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Sample records for shock layer temperature

  1. Heat transfer, velocity-temperature correlation, and turbulent shear stress from Navier-Stokes computations of shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. R.; Hingst, W. R.; Porro, A. R.

    1991-01-01

    The properties of 2-D shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction flows were calculated by using a compressible turbulent Navier-Stokes numerical computational code. Interaction flows caused by oblique shock wave impingement on the turbulent boundary layer flow were considered. The oblique shock waves were induced with shock generators at angles of attack less than 10 degs in supersonic flows. The surface temperatures were kept at near-adiabatic (ratio of wall static temperature to free stream total temperature) and cold wall (ratio of wall static temperature to free stream total temperature) conditions. The computational results were studied for the surface heat transfer, velocity temperature correlation, and turbulent shear stress in the interaction flow fields. Comparisons of the computational results with existing measurements indicated that (1) the surface heat transfer rates and surface pressures could be correlated with Holden's relationship, (2) the mean flow streamwise velocity components and static temperatures could be correlated with Crocco's relationship if flow separation did not occur, and (3) the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model should be modified for turbulent shear stress computations in the interaction flows.

  2. 2-Shock layered tuning campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masse, Laurent; Dittrich, T.; Khan, S.; Kyrala, G.; Ma, T.; MacLaren, S.; Ralph, J.; Salmonson, J.; Tipton, R.; Los Alamos Natl Lab Team; Lawrence Livermore Natl Lab Team

    2016-10-01

    The 2-Shock platform has been developed to maintain shell sphericity throughout the compression phase of an indirect-drive target implosion and produce a stagnating hot spot in a quasi 1D-like manner. A sub-scale, 1700 _m outer diameter, and thick, 200 _m, uniformly Silicon doped, gas-filled plastic capsule is driven inside a nominal size 5750 _m diameter ignition hohlraum. The hohlraum fill is near vacuum to reduce back-scatter and improve laser/drive coupling. A two-shock pulse of about 1 MJ of laser energy drives the capsule. The thick capsule prevents ablation front feed-through to the imploded core. This platform has demonstrated its efficiency to tune a predictable and reproducible 1-D implosion with a nearly round shape. It has been shown that the high foot performance was dominated by the local defect growth due to the ablation front instability and by the hohlraum radiation asymmetries. The idea here is to take advantage of this 2-Shock platform to design a 1D-like layered implosion and eliminates the deleterious effects of radiation asymmetries and ablation front instability growth. We present the design work and our first experimental results of this near one-dimensional 2-Shock layered design. This work was performed under the auspices of the Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, (LLNS) under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  3. Shock waves in helium at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liepmann, H.W.; Torczynski, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    Results are reported from studies of the properties of low temperature He-4 using shock waves as a probe. Ideal shock tube theory is used to show that sonic speeds of Mach 40 are attainable in He at 300 K. Viscosity reductions at lower temperatures minimize boundary layer effects at the side walls. A two-fluid model is described to account for the phase transition which He undergoes at temperatures below 2.2 K, after which the quantum fluid (He II) and the normal compressed superfluid (He I) coexist. Analytic models are provided for pressure-induced shocks in He I and temperature-induced shock waves (called second sound) which appear in He II. The vapor-fluid interface of He I is capable of reflecting second and gasdynamic sound shocks, which can therefore be used as probes for studying phase transitions between He I and He II. 17 references

  4. Optimizing thermal shock resistance of layered refractories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hein, Jarno; Kuna, Meinhard [Institute of Mechanics and Fluid Dynamics, Technical University Bergakademie Freiberg, Lampadiusstrasse 4, 09599 Freiberg (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    Severe thermal shocks may cause critical thermal stresses and failure in refractories or ceramic materials. To increase the thermal shock resistance, layered material structures are suggested. In order to optimize properties of these alternative structures, thermo-mechanical simulations are required. In this study, a finite difference method (FDM) is used for solving the partial differential equation of heat conduction with spatially varying parameters. The optimization of the strip's thermal shock resistance is exemplarily done on a 10 layered strip subjected to constant temperature jump on the top surface. Each layer can be set with different porous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MgO ceramics, whose material properties are theoretically determined. In this study, an improved optimization method is developed that consists of a combination and sequence of Monte Carlo simulations and evolution strategies to overcome certain disadvantages of both techniques. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Shock dynamics in layered periodic media

    KAUST Repository

    Ketcheson, David I.

    2012-01-01

    Solutions of constant-coeffcient nonlinear hyperbolic PDEs generically develop shocks, even if the initial data is smooth. Solutions of hyperbolic PDEs with variable coeffcients can behave very differently. We investigate formation and stability of shock waves in a one-dimensional periodic layered medium by a computational study of time-reversibility and entropy evolution. We find that periodic layered media tend to inhibit shock formation. For small initial conditions and large impedance variation, no shock formation is detected even after times much greater than the time of shock formation in a homogeneous medium. Furthermore, weak shocks are observed to be dynamically unstable in the sense that they do not lead to significant long-term entropy decay. We propose a characteristic condition for admissibility of shocks in heterogeneous media that generalizes the classical Lax entropy condition and accurately predicts the formation or absence of shocks in these media.

  6. Shock dynamics in layered periodic media

    KAUST Repository

    Ketcheson, David I.; Leveque, Randall J.

    2012-01-01

    of shock waves in a one-dimensional periodic layered medium by a computational study of time-reversibility and entropy evolution. We find that periodic layered media tend to inhibit shock formation. For small initial conditions and large impedance variation

  7. Prenatal temperature shocks reduce cooperation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duchoslav, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Climate change has not only led to a sustained rise in mean global temperature over the past decades, but also increased the frequency of extreme weather events. This paper explores the effect of temperature shocks in utero on later-life taste for cooperation. Using historical climate data combined

  8. Shock timing measurements in DT ice layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Sater, J.; Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R. J.; Ross, J. S.; Lepape, S.; Ralph, J. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Kroll, J. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Boehly, T. R.; Nikroo, A.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J.

    2013-10-01

    Shock timing experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are routinely conducted using the keyhole target geometry, in which the strength and timing of multiple shocks are measured in a liquid-deuterium (D2) filled capsule interior. These targets have recently been modified to improve the surrogacy to ignition implosions by replacing the standard, continuous liquid D2 capsule fill with a deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layer with a central DT gas fill. These experiments remove any possible material surrogacy difference between D2 and DT as well as incorporating the physics of multiple shock release and recompression events from an ice layer of finite thickness, an effect that is absent in the liquid-filled targets. Experimental results and comparisons with numerical simulation are presented. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. Temperature measurements of shock-compressed deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, N.C.; Ross, M.; Nellis, W.J.

    1994-11-01

    The authors measured the temperatures of single and double-shocked D 2 and H 2 up to 85 GPa (0.85 Mbar) and 5,200 K. While single shock temperatures, at pressures to 23 GPa, agree well with previous models, the double shock temperatures are as much as 40% lower than predicted. This is believed to be caused by molecular dissociation, and a new model of the hydrogen EOS at extreme conditions has been developed which correctly predicts their observations. These data and model have important implications for programs which use condensed-phase hydrogen in implosion systems

  10. Radiography for a Shock-accelerated Liquid Layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    P. Meekunnasombat J.G. Oakley/inst M.H. Anderson R. Bonazza

    2005-01-01

    This program supported the experimental study of the interaction of planar shock waves with both solid structures (a single cylinder or a bank of cylinders) and single and multiple liquid layers. Objectives of the study included: characterization of the shock refraction patterns; measurements of the impulsive loading of the solid structures; observation of the response of the liquid layers to shock acceleration; assessment of the shock-mitigation effects of single and multiple liquid layers. The uploaded paper is intended as a final report for the entire funding period. The poster described in the paper won the Best Poster Award at the 25 International Symposium on Shock Waves

  11. Study on Reflected Shock Wave/Boundary Layer Interaction in a Shock Tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Wook; Kim, Tae Ho; Kim, Heuy Dong [Andong Nat’l Univ., Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    The interaction between a shock wave and a boundary layer causes boundary layer separation, shock train, and in some cases, strong unsteadiness in the flow field. Such a situation is also observed in a shock tube, where the reflected shock wave interacts with the unsteady boundary layer. However, only a few studies have been conducted to investigate the shock train phenomenon in a shock tube. In the present study, numerical studies were conducted using the two-dimensional axisymmetric domain of a shock tube, and compressible Navier-Stokes equations were solved to clarify the flow characteristics of shock train phenomenon inside a shock tube. A detailed wave diagram was developed based on the present computational results, which were validated with existing experimental data.

  12. Transonic shock wave. Boundary layer interaction at a convex wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koren, B.; Bannink, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    A standard finite element procedure has been applied to the problem of transonic shock wave – boundary layer interaction at a convex wall. The method is based on the analytical Bohning-Zierep model, where the boundary layer is perturbed by a weak normal shock wave which shows a singular pressure

  13. Temperature measurement of tin under shock compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hereil, Pierre-Louis; Mabire, Catherine

    2002-01-01

    The results of pyrometric measurements performed at the interface of a tin target with a LiF window material are presented for stresses ranging from 38 to 55 GPa. The purpose of the study is to analyze the part of the interface in the temperature measurement by a multi-channel pyrometric device. The results show that the glue used at target/window interface remains transparent under shock. The values of temperature measured at the tin/LiF interface are consistent with the behavior of tin under shock

  14. Multi-layer protective armour for underwater shock wave mitigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Hawass

    2015-12-01

    The strain gauge data and displacement sensors results showed that the multi-layer plates have higher level of underwater shock wave mitigation than the triple aluminum plates with strain and deflection of nearly 50%.

  15. Nonequilibrium effects on shock-layer radiometry during earth entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, J. O.; Whiting, E. E.

    1973-01-01

    Radiative enhancement factors for the CN violet and N2(+) first negative band systems caused by nonequilibrium thermochemistry in the shock layer of a blunt-nosed vehicle during earth entry are reported. The results are based on radiometric measurements obtained with the aid of a combustion-driven shock tube. The technique of converting the shock-tube measurements into predictions of the enhancement factors for the blunt-body case is described, showing it to be useful for similar applications of other shock-tube measurements.

  16. High Temperature Phenomena in Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The high temperatures generated in gases by shock waves give rise to physical and chemical phenomena such as molecular vibrational excitation, dissociation, ionization, chemical reactions and inherently related radiation. In continuum regime, these processes start from the wave front, so that generally the gaseous media behind shock waves may be in a thermodynamic and chemical non-equilibrium state. This book presents the state of knowledge of these phenomena. Thus, the thermodynamic properties of high temperature gases, including the plasma state are described, as well as the kinetics of the various chemical phenomena cited above. Numerous results of measurement and computation of vibrational relaxation times, dissociation and reaction rate constants are given, and various ionization and radiative mechanisms and processes are presented. The coupling between these different phenomena is taken into account as well as their interaction with the flow-field. Particular points such as the case of rarefied flows an...

  17. Chemical kinetics studies at high temperatures using shock tubes

    OpenAIRE

    Rajakumar, B; Anandraj, D; Reddy, KPJ; Arunan, E

    2002-01-01

    Shock tube is an unique facility to create temperature gradients exceeding million degrees Kelvin per second. We have established two shock tubes for measuring the kinetic reaction rates at high temperatures with two different but complementary detection techniques. The first one is a single pulse shock tube, in which the reflected shock is used to heat the molecules. The equilibrated products are analyzed by gas chromatograph and infrared spectrometer. The second one uses laser-schlieren sys...

  18. Shock-like structures in the tropical cyclone boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gabriel J.; Taft, Richard K.; McNoldy, Brian D.; Schubert, Wayne H.

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents high horizontal resolution solutions of an axisymmetric, constant depth, slab boundary layer model designed to simulate the radial inflow and boundary layer pumping of a hurricane. Shock-like structures of increasing intensity appear for category 1-5 hurricanes. For example, in the category 3 case, the u>(∂u/∂r>) term in the radial equation of motion produces a shock-like structure in the radial wind, i.e., near the radius of maximum tangential wind the boundary layer radial inflow decreases from approximately 22 m s-1 to zero over a radial distance of a few kilometers. Associated with this large convergence is a spike in the radial distribution of boundary layer pumping, with updrafts larger than 22 m s-1 at a height of 1000 m. Based on these model results, it is argued that observed hurricane updrafts of this magnitude so close to the ocean surface are attributable to the dry dynamics of the frictional boundary layer rather than moist convective dynamics. The shock-like structure in the boundary layer radial wind also has important consequences for the evolution of the tangential wind and the vertical component of vorticity. On the inner side of the shock the tangential wind tendency is essentially zero, while on the outer side of the shock the tangential wind tendency is large due to the large radial inflow there. The result is the development of a U-shaped tangential wind profile and the development of a thin region of large vorticity. In many respects, the model solutions resemble the remarkable structures observed in the boundary layer of Hurricane Hugo (1989).

  19. Experimental research on crossing shock wave boundary layer interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settles, G. S.; Garrison, T. J.

    1994-10-01

    An experimental research effort of the Penn State Gas Dynamics Laboratory on the subject of crossing shock wave boundary layer interactions is reported. This three year study was supported by AFOSR Grant 89-0315. A variety of experimental techniques were employed to study the above phenomena including planar laser scattering flowfield visualization, kerosene lampblack surface flow visualization, laser-interferometer skin friction surveys, wall static pressure measurements, and flowfield five-hole probe surveys. For a model configuration producing two intersecting shock waves, measurements were made for a range of oblique shock strengths at freestream Mach numbers of 3.0 and 3.85. Additionally, measurements were made at Mach 3.85 for a configuration producing three intersecting waves. The combined experimental dataset was used to formulate the first detailed flowfield models of the crossing-shock and triple-shock wave/boundary layer interactions. The structure of these interactions was found to be similar over a broad range of interaction strengths and is dominated by a large, separated, viscous flow region.

  20. Shock Wave Propagation in Layered Planetary Interiors: Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkani-Hamed, J.; Monteux, J.

    2017-12-01

    The end of the terrestrial planet accretion is characterized by numerous large impacts. About 90% of the mass of a large planet is accreted while the core mantle separation is occurring, because of the accretionary and the short-lived radio-isotope heating. The characteristics of the shockwave propagation, hence the existing scaling laws are poorly known within the layered planets. Here, we use iSALE-2D hydrocode simulations to calculate shock pressure in a differentiated Mars type body for impact velocities of 5-20 km/s, and impactor sizes of 100-400 km. We use two different rheologies for the target interior, an inviscid model ("no-stress model") and a pressure and damage-dependent strength model ("elaborated model"). To better characterize the shock pressure within the whole mantle as a function of distance from the impact site, we propose the following distribution: (1) a near field zone larger than the isobaric core that extends to 7-15 times the projectile radius into the target, where the peak shock pressure decays exponentially with increasing distance, (2) a far field zone where the pressure decays with distance following a power law. The shock pressure decreases more rapidly with distance in the near field for the elaborated model than for the no-stress model because of the influence of acoustic fluidization and damage. However to better illustrate the influence of the rheology on the shock propagation, we use the same expressions to fit the shock pressure with distance for both models. At the core-mantle boundary, CMB, the peak shock pressure jumps as the shock wave enters the core. We derived the boundary condition at CMB for the peak shock pressure. It is less sensitive to the impact velocity or the impactor size, but strongly depends on the rheology of the planet's mantle. Because of the lower shock wave velocity in the core compared to that in the mantle, the refracted shockwave propagates toward the symmetry axis of the planet, and the shock

  1. Laser-driven shock-wave propagation in pure and layered targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salzmann, D.; Eliezer, S.; Krumbein, A.D.; Gitter, L.

    1983-01-01

    The propagation properties of laser-driven shock waves in pure and layered polyethylene and aluminum slab targets are studied for a set of laser intensities and pulse widths. The laser-plasma simulations were carried out by means of our one-dimensional Lagrangian hydrodynamic code. It is shown that the various parts of a laser-driven compression wave undergo different thermodynamic trajectories: The shock front portion is on the Hugoniot curve whereas the rear part is closer to an adiabat. It is found that the shock front is accelerated into the cold material till troughly-equal0.8tau (where tau is the laser pulse width) and only later is a constant velocity propagation attained. The scaling laws obtained for the pressure and temperature of the compression wave in pure targets are in good agreement with those published in other works. In layered targets, high compression and pressure were found to occur at the interface of CH 2 on Al targets due to impedance mismatch but were not found when the layers were reversed. The persistence time of the high pressure on the interface in the CH 2 on Al case is long enough relative to the characteristic times of the plasma to have an appreciable influence on the shock-wave propagation into the aluminum layer. This high pressure and compression on the interface can be optimized by adjusting the CH 2 layer thickness

  2. Evolution of wave patterns and temperature field in shock-tube flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiverin, A. D.; Yakovenko, I. S.

    2018-05-01

    The paper is devoted to the numerical analysis of wave patterns behind a shock wave propagating in a tube filled with a gaseous mixture. It is shown that the flow inside the boundary layer behind the shock wave is unstable, and the way the instability develops fully corresponds to the solution obtained for the boundary layer over a flat plate. Vortical perturbations inside the boundary layer determine the nonuniformity of the temperature field. In turn, exactly these nonuniformities define the way the ignition kernels arise in the combustible mixture after the reflected shock interaction with the boundary layer. In particular, the temperature nonuniformity determines the spatial limitations of probable ignition kernel position relative to the end wall and side walls of the tube. In the case of low-intensity incident shocks the ignition could start not farther than the point of first interaction between the reflected shock wave and roller vortices formed in the process of boundary layer development. Proposed physical mechanisms are formulated in general terms and can be used for interpretation of the experimental data in any systems with a delayed exothermal reaction start. It is also shown that contact surface thickening occurs due to its interaction with Tollmien-Schlichting waves. This conclusion is of importance for understanding the features of ignition in shock tubes operating in the over-tailored regime.

  3. Subgrid-scale turbulence in shock-boundary layer flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jammalamadaka, Avinash; Jaberi, Farhad

    2015-04-01

    Data generated by direct numerical simulation (DNS) for a Mach 2.75 zero-pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer interacting with shocks of different intensities are used for a priori analysis of subgrid-scale (SGS) turbulence and various terms in the compressible filtered Navier-Stokes equations. The numerical method used for DNS is based on a hybrid scheme that uses a non-dissipative central scheme in the shock-free turbulent regions and a robust monotonicity-preserving scheme in the shock regions. The behavior of SGS stresses and their components, namely Leonard, Cross and Reynolds components, is examined in various regions of the flow for different shock intensities and filter widths. The backscatter in various regions of the flow is found to be significant only instantaneously, while the ensemble-averaged statistics indicate no significant backscatter. The budgets for the SGS kinetic energy equation are examined for a better understanding of shock-tubulence interactions at the subgrid level and also with the aim of providing useful information for one-equation LES models. A term-by-term analysis of SGS terms in the filtered total energy equation indicate that while each term in this equation is significant by itself, the net contribution by all of them is relatively small. This observation is consistent with our a posteriori analysis.

  4. Temperature maxima in stable two-dimensional shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kum, O.; Hoover, W.G.; Hoover, C.G.

    1997-01-01

    We use molecular dynamics to study the structure of moderately strong shock waves in dense two-dimensional fluids, using Lucy pair potential. The stationary profiles show relatively broad temperature maxima, for both the longitudinal and the average kinetic temperatures, just as does Mott-Smith model for strong shock waves in dilute three-dimensional gases. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  5. Simulation of hypersonic shock wave - laminar boundary layer interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kianvashrad, N.; Knight, D.

    2017-06-01

    The capability of the Navier-Stokes equations with a perfect gas model for simulation of hypersonic shock wave - laminar boundary layer interactions is assessed. The configuration is a hollow cylinder flare. The experimental data were obtained by Calspan-University of Buffalo (CUBRC) for total enthalpies ranging from 5.07 to 21.85 MJ/kg. Comparison of the computed and experimental surface pressure and heat transfer is performed and the computed §ow¦eld structure is analyzed.

  6. Effects of shock on hypersonic boundary layer stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinna, F.; Rambaud, P.

    2013-06-01

    The design of hypersonic vehicles requires the estimate of the laminar to turbulent transition location for an accurate sizing of the thermal protection system. Linear stability theory is a fast scientific way to study the problem. Recent improvements in computational capabilities allow computing the flow around a full vehicle instead of using only simplified boundary layer equations. In this paper, the effect of the shock is studied on a mean flow provided by steady Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) computations and simplified boundary layer calculations.

  7. Titan atmospheric composition by hypervelocity shock layer analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, H.F.; Park, C.; Whiting, E.E.

    1989-01-01

    The Cassini Mission, a NASA/ESA cooperative project which includes a deployment of probe into the atmosphere of Titan, is described, with particular attention given to the shock radiometer experiment planned for the Titan probe for the analysis of Titan's atmosphere. Results from a shock layer analysis are presented, demonstrating that the mole fractions of the major species (N2, CH4, and, possibly Ar) in the Titan atmosphere can be successfully determined by the Titan-probe radiometer, by measuring the intensity of the CN(violet) radiation emitted in the shock layer during the high velocity portion of the probe entry between 200 and 400 km altitude. It is shown that the sensitivity of the CN(violet) radiation makes it possible to determine the mole fractions of N2, CH4, and Ar to about 0.015, 0.003, and 0.01, respectively, i.e., much better than the present uncertainties in the composition of Titan atmosphere. 29 refs

  8. DSMC Computations for Regions of Shock/Shock and Shock/Boundary Layer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, James N.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a numerical study of hypersonic interacting flows at flow conditions that include those for which experiments have been conducted in the Calspan-University of Buffalo Research Center (CUBRC) Large Energy National Shock (LENS) tunnel and the ONERA R5Ch low-density wind tunnel. The computations are made with the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method of Bird. The focus is on Mach 9.3 to 11.4 flows about flared axisymmetric configurations, both hollow cylinder flares and double cones. The results presented highlight the sensitivity of the calculations to grid resolution, provide results concerning the conditions for incipient separation, and provide information concerning the flow structure and surface results for the extent of separation, heating, pressure, and skin friction.

  9. Temperature manipulation during layer chick embryogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walstra, I.; Napel, ten J.; Kemp, B.; Brand, van den H.

    2010-01-01

    The current study investigated the effects of temperature manipulation (TM) during late embryogenesis on temperature preference, response to high environmental temperature, behavior, and performance in young layer chicks. Control (CC) embryos (n = 96) were incubated at 37.8°C eggshell temperature

  10. High temperature mechanical properties and surface fatigue behavior improving of steel alloy via laser shock peening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, N.F.; Yang, H.M.; Yuan, S.Q.; Wang, Y.; Tang, S.X.; Zheng, L.M.; Ren, X.D.; Dai, F.Z.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The properties of 00C r 12 were improved by laser shock processing. • A deep layer of residual compressive stresses was introduced. • Fatigue life was enhanced about 58% at elevated temperature up to 600 °C. • The pinning effect is the reason of prolonging fatigue life at high temperature. - Abstract: Laser shock peening was carried out to reveal the effects on ASTM: 410L 00C r 12 microstructures and fatigue resistance in the temperature range 25–600 °C. The new conception of pinning effect was proposed to explain the improvements at the high temperature. Residual stress was measured by X-ray diffraction with sin 2 ψ method, a high temperature extensometer was utilized to measure the strain and control the strain signal. The grain and precipitated phase evolutionary process were observed by scanning electron microscopy. These results show that a deep layer of compressive residual stress is developed by laser shock peening, and ultimately the isothermal stress-controlled fatigue behavior is enhanced significantly. The formation of high density dislocation structure and the pinning effect at the high temperature, which induces a stronger surface, lower residual stress relaxation and more stable dislocation arrangement. The results have profound guiding significance for fatigue strengthening mechanism of components at the elevated temperature

  11. Multi-layer protective armour for underwater shock wave mitigation

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed Hawass; Hosam Mostafa; Ahmed Elbeih

    2015-01-01

    The effect of underwater shock wave on different target plates has been studied. An underwater shock wave generator (shock tube) was used to study the interactions between water and different constructed targets which act as shock wave mitigation. Target plates, composed of sandwich of two aluminum sheets with rubber and foam in between, were prepared and studied. For comparison, the target plates composed of triple aluminum sheets were tested. The study includes the testing of the selected p...

  12. Parametric study of non-relativistic electrostatic shocks and the structure of their transition layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dieckmann, M. E. [Institute of Physics and Astronomy, University of Potsdam, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany); Department of Science and Technology, Linkoeping University, SE-60174 Norrkoeping (Sweden); Ahmed, H.; Sarri, G.; Doria, D.; Kourakis, I.; Borghesi, M. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University of Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Romagnani, L. [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Pohl, M. [Institute of Physics and Astronomy, University of Potsdam, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany); DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    Nonrelativistic electrostatic unmagnetized shocks are frequently observed in laboratory plasmas and they are likely to exist in astrophysical plasmas. Their maximum speed, expressed in units of the ion acoustic speed far upstream of the shock, depends only on the electron-to-ion temperature ratio if binary collisions are absent. The formation and evolution of such shocks is examined here for a wide range of shock speeds with particle-in-cell simulations. The initial temperatures of the electrons and the 400 times heavier ions are equal. Shocks form on electron time scales at Mach numbers between 1.7 and 2.2. Shocks with Mach numbers up to 2.5 form after tens of inverse ion plasma frequencies. The density of the shock-reflected ion beam increases and the number of ions crossing the shock thus decreases with an increasing Mach number, causing a slower expansion of the downstream region in its rest frame. The interval occupied by this ion beam is on a positive potential relative to the far upstream. This potential pre-heats the electrons ahead of the shock even in the absence of beam instabilities and decouples the electron temperature in the foreshock ahead of the shock from the one in the far upstream plasma. The effective Mach number of the shock is reduced by this electron heating. This effect can potentially stabilize nonrelativistic electrostatic shocks moving as fast as supernova remnant shocks.

  13. Parametric study of non-relativistic electrostatic shocks and the structure of their transition layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dieckmann, M. E.; Ahmed, H.; Sarri, G.; Doria, D.; Kourakis, I.; Borghesi, M.; Romagnani, L.; Pohl, M.

    2013-01-01

    Nonrelativistic electrostatic unmagnetized shocks are frequently observed in laboratory plasmas and they are likely to exist in astrophysical plasmas. Their maximum speed, expressed in units of the ion acoustic speed far upstream of the shock, depends only on the electron-to-ion temperature ratio if binary collisions are absent. The formation and evolution of such shocks is examined here for a wide range of shock speeds with particle-in-cell simulations. The initial temperatures of the electrons and the 400 times heavier ions are equal. Shocks form on electron time scales at Mach numbers between 1.7 and 2.2. Shocks with Mach numbers up to 2.5 form after tens of inverse ion plasma frequencies. The density of the shock-reflected ion beam increases and the number of ions crossing the shock thus decreases with an increasing Mach number, causing a slower expansion of the downstream region in its rest frame. The interval occupied by this ion beam is on a positive potential relative to the far upstream. This potential pre-heats the electrons ahead of the shock even in the absence of beam instabilities and decouples the electron temperature in the foreshock ahead of the shock from the one in the far upstream plasma. The effective Mach number of the shock is reduced by this electron heating. This effect can potentially stabilize nonrelativistic electrostatic shocks moving as fast as supernova remnant shocks.

  14. Transonic Shock-Wave/Boundary-Layer Interactions on an Oscillating Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Sanford S.; Malcolm, Gerald N.

    1980-01-01

    Unsteady aerodynamic loads were measured on an oscillating NACA 64A010 airfoil In the NASA Ames 11 by 11 ft Transonic Wind Tunnel. Data are presented to show the effect of the unsteady shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction on the fundamental frequency lift, moment, and pressure distributions. The data show that weak shock waves induce an unsteady pressure distribution that can be predicted quite well, while stronger shock waves cause complex frequency-dependent distributions due to flow separation. An experimental test of the principles of linearity and superposition showed that they hold for weak shock waves while flows with stronger shock waves cannot be superimposed.

  15. Prediction of shock-layer ultraviolet radiation for hypersonic vehicles in near space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niu Qinglin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A systemic and validated model was developed to predict ultraviolet spectra features from the shock layer of near-space hypersonic vehicles in the “solar blind” band region. Computational procedures were performed with 7-species thermal non-equilibrium fluid mechanics, finite rate chemistry, and radiation calculations. The thermal non-equilibrium flow field was calculated with a two-temperature model by the finite volume technique and verified against the bow-shock ultra-violet (BSUV flight experiments. The absorption coefficient of the mixture gases was evaluated with a line-by-line method and validated through laboratory shock tube measurements. Using the line of sight (LOS method, radiation was calculated from three BSUV flights at altitudes of 38, 53.5 and 71 km. The investigation focused on the level and structure of ultraviolet spectra radiated from a NO band system in wavelengths of 200–400 nm. Results predicted by the current model show qualitative spatial agreement with the measured data. At a velocity of 3.5 km/s (about Mach 11, the peak absolute intensity at an altitude of 38 km is two orders of magnitude higher than that at 53.5 km. Under the same flight conditions, the spectra structures have quite a similar distribution at different viewing angles. The present computational model performs well in the prediction of the ultraviolet spectra emitted from the shock layer and will contribute to the investigation and analysis of radiative features of hypersonic vehicles in near space.

  16. Shock tube/time-of-flight mass spectrometer for high temperature kinetic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tranter, Robert S.; Giri, Binod R.; Kiefer, John H.

    2007-01-01

    A shock tube (ST) with online, time-of-flight mass spectrometric (TOF-MS) detection has been constructed for the study of elementary reactions at high temperature. The ST and TOF-MS are coupled by a differentially pumped molecular beam sampling interface, which ensures that the samples entering the TOF-MS are not contaminated by gases drawn from the cold end wall thermal boundary layer in the ST. Additionally, the interface allows a large range of postshock pressures to be used in the shock tube while maintaining high vacuum in the TOF-MS. The apparatus and the details of the sampling system are described along with an analysis in which cooling of the sampled gases and minimization of thermal boundary layer effects are discussed. The accuracy of kinetic measurements made with the apparatus has been tested by investigating the thermal unimolecular dissociation of cyclohexene to ethylene and 1,3-butadiene, a well characterized reaction for which considerable literature data that are in good agreement exist. The experiments were performed at nominal reflected shock wave pressures of 600 and 1300 Torr, and temperatures ranging from 1260 to 1430 K. The rate coefficients obtained are compared with the earlier shock tube studies and are found to be in very good agreement. As expected no significant difference is observed in the rate constant between pressures of 600 and 1300 Torr

  17. Shock-induced synthesis of high temperature superconducting materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginley, D.S.; Graham, R.A.; Morosin, B.; Venturini, E.L.

    1987-06-18

    It has now been determined that the unique features of the high pressure shock method, especially the shock-induced chemical synthesis technique, are fully applicable to high temperature superconducting materials. Extraordinarily high yields are achievable in accordance with this invention, e.g., generally in the range from about 20% to about 99%, often in the range from about 50% to about 90%, lower and higher yields, of course, also being possible. The method of this invention involves the application of a controlled high pressure shock compression pulse which can be produced in any conventional manner, e.g., by detonation of a high explosive material, the impact of a high speed projectile or the effect of intense pulsed radiation sources such as lasers or electron beams. Examples and a discussion are presented.

  18. Ideal shocks in 2-layer flow Part I: Under a rigid lid

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Qingfang; Smith, Ronald B.

    2011-01-01

    Previous work on the classical problem of shocks in a 2-layer density-stratified fluid used eithera parameterized momentum exchange or an assumed Bernoulli loss. We propose a new theorybased on a set of viscous model equations. We define an idealized shock in two-layer densitystratified flow under a rigid lid as a jump or drop of the interface in which (1) the force balanceremains nearly hydrostatic in the shock, (2) there is no exchange of momentum between thetwo layers except by pressure fo...

  19. Composition of the earth's atmosphere by shock-layer radiometry during the PAET entry probe experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiting, E. E.; Arnold, J. O.; Page, W. A.; Reynolds, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    A determination of the composition of the earth's atmosphere obtained from onboard radiometer measurements of the spectra emitted from the bow shock layer of a high-speed entry probe is reported. The N2, O2, CO2, and noble gas concentrations in the earth's atmosphere were determined to good accuracy by this technique. The results demonstrate unequivocally the feasibility of determining the composition of an unknown planetary atmosphere by means of a multichannel radiometer viewing optical emission from the heated atmospheric gases in the region between the bow shock wave and the vehicle surface. The spectral locations in this experiment were preselected to enable the observation of CN violet, N2(+) first negative and atomic oxygen emission at 3870, 3910, and 7775 A, respectively. The atmospheric gases were heated and compressed by the shock wave to a peak temperature of about 6100 K and a corresponding pressure of 0.4 atm. Complete descriptions of the data analysis technique and the onboard radiometer and its calibration are given.

  20. Transonic shock wave. Turbulent boundary layer interaction on a curved surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nebbeling, C.; Koren, B.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation of a transonic shock wave - turbulent boundary layer interaction in a curved test section, in which the flow has been computed by a 2-D Euler flow method. The test section has been designed such that the flow near the shock wave on the convex curved

  1. Shock initiation of explosives: Temperature spikes and growth spurts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Will P.; Dlott, Dana D.

    2016-08-01

    When energetic materials are subjected to high-velocity impacts, the first steps in the shock-to-detonation transition are the creation, ignition, and growth of hot spots. We used 1-3.2 km s-1 laser-launched flyer plates to impact powdered octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine, a powerful explosive, and monitored hundreds of emission bursts with an apparatus that determined temperature and emissivity at all times. The time-dependent volume fraction of hot spots was determined by measuring the time-dependent emissivity. After the shock, most hot spots extinguished, but the survivors smoldered for hundreds of nanoseconds until their temperatures spiked, causing a hot spot growth spurt. Depending on the impact duration, the growth spurts could be as fast as 300 ns and as slow as 13 μs.

  2. Factors influencing flow steadiness in laminar boundary layer shock interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumuklu, Ozgur; Levin, Deborah A.; Gimelshein, Sergey F.; Austin, Joanna M.

    2016-11-01

    The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method has been used to model laminar shock wave boundary interactions of hypersonic flow over a 30/55-deg double-wedge and "tick-shaped" model configurations studied in the Hypervelocity Expansion Tube facility and T-ADFA free-piston shock tunnel, respectively. The impact of thermochemical effects on these interactions by changing the chemical composition from nitrogen to air as well as argon for a stagnation enthalpy of 8.0 MJ/kg flow are investigated using the 2-D wedge model. The simulations are found to reproduce many of the classic features related to Edney Type V strong shock interactions that include the attached, oblique shock formed over the first wedge, the detached bow shock from the second wedge, the separation zone, and the separation and reattachment shocks that cause complex features such as the triple point for both cases. However, results of a reacting air flow case indicate that the size of the separation length, and the movement of the triple point toward to the leading edge is much less than the nitrogen case.

  3. Interaction of a conical shock wave with a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, S. L.; Gai, S. L.

    The paper reports an investigation on the interaction of an incident conical shock wave with a turbulent boundary layer. Although a conical shock theoretically creates a hyperbolic shock trace on the flat plate, the line joining all the experimental interaction origins takes a different form due to varying upstream influence. The existence of strong pressure gradients in the spanwise direction after the shock leads to the boundary-layer twist. A model based on the upstream influence of the shock when combined with McCabe's secondary-flow theory showed separation to occur at an external flow deflection of 11.8 deg. The oil flow measurements however show this to occur at 9.2 deg. This discrepancy is of the same order as that found by McCabe. Detailed data involving Schlieren and shadowgraph photography, surface-flow visualization, and surface-pressure measurements are presented.

  4. Viscous-shock-layer solutions with coupled radiation and ablation injection for earth entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Roop N.; Lee, Kam-Pui; Moos, James N.; Sutton, Kenneth

    1990-01-01

    Results are obtained for the forebody of a planetary exploration vehicle entering the earth's atmosphere. A viscous-shock-layer analysis is used assuming the flow to be laminar and in chemical equilibrium. Presented results include coupled radiation and ablation injection. This study further includes the effect of different transport and thermodynamic properties and radiation models. A Lewis number of 1.4 appears adequate for the radiation-dominated flows. Five velocities corresponding to different possible trajectory points at an altitude of 70 km have been further analyzed in detail. Sublimation and radiative equilibrium wall temperatures are employed for cases with and without coupled injection, respectively. For the cases analyzed here, the mass injection rates are small. However, the rates could become large if a lower altitude is used for aerobraking and/or the body size is increased. A comparison of the equilibrium results with finite-rate chemistry calculation shows the flowfield to be in chemical equilibrium.

  5. Spectral fitting, shock layer modeling, and production of nitrogen oxides and excited nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, H. E.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis was made of N2 emission from 8.72 MJ/kg shock layer at 2.54, 1.91, and 1.27 cm positions and vibrational state distributions, temperatures, and relative electronic state populations was obtained from data sets. Other recorded arc jet N2 and air spectral data were reviewed and NO emission characteristics were studied. A review of operational procedures of the DSMC code was made. Information on other appropriate codes and modifications, including ionization, were made as well as a determination of the applicability of codes reviewed to task requirement. A review was also made of computational procedures used in CFD codes of Li and other codes on JSC computers. An analysis was made of problems associated with integration of specific chemical kinetics applicable to task into CFD codes.

  6. Shock temperature dependent rate law for plastic bonded explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Tariq D.

    2018-04-01

    A reactive flow model for the tri-amino-tri-nitro-benzene (TATB) based plastic bonded explosive PBX 9502 (95% TATB, 5% polymeric binder Kel-F 800) is presented. This newly devised model is based primarily on the shock temperature of the material, along with local pressure, and accurately models a broader range of detonation and initiation scenarios. Specifically, sensitivity changes to the initial explosive temperature are accounted for naturally and with a single set of parameters. The equation of state forms for the reactants and products, as well as the thermodynamic closure of pressure and temperature equilibration, are carried over from the Wescott-Stewart-Davis (WSD) model [Wescott et al., J. Appl. Phys. 98, 053514 (2005) and "Modeling detonation diffraction and dead zones in PBX-9502," in Proceedings of the Thirteenth International Detonation Symposium (2006)]. This newly devised model, with Arrhenius state dependence on the shock temperature, based on the WSD equation of states, is denoted by AWSD. Modifying an existing implementation of the WSD model to the AWSD model in a hydrocode is a rather straightforward procedure.

  7. Ion temperature gradient mode driven solitons and shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakir, U.; Adnan, Muhammad; Haque, Q.; Qamar, Anisa; Mirza, Arshad M.

    2016-04-01

    Ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven solitons and shocks are studied in a plasma having gradients in the equilibrium number density and equilibrium ion temperature. In the linear regime, it is found that the ion temperature and the ratio of the gradient scale lengths, ηi=Ln/LT , affect both the real frequency and the growth rate of the ITG driven wave instability. In the nonlinear regime, for the first time we derive a Korteweg de Vries-type equation for the ITG mode, which admits solitary wave solution. It is found that the ITG mode supports only compressive solitons. Further, it is noticed that the soliton amplitude and width are sensitive to the parameter ηi=Ln/LT . Second, in the presence of dissipation in the system, we obtain a Burger type equation, which admits the shock wave solution. This work may be useful to understand the low frequency electrostatic modes in inhomogeneous electron-ion plasma having density and ion temperature gradients. For illustration, the model has been applied to tokamak plasma.

  8. Effects of micro-ramps on a shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blinde, P.L.; Humble, R.A.; Van Oudheusden, B.W.; Scarano, F.

    2009-01-01

    Stereoscopic particle image velocimetry is used to investigate the effects of micro-ramp sub-boundary layer vortex generators, on an incident shock wave/boundary layer interaction at Mach 1.84. Single- and double-row arrangements of micro-ramps are considered. The micro-ramps have a height of 20% of

  9. Notes on the Prediction of Shock-induced Boundary-layer Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Roy H.

    1953-01-01

    The present status of available information relative to the prediction of shock-induced boundary-layer separation is discussed. Experimental results showing the effects of Reynolds number and Mach number on the separation of both laminar and turbulent boundary layer are given and compared with available methods for predicting separation. The flow phenomena associated with separation caused by forward-facing steps, wedges, and incident shock waves are discussed. Applications of the flat-plate data to problems of separation on spoilers, diffusers, and scoop inlets are indicated for turbulent boundary layers.

  10. Temperature manipulation during layer chick embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walstra, I; Ten Napel, J; Kemp, B; van den Brand, H

    2010-07-01

    The current study investigated the effects of temperature manipulation (TM) during late embryogenesis on temperature preference, response to high environmental temperature, behavior, and performance in young layer chicks. Control (CC) embryos (n = 96) were incubated at 37.8 degrees C eggshell temperature throughout incubation. Thermally manipulated embryos (n = 96) were incubated at 37.8 degrees C eggshell temperature throughout incubation and were exposed to 40 degrees C for 4 h/d from embryonic d 14 to 18 (TM chicks). After hatch, chicks from each treatment were divided into 3 subgroups (n = 32 per group) and were subjected to a temperature preference test at d 1, 7, or 33. One day after the temperature preference test, each subgroup was exposed to 1 thermal challenge for 4 h (d 2, 40 degrees C; d 8, 40 degrees C; or d 34, 35 degrees C). Effects of TM on (fearfulness) behavior of chicks were investigated in a tonic immobility test and during home pen observations. Temperature manipulation decreased incubation time with 7 h (P preferred a lower ambient temperature in the temperature preference test (P preference and response to high environmental temperatures are only found until d 8 of age. This may suggest 1 of 3 options: a) the timing or the level, or both, of TM and duration were not at the sensitive period of embryogenesis or not sufficient, or both, respectively; b) the level of the postnatal thermal challenge was not strong enough to induce a hyperthermic response; and c) the postnatal effects of TM in layers are limited in time.

  11. Behavior of porous tungsten under shock compression at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dandekar, D.P.; Lamothe, R.M.

