermal annealing at 305 °C the glass first rejects Al, then persists for approximately 1 h with no detectable change in structure, and finally is transformed by a first-order phase transition to a crystalline phase with a structure that is different from that within the glass. It is possible that this remarkable glass phase has a fully ordered atomic structure that nevertheless possesses no long-range translational symmetry and is isotropic

  7. Shock Induced Melting in Aluminum: Wave Profile Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chhabildas, Lalit C.; Furnish, Michael D.; Reinhart, William D.

    1999-06-23

    We have developed launch capabilities that can propel macroscopic plates to hypervelocities (8 to 16 km/s). This capability has been used to determine the first time-resolved wave profile measurements using velocity interferometry techniques at impact velocities of 10 km/s. These measurements show that alu- minum continues to exhibit normal release behavior to 161 GPa with complete loss of strength in the shocked state. Results of these experiments are discussed and compared with the results of lower pressure experi- ments conducted at lower impact velocities.

  8. Glass-melting using an IGBT full-bridge resonant converter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco S, J.O.; Gutierrez O, E.; Benitez R, J.S.; Martinez V, J.; Lopez C, R.

    1999-01-01

    This work describes the design implementation and application of a full-bridge IGBT resonant converter used to obtain glass melting. The design procedure is discussed and complete converter schematics are provided, including drivers and control circuits. A brief review of the glass properties is given, and some coupling parameters of the induction furnace are also described. A very special provision is made to the coupling charge transformer and the heat induced to the glass itself, first by conduction, followed by direct electromagnetic induction when the glass becomes a conductor. A brief analysis of electromagnetic fields, current density and power induced in the material is given. A very simple method is presented to calculate the power absorbed by the load and therefore the efficiency of the heating process. Several tests are carried out to verify the effectiveness of this method. Finally, this paper describes the design and construction of a 5 k W, 50 k Hz Full-Bridge Resonant Converter (FBRC), based on IGBT transistors and a transformer-capacitor coupled to a thermal load composed of a metal-glass cylinder. For glass makers, the benefits obtained by implementing the melting system with an IGBT-based FRBC resides on the relative simplicity of its design, the low-cost of the components, the energy transfer efficiency, and the robustness of its operation. With a proper scaling, this melting system can be used, for instance, to vitrify hazardous industrial wastes, nuclear waste, and fume ashes from melting plants or combustion systems. (Author)

  9. NUCLEAR WASTE GLASSES: CONTINUOUS MELTING AND BULK VITRIFICAITON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KRUGER, A.A.

    2008-01-01

    This contribution addresses various aspects of nuclear waste vitrification. Nuclear wastes have a variety of components and composition ranges. For each waste composition, the glass must be formulated to possess acceptable processing and product behavior defined in terms of physical and chemical properties that guarantee the glass can be easily made and resist environmental degradation. Glass formulation is facilitated by developing property-composition models, and the strategy of model development and application is reviewed. However, the large variability of waste compositions presents numerous additional challenges: insoluble solids and molten salts may segregate; foam may hinder heat transfer and slow down the process; molten salts may accumulate in container refractory walls; the glass on cooling may precipitate crystalline phases. These problems need targeted exploratory research. Examples of specific problems and their possible solutions are discussed

  10. Microwave melt and offgas analysis results from a Ferro Corporation reg-sign glass frit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, J.A.; Hoffman, C.R.; Knutson, P.T.

    1995-03-01

    In support of the Residue Treatment Technology (RTT) Microwave Solidification project, Waste Projects and Surface Water personnel conducted a series of experiments to determine the feasibility of encapsulating a surrogate sludge waste using the microwave melter. The surrogate waste was prepared by RTT and melted with five varying compositions of low melting glass frit supplied by the Ferro Corporation. Samples were melted using a 50% waste/50% glass frit and a 47.5% waste/47.5% glass frit/5% carbon powder. This was done to evaluate the effectiveness of carbon at reducing a sulfate-based surface scale which has been observed in previous experiments and in full-scale testing. These vitrified samples were subsequently submitted to Environmental Technology for toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) testing. Two of the five frits tested in this experiment merit further evaluation as raw materials for the microwave melter. Ferro frit 3110 with and without carbon powder produced a crystalline product which passed TCLP testing. The quality of the melt product could be improved by increasing the melting temperature from 900 degrees C to approximately 1150-1200 degrees C. Ferro frit 3249 produced the optimal quality of glass based on visual observations, but failed TCLP testing for silver when melted without carbon powder. This frit requires a slightly higher melting temperature (≥ 1200 degrees C) compared to frit 3110 and produces a superior product. In conjunction with this work, Surface Water personnel conducted offgas analyses using a Thermal Desorption Mass Spectrometer (TDMS) on selected formulations. The offgas analyses identified and quantified water vapor (H 2 O), oxygen (O 2 ) and carbon oxides (CO and CO 2 ), sulfur (S) and sulfur oxides (SO and SO 2 ), and nitrogen (N 2 ) and nitrogen oxides (NO and NO 2 ) that volatilized during glass formation

  11. Chemical speciation of U, Fe, and Pu in melt glass from nuclear weapons testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacold, J. I.; Lukens, W. W.; Booth, C. H.; Shuh, D. K. [Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Knight, K. B.; Eppich, G. R. [Nuclear and Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Holliday, K. S. [Materials Science Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2016-05-21

    Nuclear weapons testing generates large volumes of glassy materials that influence the transport of dispersed actinides in the environment and may carry information on the composition of the detonated device. We determine the oxidation state of U and Fe (which is known to buffer the oxidation state of actinide elements and to affect the redox state of groundwater) in samples of melt glass collected from three U.S. nuclear weapons tests. For selected samples, we also determine the coordination geometry of U and Fe, and we report the oxidation state of Pu from one melt glass sample. We find significant variations among the melt glass samples and, in particular, find a clear deviation in one sample from the expected buffering effect of Fe(II)/Fe(III) on the oxidation state of uranium. In the first direct measurement of Pu oxidation state in a nuclear test melt glass, we obtain a result consistent with existing literature that proposes Pu is primarily present as Pu(IV) in post-detonation material. In addition, our measurements imply that highly mobile U(VI) may be produced in significant quantities when melt glass is quenched rapidly following a nuclear detonation, though these products may remain immobile in the vitrified matrices. The observed differences in chemical state among the three samples show that redox conditions can vary dramatically across different nuclear test conditions. The local soil composition, associated device materials, and the rate of quenching are all likely to affect the final redox state of the glass. The resulting variations in glass chemistry are significant for understanding and interpreting debris chemistry and the later environmental mobility of dispersed material.

  12. Chemical speciation of U, Fe, and Pu in melt glass from nuclear weapons testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacold, J. I.; Lukens, W. W.; Booth, C. H.; Shuh, D. K.; Knight, K. B.; Eppich, G. R.; Holliday, K. S.

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear weapons testing generates large volumes of glassy materials that influence the transport of dispersed actinides in the environment and may carry information on the composition of the detonated device. We determine the oxidation state of U and Fe (which is known to buffer the oxidation state of actinide elements and to affect the redox state of groundwater) in samples of melt glass collected from three U.S. nuclear weapons tests. For selected samples, we also determine the coordination geometry of U and Fe, and we report the oxidation state of Pu from one melt glass sample. We find significant variations among the melt glass samples and, in particular, find a clear deviation in one sample from the expected buffering effect of Fe(II)/Fe(III) on the oxidation state of uranium. In the first direct measurement of Pu oxidation state in a nuclear test melt glass, we obtain a result consistent with existing literature that proposes Pu is primarily present as Pu(IV) in post-detonation material. In addition, our measurements imply that highly mobile U(VI) may be produced in significant quantities when melt glass is quenched rapidly following a nuclear detonation, though these products may remain immobile in the vitrified matrices. The observed differences in chemical state among the three samples show that redox conditions can vary dramatically across different nuclear test conditions. The local soil composition, associated device materials, and the rate of quenching are all likely to affect the final redox state of the glass. The resulting variations in glass chemistry are significant for understanding and interpreting debris chemistry and the later environmental mobility of dispersed material.

  13. Process and device for continuous measurement of the level of a radioactive glass melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, H.

    1987-01-01

    The glass melt runs into a high quality steel mould in the form of a jet at the bottom exit of the smelting furnace or reservoir. The smelting furnace or reservoir and the high quality steel mould can be made part of an electrical circuit by suitable insulation measures relative to one another and relative to the earth potential. The glass melt jet is used as a variable resistance in this circuit, as its resistance will decrease with its decreasing length due to the increasing level in the mould. The resistance is suitable as a direct measure of the level. (DG) [de

  14. Material interactions between system components and glass product melts in a ceramic melter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knitter, R.

    1989-07-01

    The interactions of the ceramic and metallic components of a ceramic melter for the vitrification of High Active Waste were investigated with simulated glass product melts in static crucible tests at 1000 0 C and 1150 0 C. Corrosion of the fusion-cast Al 2 O 3 -ZrO 2 -SiO 2 - and Al 2 O 3 -ZrO 2 -SiO 2 -Cr 2 O 3 -refractories (ER 1711 and ER 2161) is characterized by homogeneous chemical dissolution and diffusion through the glass matrix of the refractory. The resulting boundary compositions lead to characteristic modification and formation of phases, not only inside the refractory but also in the glass melt. The attack of the electrode material, a Ni-Cr-Fe-alloy Inconel 690, by the glass melt takes place via grain boundaries and leads to the oxidation of Cr and growth of Cr 2 O 3 -crystals at the boundary layer. Noble metals, added to the glass melt can form solid solutions with the alloy with varying compositions. (orig.) [de

  15. Dynamic fragmentation of laser shock-melted tin: experiment and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Resseguier, T. [CNRS ENSMA, Lab Combust and Deton, F-86961 Futuroscope (France); Signor, L.; Dragon, A. [CNRS ENSMA, Mecan and Phys Mat Lab, F-86961 Futuroscope (France); Signor, L.; Roy, G. [CEA Valduc, 21 - Is-sur-Tille (France)

    2010-07-01

    Dynamic fragmentation of shock-loaded metals is an issue of considerable importance for both basic science and a variety of technological applications, such as pyrotechnics or inertial confinement fusion, the latter involving high energy laser irradiation of thin metallic shells. Whereas spall fracture in solid materials has been extensively studied for many years, little data can be found yet about the evolution of this phenomenon after partial or full melting on compression or on release. Here, we present an investigation of dynamic fragmentation in laser shock-melted tin, from the 'micro-spall' process (ejection of a cloud of fine droplets) occurring upon reflection of the compressive pulse from the target free surface, to the late rupture observed in the un-spalled melted layer (leading to the formation of larger spherical fragments). Experimental results consist of time-resolved velocity measurements and post-shock observations of recovered targets and fragments. They provide original information regarding the loss of tensile strength associated with melting, the cavitation mechanism likely to occur in the melted metal, the sizes of the subsequent fragments and their ejection velocities. A theoretical description based on an energetic approach adapted to the case of a liquid metal is implemented as a failure criterion in a one-dimensional hydro-code including a multi-phase equation of state for tin. The resulting predictions of the micro-spall process are compared with experimental data. In particular, the use of a new experimental technique to quantify the fragment size distributions leads to a much better agreement with theory than previously reported. Finally, a complementary approach focused on cavitation is proposed to evaluate the role of this phenomenon in the fragmentation of the melted metal. (authors)

  16. Methods of vitrifying waste with low melting high lithia glass compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Pickett, John B.; Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Marra, James C.

    2001-01-01

    The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste streams, sludge solids, mixtures of aqueous supernate and sludge solids, combinations of spent filter aids from waste water treatment and waste sludges, supernate alone, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, or combinations thereof, geological mine tailings and sludges, asbestos, inorganic filter media, cement waste forms in need of remediation, spent or partially spent ion exchange resins or zeolites, contaminated soils, lead paint, etc. The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

  17. Reaction products and corrosion of molybdenum electrode in glass melt containing antimony oxides and sodium sulfate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matěj, J.; Langrová, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 3 (2012), s. 280-285 ISSN 0862-5468 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : antimony oxides * corrosion * glass melt * Molybdenum electrode * sulfate Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 0.418, year: 2012 http://www.ceramics-silikaty.cz/2012/pdf/2012_03_280.pdf

  18. The melting of stable glasses is governed by nucleation-and-growth dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jack, Robert L.; Berthier, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the microscopic mechanisms by which low-temperature amorphous states, such as ultrastable glasses, transform into equilibrium fluids, after a sudden temperature increase. Experiments suggest that this process is similar to the melting of crystals, thus differing from the behaviour found in ordinary glasses. We rationalize these observations using the physical idea that the transformation process takes place close to a “hidden” equilibrium first-order phase transition, which is observed in systems of coupled replicas. We illustrate our views using simulation results for a simple two-dimensional plaquette spin model, which is known to exhibit a range of glassy behaviour. Our results suggest that nucleation-and-growth dynamics, as found near ordinary first-order transitions, is also the correct theoretical framework to analyse the melting of ultrastable glasses. Our approach provides a unified understanding of multiple experimental observations, such as propagating melting fronts, large kinetic stability ratios, and “giant” dynamic length scales. We also provide a comprehensive discussion of available theoretical pictures proposed in the context of ultrastable glass melting.

  19. Future energy-efficient and low-emissions glass melting processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerkens, R.G.C.; Limpt, J.A.C. van; Lankhorst, A.M.; Santen, P.J. van

    2012-01-01

    All over the world, there is an increasing drive to develop new technologies or concepts for industrial glass melting furnaces, with the main aim to increase the energy efficiency, tabilize production and reduce emissions. The application of new process sensors, improved furnace design, intelligent

  20. The role of noble metals in electric melting of nuclear waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, G.; Weisenburger, S.

    1990-01-01

    Electrical melting of nuclear waste glass in ceramic melters applies Joule heating, with the molten glass acting as the conductive medium. The local energy release inside the melt relieves from the restriction of external heat addition, allowing to scale up the melter to industrial units. Certainly, that principle makes the melter operation susceptible for changes of the electrical properties of the glass melt. Hence, the melt properties are required to be locally uniform and constant with time. Temporary fluctuations in the feed composition, however, are usually attenuated by the high retention times being in the order of a day and more. More essential for the melter operation are segregation effects occurring systematically. This behaviour can be observed in the case of the so-called noble metal elements Ruthenium, Palladium and Rhodium, belonging to the Platinum metal group. The subject of this paper is to describe the behaviour of the noble metals in electric melting and the problems they can contribute to. The discussion is based on detailed knowledge gained from PAMELA's LEWC processing and from large-scale vitrification of commercial-like waste simulate at INE/KfK. Finally, ways are indicated to solve the noble metal problem technically

  1. A kinetic approach of sulphur behaviour in borosilicate glasses and melts: implications for sulphate incorporation in nuclear waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenoir, Marion [Service de Confinement des Dechets et Vitrification - Laboratoire d' Etudes de Base sur les Verres, CEA Valrho, Centre de Marcoule, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France); Physique des Mineraux et des Magmas, UMR 7047 - CNRS, Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, 7 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Grandjean, Agnes [Service de Confinement des Dechets et Vitrification - Laboratoire d' Etudes de Base sur les Verres, CEA Valrho, Centre de Marcoule, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France); Neuville, Daniel R. [Physique des Mineraux et des Magmas, UMR 7047 - CNRS, Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, 7 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2008-07-01

    The kinetics of sulphate decomposition in a borosilicate melt were studied using in situ Raman spectroscopy. This technique permits the quantification of the amount of sulphate dissolved in a borosilicate glass as a function of heating time by comparison with measurements obtained by microprobe WDS (Wavelength Dispersive Spectrometry). In order to quantify the content of sulphate obtained by Raman spectroscopy, the integrated intensity of the sulphate band at 985 cm{sup -1} was scaled to the sum of the integrated bands between 800 and 1200 cm{sup -1}, bands that are assigned to Q{sup n} silica units on the basis of previous literature. Viscosities of some borosilicate glasses are also presented here in order to study the kinetics of sulphate decomposition as a function of the viscosity of the melt. This underlines the importance of variations in viscosity depending on the composition of the melt and thus shows that viscosity is an important parameter governing the kinetics of decomposition of sulphate in borosilicate glasses. (authors)

  2. Forsterite Shock Temperatures and Entropy: New Scaling Laws for Impact Melting and Vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, E.; Root, S.; Kraus, R. G.; Townsend, J. P.; Spaulding, D.; Stewart, S. T.; Jacobsen, S. B.; Fratanduono, D.; Millot, M. A.; Mattsson, T. R.; Hanshaw, H. L.

    2017-12-01

    The observed masses, radii and temperatures of thousands of extra-solar planets have challenged our theoretical understanding of planet formation and planetary structures. Planetary materials are subject to extreme pressures and temperatures during formation and within the present-day interiors of large bodies. Here, we focus on improving understanding of the physical properties of rocky planets for calculations of internal structure and the outcomes of giant impacts. We performed flyer plate impact experiments on forsterite [Mg2SiO4] on the Z-Machine at Sandia National Laboratory and decaying shock temperature measurements at the Omega EP laser at U. Rochester. At Z, planar, supported shock waves are generated in single crystal samples, permitting observation of both compressed and released states. Using available static and dynamic thermodynamic data, we calculate absolute entropy and heat capacity along the forsterite shock Hugoniot. Entropy and heat capacity on the Hugoniot are larger than previous estimates. Our data constrain the thermodynamic properties of forsterite liquid at high pressures and temperatures and the amount of melt and vapor produced during impact events. For an ambient pressure of 1 bar, shock-vaporization begins upon reaching the liquid region on the forsterite Hugoniot (about 200 GPa). Using hydrocode simulations of giant impacts between rocky planets with forsterite mantles and iron cores and the new experimentally-constrained forsterite shock entropy, we present a new scaling law for the fraction of mantle that is melted or vaporized by the initial shock wave. Sandia National Laboratories is a multimission laboratory managed and operated by National Technology and Engineering Solutions of Sandia, LLC., a wholly owned subsidiary of Honeywell International, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-NA0003525. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Prepared by the Center

  3. Property-Composition-Temperature Modeling of Waste Glass Melt Data Subject to a Randomization Restriction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Cooley, Scott K.

    2008-01-01

    Properties such as viscosity and electrical conductivity of glass melts are functions of melt temperature as well as glass composition. When measuring such a property for several glasses, the property is typically measured at several temperatures for one glass, then at several temperatures for the next glass, and so on. This data-collection process involves a restriction on randomization, which is referred to as split-plot experiment. The split-plot data structure must be accounted for in developing property-composition-temperature models and the corresponding uncertainty equations for model predictions. Instead of ordinary least squares (OLS) regression methods, generalized least squares (GLS) regression methods using restricted maximum likelihood (REML) estimation must be used. This article describes the methodology for developing property-composition-temperature models and corresponding prediction uncertainty equations using the GLS/REML regression approach. Viscosity data collected on 197 simulated nuclear waste glasses are used to illustrate the GLS/REML methods for developing a viscosity-composition-temperature model and corresponding equations for model prediction uncertainties. The correct results using GLS/REML regression are compared to the incorrect results obtained using OLS regression

  4. Time-resolved diffraction of shock-released SiO2 and diaplectic glass formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gleason, A. E.; Bolme, C. A.; Lee, H. J.; Nagler, B.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding how rock-forming minerals transform under shock loading is critical for modeling collisions between planetary bodies, interpreting the significance of shock features in minerals and for using them as diagnostic indicators of impact conditions, such as shock pressure. To date, our understanding of the formation processes experienced by shocked materials is based exclusively on ex situ analyses of recovered samples. Formation mechanisms and origins of commonly observed mesoscale material features, such as diaplectic (i.e., shocked) glass, remain therefore controversial and unresolvable. Here in this paper we show in situ pump-probe X-ray diffraction measurements on fused silica crystallizing to stishovite on shock compression and then converting to an amorphous phase on shock release in only 2.4 ns from 33.6 GPa. Recovered glass fragments suggest permanent densification. These observations of real-time diaplectic glass formation attest that it is a back-transformation product of stishovite with implications for revising traditional shock metamorphism stages.

  5. Corrosion of K-3 glass-contact refractory in sodium-rich aluminosilicate melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, X.D.; Gan, H.; Buechele, A.C.; Pegg, I.L.

    1999-01-01

    The corrosion of the glass-contact refractory Monofrax K-3 in two sodium-rich aluminosilicate melts has been studied at 1,208 and 1,283 C using a modified ASTM procedure with constant agitation of the melt by air bubbling. The results for the monolithic refractory indicate a fast initial stage involving phase dissolution and transformation and a later passivated stage in which the surface of the refractory has been substantially modified. The composition of the stable spinel phase in the altered layer on monolithic coupons of K-3 is almost identical to the equilibrium composition bracketed by the dissolution of powdered K-3 into under-saturated melts on the other. The temperature and melt shear viscosity were found to have significant effects on the rates of K-3 dissolution and transformation

  6. Composition dependence of spontaneous crystallization of phosphosilicate glass melts during cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, S.J.; Zhu, C.F.; Zhang, Y.F.

    2012-01-01

    Crystallization behavior of alumino-phospho-silicate melts during cooling is studied by means of the differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffractometry and viscometry. The results show a pronounced impact of alkaline earth oxide, alkali oxide and fluoride on the crystal type and crystallizat......Crystallization behavior of alumino-phospho-silicate melts during cooling is studied by means of the differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffractometry and viscometry. The results show a pronounced impact of alkaline earth oxide, alkali oxide and fluoride on the crystal type...... and crystallization degree. It is found that adding NaF into the studied compositions slightly decreases melt fragility and improves both the glass-forming ability and melt workability. This effect is associated with the unique structural role of NaF compared to the other modifier oxides. It is also found...

  7. Shock Melting of Iron Silicide as Determined by In Situ X-ray Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, M.; Kraus, R. G.; Wicks, J. K.; Smith, R.; Duffy, T. S.

    2016-12-01

    The equation of state of core alloys at pressures and temperatures near the solid-liquid coexistence curve is important for understanding the dynamics at the inner core boundary of the Earth and super-Earths. Here, we present a series of laser driven shock experiments on textured polycrystalline Fe-15Si. These experiments were conducted at the Omega and Omega EP laser facilities. Particle velocities in the Fe-15Si samples were measured using a line VISAR and were used to infer the thermodynamic state of the shocked samples. In situ x-ray diffraction measurements were used to probe the melting transition and investigate the potential decomposition of Fe-15Si in to hcp and B2 structures. This work examines the kinetic effects of decomposition due to the short time scale of dynamic compression experiments. In addition, the thermodynamic data collected in these experiments adds to a limited body of information regarding the equation of state of Fe-15Si, which is a candidate for the composition in Earth's outer core. Our experimental results show a highly textured solid phase upon shock compression to pressures ranging from 170 to 300 GPa. Below 320 GPa, we observe diffraction peaks consistent with decomposition of the D03 starting material in to an hcp and a cubic (potentially B2) structure. Upon shock compression above 320 GPa, the intense and textured solid diffraction peaks give way to diffuse scattering and loss of texture, consistent with melting along the Hugoniot. When comparing these results to that of pure iron, we can ascertain that addition of 15 wt% silicon increases the equilibrium melting temperature significantly, or that the addition of silicon significantly increases the metastability of the solid phase, relative to the liquid. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. Water speciation in sodium silicate glasses (quenched melts): A comprehensive NMR study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, X.; Kanzaki, M.; Eguchi, J.

    2012-12-01

    Dissolution mechanism of water is an important factor governing how the dissolved water affects the physical and thermodynamic properties of silicate melts and glasses. Our previous studies have demonstrated that 1H MAS NMR in combination with 29Si-1H and 27Al-1H double-resonance NMR experiments is an effective approach for unambiguously differentiating and quantifying different water species in quenched silicate melts (glasses). Several contrasting dissolution mechanisms have been revealed depending on the melt composition: for relatively polymerized melts, the formation of SiOH/AlOH species (plus molecular H2O) and depolymerization of the network structure dominate; whereas for depolymerized Ca-Mg silicate melts, free OH (e.g. MgOH) become increasingly important (cf. [1]). The proportion of free OH species has been shown to decrease with both increasing melt polymerization (silica content) and decreasing field strength of the network modifying cations (from Mg to Ca). Our previous 1H and 29Si MAS NMR results for hydrous Na silicate glasses of limited compositions (Na2Si4O9 and Na2Si2O5) were consistent with negligible free OH (NaOH) species and depolymerizing effect of water dissolution [2]. On the other hand, there were also other studies that proposed the presence of significant NaOH species in hydrous glasses near the Na2Si2O5 composition. The purpose of this study is apply the approach of combined 1H MAS NMR and double-resonance (29Si-1H and 23Na-1H) NMR to gain unambiguous evidence for the OH speciation in Na silicate glasses (melts) as a function of composition. Hydrous Na silicate glasses containing mostly ≤ 1 wt% H2O for a range of Na/Si ratios from 0.33 to 1.33 have been synthesized by rapidly quenching melts either at 0.2 GPa using an internally heated gas pressure vessel or at 1 GPa using a piston cylinder high-pressure apparatus. NMR spectra have been acquired using a 9.4 T Varian Unity-Inova spectrometer. The 29Si and 1H chemical shifts are

  9. Volatilization from borosilicate glass melts of simulated Savannah River Plant waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilds, G.W.

    1979-01-01

    Laboratory scale studies determined the rates at which the semivolatile components sodium, boron, lithium, cesium, and ruthenium volatilized from borosilicate glass melts that contained simulated Savannah River Plant waste sludge. Sodium and boric oxides volatilize as the thermally stable compound sodium metaborate, and accounted for approx. 90% of the semivolatiles that evolved. The amounts of semivolatiles that evolved increased linearly with the logarithm of the sodium content of the glass-forming mixture. Cesium volatility was slightly suppressed when titanium dioxide was added to the melt, but was unaffected when cesium was added to the melt as a cesium-loaded zeolite rather than as a cesium carbonate solution. Volatility of ruthenium was not suppressed when the glass melt was blanketed with a nonoxidizing atmosphere. Trace quantities of mercury were removed from vapor streams by adsorption onto a silver-exchanged zeolite. A bed containing silver in the ionic state removed more than 99.9% of the mercury and had a high chemisorption capacity. Beds of lead-, copper-, and copper sulfide-exchanged zeolite-X and also an unexchanged zeolite-X were tested. None of these latter beds had high removal efficiency and high chemisorption capacity

  10. Volatilization from borosilicate glass melts of simulated Savannah River Plant waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilds, G.W.

    1978-01-01

    Laboratory scale studies determined the rates at which the semivolatile components sodium, boron, lithium, cesium, and ruthenium volatilized from borosilicate glass melts that contained simulated Savannah River Plant waste sludge. Sodium and boric oxides volatilize as the thermally stable compound sodium metaborate, and accounted for approx. 90% of the semivolatiles that evolved. The amounts of semivolatiles that evolved increased linearly with the logarithm of the sodium content of the glass-forming mixture. Cesium volatility was slightly suppressed when titanium dioxide was added to the melt, but was unaffected when cesium was added to the melt as a cesium-loaded zeolite rather than as a cesium carbonate solution. Volatility of ruthenium was not suppressed when the glass melt was blanketed with a nonoxidizing atmosphere. Trace quantities of mercury were removed from vapor streams by adsorption onto a silver-exchanged zeolite. A bed containing silver in the ionic state removed more than 99.9% of the mercury and had a high chemisorption capacity. Beds of lead-, copper-, and copper sulfide-exchanged zeolite-X and also an unexchanged zeolite-X were tested. None of these latter beds had high removal efficiency and high chemisorption capacity

  11. Conversion of wet glass to melt at lower seismogenic zone conditions: Implications for pseudotachylyte creep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Brooks; Lockner, David A.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Beeler, Nicholas M.

    2018-01-01

    Coseismic frictional melting and the production of quenched glass called pseudotachylyte is a recurring process during earthquakes. To investigate how glassy materials affect the postseismic strength and stability of faults, obsidian gouges were sheared under dry and wet conditions from 200°C to 300°C at ~150 MPa effective normal stress. Dry glass exhibited a brittle rheology at all conditions tested, exhibiting friction values and microstructures consistent with siliciclastic materials. Likewise, wet glass at 200°C exhibited a brittle rheology. In contrast, wet gouges at 300°C transitioned from brittle sliding to linear‐viscous (Newtonian) flow at strain rates water was the dominant process reducing the viscosity and promoting viscous flow. As much as 5 wt % water diffused into the glass. These results may provide insight into postseismic‐slip behaviors and challenge some interpretations of fault kinematics based on studies assuming that pseudotachylyte formation and flow is solely coseismic.

  12. Conversion of Wet Glass to Melt at Lower Seismogenic Zone Conditions: Implications for Pseudotachylyte Creep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, B. P.; Lockner, D. A.; Lowenstern, J. B.; Beeler, N. M.

    2017-10-01

    Coseismic frictional melting and the production of quenched glass called pseudotachylyte is a recurring process during earthquakes. To investigate how glassy materials affect the postseismic strength and stability of faults, obsidian gouges were sheared under dry and wet conditions from 200°C to 300°C at 150 MPa effective normal stress. Dry glass exhibited a brittle rheology at all conditions tested, exhibiting friction values and microstructures consistent with siliciclastic materials. Likewise, wet glass at 200°C exhibited a brittle rheology. In contrast, wet gouges at 300°C transitioned from brittle sliding to linear-viscous (Newtonian) flow at strain rates <3 × 10-4 s-1, indicating melt-like behavior. The viscosity ranged from 2 × 1011 to 7.8 × 1011 Pa-s. Microstructures show that viscous gouges were fully welded with rod-shaped microlites rotated into the flow direction. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy along with electron backscatter imaging demonstrate that hydration of the glass by diffusion of pore water was the dominant process reducing the viscosity and promoting viscous flow. As much as 5 wt % water diffused into the glass. These results may provide insight into postseismic-slip behaviors and challenge some interpretations of fault kinematics based on studies assuming that pseudotachylyte formation and flow is solely coseismic.

  13. Dynamic strength behavior of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass under shock loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Yu-Ying; Xi Feng; Dai Cheng-Da; Cai Ling-Cang; Tan Ye; Li Xue-Mei; Wu Qiang; Tan Hua

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic strength behavior of Zr 51 Ti 5 Ni 10 Cu 25 Al 9 bulk metallic glass (BMG) up to 66 GPa was investigated in a series of plate impact shock-release and shock-reload experiments. Particle velocity profiles measured at the sample/LiF window interface were used to estimate the shear stress, shear modulus, and yield stress in shocked BMG. Beyond confirming the previously reported strain-softening of shear stress during the shock loading process for BMGs, it is also shown that the softened Zr-BMG still has a high shear modulus and can support large yield stress when released or reloaded from the shocked state, and both the shear modulus and the yield stress appear as strain-hardening behaviors. The work provides a much clearer picture of the strength behavior of BMGs under shock loading, which is useful to comprehensively understand the plastic deformation mechanisms of BMGs. (paper)

  14. Characterization of ion distributions near the surface of sodium-containing and sodium-depleted calcium aluminosilicate glass melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrales, Louis R.; Du, Jincheng

    2006-01-01

    The distribution of cation and anion components of sodium containing calcium aluminosilicate glass was studied by classical molecular dynamics simulations in a high temperature melt in the bulk and at the vacuum-melt interface. A significant redistribution of the sodium and non-bridging oxygen ions was observed. Subsequently, a sodium depleted calcium aluminosilicate glass melt was simulated to determine the sensitivity of the redistribution of ions near the vacuum-melt interface to the presence of sodium ions. It is found that the thermodynamic equilibrium condition near a surface favors the enrichment of non-bridging oxygen ions that is closely associated with enrichment of the sodium ions

  15. Fragility of superheated melts and glass-forming ability in Pr-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Q.G.; Zhou, J.K.; Zheng, H.X.; Li, J.G.

    2006-01-01

    The kinetic viscosity (η) of superheated melts, thermal properties (T x , T m , T L ) and X-ray diffraction analysis on the Pr-based bulk metallic glasses (BMG) are reported and discussed. A new refined concept, the superheated fragility defined as M' = E S δ x /k B , has been developed based on common solidification theory and the Arrhenius equation. The interrelationship between this kind of fragility and the glass-forming ability (GFA) is elaborated on and evaluated in Pr-based BMG and Al-based amorphous ribbon alloys. Using viscosity data of superheated melts, it is shown, theoretically and experimentally, that the fragility parameter M' may be used as a GFA indicator for metallic alloys

  16. Influence of clusters in melt on the subsequent glass-formation and crystallization of Fe–Si–B metallic glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoxiong Zhou

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The liquid structure of seven representative Fe–Si–B alloys has been investigated by ab initio molecular dynamics simulation focusing on the role of clusters in terms of glass-forming ability (GFA and crystallization. It is demonstrated that the type of primary phase precipitated from amorphous state under heat treatment is determined by the relative fraction and role of various clusters in melt. The alloy melt shows higher stability and resultantly larger GFA when there is no dominant cluster or several clusters coexist, which explains the different GFAs and crystallization processes at various ratios of Si and B in the Fe–Si–B system. The close correlation among clusters, crystalline phase and GFA is also studied.

  17. Formation peculiarities of superconducting Bi-Sr-Ca -cuprates from glass ceramic quenched melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furmakova, O.E.; Zinov'ev, S.Yu.; Glushkova, V.B.; Bugakov, A.G.; Sulejmanov, S.Kh.

    1992-01-01

    Specimens of varying composition of the Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O system, X-ray amorphous Alakes and glass ceramic ingots were prepared by means of different rate quenching of melts. Crystallization temperatures of flakes were determined and sequence of phase formation in both types of specimens during annealing was studied. Microstructure and distribution of elements by volume of specimen in initial and annealed ingot were investigated

  18. Ultrafast growth of wadsleyite in shock-produced melts and its implications for early solar system impact processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tschauner, Oliver; Asimow, Paul; Kostandova, Natalia; Ahrens, Thomas; Ma, Chi; Sinogeikin, Stanislav; Liu, Zhenxian; Fakra, Sirine; Tamura, Nobumichi

    2009-12-01

    We observed micrometer-sized grains of wadsleyite, a high-pressure phase of (Mg,Fe)2SiO4, in the recovery products of a shock experiment. We infer these grains crystallized from shock-generated melt over a time interval of <1 fs, the maximum time over which our experiment reached and sustained pressure sufficient to stabilize this phase. This rapid crystal growth rate (=1 m/s) suggests that, contrary to the conclusions of previous studies of the occurrence of high-pressure phases in shock-melt veins in strongly shocked meteorites, the growth of high-pressure phases from the melt during shock events is not diffusion-controlled. Another process, such as microturbulent transport, must be active in the crystal growth process. This result implies that the times necessary to crystallize the high-pressure phases in shocked meteorites may correspond to shock pressure durations achieved on impacts between objects 1-5 m in diameter and not, as previously inferred, =1-5 km in diameter. These results may also provide another pathway for syntheses, via shock recovery, of some high-value, high-pressure phases.

  19. A Comparative Study of the Behaviour of Five Dense Glass Materials Under Shock Loading Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radford, Darren D.; Proud, William G.; Field, John E.

    2001-06-01

    Previous work at the Cavendish Laboratory on the properties of glasses under shock loading has demonstrated that the material response is highly dependent upon the composition of the glass. The shock response of glass materials with an open structure, such as borosilicate, exhibits a ramping behaviour in the longitudinal stress histories due to structural collapse. Glass materials with a “filled” microstructure, as in the case of Type-D, Extra Dense Flint (DEDF) do not exhibit a ramping behaviour and behave in a manner similar to polycrystalline ceramics [1]. The current investigation compares the behaviour of five such glasses (SF15, DEDF, LACA, SF57 and DEDF-927210) under shock loading conditions. It is observed that slight changes in material composition can have a large affect on the inelastic behaviour. Principal Hugoniot and shear strength data are presented for all of the materials for pressures ranging from 2 to 14 GPa. Evidence of the so-called failure-front [2] is presented via lateral stress histories measured using manganin stress gauges and confirmed with high-speed photography. 1. Bourne, N.K., Millett, J.C.F., and Field, J.E., “On the strength of shocked glasses” Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 455 (1999) 1275-1282 2. Brar, N.S., “Failure Waves in Glass and Ceramics Under Shock Compression”, in "Shock Compression of Condensed Matter 1999", ed. M.D. Furnish, L.C. Chhabildas, and R.S. Hixson, American Institute of Physics, Woodbury, New York, (1999) 601-606

  20. Structure and properties of alumino-boro-silicate glasses and melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    neuville, D. R.; Florian, P.; Cadars, S.; Massiot, D.

    2012-12-01

    The relationship between physical properties and structure of glasses and melts in the system MO-T2O3-SiO2 (with M= Na2, Ca and T= Al, B) are technologically and geologically important, in particular to understand the microscopic origin of the configurational thermodynamic properties. The connection of these network former is fundamental to understand the physical properties of magmatic liquids. The configurational properties of melts and glasses provide fundamental information needed to characterize magmatic processes. A principal difficulty, however is to link the "macroscopic" configurational entropy with the structure of melts. This has been done by combining viscometry with Raman and NMR spectroscopy studies. From the viscosity measurements at low and high temperatures, we have obtained the configurational entropy, Sconf (log η = Ae + Be/TSconf, were η is the viscosity, T the temperature and Ae, Be two constants). Silicon, aluminum, and boron are 3 network formers playing different role on the silicate network, whereas Si is the strongest network former in coordination 4, 5 or 6 as a function of T, P; Al can play different function as a network former in 4- or 5-fold coordination and probably as a network modifier in 6 fold coordination. Boron observed in 3 or 4 fold coordination is always a network former but for very "fragile" glasses. For the glass the Al/B substitution produce a small decrease of the molar volume while this substitution produced a strong decrease of viscosity and glass transition temperature while the fragility of the network is less affected by this chemical change. Raman spectra show significant change in the D1 and D2 bands. NMR spectroscopies show also significant change as a function of chemical change and temperature. All this observations will be discussed and interpreted in order to link microscopic versus macroscopic changes.

  1. Kinetic model for quartz and spinel dissolution during melting of high-level-waste glass batch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokorny, Richard; Rice, Jarrett A.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Hrma, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    The dissolution of quartz particles and the growth and dissolution of crystalline phases during the conversion of batch to glass potentially affects both the glass melting process and product quality. Crystals of spinel exiting the cold cap to molten glass below can be troublesome during the vitrification of iron-containing high-level wastes. To estimate the distribution of quartz and spinel fractions within the cold cap, we used kinetic models that relate fractions of these phases to temperature and heating rate. Fitting the model equations to data showed that the heating rate, apart from affecting quartz and spinel behavior directly, also affects them indirectly via concurrent processes, such as the formation and motion of bubbles. Because of these indirect effects, it was necessary to allow one kinetic parameter (the pre-exponential factor) to vary with the heating rate. The resulting kinetic equations are sufficiently simple for the detailed modeling of batch-to-glass conversion as it occurs in glass melters. The estimated fractions and sizes of quartz and spinel particles as they leave the cold cap, determined in this study, will provide the source terms needed for modeling the behavior of these solid particles within the flow of molten glass in the melter

  2. Shock compression behavior of bi-material powder composites with disparate melting temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, Kyle T.; Swift, Damian; Barham, Matthew; Stölken, James; Kuntz, Joshua; Kumar, Mukul

    2014-01-01

    Laser driven experiments were used to investigate the shock compression behavior of powder processed Bismuth/Tungsten (Bi/W) composite samples. The constituents provide different functionality to the composite behavior as Bi could be shock melted at the pressures attained in this work, while the W could not. Samples were prepared by uniaxial pressing, and the relative density was measured as a function of particle size, applied pressure, and composition for both hot and cold pressing conditions. This resulted in sample densities between 73% and 99% of the theoretical maximum density, and also noticeable differences in microstructure in the hot and cold pressed samples. The compression waves were generated with a 1.3 × 1.3 mm square spot directly onto the surface of the sample, using irradiances between 10 12 and 10 13  W/cm 2 , which resulted in calculated peak pressures between 50 and 150 GPa within a few micrometers. Sample recovery and post-mortem analysis revealed the formation of a crater on the laser drive surface, and the depth of this crater corresponded to the depth to which the Bi had been melted. The melt depth was found to be primarily a function of residual porosity and composition, and ranged from 167 to 528 μm. In general, a higher porosity led to a larger melt depth. Direct numerical simulations were performed, and indicated that the observed increase in melt depth for low-porosity samples could be largely attributed to increased heating associated with work done for pore collapse. However, the relative scaling was sensitive to composition, with low volume fraction Bi samples exhibiting a much stronger dependence on porosity than high Bi content samples. Select samples were repeated using an Al foil ablator, but there were no noticeable differences ensuring that the observed melting was indeed pressure-driven and was not a result of direct laser heating. The resultant microstructures and damage near the spall surface were also investigated

  3. The glass transition, crystallization and melting in Au-Pb-Sb alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M. C.; Allen, J. L.; Fecht, H. J.; Perepezko, J. H.; Ohsaka, K.

    1988-01-01

    The glass transition, crystallization and melting of Au(55)Pb(22.5)Sb(22.5) alloys have been studied by differential scanning calorimetry DSC. Crystallization on heating above the glass transition temperature Tg (45 C) begins at 64 C. Further crystallization events are observed at 172 C and 205 C. These events were found to correspond to the formation of the intermetallic compounds AuSb2, Au2Pb, and possibly AuPb2, respectively. Isothermal DSC scans of the glassy alloy above Tg were used to monitor the kinetics of crystallization. The solidification behavior and heat capacity in the glass-forming composition range were determined with droplet samples. An undercooling level of 0.3T(L) below the liquidus temperature T(L) was achieved, resulting in crystallization of different stable and metastable phases. The heat capacity C(P) of the undercooled liquid was measured over an undercooling range of 145 C.

  4. Flux Decoupling and Chemical Diffusion in Redox Dynamics in Aluminosilicate Melts and Glasses (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, R. F.

    2010-12-01

    Measurements of redox dynamics in silicate melts and glasses suggest that, for many compositions and for many external environments, the reaction proceeds and is rate-limited by the diffusive flux of divalent-cation network modifiers. Application of ion-backscattering spectrometry either (i) on oxidized or reduced melts (subsequently quenched before analysis) or (ii) on similarly reacted glasses, both of basalt-composition polymerization, demonstrates that the network modifiers move relative to the (first-order-rigid) aluminosilicate network. Thus, the textures associated with such reactions are often surprising, and frequently include metastable or unstable phases and/or spatial compositional differences. This response is only possible if the motion of cations can be decoupled from that of anions. In many cases, decoupling is accomplished by the presence in the melt/glass of transition-metal cations, whose heterovalency creates distortions in the electronic band structure resulting in electronic defects: electron “holes” in the valence band or electrons in the conduction band. (The prevalence of holes or electrons being a function of bulk chemistry and oxygen activity.) These electronic species make the melt/glass a “defect semiconductor.” Because (a) the critical issue in reaction dynamics is the transport coefficient (the product of species mobility and species concentration) and (b) the electronic species are many orders of magnitude more mobile than are the ions, very low concentrations of transition-metal ions are required for flux decoupling. For example, 0.04 at% Fe keeps a magnesium aluminosilicate melt/glass a defect semiconductor down to 800°C [Cook & Cooper, 2000]. Depending on composition, high-temperature melts can see ion species having a high-enough transport coefficient to allow decoupling, e.g., alkali cations in a basaltic melt [e.g., Pommier et al., 2010]. In this presentation, these ideas will be illustrated by examining redox dynamics

  5. Effect of magnesium aluminum silicate glass on the thermal shock resistance of BN matrix composite ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cai, Delong; Jia, Dechang; Yang, Zhihua; Zhu, Qishuai; Ocelik, Vaclav; Vainchtein, Ilia D.; De Hosson, Jeff Th M.; Zhou, Yu

    The effects of magnesium aluminum silicate (MAS) glass on the thermal shock resistance and the oxidation behavior of h-BN matrix composites were systematically investigated at temperature differences from 600 degrees C up to 1400 degrees C. The retained strength rate of the composites rose with the

  6. Mathematical modelling of bubble removal from a glass melting channel with defined melt flow and the relation between the optimal flow conditions of bubble removal and sand dissolution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cincibusová, Petra; Němec, L.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 2 (2015), s. 52-62 ISSN 1753-3546 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01010844 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : glass melt * mathematical modelling * controlled flow * space utilization * temperature gradients Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.362, year: 2015 http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/sgt/gta/2015/00000056/00000002/art00003

  7. Equations of state and melting curve of boron carbide in the high-pressure range of shock compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molodets, A. M., E-mail: molodets@icp.ac.ru; Golyshev, A. A.; Shakhrai, D. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Problems in Chemical Physics (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    We have constructed the equations of state for crystalline boron carbide B{sub 11}C (C–B–C) and its melt under high dynamic and static pressures. A kink on the shock adiabat for boron carbide has been revealed in the pressure range near 100 GPa, and the melting curve with negative curvature in the pressure range 0–120 GPa has been calculated. The results have been used for interpreting the kinks on the shock adiabat for boron carbide in the pressure range of 0–400 GPa.

  8. Redox phenomena in glass melts; Les phenomenes d'oxydoreduction dans les verres d'oxyde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinet, O.; Di Nardo, Ch. [CEA Valrho, (DCC/DRRV/SCD), 30 - Marcoule (France)

    2000-07-01

    One of the major concerns in the glass-making industry is the control of redox mechanisms, which condition the glass properties and particularly refinement and color. The development of vitrification processes and vitreous materials for nuclear waste containment further emphasized the advantages of optimizing the glass oxidation state. The oxidation state of polyvalent species in a glass melt essentially depends on the basicity of the glass and the oxygen fugacity in the melt at a given temperature. Theoretical studies show that redox couples in glass melts can be classified according to their characteristic oxygen fugacities. This corresponds to the oxygen fugacity for which the concentrations of reduced and oxidized forms of the couple are equal. The quantity f{sub O{sub 2}}{sub char}. depends primarily on the redox couple considered, the basicity and the temperature of the glass melt. A classification of 36 redox couples is proposed here, covering a temperature range from 1085 deg C to 1500 deg C for silicate glass compositions for which the basicity can be characterized by theoretical optical basicity values [2) between 0.55 and 0.65. This classification is based on a variety of published experimental results obtained by different techniques. Figure 1 shows the satisfactory agreement obtained from these various studies. Figure 2 shows that the increase in f{sub O{sub 2}}{sub char}. with temperature in glasses with the same level of basicity ({lambda}= 0.57 {+-} 0.02) is consistent with the theory. From the characteristic oxygen fugacity values, potentiometric measurements of the oxygen fugacity in glass with an oxygen sensor allow in situ evaluation of the redox ratio. Voltammetric investigations of glasses can be used to supplement and refine the classification. The resulting Epeak values, expressed in terms of characteristic oxygen fugacity, are fully consistent with the values for other glasses of comparable basicity measured at comparable temperature

  9. Higher Fe{sup 2+}/total Fe ratio in iron doped phosphate glass melted by microwave heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, Ashis K., E-mail: ashis@cgcri.res.in [CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, 196 Raja S.C. Mullick Road, Kolkata 700032 (India); Sinha, Prasanta K. [CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, 196 Raja S.C. Mullick Road, Kolkata 700032 (India); Das, Dipankar [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Kolkata 700098 (India); Guha, Chandan [Department of Chemical Engineering, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India); Sen, Ranjan [CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, 196 Raja S.C. Mullick Road, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Iron doped phosphate glasses prepared using microwave heating and conventional heating under air and reducing atmosphere. • Presence of iron predominantly in the ferrous oxidation state in all the glasses. • Significant concentrations of iron in the ferrous oxidation state on both octahedral and tetrahedral sites in all the glasses. • Ratio of Fe{sup 2+} with total iron is found higher in microwave prepared glasses in comparison to conventional prepared glasses. - Abstract: Iron doped phosphate glasses containing P{sub 2}O{sub 5}–MgO–ZnO–B{sub 2}O{sub 3}–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were melted using conventional resistance heating and microwave heating in air and under reducing atmosphere. All the glasses were characterised by UV–Vis–NIR spectroscopy, Mössbauer spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and wet colorimetry analysis. Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed presence of iron predominantly in the ferrous oxidation state on two different sites in all the glasses. The intensity of the ferrous absorption peaks in UV–Vis–NIR spectrum was found to be more in glasses prepared using microwave radiation compared to the glasses prepared in a resistance heating furnace. Thermogravimetric analysis showed increasing weight gain on heating under oxygen atmosphere for glass corroborating higher ratio of FeO/(FeO + Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) in glass melted by direct microwave heating. Wet chemical analysis also substantiated the finding of higher ratio Fe{sup +2}/ΣFe in microwave melted glasses. It was found that iron redox ratio was highest in the glasses prepared in a microwave furnace under reducing atmosphere.

  10. Complementary methods to study glasses and melts at large scale facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leydier, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, large scale facilities (neutron and synchrotron sources) were used for studying the structure and dynamic of disordered materials (liquids and glasses). In particular, three studies are presented. The first is a structural study of Ln 2 O 3 -Al 2 O 3 -SiO 2 glasses where Ln represents the cations Sc, Y and La. We combined the results obtained from x-ray and neutron diffraction and x-ray absorption experiments. This work is focused on the determination of the interatomic distances and coordination numbers for the three pairs Si-O, Al-O and Ln-O. The second is a study of the iron oxide FeO in the liquid state. Photoemission experiments at the iron absorption edge were associated with x-ray and neutron diffraction measurements. The results obtained made it possible to define a consistent structural model for liquid FeO. The third is a study of the dynamics in CaAl 2 O 4 melts. From inelastic x-ray scattering experiments, it was possible to determine the apparent and isothermal sound velocities as well as the longitudinal viscosity. These measurements were complemented by quasielastic neutron scattering experiments from which atomic diffusion coefficients were determined. This work shows the interest of combining various experimental techniques for studying glasses and melts and points out the need to associate also modelling techniques such as molecular dynamics simulations. (author)

  11. Crystal growth nucleation and Fermi energy equalization of intrinsic spherical nuclei in glass-forming melts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert F Tournier

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The energy saving resulting from the equalization of Fermi energies of a crystal and its melt is added to the Gibbs free-energy change ΔG2ls associated with a crystal formation in glass-forming melts. This negative contribution being a fraction ε ls(T of the fusion heat is created by the electrostatic potential energy −U0 resulting from the electron transfer from the crystal to the melt and is maximum at the melting temperature Tm in agreement with a thermodynamics constraint. The homogeneous nucleation critical temperature T2, the nucleation critical barrier ΔG2ls*/kBT and the critical radius R*2ls are determined as functions of εls(T. In bulk metallic glass forming melts, εls(T and T2 only depend on the free-volume disappearance temperature T0l, and εls(Tm is larger than 1 (T0l>Tm/3; in conventional undercooled melts εls(Tm is smaller than 1 (T0l>Tm/3. Unmelted intrinsic crystals act as growth nuclei reducing ΔG2ls*/kBT and the nucleation time. The temperature-time transformation diagrams of Mg65Y10 Cu25, Zr41.2Ti13.8 Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5, Pd43Cu27 Ni10P20, Fe83B17 and Ni melts are predicted using classic nucleation models including time lags in transient nucleation, by varying the intrinsic nucleus contribution to the reduction of ΔG2ls*/kBT. The energy-saving coefficient ε nm(T of an unmelted crystal of radius Rnm is reduced when Rnm LtR*2ls; εnm is quantified and corresponds to the first energy level of one s-electron moving in vacuum in the same spherical attractive potential −U0 despite the fact that the charge screening is built by many-body effects.