    1977-01-01

    This work reports the results of room-temperature shock-compression experiments on porous tungsten. The porous tungsten was fabricated by sintering 1-μm tungsten particles. The initial density of the material was 15290 kg/m 3 . Around 97% of the pores in the material were interconnected. The main features of the results are as follows: (1) porous tungsten behaves as a linear elastic material to 1.43 GPa; (2) the shock wave following the elastic precursor is unstable in the material in the stress range 1.43--2.7 GPa; (3) a stable two-wave structure is established at and above 6.4 GPa; (4) the response of porous tungsten is accurately described by the Mie-Grueneisen equation of state at stresses above 4.9 GPa, the stress at which the voids suffer a complete extinction in the material; (5) the deformations induced in the material due to shock compression are irreversible; (6) the recentered Hugoniot of porous tungsten becomes stiffer with the increasing magnitude of initial compressive stress

  12. Variable capacity utilization, ambient temperature shocks and generation asset valuation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tseng, Chung-Li; Dmitriev, Alexandre [Australian School of Business, University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW 2052 (Australia); Zhu, Wei [Optim Energy, 225 E. John Carpenter Freeway, Irving, TX 75062 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    This paper discusses generation asset valuation in a framework where capital utilization decisions are endogenous. We use real options approach for valuation of natural gas fueled turbines. Capital utilization choices that we explore include turning on/off the unit, operating the unit at increased firing temperatures (overfiring), and conducting preventive maintenance. Overfiring provides capacity enhancement which comes at the expense of reduced maintenance interval and increased costs of part replacement. We consider the costs and benefits of overfiring in attempt to maximize the asset value by optimally exercising the overfire option. In addition to stochastic processes governing prices, we incorporate an exogenous productivity shock: ambient temperature. We consider how variation in ambient temperature affects the asset value through its effect on gas turbine's productivity. (author)

  13. Temperature-dependent shock initiation of LX-17 explosive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, R.S.; Chau, H.H.; Druce, R.L.; Moua, K.

    1995-02-01

    LX-17 samples, heated to temperatures up to 250 C, were impacted by 3 to 10-mm-wide, 50.8-mm-long strips of 0.13-mm-thick Kapton polyimide film at velocities up to 7.7 km/s. The Kapton strips were laminated onto a thin aluminum bridge foil and were launched to the desired velocity by discharging a capacitor bank through the foil, causing the foil to explode. The LX-17 samples were confined in a steel holder and heated in an oven to the desired temperature. After the capacitor bank was charged, the LX-17 sample in its steel holder was remotely drawn out of the oven on rails and positioned over the bridge-foil/Kapton-strip laminate. When the sample was in position, the bank was discharged, launching the Kapton strip against the LX-17 surface. The shock initiation threshold was measured for 3, 7, and 10-mm-wide strips at room temperature, 200 C and 250 C. The authors found a significant reduction in the velocity threshold and in the critical area for initiation when the samples were heated. The authors compare the results with the earlier data of Bloom, who measured the initiation threshold of LX-17 over the density range 1.8--1.91 g/cm{sup 3} at room temperature and {minus}54 C. LX-17 has a large coefficient of thermal expansion, as reported by Urtiew, et al., which reduces its density significantly t elevated temperatures. They find that the change of shock initiation threshold with temperature is consistent with the change in sample density, using the relation between threshold and density reported by Bloom.

  14. Assessment of CFD Capability for Hypersonic Shock Wave Laminar Boundary Layer Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Mehrnaz Rouhi Youssefi; Doyle Knight

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this study is to assess CFD capability for the prediction of shock wave laminar boundary layer interactions at hypersonic velocities. More specifically, the flow field over a double-cone configuration is simulated using both perfect gas and non-equilibrium Navier–Stokes models. Computations are compared with recent experimental data obtained from measurements conducted in the LENS XX (Large Energy National Shock Expansion Tunnel Version 2) at the Calspan University of Buffalo Rese...

  15. Thermal shock behavior of toughened gadolinium zirconate/YSZ double-ceramic-layered thermal barrier coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Xinghua; Zhao, Huayu; Zhou, Xiaming; Liu, Chenguang; Wang, Liang; Shao, Fang; Yang, Kai; Tao, Shunyan; Ding, Chuanxian

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Gd 2 Zr 2 O 7 /YSZ DCL thermal barrier coating was designed and fabricated. • The Gd 2 Zr 2 O 7 top ceramic layer was toughened by addition of nanostructured 3YSZ. • Remarkable improvement in thermal shock resistance of the DCL coating was achieved. - Abstract: Double-ceramic-layered (DCL) thermal barrier coating system comprising of toughened Gadolinium zirconate (Gd 2 Zr 2 O 7 , GZ) as the top ceramic layer and 4.5 mol% Y 2 O 3 partially-stabilized ZrO 2 (4.5YSZ) as the bottom ceramic layer was fabricated by plasma spraying and thermal shock behavior of the DCL coating was investigated. The GZ top ceramic layer was toughened by addition of nanostructured 3 mol% Y 2 O 3 partially-stabilized ZrO 2 (3YSZ) to improve fracture toughness of the matrix. The thermal shock resistance of the DCL coating was enhanced significantly compared to that of single-ceramic-layered (SCL) GZ-3YSZ composite coating, which is believed to be primarily attributed to the two factors: (i) the increase in fracture toughness of the top ceramic layer by incorporating nanostructured YSZ particles and (ii) the improvement in strain tolerance through the utilization of 4.5YSZ as the bottom ceramic layer. In addition, the failure mechanisms are mainly attributed to the still low fracture toughness of the top ceramic layer and oxidation of the bond-coat

  16. Temperature and density profiles of an MHD switch-on shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson-Munro, C.N.; Bighel, L.; Collins, A.R.; Cramer, N.F.; Cross, R.C.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental study of the structure of MHD switch-on shock waves propagating into partially ionized hydrogen and helium plasmas is described. The variation of electron and ion temperatures through the shock front was studied as a function of the level of pre-ionization. When the shock propagates into an almost fully ionized plasma, the electron temperature rises well above the ion temperature owing to resistive heating of the electrons. At low pre-ionization levels, however, the ion temperature rises above the electron temperature. These results indicate that ion-neutral collisions can play a dominant role in the dissipation of energy in a shock wave. (author)

  17. Time-resolved stereo PIV measurements of shock-boundary layer interaction on a supercritical airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, Axel; Klaas, Michael; Schroeder, Wolfgang [RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Aerodynamics, Aachen (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    Time-resolved stereo particle-image velocimetry (TR-SPIV) and unsteady pressure measurements are used to analyze the unsteady flow over a supercritical DRA-2303 airfoil in transonic flow. The dynamic shock wave-boundary layer interaction is one of the most essential features of this unsteady flow causing a distinct oscillation of the flow field. Results from wind-tunnel experiments with a variation of the freestream Mach number at Reynolds numbers ranging from 2.55 to 2.79 x 10{sup 6} are analyzed regarding the origin and nature of the unsteady shock-boundary layer interaction. Therefore, the TR-SPIV results are analyzed for three buffet flows. One flow exhibits a sinusoidal streamwise oscillation of the shock wave only due to an acoustic feedback loop formed by the shock wave and the trailing-edge noise. The other two buffet flows have been intentionally influenced by an artificial acoustic source installed downstream of the test section to investigate the behavior of the interaction to upstream-propagating disturbances generated by a defined source of noise. The results show that such upstream-propagating disturbances could be identified to be responsible for the upstream displacement of the shock wave and that the feedback loop is formed by a pulsating separation of the boundary layer dependent on the shock position and the sound pressure level at the shock position. Thereby, the pulsation of the separation could be determined to be a reaction to the shock motion and not vice versa. (orig.)

  18. Control Volume Analysis of Boundary Layer Ingesting Propulsion Systems With or Without Shock Wave Ahead of the Inlet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Dae; Felder, James L.

    2011-01-01

    The performance benefit of boundary layer or wake ingestion on marine and air vehicles has been well documented and explored. In this article, a quasi-one-dimensional boundary layer ingestion (BLI) benefit analysis for subsonic and transonic propulsion systems is performed using a control volume of a ducted propulsion system that ingests the boundary layer developed by the external airframe surface. To illustrate the BLI benefit, a relationship between the amount of BLI and the net thrust is established and analyzed for two propulsor types. One propulsor is an electric fan, and the other is a pure turbojet. These engines can be modeled as a turbofan with an infinite bypass ratio for the electric fan, and with a zero bypass ratio for the pure turbojet. The analysis considers two flow processes: a boundary layer being ingested by an aircraft inlet and a shock wave sitting in front of the inlet. Though the two processes are completely unrelated, both represent a loss of total pressure and velocity. In real applications, it is possible to have both processes occurring in front of the inlet of a transonic vehicle. Preliminary analysis indicates that the electrically driven propulsion system benefits most from the boundary layer ingestion and the presence of transonic shock waves, whereas the benefit for the turbojet engine is near zero or negative depending on the amount of total temperature rise across the engine.

  19. Drop Hammer Tests with Three Oleo Strut Models and Three Different Shock Strut Oils at Low Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranz, M

    1954-01-01

    Drop hammer tests with different shock strut models and shock strut oils were performed at temperatures ranging to -40 C. The various shock strut models do not differ essentially regarding their springing and damping properties at low temperatures; however, the influence of the different shock strut oils on the springing properties at low temperatures varies greatly.

  20. Shock timing measurements and analysis in deuterium-tritium-ice layered capsule implosions on NIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Sater, J.; Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Ross, J. S.; LePape, S.; Ralph, J. E.; Dewald, E. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Kroll, J. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Hohenberger, M.; Boehly, T. R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92196 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Recent advances in shock timing experiments and analysis techniques now enable shock measurements to be performed in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion implosions [Boehly et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195005 (2011); Robey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215004 (2012)] were performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. These previous experiments pose two surrogacy issues: a material surrogacy due to the difference of species (D2 vs. DT) and densities of the materials used and a geometric surrogacy due to presence of an additional interface (ice/gas) previously absent in the liquid-filled targets. This report presents experimental data and a new analysis method for validating the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique. Comparison of the data with simulation shows good agreement for the timing of the first three shocks, but reveals a considerable discrepancy in the timing of the 4th shock in DT ice layered implosions. Electron preheat is examined as a potential cause of the observed discrepancy in the 4th shock timing.

  1. Shock timing measurements and analysis in deuterium-tritium-ice layered capsule implosions on NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Sater, J.; Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Ross, J. S.; LePape, S.; Ralph, J. E.; Hohenberger, M.; Dewald, E. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Kroll, J. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Boehly, T. R.; Nikroo, A.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J.

    2014-02-01

    Recent advances in shock timing experiments and analysis techniques now enable shock measurements to be performed in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion implosions [Boehly et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195005 (2011); Robey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215004 (2012)] were performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. These previous experiments pose two surrogacy issues: a material surrogacy due to the difference of species (D2 vs. DT) and densities of the materials used and a geometric surrogacy due to presence of an additional interface (ice/gas) previously absent in the liquid-filled targets. This report presents experimental data and a new analysis method for validating the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique. Comparison of the data with simulation shows good agreement for the timing of the first three shocks, but reveals a considerable discrepancy in the timing of the 4th shock in DT ice layered implosions. Electron preheat is examined as a potential cause of the observed discrepancy in the 4th shock timing.

  2. Shock timing measurements and analysis in deuterium-tritium-ice layered capsule implosions on NIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Sater, J.; Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Ross, J. S.; LePape, S.; Ralph, J. E.; Dewald, E. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Kroll, J. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J.; Hohenberger, M.; Boehly, T. R.; Nikroo, A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in shock timing experiments and analysis techniques now enable shock measurements to be performed in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion implosions [Boehly et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195005 (2011); Robey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215004 (2012)] were performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. These previous experiments pose two surrogacy issues: a material surrogacy due to the difference of species (D2 vs. DT) and densities of the materials used and a geometric surrogacy due to presence of an additional interface (ice/gas) previously absent in the liquid-filled targets. This report presents experimental data and a new analysis method for validating the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique. Comparison of the data with simulation shows good agreement for the timing of the first three shocks, but reveals a considerable discrepancy in the timing of the 4th shock in DT ice layered implosions. Electron preheat is examined as a potential cause of the observed discrepancy in the 4th shock timing

  3. Two-temperature hydrodynamics of laser-generated ultrashort shock waves in elasto-plastic solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilnitsky, Denis K; Migdal, Kirill P; Khokhlov, Viktor A; Inogamov, Nail A; Petrov, Yurii V; Anisimov, Sergey I; Zhakhovsky, Vasily V; Khishchenko, Konstantin V

    2014-01-01

    Shock-wave generation by ultrashort laser pulses opens new doors for study of hidden processes in materials happened at an atomic-scale spatiotemporal scales. The poorly explored mechanism of shock generation is started from a short-living two-temperature (2T) state of solid in a thin surface layer where laser energy is deposited. Such 2T state represents a highly non-equilibrium warm dense matter having cold ions and hot electrons with temperatures of 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than the melting point. Here for the first time we present results obtained by our new hybrid hydrodynamics code combining detailed description of 2T states with a model of elasticity together with a wide-range equation of state of solid. New hydro-code has higher accuracy in the 2T stage than molecular dynamics method, because it includes electron related phenomena including thermal conduction, electron-ion collisions and energy transfer, and electron pressure. From the other hand the new code significantly improves our previous version of 2T hydrodynamics model, because now it is capable of reproducing the elastic compression waves, which may have an imprint of supersonic melting like as in MD simulations. With help of the new code we have solved a difficult problem of thermal and dynamic coupling of a molten layer with an uniaxially compressed elastic solid. This approach allows us to describe the recent femtosecond laser experiments.

  4. A numerical investigation on the effects of slot geometry on shock boundary layer interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazazzadeh, M.; Menshadi, M. D.; Karbasizadeh, M. [Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Malek Ashtar University of Technology, Esfahan (Turkmenistan)

    2017-01-15

    Slot is one of the features that control Shock wave-boundary layer interaction (SBLI), which is generally used to prevent strong interference from shockwaves to the boundary layer in supersonic flows. With this feature, the height of the triple point of λ shock significantly increases, and this increase causes a decline in shock power and pressure drop rate. In the current paper, the main focus is on the monitoring of the geometrical effect of slot as an influential parameter on the structure of the shock and flow characteristics by using numerical methods. Therefore, the averaged implicit Navier-Stokes equations and two equation standard k-ω turbulence models for the numerical simulation of the flow field have been used. Results indicate that the numerical results are fairly consistent with the experimental data. Because of the increase in the number of slots (n), and the leading leg of the λ shock is located within the slot, the height of the triple point increases. However, because of the increasing drops due to viscosity, the total pressure changes are negligible. In addition, with an increase in this parameter, changes in the static pressure caused by the leading leg of the shock have increased. By increasing the width of the slots, the height of the triple point has had an upward trend up to s = 8 mm and then had nearly constant values. In this mode, the static pressure changes resulting from the leading leg of the shock are negligible. For increasing the number or the width of slots, the re-expansion waves formed within the slot are removed because of the reduction in the severity of the changes in the boundary layer. To simulate and compare the results with the data obtained from the experimental tests, results from the Cambridge University's wind tunnel tests have been used.

  5. Nitro Stretch Probing of a Single Molecular Layer to Monitor Shock Compression with Picosecond Time-Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Christopher; Lagutchev, Alexei; Fu, Yuanxi; Dlott, Dana

    2011-06-01

    To obtain maximum possible temporal resolution, laser-driven shock compression of a molecular monolayer was studied using vibrational spectroscopy. The stretching transitions of nitro groups bound to aromatic rings was monitored using a nonlinear coherent infrared spectroscopy termed sum-frequency generation, which produced high-quality signals from this very thin layer. To overcome the shock opacity problem, a novel polymer overcoat method allowed us to make the observation window (witness plate) a few micrometers thick. The high signal-to-noise ratios (>100:1) obtained via this spectroscopy allowed us to study detailed behavior of the shocked molecules. To help interpret these vibrational spectra, additional spectra were obtained under conditions of static pressures up to 10 GPa and static temperatures up to 1000 C. Consequently, this experiment represents a significant step in resolving molecular dynamics during shock compression and unloading with both high spatial and temporal resolution. Supported by the Stewardship Sciences Academic Alliance Program from the Carnegie-DOE Alliance Center under grant number DOE CIW 4-3253-13 and the US Air Force Office of Scientific Research under award number FAA9550-09-1-0163.

  6. Surface layer temperature inversion in the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pankajakshan, T.; Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Muraleedharan, P.M.; Reddy, G.V.; Araligidad, N.; Shenoy, Shrikant

    Surface layer temperature inversion occurring in the Bay of Bengal has been addressed. Hydrographic data archived in the Indian Oceanographic Data Center are used to understand various aspects of the temperature inversion of surface layer in the Bay...

  7. Two-temperature hydrodynamic expansion and coupling of strong elastic shock with supersonic melting front produced by ultrashort laser pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inogamov, Nail A; Khokhlov, Viktor A; Zhakhovsky, Vasily V; Khishchenko, Konstantin V; Demaske, Brian J; Oleynik, Ivan I

    2014-01-01

    Ultrafast processes, including nonmonotonic expansion of material into vacuum, supersonic melting and generation of super-elastic shock wave, in a surface layer of metal irradiated by an ultrashort laser pulse are discussed. In addition to the well-established two-temperature (2T) evolution of heated layer a new effect of electron pressure gradient on early stage of material expansion is studied. It is shown that the expanding material experiences an unexpected jump in flow velocity in a place where stress exceeds the effective tensile strength provided by used EoS of material. Another 2T effect is that supersonic propagation of homogeneous melting front results in distortion of spatial profile of ion temperature, which later imprints on ion pressure profile transforming in a super-elastic shock wave with time.

  8. Cracking of a layered medium on an elastic foundation under thermal shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizk, Abd El-Fattah A.; Erdogan, Fazil

    1988-01-01

    The cladded pressure vessel under thermal shock conditions which is simulated by using two simpler models was studied. The first model (Model 1) assumes that, if the crack size is very small compared to the vessel thickness, the problem can be treated as a semi-infinite elastic medium bonded to a very thin layer of different material. However, if the crack size is of the same order as the vessel thickness, the curvature effects may not be negligible. In this case it is assumed that the relatively thin walled hollow cylinder with cladding can be treated as a composite beam on an elastic foundation (Model 2). In both models, the effect of surface cooling rate is studied by assuming the temperature boundary condition to be a ramp function. The calculated results include the transient temperature, thermal stresses in the uncracked medium and stress intensity factors which are presented as a function of time, and the duration of cooling ramp. The stress intensity factors are also presented as a function of the size and the location of the crack. The problem is solved for two bonded materials of different thermal and mechanical properties. The mathematical formulation results in two singular integral equations which are solved numerically. The results are given for two material pairs, namely an austenitic steel layer welded on a ferritic steel substrate, and a ceramic coating on ferritic steel. In the case of the yielded clad, the stress intensity factors for a crack under the clad are determined by using a plastic strip model and are compared with elastic clad results.

  9. Shock-induced spall in copper: the effects of anisotropy, temperature, loading pulse and defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Shengnian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, Timothy C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; An, Qi [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Han, Li - Bo [USTC

    2009-07-28

    Shock-induced spall in Cu is investigated with molecular dynamics simulations. We examine spallation in initially perfect crystals and defective solids with grain boundaries (columnar bicrystals), stacking faults or vacancies, as well as the effect of temperature and loading pulses. Spall in single crystal Cu is anisotropic, and defects and high temperature may reduce the spall strength. Taylor-wave (triangular shock-release wave) loading is explored in comparison with square wave shock loading.

  10. Shock Wave / Boundary Layer Interaction Experiment on Control Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    attachment points to the cold structure of the capsule (see Figure 16, left). Vibrational and acoustical loads are relevant for electronic components. Noise...thermal detector subsystems. Table 1: Summary of infrared technologies considered. Thermal Detectors Quantum Detectors Bolometer Pyrometer InGaAs...holes but a decrease in sensitivity at lower temperature results. Pyrometers are suitable for high temperature measurement, but they respond only to

  11. Passive shock wave/boundary layer control of wing at transonic speeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Zhou

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available At supercritical conditions a porous strip (or slot strip placed beneath a shock wave can reduce the drag by a weaker lambda shock system, and increase the buffet boundary, even may increase the lift. Passive shock wave/boundary layer control (PSBC for drag reduction was conducted by SC(2-0714 supercritical wing, with emphases on parameter of porous/slot and bump, such as porous distribution, hole diameter, cavity depth, porous direction and so on. A sequential quadratic programming (SQP optimization method coupled with adjoint method was adopted to achieve the optimized shape and position of the bumps. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD, force test and oil test with half model all indicate that PSBC with porous, slot and bump generally reduce the drag by weaker lambda shock at supercritical conditions. According to wind tunnel test results for angle of attack of 2° at Mach number M=0.8, the porous configuration with 6.21% porosity results in a drag reduction of 0.0002 and lift–drag ratio increase of 0.2, the small bump configuration results in a drag reduction of 0.0007 and lift–drag ratio increase of 0.3. Bump normally reduce drag at design point with shock wave position being accurately computed. If bump diverges from the position of shock wave, drag will not be easily reduced.

  12. Numerical study of shock-wave/boundary layer interactions in premixed hydrogen-air hypersonic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yungster, Shaye

    1991-01-01

    A computational study of shock wave/boundary layer interactions involving premixed combustible gases, and the resulting combustion processes is presented. The analysis is carried out using a new fully implicit, total variation diminishing (TVD) code developed for solving the fully coupled Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations and species continuity equations in an efficient manner. To accelerate the convergence of the basic iterative procedure, this code is combined with vector extrapolation methods. The chemical nonequilibrium processes are simulated by means of a finite-rate chemistry model for hydrogen-air combustion. Several validation test cases are presented and the results compared with experimental data or with other computational results. The code is then applied to study shock wave/boundary layer interactions in a ram accelerator configuration. Results indicate a new combustion mechanism in which a shock wave induces combustion in the boundary layer, which then propagates outwards and downstream. At higher Mach numbers, spontaneous ignition in part of the boundary layer is observed, which eventually extends along the entire boundary layer at still higher values of the Mach number.

  13. Analysis of the interaction of a weak normal shock wave with a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, R. E.; Grossman, B.

    1974-01-01

    The method of matched asymptotic expansions is used to analyze the interaction of a normal shock wave with an unseparated turbulent boundary layer on a flat surface at transonic speeds. The theory leads to a three-layer description of the interaction in the double limit of Reynolds number approaching infinity and Mach number approaching unity. The interaction involves an outer, inviscid rotational layer, a constant shear-stress wall layer, and a blending region between them. The pressure distribution is obtained from a numerical solution of the outer-layer equations by a mixed-flow relaxation procedure. An analytic solution for the skin friction is determined from the inner-layer equations. The significance of the mathematical model is discussed with reference to existing experimental data.

  14. Color surface-flow visualization of fin-generated shock wave boundary-layer interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, F. K.; Settles, G. S.

    1990-03-01

    Kerosene-lampblack mixtures with addition of a ground colored chalk were used in an experiment on visualizing surface flows of swept shock boundary-layer interactions. The results show that contrasting colors intensify the visualization of different regions of the interaction surface, and help the eye in following the fine streaks to locate the upstream influence. The study confirms observations of the separation occurring at shock strength below accepted values. The superiority of the reported technique over the previous monochrome technique is demonstrated.

  15. Investigation of 3D Shock-Boundary Layer Interaction: A Combined Approach using Experiments, Numerical Simulations and Stability Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-02

    layer , the non-reflecting boundary condition suggested by Poinsot and Lele is adopted.38 On the flat – plate surface, the no-penetration (v = 0) and the no...Introduction Shock-wave boundary layer interactions (SBLIs) occur in most supersonic flight applications and have been the subject of many studies...generator plate is emulated to create an oblique shock that impinges on the boundary layer causing separation. This is similar to the experimental

  16. A computational study on oblique shock wave-turbulent boundary layer interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Md. Saddam Hossain; Rahman, Saeedur; Hasan, A. B. M. Toufique; Ali, M.; Mitsutake, Y.; Matsuo, S.; Setoguchi, T.

    2016-07-01

    A numerical computation of an oblique shock wave incident on a turbulent boundary layer was performed for free stream flow of air at M∞ = 2.0 and Re1 = 10.5×106 m-1. The oblique shock wave was generated from a 8° wedge. Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulation with k-ω SST turbulence model was first utilized for two dimensional (2D) steady case. The results were compared with the experiment at the same flow conditions. Further, to capture the unsteadiness, a 2D Large Eddy Simulation (LES) with sub-grid scale model WMLES was performed which showed the unsteady effects. The frequency of the shock oscillation was computed and was found to be comparable with that of experimental measurement.

  17. Temperature dependence on shock response of stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Zhuowei; Jin Xiaogang

    1998-01-01

    Free surface velocity measurements were reported for HR-2(Cr-Ni-Mn-N) stainless steel, initially heated to 300K∼1000K and shock-compressed to about 8GPa. The corresponding spall strength σ f and Hugoniot elastic limit σ HEL were determined from the wave profiles. It is demonstrated that σ f and σ HEL decrease linearly with increasing temperature T in the range from 300K to 806K, i.e., σ f =5.63-4.32x10 -3 T and σ HEL =2.08-1.54x10 -3 T, and in the range of 806K∼980K, σ HEL increases from 0.84GPa at 806K to 0.93GPa at 980K, σ f has a negligible increase to 2.15GPa from 2.14GPa. Primary TEM test on recovery samples identified the existence of intermatallic compound Ni 3 Ti in the sample of 980K

  18. Large-eddy simulation of passive shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasquariello, Vito; Grilli, Muzio; Hickel, Stefan; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The present study investigates a passive flow-control technique for shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction. • The control configuration consists of local suction and injection through a pressure feedback duct. • Implicit LES have been conducted for three different suction locations. • Suction reduces the size of the separation zone. • Turbulence amplification and reflected shock dynamics can be significantly reduced. - Abstract: We investigate a passive flow-control technique for the interaction of an oblique shock generated by an 8.8° wedge with a turbulent boundary-layer at a free-stream Mach number of Ma ∞ =2.3 and a Reynolds number based on the incoming boundary-layer thickness of Re δ 0 =60.5×10 3 by means of large-eddy simulation (LES). The compressible Navier–Stokes equations in conservative form are solved using the adaptive local deconvolution method (ALDM) for physically consistent subgrid scale modeling. Emphasis is placed on the correct description of turbulent inflow boundary conditions, which do not artificially force low-frequency periodic motion of the reflected shock. The control configuration combines suction inside the separation zone and blowing upstream of the interaction region by a pressure feedback through a duct embedded in the wall. We vary the suction location within the recirculation zone while the injection position is kept constant. Suction reduces the size of the separation zone with strongest effect when applied in the rear part of the separation bubble. The analysis of wall-pressure spectra reveals that all control configurations shift the high-energy low-frequency range to higher frequencies, while the energy level is significantly reduced only if suction acts in the rear part of the separated zone. In that case also turbulence production within the interaction region is significantly reduced as a consequence of mitigated reflected shock dynamics and near-wall flow acceleration

  19. Effect of environmental temperature on shock absorption properties of running shoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dib, Mansour Y; Smith, Jay; Bernhardt, Kathie A; Kaufman, Kenton R; Miles, Kevin A

    2005-05-01

    To determine the effect of temperature changes on the shock attenuation of 4 running shoe shock absorption systems. Prospective. Motion analysis laboratory. The shock attenuation of 4 different running shoes representing common shock absorption systems (Nike Air Triax, Asics Gel Nimbus IV, Adidas a3 cushioning, Adidas Supernova cushion) was measured at ambient temperatures of -20 degrees C, -10 degrees C, 0 degrees C, +10 degrees C, +20 degrees C, +30 degrees C, +40 degrees C, and +50 degrees C. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to determine differences between shoes. Shock attenuation as indicated by peak deceleration (g) measured by a mechanical impactor following ASTM Standard F1614-99. Shock attenuation decreased significantly with reduced temperature for each shoe tested. The Adidas a3 shoe exhibited significantly higher peak decelerations (lower shock attenuation) at cold temperatures compared with the other shoes. Cold ambient temperatures significantly reduce the shock attenuation of commonly used running shoes. These findings have important clinical implications for individuals training in extreme weather environments, particularly those with a history of lower limb overuse injuries.

  20. Structural characteristics of the shock-induced boundary layer separation extended to the leading edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Y.; Liu, W. D.; Fan, X. Q.; Zhao, Y. L.

    2017-07-01

    For a better understanding of the local unstart of supersonic/hypersonic inlet, a series of experiments has been conducted to investigate the shock-induced boundary layer separation extended to the leading edge. Using the nanoparticle-based planar laser scattering, we recorded the fine structures of these interactions under different conditions and paid more attention to their structural characteristics. According to their features, these interactions could be divided into four types. Specifically, Type A wave pattern is similar to the classic shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction, and Type B wave configuration consists of an overall Mach reflection above the large scale separation bubble. Due to the gradual decrease in the size of the separation bubble, the separation bubble was replaced by several vortices (Type C wave pattern). Besides, for Type D wave configuration which exists in the local unstart inlet, there appears to be some flow spillage around the leading edge.

  1. Effect of shock interactions on mixing layer between co-flowing supersonic flows in a confined duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, S. M. V.; Asano, S.; Imani, I.; Saito, T.

    2018-03-01

    Experiments are conducted to observe the effect of shock interactions on a mixing layer generated between two supersonic streams of Mach number M _{1} = 1.76 and M _{2} = 1.36 in a confined duct. The development of this mixing layer within the duct is observed using high-speed schlieren and static pressure measurements. Two-dimensional, compressible Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved using the k-ω SST turbulence model in Fluent. Further, adverse pressure gradients are imposed by placing inserts of small ( boundary layer thickness) thickness on the walls of the test section. The unmatched pressures cause the mixing layer to bend and lead to the formation of shock structures that interact with the mixing layer. The mixing layer growth rate is found to increase after the shock interaction (nearly doubles). The strongest shock is observed when a wedge insert is placed in the M _{2} flow. This shock interacts with the mixing layer exciting flow modes that produce sinusoidal flapping structures which enhance the mixing layer growth rate to the maximum (by 1.75 times). Shock fluctuations are characterized, and it is observed that the maximum amplitude occurs when a wedge insert is placed in the M _{2} flow.

  2. Application of pressure-sensitive paint in shock-boundary layer interaction experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Seivwright, Douglas L.

    1996-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited A new type of pressure transducer, pressure-sensitive paint, was used to obtain pressure distributions associated with shock-boundary layer interaction. Based on the principle of photoluminescence and the process of oxygen quenching, pressure-sensitive paint provides a continous mapping of a pressure field over a surface of interest. The data measurement and acquisition system developed for use with the photoluminescence sensor was eva...

  3. Viscous-shock-layer solutions for turbulent flow of radiating gas mixtures in chemical equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, E. C.; Moss, J. N.

    1975-01-01

    The viscous-shock-layer equations for hypersonic laminar and turbulent flows of radiating or nonradiating gas mixtures in chemical equilibrium are presented for two-dimensional and axially-symmetric flow fields. Solutions were obtained using an implicit finite-difference scheme and results are presented for hypersonic flow over spherically-blunted cone configurations at freestream conditions representative of entry into the atmosphere of Venus. These data are compared with solutions obtained using other methods of analysis.

  4. Viscous shock layer solutions for turbulent flow of radiating gas mixtures in chemical equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, E. C.; Moss, J. N.

    1975-01-01

    The viscous shock layer equations for hypersonic laminar and turbulent flows of radiating or nonradiating gas mixtures in chemical equilibrium are presented for two-dimensional and axially symmetric flow fields. Solutions are obtained using an implicit finite difference scheme and results are presented for hypersonic flow over spherically blunted cone configurations at free stream conditions representative of entry into the atmosphere of Venus. These data are compared with solutions obtained using other methods of analysis.

  5. CFD Validation Experiment of a Mach 2.5 Axisymmetric Shock-Wave/Boundary-Layer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, David Owen

    2015-01-01

    Preliminary results of an experimental investigation of a Mach 2.5 two-dimensional axisymmetric shock-wave/ boundary-layer interaction (SWBLI) are presented. The purpose of the investigation is to create a SWBLI dataset specifically for CFD validation purposes. Presented herein are the details of the facility and preliminary measurements characterizing the facility and interaction region. These results will serve to define the region of interest where more detailed mean and turbulence measurements will be made.

  6. Effects of non-adiabatic walls on shock/boundary-layer interaction using direct numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpiani, Pedro S.; Bernardini, Matteo; Larsson, Johan

    2017-11-01

    The influence of wall thermal conditions on the properties of an impinging shock wave interacting with a turbulent supersonic boundary layer is a research topic that still remains underexplored. In the present study, direct numerical simulations (DNS) are employed to investigate the flow properties of a shock wave interacting with a turbulent boundary layer at free-stream Mach number M∞ = 2.28 with distinct wall thermal conditions and shock strengths. Instantaneous and mean flow fields, wall quantities and the low-frequency unsteadiness are analyzed. While heating contributes to increase the extent of the interaction zone, wall cooling turns out to be a good candidate for flow control. The distribution of the Stanton number shows a good agreement with prior experimental studies and confirms the strong heat transfer and complex pattern within the interaction region. Numerical results indicate that the changes in the interaction length are mainly linked to the incoming boundary layer as suggested in previous studies (Souverein et al., 2013 and Jaunet et al., 2014). This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Grant FA95501610385.

  7. The effects of salinity and temperature shock on Kappaphycus alvarezii seaweed spores release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwinda, F. K.; Satyantini, W. H.; Masithah, E. W.

    2018-04-01

    One of the reproductive aspects of development step that is considered as the solution of this issue is seaweed sporulation technique through which is induced through salinity and temperature shock. This study aims to determine the effect of combination and interaction of salinity and temperature shock on the release of K. alvarezii spores in order to produce superior seeds. This research was conducted using Complete Randomized Design Factorial which consists of nine combinations of treatments and three replications. The used treatment in this study is the combination of different environmental factors such as salinity shock and temperature shock. The data were analyzed using ANOVA (Analysis of Variance) followed by Duncan Multiple Range Test. The results showed that salinity (31 ppt, 33 ppt, and 35 ppt) and temperature (30°C, 32°C, and 34°C). shock affected the osmoregulation system and the release of K. alvarezii spores. The salinity shock and temperature shock had interaction with K. alvarezii spore release on the sixth and seventh day with the best treatment at 32°C temperature and 31 ppt salinity and released 5413 cells/ml spores on the seventh day.

  8. Budget of Turbulent Kinetic Energy in a Shock Wave Boundary-Layer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Manan A.; Waindim, Mbu; Gaitonde, Datta V.

    2016-01-01

    Implicit large-eddy simulation (ILES) of a shock wave/boundary-layer interaction (SBLI) was performed. Quantities present in the exact equation of the turbulent kinetic energy transport were accumulated and used to calculate terms like production, dissipation, molecular diffusion, and turbulent transport. The present results for a turbulent boundary layer were validated by comparison with direct numerical simulation data. It was found that a longer development domain was necessary for the boundary layer to reach an equilibrium state and a finer mesh resolution would improve the predictions. In spite of these findings, trends of the present budget match closely with that of the direct numerical simulation. Budgets for the SBLI region are presented at key axial stations. These budgets showed interesting dynamics as the incoming boundary layer transforms and the terms of the turbulent kinetic energy budget change behavior within the interaction region.

  9. On the Unsteadiness of a Transitional Shock Wave-Boundary Layer Interaction Using Fast-Response Pressure-Sensitive Paint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lash, E. Lara; Schmisseur, John

    2017-11-01

    Pressure-sensitive paint has been used to evaluate the unsteady dynamics of transitional and turbulent shock wave-boundary layer interactions generated by a vertical cylinder on a flat plate in a Mach 2 freestream. The resulting shock structure consists of an inviscid bow shock that bifurcates into a separation shock and trailing shock. The primary features of interest are the separation shock and an upstream influence shock that is intermittently present in transitional boundary layer interactions, but not observed in turbulent interactions. The power spectral densities, frequency peaks, and normalized wall pressures are analyzed as the incoming boundary layer state changes from transitional to fully turbulent, comparing both centerline and outboard regions of the interaction. The present study compares the scales and frequencies of the dynamics of the separation shock structure in different boundary layer regimes. Synchronized high-speed Schlieren imaging provides quantitative statistical analyses as well as qualitative comparisons to the fast-response pressure sensitive paint measurements. Materials based on research supported by the U.S. Office of Naval Research under Award Number N00014-15-1-2269.

  10. The elevated temperature and thermal shock fracture toughnesses of nuclear pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Kazumi; Kobayashi, Hideo; Nakazawa, Hajime; Nara, Atsushi.

    1979-01-01

    Thermal shock experiments were conducted on nuclear pressure vessel steel A533 Grade B Class 1. Elastic-plastic fracture toughness tests were carried out within the same high temperature range of the thermal shock experiment and the relation between stretched zone width, SZW and J-integral was clarified. An elastic-plastic thermal shock fracture toughness value. J sub(tsc) was evaluated from a critical value of stretched zone width, SZW sub(tsc) at the initiation of thermal shock fracture by using the relation between SZW and J. The J sub(tsc) value was compared with elastic-plastic fracture toughness values, J sub( ic), and the difference between the J sub(tsc) and J sub( ic) values was discussed. The results obtained are summarized as follows; (1) The relation between SZW and J before the initiation of stable crack growth in fracture toughness test at a high temperature can be expressed by the following equation regardless of test temperature, SZW = 95(J/E), where E is Young's modulus. (2) Elevated temperature fracture toughness values ranging from room temperature to 400 0 C are nearly constant regardless of test temperature. It is confirmed that upper shelf fracture toughness exists. (3) Thermal shock fracture toughness is smaller than elevated temperature fracture toughness within the same high temperature range of thermal shock experiment. (author)

  11. Robust design of microelectronics assemblies against mechanical shock, temperature and moisture effects of temperature, moisture and mechanical driving forces

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, E-H

    2015-01-01

    Robust Design of Microelectronics Assemblies Against Mechanical Shock, Temperature and Moisture discusses how the reliability of packaging components is a prime concern to electronics manufacturers. The text presents a thorough review of this important field of research, providing users with a practical guide that discusses theoretical aspects, experimental results, and modeling techniques. The authors use their extensive experience to produce detailed chapters covering temperature, moisture, and mechanical shock induced failure, adhesive interconnects, and viscoelasticity. Useful progr

  12. Control of a shock wave-boundary layer interaction using localized arc filament plasma actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Nathan Joseph

    Supersonic flight is currently possible, but expensive. Inexpensive supersonic travel will require increased efficiency of high-speed air entrainment, an integral part of air-breathing propulsion systems. Although mixed compression inlet geometry can significantly improve entrainment efficiency, numerous Shock Wave-Boundary Layer Interactions (SWBLIs) are generated in this configuration. The boundary layer must therefore develop through multiple regions of adverse pressure gradient, causing it to thicken, and, in severe cases, separate. The associated increase in unsteadiness can have adverse effects on downstream engine hardware. The most severe consequence of these interactions is the increased aerodynamic blockage generated by the thickened boundary layer. If the increase is sufficient, it can choke the flow, causing inlet unstart, and resulting in a loss of thrust and high transient forces on the engine, airframe, and aircraft occupants. The potentially severe consequences associated with SWBLIs require flow control to ensure proper operation. Traditionally, boundary layer bleed has been used to control the interaction. Although this method is effective, it has inherent efficiency penalties. Localized Arc Filament Plasma Actuators (LAFPAs) are designed to generate perturbations for flow control. Natural flow instabilities act to amplify certain perturbations, allowing the LAFPAs to control the flow with minimal power input. LAFPAs also have the flexibility to maintain control over a variety of operating conditions. This work seeks to examine the effectiveness of LAFPAs as a separation control method for an oblique, impinging SWBLI. The low frequency unsteadiness in the reflected shock was thought to be the natural manifestation of a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the shear layer above the separation region. The LAFPAs were therefore placed upstream of the interaction to allow their perturbations to convect to the receptivity region (near the shear layer origin

  13. High Frequency Measurements in Shock-Wave/Turbulent Boundary-Layer Interaction at Duplicated Flight Conditions, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Large amplitude, unsteady heating loads and steep flow gradients produced in regions of shock-wave/turbulent boundary-layer interaction (SWTBLI) pose a serious and...

  14. High Frequency Measurements in Shock-Wave/Turbulent Boundary-Layer Interaction at Duplicated Flight Conditions, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Large amplitude, unsteady heating loads and steep flow gradients produced in regions of shock-wave/turbulent boundary-layer interaction (SWTBLI) pose a serious and...

  15. Maybe Next Month? Temperature Shocks, Climate Change, and Dynamic Adjustments in Birth Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Barreca, Alan I.; Deschenes, Olivier; Guldi, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic adjustments could be a useful strategy for mitigating the costs of acute environmental shocks when timing is not a strictly binding constraint. To investigate whether such adjustments could apply to fertility, we estimate the effects of temperature shocks on birth rates in the United States between 1931 and 2010. Our innovative approach allows for presumably random variation in the distribution of daily temperatures to affect birth rates up to 24 months into the future. We find that a...

  16. Assessment of CFD Capability for Hypersonic Shock Wave Laminar Boundary Layer Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnaz Rouhi Youssefi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to assess CFD capability for the prediction of shock wave laminar boundary layer interactions at hypersonic velocities. More specifically, the flow field over a double-cone configuration is simulated using both perfect gas and non-equilibrium Navier–Stokes models. Computations are compared with recent experimental data obtained from measurements conducted in the LENS XX (Large Energy National Shock Expansion Tunnel Version 2 at the Calspan University of Buffalo Research Center (CUBRC. Four separate cases of freestream conditions are simulated to examine the models for a range of stagnation enthalpies from 5.44 MJ/kg to 21.77 MJ/kg and Mach numbers from 10.9 to 12.82.

  17. A documentation of two- and three-dimensional shock-separated turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J. D.; Brown, J. L.; Kussoy, M. I.

    1988-01-01

    A shock-related separation of a turbulent boundary layer has been studied and documented. The flow was that of an axisymmetric turbulent boundary layer over a 5.02-cm-diam cylinder that was aligned with the wind tunnel axis. The boundary layer was compressed by a 30 deg half-angle conical flare, with the cone axis inclined at an angle alpha to the cylinder axis. Nominal test conditions were P sub tau equals 1.7 atm and M sub infinity equals 2.85. Measurements were confined to the upper-symmetry, phi equals 0 deg, plane. Data are presented for the cases of alpha equal to 0. 5. and 10 deg and include mean surface pressures, streamwise and normal mean velocities, kinematic turbulent stresses and kinetic energies, as well as reverse-flow intermittencies. All data are given in tabular form; pressures, streamwise velocities, turbulent shear stresses, and kinetic energies are also presented graphically.

  18. High frequency ground temperature fluctuation in a Convective Boundary Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garai, A.; Kleissl, J.; Lothon, M.; Lohou, F.; Pardyjak, E.; Saïd, F.; Cuxart, J.; Steeneveld, G.J.; Yaguë, C.; Derrien, S.; Alexander, D.; Villagrasa, D.M.

    2012-01-01

    To study influence of the turbulent structures in the convective boundary layer (CBL) on the ground temperature, during the Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence (BLLAST) observational campaign, high frequency ground temperature was recorded through infra-red imagery from 13 June - 8

  19. Analysis of dimensionality effect on shock wave boundary layer interaction in laminar hypersonic flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, Bibin; Surendranath, Srikanth; Natarajan, Ganesh; Kulkarni, Vinayak

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Leading edge bluntness based separation control has been analysed numerically for 2D and axi-symmetric flows. • Differential growth of entropy layer in the streamwise direction in these cases leads to different interaction with respective boundary layers. • Separation control is found possible for planar flows beyond a critical radius called as equivalent radius. • No equivalent radius has been noticed in axi-symmertric flows in the present studies due to thin entropy layer and lack of favourable pressure gradient. - Abstract: Present investigations are centered on passive control of shock wave boundary layer interaction (SWBLI) for double cone and double wedge configurations with leading edge bluntness. This study seeks the differences in the flow physics of SWBLI in case of two dimensional (2D) and axisymmetric flow fields. In-house developed second order accurate finite-volume 2D axisymmetric compressible flow solver is employed for these studies. It is observed that the idea of leading edge bluntness offers reduction in separation bubble for 2D flow fields, whereas it leads to enhanced separation zone in case of axisymmetric flow fields. Relevant flow physics is well explored herein using wall pressure profile and relative thicknesses of boundary layer and entropy layer. Thicker entropy layer and stronger favorable pressure gradient are found responsible for the possibility of separation control in case of 2D flow fields. Thin entropy layer due to three dimensional relieving effect and its swallowing by the boundary layer are attributed for higher separation bubble size in case of cone with range of radii under consideration.

  20. Shock dynamics induced by double-spot laser irradiation of layered targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliverdiev Abutrab A.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We studied the interaction of a double-spot laser beam with targets using the Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS iodine laser working at 0.44 μm wavelength and intensity of about 1015 W/cm2. Shock breakout signals were recorder using time-resolved self-emission from target rear side of irradiated targets. We compared the behavior of pure Al targets and of targets with a foam layer on the laser side. Results have been simulated using hydrodynamic numerical codes.

  1. Natural Rubber Modification For Upper Layer Of Rubberized Asphalt Paving Block AS Shock Absorber

    OpenAIRE

    Nasruddin, Nasruddin

    2017-01-01

    The research of rubber compounding modification for upper layer of rubberized asphalt paving block as shock absorber using natural rubber, styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) as synthetic rubber, fly ash as filler and also vegetable oil as plasticizer has been conducted. The research design was varying the filler Si-69, fly ash and palm oil. The five formulas A, B, C, D, and E designed by varying the amount of Si-69 (48.5; 50.75; 53.00; 55.25; and 57.50) phr; coal fly ash (4.75, 7.00, 9.25, 11.50 ...

  2. Modeling of the plasma generated in a rarefied hypersonic shock layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farbar, Erin D.; Boyd, Iain D.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, a rigorous numerical model is developed to simulate the plasma generated in a rarefied, hypersonic shock layer. The model uses the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method to treat the particle collisions and the particle-in-cell (PIC) method to simulate the plasma dynamics in a self-consistent manner. The model is applied to compute the flow along the stagnation streamline in front of a blunt body reentering the Earth's atmosphere at very high velocity. Results from the rigorous DSMC-PIC model are compared directly to the standard DSMC modeling approach that uses the ambipolar diffusion approximation to simulate the plasma dynamics. It is demonstrated that the self-consistent computation of the plasma dynamics using the rigorous DSMC-PIC model captures many physical phenomena not accurately predicted by the standard modeling approach. These computations represent the first assessment of the validity of the ambipolar diffusion approximation when predicting the rarefied plasma generated in a hypersonic shock layer.

  3. Mitigation of Adverse Effects Caused by Shock Wave Boundary Layer Interactions Through Optimal Wall Shaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, May-Fun; Lee, Byung Joon

    2013-01-01

    It is known that the adverse effects of shock wave boundary layer interactions in high speed inlets include reduced total pressure recovery and highly distorted flow at the aerodynamic interface plane (AIP). This paper presents a design method for flow control which creates perturbations in geometry. These perturbations are tailored to change the flow structures in order to minimize shock wave boundary layer interactions (SWBLI) inside supersonic inlets. Optimizing the shape of two dimensional micro-size bumps is shown to be a very effective flow control method for two-dimensional SWBLI. In investigating the three dimensional SWBLI, a square duct is employed as a baseline. To investigate the mechanism whereby the geometric elements of the baseline, i.e. the bottom wall, the sidewall and the corner, exert influence on the flow's aerodynamic characteristics, each element is studied and optimized separately. It is found that arrays of micro-size bumps on the bottom wall of the duct have little effect in improving total pressure recovery though they are useful in suppressing the incipient separation in three-dimensional problems. Shaping sidewall geometry is effective in re-distributing flow on the side wall and results in a less distorted flow at the exit. Subsequently, a near 50% reduction in distortion is achieved. A simple change in corner geometry resulted in a 2.4% improvement in total pressure recovery.

  4. Multi-fidelity numerical simulations of shock/turbulent-boundary layer interaction with uncertainty quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermejo-Moreno, Ivan; Campo, Laura; Larsson, Johan; Emory, Mike; Bodart, Julien; Palacios, Francisco; Iaccarino, Gianluca; Eaton, John

    2013-11-01

    We study the interaction between an oblique shock wave and the turbulent boundary layers inside a nearly-square duct by combining wall-modeled LES, 2D and 3D RANS simulations, targeting the experiment of Campo, Helmer & Eaton, 2012 (nominal conditions: M = 2 . 05 , Reθ = 6 , 500). A primary objective is to quantify the effect of aleatory and epistemic uncertainties on the STBLI. Aleatory uncertainties considered include the inflow conditions (Mach number of the incoming air stream and thickness of the boundary layers) and perturbations of the duct geometry upstream of the interaction. The epistemic uncertainty under consideration focuses on the RANS turbulence model form by injecting perturbations in the Reynolds stress anisotropy in regions of the flow where the model assumptions (in particular, the Boussinesq eddy-viscosity hypothesis) may be invalid. These perturbations are then propagated through the flow solver into the solution. The uncertainty quantification (UQ) analysis is done through 2D and 3D RANS simulations, assessing the importance of the three-dimensional effects imposed by the nearly-square duct geometry. Wall-modeled LES are used to verify elements of the UQ methodology and to explore the flow features and physics of the STBLI for multiple shock strengths. Financial support from the United States Department of Energy under the PSAAP program is gratefully acknowledged.

  5. On the electron-ion temperature ratio established by collisionless shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vink, Jacco; Broersen, Sjors; Bykov, Andrei; Gabici, Stefano

    2015-07-01

    Astrophysical shocks are often collisionless shocks, in which the changes in plasma flow and temperatures across the shock are established not through Coulomb interactions, but through electric and magnetic fields. An open question about collisionless shocks is whether electrons and ions each establish their own post-shock temperature (non-equilibration of temperatures), or whether they quickly equilibrate in the shock region. Here we provide a simple, thermodynamic, relation for the minimum electron-ion temperature ratios that should be expected as a function of Mach number. The basic assumption is that the enthalpy-flux of the electrons is conserved separately, but that all particle species should undergo the same density jump across the shock, in order for the plasma to remain charge neutral. The only form of additional electron heating that we allow for is adiabatic heating, caused by the compression of the electron gas. These assumptions result in an analytic treatment of expected electron-ion temperature ratio that agrees with observations of collisionless shocks: at low sonic Mach numbers, Ms ≲ 2, the electron-ion temperature ratio is close to unity, whereas for Mach numbers above Ms ≈ 60 the electron-ion temperature ratio asymptotically approaches a temperature ratio of Te/Ti = me/ ⟨ mi ⟩. In the intermediate Mach number range the electron-ion temperature ratio scales as Te/Ti ∝ Ms-2. In addition, we calculate the electron-ion temperature ratios under the assumption of adiabatic heating of the electrons only, which results in a higher electron-ion temperature ratio, but preserves the Te/Ti ∝ Ms-2 scaling. We also show that for magnetised shocks the electron-ion temperature ratio approaches the asymptotic value Te/Ti = me/ ⟨ mi ⟩ for lower magnetosonic Mach numbers (Mms), mainly because for a strongly magnetised shock the sonic Mach number is larger than the magnetosonic Mach number (Mms ≤ Ms). The predicted scaling of the electron

  6. Shock wave interaction with turbulence: Pseudospectral simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckingham, A.C.

    1986-01-01

    Shock waves amplify pre-existing turbulence. Shock tube and shock wave boundary layer interaction experiments provide qualitative confirmation. However, shock pressure, temperature, and rapid transit complicate direct measurement. Computational simulations supplement the experimental data base and help isolate the mechanisms responsible. Simulations and experiments, particularly under reflected shock wave conditions, significantly influence material mixing. In these pseudospectral Navier-Stokes simulations the shock wave is treated as either a moving (tracked or fitted) domain boundary. The simulations assist development of code mix models. Shock Mach number and pre-existing turbulence intensity initially emerge as key parameters. 20 refs., 8 figs

  7. TEMPERATURE STRUCTURE OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS UNDERGOING LAYERED ACCRETION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesniak, M. V.; Desch, S. J.

    2011-01-01

    We calculate the temperature structures of protoplanetary disks (PPDs) around T Tauri stars heated by both incident starlight and viscous dissipation. We present a new algorithm for calculating the temperatures in disks in hydrostatic and radiative equilibrium, based on Rybicki's method for iteratively calculating the vertical temperature structure within an annulus. At each iteration, the method solves for the temperature at all locations simultaneously, and converges rapidly even at high (>>10 4 ) optical depth. The method retains the full frequency dependence of the radiation field. We use this algorithm to study for the first time disks evolving via the magnetorotational instability. Because PPD midplanes are weakly ionized, this instability operates preferentially in their surface layers, and disks will undergo layered accretion. We find that the midplane temperatures T mid are strongly affected by the column density Σ a of the active layers, even for fixed mass accretion rate M-dot . Models assuming uniform accretion predict midplane temperatures in the terrestrial planet forming region several x 10 2 K higher than our layered accretion models do. For M-dot -7 M sun yr -1 and the column densities Σ a -2 associated with layered accretion, disk temperatures are indistinguishable from those of a passively heated disk. We find emergent spectra are insensitive to Σ a , making it difficult to observationally identify disks undergoing layered versus uniform accretion.

  8. Flow-around modes for a rhomboid wing with a stall vortex in the shock layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubin, M. A.; Maximov, F. A.; Ostapenko, N. A.

    2017-12-01

    The results of theoretical and experimental investigation of an asymmetrical hypersonic flow around a V-shaped wing with the opening angle larger than π on the modes with attached shockwaves on forward edges, when the stall flow is implemented on the leeward wing cantilever behind the kink point of the cross contour. In this case, a vortex of nonviscous nature is formed in which the velocities on the sphere exceeding the speed of sound and resulting in the occurrence of pressure shocks with an intensity sufficient for the separation of the turbulent boundary layer take place in the reverse flow according to the calculations within the framework of the ideal gas. It is experimentally established that a separation boundary layer can exist in the reverse flow, and its structure is subject to the laws inherent to the reverse flow in the separation region of the turbulent boundary layer arising in the supersonic conic flow under the action of a shockwave incident to the boundary layer.

  9. Active layer thickness and ground temperatures, Svea, Svalbard, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Snow and soil temperature records for January 1988 - May 1996 are presented. Included are snow depth and weight measurements, snow density (calculated), active layer...

  10. Boundary-layer development and transition due to free-stream exothermic reactions in shock-induced flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    A study of the effect of free-stream thermal-energy release from shock-induced exothermic reactions on boundary-layer development and transition is presented. The flow model is that of a boundary layer developing behind a moving shock wave in two-dimensional unsteady flow over a shock-tube wall. Matched sets of combustible hydrogen-oxygen-nitrogen mixtures and inert hydrogen-nitrogen mixtures were used to obtain transition data over a range of transition Reynolds numbers from 1,100,000 to 21,300,000. The heat-energy is shown to significantly stabilize the boundary layer without changing its development character. A method for application of this data to flat-plate steady flows is included.

  11. A thin-shock-layer solution for nonequilibrium, inviscid hypersonic flows in earth, Martian, and Venusian atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grose, W. L.

    1971-01-01

    An approximate inverse solution is presented for the nonequilibrium flow in the inviscid shock layer about a vehicle in hypersonic flight. The method is based upon a thin-shock-layer approximation and has the advantage of being applicable to both subsonic and supersonic regions of the shock layer. The relative simplicity of the method makes it ideally suited for programming on a digital computer with a significant reduction in storage capacity and computing time required by other more exact methods. Comparison of nonequilibrium solutions for an air mixture obtained by the present method is made with solutions obtained by two other methods. Additional cases are presented for entry of spherical nose cones into representative Venusian and Martian atmospheres. A digital computer program written in FORTRAN language is presented that permits an arbitrary gas mixture to be employed in the solution. The effects of vibration, dissociation, recombination, electronic excitation, and ionization are included in the program.

  12. Shock Hugoniot and temperature data for polystyrene obtained with quartz standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, N.; Kimura, T.; Miyanishi, K.; Endo, T.; Sano, T.; Shigemori, K.; Azechi, H.; Hironaka, Y.; Kadono, T.; Nagatomo, H.; Nakai, M.; Norimatsu, T.; Otani, K.; Shiroshita, A.; Sunahara, A.; Ikoma, M.; Hori, Y.; Vinci, T.; Ree, F. H.; Iwamoto, A.

    2009-01-01

    Equation-of-state data, not only pressure and density but also temperature, for polystyrene (CH) are obtained up to 510 GPa. The region investigated in this work corresponds to an intermediate region, bridging a large gap between available gas-gun data below 60 GPa and laser shock data above 500 GPa. The Hugoniot parameters and shock temperature were simultaneously determined by using optical velocimeters and pyrometers as the diagnostic tools and the α-quartz as a new standard material. The CH Hugoniot obtained tends to become stiffer than a semiempirical chemical theoretical model predictions at ultrahigh pressures but is consistent with other models and available experimental data.

  13. An Experimental Study into the Scaling of an Unswept-Sharp-Fin-Generated Shock/Turbulent Boundary Layer Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Influence Scaling of 2D and 3D Shock/Turbulent ioundary Layer Interactions at Compression Corners." AIM Paper 81-334, January 1981. 5. Kubota, H...generating 3D shock wave/boundary layer interactions 2 Unswept sharp fin interaction and coordinate system 3 Cobra probe measurements of Peake (4) at Mach 4...were made by two Druck 50 PSI transducers, each in- stalled in a computer-controlled 48-port Model 48J4 Scani- valve and referenced to vacuum. A 250

  14. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. II - Wall shear stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, M. S.; Adamson, T. C., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Asymptotic methods are used to calculate the shear stress at the wall for the interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate. A mixing length model is used for the eddy viscosity. The shock wave is taken to be strong enough that the sonic line is deep in the boundary layer and the upstream influence is thus very small. It is shown that unlike the result found for laminar flow an asymptotic criterion for separation is not found; however, conditions for incipient separation are computed numerically using the derived solution for the shear stress at the wall. Results are compared with available experimental measurements.

  15. Development of laser-induced grating spectroscopy for underwater temperature measurement in shock wave focusing regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gojani, Ardian B.; Danehy, Paul M.; Alderfer, David W.; Saito, Tsutomu; Takayama, Kazuyoshi

    2004-02-01

    In Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy (ESWL) underwater shock wave focusing generates high pressures at very short duration of time inside human body. However, it is not yet clear how high temperatures are enhanced at the spot where a shock wave is focused. The estimation of such dynamic temperature enhancements is critical for the evaluation of tissue damages upon shock loading. For this purpose in the Interdisciplinary Shock Wave Research Center a technique is developed which employs laser induced thermal acoustics or Laser Induced Grating Spectroscopy. Unlike most of gas-dynamic methods of measuring physical quantities this provides a non-invasive one having spatial and temporal resolutions of the order of magnitude of 1.0 mm 3 and 400 ns, respectively. Preliminary experiments in still water demonstrated that this method detected sound speed and hence temperature in water ranging 283 K to 333 K with errors of 0.5%. These results are used to empirically establish the equation of states of water, gelatin or agar cell which will work as alternatives of human tissues.

  16. Parametric Study of Swept Impinging Oblique Shock/Boundary Layer Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doehrmann, Adam; Threadgill, James; Little, Jesse

    2017-11-01

    Modern high-speed vehicles have increasingly complex 3D geometries featuring: surface curvature, variable aspect ratio inlet ducts and swept bodies. Such distortion to the flow field necessitates a further understanding of swept 3D Shock/Boundary Layer Interactions (SBLIs), where various regimes of spanwise interaction development have been observed. A parametric experimental study of swept oblique impinging SBLIs has been conducted comparing cylindrical and conical interaction structures to that of swept compression ramps in previous work. This investigation examines five shock generators with 2D deflection of θ = 12 .5° and varying degrees of sweep (ψ = 10 .0° , 15 .0° , 22 .5° , 30 .0° , 40 .0°), with an incoming turbulent flow at Mach 2.3 and 3.0. Parametric characterization of surface oil-flow visualizations has shown that the inception length of the interaction follows a similar trend to that seen in swept compression ramps as sweep is varied, namely that it increases as sweep approaches a critical angle. However, this criteria disagrees with direct observations of separation and reattachment angles. Similarities in mean pressures profiles have also been assessed and analyzed with respect to the onset of a cylindrical/conical interaction. Supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (FA9550-15-1-0430).

  17. Assessment of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Models for Shock Boundary-Layer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBonis, James R.; Oberkampf, William L.; Wolf, Richard T.; Orkwis, Paul D.; Turner, Mark G.; Babinsky, Holger

    2011-01-01

    A workshop on the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) prediction of shock boundary-layer interactions (SBLIs) was held at the 48th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting. As part of the workshop numerous CFD analysts submitted solutions to four experimentally measured SBLIs. This paper describes the assessment of the CFD predictions. The assessment includes an uncertainty analysis of the experimental data, the definition of an error metric and the application of that metric to the CFD solutions. The CFD solutions provided very similar levels of error and in general it was difficult to discern clear trends in the data. For the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes methods the choice of turbulence model appeared to be the largest factor in solution accuracy. Large-eddy simulation methods produced error levels similar to RANS methods but provided superior predictions of normal stresses.

  18. Laser Structuring of Thin Layers for Flexible Electronics by a Shock Wave-induced Delamination Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Pierre; Ehrhardt, Martin; Zimmer, Klaus

    The defect-free laser-assisted structuring of thin films on flexible substrates is a challenge for laser methods. However, solving this problem exhibits an outstanding potential for a pioneering development of flexible electronics. Thereby, the laser-assisted delamination method has a great application potential. At the delamination process: the localized removal of the layer is induced by a shock wave which is produced by a laser ablation process on the rear side of the substrate. In this study, the thin-film patterning process is investigated for different polymer substrates dependent on the material and laser parameters using a KrF excimer laser. The resultant structures were studied by optical microscopy and white light interferometry (WLI). The delamination process was tested at different samples (indium tin oxide (ITO) on polyethylene terephthalate (PET), epoxy-based negative photoresist (SU8) on polyimide (PI) and indium tin oxide/copper indium gallium selenide/molybdenum (ITO/CIGS/Mo) on PI.

  19. The electron density and temperature distributions predicted by bow shock models of Herbig-Haro objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noriega-Crespo, A.; Bohm, K.H.; Raga, A.C.

    1990-01-01

    The observable spatial electron density and temperature distributions for series of simple bow shock models, which are of special interest in the study of Herbig-Haro (H-H) objects are computed. The spatial electron density and temperature distributions are derived from forbidden line ratios. It should be possible to use these results to recognize whether an observed electron density or temperature distribution can be attributed to a bow shock, as is the case in some Herbig-Haro objects. As an example, the empirical and predicted distributions for H-H 1 are compared. The predicted electron temperature distributions give the correct temperature range and they show very good diagnostic possibilities if the forbidden O III (4959 + 5007)/4363 wavelength ratio is used. 44 refs

  20. Forsterite Shock Temperatures and Entropy: New Scaling Laws for Impact Melting and Vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, E.; Root, S.; Kraus, R. G.; Townsend, J. P.; Spaulding, D.; Stewart, S. T.; Jacobsen, S. B.; Fratanduono, D.; Millot, M. A.; Mattsson, T. R.; Hanshaw, H. L.

    2017-12-01

    The observed masses, radii and temperatures of thousands of extra-solar planets have challenged our theoretical understanding of planet formation and planetary structures. Planetary materials are subject to extreme pressures and temperatures during formation and within the present-day interiors of large bodies. Here, we focus on improving understanding of the physical properties of rocky planets for calculations of internal structure and the outcomes of giant impacts. We performed flyer plate impact experiments on forsterite [Mg2SiO4] on the Z-Machine at Sandia National Laboratory and decaying shock temperature measurements at the Omega EP laser at U. Rochester. At Z, planar, supported shock waves are generated in single crystal samples, permitting observation of both compressed and released states. Using available static and dynamic thermodynamic data, we calculate absolute entropy and heat capacity along the forsterite shock Hugoniot. Entropy and heat capacity on the Hugoniot are larger than previous estimates. Our data constrain the thermodynamic properties of forsterite liquid at high pressures and temperatures and the amount of melt and vapor produced during impact events. For an ambient pressure of 1 bar, shock-vaporization begins upon reaching the liquid region on the forsterite Hugoniot (about 200 GPa). Using hydrocode simulations of giant impacts between rocky planets with forsterite mantles and iron cores and the new experimentally-constrained forsterite shock entropy, we present a new scaling law for the fraction of mantle that is melted or vaporized by the initial shock wave. Sandia National Laboratories is a multimission laboratory managed and operated by National Technology and Engineering Solutions of Sandia, LLC., a wholly owned subsidiary of Honeywell International, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-NA0003525. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Prepared by the Center

  1. Temperature Dependence of the Resonant Magnetoelectric Effect in Layered Heterostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitrii A. Burdin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The dependence of the resonant direct magnetoelectric effect on temperature is studied experimentally in planar composite structures. Samples of rectangular shapes with dimensions of 5 mm × 20 mm employed ferromagnetic layers of either an amorphous (metallic glass alloy or nickel with a thickness of 20–200 μm and piezoelectric layers of single crystalline langatate material or lead zirconate titanate piezoelectric ceramics with a thickness of 500 μm. The temperature of the samples was varied in a range between 120 and 390 K by blowing a gaseous nitrogen stream around them. It is shown that the effective characteristics of the magnetoelectric effect—such as the mechanical resonance frequency fr, the quality factor Q and the magnitude of the magnetoelectric coefficient αE at the resonance frequency—are contingent on temperature. The interrelations between the temperature changes of the characteristics of the magnetoelectric effect and the temperature variations of the following material parameters—Young’s modulus Y, the acoustic quality factor of individual layers, the dielectric constant ε, the piezoelectric modulus d of the piezoelectric layer as well as the piezomagnetic coefficients λ(n of the ferromagnetic layer—are established. The effect of temperature on the characteristics of the nonlinear magnetoelectric effect is observed for the first time. The results can be useful for designing magnetoelectric heterostructures with specified temperature characteristics, in particular, for the development of thermally stabilized magnetoelectric devices.

  2. Nonlinear CARS measurement of nitrogen vibrational and rotational temperatures behind hypervelocity strong shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Takashi; Endo, Youichi; Kanazawa, Chikara; Ota, Masanori; Maeno, Kazuo

    2009-02-01

    The hypervelocity strong shock waves are generated, when the space vehicles reenter the atmosphere from space. Behind the shock wave radiative and non-equilibrium flow is generated in front of the surface of the space vehicle. Many studies have been reported to investigate the phenomena for the aerospace exploit and reentry. The research information and data on the high temperature flows have been available to the rational heatproof design of the space vehicles. Recent development of measurement techniques with laser systems and photo-electronics now enables us to investigate the hypervelocity phenomena with greatly advanced accuracy. In this research strong shock waves are generated in low-density gas to simulate the reentry range gas flow with a free-piston double-diaphragm shock tube, and CARS (Coherent Anti-stokes Raman Spectroscopy) measurement method is applied to the hypervelocity flows behind the shock waves, where spectral signals of high space/time resolution are acquired. The CARS system consists of YAG and dye lasers, a spectroscope, and a CCD camera system. We obtain the CARS signal spectrum data by this special time-resolving experiment, and the vibrational and rotational temperatures of N2 are determined by fitting between the experimental spectroscopic profile data and theoretically estimated spectroscopic data.

  3. Nonlinear CARS measurement of nitrogen vibrational and rotational temperatures behind hypervelocity strong shock wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osada, Takashi; Endo, Youichi [Graduate Student, Chiba University 1-33 Yayoi, Inage, Chiba, 263-8522 (Japan); Kanazawa, Chikara [Undergraduate, Chiba University 1-33 Yayoi, Inage, Chiba, 63-8522 (Japan); Ota, Masanori; Maeno, Kazuo, E-mail: maeno@faculty.chiba-u.j [Graduate School of Engineering, Chiba University 1-33 Yayoi, Inage, Chiba, 263-8522 (Japan)

    2009-02-01

    The hypervelocity strong shock waves are generated, when the space vehicles reenter the atmosphere from space. Behind the shock wave radiative and non-equilibrium flow is generated in front of the surface of the space vehicle. Many studies have been reported to investigate the phenomena for the aerospace exploit and reentry. The research information and data on the high temperature flows have been available to the rational heatproof design of the space vehicles. Recent development of measurement techniques with laser systems and photo-electronics now enables us to investigate the hypervelocity phenomena with greatly advanced accuracy. In this research strong shock waves are generated in low-density gas to simulate the reentry range gas flow with a free-piston double-diaphragm shock tube, and CARS (Coherent Anti-stokes Raman Spectroscopy) measurement method is applied to the hypervelocity flows behind the shock waves, where spectral signals of high space/time resolution are acquired. The CARS system consists of YAG and dye lasers, a spectroscope, and a CCD camera system. We obtain the CARS signal spectrum data by this special time-resolving experiment, and the vibrational and rotational temperatures of N{sub 2} are determined by fitting between the experimental spectroscopic profile data and theoretically estimated spectroscopic data.

  4. Nonlinear CARS measurement of nitrogen vibrational and rotational temperatures behind hypervelocity strong shock wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osada, Takashi; Endo, Youichi; Kanazawa, Chikara; Ota, Masanori; Maeno, Kazuo

    2009-01-01

    The hypervelocity strong shock waves are generated, when the space vehicles reenter the atmosphere from space. Behind the shock wave radiative and non-equilibrium flow is generated in front of the surface of the space vehicle. Many studies have been reported to investigate the phenomena for the aerospace exploit and reentry. The research information and data on the high temperature flows have been available to the rational heatproof design of the space vehicles. Recent development of measurement techniques with laser systems and photo-electronics now enables us to investigate the hypervelocity phenomena with greatly advanced accuracy. In this research strong shock waves are generated in low-density gas to simulate the reentry range gas flow with a free-piston double-diaphragm shock tube, and CARS (Coherent Anti-stokes Raman Spectroscopy) measurement method is applied to the hypervelocity flows behind the shock waves, where spectral signals of high space/time resolution are acquired. The CARS system consists of YAG and dye lasers, a spectroscope, and a CCD camera system. We obtain the CARS signal spectrum data by this special time-resolving experiment, and the vibrational and rotational temperatures of N 2 are determined by fitting between the experimental spectroscopic profile data and theoretically estimated spectroscopic data.

  5. Temperature measurements of shocked translucent materials by time-resolved infrared radiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Holle, W.G.

    1981-01-01

    Infrared emission in the range 2 to 5.5 μm has been used to measure temperatures in shock-compressed states of nitromethane, cyclohexane and benzene and in polycrystalline KBr. Polymethylmethacrylate shows anomolous emission probably associated with some heterogeneity

  6. High temperature science: future needs and anticipated development in high-density shock-wave research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, M.; Ahrens, T.J.; Nellis, W.J.

    1979-01-01

    Shock-wave experiments on condensed matter currently achieve pressures up to 5 Mbar, and temperatures over 20,000 0 K. In this report we survey a number of experimental methods that, in the next decade, may increase the conditions by an order of magnitude. These advanced experiments will allow us to investigate a new range of physics problems

  7. Low-temperature magnetic study of naturally and experimentally shocked pyrrhotite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mang, C.; Kontny, A. M.; Hecht, L.

    2011-12-01

    The most intriguing observation from the suevite unit of the 35 Ma old Chesapeake Bay impact structure (CBIS), Virginia, USA, is the occurrence of "shocked pyrrhotite", which might provide clues for a better understanding of the acquisition of shock-induced remagnetization during an impact event. A large range of differently strong deformed and melted components are mixed in the suevite and maximum shock pressures up to 35 GPa are reported (Wittmann et al. 2009). Pyrrhotite occurs as grains and grain clusters within the suevite matrix and rarely in melt fragments, and abundant lattice defects in pyrrhotite prove a shock-induced deformation. The shocked mineral is characterized by a significant loss of iron and the stoichiometric formula lies between Fe0.808S and Fe0.811S. This composition falls significantly below the Fe/S ratio of regular pyrrhotite (Fe>0.875) and is similar to the one of smythite (Fe9S11). The Curie temperature (TC) is above that of the ferrimagnetic 4C modification (320°C) and lies between 350 and 365°C. However, a transition at 30 K (Rochette et al. 1990), visible in low temperature remanence curves, confirms the presence of ferrimagnetic monoclinic 4C pyrrhotite.The present work aims at the question if all these different features observed in the natural pyrrhotite from the CBIS suevite are impact-related. Therefore we experimentally shocked a pyrrhotite ore from the Cerro de Pasco mine, Peru at 3, 5, 8, 20 and 30 GPa using a high pressure gun and high explosive devices. The obtained samples have been investigated by low-temperature AC susceptibility and remanence measurements (LT). In addition, we determined TC using AC susceptibility as function of temperature. LT experiments of the pyrrhotite ore unfortunately do not only show magnetic transition temperatures related to pure pyrrhotite but additionally of accessory magnetic mineral phases like magnetite (Fe3O4) and pyrophanite (MnTiO3). The contribution of those phases makes especially

  8. Reynolds-Stress Budgets in an Impinging Shock Wave/Boundary-Layer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Manan A.; Yoder, Dennis A.; Gaitonde, Datta V.

    2018-01-01

    Implicit large-eddy simulation (ILES) of a shock wave/boundary-layer interaction (SBLI) was performed. Comparisons with experimental data showed a sensitivity of the current prediction to the modeling of the sidewalls. This was found to be common among various computational studies in the literature where periodic boundary conditions were used in the spanwise direction, as was the case in the present work. Thus, although the experiment was quasi-two-dimensional, the present simulation was determined to be two-dimensional. Quantities present in the exact equation of the Reynolds-stress transport, i.e., production, molecular diffusion, turbulent transport, pressure diffusion, pressure strain, dissipation, and turbulent mass flux were calculated. Reynolds-stress budgets were compared with past large-eddy simulation and direct numerical simulation datasets in the undisturbed portion of the turbulent boundary layer to validate the current approach. The budgets in SBLI showed the growth in the production term for the primary normal stress and energy transfer mechanism was led by the pressure strain term in the secondary normal stresses. The pressure diffusion term, commonly assumed as negligible by turbulence model developers, was shown to be small but non-zero in the normal stress budgets, however it played a key role in the primary shear stress budget.

  9. Anti-diffusive radiation flow in the cooling layer of a radiating shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClarren, Ryan G.; Paul Drake, R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper shows that for systems with optically thin, hot layers, such as those that occur in radiating shocks, radiation will flow uphill: radiation will flow from low to high radiation energy density. These are systems in which the angular distribution of the radiation intensity changes rapidly in space, and in which the radiation in some region has a pancaked structure, whose effect on the mean intensity will be much larger than the effect on the scalar radiation pressure. The salient feature of the solution to the radiative transfer equation in these circumstances is that the gradient of the radiation energy density is in the same direction as the radiation flux, i.e. radiation energy is flowing uphill. Such an anti-diffusive flow of energy cannot be captured by a model where the spatial variation of the Eddington factor is not accounted for, as in flux-limited diffusion models or the P 1 equations. The qualitative difference between the two models leads to a monotonic mean intensity for the diffusion model whereas the transport mean intensity has a global maximum in the hot layer. Mathematical analysis shows that the discrepancy between the diffusion model and the transport solution is due to an approximation of exponential integrals using a simple exponential.

  10. A Source-Term Based Boundary Layer Bleed/Effusion Model for Passive Shock Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baurle, Robert A.; Norris, Andrew T.

    2011-01-01

    A modeling framework for boundary layer effusion has been developed based on the use of source (or sink) terms instead of the usual practice of specifying bleed directly as a boundary condition. This framework allows the surface boundary condition (i.e. isothermal wall, adiabatic wall, slip wall, etc.) to remain unaltered in the presence of bleed. This approach also lends itself to easily permit the addition of empirical models for second order effects that are not easily accounted for by simply defining effective transpiration values. Two effusion models formulated for supersonic flows have been implemented into this framework; the Doerffer/Bohning law and the Slater formulation. These models were applied to unit problems that contain key aspects of the flow physics applicable to bleed systems designed for hypersonic air-breathing propulsion systems. The ability of each model to predict bulk bleed properties was assessed, as well as the response of the boundary layer as it passes through and downstream of a porous bleed system. The model assessment was performed with and without the presence of shock waves. Three-dimensional CFD simulations that included the geometric details of the porous plate bleed systems were also carried out to supplement the experimental data, and provide additional insights into the bleed flow physics. Overall, both bleed formulations fared well for the tests performed in this study. However, the sample of test problems considered in this effort was not large enough to permit a comprehensive validation of the models.

  11. Surface layer temperature inversion in the Arabian Sea during winter

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pankajakshan, T.; Ghosh, A.K.

    picture of the actual inversion phenomena occurring in this area. Figure 1 illustrates the procedure adopted in finding the inversion stations. If the temperature difference (Del T) obtained from (T U –T L ) is greater than 0.2°C, then the station... is more or less consistent. Figure 3-A shows the frequency distribution of temperature difference of the inversion layer (Del T). Figure 3-B shows the frequency distribution of the thickness of the inversion layers in meters (Di). Del T is distributed over...

  12. Temperature and ice layer trends in the summer middle atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lübken, F.-J.; Berger, U.

    2012-04-01

    We present results from our LIMA model (Leibniz Institute Middle Atmosphere Model) which nicely reproduces mean conditions of the summer mesopause region and also mean characteristics of ice layers known as noctilucent clouds. LIMA nudges to ECMWF data in the troposphere and lower stratosphere which influences the background conditions in the mesosphere. We study temperature trends in the mesosphere at middle and polar latitudes and compared with temperature trends from satellites, lidar, and phase height observations. For the first time large observed temperature trends in the summer mesosphere can be reproduced and explained by a model. As will be shown, stratospheric ozone has a major impact on temperature trends in the summer mesosphere. The temperature trend is not uniform in time: it is moderate from 1961 (the beginning of our record) until the beginning of the 1980s. Thereafter, temperatures decrease much stronger until the mid 1990s. Thereafter, temperatures are nearly constant or even increase with time. As will be shown, trends in ozone and carbon dioxide explain most of this behavior. Ice layers in the summer mesosphere are very sensitive to background conditions and are therefore considered to be appropriate tracers for long term variations in the middle atmosphere. We use LIMA background conditions to determine ice layer characteristics in the mesopause region. We compare our results with measurements, for example with albedos from the SBUV satellites, and show that we can nicely reproduce observed trends. It turns out that temperature trends are positive (negative) in the upper (lower) part of the ice layer regime. This complicates an interpretation of NLC long term variations in terms of temperature trends.

  13. Properties of a Laser Shock Wave in Al-Cu Alloy under Elevated Temperatures: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiankai Meng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The laser shock wave (LSW generated by the interaction between a laser and a material has been widely used in laser manufacturing, such as laser shock peening and laser shock forming. However, due to the high strain rate, the propagation of LSW in materials, especially LSW at elevated temperatures, is difficult to study through experimental methods. A molecular dynamics simulation was used in this study to investigate the propagation of LSW in an Al-Cu alloy. The Hugoniot relations of LSW were obtained at different temperatures and the effects of elevated temperatures on shock velocity and shock pressure were analyzed. Then the elastic and plastic wave of the LSW was researched. Finally, the evolution of dislocations induced by LSW and its mechanism under elevated temperatures was explored. The results indicate that the shock velocity and shock pressure induced by LSW both decrease with the increasing temperatures. Moreover, the velocity of elastic wave and plastic wave both decrease with the increasing treatment temperature, while their difference decreases as the temperature increases. Moreover, the dislocation atoms increases with the increasing temperatures before 2 ps, while it decreases with the increasing temperatures after 2 ps. The reason for the results is related to the formation and evolution of extended dislocations.

  14. A stable boundary layer perspective on global temperature trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNider, R T; Christy, J R; Biazar, A

    2010-01-01

    One of the most significant signals in the thermometer-observed temperature record since 1900 is the decrease in the diurnal temperature range over land, largely due to warming of the minimum temperatures. While some data sets have indicated this asymmetrical warming has been reduced since 1979, regional analyses (e.g. East Africa) indicate that the nocturnal warming continues at a pace greater than daytime temperatures. The cause for this night time warming in the observed temperatures has been attributed to a variety of causes. Climate models have in general not replicated the change in diurnal temperature range well. Here we would like to try to distinguish between warming in the nocturnal boundary layer due to a redistribution of heat and warming due to the accumulation of heat. The temperature at night at shelter height is a result of competition between thermal stability and mechanical shear. If stability wins then turbulence is suppressed and the cooling surface becomes cut-off from the warmer air aloft, which leads to sharp decay in surface air temperature. If shear wins, then turbulence is maintained and warmer air from aloft is continually mixed to the surface, which leads to significantly lower cooling rates and warmer temperatures. This warming occurs due to a redistribution of heat. As will be shown by techniques of nonlinear analysis the winner of the stability and shear contest can be very sensitive to changes in greenhouse gas forcing, surface roughness, cloudiness, and surface heat capacity (including soil moisture). Further, the minimum temperatures measured in the nocturnal boundary layer represent only a very shallow layer of the atmosphere which is usually only a few hundred meters thick. It is likely that the observed warming in minimum temperature, whether caused by additional greenhouse forcing or land use changes or other land surface dynamics, is reflecting a redistribution of heat by turbulence-not an accumulation of heat. Because minimum

  15. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. I - Pressure distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messiter, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    Asymptotic solutions are derived for the pressure distribution in the interaction of a weak normal shock wave with a turbulent boundary layer. The undisturbed boundary layer is characterized by the law of the wall and the law of the wake for compressible flow. In the limiting case considered, for 'high' transonic speeds, the sonic line is very close to the wall. Comparisons with experiment are shown, with corrections included for the effect of longitudinal wall curvature and for the boundary-layer displacement effect in a circular pipe.

  16. The effects of digestion temperature and temperature shock on the biogas yields from the mesophilic anaerobic digestion of swine manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, K J; Jang, Am; Yim, S K; Kim, In S

    2008-01-01

    In order to obtain basic design criteria for anaerobic digesters of swine manure, the effects of different digesting temperatures, temperature shocks and feed loads, on the biogas yields and methane content were evaluated. The digester temperatures were set at 25, 30 and 35 degrees C, with four feed loads of 5%, 10%, 20% and 40% (feed volume/digester volume). At a temperature of 30 degrees C, the methane yield was reduced by only 3% compared to 35 degrees C, while a 17.4% reduction was observed when the digestion was performed at 25 degrees C. Ultimate methane yields of 327, 389 and 403 mL CH(4)/g VS(added) were obtained at 25, 30 and 35 degrees C, respectively; with moderate feed loads from 5% to 20% (V/V). From the elemental analysis of swine manure, the theoretical biogas and methane yields at standard temperature and pressure were 1.12L biogas/g VS(destroyed) and 0.724 L CH(4)/g VS(destroyed), respectively. Also, the methane content increased with increasing digestion temperatures, but only to a small degree. Temperature shocks from 35 to 30 degrees C and again from 30 to 32 degrees C led to a decrease in the biogas production rate, but it rapidly resumed the value of the control reactor. In addition, no lasting damage was observed for the digestion performance, once it had recovered.

  17. Effect of Temperature Shock and Inventory Surprises on Natural Gas and Heating Oil Futures Returns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, John Wei-Shan; Lin, Chien-Yu

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine the impact of temperature shock on both near-month and far-month natural gas and heating oil futures returns by extending the weather and storage models of the previous study. Several notable findings from the empirical studies are presented. First, the expected temperature shock significantly and positively affects both the near-month and far-month natural gas and heating oil futures returns. Next, significant temperature shock has effect on both the conditional mean and volatility of natural gas and heating oil prices. The results indicate that expected inventory surprises significantly and negatively affects the far-month natural gas futures returns. Moreover, volatility of natural gas futures returns is higher on Thursdays and that of near-month heating oil futures returns is higher on Wednesdays than other days. Finally, it is found that storage announcement for natural gas significantly affects near-month and far-month natural gas futures returns. Furthermore, both natural gas and heating oil futures returns are affected more by the weighted average temperature reported by multiple weather reporting stations than that reported by a single weather reporting station. PMID:25133233

  18. An improved method to experimentally determine temperature and pressure behind laser-induced shock waves at low Mach numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendijanifard, Mohammad; Willis, David A

    2011-01-01

    Laser-matter interactions are frequently studied by measuring the propagation of shock waves caused by the rapid laser-induced material removal. An improved method for calculating the thermo-fluid parameters behind shock waves is introduced in this work. Shock waves in ambient air, induced by pulsed Nd : YAG laser ablation of aluminium films, are measured using a shadowgraph apparatus. Normal shock solutions are applied to experimental data for shock wave positions and used to calculate pressure, temperature, and velocity behind the shock wave. Non-dimensionalizing the pressure and temperature with respect to the ambient values, the dimensionless pressure and temperature are estimated to be as high as 90 and 16, respectively, at a time of 10 ns after the ablation pulse for a laser fluence of F = 14.5 J cm -2 . The results of the normal shock solution and the Taylor-Sedov similarity solution are compared to show that the Taylor-Sedov solution under-predicts pressure when the Mach number of the shock wave is small. At a fluence of 3.1 J cm -2 , the shock wave Mach number is less than 3, and the Taylor-Sedov solution under-predicts the non-dimensional pressure by as much as 45%.