  12. IRON REDOX EQUILIBRIUM AND DIFFUSIVITY IN MIXED ALKALI-ALKALINE EARTH-SILICA GLASS MELTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KI-DONG KIM

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Dependence of redox behavior and diffusivity of iron on temperature and composition was studied in mixed alkali-alkaline earth-silica glass melts by means of square wave voltammetry (SWV. The voltammograms showed that irrespective of K2O/(Na2O+K2O the peak potential due to Fe3+/Fe2+ moved toward negative direction with temperature decrease and the peak current showed a strong dependence on frequency at constant temperature. Iron diffusion coefficient versus melt viscosity showed a good linearity. The compositional dependence showed that the peak potential shifted to the positive direction with increase of K2O but a typical mixed alkali effect occurred in iron diffusion either at constant temperature or at constant viscosity.

  13. Structure of B2O3 and alkali borates in glass-like and melted states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golubkov, V.V.

    1992-01-01

    Structure of boron oxide and alkali-borate oxide and alkali-borate glasses and melts at temperatures up to 100 deg C was investigated using method of x-ray scattering at small angles (RSA). Specified and detailed concentration dependences were given for the main parameters of the structure: sizes of non-uniformity regions, values of surface interface, data of average square of difference of electron densities. Uppearance of ordered structures at sharp drop of temperature of B 2 O 3 sample was shown. Interference effects connected with this phenomenon significantly influence on value of RSA intensity in the field of small angles and correspondingly on light diffusion intensity. Conclusion on existence of structural differences between liquids and supercooled liquids was confirmed. Narrow temperature range of transition from one state to another esisted. Submicrononuniform structure of alkaliborate glasses wasn't connected with critical phenomenon. In the fields of non-uniformity 25-50% of alkali ions were concentrated

  14. Determination of iron redox ratio in borosilicate glasses and melts from Raman spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochain, B. [SCDV-Laboratoire d' Etudes de Base sur les Verres, CEA Valrho, Centre de Marcoule, 30207 Bagnols-sur-ceze (France); Physique des Mineraux et des Magmas, CNRS-IPGP, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex05 (France); Neuville, D.R.; Richet, P. [Physique des Mineraux et des Magmas, CNRS-IPGP, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex05 (France); Henderson, G.S. [Dept of Geology, University of Toronto, 22 Russell Street, Toronto (Canada); Pinet, O. [SCDV-Laboratoire d' Etudes de Base sur les Verres, CEA Valrho, Centre de Marcoule, 30207 Bagnols-sur-ceze (France)

    2008-07-01

    A method is presented to determine the redox ratio of iron in borosilicate glasses and melts relevant to nuclear waste storage from an analysis of Raman spectra recorded at room or high temperature. The basis of this method is the strong variation of the spectral feature observed between 800 and 1200 cm{sup -1}, in which it is possible to assign a band to vibrational modes involving ferric iron in tetrahedral coordination whose intensity increases with iron content and iron oxidation. After baseline correction and normalization, fits to the Raman spectra made with Gaussian bands enable us to determine the proportion of ferric iron provided the redox ratio is known independently for at least two redox states for a given glass composition. This method is particularly useful for in situ determinations of the kinetics and mechanisms of redox reactions. (authors)

  15. Determination of iron redox ratio in borosilicate glasses and melts from Raman spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochain, B.; Neuville, D.R.; Richet, P.; Henderson, G.S.; Pinet, O.

    2008-01-01

    A method is presented to determine the redox ratio of iron in borosilicate glasses and melts relevant to nuclear waste storage from an analysis of Raman spectra recorded at room or high temperature. The basis of this method is the strong variation of the spectral feature observed between 800 and 1200 cm -1 , in which it is possible to assign a band to vibrational modes involving ferric iron in tetrahedral coordination whose intensity increases with iron content and iron oxidation. After baseline correction and normalization, fits to the Raman spectra made with Gaussian bands enable us to determine the proportion of ferric iron provided the redox ratio is known independently for at least two redox states for a given glass composition. This method is particularly useful for in situ determinations of the kinetics and mechanisms of redox reactions. (authors)

  16. Fast and slow crystal growth kinetics in glass-forming melts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orava, J.; Greer, A. L., E-mail: alg13@cam.ac.uk [WPI-Advanced Institute for Materials Research (WPI-AIMR), Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577, Japan and Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, 27 Charles Babbage Road, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-07

    Published values of crystal growth rates are compared for supercooled glass-forming liquids undergoing congruent freezing at a planar crystal-liquid interface. For the purposes of comparison pure metals are considered to be glass-forming systems, using data from molecular-dynamics simulations. For each system, the growth rate has a maximum value U{sub max} at a temperature T{sub max} that lies between the glass-transition temperature T{sub g} and the melting temperature T{sub m}. A classification is suggested, based on the lability (specifically, the propensity for fast crystallization), of the liquid. High-lability systems show “fast” growth characterized by a high U{sub max}, a low T{sub max} / T{sub m}, and a very broad peak in U vs. T / T{sub m}. In contrast, systems showing “slow” growth have a low U{sub max}, a high T{sub max} / T{sub m}, and a sharp peak in U vs. T / T{sub m}. Despite the difference of more than 11 orders of magnitude in U{sub max} seen in pure metals and in silica, the range of glass-forming systems surveyed fit into a common pattern in which the lability increases with lower reduced glass-transition temperature (T{sub g} / T{sub m}) and higher fragility of the liquid. A single parameter, a linear combination of T{sub g} / T{sub m} and fragility, can show a good correlation with U{sub max}. For all the systems, growth at U{sub max} is coupled to the atomic/molecular mobility in the liquid. It is found that, across the diversity of glass-forming systems, T{sub max} / T{sub g} = 1.48 ± 0.15.

  17. Heat and mass transfer during the inductive skull melting process of glasses and oxides; Waerme- und Stofftransport beim induktiven Skull-Schmelzen von Glaesern und Oxiden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nacke, Bernard; Niemann, Benjamin [Leibniz Univ. Hannover (Germany). Inst. fuer Elektroprozesstechnik; Schlesselmann, Dirk [Auer Lighting GmbH, Bad Gandersheim (Germany)

    2013-03-15

    The skull melting technology is a melting process for innovative materials in the range of glasses. A hitherto unknown problem under glass melting by means of this technology is the fact that the processes in the interior of the molten mass are still unknown. Under this aspect, the authors of the contribution under consideration present an overview of the inductive melting process for glasses in an inductor crucible developed at the Institute for Electrotechnology (Hanover, Federal Republic of Germany). A newly developed numerical model is presented in order to simulate the heat and mass transfer in a molten glass. This simulation enables a future optimization of the design of the inductor crucible and the melting process. The transient three-dimensional melting flow during the melting of glasses and oxides by means of the skull meeting process also can be simulated by the newly developed numerical model.

  18. Ultrafast studies of shock-induced melting and phase transitions at LCLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Malcolm

    The study of shock-induced phase transitions, which is vital to the understanding of material response to rapid pressure changes, dates back to the 1950s, when Bankcroft et al reported a transition in iron. Since then, many transitions have been reported in a wide range of materials, but, due to the lack of sufficiently bright x-ray sources, the structural details of these new phases has been notably lacking. While the development of nanosecond in situ x-ray diffraction has meant that lattice-level studies of such phenomena have become possible, including studies of the phase transition reported 60 years ago in iron, the quality of the diffraction data from such studies is noticeably poorer than that obtained from statically-compressed samples on synchrotrons. The advent of x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs), such as the LCLS, has resulted in an unprecedented improvement in the quality of diffraction data that can be obtained from shock-compressed matter. Here I describe the results from three recent experiment at the LCLS that looked at the solid-solid and solid-liquid phase transitions in Sb, Bi and Sc using single 50 fs x-ray exposures. The results provide new insight into the structural changes and melting induced by shock compression. This work is supported by EPSRC under Grant No. EP/J017051/1. Use of the LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Contract No. DE-AC02-76SF00515.

  19. Molecular dynamics study of shock compression in porous silica glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Keith; Lane, J. Matthew D.; Vogler, Tracy J.

    2017-06-01

    The shock response of porous amorphous silica is investigated using classical molecular dynamics, over a range of porosity ranging from fully dense (2.21 g/cc) down to 0.14 g/cc. We observe an enhanced densification in the Hugoniot response at initial porosities above 50 %, and the effect increases with increasing porosity. In the lowest initial densities, after an initial compression response, the systems expand with increased pressure. These results show good agreement with experiments. Mechanisms leading to enhanced densification will be explored, which appear to differ from mechanisms observed in similar studies in silicon. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi mission laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. Investigations on oxy-fuel combustion in glass melting furnaces; Untersuchungen zur Oxy-Fuel-Feuerung in Glasschmelzwannen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leicher, Joerg; Giese, Anne [Gaswaerme-Institut e.V., Essen (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    Glass melting requires process temperatures of more than 1600 C which are usually achieved using intensive air preheating and near-stoichiometric combustion. This often leads to high nitrous oxide emissions (NO{sub x}). Oxy-fuel technology offers an interesting alternative since high combustion temperatures can be achieved using pure oxygen as oxidizer while obtaining low NO{sub x} emissions. In the course of the AiF research project ''O2-Glaswanne'' (IGF-Nr.: 15987 N), Gaswaerme- Institut e.V. Essen investigates this combustion process by experimental and numerical means in order to determine potential optimization approaches for glass melting furnaces.

  1. Impulsive shock induced single drop steam explosion visualized by high-speed x-ray radiography and photography - metallic melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, H. S.; Hansson, R. C.; Sehgal, B. R.

    2003-01-01

    Experimental investigation of fine fragmentation process during vapor explosion was conducted in a small-scale single drop system employing continuous high-speed X-ray radiography and photography. A molten tin drop of about 0.7 g at approximately 1000 .deg. C was dropped into a water pool, at temperatures ranging from 20 to 90 .deg. C, and the explosion was triggered by an external shock pulse of about 1 MPa. X-ray radiographs show that finely fragmented melt particles accelerates to the vapor bubble boundary and forms a particle shell during the period of vapor bubble expansion due to vapor explosions. From the photographs, it was possible to observe a number of counter-jets on the vapor boundary. For tests with highly subcooled coolant, local explosion due to external impulsive shock trigger initiates the stratified mode of explosion along the entire melt surface. For tests with lower subcooled coolant local explosions were initiated by an external impulsive shock trigger and by collapse of vapor/gas pocket attached on the top of the melt drop. Transient spatial distribution map of melt fragments during vapor explosion was obtained by a series of image processing and calibration tests

  2. Novel dielectric properties of glasses prepared by quenching melts of Bi-Ca-Sr-Cu-O cuprates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varma, K.B.R.; Subbanna, G.N.; Ramakrishnan, T.V. (Materials Research Centre, Indian Inst. of Science, Bangalore (India) Dept. of Physics, Indian Inst. of Science, Bangalore (India)); Rao, C.N.R. (Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Inst. of Science, Bangalore (India))

    1989-12-01

    Glasses, prepared from the melts of Bi{sub 2}(Ca,Sr){sub n+1}Cu{sub n}O{sub 2n+4} (n=1, 2 and 3) have been characterized by various techniques. These glasses exhibit relatively high dielectric constants, high electrical conductivity, a ferroelectric-like dielectric hysteresis loop and pyroelectric effect at 300K. They also show weak microwave absorption at 77K. (orig.).

  3. REDOX BEHAVIOR AND DIFFUSIVITY OF ANTIMONY AND CERIUM ION IN ALKALI ALKALINE EARTH SILICATE GLASS MELTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. D. Kim

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Redox behavior and diffusivity of antimony and cerium ion in alkali alkaline earth silicate CRT (Cathode Ray Tube model glass melts were studied by means of square wave voltammetry under the frequency range of 5-1000 Hz and in the temperature range of 800-1400°C. According to voltammogram, peaks due to Sb³⁺/Sb⁰ were positioned in the negative potential region while peaks due to Sb⁵⁺/Sb³⁺ and Ce⁴⁺/Ce³⁺ were found in the positive potential region. By using some equations, correlation for peak potential versus temperature and peak current versus reciprocal frequency was examined, respectively. Their correlation showed a linear relation in the applied temperature and frequency range. Based on the linear relationship, thermodynamic and kinetic properties for each redox reaction were suggested.

  4. Improvement of energy efficiency in glass-melting furnaces, cement kilns and baking ovens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, M.D.G. [Technical University of Lisbon (Portugal). Instituto Superior Tecnico; Nogueira, M. [IrRADIARE, R and D in Engineering andrsholm Environment, Oeiras (Portugal)

    1997-08-01

    This paper is aimed at presenting the utilisation of dedicated modelling tools for the optimisation of a variety of thermal equipment for high-, medium-, and low-temperature heat transfer process. A combination of modelling with advanced extensive on-line measurements is proposed as an approach for the development of optimisation procedures able to be used in equipment design and operation. The industrially oriented utilisation of modelling is discussed considering the state-of-the-art and the application of existing codes capable of computing the three-dimensional characteristics of the aerodynamics, mixing, combustion (single- or multi-phase), pollutants formation and heat transfer of industrial combustion equipment. The present paper describes modelling tools for the optimisation of a glass-melting furnace, a ceramic kiln, a cement kiln and a baking oven. Significant reduction of energy consumption and low-cost abatement were achieved for these four industrial situations. (author)

  5. Effect of component substitution on the atomic dynamics in glass-forming binary metallic melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, B.; Holland-Moritz, D.; Yang, F.; Voigtmann, Th.; Evenson, Z.; Hansen, T. C.; Meyer, A.

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the substitution of early transition metals (Zr, Hf, and Nb) in Ni-based binary glass-forming metallic melts and the impact on structural and dynamical properties by using a combination of neutron scattering, electrostatic levitation (ESL), and isotopic substitution. The self-diffusion coefficients measured by quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) identify a sluggish diffusion as well as an increased activation energy by almost a factor of 2 for Hf35Ni65 compared to Zr36Ni64 . This finding can be explained by the locally higher packing density of Hf atoms in Hf35Ni65 compared to Zr atoms in Zr36Ni64 , which has been derived from interatomic distances by analyzing the measured partial structure factors. Furthermore, QENS measurements of liquid Hf35Ni65 prepared with 60Ni , which has a vanishing incoherent scattering cross section, have demonstrated that self-diffusion of Hf is slowed down compared to the concentration weighted self-diffusion of Hf and Ni. This implies a dynamical decoupling between larger Hf and smaller Ni atoms, which can be related to a saturation effect of unequal atomic nearest-neighbor pairs, that was observed recently for Ni-rich compositions in Zr-Ni metallic melts. In order to establish a structure-dynamics relation, measured partial structure factors have been used as an input for mode-coupling theory (MCT) of the glass transition to calculate self-diffusion coefficients for the different atomic components. Remarkably, MCT can reproduce the increased activation energy for Hf35Ni65 as well as the dynamical decoupling between Hf and Ni atoms.

  6. Two-temperature hydrodynamic expansion and coupling of strong elastic shock with supersonic melting front produced by ultrashort laser pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inogamov, Nail A; Khokhlov, Viktor A; Zhakhovsky, Vasily V; Khishchenko, Konstantin V; Demaske, Brian J; Oleynik, Ivan I

    2014-01-01

    Ultrafast processes, including nonmonotonic expansion of material into vacuum, supersonic melting and generation of super-elastic shock wave, in a surface layer of metal irradiated by an ultrashort laser pulse are discussed. In addition to the well-established two-temperature (2T) evolution of heated layer a new effect of electron pressure gradient on early stage of material expansion is studied. It is shown that the expanding material experiences an unexpected jump in flow velocity in a place where stress exceeds the effective tensile strength provided by used EoS of material. Another 2T effect is that supersonic propagation of homogeneous melting front results in distortion of spatial profile of ion temperature, which later imprints on ion pressure profile transforming in a super-elastic shock wave with time.

  7. OXYGEN BUBBLE DEVELOPMENT ON A PLATINUM ELECTRODE IN BOROSILICATE GLASS MELT BY THE EFFECT OF ALTERNATING CURRENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiri Matej

    2014-10-01

    or on alternating reduction and re-forming of oxidic layer on the electrode in the transition range, has been suggested. Start of bubble evolution at low alternating current density has also been observed in simple sodium-calcium-silicate glass melt. A relation between bubble release and platinum corrosion caused by reduced silicon has been suggested

  8. Effect of Feed Melting, Temperature History, and Minor Component Addition on Spinel Crystallization in High-Level Waste Glass

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Izák, Pavel; Hrma, P.; Arey, B. W.; Plaisted, T. J.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 289, 1-3 (2001), s. 17-29 ISSN 0022-3093 Grant - others:DOE(US) DE/06/76RL01830 Keywords : feed melting * crystalization * high-level waste glass Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.363, year: 2001

  9. Chemically durable iron phosphate glasses for vitrifying sodium bearing waste (SBW) using conventional and cold crucible induction melting (CCIM) techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, C.W. E-mail: cheol@umr.edu; Ray, C.S.; Zhu, D.; Day, D.E.; Gombert, D.; Aloy, A.; Mogus-Milankovic, A.; Karabulut, M

    2003-11-01

    A simulated sodium bearing waste (SBW) was successfully vitrified in iron phosphate glasses (IPG) at a maximum waste loading of 40 wt% using conventional and cold crucible induction melting (CCIM) techniques. No sulfate segregation or crystalline phases were detectable in the IPG when examined by SEM and XRD. The IPG wasteforms containing 40 wt% SBW satisfy current DOE requirements for aqueous chemical durability as evaluated from their bulk dissolution rate (D{sub R}), product consistency test, and vapor hydration test. The fluid IPG wasteforms can be melted at a relatively low temperature (1000 deg. C) and for short times (<6 h). These properties combined with a significantly higher waste loading, and the feasibility of CCIM melting offer considerable savings in time, energy, and cost for vitrifying the SBW stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory in iron phosphate glasses.

  10. MgO melting curve constraints from shock temperature and rarefaction overtake measurements in samples preheated to 2300 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fat'yanov, O. V.; Asimow, P. D.

    2014-05-01

    Continuing our effort to obtain experimental constraints on the melting curve of MgO at 100-200 GPa, we extended our target preheating capability to 2300 K. Our new Mo capsule design holds a long MgO crystal in a controlled thermal gradient until impact by a Ta flyer launched at up to 7.5 km/s on the Caltech two-stage light-gas gun. Radiative shock temperatures and rarefaction overtake times were measured simultaneously by a 6-channel VIS/NIR pyrometer with 3 ns time resolution. The majority of our experiments showed smooth monotonic increases in MgO sound speed and shock temperature with pressure from 197 to 243 GPa. The measured temperatures as well as the slopes of the pressure dependences for both temperature and sound speed were in good agreement with those calculated numerically for the solid phase at our peak shock compression conditions. Most observed sound speeds, however, were ~800 m/s higher than those predicted by the model. A single unconfirmed data point at 239 GPa showed anomalously low temperature and sound speed, which could both be explained by partial melting in this experiment and could suggest that the Hugoniot of MgO preheated to 2300 K crosses its melting line just slightly above 240 GPa.

  11. MgO melting curve constraints from shock temperature and rarefaction overtake measurements in samples preheated to 2300 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fat'yanov, O V; Asimow, P D

    2014-01-01

    Continuing our effort to obtain experimental constraints on the melting curve of MgO at 100-200 GPa, we extended our target preheating capability to 2300 K. Our new Mo capsule design holds a long MgO crystal in a controlled thermal gradient until impact by a Ta flyer launched at up to 7.5 km/s on the Caltech two-stage light-gas gun. Radiative shock temperatures and rarefaction overtake times were measured simultaneously by a 6-channel VIS/NIR pyrometer with 3 ns time resolution. The majority of our experiments showed smooth monotonic increases in MgO sound speed and shock temperature with pressure from 197 to 243 GPa. The measured temperatures as well as the slopes of the pressure dependences for both temperature and sound speed were in good agreement with those calculated numerically for the solid phase at our peak shock compression conditions. Most observed sound speeds, however, were ∼800 m/s higher than those predicted by the model. A single unconfirmed data point at 239 GPa showed anomalously low temperature and sound speed, which could both be explained by partial melting in this experiment and could suggest that the Hugoniot of MgO preheated to 2300 K crosses its melting line just slightly above 240 GPa.

  12. Failure analysis of glass-ceramic insulators of shock tested vacuum (neutron) tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spears, R.K.

    1980-01-01

    Eight investigative techniques were used to examine the glass-ceramic insulators in vacuum (neutron) tubes. The insulators were extracted from units that had been subjected to low temperature mechanical shock tests. Two of the three units showed reduced neutron output after these tests and an insulator on one of these two was cracked completely through which probably occurred during shock testing. The objective of this study was to determine if any major differences existed between the insulators of these tubes. After eight analyses, it was concluded that no appreciable differences existed. It appeared that cracking of the one glass-ceramic sample was initiated at inner-sleeve interface voids. For this sample, the interface void density was much higher than is presently acceptable. All insulators were made with glass-ceramic having a Na 2 O content of 4.6 wt%. An increased Na 2 O content will cause an increase in the coefficient of expansion and will reduce the residual stress level since the molybdenum has a higher coefficient of thermal expansion than the insulator. Thus, it is believed that a decrease in interface voids and an increase in Na 2 O should aid in reduced cracking of the insulator during these tests

  13. Effect of Feed Melting, Temperature History and Minor Component Addition on Spinel Crystallization in High-Level Waste Glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izak, Pavel; Hrma, Pavel R.; Arey, Bruce W.; Plaisted, Trevor J.

    2001-01-01

    This study was undertaken to help design mathematical models for high-level waste (HLW) glass melter that simulate spinel behavior in molten glass. Spinel, (Fe,Ni,Mn) (Fe,Cr)2O4, is the primary solid phase that precipitates from HLW glasses containing Fe and Ni in sufficient concentrations. Spinel crystallization affects the anticipated cost and risk of HLW vitrification. To study melting reactions, we used simulated HLW feed, prepared with co-precipitated Fe, Ni, Cr, and Mn hydroxides. Feed samples were heated up at a temperature-increase rate (4C/min) close to that which the feed experiences in the HLW glass melter. The decomposition, melting, and dissolution of feed components (such as nitrates, carbonates, and silica) and the formation of intermediate crystalline phases (spinel, sodalite (Na8(AlSiO4)6(NO2)2), and Zr-containing minerals) were characterized using evolved gas analysis, volume-expansion measurement, optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and X-ray diffraction. Nitrates and quartz, the major feed components, converted to a glass-forming melt by 880C. A chromium-free spinel formed in the nitrate melt starting from 520C and Sodalite, a transient product of corundum dissolution, appeared above 600C and eventually dissolved in glass. To investigate the effects of temperature history and minor components (Ru,Ag, and Cu) on the dissolution and growth of spinel crystals, samples were heated up to temperatures above liquidus temperature (TL), then subjected to different temperature histories, and analyzed. The results show that spinel mass fraction, crystals composition, and crystal size depend on the chemical and physical makeup of the feed and temperature history

  14. Eruption Depths, Magma Storage and Magma Degassing at Sumisu Caldera, Izu-Bonin Arc: Evidence from Glasses and Melt Inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, E. R.

    2015-12-01

    Island arc volcanoes can become submarine during cataclysmal caldera collapse. The passage of a volcanic vent from atmospheric to under water environment involves complex modifications of the eruption style and subsequent transport of the pyroclasts. Here, we use FTIR measurements of the volatile contents of glass and melt inclusions in the juvenile pumice clasts in the Sumisu basin and its surroundings (Izu-Bonin arc) to investigate changes in eruption depths, magma storage and degassing over time. This study is based on legacy cores from ODP 126, where numerous unconsolidated (250 m), massive to normally graded pumice lapilli-tuffs were recovered over four cores (788C, 790A, 790B and 791A). Glass and clast geochemistry indicate the submarine Sumisu caldera as the source of several of these pumice lapilli-tuffs. Glass chips and melt inclusions from these samples were analyzed using FTIR for H2O and CO2 contents. Glass chips record variable H2O contents; most chips contain 0.6-1.6 wt% H2O, corresponding to eruption depths of 320-2100 mbsl. Variations in glass H2O and pressure estimates suggest that edifice collapse occurred prior-to or during eruption of the oldest of these samples, and that the edifice may have subsequently grown over time. Sanidine-hosted melt inclusions from two units record variably degassed but H2O-rich melts (1.1-5.6 wt% H2O). The lowest H2O contents overlap with glass chips, consistent with degassing and crystallization of melts until eruption, and the highest H2O contents suggest that large amounts of degassing accompanied likely explosive eruptions. Most inclusions, from both units, contain 2-4 wt% H2O, which further indicates that the magmas crystallized at pressures of ~50-100 MPa, or depths ~400-2800 m below the seafloor. Further glass and melt inclusion analyses, including major element compositions, will elucidate changes in magma storage, degassing and evolution over time.

  15. Nanosecond (ns) laser transfer of silver nanoparticles from silver-exchanged soda-lime glass to transparent soda-lime glass and shock waves formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sow, Mohamed Chérif; Blondeau, Jean-Philippe; Sagot, Nadine; Ollier, Nadège; Tite, Teddy

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Silver nanoparticles growth by nanosecond laser irradiation of silver exchanged soda-lime glasses. • Silver nanoparticles transfer. • Nanosecond laser induced shock waves formation on glass. - Abstract: In this contribution, we showed for the first time in our knowledge a single-step process for silver clusters and nanoparticles growth and transfer from silver-exchanged soda-lime glass to un-exchanged soda-lime glass (transparent glass in visible and NIR domain) by nanosecond (ns) laser irradiation. The transferred silver nanoparticles in transparent glass are strongly linked to the glass surface. In addition, we point out the formation of shock waves, with selective silver clustering on the top wave. This technique provides an alternative and simple way to obtain metallic nanoparticles in different media which can be traversed by laser wavelength used. Moreover, this experiment is made at room temperature and air environment. It is worth noting that our technique requires a glass previously doped with the corresponding silver ions

  16. ZrCuAl Bulk Metallic Glass spall induced by laser shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jodar, Benjamin; Loison, Didier; Yokoyama, Yoshihiko; Lescoute, Emilien; Berthe, Laurent; Sangleboeuf, Jean-Christophe

    2017-06-01

    To face High Velocity Impacts, the aerospace industry is always seeking for innovative materials usable as debris shielding components. Bulk Metallic Glasses (BMG) revealed interesting mechanical properties in case of static and quasi-static loading conditions: high elasticity, high tenacity, low density and high fracture threshold... The department of Mechanics and Glass of the Institut of Physics Rennes conducted on the ELFIE facility, laser shock experiments to study the behavior of a ternary ZrCuAl BMG under high strain rate, up-to fragmentation process. On the one hand, in-situ diagnostics were used to measure ejection velocities with PDV and debris morphologies were observed by Shadowgraphy. On the other hand, spalled areas (dimensions and features) were characterized through post-mortem analysis (optical observations, profilometry and SEM). These results are compared to experimental and numerical data on the crystalline forms of the ZrCuAl basic compounds.

  17. Deep pooling of low degree melts and volatile fluxes at the 85°E segment of the Gakkel Ridge: Evidence from olivine-hosted melt inclusions and glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Alison M.; Behn, Mark D.; Humphris, Susan E.; Sohn, Robert A.; Gregg, Patricia M.

    2010-01-01

    We present new analyses of volatile, major, and trace elements for a suite of glasses and melt inclusions from the 85°E segment of the ultra-slow spreading Gakkel Ridge. Samples from this segment include limu o pele and glass shards, proposed to result from CO 2-driven explosive activity. The major element and volatile compositions of the melt inclusions are more variable and consistently more primitive than the glass data. CO 2 contents in the melt inclusions extend to higher values (167-1596 ppm) than in the co-existing glasses (187-227 ppm), indicating that the melt inclusions were trapped at greater depths. These melt inclusions record the highest CO 2 melt concentrations observed for a ridge environment. Based on a vapor saturation model, we estimate that the melt inclusions were trapped between seafloor depths (˜ 4 km) and ˜ 9 km below the seafloor. However, the glasses are all in equilibrium with their eruption depths, which is inconsistent with the rapid magma ascent rates expected for explosive activity. Melting conditions inferred from thermobarometry suggest relatively deep (25-40 km) and cold (1240°-1325 °C) melting conditions, consistent with a thermal structure calculated for the Gakkel Ridge. The water contents and trace element compositions of the melt inclusions and glasses are remarkably homogeneous; this is an unexpected result for ultra-slow spreading ridges, where magma mixing is generally thought to be less efficient based on the assumption that steady-state crustal magma chambers are absent in these environments. All melts can be described by a single liquid line of descent originating from a pooled melt composition that is consistent with the aggregate melt calculated from a geodynamic model for the Gakkel Ridge. These data suggest a model in which deep, low degree melts are efficiently pooled in the upper mantle (9-20 km depth), after which crystallization commences and continues during ascent and eruption. Based on our melting model

  18. MELT RATE ENHANCEMENT FOR HIGH ALUMINUM HLW (HIGH LEVEL WASTE) GLASS FORMULATION FINAL REPORT 08R1360-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT W; PEGG IL; JOSEPH I; BARDAKCI T; GAN H; GONG W; CHAUDHURI M

    2010-01-04

    This report describes the development and testing of new glass formulations for high aluminum waste streams that achieve high waste loadings while maintaining high processing rates. The testing was based on the compositions of Hanford High Level Waste (HLW) with limiting concentrations of aluminum specified by the Office of River Protection (ORP). The testing identified glass formulations that optimize waste loading and waste processing rate while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work included preparation and characterization of crucible melts and small scale melt rate screening tests. The results were used to select compositions for subsequent testing in a DuraMelter 100 (DM100) system. These tests were used to determine processing rates for the selected formulations as well as to examine the effects of increased glass processing temperature, and the form of aluminum in the waste simulant. Finally, one of the formulations was selected for large-scale confirmatory testing on the HLW Pilot Melter (DM1200), which is a one third scale prototype of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) HLW melter and off-gas treatment system. This work builds on previous work performed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) for Department of Energy (DOE) to increase waste loading and processing rates for high-iron HLW waste streams as well as previous tests conducted for ORP on the same high-aluminum waste composition used in the present work and other Hanford HLW compositions. The scope of this study was outlined in a Test Plan that was prepared in response to an ORP-supplied statement of work. It is currently estimated that the number of HLW canisters to be produced in the WTP is about 13,500 (equivalent to 40,500 MT glass). This estimate is based upon the inventory of the tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the sludge treatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form

  19. MELT RATE ENHANCEMENT FOR HIGH ALUMINUM HLW (HIGH LEVEL WASTE) GLASS FORMULATION. FINAL REPORT 08R1360-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.; Matlack, K.S.; Kot, W.; Pegg, I.L.; Joseph, I.; Bardakci, T.; Gan, H.; Gong, W.; Chaudhuri, M.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes the development and testing of new glass formulations for high aluminum waste streams that achieve high waste loadings while maintaining high processing rates. The testing was based on the compositions of Hanford High Level Waste (HLW) with limiting concentrations of aluminum specified by the Office of River Protection (ORP). The testing identified glass formulations that optimize waste loading and waste processing rate while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work included preparation and characterization of crucible melts and small scale melt rate screening tests. The results were used to select compositions for subsequent testing in a DuraMelter 100 (DM100) system. These tests were used to determine processing rates for the selected formulations as well as to examine the effects of increased glass processing temperature, and the form of aluminum in the waste simulant. Finally, one of the formulations was selected for large-scale confirmatory testing on the HLW Pilot Melter (DM1200), which is a one third scale prototype of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) HLW melter and off-gas treatment system. This work builds on previous work performed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) for Department of Energy (DOE) to increase waste loading and processing rates for high-iron HLW waste streams as well as previous tests conducted for ORP on the same high-aluminum waste composition used in the present work and other Hanford HLW compositions. The scope of this study was outlined in a Test Plan that was prepared in response to an ORP-supplied statement of work. It is currently estimated that the number of HLW canisters to be produced in the WTP is about 13,500 (equivalent to 40,500 MT glass). This estimate is based upon the inventory of the tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the sludge treatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form

  20. Aluminosilicate melts and glasses at 1 to 3 GPa: Temperature and pressure effects on recovered structural and density changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bista, S; Stebbins, Jonathan; Hankins, William B.; Sisson, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    In the pressure range in the Earth’s mantle where many basaltic magmas are generated (1 to 3 GPa) (Stolper et al. 1981), increases in the coordination numbers of the network-forming cations in aluminosilicate melts have generally been considered to be minor, although effects on silicon and particularly on aluminum coordination in non-bridging oxygen-rich glasses from the higher, 5 to 12 GPa range, are now well known. Most high-precision measurements of network cation coordination in such samples have been made by spectroscopy (notably 27Al and 29Si NMR) on glasses quenched from high-temperature, high-pressure melts synthesized in solid-media apparatuses and decompressed to room temperature and 1 bar pressure. There are several effects that could lead to the underestimation of the extent of actual structural (and density) changes in high-pressure/temperature melts from such data. For non-bridging oxygen-rich sodium and calcium aluminosilicate compositions in the 1 to 3 GPa range, we show here that glasses annealed near to their glass transition temperatures systematically record higher recovered increases in aluminum coordination and in density than samples quenched from high-temperature melts. In the piston-cylinder apparatus used, rates of cooling through the glass transition are measured as very similar for both higher and lower initial temperatures, indicating that fictive temperature effects are not the likely explanation of these differences. Instead, transient decreases in melt pressure during thermal quenching, which may be especially large for high initial run temperatures, of as much as 0.5 to 1 GPa, may be responsible. As a result, the equilibrium proportion of high-coordinated Al in this pressure range may be 50 to 90% greater than previously estimated, reaching mean coordination numbers (e.g., 4.5) that are probably high enough to significantly affect melt properties. New data on jadeite (NaAlSi2O6) glass confirm that aluminum coordination increase

  1. Crystallization of nuclear glass under a thermal gradient: application to the self-crucible produced in the skull melting process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delattre, O.

    2013-01-01

    In the context of the vitrification of high level nuclear waste, a new industrial process has been launched in 2010 at the La Hague factory: The skull melting process. This setup applies thermal gradients to the melt, which leads to the formation of a solid layer of glass: the 'self-crucible'. The question would be to know whether these thermal gradients have an impact or not on the crystallization behaviour of the considered glasses in the self crucible. In order to answer that question, the crystallization of two glass compositions of nuclear interest has been investigated with an image analysis based method in isothermal and thermal gradient heat treatments conditions. The isothermal experiments allow for the quantification (growth speed, nucleation, crystallized fraction) of the crystallization of apatites (660 C-900 C) and powellites (630 C-900 C). The comparison of the results obtained through these two types of experimentations allows us to conclude that there is no impact of the thermal gradient on the crystallization of the studied glass compositions. In order to complete the image analysis study (based on surfaces), in and ex situ microtomography experiments have been performed at ESRF (Grenoble) on the ID19 beamline. This study allowed us to follow the crystallization of apatites in a simplified glass and to confirm the reliability of the image analysis method based on the analysis of surfaces. (author) [fr

  2. Effect of ion implantation on thermal shock resistance of magnesia and glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurarie, V.N.; Williams, J.S.; Watt, A.J.

    1995-01-01

    Monocrystals of magnesia together with glass samples have been subjected to ion implantation prior to thermal shock testing in an impulse plasma of continuously varied intensity. Measurements of the separation between fragments have been used to estimate the surface temperature. Fracture and deformation characteristics of the surface layer are measured in ion implanted and unimplanted samples using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Implantation-induced near-surface damage is analysed by ion channeling using 2 MeV He + ions. Ion implantation is shown to modify the near-surface structure of magnesia samples by introducing damage, which makes crack initiation easier under thermal stresses. The fracture threshold and maximum crack density are shifted towards the lower temperature range. Ion implanted MgO crystals show a ten fold increase in surface crack density. An increased crack density results in a decreased degree of damage characterised by the depth of crack penetration. The thermal stress resistance parameter of glass samples is increased at relatively small doses and decreased at higher doses. The results suggest that crack density and the degree of fracture damage in brittle ceramics operating under thermal shock conditions can be effectively controlled by ion implantation which provides crack initiating defects in the near-surface region. 23 refs., 7 figs

  3. Dielectric properties of glasses prepared by quenching melts of superconducting Bi-Ca-Sr-Cu-O cuprates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varma, K. B. R.; Subbanna, G. N.; Ramakrishnan, T. V.; Rao, C. N. R.

    1989-07-03

    Glasses obtained from quenching melts of superconducting bismuth cuprates of the formula Bi/sub 2/(Ca,Sr)/sub /ital n/+1/Cu/sub /ital n//O/sub 2/ital n/+4/ with /ital n/=1 and 3 exhibit novel dielectric properties. They possess relatively high dielectric constants as well as high electrical conductivity. The novel dielectric properties of these cuprate glasses are likely to be of electronic origin. They exhibit a weak microwave absorption due to the presence of microcrystallites.

  4. Effect of Na2CO3 as Foaming Agent on Dynamics and Structure of Foam Glass Melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the kinetics and dynamics of the reaction between Na2CO3 and the cathode ray tube panel glass powder at 923-1173 K. The reaction causes foaming of the glass melt. After the reaction, the Tg decreases with increasing Na2CO3 content and reaches a minimum value of Tg. However, this Tg...... value is even lower than that of the homogeneous bulk glass with the same chemical composition. The lower Tg of the foam glass could be attributed to inhomogeneous incorporation of Na in the glass, leading to Na-rich domains that cause an overall decrease of Tg. Remarkably, after 5 min treatment at 1073...... K, the Tg drops by 120 K, indicating that the reaction between Na2CO3 and glass is very fast. Increasing treatment duration causes a slight increase of Tg likely due to both a more homogeneous Na distribution and the compositional change of the glass as a result of Na2SrSi2O6 crystal formation....

  5. Thermo-hydrodynamic and inductive modelling of a glass melt elaborated in cold inductive crucible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauvage, E.

    2009-11-01

    Within the context of a search for a new vitrification process for nuclear wastes with a replacement of the presently used metallic pot by an inductive cold crucible, this research thesis deals with the numerical modelling of this technology. After having recalled the interest of nuclear waste vitrification, this report presents the new process based on the use of a cold crucible, describing principles and objectives of this method, and the characteristic physical phenomena associated with the flow and the thermodynamics of the glassy melt in such a crucible. It also recalls and comments the existing works on modelling. The main objective of this research is then to demonstrate the feasibility of 3D thermo-hydraulic and inductive simulations. He describes and analyses the glass physical properties (electrical properties, viscosity, thermal properties), the electromagnetic, hydrodynamic and thermal phenomena. He presents in detail the bubbling mixing modelling, reports 3D induction and fluid mechanical coupling calculations, and specific thermal investigations (radiating transfers, thermal limit conditions)

  6. Shock Wave Response of Iron-based In Situ Metallic Glass Matrix Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanolkar, Gauri R; Rauls, Michael B; Kelly, James P; Graeve, Olivia A; Hodge, Andrea M; Eliasson, Veronica

    2016-03-02

    The response of amorphous steels to shock wave compression has been explored for the first time. Further, the effect of partial devitrification on the shock response of bulk metallic glasses is examined by conducting experiments on two iron-based in situ metallic glass matrix composites, containing varying amounts of crystalline precipitates, both with initial composition Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4. The samples, designated SAM2X5-600 and SAM2X5-630, are X-ray amorphous and partially crystalline, respectively, due to differences in sintering parameters during sample preparation. Shock response is determined by making velocity measurements using interferometry techniques at the rear free surface of the samples, which have been subjected to impact from a high-velocity projectile launched from a powder gun. Experiments have yielded results indicating a Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL) to be 8.58 ± 0.53 GPa for SAM2X5-600 and 11.76 ± 1.26 GPa for SAM2X5-630. The latter HEL result is higher than elastic limits for any BMG reported in the literature thus far. SAM2X5-600 catastrophically loses post-yield strength whereas SAM2X5-630, while showing some strain-softening, retains strength beyond the HEL. The presence of crystallinity within the amorphous matrix is thus seen to significantly aid in strengthening the material as well as preserving material strength beyond yielding.

  7. Low-Li2O Frits: Selecting Glasses that Support the Melt Rate Studies and Challenge the Current Durability Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peeler, D. K.; Edwards, T. B.

    2005-01-01

    During the progressive development of the cold cap model (as it applies to a potential melt rate predictive tool), the formation of an Al-Li-silicate phase was identified as an intermediate reaction phase that could possibly hinder melt rate for SB4. To test this theory, six glasses were designed (using Frit 320's composition as the baseline) to maintain a constant 20 wt% sum of alkali content (in frit) by varying Na 2 O to Li 2 O ratios. The Li 2 O concentration ranged from 8 wt% down to 0% in either 2% or 1% increments with the differences being accounted for by an increase in Na 2 O concentration. Although the primary objective of the ''lower Li 2 O'' frits was to evaluate the potential for melt rate improvements, assessments of durability (as measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT)) were also performed. The results suggest that durable glasses can be produced with these ''lower Li 2 O'' frits should it be necessary to pursue this option for improving melt rate. In addition to the series of glasses to support melt rate assessments, a series of frits were also developed to challenge the current durability model based on the limits proposed by Edwards et al. (2004). Although the ''new'' limits allow access into compositional regions of interest (i.e., higher alkali systems) which can improve melt rate and/or waste loading, there may still be ''additional'' conservatism. In this report, two series of glasses were developed to challenge the ''new'' durability limits for the SB4 system. In the first series, the total alkali of the Frit 320-based glasses (designed to support the melt rate program) was increased from 20 wt% to 21 wt% (in the frit), but the series also evaluated the possible impact of various Na 2 O and Li 2 O mass ratio differences. The second series pushed the alkali limit in the frit even further with frits containing either 22 or 24 wt% total alkali as well as various Na 2 O and Li 2 O mass ratios. The results of the PCT evaluation indicated

  8. Coordination Environments of Highly Charged Cations (Ti, Cr, and Light REE's) in Borosilicate Glass/Melts to 1120C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farges, Francois; /Museum Natl. Hist. Natur. /Stanford U., Geo. Environ. Sci.; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.; /Stanford U., Geo. Environ Sci. /SLAC, SSRL

    2007-01-02

    The local environments around Ti, Cr, and several light rare-earth elements (La, Ce, and Nd) were investigated by in-situ XANES spectroscopy in a number of complex borosilicate glasses and melts (to 1120 C) that are used for nuclear waste storage. Examination of the high-resolution XANES spectra at the Ti K-edge shows that the average coordination of Ti changes from {approx}5 to {approx}4.5. Cr is dominantly trivalent in the melts studied. However, its average coordination is probably lower in the melt (tetrahedral ?) as revealed by the more intense Cr-K pre-edge feature. Ce also changes its average valence from dominantly +4 to +3.5 upon glass melting. These changes are reversible at T{sub g}, the glass transition temperature ({approx}500-550 C for these glasses). In contrast, the local environments of Nd, Pr, and La are unaffected by melting. Therefore, structural reorganization of these borosilicate glass/melts above T{sub g} is variable, not only in terms of valence (as for Ce) but also speciation (Ti and Cr). Both the ability of B to adopt various coordination geometries (triangular and tetrahedral) and the chemical complexity of the glass/melts explain these changes.

  9. Tracking the Depleted Mantle Signature in Melt Inclusions and Residual Glass of Basaltic Martian Shergottites using Secondary Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Timothy J.; Simon, Justin I.; Jones, John H.; Usui, Tomohiro; Economos, Rita C.; Schmitt, Axel K.; McKeegan, Kevin D.

    2013-01-01

    Trace element abundances of depleted shergottite magmas recorded by olivine-hosted melt inclusions (MI) and interstitial mesostasis glass were measured using the Cameca ims-1270 ion microprobe. Two meteorites: Tissint, an olivine-­phyric basaltic shergottite which fell over Morocco July 18th 2001; and the Antarctic meteorite Yamato 980459 (Y98), an olivine-phyric basaltic shergottite with abundant glassy mesostasis have been studied. Chondrite-­normalized REE patterns for MI in Tissint and Y98 are characteristically LREE depleted and, within analytical uncertainty, parallel those of their respective whole rock composition; supporting each meteorite to represent a melt composition that has experienced closed-­system crystallization. REE profiles for mesostasis glass in Y98 lie about an order of magnitude higher than those from the MI; with REE profiles for Tissint MI falling in between. Y98 MI have the highest average Sm/Nd and Y/Ce ratios, reflecting their LREE depletion and further supporting Y98 as one of our best samples to probe the depleted shergotitte mantle. In general, Zr/Nb ratios overlap between Y98 and Tissint MI, Ce/Nb ratios overlap between Y98 MI and mesostasis glass, and Sm/Nd ratios overlap between Y98 mesostasis glass and Tissint MI. These features support similar sources for both, but with subtle geochemical differences that may reflect different melting conditions or fractionation paths during ascent from the mantle. Interestingly, the REE patterns for both Y98 bulk and MI analyses display a flattening of the LREE that suggests a crustal contribution to the Y98 parent melt. This observation has important implications for the origins of depleted and enriched shergottites.

  10. MgO melting curve constraints from shock temperature and rarefaction overtake measurements in samples preheated to 2300 K

    OpenAIRE

    Fat'yanov, Oleg V.; Asimow, P. D.

    2014-01-01

    Continuing our effort to obtain experimental constraints on the melting curve of MgO at 100-200 GPa, we extended our target preheating capability to 2300 K. Our new Mo capsule design holds a long MgO crystal in a controlled thermal gradient until impact by a Ta flyer launched at up to 7.5 km/s on the Caltech two-stage light-gas gun. Radiative shock temperatures and rarefaction overtake times were measured simultaneously by a 6-channel VIS/NIR pyrometer with 3 ns time resolution. The majority ...

  11. Fiscal 1999 international cooperation project report. R and D on convection control technology of glass melts by microgravity experiment; 1999 nendo bisho juryoku kankyo wo riyoshita glass yuekinai tairyu seigyo gijutsu no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    This R and D aims at development of convection simulation technology of glass melts based on measurement of accurate glass melt properties, and development of convection control technology of glass melts through the model experiment and small tank furnace experiment. Experiment was made on measurement of surface tension while levitating glass melts under the microgravity condition obtained by the drop tower of Japan Microgravity Center in Hokkaido. The shape of glass melt changes into a real sphere under the microgravity condition, and surface tension can be obtained by measuring its frequency, however, such frequency of glass could not be measured in this experiment. Levitation, fusion and oscillation experiment of glass was carried out by using an aero-acoustic levitator of CRT at Chicago. The experiment result is now in analysis. This study also aims the analysis in consideration of a surface tension flow effect. The calculation result showed generation of surface tension flow due to temperature gradient on a liquid surface. Various information were obtained through the model experiment using silicon oil, and glass convention observation by using a small tank furnace. (NEDO)

  12. Measurement of Preheat and Shock Melting in Be Ablators During the First Few ns of the NIF Ignition Pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, D K; Prisbrey, S T; Page, R H; Braun, D G; Edwards, M J; Hibbard, R L; Moreno, K A; Mauldin, M P; Nikroo, A

    2008-05-28

    We have developed a scaled hohlraum platform to experimentally measure preheat in ablator materials during the first few nanoseconds of the radiation drive proposed for ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility [J. A. Paisner, J. D. Boyes, S. A. Kumpan, et al., Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)]. The platform design approximates the radiation environment of the pole of the capsule by matching both the laser spot intensity and illuminated hohlraum wall fraction in scaled halfraums driven by the OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly, D. L. Brown, R. S. Craxton, et al., Optics Communications 133, 495 (1997)]. A VISAR reflecting from the rear surface of the sample was used to measure sample motion prior to shock breakout. The experiments show that the first {approx}20 {micro}m of a Be ablator will be melted by radiation preheat, with subsequent material melted by the initial shock, in agreement with simulations. The experiments also show no evidence of anomalous heating of buried high-z doped layers in the ablator.

  13. Formulation and synthesis by melting process of titanate enriched glass-ceramics and ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advocat, T.; Fillet, C.; Lacombe, J.; Bonnetier, A.; McGlinn, P.

    1999-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to provide containment for the separated radionuclides in stable oxide phases with proven resistance to leaching and irradiation damage and in consequence to obtain a glass ceramic or a ceramic material using a vitrification process. Sphene glass ceramic, zirconolite glass ceramic and zirconolite enriched ceramic have been fabricated and characterized by XRD, SEM/EDX and DTA

  14. Phase transformations in lithium bearing sodiumborosilicate base glass melts for the solidification of HAW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goettlicher, J.

    1994-10-01

    Metastable phase separation has been observed in the Li-bearing basic glass SM58. This observation gave rise to examine the exsolution behaviour in model glasses by chemical substitution. It is impossible to produce metastable phase separation in the Li-free HAW-glasses VG98/12 and VG98/12.2. However, one can't exclude textural changes of Li-bearing glasses, because in a HAW-container the central temperature remains at about 300 C for more than 50 years. For the first time it has been tried to find a relationship between glass textures and structural parameters by combining textural investigations (electron microscopy) with structural determinations (NMR, WAXS). Modell glasses belong to the system (Li, Na) 2 O.B 2 O 3 , (Al 2 O 3 ).n(TO 2 ), with T=Si, Ge and n=2, 4, 6. Furthermore glasses from the KfK and from Mol (PAMELA) were investigated. A newly built apparatus was used to prepare glasses by replica technique (PtIrC oblique shadowing) for TEM investigations. This method turned out to be well suited to study glass textures with features down to 5 nm. Sometimes direct examinations of ion-thinned glasses showed that their textures were affected by radiation damage, caused by accelerated electrons. LVSE-(Low Voltage Scanning Electron)- and AF-(Atomic Force)- microscopy seems to be a promising method for studying glass surfaces and their textures directly. (orig./MM) [de

  15. Use of IR pyrometry to measure free-surface temperatures of partially melted tin as a function of shock pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifter, A.; Furlanetto, M. R.; Holtkamp, D. B.; Obst, A. W.; Payton, J. R.; Stone, J. B.; Tabaka, L. J.; Grover, M.; Macrum, G. S.; Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D.; Swift, D. C.; Veeser, L. R.

    2009-01-01

    Equilibrium equation of state theory predicts that the free-surface release temperature of shock-loaded tin will show a plateau at 505 K in the stress range from 19.5 to 33.0 GPa, corresponding to the solid-liquid, mixed-phase region of tin. In this paper we report free-surface temperature measurements on shock-loaded tin from 15 to 31 GPa using multiwavelength optical pyrometry. The shock waves were generated by direct contact of detonating high explosive with a tin sample, and the stress in the sample was determined by free-surface velocity measurements using photon Doppler velocimetry. We measured the emitted thermal radiance in the near IR region at four wavelengths from 1.5 to 5.0 μm. Above 25 GPa the measured free-surface temperatures were higher than the predicted 505 K, and they increased with increasing stress. This deviation may be explained by hot spots and/or variations in surface emissivity, and it may indicate a weakness in the use of a simple analysis of multiwavelength pyrometry data for conditions, such as above the melt threshold, where hot spots or emissivity variations may be significant. We are continuing to study the discrepancy to determine its cause.

  16. Assessment of thermal shock induced damage in silicon carbide fibre reinforced glass matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boccaccini, A. R.