  19. Measurement of high-pressure shock waves in cryogenic deuterium-tritium ice layered capsule implosions on NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robey, H F; Moody, J D; Celliers, P M; Ross, J S; Ralph, J; Le Pape, S; Berzak Hopkins, L; Parham, T; Sater, J; Mapoles, E R; Holunga, D M; Walters, C F; Haid, B J; Kozioziemski, B J; Dylla-Spears, R J; Krauter, K G; Frieders, G; Ross, G; Bowers, M W; Strozzi, D J; Yoxall, B E; Hamza, A V; Dzenitis, B; Bhandarkar, S D; Young, B; Van Wonterghem, B M; Atherton, L J; Landen, O L; Edwards, M J; Boehly, T R

    2013-08-09

    The first measurements of multiple, high-pressure shock waves in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility have been performed. The strength and relative timing of these shocks must be adjusted to very high precision in order to keep the DT fuel entropy low and compressibility high. All previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion implosions [T. R. Boehly et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195005 (2011), H. F. Robey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215004 (2012)] have been performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas regions were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. This report presents the first experimental validation of the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique.

  20. CFD Validation Experiment of a Mach 2.5 Axisymmetric Shock-Wave/Boundary-Layer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, David O.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental investigations of specific flow phenomena, e.g., Shock Wave Boundary-Layer Interactions (SWBLI), provide great insight to the flow behavior but often lack the necessary details to be useful as CFD validation experiments. Reasons include: 1.Undefined boundary conditions Inconsistent results 2.Undocumented 3D effects (CL only measurements) 3.Lack of uncertainty analysis While there are a number of good subsonic experimental investigations that are sufficiently documented to be considered test cases for CFD and turbulence model validation, the number of supersonic and hypersonic cases is much less. This was highlighted by Settles and Dodsons [1] comprehensive review of available supersonic and hypersonic experimental studies. In all, several hundred studies were considered for their database.Of these, over a hundred were subjected to rigorous acceptance criteria. Based on their criteria, only 19 (12 supersonic, 7 hypersonic) were considered of sufficient quality to be used for validation purposes. Aeschliman and Oberkampf [2] recognized the need to develop a specific methodology for experimental studies intended specifically for validation purposes.

  1. Investigation of corner shock boundary layer interactions to understand inlet unstart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funderburk, Morgan

    2015-11-01

    Inlet unstart is a detrimental phenomenon in dual-mode ramjet/scramjet engines that causes severe loss of thrust, large transient structural load, and potentially a loss of the aircraft. In order to analyze the effects that the corner shock boundary layer interaction (SBLI) has on initiating and perpetuating inlet unstart, a qualitative and quantitative investigation into mean and dynamic features of corner SBLI at various Mach numbers is made. Surface streakline visualization showed that the corner SBLI is highly three-dimensional with a dominant presence of corner separation vortex. Further, the peak r.m.s. pressure was located at the periphery of corner separation vortex, suggesting that the unsteady loading is caused by the corner vortex. Power spectral densities of wall-pressure fluctuations in the peak r.m.s. location were analyzed in order to characterize the dominant frequencies of oscillation of the flow structures and to unravel the dynamic interactions between them in order to expand the operating margin of future hypersonic air breathing vehicles.

  2. HIFiRE-1 Turbulent Shock Boundary Layer Interaction - Flight Data and Computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmel, Roger L.; Prabhu, Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    The Hypersonic International Flight Research Experimentation (HIFiRE) program is a hypersonic flight test program executed by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and Australian Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO). This flight contained a cylinder-flare induced shock boundary layer interaction (SBLI). Computations of the interaction were conducted for a number of times during the ascent. The DPLR code used for predictions was calibrated against ground test data prior to exercising the code at flight conditions. Generally, the computations predicted the upstream influence and interaction pressures very well. Plateau pressures on the cylinder were predicted well at all conditions. Although the experimental heat transfer showed a large amount of scatter, especially at low heating levels, the measured heat transfer agreed well with computations. The primary discrepancy between the experiment and computation occurred in the pressures measured on the flare during second stage burn. Measured pressures exhibited large overshoots late in the second stage burn, the mechanism of which is unknown. The good agreement between flight measurements and CFD helps validate the philosophy of calibrating CFD against ground test, prior to exercising it at flight conditions.

  3. Understanding the Flow Physics of Shock Boundary-Layer Interactions Using CFD and Numerical Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlander, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analyses of the University of Michigan (UM) Shock/Boundary-Layer Interaction (SBLI) experiments were performed as an extension of the CFD SBLI Workshop held at the 48th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting in 2010. In particular, the UM Mach 2.75 Glass Tunnel with a semi-spanning 7.75deg wedge was analyzed in attempts to explore key physics pertinent to SBLI's, including thermodynamic and viscous boundary conditions as well as turbulence modeling. Most of the analyses were 3D CFD simulations using the OVERFLOW flow solver, with additional quasi-1D simulations performed with an in house MATLAB code interfacing with the NIST REFPROP code to explore perfect verses non-ideal air. A fundamental exploration pertaining to the effects of particle image velocimetry (PIV) on post-processing data is also shown. Results from the CFD simulations showed an improvement in agreement with experimental data with key contributions including adding a laminar zone upstream of the wedge and the necessity of mimicking PIV particle lag for comparisons. Results from the quasi-1D simulation showed that there was little difference between perfect and non-ideal air for the configuration presented.

  4. Numerical simulation of heat fluxes in a two-temperature plasma at shock tube walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, E A; Poniaev, S A

    2015-01-01

    Numerical simulation of a two-temperature three-component Xenon plasma flow is presented. A solver based on the OpenFOAM CFD software package is developed. The heat flux at the shock tube end wall is calculated and compared with experimental data. It is shown that the heat flux due to electrons can be as high as 14% of the total heat flux. (paper)

  5. Numerical simulation of heat fluxes in a two-temperature plasma at shock tube walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, E. A.; Poniaev, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical simulation of a two-temperature three-component Xenon plasma flow is presented. A solver based on the OpenFOAM CFD software package is developed. The heat flux at the shock tube end wall is calculated and compared with experimental data. It is shown that the heat flux due to electrons can be as high as 14% of the total heat flux.

  6. Reversibility of temperature driven discrete layer-by-layer formation of dioctyl-benzothieno-benzothiophene films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohr, M; Ehmann, H M A; Jones, A O F; Salzmann, I; Shen, Q; Teichert, C; Ruzié, C; Schweicher, G; Geerts, Y H; Resel, R; Sferrazza, M; Werzer, O

    2017-03-22

    Film forming properties of semiconducting organic molecules comprising alkyl-chains combined with an aromatic unit have a decisive impact on possible applications in organic electronics. In particular, knowledge on the film formation process in terms of wetting or dewetting, and the precise control of these processes, is of high importance. In the present work, the subtle effect of temperature on the morphology and structure of dioctyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothiophene (C8-BTBT) films deposited on silica surfaces by spin coating is investigated in situ via X-ray diffraction techniques and atomic force microscopy. Depending on temperature, bulk C8-BTBT exhibits a crystalline, a smectic A and an isotropic phase. Heating of thin C8-BTBT layers at temperatures below the smectic phase transition temperature leads to a strong dewetting of the films. Upon approaching the smectic phase transition, the molecules start to rewet the surface in the form of discrete monolayers with a defined number of monolayers being present at a given temperature. The wetting process and layer formation is well defined and thermally stable at a given temperature. On cooling the reverse effect is observed and dewetting occurs. This demonstrates the full reversibility of the film formation behavior and reveals that the layering process is defined by an equilibrium thermodynamic state, rather than by kinetic effects.

  7. Study of the response of Zircaloy- 4 cladding to thermal shock during water quenching after double sided steam oxidation at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawarn, Tapan K., E-mail: sawarn@barc.gov.in; Banerjee, Suparna; Kumar, Sunil

    2016-05-15

    This study investigates the failure of embrittled Zircaloy-4 cladding in a simulated loss of coolant accident condition and correlates it with the evolved stratified microstructure. Isothermal steam oxidation of Zircaloy-4 cladding at high temperatures (900–1200 °C) with soaking periods in the range 60–900 s followed by water quenching was carried out. The combined oxide + oxygen stabilized α-Zr layer thickness and the fraction of the load bearing phase (recrystallised α-Zr grains + prior β-Zr or only prior β-Zr) of clad tube specimens were correlated with the %ECR calculated using Baker-Just equation. Average oxygen concentration of the load bearing phase corresponding to different oxidation conditions was calculated from the average microhardness using an empirical correlation. The results of these experiments are presented in this paper. Thermal shock sustainability of the clad was correlated with the %ECR, combined oxide+α-Zr(O) layer thickness, fraction of the load bearing phase and its average oxygen concentration. - Highlights: • Response of the embrittled Zircaloy-4 clad towards thermal shock, simulated under LOCA condition was investigated. • Thermal shock sustainability of the clad was correlated with its evolved stratified microstructure. • Cladding fails at %ECR value ≥ 29. • To resist the thermal shock, clad should have load bearing phase fraction > 0.44 and average oxygen concentration < 0.69 wt%.

  8. COLLISIONLESS ELECTRON–ION SHOCKS IN RELATIVISTIC UNMAGNETIZED JET–AMBIENT INTERACTIONS: NON-THERMAL ELECTRON INJECTION BY DOUBLE LAYER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardaneh, Kazem; Cai, Dongsheng; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    The course of non-thermal electron ejection in relativistic unmagnetized electron–ion shocks is investigated by performing self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations. The shocks are excited through the injection of a relativistic jet into ambient plasma, leading to two distinct shocks (referred to as the trailing shock and leading shock) and a contact discontinuity. The Weibel-like instabilities heat the electrons up to approximately half of the ion kinetic energy. The double layers formed in the trailing and leading edges then accelerate the electrons up to the ion kinetic energy. The electron distribution function in the leading edge shows a clear, non-thermal power-law tail which contains ∼1% of electrons and ∼8% of the electron energy. Its power-law index is −2.6. The acceleration efficiency is ∼23% by number and ∼50% by energy, and the power-law index is −1.8 for the electron distribution function in the trailing edge. The effect of the dimensionality is examined by comparing the results of three-dimensional simulations with those of two-dimensional simulations. The comparison demonstrates that electron acceleration is more efficient in two dimensions.

  9. Release path temperatures of shock-compressed tin from dynamic reflectance and radiance measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Lone, B. M., E-mail: lalonebm@nv.doe.gov; Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Special Technologies Laboratory, Santa Barbara, California 93111 (United States); Holtkamp, D. B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Iverson, A. J. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Los Alamos Operations, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Hixson, R. S.; Veeser, L. R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); National Security Technologies, LLC, Los Alamos Operations, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2013-08-14

    Dynamic reflectance and radiance measurements were conducted for tin samples shock compressed to 35 GPa and released to 15 GPa using high explosives. We determined the reflectance of the tin samples glued to lithium fluoride windows using an integrating sphere with an internal xenon flashlamp as an illumination source. The dynamic reflectance (R) was determined at near normal incidence in four spectral bands with coverage in visible and near-infrared spectra. Uncertainties in R/R{sub 0} are <2%, and uncertainties in absolute reflectance are <5%. In complementary experiments, thermal radiance from the tin/glue/lithium fluoride interface was recorded with similar shock stress and spectral coverage as the reflectance measurements. The two sets of experiments were combined to obtain the temperature history of the tin surface with an uncertainty of <2%. The stress at the interface was determined from photonic Doppler velocimetry and combined with the temperatures to obtain temperature-stress release paths for tin. We discuss the relationship between the experimental release paths and release isentropes that begin on the principal shock Hugoniot.

  10. An experimental study of three-dimensional shock wave/boundary layer interactions generated by sharp fins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, F. K.; Settles, G. S.; Bogdonoff, S. M.

    1983-01-01

    The interaction between a turbulent boundary layer and a shock wave generated by a sharp fin with leading edge sweepback was investigated. The incoming flow was at Mach 2.96 and at a unit Reynolds number of 63 x 10 to the 6th power 0.1 m. The approximate incoming boundary layer thickness was either 4 mm or 17 mm. The fins used were at 5 deg, 9 deg and 15 deg incidence and had leading edge sweepback from 0 deg to 65 deg. The tests consisted of surface kerosene lampblack streak visualization, surface pressure measurements, shock wave shape determination by shadowgraphs, and localized vapor screen visualization. The upstream influence lengths of the fin interactions were correlated using viscous and inviscid flow parameters. The parameters affecting the surface features close to the fin and way from the fin were also identified. Essentially, the surface features in the farfield were found to be conical.

  11. CFD Validation Experiment of a Mach 2.5 Axisymmetric Shock-Wave Boundary-Layer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, David O.

    2015-01-01

    Preliminary results of an experimental investigation of a Mach 2.5 two-dimensional axisymmetric shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction (SWBLI) are presented. The purpose of the investigation is to create a SWBLI dataset specifically for CFD validation purposes. Presented herein are the details of the facility and preliminary measurements characterizing the facility and interaction region. The results will serve to define the region of interest where more detailed mean and turbulence measurements will be made.

  12. Low-temperature atomic layer epitaxy of AlN ultrathin films by layer-by-layer, in-situ atomic layer annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Huan-Yu; Lee, Wei-Hao; Kao, Wei-Chung; Chuang, Yung-Chuan; Lin, Ray-Ming; Lin, Hsin-Chih; Shiojiri, Makoto; Chen, Miin-Jang

    2017-01-03

    Low-temperature epitaxial growth of AlN ultrathin films was realized by atomic layer deposition (ALD) together with the layer-by-layer, in-situ atomic layer annealing (ALA), instead of a high growth temperature which is needed in conventional epitaxial growth techniques. By applying the ALA with the Ar plasma treatment in each ALD cycle, the AlN thin film was converted dramatically from the amorphous phase to a single-crystalline epitaxial layer, at a low deposition temperature of 300 °C. The energy transferred from plasma not only provides the crystallization energy but also enhances the migration of adatoms and the removal of ligands, which significantly improve the crystallinity of the epitaxial layer. The X-ray diffraction reveals that the full width at half-maximum of the AlN (0002) rocking curve is only 144 arcsec in the AlN ultrathin epilayer with a thickness of only a few tens of nm. The high-resolution transmission electron microscopy also indicates the high-quality single-crystal hexagonal phase of the AlN epitaxial layer on the sapphire substrate. The result opens a window for further extension of the ALD applications from amorphous thin films to the high-quality low-temperature atomic layer epitaxy, which can be exploited in a variety of fields and applications in the near future.

  13. Temperature dependence of mobility in silicon (100) inversion layers at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, Y.; Suzuki, T.; Kawaji, S.

    1982-01-01

    Electron mobility of Si(100) n-inversion layers in MOSFETs having μsub(peak) (4.2 K) = 4000.6500 and 12000 cm 2 /V x s has been measured at temperatures between 1 and 80 K. The carrier concentration dependence of the mobility extrapolated to T = O and the temperature dependent part of the scattering probability are investigated. (orig.)

  14. Gibberellic Acid-Induced Aleurone Layers Responding to Heat Shock or Tunicamycin Provide Insight into the N-Glycoproteome, Protein Secretion, and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barba Espin, Gregorio; Dedvisitsakul, Plaipol; Hägglund, Per

    2014-01-01

    respond to gibberellic acid by secreting an array of proteins and provide a unique system for the analysis of plant protein secretion. Perturbation of protein secretion in gibberellic acid-induced aleurone layers by two independent mechanisms, heat shock and tunicamycin treatment, demonstrated overlapping...... and secretion, such as calreticulin, protein disulfide isomerase, proteasome subunits, and isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase. Sixteen heat shock proteins in 29 spots showed diverse responses to the treatments, with only a minority increasing in response to heat shock. The majority, all of which were small heat...... shock proteins, decreased in heat-shocked aleurone layers. Additionally, glycopeptide enrichment and N-glycosylation analysis identified 73 glycosylation sites in 65 aleurone layer proteins, with 53 of the glycoproteins found in extracellular fractions and 36 found in intracellular fractions...

  15. Temperature boundary layer profiles in turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Emily S. C.; Emran, Mohammad S.; Horn, Susanne; Shishkina, Olga

    2017-11-01

    Classical boundary-layer theory for steady flows cannot adequately describe the boundary layer profiles in turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection. We have developed a thermal boundary layer equation which takes into account fluctuations in terms of an eddy thermal diffusivity. Based on Prandtl's mixing length ideas, we relate the eddy thermal diffusivity to the stream function. With this proposed relation, we can solve the thermal boundary layer equation and obtain a closed-form expression for the dimensionless mean temperature profile in terms of two independent parameters: θ(ξ) =1/b∫0b ξ [ 1 +3a3/b3(η - arctan(η)) ] - c dη , where ξ is the similarity variable and the parameters a, b, and c are related by the condition θ(∞) = 1 . With a proper choice of the parameters, our predictions of the temperature profile are in excellent agreement with the results of our direct numerical simulations for a wide range of Prandtl numbers (Pr), from Pr=0.01 to Pr=2547.9. OS, ME and SH acknowledge the financial support by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) under Grants Sh405/4-2 (Heisenberg fellowship), Sh405/3-2 and Ho 5890/1-1, respectively.

  16. Direct measurements of wall shear stress by buried wire gages in a shock-wave boundary-layer interaction region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, V. S.; Rose, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    Detailed measurements of wall shear stress (skin friction) were made with specially developed buried wire gages in the interaction regions of a Mach 2.9 turbulent boundary layer with externally generated shocks. Separation and reattachment points inferred by these measurements support the findings of earlier experiments which used a surface oil flow technique and pitot profile measurements. The measurements further indicate that the boundary layer tends to attain significantly higher skin-friction values downstream of the interaction region as compared to upstream. Comparisons between measured wall shear stress and published results of some theoretical calculation schemes show that the general, but not detailed, behavior is predicted well by such schemes.

  17. Oxide layer stability in lead-bismuth at high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, F. J.; Soler, L.; Hernández, F.; Gómez-Briceño, D.

    2004-11-01

    Materials protection by 'in situ' oxidation has been studied in stagnant lead-bismuth, with different oxygen levels (H 2/H 2O ratios of 0.3 and 0.03), at temperatures from 535 °C to 600 °C and times from 100 to 3000 h. The materials tested were the martensitic steels F82Hmod, EM10 and T91 and the austenitic stainless steels, AISI 316L and AISI 304L. The results obtained point to the existence of an apparent threshold temperature above which corrosion occurs and the formation of a protective and stable oxide layer is not possible. This threshold temperature depends on material composition, oxygen concentration in the liquid lead-bismuth and time. The threshold temperature is higher for the austenitic steels, especially for the AISI 304L, and it increases with the oxygen concentration in the lead-bismuth. The oxide layer formed disappear with time and, after 3000 h all the materials, except AISI 304L, suffer corrosion, more severe for the martensitic steels and at the highest temperature tested.

  18. Impact of Isothermal Aging and Testing Temperature on Large Flip-Chip BGA Interconnect Mechanical Shock Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae-Kyu; Chen, Zhiqiang; Guirguis, Cherif; Akinade, Kola

    2017-10-01

    The stability of solder interconnects in a mechanical shock environment is crucial for large body size flip-chip ball grid array (FCBGA) electronic packages. Additionally, the junction temperature increases with higher electric power condition, which brings the component into an elevated temperature environment, thus introducing another consideration factor for mechanical stability of interconnection joints. Since most of the shock performance data available were produced at room temperature, the effect of elevated temperature is of interest to ensure the reliability of the device in a mechanical shock environment. To achieve a stable␣interconnect in a dynamic shock environment, the interconnections must tolerate mechanical strain, which is induced by the shock wave input and reaches the particular component interconnect joint. In this study, large body size (52.5 × 52.5 mm2) FCBGA components assembled on 2.4-mm-thick boards were tested with various isothermal pre-conditions and testing conditions. With a heating element embedded in the test board, a test temperature range from room temperature to 100°C was established. The effects of elevated temperature on mechanical shock performance were investigated. Failure and degradation mechanisms are identified and discussed based on the microstructure evolution and grain structure transformations.

  19. Temperature Distribution of the Ionospheric Plasma at F Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwang-Jae Rhee

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Langmuir probe was housed in the sounding rocket to test the probe's performance and to find the environmental parameters at the F layer of the ionosphere. The gold plated cylindrical probe had a length of 14§¯ and a diameter of 0.096 §¯. The applied voltage to the probe consisted of 0.9 sec fixed positive bias followed by 0.1 sec of down/up sweep. This ensured that the probe swept through the probe's current-voltage characteristic at least once during 1 second quiescent periods enabling the electron temperature to be measured during the undisturbed times of the flight. The experimental results showed good agreement of the temperature distribution with IRI model at the lower F layer. In the upper layer, the experimental temperatures were 100-200K lower than the IRI model's because of the different geomagnetic conditions: averaged conditions were used in IRI model and specific conditions were reflected in the experiment.

  20. Elastic precursor wave decay in shock-compressed aluminum over a wide range of temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Ryan A.

    2018-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the dynamic flow behavior of aluminum is considered in the context of precursor wave decay measurements and simulations. In this regard, a dislocation-based model of high-rate metal plasticity is brought into agreement with previous measurements of evolving wave profiles at 300 to 933 K, wherein the amplification of the precursor structure with temperature arises naturally from the dislocation mechanics treatment. The model suggests that the kinetics of inelastic flow and stress relaxation are governed primarily by phonon scattering and radiative damping (sound wave emission from dislocation cores), both of which intensify with temperature. The manifestation of these drag effects is linked to low dislocation density ahead of the precursor wave and the high mobility of dislocations in the face-centered cubic lattice. Simulations performed using other typical models of shock wave plasticity do not reproduce the observed temperature-dependence of elastic/plastic wave structure.

  1. Atomic layer deposition of GaN at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozgit, Cagla; Donmez, Inci; Alevli, Mustafa; Biyikli, Necmi [UNAM - Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2012-01-15

    The authors report on the self-limiting growth of GaN thin films at low temperatures. Films were deposited on Si substrates by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition using trimethylgallium (TMG) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) as the group-III and -V precursors, respectively. GaN deposition rate saturated at 185 deg. C for NH{sub 3} doses starting from 90 s. Atomic layer deposition temperature window was observed from 185 to {approx}385 deg. C. Deposition rate, which is constant at {approx}0.51 A/cycle within the temperature range of 250 - 350 deg. C, increased slightly as the temperature decreased to 185 deg. C. In the bulk film, concentrations of Ga, N, and O were constant at {approx}36.6, {approx}43.9, and {approx}19.5 at. %, respectively. C was detected only at the surface and no C impurities were found in the bulk film. High oxygen concentration in films was attributed to the oxygen impurities present in group-V precursor. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy studies revealed a microstructure consisting of small crystallites dispersed in an amorphous matrix.

  2. High temperature shock tube experiments and kinetic modeling study of diisopropyl ketone ignition and pyrolysis

    KAUST Repository

    Barari, Ghazal

    2017-03-10

    Diisopropyl ketone (DIPK) is a promising biofuel candidate, which is produced using endophytic fungal conversion. In this work, a high temperature detailed combustion kinetic model for DIPK was developed using the reaction class approach. DIPK ignition and pyrolysis experiments were performed using the UCF shock tube. The shock tube oxidation experiments were conducted between 1093K and 1630K for different reactant compositions, equivalence ratios (φ=0.5–2.0), and pressures (1–6atm). In addition, methane concentration time-histories were measured during 2% DIPK pyrolysis in argon using cw laser absorption near 3400nm at temperatures between 1300 and 1400K near 1atm. To the best of our knowledge, current ignition delay times (above 1050K) and methane time histories are the first such experiments performed in DIPK at high temperatures. Present data were used as validation targets for the new kinetic model and simulation results showed fair agreement compared to the experiments. The reaction rates corresponding to the main consumption pathways of DIPK were found to have high sensitivity in controlling the reactivity, so these were adjusted to attain better agreement between the simulation and experimental data. A correlation was developed based on the experimental data to predict the ignition delay times using the temperature, pressure, fuel concentration and oxygen concentration.

  3. High temperature shock tube experiments and kinetic modeling study of diisopropyl ketone ignition and pyrolysis

    KAUST Repository

    Barari, Ghazal; Pryor, Owen; Koroglu, Batikan; Sarathy, Mani; Masunov, Artë m E.; Vasu, Subith S.

    2017-01-01

    Diisopropyl ketone (DIPK) is a promising biofuel candidate, which is produced using endophytic fungal conversion. In this work, a high temperature detailed combustion kinetic model for DIPK was developed using the reaction class approach. DIPK ignition and pyrolysis experiments were performed using the UCF shock tube. The shock tube oxidation experiments were conducted between 1093K and 1630K for different reactant compositions, equivalence ratios (φ=0.5–2.0), and pressures (1–6atm). In addition, methane concentration time-histories were measured during 2% DIPK pyrolysis in argon using cw laser absorption near 3400nm at temperatures between 1300 and 1400K near 1atm. To the best of our knowledge, current ignition delay times (above 1050K) and methane time histories are the first such experiments performed in DIPK at high temperatures. Present data were used as validation targets for the new kinetic model and simulation results showed fair agreement compared to the experiments. The reaction rates corresponding to the main consumption pathways of DIPK were found to have high sensitivity in controlling the reactivity, so these were adjusted to attain better agreement between the simulation and experimental data. A correlation was developed based on the experimental data to predict the ignition delay times using the temperature, pressure, fuel concentration and oxygen concentration.

  4. Mapping temperature-induced conformational changes in the Escherichia coli heat shock transcription factor sigma 32 by amide hydrogen exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rist, Wolfgang; Jørgensen, Thomas J D; Roepstorff, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Stress conditions such as heat shock alter the transcriptional profile in all organisms. In Escherichia coli the heat shock transcription factor, sigma 32, out-competes upon temperature up-shift the housekeeping sigma-factor, sigma 70, for binding to core RNA polymerase and initiates heat shock...... gene transcription. To investigate possible heat-induced conformational changes in sigma 32 we performed amide hydrogen (H/D) exchange experiments under optimal growth and heat shock conditions combined with mass spectrometry. We found a rapid exchange of around 220 of the 294 amide hydrogens at 37...... degrees C, indicating that sigma 32 adopts a highly flexible structure. At 42 degrees C we observed a slow correlated exchange of 30 additional amide hydrogens and localized it to a helix-loop-helix motif within domain sigma 2 that is responsible for the recognition of the -10 region in heat shock...

  5. Fluorescence Imaging of Rotational and Vibrational Temperature in a Shock Tunnel Nozzle Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Philip C.; Danehy, Paul M.; Houwing, A. F. P.

    2003-01-01

    Two-dimensional rotational and vibrational temperature measurements were made at the nozzle exit of a free-piston shock tunnel using planar laser-induced fluorescence. The Mach 7 flow consisted predominantly of nitrogen with a trace quantity of nitric oxide. Nitric oxide was employed as the probe species and was excited at 225 nm. Nonuniformities in the distribution of nitric oxide in the test gas were observed and were concluded to be due to contamination of the test gas by driver gas or cold test gas.The nozzle-exit rotational temperature was measured and is in reasonable agreement with computational modeling. Nonlinearities in the detection system were responsible for systematic errors in the measurements. The vibrational temperature was measured to be constant with distance from the nozzle exit, indicating it had frozen during the nozzle expansion.

  6. Reply to ''Comment on 'Thermocouple temperature measurements in shock-compressed solids' ''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloomquist, D.D.; Sheffield, S.A.

    1982-01-01

    We disagree with the interpretation offered in the above comment. The suggestion was made that the anomalously fast response of thin-foil thermocouples reported previously is the result of strain dependence of the thermocouple response and not shock enhanced thermal equilibration. Although the emplacement geometry has a profound effect on the response of embedded thin-foil temperature gauges as noted in the above comment, the evidence presented, along with recent results discussed in this reply, do not support the conclusions presented in the above comment

  7. Surface layer temperature inversion in the Bay of Bengal: Main characteristics and related mechanisms

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pankajakshan, T.; Suresh, I.; Gautham, S.; PrasannaKumar, S.; Lengaigne, M.; Rao, R.R.; Neetu, S.; Hegde, A.

    Surface layer temperature inversion (SLTI), a warm layer sandwiched between surface and subsurface colder waters, has been reported to frequently occur in conjunction with barrier layers in the Bay of Bengal (BoB), with potentially commensurable...

  8. Study of thermochemical nonequilibrium flow in the radiative shock layer of the simulated atmosphere of Titan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koffi-Kpante, Kossi

    1996-01-01

    Inviscid flow of the N 2 -CH 4 -Ar gas mixture in thermochemical nonequilibrium has been studied. We have specially modelled the thermal and the chemical processes, such as vibrational excitation, dissociation, ionization and radiation which can occur in the hypersonic flows. Different vibrational models are tested and the effects of kinetic-vibration coupling modeling are studied on the flow-field properties. Therefore, the intensity of spontaneous emission of CN molecule from B 2 Σ + → X 2 Σ + electronic transition of the violet band, where Δν = 0 is computed. So, comparison is made between experimental and numerical results on: 1) The spontaneous emission of CN, 2) the rotational temperature of CN B state and 3) the vibrational temperature of CN B state. Because of the profiles of the measured intensity and the disagreement between numerical results and measurements, especially on the spontaneous emission and in the thermodynamic size, the inviscid flow and the unsteady boundary layer interaction study is made. Last, the thermal and the chemical processes models described in the first part of this thesis are used to compute the inviscid nonequilibrium flow around the Huygens probe. The equations system has been solved with a finite volume method, in with the fluxes have been split with Van-Leer methods. (author) [fr

  9. Experimental Study of Fillets to Reduce Corner Effects in an Oblique Shock-Wave/Boundary Layer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirt, Stefanie M.

    2015-01-01

    A test was conducted in the 15 cm x 15 cm supersonic wind tunnel at NASA Glenn Research Center that focused on corner effects of an oblique shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction. In an attempt to control the interaction in the corner region, eight corner fillet configurations were tested. Three parameters were considered for the fillet configurations: the radius, the fillet length, and the taper length from the square corner to the fillet radius. Fillets effectively reduced the boundary-layer thickness in the corner; however, there was an associated penalty in the form of increased boundary-layer thickness at the tunnel centerline. Larger fillet radii caused greater reductions in boundary-layer thickness along the corner bisector. To a lesser, but measureable, extent, shorter fillet lengths resulted in thinner corner boundary layers. Overall, of the configurations tested, the largest radius resulted in the best combination of control in the corner, evidenced by a reduction in boundary-layer thickness, coupled with minimal impacts at the tunnel centerline.

  10. Uncertainty Assessments of 2D and Axisymmetric Hypersonic Shock Wave - Turbulent Boundary Layer Interaction Simulations at Compression Corners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Berry, Scott A.; VanNorman, John W.

    2011-01-01

    This paper is one of a series of five papers in a special session organized by the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program that addresses uncertainty assessments for CFD simulations in hypersonic flow. Simulations of a shock emanating from a compression corner and interacting with a fully developed turbulent boundary layer are evaluated herein. Mission relevant conditions at Mach 7 and Mach 14 are defined for a pre-compression ramp of a scramjet powered vehicle. Three compression angles are defined, the smallest to avoid separation losses and the largest to force a separated flow engaging more complicated flow physics. The Baldwin-Lomax and the Cebeci-Smith algebraic models, the one-equation Spalart-Allmaras model with the Catrix-Aupoix compressibility modification and two-equation models including Menter SST, Wilcox k-omega 98, and Wilcox k-omega 06 turbulence models are evaluated. Each model is fully defined herein to preclude any ambiguity regarding model implementation. Comparisons are made to existing experimental data and Van Driest theory to provide preliminary assessment of model form uncertainty. A set of coarse grained uncertainty metrics are defined to capture essential differences among turbulence models. Except for the inability of algebraic models to converge for some separated flows there is no clearly superior model as judged by these metrics. A preliminary metric for the numerical component of uncertainty in shock-turbulent-boundary-layer interactions at compression corners sufficiently steep to cause separation is defined as 55%. This value is a median of differences with experimental data averaged for peak pressure and heating and for extent of separation captured in new, grid-converged solutions presented here. This value is consistent with existing results in a literature review of hypersonic shock-turbulent-boundary-layer interactions by Roy and Blottner and with more recent computations of MacLean.

  11. CuInP₂S₆ Room Temperature Layered Ferroelectric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belianinov, A; He, Q; Dziaugys, A; Maksymovych, P; Eliseev, E; Borisevich, A; Morozovska, A; Banys, J; Vysochanskii, Y; Kalinin, S V

    2015-06-10

    We explore ferroelectric properties of cleaved 2-D flakes of copper indium thiophosphate, CuInP2S6 (CITP), and probe size effects along with limits of ferroelectric phase stability, by ambient and ultra high vacuum scanning probe microscopy. CITP belongs to the only material family known to display ferroelectric polarization in a van der Waals, layered crystal at room temperature and above. Our measurements directly reveal stable, ferroelectric polarization as evidenced by domain structures, switchable polarization, and hysteresis loops. We found that at room temperature the domain structure of flakes thicker than 100 nm is similar to the cleaved bulk surfaces, whereas below 50 nm polarization disappears. We ascribe this behavior to a well-known instability of polarization due to depolarization field. Furthermore, polarization switching at high bias is also associated with ionic mobility, as evidenced both by macroscopic measurements and by formation of surface damage under the tip at a bias of 4 V-likely due to copper reduction. Mobile Cu ions may therefore also contribute to internal screening mechanisms. The existence of stable polarization in a van-der-Waals crystal naturally points toward new strategies for ultimate scaling of polar materials, quasi-2D, and single-layer materials with advanced and nonlinear dielectric properties that are presently not found in any members of the growing "graphene family".

  12. Thermal shock behaviour of H and H/He-exposed tungsten at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemahieu, N; Linke, J; Pintsuk, G; Wirtz, M; Greuner, H; Maier, H; Oost, G Van; Noterdaeme, J-M

    2016-01-01

    Polycrystalline tungsten samples were characterized and exposed to a pure H beam or mixed H/He beam containing 6% He in GLADIS at a surface temperature of 600 °C, 1000 °C, or 1500 °C. After 5400 s of exposure time with a heat flux of 10.5 MW m −2 , the total accumulated fluence of 2 × 10 25 m −2 was reached. Thereafter, edge localized mode (ELM)-like thermal shocks with a duration of 1 ms and an absorbed power density of 190 MW m −2 and 380 MW m −2 were applied on the samples in JUDITH 1. During the thermal shocks, the base temperature was kept at 1000 °C. The ELM-experiments with the lowest transient power density did not result in any detected damage. The other tests showed the beginning of crack formation for every sample, except the sample pre-exposed with the pure H-beam at 1500 °C in GLADIS. This sample was roughened, but did not show any crack initiation. With exception to the roughened sample, the category of ELM-induced damage for the pre-exposed samples is identical to the reference tests without pre-exposure to a particle flux. (paper)

  13. Histoplasma capsulatum heat-shock 60 orchestrates the adaptation of the fungus to temperature stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Jefferson Guimarães

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock proteins (Hsps are among the most widely distributed and evolutionary conserved proteins. Hsps are essential regulators of diverse constitutive metabolic processes and are markedly upregulated during stress. A 62 kDa Hsp (Hsp60 of Histoplasma capsulatum (Hc is an immunodominant antigen and the major surface ligand to CR3 receptors on macrophages. However little is known about the function of this protein within the fungus. We characterized Hc Hsp60-protein interactions under different temperature to gain insights of its additional functions oncell wall dynamism, heat stress and pathogenesis. We conducted co-immunoprecipitations with antibodies to Hc Hsp60 using cytoplasmic and cell wall extracts. Interacting proteins were identified by shotgun proteomics. For the cell wall, 84 common interactions were identified among the 3 growth conditions, including proteins involved in heat-shock response, sugar and amino acid/protein metabolism and cell signaling. Unique interactions were found at each temperature [30°C (81 proteins, 37°C (14 and 37/40°C (47]. There were fewer unique interactions in cytoplasm [30°C (6, 37°C (25 and 37/40°C (39] and four common interactions, including additional Hsps and other known virulence factors. These results show the complexity of Hsp60 function and provide insights into Hc biology, which may lead to new avenues for the management of histoplasmosis.

  14. The strengthening mechanism of a nickel-based alloy after laser shock processing at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yinghong; Zhou, Liucheng; He, Weifeng; He, Guangyu; Wang, Xuede; Nie, Xiangfan; Wang, Bo; Luo, Sihai; Li, Yuqin

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the strengthening mechanism of laser shock processing (LSP) at high temperatures in the K417 nickel-based alloy. Using a laser-induced shock wave, residual compressive stresses and nanocrystals with a length of 30–200 nm and a thickness of 1 μm are produced on the surface of the nickel-based alloy K417. When the K417 alloy is subjected to heat treatment at 900 °C after LSP, most of the residual compressive stress relaxes while the microhardness retains good thermal stability; the nanocrystalline surface has not obviously grown after the 900 °C per 10 h heat treatment, which shows a comparatively good thermal stability. There are several reasons for the good thermal stability of the nanocrystalline surface, such as the low value of cold hardening of LSP, extreme high-density defects and the grain boundary pinning of an impure element. The results of the vibration fatigue experiments show that the fatigue strength of K417 alloy is enhanced and improved from 110 to 285 MPa after LSP. After the 900 °C per 10 h heat treatment, the fatigue strength is 225 MPa; the heat treatment has not significantly reduced the reinforcement effect. The feature of the LSP strengthening mechanism of nickel-based alloy at a high temperature is the co-working effect of the nanocrystalline surface and the residual compressive stress after thermal relaxation. (paper)

  15. Theoretical Research on Thermal Shock Resistance of Ultra-High Temperature Ceramics Focusing on the Adjustment of Stress Reduction Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daining Fang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The thermal shock resistance of ceramics depends on not only the mechanical and thermal properties of materials, but also the external constraint and thermal condition. So, in order to study the actual situation in its service process, a temperature-dependent thermal shock resistance model for ultra-high temperature ceramics considering the effects of the thermal environment and external constraint was established based on the existing theory. The present work mainly focused on the adjustment of the stress reduction factor according to different thermal shock situations. The influences of external constraint on both critical rupture temperature difference and the second thermal shock resistance parameter in either case of rapid heating or cooling conditions had been studied based on this model. The results show the necessity of adjustment of the stress reduction factor in different thermal shock situations and the limitations of the applicable range of the second thermal shock resistance parameter. Furthermore, the model was validated by the finite element method.

  16. Towards a smoothed particle hydrodynamics algorithm for shocks through layered materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zisis, I.A.; Linden, van der B.J.; Giannopapa, C.G.

    2013-01-01

    Hypervelocity impacts (HVIs) are collisions at velocities greater than the target object’s speed of sound. Such impacts produce pressure waves that generate sharp and sudden changes in the density of the materials. These are propagated as shock waves. Previous computational research has given

  17. Shock waves in gas and plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, K.

    1996-01-01

    A shock wave is a discontinuous surface that connects supersonic flow with subsonic flow. After a shock wave, flow velocity is reduced, and pressure and temperature increase; entropy especially increases across a shock wave. Therefore, flow is in nonequilibrium, and irreversible processes occur inside the shock layer. The thickness of a shock wave in neutral gas is of the order of the mean free path of the fluid particle. A shock wave also appears in magnetized plasma. Provided that when the plasma flow is parallel to the magnetic field, a shock wave appears if the governing equation for velocity potential is in hyperbolic type in relation with the Mach number and the Alfven number. When the flow is perpendicular to the magnetic field, the Maxwell stress, in addition to the pressure, plays a role in the shock wave in plasma. When the plasma temperature is so high, as the plasma becomes collision-free, another type of shock wave appears. In a collision-free shock wave, gyromotions of electrons around the magnetic field lines cause the shock formation instead of collisions in a collision-dominant plasma or neutral gas. Regardless of a collision-dominant or collision-free shock wave, the fluid that passes through the shock wave is heated in addition to being compressed. In inertial confinement fusion, the fuel must be compressed. Really, implosion motion performs fuel compression. A shock wave, appearing in the process of implosion, compresses the fuel. The shock wave, however, heats the fuel more intensively, and it makes it difficult to compress the fuel further because high temperatures invite high pressure. Adiabatic compression of the fuel is the desired result during the implosion, without the formation of a shock wave. (Author)

  18. Efficient dual layer interconnect coating for high temperature electrochemical devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palcut, Marián; Mikkelsen, Lars; Neufeld, Kai

    2012-01-01

    Effects of novel dual layer coatings Co3O4/La0.85Sr0.15MnO3−δ on high temperature oxidation behaviour of candidate steels for interconnects are studied at 1123 K in flowing simulated ambient air (air + 1% H2O) and oxygen. Four alloys are investigated: Crofer 22 APU, Crofer 22 H, E-Brite and AL 29...... that the oxidation reaction is limited by outward Cr3+ diffusion in the chromia scale. The coating effectively reduces the oxidation rate. Reactions and cation inter-diffusion between the coating and the oxide scale are observed. Long term effects of these interactions are discussed and practical implications...