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available The development of microstructural damage in silicon carbide fibre (Nicalon™ reinforced glass matrix composite samples subjected to thermal shock was investigated by using a nondestructive forced resonance technique and fibre push out indentation tests. Thermal shock testing involved quenching samples in a water bath maintained at room temperature from a high temperature (650ºC. Changes in the Young's modulus and internal friction of the samples with increasing number of shocks were measured accurately by the forced resonance technique. Fibre push-out tests showed no significant changes in the properties of the fibre-matrix interface, indicating that damage in the composite was concentrated mainly in the development of matrix microcracking. It was also shown that the internal friction is a very sensitive parameter by which to detect the onset and development of such microcracking. A simple semi-empirical model is proposed to correlate the internal friction level with the microcracking density in the glass matrix. Finally, the relevance of detecting nondestructively the existence of microcracks in the glass matrix, before any significant interfacial degradation occurs, is emphasized, in conextion with the possibility of inducing a crack healing process by a thermal treatment (annealing, taking advantage of the viscous flow properties of the glass.

    El desarrollo de daño microestructural en materiales compuestos de matriz de vidrio reforzados con fibras de carburo de silicio (Nicalon™ sometidos a choque térmico fue investigado mediante la técnica no-destructiva de resonancia forzada y por mediciones de indentación "push-out" de fibras. Los ensayos de choque térmico involucraron el enfriamiento brusco en un baño de agua a temperatura ambiente de las piezas previamente calentadas a una temperatura elevada (650ºC. La técnica de resonancia forzada permitió medir cambios en el módulo de Young de elasticidad y en la fricci

  17. Glass produced by underground nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, L.; Piwinskii, A.; Ryerson, F.; Tewes, H.; Beiriger, W.

    1983-01-01

    Detonation of an underground nuclear explosive produces a strong shock wave which propagates spherically outward, vaporizing the explosive and nearby rock and melting, the surrounding rock. The vaporized material expands adiabatically, forming a cavity. As the energy is dissipated during the cavity formation process, the explosive and rock debris condense and mix with the melted rock. The melt flows to the bottom of the cavity where it is quenched by fractured rock fragments falling from above as the cavity collapses. Measurements indicate that about 740 tonnes of rock and/or soil are melted for every kiloton (10 12 calories) of explosive energy, or about 25% of the explosive energy goes to melting rock. The resulting glass composition reflects the composition of the unaltered rock with explosive debris. The appearance ranges from white pumice to dense, dark lava. The bulk composition and color vary with the amount of explosive iron incorporated into the glass. The refractory explosion products are mixed with the solidified melt, although the degree of mixing is variable. Electron microprobe studies of glasses produced by Rainier in welded tuff have produced the following results: glasses are dehydrated relative to the host media, glasses are extremely heterogeneous on a 20 μm scale, a ubiquitous feature is the presence of dark marble-cake regions in the glass, which were locally enriched in iron and may be related to the debris, optically amorphous regions provide evidence of shock melting, only limited major element redistribution and homogenization occur within the cavity

  18. Advanced temperature measurement system for the US glass industry melt tanks and delivery system. Phase 1 [final] report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    Improved temperature measurement in the melting and delivery systems of the glass making process will aid in energy conservation. The ``Needs Analysis`` survey found the greatest problem was the inability to identify in situ decalibration (drift). Phase I objectives are: a more rugged reliable sensor; high quality inner protective sheath; improved data transmission hardened to the melt tank environs; a system that reduces or eliminates drift; and an improved outer protection sheath. Results show that 4 of the 5 problem areas have been resolved; with the help of the Univ. of Missouri-Rolla`s materials group, the fifth may be solvable. The major identified problem, the inability to identify in-situ drift has been solved.

  19. Molten (Mg0.88Fe0.12)2SiO4 at lower mantle conditions - Melting products and structure of quenched glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Quentin

    1990-01-01

    Infrared spectra of quenched magnesium silicate glasses synthesized by fusing olivine at pressures in excess of 50 GPa and temperatures greater than 2500 K demonstrate that silicon is dominantly present in four-fold coordination with respect to oxygen within these quenched glasses. This low coordination is attributed, by analogy with the structural behavior of glasses compressed at 300 K, to the instability of higher coordinations in glasses of these compositions on decompression. Spectra of glasses formed in a hydrous environment document that water is extensively soluble in melts at these high pressures and temperatures. Also, these results are consistent with the melting of (Mg0.88Fe0.12)2SiO4 compositions to liquids near pyroxene in stoichiometry under these conditions, with iron-rich magnesiowuestite being the liquidus phase.

  20. X-ray spectrometric determination of glass content of melts incorporating radioactive waste: a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slates, R.V.

    1978-09-01

    X-ray fluorescence spectrometry was evaluated for the determination of glass content and homogeneity of glass incorporating high-level radioactive waste. Accuracy and precision were determined for analyses of Al 2 O 3 , SiO 2 , CaO, TiO 2 , MnO, Fe 2 O 3 , and NiO in specimens of known composition. These specimens were prepared by fusing powdered glass with nonradioactive synthetic waste. Matrix effects of sodium on these analyses were specifically evaluated. X-ray fluorescence spectrometry was shown to be applicable to the proposed determinations by comparing the known glass contents of 14 glass waste compositions with those calculated from experimentally determined concentrations of SiO or TiO 2

  1. Oxygen isotope partitioning between rhyolitic glass/melt and CO2: An experimental study at 550-950 degrees C and 1 bar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palin, J.M.; Epstein, S.; Stolper, E.M.

    1996-01-01

    Oxygen isotope partitioning between gaseous CO 2 and a natural rhyolitic glass and melt (77.7 wt% SiO 2 , 0.16 wt% H 2 O total ) has been measured at 550-950 degrees C and approximately 1 bar. Equilibrium oxygen isotope fractionation factors (α CO2-rhyolite = ( 18 O/ 16 O) rhyolite ) determined in exchange experiments of 100-255 day duration. These values agree well with predictions based on experimentally determined oxygen isotope fractionation factors for CO 2 -silica glass and CO 2 -albitic glass/melt, if the rhyolitic glass is taken to be a simple mixture of normative silica and alkali feldspar components. The results indicate that oxygen isotope partitioning in felsic glasses and melts can be modeled by linear combinations of endmember silicate constituents. Rates of oxygen isotope exchange observed in the partitioning experiments are consistent with control by diffusion of molecular H 2 O dissolved in the glass/melt and are three orders of magnitude faster than predicted for rate control solely by diffusion of dissolved molecular CO 2 under the experimental conditions. Additional experiments using untreated and dehydrated (0.09 wt% H 2 O total ) rhyolitic glass quantatively support these interpretations. We conclude that diffusive oxygen isotope exchange in rhyolitic glass/melt, and probably other polymerized silicate materials, it controlled by the concentrations and diffusivities of dissolved oxygen-bearing volatile species rather than diffusion of network oxygen under all but the most volatile-poor conditions. 25 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  2. Effect of the melting conditions on the properties of radiation color centers in lanthanum phosphate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karapetyan, G.O.; Rusan, V.V.; Yashchurzhinskaya, O.A.

    1986-01-01

    The authors investigate the spatial effects of ionizing radiation on the radiation processes in phosphate glasses to make a comparative estimate of the radiation yield from the radiation color centers (RCC) of different types. A study is made of their behavior under thermal decoloration. The results of a comparison of the integrated intensities of the ESR signal from trapping centers are given. The ESR spectrum of the glasses are presented--one differs slightly from the others. On the basis of the result of processing the ESR and optical spectra of gamma-irradiated lanthanum phosphate glasses synthesized under various conditions, the radiation yield of the RCC and the behavior of the intensity of their absorption under thermodecoloration are significantly affected by the conditions of synthesis of the glass.

  3. Gels and gel-derived glasses in the Na2O-B2O3-SiO2 system. [containerless melting in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, S. P.

    1982-01-01

    The containerless melting of high-purity multicomponent homogeneous gels and gel-monoliths offers a unique approach to making ultrapure multicomponent optical glasses in the reduced gravity environment of space. Procedures for preparing and characterizing gels and gel-derived glasses in the Na2O-B2O3-SiO2 system are described. Preparation is based on the polymerization reactions of alkoxysilane with trimethyl borate or boric acid and a suitable sodium compound. The chemistry of the gelling process is discussed in terms of process parameters and the gel compositions. The physicochemical nature of gels prepared by three different procedures were found to be significantly different. IR absorption spectra indicate finite differences in the molecular structures of the different gels. The melting of the gel powders and the transformation of porous gel-monoliths to transparent 'glass' without melting are described.

  4. Physical and mathematical modelling of gas-fired glass melting furnaces with regard to NO-formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, F.; Stuchlik, O.; Kremer, H.

    1999-01-01

    The increasing demand in quality, efficiency, energy conservation and the environmental issues drive the operators of high temperature processes to optimize their furnaces. Especially the glass manufacturing industry with their high working temperatures from about 1850 K to more than 1950 K and high air preheating temperatures of above 1480 K will produce high NOx-concentrations in the flue gas if no primary measures are taken. Considering the three different paths for NO-formation it is obvious that increased thermal NO is responsible for higher emissions. The German environmental regulations on air ''TA Luft'' requires a maximum value of 500 mg/mN3 in the flue gas for most of the combustion processes but for glass melting furnaces a temporary regulation of 1200 mg/mN3 and further on to 800 mg/mN3 is valid. Due to economical reasons the level of secondary measures is to be minimized thus the main objective of research is to reduce the NOx-emissions via primary measures. The design of the furnace is very important due to its strong influence on the distribution of velocity and species. That consequently affects the temperature field and the heat transfer to the load and further on the emissions. For the understanding of the processes within these furnaces numerical simulations, which are successfully validated with experiments, can give valuable indications to optimize furnace design for the reduction of NOx-emissions. The glass melting furnace modelled here is a regenerative horseshoe furnace fired with natural gas. Combustion air is preheated within the regenerator onto a level of temperature of 1650 K. (author)

  5. Structure of aluminosilicate melts produced from granite rocks for the manufacturing of petrurgical glass-ceramics construction materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simakin, A. G.

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The aluminosilicate melt is a partly ordered phase and is the origin of glass for producing glassceramics and petrurgical materials. They are well extended used as construction materials for pavings and coatings. Its structure can be described in the terms of the aluminosilica tetrahedras coordination so-called Q speciation. The proportions of tetrahedra with different degree of connectivity with others (from totally connected to free has been studied by NMR and IR methods for sodium-silicate melts. Medium range structure can be characterized by the sizes of irreducible rings composed of the aluminosilica tetrahedra. Systematic increase of the four member rings proportion in the sequence of the Ab-An glasses were observed. The water dissolution in sodium-silicate glass affects the Q speciation. Cations network-modifiers positions in the melt structure are important to know since these cations stabilize particular structure configurations. Modification of the distribution of Na coordination in the sodium-silicate glass at water dissolution was determined by NMR spectroscopy. The observed modification of the hydrous aluminosilicate melt structure resulted in the shift of the eutectic composition in the granite system with decreasing of the crystallization field of feldspars. The feldspar growth rates show practically no dependence on the water content in the concentration range 2-4 wt.%. Likewise, the solved water has a little influence on the crystal growth rate of the lithium silicate phase in lithium containing glasses in accordance with estimated enhancing of the diffusion transport.

    Los fundidos de alumino-silicato son una fase parcialmente ordenada. Su estructura puede ser descrita en términos de la coordinación de tetraedros de alúmina-sílice también denominados especies Q. La proporción de tetraedros con diferente grado de conectividad entre si se ha investigado por espectroscopias de RMN e IR en fundidos de silicatos

  6. Behavior of bubbles in glass melts under effect of the gravitational and centrifugal fields

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němec, Lubomír; Tonarová, V.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 3 (2005), s. 162-169 ISSN 0862-5468 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : glass refining * bubbles * modelling Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.463, year: 2005

  7. Millimeter-Wave Measurements of High Level and Low Level Activity Glass Melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woskov, Paul

    2005-01-01

    EMSP supported research of millimeter-wave technology for nuclear waste glass melter monitoring has been very productive in establishing this field and showing great progress. This work has garnered significant recognition, winning an R and D 100 Award for viscosity monitoring, a Best Paper Award by the American Ceramic Society for nuclear waste glass monitoring, investment by the Glass Plus industry consortium to test this technology for glass fiber manufacture, investment by Savannah River Technology Center in purchasing key hardware components for additional tests, and Japanese initiated exchange visits between MIT and the vitrification facilities at Japanese Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) in Tokai to review this technology. There are also potentially important spin offs to other areas including nuclear and fossil fuel power production, and National Institute of Health sponsored research as indicated below. Consequently, this work has the potential of becoming a major inter nationally recognized EMSP success story. A summary of the main accomplishments follows. The readers are referred to the cited reference publications for more details, many of which were EMSP supported by this work

  8. Study of viscosity of aluminum melt during glass transition by molecular dynamics and Green–Kubo formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirova, E M; Pisarev, V V

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics study of shear viscosity behavior of liquid aluminum is performed. The embedded atom method potential is used at the simulation of isobaric cooling. The viscosity is calculated using the Green–Kubo formula. The stress autocorrelation functions are obtained in the range 300-1200 K. The calculated kinematic viscosity is in agreement with the experimental data for the temperatures above melting temperature. The steep change of the shear viscosity is found below 650 K which we associate with the glass transition and is in a good agreement with the temperature which is obtained using the calorimetric criterion Kolotova et al (2015 J. Non-Cryst. Solids 429 98). The viscosity coefficient can not be calculated using the direct atomistic simulations below that temperature. (paper)

  9. Direct induction skull melting for glass and vitreous materials (Fly ash- oxides - salts)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uring, J.C. [Celes, 68 - Lautenbach (France); Van den Broek, J. [Promethee, 92 - Paris-la-Defense (France)

    1997-12-31

    Direct coil cold crucibles appear as the most economic and reliable furnaces for vitrifying solid wastes. The efficiency is excellent, as the electromagnetic energy is only transferred into the melt and the power dissipation in the walls of the crucible is negligible. The walls of the crucible are cooled, so a skull of cold material protects the metal or the lining of the crucible. Application to municipal solid waste fly ashes is discussed

  10. Simulated glass-forming polymer melts: dynamic scattering functions, chain length effects, and mode-coupling theory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, S; Weysser, F; Meyer, H; Farago, J; Fuchs, M; Baschnagel, J

    2015-02-01

    We present molecular-dynamics simulations for a fully flexible model of polymer melts with different chain length N ranging from short oligomers (N = 4) to values near the entanglement length (N = 64). For these systems we explore the structural relaxation of the supercooled melt near the critical temperature T c of mode-coupling theory (MCT). Coherent and incoherent scattering functions are analyzed in terms of the idealized MCT. For temperatures T > T c we provide evidence for the space-time factorization property of the β relaxation and for the time-temperature superposition principle (TTSP) of the α relaxation, and we also discuss deviations from these predictions for T ≈ T c. For T larger than the smallest temperature where the TTSP holds we perform a quantitative analysis of the dynamics with the asymptotic MCT predictions for the late β regime. Within MCT a key quantity, in addition to T c, is the exponent parameter λ. For the fully flexible polymer models studied we find that λ is independent of N and has a value (λ = 0.735 ) typical of simple glass-forming liquids. On the other hand, the critical temperature increases with chain length toward an asymptotic value T c (∞) . This increase can be described by T c (∞) - T c(N) ∼ 1/N and may be interpreted in terms of the N dependence of the monomer density ρ, if we assume that the MCT glass transition is ruled by a soft-sphere-like constant coupling parameter Γ c = ρ c T c (-1/4), where ρ c is the monomer density at T c. In addition, we also estimate T c from a Hansen-Verlet-like criterion and MCT calculations based on structural input from the simulation. For our polymer model both the Hansen-Verlet criterion and the MCT calculations suggest T c to decrease with increasing chain length, in contrast to the direct analysis of the simulation data.

  11. Dynamic fracture characteristics of Fe78Si9B13 metallic glass subjected to laser shock loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Chao; Sun, Sheng; Song, Libin; Zhang, Guofang; Luan, Yiguo; Ji, Zhong; Zhang, Jianhua

    2013-01-01

    The response of the Fe 78 Si 9 B 13 metallic glass under different ratio of laser beam diameter (d) to die hole diameter (D) in micro scale laser punching was investigated. The typical fracture surface morphologies were observed using scanning electron microscope. The influence of the ratio d/D on dynamic deformation and fracture of metallic glasses foils was characterized. The results show that the dynamic fracture behavior of the Fe 78 Si 9 B 13 metallic glass is sensitive to the ratio d/D. In the case of d/D = 1.75, the fracture surface is occupied by numerous liquid droplets, indicating that the temperature rise in an adiabatic shear band is beyond the melting temperature of the material. On the other hand, the fracture surface is covered dominantly with a mixture of shear steps, cellular patterns, liquid droplets and melted belts at d/D = 0.70. According to the general mechanical analysis, the specimen fails in a shear fracture mode at d/D = 1.75 due to the existence of shear stresses, while the fracture occurs in a tensile fracture mode at d/D = 0.70 under the effect of bidirectional tensile stresses.

  12. Aging effects around the glass and melting transitions in poly(dimethylsiloxane) visualized by resistance measurements [erratum in Applied Physics Letters 85 (16) 3638-3638

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brom, H.B.; Romijn, I.G.; Magis, J.G.; van der Vleuten, M.; Michels, M.A.J.

    2004-01-01

    The aging effects around the glass and melting transitions in poly(dimethylsiloxane) were investigated. Small amounts of carbon-black (CB) particles were dispersed in a fractal network in nonconducting rubbers for monitoring the structural changes on small length scales due to aging. Long time

  13. Potassium/sodium ion exchange of sodium aluminosilicate and soda-lime glasses with potassium nitrate melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, E.

    1983-08-01

    The alkali self-diffusion coefficients, the concentration-dependent interdiffusion coefficients, and the actual equilibrium constants of the ion exchange process were determinated for model glasses of the Na 2 O-Al 2 O 3 -SiO 2 type and the Na 2 O-CaO-SiO 2 type by nuclear techniques. The measured self-diffusion data and interdiffusion coefficients were used to estimate the stress profiles initiated by the K/Na exchange below the transformation temperature in the surface region. The activation volume of the sodium and potassium ions for diffusion through the surface zone stressed by ion exchange was determined. The disturbing influence of small concentrations of determined divalent cations in KNO 3 (especially Ca 2+ ) was investigated and thermodynamically described. Possibilities were demonstrated to remove these disturbances by anionic admixtures to the KNO 3 melt. Conclusions were drawn for the technical process of the chemical strengthening of glass by K/Na ion exchange at lower temperatures. (author)

  14. Dynamic behaviors of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass under ramp wave and shock wave loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binqiang Luo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic behaviors of Zr51Ti5Ni10Cu25Al9 bulk metallic glass were investigated using electric gun and magnetically driven isentropic compression device which provide shock and ramp wave loading respectively. Double-wave structure was observed under shock compression while three-wave structure was observed under ramp compression in 0 ∼ 18GPa. The HEL of Zr51Ti5Ni10Cu25Al9 is 8.97 ± 0.61GPa and IEL is 8.8 ± 0.3GPa, respectively. Strength of Zr51Ti5Ni10Cu25Al9 estimated from HEL is 5.0 ± 0.3GPa while the strength estimated from IEL is 3.6 ± 0.1GPa. Shock wave velocity versus particle velocity curve of Zr51Ti5Ni10Cu25Al9 under shock compression appears to be bilinear and a kink appears at about 18GPa. The Lagrangian sound speed versus particle velocity curve of Zr51Ti5Ni10Cu25Al9 under ramp wave compression exhibits two discontinuances and are divided to three regions: elastic, plastic-I and plastic-II. The first jump-down occurs at elastic-plastic transition and the second appears at about 17GPa. In elastic and plastic-I regions, Lagrangian sound speed increases linearly with particle velocity, respectively. Characteristic response of sound speed in plastic-I region disagree with shock result in the same pressure region(7GPa ∼ 18GPa, but is consistent with shock result at higher pressure(18-110GPa.

  15. On the glass transition of the one-component metallic melts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fedorchenko, Alexander I.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 475, October (2017), s. 362-367 ISSN 0022-0248 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : equilibrium and non-equilibrium solidification * criterion of the phase transition scenario * one-component metal melts Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics OBOR OECD: Thermodynamics Impact factor: 1.751, year: 2016 http://ac.els-cdn.com/S0022024817304281/1-s2.0-S0022024817304281-main.pdf?_tid=a12ba97e-873b-11e7-b6be-00000aacb35e&acdnat=1503407763_5cdbcdb15d504baf5f8dfb94886b3100

  16. Effect of severely thermal shocked MWCNT enhanced glass fiber reinforced polymer composite: An emphasis on tensile and thermal responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahato, K. K.; Fulmali, A. O.; Kattaguri, R.; Dutta, K.; Prusty, R. K.; Ray, B. C.

    2018-03-01

    Fiber reinforced polymeric (FRP) composite materials are exposed to diverse changing environmental temperatures during their in-service period. Current investigation is aimed to investigate the influence of thermal-shock exposure on the mechanical behavior of multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) enhanced glass fiber reinforced polymeric (GFRP) composites. The samples were exposed to +70°C for 36 hrs followed by further exposure to ‑ 60°C for the similar interval of time. Tensile tests were conducted in order to evaluate the results of thermal-shock on the mechanical behavior of the neat and conditioned samples at 1 mm/min loading rate. The polymer phase i.e. epoxy was modified with various MWCNT content. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS) was raised by 15.11 % with increase in the 0.1 % MWCNT content GFRP as related to the thermal-shocked neat GFRP conditioned samples. The possible reason may be attributed to the variation in the coefficients of thermal expansion at the time of conditioning. Also, upto some extent the pre-existing residual stresses allows uniform distribution of stress and hence the reason in enhanced mechanical properties of GFRP and MWCNT filled composites. In order to access the modifications in the glass transition temperature (Tg) due to the addition of MWCNT in GFRP composite and also due to the thermal shock temperature modulated differential scanning calorimeter (TMDSC) measurements are carried out. Scanning electron microscopy(SEM) was carried out to identify different modes of failures and strengthening morphology in the composites.

  17. Formation and partial melting of two types of spin-cluster glass behavior in vanadate spinel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yuanjie; Pi Li; Tan Shun; Zhang Yuheng; Yang Zhaorong

    2012-01-01

    We report the doping effect on the various properties of spinels Co 1-x Zn x V 2 O 4 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.2). For the parent compounds, the rise in magnetization, the valley in thermal conductance, the transition from the ferromagnetic arrangement to non-collinear alignment indicated by the specific heat for the V sublattice, especially the frequency dependence of AC susceptibility around T 1 = 59 K, verify the occurrence of the transition at T 1 besides the ferrimagnetic transition at T C . The ferrimagnetic transition at T C induces the spin-cluster glass behavior and the transition at T 1 yields the new spin-cluster glass (NSCG) behavior. As the Zn 2+ -doped content increases, the above phenomena are gradually weakening to vanishing, but the glassy behavior at T C still exists for all samples. Through the fourth-order perturbation theory, we discuss the reasons for the gradual vanishing of the transition at T 1 . (paper)

  18. Noble metal behavior during melting of simulated high-level nuclear waste glass feeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, L.D.; Dennis, T.; Elliott, M.L.; Hrma, P.

    1993-04-01

    Noble metals and their oxides can settle in waste glass melters and cause electrical shorting. Simulated waste feeds from Hanford, Savannah River, and Germany were heat treated for 1 hour in a gradient furnace at temperatures ranging from approximately 600 degrees C--1000 degrees C and examined by electron microscopy to determine shapes, sizes, and distribution of noble metal particles as a function of temperature. Individual noble metal particles and agglomerates of rhodium (Rh), ruthenium (RuO 2 ), and palladium (Pd), as well as their alloys, were seen. the majority of particles and agglomerates were generally less than 10 microns; however, large agglomerations (up to 1 mm) were found in the German feed. Detailed particle distribution and characterization was performed for a Hanford waste to provide input to computer modeling of particle settling in the melter

  19. Noble metal behavior during melting of simulated high-level nuclear waste glass feeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, L.D.; Dennis, T.; Elliott, M.L.; Hrma, P.

    1994-01-01

    Noble metals and their oxides can settle in waste glass melters and cause electrical shorting. Simulate waste feeds from Hanford, Savannah River, and Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe were heat treated for 1 hour in a gradient furnace at temperatures ranging from approximately 600 degrees C to 1000 degrees C and examined by electron microscopy to determine shapes, sizes, and distribution of noble metal particles as a function of temperature. Individual noble metal particles and agglomerates of rhodium (Rh), ruthenium (RuO 2 ), and palladium (Pd), as well as their alloys, were seen. The majority of particles and agglomerates were generally less than 10 μm; however, large agglomerations (up to 1 mm) were found in the German feed. 5 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Crustal accretion along the global mid-ocean ridge system based on basaltic glass and olivine-hosted melt inclusion compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanless, V. D.; Behn, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    The depth and distribution of crystallization at mid-ocean ridges controls the overall architecture of the oceanic crust, influences hydrothermal circulation, and determines geothermal gradients in the crust and uppermost mantle. Despite this, there is no overall consensus on how crystallization is distributed within the crust/upper mantle or how this varies with spreading rate. Here, we examine crustal accretion at mid-ocean ridges by combining crystallization pressures calculated from major element barometers on mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) glasses with vapor-saturation pressures from melt inclusions to produce a detailed map of crystallization depths and distributions along the global ridge system. We calculate pressures of crystallization from >11,500 MORB glasses from the global ridge system using two established major element barometers (1,2). Additionally, we use vapor-saturation pressures from >400 olivine-hosted melt inclusions from five ridges with variable spreading rates to constrain pressures and distributions of crystallization along the global ridge system. We show that (i) crystallization depths from MORB glasses increase and become less focused with decreasing spreading rate, (ii) maximum glass pressures are greater than the maximum melt inclusion pressure, which indicates that the melt inclusions do not record the deepest crystallization at mid-ocean ridges, and (iii) crystallization occurs in the lower crust/upper mantle at all ridges, indicating accretion is distributed throughout the crust at all spreading rates, including those with a steady-state magma lens. Finally, we suggest that the remarkably similar maximum vapor-saturation pressures (~ 3000 bars) in melt inclusion from all spreading rates reflects the CO2 content of the depleted upper mantle feeding the global mid-ocean ridge system. (1) Michael, P. & W. Cornell (1998), Journal of Geophysical Research, 103(B8), 18325-18356; (2) Herzberg, C. (2004), Journal of Petrology, 45(12), 2389.

  1. Evidence of denser MgSiO3 glass above 133 gigapascal (GPa) and implications for remnants of ultradense silicate melt from a deep magma ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Motohiko; Bass, Jay D

    2011-10-18

    Ultralow velocity zones are the largest seismic anomalies in the mantle, with 10-30% seismic velocity reduction observed in thin layers less than 20-40 km thick, just above the Earth's core-mantle boundary (CMB). The presence of silicate melts, possibly a remnant of a deep magma ocean in the early Earth, have been proposed to explain ultralow velocity zones. It is, however, still an open question as to whether such silicate melts are gravitationally stable at the pressure conditions above the CMB. Fe enrichment is usually invoked to explain why melts would remain at the CMB, but this has not been substantiated experimentally. Here we report in situ high-pressure acoustic velocity measurements that suggest a new transformation to a denser structure of MgSiO(3) glass at pressures close to those of the CMB. The result suggests that MgSiO(3) melt is likely to become denser than crystalline MgSiO(3) above the CMB. The presence of negatively buoyant and gravitationally stable silicate melts at the bottom of the mantle, would provide a mechanism for observed ultralow seismic velocities above the CMB without enrichment of Fe in the melt. An ultradense melt phase and its geochemical inventory would be isolated from overlying convective flow over geologic time.

  2. A thermodynamic approach to the quantitative evaluation of the metallic melts glass-forming ability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajtsev, A.I.

    2004-01-01

    The outlook for development of quantitative criteria of the tendency of metallic melt to render amorphous is shown with taking into account specific features of chemical interaction between components. With the use of statistical physics methods and thermodynamics as well as concepts of association the techniques are devised for quantitative separation of contributions to liquid alloy thermodynamic functions conditioned by various types of chemical interaction between components. The results Knudsen mass-spectroscopic comprehensive thermodynamic study of a wide range of systems with various tendency to vitrification are summarized. It is shown that excessive (configurational) entropy and specific heat of the liquid are key features predetermining thermodynamic and kinetic stimuli of amorphization. Their values are completely determined by a covalent constituent of chemical interaction on entropic term of association reaction. The possibility of construction of quantitative amorphization criteria on the basis of this feature and the outlook for the use of the approach proposed to predict physicochemical and mechanical properties of solid amorphous materials are illustrated [ru

  3. Small-scale, joule-heated melting of Savannah River Plant waste glass. I. Factors affecting large-scale vitrification tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plodinec, M.J.; Chismar, P.H.

    1979-10-01

    A promising method of immobilizing SRP radioactive waste solids is incorporation in borosilicate glass. In the reference vitrification process, called joule-heated melting, a mixture of glass frit and calcined waste is heated by passage of an electric current. Two problems observed in large-scale tests are foaming and formation of an insoluble slag. A small joule-heated melter was designed and built to study problems such as these. This report describes the melter, identifies factors involved in foaming and slag formation, and proposes ways to overcome these problems

  4. A Brillouin scattering study of hydrous basaltic glasses: the effect of H2O on their elastic behavior and implications for the densities of basaltic melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lei; Yang, De-Bin; Liu, Jun-Xiu; Hu, Bo; Xie, Hong-Sen; Li, Fang-Fei; Yu, Yang; Xu, Wen-Liang; Gao, Chun-Xiao

    2017-06-01

    Hydrous basalt glasses with water contents of 0-6.82% were synthesized using a multi-anvil press at 1.0-2.0 GPa and 1200-1400 °C. The starting materials were natural Mesozoic basalts from the eastern North China Craton (NCC). Their sound velocities and elastic properties were measured by Brillouin scattering spectroscopy. The longitudinal ( V P) and shear ( V S) wave velocities decreased with increasing water content. Increasing the synthesis pressure resulted in the glass becoming denser, and finally led to an increase in V P. As the degree of depolymerization increased, the V P, V S, and shear and bulk moduli of the hydrous basalt glasses decreased, whereas the adiabatic compressibility increased. The partial molar volumes of water (ν) under ambient conditions were independent of composition, having values of 11.6 ± 0.8, 10.9 ± 0.6 and 11.5 ± 0.5 cm3/mol for the FX (Feixian), FW (Fuxin), and SHT (Sihetun) basalt glasses, respectively. However, the {{V}_{{{{H}}_{{2}}}{O}}} values measured at elevated temperatures and pressures are increasing with increasing temperature or decreasing pressure. The contrasting densities of these hydrous basalt melts with those previously reported for mid-ocean ridge basalt and preliminary reference Earth model data indicate that hydrous basalt melts may not maintain gravitational stability at the base of the upper mantle.

  5. Final Report - Melt Rate Enhancement for High Aluminum HLW Glass Formulation, VSL-08R1360-1, Rev. 0, dated 12/19/08

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Albert A.; Pegg, I. L.; Chaudhuri, M.; Gong, W.; Gan, H.; Matlack, K. S.; Bardakci, T.; Kot, W.

    2013-11-13

    in melter operating temperature. Glass composition development was based on one of the HLW waste compositions specified by ORP that has a high concentration of aluminum. Small-scale tests were used to provide an initial screening of various glass formulations with respect to melt rates; more definitive screening was provided by the subsequent DM100 tests. Glass properties evaluated included: viscosity, electrical conductivity, crystallinity, gross glass phase separation and the 7- day Product Consistency Test (ASTM-1285). Glass property limits were based upon the reference properties for the WTP HLW melter. However, the WTP crystallinity limit (< 1 vol% at 950oC) was relaxed slightly as a waste loading constraint for the crucible melts.

  6. The deviatoric response of three dense glasses under shock loading conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radford, D.D.; Proud, W.G.; Field, J.E.

    2002-01-01

    In-material longitudinal and lateral stress histories in three dense, silica-based glasses were directly measured by embedded manganin stress gauges during plate impact experiments. Lateral stress profiles in all of the materials show evidence of failure fronts that behave in a similar manner to those observed in open-structured glasses. The measured stress histories were used to calculate the deviatoric responses and results indicate that ahead of the failure front the shear stress increases linearly along the estimated elastic response. Behind the failure front, however, the shear stress appears to first decrease and then increase as the pressure increases, contrary to a previous interpretation

  7. Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe

    2004-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the viscosity of most glassforming liquids is known to depart significantly from the classical Arrhenius behaviour of simple fluids. The discovery of an unexpected correlation between the extent of this departure and the Poisson ratio of the resulting glass could lead...... to new understanding of glass ageing and viscous liquid dynamics....

  8. Property/composition relationships for Hanford high-level waste glasses melting at 115 degrees C volume 1: Chapters 1-11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrma, P.R.; Piepel, G.F.

    1994-12-01

    A Composition Variation study (CVS) is being performed within the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) project in support of a future high-level nuclear waste vitrification plant at the Hanford site in Washington. From 1989 to 1994, over 120 nonradioactive glasses were melted and properties measured in five statistically-designed experimental phases. Glass composition is represented by the 10 components SiO 2 , B 2 O 3 , Al 2 O 3 , Fe 2 O 3 , ZrO 2 , Na 2 O, Li 2 O, CaO, MgO, and Others (all remaining components). The properties measured include viscosity (η), electrical conductivity (ε), glass transition temperature (T g ), thermal expansion of solid glass (α s ) and molten glass (α m ), crystallinity (quenched and canister centerline cooled glasses), liquidus temperature (T L ), durability based on normalized elemental releases from the Materials Characterization Center-1 28-day dissolution test (MCC-1, r mi ) and the 7-day Product Consistency Test (PCT, r pi ), and solution pHs from MCC-1 and PCT. Amorphous phase separation was also evaluated. Empirical first- and second-order mixture models were fit using the CVS data to relate the various properties to glass composition. Equations for calculating the uncertainty associated with property values predicted by the models were also developed. The models were validated using both internal and external data. Other modeling approaches (e.g., non-bridging oxygen, free energy of hydration, phase-equilibria T L ) were investigated for specific properties. A preliminary Qualified Composition Region was developed to identify glass compositions with high confidence of being processable in a melter and meeting waste form acceptance criteria

  9. Property/composition relationships for Hanford high-level waste glasses melting at 1150 degrees C volume 2: Chapters 12-16 and appendices A-K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrma, P.R.; Piepel, G.F.

    1994-12-01

    A Composition Variation Study (CVS) is being performed within the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) project in support of a future high-level nuclear waste vitrification plant at the Hanford site in Washington. From 1989 to 1994, over 120 nonradioactive glasses were melted and properties measured in five statistically-designed experimental phases. Glass composition is represented by the 10 components SiO 2 , B 2 O 3 , ZrO 2 , Na 2 O, Li 2 O, CaO, MgO, and Others (all remaining components). The properties measured include viscosity (η), electrical conductivity (ε), glass transition temperature (T g ), thermal expansion of solid glass (α s ) and molten glass (α m ), crystallinity (quenched and canister centerline cooled glasses), liquidus temperature (T L ), durability based on normalized elemental releases from the Materials Characterization Center-1 28-day dissolution test (MCC-1, r mi ) and the 7-day Product Consistency Test (PCT, r pi ), and solution pHs from MCC-1 and PCT. Amorphous phase separation was also evaluated. Empirical first- and second-order mixture models were fit using the CVS data to relate the various properties to glass composition. Equations for calculating the uncertainty associated with property values predicted by the models were also developed. The models were validated using both internal and external data. Other modeling approaches (e.g., non-bridging oxygen, free energy of hydration, phase-equilibria T L ) were investigated for specific properties. A preliminary Qualified Composition Region was developed to identify glass compositions with high confidence of being processable in a melter and meeting waste form acceptance criteria

  10. Laser Shock Peening on Zr-based Bulk Metallic Glass and Its Effect on Plasticity: Experiment and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yunfeng; Xie, Xie; Antonaglia, James; Winiarski, Bartlomiej; Wang, Gongyao; Shin, Yung C.; Withers, Philip J.; Dahmen, Karin A.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-05-01

    The Zr-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are a new family of attractive materials with good glass-forming ability and excellent mechanical properties, such as high strength and good wear resistance, which make them candidates for structural and biomedical materials. Although the mechanical behavior of BMGs has been widely investigated, their deformation mechanisms are still poorly understood. In particular, their poor ductility significantly impedes their industrial application. In the present work, we show that the ductility of Zr-based BMGs with nearly zero plasticity is improved by a laser shock peening technique. Moreover, we map the distribution of laser-induced residual stresses via the micro-slot cutting method, and then predict them using a three-dimensional finite-element method coupled with a confined plasma model. Reasonable agreement is achieved between the experimental and modeling results. The analyses of serrated flows reveal plentiful and useful information of the underlying deformation process. Our work provides an easy and effective way to extend the ductility of intrinsically-brittle BMGs, opening up wider applications of these materials.

  11. A combined arc-melting and tilt-casting furnace for the manufacture of high-purity bulk metallic glass materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soinila, E; Pihlajamäki, T; Bossuyt, S; Hänninen, H

    2011-07-01

    An arc-melting furnace which includes a tilt-casting facility was designed and built, for the purpose of producing bulk metallic glass specimens. Tilt-casting was chosen because reportedly, in combination with high-purity processing, it produces the best fatigue endurance in Zr-based bulk metallic glasses. Incorporating the alloying and casting facilities in a single piece of equipment reduces the amount of laboratory space and capital investment needed. Eliminating the sample transfer step from the production process also saves time and reduces sample contamination. This is important because the glass forming ability in many alloy systems, such as Zr-based glass-forming alloys, deteriorates rapidly with increasing oxygen content of the specimen. The challenge was to create a versatile instrument, in which high purity conditions can be maintained throughout the process, even when melting alloys with high affinity for oxygen. Therefore, the design provides a high-vacuum chamber to be filled with a low-oxygen inert atmosphere, and takes special care to keep the system hermetically sealed throughout the process. In particular, movements of the arc-melting electrode and sample manipulator arm are accommodated by deformable metal bellows, rather than sliding O-ring seals, and the whole furnace is tilted for tilt-casting. This performance of the furnace is demonstrated by alloying and casting Zr(55)Cu(30)Al(10)Ni(5) directly into rods up to ø 10 mm which are verified to be amorphous by x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry, and to exhibit locally ductile fracture at liquid nitrogen temperature.

  12. Glass melting and its innovation potentials: the impact of the input and output geometries on the utilization of the melting space

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polák, M.; Němec, Lubomír

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 3 (2010), s. 212-218 ISSN 0862-5468 R&D Projects: GA MPO 2A-1TP1/063 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : space utilization, * sand dissolution * bubble removal * space geometry Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.297, year: 2010

  13. Improvement of the Shock Absorption Ability of a Face Guard by Incorporating a Glass-Fiber-Reinforced Thermoplastic and Buffering Space

    OpenAIRE

    Wada, Takahiro; Churei, Hiroshi; Takayanagi, Haruka; Iwasaki, Naohiko; Ueno, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Uo, Motohiro

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the shock absorption ability of trial face guards (FGs) incorporating a glass-fiber-reinforced thermoplastic (GF) and buffering space. The mechanical properties of 3.2 mm and 1.6 mm thick commercial medical splint materials (Aquaplast, AP) and experimental GF prepared from 1.6 mm thick AP and fiberglass cloth were determined by a three-point bending test. Shock absorption tests were conducted on APs with two different thicknesses and two types of experimental mate...

  14. Power law and exponential ejecta size distributions from the dynamic fragmentation of shock-loaded Cu and Sn metals under melt conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, O.; Soulard, L.

    2013-01-01

    Large scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to study and to model the ejecta production from the dynamic fragmentation of shock-loaded metals under melt conditions. A generic 3D crystal in contact with vacuum containing about 10 8 atoms and with a sinusoidal free surface roughness is shock loaded so as to undergo a solid-liquid phase change on shock. The reflection of the shock wave at the interface metal/vacuum gives rise to the ejection of 2D jets/sheets of atoms (Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities in the continuum limit), which develop and break up, forming ejecta (fragments) of different volumes (or mass). The fragmentation process is investigated by analyzing the evolution of the resulting volume distribution of the ejecta as a function of time. Two metals are studied (Cu and Sn) and the amplitude of the roughness is varied. The simulations show that the associated distributions exhibit a generic behavior with the sum of two distinct terms of varying weight, following the expansion rate of the jets: in the small size limit, the distribution obeys a power law dependence with an exponent equal to 1.15 ± 0.08; and in the large size limit, it obeys an exponential form. These two components are interpreted, with the help of additional simple simulations, as the signature of two different basic mechanisms of fragmentation. The power law dependence results from the fragmentation of a 2D network of ligaments arranged following a fractal (scale free) geometry and generated when the sheets of liquid metal expand and tear. The exponential distribution results from a 1D Poisson fragmentation process of the largest ligaments previously generated. Unlike the power law distribution, it is governed by a characteristic length scale, which may be provided by energy balance principle

  15. Power law and exponential ejecta size distributions from the dynamic fragmentation of shock-loaded Cu and Sn metals under melt conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durand, O.; Soulard, L. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

    2013-11-21

    Large scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to study and to model the ejecta production from the dynamic fragmentation of shock-loaded metals under melt conditions. A generic 3D crystal in contact with vacuum containing about 10{sup 8} atoms and with a sinusoidal free surface roughness is shock loaded so as to undergo a solid-liquid phase change on shock. The reflection of the shock wave at the interface metal/vacuum gives rise to the ejection of 2D jets/sheets of atoms (Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities in the continuum limit), which develop and break up, forming ejecta (fragments) of different volumes (or mass). The fragmentation process is investigated by analyzing the evolution of the resulting volume distribution of the ejecta as a function of time. Two metals are studied (Cu and Sn) and the amplitude of the roughness is varied. The simulations show that the associated distributions exhibit a generic behavior with the sum of two distinct terms of varying weight, following the expansion rate of the jets: in the small size limit, the distribution obeys a power law dependence with an exponent equal to 1.15 ± 0.08; and in the large size limit, it obeys an exponential form. These two components are interpreted, with the help of additional simple simulations, as the signature of two different basic mechanisms of fragmentation. The power law dependence results from the fragmentation of a 2D network of ligaments arranged following a fractal (scale free) geometry and generated when the sheets of liquid metal expand and tear. The exponential distribution results from a 1D Poisson fragmentation process of the largest ligaments previously generated. Unlike the power law distribution, it is governed by a characteristic length scale, which may be provided by energy balance principle.

  16. Synthesis and structure of Na-Li-Si-Al-P-O-N glasses prepared by melt nitridation using NH3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kidar, A.; Pomeroy, M.J.; Hampshire, S.; Mercier, C.; Leriche, A.; Revel, B.

    2012-01-01

    Na-Li-Si-Al-P-O-N glasses have been prepared by nitridation of a pre-synthesized Na 2 O-Li 2 O-SiO 2 -P 2 O 5 -Al 2 O 3 glass under anhydrous ammonia. Nitrogen for oxygen substitution increases the network connectivity leading to increases in microhardness and glass transition temperature. Raman and 31 P MAS-NMR spectroscopy indicate sequential nitridation reactions forming PO 3 N and PO 2 N 2 species. The data collected so far show no evidence of N/O substitutions in the silicate sub-network. (authors)

  17. Bioactive glass-ceramic coatings prepared by pulsed laser deposition from RKKP targets (sol-gel vs melt-processing route)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rau, J.V., E-mail: giulietta.rau@ism.cnr.it [Istituto di Struttura della Materia, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere, 100-00133 Rome (Italy); Teghil, R. [Universita della Basilicata, Dipartimento di Chimica ' A.M. Tamburro' , Via dell' Ateneo Lucano, 10-85100 Potenza (Italy); CNR-IMIP U.O.S. di Potenza, Zona Industriale di Tito scalo (PZ) (Italy); Fosca, M. [Istituto di Struttura della Materia, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere, 100-00133 Rome (Italy); Universita di Roma ' La Sapienza' , Dipartimento di Chimica, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 5-00185 Rome (Italy); De Bonis, A. [Universita della Basilicata, Dipartimento di Chimica ' A.M. Tamburro' , Via dell' Ateneo Lucano, 10-85100 Potenza (Italy); CNR-IMIP U.O.S. di Potenza, Zona Industriale di Tito scalo (PZ) (Italy); Cacciotti, I.; Bianco, A. [Universita di Roma ' Tor Vergata' , Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale, UR INSTM ' Roma Tor Vergata' , Via del Politecnico, 1-00133 Rome (Italy); Albertini, V. Rossi [Istituto di Struttura della Materia, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere, 100-00133 Rome (Italy); Caminiti, R. [Universita di Roma ' La Sapienza' , Dipartimento di Chimica, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 5-00185 Rome (Italy); Ravaglioli, A. [Parco Torricelli delle Arti e delle Scienze, Via Granarolo, 64-48018 Faenza (Ra) (Italy)

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bioactive glass-ceramic coatings for bone tissue repair and regeneration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pulsed Lased Deposition allowed congruent transfer of target composition to coating. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Target was prepared by sol-gel process suitable for compositional tailoring. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Titanium, widely used for orthopaedics and dental implants, was used as substrate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The physico-chemical properties of the prepared coatings are reported. -- Abstract: The deposition of innovative glass-ceramic composition (i.e. RKKP) coatings by Pulsed Lased Deposition (PLD) technique is reported. RKKP was synthesised following two methodologies: melt-processing and sol-gel, the latter being particularly suitable to tailor the compositional range. The PLD advantage with respect to other deposition techniques is the congruent transfer of the target composition to the coating. The physico-chemical properties of films were investigated by Scanning Electron and Atomic Force Microscopies, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Angular and Energy Dispersive X-ray Diffraction, and Vickers microhardness. The deposition performed at 12 J/cm{sup 2} and 500 Degree-Sign C allows to prepare crystalline films with the composition that replicates rather well that of the initial targets. The 0.6 {mu}m thin melt-processing RKKP films, possessing the hardness of 25 GPa, and the 4.3 {mu}m thick sol-gel films with the hardness of 17 GPa were obtained.

  18. High spatial resolution geochemistry and textural characteristics of 'microtektite' glass spherules in proximal Cretaceous-Paleogene sections: Insights into glass alteration patterns and precursor melt lithologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belza, J.; Goderis, S.; Smit, J.; Vanhaecke, F.; Baert, K.; Terryn, H.; Claeys, P.

    2015-01-01

    Using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), we have conducted spatially resolved trace element analysis on fresh, unaltered microtektite glasses linked to the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) boundary Chicxulub crater and on their surrounding alteration phases. This

  19. Acid neutralizing, mechanical and physical properties of pit and fissure sealants containing melt-derived 45S5 bioactive glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Song-Yi; Piao, Yin-Zhu; Kim, Sung-Min; Lee, Yong-Keun; Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Kim, Kwang-Mahn

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of 45S5 bioactive glass (BAG) on the acid neutralizing, mechanical and physical properties of pit and fissure sealants. 45S5BAG (glass (180 ± 30 nm) and added into a resin matrix [Bis-GMA/TEGDMA 50/50 (wt%) containing 1% of DMAEMA/CQ 2:1 (wt%)] with varying filler proportions; 0% 45S5BAG+50% glass (BAG0); 12.5% 45S5BAG+37.5% glass (BAG12.5); 25% 45S5BAG+25% glass (BAG25); 37.5% 45S5BAG+12.5% glass (BAG37.5); and 50% 45S5BAG+0% glass (BAG50). To evaluate the acid neutralizing properties, specimens were immersed in lactic acid solution (pH 4.0). Then, the change in pH and the time required to raise the pH from 4.0 to 5.5 were measured. In addition, flexural strength, water sorption and solubility were analyzed. The acid neutralizing properties of each group exhibited increasing pH values as more 45S5BAG was added, and the time required to raise the pH from 4.0 to 5.5 became shorter as the proportion of 45S5BAG increased (P0.05), except for BAG50. The novel pit and fissure sealants neutralized the acid solution (pH 4.0) and exhibited appropriate mechanical and physical properties. Therefore, these compounds are suitable candidates for caries-inhibiting dental materials. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Model-based control of glass melting furnaces and forehearths: first principles-based model of predictive control system design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backx, T.C.; Huisman, L.; Astrid, P.; Beerkens, R.G.C.

    2003-01-01

    The volume of the Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceeding (CESP) series, in which this paper is incorporated, contains a collection of papers dealing with issues in both traditional ceramics (i.e., glass, whitewares, refractories, and porcelain enamel) and advanced ceramics. Topics covered in the

  1. Glass melting and its innovation potentials: The combination of transversal and longitudinal circulations and its influence on space utilisation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polák, M.; Němec, Lubomír

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 357, 16-17 (2011), s. 3108-3116 ISSN 0022-3093 R&D Projects: GA MPO 2A-1TP1/063 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : space utilisation * sand dissolution * bubble removal * flow patterns * model furnace Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.537, year: 2011

  2. Selective laser melting of an Al86Ni6Y4.5Co2La1.5 metallic glass: Processing, microstructure evolution and mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X.P.; Kang, C.W.; Huang, H.; Zhang, L.C.; Sercombe, T.B.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, single line scans at different laser powers were carried out using selective laser meting (SLM) equipment on a pre-fabricated porous Al 86 Ni 6 Y 4.5 Co 2 La 1.5 metallic glass (MG) preform. The densification, microstructural evolution, phase transformation and mechanical properties of the scan tracks were systematically investigated. It was found that the morphology of the scan track was influenced by the energy distribution of the laser beam and the heat transfer competition between convection and conduction in the melt pool. Due to the Gaussian distribution of laser energy and heat transfer process, different regions of the scan track experienced different thermal histories, resulting in a gradient microstructure and mechanical properties. Higher laser powers caused higher thermal stresses, which led to the formation of cracks; while low power reduced the strength of the laser track, also inducing cracking. The thermal fluctuation at high laser power produced an inhomogeneous chemical distribution which gave rise to severe crystallization of the MG, despite the high cooling rate. The crystallization occurred both within the heat affected zone (HAZ) and at the edge of melt pool. However, by choosing an appropriate laser power crack-free scan tracks could be produced with no crystallization. This work provides the necessary fundamental understanding that will lead to the fabrication of large-size, crack-free MG with high density, controllable microstructure and mechanical properties using SLM

  3. Theoretical Considerations of the Prigogine-Defay Ration with Regard to the Glass-Forming Ability of Drugs from Undercooled Melts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyttenbach, Nicole; Kirchmeyer, Wiebke; Alsenz, Jochem; Kuentz, Martin [UASANS

    2016-01-26

    Drug behavior in undercooled melts is highly important for pharmaceutics with regard to amorphous solid dispersions, and therefore, categories were recently introduced that differentiate glass formers (GFs) from other drugs that are nonglass formers (nGFs). The present study is based on the assumption that molecular properties relevant for the so-called Prigogine–Defay (PD) ratio would be indicative of a drug’s glass-forming ability. The PD ratio depends in theory on the entropy of fusion and molar volume. Experimental data were gathered from a broad set of pharmaceutical compounds (n = 54) using differential scanning calorimetry. The obtained entropy of fusion and molar volume were indeed found to significantly discriminate GFs from nGFs. In a next step, the entropy of fusion was predicted by different in silico methods. A first group contribution method provided rather unreliable estimates for the entropy of fusion, while an alternative in silico approach seemed more promising for drug categorization. Thus, a significant discrimination model employed molar volume, a so-called effective hydrogen bond number, and effective number of torsional bonds (or torsional units) to categorize GFs and nGFs (p ≤ 0.0000). The results led to new insights into drug vitrification and to practical rules of thumb. The latter may serve as guidance in pharmaceutical profiling and early formulation development with respect to amorphous drug formulations.