  19. Selective and low temperature transition metal intercalation in layered tellurides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Takeshi; Koshiko, Masaki; Zhang, Yaoqing; Oguchi, Tamio; Yu, Wen; Kato, Daichi; Kobayashi, Yoji; Orikasa, Yuki; Yamamoto, Takafumi; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Green, Mark A.; Kageyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Layered materials embrace rich intercalation reactions to accommodate high concentrations of foreign species within their structures, and find many applications spanning from energy storage, ion exchange to secondary batteries. Light alkali metals are generally most easily intercalated due to their light mass, high charge/volume ratio and in many cases strong reducing properties. An evolving area of materials chemistry, however, is to capture metals selectively, which is of technological and environmental significance but rather unexplored. Here we show that the layered telluride T2PTe2 (T=Ti, Zr) displays exclusive insertion of transition metals (for example, Cd, Zn) as opposed to alkali cations, with tetrahedral coordination preference to tellurium. Interestingly, the intercalation reactions proceed in solid state and at surprisingly low temperatures (for example, 80 °C for cadmium in Ti2PTe2). The current method of controlling selectivity provides opportunities in the search for new materials for various applications that used to be possible only in a liquid. PMID:27966540

  20. Aeroheating Measurement of Apollo Shaped Capsule with Boundary Layer Trip in the Free-piston Shock Tunnel HIEST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hideyuki, TANNO; Tomoyuki, KOMURO; Kazuo, SATO; Katsuhiro, ITOH; Lillard, Randolph P.; Olejniczak, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    An aeroheating measurement test campaign of an Apollo capsule model with laminar and turbulent boundary layer was performed in the free-piston shock tunnel HIEST at JAXA Kakuda Space Center. A 250mm-diameter 6.4%-scaled Apollo CM capsule model made of SUS-304 stainless steel was applied in this study. To measure heat flux distribution, the model was equipped with 88 miniature co-axial Chromel-Constantan thermocouples on the heat shield surface of the model. In order to promote boundary layer transition, a boundary layer trip insert with 13 "pizza-box" isolated roughness elements, which have 1.27mm square, were placed at 17mm below of the model geometric center. Three boundary layer trip inserts with roughness height of k=0.3mm, 0.6mm and 0.8mm were used to identify the appropriate height to induce transition. Heat flux records with or without roughness elements were obtained for model angles of attack 28º under stagnation enthalpy between H(sub 0)=3.5MJ/kg to 21MJ/kg and stagnation pressure between P(sub 0)=14MPa to 60MPa. Under the condition above, Reynolds number based on the model diameter was varied from 0.2 to 1.3 million. With roughness elements, boundary layer became fully turbulent less than H(sub 0)=9MJ/kg condition. However, boundary layer was still laminar over H(sub 0)=13MJ/kg condition even with the highest roughness elements. An additional experiment was also performed to correct unexpected heat flux augmentation observed over H(sub 0)=9MJ/kg condition.

  1. Study of the response of Zircaloy cladding to thermal shock during water quenching after double sided steam oxidation at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Suparna; Sawarn, Tapan K.; Kumar, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the failure of embrittled Zircaloy-4 cladding used in the present generation of Indian pressurized heavy water reactors (IPHWRs) in a simulated LOCA condition and its correlation with the evolved stratified microstructure. Isothermal steam oxidation of Zircaloy-4 cladding at high temperatures (900-1200°C) with soaking periods in the range 60-900 seconds followed by water quenching was carried out. None of the pieces broke during quenching except for those heated at 1100, 1150 and 1200°C for longer durations. The combined oxide + oxygen stabilized α-Zr(O) layer thickness and the fraction of the load bearing phase of clad tube specimens were correlated with the %ECR values calculated using Baker-Just equation. Average oxygen concentration of the load bearing prior β-Zr phase corresponding to different oxidation conditions was calculated from the average microhardness values in Vickers scale using an empirical correlation developed by Leistikow. The results of these experiments are presented in this paper. Thermal shock sustainability of the clad was correlated with the %ECR, combined oxide+α-Zr(O) layer thickness, fraction of the prior β-Zr phase and its average oxygen concentration. The thermal shock boundary was observed to be 29% ECR, 0.29 mm combined thickness of ZrO_2+α-Zr(O), 0.16 mm of β-Zr thickness with an average β phase oxygen content of 0.69 wt%. (author)

  2. Generalized Magneto-thermo-microstretch Response of a Half-space with Temperature-dependent Properties During Thermal Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi-lin Xiong

    Full Text Available Abstract The generalized magneto-thermoelastic problem of an infinite homogeneous isotropic microstretch half-space with temperature-dependent material properties placed in a transverse magnetic field is investigated in the context of different generalized thermoelastic theories. The upper surface of the half-space is subjected to a zonal time-dependent heat shock. By solving finite element governing equations, the solution to the problem is obtained, from which the transient magneto-thermoelastic responses, including temperature, stresses, displacements, microstretch, microrotation, induced magnetic field and induced electric field are presented graphically. Comparisons are made in the results obtained under different generalized thermoelastic theories to show some unique features of generalized thermoelasticity, and comparisons are made in the results obtained under three forms of temperature dependent material properties (absolute temperature dependent, reference temperature dependent and temperature-independent to show the effects of absolute temperature and reference temperature. Weibull or Log-normal.

  3. Extraordinary Photoluminescence and Strong Temperature/Angle-Dependent Raman Responses in Few-Layer Phosphorene

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Shuang; Yang, Jiong; Xu, Renjing; Wang, Fan; Li, Weifeng; Ghufran, Muhammad; Zhang, Yong-wei; Yu, Zongfu; Zhang, Gang; Qin, Qinghua; Lu, Yuerui

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorene is a new family member of two-dimensional materials. We observed strong and highly layer-dependent photoluminescence in few-layer phosphorene (2 to 5 layers). The results confirmed the theoretical prediction that few-layer phosphorene has a direct and layer-sensitive band gap. We also demonstrated that few-layer phosphorene is more sensitive to temperature modulation than graphene and MoS2 in Raman scattering. The anisotropic Raman response in few-layer phosphorene has enabled us ...

  4. MgO melting curve constraints from shock temperature and rarefaction overtake measurements in samples preheated to 2300 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fat'yanov, O. V.; Asimow, P. D.

    2014-05-01

    Continuing our effort to obtain experimental constraints on the melting curve of MgO at 100-200 GPa, we extended our target preheating capability to 2300 K. Our new Mo capsule design holds a long MgO crystal in a controlled thermal gradient until impact by a Ta flyer launched at up to 7.5 km/s on the Caltech two-stage light-gas gun. Radiative shock temperatures and rarefaction overtake times were measured simultaneously by a 6-channel VIS/NIR pyrometer with 3 ns time resolution. The majority of our experiments showed smooth monotonic increases in MgO sound speed and shock temperature with pressure from 197 to 243 GPa. The measured temperatures as well as the slopes of the pressure dependences for both temperature and sound speed were in good agreement with those calculated numerically for the solid phase at our peak shock compression conditions. Most observed sound speeds, however, were ~800 m/s higher than those predicted by the model. A single unconfirmed data point at 239 GPa showed anomalously low temperature and sound speed, which could both be explained by partial melting in this experiment and could suggest that the Hugoniot of MgO preheated to 2300 K crosses its melting line just slightly above 240 GPa.

  5. MgO melting curve constraints from shock temperature and rarefaction overtake measurements in samples preheated to 2300 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fat'yanov, O V; Asimow, P D

    2014-01-01

    Continuing our effort to obtain experimental constraints on the melting curve of MgO at 100-200 GPa, we extended our target preheating capability to 2300 K. Our new Mo capsule design holds a long MgO crystal in a controlled thermal gradient until impact by a Ta flyer launched at up to 7.5 km/s on the Caltech two-stage light-gas gun. Radiative shock temperatures and rarefaction overtake times were measured simultaneously by a 6-channel VIS/NIR pyrometer with 3 ns time resolution. The majority of our experiments showed smooth monotonic increases in MgO sound speed and shock temperature with pressure from 197 to 243 GPa. The measured temperatures as well as the slopes of the pressure dependences for both temperature and sound speed were in good agreement with those calculated numerically for the solid phase at our peak shock compression conditions. Most observed sound speeds, however, were ∼800 m/s higher than those predicted by the model. A single unconfirmed data point at 239 GPa showed anomalously low temperature and sound speed, which could both be explained by partial melting in this experiment and could suggest that the Hugoniot of MgO preheated to 2300 K crosses its melting line just slightly above 240 GPa.

  6. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Atmospheric Layer Temperatures, Version 3.3

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Atmospheric Layer Temperature Climate Data Record (CDR) dataset is a monthly analysis of the tropospheric and stratospheric data using temperature sounding...

  7. Computations of the Shock Waves at Hypersonic Velocities Taken into Account the Chemical Reactions that Appear in the Air at High Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Leonida NICULESCU

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The temperature in the nose region of a hypersonic vehicle can be extremely high, for example, reaching approximately 11 000 K at a Mach number of 36 (Apollo reentry. The bow shock wave is normal, or nearly normal, in the nose region of a blunt body, and the gas temperature behind this shock wave can be enormous at hypersonic speeds. In this case, the assumption of a calorically perfect nonreacting gas with the ratio of specific heats  of 1.4 gives an unrealistically high value of temperature. Therefore, the proper inclusion of chemically reacting effects is vital to the calculation of an accurate normal shock wave temperature.

  8. PIV measurements in two hypersonic shock wave / turbulent boundary layer interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreyer, Anne-Marie; Williams, Owen; Smits, Alexander J.

    2017-11-01

    Particle Image Velocimetry measurements were performed to study two compression corner interactions in hypersonic flow. The experiments, carried out at Mach 7.2 and at a Reynolds number based on momentum thickness of 3500, included mean flow surveys as well as turbulence measurements in the near-field of the interaction. For the 8° compression corner, the flow remained attached, and for the 33° compression corner a large separation bubble formed. For the attached case, the influence of the shock wave on the streamwise turbulence intensities is weak, but the wall-normal component and the Reynolds shear stress show considerable amplification. In the fully separated case, both the streamwise and wall normal velocity fluctuations, as well as the Reynolds shear stresses, show strong amplification across the interaction. In contrast with the behavior in the attached case, equilibrium flow is approached much more rapidly in the separated case. Turbulence measurements in such complex hypersonic flows are far from trivial, with particle frequency response limitations often significantly reducing the measured wall-normal turbulence. We will therefore discuss these influences on overall data quality as well as the interpretation of flow physics based on these results.

  9. An Experimental Study of Shock/Turbulent Boundary Layer Interactions at DNS Accessible Reynolds Numbers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bookey, Patrick B

    2005-01-01

    .... The flow was examined through the use of surface oil flow visualization, surface pressure measurements, mean Pitot pressure and total temperature surveys and condensate-enhanced filtered Rayleigh scattering (FRS...

  10. Shock compression of synthetic opal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, A; Okuno, M; Okudera, H; Mashimo, T; Omurzak, E; Katayama, S; Koyano, M

    2010-01-01

    Structural change of synthetic opal by shock-wave compression up to 38.1 GPa has been investigated by using SEM, X-ray diffraction method (XRD), Infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies. Obtained information may indicate that the dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole due to high shock and residual temperature are very important factors in the structural evolution of synthetic opal by shock compression. Synthetic opal loses opalescence by 10.9 and 18.4 GPa of shock pressures. At 18.4 GPa, dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole and transformation of network structure may occur simultaneously. The 4-membered ring of TO 4 tetrahedrons in as synthetic opal may be relaxed to larger ring such as 6-membered ring by high residual temperature. Therefore, the residual temperature may be significantly high at even 18.4 GPa of shock compression. At 23.9 GPa, opal sample recovered the opalescence. Origin of this opalescence may be its layer structure by shock compression. Finally, sample fuse by very high residual temperature at 38.1 GPa and the structure closes to that of fused SiO 2 glass. However, internal silanole groups still remain even at 38.1 GPa.

  11. Shock compression of synthetic opal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, A.; Okuno, M.; Okudera, H.; Mashimo, T.; Omurzak, E.; Katayama, S.; Koyano, M.

    2010-03-01

    Structural change of synthetic opal by shock-wave compression up to 38.1 GPa has been investigated by using SEM, X-ray diffraction method (XRD), Infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies. Obtained information may indicate that the dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole due to high shock and residual temperature are very important factors in the structural evolution of synthetic opal by shock compression. Synthetic opal loses opalescence by 10.9 and 18.4 GPa of shock pressures. At 18.4 GPa, dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole and transformation of network structure may occur simultaneously. The 4-membered ring of TO4 tetrahedrons in as synthetic opal may be relaxed to larger ring such as 6-membered ring by high residual temperature. Therefore, the residual temperature may be significantly high at even 18.4 GPa of shock compression. At 23.9 GPa, opal sample recovered the opalescence. Origin of this opalescence may be its layer structure by shock compression. Finally, sample fuse by very high residual temperature at 38.1 GPa and the structure closes to that of fused SiO2 glass. However, internal silanole groups still remain even at 38.1 GPa.

  12. Shock compression of synthetic opal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, A; Okuno, M; Okudera, H [Department of Earth Sciences, Kanazawa University Kanazawa, Ishikawa, 920-1192 (Japan); Mashimo, T; Omurzak, E [Shock Wave and Condensed Matter Research Center, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, 860-8555 (Japan); Katayama, S; Koyano, M, E-mail: okuno@kenroku.kanazawa-u.ac.j [JAIST, Nomi, Ishikawa, 923-1297 (Japan)

    2010-03-01

    Structural change of synthetic opal by shock-wave compression up to 38.1 GPa has been investigated by using SEM, X-ray diffraction method (XRD), Infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies. Obtained information may indicate that the dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole due to high shock and residual temperature are very important factors in the structural evolution of synthetic opal by shock compression. Synthetic opal loses opalescence by 10.9 and 18.4 GPa of shock pressures. At 18.4 GPa, dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole and transformation of network structure may occur simultaneously. The 4-membered ring of TO{sub 4} tetrahedrons in as synthetic opal may be relaxed to larger ring such as 6-membered ring by high residual temperature. Therefore, the residual temperature may be significantly high at even 18.4 GPa of shock compression. At 23.9 GPa, opal sample recovered the opalescence. Origin of this opalescence may be its layer structure by shock compression. Finally, sample fuse by very high residual temperature at 38.1 GPa and the structure closes to that of fused SiO{sub 2} glass. However, internal silanole groups still remain even at 38.1 GPa.

  13. High ion temperatures from buried layers irradiated with Vulcan Petawatt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karsch, S.; Schreiber, J.; Willingale, L.; Lancaster, K.; Habara, H.; Nilson, P.; Gopal, A.; Wei, M. S.; Stoeckl, C.; Evans, R.; Clarke, R.; Heathcote, R.; Najmudin, Z.; Krushelnick, K.; Neely, D.; Norreys, P. A.

    2005-01-01

    Deuteron acceleration from CH/CD/CH layer targets irradiated with PW laser pulses has been studied using. Thomson parabola spectrometers and neutron TOF spectroscopy. The measured ion and neutron spectra reveal significant MeV deuteron acceleration from the deeply buried CD layer, which scales with the thickness of the overlying CH layer. While the neutron spectra reveal the scaling of the thermal heating with target thickness, the ion spectra indicate the presence of an efficient nonthermal acceleration mechanism inside. the bulk. Possible explanations will be discussed. (Author)

  14. Melting under shock compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, B.I.

    1980-10-01

    A simple model, using experimentally measured shock and particle velocities, is applied to the Lindemann melting formula to predict the density, temperature, and pressure at which a material will melt when shocked from room temperature and zero pressure initial conditions

  15. Shock-darkening in ordinary chondrites: Determination of the pressure-temperature conditions by shock physics mesoscale modeling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moreau, J.; Kohout, Tomáš; Wünnemann, K.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 11 (2017), s. 2375-2390 ISSN 1086-9379 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : chondrites * pressure-temperature conditions * astrophysics Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics OBOR OECD: Astronomy (including astrophysics,space science) Impact factor: 2.391, year: 2016

  16. Temperature dependence of magnetically dead layers in ferromagnetic thin-films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tokaç

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Polarized neutron reflectometry has been used to study interface magnetism and magnetic dead layers in model amorphous CoFeB:Ta alloy thin-film multilayers with Curie temperatures tuned to be below room-temperature. This allows temperature dependent variations in the effective magnetic thickness of the film to be determined at temperatures that are a significant fraction of the Curie temperature, which cannot be achieved in the material systems used for spintronic devices. In addition to variation in the effective magnetic thickness due to compositional grading at the interface with the tantalum capping layer, the key finding is that at the interface between ferromagnetic film and GaAs(001 substrate local interfacial alloying creates an additional magnetic dead-layer. The thickness of this magnetic dead-layer is temperature dependent, which may have significant implications for elevated-temperature operation of hybrid ferromagnetic metal-semiconductor spintronic devices.

  17. HIFiRE-1 Turbulent Shock Boundary Layer Interaction - Flight Data and Computations (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    STATEMENT. *//Signature// //Signature// ROGER L. KIMMEL MICHAEL S. BROWN, Chief Project Manager Hypersonic Sciences Branch...propulsion, propulsion-airframe integration, aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics, high temperature materials and structures, thermal management ...Stanfield, S., Borg , M., “Analysis of HIFiRE-1 Transition Data,” NATO Research and Technology Agency, Specialists Meeting AVT-200/RSM-030 on

  18. Profile vertical of temperature in an atmosphere semi-gray with a layer of clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelkowski, Joaquin; Anduckia Avila, Juan Carlos

    2000-01-01

    We extend earlier models of planetary layers in radioactive equilibrium by including scattering within a homogeneous cloud layer in a single direction. The atmospheric layers above and below the cloud layer are taken to be in radioactive equilibrium, whose temperature profiles may be calculated. Though the resulting profile, being discontinuous, is unrealistic, the model adds to the effects of the earlier models a cloud albedo, resulting from the scattering of short-wave radiation

  19. Investigating the Effects of Temperature on the Signatures of Shocks Propagated Through Impacts into Minerals Found in Comets and Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, Susan M.; Jensen, E. A.; Fane, M.; Smith, D. C.; Holmes, J.; Keller, L. P.; Lindsay, S. S.; Wooden, D. H.; Cintala, M. J.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2015-01-01

    Comets and asteroids are subjected to extremely cold conditions throughout their lifetimes. During their sojourns in the solar system, they are subjected to collisions at speeds that are easily capable of generating shock waves in their constituent materials. In addition to ices, more common silicate minerals such as olivines and pyroxenes are important components of these objects. The collision-induced shocks could affect the spectral signatures of those mineral components, which could in turn be detected telescopically. We have embarked on a project to determine how impact-generated shock might affect the reflectance spectra and structures of select silicates as both impact speed and target temperature are varied systematically. While the effects of impact speed (in the form of shock stress) on numerous materials have been and continue to be studied, the role of target temperature has received comparatively little attention, presumably because of the operational difficulties it can introduce to experimentation. Our experiments were performed with the vertical gun in the Experimental Impact Laboratory of the Johnson Space Center. A liquid-nitrogen system was plumbed to permit cooling of the target container and its contents under vacuum to temperatures as low as -100 C (173 K). Temperatures were monitored by thermocouples mounted on the outside of the target container. Because those sensors were not in contact with the target material at impact, the measured temperatures are treated as lower limits for the actual values. Peridot (Mg-rich olivine) and enstatite (Mg-rich orthopyroxene) were used as targets, which involved the impact of alumina (Al2O3) spheres at speeds of 2.0 - 2.7 km s(exp -1) and temperatures covering 25 C to -100 C (298 K to 173 K). We have begun collecting and analyzing data in the near to mid-IR with a Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer, and preliminary analyses show that notable differences in absorption-band strength and position occur

  20. Evolution of disturbances in the shock layer on a flat plate in the flow of a mixture of vibrationally excited gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirilovskiy, S. V.; Poplavskaya, T. V.; Tsyryulnikov, I. S.; Maslov, A. A.

    2017-05-01

    The results of the numerical and experimental investigations of the evolution of the disturbances in a hypersonic shock layer on a flat plate streamlined by a flow of the mixture of vibrationally excited gases are presented. The experimental study was conducted in the hot-shot high-enthalpy wind tunnel IT-302 of the ITAM SB RAS. The numerical simulation was carried out with the aid of the ANSYS Fluent package using the solution of the unsteady two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations with the incorporation of the user-created modules and enabling the consideration of the vibrational non-equilibrium of the carbon dioxide molecules within the framework of the model of the two-temperature aerodynamics. It was obtained that an increase in the carbon dioxide concentration in the mixture with air leads to a reduction of the intensity of pressure disturbances on the surface. The efficiency (up to 20 %) of the method of sound absorbing coatings in the vibrationally excited flows of the mixture of the carbon dioxide and air has been shown.

  1. Structural transformation of implanted diamond layers during high temperature annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubanov, S.; Fairchild, B.A.; Suvorova, A.; Olivero, P.; Prawer, S.

    2015-01-01

    In the recent years graphitization of ion-beam induced amorphous layers became the basic tool for device fabrication in diamond. The etchable graphitic layers can be removed to form free-standing membranes into which the desired structures can be sculpted using FIB milling. The optical properties of the devices fabricated using this method are assumed on the model of sharp diamond–air interface. The real quality of this interface could depend on degree of graphitization of the amorphous damage layers after annealing. In the present work the graphitization process was studied using conventional and analytical TEM. It was found that annealing at 550 °C results in a partial graphitization of the implanted volume with formation of the nano-crystalline graphitic phase sandwiched between layers of tetrahedral amorphous carbon. Annealing at 1400 °C resulted in complete graphitization of the amorphous layers. The average size of graphite nano-crystals did not exceed 5 nm with predominant orientation of c-planes normal to the sample surface.

  2. Alloy synthesis using the mach stem region in an axial symmetric implosive shock: Understanding the pressure strain-temperature contributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staudhammer, Karl P.

    2004-01-01

    The Mach stem region in an axial symmetric shock implosion has generally been avoided in the dynamic consolidation of powders for a number of reasons. The prime reason being that the convergence of the shock waves in the cylindrical axis produce enormous pressures and concomitant temperatures that have melted tungsten. This shock wave convergence consequently results in a discontinuity in the hydro-code calculations. Dynamic deformation experiments on gold plated 304L stainless steel powders were undertaken. These experiments utilized pressures of 0.08 to 1.0 Mbar and contained a symmetric radial melt region along the central axis of the sample holder. To understand the role of deformation in a porous material, the pressure, and temperature as well as the deformation heat and associated defects must be accounted for. When the added heat of consolidation deformation exceeds the melt temperature of the 304 powders, a melt zone results that can consume large regions of the compact while still under the high-pressure pulse. As the shock wave traverses the sample and is removed in a momentum trap, its pressure/temperature are quenched. It is within this region that very high diffusion/alloying occurs and has been observed in the gold plated powders. Anomalous increases of gold diffusion into 304 stainless steel have been observed via optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and EDAX measurements. Values exceeding 1200 m/sec have been measured and correlated to the powder sizes, size distribution and packing density, concomitant with sample container strains ranging from 2.0% to 26%.

  3. Shock Tube/Laser Absorption Studies of Jet Fuels at Low Temperatures (600-1200K)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-27

    Davidson, Ronald K. Hanson. A second-generation aerosol shock tube and its use in studying ignition delay times of large biodiesel surrogates, 28th... Biodiesel Surrogate behind Reflected Shock Waves,” 8th US National Combustion Meeting, Paper 070RK-0008 Park City, UT 5/2013.   These  studies provide...www.elsevier .com/locate / fuel 1. Introduction Normal alkanes have been widely used as fuels and are major components of many commercial transportation fuels

  4. Use of IR pyrometry to measure free-surface temperatures of partially melted tin as a function of shock pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifter, A.; Furlanetto, M. R.; Holtkamp, D. B.; Obst, A. W.; Payton, J. R.; Stone, J. B.; Tabaka, L. J.; Grover, M.; Macrum, G. S.; Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D.; Swift, D. C.; Veeser, L. R.

    2009-01-01

    Equilibrium equation of state theory predicts that the free-surface release temperature of shock-loaded tin will show a plateau at 505 K in the stress range from 19.5 to 33.0 GPa, corresponding to the solid-liquid, mixed-phase region of tin. In this paper we report free-surface temperature measurements on shock-loaded tin from 15 to 31 GPa using multiwavelength optical pyrometry. The shock waves were generated by direct contact of detonating high explosive with a tin sample, and the stress in the sample was determined by free-surface velocity measurements using photon Doppler velocimetry. We measured the emitted thermal radiance in the near IR region at four wavelengths from 1.5 to 5.0 μm. Above 25 GPa the measured free-surface temperatures were higher than the predicted 505 K, and they increased with increasing stress. This deviation may be explained by hot spots and/or variations in surface emissivity, and it may indicate a weakness in the use of a simple analysis of multiwavelength pyrometry data for conditions, such as above the melt threshold, where hot spots or emissivity variations may be significant. We are continuing to study the discrepancy to determine its cause.

  5. On the high-temperature combustion of n-butanol: Shock tube data and an improved kinetic model

    KAUST Repository

    Vasu, Subith S.

    2013-11-21

    The combustion of n-butanol has received significant interest in recent years, because of its potential use in transportation applications. Researchers have extensively studied its combustion chemistry, using both experimental and theoretical methods; however, additional work is needed under specific conditions to improve our understanding of n-butanol combustion. In this study, we report new OH time-history data during the high-temperature oxidation of n-butanol behind reflected shock waves over the temperature range of 1300-1550 K and at pressures near 2 atm. These data were obtained at Stanford University, using narrow-line-width ring dye laser absorption of the R1(5) line of OH near 306.7 nm. Measured OH time histories were modeled using comprehensive n-butanol literature mechanisms. It was found that n-butanol unimolecular decomposition rate constants commonly used in chemical kinetic models, as well as those determined from theoretical studies, are unable to predict the data presented herein. Therefore, an improved high-temperature mechanism is presented here, which incorporates recently reported rate constants measured in a single pulse shock tube [C. M. Rosado-Reyes and W. Tsang, J. Phys. Chem. A 2012, 116, 9825-9831]. Discussions are presented on the validity of the proposed mechanism against other literature shock tube experiments. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  6. Cold Shock Proteins Are Expressed in the Retina Following Exposure to Low Temperatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio M Larrayoz

    Full Text Available Hypothermia has been proposed as a therapeutic intervention for some retinal conditions, including ischemic insults. Cold exposure elevates expression of cold-shock proteins (CSP, including RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3 and cold inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP, but their presence in mammalian retina is so far unknown. Here we show the effects of hypothermia on the expression of these CSPs in retina-derived cell lines and in the retina of newborn and adult rats. Two cell lines of retinal origin, R28 and mRPE, were exposed to 32°C for different time periods and CSP expression was measured by qRT-PCR and Western blotting. Neonatal and adult Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to a cold environment (8°C and expression of CSPs in their retinas was studied by Western blotting, multiple inmunofluorescence, and confocal microscopy. RBM3 expression was upregulated by cold in both R28 and mRPE cells in a time-dependent fashion. On the other hand, CIRP was upregulated in R28 cells but not in mRPE. In vivo, expression of CSPs was negligible in the retina of newborn and adult rats kept at room temperature (24°C. Exposure to a cold environment elicited a strong expression of both proteins, especially in retinal pigment epithelium cells, photoreceptors, bipolar, amacrine and horizontal cells, Müller cells, and ganglion cells. In conclusion, CSP expression rapidly rises in the mammalian retina following exposure to hypothermia in a cell type-specific pattern. This observation may be at the basis of the molecular mechanism by which hypothermia exerts its therapeutic effects in the retina.

  7. Investigating pyroclast ejection dynamics using shock-tube experiments: temperature, grain size and vent geometry effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigala, V.; Kueppers, U.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions eject large quantities of gas and particles into the atmosphere. The portion directly above the vent commonly shows characteristics of underexpanded jets. Understanding the factors that influence the initial pyroclast ejection dynamics is necessary in order to better assess the resulting near- and far-field hazards. Field observations are often insufficient for the characterization of volcanic explosions due to lack of safe access to such environments. Fortunately, their dynamics can be simulated in the laboratory where experiments are performed under controlled conditions. We ejected loose natural particles from a shock-tube while controlling temperature (25˚ and 500˚C), overpressure (15MPa), starting grain size distribution (1-2 mm, 0.5-1 mm and 0.125-0.250 mm), sample-to-vent distance and vent geometry. For each explosion we quantified the velocity of individual particles, the jet spreading angle and the production of fines. Further, we varied the setup to allow for different sample-to-gas ratios and deployed four different vent geometries: 1) cylindrical, 2) funnel with a flaring of 30˚, 3) funnel with a flaring of 15˚ and 4) nozzle. The results showed maximum particle velocities up to 296 m/s, gas spreading angles varying from 21˚ to 37˚ and particle spreading angles from 3˚ to 40˚. Moreover we observed dynamically evolving ejection characteristics and variations in the production of fines during the course of individual experiments. Our experiments mechanistically mimic the process of pyroclast ejection. Thus the capability for constraining the effects of input parameters (fragmentation conditions) and conduit/vent geometry on ballistic pyroclastic plumes has been clearly established. These data obtained in the presence of well-documented conduit and vent conditions, should greatly enhance our ability to numerically model explosive ejecta in nature.

  8. First results of radiation-driven, layered deuterium-tritium implosions with a 3-shock adiabat-shaped drive at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Robey, H. F.; Döppner, T.; Jones, O. S.; Milovich, J. L.; Bachmann, B.; Baker, K. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Bond, E.; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D. T.; Celliers, P. M.; Cerjan, C.; Clark, D. S.; Dixit, S. N.; Edwards, M. J.; Haan, S. W.; Hamza, A. V.; Hurricane, O. A.; Jancaitis, K. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2015-08-15

    Radiation-driven, layered deuterium-tritium plastic capsule implosions were carried out using a new, 3-shock “adiabat-shaped” drive on the National Ignition Facility. The purpose of adiabat shaping is to use a stronger first shock, reducing hydrodynamic instability growth in the ablator. The shock can decay before reaching the deuterium-tritium fuel leaving it on a low adiabat and allowing higher fuel compression. The fuel areal density was improved by ∼25% with this new drive compared to similar “high-foot” implosions, while neutron yield was improved by more than 4 times, compared to “low-foot” implosions driven at the same compression and implosion velocity.

  9. Experimental Database with Baseline CFD Solutions: 2-D and Axisymmetric Hypersonic Shock-Wave/Turbulent-Boundary-Layer Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvin, Joseph G.; Brown, James L.; Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    A database compilation of hypersonic shock-wave/turbulent boundary layer experiments is provided. The experiments selected for the database are either 2D or axisymmetric, and include both compression corner and impinging type SWTBL interactions. The strength of the interactions range from attached to incipient separation to fully separated flows. The experiments were chosen based on criterion to ensure quality of the datasets, to be relevant to NASA's missions and to be useful for validation and uncertainty assessment of CFD Navier-Stokes predictive methods, both now and in the future. An emphasis on datasets selected was on surface pressures and surface heating throughout the interaction, but include some wall shear stress distributions and flowfield profiles. Included, for selected cases, are example CFD grids and setup information, along with surface pressure and wall heating results from simulations using current NASA real-gas Navier-Stokes codes by which future CFD investigators can compare and evaluate physics modeling improvements and validation and uncertainty assessments of future CFD code developments. The experimental database is presented tabulated in the Appendices describing each experiment. The database is also provided in computer-readable ASCII files located on a companion DVD.

  10. Low temperature plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition of thin vanadium nitride layers for copper diffusion barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rampelberg, Geert; Devloo-Casier, Kilian; Deduytsche, Davy; Detavernier, Christophe [Department of Solid State Sciences, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281/S1, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Schaekers, Marc [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Blasco, Nicolas [Air Liquide Electronics US, L.P., 46401 Landing Parkway, Fremont, California 94538 (United States)

    2013-03-18

    Thin vanadium nitride (VN) layers were grown by atomic layer deposition using tetrakis(ethylmethylamino)vanadium and NH{sub 3} plasma at deposition temperatures between 70 Degree-Sign C and 150 Degree-Sign C on silicon substrates and polymer foil. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed a composition close to stoichiometric VN, while x-ray diffraction showed the {delta}-VN crystal structure. The resistivity was as low as 200 {mu}{Omega} cm for the as deposited films and further reduced to 143 {mu}{Omega} cm and 93 {mu}{Omega} cm by annealing in N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}/He/N{sub 2}, respectively. A 5 nm VN layer proved to be effective as a diffusion barrier for copper up to a temperature of 720 Degree-Sign C.

  11. A Recipe for implementing the Arrhenius-Shock-Temperature State Sensitive WSD (AWSD) model, with parameters for PBX 9502

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aslam, Tariq Dennis [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-03

    A reactive ow model for the tri-amino-tri-nitro-benzene (TATB) based plastic bonded explosive PBX 9502 is presented. This newly devised model is based primarily on the shock temperature of the material, along with local pressure, and accurately models a broader range of detonation and initiation scenarios. The equation of state for the reactants and products, as well as the thermodynamic closure of pressure and temperature equilibration are carried over from the Wescott-Stewart-Davis (WSD) model7,8. Thus, modifying an existing WSD model in a hydrocode should be rather straightforward.

  12. Surface layer temperature inversion in the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pankajakshan, T.; Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Muraleedharan, P.M.; Reddy, G.V.; Araligidad, N.

    Hydrographic and XBT data archived in the Indian Oceanographic Data Centre (IODC) are used to understand the process of temperature inversions occurring in the Bay of Bengal. The following aspects of the inversions are addressed: i) annual...

  13. Blocking layer modeling for temperature analysis of electron transfer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this article, we simulate thermal effects on the electron transfer rate from three quantum dots CdSe, CdS and CdTe to three metal oxides TiO2, SnO2 and ZnO2 in the presence of four blocking layers ZnS, ZnO, TiO2 and Al2O3, in a porous quantum dot sensitized solar cell (QDSSC) structure, using Marcus theory.

  14. Extraordinary photoluminescence and strong temperature/angle-dependent Raman responses in few-layer phosphorene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuang; Yang, Jiong; Xu, Renjing; Wang, Fan; Li, Weifeng; Ghufran, Muhammad; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Yu, Zongfu; Zhang, Gang; Qin, Qinghua; Lu, Yuerui

    2014-09-23

    Phosphorene is a new family member of two-dimensional materials. We observed strong and highly layer-dependent photoluminescence in few-layer phosphorene (two to five layers). The results confirmed the theoretical prediction that few-layer phosphorene has a direct and layer-sensitive band gap. We also demonstrated that few-layer phosphorene is more sensitive to temperature modulation than graphene and MoS2 in Raman scattering. The anisotropic Raman response in few-layer phosphorene has enabled us to use an optical method to quickly determine the crystalline orientation without tunneling electron microscopy or scanning tunneling microscopy. Our results provide much needed experimental information about the band structures and exciton nature in few-layer phosphorene.

  15. Boundary-Layer Detection at Cryogenic Conditions Using Temperature Sensitive Paint Coupled with a Carbon Nanotube Heating Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Kyle Z.; Lipford, William E.; Watkins, Anthony Neal

    2016-01-01

    Detection of flow transition on aircraft surfaces and models can be vital to the development of future vehicles and computational methods for evaluating vehicle concepts. In testing at ambient conditions, IR thermography is ideal for this measurement. However, for higher Reynolds number testing, cryogenic facilities are often used, in which IR thermography is difficult to employ. In these facilities, temperature sensitive paint is an alternative with a temperature step introduced to enhance the natural temperature change from transition. Traditional methods for inducing the temperature step by changing the liquid nitrogen injection rate often change the tunnel conditions. Recent work has shown that adding a layer consisting of carbon nanotubes to the surface can be used to impart a temperature step on the model surface with little change in the operating conditions. Unfortunately, this system physically degraded at 130 K and lost heating capability. This paper describes a modification of this technique enabling operation down to at least 77 K, well below the temperature reached in cryogenic facilities. This is possible because the CNT layer is in a polyurethane binder. This was tested on a Natural Laminar Flow model in a cryogenic facility and transition detection was successfully visualized at conditions from 200 K to 110 K. Results were also compared with the traditional temperature step method.

  16. Boundary-Layer Detection at Cryogenic Conditions Using Temperature Sensitive Paint Coupled with a Carbon Nanotube Heating Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle Z. Goodman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Detection of flow transition on aircraft surfaces and models can be vital to the development of future vehicles and computational methods for evaluating vehicle concepts. In testing at ambient conditions, IR thermography is ideal for this measurement. However, for higher Reynolds number testing, cryogenic facilities are often used, in which IR thermography is difficult to employ. In these facilities, temperature sensitive paint is an alternative with a temperature step introduced to enhance the natural temperature change from transition. Traditional methods for inducing the temperature step by changing the liquid nitrogen injection rate often change the tunnel conditions. Recent work has shown that adding a layer consisting of carbon nanotubes to the surface can be used to impart a temperature step on the model surface with little change in the operating conditions. Unfortunately, this system physically degraded at 130 K and lost heating capability. This paper describes a modification of this technique enabling operation down to at least 77 K, well below the temperature reached in cryogenic facilities. This is possible because the CNT layer is in a polyurethane binder. This was tested on a Natural Laminar Flow model in a cryogenic facility and transition detection was successfully visualized at conditions from 200 K to 110 K. Results were also compared with the traditional temperature step method.

  17. Temperature aspect of degradation of electrochemical double-layer capacitors (EDLC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Dong-Cheon; Kim, Hyun-Ho; Lee, Soon-Bok

    2015-03-01

    Electric double layer capacitors (EDLC) cells have a process variation and temperature dependency in capacitance so that balancing is required when they are connected in series, which includes electronic voltage management based on capacitance monitoring. This paper measured temperature aspect of capacitance periodically to monitor health and degradation behavior of EDLC stressed under high temperatures and zero below temperatures respectively, which enables estimation of the state of health (SOH) regardless of temperature. At high temperature, capacitance saturation and delayed expression of degradation was observed. After cyclic stress at zero below temperature, less effective degradation and time recovery phenomenon were occurred.

  18. [The effect of body temperature control on organ function and prognosis in patients with refractory septic shock].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoting; Liu, Dawei; Yang, Yanli; Zhou, Xiang; Chai, Wenzhao; Long, Yun; Zhang, Hongmin; Zhang, Qing; He, Huaiwu

    2014-04-01

    To investigate the effect of body temperature control on organ function and prognosis in patients with refractory septic shock. A total of 67 eligible patients with the body temperature over 38.5 °C were enrolled in the study and all patients were treated with a water-flow cooling blanket to control the body temperature below 38.3 °C for 72 hours. The core and peripheral temperature was tested at 1 hour interval. All patients were devised into the following two groups according to their mean core temperature within the 72 hours: the HT group with a mean core temperature ≥ 37.5 °C and the LT group with a mean core temperature temperature increased above 38.5 °C. Thirty-four patients (50.7%) were classified into the HT group, while thirty-three patients (49.3%) were in the LT group. Compared with the HT group, higher mortality rate at Day 28 was observed in the LT group (69.7% vs 35.3%, P = 0.005). Significant difference in the increase of sepsis-related organ failure assessment (SOFA) score was found between of the HT and the LT groups (1.30 ± 0.90 vs 2.30 ± 2.10, P = 0.02). Statistical differences were observed between the two groups in mean core temperature [(37.90 ± 0.30) °C vs (36.80 ± 0.60) °C, P peripheral temperature [(37.20 ± 0.30) °C vs (36.30 ± 0.60) °C, P temperature [(36.90 ± 0.30)°C vs (35.80 ± 0.60) °C, P peripheral temperature [(36.20 ± 0.40) °C vs (35.50 ± 0.60) °C, P peripheral temperature.Statistical difference was also shown in troponin I, fibrinogen, partial thromboplastin and activated partial thromboplastin between the two groups. Cox regression analysis revealed that the mean core temperature was the only independent predictor for the mortality rate at Day 28. Body temperature control within the normal range may exert potentially detrimental effect on organ function and prognosis in patients with refractory septic shock with fever.

  19. Fabrication of a microfluidic chip by UV bonding at room temperature for integration of temperature-sensitive layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlautmann, S.; Besselink, G. A. J.; Radhakrishna Prabhu, G.; Schasfoort, R. B. M.

    2003-07-01

    A method for the bonding of a microfluidic device at room temperature is presented. The wafer with the fluidic structures was bonded to a sensor wafer with gold pads by means of adhesive bonding, utilizing an UV-curable glue layer. To avoid filling the fluidic channels with the glue, a stamping process was developed which allows the selective application of a thin glue layer. In this way a microfluidic glass chip was fabricated that could be used for performing surface plasmon resonance measurements without signs of leakage. The advantage of this method is the possibility of integration of organic layers as well as other temperature-sensitive layers into a microfluidic glass device.

  20. Improvement of temperature-stability in a quantum well laser with asymmetric barrier layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhukov, Alexey E.; Kryzhanovskaya, Natalia V.; Zubov, Fedor I.

    2012-01-01

    We fabricated and tested a quantum well laser with asymmetric barrier layers. Such a laser has been proposed earlier to suppress bipolar carrier population in the optical confinement layer and thus to improve temperature-stability of the threshold current. As compared to the conventional reference...

  1. Room temperature synthesis of protonated layered titanate sheets using peroxo titanium carbonate complex solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutradhar, Narottam; Sinhamahapatra, Apurba; Pahari, Sandip Kumar; Bajaj, Hari C; Panda, Asit Baran

    2011-07-21

    We report the synthesis of peroxo titanium carbonate complex solution as a novel water-soluble precursor for the direct synthesis of layered protonated titanate at room temperature. The synthesized titanates showed excellent removal capacity for Pb(2+) and methylene blue. Based on experimental observations, a probable mechanism for the formation of protonated layered dititanate sheets is also discussed.

  2. Effect of High Incubation Temperature on the Blood Parameters of Layer Chicks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sgavioli

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Adequate environmental temperature control is essential for incubation efficiency. Layer breeder eggs (n=360 were weighed and distributed in a completely randomized experimental design with two treatments, consisting of two incubation temperatures (T1=37.5 °C, control; and T2=39.0 °C, hot, with two incubators per temperature, and 90 eggs per incubator, totaling 360 eggs. Hatchability, embryo mortality, and chick cloacal and body surface temperatures were not affected by incubation temperature. Eggs incubated at the hot temperature presented greater egg mass loss and higher eggshell conductance than those incubated at the control temperature. Layer chicks derived from eggs incubated at control temperature showed greater absolute weight, yolk-free egg mass, and heavier hearts than those from eggs submitted to heat stress during incubation. The control group presented lower base excess and ionized calcium blood levels. Incubating eggs at temperatures higher than those recommended compromises body and heart development of layer chicks and negatively affects blood ionized calcium availability, and therefore, bone mineralization during embryo development. Efficient temperature control during the incubation of fertile eggs is essential to obtain good quality layer chicks.

  3. An unusual temperature dependence in the oxidation of oxycarbide layers on uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Walton P.

    1981-09-01

    An anomalous temperature dependence has been observed for the oxidation kinetics of outermost oxycarbide layers on polycrystalline uranium metal. Normally, oxidation or corrosion reactions are expected to proceed more rapidly as the temperature is elevated. Thus, it came as a surprise when we observed that the removal of the outermost atomic layers of carbon from uranium oxycarbide by O 2 reproducibly proceeds at a much faster rate at 25°C than at 280°C.

  4. Boundary Layer Transition and Trip Effectiveness on an Apollo Capsule in the JAXA High Enthalpy Shock Tunnel (HIEST) Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Lindsay C.; Lillard, Randolph P.; Olejniczak, Joseph; Tanno, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    Computational assessments were performed to size boundary layer trips for a scaled Apollo capsule model in the High Enthalpy Shock Tunnel (HIEST) facility at the JAXA Kakuda Space Center in Japan. For stagnation conditions between 2 MJ/kg and 20 MJ/kg and between 10 MPa and 60 MPa, the appropriate trips were determined to be between 0.2 mm and 1.3 mm high, which provided kappa/delta values on the heatshield from 0.15 to 2.25. The tripped configuration consisted of an insert with a series of diamond shaped trips along the heatshield downstream of the stagnation point. Surface heat flux measurements were obtained on a capsule with a 250 mm diameter, 6.4% scale model, and pressure measurements were taken at axial stations along the nozzle walls. At low enthalpy conditions, the computational predictions agree favorably to the test data along the heatshield centerline. However, agreement becomes less favorable as the enthalpy increases conditions. The measured surface heat flux on the heatshield from the HIEST facility was under-predicted by the computations in these cases. Both smooth and tripped configurations were tested for comparison, and a post-test computational analysis showed that kappa/delta values based on the as-measured stagnation conditions ranged between 0.5 and 1.2. Tripped configurations for both 0.6 mm and 0.8 mm trip heights were able to effectively trip the flow to fully turbulent for a range of freestream conditions.

  5. Temperatures, strains and crack behavior during local thermal shock tests on the RPV-cylinder of the HDR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neubrech, G.E.; Goerner, F.; Siebler, T.

    1987-01-01

    This report summarises and critically discusses the results obtained from thermal shocks locally applied to the inner surface of the RPV-cylinder. This evaluation is based on on-line measurements (temperatures and strains at the RPV-wall during the thermal shock loading, non-destructive-testing), on materials investigations, and on theoretical investigations (finite element calculations, fracture mechanics analyses). The comparison between the corresponding measured and calculated results serves as a basis for subsequent assessments. It was the object of these tests to achieve the following primary aims: - Investigation of the loading conditions produced by local thermal shocks during realistic cooling processes. - A better understanding of the physical processes involved in crack initiation and propagation resulting from thermocyclic loading. - Assessment of non-destructive-testing methods with respect to detection and analysis of cracks as a basis for fracture mechanical evaluations. - Assessment of the reliability of the applied structural analysis methods. - Production of naturally formed deep cracks on the inner surface of the RPV-cylinder by means of excessive cooling processes. (orig./HP)

  6. Dependence of Magnetic Properties of Co/Pt Multilayers on Deposition Temperature of Pt Buffer Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiomi, Shigeru; Nishimura, Tomotaka; Kobayashi, Tadashi; Masuda, Morio

    1993-04-01

    A 15-nm-thick Pt buffer layer was deposited on a glass slide at temperature Ts(Ptbuf) ranging from 30 to 300°C by e-gun evaporation. Following the cooling in vacuum to ambient temperature, Co and Pt layers have been alternately deposited on it. Very large perpendicular anisotropy and coercivity have been obtained at Ts(Ptbuf) higher than 200°C. The (111) preferred orientation of the Co/Pt multilayer as well as the Pt buffer layer became more pronounced with elevating Ts(Ptbuf), to which the enhancement of perpendicular anisotropy with elevating Ts(Ptbuf) might be ascribable.

  7. Receptivity of a high-speed boundary layer to temperature spottiness

    OpenAIRE

    Fedorov, A. V.; Ryzhov, A. A.; Soudakov, V. G.; Utyuzhnikov, S. V.

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the receptivity of a flat-plate boundary layer to temperature spottiness in the Mach 6 free stream is carried out. The influence of spottiness parameters on the receptivity process is studied. It is shown that the temperature spots propagating near the upper boundary-layer edge generate mode F inside the boundary layer. Further downstream mode F is synchronized with unstable mode S (Mack second mode) and excites the latter via the inter-mod...

  8. Temperature dependence of microwave oscillations in magnetic tunnel junctions with a perpendicularly magnetized free layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Peng; Feng, Jiafeng; Wei, Hongxiang; Han, Xiufeng; Fang, Bin; Zhang, Baoshun; Zeng, Zhongming

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally study the temperature dependence of the spin-transfer-torque-induced microwave oscillations in MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction nanopillars with a perpendicularly magnetized free layer. We demonstrate that the oscillation frequency increases rapidly with decreasing temperature, which is mainly ascribed to the temperature dependence of both the saturation magnetization and the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. We also find that a strong temperature dependence of the output power while a nonmonotonic temperature dependence of spectral linewidth are maintained for a constant dc bias in measured temperature range. Possible mechanisms leading to the different dependences of oscillation frequency, output power, and linewidth are discussed

  9. MgO melting curve constraints from shock temperature and rarefaction overtake measurements in samples preheated to 2300 K

    OpenAIRE

    Fat'yanov, Oleg V.; Asimow, P. D.

    2014-01-01

    Continuing our effort to obtain experimental constraints on the melting curve of MgO at 100-200 GPa, we extended our target preheating capability to 2300 K. Our new Mo capsule design holds a long MgO crystal in a controlled thermal gradient until impact by a Ta flyer launched at up to 7.5 km/s on the Caltech two-stage light-gas gun. Radiative shock temperatures and rarefaction overtake times were measured simultaneously by a 6-channel VIS/NIR pyrometer with 3 ns time resolution. The majority ...

  10. Lithium implantation at low temperature in silicon for sharp buried amorphous layer formation and defect engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliviero, E.; David, M. L.; Beaufort, M. F.; Barbot, J. F.; Fichtner, P. F. P.

    2013-01-01

    The crystalline-to-amorphous transformation induced by lithium ion implantation at low temperature has been investigated. The resulting damage structure and its thermal evolution have been studied by a combination of Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy channelling (RBS/C) and cross sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM). Lithium low-fluence implantation at liquid nitrogen temperature is shown to produce a three layers structure: an amorphous layer surrounded by two highly damaged layers. A thermal treatment at 400 °C leads to the formation of a sharp amorphous/crystalline interfacial transition and defect annihilation of the front heavily damaged layer. After 600 °C annealing, complete recrystallization takes place and no extended defects are left. Anomalous recrystallization rate is observed with different motion velocities of the a/c interfaces and is ascribed to lithium acting as a surfactant. Moreover, the sharp buried amorphous layer is shown to be an efficient sink for interstitials impeding interstitial supersaturation and {311} defect formation in case of subsequent neon implantation. This study shows that lithium implantation at liquid nitrogen temperature can be suitable to form a sharp buried amorphous layer with a well-defined crystalline front layer, thus having potential applications for defects engineering in the improvement of post-implantation layers quality and for shallow junction formation.

  11. Microwave Synthesized ZnO Nanorod Arrays for UV Sensors: A Seed Layer Annealing Temperature Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, Ana; Ferreira, Sofia Henriques; Nunes, Daniela; Calmeiro, Tomas; Martins, Rodrigo; Fortunato, Elvira

    2016-04-20

    The present work reports the influence of zinc oxide (ZnO) seed layer annealing temperature on structural, optical and electrical properties of ZnO nanorod arrays, synthesized by hydrothermal method assisted by microwave radiation, to be used as UV sensors. The ZnO seed layer was produced using the spin-coating method and several annealing temperatures, ranging from 100 to 500 °C, have been tested. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and spectrophotometry measurements have been used to investigate the structure, morphology, and optical properties variations of the produced ZnO nanorod arrays regarding the seed layer annealing temperatures employed. After the growth of ZnO nanorod arrays, the whole structure was tested as UV sensors, showing an increase in the sensitivity with the increase of seed layer annealing temperature. The UV sensor response of ZnO nanorod arrays produced with the seed layer annealed temperature of 500 °C was 50 times superior to the ones produced with a seed layer annealed at 100 °C.

  12. Layering and temperature-dependent magnetization and anisotropy of naturally produced Ni/NiO multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pappas, S. D.; Trachylis, D.; Velgakis, M. J. [Laboratory of High-Tech Materials, School of Engineering, University of Patras, 26504 Patras (Greece); Kapaklis, V.; Joensson, P. E.; Papaioannou, E. Th. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Delimitis, A. [Chemical Process Engineering Research Institute (CPERI), Centre for Research and Technology Hellas (CERTH), 57001 Thermi, Thessaloniki (Greece); Poulopoulos, P. [Laboratory of High-Tech Materials, School of Engineering, University of Patras, 26504 Patras (Greece); Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Arnimallee 14, D-14195 Berlin-Dahlem (Germany); Materials Science Department, University of Patras, 26504 Patras (Greece); Fumagalli, P. [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Arnimallee 14, D-14195 Berlin-Dahlem (Germany); Politis, C. [Laboratory of High-Tech Materials, School of Engineering, University of Patras, 26504 Patras (Greece); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, Texas 76019 (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Ni/NiO multilayers were grown by magnetron sputtering at room temperature, with the aid of the natural oxidation procedure. That is, at the end of the deposition of each single Ni layer, air is let to flow into the vacuum chamber through a leak valve. Then, a very thin NiO layer ({approx}1.2 nm) is formed. Simulated x-ray reflectivity patterns reveal that layering is excellent for individual Ni-layer thickness larger than 2.5 nm, which is attributed to the intercalation of amorphous NiO between the polycrystalline Ni layers. The magnetization of the films, measured at temperatures 5-300 K, has almost bulk-like value, whereas the films exhibit a trend to perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) with an unusual significant positive interface anisotropy contribution, which presents a weak temperature dependence. The power-law behavior of the multilayers indicates a non-negligible contribution of higher order anisotropies in the uniaxial anisotropy. Bloch-law fittings for the temperature dependence of the magnetization in the spin-wave regime show that the magnetization in the multilayers decreases faster as a function of temperature than the one of bulk Ni. Finally, when the individual Ni-layer thickness decreases below 2 nm, the multilayer stacking vanishes, resulting in a dramatic decrease of the interface magnetic anisotropy and consequently in a decrease of the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

  13. Single layer porous gold films grown at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Renyun; Hummelgard, Magnus; Olin, Hakan

    2010-01-01

    Large area porous gold films can be used in several areas including electrochemical electrodes, as an essential component in sensors, or as a conducting material in electronics. Here, we report on evaporation induced crystal growth of large area porous gold films at 20, 40 and 60 deg. C. The gold films were grown on liquid surface at 20 deg. C, while the films were grown on the wall of beakers when temperature increased to 40 and 60 deg. C. The porous gold films consisted of a dense network of gold nanowires as characterized by TEM and SEM. TEM diffraction results indicated that higher temperature formed larger crystallites of gold wires. An in situ TEM imaging of the coalescence of gold nanoparticles mimicked the process of the growth of these porous films, and a plotting of the coalescence time and the neck radius showed a diffusion process. The densities of these gold films were also characterized by transmittance, and the results showed film grown at 20 deg. C had the highest density, while the film grown at 60 deg. C had the lowest consistent with SEM and TEM characterization. Electrical measurements of these gold films showed that the most conductive films were the ones grown at 40 deg. C. The conductivities of the gold films were related to the amount of contamination, density and the diameter of the gold nanowires in the films. In addition, a gold film/gold nanoparticle hybrid was made, which showed a 10% decrease in transmittance during hybridization, pointing to applications as chemical and biological sensors.

  14. Surface Morphology Transformation Under High-Temperature Annealing of Ge Layers Deposited on Si(100).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shklyaev, A A; Latyshev, A V

    2016-12-01

    We study the surface morphology and chemical composition of SiGe layers after their formation under high-temperature annealing at 800-1100 °C of 30-150 nm Ge layers deposited on Si(100) at 400-500 °C. It is found that the annealing leads to the appearance of the SiGe layers of two types, i.e., porous and continuous. The continuous layers have a smoothened surface morphology and a high concentration of threading dislocations. The porous and continuous layers can coexist. Their formation conditions and the ratio between their areas on the surface depend on the thickness of deposited Ge layers, as well as on the temperature and the annealing time. The data obtained suggest that the porous SiGe layers are formed due to melting of the strained Ge layers and their solidification in the conditions of SiGe dewetting on Si. The porous and dislocation-rich SiGe layers may have properties interesting for applications.

  15. Maglev performance of a double-layer bulk high temperature superconductor above a permanent magnet guideway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Z; Wang, J; Zheng, J; Lin, Q; Zhang, Y; Wang, S

    2009-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of the present high temperature superconducting (HTS) maglev vehicle system, the maglev performance of single- and double-layer bulk high temperature superconductors (HTSC) was investigated above a permanent magnet guideway (PMG). It is found that the maglev performance of a double-layer bulk HTSC is not a simple addition of each layer's levitation and guidance force. Moreover, the applied magnetic field at the position of the upper layer bulk HTSC is not completely shielded by the lower layer bulk HTSC either. 53.5% of the levitation force and 27.5% of the guidance force of the upper layer bulk HTSC are excited in the double-layer bulk HTSC arrangement in the applied field-cooling condition and working gap, bringing a corresponding improvement of 16.9% and 8.8% to the conventional single-layer bulk HTSC. The present research implies that the cost performance of upper layer bulk HTSC is a little low for the whole HTS maglev system.

  16. Maglev performance of a double-layer bulk high temperature superconductor above a permanent magnet guideway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Z; Wang, J; Zheng, J; Lin, Q; Zhang, Y; Wang, S [Applied Superconductivity Laboratory, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, 610031 (China)], E-mail: asclab@asclab.cn

    2009-05-15

    In order to improve the performance of the present high temperature superconducting (HTS) maglev vehicle system, the maglev performance of single- and double-layer bulk high temperature superconductors (HTSC) was investigated above a permanent magnet guideway (PMG). It is found that the maglev performance of a double-layer bulk HTSC is not a simple addition of each layer's levitation and guidance force. Moreover, the applied magnetic field at the position of the upper layer bulk HTSC is not completely shielded by the lower layer bulk HTSC either. 53.5% of the levitation force and 27.5% of the guidance force of the upper layer bulk HTSC are excited in the double-layer bulk HTSC arrangement in the applied field-cooling condition and working gap, bringing a corresponding improvement of 16.9% and 8.8% to the conventional single-layer bulk HTSC. The present research implies that the cost performance of upper layer bulk HTSC is a little low for the whole HTS maglev system.

  17. On Parametric Sensitivity of Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes SST Turbulence Model: 2D Hypersonic Shock-Wave Boundary Layer Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Examined is sensitivity of separation extent, wall pressure and heating to variation of primary input flow parameters, such as Mach and Reynolds numbers and shock strength, for 2D and Axisymmetric Hypersonic Shock Wave Turbulent Boundary Layer interactions obtained by Navier-Stokes methods using the SST turbulence model. Baseline parametric sensitivity response is provided in part by comparison with vetted experiments, and in part through updated correlations based on free interaction theory concepts. A recent database compilation of hypersonic 2D shock-wave/turbulent boundary layer experiments extensively used in a prior related uncertainty analysis provides the foundation for this updated correlation approach, as well as for more conventional validation. The primary CFD method for this work is DPLR, one of NASA's real-gas aerothermodynamic production RANS codes. Comparisons are also made with CFL3D, one of NASA's mature perfect-gas RANS codes. Deficiencies in predicted separation response of RANS/SST solutions to parametric variations of test conditions are summarized, along with recommendations as to future turbulence approach.

  18. Nonequilibrium temperatures and second-sound propagation along nanowires and thin layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jou, D.; Cimmelli, V.A.; Sellitto, A.

    2009-01-01

    It is shown that the dispersion relation of heat waves along nanowires or thin layers could allow to compare two different definitions of nonequilibrium temperature, since thermal waves are predicted to propagate with different phase speed depending on the definition of nonequilibrium temperature being used. The difference is small, but it could be in principle measurable in nanosystems, as for instance nanowires and thin layers, in a given frequency range. Such an experiment could provide a deeper view on the problem of the definition of temperature in nonequilibrium situations.

  19. Fiber optic distributed temperature sensing for the determination of the nocturnal atmospheric boundary layer height

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Keller

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A new method for measuring air temperature profiles in the atmospheric boundary layer at high spatial and temporal resolution is presented. The measurements are based on Raman scattering distributed temperature sensing (DTS with a fiber optic cable attached to a tethered balloon. These data were used to estimate the height of the stable nocturnal boundary layer. The experiment was successfully deployed during a two-day campaign in September 2009, providing evidence that DTS is well suited for this atmospheric application. Observed stable temperature profiles exhibit an exponential shape confirming similarity concepts of the temperature inversion close to the surface. The atmospheric mixing height (MH was estimated to vary between 5 m and 50 m as a result of the nocturnal boundary layer evolution. This value is in good agreement with the MH derived from concurrent Radon-222 (222Rn measurements and in previous studies.

  20. Nonequilibrium recombination after a curved shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Chihyung; Hornung, Hans

    2010-02-01

    The effect of nonequilibrium recombination after a curved two-dimensional shock wave in a hypervelocity dissociating flow of an inviscid Lighthill-Freeman gas is considered. An analytical solution is obtained with the effective shock values derived by Hornung (1976) [5] and the assumption that the flow is ‘quasi-frozen’ after a thin dissociating layer near the shock. The solution gives the expression of dissociation fraction as a function of temperature on a streamline. A rule of thumb can then be provided to check the validity of binary scaling for experimental conditions and a tool to determine the limiting streamline that delineates the validity zone of binary scaling. The effects on the nonequilibrium chemical reaction of the large difference in free stream temperature between free-piston shock tunnel and equivalent flight conditions are discussed. Numerical examples are presented and the results are compared with solutions obtained with two-dimensional Euler equations using the code of Candler (1988) [10].

  1. Temperature dependent magnetic coupling between ferromagnetic FeTaC layers in multilayer thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Akhilesh Kumar; Hsu, Jen-Hwa; Perumal, Alagarsamy

    2016-01-01

    We report systematic investigations on temperature dependent magnetic coupling between ferromagnetic FeTaC layers and resulting magnetic properties of multilayer structured [FeTaC (~67 nm)/Ta(x nm)] 2 /FeTaC(~67 nm)] thin films, which are fabricated directly on thermally oxidized Si substrate. As-deposited amorphous films are post annealed at different annealing temperatures (T A =200, 300 and 400 °C). Structural analyzes reveal that the films annealed at T A ≤200 °C exhibit amorphous nature, while the films annealed above 200 °C show nucleation of nanocrystals at T A =300 °C and well-defined α-Fe nanocrystals with size of about 9 nm in amorphous matrix for 400 °C annealed films. Room temperature and temperature dependent magnetic hysteresis (M–H) loops reveal that magnetization reversal behaviors and magnetic properties are strongly depending on spacer layer thickness (x), T A and temperature. A large reduction in coercivity (H C ) was observed for the films annealed at 200 °C and correlated to relaxation of stress quenched in during the film deposition. On the other hand, the films annealed at 300 °C exhibit unusual variation of H C (T), i.e., a broad minimum in H C (T) vs T curve. This is caused by change in magnetic coupling between ferromagnetic layers having different microstructure. In addition, the broad minimum in the H C (T) curve shifts from 150 K for x=1 film to 80 K for x=4 film. High-temperature thermomagnetization data show a strong (significant) variation of Curie temperature (T C ) with T A (x). The multilayer films annealed at 200 °C exhibit low value of T C with a minimum of 350 K for x=4 film. But, the films annealed at 400 °C show largest T C with a maximum of 869 K for x=1 film. The observed results are discussed on the basis of variations in magnetic couplings between FeTaC layers, which are majorly driven by temperature, spacer layer thickness, annealing temperature and nature of interfaces. - Highlights: • Preparation and

  2. The Impact of Wet Soil and Canopy Temperatures on Daytime Boundary-Layer Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, M.; Garratt, J. R.; Kallos, G.; Pielke, R. A.

    1989-12-01

    The impact of very wet soil and canopy temperatures on the surface sensible heat flux, and on related daytime boundary-layer properties is evaluated. For very wet soils, two winter situations are considered, related to significant changes in soil surface temperature: (1) due to weather perturbations at a given location, and (2) due to the climatological north-south temperature gradient. Analyses and scaling of the various boundary-layer properties, and soil surface fluxes affecting the sensible beat flux, have been made; related evaluations show that changes in the sensible heat flux at a given location by a factor of 2 to 3 due to temperature changes related to weather perturbations is not uncommon. These changes result in significant alterations in the boundary-layer depth; in the atmospheric boundary-layer warming; and in the break-up time of the nocturnal surface temperature inversion. Investigation of the impact of the winter latitudinal temperature gradient on the above characteristics indicated that the relative increase in very wet soil sensible heat flux, due to the climatological reduction in the surface temperature in northern latitudes, moderates to some extent its reduction due to the corresponding decrease in solar radiation. Numerical model simulations confirmed these analytical evaluations.In addition, the impact of synoptic temperature perturbations during the transition seasons (fall and spring) on canopy sensible heal fluxes, and the related boundary-layer characteristics mentioned above, was evaluated. Analogous features to those found for very wet soil surfaces occurred also for the canopy situations. Likewise, evaluations were also carried out to explore the impact of high midlatitude foreste areas on the boundary-layer characteristics during the winter as compared to those during the summer. Similar impacts were found in both seasons, regardless of the substantial difference in the daily total solar radiation.

  3. Phonon and electron temperature and non-Fourier heat transport in thin layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlomagno, I.; Cimmelli, V.A. [Department of Mathematics, Computer Science and Economics, University of Basilicata, Campus Macchia Romana, Viale dell' Ateneo Lucano 10, 85100 Potenza (Italy); Sellitto, A. [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, 132, 84084 Fisciano (Italy)

    2017-04-15

    We present a thermodynamic model of heat conductor which allows for different temperatures of phonons and electrons. This model is applied to calculate the steady-state radial temperature profile in a circular thin layer. The compatibility of the obtained temperature profiles with the second law of thermodynamics is investigated in view of the requirement of positive entropy production and of a nonlocal constitutive equation for the entropy flux.

  4. Remote Multi-layer Soil Temperature Monitoring System Based on GPRS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Kuo CHEN

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available There is the temperature difference between the upper and lower layer of the shallow soil in the forest. It is a potential energy that can be harvested by thermoelectric generator for the electronic device in the forest. The temperature distribution at different depths of the soil is the first step for thermoelectric generation. A remote multi-layer soil temperature monitoring system based on GPRS is proposed in this paper. The MSP430F149 MCU is used as the main controller of multi-layer soil temperature monitoring system. A temperature acquisition module is designed with DS18B20 and 4 core shielded twisted-pair cable. The GPRS module sends the measured data to remote server through wireless communication network. From the experiments in the campus of Beijing Forestry University, the maximum error of measured temperature in this system is 0.2°C by comparing with professional equipment in the same condition. The results of the experiments show that the system can accurately realize real-time monitoring of multi-layer soil temperature, and the data transmission is stable and reliable.

  5. MATERIAL DEPENDENCE OF TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION IN MULTI-LAYER MULTI-METAL COOKWARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHAMMADREZA SEDIGH

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Laminated structure is becoming more popular in cookware markets; however, there seems to be a lack of enough scientific studies to evaluate its pros and cons, and to show that how it functions. A numerical model using a finite element method with temperature-dependent material properties has been performed to investigate material and layer dependence of temperature distribution in multi-layer multi-metal plate exposed to irregular heating. Behavior of two parameters including mean temperature value and uniformity on the inner surface of plate under variations of thermal properties and geometrical conditions have been studied. The results indicate that conductive metals used as first layer in bi-layer plates have better thermal performance than those used in the second layer. In addition, since cookware manufacturers increasingly prefer to use all-clad aluminium plate, recently, this structure is analysed in the present study as well. The results show all-clad copper and aluminum plate possesses lower temperature gradient compared with single layer aluminum and all-clad aluminum core plates.

  6. UV irradiation/cold shock-mediated apoptosis is switched to bubbling cell death at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Szu-Jung; Lin, Pei-Wen; Lin, Hsin-Ping; Huang, Shenq-Shyang; Lai, Feng-Jie; Sheu, Hamm-Ming; Hsu, Li-Jin; Chang, Nan-Shan

    2015-04-10

    When COS7 fibroblasts and other cells were exposed to UVC irradiation and cold shock at 4°C for 5 min, rapid upregulation and nuclear accumulation of NOS2, p53, WWOX, and TRAF2 occurred in 10-30 min. By time-lapse microscopy, an enlarging gas bubble containing nitric oxide (NO) was formed in the nucleus in each cell that finally popped out to cause "bubbling death". Bubbling occurred effectively at 4 and 22°C, whereas DNA fragmentation was markedly blocked at 4°C. When temperature was increased to 37°C, bubbling was retarded and DNA fragmentation occurred in 1 hr, suggesting that bubbling death is switched to apoptosis with increasing temperatures. Bubbling occurred prior to nuclear uptake of propidium iodide and DAPI stains. Arginine analog Nω-LAME inhibited NO synthase NOS2 and significantly suppressed the bubbling death. Unlike apoptosis, there were no caspase activation and flip-over of membrane phosphatidylserine (PS) during bubbling death. Bubbling death was significantly retarded in Wwox knockout MEF cells, as well as in cells overexpressing TRAF2 and dominant-negative p53. Together, UV/cold shock induces bubbling death at 4°C and the event is switched to apoptosis at 37°C. Presumably, proapoptotic WWOX and p53 block the protective TRAF2 to execute the bubbling death.

  7. Optimizing pentacene thin-film transistor performance: Temperature and surface condition induced layer growth modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassnig, R; Hollerer, M; Striedinger, B; Fian, A; Stadlober, B; Winkler, A

    2015-11-01

    In this work we present in situ electrical and surface analytical, as well as ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies on temperature and surface condition induced pentacene layer growth modifications, leading to the selection of optimized deposition conditions and entailing performance improvements. We prepared p ++ -silicon/silicon dioxide bottom-gate, gold bottom-contact transistor samples and evaluated the pentacene layer growth for three different surface conditions (sputtered, sputtered + carbon and unsputtered + carbon) at sample temperatures during deposition of 200 K, 300 K and 350 K. The AFM investigations focused on the gold contacts, the silicon dioxide channel region and the highly critical transition area. Evaluations of coverage dependent saturation mobilities, threshold voltages and corresponding AFM analysis were able to confirm that the first 3-4 full monolayers contribute to the majority of charge transport within the channel region. At high temperatures and on sputtered surfaces uniform layer formation in the contact-channel transition area is limited by dewetting, leading to the formation of trenches and the partial development of double layer islands within the channel region instead of full wetting layers. By combining the advantages of an initial high temperature deposition (well-ordered islands in the channel) and a subsequent low temperature deposition (continuous film formation for low contact resistance) we were able to prepare very thin (8 ML) pentacene transistors of comparably high mobility.

  8. Temperature-dependent layer breathing modes in two-dimensional materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Indrajit; Maiti, Prabal K.; Jain, Manish

    2018-04-01

    Relative out-of-plane displacements of the constituent layers of two-dimensional materials give rise to unique low-frequency breathing modes. By computing the height-height correlation functions from molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the layer breathing modes (LBMs) can be mapped consistently to vibrations of a simple linear chain model. Our calculated thickness dependence of LBM frequencies for few-layer (FL) graphene and molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) are in excellent agreement with available experiments. Our results show a redshift of LBM frequency with an increase in temperature, which is a direct consequence of anharmonicities present in the interlayer interaction. We also predict the thickness and temperature dependence of LBM frequencies for FL hexagonal boron nitride. Our Rapid Communication provides a simple and efficient way to probe the interlayer interaction for layered materials and their heterostructures with the inclusion of anharmonic effects.

  9. Is the boundary layer of an ionic liquid equally lubricating at higher temperature?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjalmarsson, Nicklas; Atkin, Rob; Rutland, Mark W

    2016-04-07

    Atomic force microscopy has been used to study the effect of temperature on normal forces and friction for the room temperature ionic liquid (IL) ethylammonium nitrate (EAN), confined between mica and a silica colloid probe at 25 °C, 50 °C, and 80 °C. Force curves revealed a strong fluid dynamic influence at room temperature, which was greatly reduced at elevated temperatures due to the reduced liquid viscosity. A fluid dynamic analysis reveals that bulk viscosity is manifested at large separation but that EAN displays a nonzero slip, indicating a region of different viscosity near the surface. At high temperatures, the reduction in fluid dynamic force reveals step-like force curves, similar to those found at room temperature using much lower scan rates. The ionic liquid boundary layer remains adsorbed to the solid surface even at high temperature, which provides a mechanism for lubrication when fluid dynamic lubrication is strongly reduced. The friction data reveals a decrease in absolute friction force with increasing temperature, which is associated with increased thermal motion and reduced viscosity of the near surface layers but, consistent with the normal force data, boundary layer lubrication was unaffected. The implications for ILs as lubricants are discussed in terms of the behaviour of this well characterised system.

  10. Effect of Rotation for Two-Temperature Generalized Thermoelasticity of Two-Dimensional under Thermal Shock Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kh. Lotfy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The theory of two-temperature generalized thermoelasticity based on the theory of Youssef is used to solve boundary value problems of two-dimensional half-space. The governing equations are solved using normal mode method under the purview of the Lord-Şhulman (LS and the classical dynamical coupled theory (CD. The general solution obtained is applied to a specific problem of a half-space subjected to one type of heating, the thermal shock type. We study the influence of rotation on the total deformation of thermoelastic half-space and the interaction with each other under the influence of two temperature theory. The material is homogeneous isotropic elastic half-space. The methodology applied here is use of the normal mode analysis techniques that are used to solve the resulting nondimensional coupled field equations for the two theories. Numerical results for the displacement components, force stresses, and temperature distribution are presented graphically and discussed. The conductive temperature, the dynamical temperature, the stress, and the strain distributions are shown graphically with some comparisons.

  11. Improved Seasonal Prediction of European Summer Temperatures With New Five-Layer Soil-Hydrology Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunzel, Felix; Müller, Wolfgang A.; Dobrynin, Mikhail; Fröhlich, Kristina; Hagemann, Stefan; Pohlmann, Holger; Stacke, Tobias; Baehr, Johanna

    2018-01-01

    We evaluate the impact of a new five-layer soil-hydrology scheme on seasonal hindcast skill of 2 m temperatures over Europe obtained with the Max Planck Institute Earth System Model (MPI-ESM). Assimilation experiments from 1981 to 2010 and 10-member seasonal hindcasts initialized on 1 May each year are performed with MPI-ESM in two soil configurations, one using a bucket scheme and one a new five-layer soil-hydrology scheme. We find the seasonal hindcast skill for European summer temperatures to improve with the five-layer scheme compared to the bucket scheme and investigate possible causes for these improvements. First, improved indirect soil moisture assimilation allows for enhanced soil moisture-temperature feedbacks in the hindcasts. Additionally, this leads to improved prediction of anomalies in the 500 hPa geopotential height surface, reflecting more realistic atmospheric circulation patterns over Europe.

  12. Anomalous temperature dependence of layer spacing of de Vries liquid crystals: Compensation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merkel, K. [Central Mining Institute, Katowice 40-166 (Poland); Kocot, A. [Institute of Physics, Silesian University, Katowice 40-007 (Poland); Vij, J. K., E-mail: jvij@tcd.ie [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Trinity College, The University of Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Stevenson, P. J.; Panov, A.; Rodriguez, D. [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Queens University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-13

    Smectic liquid crystals that exhibit temperature independent layer thickness offer technological advantages for their use in displays and photonic devices. The dependence of the layer spacing in SmA and SmC phases of de Vries liquid crystals is found to exhibit distinct features. On entering the SmC phase, the layer thickness initially decreases below SmA to SmC (T{sub A–C}) transition temperature but increases anomalously with reducing temperature despite the molecular tilt increasing. This anomalous observation is being explained quantitatively. Results of IR spectroscopy show that layer shrinkage is caused by tilt of the mesogen's rigid core, whereas the expansion is caused by the chains getting more ordered with reducing temperature. This mutual compensation arising from molecular fragments contributing to the layer thickness differs from the previous models. The orientational order parameter of the rigid core of the mesogen provides direct evidence for de Vries cone model in the SmA phase for the two compounds investigated.

  13. Low temperature bonding of heterogeneous materials using Al2O3 as an intermediate layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahoo, Hitesh Kumar; Ottaviano, Luisa; Zheng, Yi

    2018-01-01

    Integration of heterogeneous materials is crucial for many nanophotonic devices. The integration is often achieved by bonding using polymer adhesives or metals. A much better and cleaner option is direct wafer bonding, but the high annealing temperatures required make it a much less attractive...... atomic layer deposited Al2O3 an excellent choice for the intermediate layer. The authors have optimized the bonding process to achieve a high interface energy of 1.7 J/m2 for a low temperature annealing of 300 °C. The authors also demonstrate wafer bonding of InP to SiO2 on Si and GaAs to sapphire using...

  14. The attenuation of temperature oscillations in passing through liquid metal boundary layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawn, C.J.

    1975-08-01

    One aspect of predicting the endurance of components subject to thermal fatigue in liquid metal cooled reactors is the extent to which oscillations in fluid temperature are transmitted to metal surfaces, such as the above-core structure. The first geometry considered is that of a solid plate in contact with a layer of stagnant fluid, in which temperature oscillations are imposed at a given distance from the plate. Transmission through a laminar boundary layer developing over the plate surface is then considered. An approximate calculation based on the slug-flow analysis of Sucec (1975) is developed. (U.K.)

  15. ANALYSIS OF STRESS STATE IN UPPER LAYER OF ROAD CONCRETE PAVEMENT WITH TEMPERATURE ACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Pshembaev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available While being operated auto-road pavements are subjected to intensive mechanical impacts, ultraviolet ray irradiation, freeze-thaw temperatures, freezing and thawing, drying and moistening. Due to these actions various types of pavement distresses appear on the road pavement. The most significant and dangerous type of distresses is micro-cracks on the road surface. One of the main reasons for their formation is an action of weather and climatic factors that initiate large changes in temperature of coating surface and occurrence of large temperature gradients in the upper layer. In this context while designing and operating auto-roads it is rather essential to investigate a stress state in road surface which is caused by temperature action. Purpose of the described investigations is to determine permissible temperature gradients for cement-concrete pavements that exclude formation of micro-cracks on their surface and thickness of damaged surface layer. Calculations of road pavement have been carried out at various laws for temperature distribution in its depth. A finite difference method realized in PARUS software has been used for studying a stress state of cement-concrete auto-roads. Regularities for distribution of stresses in cement-concrete pavement of auto-roads have been obtained at various surface temperatures. Permissible temperature gradients in the upper pavement layer have been determined and thickness of the layer where micro-cracks are formed has been assessed in the paper. Strength criterion based on the process of micro-crack formation and development in the concrete has been used for calculations. Risk of micro-crack formation on the auto-road pavement depends on material strength, conditions of plate fixing and temperature gradients.

  16. Low Temperature Double-layer Capacitors with Improved Energy Density: An Overview of Recent Development Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Erik J.; West, William C.; Smart, Marshall C.; Yushin, Gleb; Korenblit, Yair; Kajdos, Adam; Kvit, Alexander; Jagiello, Jacek

    2012-01-01

    Electrochemical double-layer capacitors are finding increased use in a wide range of energy storage applications, particularly where high pulse power capabilities are required. Double-layer capacitors store charge at a liquid/solid interface, making them ideal for low temperature power applications, due to the facile kinetic processes associated with the rearrangement of the electrochemical double-layer at these temperatures. Potential low temperature applications include hybrid and electric vehicles, operations in polar regions, high altitude aircraft and aerospace avionics, and distributed environmental and structural health monitoring. State-of-the-art capacitors can typically operate to -40 C, with a subsequent degradation in power performance below room temperature. However, recent efforts focused on advanced electrolyte and electrode systems can enable operation to temperatures as low as -70 C, with capacities similar to room temperature values accompanied by reasonably low equivalent series resistances. This presentation will provide an overview of recent development efforts to extend and improve the wide temperature performance of these devices.

  17. Temperature and species measurement in a quenching boundary layer on a flat-flame burner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuyuto, Takayuki; Fujikawa, Taketoshi; Akihama, Kazuhiro [Toyota Central Research and Development Labs., Inc., Nagakute, Aichi (Japan); Kronemayer, Helmut [University of Duisburg-Essen, IVG, Institute for Combustion and Gasdynamics, Duisburg (Germany); BASF SE, Ludwigshafen (Germany); Lewerich, Burkhard; Dreier, Thomas; Schulz, Christof [University of Duisburg-Essen, IVG, Institute for Combustion and Gasdynamics, Duisburg (Germany); Bruebach, Jan [Technical University Darmstadt, EKT, Institute for Energy and Powerplant Technology, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    A detailed understanding of transport phenomena and reactions in near-wall boundary layers of combustion chambers is essential for further reducing pollutant emissions and improving thermal efficiencies of internal combustion engines. In a model experiment, the potential of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) was investigated for measurements inside the boundary layer connected to flame-wall interaction at atmospheric pressure. Temperature and species distributions were measured in the quenching boundary layer formed close to a cooled metal surface located parallel to the flow of a premixed methane/air flat flame. Multi-line NO-LIF thermometry provided gas-phase temperature distributions. In addition, flame species OH, CH{sub 2}O and CO were monitored by single-photon (OH, CH{sub 2}O) and two-photon (CO) excitation LIF, respectively. The temperature dependence of the OH-LIF signal intensities was corrected for using the measured gas-phase temperature distributions. The spatial line-pair resolution of the imaging system was 22 {mu}m determined by imaging microscopic line pairs printed on a resolution target. The experimental results show the expected flame quenching behavior in the boundary layer and they reveal the potential and limitations of the applied diagnostics techniques. Limitations in spatial resolution are attributed to refraction of fluorescence radiation propagating through steep temperature gradients in the boundary layer. For the present experimental arrangements, the applied diagnostics techniques are applicable as close to the wall as 200 {mu}m with measurement precision then exceeding the 15-25% limit for species detection, with estimates of double this value for the case of H{sub 2}CO due to the unknown effect of the Boltzmann fraction corrections not included in the data evaluation process. Temperature measurements are believed to be accurate within 50 K in the near-wall zone, which amounts to roughly 10% at the lower temperatures encountered in

  18. A thermal conductivity model for nanofluids including effect of the temperature-dependent interfacial layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitprasert, Chatcharin; Dechaumphai, Pramote; Juntasaro, Varangrat

    2009-01-01

    The interfacial layer of nanoparticles has been recently shown to have an effect on the thermal conductivity of nanofluids. There is, however, still no thermal conductivity model that includes the effects of temperature and nanoparticle size variations on the thickness and consequently on the thermal conductivity of the interfacial layer. In the present work, the stationary model developed by Leong et al. (J Nanopart Res 8:245-254, 2006) is initially modified to include the thermal dispersion effect due to the Brownian motion of nanoparticles. This model is called the 'Leong et al.'s dynamic model'. However, the Leong et al.'s dynamic model over-predicts the thermal conductivity of nanofluids in the case of the flowing fluid. This suggests that the enhancement in the thermal conductivity of the flowing nanofluids due to the increase in temperature does not come from the thermal dispersion effect. It is more likely that the enhancement in heat transfer of the flowing nanofluids comes from the temperature-dependent interfacial layer effect. Therefore, the Leong et al.'s stationary model is again modified to include the effect of temperature variation on the thermal conductivity of the interfacial layer for different sizes of nanoparticles. This present model is then evaluated and compared with the other thermal conductivity models for the turbulent convective heat transfer in nanofluids along a uniformly heated tube. The results show that the present model is more general than the other models in the sense that it can predict both the temperature and the volume fraction dependence of the thermal conductivity of nanofluids for both non-flowing and flowing fluids. Also, it is found to be more accurate than the other models due to the inclusion of the effect of the temperature-dependent interfacial layer. In conclusion, the present model can accurately predict the changes in thermal conductivity of nanofluids due to the changes in volume fraction and temperature for

  19. Effects of AlN Coating Layer on High Temperature Characteristics of Langasite SAW Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Shu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available High temperature characteristics of langasite surface acoustic wave (SAW devices coated with an AlN thin film have been investigated in this work. The AlN films were deposited on the prepared SAW devices by mid-frequency magnetron sputtering. The SAW devices coated with AlN films were measured from room temperature to 600 °C. The results show that the SAW devices can work up to 600 °C. The AlN coating layer can protect and improve the performance of the SAW devices at high temperature. The SAW velocity increases with increasing AlN coating layer thickness. The temperature coefficients of frequency (TCF of the prepared SAW devices decrease with increasing thickness of AlN coating layers, while the electromechanical coupling coefficient (K2 of the SAW devices increases with increasing AlN film thickness. The K2 of the SAW devices increases by about 20% from room temperature to 600 °C. The results suggest that AlN coating layer can not only protect the SAW devices from environmental contamination, but also improve the K2 of the SAW devices.

  20. Low-temperature atomic layer deposition of TiO2 thin layers for the processing of memristive devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porro, Samuele; Conti, Daniele; Guastella, Salvatore; Ricciardi, Carlo; Jasmin, Alladin; Pirri, Candido F.; Bejtka, Katarzyna; Perrone, Denis; Chiolerio, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) represents one of the most fundamental techniques capable of satisfying the strict technological requirements imposed by the rapidly evolving electronic components industry. The actual scaling trend is rapidly leading to the fabrication of nanoscaled devices able to overcome limits of the present microelectronic technology, of which the memristor is one of the principal candidates. Since their development in 2008, TiO 2 thin film memristors have been identified as the future technology for resistive random access memories because of their numerous advantages in producing dense, low power-consuming, three-dimensional memory stacks. The typical features of ALD, such as self-limiting and conformal deposition without line-of-sight requirements, are strong assets for fabricating these nanosized devices. This work focuses on the realization of memristors based on low-temperature ALD TiO 2 thin films. In this process, the oxide layer was directly grown on a polymeric photoresist, thus simplifying the fabrication procedure with a direct liftoff patterning instead of a complex dry etching process. The TiO 2 thin films deposited in a temperature range of 120–230 °C were characterized via Raman spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and electrical current–voltage measurements taken in voltage sweep mode were employed to confirm the existence of resistive switching behaviors typical of memristors. These measurements showed that these low-temperature devices exhibit an ON/OFF ratio comparable to that of a high-temperature memristor, thus exhibiting similar performances with respect to memory applications

  1. Temperature shock, injury and transient sensitivity to nisin in Gram negatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boziaris, I S; Adams, M R

    2001-10-01

    The effect of thermal stresses on survival, injury and nisin sensitivity was investigated in Salmonella Enteritidis PT4, PT7 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Heating at 55 degrees C, rapid chilling to 0.5 degrees C or freezing at -20 degrees C produced transient sensitivity to nisin. Cells were only sensitive if nisin was present during stress. Resistance recovered rapidly afterwards, though some cells displayed residual injury. Injury was assessed by SDS sensitivity, hydrophobicity changes, lipopolysaccharide release and NPN uptake. LPS release and hydrophobicity were not always associated with transient nisin sensitivity. Uptake of NPN correlated better but persisted longer after treatment. Thermal shocks produce transient injury to the outer membrane, allowing nisin access. After treatment, the permeability barrier is rapidly restored by a process apparently involving reorganization rather than biosynthetic repair. Inclusion of nisin during food treatments that impose sub-lethal stress on Gram negatives could increase process lethality, enhancing microbiological safety and stability.