  4. From beta-relaxation to alpha-decay: Atomistic picture from molecular dynamics simulations for glass-forming Ni0.5Zr0.5 melt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teichler, Helmar [Inst. Materialphysik, Univ Goettingen (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    In glass-forming melts the decay of structural fluctuation shows the well known transition from beta-relaxation (von-Schweidler law with exponent b) to alpha-decay (KWW law with exponent beta). Here we present results from molecular dynamics simulations for a metallic glass forming Ni0.5Zr0.5 model aimed at giving an understanding of this transition on the atomistic scale. At the considered temperature below mode coupling Tc, the dynamics of the system can be interpreted by residence of the particles in their neighbour cages and escape from the cages as rare processes. Our analysis yields that the fraction of residing particles is characterized by a hierarchical law in time, with von-Schweidler b explicitly related to the exponent of this law. In the alpha-decay regime the stretching exponent reflects, in addition, floating of the cages due to strain effects of escaped particles. Accordingly, the change from beta-relaxation to alpha-decay indicates the transition from low to large fraction of escaped particles.

  5. Coercivity of the Nd–Fe–B hot-deformed magnets diffusion-processed with low melting temperature glass forming alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seelam, U.M.R. [Elements Strategy Initiative Center for Magnetic Materials (ESICMM), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Liu, Lihua [Elements Strategy Initiative Center for Magnetic Materials (ESICMM), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan); Akiya, T.; Sepehri-Amin, H.; Ohkubo, T. [Elements Strategy Initiative Center for Magnetic Materials (ESICMM), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Sakuma, N.; Yano, M.; Kato, A. [Advanced Material Engineering Division, Toyota Motor Corporation, Susono 410-1193 (Japan); Hono, K., E-mail: kazuhiro.hono@nims.go.jp [Elements Strategy Initiative Center for Magnetic Materials (ESICMM), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    Nd- and Pr-based alloys with bulk glass forming ability and low melting temperatures, Nd{sub 60}Al{sub 10}Ni{sub 10}Cu{sub 20} and Pr{sub 60}Al{sub 10}Ni{sub 10}Cu{sub 20}, were used for grain boundary diffusion process to enhance the coercivity of hot-deformed magnets. The coercivity increment was proportional to the weight gain after the diffusion process. For the sample with 64% weight gain, the coercivity increased up to 2.8 T, which is the highest value for bulk Nd–Fe–B magnets that do not contain heavy rare-earth elements, Dy or Tb. Approximately half of the intergranular regions were amorphous and the remaining regions were crystalline. Magnetic isolation of the Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B grains by the Nd-rich amorphous/crystalline intergranular phases is attributed to the large coercivity enhancement. The coercivity does not change after the crystallization of the intergranular phase, indicating that the coercivity is not influenced by the strain at the interface with the crystalline intergranular phase. - Highlights: • Bulk-glass forming alloys were infiltrated into hot-deformed Nd–Fe–B magnets. • Very high coercivity of 2.8 T was attained without heavy rare-earth elements. • Approximately half of the inter-granular regions were amorphous. • Crystallization of amorphous intergranular phase does not change coercivity.

  6. Effect of P addition on glass forming ability and soft magnetic properties of melt-spun FeSiBCuC alloy ribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, J.; Yang, Y.Z.; Li, W.; Chen, X.C.; Xie, Z.W.

    2016-01-01

    The dependency of phosphorous content on the glass forming ability, thermal stability and soft magnetic properties of Fe 83.4 Si 2 B 14−x P x Cu 0.5 C 0.1 (x=0,1,2,3,4) alloys was investigated. The experimental results showed that the substitution of B by P increased the glass forming ability in this alloy system. The Fe 83.4 Si 2 B 10 P 4 Cu 0.5 C 0.1 alloy shows a fully amorphous character. Thermal stability of melt-spun ribbons increases and temperature interval between the first and second crystallization peaks enlarges with the increase of P content. And the saturation magnetic flux density (Bs) shows a slight increase with the increase of P content. The Fe 83.4 Si 2 B 11 P 3 Cu 0.5 C 0.1 nanocrystalline alloy exhibits a high Bs about 200.6 emu/g. The Bs of fully amorphous alloy Fe 83.4 Si 2 B 10 P 4 Cu 0.5 C 0.1 drops dramatically to 172.1 emu/g, which is lower than that of other nanocrystallines. Low material cost and excellent soft magnetic properties make the FeSiBPCuC alloys promise soft magnetic materials for industrial applications. - Highlights: • Partial substituting B by P helps to improve the glass forming ability of the alloy. • The addition of P content reduces the thermal stability and improves heat treatment temperature region for these alloys. • The Fe 83.4 Si 2 B 11 P 3 Cu 0.5 C 0.1 nanocrystalline alloy exhibits a high saturation magnetic density of 200.6 emu/g.

  7. Key role of the expression of bone morphogenetic proteins in increasing the osteogenic activity of osteoblast-like cells exposed to shock waves and seeded on bioactive glass-ceramic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzio, Giuliana; Martinasso, Germana; Baino, Francesco; Frairia, Roberto; Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara; Canuto, Rosa A

    2014-11-01

    In this work, the role of shock wave-induced increase of bone morphogenetic proteins in modulating the osteogenic properties of osteoblast-like cells seeded on a bioactive scaffold was investigated using gremlin as a bone morphogenetic protein antagonist. Bone-like glass-ceramic scaffolds, based on a silicate experimental bioactive glass developed at the Politecnico di Torino, were produced by the sponge replication method and used as porous substrates for cell culture. Human MG-63 cells, exposed to shock waves and seeded on the scaffolds, were treated with gremlin every two days and analysed after 20 days for the expression of osteoblast differentiation markers. Shock waves have been shown to induce osteogenic activity mediated by increased expression of alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, type I collagen, BMP-4 and BMP-7. Cells exposed to shock waves plus gremlin showed increased growth in comparison with cells treated with shock waves alone and, conversely, mRNA contents of alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin were significantly lower. Therefore, the shock wave-mediated increased expression of bone morphogenetic protein in MG-63 cells seeded on the scaffolds is essential in improving osteogenic activity; blocking bone morphogenetic protein via gremlin completely prevents the increase of alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin. The results confirmed that the combination of glass-ceramic scaffolds and shock waves exposure could be used to significantly improve osteogenesis opening new perspectives for bone regenerative medicine. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  8. Localized atomic segregation in the spalled area of a Zr50Cu40Al10 bulk metallic glasses induced by laser-shock experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jodar, B.; Loison, D.; Yokoyama, Y.; Lescoute, E.; Nivard, M.; Berthe, L.; Sangleboeuf, J.-C.

    2018-02-01

    Laser-shock experiments were performed on a ternary {Zr50{Cu}40{Al}10} bulk metallic glass. A spalling process was studied through post-mortem analyses conducted on a recovered sample and spall. Scanning electron microscopy magnification of fracture surfaces revealed the presence of a peculiar feature known as cup-cone. Cups are found on sample fracture surface while cones are observed on spall. Two distinct regions can be observed on cups and cones: a smooth viscous-like region in the center and a flat one with large vein-pattern in the periphery. Energy dispersive spectroscopy measurements conducted on these features emphasized atomic distribution discrepancies both on the sample and spall. We propose a mechanism for the initiation and the growth of these features but also a process for atomic segregation during spallation. Cup and cones would originate from cracks arising from shear bands formation (softened paths). These shear bands result from a quadrupolar-shaped atomic disorder engendered around an initiation site by shock wave propagation. This disorder turns into a shear band when tensile front reaches spallation plane. During the separation process, temperature gain induced by shock waves and shear bands generation decreases material viscosity leading to higher atomic mobility. Once in a liquid-like form, atomic clusters migrate and segregate due to inertial effects originating from particle velocity variation (interaction of release waves). As a result, a high rate of copper is found in sample cups and high zirconium concentration is found on spall cones.

  9. Relaxation processes and glass transition of confined polymer melts: A molecular dynamics simulation of 1,4-polybutadiene between graphite walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solar, M; Binder, K; Paul, W

    2017-05-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a chemically realistic model for 1,4-polybutadiene in a thin film geometry confined by two graphite walls are presented. Previous work on melts in the bulk has shown that the model faithfully reproduces static and dynamic properties of the real material over a wide temperature range. The present work studies how these properties change due to nano-confinement. The focus is on orientational correlations observable in nuclear magnetic resonance experiments and on the local intermediate incoherent neutron scattering function, F s (q z , z, t), for distances z from the graphite walls in the range of a few nanometers. Temperatures from about 2T g down to about 1.15T g , where T g is the glass transition temperature in the bulk, are studied. It is shown that weakly attractive forces between the wall atoms and the monomers suffice to effectively bind a polymer coil that is near the wall. For a wide regime of temperatures, the Arrhenius-like adsorption/desorption kinetics of the monomers is the slowest process, while very close to T g the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann-like α-relaxation takes over. The α-process is modified only for z≤1.2 nm due to the density changes near the walls, less than expected from studies of coarse-grained (bead-spring-type) models. The weakness of the surface effects on the glass transition in this case is attributed to the interplay of density changes near the wall with the torsional potential. A brief discussion of pertinent experiments is given.

  10. Improvement of the Shock Absorption Ability of a Face Guard by Incorporating a Glass-Fiber-Reinforced Thermoplastic and Buffering Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Wada

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the shock absorption ability of trial face guards (FGs incorporating a glass-fiber-reinforced thermoplastic (GF and buffering space. The mechanical properties of 3.2 mm and 1.6 mm thick commercial medical splint materials (Aquaplast, AP and experimental GF prepared from 1.6 mm thick AP and fiberglass cloth were determined by a three-point bending test. Shock absorption tests were conducted on APs with two different thicknesses and two types of experimental materials, both with a bottom material of 1.6 mm thick AP and a buffering space of 30 mm in diameter (APS and with either (i 1.6 mm thick AP (AP-APS or (ii  1.6 mm thick GF (GF-APS covering the APS. The GF exhibited significantly higher flexural strength (64.4 MPa and flexural modulus (7.53 GPa than the commercial specimens. The maximum load of GF-APS was 75% that of 3.2 mm AP, which is widely used clinically. The maximum stress of the GF-APS only could not be determined as its maximum stress is below the limits of the analysis materials used (<0.5 MPa. Incorporating a GF and buffering space would enhance the shock absorption ability; thus, the shock absorption ability increased while the total thickness and weight decreased.

  11. Recent advances in phosphate laser glasses for high power applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J.H.

    1996-01-01

    Recent advances in Nd-doped phosphate laser glasses for high-peak-power and high-average-power applications are reviewed. Compositional studies have progressed to the point that glasses can be tailored to have specific properties for specific applications. Non-radiative relaxation effects can be accurately modeled and empirical expressions have been developed to evaluate both intrinsic (structural) and extrinsic (contamination induced) relaxation effects. Losses due to surface scattering and bulk glass absorption have been carefully measured and can be accurately predicted. Improvements in processing have lead to high damage threshold (e.g. Pt inclusion free) and high thermal shock resistant glasses with improved edge claddings. High optical quality pieces up to 79 x 45 x 4cm 3 have been made and methods for continuous melting laser glass are under development

  12. X-ray Raman scattering study of MgSiO₃ glass at high pressure: Implication for triclustered MgSiO₃ melt in Earth's mantle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Keun; Lin, Jung-Fu; Cai, Yong Q.; Hiraoka, Nozomu; Eng, Peter J.; Okuchi, Takuo; Mao, Ho-kwang; Meng, Yue; Hu, Michael Y.; Chow, Paul; Shu, Jinfu; Li, Baosheng; Fukui, Hiroshi; Lee, Bum Han; Kim, Hyun Na; Yoo, Choong-Shik [SNU; (LLNL); (NSRRC); (Okayama); (UC); (CIW); (Wash State U); (Nagoya); (SBU)

    2015-02-09

    Silicate melts at the top of the transition zone and the core-mantle boundary have significant influences on the dynamics and properties of Earth's interior. MgSiO3-rich silicate melts were among the primary components of the magma ocean and thus played essential roles in the chemical differentiation of the early Earth. Diverse macroscopic properties of silicate melts in Earth's interior, such as density, viscosity, and crystal-melt partitioning, depend on their electronic and short-range local structures at high pressures and temperatures. Despite essential roles of silicate melts in many geophysical and geodynamic problems, little is known about their nature under the conditions of Earth's interior, including the densification mechanisms and the atomistic origins of the macroscopic properties at high pressures. Here, we have probed local electronic structures of MgSiO3 glass (as a precursor to Mg-silicate melts), using high-pressure x-ray Raman spectroscopy up to 39 GPa, in which high-pressure oxygen K-edge features suggest the formation of tricluster oxygens (oxygen coordinated with three Si frameworks; [3]O) between 12 and 20 GPa. Our results indicate that the densification in MgSiO3 melt is thus likely to be accompanied with the formation of triculster, in addition to a reduction in nonbridging oxygens. The pressure-induced increase in the fraction of oxygen triclusters >20 GPa would result in enhanced density, viscosity, and crystal-melt partitioning, and reduced element diffusivity in the MgSiO3 melt toward deeper part of the Earth's lower mantle.

  13. The shock behaviour of a SiO2-Li2O transparent glass-ceramic armour material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickup, I.M.; Millett, J.C.F.; Bourne, N.K.

    2004-01-01

    The dynamic behaviour of a transparent glass-ceramic material, Transarm, developed by Alstom UK for the UK MoD has been studied. Plate impact experiments have been used to measure the materials Hugoniot characteristics and failure behaviour. Longitudinal stresses have been measured using embedded and back surface mounted Manganin gauges. Above a threshold stress of ca. 4 GPa, the longitudinal stress histories exhibit a significant secondary rise, prior to attaining their Hugoniot stress. Lateral stresses were also measured by embedding Manganin gauges in longitudinal cuts. Significant secondary rises in stress were observed when the applied longitudinal stress exceeded the 4 GPa threshold, indicating the presence of a failure front. The dynamic shear strength of the glass has been measured using the longitudinal and lateral data. Even though significant strength drops have been measured before and behind the failure front, the material has a high post-failure strength compared to non- crystalline glasses

  14. The Shock Behaviour of a SiO2-Li2O Transparent Glass-Ceramic Armour Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickup, I. M.; Millett, J. C. F.; Bourne, N. K.

    2004-07-01

    The dynamic behaviour of a transparent glass-ceramic material, Transarm, developed by Alstom UK for the UK MoD has been studied. Plate impact experiments have been used to measure the materials Hugoniot characteristics and failure behaviour. Longitudinal stresses have been measured using embedded and back surface mounted Manganin gauges. Above a threshold stress of ca. 4 GPa, the longitudinal stress histories exhibit a significant secondary rise, prior to attaining their Hugoniot stress. Lateral stresses were also measured by embedding Manganin gauges in longitudinal cuts. Significant secondary rises in stress were observed when the applied longitudinal stress exceeded the 4 GPa threshold, indicating the presence of a failure front. The dynamic shear strength of the glass has been measured using the longitudinal and lateral data. Even though significant strength drops have been measured before and behind the failure front, the material has a high post-failure strength compared to non- crystalline glasses.

  15. Glass science tutorial: Lecture number-sign 2, Operating electric glass melters. James N. Edmonson, Lecturer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.

    1994-10-01

    This report contains basic information on electric furnaces used for glass melting and on the properties of glass useful for the stabilization of radioactive wastes. Furnace nomenclature, furnace types, typical silicate glass composition and properties, thermal conductivity information, kinetics of the melting process, glass furnace refractory materials composition and thermal conductivity, and equations required for the operation of glass melters are included

  16. Self-assembly and glass-formation in a lattice model of telechelic polymer melts: Influence of stiffness of the sticky bonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Wen-Sheng, E-mail: wsxu@uchicago.edu [James Franck Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Freed, Karl F., E-mail: freed@uchicago.edu [James Franck Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Department of Chemistry, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2016-06-07

    Telechelic polymers are chain macromolecules that may self-assemble through the association of their two mono-functional end groups (called “stickers”). A deep understanding of the relation between microscopic molecular details and the macroscopic physical properties of telechelic polymers is important in guiding the rational design of telechelic polymer materials with desired properties. The lattice cluster theory (LCT) for strongly interacting, self-assembling telechelic polymers provides a theoretical tool that enables establishing the connections between important microscopic molecular details of self-assembling polymers and their bulk thermodynamics. The original LCT for self-assembly of telechelic polymers considers a model of fully flexible linear chains [J. Dudowicz and K. F. Freed, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 064902 (2012)], while our recent work introduces a significant improvement to the LCT by including a description of chain semiflexibility for the bonds within each individual telechelic chain [W.-S. Xu and K. F. Freed, J. Chem. Phys. 143, 024901 (2015)], but the physically associative (or called “sticky”) bonds between the ends of the telechelics are left as fully flexible. Motivated by the ubiquitous presence of steric constraints on the association of real telechelic polymers that impart an additional degree of bond stiffness (or rigidity), the present paper further extends the LCT to permit the sticky bonds to be semiflexible but to have a stiffness differing from that within each telechelic chain. An analytical expression for the Helmholtz free energy is provided for this model of linear telechelic polymer melts, and illustrative calculations demonstrate the significant influence of the stiffness of the sticky bonds on the self-assembly and thermodynamics of telechelic polymers. A brief discussion is also provided for the impact of self-assembly on glass-formation by combining the LCT description for this extended model of telechelic polymers with

  17. Self-assembly and glass-formation in a lattice model of telechelic polymer melts: Influence of stiffness of the sticky bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Wen-Sheng; Freed, Karl F.

    2016-01-01

    Telechelic polymers are chain macromolecules that may self-assemble through the association of their two mono-functional end groups (called “stickers”). A deep understanding of the relation between microscopic molecular details and the macroscopic physical properties of telechelic polymers is important in guiding the rational design of telechelic polymer materials with desired properties. The lattice cluster theory (LCT) for strongly interacting, self-assembling telechelic polymers provides a theoretical tool that enables establishing the connections between important microscopic molecular details of self-assembling polymers and their bulk thermodynamics. The original LCT for self-assembly of telechelic polymers considers a model of fully flexible linear chains [J. Dudowicz and K. F. Freed, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 064902 (2012)], while our recent work introduces a significant improvement to the LCT by including a description of chain semiflexibility for the bonds within each individual telechelic chain [W.-S. Xu and K. F. Freed, J. Chem. Phys. 143, 024901 (2015)], but the physically associative (or called “sticky”) bonds between the ends of the telechelics are left as fully flexible. Motivated by the ubiquitous presence of steric constraints on the association of real telechelic polymers that impart an additional degree of bond stiffness (or rigidity), the present paper further extends the LCT to permit the sticky bonds to be semiflexible but to have a stiffness differing from that within each telechelic chain. An analytical expression for the Helmholtz free energy is provided for this model of linear telechelic polymer melts, and illustrative calculations demonstrate the significant influence of the stiffness of the sticky bonds on the self-assembly and thermodynamics of telechelic polymers. A brief discussion is also provided for the impact of self-assembly on glass-formation by combining the LCT description for this extended model of telechelic polymers with

  18. Development of improved laser glasses which can be melted on a commercial scale. Annual progress report, September 15, 1976--September 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, C.F.; Huff, N.T.; Vergano, P.J.

    1978-04-01

    Large neodymium doped glass laser systems are presently being built for nuclear fusion research. However, the power which can be generated by these systems is generally limited by self focusing in the laser glass. This study was undertaken to develop laser glasses with a minimum nonlinear refractive index which would allow the generation of higher powers in these laser systems. Various fluorophosphate glass forming systems were investigated in order to develop laser glasses with ''optimum'' properties (low n/sub 2/, medium sigma, long tau, highly stable). In these fluorophosphate systems, the regions of glass formation were defined and glass composition-property correlation equations were derived which related the various properties (n/sub D/, n/sub 2/, sigma, the Nd/sup 3 +/ peak lambda, ..delta..lambda, effective ..delta..lambda, sigma and tau radiative) to the glass composition. Specific glass compositions were developed which had nonlinear refractive indices of about /sup 1///sub 3/ those of commercial silicate laser glasses but had comparable spectroscopic properties (i.e., sigma). These glasses were sufficiently stable to cast single pieces of glass weighing in excess of 50 lbs.

  19. Physical properties of glasses exposed to Earth-facing and trailing-side environments on LDEF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedlocher, David E.; Kinser, Donald L.; Weller, Robert A.; Weeks, Robert A.; Mendenhall, Marcus H.

    1993-01-01

    The exposure of 108 glass samples and 12 glass-ceramic samples to Earth-orbit environments permitted measurements which establish the effects of each environment. Examination of five glass types and one glass ceramic located on both the Earth-facing side and the trailing edge revealed no reduction in strength within experimental limits. Strength measurements subjected less than 5 percent of the sample surface area to stresses above 90 percent of the glass's failure strength. Seven micrometeorite or space debris impacts occurred on trailing edge samples. One of those impacts occurred in a location which was subjected to 50 percent of the applied stress at failure. Micrometeorite or space debris impacts were not observed on Earth-facing samples. The physical shape and structure of the impact sites were carefully examined using stereographic scanning electron microscopy. These impacts induce a stress concentration at the damaged region which influences mechanical strength. The flaw size produced by such damage was examined to determine the magnitude of strength degradation in micrometeorite or space-debris impacted glasses. Scanning electron microscopy revealed topographical details of impact sites which included central melt zones and glass fiber production. The overall crater structure is similar to much larger impacts of large meteorite on the Moon in that the melt crater is surrounded by shocked regions of material which fracture zones and spall areas. Residual stresses arising from shock compression and cooling of the fused zone cannot currently be included in fracture mechanics analyses based on simple flaw size examination.

  20. Foam Glass for Construction Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund

    2016-01-01

    Foaming is commonly achieved by adding foaming agents such as metal oxides or metal carbonates to glass powder. At elevated temperature, the glass melt becomes viscous and the foaming agents decompose or react to form gas, causing a foamy glass melt. Subsequent cooling to room temperature, result...... in a solid foam glass. The foam glass industry employs a range of different melt precursors and foaming agents. Recycle glass is key melt precursors. Many parameters influence the foaming process and optimising the foaming conditions is very time consuming. The most challenging and attractive goal is to make...... low density foam glass for thermal insulation applications. In this thesis, it is argued that the use of metal carbonates as foaming agents is not suitable for low density foam glass. A reaction mechanism is proposed to justify this result. Furthermore, an in situ method is developed to optimise...

  1. Experimental investigation and optimisation of burner systems for glass melting ends with regenerative air preheating. Final report; Experimentelle Untersuchung und Optimierung von Brennersystemen fuer Glasschmelzwannen mit regenerativer Luftvorwaermung. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherello, A.; Flamme, M.; Kremer, H.

    2000-02-15

    The project comprised experiments on burner systems for glass melting ends with regenerative air preheating for the purpose of optimisation. The experimental set-up was to reflect realistic conditions. In the first stage of the investigations, modern burner systems were installed in a GWI test facility and investigated. [German] Ziel des oben genannten Forschungsvorhabens war die Durchfuehrung experimenteller Untersuchungen von Brennersystemen fuer Glasschmelzwannen mit regenerativer Luftvorwaermung sowie deren Optimierung. Dazu war es notwendig, einen experimentellen Aufbau zu realisieren, mit dessen Hilfe die Stroemungs-, Mischungs- und Umsetzungsphaenomene von Glasschmelzoefen realistisch nachgestellt und aussagekraeftige Untersuchungen durchgefuehrt werden koennen. In einem ersten Untersuchungsschritt wurden moderne Brennerlanzen an der GWI-Versuchsanlage installiert und untersucht. (orig.)

  2. Shock Compression and Melting of an Fe-Ni-Si Alloy: Implications for the Temperature Profile of the Earth's Core and the Heat Flux Across the Core-Mantle Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Youjun; Sekine, Toshimori; Lin, Jung-Fu; He, Hongliang; Liu, Fusheng; Zhang, Mingjian; Sato, Tomoko; Zhu, Wenjun; Yu, Yin

    2018-02-01

    Understanding the melting behavior and the thermal equation of state of Fe-Ni alloyed with candidate light elements at conditions of the Earth's core is critical for our knowledge of the region's thermal structure and chemical composition and the heat flow across the liquid outer core into the lowermost mantle. Here we studied the shock equation of state and melting curve of an Fe-8 wt% Ni-10 wt% Si alloy up to 250 GPa by hypervelocity impacts with direct velocity and reliable temperature measurements. Our results show that the addition of 10 wt% Si to Fe-8 wt% Ni alloy slightly depresses the melting temperature of iron by 200-300 (±200) K at the core-mantle boundary ( 136 GPa) and by 600-800 (±500) K at the inner core-outer core boundary ( 330 GPa), respectively. Our results indicate that Si has a relatively mild effect on the melting temperature of iron compared with S and O. Our thermodynamic modeling shows that Fe-5 wt% Ni alloyed with 6 wt% Si and 2 wt% S (which has a density-velocity profile that matches the outer core's seismic profile well) exhibits an adiabatic profile with temperatures of 3900 K and 5300 K at the top and bottom of the outer core, respectively. If Si is a major light element in the core, a geotherm modeled for the outer core indicates a thermal gradient of 5.8-6.8 (±1.6) K/km in the D″ region and a high heat flow of 13-19 TW across the core-mantle boundary.

  3. Glass compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    France, P W

    1985-05-30

    A fluoride glass for use in the production of optical fibres has an enhanced D/H ratio, preferably such that OD:OH is at least 9:1. In the example, such a glass is prepared by treating with D/sub 2/O a melt comprising 51.53 mole per cent ZrF/sub 4/, 20.47 mole per cent BaF/sub 2/, 5.27 mole per cent LaF/sub 3/, 3.24 mole per cent AlF/sub 3/, and 19.49 mole per cent LiF.

  4. On high-pressure melting of tantalum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Sheng-Nian; Swift, Damian C.

    2007-01-01

    The issues related to high-pressure melting of Ta are discussed within the context of diamond-anvil cell (DAC) and shock wave experiments, theoretical calculations and common melting models. The discrepancies between the extrapolations of the DAC melting curve and the melting point inferred from shock wave experiments, cannot be reconciled either by superheating or solid-solid phase transition. The failure to reproduce low-pressure DAC melting curve by melting models such as dislocation-mediated melting and the Lindemann law, and molecular dynamics and quantum mechanics-based calculations, undermines their predictions at moderate and high pressures. Despite claims to the contrary, the melting curve of Ta (as well as Mo and W) remains inconclusive at high pressures.

  5. Characterization of glass and glass ceramic nuclear waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutze, W.; Borchardt, J.; De, A.K.

    1979-01-01

    Characteristics of solidified nuclear waste forms, glass and glass ceramic compositions and the properties (composition, thermal stability, crystallization, phase behavior, chemical stability, mechanical stability, and radiation effects) of glasses and glass ceramics are discussed. The preparation of glass ceramics may be an optional step for proposed vitrification plants if tailored glasses are used. Glass ceramics exhibit some improved properties with respect to glasses. The overall leach resistance is similar to that of glasses. An increased leach resistance may become effective for single radionuclides being hosted in highly insoluble crystal phases mainly when higher melting temperatures are applicable in order to get more leach resistant residual glass phases. The development of glass ceramic is going on. The technological feasibility is still to be demonstrated. The potential gain of stability when using glass ceramics qualifies the material as an alternative nuclear waste form

  6. Polycarboxylic acids as network modifiers for water durability improvement of inorganic-organic hybrid tin-silico-phosphate low-melting glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menaa, Bouzid; Mizuno, Megumi; Takahashi, Masahide; Tokuda, Yomei; Yoko, Toshinobu

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the water durability of the inorganic-organic hybrid tin-silico-phosphate glasses Me 2 SiO-SnO-P 2 O 5 (Me designs the organic methyl group) doped with organic acids (salicylic acid (SA), tartaric acid (TA), citric acid (Canada) and butane tetracarboxylic acid (BTCA)) containing one or more of carboxylic groups per molecule. The structure, thermal properties and durability of the final glasses obtained via a non-aqueous acid-base reaction were discussed owing to the nature and the concentration of the acid added. 29 Si magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR and 31 P MAS NMR spectra, respectively, showed clearly a modification of the network in the host glass matrix of the Me 2 SiO-SnO-P 2 O 5 system. The polycondensation enhancement to form -P-O-Si-O-P- linkages (PSP) and the increase of the Q 2 unit (two bridging oxygens per phosphorus atom) over the Q 3 unit (three bridging oxygens per phosphorus atom) as a function of the acid in the order SA 2 SiO-SnO-P 2 O 5 matrix. In addition, this structural change is accompanied by a decrease of the coefficient of thermal expansion and an increase of the water durability of the glasses with the acids containing a large number of carboxylic groups per molecule. The presence of carboxylic groups of the acid acting as network modifier may retard the movement of water molecules through the glasses due to the steric hindrance strengthening the PSP connections in a chain-like structure

  7. DEPENDENCY OF SULFATE SOLUBILITY ON MELT COMPOSITION AND MELT POLYMERIZATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JANTZEN, CAROL M.

    2004-01-01

    Sulfate and sulfate salts are not very soluble in borosilicate waste glass. When sulfate is present in excess it can form water soluble secondary phases and/or a molten salt layer (gall) on the melt pool surface which is purported to cause steam explosions in slurry fed melters. Therefore, sulfate can impact glass durability while formation of a molten salt layer on the melt pool can impact processing. Sulfate solubility has been shown to be compositionally dependent in various studies, (e.g. , B2O3, Li2O, CaO, MgO, Na2O, and Fe2O3 were shown to increase sulfate solubility while Al2O3 and SiO2 decreased sulfate solubility). This compositional dependency is shown to be related to the calculated melt viscosity at various temperatures and hence the melt polymerization

  8. The mineral phase evolution behaviour in the production of glass-ceramics from municipal solid waste incineration fly ash by melting technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Jingde; Chai, Meiyun; Li, Rundong; Yao, Pengfei; Khan, Agha Saood

    2016-01-01

    High energy consumption was the major obstacle to the widespread application of melting technology in the treatment of municipal solid waste incineration fly ash. Aiming to lower the ash-melting temperature (AMT) for energy-saving, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and the scanning electron microscope were used to investigate the relations between AMT and the mineral evolution. The results indicated that the change of AMT was determined by the types and the contents of mineral crystals. The transition from refractory minerals to fluxing minerals was the key. The transition of the main crystalline phase from pseudowollastonite (Ca3(Si3O9)) to wollastonite (CaSiO3) played a significant role in AMT reduction. A quantum chemistry calculation was carried out to investigate the effect of crystal reaction activity on AMT. In the chemical reaction, the highest occupied molecular orbital and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital played a more important role than any other orbits. Cations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Na(+), K(+)) were apt to enter into the crystal lattice of wollastonite and gehlenite mainly through Si (3), O (1), Si (6), O (10) and Al (2), O (10), and broke the covalent bonds of Si (3)-O (7), Al (1)-O (9) and Al (1)-O (15), respectively. This deconstruction behaviour provided convenient conditions for restructuring and promoted the formation of fluxing minerals. In melts, the excess SiO2 monomers which existed in the form of cristobalite and quartz caused AMT increase.

  9. Baseline LAW Glass Formulation Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, Albert A.; Mooers, Cavin; Bazemore, Gina; Pegg, Ian L.; Hight, Kenneth; Lai, Shan Tao; Buechele, Andrew; Rielley, Elizabeth; Gan, Hao; Muller, Isabelle S.; Cecil, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The major objective of the baseline glass formulation work was to develop and select glass formulations that are compliant with contractual and processing requirements for each of the LAW waste streams. Other objectives of the work included preparation and characterization of glasses with respect to the properties of interest, optimization of sulfate loading in the glasses, evaluation of ability to achieve waste loading limits, testing to demonstrate compatibility of glass melts with melter materials of construction, development of glass formulations to support ILAW qualification activities, and identification of glass formulation issues with respect to contract specifications and processing requirements

  10. Development of Pb-rich (Bi, Pb) sub 3 Sr sub 2 Ca sub 2 Cu sub 1 O sub x phase during reformation of lead doped 2223 superconducting phase from melt quenched glass. [BiPbSrCaCuO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezkan, N; Glowacki, B A [IRC in Superconductivity, Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    1992-05-01

    The reformation process of the lead doped superconducting 2223 phase from the melt quenched glass was investigated. It was shown that during the crystallisation of the glass a new lead rich phase, Bi{sub 0.5}Pb{sub 3}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 1}O{sub x}, was formed and severe copper segregation was observed. The volume fraction of the high Tc 2223 phase increased with annealing time for an annealing temperature of 840degC. A glass sample annealed at 840degC for 150 h showed two superconducting transitions Tc = 107 K and Tc = 70 K. (orig.).

  11. Production of lightweight foam glass (invited talk)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    The foam glass production allows low cost recycling of postconsumer glass and industrial waste materials as foaming agent or as melt resource. Foam glass is commonly produced by utilising milled glass mixed with a foaming agent. The powder mixture is heat-treated to around 10^3.7 – 10^6 Pa s, which...... result in viscous sintering and subsequent foaming of the glass melt. The porous glass melt is cooled down to room temperature to freeze-in the foam structure. The resulting foam glass is applied in constructions as a light weight material to reduce load bearing capacity and as heat insulating material...... in buildings and industry. We foam panel glass from old televisions with different foaming agents. We discuss the foaming ability and the foaming mechanism of different foaming systems. We compare several studies to define a viscous window for preparing low density foam glass. However, preparing foam glass...

  12. The role of a low-energy–density re-scan in fabricating crack-free Al85Ni5Y6Co2Fe2 bulk metallic glass composites via selective laser melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X.P.; Kang, C.W.; Huang, H.; Sercombe, T.B.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We proposed a re-scan strategy to prevent crack propagation in SLM. • The re-scan should be carried out at a low laser energy density. • The underlying mechanism is through reduction and relief of residual stresses. • Lowered temperature gradient and superplasticity account for reduction of stress. • For the first time, a crack-free BMGCs gear with a large size was produced. - Abstract: In this paper, we have investigated the use of a re-scanning strategy to prevent propagation of macro-cracks during the selective laser melting of an Al 85 Ni 5 Y 6 Co 2 Fe 2 bulk metallic glass composites (BMGCs). These cracks form as a result of the high residual stress caused by the rapid heating and cooling of the material by the laser beam. Unlike crystalline materials, the BMGCs possess a supercooled liquid region in which the residual stress can be relieved by plastic flow. We show that by using a high power initial scan (designed to melt the material) followed by a lower power re-scan (for stress relief) cracking can be prevented. Using this approach, crack-free Al 85 Ni 5 Y 6 Co 2 Fe 2 BMGCs components have been fabricated, including a gear with a diameter ∼25 mm and height ∼10 mm

  13. Effects of Quartz Particle Size and Sucrose Addition on Melting Behavior of a Melter Feed for High-Level Waste Glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcial, Jose; Hrma, Pavel R.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Swearingen, Kevin J.; Tegrotenhuis, Nathan E.; Henager, Samuel H.

    2010-01-01

    The behavior of melter feed (a mixture of nuclear waste and glass-forming additives) during waste-glass processing has a significant impact on the rate of the vitrification process. We studied the effects of silica particle size and sucrose addition on the volumetric expansion (foaming) of a high-alumina feed and the rate of dissolution of silica particles in feed samples heated at 5 C/min up to 1200 C. The initial size of quartz particles in feed ranged from 5 to 195 (micro)m. The fraction of the sucrose added ranged from 0 to 0.20 g per g glass. Extensive foaming occurred only in feeds with 5-(micro)m quartz particles; particles (ge) 150 (micro)m formed clusters. Particles of 5 (micro)m completely dissolved by 900 C whereas particles (ge) 150 (micro)m did not fully dissolve even when the temperature reached 1200 C. Sucrose addition had virtually zero impact on both foaming and the dissolution of silica particles.

  14. Thermal Conductivity of Foam Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    Due to the increased focus on energy savings and waste recycling foam glass materials have gained increased attention. The production process of foam glass is a potential low-cost recycle option for challenging waste, e.g. CRT glass and industrial waste (fly ash and slags). Foam glass is used...... as thermal insulating material in building and chemical industry. The large volume of gas (porosity 90 – 95%) is the main reason of the low thermal conductivity of the foam glass. If gases with lower thermal conductivity compared to air are entrapped in the glass melt, the derived foam glass will contain...... only closed pores and its overall thermal conductivity will be much lower than that of the foam glass with open pores. In this work we have prepared foam glass using different types of recycled glasses and different kinds of foaming agents. This enabled the formation of foam glasses having gas cells...

  15. Nitrate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirilenko, I.A.; Vinogradov, E.E.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental evidence on behaviour of nitrate glasses is reviewed in terms of relationships between the presence of water in vitrescent nitrate systems and the properties of the systems. The glasses considered belong to systems of Mg(NO 3 ) 2 - Nd(NO 3 ) 3 ; Hg(NO 3 ) 2 -Nd(NO 3 ) 3 ; NaNO 3 -Mg(NO 3 ) 2 -Nd(NO 3 ) 3 ; M-Zn(NO 3 ) 3 , where M is a mixture of 20% mass NaNO 3 and 80% mass Mg(NO 3 ) 2 , and Zn is a rare earth ion. Nitrate glass is shown to be a product of dehydration. Vitrification may be regarded as a resusl of formation of molecular complexes in the chain due to hydrogen bonds of two types, i.e. water-water, or water-nicrate group. Chain formation, along with low melting points of the nitrates, hinder crystallization of nitrate melts. Provided there is enough water, this results in vitrification

  16. Modeling of an electric arc transferred on a melted glass bath; Modelisation d`un arc electrique transfere sur un bain de verre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehlman, G.; Langlois, A. [SGN, 78 - Saint Quentin en Yvelines (France)

    1997-12-31

    The aim of this study is to propose a methodology allowing the simulation of melting processes involving electromagnetic phenomena. This methodology is based on the use of scientific calculation tools currently used elsewhere. The case considered in this study has been defined in collaboration with Electricite de France (EdF) and concerns more particularly an electric arc vitrification process for wastes. Basic data have been determined in order to obtain results representative of the tests performed by EdF with pilot installations. (J.S.)

  17. Glass transition dynamics and conductivity scaling in ionic deep eutectic solvents: The case of (acetamide + lithium nitrate/sodium thiocyanate) melts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathy, Satya N., E-mail: satyanarayantripathy@gmail.com; Wojnarowska, Zaneta; Knapik, Justyna; Paluch, Marian [Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Silesian Center for Education and Interdisciplinary Research, 75 Pulku Piechoty 1A, 41-500 Chorzow (Poland); Shirota, Hideaki [Department of Nanomaterial Science and Department of Chemistry, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Biswas, Ranjit [Department of Chemical, Biological and Macromolecular Sciences, S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, JD Block, Sector III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700098 (India)

    2015-05-14

    A detailed investigation on the molecular dynamics of ionic deep eutectic solvents (acetamide + lithium nitrate/sodium thiocyanate) is reported. The study was carried out employing dielectric relaxation spectroscopy covering seven decades in frequency (10{sup −1}-10{sup 6} Hz) and in a wide temperature range from 373 K down to 173 K, accessing the dynamic observables both in liquid and glassy state. The dielectric response of the ionic system has been presented in the dynamic window of modulus formalism to understand the conductivity relaxation and its possible connection to the origin of localized motion. Two secondary relaxation processes appear below glass transition temperature. Our findings provide suitable interpretation on the nature of secondary Johari-Goldstein process describing the ion translation and orientation of dipoles in a combined approach using Ngai’s coupling model. A nearly constant loss feature is witnessed at shorter times/lower temperatures. We also discuss the ac conductivity scaling behavior using Summerfield approach and random free energy barrier model which establish the time-temperature superposition principle. These experimental observations have fundamental importance on theoretical elucidation of the conductivity relaxation and glass transition phenomena in molten ionic conductors.

  18. Effect of pressure on the short-range structure and speciation of carbon in alkali silicate and aluminosilicate glasses and melts at high pressure up to 8 GPa: 13C, 27Al, 17O and 29Si solid-state NMR study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Jeong; Fei, Yingwei; Lee, Sung Keun

    2018-03-01

    Despite the pioneering efforts to explore the nature of carbon in carbon-bearing silicate melts under compression, experimental data for the speciation and the solubility of carbon in silicate melts above 4 GPa have not been reported. Here, we explore the speciation of carbon and pressure-induced changes in network structures of carbon-bearing silicate (Na2O-3SiO2, NS3) and sodium aluminosilicate (NaAlSi3O8, albite) glasses quenched from melts at high pressure up to 8 GPa using multi-nuclear solid-state NMR. The 27Al triple quantum (3Q) MAS NMR spectra for carbon-bearing albite melts revealed the pressure-induced increase in the topological disorder around 4 coordinated Al ([4]Al) without forming [5,6]Al. These structural changes are similar to those in volatile-free albite melts at high pressure, indicating that the addition of CO2 in silicate melts may not induce any additional increase in the topological disorder around Al at high pressure. 13C MAS NMR spectra for carbon-bearing albite melts show multiple carbonate species, including [4]Si(CO3)[4]Si, [4]Si(CO3)[4]Al, [4]Al(CO3)[4]Al, and free CO32-. The fraction of [4]Si(CO3)[4]Al increases with increasing pressure, while those of other bridging carbonate species decrease, indicating that the addition of CO2 may enhance mixing of Si and Al at high pressure. A noticeable change is not observed for 29Si NMR spectra for the carbon-bearing albite glasses with varying pressure at 1.5-6 GPa. These NMR results confirm that the densification mechanisms established for fluid-free, polymerized aluminosilicate melts can be applied to the carbon-bearing albite melts at high pressure. In contrast, the 29Si MAS NMR spectra for partially depolymerized, carbon-bearing NS3 glasses show that the fraction of [5,6]Si increases with increasing pressure at the expense of Q3 species ([4]Si species with one non-bridging oxygen as the nearest neighbor). The pressure-induced increase in topological disorder around Si is evident from an

  19. Reduced energy consumption for melting in foundries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skov-Hansen, S.

    2007-09-15

    By improving the gating technology in traditional gating systems it is possible to reduce the amount of metal to be re-melted, and hence reduce the energy consumption for melting in foundries. Traditional gating systems are known for a straight tapered down runner a well base and 90 deg. bends in the runner system. In the streamlined gating systems there are no sharp changes in direction and a large effort is done to confine and control the flow of the molten metal during mould filling. Experiments in real production lines have proven that using streamlined gating systems improves yield by decreasing the poured weight compared to traditional layouts. In a layout for casting of valve housings in a vertically parted mould the weight of the gating system was reduced by 1,1kg which is a 20% weight reduction for the gating system. In a layout for horizontally parted moulds the weight of the gating system has been reduced by 3,7kg which is a weight reduction of 60% for the gating system. The experiments casting valve housings in ductile iron also proved that it is possible to lower the pouring temperature from 1400 deg. C to 1300 deg. C without the risk of cold runs. Glass plate fronted moulds have been used to study the flow of melt during mould filling. These experiments have also been used for studying the flow pattern when ceramic filters are used. The thorough study of the use of filters revealed that the metal passing through the filter is divided into a number of small jets. This proves that filters do not have the claimed positive effect on the flow of metal. The volumes necessary on either side of the filter is not filled till a backpressure is build up and results in formation of pressure shocks when backfilled. These pressure shocks result in more turbulence inside the casting than the same gating system with no filter. Not using filters can mean a reduction in poured weight of 0,6kg. To examine if the experiments using glass plate fronted moulds give

  20. Effect of small glass composition changes on flue gas emissions of glass furnaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limpt, J.A.C. van; Beerkens, R.G.C.; Kersbergen, M.J. van

    2008-01-01

    Relatively small changes in glass composition might have drastic consequences on the evaporation rates of volatile glass components in glass melting furnaces. Transpiration evaporation tests have been applied to measure the impact of minor glass composition changes on the evaporation rates of

  1. Bubble Formation in Basalt-like Melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin; Keding, Ralf; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2011-01-01

    and their diameter. The variation in melting temperature has little influence on the overall bubble volume. However, the size distribution of the bubbles varies with the melting temperature. When the melt is slowly cooled, the bubble volume increases, implying decreased solubility of the gaseous species. Mass...... spectroscopy analysis of gases liberated during heating of the glass reveals that small bubbles contain predominantly CH4, CO and CO2, whereas large bubbles bear N2, SO2 and H2S. The methodology utilised in this work can, besides mapping the bubbles in a glass, be applied to shed light on the sources of bubble...

  2. Termination of light-water reactor core-melt accidents with a chemical core catcher: the core-melt source reduction system (COMSORS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Parker, G.W.; Rudolph, J.C.; Osborne-Lee, I.W.; Kenton, M.A.

    1996-09-01

    The Core-Melt Source Reduction System (COMSORS) is a new approach to terminate light-water reactor core melt accidents and ensure containment integrity. A special dissolution glass is placed under the reactor vessel. If core debris is released onto the glass, the glass melts and the debris dissolves into the molten glass, thus creating a homogeneous molten glass. The molten glass, with dissolved core debris, spreads into a wide pool, distributing the heat for removal by radiation to the reactor cavity above or by transfer to water on top of the molten glass. Expected equilibrium glass temperatures are approximately 600 degrees C. The creation of a low-temperature, homogeneous molten glass with known geometry permits cooling of the glass without threatening containment integrity. This report describes the technology, initial experiments to measure key glass properties, and modeling of COMSORS operations

  3. Chondrule destruction in nebular shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquet, Emmanuel; Thompson, Christopher, E-mail: ejacquet@mnhn.fr [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada)

    2014-12-10

    Chondrules are millimeter-sized silicate spherules ubiquitous in primitive meteorites, but whose origin remains mysterious. One of the main proposed mechanisms for producing them is melting of solids in shock waves in the gaseous protoplanetary disk. However, evidence is mounting that chondrule-forming regions were enriched in solids well above solar abundances. Given the high velocities involved in shock models, destructive collisions would be expected between differently sized grains after passage of the shock front as a result of differential drag. We investigate the probability and outcome of collisions of particles behind a one-dimensional shock using analytic methods as well as a full integration of the coupled mass, momentum, energy, and radiation equations. Destruction of protochondrules seems unavoidable for solid/gas ratios ε ≳ 0.1, and possibly even for solar abundances because of 'sandblasting' by finer dust. A flow with ε ≳ 10 requires much smaller shock velocities (∼2 versus 8 km s{sup –1}) in order to achieve chondrule-melting temperatures, and radiation trapping allows slow cooling of the shocked fragments. Initial destruction would still be extensive; although re-assembly of millimeter-sized particles would naturally occur by grain sticking afterward, the compositional heterogeneity of chondrules may be difficult to reproduce. We finally note that solids passing through small-scale bow shocks around few kilometer-sized planetesimals might experience partial melting and yet escape fragmentation.

  4. Phase transitions and glass transition in a hyperquenched silica–alumina glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Y.F.; Zhao, D.H.; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2017-01-01

    We investigate phase transitions, glass transition, and dynamic behavior in the hyperquenched 69SiO2–31Al2O3 (mol%) glass (SA glass). Upon reheating, the SA glass exhibits a series of thermal responses. Subsequent to the sub-Tg enthalpy release, the glass undergoes a large jump in isobaric heat...... capacity (ΔCp) during glass transition, implying the fragile nature of the SA glass. The mullite starts to form before the end of glass transition, indicating that the SA glass is extremely unstable against crystallization. After the mullite formation, the remaining glass phase exhibits an increased Tg...... and a suppressed ΔCp. The formation of cristobalite at 1553 K indicates the dominance of silica in the remaining glass matrix. The cristobalite gradually re-melts as the isothermal heat-treatment temperature is raised from 1823 to 1853 K, which is well below the melting point of cristobalite, while the amount...

  5. Comparative Study on Two Melting Simulation Methods: Melting Curve of Gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhong-Li; Li Rui; Sun Jun-Sheng; Zhang Xiu-Lu; Cai Ling-Cang

    2016-01-01

    Melting simulation methods are of crucial importance to determining melting temperature of materials efficiently. A high-efficiency melting simulation method saves much simulation time and computational resources. To compare the efficiency of our newly developed shock melting (SM) method with that of the well-established two-phase (TP) method, we calculate the high-pressure melting curve of Au using the two methods based on the optimally selected interatomic potentials. Although we only use 640 atoms to determine the melting temperature of Au in the SM method, the resulting melting curve accords very well with the results from the TP method using much more atoms. Thus, this shows that a much smaller system size in SM method can still achieve a fully converged melting curve compared with the TP method, implying the robustness and efficiency of the SM method. (paper)

  6. A comparative property investigation of lithium phosphate glass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present study addresses the application of microwave (MW) energy for melting lithium phosphate glass. Acomparative analysis of the properties is presented with glasses melted in conventional resistance heating adopting standardmethods of characterization. The density of the glass was found less in MW heating.

  7. Mechanical properties of glasses impacted by debris or micrometeorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinser, Donald L.; Wiedlocher, David E.

    1992-01-01

    Mechanical strength measurements on five glasses and one glass ceramic exposed on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) have revealed no damage exceeding experimental limits of error after exposure. The measurement technique subjected less than 5 percent of the sample surface area to stresses above 90 percent of the failure strength. Seven micrometeorite or space debris impacts occurred at locations which were not in that portion of the sample subjected to greater than 90 percent of the applied stress. In consequence of this, the impact events on the sample were not detected in mechanical strength measurements. The physical form and structure of the impact sites was carefully examined to determine the influence of those events upon stress concentration associated with the impact and the resulting mechanical strength influence. The size of the impact site insofar as it determines flaw size for fracture purposes was examined. Surface topography of the impacts reveals that six of the seven sites display impact melting. The classical melt crater structure is surrounded by a zone of fractured glass. Residual stresses arising from shock compression and from cooling of the impact fused zone cannot be included in fracture mechanics analyses based on simple flaw size analyses. Strategies for refining estimates of mechanical strength degradation by impact events are presented.

  8. Zirconium based bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, G.K.; Neogy, S.; Savalia, R.T.; Tewari, R.; Srivastava, D.; Banerjee, S.

    2006-01-01

    Metallic glasses have come into prominence in recent times because their nanocrystalline atomic arrangement imparts many useful and unusual properties to these metallic solids. In this study, bulk glasses have been obtained in Zr based multicomponent alloy by induction melting these alloys in silica crucibles and casting these in form of rods 3 and 6 mm in diameter in a copper mould

  9. Lead-iron phosophate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sales, B.C.; Boatner, L.A.

    1988-01-01

    The lead-iron phosphate nuclear waste glasses (LIPNWG) are the subject of the present chapter. They were discovered in 1984 while the authors were attempting to find a sintering aid for certain types of crystalline monazite ceramic high-level nuclear waste forms. In the present chapter, the term waste glass is synonymous with nuclear waste glass (NWG), and the acronym LIP is often used for lead-iron phosphate. Lead-iron phosphate glasses, like many of the previously studied phosphate glasses, are corrosion resistant in aqueous solutions at temperatures below 100 degrees C, and they can be melted and poured at temperatures that are relatively low in comparison with the processing temperatures required for current silicate glass compositions. Unlike the phosphate glasses investigated previously, however, LIPNWGs do not suffer from alteration due to devitrification during realistic and readily, achievable cooling periods. Additionally, lead-iron phosphate glass melts are not nearly as corrosive as the sodium phosphate melts investigated during the 1960s; and, therefore, they can be melted and processed using crucibles made from a variety of materials

  10. Mars on Earth: Analog basaltic soils and particulates from Lonar Crater, India, include Deccan soil, shocked soil, reworked lithic and glassy ejecta, and both shocked and unshocked baked zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, S. P.