  2. The effect of Laser Shock Peening on Fatigue Life Using Pure Water and Hydrofluoric Acid As a Confining Layer of Al – Alloy 7075-T6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaker Sakran Hassan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser shock peening (LSP is deemed as a deep-rooted technology for stimulating compressive residual stresses below the surface of metallic elements. As a result, fatigue lifespan is improved, and the substance properties become further resistant to wear and corrosion. The LSP provides more unfailing surface treatment and a potential decrease in microstructural damage. Laser shock peening is a well-organized method measured up to the mechanical shoot peening. This kind of surface handling can be fulfilled via an intense laser pulse focused on a substantial surface in extremely shorter intervals. In this work, Hydrofluoric Acid (HF and pure water as a coating layer were utilized as a new technique to improve the properties and to harden the treated surface of the Al -alloy 7075-T6. Fatigue life by means of laser peened workpieces was improved to 154.3%, 9.78%, respectively, for Hydrofluoric (HF and pure water compared to un-peened specimens. And the outcomes of Vickers hardness test for laser shock peening with acid and pure water as well as un-peened specimens were 165.2HV30, 143.95HV30 and 134.7HV30, respectively showed a significant improvement in the hardness property.

  3. A Temperature-Independent Cold-Shock Protein Homolog Acts as a Virulence Factor in Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbank, Lindsey P; Stenger, Drake C

    2016-05-01

    Xylella fastidiosa, causal agent of Pierce's disease (PD) of grapevine, is a fastidious organism that requires very specific conditions for replication and plant colonization. Cold temperatures reduce growth and survival of X. fastidiosa both in vitro and in planta. However, little is known regarding physiological responses of X. fastidiosa to temperature changes. Cold-shock proteins (CSP), a family of nucleic acid-binding proteins, act as chaperones facilitating translation at low temperatures. Bacterial genomes often encode multiple CSP, some of which are strongly induced following exposure to cold. Additionally, CSP contribute to the general stress response through mRNA stabilization and posttranscriptional regulation. A putative CSP homolog (Csp1) with RNA-binding activity was identified in X. fastidiosa Stag's Leap. The csp1 gene lacked the long 5' untranslated region characteristic of cold-inducible genes and was expressed in a temperature-independent manner. As compared with the wild type, a deletion mutant of csp1 (∆csp1) had decreased survival rates following cold exposure and salt stress in vitro. The deletion mutant also was significantly less virulent in grapevine, as compared with the wild type, in the absence of cold stress. These results suggest an important function of X. fastidiosa Csp1 in response to cellular stress and during plant colonization.

  4. Response of estuarine fish embryos to environmental temperature shock. Annual progress report, January 14, 1975--January 13, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    The results have demonstrated that the most sensitive stages to acute thermal shock were the 1-2 and 2-4 cell stages of periods of cell division. Late embryos and larvae were more tolerant of temperature and chemical stress than were juveniles or adults. The level and duration of exposure was not critical at less than 40 0 C for 24 0 C acclimated fish. Increased incubation temperatures shortened the time to hatching and fish reared at high but non-lethal temperatures had higher feeding rates than those reared below an apparently sensitive environmental level of 24 0 C. The results of the exposure of different developmental stages to chlorine and temperature at different levels and for different durations are still undergoing analysis. Preliminary interpretation is possible of the 0 and 7 day larvae stage where the effects were obvious but more subtle interaction effects could occur at earlier developmental stages and not be apparent without the further statistical analysis that is underway

  5. Temperature distribution around thin electroconductive layers created on composite textile substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korzeniewska Ewa

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the authors describe the distribution of temperatures around electroconductive pathways created by a physical vacuum deposition process on flexible textile substrates used in elastic electronics and textronics. Cordura material was chosen as the substrate. Silver with 99.99% purity was used as the deposited metal. This research was based on thermographic photographs of the produced samples. Analysis of the temperature field around the electroconductive layer was carried out using Image ThermaBase EU software. The analysis of the temperature distribution highlights the software’s usefulness in determining the homogeneity of the created metal layer. Higher local temperatures and non-uniform distributions at the same time can negatively influence the work of the textronic system.

  6. Shadowgraph studies of laser-assisted non-thermal structuring of thin layers on flexible substrates by shock-wave-induced delamination processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.lorenz@iom-leipzig.de [Leibniz-Institut für Oberflächenmodifizierung e. V., Permoserstraße 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Smausz, Tomi [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Dóm tér 9 (Hungary); MTA-SZTE Research Group on Photoacoustic Spectroscopy, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Dóm tér 9 (Hungary); Csizmadia, Tamas [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Dóm tér 9 (Hungary); Ehrhardt, Martin; Zimmer, Klaus [Leibniz-Institut für Oberflächenmodifizierung e. V., Permoserstraße 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Hopp, Bela [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Dóm tér 9 (Hungary)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • The shock-wave-induced film delamination (SWIFD) is a laser patterning process. • The SWIFD process of CIGS solar cells was studied by shadowgraph measurements. • The study presented that SWIFD allows the structuring of CIGS solar cells. • The dynamics of the delamination process was analyzed. - Abstract: The laser-assisted microstructuring of thin films especially for electronic applications without damaging the layers or the substrates is a challenge for the laser micromachining techniques. The laser-induced thin-film patterning by ablation of the polymer substrate at the rear side that is called ‘SWIFD’ – shock-wave-induced film delamination patterning has been demonstrated. This study focuses on the temporal sequence of processes that characterize the mechanism of this SWIFD process on a copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) solar cell stacks on polyimide. For this purpose high-speed shadowgraph experiments were performed in a pump probe experimental set-up using a KrF excimer laser for ablating the rear side of the polyimide substrate and measuring the shock wave generation at laser ablation of the polymer substrate as well as the thin-film delamination. The morphology and size of the thin-film structures were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Furthermore, the composition after the laser treatment was analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. The shadowgraph experiments allow the time-dependent identification and evaluation of the shock wave formation, substrate bending, and delamination of the thin film in dependence on the laser parameters. These results will contribute to improve the physical understanding of the laser-induced delamination effect for thin-film patterning.

  7. The airglow layer emission altitude cannot be determined unambiguously from temperature comparison with lidars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunker, Tim

    2018-05-01

    I investigate the nightly mean emission height and width of the OH* (3-1) layer by comparing nightly mean temperatures measured by the ground-based spectrometer GRIPS 9 and the Na lidar at ALOMAR. The data set contains 42 coincident measurements taken between November 2010 and February 2014, when GRIPS 9 was in operation at the ALOMAR observatory (69.3° N, 16.0° E) in northern Norway. To closely resemble the mean temperature measured by GRIPS 9, I weight each nightly mean temperature profile measured by the lidar using Gaussian distributions with 40 different centre altitudes and 40 different full widths at half maximum. In principle, one can thus determine the altitude and width of an airglow layer by finding the minimum temperature difference between the two instruments. On most nights, several combinations of centre altitude and width yield a temperature difference of ±2 K. The generally assumed altitude of 87 km and width of 8 km is never an unambiguous, good solution for any of the measurements. Even for a fixed width of ˜ 8.4 km, one can sometimes find several centre altitudes that yield equally good temperature agreement. Weighted temperatures measured by lidar are not suitable to unambiguously determine the emission height and width of an airglow layer. However, when actual altitude and width data are lacking, a comparison with lidars can provide an estimate of how representative a measured rotational temperature is of an assumed altitude and width. I found the rotational temperature to represent the temperature at the commonly assumed altitude of 87.4 km and width of 8.4 km to within ±16 K, on average. This is not a measurement uncertainty.

  8. Deformation of depleted uranium - 0.78 Ti under shock compression to 11.0 GPa at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dandekar, D.P.; Martin, A.G.; Kelley, J.V.

    1980-01-01

    The present work on depleted uranium alloyed with 0.78% titanium by weight (i.e., U-0.8 Ti) describes the nature of deformation it undergoes when subjected to shock compression at room temperature. The principal results emerging out of the present work are: (1) The stress limits of elastic deformation are dependent on the thickness of U-0.8Ti. The stress limit decreases from over 3.0 GPa at the impact surface to 1.2 GPa at a depth of 9 mm in U-0.8 Ti; (2) The lower limit of the stress agrees with the static yield stress in U-0.8 Ti; (3) Above the elastic stress limit, the deformation of U-0.8 Ti proceeds in a manner of the ideal plastic solid; and (4) The pressure derivative of Lame's parameter of U-0.8 Ti is estimated to be 3.8

  9. Influence of temperature and molecular structure on ionic liquid solvation layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeham, Deborah; Hayes, Robert; Warr, Gregory G; Atkin, Rob

    2009-04-30

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) force profiling is used to investigate the structure of adsorbed and solvation layers formed on a mica surface by various room temperature ionic liquids (ILs) ethylammonium nitrate (EAN), ethanolammonium nitrate (EtAN), ethylammonium formate (EAF), propylammonium formate (PAF), ethylmethylammonium formate (EMAF), and dimethylethylammonium formate (DMEAF). At least seven layers are observed for EAN at 14 degrees C (melting point 13 degrees C), decreasing as the temperature is increased to 30 degrees C due to thermal energy disrupting solvophobic forces that lead to segregation of cation alkyl tails from the charged ammonium and nitrate moieties. The number and properties of the solvation layers can also be controlled by introducing an alcohol moiety to the cation's alkyl tail (EtAN), or by replacing the nitrate anion with formate (EAF and PAF), even leading to the detection of distinct cation and anion sublayers. Substitution of primary by secondary or tertiary ammonium cations reduces the number of solvation layers formed, and also weakens the cation layer adsorbed onto mica. The observed solvation and adsorbed layer structures are discussed in terms of the intermolecular cohesive forces within the ILs.

  10. High-temperature adsorption layers based on fluoridated polyimide and diatomite carrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovleva, E. Yu.; Shundrina, I. K.; Gerasimov, E. Yu.

    2017-09-01

    A way of preparing separation layers by the pyrolysis of fluorinated polyimide obtained from 2,4,6-trimethyl- m-phenylenediamine (2,4,6-TM mPDA) and 2,2-bis(3',4'-dicarboxyphenyl)hexafluoropropane (6FDA) applied onto a diatomite carrier is described. Thermogravimetry, elemental analysis, low-temperature nitrogen adsorption, high-resolution electron microscopy, and gas chromatography are used to study changes in the texture and chromatographic characteristics of these layers. It is found that changes in the structure and the effectivity of separation characteristic of the layers depend on the temperature of pyrolysis, which ranges from 250 to 1100°C. It is established that a layer of separation is formed at 250-350°C, and the order of elution of hydrocarbons is similar to their chromatographic behavior on such stationary phases as OV-101. Layers of amorphous carbon formed on the surfaces of individual particles on a diatomite surface at 500-700°C. These layers ensure highly stable and selective separation of permanent gases and hydrocarbons when they are present together.

  11. heat shock factor genes of tall fescue and perennial ryegrass in response to temperature stress by RNA-Seq analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan eWang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock factors (Hsfs are important regulators of stress-response in plants. However, our understanding of Hsf genes and their responses to temperature stresses in two Pooideae cool-season grasses, Festuca arundinacea and Lolium perenne, is limited. Here we conducted comparative transcriptome analyses of plant leaves exposed to heat or cold stress for 10 h. Approximately, 30% and 25% of the genes expressed in the two species showed significant changes under heat and cold stress respectively, including subsets of Hsfs and their target genes. We uncovered 74 Hsfs in F. arundinacea and 52 Hsfs in L. perenne, and categorized these genes into three subfamilies, HsfA, HsfB, and HsfC based on protein sequence homology to known Hsf members in model organisms. The Hsfs showed a strong response to heat and/or cold stress. The expression of HsfAs was elevated under heat stress, especially in class HsfA2, which exhibited the most dramatic responses. HsfBs were upregulated by the both temperature conditions, and HsfCs mainly showed an increase in expression under cold stress. The target genes of Hsfs, such as heat shock protein (HSP, ascorbate peroxidase (APX, inositol-3-phosphate synthase (IPS, and galactinol synthase (GOLS1, showed strong and unique responses to different stressors. We comprehensively detected Hsfs and their target genes in F. arundinacea and L. perenne, providing a foundation for future gene function studies and genetic engineering to improve stress tolerance in grasses and other crops.

  12. Low-temperature atomic layer deposition of MoOx for silicon heterojunction solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macco, B.; Vos, M.; Thissen, N.F.W.; Bol, A.A.; Kessels, W.M.M.

    2015-01-01

    The preparation of high-quality molybdenum oxide (MoOx) is demonstrated by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (ALD) at substrate temperatures down to 50 °C. The films are amorphous, slightly substoichiometric with respect to MoO3, and free of other elements apart from hydrogen (&11 at%). The

  13. Temperature Dependence and Magnetic Field Dependence of Quantum Point Contacts in Si-Inversion Layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, S.L.; Son, P.C. van; Wees, B.J. van; Klapwijk, T.M.

    1992-01-01

    The conductance of ballistic point contacts in high-mobility Si-inversion layers has been studied at several temperatures between 75 and 600 mK both without and in a magnetic field (up to 12T). When the width of constriction is varied in zero magnetic field, step-like features at multiples of 4e2/h

  14. High-temperature oxidation of tungsten covered by layer of glass-enamel melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasnetsova, V.B.; Shardakov, N.T.; Kudyakov, V.Ya.; Deryabin, V.A.

    1997-01-01

    Corrosion losses of tungsten covered by the layer of glass-enamel melt were determined at 800, 850, 900, 950 deg C. It is shown that the rate of high-temperature oxidation of tungsten decreases after application of glass-enamel melt on its surface. This is probably conditioned by reduction of area of metal interaction with oxidizing atmosphere

  15. Low temperature growth of gallium oxide thin films via plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Donoghue, R.; Rechmann, J.; Aghaee, M.; Rogalla, D.; Becker, H.-W.; Creatore, M.; Wieck, A.D.; Devi, A.P.K.

    2017-01-01

    Herein we describe an efficient low temperature (60–160 °C) plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) process for gallium oxide (Ga2O3) thin films using hexakis(dimethylamido)digallium [Ga(NMe2)3]2 with oxygen (O2) plasma on Si(100). The use of O2 plasma was found to have a significant

  16. Shock compression behavior of bi-material powder composites with disparate melting temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, Kyle T.; Swift, Damian; Barham, Matthew; Stölken, James; Kuntz, Joshua; Kumar, Mukul

    2014-01-01

    Laser driven experiments were used to investigate the shock compression behavior of powder processed Bismuth/Tungsten (Bi/W) composite samples. The constituents provide different functionality to the composite behavior as Bi could be shock melted at the pressures attained in this work, while the W could not. Samples were prepared by uniaxial pressing, and the relative density was measured as a function of particle size, applied pressure, and composition for both hot and cold pressing conditions. This resulted in sample densities between 73% and 99% of the theoretical maximum density, and also noticeable differences in microstructure in the hot and cold pressed samples. The compression waves were generated with a 1.3 × 1.3 mm square spot directly onto the surface of the sample, using irradiances between 10 12 and 10 13  W/cm 2 , which resulted in calculated peak pressures between 50 and 150 GPa within a few micrometers. Sample recovery and post-mortem analysis revealed the formation of a crater on the laser drive surface, and the depth of this crater corresponded to the depth to which the Bi had been melted. The melt depth was found to be primarily a function of residual porosity and composition, and ranged from 167 to 528 μm. In general, a higher porosity led to a larger melt depth. Direct numerical simulations were performed, and indicated that the observed increase in melt depth for low-porosity samples could be largely attributed to increased heating associated with work done for pore collapse. However, the relative scaling was sensitive to composition, with low volume fraction Bi samples exhibiting a much stronger dependence on porosity than high Bi content samples. Select samples were repeated using an Al foil ablator, but there were no noticeable differences ensuring that the observed melting was indeed pressure-driven and was not a result of direct laser heating. The resultant microstructures and damage near the spall surface were also investigated

  17. Generation of transverse waves in a liquid layer with insoluble surfactant subjected to temperature gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikishev, Alexander B; Friedman, Barry A [Department of Physics, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX 77341 (United States); Nepomnyashchy, Alexander A, E-mail: amik@shsu.edu, E-mail: phy_baf@shsu.edu, E-mail: nepom@technion.ac.il [Department of Mathematics, Technion—Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2016-12-15

    The formation of Faraday waves (FWs) at the surfactant-covered free surface of a vertically vibrated liquid layer is considered. The layer is subjected to a vertical temperature gradient. The surfactant is insoluble. Linear stability analysis and the Floquet method are used for disturbances with arbitrary wave numbers to find the regions of critical vibration amplitude where FWs are generated. The problem is considered for the semi-infinite liquid layer, as well as for the layer of a finite depth. It is shown numerically, that in the semi-infinite case the critical tongue of a neutral stability curve corresponding to the lowest value of the forcing amplitude is related to the subharmonic instability mode. It changes to the harmonic one in the case of finite depth. The influence of thermocapillary Marangoni number on the critical amplitude of FWs is studied. The growth of that number stabilizes the system, however, this effect is very weak. (paper)

  18. A long-term ultrahigh temperature application of layered silicide coated Nb alloy in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jia; Fu, Qian-Gang; Li, Tao; Wang, Chen; Huo, Cai-Xia; Zhou, Hong; Yang, Guan-Jun; Sun, Le

    2018-05-01

    Nb-based alloy possessed limited application service life at ultrahigh temperature (>1400 °C) in air even taking the effective protective coating strategy into consideration for last decades. In this work a long duration of above 128 h at 1500 °C in air was successfully achieved on Nb-based alloy thanked to multi-layered silicide coating. Through optimizing interfaces, the MoSi2/NbSi2 silicide coating with Al2O3-adsorbed-particles layer exhibited three-times higher of oxidation resistance capacity than the one without it. In MoSi2-Al2O3-NbSi2 multilayer coating, the Al2O3-adsorbed-particles layer playing as an element-diffusion barrier role, as well as the formed porous Nb5Si3 layer as a stress transition zone, contributed to the significant improvement.

  19. The Mobility Enhancement of Indium Gallium Zinc Oxide Transistors via Low-temperature Crystallization using a Tantalum Catalytic Layer

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Yeonwoo; Kim, Sang Tae; Kim, Kuntae; Kim, Mi Young; Oh, Saeroonter; Jeong, Jae Kyeong

    2017-01-01

    High-mobility indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) are achieved through low-temperature crystallization enabled via a reaction with a transition metal catalytic layer. For conventional amorphous IGZO TFTs, the active layer crystallizes at thermal annealing temperatures of 600??C or higher, which is not suitable for displays using a glass substrate. The crystallization temperature is reduced when in contact with a Ta layer, where partial crystallization at the IGZO bac...

  20. Structure of boron nitride after the high-temperature shock compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurdyumov, A.V.; Ostrovskaya, N.F.; Pilipenko, V.A.; Pilyankevich, A.N.; Savvakin, G.I.; Trefilov, V.I.

    1979-01-01

    Boron nitride structure changes as a result of high temperature dynamic compression are studied. The X-ray technique and transmission electron microscopy have been applied. The data on the structure and regularities of formation of diamond-like modifications of boron nitride at high temperature impact compression permit to consider martensite transformation as the first stage of formation of the sphalerite phase stable at high pressures. The second stage is possible if the temperature at the impact moment is sufficiently high for intensive diffusion processes

  1. Growth characteristics of (100)HgCdTe layers in low-temperature MOVPE with ditertiarybutyltelluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, K.; Hatano, H.; Ferid, T.; Minamide, M.; Maejima, T.; Kawamoto, K.

    1996-09-01

    Low-temperature growth of (100)HgCdTe (MCT) layers in MOVPE has been studied using ditertiarybutyltelluride (DtBTe), dimethylcadmium (DMCd), and elementary mercury as precursors. MCT layers were grown at 275°C on (100)GaAs substrates. Growths were carried out in a vertical growth cell which has a narrow spacing between the substrate and cell ceiling. Using the growth cell, the Cd-composition ( x) of MCT layers was controlled over a wide range from 0 to 0.98 by the DMCd flow. The growth rate of the MCT layers was constant at 5 μm h -1 for the increased DMCd flow. Preferential Cd-incorporation into MCT layers and an increase of the growth rate were observed in the presence of mercury vapor. The growth characteristics were considered to be due to the alkyl-exchange reaction between DMCd and mercury. The electrical properties and crystallinity of grown layers were also evaluated, which showed that layers with high quality can be grown at 275°C.

  2. Substituted Quaternary Ammonium Salts Improve Low-Temperature Performance of Double-Layer Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Erik J.; Smart, Marshall C.; West, William C.

    2011-01-01

    Double-layer capacitors are unique energy storage devices, capable of supporting large current pulses as well as a very high number of charging and discharging cycles. The performance of doublelayer capacitors is highly dependent on the nature of the electrolyte system used. Many applications, including for electric and fuel cell vehicles, back-up diesel generators, wind generator pitch control back-up power systems, environmental and structural distributed sensors, and spacecraft avionics, can potentially benefit from the use of double-layer capacitors with lower equivalent series resistances (ESRs) over wider temperature limits. Higher ESRs result in decreased power output, which is a particular problem at lower temperatures. Commercially available cells are typically rated for operation down to only 40 C. Previous briefs [for example, Low Temperature Supercapacitors (NPO-44386), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 32, No. 7 (July 2008), p. 32, and Supercapacitor Electrolyte Solvents With Liquid Range Below 80 C (NPO-44855), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 34, No. 1 (January 2010), p. 44] discussed the use of electrolytes that employed low-melting-point co-solvents to depress the freezing point of traditional acetonitrile-based electrolytes. Using these modified electrolyte formulations can extend the low-temperature operational limit of double-layer capacitors beyond that of commercially available cells. This previous work has shown that although the measured capacitance is relatively insensitive to temperature, the ESR can rise rapidly at low temperatures, due to decreased electrolyte conductance within the pores of the high surface- area carbon electrodes. Most of these advanced electrolyte systems featured tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate (TEATFB) as the salt. More recent work at JPL indicates the use of the asymmetric quaternary ammonium salt triethylmethylammonium tetrafluoroborate (TEMATFB) or spiro-(l,l')-bipyrrolidium tetrafluoroborate (SBPBF4) in a 1:1 by volume solvent

  3. Low Temperature Processed Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) Device by Oxidation Effect from Capping Layer

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Zhenwei

    2015-04-20

    In this report, both p- and n-type tin oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs) were simultaneously achieved using single-step deposition of the tin oxide channel layer. The tuning of charge carrier polarity in the tin oxide channel is achieved by selectively depositing a copper oxide capping layer on top of tin oxide, which serves as an oxygen source, providing additional oxygen to form an n-type tin dioxide phase. The oxidation process can be realized by annealing at temperature as low as 190°C in air, which is significantly lower than the temperature generally required to form tin dioxide. Based on this approach, CMOS inverters based entirely on tin oxide TFTs were fabricated. Our method provides a solution to lower the process temperature for tin dioxide phase, which facilitates the application of this transparent oxide semiconductor in emerging electronic devices field.

  4. Shock Response of Commercial Purity Polycrystalline Magnesium Under Uniaxial Strain at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianxue; Zuanetti, Bryan; Prakash, Vikas

    2017-12-01

    In the present paper, results of plate impact experiments designed to investigate the onset of incipient plasticity in commercial purity polycrystalline magnesium (99.9%) under weak uniaxial strain compression and elevated temperatures up to melt are presented. The dynamic stress at yield and post yield of magnesium, as inferred from the measured normal component of the particle velocity histories at the free (rear) surface of the target plate, are observed to decrease progressively with increasing test temperatures in the range from 23 to 500 °C. At (higher) test temperatures in the range 500-610 °C, the rate of decrease of dynamic stress with temperature at yield and post-yield in the sample is observed to weaken. At still higher test temperatures (617 and 630 °C), a dramatic increase in dynamic yield as well as flow stress is observed indicating a change in dominant mechanism of plastic deformation as the sample approaches the melt point of magnesium at strain rates of 105/s. In addition to these measurements at the wavefront, the plateau region of the free surface particle velocity profiles indicates that the longitudinal (plastic) impedance of the magnesium samples decreases continuously as the sample temperatures are increased from room to 610 °C, and then reverses trend (indicating increasing material longitudinal impedance/strength) as the sample temperatures are increased to 617 and 630 °C. Electron back scattered diffraction analysis of the as-received and annealed pre-test magnesium samples reveal grain coarsening as well as grain re-orientation to a different texture during the heating process of the samples.

  5. Temperature dependent magnetic coupling between ferromagnetic FeTaC layers in multilayer thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Akhilesh Kumar [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781039 (India); Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Jen-Hwa [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Perumal, Alagarsamy, E-mail: perumal@iitg.ernet.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781039 (India)

    2016-11-15

    We report systematic investigations on temperature dependent magnetic coupling between ferromagnetic FeTaC layers and resulting magnetic properties of multilayer structured [FeTaC (~67 nm)/Ta(x nm)]{sub 2}/FeTaC(~67 nm)] thin films, which are fabricated directly on thermally oxidized Si substrate. As-deposited amorphous films are post annealed at different annealing temperatures (T{sub A}=200, 300 and 400 °C). Structural analyzes reveal that the films annealed at T{sub A}≤200 °C exhibit amorphous nature, while the films annealed above 200 °C show nucleation of nanocrystals at T{sub A}=300 °C and well-defined α-Fe nanocrystals with size of about 9 nm in amorphous matrix for 400 °C annealed films. Room temperature and temperature dependent magnetic hysteresis (M–H) loops reveal that magnetization reversal behaviors and magnetic properties are strongly depending on spacer layer thickness (x), T{sub A} and temperature. A large reduction in coercivity (H{sub C}) was observed for the films annealed at 200 °C and correlated to relaxation of stress quenched in during the film deposition. On the other hand, the films annealed at 300 °C exhibit unusual variation of H{sub C}(T), i.e., a broad minimum in H{sub C}(T) vs T curve. This is caused by change in magnetic coupling between ferromagnetic layers having different microstructure. In addition, the broad minimum in the H{sub C}(T) curve shifts from 150 K for x=1 film to 80 K for x=4 film. High-temperature thermomagnetization data show a strong (significant) variation of Curie temperature (T{sub C}) with T{sub A} (x). The multilayer films annealed at 200 °C exhibit low value of T{sub C} with a minimum of 350 K for x=4 film. But, the films annealed at 400 °C show largest T{sub C} with a maximum of 869 K for x=1 film. The observed results are discussed on the basis of variations in magnetic couplings between FeTaC layers, which are majorly driven by temperature, spacer layer thickness, annealing temperature and

  6. Low temperature synthesis and field emission characteristics of single to few layered graphene grown using PECVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Avshish; Khan, Sunny; Zulfequar, M.; Harsh; Husain, Mushahid, E-mail: mush_reslab@rediffmail.com

    2017-04-30

    Highlights: • Graphene was synthesized by PECVD system at a low temperature of 600 °C. • From different characterization techniques, the presence of single and few layered graphene was confirmed. • X-ray diffraction pattern of the graphene showed single crystalline nature of the film. • The as-grown graphene films were observed extremely good field emitters with long term emission current stability. - Abstract: In this work, high-quality graphene has successfully been synthesized on copper (Cu) coated Silicon (Si) substrate at very large-area by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system. This method is low cost and highly effective for synthesizing graphene relatively at low temperature of 600 °C. Electron microscopy images have shown that surface morphology of the grown samples is quite uniform consisting of single layered graphene (SLG) to few layered graphene (FLG). Raman spectra reveal that graphene has been grown with high-quality having negligible defects and the observation of G and G' peaks is also an indicative of stokes phonon energy shift caused due to laser excitation. Scanning probe microscopy image also depicts the synthesis of single to few layered graphene. The field emission characteristics of as-grown graphene samples were studied in a planar diode configuration at room temperature. The graphene samples were observed to be a good field emitter having low turn-on field, higher field amplification factor and long term emission current stability.

  7. Temperature anomalies of shock and isentropic waves of quark-hadron phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konyukhov, A. V.; Iosilevskiy, I. L.; Levashov, P. R.; Likhachev, A. P.

    2018-01-01

    In this work, we consider a phenomenological equation of state, which combinesstatistical description for hadron gas and a bag-model-based approach for the quark-gluon plasma. The equation of state is based on the excluded volume method in its thermodynamically consistent variant from Satarov et al [2009 Phys. At. Nucl. 72 1390]. The characteristic shape of the Taub adiabats and isentropes in the phase diagram is affected by the anomalous pressure-temperature dependence along the curve of phase equilibrium. The adiabats have kink points at the boundary of the two-phase region, inside which the temperature decreases with compression. Thermodynamic properties of matter observed in the quark-hadron phase transition region lead to hydrodynamic anomalies (in particular, to the appearance of composite compression and rarefaction waves). On the basis of relativistic hydrodynamics equations we investigate and discuss the structure and anomalous temperature behavior in these waves.

  8. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. Part 2: Wall shear stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, M. S.; Adamson, T. C., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the flow in the two inner layers, the Reynolds stress sublayer and the wall layer. Included is the calculation of the shear stress at the wall in the interaction region. The limit processes considered are those used for an inviscid flow.

  9. Silicotungstate, a Potential Electron Transporting Layer for Low-Temperature Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon Ho; Kim, Hyun Bin; Yang, In Seok; Sung, Sang Do; Choi, Young Sik; Kim, Jeongho; Lee, Wan In

    2017-08-02

    Thin films of a heteropolytungstate, lithium silicotungstate (Li 4 SiW 12 O 40 , termed Li-ST), prepared by a solution process at low temperature, were successfully applied as electron transporting layer (ETL) of planar-type perovskite solar cells (PSCs). Dense and uniform Li-ST films were prepared on FTO glass by depositing a thin Li-ST buffer layer, followed by coating of a main Li-ST layer. The film thickness was controlled by varying the number of coating cycles, consisting of spin-coating and thermal treatment at 150 °C. In particular, by employing 60 nm-thick Li-ST layer obtained by two cycles of coating, the fabricated CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 PSC device demonstrates the photovoltaic conversion efficiency (PCE) of 14.26% with J SC of 22.16 mA cm -2 , V OC of 0.993 mV and FF of 64.81%. The obtained PCE is significantly higher than that of the PSC employing a TiO 2 layer processed at the same temperature (PCE = 12.27%). Spectroscopic analyses by time-resolved photoluminescence and pulsed light-induced transient measurement of photocurrent indicate that the Li-ST layer collects electrons from CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 more efficiently and also exhibits longer electron lifetime than the TiO 2 layer thermally treated at 150 °C. Thus, Li-ST is considered to be a promising ETL material that can be applied for the fabrication of flexible PSC devices.

  10. Thermally activated flux creep in strongly layered high-temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakravarty, S.; Ivlev, B.I.; Ovchinnikov, Y.N.

    1990-01-01

    Thermal activation energies for single vortices and vortex bundles in the presence of a magnetic field parallel to the layers are calculated. The pinning considered is intrinsic and is due to the strongly layered structure of high-temperature superconductors. The magnetic field and the current dependence of the activation energy are studied in detail. The calculation of the activation energy is used to determine the current-voltage characteristic. It may be possible to observe the effects discussed in this paper in a pure enough sample

  11. On the influence of mechanical surface treatments--deep rolling and laser shock peening--on the fatigue behavior of Ti-6Al-4V at ambient and elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nalla, R.K.; Altenberger, I.; Noster, U.; Liu, G.Y.; Scholtes, B.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2003-01-01

    It is well known that mechanical surface treatments, such as deep rolling, shot peening and laser shock peening, can significantly improve the fatigue behavior of highly-stressed metallic components. Deep rolling (DR) is particularly attractive since it is possible to generate, near the surface, deep compressive residual stresses and work hardened layers while retaining a relatively smooth surface finish. In the present investigation, the effect of DR on the low-cycle fatigue (LCF) and high-cycle fatigue (HCF) behavior of a Ti-6Al-4V alloy is examined, with particular emphasis on the thermal and mechanical stability of the residual stress states and the near-surface microstructures. Preliminary results on laser shock peened Ti-6Al-4V are also presented for comparison. Particular emphasis is devoted to the question of whether such surface treatments are effective for improving the fatigue properties at elevated temperatures up to ∼450 deg. C, i.e. at a homologous temperature of ∼0.4T/T m (where T m is the melting temperature). Based on cyclic deformation and stress/life (S/N) fatigue behavior, together with the X-ray diffraction and in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations of the microstructure, it was found that deep rolling can be quite effective in retarding the initiation and initial propagation of fatigue cracks in Ti-6Al-4V at such higher temperatures, despite the almost complete relaxation of the near-surface residual stresses. In the absence of such stresses, it is shown that the near-surface microstructures, which in Ti-6Al-4V consist of a layer of work hardened nanoscale grains, play a critical role in the enhancement of fatigue life by mechanical surface treatment

  12. The performance of BAF using natural zeolite as filter media under conditions of low temperature and ammonium shock load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Shengbing; Xue Gang; Kong Hainan

    2007-01-01

    Natural zeolite and expanded clay were used as filter media for biological aerated filter (BAF) to treat municipal wastewater in parallel in whole three test stages. The stage one test results revealed that zeolite BAF and expanded clay BAF have COD and NH 3 -N removals in the range of 84.63-93.11%, 85.74-96.26%, 82.34-93.71%, and 85.06-93.2%, respectively, under the conditions of water temperature of 20-25 deg. C and hydraulic load of 2-3 m 3 /(m 2 h). At the following stage two, the influent NH 3 -N concentration was increased to about double value of the stage one, and it was investigated that the effluent NH 3 -N of expanded clay BAF increased significantly and then gradually restored to normal condition in 2 weeks, while the effluent NH 3 -N of zeolite BAF kept stable. At stage three, the low reactor temperature has also different effects on these two BAFs, under conditions of water temperature of 7-10 deg. C, hydraulic load of 2-3 m 3 /(m 2 h), zeolite BAF and expanded clay BAF have COD and NH 3 -N removals in the range of 74.5-88.47% (average of 81.57%), 71.73-88.49% (average of 81.06%), 71.91-87.76% (average of 80.49%), and 38.41-77.17% (average of 65.42%), respectively. Three stages test results indicated that the zeolite BAF has a stronger adaptability to NH 3 -N shock load and low temperature compared to expanded clay BAF. In addition, the detection of the amounts of heterobacteria and nitrobacteria of two biological aerated filters in three stages also showed the zeolite filter media was more suitable to the attached growth of nitrobacteria, which is helpful to the improvement of nitrification performance in zeolite BAF

  13. Regulation of lead toxicity by heat shock protein 90 (daf-21) is affected by temperature in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunbiao; Xu, Songbai; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Yanhui; Guo, Tai L

    2014-06-01

    In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, stress resistance can be regulated by dauer formation (daf) genes. In the present study, regulation of heavy metal lead (Pb) toxicity by the 90-kDa heat shock proteins (Hsp90; daf-21) was investigated in both wild-type C. elegans and daf-21/Hsp90 mutants by focusing on the effects of varied temperatures below (15°C) or above (25 and 30°C) the presumptive optimum growth temperature (20°C). More acute toxicity of Pb, indicated by the 24-h median lethal concentrations (LC50), was observed in wild-type adults than in the daf-21 mutant adults at 15, 20 and 25°C; however, the daf-21 mutant adults showed more sensitivity at 30°C. Enhanced Pb sensitivity (e.g., decrease LC50) in both types of C. elegans was observed with both increased and decreased temperatures when compared to that at 20°C. Additional examined endpoints included time course of toxicity at LC50s, pharyngeal pumping, reproduction, life span, and Hsp90 expression. Collective results showed that temperatures both above and below 20°C exacerbated Pb toxicity, and that the protein level of daf-21/Hsp90 was one of the most sensitive indicators of Pb toxicity in wild-type C. elegans, while pharyngeal pumping was more Pb sensitive in daf-21 mutants. Therefore, the expression of daf-21/Hsp90 has apparent utility for the prediction and assessment of Pb-induced toxicity in nematodes. Further, the stress responses related to Hsp90 expression in C. elegans may have considerable potential as sensitive biomarkers for the monitoring of environmental Pb contamination. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Emission of OH* and CO2* during the high-temperature oxidation of acetone in reflected shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereza, A. M.; Smirnov, V. N.; Vlasov, P. A.; Shumova, V. V.; Garmash, A. A.

    2018-01-01

    Experimental and kinetic modeling study of the ignition of a stoichiometric mixture of acetone with oxygen diluted by argon was carried out behind reflected shock waves within the temperature range of 1350-1810 K for the total mixture concentration [M 50] ~ 10-5 mol/cm3. Emission signals were recorded simultaneously for three different wavelengths: OH* (λ = 308 nm) and {{{CO}}}2* (λ1 = 365 nm; λ2 = 451 nm). It was revealed that the time it takes to reach the maximum of emission of OH* and {{{CO}}}2* is practically the same over the whole temperature range. At the same time, the emission profiles of {{{CO}}}2* after the maximum was attained, recorded at λ2 = 451 nm, differ noticeably from the profiles recorded at λ1 = 365 nm. For numerical modeling of the emission profiles of OH* and {{{CO}}}2* , the corresponding sets of excitation and quenching reactions available in the literature were used. In the course of our numerical simulations we succeeded in good agreement of our own experimental and simulation results on acetone ignition and the results available in the literature for conditions under consideration.

  15. The effect of substrate temperature on atomic layer deposited zinc tin oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindahl, Johan, E-mail: johan.lindahl@angstrom.uu.se; Hägglund, Carl, E-mail: carl.hagglund@angstrom.uu.se; Wätjen, J. Timo, E-mail: timo.watjen@angstrom.uu.se; Edoff, Marika, E-mail: marika.edoff@angstrom.uu.se; Törndahl, Tobias, E-mail: tobias.torndahl@angstrom.uu.se

    2015-07-01

    Zinc tin oxide (ZTO) thin films were deposited on glass substrates by atomic layer deposition (ALD), and the film properties were investigated for varying deposition temperatures in the range of 90 to 180 °C. It was found that the [Sn]/([Sn] + [Zn]) composition is only slightly temperature dependent, while properties such as growth rate, film density, material structure and band gap are more strongly affected. The growth rate dependence on deposition temperature varies with the relative number of zinc or tin containing precursor pulses and it correlates with the growth rate behavior of pure ZnO and SnO{sub x} ALD. In contrast to the pure ZnO phase, the density of the mixed ZTO films is found to depend on the deposition temperature and it increases linearly with about 1 g/cm{sup 3} in total over the investigated range. Characterization by transmission electron microscopy suggests that zinc rich ZTO films contain small (~ 10 nm) ZnO or ZnO(Sn) crystallites embedded in an amorphous matrix, and that these crystallites increase in size with increasing zinc content and deposition temperature. These crystallites are small enough for quantum confinement effects to reduce the optical band gap of the ZTO films as they grow in size with increasing deposition temperature. - Highlights: • Zinc tin oxide thin films were deposited by atomic layer deposition. • The structure and optical properties were studied at different growth temperatures. • The growth temperature had only a small effect on the composition of the films. • Small ZnO or ZnO(Sn) crystallites were observed by TEM in zinc rich ZTO films. • The growth temperature affects the crystallite size, which influences the band gap.

  16. The effect of substrate temperature on atomic layer deposited zinc tin oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindahl, Johan; Hägglund, Carl; Wätjen, J. Timo; Edoff, Marika; Törndahl, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Zinc tin oxide (ZTO) thin films were deposited on glass substrates by atomic layer deposition (ALD), and the film properties were investigated for varying deposition temperatures in the range of 90 to 180 °C. It was found that the [Sn]/([Sn] + [Zn]) composition is only slightly temperature dependent, while properties such as growth rate, film density, material structure and band gap are more strongly affected. The growth rate dependence on deposition temperature varies with the relative number of zinc or tin containing precursor pulses and it correlates with the growth rate behavior of pure ZnO and SnO x ALD. In contrast to the pure ZnO phase, the density of the mixed ZTO films is found to depend on the deposition temperature and it increases linearly with about 1 g/cm 3 in total over the investigated range. Characterization by transmission electron microscopy suggests that zinc rich ZTO films contain small (~ 10 nm) ZnO or ZnO(Sn) crystallites embedded in an amorphous matrix, and that these crystallites increase in size with increasing zinc content and deposition temperature. These crystallites are small enough for quantum confinement effects to reduce the optical band gap of the ZTO films as they grow in size with increasing deposition temperature. - Highlights: • Zinc tin oxide thin films were deposited by atomic layer deposition. • The structure and optical properties were studied at different growth temperatures. • The growth temperature had only a small effect on the composition of the films. • Small ZnO or ZnO(Sn) crystallites were observed by TEM in zinc rich ZTO films. • The growth temperature affects the crystallite size, which influences the band gap

  17. A method to estimate the height of temperature inversion layer and the effective mixing depht

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolli, D.

    1978-05-01

    A review of the concept PBL or turbulent boundary layer is made as it is understood in meteorology. Some features of the PBL parameterization are also discussed, as well as the methods used to estimate the temperature inversion heights during morning and afternoon hours. The study bases on the assumption of the dry adiabatic lapse rate in the mixing layer that is, water vapor and airborne material are supposed to be homogeneously mixed below the inversion layer or in the effective mixing depth. The mean mixing heights over Rio de Janeiro area respectively about 500m and 1000m at morning and afternoon hours. For Sao Paulo these values are respectively 400m and 1300m at morning and afternoon hours [pt

  18. Satellite air temperature estimation for monitoring the canopy layer heat island of Milan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pichierri, Manuele; Bonafoni, Stefania; Biondi, Riccardo

    2012-01-01

    across the city center from June to September confirming that, in Milan, urban heating is not an occasional phenomenon. Furthermore, this study shows the utility of space missions to monitor the metropolis heat islands if they are able to provide nighttime observations when CLHI peaks are generally......In this work, satellite maps of the urban heat island of Milan are produced using satellite-based infrared sensor data. For this aim, we developed suitable algorithms employing satellite brightness temperatures for the direct air temperature estimation 2 m above the surface (canopy layer), showing...... 2007 and 2010 were processed. Analysis of the canopy layer heat island (CLHI) maps during summer months reveals an average heat island effect of 3–4K during nighttime (with some peaks around 5K) and a weak CLHI intensity during daytime. In addition, the satellite maps reveal a well defined island shape...