    2017-12-01

    "There is no perfect analog for Mars on Earth" [first line of Hipkin et al. (2013) Icarus, 261-267]. However, fieldwork and corresponding sample analyses from laboratory instrumentation (to proxy field instruments) has resulted in the finding of unique analog materials that suggest that detailed investigations of Lonar Crater, India would be beneficial to the goals of the Mars Program. These are briefly described below as Analog Processes, Materials, and Fieldwork. Analog Processes: The geologic history of Lonar Crater emulates localities on Mars with 1.) flood basaltic volcanism with interlayer development of 2.) baked zones or "boles" and 3.) soil formation. Of six flows, the lower three are aqueously altered by groundwater to produce a range of 4.) alteration products described below. The impact event 570 ka produced a range of 5.) impactites including shocked baked zones, shocked soils, and altered basalt shocked to a range of shock pressures [Kieffer et al., 1976]. Analog Materials: 65 Ma Deccan basalt contains augite and labradorite. Baked zones are higher in hematite and other iron oxides. Soil consists of calcite and organic matter. Several basalts with secondary alteration are listed here and these mirror alteration on Mars: hematite, chlorite, serpentine, zeolite, and palagonite, with varying combinations of these with primary igneous minerals. All of these materials (#1 through 4 above) are shocked to a range of shocked pressures to produce maskelynite, flowing plagioclase glass, vesiculated plagioclase glass, and complete impact melts. Shocked soils contain schlieren calcite amidst comminuted grains of augite, labradorite, and these glasses. Shocked baked zones unsurprisingly have a petrographic texture similar to hornfels, another product of contact metamorphism. Analog Fieldwork: The ejecta consists of two layers: 8 m of lithic breccia with unshocked and fractured basalts under a 1 m suevite consisting of all ranges of shock pressure described above

  11. Electric melting furnace of solidifying radioactive waste by utilizing magnetic field and melting method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Hiroshi.

    1990-01-01

    An electric melting furnace for solidification of radioactive wastes utilizing magnetic fields in accordance with the present invention comprises a plurality of electrodes supplying AC current to molten glass in a glass melting furnace and a plurality of magnetic poles for generating AC magnetic fields. Interactions between the current and the magnetic field, generated forces in the identical direction in view of time in the molten glass. That is, forces for promoting the flow of molten glass in the melting furnace are resulted due to the Fleming's left-hand rule. As a result, the following effects can be obtained. (1) The amount of heat ransferred from the molten glass to the starting material layer on the molten surface is increased to improve the melting performance. (2) For an identical melting performance, the size and the weight of the melting furnace can be reduced to decrease the amount of secondary wastes when the apparatus-life is exhausted. (3) Bottom deposits can be suppressed and prevented from settling and depositing to the reactor bottom by the promoted flow in the layer. (4) Further, the size of auxiliary electrodes for directly supplying electric current to heat the molten glass near the reactor bottom can be decreased. (I.S.)

  12. Study of melt flow dynamics and influence on quality for CO{sub 2} laser fusion cutting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riveiro, A; Quintero, F; Lusquinos, F; Comesana, R; Pou, J [Applied Physics Department, University of Vigo, ETSII, Lagoas-Marcosende, 9, 36310 Vigo (Spain)

    2011-04-06

    The understanding of melt flow dynamics during fusion laser cutting is still a topic of great importance because this determines the quality characteristics of the processed workpiece. Despite the complexity of the experimental study of the physical processes involved in this technique, fusion laser cutting can be visualized during the processing of glass because this material absorbs the laser radiation provided by a CO{sub 2} laser but shows transparency to visible radiation. Then, we present in this work the results of the study of the melt flow dynamics during laser cutting of glass. Under different experimental conditions, the dynamics of the cutting front and its complete geometry (front wall inclination), and the evolution of the melt along the cut edge were analysed using a high-speed video camera to study the process. A phenomenon concerning the plasma plume formed during the process was observed, which has not been previously reported in the literature. This can displace the normal shock wave (MSD) commonly formed in the inlet kerf and can affect the assist gas flow into the kerf. On the other hand, the analysis of the recorded images allowed the determination of not only the amount of molten material along the cut edge but also the direction and velocity of the melt. Relevant processing parameters affecting the flow of molten material were assessed. These results were used as a basis to explain the different processes involved in the generation of dross, a typical imperfection appearing in laser cutting.

  13. On the rapid melt quenching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usatyuk, I.I.; Novokhatskij, I.A.; Kaverin, Yu.F.

    1994-01-01

    Specific features of instrumentation of traditionally employed method of melt spinning (rapid quenching), its disadvantages being discussed, were analyzed. The necessity of the method upgrading as applied to the problems of studying fine structure of molten metals and glasses was substantiated. The principle flowsheet of experimental facility for extremely rapid quenching of the melts of metals is described, specificity of its original functional units being considered. The sequence and character of all the principal stages of the method developed were discussed. 18 refs.; 3 figs

  14. Eutectic melting temperature of the lowermost Earth's mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrault, D.; Lo Nigro, G.; Bolfan-Casanova, N.; Bouhifd, M.; Garbarino, G.; Mezouar, M.

    2009-12-01

    Partial melting of the Earth's deep mantle probably occurred at different stages of its formation as a consequence of meteoritic impacts and seismology suggests that it even continues today at the core-mantle boundary. Melts are important because they dominate the chemical evolution of the different Earth's reservoirs and more generally the dynamics of the whole planet. Unfortunately, the most critical parameter, that is the temperature profile inside the deep Earth, remains poorly constrained accross the planet history. Experimental investigations of the melting properties of materials representative of the deep Earth at relevant P-T conditions can provide anchor points to refine past and present temperature profiles and consequently determine the degree of melting at the different geological periods. Previous works report melting relations in the uppermost lower mantle region, using the multi-anvil press [1,2]. On the other hand, the pyrolite solidus was determined up to 65 GPa using optical observations in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LH-DAC) [3]. Finally, the melting temperature of (Mg,Fe)2SiO4 olivine is documented at core-mantle boundary (CMB) conditions by shock wave experiments [4]. Solely based on these reports, experimental data remain too sparse to draw a definite melting curve for the lower mantle in the relevant 25-135 GPa pressure range. We reinvestigated melting properties of lower mantle materials by means of in-situ angle dispersive X-ray diffraction measurements in the LH-DAC at the ESRF [5]. Experiments were performed in an extended P-T range for two starting materials: forsterite and a glass with chondrite composition. In both cases, the aim was to determine the onset of melting, and thus the eutectic melting temperatures as a function of pressure. Melting was evidenced from drastic changes of diffraction peak shape on the image plate, major changes in diffraction intensities in the integrated pattern, disappearance of diffraction rings

  15. Glass manufacturing through induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boen, R.; Paya, B.; Roscini, M.; Fautrelle, Y.; Tuaz, F.; Delage, D.

    1991-01-01

    Oxides and glasses are electrical and thermal insulators, but show the characteristic of being weakly conductors of electricity when they are melt. It is then possible to heat them through HF induction. This interesting property allows the development of a melting process in cold crucible induction furnace. The process is being studied and developed by a consortium made up of CFEI, CEA Marcoule, ELECTRICITE DE FRANCE and MADYLAM laboratory. The studies include 2 parts: a) One experimental part to develop the technology and research for satisfying configurations, through a small size platform (10 to 30 kg/h). The long run continuous pouring melting tests made on different kinds of glass allow to go-on with industrial range units. b) One theoretical part to understand the magneto-thermo-hydraulic phenomenon hardly in relation with the heavy dependence of the physical characteristics (electrical and heat conductivities, viscosity) according to temperature. 6 refs., 4 figs [fr

  16. Microwave and conventional preparation of Zinc borate glass: Eu3+ ion as luminescent probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, Ashis K.; Balaji, S.; Sen, Ranjan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • IR transparent Zinc borate glass is prepared using microwave heating. • Glass transition temperature of microwave melted glass is found higher than that of glass prepared in conventional melting. • Low OH concentration in glass can be prepared in microwave heating. • We report higher reduction of Eu 3+ to Eu 2+ in microwave processing of Zinc borate glass. - Abstract: Transparent Zinc borate glass is melted using microwave energy as an alternative heating route to conventional resistive heating. A comparative study of the properties of the glasses prepared by both the methods is conducted by adopting X-ray diffraction (XRD), Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), UV–VIS–NIR spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, Refractive Indices (RI). Amorphous nature of samples is confirmed by X-ray diffraction study. Glass transition temperature (T g ) of microwave melted glass is found ∼7–9 °C higher than that of glass prepared in conventional melting. OH content is found less than 250 ppm in microwave melted glass whereas it is above 330 ppm in conventional melted glasses. Photoluminescence study of Eu 2 O 3 doped glass prepared in microwave heating indicates higher reduction of Eu 3+ → Eu 2+ than the glass melted in conventional route. Thus, microwave processing can be an alternative energy efficient, time saving, environmental friendly glass preparation method

  17. Control of radioactive waste-glass melters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickford, D.F.; Smith, P.K.; Hrma, P.; Bowan, B.W.

    1987-01-01

    Radioactive waste-glass melters require physical control limits and redox control of glass to assure continuous operation, and maximize production rates. Typical waste-glass melter operating conditions, and waste-glass chemical reaction paths are discussed. Glass composition, batching and melter temperature control are used to avoid the information of phases which are disruptive to melting or reduce melter life. The necessity and probable limitations of control for electric melters with complex waste feed compositions are discussed. Preliminary control limits, their bases, and alternative control methods are described for use in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant (SRP), and at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). Slurries of simulated high level radioactive waste and ground glass frit or glass formers have been isothermally reacted and analyzed to identify the sequence of the major chemical reactions in waste vitrification, and their effect on waste-glass production rates. Relatively high melting rates of waste batches containing mixtures of reducing agents (formic acid, sucrose) and nitrates are attributable to exothermic reactions which occur at critical stages in the vitrification process. The effect of foaming on waste glass production rates is analyzed, and limits defined for existing waste-glass melters, based upon measurable thermophysical properties. Through balancing the high nitrate wastes of the WVDP with reducing agents, the high glass melting rates and sustained melting without foaming required for successful WVDP operations have been demonstrated. 65 refs., 4 figs., 15 tabs

  18. Properties of sintered glass-ceramics prepared from plasma vitrified air pollution control residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roether, J.A.; Daniel, D.J. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Amutha Rani, D. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Deegan, D.E. [Tetronics Ltd., Swindon, Wiltshire SN3 4DE (United Kingdom); Cheeseman, C.R., E-mail: c.cheeseman@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Boccaccini, A.R., E-mail: a.boccaccini@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-15

    Air pollution control (APC) residues, obtained from a major UK energy from waste (EfW) plant, processing municipal solid waste, have been blended with silica and alumina and melted using DC plasma arc technology. The glass produced was crushed, milled, uni-axially pressed and sintered at temperatures between 750 and 1150 deg. C, and the glass-ceramics formed were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Mechanical properties assessed included Vickers's hardness, flexural strength, Young's modulus and thermal shock resistance. The optimum sintering temperature was found to be 950 deg. C. This produced a glass-ceramic with high density ({approx}2.58 g/cm{sup 3}), minimum water absorption ({approx}2%) and relatively high mechanical strength ({approx}81 {+-} 4 MPa). Thermal shock testing showed that 950 deg. C sintered samples could withstand a 700 deg. C quench in water without micro-cracking. The research demonstrates that glass-ceramics can be readily formed from DC plasma treated APC residues and that these have comparable properties to marble and porcelain. This novel approach represents a technically and commercially viable treatment option for APC residues that allow the beneficial reuse of this problematic waste.

  19. Properties of sintered glass-ceramics prepared from plasma vitrified air pollution control residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roether, J.A.; Daniel, D.J.; Amutha Rani, D.; Deegan, D.E.; Cheeseman, C.R.; Boccaccini, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    Air pollution control (APC) residues, obtained from a major UK energy from waste (EfW) plant, processing municipal solid waste, have been blended with silica and alumina and melted using DC plasma arc technology. The glass produced was crushed, milled, uni-axially pressed and sintered at temperatures between 750 and 1150 deg. C, and the glass-ceramics formed were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Mechanical properties assessed included Vickers's hardness, flexural strength, Young's modulus and thermal shock resistance. The optimum sintering temperature was found to be 950 deg. C. This produced a glass-ceramic with high density (∼2.58 g/cm 3 ), minimum water absorption (∼2%) and relatively high mechanical strength (∼81 ± 4 MPa). Thermal shock testing showed that 950 deg. C sintered samples could withstand a 700 deg. C quench in water without micro-cracking. The research demonstrates that glass-ceramics can be readily formed from DC plasma treated APC residues and that these have comparable properties to marble and porcelain. This novel approach represents a technically and commercially viable treatment option for APC residues that allow the beneficial reuse of this problematic waste.

  20. The borosilicate glass for 'PAMELA'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiewer, E.

    1986-01-01

    The low enriched waste concentrate (LEWC) stored at Mol, Belgium, will be solidified in the vitrification plant 'PAMELA'. An alkali-borosilicate glass was developed by the Hahn-Meitner-Institut, Berlin, which dissolves (11 +- 3)wt% waste oxides while providing sufficient flexibility for changes in the process parameters. The development of the glass labelled SM513LW11 is described. Important properties of the glass melt (viscosity, resistivity, formation of yellow phase) and of the glass (corrosion in aqueous solutions, crystallization) are reported. The corrosion data of this glass are similar to those of other HLW-glasses. Less than five wt% of crystalline material are produced upon cooling of large glass blocks. Crystallization does not affect the chemical durability. (Auth.)

  1. Fusibility of medical glass in hospital waste incineration: Effect of glass components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, X.G.; An, C.G.; Li, C.Y.; Fei, Z.W.; Jin, Y.Q.; Yan, J.H.

    2009-01-01

    Medical glass, which is the principal incombustible component in hospital wastes, has a bad influence on combustion. In a rotary kiln incinerator, medical glass melts and turns into slag, possibly adhering to the inner wall. Prediction of the melting characteristics of medical glass hence is important for preventing slagging. The effect of various glass components on fusibility has been investigated experimentally; that of Na 2 O is the most marked. The softening temperature and flow temperature decrease 19.8 o C and 34.0 o C, respectively, with a rise of Na 2 O content in the Basic Content (standard composition of medical glass) of 1%. Correlations between fusion temperatures and glass components have been investigated; predictive functions of four characteristic melting temperatures have been obtained by simplifying the multi-variant series and were verified by testing glass samples. Relative errors of fusion temperatures (computed vs. measured) are mostly less than 5%.

  2. X-ray tomography of feed-to-glass transition of simulated borosilicate waste glasses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Harris, W.H.; Guillen, D.P.; Kloužek, Jaroslav; Pokorný, P.; Yano, T.; Lee, S.; Schweiger, M. J.; Hrma, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 9 (2017), s. 3883-3894 ISSN 0002-7820 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : borosilicate glass * computed tomography * glass melting * morphology * nuclear waste * X-ray Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass OBOR OECD: Ceramics Impact factor: 2.841, year: 2016

  3. Fabrication of Radiation Shielding Glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavichai, Nattaya; Pormsean, Suriyont; Dararutana, Pisutti; Sirikulrat, Narin

    2003-06-01

    In this work, lead glass doped with 50%, 55%,60%, 65%, and 70% w/w Pb 3 O 4 . After that, glass mixtures were melt at 1,250οC with 4 hours soaking time. Molten glass was shaped by mould casting technique then annealed at 700οC and cooled down to room temperature. It was found that the glass with 60%w/w Pb 3 O 4 show maximum absorption coefficient of about 0.383 cm -1 with I-131 at energy 364 keV. The observed refractive indices of the samples range between 1.5908 to 1.5922

  4. Glasses and nuclear waste vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojovan, Michael I.

    2012-01-01

    Glass is an amorphous solid material which behaves like an isotropic crystal. Atomic structure of glass lacks long-range order but possesses short and most probably medium range order. Compared to crystalline materials of the same composition glasses are metastable materials however crystallisation processes are kinetically impeded within times which typically exceed the age of universe. The physical and chemical durability of glasses combined with their high tolerance to compositional changes makes glasses irreplaceable when hazardous waste needs immobilisation for safe long-term storage, transportation and consequent disposal. Immobilisation of radioactive waste in glassy materials using vitrification has been used successfully for several decades. Nuclear waste vitrification is attractive because of its flexibility, the large number of elements which can be incorporated in the glass, its high corrosion durability and the reduced volume of the resulting wasteform. Vitrification involves melting of waste materials with glass-forming additives so that the final vitreous product incorporates the waste contaminants in its macro- and micro-structure. Hazardous waste constituents are immobilised either by direct incorporation into the glass structure or by encapsulation when the final glassy material can be in form of a glass composite material. Both borosilicate and phosphate glasses are currently used to immobilise nuclear wastes. In addition to relatively homogeneous glasses novel glass composite materials are used to immobilise problematic waste streams. (author)

  5. Melting of superheated molecular crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubeta, Ulyana; Bhattacharya, Deepanjan; Sadtchenko, Vlad

    2017-07-01

    Melting dynamics of micrometer scale, polycrystalline samples of isobutane, dimethyl ether, methyl benzene, and 2-propanol were investigated by fast scanning calorimetry. When films are superheated with rates in excess of 105 K s-1, the melting process follows zero-order, Arrhenius-like kinetics until approximately half of the sample has transformed. Such kinetics strongly imply that melting progresses into the bulk via a rapidly moving solid-liquid interface that is likely to originate at the sample's surface. Remarkably, the apparent activation energies for the phase transformation are large; all exceed the enthalpy of vaporization of each compound and some exceed it by an order of magnitude. In fact, we find that the crystalline melting kinetics are comparable to the kinetics of dielectric α-relaxation in deeply supercooled liquids. Based on these observations, we conclude that the rate of non-isothermal melting for superheated, low-molecular-weight crystals is limited by constituent diffusion into an abnormally dense, glass-like, non-crystalline phase.

  6. Heterogeneities in nuclear waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladirat, Ch.

    1997-01-01

    The industrial vitrification of high level radioactive wastes is a 2 stage process. During the first stage, the concentrated solution is heated in a spinning resistance oven at the temperature of 400 Celsius degrees till evaporation and calcination. The second stage begins when the dry residue falls into a melting pot that is maintained at a temperature of 1100-1150 Celsius degrees. Glass fretting is added and the glass is elaborated through the fusion of the different elements present in the melting pot. Heterogeneities in the glass may be associated to: - the presence in the solution to vitrify of insoluble elements from the dissolution of the fuel (RuO 2 , Rh, Pd), - the presence of minuscule metal scraps (Zr) that have been produced during the cutting of the fuel element, - the failures to conform to the technical specifications of the vitrification process, for instance, temperatures or flow rates when introducing the different elements in the melting pot. (A.C.)

  7. Lid heater for glass melter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, T.D.

    1993-01-01

    A glass melter having a lid electrode for heating the glass melt radiantly. The electrode comprises a series of INCONEL 690 tubes running above the melt across the melter interior and through the melter walls and having nickel cores inside the tubes beginning where the tubes leave the melter interior and nickel connectors to connect the tubes electrically in series. An applied voltage causes the tubes to generate heat of electrical resistance for melting frit injected onto the melt. The cores limit heat generated as the current passes through the walls of the melter. Nickel bus connection to the electrical power supply minimizes heat transfer away from the melter that would occur if standard copper or water-cooled copper connections were used between the supply and the INCONEL 690 heating tubes. 3 figures

  8. The influence of glass composition on crystalline phase stability in glass-ceramic wasteforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maddrell, Ewan; Thornber, Stephanie; Hyatt, Neil C.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Crystalline phase formation shown to depend on glass matrix composition. • Zirconolite forms as the sole crystalline phase only for most aluminous glasses. • Thermodynamics indicate that low silica activity glasses stabilise zirconolite. - Abstract: Zirconolite glass-ceramic wasteforms were prepared using a suite of Na 2 O–Al 2 O 3 –B 2 O 3 –SiO 2 glass matrices with variable Al:B ratios. Zirconolite was the dominant crystalline phase only for the most alumina rich glass compositions. As the Al:B ratio decreased zirconolite was replaced by sphene, zircon and rutile. Thermodynamic data were used to calculate a silica activity in the glass melt below which zirconolite is the favoured crystalline phase. The concept of the crystalline reference state of glass melts is then utilised to provide a physical basis for why silica activity varies with the Al:B ratio

  9. Systems approach to nuclear waste glass development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1986-01-01

    Development of a host solid for the immobilization of nuclear waste has focused on various vitreous wasteforms. The systems approach requires that parameters affecting product performance and processing be considered simultaneously. Application of the systems approach indicates that borosilicate glasses are, overall, the most suitable glasses for the immobilization of nuclear waste. Phosphate glasses are highly durable; but the glass melts are highly corrosive and the glasses have poor thermal stability and low solubility for many waste components. High-silica glasses have good chemical durability, thermal stability, and mechanical stability, but the associated high melting temperatures increase volatilization of hazardous species in the waste. Borosilicate glasses are chemically durable and are stable both thermally and mechanically. The borosilicate melts are generally less corrosive than commercial glasses, and the melt temperature miimizes excessive volatility of hazardous species. Optimization of borosilicate waste glass formulations has led to their acceptance as the reference nuclear wasteform in the United States, United Kingdom, Belgium, Germany, France, Sweden, Switzerland, and Japan

  10. Shock pressure estimation in basement rocks of the Chicxulub impact crater using cathodoluminescence spectroscopy of quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomioka, N.; Tani, R.; Kayama, M.; Chang, Y.; Nishido, H.; Kaushik, D.; Rae, A.; Ferrière, L.; Gulick, S. P. S.; Morgan, J. V.

    2017-12-01

    The Chicxulub impact structure, located in the northern Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico, was drilled by the joint IODP-ICDP Expedition 364 in April-May 2016. This expedition is the first attempt to obtain materials from the topographic peak ring within the crater previously identified by seismic imaging. A continuous core was successfully recovered from the peak ring at depths between 505.7 and 1334.7 mbsf. Uplifted, fractured, and shocked granitic basement rocks forming the peak ring were found below, in the impact breccia and impact melt rock unit (747.0-1334.7 mbsf; Morgan et al. 2016). In order to constrain impact crater formation, we investigated shock pressure distribution in the peak-ring basement rocks. Thin sections of the granitic rocks were prepared at intervals of 60 m. All the samples contains shocked minerals, with quartz grains frequently showing planar deformation features (PDFs). We determined shock pressures based on the cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy of quartz. The strong advantage of the CL method is its applicability to shock pressure estimation for individual grains for both quartz and diaplectic SiO2 glass with high-spatial resolution ( 1 μm) (Chang et al. 2016). CL spectra of quartz shows a blue emission band caused by shock-induced defect centers, where its intensity increases with shock pressure. A total of 108 quartz grains in ten thin sections were analyzed using a scanning electron microscope with a CL spectrometer attached (an acceleration voltage of 15 kV and a beam current of 2 nA were used). Natural quartz single crystals, which were experimentally shocked at 0-30 GPa, were used for pressure calibration. CL spectra of all the quartz grains in the basement rocks showed broad blue emission band at the wavelength range of 300-500 nm and estimated shock pressures were in the range of 15-20 GPa. The result is consistent with values obtained from PDFs analysis in quartz using the universal stage (Ferrière et al. 2017; Rae et al. 2017

  11. Professor I I Glass A Tribute and Memorial

    CERN Document Server

    Igra, Ozer

    2013-01-01

    The book provides personal memories along with description of scientific works written by ex-graduate students and research associates of the late Professor Glass. The described research work covers a wide range of shock wave phenomena, resulting from seeds planted by Professor Glass. Professor Glass was born in Poland in 1918. He immigrated together with his parents to Canada at the age of 12 and received all his professional education at the University of Toronto, Canada. He became a world recognized expert in shock wave phenomena, and during his 45 years of active research he supervised more than 125 master and doctoral students, post-doctoral fellows and visiting research associates. In this book seven of his past students/research-associates describe their personal memories of Professor Glass and present some of their investigations in shock wave phenomena which sprung from their past work with Professor Glass. Specifically, these investigations include underwater shock waves, shock/bubble interaction, m...

  12. Permeability and 3-D melt geometry in shear-induced high melt fraction conduits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W.; Cordonnier, B.; Qi, C.; Kohlstedt, D. L.

    2017-12-01

    Observations of dunite channels in ophiolites and uranium-series disequilibria in mid-ocean ridge basalt suggest that melt transport in the upper mantle beneath mid-ocean ridges is strongly channelized. Formation of high melt fraction conduits could result from mechanical shear, pyroxene dissolution, and lithological partitioning. Deformation experiments (e.g. Holtzman et al., 2003) demonstrate that shear stress causes initially homogeneously distributed melt to segregate into an array of melt-rich bands, flanked by melt-depleted regions. At the same average melt fraction, the permeability of high melt fraction conduits could be orders of magnitude higher than that of their homogenous counterparts. However, it is difficult to determine the permeability of melt-rich bands. Using X-ray synchrotron microtomography, we obtained high-resolution images of 3-dimensional (3-D) melt distribution in a partially molten rock containing shear-induced high melt fraction conduits. Sample CQ0705, an olivine-alkali basalt aggregate with a nominal melt fraction of 4%, was deformed in torsion at a temperature of 1473 K and a confining pressure of 300 MPa to a shear strain of 13.3. A sub-volume of CQ0705 encompassing 3-4 melt-rich bands was imaged. Microtomography data were reduced to binary form so that solid olivine is distinguishable from basalt glass. At a spatial resolution of 160 nm, the 3-D images reveal the shape and connectedness of melt pockets in the melt-rich bands. Thin melt channels formed at grain edges are connected at large melt nodes at grain corners. Initial data analysis shows a clear preferred orientation of melt pockets alignment subparallel to the melt-rich band. We use the experimentally determined geometrical parameters of melt topology to create a digital rock with identical 3-D microstructures. Stokes flow simulations are conducted on the digital rock to obtain the permeability tensor. Using this digital rock physics approach, we determine how deformation

  13. Sealed glass coating of high temperature ceramic superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weite; Chu, Cha Y.; Goretta, Kenneth C.; Routbort, Jules L.

    1995-01-01

    A method and article of manufacture of a lead oxide based glass coating on a high temperature superconductor. The method includes preparing a dispersion of glass powders in a solution, applying the dispersion to the superconductor, drying the dispersion before applying another coating and heating the glass powder dispersion at temperatures below oxygen diffusion onset and above the glass melting point to form a continuous glass coating on the superconductor to establish compressive stresses which enhance the fracture strength of the superconductor.

  14. Evidence for a Meteoritic Component in Impact Melt Rock from the Chicxulub Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeberl, Christian; Sharpton, Virgil L.; Schuraytz, Benjamin C.; Shirey, Steven B.; Blum, Joel D.; Marin, Luis E.

    1994-01-01

    The Chicxulub structure in Yucatan, Mexico, has recently been recognized as a greater then 200-km-diameter multi-ring impact crater of K-T boundary age. Crystalline impact melt rocks and breccias from within the crater, which have compositions similar to those of normal continental crustal rocks and which show shock metamorphic effects, have been studied for trace element and Re-Os isotope compositions. Re-Os isotope systematics allow the sensitive and selective determination of an extraterrestrial component in impact-derived rocks. A melt rock sample shows elevated iridium concentrations, an osmium concentration of 25 ppb, and a low Os-187/Os-188 ratio of 0.113, which are incompatible with derivation from the continental crust. Even though the Os-187/Os-188 ratio is slightly lower than the range so far measured in meteorites, a mantle origin seems unlikely for mass balance reasons and because the cratering event is unlikely to have excavated mantle material. The data support the hypothesis of a heterogeneously distributed meteoritic component in the Chicxulub melt rock. A sample of impact glass from the Haitian K-T boundary at Beloc yielded about 0.1 ppb osmium and an Os-187/0s-188 ratio of 0.251, indicating the presence of a small meteoritic component in the impact ejecta as well.

  15. Melting and Pressure-Induced Amorphization of Quartz

    OpenAIRE

    Badro, James; Gillet, Philippe; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    1997-01-01

    It has recently been shown that amorphization and melting of ice were intimately linked. In this letter, we infer from molecular dynamics simulations on the SiO2 system that the extension of the quartz melting line in the metastable pressure-temperature domain is the pressure-induced amorphization line. It seems therefore likely that melting is the physical phenomenon responsible for pressure induced amorphization. Moreover, we show that the structure of a "pressure glass" is similar to that ...

  16. Theoretical study of melting curves on Ta, Mo, and W at high pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi Feng [Laboratory for Shock Wave and Detonation Physics Research, Institute of Fluid Physics, P.O. Box 919-102, 621900 Mianyang (China)], E-mail: hawk_0816@yahoo.com.cn; Cai Lingcang [Laboratory for Shock Wave and Detonation Physics Research, Institute of Fluid Physics, P.O. Box 919-102, 621900 Mianyang (China)

    2008-06-01

    The melting curves of tantalum (Ta), molybdenum (Mo), and tungsten (W) are calculated using a dislocation-mediated melting model. The calculated melting curves are in good agreement with shock-wave data, and partially in agreement with wire explosion and piston-cylinder data, but show large discrepancies with diamond-anvil cell (DAC) data. We propose that the melting mechanism caused by shock-wave and laser-heated DAC techniques are probably different, and that a systematic difference exists in the two melting processes.

  17. Hybrid Glasses from Strong and Fragile Metal-Organic Framework Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, T.D.; Tan, J.C.; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid glasses connect the emerging field of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with the glass formation, amorphization and melting processes of these chemically versatile systems. Though inorganic zeolites collapse around the glass transition and melt at higher temperatures, the relationship betwee...

  18. Disorder effect on flux lattice melting near Hc2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Ayumi; Hikami, Shinobu; Larkin, A.I.

    1991-01-01

    The perturbation series of the three dimensional free energy of Ginzburg-Landau model in a random potential is investigated for a strong magnetic field. The shift of the melting temperature of vortex lattice caused by the white noise random potential is evaluated. The crossover between the ''vortex-glass'' phase and the ''gauge-glass'' phase is discussed for a strong disorder. (orig.)

  19. Shock absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemeth, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    A shock absorber for the support of piping and components in a nuclear power plant is described. It combines a high degree of stiffness under sudden shocks, e.g. seismic disturbances, with the ability to allow for thermal expansion without resistance when so required. (JIW)

  20. Glass containing radioactive nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boatner, L.A.; Sales, B.C.

    1985-01-01

    Lead-iron phosphate glasses containing a high level of Fe 2 O 3 for use as a storage medium for high-level-radioactive nuclear waste. By combining lead-iron phosphate glass with various types of simulated high-level nuclear waste, a highly corrosion resistant, homogeneous, easily processed glass can be formed. For corroding solutions at 90 C, with solution pH values in the range between 5 and 9, the corrosion rate of the lead-iron phosphate nuclear waste glass is at least 10 2 to 10 3 times lower than the corrosion rate of a comparable borosilicate nuclear waste glass. The presence of Fe 2 O 3 in forming the lead-iron phosphate glass is critical. Lead-iron phosphate nuclear waste glass can be prepared at temperatures as low as 800 C, since they exhibit very low melt viscosities in the 800 to 1050 C temperature range. These waste-loaded glasses do not readily devitrify at temperatures as high as 550 C and are not adversely affected by large doses of gamma radiation in H 2 O at 135 C. The lead-iron phosphate waste glasses can be prepared with minimal modification of the technology developed for processing borosilicate glass nuclear waste forms. (author)

  1. Glass sealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brow, R.K.; Kovacic, L.; Chambers, R.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Hernetic glass sealing technologies developed for weapons component applications can be utilized for the design and manufacture of fuel cells. Design and processing of of a seal are optimized through an integrated approach based on glass composition research, finite element analysis, and sealing process definition. Glass sealing procedures are selected to accommodate the limits imposed by glass composition and predicted calculations.

  2. Electrochromic Glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-31

    this glass and that dipole-dipole correlations contribute to the "ferroelectric-like" character of this amorphous system. The TeO2 -W03 glasses can only...shows the dielectric constant and Fig. I(b) glass from pure TeO2 ot pure WO. In addition, glass the tan 8 of the WO glass as a function of temperature... glasses containing WO, in various glass forming nitworks of LifO-B1O0, Na:O-BzO,, and TeO2 were prepared from reagent grade oxides at 800 C - 9SO C in

  3. demystifying the shock of shocking

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (with a pulse), atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter. The energy dose in cardioversion is less (0.5. - 2 J/kg) than in defibrillation (2 - 4 J/kg). In cardioversion the shock is discharged synchronously with the native R wave of the patient. Without synchronisation,. VF can be induced if a shock is delivered during the refractory period ...

  4. Foaming of CRT panel glass powder with Na2CO3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup

    melt, while Na2O becomes incorporated into the glass structure. We have quantified the melt expansion through density measurements and the Na2O incorporation is indicated by the decrease of the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the final foam glass. The glass foaming quality depends on the foaming......Recycling of cathode ray tube (CRT) glass remains a challenging task. The CRT glass consists of four glass types fused together: Funnel-, neck-, frit- and panel glass. The three former glasses contain toxic lead oxide, and therefore have a low recycling potential. The latter on the other hand...... is lead-free, but since barium and strontium oxide are present, panel glass is incompatible with most common recycling methods. However, foam glass production is a promising approach for the recycling of panel glass waste, since the process parameters can be changed according to the glass waste...

  5. Method and apparatus for glass solidification porcessing for radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torada, Shin-ichiro; Masaki, Toshio; Sakai, Akira.

    1989-01-01

    Glass material supplied to a glass melting furnace is made in the form of a glass container. Then, radioactive liquid wastes are directly injected into the glass vessel and the glass vessel injected with the radioactive liquid wastes is charged into the glass melting furnace. The glass material and the radioactive liquid wastes are supplied simultaneously to the glass melting furnace. Then, corresponding to the amount of the glass material used for the glass vessel, the amount of the radioactive liquid wastes injected to the inside thereof is controlled to thereby set the mixing ratio between the glass material and the radioactive liquid wastes. Further, by controlling the number of the glass vessels injected with the radioactive liquid wastes to be charged into the glass melting furnace, the amount of supplying the radioactive liquid wastes and the glass material is controlled. This can easily maintain constant the amount of the glass material and the radioacative liquid wastes supplied to the glass melting furnace and the mixing ratio thereof. (T.M.)

  6. Investigation of lead-iron-phosphate glass for SRP waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1986-10-01

    The search for a host solid for the immobilization of nuclear waste has focused on various vitreous waste forms. Recently, lead-iron-phosphate (LIP) glasses have been proposed for solidification of all types of HLLW. Investigation of this glass for vitrification of SRP waste demonstrated that the phosphate glass is incompatible with the current borosilicate glass technology. The durability of LIP glasses in deionized water was comparable to current borosilicate waste glass formulations, and the LIP glass has a low melt temperature. However, many of the defense waste constituents have low solubility in the phosphate melt, producing an inhomogeneous product. Also, the LIP melt is highly corrosive which prevents the use of current melter materials, in particular Inconel 690, and thus requires more exotic materials of construction such as platinum

  7. Foaming Glass Using High Pressure Sintering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Martin Bonderup; Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob

    Foam glass is a high added value product which contributes to waste recycling and energy efficiency through heat insulation. The foaming can be initiated by a chemical or physical process. Chemical foaming with aid of a foaming agent is the dominant industrial process. Physical foaming has two...... to expand. After heat-treatment foam glass can be obtained with porosities of 80–90 %. In this study we conduct physical foaming of cathode ray tube (CRT) panel glass by sintering under high pressure (5-25 MPa) using helium, nitrogen, or argon at 640 °C (~108 Pa s). Reheating a sample in a heating...... variations. One way is by saturation of glass melts with gas. The other involves sintering of powdered glass under a high gas pressure resulting in glass pellets with high pressure bubbles entrapped. Reheating the glass pellets above the glass transition temperature under ambient pressure allows the bubbles...

  8. Influence of Glass Property Restrictions on Hanford HLW Glass Volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.

    2001-01-01

    A systematic evaluation of Hanford High-Level Waste (HLW) loading in alkali-alumino-borosilicate glasses was performed. The waste feed compositions used were obtained from current tank waste composition estimates, Hanford's baseline retrieval sequence, and pretreatment processes. The waste feeds were sorted into groups of like composition by cluster analysis. Glass composition optimization was performed on each cluster to meet property and composition constraints while maximizing waste loading. Glass properties were estimated using property models developed for Hanford HLW glasses. The impacts of many constraints on the volume of HLW glass to be produced at Hanford were evaluated. The liquidus temperature, melting temperature, chromium concentration, formation of multiple phases on cooling, and product consistency test response requirements for the glass were varied one- or many-at-a-time and the resultant glass volume was calculated. This study shows clearly that the allowance of crystalline phases in the glass melter can significantly decrease the volume of HLW glass to be produced at Hanford.

  9. Glass Ceramic Formulation Data Package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; McCloy, John S.; Vienna, John D.; Chung, Chul-Woo

    2012-01-01

    A glass ceramic waste form is being developed for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by aqueous reprocessing of commercial used nuclear fuel (Crum et al. 2012b). The waste stream contains a mixture of transition metals, alkali, alkaline earths, and lanthanides, several of which exceed the solubility limits of a single phase borosilicate glass (Crum et al. 2009; Caurant et al. 2007). A multi-phase glass ceramic waste form allows incorporation of insoluble components of the waste by designed crystallization into durable heat tolerant phases. The glass ceramic formulation and processing targets the formation of the following three stable crystalline phases: (1) powellite (XMoO4) where X can be (Ca, Sr, Ba, and/or Ln), (2) oxyapatite Yx,Z(10-x)Si6O26 where Y is alkaline earth, Z is Ln, and (3) lanthanide borosilicate (Ln5BSi2O13). These three phases incorporate the waste components that are above the solubility limit of a single-phase borosilicate glass. The glass ceramic is designed to be a single phase melt, just like a borosilicate glass, and then crystallize upon slow cooling to form the targeted phases. The slow cooling schedule is based on the centerline cooling profile of a 2 foot diameter canister such as the Hanford High-Level Waste canister. Up to this point, crucible testing has been used for glass ceramic development, with cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) targeted as the ultimate processing technology for the waste form. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will conduct a scaled CCIM test in FY2012 with a glass ceramic to demonstrate the processing behavior. This Data Package documents the laboratory studies of the glass ceramic composition to support the CCIM test. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) measured melt viscosity, electrical conductivity, and crystallization behavior upon cooling to identify a processing window (temperature range) for melter operation and cooling profiles necessary to crystallize the targeted phases in the

  10. Volcanic glasses, their origins and alteration processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, I.; Long, W.

    1984-01-01

    Natural glass can be formed by volcanic processes, lightning (fulgarites) burning coal, and by meteorite impact. By far the most common process is volcanic - basically the glass is rapidly chilled molten rock. All natural glasses are thermodynamically unstable and tend to alter chemically or to crystallize. The rate of these processes is determined by the chemical composition of the magma. The hot and fluid basaltic melts have a structure that allows for rapid crystal growth, and seldom forms glass selvages greater than a few centimeters thick, even when the melt is rapidly cooled by extrusion in the deep sea. In contrast the cooler and very viscous rhyolitic magmas can yield bodies of glass that are tens of meters thick. These highly polymerized magmas have a high silica content - often 71-77% SiO2. Their high viscosity inhibits diffusive crystal growth. Basalt glass in sea water forms an alteration zone called palagonite whose thickness increases linearly with time. The rate of diffusion of water into rhyolitic glass, which follows the relationship - thickness = k (time) 1 2, has been determined as a function of the glass composition and temperature. Increased SiO2 increases the rate, whereas increased CaO, MgO and H2O decrease the rate. The activation energy of water diffusion varies from about 19 to 22 kcal/mol. for the glasses studied. The diffusion of alkali out of rhyolite glass occurs simultaneously with water diffusion into the glass. The rate of devitrification of rhyolitic glass is a function of the glass viscosity, which in turn is a function of water content and temperature. Although all of the aforementioned processes tend to destroy natural glasses, the slow rates of these processes, particularly for rhyolitic glass, has allowed samples of glass to persist for 60 million years. ?? 1984.

  11. Hypovolemic shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the person's position unless they are in immediate danger. Do not give fluids by mouth. If person ... the patient with shock. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  12. Shock absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Housman, J.J.

    1978-01-01

    A shock absorber is described for use in a hostile environment at the end of a blind passage for absorbing impact loads. The shock absorber includes at least one element which occupies the passage and which is comprised of a porous brittle material which is substantially non-degradable in the hostile environment. A void volume is provided in the element to enable the element to absorb a predetermined level of energy upon being crushed due to impact loading

  13. Glasses obtained from industrial wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bortoluzzi, D.; Oliveira Fillho, J.; Uggioni, E.; Bernardin, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the study of the vitrification mechanism as an inertization method for industrial wastes contaminated with heavy metals. Ashes from coal (thermoelectric), wastes from mining (fluorite and feldspar) and plating residue were used to compose vitreous systems planed by mixture design. The chemical composition of the wastes was determined by XRF and the formulations were melted at 1450 deg C for 2h using 10%wt of CaCO 3 (fluxing agent). The glasses were poured into a mold and annealed (600 deg C). The characteristic temperatures were determined by thermal analysis (DTA, air, 20 deg C/min) and the mechanical behavior by Vickers microhardness. As a result, the melting temperature is strongly dependent on silica content of each glass, and the fluorite residue, being composed mainly by silica, strongly affects Tm. The microhardness of all glasses is mainly affected by the plating residue due to the high iron and zinc content of this waste. (author)

  14. Sol-Gel Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    Multicomponent homogeneous, ultrapure noncrystalline gels/gel derived glasses are promising batch materials for the containerless glass melting experiments in microgravity. Hence, ultrapure, homogeneous gel precursors could be used to: (1) investigate the effect of the container induced nucleation on the glass forming ability of marginally glass forming compositions; and (2) investigate the influence of gravity on the phase separation and coarsening behavior of gel derived glasses in the liquid-liquid immiscibility zone of the nonsilicate systems having a high density phase. The structure and crystallization behavior of gels in the SiO2-GeO2 as a function of gel chemistry and thermal treatment were investigated. As are the chemical principles involved in the distribution of a second network former in silica gel matrix being investigated. The procedures for synthesizing noncrystalline gels/gel-monoliths in the SiO2-GeO2, GeO2-PbO systems were developed. Preliminary investigations on the levitation and thermal treatment of germania silicate gel-monoliths in the Pressure Facility Acoustic Levitator were done.

  15. Method of manufacturing borosilicate glass solidification products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Tsuneya.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain glass solidification products efficiently in a dry process from medium and high level radioactive liquid wastes discharged from PWR type reactors. Method: Boric acid-containing radioactive liquid wastes generated from primary coolants of PWR type reactors are evaporated to condensate as the pre-treatment. The concentrated liquid wastes are supplied to a drum type rotary kiln. While on the other hand, usual glass frits are introduced into the kiln. The liquid wastes are dried in the rotary kiln, as well as B 2 O 3 and the glass frits in the liquid wastes are combined into glass particles. In this case, since the kiln is rotated, no glass particles are deposited on the wall of the kiln. Then, the glass particles are introduced for melting into a high frequency melting furnace made of metal. The melting temperature is set to 1100 - 1150 deg C. The molten borosilicate glass is recovered from the bottom of the melting furance, contained in a canister and cooled for several hours, and then a cover is welded to the canister. (Ikeda, J.)

  16. Failure Waves in Shock-Compressed Glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanel, G. I.

    2006-01-01

    The failure wave is a network of cracks that are nucleated on the surface and propagate into the elastically stressed body. It is a mode of catastrophic fracture in an elastically stressed media whose relevance is not limited to impact events. In the paper, main properties of the failure waves are summarized and discussed. It has been shown that the failure wave is really a wave process which is characterized by small increase of the longitudinal stress and corresponding increments of the particle velocity and the density. The propagation velocity of the failure wave is less than the sound speed; it is not directly related to the compressibility but is determined by the crack growth speed. The failure wave is steady if the stress state ahead of it is supported unchanging. In some sense the process is similar to a subsonic combustion wave. Computer simulations based on the phenomenological combustion-like model reproduces well all kinematical aspects of the phenomenon

  17. Radiation-induced transmission spectral variations of Ce3+-doped heavy germanate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yunxia; Baccaro, S.; Cecilia, A.; Rao Jinhua; Zhang Junbiao; Xia Fang; Chen Guorong

    2005-01-01

    Radiation-induced transmission spectral variations of Ce 3+ -doped heavy germanate glasses used as scintillating materials are presented. Glass matrix contains mainly GeO 2 , BaO and Gd 2 O 3 with a density higher than 5 g/cm 3 . Glasses are melted in the different atmosphere. The transmission spectra of glasses before and after radiation treatments are measured and compared. Unlike exhibiting the monotonous deterioration effect on the glass matrix, radiation plays the radiation protection role, even making enhanced transmission of Ce 3+ -doped glasses, depending upon glass melting atmosphere and radiation dose. Radiation-induced reducing and oxidizing mechanism is proposed to explain phenomena

  18. Shock compression of synthetic opal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, A; Okuno, M; Okudera, H; Mashimo, T; Omurzak, E; Katayama, S; Koyano, M

    2010-01-01

    Structural change of synthetic opal by shock-wave compression up to 38.1 GPa has been investigated by using SEM, X-ray diffraction method (XRD), Infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies. Obtained information may indicate that the dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole due to high shock and residual temperature are very important factors in the structural evolution of synthetic opal by shock compression. Synthetic opal loses opalescence by 10.9 and 18.4 GPa of shock pressures. At 18.4 GPa, dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole and transformation of network structure may occur simultaneously. The 4-membered ring of TO 4 tetrahedrons in as synthetic opal may be relaxed to larger ring such as 6-membered ring by high residual temperature. Therefore, the residual temperature may be significantly high at even 18.4 GPa of shock compression. At 23.9 GPa, opal sample recovered the opalescence. Origin of this opalescence may be its layer structure by shock compression. Finally, sample fuse by very high residual temperature at 38.1 GPa and the structure closes to that of fused SiO 2 glass. However, internal silanole groups still remain even at 38.1 GPa.

  19. Shock compression of synthetic opal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, A.; Okuno, M.; Okudera, H.; Mashimo, T.; Omurzak, E.; Katayama, S.; Koyano, M.

    2010-03-01

    Structural change of synthetic opal by shock-wave compression up to 38.1 GPa has been investigated by using SEM, X-ray diffraction method (XRD), Infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies. Obtained information may indicate that the dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole due to high shock and residual temperature are very important factors in the structural evolution of synthetic opal by shock compression. Synthetic opal loses opalescence by 10.9 and 18.4 GPa of shock pressures. At 18.4 GPa, dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole and transformation of network structure may occur simultaneously. The 4-membered ring of TO4 tetrahedrons in as synthetic opal may be relaxed to larger ring such as 6-membered ring by high residual temperature. Therefore, the residual temperature may be significantly high at even 18.4 GPa of shock compression. At 23.9 GPa, opal sample recovered the opalescence. Origin of this opalescence may be its layer structure by shock compression. Finally, sample fuse by very high residual temperature at 38.1 GPa and the structure closes to that of fused SiO2 glass. However, internal silanole groups still remain even at 38.1 GPa.

  20. Shock compression of synthetic opal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, A; Okuno, M; Okudera, H [Department of Earth Sciences, Kanazawa University Kanazawa, Ishikawa, 920-1192 (Japan); Mashimo, T; Omurzak, E [Shock Wave and Condensed Matter Research Center, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, 860-8555 (Japan); Katayama, S; Koyano, M, E-mail: okuno@kenroku.kanazawa-u.ac.j [JAIST, Nomi, Ishikawa, 923-1297 (Japan)

    2010-03-01

    Structural change of synthetic opal by shock-wave compression up to 38.1 GPa has been investigated by using SEM, X-ray diffraction method (XRD), Infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies. Obtained information may indicate that the dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole due to high shock and residual temperature are very important factors in the structural evolution of synthetic opal by shock compression. Synthetic opal loses opalescence by 10.9 and 18.4 GPa of shock pressures. At 18.4 GPa, dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole and transformation of network structure may occur simultaneously. The 4-membered ring of TO{sub 4} tetrahedrons in as synthetic opal may be relaxed to larger ring such as 6-membered ring by high residual temperature. Therefore, the residual temperature may be significantly high at even 18.4 GPa of shock compression. At 23.9 GPa, opal sample recovered the opalescence. Origin of this opalescence may be its layer structure by shock compression. Finally, sample fuse by very high residual temperature at 38.1 GPa and the structure closes to that of fused SiO{sub 2} glass. However, internal silanole groups still remain even at 38.1 GPa.

  1. Glass consistency and glass performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plodinec, M.J.; Ramsey, W.G.

    1994-01-01

    Glass produced by the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will have to consistently be more durable than a benchmark glass (evaluated using a short-term leach test), with high confidence. The DWPF has developed a Glass Product Control Program to comply with this specification. However, it is not clear what relevance product consistency has on long-term glass performance. In this report, the authors show that DWPF glass, produced in compliance with this specification, can be expected to effectively limit the release of soluble radionuclides to natural environments. However, the release of insoluble radionuclides to the environment will be limited by their solubility, and not glass durability

  2. The chemistry of copper chalcogenides in waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, H.D.; Lambert, H.W.

    1994-01-01

    The solubilities of copper chalcogenides (CuS, CuSe, CuTe) were measured in a glass melt which is representative of those proposed for nuclear waste immobilization and circuit board vitrification. CuTe is more soluble than CuS and CuSe in the glass melt under relatively oxidizing conditions. However, the solubilities of all the copper chalcogenides in the glass melt are virtually identical at reducing conditions, probably a result of the redox-controlled solubility of copper metal in all cases. The redox chemistry of a glass melt coexisting with an immiscible copper chalcogenide depends primarily on the prevailing oxygen fugacity, not on the identity of the chalcogenide. The target concentration of less than 0.3 to 0.5 wt% copper in the waste glass should eliminate the precipitation of copper chalcogenides during processing

  3. Survey of glass plutonium contents and poison selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plodinec, M.J.; Ramsey, W.G. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States); Ellison, A.J.G.; Shaw, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    If plutonium and other actinides are to be immobilized in glass, then achieving high concentrations in the glass is desirable. This will lead to reduced costs and more rapid immobilization. However, glasses with high actinide concentrations also bring with them undersirable characteristics, especially a greater concern about nuclear criticality, particularly in a geologic repository. The key to achieving a high concentration of actinide elements in a glass is to formulate the glass so that the solubility of actinides is high. At the same time, the glass must be formulated so that the glass also contains neutron poisons, which will prevent criticality during processing and in a geologic repository. In this paper, the solubility of actinides, particularly plutonium, in three types of glasses are discussed. Plutonium solubilities are in the 2-4 wt% range for borosilicate high-level waste (HLW) glasses of the type which will be produced in the US. This type of glass is generally melted at relatively low temperatures, ca. 1150{degrees}C. For this melting temperature, the glass can be reformulated to achieve plutonium solubilities of at least 7 wt%. This low melting temperature is desirable if one must retain volatile cesium-137 in the glass. If one is not concerned about cesium volatility, then glasses can be formulated which can contain much larger amounts of plutonium and other actinides. Plutonium concentrations of at least 15 wt% have been achieved. Thus, there is confidence that high ({ge}5 wt%) concentrations of actinides can be achieved under a variety of conditions.

  4. Colloidal glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Colloidal glasses. Glassy state is attained when system fails to reach equilibrium due to crowding of constituent particles. In molecular glasses, glassy state is reached by rapidly lowering the temperature. In colloidal glasses, glassy state is reached by increasing the ...

  5. Influence of foaming agents on solid thermal conductivity of foam glasses prepared from CRT panel glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Martin Bonderup; Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    The understanding of the thermal transport mechanism of foam glass is still lacking. The contribution of solid- and gas conduction to the total thermal conductivity remains to be reported. In many foam glasses, the solid phase consist of a mix of an amorphous and a crystalline part where foaming...... containing glass and crystalline foaming agents and amorphous samples where the foaming agents are completely dissolved in the glass structure, respectively. Results show that the samples prepared by sintering have a higher thermal conductivity than the samples prepared by melt-quenching. The thermal...... conductivities of the sintered and the melt-quenched samples represent an upper and lower limit of the solid phase thermal conductivity of foam glasses prepared with these foaming agents. The content of foaming agents dissolved in the glass structure has a major impact on the solid thermal conductivity of foam...

  6. Challenges in commercial manufacture of radiation shielding glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, R.K.

    2011-01-01

    Radioactive hot-cells employ Radiation Shielding Windows (RSWs), assembled from specialty glasses, developed exclusively for nuclear industry. RSWs serve the twin purpose of direct viewing and shielding protection to the operator and use various types of radiation resistant and optically compatible glasses, such as low-density borosilicate glass; medium-density glass with up to 45% Lead and high-density glass with over 70% lead. Some glasses are Ceria-doped for enhancing their resistance threshold to radiation browning. A clear view of future requirement, capital and environmental costs could be the driving force towards bringing about changes in melting practices, encourage melting development, and enhancing collaboration. With DAE and CGCRI working in tandem, production of the entire range of RSW glasses by an Indian glass industry participant may no longer be a distant dream

  7. Glasses, ceramics, and composites from lunar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, George H.

    1992-01-01

    A variety of useful silicate materials can be synthesized from lunar rocks and soils. The simplest to manufacture are glasses and glass-ceramics. Glass fibers can be drawn from a variety of basaltic glasses. Glass articles formed from titania-rich basalts are capable of fine-grained internal crystallization, with resulting strength and abrasion resistance allowing their wide application in construction. Specialty glass-ceramics and fiber-reinforced composites would rely on chemical separation of magnesium silicates and aluminosilicates as well as oxides titania and alumina. Polycrystalline enstatite with induced lamellar twinning has high fracture toughness, while cordierite glass-ceramics combine excellent thermal shock resistance with high flexural strengths. If sapphire or rutile whiskers can be made, composites of even better mechanical properties are envisioned.

  8. Selenium containing clays minerals as additive for the discoloration of glass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, K.; Limpt, J.A.C. van; Fischer, H.R.

    2010-01-01

    While selenium is applied as decolorizing agent for flint container glass or tableware glass, the retention of selenium in glass however is very low. Generally more than 75% of the total selenium input sublimes from the glass melt and leaves the clay minerals due to the high volatility of

  9. Durability of Silicate Glasses: An Historical Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farges, Francois; Etcheverry, Marie-Pierre; Haddi, Amine; Trocellier, Patrick; Curti, Enzo; Brown, Gordon E. Jr.

    2007-01-01

    We present a short review of current theories of glass weathering, including glass dissolution, and hydrolysis of nuclear waste glasses, and leaching of historical glasses from an XAFS perspective. The results of various laboratory leaching experiments at different timescales (30 days to 12 years) are compared with results for historical glasses that were weathered by atmospheric gases and soil waters over 500 to 3000 years. Good agreement is found between laboratory experiments and slowly leached historical glasses, with a strong enrichment of metals at the water/gel interface. Depending on the nature of the transition elements originally dissolved in the melt, increasing elemental distributions are expected to increase with time for a given glass durability context

  10. Durability of Silicate Glasses: An Historical Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farges, Francois; /Museum Natl. Hist. Natur. /Stanford U., Geo. Environ. Sci.; Etcheverry, Marie-Pierre; /Marne la Vallee U.; Haddi, Amine; /Marne la Valle U.; Trocellier,; /Saclay; Curti, Enzo; /PSI, Villigen; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2007-01-02

    We present a short review of current theories of glass weathering, including glass dissolution, and hydrolysis of nuclear waste glasses, and leaching of historical glasses from an XAFS perspective. The results of various laboratory leaching experiments at different timescales (30 days to 12 years) are compared with results for historical glasses that were weathered by atmospheric gases and soil waters over 500 to 3000 years. Good agreement is found between laboratory experiments and slowly leached historical glasses, with a strong enrichment of metals at the water/gel interface. Depending on the nature of the transition elements originally dissolved in the melt, increasing elemental distributions are expected to increase with time for a given glass durability context.

  11. Ce+3-and Tb+3-luminescence in glasses. Ce+3-activated bulk silica and silica thin films. An α-particle detector based on a Ce+3-activated silica thin film. A Ce+3-Tb+3-energy transfer in a high melting point phosphate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heindl, R.; Loriers, J.; Sella, J.C.; Robert, A.

    1984-07-01

    While many Ce +3 -activated glasses of different type emit strongly under UV (253,7 nm) and β-ray excitation, only the commercial silicate glass NE 905 shows an useful emission when exposed to α-particles. Only phosphate glasses have give the green Tb +3 -emission, when doped by it, under UV and α and β radiation. Sputtered films of Ce +3 -activated silica have appropriate luminescence properties, adherence to the substrate and a perfect chemical resistance to hot nitric acid. An α-particle detector has been built which has permitted the quantitative detection of plutonium in the presence of other radiative ions

  12. Silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutze, W.

    1988-01-01

    Vitrification of liquid high-level radioactive wastes has received the greatest attention, world-wide, compared to any other HLW solidification process. The waste form is a borosilicate-based glass. The production of phosphate-based glass has been abandoned in the western world. Only in the Soviet Union are phosphate-based glasses still being developed. Vitrification techniques, equipment and processes and their remote operation have been developed and studied for almost thirty years and have reached a high degree of technical maturity. Industrial demonstration of the vitrification process has been in progress since 1978. This chapter is a survey of world-wide research and development efforts in nuclear waste glasses and its production technology. The principal glasses considered are silicate glasses which contain boron, i.e., borosilicate glasses

  13. Effect of Gamma Irradiation on Some Properties of Bismuth Silicate Glasses and Their Glass Derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abo Hussein, E.M.K.

    2014-01-01

    Glasses containing bismuth oxide have attracted considerable attention, although it is non-conventional glass forming oxide, but it has wide applications. In this work, it is aimed to prove that bismuth silicate glass can act as a good shielding material for γ- rays. For this purpose glass containing 20% bismuth oxide and 80% SiO_2 was prepared using melting-annealing technique. Also effects of adding some alkali heavy metal oxides to this glass such as PbO, BaO or SrO were also studied. The formed glasses were also heat treated at 450 degree C for 4 hours to give the corresponding heat treated glasses. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) measurements show that the prepared glasses and heat treated glasses have very good stability when exposed to γ- irradiation, which encourage the assumption of using these glasses as gamma ray shielding materials. Many properties have been investigated, such as density to understand the structural properties, also mechanical properties were verified by measuring microhardness, while the chemical resistance was identified by testing their durability in both acidic and basic solutions. The EPR results were supported by measuring electrical conductivity of the glass and heat treated glass samples at different temperatures ranging from 298 to 553 K, which proved that these glasses have very low conductivity even at high temperature. The formed phases of heat treated glass or glass ceramic samples were demonstrated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD). Also studying the structure of glasses and heat treated glasses before and after irradiation was investigated by the Infrared transmitting spectra. Calculations of optical band gap energies were demonstrated for some selected glasses and heat treated glasses from the data of UV optical absorption spectra to support the probability of using these bismuth silicate glasses for gamma radiation shielding processing.

  14. Toxic shock syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome; Toxic shock-like syndrome; TSLS ... Toxic shock syndrome is caused by a toxin produced by some types of staphylococcus bacteria. A similar problem, called toxic shock- ...

  15. Influence of interface scattering on shock waves in heterogeneous solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang Shiming; Ravichandran, Guruswami; Grady, Dennis E.

    2002-01-01

    In heterogeneous media, the scattering due to interfaces between dissimilar materials play an important role in shock wave dissipation and dispersion. In this work the influence of interface scattering effect on shock waves was studied by impacting flyer plates onto periodically layered polycarbonate/6061 aluminum, polycarbonate/304 stainless steel and polycarbonate/glass composites. The experimental results (using VISAR and stress gauges) indicate that the rise time of the shock front decreases with increasing shock strength, and increases with increasing mechanical impedance mismatch between layers; the strain rate at the shock front increases by about the square of the shock stress. Experimental and numerical results also show that due to interface scattering effect the shock wave velocity in periodically layered composites decreases. In some cases the shock velocity of a layered heterogeneous composite can be lower than that of either of its components

  16. Bursting the bubble of melt inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstern, Jacob B.

    2015-01-01

    Most silicate melt inclusions (MI) contain bubbles, whose significance has been alternately calculated, pondered, and ignored, but rarely if ever directly explored. Moore et al. (2015) analyze the bubbles, as well as their host glasses, and conclude that they often hold the preponderance of CO2 in the MI. Their findings entreat future researchers to account for the presence of bubbles in MI when calculating volatile budgets, saturation pressures, and eruptive flux.

  17. Induction melting of simulated transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenaglia, R.D.; McCall, J.L.

    1983-06-01

    Coreless induction melting was investigated as a method to melt and consolidate waste material representative of the transuranic waste (TRU) stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Waste material was introduced onto the surface of a molten cast iron bath in a coreless induction furnace. Waste metallics were incorporated into the bath. Noncombustibles formed a slag which was poured or skimmed from the bath surface. Stack sampling was performed to characterize the off-gas and particulate matter evolved. Experimental melting tests were performed for a variety of types of wastes including metallics, chemical sludge, soil, concrete, and glass. Each test also included a representative level of combustible materials consisting of paper, wood, cloth, polyvinyl chloride and polyethylene. Metallic wastes were readily processed by induction melting with a minimum of slag production. Test waste consisting primarily of chemical sludge provided fluid slags which could be poured from the bath surface. Processing of wastes consisting of soil, concrete, or glass was limited by the inability to achieve fluid slags. It appears from test results that coreless induction melting is a feasible method to process INEL-type waste materials if two problems can be resolved. First, slag fluidity must be improved to facilitate the collection of slags formed from soil, concrete, or glass containing wastes. Secondly, refractory life must be further optimized to permit prolonged processing of the waste materials. The use of a chrome-bearing high-alumina refractory was found to resist slag line attach much better than a magnesia refractory, although some attack was still noted

  18. Investigations on vanadium doped glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhusudana Rao, P.

    2013-01-01

    The glass samples studied in the present work have been prepared by melt quenching technique. They were prepared by mixing and grinding together by appropriate amounts of Li 2 O - Na 2 O - B 2 O 3 doped with V 2 O 5 in an agate motor before transferring into crucible. The mixtures were heated in an electric furnace at 1225K for 20 mm. The melt was then quenched to room temperature by pouring it on plane brass plate and pressing it with another brass plate. White and yellow coloured glasses have been obtained with good optical quality and high transparency. Finally the vitreous sample were annealed for 3 hrs at 423K to relieve residual internal stress and slowly cooled to room temperature. The polished glasses have been used for XRD, FTIR analysis and for DSC report. The DSC thermo grams for all the glasses were recorded on in the temperature range 50-550℃ with a heating rate of 10℃/min. Electron spin resonance and optical absorption of 20Li 2 O - 10 Na 2 O - (70-X)B 2 O 3 doped with XV 2 O 5 glass system are studied. ESR spectra of V 4+ ions doped in the glass exhibit peak at g =1.98. Spin Hamiltonian parameters are calculated. It was found that these parameters are dependent upon alkali ion concentration in the glass and the VO +2 ion in an octahedral coordination with a tetragonal compression. The physical parameters of all glasses were also evaluated with respect to the composition

  19. Review of glass ceramic waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusin, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    Glass ceramics are being considered for the immobilization of nuclear wastes to obtain a waste form with improved properties relative to glasses. Improved impact resistance, decreased thermal expansion, and increased leach resistance are possible. In addition to improved properties, the spontaneous devitrification exhibited in some waste-containing glasses can be avoided by the controlled crystallization after melting in the glass-ceramic process. The majority of the glass-ceramic development for nuclear wastes has been conducted at the Hahn-Meitner Institute (HMI) in Germany. Two of their products, a celsian-based (BaAl 3 Si 2 O 8 ) and a fresnoite-based (Ba 2 TiSi 2 O 8 ) glass ceramic, have been studied at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). A basalt-based glass ceramic primarily containing diopsidic augite (CaMgSi 2 O 6 ) has been developed at PNL. This glass ceramic is of interest since it would be in near equilibrium with a basalt repository. Studies at the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) in Japan have favored a glass-ceramic product based upon diopside (CaMgSi 2 O 6 ). Compositions, processing conditions, and product characterization of typical commercial and nuclear waste glass ceramics are discussed. In general, glass-ceramic waste forms can offer improved strength and decreased thermal expansion. Due to typcially large residual glass phases of up to 50%, there may be little improvement in leach resistance

  20. Melting of Dense Sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregoryanz, Eugene; Degtyareva, Olga; Hemley, Russell J.; Mao, Ho-kwang; Somayazulu, Maddury

    2005-01-01

    High-pressure high-temperature synchrotron diffraction measurements reveal a maximum on the melting curve of Na in the bcc phase at ∼31 GPa and 1000 K and a steep decrease in melting temperature in its fcc phase. The results extend the melting curve by an order of magnitude up to 130 GPa. Above 103 GPa, Na crystallizes in a sequence of phases with complex structures with unusually low melting temperatures, reaching 300 K at 118 GPa, and an increased melting temperature is observed with further increases in pressure

  1. Electric melting furnace for waste solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masaki, Toshio.

    1990-01-01

    To avoid electric troubles or reduction of waste processing performance even when platinum group elements are contained in wastes to be applied with glass solidification. For this purpose, a side electrode is disposed to the side wall of a melting vessel and a central electrode serving as a counter electrode is disposed about at the center inside the melting vessel. With such a constitution, if conductive materials are deposited at the bottom of the furnace or the bottom of the melting vessel, heating currents flow selectively between the side electrode and the central electrode. Accordingly, no electric currents flow through the conductive deposits thereby enabling to prevent abnormal heating in the bottom of the furnace. Further, heat generated by electric supply between the side electrode and the central electrode is supplied efficiently to raw material on the surface of the molten glass liquid to improve the processing performance. Further, disposition of the bottom electrode at the bottom of the furnace enables current supply between the central electrode and the bottom electrode to facilitate the temperature control for the molten glass in the furnace than in the conventional structure. (I.S.)

  2. Redox kinetics and mechanism in silicate melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochain, B.

    2009-12-01

    This work contributes to better understand iron redox reactions and mechanisms in silicate melts. It was conducted on compositions in both Na 2 O-B 2 O 3 -SiO 2 -FeO and Na 2 O-Al 2 O 3 -SiO 2 -FeO systems. The influence of boron-sodium and aluminum-sodium substitutions and iron content on properties and structure of glasses and on the iron redox kinetics has been studied by Raman, Moessbauer and XANES spectroscopies at the B and Fe K-edges. In borosilicate glasses, an increase in iron content or in the Fe 3+ /ΣFe redox state implies a structural rearrangement of the BO 4 species in the glass network whereas the BO 3 and BO 4 relative proportions remain nearly constant. In all studied glasses and melts, Fe 3+ is a network former in tetrahedral coordination, unless for aluminosilicates of ratio Al/Na≥1 where Fe 3+ is a network modifier in five-fold coordination. Near Tg, diffusion of network modifying cations controls the iron redox kinetics along with a flux of electron holes. At liquidus temperatures, oxygen diffusion is considered to be the mechanism that governs redox reactions. This study shows the role played by the silicate network polymerization on the redox kinetics. In borosilicate melts, iron redox kinetics depends on the boron speciation between BO 3 and BO 4 that depends itself on the sodium content. Furthermore, an increase in the network-former/network-modifier ratio implies a decrease in oxygen diffusion that results in a slowing down of the redox kinetics. The obtained results allow a description of the iron redox kinetics for more complex compositions as natural lavas or nuclear waste model glasses. (author)

  3. Database and Interim Glass Property Models for Hanford HLW Glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrma, Pavel R; Piepel, Gregory F; Vienna, John D; Cooley, Scott K; Kim, Dong-Sang; Russell, Renee L

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a methodology for an increase in the efficiency and a decrease in the cost of vitrifying high-level waste (HLW) by optimizing HLW glass formulation. This methodology consists in collecting and generating a database of glass properties that determine HLW glass processability and acceptability and relating these properties to glass composition. The report explains how the property-composition models are developed, fitted to data, used for glass formulation optimization, and continuously updated in response to changes in HLW composition estimates and changes in glass processing technology. Further, the report reviews the glass property-composition literature data and presents their preliminary critical evaluation and screening. Finally the report provides interim property-composition models for melt viscosity, for liquidus temperature (with spinel and zircon primary crystalline phases), and for the product consistency test normalized releases of B, Na, and Li. Models were fitted to a subset of the screened database deemed most relevant for the current HLW composition region

  4. Transformations to granular zircon revealed: Twinning, reidite, and ZrO2 in shocked zircon from Meteor Crater (Arizona, USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavosie, Aaron; Timms, Nicholas E.; Erickson, Timmons M.; Hagerty, Justin J.; Hörz, Friedrich

    2016-01-01

    Granular zircon in impact environments has long been recognized but remains poorly understood due to lack of experimental data to identify mechanisms involved in its genesis. Meteor Crater in Arizona (United States) contains abundant evidence of shock metamorphism, including shocked quartz, the high pressure polymorphs coesite and stishovite, diaplectic SiO2 glass, and lechatelierite (fused SiO2). Here we report the presence of granular zircon, a new shocked mineral discovery at Meteor Crater, that preserve critical orientation evidence of specific transformations that occurred during its formation at extreme impact conditions. The zircon grains occur as aggregates of sub-µm neoblasts in highly shocked Coconino Formation Sandstone (CFS) comprised of lechatelierite. Electron backscatter diffraction shows that each grain consists of multiple domains, some with boundaries disoriented by 65°, a known {112} shock-twin orientation. Other domains have crystallographic c-axes in alignment with {110} of neighboring domains, consistent with the former presence of the high pressure ZrSiO4 polymorph reidite. Additionally, nearly all zircon preserve ZrO2 + SiO2, providing evidence of partial dissociation. The genesis of CFS granular zircon started with detrital zircon that experienced shock-twinning and reidite formation from 20 to 30 GPa, ultimately yielding a phase that retained crystallographic memory; this phase subsequently recrystallized to systematically oriented zircon neoblasts, and in some areas partially dissociated to ZrO2. The lechatelierite matrix, experimentally constrained to form at >2000 °C, provided an ultra high-temperature environment for zircon dissociation (~1670 °C) and neoblast formation. The capacity of granular zircon to preserve a cumulative P-T record has not been recognized previously, and provides a new method for retrieving histories of impact-related mineral transformations in the crust at conditions far beyond which most rocks melt.

  5. Hafnium in peralkaline and peraluminous boro-aluminosilicate glass, and glass subcomponents: a solubility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, Linda L.; Darab, John G.; Qian, Maoxu; Zhao, Donggao; Palenik, Christopher S.; Li, Hong; Strachan, Denis M.; Li, Liyu

    2003-01-01

    A relationship between the solubility of hafnia (HfO2) and the host glass composition was explored by determining the solubility limits of HfO2 in peralkaline and peraluminous borosilicate glasses in the system SiO2-Al2O3-B2O3-Na2O, and in glasses in the system SiO2-Na2O-Al2O3 in air at 1450 C. The only Hf-bearing phase to crystallize in the peralkaline borosilicate melts is hafnia, while in the boron-free melts sodium-hafnium silicates crystallize. All peraluminous borosilicate melts crystallize hafnia, but the slightly peraluminous glasses also have sector-zoned hafnia crystals that contain Al and Si. The more peraluminous borosilicate glasses also crystallize a B-containing mullite. The general morphology of the hafnia crystals changes as peralkalinity (Na2O/(Na2O+Al2O3)) decreases, as expected in melts with increasing viscosity. In all of the glasses with Na2O > Al2O3, the solubility of hafnia is linearly and positively correlated with Na2O/(Na2O + Al2O3) or Na2O - Al2O3 (excess sodium), despite the presence of 5 to 16 mol% B2O3. The solubility of hafnia is higher in the sodium-aluminum borosilicate glasses than in the sodium-aluminosilicate glasses, suggesting that the boron is enhancing the effect that excess sodium has on the incorporation of Hf into the glass structure. The results of this solubility study are compared to other studies of high-valence cation solubility in B-free silicate melts. From this, for peralkaline B-bearing glasses, it is shown that, although the solubility limits are higher, the solution behavior of hafnia is the same as in B-free silicate melts previously studied. By comparison, also, it is shown that in peraluminous melts, there must be a different solution mechanism for hafnia: different than for peralkaline sodium-aluminum borosilicate glasses and different than for B-free silicate melts studied by others

  6. Recycle Glass in Foam Glass Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    The foam glass industry turn recycle glass into heat insulating building materials. The foaming process is relative insensitive to impurities in the recycle glass. It is therefore considered to play an important role in future glass recycling. We show and discuss trends of use of recycled glasses...... in foam glass industry and the supply sources and capacity of recycle glass....

  7. Vanadium and Chromium Redox Behavior in borosilicate Nuclear Waste Glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKeown, D.; Muller, I.; Gan, H.; Feng, Z.; Viragh, C.; Pegg, I.

    2011-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was used to characterize vanadium (V) and chromium (Cr) environments in low activity nuclear waste (LAW) glasses synthesized under a variety of redox conditions. V 2 O 5 was added to the melt to improve sulfur incorporation from the waste; however, at sufficiently high concentrations, V increased melt foaming, which lowered melt processing rates. Foaming may be reduced by varying the redox conditions of the melt, while small amounts of Cr are added to reduce melter refractory corrosion. Three parent glasses were studied, where CO-CO 2 mixtures were bubbled through the corresponding melt for increasing time intervals so that a series of redox-adjusted-glasses was synthesized from each parent glass. XAS data indicated that V and Cr behaviors are significantly different in these glasses with respect to the cumulative gas bubbling times: V 4+ /V total ranges from 8 to 35%, while Cr 3+ /Cr total can range from 15 to 100% and even to population distributions including Cr 2+ . As Na-content decreased, V, and especially, Cr became more reduced, when comparing equivalent glasses within a series. The Na-poor glass series show possible redox coupling between V and Cr, where V 4+ populations increase after initial bubbling, but as bubbling time increases, V 4+ populations drop to near the level of the parent glass, while Cr becomes more reduced to the point of having increasing Cr 2+ populations.

  8. Magnetic Fields Recorded by Chondrules Formed in Nebular Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Chuhong; Desch, Steven J.; Boley, Aaron C.; Weiss, Benjamin P.

    2018-04-01

    Recent laboratory efforts have constrained the remanent magnetizations of chondrules and the magnetic field strengths to which the chondrules were exposed as they cooled below their Curie points. An outstanding question is whether the inferred paleofields represent the background magnetic field of the solar nebula or were unique to the chondrule-forming environment. We investigate the amplification of the magnetic field above background values for two proposed chondrule formation mechanisms, large-scale nebular shocks and planetary bow shocks. Behind large-scale shocks, the magnetic field parallel to the shock front is amplified by factors of ∼10–30, regardless of the magnetic diffusivity. Therefore, chondrules melted in these shocks probably recorded an amplified magnetic field. Behind planetary bow shocks, the field amplification is sensitive to the magnetic diffusivity. We compute the gas properties behind a bow shock around a 3000 km radius planetary embryo, with and without atmospheres, using hydrodynamics models. We calculate the ionization state of the hot, shocked gas, including thermionic emission from dust, thermal ionization of gas-phase potassium atoms, and the magnetic diffusivity due to Ohmic dissipation and ambipolar diffusion. We find that the diffusivity is sufficiently large that magnetic fields have already relaxed to background values in the shock downstream where chondrules acquire magnetizations, and that these locations are sufficiently far from the planetary embryos that chondrules should not have recorded a significant putative dynamo field generated on these bodies. We conclude that, if melted in planetary bow shocks, chondrules probably recorded the background nebular field.

  9. Development Of Glass Matrices For HLW Radioactive Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C.

    2010-01-01

    Vitrification is currently the most widely used technology for the treatment of high level radioactive wastes (HLW) throughout the world. Most of the nations that have generated HLW are immobilizing in either borosilicate glass or phosphate glass. One of the primary reasons that glass has become the most widely used immobilization media is the relative simplicity of the vitrification process, e.g. melt waste plus glass forming frit additives and cast. A second reason that glass has become widely used for HLW is that the short range order (SRO) and medium range order (MRO) found in glass atomistically bonds the radionuclides and governs the melt properties such as viscosity, resistivity, sulphate solubility. The molecular structure of glass controls contaminant/radionuclide release by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. The molecular structure is flexible and hence accounts for the flexibility of glass formulations to waste variability. Nuclear waste glasses melt between 1050-1150 C which minimizes the volatility of radioactive components such as Tc 99 , Cs 137 , and I 129 . Nuclear waste glasses have good long term stability including irradiation resistance. Process control models based on the molecular structure of glass have been mechanistically derived and have been demonstrated to be accurate enough to control the world's largest HLW Joule heated ceramic melter in the US since 1996 at 95% confidence.

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS MATRICES FOR HLW RADIOACTIVE WASTES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C.

    2010-03-18

    Vitrification is currently the most widely used technology for the treatment of high level radioactive wastes (HLW) throughout the world. Most of the nations that have generated HLW are immobilizing in either borosilicate glass or phosphate glass. One of the primary reasons that glass has become the most widely used immobilization media is the relative simplicity of the vitrification process, e.g. melt waste plus glass forming frit additives and cast. A second reason that glass has become widely used for HLW is that the short range order (SRO) and medium range order (MRO) found in glass atomistically bonds the radionuclides and governs the melt properties such as viscosity, resistivity, sulphate solubility. The molecular structure of glass controls contaminant/radionuclide release by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. The molecular structure is flexible and hence accounts for the flexibility of glass formulations to waste variability. Nuclear waste glasses melt between 1050-1150 C which minimizes the volatility of radioactive components such as Tc{sup 99}, Cs{sup 137}, and I{sup 129}. Nuclear waste glasses have good long term stability including irradiation resistance. Process control models based on the molecular structure of glass have been mechanistically derived and have been demonstrated to be accurate enough to control the world's largest HLW Joule heated ceramic melter in the US since 1996 at 95% confidence.

  11. Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Z

    2005-01-01

    The International Symposium on Shock Waves (ISSW) is a well established series of conferences held every two years in a different location. A unique feature of the ISSW is the emphasis on bridging the gap between physicists and engineers working in fields as different as gas dynamics, fluid mechanics and materials sciences. The main results presented at these meetings constitute valuable proceedings that offer anyone working in this field an authoritative and comprehensive source of reference.

  12. Cosmos & Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beim, Anne

    1996-01-01

    The article unfolds the architectural visions of glass by Bruno Taut. It refers to inspirations by Paul Sheerbart and litterature and the Crystal Chain, also it analyses the tectonic univers that can be found in the glass pavillion for the Werkbund exposition in Cologne....

  13. Glass Glimpsed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lock, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Glass in poetry as it reflects the viewer and as its power of reflection are both reduced and enhanced by technology.......Glass in poetry as it reflects the viewer and as its power of reflection are both reduced and enhanced by technology....

  14. Bioactive Glasses in Dentistry: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbasi Z

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive glasses are silicate-based and can form a strong chemical bond with the tissues. These biomaterials are highly biocompatible and can form a hydroxyapatite layer when implanted in the body or soaked in the simulated body fluid. Due to several disadvantages, conventional glass processing method including melting of glass components, is replaced by sol-gel method with a large number of benefits such as low processing temperature, higher purity and homogeneity and therefore better control of bioactivity. Bioactive glasses have a wide range of applications, particularly in dentistry. These glasses can be used as particulates or monolithic shapes and porous or dense constructs in different applications such as remineralization or hypersensitivity treatment. Some properties of bioactive glasses such as antibacterial properties can be promoted by adding different elements into the glass. Bioactive glasses can also be used to modify different biocompatible materials that need to be bioactive. This study reviews the significant developments of bioactive glasses in clinical application, especially dentistry. Furthermore, we will discuss the field of bioactive glasses from beginning to the current developments, which includes processing methods, applications, and properties of these glasses.

  15. Spin glasses

    CERN Document Server

    Bovier, Anton

    2007-01-01

    Spin glass theory is going through a stunning period of progress while finding exciting new applications in areas beyond theoretical physics, in particular in combinatorics and computer science. This collection of state-of-the-art review papers written by leading experts in the field covers the topic from a wide variety of angles. The topics covered are mean field spin glasses, including a pedagogical account of Talagrand's proof of the Parisi solution, short range spin glasses, emphasizing the open problem of the relevance of the mean-field theory for lattice models, and the dynamics of spin glasses, in particular the problem of ageing in mean field models. The book will serve as a concise introduction to the state of the art of spin glass theory, usefull to both graduate students and young researchers, as well as to anyone curious to know what is going on in this exciting area of mathematical physics.

  16. Detection of fire protection and mineral glasses in industrial recycling using Raman mapping spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Biasio, Martin; Arnold, Thomas; McGunnigle, Gerald; Kraft, Martin; Leitner, Raimund; Balthasar, Dirk; Rehrmann, Volker

    2011-06-01

    Recycling of glass requires the removal of specialist glasses, such as fireproof and mineral glasses, and glass ceramics, which are regarded as contaminants. The sorting must take place before melting for efficient glass recycling. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of a real-time Raman mapping system for detecting and discriminating a range of industrially relevant glass contaminants in recovered glass streams. The components used are suitable for industrial conditions and the chemometric model is robust against imaging geometry and excitation intensity. The proposed approach is a novel alternative to established glass sorting sensors.

  17. Glass formability in medium-sized molecular systems/pharmaceuticals. I. Thermodynamics vs. kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Wenkang; Li, Xiangqian; Chen, Zeming; Liu, Ying Dan; Wang, Li-Min, E-mail: simone.capaccioli@unipi.it, E-mail: Limin-Wang@ysu.edu.cn [State Key Lab of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, and College of Materials Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao, Hebei 066004 (China); Labardi, Massimiliano [CNR-IPCF, Sede Secondaria Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Capaccioli, Simone, E-mail: simone.capaccioli@unipi.it, E-mail: Limin-Wang@ysu.edu.cn [CNR-IPCF, Sede Secondaria Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Department of Physics, Pisa University, Largo Bruno Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Paluch, M. [Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland)

    2016-05-07

    Scrutinizing critical thermodynamic and kinetic factors for glass formation and the glass stability of materials would benefit the screening of the glass formers for the industry of glassy materials. The present work aims at elucidating the factors that contribute to the glass formation by investigating medium-sized molecules of pharmaceuticals. Glass transition related thermodynamics and kinetics are performed on the pharmaceuticals using calorimetric, dielectric, and viscosity measurements. The characteristic thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of glass transition are found to reproduce the relations established for small-molecule glass formers. The systematic comparison of the thermodynamic and kinetic contributions to glass formation reveals that the melting-point viscosity is the crucial quantity for the glass formation. Of more interest is the finding of a rough correlation between the melting-point viscosity and the entropy of fusion normalized by the number of beads of the pharmaceuticals, suggesting the thermodynamics can partly manifest its contribution to glass formation via kinetics.

  18. Glass formability in medium-sized molecular systems/pharmaceuticals. I. Thermodynamics vs. kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Wenkang; Li, Xiangqian; Chen, Zeming; Liu, Ying Dan; Labardi, Massimiliano; Capaccioli, Simone; Paluch, M; Wang, Li-Min

    2016-05-07

    Scrutinizing critical thermodynamic and kinetic factors for glass formation and the glass stability of materials would benefit the screening of the glass formers for the industry of glassy materials. The present work aims at elucidating the factors that contribute to the glass formation by investigating medium-sized molecules of pharmaceuticals. Glass transition related thermodynamics and kinetics are performed on the pharmaceuticals using calorimetric, dielectric, and viscosity measurements. The characteristic thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of glass transition are found to reproduce the relations established for small-molecule glass formers. The systematic comparison of the thermodynamic and kinetic contributions to glass formation reveals that the melting-point viscosity is the crucial quantity for the glass formation. Of more interest is the finding of a rough correlation between the melting-point viscosity and the entropy of fusion normalized by the number of beads of the pharmaceuticals, suggesting the thermodynamics can partly manifest its contribution to glass formation via kinetics.

  19. Model of interfacial melting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, Ole G.; Zuckermann, Martin J.

    1987-01-01

    A two-dimensional model is proposed to describe systems with phase transitions which take place in terms of crystalline as well as internal degrees of freedom. Computer simulation of the model shows that the interplay between the two sets of degrees of freedom permits observation of grain-boundar......-boundary formation and interfacial melting, a nonequilibrium process by which the system melts at the boundaries of a polycrystalline domain structure. Lipid membranes are candidates for systems with pronounced interfacial melting behavior....

  20. Laser shock wave and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chaojun; Zhang, Yongkang; Zhou, Jianzhong; Zhang, Fang; Feng, Aixin

    2007-12-01

    The technology of laser shock wave is used to not only surface modification but also metal forming. It can be divided into three parts: laser shock processing, laser shock forming (LSF) and laser peenforming(LPF). Laser shock processing as a surface treatment to metals can make engineering components have a residual compressive stress so that it obviously improves their fatigue strength and stress corrosion performances, while laser shock forming (LSF) is a novel technique that is used in plastic deformation of sheet metal recently and Laser peen forming (LPF) is another new sheet metal forming process presented in recent years. They all can be carried out by a high-power and repetition pulse Nd:Glass laser device made by Jiangsu University. Laser shock technology has characterized of ultrahigh pressure and high strain rate (10 6 - 10 7s -1). Now, for different materials, we are able to form different metals to contours and shapes and simultaneity leave their surfaces in crack-resistant compressive stress state. The results show that the technology of laser shock wave can strengthen surface property and prolong fatigue life and especially can deform metals to shapes that could not be adequately made using conventional methods. With the development of the technology of laser shock wave, the applied fields of laser will become greater and greater.

  1. Investigation on neptunium in a borosilicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirot, I.

    1988-03-01

    The oxidization state and coordination of neptunium, introduced as dopant in borosilicate glasses were studied through optical, Mossbauer spectroscopies and magnetic measurements. The neptunium oxide, introduced previously as NpO 2 is reduced during the melting process of the glass. This leads to an equilibrium in which the ratio of Np 4+ to Np 3+ valences depends on experimental conditions. Spectroscopic analysises conduct to postulate the presence of different sites for each of the oxydation states of neptunium [fr

  2. Control of high-level radioactive waste-glass melters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickford, D.F.; Coleman, C.J.

    1990-01-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will immobilize Savannah River Site High Level Waste as a durable borosilicate glass for permanent disposal in a repository. The DWPF will be controlled based on glass composition. The following discussion is a preliminary analysis of the capability of the laboratory methods that can be used to control the glass composition, and the relationships between glass durability and glass properties important to glass melting. The glass durability and processing properties will be controlled by controlling the chemical composition of the glass. The glass composition will be controlled by control of the melter feed transferred from the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) to the Melter Feed Tank (MFT). During cold runs, tests will be conducted to demonstrate the chemical equivalence of glass sampled from the pour stream and glass removed from cooled canisters. In similar tests, the compositions of glass produced from slurries sampled from the SME and MFT will be compared to final product glass to determine the statistical relationships between melter feed and glass product. The total error is the combination of those associated with homogeneity in the SME or MFT, sampling, preparation of samples for analysis, instrument calibration, analysis, and the composition/property model. This study investigated the sensitivity of estimation of property data to the combination of variations from sampling through analysis. In this or a similar manner, the need for routine glass product sampling will be minimized, and glass product characteristics will be assured before the melter feed is committed to the melter

  3. Melting curve of materials: theory versus experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfe, D; Vocadlo, L; Price, G D; Gillan, M J

    2004-01-01

    A number of melting curves of various materials have recently been measured experimentally and calculated theoretically, but the agreement between different groups is not always good. We discuss here some of the problems which may arise in both experiments and theory. We also report the melting curves of Fe and Al calculated recently using quantum mechanics techniques, based on density functional theory with generalized gradient approximations. For Al our results are in very good agreement with both low pressure diamond-anvil-cell experiments (Boehler and Ross 1997 Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 153 223, Haenstroem and Lazor 2000 J. Alloys Compounds 305 209) and high pressure shock wave experiments (Shaner et al 1984 High Pressure in Science and Technology ed Homan et al (Amsterdam: North-Holland) p 137). For Fe our results agree with the shock wave experiments of Brown and McQueen (1986 J. Geophys. Res. 91 7485) and Nguyen and Holmes (2000 AIP Shock Compression of Condensed Matter 505 81) and the recent diamond-anvil-cell experiments of Shen et al (1998 Geophys. Res. Lett. 25 373). Our results are at variance with the recent calculations of Laio et al (2000 Science 287 1027) and, to a lesser extent, with the calculations of Belonoshko et al (2000 Phys. Rev. Lett. 84 3638). The reasons for these disagreements are discussed

  4. Premixing and steam explosion phenomena in the tests with stratified melt-coolant configuration and binary oxidic melt simulant materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudinov, Pavel, E-mail: pavel@safety.sci.kth.se; Grishchenko, Dmitry, E-mail: dmitry@safety.sci.kth.se; Konovalenko, Alexander, E-mail: kono@kth.se; Karbojian, Aram, E-mail: karbojan@kth.se

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • Steam explosion in stratified melt-coolant configuration is studied experimentally. • Different binary oxidic melt simulant materials were used. • Five spontaneous steam explosions were observed. • Instability of melt-coolant interface and formation of premixing layer was observed. • Explosion strength is influenced by melt superheat and water subcooling. - Abstract: Steam explosion phenomena in stratified melt-coolant configuration are considered in this paper. Liquid corium layer covered by water on top can be formed in severe accident scenarios with (i) vessel failure and release of corium melt into a relatively shallow water pool; (ii) with top flooding of corium melt layer. In previous assessments of potential energetics in stratified melt-coolant configuration, it was assumed that melt and coolant are separated by a stable vapor film and there is no premixing prior to the shock wave propagation. This assumption was instrumental for concluding that the amount of energy that can be released in such configuration is not of safety importance. However, several recent experiments carried out in Pouring and Under-water Liquid Melt Spreading (PULiMS) facility with up to 78 kg of binary oxidic corium simulants mixtures have resulted in spontaneous explosions with relatively high conversion ratios (order of one percent). The instability of the melt-coolant interface, melt splashes and formation of premixing layer were observed in the tests. In this work, we present results of experiments carried out more recently in steam explosion in stratified melt-coolant configuration (SES) facility in order to shed some light on the premixing phenomena and assess the influence of the test conditions on the steam explosion energetics.

  5. Microjetting from a grooved Al surface under supported and unsupported shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jian-Li; Wang, Pei; He, An-Min

    2014-08-01

    Using molecular dynamics methods, we simulate and compare the microjetting from a grooved Al surface induced by supported and unsupported shocks at different breakout pressures. Via the analysis on the microjetting morphologies and mass distributions, we find that the threshold of shock breakout pressure for the microjetting formation is almost same, but the variation of microjet mass with shock pressure shows a great difference for the two loading patterns. Under supported shock loading, the microjet mass keeps a continuous increase with increasing shock pressure, and release melting can enhance it markedly. By contrast, the microjet mass under unsupported shocks is smaller and seems no remarkable increase with shock pressure in our simulations (at extremely short pulses), implying the shock decaying can weaken the microjetting. Of course, a large area of fragments near the surface may form in this case. The microjet source distributions corresponding to supported and unsupported shocks are presented. It is found that the former becomes apparently broader than the latter with increasing shock pressure. Besides, the microjet tip velocity under supported shocks may appear a reduction because of the material strength effect below release melting. While under unsupported shocks, all the microjets in solid and melted states will experience the reduction of tip velocity. These decrements of tip velocity can be fitted by an exponential function.

  6. Converting sunlight into red light in fluorosilicate glass for amorphous silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ming, Chengguo, E-mail: mingchengguo1978@163.com [Physics Department, School of Sciences, Tianjin University of Science & Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China); Song, Feng [Photonics Center, College of Physical Science, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Ren, Xiaobin [Physics Department, School of Sciences, Tianjin University of Science & Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China); Yuan, Fengying; Qin, Yueting [Physics Department, School of Sciences, Tianjin University of Science & Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China); Photonics Center, College of Physical Science, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); An, Liqun; Cai, Yuanxue [Physics Department, School of Sciences, Tianjin University of Science & Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China)

    2017-03-15

    Fluorosilicate glass was prepared by high-temperature melting method to explore highly efficient luminescence materials for amorphous silicon solar cells. Absorption, excitation and emission spectra of the glass were measured. The optical characters of the glass were discussed in details. The glass can efficiently convert sunlight into red light. Our glass can be applied to amorphous silicon solar cells as a converter of solar spectrum.

  7. Quartz glass behavior at ultraviolet spectrum region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braga, A.F.B.; Barbosa, L.C.; Evora, C.A.P.D.

    1990-01-01

    Melted quartz ingots were produced from raw materials of different sources. Behavior studies of these three different quartz glass were made at the eletromagnetic spectrum ultraviolet region. The atomic absorption spectroscopy was used as an analysis technique of the alkaline, transition and aluminum metal traces. It was found that the alkaline, transition and aluminum metals impurities present a great influence on the melted quartz spectral behavior at the ultraviolet region. It was stated that measurments at this spectrum region constitute an important characterization technique to natural quartz as well as melted quartz. (author) [pt

  8. Behaviour of monolithic and laminated glass exposed to radiant heating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debuyser, M.; Sjöström, J.; Lange, D.; Honfi, D.; Sonck, D.; Belis, J.

    2017-01-01

    Glass is seeing a growing interest as a structural material as a result of its relatively good strength to weight ratio and the obvious aesthetic benefits of its use in buildings. However due to the sensitivity of glass to thermal shock and the considerably temperature-dependent behaviour of

  9. Effect of cooling rate on crystallization in an aluminophosphosilicate melt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, S. J.; Zhang, Yanfei; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2011-01-01

    The effect of cooling rate on spontaneous crystallization behavior of an alumino-phospho-silicate melt is studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and viscometry. The cooling rates of 160, 2100 and 12000 K/s are attained by subjecting ......, the opalescence of the glass can be tuned by adjusting the cooling rate. This makes the production of opal glasses or transparent glass ceramics more efficient and energy saving, since the conventional isothermal treatment procedure can be left out....

  10. Shock Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    The electrician pictured is installing a General Electric Ground Fault Interrupter (GFI), a device which provides protection against electrical shock in the home or in industrial facilities. Shocks due to defective wiring in home appliances or other electrical equipment can cause severe burns, even death. As a result, the National Electrical Code now requires GFIs in all new homes constructed. This particular type of GFI employs a sensing element which derives from technology acquired in space projects by SCI Systems, Inc., Huntsville, Alabama, producer of sensors for GE and other manufacturers of GFI equipment. The sensor is based on the company's experience in developing miniaturized circuitry for space telemetry and other spacecraft electrical systems; this experience enabled SCI to package interruptor circuitry in the extremely limited space available and to produce sensory devices at practicable cost. The tiny sensor measures the strength of the electrical current and detects current differentials that indicate a fault in the functioning of an electrical system. The sensing element then triggers a signal to a disconnect mechanism in the GFI, which cuts off the current in the faulty circuit.

  11. Melt inclusions: Chapter 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,; Lowenstern, J. B.

    2014-01-01

    Melt inclusions are small droplets of silicate melt that are trapped in minerals during their growth in a magma. Once formed, they commonly retain much of their initial composition (with some exceptions) unless they are re-opened at some later stage. Melt inclusions thus offer several key advantages over whole rock samples: (i) they record pristine concentrations of volatiles and metals that are usually lost during magma solidification and degassing, (ii) they are snapshots in time whereas whole rocks are the time-integrated end products, thus allowing a more detailed, time-resolved view into magmatic processes (iii) they are largely unaffected by subsolidus alteration. Due to these characteristics, melt inclusions are an ideal tool to study the evolution of mineralized magma systems. This chapter first discusses general aspects of melt inclusions formation and methods for their investigation, before reviewing studies performed on mineralized magma systems.

  12. Near net-shape fabrication of alumina glass composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Q.; With, de G.; Dortmans, L.J.M.G.; Feenstra, F.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to fabricate alumina glass composites by melt infiltration with better dimensional control through reducing both the presintering and infiltration temperature. Main efforts were put to develop glasses that are chemically compatible with alumina. After extensive

  13. GLASS BOX

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Curtis, Laura

    2008-01-01

    The goals of this effort were to develop Glass Box capabilities to allow for the capturing of analyst activities and the associated data resources, track and log the results of automated processing...

  14. Thermal behaviors of liquid La-based bulk metallic glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, D. W.; Wang, X. D., E-mail: wangxd@zju.edu.cn, E-mail: jiangjz@zju.edu.cn; Lou, H. B.; Cao, Q. P.; Jiang, J. Z., E-mail: wangxd@zju.edu.cn, E-mail: jiangjz@zju.edu.cn [International Center for New-Structured Materials (ICNSM), Laboratory of New-Structured Materials, State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Wang, L. W. [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhang, D. X. [State Key Laboratory of Modern Optical Instrumentation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2014-12-14

    Thermal behaviors of liquid La-based bulk metallic glasses have been measured by using the dilatometer with a self-sealed sample cell. It is demonstrated that the strong glass forming liquid not only has the small thermal expansion coefficient but also shows the slow variation rate. Moreover, the strong glass former has relatively dense atomic packing and also small density change in the liquid state. The results suggest that the high glass forming ability of La-based metallic glasses would be closely related to the slow atomic rearrangements in liquid melts.

  15. Vortex lattice melting, pinning and kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doniach, S.; Ryu, S.; Kapitulnik, A.

    1994-01-01

    The phenomenology of the high T c superconductors is discussed both at the level of the thermodynamics of melting of the Abrikosov flux lattice and in terms of the melting and kinetics of the flux lattice for a pinned system. The authors review results on 3D melting obtained by a Monte Carlo simulation approach in which the 2D open-quotes pancakeclose quotes vortices are treated as statistical variables. The authors discuss pinning in the context of the strong pinning regime in which the vortex density given in terms of the applied field B is small compared to that represented by an effective field B pin measuring the pinning center density. The authors introduce a new criterion for the unfreezing of a vortex glass on increase of magnetic field or temperature, in the strong pinning, small field unit. The authors model this limit in terms of a single flux line interacting with a columnar pin. This model is studied both analytically and by computer simulation. By applying a tilt potential, the authors study the kinetics of the vortex motion in an external current and show that the resulting current-voltage characteristic follows a basic vortex glass-like scaling relation in the vicinity of the depinning transition

  16. Do cracks melt their way through solids?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, P. R.

    1998-01-01

    Real-time, in situ fracture studies in the high-voltage electron microscope (HVEM) show that microscopically thin regions of amorphous NiTi form ahead of moving crack tips in the B2-NiTi intermetallic compound during tensile straining at temperatures equal to or below 600K. The upper cutoff temperature of 600K for this stress-induced melting (or amorphization) is identical to the upper cutoff temperatures reported in the literature for both heavy-ion-induced amorphization of the intermetallic NiTi and ion-beam-mixing-induced amorphization of Ni and Ti multilayer. These results, together with the fact that the higher crystallization temperatures (∼800K)of unrelaxed amorphous NiTi alloys obtained by rapid quenching can also be reduced to, but not lower than 600K, by heavy-ion irradiation, strongly suggest that structural relaxation processes enhanced or induced by dynamic atomic disordering allow the formation of a unique, fully-relaxed glassy state which is characterized by a unique isothermal crystallization temperature. We believe that this unique temperature is the Kauzmann glass-transition temperature, corresponding to the ideal glass having the same entropy as the crystalline state. As the glassy state with the lowest global free energy, the preferential formation of this ideal glass by disorder-induced amorphization processes can be understood as the most energetically-favored, kinetically-constrained melting response of crystalline materials driven far from equilibrium at low temperatures

  17. Development of glass ceramics for the incorporation of fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De, A.K.; Luckscheiter, B.; Lutze, W.; Malow, G.; Schiewer, E.

    1976-01-01

    Spontaneous devitrification of fission-product-containing borosilicate glasses can be avoided by controlled crystallization after melting. Glass ceramics have been developed from a vitrified simulated waste and further improvement of product properties was achieved. In particular perovskite, h-celsian, diopside and eucryptite glass ceramics were prepared. These contained leach resistant host phases which exhibited considerable enrichment of long-lived fission products. All products showed increased impact resistance, but the thermal expansion was only slightly improved

  18. Bioactive Glass and Glass-Ceramic Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo R. Boccaccini

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, bioactive glasses have been used to fill and restore bone defects. More recently, this category of biomaterials has become an emerging research field for bone tissue engineering applications. Here, we review and discuss current knowledge on porous bone tissue engineering scaffolds on the basis of melt-derived bioactive silicate glass compositions and relevant composite structures. Starting with an excerpt on the history of bioactive glasses, as well as on fundamental requirements for bone tissue engineering scaffolds, a detailed overview on recent developments of bioactive glass and glass-ceramic scaffolds will be given, including a summary of common fabrication methods and a discussion on the microstructural-mechanical properties of scaffolds in relation to human bone (structure-property and structure-function relationship. In addition, ion release effects of bioactive glasses concerning osteogenic and angiogenic responses are addressed. Finally, areas of future research are highlighted in this review.

  19. Structural investigations of some metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sietsma, J.

    1987-03-01

    Metallic glasses were prepared by the melt spinning technique from iron and nickel alloys (Fe-Ni-P; Fe-B; Ni-Nb; Ni-B). Structure investigations were made by means of neutron diffraction experiments. Distribution functions and range orders were determined. (Auth.)

  20. Modeling of glass fusion furnaces; Modelisation des fours de fusion de verre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mechitoua, N. [Electricite de France (EDF), 78 - Chatou (France). Direction des Etudes et Recherches; Plard, C. [Electricite de France, 77 - Moret sur Loing (France). Direction des Etudes et Recherches

    1997-12-31

    The furnaces used for glass melting are industrial installations inside which complex and coupled physical and chemical phenomena occur. Thermal engineering plays a major role and numerical simulation is a precious tool for the analysis of the different coupling, of their interaction and of the influence of the different parameters. In order to optimize the functioning of glass furnaces and to improve the quality of the glass produced, Electricite de France (EdF) has developed a specialized version of the ESTET fluid mechanics code, called `Joule`. This paper describes the functioning principle of glass furnaces, the interactions between heat transfers and flows inside the melted glass, the interactions between heat transfers and the thermal regulation of the furnace, the interactions between heat transfers and glass quality and the heat transfer interactions between the melted glass, the furnace walls and the combustion area. (J.S.)

  1. Corrosion of simulated nuclear waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Music, S.; Ristic, M.; Gotic, M.; Foric, J.

    1988-01-01

    In this study the preparation and characterization of borosilicate glasses of different chemical composition were investigated. Borosilicate glasses were doped with simulated nuclear waste oxides. The chemical corrosion in water of these glasses was followed by measuring the leach rates as a function of time. It was found that a simulated nuclear waste glass with the chemical composition (weight %), 15.61% Na 2 O, 10.39% B 2 O 3 , 45.31% SiO 2 , 13.42% ZnO, 6.61% TiO 2 and 8.66% waste oxides, is characterized by low melting temperature and with good corrosion resistance in water. Influence of passive layers on the leaching behaviour of nuclear waste glasses is discussed. (author) 20 refs.; 7 figs.; 4 tabs

  2. Experimental design of a waste glass study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piepel, G.F.; Redgate, P.E.; Hrma, P.

    1995-04-01

    A Composition Variation Study (CVS) is being performed to support a future high-level waste glass plant at Hanford. A total of 147 glasses, covering a broad region of compositions melting at approximately 1150 degrees C, were tested in five statistically designed experimental phases. This paper focuses on the goals, strategies, and techniques used in designing the five phases. The overall strategy was to investigate glass compositions on the boundary and interior of an experimental region defined by single- component, multiple-component, and property constraints. Statistical optimal experimental design techniques were used to cover various subregions of the experimental region in each phase. Empirical mixture models for glass properties (as functions of glass composition) from previous phases wee used in designing subsequent CVS phases

  3. Technological advances in tellurite glasses properties, processing, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Manzani, Danilo

    2017-01-01

    This book is the first to provide a comprehensive introduction to the synthesis, optical properties, and photonics applications of tellurite glasses. The book begins with an overview of tellurite glasses, followed by expert chapters on synthesis, properties, and state-of-the-art applications ranging from laser glass, optical fibers, and optical communications through color tuning, plasmonics, supercontinuum generation, and other photonic devices. The book provides in-depth information on the the structural, linear, and non-linear optical properties of tellurite glasses and their implications for device development. Real-world examples give the reader valuable insight into the applications of tellurite glass. A detailed discussion of glass production methods, including raw materials and melting and refining oxide- and fluoro-tellurite glasses, is also included. The book features an extensive reference list for further reading. This highly readable and didactic text draws on chemical composition, glass science,...

  4. Fabrication, characterization, and evaluation of a fully radioactive glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, K.M.; Elliott, M.L.; Shade, J.W.; Smith, H.D.

    1991-01-01

    West Valley Sludge Glass-1 (WVSG-1) was fabricated using high-level waste from the West Valley Demonstration Project. Melt foaming was a problem during fabrication and a unique two-step funnel system was designed to feed the melting calcine into a crucible. The resultant glass was essentially bubble free. Crushed WVSG-1 was tested for durability using the Product Consistency Test developed at WSRC. Except for Al, the release of nonradioactive elements from WVSG-1 was lower than the release of the same elements from ATM-10, the West Valley reference glass and the release of the radionuclides Th, U, and Tc was about the same as for ATM-10

  5. Non-local viscosity of polymer melts approaching their glassy state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puscasu, Ruslan; Todd, Billy; Daivis, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The nonlocal viscosity kernels of polymer melts have been determined by means of equilibrium molecular dynamics upon cooling toward the glass transition. Previous results for the temperature dependence of the self-diffusion coefficient and the value of the glass transition temperature are confirmed...

  6. Enhanced Luminescent Properties in Tm3+/Dy3+ Co-doped Transparent Phosphate Glass Ceramic

    OpenAIRE

    Yao L. Q.; Chen G. H.; Zhong H. J.; Cui S. C.; Li F.; Gan J.Y.

    2016-01-01

    Novel Tm3+/Dy3+ co-doped phosphate glass and glass ceramic samples for white light emitting diodes were prepared by melt quenching method. Under 353 nm excitation, the colors of the luminescence of the glass and glass ceramic samples are white. The CIE chromaticity coordinates (0.338, 0.328) of the emission from the glass ceramic is close to the standard white-light illumination (0.333, 0.333). Compared to the glass, the fluorescence intensity in the glass ceramic is greatly enhanced.

  7. Final Report. Baseline LAW Glass Formulation Testing, VSL-03R3460-1, Rev. 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, Isabelle S. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Gan, Hao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Buechele, Andrew [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Rielley, Elizabeth [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Bazemore, Gina [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Cecil, Richard [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Hight, Kenneth [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Mooers, Cavin [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Lai, Shan-Tao T. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Kruger, Albert A. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-06-18

    The major objective of the baseline glass formulation work was to develop and select glass formulations that are compliant with contractual and processing requirements for each of the LAW waste streams. Other objectives of the work included preparation and characterization of glasses with respect to the properties of interest, optimization of sulfate loading in the glasses, evaluation of ability to achieve waste loading limits, testing to demonstrate compatibility of glass melts with melter materials of construction, development of glass formulations to support ILAW qualification activities, and identification of glass formulation issues with respect to contract specifications and processing requirements.

  8. Continuous drawing of Bi-Ca-Sr-Cu-O glass fibers from a preform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, H.; Hu, Y.; Mackenzie, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    Several issues related to drawing Bi-Ca-Sr-Cu-O glass fibers from a preform are discussed. Continuous drawing of Bi-Ca-Sr-Cu-O glass fibers was successfully accomplished. Bi-Ca-Sr-Cu-O glass fibers are drawn above the crystallization temperature. Minimizing crystallization of the glass preforms is a key for successful drawing of the glass fibers. Two effective means, high glass melting temperature and V 2 O 5 doping, have been used to minimize the crystallization of the preforms, thus assuring the continuous drawing of Bi-Ca-Sr-Cu-O glass fibers

  9. Precipitation of metal nitrides from chloride melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slater, S.A.; Miller, W.E.; Willit, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    Precipitation of actinides, lanthanides, and fission products as nitrides from molten chloride melts is being investigated for use as a final cleanup step in treating radioactive salt wastes generated by electrometallurgical processing of spent nuclear fuel. The radioactive components (eg, fission products) need to be removed to reduce the volume of high-level waste that requires disposal. To extract the fission products from the salt, a nitride precipitation process is being developed. The salt waste is first contacted with a molten metal; after equilibrium is reached, a nitride is added to the metal phase. The insoluble nitrides can be recovered and converted to a borosilicate glass after air oxidation. For a bench-scale experimental setup, a crucible was designed to contact the salt and metal phases. Solubility tests were performed with candidate nitrides and metal nitrides for which there are no solubility data. Experiments were performed to assess feasibility of precipitation of metal nitrides from chloride melts

  10. Melting point of yttria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skaggs, S.R.

    1977-06-01

    Fourteen samples of 99.999 percent Y 2 O 3 were melted near the focus of a 250-W CO 2 laser. The average value of the observed melting point along the solid-liquid interface was 2462 +- 19 0 C. Several of these same samples were then melted in ultrahigh-purity oxygen, nitrogen, helium, or argon and in water vapor. No change in the observed temperature was detected, with the exception of a 20 0 C increase in temperature from air to helium gas. Post test examination of the sample characteristics, clarity, sphericity, and density is presented, along with composition. It is suggested that yttria is superior to alumina as a secondary melting-point standard

  11. Glass viscosity calculation based on a global statistical modelling approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fluegel, Alex

    2007-02-01

    A global statistical glass viscosity model was developed for predicting the complete viscosity curve, based on more than 2200 composition-property data of silicate glasses from the scientific literature, including soda-lime-silica container and float glasses, TV panel glasses, borosilicate fiber wool and E type glasses, low expansion borosilicate glasses, glasses for nuclear waste vitrification, lead crystal glasses, binary alkali silicates, and various further compositions from over half a century. It is shown that within a measurement series from a specific laboratory the reported viscosity values are often over-estimated at higher temperatures due to alkali and boron oxide evaporation during the measurement and glass preparation, including data by Lakatos et al. (1972) and the recently published High temperature glass melt property database for process modeling by Seward et al. (2005). Similarly, in the glass transition range many experimental data of borosilicate glasses are reported too high due to phase separation effects. The developed global model corrects those errors. The model standard error was 9-17°C, with R^2 = 0.985-0.989. The prediction 95% confidence interval for glass in mass production largely depends on the glass composition of interest, the composition uncertainty, and the viscosity level. New insights in the mixed-alkali effect are provided.

  12. High-efficiency organic glass scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Patrick L.; Carlson, Joseph S.

    2017-12-19

    A new family of neutron/gamma discriminating scintillators is disclosed that comprises stable organic glasses that may be melt-cast into transparent monoliths. These materials have been shown to provide light yields greater than solution-grown trans-stilbene crystals and efficient PSD capabilities when combined with 0.01 to 0.05% by weight of the total composition of a wavelength-shifting fluorophore. Photoluminescence measurements reveal fluorescence quantum yields that are 2 to 5 times greater than conventional plastic or liquid scintillator matrices, which accounts for the superior light yield of these glasses. The unique combination of high scintillation light-yields, efficient neutron/gamma PSD, and straightforward scale-up via melt-casting distinguishes the developed organic glasses from existing scintillators.

  13. Collisionless electrostatic shocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H.K.; Andersen, S.A.; Jensen, Vagn Orla

    1970-01-01

    An attempt was made in the laboratory to observe the standing collisionless electrostatic shocks in connection with the bow shock of the earth......An attempt was made in the laboratory to observe the standing collisionless electrostatic shocks in connection with the bow shock of the earth...

  14. Force induced DNA melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santosh, Mogurampelly; Maiti, Prabal K

    2009-01-01

    When pulled along the axis, double-strand DNA undergoes a large conformational change and elongates by roughly twice its initial contour length at a pulling force of about 70 pN. The transition to this highly overstretched form of DNA is very cooperative. Applying a force perpendicular to the DNA axis (unzipping), double-strand DNA can also be separated into two single-stranded DNA, this being a fundamental process in DNA replication. We study the DNA overstretching and unzipping transition using fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and argue that the conformational changes of double-strand DNA associated with either of the above mentioned processes can be viewed as force induced DNA melting. As the force at one end of the DNA is increased the DNA starts melting abruptly/smoothly above a critical force depending on the pulling direction. The critical force f m , at which DNA melts completely decreases as the temperature of the system is increased. The melting force in the case of unzipping is smaller compared to the melting force when the DNA is pulled along the helical axis. In the case of melting through unzipping, the double-strand separation has jumps which correspond to the different energy minima arising due to sequence of different base pairs. The fraction of Watson-Crick base pair hydrogen bond breaking as a function of force does not show smooth and continuous behavior and consists of plateaus followed by sharp jumps.

  15. Transition metal ions in silicate melts. I. Manganese in sodium silicate melts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, C; White, W B

    1980-01-01

    Optical absorption spectra obtained on glasses quenched from sodium silicate melts show Mn/sup 3 +/ to be the dominant species for melts heated in air and Mn/sup 2 +/ to be the dominant species for melts heated at P/sub O/sub 2// = 10/sup -17/ bar. The absorption spectrum of Mn/sup 3 +/ consists of an intense band at 20,000 cm/sup -1/ with a 15,000 cm/sup -1/ satellite possibly arising from the Jahn-Teller effect. The independence of the spectrum from melt composition and the high band intensity is offered as evidence for a distinct Mn/sup 3 +/ complex in the melt. The spectrum of Mn/sup 2 +/ is weak and many expected bands are not observed. A two-band luminescence spectrum from Mn/sup 2 +/ has been tentatively interpreted as due to Mn/sup 2 +/ in interstitial sites in the network and Mn/sup 2 +/ coordiated by non-bridging oxygens.

  16. Geometrical shock dynamics for magnetohydrodynamic fast shocks

    KAUST Repository

    Mostert, W.; Pullin, D. I.; Samtaney, Ravi; Wheatley, V.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a formulation of two-dimensional geometrical shock dynamics (GSD) suitable for ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fast shocks under magnetic fields of general strength and orientation. The resulting area–Mach-number–shock-angle relation is then incorporated into a numerical method using pseudospectral differentiation. The MHD-GSD model is verified by comparison with results from nonlinear finite-volume solution of the complete ideal MHD equations applied to a shock implosion flow in the presence of an oblique and spatially varying magnetic field ahead of the shock. Results from application of the MHD-GSD equations to the stability of fast MHD shocks in two dimensions are presented. It is shown that the time to formation of triple points for both perturbed MHD and gas-dynamic shocks increases as (Formula presented.), where (Formula presented.) is a measure of the initial Mach-number perturbation. Symmetry breaking in the MHD case is demonstrated. In cylindrical converging geometry, in the presence of an azimuthal field produced by a line current, the MHD shock behaves in the mean as in Pullin et al. (Phys. Fluids, vol. 26, 2014, 097103), but suffers a greater relative pressure fluctuation along the shock than the gas-dynamic shock. © 2016 Cambridge University Press

  17. Geometrical shock dynamics for magnetohydrodynamic fast shocks

    KAUST Repository

    Mostert, W.

    2016-12-12

    We describe a formulation of two-dimensional geometrical shock dynamics (GSD) suitable for ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fast shocks under magnetic fields of general strength and orientation. The resulting area–Mach-number–shock-angle relation is then incorporated into a numerical method using pseudospectral differentiation. The MHD-GSD model is verified by comparison with results from nonlinear finite-volume solution of the complete ideal MHD equations applied to a shock implosion flow in the presence of an oblique and spatially varying magnetic field ahead of the shock. Results from application of the MHD-GSD equations to the stability of fast MHD shocks in two dimensions are presented. It is shown that the time to formation of triple points for both perturbed MHD and gas-dynamic shocks increases as (Formula presented.), where (Formula presented.) is a measure of the initial Mach-number perturbation. Symmetry breaking in the MHD case is demonstrated. In cylindrical converging geometry, in the presence of an azimuthal field produced by a line current, the MHD shock behaves in the mean as in Pullin et al. (Phys. Fluids, vol. 26, 2014, 097103), but suffers a greater relative pressure fluctuation along the shock than the gas-dynamic shock. © 2016 Cambridge University Press

  18. Formation of Ti--Zr--Cu--Ni bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, X.H.; Johnson, W.L.

    1995-01-01

    Formation of bulk metallic glass in quaternary Ti--Zr--Cu--Ni alloys by relatively slow cooling from the melt is reported. Thick strips of metallic glass were obtained by the method of metal mold casting. The glass forming ability of the quaternary alloys exceeds that of binary or ternary alloys containing the same elements due to the complexity of the system. The best glass forming alloys such as Ti 34 Zr 11 Cu 47 Ni 8 can be cast to at least 4-mm-thick amorphous strips. The critical cooling rate for glass formation is of the order of 250 K/s or less, at least two orders of magnitude lower than that of the best ternary alloys. The glass transition, crystallization, and melting behavior of the alloys were studied by differential scanning calorimetry. The amorphous alloys exhibit a significant undercooled liquid region between the glass transition and first crystallization event. The glass forming ability of these alloys, as determined by the critical cooling rate, exceeds what is expected based on the reduced glass transition temperature. It is also found that the glass forming ability for alloys of similar reduced glass transition temperature can differ by two orders of magnitude as defined by critical cooling rates. The origins of the difference in glass forming ability of the alloys are discussed. It is found that when large composition redistribution accompanies crystallization, glass formation is enhanced. The excellent glass forming ability of alloys such as Ti 34 Zr 11 Cu 47 Ni 8 is a result of simultaneously minimizing the nucleation rate of the competing crystalline phases. The ternary/quaternary Laves phase (MgZn 2 type) shows the greatest ease of nucleation and plays a key role in determining the optimum compositions for glass formation. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  19. Cooling Rates of Lunar Volcanic Glass Beads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Hejiu; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Zhang, Youxue; Peslier, Anne; Lange, Rebecca; Dingwell, Donald; Neal, Clive

    2016-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the Apollo 15 green and Apollo 17 orange glass beads are of volcanic origin. The diffusion profiles of volatiles in these glass beads are believed to be due to degassing during eruption (Saal et al., 2008). The degree of degassing depends on the initial temperature and cooling rate. Therefore, the estimations of volatiles in parental magmas of lunar pyroclastic deposits depend on melt cooling rates. Furthermore, lunar glass beads may have cooled in volcanic environments on the moon. Therefore, the cooling rates may be used to assess the atmospheric condition in an early moon, when volcanic activities were common. The cooling rates of glasses can be inferred from direct heat capacity measurements on the glasses themselves (Wilding et al., 1995, 1996a,b). This method does not require knowledge of glass cooling environments and has been applied to calculate the cooling rates of natural silicate glasses formed in different terrestrial environments. We have carried out heat capacity measurements on hand-picked lunar glass beads using a Netzsch DSC 404C Pegasus differential scanning calorimeter at University of Munich. Our preliminary results suggest that the cooling rate of Apollo 17 orange glass beads may be 12 K/min, based on the correlation between temperature of the heat capacity curve peak in the glass transition range and glass cooling rate. The results imply that the parental magmas of lunar pyroclastic deposits may have contained more water initially than the early estimations (Saal et al., 2008), which used higher cooling rates, 60-180 K/min in the modeling. Furthermore, lunar volcanic glass beads could have been cooled in a hot gaseous medium released from volcanic eruptions, not during free flight. Therefore, our results may shed light on atmospheric condition in an early moon.

  20. Improving the understanding of the melting behaviour of Mo, Ta, and W at extreme pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Errandonea, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the existing conflicts between experimentally measured and theoretically calculated melting curves of Mo, Ta, and W. By assuming that vacancy formation plays a fundamental role in the melting process, an explanation for the measured melting curves is provided. Furthermore, we show that the Lindemann law fits well all the measured melting curves of BCC transition metals if the Grueneisen parameter is written as a power series of the interatomic distance. For completeness, we examine possible reasons for current disagreements between shock-wave and DAC experiments. To solve them, we propose the existence of an extra high P-T phase for Mo, Ta, and W

  1. Summary report on microstructure and composition of silicate melts containing simulated Hanford waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, J.L.

    1975-04-01

    Specimens of silicate melt es containing simulated Hanford waste were studied by microscopy and microprobe methods to determine microstructural and compositional characteristics. The two glass specimens were representative of glasses prepared with Hanford basalt and with sea sand as the source of SiO 2 . Samples of both glasses were studied in detail at locations near the top, bottom, center, and sides of the melts. Both glasses were of a highly uniform microstructure and composition. The basalt glass contained metallic iron inclusions around the periphery near the glass/crucible interface, and small increases in Si content adjacent to the pores occurring throughout the glass. The sand glass contained no iron, its Si composition was uniform, and the average pore size was somewhat smaller (about 2 μm) than in the basalt glass. The Ca nominally added to the sand glass could not be detected. Both glasses contained a random scattering of a micron-sized ''bright'' phase whose composition was identical to the matrix or containing elements not detectable by microprobe methods. (U.S.)

  2. Melting behaviour of raw materials and recycled stone wool waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz-Falk, Vickie; Agersted, Karsten; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2018-01-01

    Stone wool is a widely used material for building insulation, to provide thermal comfort along with fire stability and acoustic comfort for all types of buildings. Stone wool waste generated either during production or during renovation or demolition of buildings can be recycled back into the sto...... wool melt production. This study investigates and compares the thermal response and melting behaviour of a conventional stone wool charge and stone wool waste. The study combines differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), hot stage microscopy (HSM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). DSC reveals...... that the conventional charge and stone wool waste have fundamentally different thermal responses, where the charge experiences gas release, phase transition and melting of the individual raw materials. The stone wool waste experiences glass transition, crystallization and finally melting. Both DSC and HSM measurements...

  3. Investigation of the stability of melt flow in gating systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiedje, Niels Skat; Larsen, Per

    2011-01-01

    Melt flow in four different gating systems designed for production of brake discs was analysed experimentally and by numerical modelling. In the experiments moulds were fitted with glass fronts and melt flow was recorded on video. The video recordings were compared with modelling of melt flow...... in the gating systems. Particular emphasis was on analysing local pressure and formation of pressure waves in the gating system. It was possible to compare melt flow patterns in experiments directly to modelled flow patterns. Generally there was good agreement between flow patterns and filling times. However...... description of free liquid surfaces proved to be incorrect in the numerical model. Modelled pressure fields served to explain how specific parts of the gating systems cause instability and are a good tool to describe the quality of a gating system. The results shows clearly that sharp changes in the geometry...

  4. Melting temperature of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korobenko, V.N.; Savvatimskiy, A.I.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text: Pulse of electrical current is used for fast heating (∼ 1 μs) of metal and graphite specimens placed in dielectric solid media. Specimen consists of two strips (90 μm in thick) placed together with small gap so they form a black body model. Quasy-monocrystal graphite specimens were used for uniform heating of graphite. Temperature measurements were fulfilled with fast pyrometer and with composite 2-strip black body model up to melting temperature. There were fulfilled experiments with zirconium and tungsten of the same black body construction. Additional temperature measurements of liquid zirconium and liquid tungsten are made. Specific heat capacity (c P ) of liquid zirconium and of liquid tungsten has a common feature in c P diminishing just after melting. It reveals c P diminishing after melting in both cases over the narrow temperature range up to usual values known from steady state measurements. Over the next wide temperature range heat capacity for W (up to 5000 K) and Zr (up to 4100 K) show different dependencies of heat capacity on temperature in liquid state. The experiments confirmed a high quality of 2-strip black body model used for graphite temperature measurements. Melting temperature plateau of tungsten (3690 K) was used for pyrometer calibration area for graphite temperature measurement. As a result, a preliminary value of graphite melting temperature of 4800 K was obtained. (author)

  5. Nanoporous Glasses for Nuclear Waste Containment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Woignier

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Research is in progress to incorporate nuclear waste in new matrices with high structural stability, resistance to thermal shock, and high chemical durability. Interactions with water are important for materials used as a containment matrix for the radio nuclides. It is indispensable to improve their chemical durability to limit the possible release of radioactive chemical species, if the glass structure is attacked by corrosion. By associating high structural stability and high chemical durability, silica glass optimizes the properties of a suitable host matrix. According to an easy sintering stage, nanoporous glasses such as xerogels, aerogels, and composite gels are alternative ways to synthesize silica glass at relatively low temperatures (≈1,000–1,200°C. Nuclear wastes exist as aqueous salt solutions and we propose using the open pore structure of the nanoporous glass to enable migration of the solution throughout the solid volume. The loaded material is then sintered, thereby trapping the radioactive chemical species. The structure of the sintered materials (glass ceramics is that of nanocomposites: actinide phases (~100 nm embedded in a vitreous silica matrix. Our results showed a large improvement in the chemical durability of glass ceramic over conventional nuclear glass.

  6. Electronic Conductivity of Vanadium-Tellurite Glass-Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Jonas; Yue, Yuanzheng; Bragatto, Caio B.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the electronic conductivity of 2TeO2-V2O5 glass-ceramics with crystallinity ranging from 0 to 100 wt.%, i.e., from entirely amorphous to completely crystalline. The glass is prepared by the melt quenching technique, and the crystal is prepared by subsequent heat...... spectroscopy. We find similar activation energies for both glass and crystal, implying that they have similar conduction mechanisms, i.e., thermally activated hopping. The electronic conductivity of 2TeO2-V2O5 glass is about one order of magnitude higher than that of the corresponding crystal......, and a percolation phenomenon occurs at a glass fraction of 61 wt.%, increasing from a lower conductivity in the crystal to a higher conductivity in the glass. We explain the behavior of electronic conduction in the 2TeO2-V2O5 glass-ceramics by considering constriction effects between particles as well...

  7. Laboratory work in support of West Valley glass development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunnell, L.R.

    1988-05-01

    Over the past six years, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has conducted several studies in support of waste glass composition development and testing of glass compositions suitable for immobilizing the nuclear wastes stored at West Valley, New York. As a result of pilot-scale testing conducted by PNL, the glass composition was changed from that originally recommended in response to changes in the waste stream, and several processing-related problems were discovered. These problems were solved, or sufficiently addressed to determine their likely effect on the glass melting operations to be conducted at West Valley. This report describes the development of the waste glass composition, WV-205, and discusses solutions to processing problems such as foaming and insoluble sludges, as well as other issues such as effects of feed variations on processing of the resulting glass. An evaluation of the WV-205 glass from a repository perspective is included in the appendix to this report

  8. Glass: Rotary Electric Glass Furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Recca, L.

    1999-01-29

    Compared to conventional gas-fired furnaces, the new rotary electric furnace will increase energy efficiency while significantly reducing air emissions, product turnaround time, and labor costs. As this informative new fact sheet explains, the thousand different types of glass optical blanks produced for the photonics industry are used for lasers, telescopes, cameras, lights, and many other products.

  9. Characterization of iron phosphate glasses prepared by microwave heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Fabio Jesus Moreira de

    2006-01-01

    Phosphate glasses have been investigated since the fifties, because they are relatively easy to prepare, have low melting temperatures (1000 deg C - 1200 deg C and low glass transition. However, these glasses were very sensitive to humidity, showing a very low chemical durability. Iron phosphate glasses have been prepared by melting inorganic precursors in conventional electric furnaces and induction furnaces. By adding iron, phosphate glasses became chemical resistant and were thought to be used as nuclear waste forms or mechanical resistance fibers. The use of microwaves has been investigated because it makes possible a fast and homogeneous heating of the materials. Microwave promotes the self-heating of the material by the interaction of the external electromagnetic field with the molecules and ions of the material. Niobium phosphate glasses was also produced already through the heating of precursors in microwave ovens. Other glasses containing iron in theirs structure was produced by conventional furnaces and they had your structures analyzed. But even so, it was not still published synthesis of iron phosphate glasses starting from the melting of precursors materials in microwave ovens. In the present work mixtures of (NH 4 ) 2 HPO 4 and Fe 3 O 4 or (NH 4 ) 2 HPO 4 and Fe 2 O 3 were exposed to microwave energy with electromagnetic waves of 2,45 GHz. It was proposed that the absorption of this radiation for the material causes the heating from room temperature to melting temperature. The obtained iron phosphate glasses was analyzed by X-ray diffraction, Moessbauer spectroscopy, and Differential Thermal Analysis. Iron phosphate glasses were also produced in electrical furnaces for comparison. (author)

  10. Characterization of iron phosphate glasses prepared by microwave heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Fabio Jesus Moreira de

    2006-01-01

    Phosphate glasses have been investigated since the fifties, because they are relatively easy to prepare, have low melting temperatures (1000 deg C - 1200 deg C), and low glass transition. However, these glasses were very sensitive to humidity, showing a very low chemical durability. Iron phosphate glasses have been prepared by melting inorganic precursors in conventional electric furnaces and induction furnaces. By adding iron, phosphate glasses became chemical resistant and were thought to be used as nuclear waste forms or mechanical resistance fibers. The use of microwaves has been investigated because it makes possible a fast and homogeneous heating of the materials. Microwave promotes the self-heating of the material by the interaction of the external electromagnetic field with the molecules and ions of the material. Niobium phosphate glasses was also produced already through the heating of precursors in microwave ovens. Other glasses containing iron in theirs structure was produced by conventional furnaces and they had your structures analyzed. But even so, it was not still published synthesis of iron phosphate glasses starting from the melting of precursors materials in microwave ovens. In the present work mixtures of (NH 4 ) 2 HPO 4 and Fe 3 O 4 or (NH 4 ) 2 HPO 4 and Fe 2 O 3 were exposed to microwave energy with electromagnetic waves of 2,45 GHz. It was proposed that the absorption of this radiation for the material causes the heating from room temperature to melting temperature. The obtained iron phosphate glasses was analyzed by X-ray diffraction, Moessbauer spectroscopy, and Differential Thermal Analysis. Iron phosphate glasses were also produced in electrical furnaces for comparison. (author)

  11. Scintillation and optical properties of TiO2-ZnO-Al2O3-B2O3 glasses and glass-ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Yuki; Okada, Go; Kawaguchi, Noriaki; Masai, Hirokazu; Yanagida, Takayuki

    2018-04-01

    13TiO2-xZnO-17Al2O3-(70 - x)B2O3 (x = 17, 26, and 35) glasses were prepared by a melt-quenching method, and the obtained glass samples were heated at temperatures 30 °C above the glass transition temperature of corresponding glass in order to obtain glass-ceramics. The obtained glass-ceramic samples were confirmed to have anatase (x = 17) and rutile (x = 26 and 35) phases from X-ray diffraction analysis. Then, the scintillation and optical properties were evaluated and discussed the difference between the glass-ceramic and glass samples. In the scintillation spectra under X-ray irradiation, a broad emission peak was observed around 450 nm in all the samples, and the new peak around 500 nm appeared in the anatase-precipitated glass-ceramic. The intensities of the glass-ceramic samples were enhanced in comparison with the corresponding glasses because the glass-ceramics includes TiO2 crystallites with defect centers which act as effective emission centers. The scintillation decay curves of the glass and glass-ceramic samples were approximated by one and a sum of two exponential decay functions, respectively. The faster component of glass and glass-ceramic samples would be caused by the host emission, and the slower component of glass-ceramic sample would be ascribed to the emission of Ti3+.

  12. Making MgO/SiO2 Glasses By The Sol-Gel Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    1989-01-01

    Silicon dioxide glasses containing 15 mole percent magnesium oxide prepared by sol-gel process. Not made by conventional melting because ingredients immiscible liquids. Synthesis of MgO/SiO2 glass starts with mixing of magnesium nitrate hexahydrate with silicon tetraethoxide, both in alcohol. Water added, and transparent gel forms. Subsequent processing converts gel into glass. Besides producing glasses of new composition at lower processing temperatures, sol-gel method leads to improved homogeneity and higher purity.

  13. Numerical simulation of hot-melt extrusion processes for amorphous solid dispersions using model-based melt viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochmann, Esther S; Steffens, Kristina E; Gryczke, Andreas; Wagner, Karl G

    2018-03-01

    Simulation of HME processes is a valuable tool for increased process understanding and ease of scale-up. However, the experimental determination of all required input parameters is tedious, namely the melt rheology of the amorphous solid dispersion (ASD) in question. Hence, a procedure to simplify the application of hot-melt extrusion (HME) simulation for forming amorphous solid dispersions (ASD) is presented. The commercial 1D simulation software Ludovic ® was used to conduct (i) simulations using a full experimental data set of all input variables including melt rheology and (ii) simulations using model-based melt viscosity data based on the ASDs glass transition and the physical properties of polymeric matrix only. Both types of HME computation were further compared to experimental HME results. Variation in physical properties (e.g. heat capacity, density) and several process characteristics of HME (residence time distribution, energy consumption) among the simulations and experiments were evaluated. The model-based melt viscosity was calculated by using the glass transition temperature (T g ) of the investigated blend and the melt viscosity of the polymeric matrix by means of a T g -viscosity correlation. The results of measured melt viscosity and model-based melt viscosity were similar with only few exceptions, leading to similar HME simulation outcomes. At the end, the experimental effort prior to HME simulation could be minimized and the procedure enables a good starting point for rational development of ASDs by means of HME. As model excipients, Vinylpyrrolidone-vinyl acetate copolymer (COP) in combination with various APIs (carbamazepine, dipyridamole, indomethacin, and ibuprofen) or polyethylene glycol (PEG 1500) as plasticizer were used to form the ASDs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Melting of gold microclusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garzon, I.L.; Jellinek, J.

    1991-01-01

    The transition from solid-like to liquid-like behavior in Au n , n=6, 7, 13, clusters is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. A Gupta-type potential with all-neighbour interactions is employed to incorporate n-body effects. The melting-like transition is described in terms of short-time averages of the kinetic energy per particle, root-mean-square bond length fluctuations and mean square displacements. A comparison between melting temperatures of Au n and Ni n clusters is presented. (orig.)

  15. Structural role of Cu in the soil active glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Wacławska

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Glasses from the SiO2-P2O5-K2O-CaO-MgO-CuO system acting as slow release fertilizers were synthesized by the melt-quenching technique. Influence of copper addition on structure of the glasses was evaluated by XRD, SEM, FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy. Chemical activity of the glasses in 2 wt.% citric acid solutions was measured by ICP-AES method. It has been found that increasing content of phosphorous increased solubility of copper in the structure of the studied glasses which was the result of formation of P-O-Cu bonds.

  16. Effect of a core-softened O-O interatomic interaction on the shock compression of fused silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izvekov, Sergei; Weingarten, N. Scott; Byrd, Edward F. C.

    2018-03-01

    Isotropic soft-core potentials have attracted considerable attention due to their ability to reproduce thermodynamic, dynamic, and structural anomalies observed in tetrahedral network-forming compounds such as water and silica. The aim of the present work is to assess the relevance of effective core-softening pertinent to the oxygen-oxygen interaction in silica to the thermodynamics and phase change mechanisms that occur in shock compressed fused silica. We utilize the MD simulation method with a recently published numerical interatomic potential derived from an ab initio MD simulation of liquid silica via force-matching. The resulting potential indicates an effective shoulder-like core-softening of the oxygen-oxygen repulsion. To better understand the role of the core-softening we analyze two derivative force-matching potentials in which the soft-core is replaced with a repulsive core either in the three-body potential term or in all the potential terms. Our analysis is further augmented by a comparison with several popular empirical models for silica that lack an explicit core-softening. The first outstanding feature of shock compressed glass reproduced with the soft-core models but not with the other models is that the shock compression values at pressures above 20 GPa are larger than those observed under hydrostatic compression (an anomalous shock Hugoniot densification). Our calculations indicate the occurrence of a phase transformation along the shock Hugoniot that we link to the O-O repulsion core-softening. The phase transformation is associated with a Hugoniot temperature reversal similar to that observed experimentally. With the soft-core models, the phase change is an isostructural transformation between amorphous polymorphs with no associated melting event. We further examine the nature of the structural transformation by comparing it to the Hugoniot calculations for stishovite. For stishovite, the Hugoniot exhibits temperature reversal and associated

  17. Chemical states of molybdenum in radioactive waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiguro, Katsuhiko; Kawanishi, Nobuo; Nagaki, Hiroshi; Naito, Aritsune

    1982-01-01

    In order to confirm an expectation that the chemical state of molybdenum in glass reflects the phase separation tendency of the yellow solid from the melt of borosilicate glass, simulated waste glasses were prepared, and ESCA analysis was performed using a commercially available electron spectrometer (PHI550 E) with an excitation source consisting of Mg Kα-ray. The effects of the concentration of Mo and FE 2 O 3 and the melting atmosphere (oxidizing or reducing) in which the samples were prepared on the chemical state of Mo and the solubility of MoO 3 were examined. From the observation of Mo spectra, it was shown that Mo in waste glass had several valencies, e.g., Mo(3), Mo(4), Mo(5) and Mo(6), while Mo in the yellow solid separated from the melts exhibited hexa-valent state, the peak intensity of higher valencies increased relatively with the increase of MoO 3 concentration, but the chemical state of Mo did not change remarkably around the solubility limit of MoO 3 , the melting atmosphere influenced on the Mo state in the waste glass, the peak intensity of Mo(6) increased relatively with the increasing Fe 2 O 3 concentration, and Mo in devitrified glass exhibited hexa-valent state. (Yoshitake, I.)

  18. Studies on boro cadmium tellurite glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayathri Pavani, P.; Suresh, S.; Chandra Mouli, V.

    2011-11-01

    To investigate the modification effect of the modifier CdO on boro tellurite glass, a series of glasses with compositions (50 - x) CdO- xTeO 2-50B 2O 3 have been prepared by conventional melt quenching technique. Optical absorption, IR and Raman structural studies are carried out on the glass system. The optical absorption studies revealed that the cutoff wave length and refractive index increase while optical band gap ( Eopt) and Urbach energy decreases with increase of CdO content. The IR and Raman studies revealed that structure of glass network consists of [TeO 3]/[TeO 3+1], [TeO 4], [BO 3], [BO 4] and [Cd-Te] linkages .The compositional dependence of different physical parameters such as density, molar volume, oxygen packing density, optical basicity, have been analyzed and discussed.

  19. Viscous Control of the Foam Glass Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup

    The production of foam glass as heat insulating material is an important industrial process because it enables low-cost recycling of glass waste from a variety of chemical compositions. Optimization of the foaming process of new glass waste compositions is time consuming, since many factors affect...... the foaming process such as temperature, particle size, type and concentration of foaming agent. The foaming temperature is one of the key factors, because even small temperature changes can affect the melt viscosity by several orders of magnitude. Therefore, it is important to establish the viscosity range...... in which the foaming process should take place, particularly when the type of recycled cullet is changed or several types of cullet are mixed in one batch. According to recent glass literature, the foaming process should occur at viscosity 103 to 105 Pa s. However, no systematic studies have hitherto been...

  20. Polymer brushes: a controllable system with adjustable glass transition temperature of fragile glass formers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shi-Jie; Qian, Hu-Jun; Lu, Zhong-Yuan

    2014-01-28

    We present results of molecular dynamics simulations for coarse-grained polymer brushes in a wide temperature range to investigate the factors that affect the glass transition in these systems. We focus on the influences of free surface, polymer-substrate interaction strength, grafting density, and chain length not only on the change of glass transition temperature Tg, but also the fragility D of the glass former. It is found that the confinement can enhance the dependence of the Tg on the cooling rate as compared to the bulk melt. Our layer-resolved analysis demonstrates that it is possible to control the glass transition temperature Tg of polymer brushes by tuning the polymer-substrate interaction strength, the grafting density, and the chain length. Moreover, we find quantitative differences in the influence range of the substrate and the free surface on the density and dynamics. This stresses the importance of long range cooperative motion in glass formers near the glass transition temperature. Furthermore, the string-like cooperative motion analysis demonstrates that there exists a close relation among glass transition temperature Tg, fragility D, and string length ⟨S⟩. The polymer brushes that possess larger string length ⟨S⟩ tend to have relatively higher Tg and smaller D. Our results suggest that confining a fragile glass former through forming polymer brushes changes not only the glass transition temperature Tg, but also the very nature of relaxation process.

  1. Miniature shock tube for laser driven shocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busquet, Michel; Barroso, Patrice; Melse, Thierry; Bauduin, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    We describe in this paper the design of a miniature shock tube (smaller than 1 cm(3)) that can be placed in a vacuum vessel and allows transverse optical probing and longitudinal backside extreme ultraviolet emission spectroscopy in the 100-500 A range. Typical application is the study of laser launched radiative shocks, in the framework of what is called "laboratory astrophysics."

  2. Are Credit Shocks Supply or Demand Shocks?

    OpenAIRE

    Bijapur, Mohan

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides new insights into the relationship between the supply of credit and the macroeconomy. We present evidence that credit shocks constitute shocks to aggregate supply in that they have a permanent effect on output and cause inflation to rise in the short term. Our results also suggest that the effects on aggregate supply have grown stronger in recent decades.

  3. Shock absorbing structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Naoki; Matsushita, Kazuo.

    1992-01-01

    Small pieces of shock absorbers are filled in a space of a shock absorbing vessel which is divided into a plurality of sections by partitioning members. These sections function to prevent excess deformation or replacement of the fillers upon occurrence of falling accident. Since the shock absorbing small pieces in the shock absorbing vessel are filled irregularly, shock absorbing characteristics such as compression strength is not varied depending on the direction, but they exhibit excellent shock absorbing performance. They surely absorb shocks exerted on a transportation vessel upon falling or the like. If existing artificial fillers such as pole rings made of metal or ceramic and cut pieces such as alumium extrusion molding products are used as the shock absorbing pieces, they have excellent fire-proofness and cold resistance since the small pieces are inflammable and do not contain water. (T.M.)

  4. Processing of high-temperature simulated waste glass in a continuous ceramic melter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, S.M.; Brouns, R.A.; Hanson, M.S.

    1980-01-01

    Recent operations have demonstrated that high-melting-point glasses and glass-ceramics can be successfully processed in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters with minor modifications to the existing technology. Over 500 kg of simulated waste glasses have been processed at temperatures up to 1410 0 C. The processability of the two high-temperature waste forms tested is similar to existing borosilicate waste glasses. High-temperature waste glass formulations produced in the bench-scale melter exhibit quality comparing favorably to standard waste glass formulations

  5. MELT-IIIB: an updated version of the melt code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabb, K.K.; Lewis, C.H.; O'Dell, L.D.; Padilla, A. Jr.; Smith, D.E.; Wilburn, N.P.

    1979-04-01

    The MELT series is a reactor modeling code designed to investigate a wide variety of hypothetical accident conditions, particularly the transient overpower sequence. MELT-IIIB is the latest in the series

  6. Rock melting technology and geothermal drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    National awareness of the potential future shortages in energy resources has heightened interest in exploration and utilization of a variety of geothermal energy (GTE) reservoirs. The status of conventional drilling of GTE wells is reviewed briefly and problem areas which lead to higher drilling costs are identified and R and D directions toward solution are suggested. In the immediate future, an expanded program of drilling in GTE formations can benefit from improvements in drilling equipment and technology normally associated with oil or gas wells. Over a longer time period, the new rock-melting drill bits being developed as a part of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's Subterrene Program offer new solutions to a number of problems which frequently hamper GTE drilling, including the most basic problem - high temperature. Two of the most favorable characteristics of rock-melting penetrators are their ability to operate effectively in hot rock and produce glass linings around the hole as an integral part of the drilling process. The technical advantages to be gained by use of rock-melting penetrators are discussed in relation to the basic needs for GTE wells.

  7. Investigation of microwave melting and vitrification of nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silve, J.M.

    1996-10-01

    This work deals with the treatment process of long-lived alpha-emitting wastes, developed by the CEA, and consisting of incinerating these wastes and of vitrifying the obtained ashes by micro-waves. In this study is at first presented the materials to characterize (incineration ashes, glasses) followed by measurements of their electric permittivity. A description of the melting furnace DEMW (Densification by Micro-Waves) is given as well as its electromagnetic characterization. The inductive heating of the molten glass by micro-waves has been revealed in this part. The modeling of the power transfer to the molten glass is then presented. It is based on a sectoring of the furnace in terms of the natural weakening of each of the three areas. With this model can be obtained a general formula of the power dissipated in the molten glass in terms of the attenuation and of the position of the short-circuit piston. The fourth part relates the melt tests of different glasses and is based on the technological improvements carried out in the furnace and coming from modeling. A correlation between the modeling and the tests results is proposed. A brief characterization of the obtained material allows to verify that its qualities are acceptable particularly for leaching. (O.M.)

  8. Biomass shock pretreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzapple, Mark T.; Madison, Maxine Jones; Ramirez, Rocio Sierra; Deimund, Mark A.; Falls, Matthew; Dunkelman, John J.

    2014-07-01

    Methods and apparatus for treating biomass that may include introducing a biomass to a chamber; exposing the biomass in the chamber to a shock event to produce a shocked biomass; and transferring the shocked biomass from the chamber. In some aspects, the method may include pretreating the biomass with a chemical before introducing the biomass to the chamber and/or after transferring shocked biomass from the chamber.

  9. Structural role of molybdenum in nuclear glasses: an EXAFS study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calas, G.; Le Grand, M.; Galoisy, L.; Ghaleb, D.

    2003-01-01

    The Mo environment has been investigated in inactive nuclear glasses using extended X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Mo is present in a tetrahedron coordinated to oxygen in the form of molybdate groups [MoO 4 ] 2- (d(Mo-O)=1.78 A). This surrounding is not affected by the presence of noble metal phases in the nuclear glass. Relying on the XAS results, on the bond-valence model and on molecular dynamics simulations of a simplified borosilicate model glass, we show that these groups are not directly linked to the borosilicate network but rather located within alkali and alkaline-earth rich domains in the glass. This specific location in the glass network is a way to understand the low solubility of Mo in glasses melted under oxidizing conditions. It also explains the possible phase separation of a yellow phase enriched in alkali molybdates in molten nuclear glasses or the nucleation of calcium molybdates during thermal aging of these glasses. Boron coordination changes in the molten and the glassy states may explain the difference in the composition of the crystalline molybdates, as they exert a direct influence on the activity of alkalis in borosilicate glasses and melts

  10. Preliminary results of durability testing with borosilicate glass compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adel-Hadadi, M.; Adiga, R.; Barkatt, Aa.

    1987-01-01

    This is a report on the first year of research conducted at the Vitreous State Laboratory of the Catholic University of America in support of the West Valley Demonstration Project. One objective is the vitrification of liquid waste generated by previous nuclear fuel reprocessing. This work has been directed principally at the problem of glass composition optimization. This has necessitated the development of a coordinated program of glass production, durability measurements, and processability assessment. A small-scale continuous melter has been constructed for melting uranium and thorium containing glasses and for studying glass processing characteristics. Glass viscosities have been measured over a range of temperatures. A large number of glasses have also been produced in small crucible melts. Glass durability has been assessed using four types of leach tests: MCC-3, MCC-1, IAEA/ISO, and pulsed-flow tests. Extensive data from these tests are reported. The data have led to the design of very durable glasses (comparable to the Savannah River Laboratory Defense Waste Reference Glass) which have the requisite waste loading and processing characteristics. 14 refs., 4 figs., 77 tabs

  11. Relativistic Shock Acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffy, P.; Downes, T.P.; Gallant, Y.A.; Kirk, J.G.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we briefly review the basic theory of shock waves in relativistic hydrodynamics and magneto-hydrodynamics, emphasising some astrophysically interesting cases. We then present an overview of the theory of particle acceleration at such shocks describing the methods used to calculate the spectral indices of energetic particles. Recent results on acceleration at ultra-relativistic shocks are discussed. (author)

  12. Gaseous waste deposition preventive device for glass melting furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Sueo

    1998-01-01

    The device of the present invention comprises a heater for heating pressurized air and a moisturizer for mixing steams with the pressurized air heated by the heater to make moisturized pressurized air. Steams are mixed to rise humidity by the moisturizing up to the saturated vapor pressure at the temperature of the heating by heating pressurized air as an object of moisturizing by the heater to prevent dew condensation while increasing the amount of steams to be mixed. With such procedures, moisture enriched pressurized air can be jetted out thereby enabling to prevent deposition of solid materials and crystallized materials of gaseous wastes. (T.M.)

  13. Molecular glasses for nuclear waste encapsulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ropp, R.C.

    1982-01-01

    The use of a molecular glass based upon a polymerized phosphate of aluminum (PAP), indium or gallium overcomes all of the prior objections to use of glass as a high-level nuclear waste (HLW) encapsulation agent. This HLW glass product could not be made to devitrify, dissolved all of the oxides found in calcine, including the difficultly soluble ones, did not form microcrystallites in the melt or subsequent glass-casting, and possessed a hydrolytic etching rate to boiling water even lower than that of HLW-ZBS glass. A precursor compound, M(H 2 PO 4 ) 3 , is prepared, where M is a trivalent metal selected from the group consisting of aluminum, indium and gallium. The impurity level is carefully controlled so as not to exceed 300 ppm total. The precursor crystals may be washed to remove excess phosphoric acid as desired. HLW is added to the crystals and the mixture is then heated at a controlled heating rate to induce solid state polymerization and to form a melt at 1350 degrees C in which the HLW oxides dissolve rapidly

  14. A micro-scale investigation of melt production and extraction in the upper mantle based on silicate melt pockets in ultramafic xenoliths from the Bakony-Balaton Highland Volcanic Field (Western Hungary)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bali, Eniko; Zanetti, A.; Szabo, C.

    2008-01-01

    Mantle xenoliths in Neogene alkali basalts of the Bakony-Balaton Highland Volcanic Field (Western Hungary) frequently have melt pockets that contain silicate minerals, glass, and often carbonate globules. Textural, geochemical and thermobarometric data indicate that the melt pockets formed at rel...

  15. Optical Properties of Bismuth Tellurite Based Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooi Ming Oo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A series of binary tellurite based glasses (Bi2O3x (TeO2100−x was prepared by melt quenching method. The density, molar volume and refractive index increase when bismuth ions Bi3+ increase, this is due to the increased polarization of the ions Bi3+ and the enhanced formation of non-bridging oxygen (NBO. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR results show the bonding of the glass sample and the optical band gap, Eopt decreases while the refractive index increases when the ion Bi3+ content increases.

  16. Optical Properties of Bismuth Tellurite Based Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oo, Hooi Ming; Mohamed-Kamari, Halimah; Wan-Yusoff, Wan Mohd Daud

    2012-01-01

    A series of binary tellurite based glasses (Bi2O3)x (TeO2)100−x was prepared by melt quenching method. The density, molar volume and refractive index increase when bismuth ions Bi3+ increase, this is due to the increased polarization of the ions Bi3+ and the enhanced formation of non-bridging oxygen (NBO). The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) results show the bonding of the glass sample and the optical band gap, Eopt decreases while the refractive index increases when the ion Bi3+ content increases. PMID:22605999

  17. Crystal growth in zinc borosilicate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullberg, Ana T. G.; Lopes, Andreia A. S.; Veiga, João P. B.; Monteiro, Regina C. C.

    2017-01-01

    Glass samples with a molar composition (64+x)ZnO-(16-x)B2O3-20SiO2, where x=0 or 1, were successfully synthesized using a melt-quenching technique. Based on differential thermal analysis data, the produced glass samples were submitted to controlled heat-treatments at selected temperatures (610, 615 and 620 °C) during various times ranging from 8 to 30 h. The crystallization of willemite (Zn2SiO4) within the glass matrix was confirmed by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Under specific heat-treatment conditions, transparent nanocomposite glass-ceramics were obtained, as confirmed by UV-vis spectroscopy. The influence of temperature, holding time and glass composition on crystal growth was investigated. The mean crystallite size was determined by image analysis on SEM micrographs. The results indicated an increase on the crystallite size and density with time and temperature. The change of crystallite size with time for the heat-treatments at 615 and 620 °C depended on the glass composition. Under fixed heat-treatment conditions, the crystallite density was comparatively higher for the glass composition with higher ZnO content.

  18. Dynamics and thermodynamics of polymer glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cangialosi, D

    2014-04-16

    The fate of matter when decreasing the temperature at constant pressure is that of passing from gas to liquid and, subsequently, from liquid to crystal. However, a class of materials can exist in an amorphous phase below the melting temperature. On cooling such materials, a glass is formed; that is, a material with the rigidity of a solid but exhibiting no long-range order. The study of the thermodynamics and dynamics of glass-forming systems is the subject of continuous research. Within the wide variety of glass formers, an important sub-class is represented by glass forming polymers. The presence of chain connectivity and, in some cases, conformational disorder are unfavourable factors from the point of view of crystallization. Furthermore, many of them, such as amorphous thermoplastics, thermosets and rubbers, are widely employed in many applications. In this review, the peculiarities of the thermodynamics and dynamics of glass-forming polymers are discussed, with particular emphasis on those topics currently the subject of debate. In particular, the following aspects will be reviewed in the present work: (i) the connection between the pronounced slowing down of glassy dynamics on cooling towards the glass transition temperature (Tg) and the thermodynamics; and, (ii) the fate of the dynamics and thermodynamics below Tg. Both aspects are reviewed in light of the possible presence of a singularity at a finite temperature with diverging relaxation time and zero configurational entropy. In this context, the specificity of glass-forming polymers is emphasized.

  19. Effect of Ba in the glass characteristics of cesium loaded iron phosphate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, Kitheri; Asuvathraman, R.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R.

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive 137 Cs extracted from high level nuclear waste, when immobilized in a suitable matrix can be used as a γsource in medical industry. Iron phosphate glass (IPG) is one of a suitable matrix for the immobilization of 137 Cs prior to the immobilization of 137 Cs in IPG, it is essential to optimize the immobilization conditions using natural (inactive) cesium. Glass characteristics of inactive Cs loaded iron phosphate glasses were already explored in our earlier studies. However, the change in glass characteristics of 137 Cs loaded iron phosphate glass to 137 Ba loaded iron phosphate glass need to be studied before the immobilization of 137 Cs in iron phosphate glass as 137 Cs transforms to 137 Ba due to nuclear transmutation ( 137 Cs(β,γ) 137 Ba). This paper reports the studies on such a behaviour by incorporating inactive Ba in cesium loaded iron phosphate glasses. Cs and Ba loaded iron phosphate glasses were prepared by melt quench technique in air using appropriate amounts of Fe 2 O 3 , NH 4 H 2 PO 4 , Ba(OH) 2.8 H 2 O and Cs 2 CO 3 . The chemicals were added such that the glass formed possesses the batch composition of (a) 21.4 wt. % Fe 2 O 3 -45 wt. % Cs 2 O-5 wt % BaO-P 2 O 5 (henceforth referred as IP50Cs45Ba5); (b) 21.4 wt. % Fe 2 O 3 -25 wt. % Cs 2 O-25 wt % BaO-P 2 O5 (henceforth referred as IP50Cs25Ba25). The thermal expansion measurements were also carried out using a home-built quartz push-rod dilatometer. The data related to change in thermal expansion behaviour, glass forming ability, glass stability and structural changes in phosphate network due to the partial replacement of Cs with Ba will also be discussed. (author)

  20. Industrial grade versus scientific pure: Influence on melt properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, I.; Hembree, W.; Yang, F.; Busch, R.; Meyer, A.

    2018-04-01

    Viscosity, density, and the undercooling ability of the Zr-based bulk glass forming melt, which was manufactured in two different degrees of purity, have been studied. Investigations have been carried out by means of Couette rheometry and electrostatic and electromagnetic levitation with the latter under microgravity conditions. We found that oxygen and impurities present in industrial grade metals do not significantly alter the melt viscosity and density, while they clearly affect the undercooling ability. Comparing container based and containerless results showed that Couette rheometry can be applied in the temperature range between 1150 K and 1375 K, where it provides reliable data, but only at a rather low oxygen content. Higher oxygen contents, as in the case of the industrial grade alloy, cause measurement artefacts. In the case of Zr59.3Cu28.8Al10.4Nb1.5 alloys, these findings allow a better localization of the key factors dominating the glass forming ability.

  1. Melting of polydisperse hard disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pronk, S.; Frenkel, D.

    2004-01-01

    The melting of a polydisperse hard-disk system is investigated by Monte Carlo simulations in the semigrand canonical ensemble. This is done in the context of possible continuous melting by a dislocation-unbinding mechanism, as an extension of the two-dimensional hard-disk melting problem. We find

  2. Thermodynamics of Oligonucleotide Duplex Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber-Gosche, Sherrie; Edwards, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Melting temperatures of oligonucleotides are useful for a number of molecular biology applications, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Although melting temperatures are often calculated with simplistic empirical equations, application of thermodynamics provides more accurate melting temperatures and an opportunity for students to apply…

  3. Origin of broad NIR photoluminescence in bismuthate glass and Bi-doped glasses at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Mingying; Zollfrank, Cordt; Wondraczek, Lothar [Lehrstuhl fuer Glas und Keramik, WW3, Friedrich Alexander Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Martensstrasse 5, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany)], E-mail: mingying.peng@ww.uni-erlangen.de, E-mail: lothar.wondraczek@ww.uni-erlangen.de

    2009-07-15

    Bi-doped glasses with broadband photoluminescence in the near-infrared (NIR) spectral range are presently receiving significant consideration for potential applications in telecommunications, widely tunable fiber lasers and spectral converters. However, the origin of NIR emission remains disputed. Here, we report on NIR absorption and emission properties of bismuthate glass and their dependence on the melting temperature. Results clarify that NIR emission occurs from the same centers as it does in Bi-doped glasses. The dependence of absorption and NIR emission of bismuthate glasses on the melting temperature is interpreted as thermal dissociation of Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} into elementary Bi. Darkening of bismuthate glass melted at 1300 deg. C is due to the agglomeration of Bi atoms. The presence of Bi nanoparticles is confirmed by transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and element distribution mapping. By adding antimony oxide as an oxidation agent to the glass, NIR emission centers can be eliminated and Bi{sup 3+} is formed. By comparing with atomic spectral data, absorption bands at {approx}320 , {approx}500 , 700 , 800 and 1000 nm observed in Bi-doped glasses are assigned to Bi{sup 0} transitions {sup 4}S{sub 3/2}{yields}{sup 2}P{sub 3/2}, {sup 4}S{sub 3/2}{yields}{sup 2}P{sub 1/2}, {sup 4}S{sub 3/2}{yields}{sup 2}D{sub 5/2}, {sup 4}S{sub 3/2}{yields}{sup 2}D{sub 3/2}(2) and {sup 4}S{sub 3/2}{yields}{sup 2}D{sub 3/2}(1), respectively, and broadband NIR emission is assigned to the transition {sup 2}D{sub 3/2}(1){yields}{sup 4}S{sub 3/2}.

  4. Pavement Snow Melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, John W.

    2005-01-01

    The design of pavement snow melting systems is presented based on criteria established by ASHRAE. The heating requirements depends on rate of snow fall, air temperature, relative humidity and wind velocity. Piping materials are either metal or plastic, however, due to corrosion problems, cross-linked polyethylene pipe is now generally used instead of iron. Geothermal energy is supplied to systems through the use of heat pipes, directly from circulating pipes, through a heat exchanger or by allowing water to flow directly over the pavement, by using solar thermal storage. Examples of systems in New Jersey, Wyoming, Virginia, Japan, Argentina, Switzerland and Oregon are presented. Key words: pavement snow melting, geothermal heating, heat pipes, solar storage, Wyoming, Virginia, Japan, Argentina, Klamath Falls.

  5. Transient fuel melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, L.; Schmitz, F.

    1982-10-01

    The observation of micrographic documents from fuel after a CABRI test leads to postulate a specific mode of transient fuel melting during a rapid nuclear power excursion. When reaching the melt threshold, the bands which are characteristic for the solid state are broken statistically over a macroscopic region. The time of maintaining the fuel at the critical enthalpy level between solid and liquid is too short to lead to a phase separation. A significant life-time (approximately 1 second) of this intermediate ''unsolide'' state would have consequences on the variation of physical properties linked to the phase transition solid/liquid: viscosity, specific volume and (for the irradiated fuel) fission gas release [fr

  6. Alfven shock trains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkov, M.A.; Kennel, C.F.; Wu, C.C.; Pellat, R.; Shapiro, V.D.

    1991-01-01

    The Cohen--Kulsrud--Burgers equation (CKB) is used to consider the nonlinear evolution of resistive, quasiparallel Alfven waves subject to a long-wavelength, plane-polarized, monochromatic instability. The instability saturates by nonlinear steepening, which proceeds until the periodic waveform develops an interior scale length comparable to the dissipation length; a fast or an intermediate shock then forms. The result is a periodic train of Alfven shocks of one or the other type. For propagation strictly parallel to the magnetic field, there will be two shocks per instability wavelength. Numerical integration of the time-dependent CKB equation shows that an initial, small-amplitude growing wave asymptotes to a stable, periodic stationary wave whose analytic solution specifies how the type of shock embedded in the shock train, and the amplitude and speed of the shock train, depend on the strength and phase of the instability. Waveforms observed upstream of the Earth's bowshock and cometary shocks resemble those calculated here

  7. Thermal shock behaviour of mullite-cordierite refractory materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boccaccini, D. N.; Leonelli, C.; Romagnoli, M.; Pellacani, G. C.; Veronesi, P.; Dlouhý, Ivo; Boccaccini, A. R.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 106, č. 3 (2007), s. 142-148 ISSN 1743-6753 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA200410502 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : refraktory materials * thermal shock * fracutre toughness Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.074, year: 2007

  8. Applications of disorder-induced melting concept to critical-solute-accumulation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, N.Q.; Okamoto, P.R.; Heuer, J.K.

    2001-01-01

    A generalized version of the Lindemann melting criterion has recently been used to develop a unified thermodynamic description of disorder-induced amorphization and heat-induced melting. This concept of amorphization as a melting process is based on the fact that the melting temperature of a defective crystal driven far from equilibrium will decrease relative to that of its defect-free equilibrium state. The broader view of melting provides a new perspective of damage-accumulation processes such as radiation damage, ion implantation, ion beam mixing, plastic deformation, and fracture. For example, within this conceptual framework, disorder-induced amorphization is simply polymorphous melting of a critically disordered crystal at temperatures below the glass transition temperature. In the present communication, we discuss the application of the concept to two specific cases: amorphous phase formation during ion implantation and solute segregation-induced intergranular fracture

  9. A metastable liquid melted from a crystalline solid under decompression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chuanlong; Smith, Jesse S.; Sinogeikin, Stanislav V.; Kono, Yoshio; Park, Changyong; Kenney-Benson, Curtis; Shen, Guoyin

    2017-01-01

    A metastable liquid may exist under supercooling, sustaining the liquid below the melting point such as supercooled water and silicon. It may also exist as a transient state in solid-solid transitions, as demonstrated in recent studies of colloidal particles and glass-forming metallic systems. One important question is whether a crystalline solid may directly melt into a sustainable metastable liquid. By thermal heating, a crystalline solid will always melt into a liquid above the melting point. Here we report that a high-pressure crystalline phase of bismuth can melt into a metastable liquid below the melting line through a decompression process. The decompression-induced metastable liquid can be maintained for hours in static conditions, and transform to crystalline phases when external perturbations, such as heating and cooling, are applied. It occurs in the pressure-temperature region similar to where the supercooled liquid Bi is observed. Akin to supercooled liquid, the pressure-induced metastable liquid may be more ubiquitous than we thought.

  10. PLUTONIUM SOLUBILITY IN HIGH-LEVEL WASTE ALKALI BOROSILICATE GLASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, J.; Crawford, C.; Fox, K.; Bibler, N.

    2011-01-04

    . The incorporation of 1 wt % Pu in the glass did not adversely impact glass viscosity (as assessed using Hf surrogate) or glass durability. Finally, evaluation of DWPF glass pour samples that had Pu concentrations below the 897 g/m{sup 3} limit showed that Pu concentrations in the glass pour stream were close to targeted compositions in the melter feed indicating that Pu neither volatilized from the melt nor stratified in the melter when processed in the DWPF melter.

  11. Plutonium Solubility In High-Level Waste Alkali Borosilicate Glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marra, J.; Crawford, C.; Fox, K.; Bibler, N.

    2011-01-01

    % Pu in the glass did not adversely impact glass viscosity (as assessed using Hf surrogate) or glass durability. Finally, evaluation of DWPF glass pour samples that had Pu concentrations below the 897 g/m 3 limit showed that Pu concentrations in the glass pour stream were close to targeted compositions in the melter feed indicating that Pu neither volatilized from the melt nor stratified in the melter when processed in the DWPF melter.

  12. Glasses Containing Iron (II, III) Oxides For Immobilization Of Radioactive Technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.; Heo, J.; Xu, K.; Choi, J.K.; Hrma, P.R.; Um, W.

    2011-01-01

    Technetium-99 (Tc-99) has posed serious environmental threats as US Department of Energy's high-level waste. This work reports the vitrification of Re, as surrogate for Tc-99, by iron-borosilicate and iron-phosphate glasses, respectively. Iron-phosphate glasses can dissolve Re as high as ∼ 1.2 wt. %, which can become candidate waste forms for Tc-99 disposal, while borosilicate glasses can retain less than 0.1 wt. % of Re due to high melting temperature and long melting duration. Vitrification of Re as Tc-99's mimic was investigated using iron-borosilicate and iron-phosphate glasses. The retention of Re in borosilicate glasses was less than 0.1 wt. % and more than 99 wt. % of Re were volatilized due to high melting temperature and long melting duration. Because the retention of Re in iron-phosphate glasses is as high as 1.2 wt. % and the volatilization is reduced down to ∼50 wt. %, iron-phosphate glasses can be one of the glass waste form candidates for Tc (or Re) disposal. The investigations of chemical durability and leaching test of iron-phosphate glasses containing Re are now underway to test the performance of the waste form.

  13. Structural and thermal properties of vanadium tellurite glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Rajinder; Kaur, Ramandeep; Khanna, Atul; González, Fernando

    2018-04-01

    V2O5-TeO2 glasses containing 10 to 50 mol% V2O5 were prepared by melt quenching and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), density, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Raman studies.XRD confirmed the amorphous nature of vanadium tellurite samples. The density of the glasses decreases and the molar volume increases on increasing the concentration of V2O5. The thermal properties, such as glass transition temperature Tg, crystallization temperature Tc, and the melting temperature Tm were measured. Tg decreases from a value of 288°C to 232°C. The changes in Tg were correlated with the number of bonds per unit volume, and the average stretching force constant. Raman spectra were used to elucidate the short-range structure of vanadium tellurite glasses.

  14. Measuring device for weight of glass of glass solidification product to be charged

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasutake, Nobuhiro; Arai, Masaki; Akashi, Ken-ichi

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a device for accurately calculating the weight of molten glass to be charged during manufacturing glass solidification products of radioactive liquid wastes. Namely, a discharge nozzle at the lower end of a glass melting furnace and an upper end of a vessel for glass solidification materials are connected by a connecting device extensible vertically in a cylindrical shape. Molten glasses are flown down by way of the connecting device and filled into the vessel for solidification products. A first scale is constituted so as to measure the weight of load, and the vessel for solidification products are loaded. A second scale is constituted so as to measure the own weight and a weight of load, and is interposed between a flange at the circumference of a charging port and the lower end of the connecting device, and has an opening for flowing down the molten glass at the central portion. With such a constitution, the first scale can weigh the total of the weight of molten glass charged to the vessel for solidification products, the weight of the vessel for solidification products, the counterforce from the connecting device and the weight of the second scale. If the measured value of the secondary scale and the weight of the vessel for solidification products are subtracted from the former value, the weight of the charged molten glass can be determined. (I.S.)

  15. Three-dimensional printing of transparent fused silica glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotz, Frederik; Arnold, Karl; Bauer, Werner; Schild, Dieter; Keller, Nico; Sachsenheimer, Kai; Nargang, Tobias M.; Richter, Christiane; Helmer, Dorothea; Rapp, Bastian E.

    2017-04-01

    Glass is one of the most important high-performance materials used for scientific research, in industry and in society, mainly owing to its unmatched optical transparency, outstanding mechanical, chemical and thermal resistance as well as its thermal and electrical insulating properties. However, glasses and especially high-purity glasses such as fused silica glass are notoriously difficult to shape, requiring high-temperature melting and casting processes for macroscopic objects or hazardous chemicals for microscopic features. These drawbacks have made glasses inaccessible to modern manufacturing technologies such as three-dimensional printing (3D printing). Using a casting nanocomposite, here we create transparent fused silica glass components using stereolithography 3D printers at resolutions of a few tens of micrometres. The process uses a photocurable silica nanocomposite that is 3D printed and converted to high-quality fused silica glass via heat treatment. The printed fused silica glass is non-porous, with the optical transparency of commercial fused silica glass, and has a smooth surface with a roughness of a few nanometres. By doping with metal salts, coloured glasses can be created. This work widens the choice of materials for 3D printing, enabling the creation of arbitrary macro- and microstructures in fused silica glass for many applications in both industry and academia.

  16. Nanoporous Glasses for Nuclear Waste Containment

    OpenAIRE

    Woignier, Thierry; Primera, Juan; Reynes, Jerôme

    2016-01-01

    Research is in progress to incorporate nuclear waste in new matrices with high structural stability, resistance to thermal shock, and high chemical durability. Interactions with water are important for materials used as a containment matrix for the radio nuclides. It is indispensable to improve their chemical durability to limit the possible release of radioactive chemical species, if the glass structure is attacked by corrosion. By associating high structural stability and high chemical dura...

  17. Experimental Shock Transformation of Gypsum to Anhydrite: A New Low Pressure Regime Shock Indicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Mary S.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    The shock behavior of gypsum is important in understanding the Cretaceous/Paleogene event and other terrestrial impacts that contain evaporite sediments in their targets (e.g., Mars Exploration Rover Spirit detected sulfate at Gusev crater, [1]). Most interest focuses on issues of devolatilization to quantify the production of SO2 to better understand its role in generating a temporary atmosphere and its effects on climate and biota [2,3]. Kondo and Ahrens [4] measured induced radiation emitted from single crystal gypsum shocked to 30 and 40 GPa. They observed greybody emission spectra corresponding to temperatures in the range of 3,000 to 4,000 K that are a factor of 2 to 10 times greater than calculated pressure-density energy equation of state temperatures (Hugoniot) and are high enough to melt gypsum. Chen et al. [5] reported results of shock experiments on anhydrite, gypsum, and mixtures of these phases with silica. Their observations indicated little or no devolatilization of anhydrite shocked to 42 GPa and that the fraction of sulfur, by mass, that degassed is approx.10(exp -2) of theoretical prediction. In another report of shock experiments on calcite, anhydrite, and gypsum, Badjukov et al. [6] observed only intensive plastic deformation in anhydrite shock loaded at 63 GPa, and gypsum converted to anhydrite when shock loaded at 56 GPa but have not experimentally shocked gypsum in a step-wise manner to constrain possible incipient transformation effects. Schmitt and Hornemann [7] shock loaded anhydrite and quartz to a peak pressure of 60 GPa and report the platy anhydrite grains were completely pseudomorphed by small crystallized anhydrite grains. However, no evidence of interaction between the two phases could be observed and they suggested that recrystallization of anhydrite grains is the result of a solid-state transformation. They concluded that significant decomposition of anhydrite requires shock pressures higher than 60 GPa. Gupta et al. [8

  18. Ultrapure glass optical waveguide development in microgravity by the sol-gel process

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Containerless melting of glasses in space for the preparation of ultrapure homogeneous glass for optical waveguides is discussed. The homogenization of the glass using conventional raw materials is normally achieved on Earth either by the gravity induced convection currents or by the mechanical stirring of the melt. Because of the absence of gravity induced convection currents, the homogenization of glass using convectional raw materials is difficult in the space environment. Multicomponent, homogeneous, noncrystalline oxide gels can be prepared by the sol-gel process and these gels are promising starting materials for melting glasses in the space environment. The sol-gel process is based on the polymerization reaction of alkoxysilane with other metal alkoxy compounds or suitable metal salts. Many of the alkoxysilanes or other metal alkoxides are liquids and thus can be purified by distillation.

  19. Interfacial reactions between titanium and borate glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brow, R.K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Saha, S.K.; Goldstein, J.I. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science

    1992-12-31

    Interfacial reactions between melts of several borate glasses and titanium have been investigated by analytical scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A thin titanium boride interfacial layer is detected by XPS after short (30 minutes) thermal treatments. ASEM analyses after longer thermal treatments (8--120 hours) reveal boron-rich interfacial layers and boride precipitates in the Ti side of the interface.

  20. Properties and characteristics of high-level waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, W.A.

    1977-01-01

    This paper has briefly reviewed many of the characteristics and properties of high-level waste glasses. From this review, it can be noted that glass has many desirable properties for solidification of high-level wastes. The most important of these include: (1) its low leach rate; (2) the ability to tolerate large changes in waste composition; (3) the tolerance of anticipated storage temperatures; (4) its low surface area even after thermal shock or impact

  1. Effect of copper valence on the glass structure and crystallization behavior of Bi-Pb-Cu-O glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Yi; Lin, U.-L.; Liu, N.-H.

    1997-01-01

    Bi 0.43 Pb 0.35 Cu 0.22 O y glasses with different Cu + contents were prepared by melting at different temperatures. The glass structure consists of [BiO 3 [ and [BiO 6 [ units and the ratio of [BiO 3 [/[BiO 6 [ increases with increasing Cu + content. The glass transition temperature, the first crystallization temperature peak, and the thermal stability of the glasses decreases with increasing Cu + content. The value of the activation energy, E a , varies as a function of the Cu + content. The crystallization mechanism in the glasses is closely related to the glass structure, which is mainly affected by the Cu + content. (orig.)

  2. Evaluation of a Novel Temperature Sensing Probe for Monitoring and Controlling Glass Temperature in a Joule-Heated Glass Melter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, A. D.; Musick, C. A.; Cannon, C.; Carlson, N. M.; Mullenix, P.D.; Tillotson, R. D.

    1999-01-01

    A self-verifying temperature sensor that employs advanced contact thermocouple probe technology was tested in a laboratory-scale, joule-heated, refractory-lined glass melter used for radioactive waste vitrification. The novel temperature probe monitors melt temperature at any given level of the melt chamber. The data acquisition system provides the real-time temperature for molten glass. Test results indicate that the self-verifying sensor is more accurate and reliable than classic platinum/rhodium thermocouple and sheath assemblies. The results of this test are reported as well as enhancements being made to the temperature probe. To obtain more reliable temperature measurements of the molten glass for improving production efficiency and ensuring consistent glass properties, optical sensing was reviewed for application in a high temperature environment

  3. System Shock: The Archetype of Operational Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-25

    the battle space. They can also facilitate a much greater understanding of the variables involved in each party’s decision - making process. However...system shock nests within current US Army Unified Land Operations doctrine. In order to test the utility of system shock theory to Gray Zone...23 Neil E. Harrison, “Thinking about the World We Make ” in Chaos Theory in the Social Sciences: Foundations and Applications

  4. CRYSTALLIZATION IN MULTICOMPONENT GLASSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUGER AA; HRMA PR

    2009-10-08

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

  5. Crystallization In Multicomponent Glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.; Hrma, P.R.

    2009-01-01

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

  6. Optical properties of zinc–vanadium glasses doped with samarium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Zinc–vanadium glasses doped with samarium oxide having the chemical composition Sm2O3(x). ZnO(40−x)V2O5(60)(where x = 0·1–0·5 mol%) were prepared by melt quenching method. The density of these glasses was measured by Archimedes method; the corresponding molar volumes have also been ...

  7. Chemical and topological short-range order in metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincze, I.; Schaafsma, A.S.; Van der Woude, F.; Kemeny, T.; Lovas, A.

    1980-10-01

    Moessbauer spectroscopy is applied to the study of chemical short-range order in (Fe,Ni)B metallic glasses. It is found that the atomic arrangement in melt-quenched glasses closely resembles that of the crystalline counterparts (Fe 3 B is tetragonal, Ni 3 B is orthorombic). The distribution of transition metal atoms is not random at high Ni concentrations: Ni atoms prefer a neighbourhood with a higher boron coordination. (P.L.)

  8. Borosilicate glass as a matrix for the immobilization of Savannah River Plant waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plodinec, M.J.; Wicks, G.G.; Bibler, N.E.

    1982-01-01

    The reference waste form for immobilization of Savannah River Plant (SRP) waste is borosilicate glass. In the reference process, waste is mixed with glass-forming chemicals and melted in a Joule-heated ceramic melter at 1150 0 C. Waste glass made with actual or simulated waste on a small scale and glass made with simulated waste on a large scale confirm that the current reference process and glass-former composition are able to accommodate all SRP waste compositions and can produce a glass with: high waste loading; low leach rates; good thermal stability; high resistance to radiation effects; and good impact resistance. Borosilicate glass has been studied as a matrix for the immobilization of SRP waste since 1974. This paper reviews the results of extensive characterization and performance testing of the glass product. These results show that borosilicate glass is a very suitable matrix for the immobilization of SRP waste. 18 references, 3 figures, 10 tables

  9. Emerging melt quality control solution technologies for aluminium melt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Pascual, Jr

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The newly developed “MTS 1500” Melt Treatment System is performing the specifi cally required melt treatment operations like degassing, cleaning, modification and/or grain refinement by an automated process in one step and at the same location. This linked process is saving time, energy and metal losses allowing - by automated dosage of the melt treatment agents - the production of a consistent melt quality batch after batch. By linking the MTS Metal Treatment System with sensors operating on-line in the melt, i.e., with a hydrogen sensor “Alspek H”, a fully automated control of parts of the process chain like degassing is possible. This technology does guarantee a pre-specifi ed and documented melt quality in each melt treatment batch. Furthermore, to ensure that castings are consistent and predictable there is a growing realization that critical parameters such as metal cleanliness must be measured prior to casting. There exists accepted methods for measuring the cleanliness of an aluminum melt but these can be both slow and costly. A simple, rapid and meaningful method of measuring and bench marking the cleanliness of an aluminum melt has been developed to offer the foundry a practical method of measuring melt cleanliness. This paper shows the structure and performance of the integrated MTS melt treatment process and documents achieved melt quality standards after degassing, cleaning, modifi cation and grain refi nement operations under real foundry conditions. It also provides an insight on a melt cleanliness measuring device “Alspek MQ” to provide foundry men better tools in meeting the increasing quality and tighter specifi cation demand from the industry.

  10. AN ALTERNATIVE HOST MATRIX BASED ON IRON PHOSPHATE GLASSES FOR THE VITRIFICATION OF SPECIALIZED WASTE FORMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, Delbert D.

    2000-01-01

    As mentioned above, the overall goal of this research project was to collect the scientific information essential to develop iron phosphate glass based nuclear wasteforms. The specific objectives of the project were: (1) Investigate the structure of binary iron phosphate glasses and it's dependence on the composition and melting atmosphere: Understand atomic arrangements and nature of the bonding. Establish structure-property relationships. Determine the compositions and melting conditions which optimize the critical properties of the base glass. (2) Understand the structure of iron phosphate wasteforms and it's dependence on the composition and melting atmosphere: Investigate how the waste elements are bonded and coordinated within the glass structure. Establish structure-property relationships for the waste glasses. Determine the compositions and melting atmosphere for which the critical properties of the waste forms would be optimum. (3) Determine the role(s) played by the valence states of iron ions and it's dependence on the composition and melting atmosphere: Understand the different roles of iron(II) and iron(III) ions in determining the critical properties of the base glass and the waste forms. Investigate how the iron valence and its significance depend on the composition and melting atmosphere. (4) Investigate glass forming and crystallization processes of the iron phosphate glasses and their waste forms: Understand the dependence of the glass forming and crystallization characteristics on overall glass composition and valence states of iron ions. Identify the products of devitrification and investigate the critical properties of these crystalline compounds which may adversely affect the chemical and physical properties of the waste forms

  11. Insights into chondrule formation process and shock-thermal history of the Dergaon chondrite (H4-5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Ray

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The Dergaon fall represents a shock-melted H4-5 (S5 ordinary chondrite which includes at least ten textural varieties of chondrules and belongs to the high chondrule-matrix ratio type. Our study reveals that the chondrules are of diverse mineralogy with variable olivine-pyroxene ratios (Type II, igneous melt textures developed under variable cooling rates and formed through melt fractionations from two different melt reservoirs. Based on the experimental analogues, mineralogical associations and phase compositions, it is suggested that the Dergaon chondrules reflect two contrasting environments: a hot, dust-enriched and highly oxidized nebular environment through melting, without significant evaporation, and an arrested reducing environment concomitant with major evaporation loss of alkali and highly volatile trace elements. Coexistence of chlorapatite and merrillite suggests formation of the Dergaon matrix in an acidic accretionary environment. Textural integration and chemical homogenization occurred at ∼1 atmospheric pressure and a mean temperature of 765 °C mark the radiogenic thermal event. Equilibrated shock features (olivine mosaicism, diaplectic plagioclase, polycrystalline troilite due to an impact-induced thermal event reflect a shock pressure >45 GPa and temperature of 600 °C. By contrast, the local disequilibrium shock features (silicate melt veins comprising of olivine crystallites, troilite melt veins and metal droplets correspond to a shock pressure up to 75 GPa and temperature >950 °C.

  12. Recycling of Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Damgaard, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Glass is used for many purposes, but in the waste system glass is predominantly found in terms of beverage and food containers with a relatively short lifetime before ending up in the waste. Furthermore there is a large amount of flat glass used in building materials which also ends up in the waste...... system; this glass though has a long lifetime before ending up in the waste. Altogether these product types add up to 82% of the production of the European glass industry (IPCC, 2001). Recycling of glass in terms of cleaning and refilling of bottles as well as the use of broken glass in the production...... of new glass containers is well established in the glass industry. This chapter describes briefly howglass is produced and howwaste glass is recycled in the industry. Quality requirements and use of recycled products are discussed, as are the resource and environmental issues of glass recycling....

  13. Shock wave overtake measurements on cesium iodide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swenson, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    The luminosity of the shock front for CsI makes it an ideal material for which to measure directly sound velocities along the Hugoniot using shock wave overtake methods. In these measurements, the occurrence of melting along the Hugoniot is marked by a discontinuous decrease in the measured sound velocity. In addition, CsI is isoelectronic with xenon and is expected to begin to show metallic behavior along the Hugoniot near 0.9 Mbar. The directly-determined sound velocities and corresponding elastic moduli would be expected to be more sensitive to this transition than either Hugoniot equations of state or optical pyrometry experiments. This paper presents a brief description of the present experiments and results

  14. Sulphate decomposition and sodium oxide activity in soda-lime-silica glass metls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerkens, R.G.C.

    2003-01-01

    Reaction equilibrium constants for the sulfate decomposition process, which releases oxygen and sulfur oxide gas in sodalimesilica glass melts, have been determined. The chemical solubility of SO2, probably in the form of sulfite ions in sodalimesilica melts, has also been determined. The chemical

  15. Preserved Flora and Organics in Impact Melt Breccias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, P. H.; Harris, R. Scott; Clemett, S. J.; Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Zarate, M.

    2014-01-01

    At least seven glass-bearing strata of varying ages occur at different horizons in the Pampean sediments of Argentina dating back to the Miocene. In a strict sense, these impact glasses are melt-matrix breccias composed of partially digested minerals clasts and basement fragments indicative of crater excavation. Ar-40/Ar-39 dating yield ages (+/- 2 sigma) of 6 +/- 2 Ka, 114 +/- 26 Ka, 230 +/- 30 Ka, 445 +/- 21 Ka, 3.27 +/- 0.08 Ma (near Mar del Plata = MdP), 5.28 +/- 0.04 Ma, and 9.21 +/- 0.08 Ma (near Chasico = CH) Where found in place (not reworked), these ages are consistent with the local stratigraphy and faunal assemblages. A striking property of some of these impact glasses is the encapsulation of preserved fragments of floral (and even soft-tissue faunal remains). Here we identify retained organics and describe a likely process of encapsulation and preservation.

  16. Sintering behavior of LZSA glass-ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Rubem Klegues Montedo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The LZSA glass-ceramic system (Li2O-ZrO2-SiO2-Al2O 3 shows interesting properties, such as good chemical resistance, low thermal expansion, high abrasion resistance, and a low dielectric constant. However, in order to obtain a high performance material for specific applications, the sintering behavior must be better understood so that the porosity may be reduced and other properties improved. In this context, a sintering investigation for a specific LZSA glass-ceramic system composition was carried out. A 18.8Li2O-8.3ZrO2-64.2SiO2-8.7Al 2O3 glass was prepared by melting the solids, quenching the melt in water, and grinding the resulting solid in order to obtain a powder (3.68 μm average particle diameter. Subsequently, the glass powder was characterized (chemical analysis and determination of thermal properties and the sintering behavior was investigated using optical non-contact dilatometry measurements. The results showed that the crystallization process strongly reduced the sintering in the temperature interval from 785 to 940 °C, and a maximum thermal shrinkage of 15.4% was obtained with operating conditions of 1020 °C and 180 minutes.

  17. Glass forms for immobilization of Hanford wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, W.W.; Dressen, A.L.; Hobbick, C.W.; Babad, H.

    1975-03-01

    Approximately 140 million liters of solid salt cake (mainly NaNO 3 ), produced by evaporation of aged alkaline high-level liquid wastes, will be stored in underground tanks when the present Hanford Waste Management Program is completed in the early 1980's. At this time also, large volumes of various other solid radioactive wastes (sludges, excavated Pu-contaminated soil, and doubly encapsulated 137 CsCl and 90 SrF 2 ) will be stored on the Hanford Reservation. All these solid wastes can be converted to immobile silicate and aluminosilicate glasses of low water leachability by melting them at 1100 0 to 1400 0 C with appropriate amounts of basalt (or sand) and other glass-formers such as B 2 O 3 or CaO. Reviewed in this paper are formulations and other melt conditions used successfully in batch tests to make glasses from actual and synthetic wastes; leachability and other properties of these glasses show them to be satisfactory vehicles for immobilization of the Hanford wastes. (U.S.)

  18. Experimental study of glass sampling devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouan, A.; Moncouyoux, J.P.; Meyere, A.

    1992-01-01

    Two high-level liquid waste containment glass sampling systems have been designed and built. The first device fits entirely inside a standard glass storage canister, and may thus be used in facilities not initially designed for this function. It has been tested successfully in the nonradioactive prototype unit at Marcoule. The work primarily covered the design and construction of an articulated arm supporting the sampling vessel, and the mechanisms necessary for filling the vessel and recovering the sample. System actuation and operation are fully automatic, and the resulting sample is representative of the glass melt. Implementation of the device is delicate however, and its reliability is estimated at about 75%. A second device was designed specifically for new vitrification facilities. It is installed directly on the glass melting furnace, and meets process operating and quality control requirements. Tests conducted at the Marcoule prototype vitrification facility demonstrated the feasibility of the system. Special attention was given to the sampling vessel transfer mechanisms, with two filling and controlled sample cooling options

  19. Fission products in glasses. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De, A.K.; Luckscheiter, B.; Malow, G.; Schiewer, E.

    1977-09-01

    Glass ceramics of different composition with high leach and impact resistance can be produced for fission product solidification. In contrast to commercial glass products, they consist of a number of crystalline phases and a residual glass phase. The major crystalline phase allows a classification into celsian, diopside, encryptite, and perovskite ceramics. They all are of special importance as host phases for long-lived fission products. The paper reports on relations between product composition and melting properties, viscosity, crystallization properties, and fixation capability for fission products. Further investigations deal with dimensional stability, impact resistance, thermal expansion, and thermal conductivity. The properties of the ceramics are compared with those of the basic products. The problems still to be solved with regard to further improvement and application of these products are discussed. (RB) [de

  20. DWPF waste glass Product Composition Control System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, K.G.; Postles, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will be used to blend aqueous radwaste (PHA) with solid radwaste (Sludge) in a waste receipt vessel (the SRAT). The resulting SRAT material is transferred to the SME an there blended with ground glass (Frit) to produce a batch of melter feed slurry. The SME material is passed to a hold tank (the MFT) which is used to continuously feed the DWPF melter. The melter. The melter produces a molten glass wasteform which is poured into stainless steel canisters for cooling and, ultimately, shipment to and storage in a geologic repository. The Product Composition Control System (PCCS) is the system intended to ensure that the melt will be processible and that the glass wasteform will be acceptable. This document provides a description of this system

  1. Wetting of metals and glasses on Mo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Saiz, Eduardo; Lopez-Esteban, Sonia; Benhassine, Mehdi; de Coninck, Joel; Rauch, Nicole; Ruehle, Manfred

    2008-01-08

    The wetting of low melting point metals and Si-Ca-Al-Ti-O glasses on molybdenum has been investigated. The selected metals (Au, Cu, Ag) form a simple eutectic with Mo. Metal spreading occurs under nonreactive conditions without interdiffusion or ridge formation. The metals exhibit low (non-zero) contact angles on Mo but this requires temperatures higher than 1100 C in reducing atmospheres in order to eliminate a layer of adsorbed impurities on the molybdenum surface. By controlling the oxygen activity in the furnace, glass spreading can take place under reactive or nonreactive conditions. We have found that in the glass/Mo system the contact angle does not decrease under reactive conditions. In all cases, adsorption from the liquid seems to accelerate the diffusivity on the free molybdenum surface.

  2. Influence of seeding on crystallization behaviour of BaNaB9 glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Influence of seeding on crystallization behaviour of BaNaB9. O15 glasses. RAHUL VAISH and K B R VARMA*. Materials Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India. MS received 18 August 2008. Abstract. Transparent BaNaB9O15 (BNBO) glasses were fabricated via the conventional melt- ...

  3. Glass formation via structural fragmentation of a 2D coordination network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeyama, D; Funnell, N P; Cliffe, M J; Hill, J A; Goodwin, A L; Hijikata, Y; Itakura, T; Okubo, T; Horike, S; Kitagawa, S

    2015-08-18

    The structure of a glass obtained by the melt quenching of a two-dimensional (2D) coordination network was examined. X-ray analyses disclosed a 2D-to-0D structural transformation before and after glass formation. The mechanism is unique to coordination compounds, as it is characterized by labile and flexible coordination bonds.

  4. Spectral studies on CuO in sodium–calcium borophosphate glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    linear optical devices [10] and as low-melting glass solders or glass seals [11] derived .... For S1 to S4 samples, the vitreous phase coexists with a crystalline phase and the pattern shows large maxima overlapped with the peaks characteristics ...

  5. Thermoluminescence properties of the Cu-doped lithium potassium borate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aboud, Haydar; Wagiran, H.; Hussin, R.; Ali, Hassan; Alajerami, Yasser; Saeed, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Characteristics of lithium potassium borate glasses with various copper concentrations are reported. The glasses were prepared by the melt quenching method and irradiated with photons to doses in the 0.5–4.0 Gy range. Glowing curves, dose response curves, reproducibility of the response, dose threshold, thermal fading and optical bleaching were studied

  6. Nuclear microprobe analysis of carbon within glass inclusions and volcanic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metrich, N.; Mosbah, M.; Trocellier, P.; Clocchiatti, R.

    1986-01-01

    Microanalysis possibilities have been explored to determine light element concentrations within glasses (melt inclusions and basaltic glass fragments) and volcanic phenocrysts. In the first step, C was examined. The study of different spectral interferences lead to calculated detection limits of 40 μg/g for basaltic glasses and 50 μg/g for olivine crystals. The C contents of all investigated specimens range from 40 μg/g (the detection limit) to 6800 μg/g. Heterogeneities were revealed within glass inclusions. Measurements show obvious concentration profiles in basaltic glass samples. Our results agree with previous published data and are reliable. Accuracy of measurements is about 20%. 12 refs

  7. Spinel dissolution via addition of glass forming chemicals. Results of preliminary experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Johnson, F. C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Increased loading of high level waste in glass can lead to crystallization within the glass. Some crystalline species, such as spinel, have no practical impact on the chemical durability of the glass, and therefore may be acceptable from both a processing and a product performance standpoint. In order to operate a melter with a controlled amount of crystallization, options must be developed for remediating an unacceptable accumulation of crystals. This report describes preliminary experiments designed to evaluate the ability to dissolve spinel crystals in simulated waste glass melts via the addition of glass forming chemicals (GFCs).

  8. Spin glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mookerjee, Abhijit

    1976-01-01

    ''Spin glasses'', are entire class of magnetic alloys of moderate dilution, in which the magnetic atoms are far enough apart to be unlike the pure metal, but close enough so that the indirect exchange energy between them (mediated by the s-d interaction between local moments and conduction electrons) dominates all other energies. Characteristic critical phenomena displayed such as freezing of spin orientation at 'Tsub(c)' and spreading of magnetic ordering, are pointed out. Anomalous behaviour, associated with these critical phenomena, as reflected in : (i) Moessbauer spectroscopy giving hyperfine splitting at Tsub(c), (ii) maxima in susceptibility and remanent magnetism, (iii) thermopower maxima and change in slope, (iv) Characteristic cusp in susceptibility and its removal by very small magnetic fields, and (v) conductivity-resistivity measurements, are discussed. Theoretical developments aimed at explaining these phenomena, in particular, the ideas from percolation and localisation theories, and the approach based on the gellations of polymers, are discussed. Finally, a new approach based on renormalisation group in disordered systems is also briefly mentioned. (K.B.)

  9. Method of melting solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ootsuka, Katsuyuki; Mizuno, Ryokichi; Kuwana, Katsumi; Sawada, Yoshihisa; Komatsu, Fumiaki.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To enable the volume reduction treatment of a HEPA filter containing various solid wastes, particularly acid digestion residue, or an asbestos separator at a relatively low temperature range. Method: Solid waste to be heated and molten is high melting point material treated by ''acid digestion treatment'' for treating solid waste, e.g. a HEPA filter or polyvinyl chloride, etc. of an atomic power facility treated with nitric acid or the like. When this material is heated and molten by an electric furnace, microwave melting furnace, etc., boron oxide, sodium boride, sodium carbonate, etc. is added as a melting point lowering agent. When it is molten in this state, its melting point is lowered, and it becomes remarkably fluid, and the melting treatment is facilitated. Solidified material thus obtained through the melting step has excellent denseness and further large volume reduction rate of the solidified material. (Yoshihara, H.)

  10. Composition and redox control of waste glasses: Recommendation for process control limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C.M.; Plodinec, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    An electrochemical series of redox couples, originally developed for Savannah River Laboratory glass frit 131 (SRL-131) as a reference composition, has been extended to two other alkali borosilicate compositions that are candidate glasses for nuclear waste immobilization. Since no dramatic differences were ascertained in the redox chemistry of selected multivalent elements in SRL-131 versus that in Savannah River Laboratory glass frit 165 (SRL-165) and in West Valley glass number-sign 205 (WV-205), the comprehensive electrochemical series can readily be applied to a range of nuclear waste glass compositions. In order to alleviate potential problems with foaming and precipitation of insolubles during the processing of the nuclear waste in these glass melts, the [Fe 2+ ]/[Fe 3+ ] ratio of the melt should be between 0.1 and 0.5. 27 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  11. A SIMS study of lunar 'komatiitic glasses' - Trace element characteristics and possible origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, C. K.; Papike, J. J.; Galbreath, K. C.; Wentworth, S. J.; Shimizu, N.

    1990-01-01

    In Apollo 16 regolith breccias, Wentworth and McKay (1988) identified a suite of minute (less than 120 microns) 'komatiitic glass beads'. The wide major element compositional range, and ultra-Mg-prime character of the glasses suggest a variety of possible origins from complex impact processes to complex volcanic processes involving rather unusual and primitive magmatism. The extent of trace element depletion or enrichment in these glasses appears to be correlated to the siderophile character of the element (ionization potential or experimentally determined silicate melt/Fe metal partition coefficients. The ultra-Mg-prime glasses are depleted in Co relative to a bulk Moon Mg/Co exhibited by many lunar samples (volcanic glasses, basalts, regolith breccia, estimated upper mantle). The low Co and high incompatible element concentrations diminish the possibility that these glasses are a product of lunar komatiitic volcanism or impact, excavation, and melting of a very high Mg-prime plutonic unit.

  12. Physical, thermal and structural properties of Calcium Borotellurite glass system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paz, E.C. [CCSST – UFMA, Imperatriz, MA (Brazil); IFMA, Açailândia, MA (Brazil); Dias, J.D.M. [CCSST – UFMA, Imperatriz, MA (Brazil); Melo, G.H.A. [CCSST – UFMA, Imperatriz, MA (Brazil); IFMA, Imperatriz, MA (Brazil); Lodi, T.A. [CCSST – UFMA, Imperatriz, MA (Brazil); Carvalho, J.O. [CCSST – UFMA, Imperatriz, MA (Brazil); IFTO, Araguaína, TO (Brazil); Façanha Filho, P.F.; Barboza, M.J.; Pedrochi, F. [CCSST – UFMA, Imperatriz, MA (Brazil); Steimacher, A., E-mail: steimacher@hotmail.com [CCSST – UFMA, Imperatriz, MA (Brazil)

    2016-08-01

    In this work the glass forming ability in Calcium Borotellurite (CBTx) glass system was studied. Six glass samples were prepared by melt-quenching technique and the obtained samples are transparent, lightly yellowish, with no visible crystallites. The structural studies were carried out by using XRD, FTIR, Raman Spectra, density measurements, and the thermal analysis by using DTA and specific heat. The results are discussed in terms of tellurium oxide content and their changes in structural and thermal properties of glass samples. The addition of TeO{sub 2} increased the density and thermal stability values and decreased glass transition temperature (Tg). Raman and FTIR spectroscopies indicated that the network structure of CBTx glasses is formed by BO{sub 3}, BO{sub 4}, TeO{sub 3}, TeO{sub 3+1} and TeO{sub 4} units. CBTx system showed good glass formation ability and good thermal stability, which make CBTx glasses suitable for manufacturing process and a candidate for rare-earth doping for several optical applications. - Highlights: • Glass forming ability on Calcium Borotellurite system was studied. • The glass structure was investigated by XRD, Raman and FTIR. • The glass network structure of the CBTx glasses is formed by BO{sub 3}, BO{sub 4}, TeO{sub 3}, TeO{sub 3+1} and TeO{sub 4} units. • The density and thermal stability of the CBTx glass decreases with TeO{sub 2} while the Cp and the Tg decreases. • The obtained CBTx glasses are suitable for manufacturing process and rare-earth doping for several optical applications.

  13. Comparative study of radiation shielding parameters for bismuth borate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaundal, Rajinder Singh

    2016-01-01

    Melt and quench technique was used for the preparation of glassy samples of the composition x Bi 2 O 3- (1-x) B 2 O 3 where x= .05 to .040. XCOM computer program is used for the evaluation of gamma-ray shielding parameters of the prepared glass samples. Further the values of mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic number and half value layer for the glassy samples have been calculated in the energy range from 1KeV to 100GeV. Rigidity of the glass samples have been analyzed by molar volume of the prepared glass samples. (author)

  14. Thermal property of holmium doped lithium lead borate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usharani, V. L.; Eraiah, B.

    2018-04-01

    The new glass system of holmium doped lithium lead borate glasses were prepared by conventional melt quenching technique. The thermal stability of the different compositions of Ho3+ ions doped lithium lead borate glasses were studied by using TG-DTA. The Tg values are ranging from 439 to 444 °C with respect to the holmium concentration. Physical parameters like polaron radius(rp), inter-nuclear distance (ri), field strength (F) and polarizability (αm) of oxide ions were calculated using appropriate formulae.

  15. Simulation of Cu-Mg metallic glass: Thermodynamics and structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, Nicholas; Schiøtz, Jakob; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    2004-01-01

    We have obtained effective medium theory interatomic potential parameters suitable for studying Cu-Mg metallic glasses. We present thermodynamic and structural results from simulations of such glasses over a range of compositions. We have produced low-temperature configurations by cooling from...... the melt at as slow a rate as practical, using constant temperature and pressure molecular dynamics. During the cooling process we have carried out thermodynamic analyses based on the temperature dependence of the enthalpy and its derivative, the specific heat, from which the glass transition temperature...

  16. Low leach rate glasses for immobilization of nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chick, L.A.; Buckwalter, C.Q.

    1980-10-01

    Improved defense and commercial waste glass have about one order of magnitude lower leach rates at 90 0 C in static deionized water than reference glasses. This durability difference diminishes as the leaching temperature is raised, but at repository temperature less than 150 0 C, the improved compositions would have considerable advantages over reference glases. At the melting temperatures necessary for most of the high-durability glasses, volatility was found to be higher than that experienced in processing current reference glases. Higher volatilities might be compensated for by specific design of the off-gas system for improved off-gas treatment and volatile materials recovery. 6 figures, 2 tables

  17. Comparative study of radiation shielding parameters for bismuth borate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaundal, Rajinder Singh, E-mail: rajinder_apd@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, School of Physical Sciences, Lovely Professional University, Phagwara, Punjab (India)

    2016-07-15

    Melt and quench technique was used for the preparation of glassy samples of the composition x Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3-}(1-x) B{sub 2}O{sub 3} where x= .05 to .040. XCOM computer program is used for the evaluation of gamma-ray shielding parameters of the prepared glass samples. Further the values of mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic number and half value layer for the glassy samples have been calculated in the energy range from 1KeV to 100GeV. Rigidity of the glass samples have been analyzed by molar volume of the prepared glass samples. (author)

  18. Composition, production and procurement of glass at San Vincenzo Al Volturno: an early Medieval monastic complex in Southern Italy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Schibille

    Full Text Available 136 glasses from the ninth-century monastery of San Vincenzo and its workshops have been analysed by electron microprobe in order to situate the assemblage within the first millennium CE glass making tradition. The majority of the glass compositions can be paralleled by Roman glass from the first to third centuries, with very few samples consistent with later compositional groups. Colours for trailed decoration on vessels, for vessel bodies and for sheet glass for windows were largely produced by melting the glass tesserae from old Roman mosaics. Some weakly-coloured transparent glass was obtained by re-melting Roman window glass, while some was produced by melting and mixing of tesserae, excluding the strongly coloured cobalt blues. Our data suggest that to feed the needs of the glass workshop, the bulk of the glass was removed as tesserae and windows from a large Roman building. This is consistent with a historical account according to which the granite columns of the monastic church were spolia from a Roman temple in the region. The purported shortage of natron from Egypt does not appear to explain the dependency of San Vincenzo on old Roman glass. Rather, the absence of contemporary primary glass may reflect the downturn in long-distance trade in the later first millennium C.E., and the role of patronage in the "ritual economy" founded upon donations and gift-giving of the time.

  19. Composition, production and procurement of glass at San Vincenzo Al Volturno: an early Medieval monastic complex in Southern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schibille, Nadine; Freestone, Ian C

    2013-01-01

    136 glasses from the ninth-century monastery of San Vincenzo and its workshops have been analysed by electron microprobe in order to situate the assemblage within the first millennium CE glass making tradition. The majority of the glass compositions can be paralleled by Roman glass from the first to third centuries, with very few samples consistent with later compositional groups. Colours for trailed decoration on vessels, for vessel bodies and for sheet glass for windows were largely produced by melting the glass tesserae from old Roman mosaics. Some weakly-coloured transparent glass was obtained by re-melting Roman window glass, while some was produced by melting and mixing of tesserae, excluding the strongly coloured cobalt blues. Our data suggest that to feed the needs of the glass workshop, the bulk of the glass was removed as tesserae and windows from a large Roman building. This is consistent with a historical account according to which the granite columns of the monastic church were spolia from a Roman temple in the region. The purported shortage of natron from Egypt does not appear to explain the dependency of San Vincenzo on old Roman glass. Rather, the absence of contemporary primary glass may reflect the downturn in long-distance trade in the later first millennium C.E., and the role of patronage in the "ritual economy" founded upon donations and gift-giving of the time.

  20. Petrological Geodynamics of Mantle Melting II. AlphaMELTS + Multiphase Flow: Dynamic Fractional Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirone, Massimiliano

    2018-03-01

    In this second installment of a series that aims to investigate the dynamic interaction between the composition and abundance of the solid mantle and its melt products, the classic interpretation of fractional melting is extended to account for the dynamic nature of the process. A multiphase numerical flow model is coupled with the program AlphaMELTS, which provides at the moment possibly the most accurate petrological description of melting based on thermodynamic principles. The conceptual idea of this study is based on a description of the melting process taking place along a 1-D vertical ideal column where chemical equilibrium is assumed to apply in two local sub-systems separately on some spatial and temporal scale. The solid mantle belongs to a local sub-system (ss1) that does not interact chemically with the melt reservoir which forms a second sub-system (ss2). The local melt products are transferred in the melt sub-system ss2 where the melt phase eventually can also crystallize into a different solid assemblage and will evolve dynamically. The main difference with the usual interpretation of fractional melting is that melt is not arbitrarily and instantaneously extracted from the mantle, but instead remains a dynamic component of the model, hence the process is named dynamic fractional melting (DFM). Some of the conditions that may affect the DFM model are investigated in this study, in particular the effect of temperature, mantle velocity at the boundary of the mantle column. A comparison is made with the dynamic equilibrium melting (DEM) model discussed in the first installment. The implications of assuming passive flow or active flow are also considered to some extent. Complete data files of most of the DFM simulations, four animations and two new DEM simulations (passive/active flow) are available following the instructions in the supplementary material.