  19. Formation of presheath and current-free double layer in a two-electron-temperature plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Kunihiro; Miyawaki, Fujio

    1992-02-01

    Development of the steady-state potential in a two-temperature-electron plasma in contact with the wall is investigated analytically. It is shown that if the hot- to cold electron temperature ratio is greater than ten, the potential drop in the presheath, which is allowed to have either a small value characterized by the cold electrons or a large value by the hot electrons, discontinuously changes at a critical value for the hot- to total electron density ratio. It is also found that the monotonically decreasing potential structure which consists of the first presheath, a current-free double layer, the second presheath, and the sheath can be steadily formed in a lower range of the hot- to total electron density ratio around the critical value. The current-free double layer is set up due to existence of the two electron species and cold ions generated by ionization so as to connect two presheath potentials at different levels. (author)

  20. Ion Temperature Measurements in the Tore Supra Scrape-Off Layer Using a Retarding Field Analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocan, M.; Gunn, J.P.; Pascal, J.Y.; Gauthier, E.

    2010-01-01

    The retarding field analyzer (RFA) is one of the only widely accepted diagnostics for measuring the ion temperature T i )in the tokamak scrape-off layer. An overview of the outstanding RFA performance over ten years of operation in Tore Supra tokamak is given and the validation of T i measurements is addressed. The RFA measurements in Tore Supra are found to be well reproducible. The ion-to-electron temperature ratio is higher than one at low-to-moderate ion-electron collisionality regime and converges to unity at high collisionality regime. (authors)

  1. Temperature and carrier density dependence of anisotropy in supercurrent density in layered cuprate superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, M.P.; Tewari, B.S.; Ajay

    2006-01-01

    In the present work, we have studied the effect of temperature and carrier density on anisotropy in supercurrent density in bilayer cuprate superconductors. Here, we have considered a tight binding bilayered Hubbard Hamiltonian containing intra and interlayer attractive interactions. The situation considered here is similar to a SIS junction. We have got the expressions for the superconducting order parameters, carrier density and anisotropy in superconducting density (I ab /I c ) for such SIS junction. The numerical analysis show that the anisotropy in the supercurrent density depends on temperature and carrier density in layered high T c cuprates. (author)

  2. Variable but persistent coexistence of Prochlorococcus ecotypes along temperature gradients in the ocean's surface mixed layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Jeremy W; Lin, Yajuan; Gainer, P Jackson; Post, Anton F; Johnson, Zackary I; Zinser, Erik R

    2016-04-01

    The vast majority of the phytoplankton communities in surface mixed layer of the oligotrophic ocean are numerically dominated by one of two ecotypes of Prochlorococcus, eMIT9312 or eMED4. In this study, we surveyed large latitudinal transects in the Atlantic and Pacific Ocean to determine if these ecotypes discretely partition the surface mixed layer niche, or if populations exist as a continuum along key environmental gradients, particularly temperature. Transitions of dominance occurred at approximately 19-21°C, with the eMED4 ecotype dominating the colder, and eMIT9312 ecotype dominating the warmer regions. Within these zones of regional dominance, however, the minority ecotype was not competed to extinction. Rather, a robust log-linear relationship between ecotype ratio and temperature characterized this stabilized coexistence: for every 2.5°C increase in temperature, the eMIT9312:eMED4 ratio increased by an order of magnitude. This relationship was observed in both quantitative polymerase chain reaction and in pyrosequencing assays. Water column stratification also contributed to the ecotype ratio along the basin-scale transects, but to a lesser extent. Finally, instances where the ratio of the eMED4 and eMIT9312 abundances did not correlate well with temperature were identified. Such occurrences are likely due to changes in water temperatures outpacing changes in community structure. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Universal equations of unsteady two-dimensional MHD boundary layer whose temperature varies with time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boričić Zoran

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper concerns with unsteady two-dimensional temperature laminar magnetohydrodynamic (MHD boundary layer of incompressible fluid. It is assumed that induction of outer magnetic field is function of longitudinal coordinate with force lines perpendicular to the body surface on which boundary layer forms. Outer electric filed is neglected and magnetic Reynolds number is significantly lower then one i.e. considered problem is in inductionless approximation. Characteristic properties of fluid are constant because velocity of flow is much lower than speed of light and temperature difference is small enough (under 50ºC . Introduced assumptions simplify considered problem in sake of mathematical solving, but adopted physical model is interesting from practical point of view, because its relation with large number of technically significant MHD flows. Obtained partial differential equations can be solved with modern numerical methods for every particular problem. Conclusions based on these solutions are related only with specific temperature MHD boundary layer problem. In this paper, quite different approach is used. First new variables are introduced and then sets of similarity parameters which transform equations on the form which don't contain inside and in corresponding boundary conditions characteristics of particular problems and in that sense equations are considered as universal. Obtained universal equations in appropriate approximation can be solved numerically once for all. So-called universal solutions of equations can be used to carry out general conclusions about temperature MHD boundary layer and for calculation of arbitrary particular problems. To calculate any particular problem it is necessary also to solve corresponding momentum integral equation.

  4. CARS Measurement of Vibrational/Rotational Temperatures with Total Radiation Visualization behind Strong Shock Waves of 5-7 km/s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, K.; Bindu, V. Hima; Niinomi, S.; Ota, M.; Maeno, K.

    2011-05-01

    In the development of aerospace technology the design of space vehicles is important in phase of reentry flight. The space vehicles reenter into the atmosphere with range of 6-8 km/s. The non-equilibrium flow with radiative heating from strongly shocked air ahead of the vehicles plays an important role on the heat flux to the wall surface structure as well as convective heating. The experimental data for re-entry analyses, however, have remained in classical level. Recent development of optical instruments enables us to have novel approach of diagnostics to the re-entry problems. We employ the CARS (Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy) method for measurement of real gas temperatures of N2 with radiation of the strong shock wave. The CARS signal can be acquired even in the strong radiation area behind the strong shock waves. In addition, we try to use the CCD camera to obtain 2D images of total radiation simultaneously. The strong shock wave in front of the reentering space vehicles is experimentally realigned by free-piston, double-diaphragm shock tube with low density test gas.

  5. Scaling properties of velocity and temperature spectra above the surface friction layer in a convective atmospheric boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. G. McNaughton

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available We report velocity and temperature spectra measured at nine levels from 1.42 meters up to 25.7 m over a smooth playa in Western Utah. Data are from highly convective conditions when the magnitude of the Obukhov length (our proxy for the depth of the surface friction layer was less than 2 m. Our results are somewhat similar to the results reported from the Minnesota experiment of Kaimal et al. (1976, but show significant differences in detail. Our velocity spectra show no evidence of buoyant production of kinetic energy at at the scale of the thermal structures. We interpret our velocity spectra to be the result of outer eddies interacting with the ground, not "local free convection".

    We observe that velocity spectra represent the spectral distribution of the kinetic energy of the turbulence, so we use energy scales based on total turbulence energy in the convective boundary layer (CBL to collapse our spectra. For the horizontal velocity spectra this scale is (zi εo2/3, where zi is inversion height and εo is the dissipation rate in the bulk CBL. This scale functionally replaces the Deardorff convective velocity scale. Vertical motions are blocked by the ground, so the outer eddies most effective in creating vertical motions come from the inertial subrange of the outer turbulence. We deduce that the appropriate scale for the peak region of the vertical velocity spectra is (z εo2/3 where z is height above ground. Deviations from perfect spectral collapse under these scalings at large and small wavenumbers are explained in terms of the energy transport and the eddy structures of the flow.

    We find that the peaks of the temperature spectra collapse when wavenumbers are scaled using (z1/2 zi1/2. That is, the lengths of the thermal structures depend on both the lengths of the

  6. The rates of production of CO and CO2 from the combustion of pulverized coal particles in a shock tube

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Commissaris, F.A.C.M.; Banine, V.Y.; Roekaerts, D.J.E.M.; Veefkind, A.

    1998-01-01

    This work presents some results of experiments on coal combustion in a shock tube, as well as a time-dependent model of the boundary layer of a single, burning char particle under similar conditions. The partial pressure of O2 in a shock tube was varied between 0 and 10 bar, with gas temperatures

  7. The effect of wall temperature distribution on streaks in compressible turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhao; Tao, Yang; Xiong, Neng; Qian, Fengxue

    2018-05-01

    The thermal boundary condition at wall is very important for the compressible flow due to the coupling of the energy equation, and a lot of research works about it were carried out in past decades. In most of these works, the wall was assumed as adiabatic or uniform isothermal surface; the flow over a thermal wall with some special temperature distribution was seldom studied. Lagha studied the effect of uniform isothermal wall on the streaks, and pointed out that higher the wall temperature is, the longer the streak (POF, 2011, 23, 015106). So, we designed streamwise stripes of wall temperature distribution on the compressible turbulent boundary layer at Mach 3.0 to learn the effect on the streaks by means of direct numerical simulation in this paper. The mean wall temperature is equal to the adiabatic case approximately, and the width of the temperature stripes is in the same order as the width of the streaks. The streak patterns in near-wall region with different temperature stripes are shown in the paper. Moreover, we find that there is a reduction of friction velocity with the wall temperature stripes when compared with the adiabatic case.

  8. Contributed Review: Absolute spectral radiance calibration of fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometers using a coiled-coil irradiance standard lamp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fat’yanov, O. V., E-mail: fatyan1@gps.caltech.edu; Asimow, P. D., E-mail: asimow@gps.caltech.edu [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences 252-21, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    We describe an accurate and precise calibration procedure for multichannel optical pyrometers such as the 6-channel, 3-ns temporal resolution instrument used in the Caltech experimental geophysics laboratory. We begin with a review of calibration sources for shock temperatures in the 3000-30 000 K range. High-power, coiled tungsten halogen standards of spectral irradiance appear to be the only practical alternative to NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamps, which are no longer available with large enough calibrated area. However, non-uniform radiance complicates the use of such coiled lamps for reliable and reproducible calibration of pyrometers that employ imaging or relay optics. Careful analysis of documented methods of shock pyrometer calibration to coiled irradiance standard lamps shows that only one technique, not directly applicable in our case, is free of major radiometric errors. We provide a detailed description of the modified Caltech pyrometer instrument and a procedure for its absolute spectral radiance calibration, accurate to ±5%. We employ a designated central area of a 0.7× demagnified image of a coiled-coil tungsten halogen lamp filament, cross-calibrated against a NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamp. We give the results of the cross-calibration along with descriptions of the optical arrangement, data acquisition, and processing. We describe a procedure to characterize the difference between the static and dynamic response of amplified photodetectors, allowing time-dependent photodiode correction factors for spectral radiance histories from shock experiments. We validate correct operation of the modified Caltech pyrometer with actual shock temperature experiments on single-crystal NaCl and MgO and obtain very good agreement with the literature data for these substances. We conclude with a summary of the most essential requirements for error-free calibration of a fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometer using a high-power coiled tungsten halogen

  9. A high-temperature shock tube kinetic study for the branching ratios of isobutene+OH reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Khaled, Fathi

    2016-10-11

    Isobutene is an important intermediate formed during the oxidation of branched alkanes. It also appears as a byproduct during the combustion of methyl-tert-butyl-ether (MTBE) which is used as octane enhancer in gasolines. To understand better the oxidation kinetics of isobutene, we have measured the rate coefficients for the reaction of OH radicals with isobutene (HCC(CH)) behind reflected shock waves over the temperature range of 830-1289K and pressures near 1.5atm. The reaction progress was followed by measuring mole fraction of OH radicals near 306.7nm using UV laser absorption technique. Three deuterated isotopes, isobutene-1-d2 (DCC(CH)), isobutene-3-d6 (HCC(CD)) and isobutene-d8 (DCC(CD)) were employed to elucidate branching ratios of the allylic and vinylic H-abstraction from isobutene by OH radicals. H-abstraction from the allylic sites was found to be dominant and constituted about 75% of the total rate in the entire temperature range of the current work. The derived three-parameter Arrhenius expressions for site-specific H- and D- abstraction rates over 830-1289K are (units:cm mol s):k3,H=6.98×106(TK)1.77exp(-136.6KT) k3,D=4.42×106(TK)1.8exp(-361.7KT) k1,H=6.25×105(TK)2.16exp(-711.6KT) k1,D=3.13×107(TK)1.67exp(-1814KT) The subscript of . k identifies the position of H or D atom in isobutene according to the IUPAC nomenclature of alkenes.

  10. A high-temperature shock tube kinetic study for the branching ratios of isobutene+OH reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Khaled, Fathi; Giri, Binod; Farooq, Aamir

    2016-01-01

    Isobutene is an important intermediate formed during the oxidation of branched alkanes. It also appears as a byproduct during the combustion of methyl-tert-butyl-ether (MTBE) which is used as octane enhancer in gasolines. To understand better the oxidation kinetics of isobutene, we have measured the rate coefficients for the reaction of OH radicals with isobutene (HCC(CH)) behind reflected shock waves over the temperature range of 830-1289K and pressures near 1.5atm. The reaction progress was followed by measuring mole fraction of OH radicals near 306.7nm using UV laser absorption technique. Three deuterated isotopes, isobutene-1-d2 (DCC(CH)), isobutene-3-d6 (HCC(CD)) and isobutene-d8 (DCC(CD)) were employed to elucidate branching ratios of the allylic and vinylic H-abstraction from isobutene by OH radicals. H-abstraction from the allylic sites was found to be dominant and constituted about 75% of the total rate in the entire temperature range of the current work. The derived three-parameter Arrhenius expressions for site-specific H- and D- abstraction rates over 830-1289K are (units:cm mol s):k3,H=6.98×106(TK)1.77exp(-136.6KT) k3,D=4.42×106(TK)1.8exp(-361.7KT) k1,H=6.25×105(TK)2.16exp(-711.6KT) k1,D=3.13×107(TK)1.67exp(-1814KT) The subscript of . k identifies the position of H or D atom in isobutene according to the IUPAC nomenclature of alkenes.

  11. Low-temperature atomic layer deposition of MoS{sub 2} films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurca, Titel; Wang, Binghao; Tan, Jeffrey M.; Lohr, Tracy L.; Marks, Tobin J. [Department of Chemistry and the Materials Research Center, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL (United States); Moody, Michael J.; Henning, Alex; Emery, Jonathan D.; Lauhon, Lincoln J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and the Materials Research Center, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL (United States)

    2017-04-24

    Wet chemical screening reveals the very high reactivity of Mo(NMe{sub 2}){sub 4} with H{sub 2}S for the low-temperature synthesis of MoS{sub 2}. This observation motivated an investigation of Mo(NMe{sub 2}){sub 4} as a volatile precursor for the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of MoS{sub 2} thin films. Herein we report that Mo(NMe{sub 2}){sub 4} enables MoS{sub 2} film growth at record low temperatures - as low as 60 C. The as-deposited films are amorphous but can be readily crystallized by annealing. Importantly, the low ALD growth temperature is compatible with photolithographic and lift-off patterning for the straightforward fabrication of diverse device structures. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Sublattice-specific ordering of ZnO layers during the heteroepitaxial growth at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redondo-Cubero, A.; Vinnichenko, M.; Muecklich, A.; Kolitsch, A.; Krause, M.; Munoz, E.; Gago, R.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of the substrate temperature on the sublattice ordering in ZnO layers grown by reactive pulsed magnetron sputtering on sapphire has been investigated by different techniques. The improvement of the crystal quality and heteroepitaxial growth at relatively low temperatures (550 deg. C) is verified by x-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in channeling mode (RBS/C), and Raman spectroscopy. Sublattice-resolved analysis by resonant RBS/C and Raman spectroscopy reveals that the progressive transition to the single crystal phase is accomplished in a faster way for Zn- than for O-sublattice. This behavior is attributed to the preferential annealing of defects in the Zn sublattice at low temperatures when compared to those of the O sublattice.

  13. Temperature-dependent mechanical properties of single-layer molybdenum disulphide: Molecular dynamics nanoindentation simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Junhua, E-mail: junhua.zhao@uni-weimar.de [Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory of Advanced Manufacturing Equipment and Technology of Food, Jiangnan University, 214122 Wuxi (China); Institute of Structural Mechanics, Bauhaus-University Weimar, 99423 Weimar (Germany); Jiang, Jin-Wu, E-mail: jwjiang5918@hotmail.com [Institute of Structural Mechanics, Bauhaus-University Weimar, 99423 Weimar (Germany); Rabczuk, Timon, E-mail: timon.rabczuk@uni-weimar.de [Institute of Structural Mechanics, Bauhaus-University Weimar, 99423 Weimar (Germany); School of Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering, Korea University, 136-701 Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-02

    The temperature-dependent mechanical properties of single-layer molybdenum disulphide (MoS{sub 2}) are obtained using molecular dynamics (MD) nanoindentation simulations. The Young's moduli, maximum load stress, and maximum loading strain decrease with increasing temperature from 4.2 K to 500 K. The obtained Young's moduli are in good agreement with those using our MD uniaxial tension simulations and the available experimental results. The tendency of maximum loading strain with different temperature is opposite with that of metal materials due to the short range Stillinger-Weber potentials in MoS{sub 2}. Furthermore, the indenter tip radius and fitting strain effect on the mechanical properties are also discussed.

  14. OBSERVATIONAL SIGNATURES OF SUB-PHOTOSPHERIC RADIATION-MEDIATED SHOCKS IN THE PROMPT PHASE OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levinson, Amir

    2012-01-01

    A shock that forms below the photosphere of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) outflow is mediated by Compton scattering of radiation advected into the shock by the upstream fluid. The characteristic scale of such a shock, a few Thomson depths, is larger than any kinetic scale involved by several orders of magnitude. Hence, unlike collisionless shocks, radiation-mediated shocks cannot accelerate particles to nonthermal energies. The spectrum emitted by a shock that emerges from the photosphere of a GRB jet reflects the temperature profile downstream of the shock, with a possible contribution at the highest energies from the shock transition layer itself. We study the properties of radiation-mediated shocks that form during the prompt phase of GRBs and compute the time-integrated spectrum emitted by the shocked fluid following shock breakout. We show that the time-integrated emission from a single shock exhibits a prominent thermal peak, with the location of the peak depending on the shock velocity profile. We also point out that multiple shock emission can produce a spectrum that mimics a Band spectrum.

  15. Oxidative stress in deep scattering layers: Heat shock response and antioxidant enzymes activities of myctophid fishes thriving in oxygen minimum zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Ana Rita; Trübenbach, Katja; Teixeira, Tatiana; Lopes, Vanessa M.; Pires, Vanessa; Baptista, Miguel; Repolho, Tiago; Calado, Ricardo; Diniz, Mário; Rosa, Rui

    2013-12-01

    Diel vertical migrators, such as myctophid fishes, are known to encounter oxygen minimum zones (OMZ) during daytime in the Eastern Pacific Ocean and, therefore, have to cope with temperature and oxidative stress that arise while ascending to warmer, normoxic surface waters at night-time. The aim of this study was to investigate the antioxidant defense strategies and heat shock response (HSR) in two myctophid species, namely Triphoturus mexicanus and Benthosema panamense, at shallow and warm surface waters (21 kPa, 20-25 °C) and at hypoxic, cold (≤1 kPa, 10 °C) mesopelagic depths. More specifically, we quantified (i) heat shock protein concentrations (HSP70/HSC70) (ii) antioxidant enzyme activities [including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST)], and (iii) lipid peroxidation [malondialdehyde (MDA) levels]. HSP70/HSC70 levels increased in both myctophid species at warmer, well-oxygenated surface waters probably to prevent cellular damage (oxidative stress) due to increased oxygen demand under elevated temperatures and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. On the other hand, CAT and GST activities were augmented under hypoxic conditions, probably as preparatory response to a burst of oxyradicals during the reoxygenation phase (while ascending). SOD activity decreased under hypoxia in B. panamense, but was kept unchanged in T. mexicanus. MDA levels in B. panamense did not change between the surface and deep-sea conditions, whereas T. mexicanus showed elevated MDA and HSP70/HSC70 concentrations at warmer surface waters. This indicated that T. mexicanus seems to be not so well tuned to temperature and oxidative stress associated to diel vertical migrations. The understanding of such physiological strategies that are linked to oxygen deprivation and reoxygenation phases may provide valuable information about how different species might respond to the impacts of environmental stressors (e.g. expanding mesopelagic hypoxia

  16. The effect of simulated heat-shock and daily temperature fluctuations on seed germination of four species from fire-prone ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talita Zupo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Seed germination in many species from fire-prone ecosystems may be triggered by heat shock and/or temperature fluctuation, and how species respond to such fire-related cues is important to understand post-fire regeneration strategies. Thus, we tested how heat shock and daily temperature fluctuations affect the germination of four species from fire-prone ecosystems; two from the Cerrado and two from the Mediterranean Basin. Seeds of all four species were subjected to four treatments: Fire (F, temperature fluctuations (TF, fire+temperature fluctuations (F+TF and control (C. After treatments, seeds were put to germinate for 60 days at 25ºC (dark. Responses differed according to species and native ecosystem. Germination percentage for the Cerrado species did not increase with any of the treatments, while germination of one Mediterranean species increased with all treatments and the other only with treatments that included fire. Although the Cerrado species did not respond to the treatments used in this study, their seeds survived the exposure to heat shock, which suggests they possess tolerance to fire. Fire frequency in the Cerrado is higher than that in Mediterranean ecosystems, thus traits related to fire-resistance would be more advantageous than traits related to post-fire recruitment, which are widespread among Mediterranean species.

  17. Size and temperature consideration in the liquid layer growth from nanovoids and the melting model construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, H.; Liang, X.H.; Li, M.

    2014-01-01

    A new model for the solid melting point T m (D) from nanovoids is proposed through considering the liquid layer growth behavior. This model, which does not have any adjustable parameter, introduces the classical thermodynamic treatment, i.e., the liquid nucleation and growth theory, for nanoparticle melting. With increased void diameter D, T m (D) approaches to T m0 . Moreover, T m (D) > T m0 for a small void (T m0 is the bulk melting point). In other words, the solid can be significantly superheated especially when D decreases, even if the difference of interface energy is larger than zero. This finding can be expected from the negatively curved surface of the void. The model predictions are consistent with the molecular dynamic (MD) simulation results for argon solids. Moreover, the growth of liquid layer from void surface relies on both size and temperature, which directly determine liquid layer thickness, and only when liquid layer thickness reaches to a critical value, can void become instable. - Highlights: • A united model for the crystal melting point from nanovoids is established. • Melting point increases with decreased void size. • The result is expected from the negatively curved surface of the void. • The prediction is agreed well with the MD simulation results

  18. High Temperature Oxidation Behavior of Zirconium Alloy with Nano structured Oxide Layer in Air Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Y. J.; Kim, J. W.; Park, J. W.; Cho, S. O.

    2016-01-01

    If the temperature of the cladding materials increases above 1000 .deg. C, which can be caused by a loss of coolant accident (LOCA), Zr becomes an auto-oxidation catalyst and hence produces a huge amount of hydrogen gas from water. Therefore, many investigations are being carried out to prevent (or reduce) the hydrogen production from Zr-based cladding materials in the nuclear reactors. Our team has developed an anodization technique by which nanostructured oxide can be formed on various flat metallic elements such as Al, Ti, and Zr-based alloy. Anodization is a simple electrochemical technique and requires only a power supply and an electrolyte. In this study, Zr-based alloys with nanostructured oxide layers were oxidized by using Thermogravimetry analysis (TGA) and compared with the pristine one. It reveals that the nanostructured oxide layer can prevent oxidation of substrate metal in air. Oxidation behavior of the pristine Zr-Nb-Sn alloy and the Zr-Nb-Sn alloy with nanostructured oxide layer evaluated by measuring weight gain (TGA). In comparison with the pristine Zr-Nb-Sn alloy, weight gain of the Zr-Nb-Sn alloy with nanostructured oxide layer is lower than 10% even for 12 hours oxidation in air.

  19. Low temperature fabrication of perovskite solar cells with TiO2 nanoparticle layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanayama, Masato; Oku, Takeo; Suzuki, Atsushi; Yamada, Masahiro; Sakamoto, Hiroki; Minami, Satoshi; Kohno, Kazufumi

    2016-01-01

    TiO 2 /CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 -based photovoltaic devices were fabricated by a spin-coating method using a mixture solution. TiO 2 require high-temperature processing to achieve suitably high carrier mobility. TiO 2 electron transport layers and TiO 2 scaffold layers for the perovskite were fabricated from TiO 2 nanoparticles with different grain sizes. The photovoltaic properties and microstructures of solar cells were characterized. Nanoparticle sizes of these TiO 2 were 23 nm and 3 nm and the performance of solar cells was improved by combination of two TiO 2 nanoparticles

  20. The simulation of the temperature effects on the microhardness of anodic alumina oxide layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gombár

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the mechanical properties of the layer deposited by anodic oxidation of aluminum on the material EN AW-1050 H24, in the contribution was investigated the microhardness of the deposited layer as a function of the physic-chemical factors affecting in the process of anodic oxidation at the constant anodic current density J = 3 A.dm-2 in electrolyte formed by sulfuric acid and oxalic acid, with the emphasis on the influence of electrolyte temperature in the range – 1,78 °C to 45,78 °C. The model of the studied dependence was compiled based on mathematical and statistical analysis of matrix from experimental obtained data from composite rotation plan of experiment with five independent variable factors (amount of sulfuric acid in the electrolyte, the amount of oxalic acid in the electrolyte, electrolyte, anodizing time and applied voltage.

  1. Hydrothermal crystallization of amorphous titania films deposited using low temperature atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, D.R.G. [Institute of Materials Engineering, ANSTO, PMB 1, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia)], E-mail: drm@ansto.gov.au; Triani, G.; Zhang, Z. [Institute of Materials Engineering, ANSTO, PMB 1, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia)

    2008-10-01

    A two stage process (atomic layer deposition, followed by hydrothermal treatment) for producing crystalline titania thin films at temperatures compatible with polymeric substrates (< 130 deg. C) has been assessed. Titania thin films were deposited at 80 deg. C using atomic layer deposition. They were extremely flat, uniform and almost entirely amorphous. They also contained relatively high levels of residual Cl from the precursor. After hydrothermal treatment at 120 deg. C for 1 day, > 50% of the film had crystallized. Crystallization was complete after 10 days of hydrothermal treatment. Crystallization of the film resulted in the formation of coarse grained anatase. Residual Cl was completely expelled from the film upon crystallization. As a result of the amorphous to crystalline transformation voids formed at the crystallization front. Inward and lateral crystal growth resulted in voids being localized to the film/substrate interface and crystallite perimeters resulting in pinholing. Both these phenomena resulted in films with poor adhesion and film integrity was severely compromised.

  2. Electron-temperature-gradient-induced instability in tokamak scrape-off layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berk, H.L.; Ryutov, D.D.; Tsidulko, Y.A.; Xu, X.Q.

    1992-08-01

    An electron temperature instability driven by the Kunkel-Guillory sheath impedance, has been applied to the scrape-off layer of tokamaks. The formalism has been generalized to more fully account for parallel wavelength dynamics, to differentiate between electromagnetic and electrostatic perturbations and to account for particle recycling effects. It is conjectured that this conducting wall instability leads to edge fluctuations in tokamaks that produce scrape-off widths of many ion Larmor radii ≅10. The predicted instability characteristics correlate somewhat with DIII-D edge fluctuation data, and the scrape-off layer width in the DIII-D experiment agrees with theoretical estimates that can be derived from mixing lenght theory

  3. Room-temperature vacancy migration in crystalline Si from an ion-implanted surface layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Arne Nylandsted; Christensen, Carsten; Petersen, Jon Wulff

    1999-01-01

    Migration of vacancies in crystalline, n-type silicon at room temperature from Ge+-implanted (150 keV, 5×109–1×1011 cm–2) surface layers was studied by tracing the presence of P–V pairs (E centers) in the underlying layer using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). Under the conditions we have......–Et[approximate]0.15 eV that has donor character. It is argued that the center associated with this line is most probably the P2–V complex; it anneals at about 550 K. A lower limit of the RT-diffusion coefficient of the doubly charged, negative vacancy is estimated to be 4×10–11 cm2/s. ©1999 American Institute...

  4. Low temperature fabrication of perovskite solar cells with TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanayama, Masato; Oku, Takeo, E-mail: oku@mat.usp.ac.jp; Suzuki, Atsushi [Department of Materials Science, The University of Shiga Prefecture, 2500 Hassaka, Hikone, Shiga 522-8533 (Japan); Yamada, Masahiro; Sakamoto, Hiroki [Energy Technology Laboratories, Osaka Gas Co., Ltd., Osaka 554-0051 (Japan); Minami, Satoshi; Kohno, Kazufumi [Frontier Materials Laboratories, Osaka Gas Chemicals Co., Ltd., Osaka 554-0051 (Japan)

    2016-02-01

    TiO{sub 2}/CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3}-based photovoltaic devices were fabricated by a spin-coating method using a mixture solution. TiO{sub 2} require high-temperature processing to achieve suitably high carrier mobility. TiO{sub 2} electron transport layers and TiO{sub 2} scaffold layers for the perovskite were fabricated from TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles with different grain sizes. The photovoltaic properties and microstructures of solar cells were characterized. Nanoparticle sizes of these TiO{sub 2} were 23 nm and 3 nm and the performance of solar cells was improved by combination of two TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles.

  5. The Low Temperature Epitaxy of Strained GeSn Layers Using RTCVD System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kil, Yeon-Ho; Yuk, Sim-Hoon; Jang, Han-Soo; Lee, Sang-Geul; Choi, Chel-Jong; Shim, Kyu-Hwan

    2018-03-01

    We have investigated the low temperature (LT) growth of GeSn-Ge-Si structures using rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition system utilizing Ge2H6 and SnCl4 as the reactive precursors. Due to inappropriate phenomena, such as, Ge etch and Sn segregation, it was hard to achieve high quality GeSn epitaxy at the temperature > 350 °C. On the contrary, we found that the SnCl4 promoted the reaction of Ge2H6 precursors in a certain process condition of LT, 240-360 °C. In return, we could perform the growth of GeSn epi layer with 7.7% of Sn and its remaining compressive strain of 71.7%. The surface propagated defects were increased with increasing the Sn content in the GeSn layer confirmed by TEM analysis. And we could calculate the activation energies at lower GeSn growth temperature regime using by Ge2H6 and SnCl4 precursors about 0.43 eV.

  6. Layered SnS sodium ion battery anodes synthesized near room temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Xia, Chuan

    2017-08-10

    In this report, we demonstrate a simple chemical bath deposition approach for the synthesis of layered SnS nanosheets (typically 6 nm or ~10 layers thick) at very low temperature (40 °C). We successfully synthesized SnS/C hybrid electrodes using a solution-based carbon precursor coating with subsequent carbonization strategy. Our data showed that the ultrathin carbon shell was critical to the cycling stability of the SnS electrodes. As a result, the as-prepared binder-free SnS/C electrodes showed excellent performance as sodium ion battery anodes. Specifically, the SnS/C anodes delivered a reversible capacity as high as 792 mAh·g−1 after 100 cycles at a current density of 100 mA·g−1. They also had superior rate capability (431 mAh·g−1 at 3,000 mA·g−1) and stable long-term cycling performance under a high current density (345 mAh·g−1 after 500 cycles at 3 A·g−1). Our approach opens up a new route to synthesize SnS-based hybrid materials at low temperatures for energy storage and other applications. Our process will be particularly useful for chalcogenide matrix materials that are sensitive to high temperatures during solution synthesis.

  7. Thickness dependent growth of low temperature atomic layer deposited zinc oxide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montiel-González, Z.; Castelo-González, O.A.; Aguilar-Gama, M.T.; Ramírez-Morales, E.; Hu, H.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Polycrystalline columnar ZnO thin films deposited by ALD at low temperatures. • Higher deposition temperature leads to a greater surface roughness in the ALD ZnO films. • Higher temperature originates larger refractive index values of the ALD ZnO films. • ZnO thin films were denser as the numbers of ALD deposition cycles were larger. • XPS analysis revels mayor extent of the DEZ reaction during the ALD process. - Abstract: Zinc oxide films are promising to improve the performance of electronic devices, including those based on organic materials. However, the dependence of the ZnO properties on the preparation conditions represents a challenge to obtain homogeneous thin films that satisfy specific applications. Here, we prepared ZnO films of a wide range of thicknesses by atomic layer deposition (ALD) at relatively low temperatures, 150 and 175 °C. From the results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Spectroscopic Ellipsometry it is concluded that the polycrystalline structure of the wurtzite is the main phase of the ALD samples, with OH groups on their surface. Ellipsometry revealed that the temperature and the deposition cycles have a strong effect on the films roughness. Scanning electron micrographs evidenced such effect, through the large pyramids developed at the surface of the films. It is concluded that crystalline ZnO thin films within a broad range of thickness and roughness can be obtained for optic or optoelectronic applications.

  8. High temperature study on the thermal properties of few-layer Mo0.5W0.5S2 and effects of capping layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Gu

    Full Text Available We investigated the thermal properties of few-layer Mo0.5W0.5S2 using a series of samples with different kinds of capping layers. Temperature-dependent Raman measurements were conducted in the range of 300–500 K, with power-dependent measurements also carried out. It indicated, for the few-layer Mo0.5W0.5S2, the temperature coefficients of the WS2-like E12g mode, MoS2-like E12g mode and A1g mode were −0.0155 cm−1/K, −0.0146 cm−1/K, and −0.0130 cm−1/K, respectively. And the thermal conductivity was estimated to be 44.8 W/mK. Moreover, the Mo0.5W0.5S2 samples coated with capping layers (ZrO2, HfO2 both showed a better thermal stability and a larger thermal conductivity than the one without. The results revealed that the capping layer should be an important factor in the thermal property. Keywords: Mo0.5W0.5S2, TMDs, Thermal properties, High temperature, Capping layers, Raman

  9. Temperature-dependent evolution of the wetting layer thickness during Ge deposition on Si(001).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamaschini, R; Brehm, M; Grydlik, M; Fromherz, T; Bauer, G; Montalenti, F

    2011-07-15

    The evolution of the wetting layer (WL) thickness during Ge deposition on Si(001) is analyzed with the help of a rate-equation approach. The combined role of thickness, island volume and shape-dependent chemical potentials is considered. Several experimental observations, such as WL thinning following the pyramid-to-dome transformation, are captured by the model, as directly demonstrated by a close comparison with photoluminescence measurements (PL) on samples grown at three different temperatures. The limitations of the model in describing late stages of growth are critically addressed.

  10. Integrated high-transition temperature magnetometer with only two superconducting layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromann, R.; Kingston, J.J.; Miklich, A.H.

    1993-01-01

    We describe the fabrication and testing of an integrated YBa2Cu3O7-x thin-film magnetometer consisting of a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), with biepitaxial grain boundary junctions, integrated with a flux transformer on a single substrate. Only two superconducting layers...... are required, the SQUID body serving as the crossunder that completes the multiturn flux transformer. The highest temperature at which any of the magnetometers functioned was 76 K. At 60 K the magnetic field gain of this device was 63, and the magnetic field noise was 160 fT Hz-1/2 at 2 kHz, increasing to 3...

  11. The Effects of Oxidation Layer, Temperature, and Stress on Tin Whisker Growth: A Short Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahim, Z.; Salleh, M. A. A.; Khor, C. Y.

    2018-03-01

    In order to reduce the Tin (Sn) whisker growth phenomenon in solder alloys, the researcher all the world has studied the factor of this behaviour. However, this phenomenon still hunted the electronic devices and industries. The whiskers growth were able to cause the electrical short, which would lead to the catastrophic such as plane crush, the failure of heart pacemaker, and the lost satellite connection. This article focuses on the three factors that influence the whiskers growth in solder alloys which is stress, oxidation layer and temperature. This findings were allowed the researchers to develop various method on how to reduce the growth of the Sn whiskers.

  12. Temperature and moisture effects on greenhouse gas emissions from deep active-layer boreal soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond-Lamberty, Ben; Smith, A. Peyton; Bailey, Vanessa

    2016-12-01

    Rapid climatic changes, rising air temperatures, and increased fires are expected to drive permafrost degradation and alter soil carbon (C) cycling in many high-latitude ecosystems. How these soils will respond to changes in their temperature, moisture, and overlying vegetation is uncertain but critical to understand given the large soil C stocks in these regions. We used a laboratory experiment to examine how temperature and moisture control CO2 and CH4 emissions from mineral soils sampled from the bottom of the annual active layer, i.e., directly above permafrost, in an Alaskan boreal forest. Gas emissions from 30 cores, subjected to two temperatures and either field moisture conditions or experimental drought, were tracked over a 100-day incubation; we also measured a variety of physical and chemical characteristics of the cores. Gravimetric water content was 0.31 ± 0.12 (unitless) at the beginning of the incubation; cores at field moisture were unchanged at the end, but drought cores had declined to 0.06 ± 0.04. Daily CO2 fluxes were positively correlated with incubation chamber temperature, core water content, and percent soil nitrogen. They also had a temperature sensitivity (Q10) of 1.3 and 1.9 for the field moisture and drought treatments, respectively. Daily CH4 emissions were most strongly correlated with percent nitrogen, but neither temperature nor water content was a significant first-order predictor of CH4 fluxes. The cumulative production of C from CO2 was over 6 orders of magnitude higher than that from CH4; cumulative CO2 was correlated with incubation temperature and moisture treatment, with drought cores producing 52-73 % lower C. Cumulative CH4 production was unaffected by any treatment. These results suggest that deep active-layer soils may be sensitive to changes in soil moisture under aerobic conditions, a critical factor as discontinuous permafrost thaws in interior Alaska. Deep but unfrozen high-latitude soils have been shown to be

  13. Synthesis and room temperature photoluminescence of ZnO/CTAB ordered layered nanocomposite with flake-like architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.D.; Zhang, S.; Ma, C.L.; Li, H.D.

    2007-01-01

    Flake-like ZnO/surfactant ordered layered nanocomposite has been synthesized by self-assembly at room temperature with the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB, CH 3 (CH 2 ) 15 N + (CH 3 ) 3 Br - ) surfactant. The procedure described in this study is attractive since it gives high yields of ordered layered nanocomposite with flake-like architecture. XRD results showed the formation of a layered structure with two layered spacings ca. 18.56 A. SEM and FT-IR spectroscopy were used to further characterize ZnO/CTAB nanolayered composite. The ZnO/CTAB-ordered layered nanocomposite exhibits the room temperature photoluminescence (RTPL) characteristics. It is inferred that the RTPL of ZnO/CTAB-layered nanocomposite might be induced by the interfacial effect between the ZnO and the surfactant

  14. Novel composite materials synthesized by the high-temperature interaction of pyrrole with layered oxide matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavel, Alexandru Cezar

    The initial goal of the research presented herein was to develop the very first synthetic metal---high-temperature superconductor ceramic composite material, in the specific form of a polypyrrole---Bi2Sr2CaCu 2O8+delta nanocomposite. In the course of scientific investigation, this scope was broadened to encompass structurally and compositionally similar layered bismuthates and simpler layered oxides. The latter substrates were prepared through novel experimental procedures that enhanced the chance of yielding nanostructured morphologies. The designed novel synthesis approaches yielded a harvest of interesting results that may be further developed upon their dissemination in the scientific community. High-temperature interaction of pyrrole with molybdenum trioxide substrates with different crystalline phases and morphologies led to the formation of the first members of a new class of heterogeneous microcomposites characterized by incomplete occupancy by the metal oxide core of the volume encapsulated by the rigid, amorphous permeable polymeric membrane that reproduces the volume of the initial grain of precursor substrate. The method may be applied for various heterogeneous catalyst substrates for the precise determination of the catalytically active crystallographic planes. In a different project, room-temperature, templateless impregnation of molybdenum trioxide substrates with different crystalline phases and morphologies by a large excess of silver (I) cations led to the formation of 1-D nanostructured novel Ag-Mo-O ternary phase in what may be the simplest experimental procedure available to date that has yielded a 1-D nanostructure, regardless the nature of the constituent material. Interaction of this novel ternary phase with pyrrole vapors at high reaction temperatures led to heterogeneous nanostructured composites that exhibited a silver nanorod core. Nanoscrolls of vanadium pentoxide xerogel were synthesized through a novel, facile reflux-based method that

  15. Optoelectronic devices, low temperature preparation methods, and improved electron transport layers

    KAUST Repository

    Eita, Mohamed S.; El, Labban Abdulrahman; Usman, Anwar; Beaujuge, Pierre; Mohammed, Omar F.

    2016-01-01

    An optoelectronic device such as a photovoltaic device which has at least one layer, such as an electron transport layer, which comprises a plurality of alternating, oppositely charged layers including metal oxide layers. The metal oxide can be zinc

  16. Flexibl Pavement Analysis Considering Temperature Profile and Anisotropy Behavior in Hot Mix Asphalt Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Joonho

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A three Dimensional finite element model (FEM incorporating the anisotropic properties and temperature profile of hot mix asphalt (HMA pavement was developed to predict the structural responses of HMA pavement subject to heavy loads typically encountered in the field. In this study, ABAQUS was adopted to model the stress and strain relationships within the pavement structure. The results of the model were verified using data collected from the Korean Highway Corporation Test Road (KHCTR. The results demonstrated that both the base course and surface course layers follow the anisotropic behavior and the incorporation of the temperature profile throughout the pavement has a substantial effect on the pavement response predictions that impact pavement design. The results also showed that the anisotropy level of HMA and base material can be reduced to as low as 80% and 15% as a result of repeated loading, respectively.

  17. Loading direction-dependent shear behavior at different temperatures of single-layer chiral graphene sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang; Dong, Shuhong; Yu, Peishi; Zhao, Junhua

    2018-06-01

    The loading direction-dependent shear behavior of single-layer chiral graphene sheets at different temperatures is studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Our results show that the shear properties (such as shear stress-strain curves, buckling strains, and failure strains) of chiral graphene sheets strongly depend on the loading direction due to the structural asymmetry. The maximum values of both the critical buckling shear strain and the failure strain under positive shear deformation can be around 1.4 times higher than those under negative shear deformation. For a given chiral graphene sheet, both its failure strain and failure stress decrease with increasing temperature. In particular, the amplitude to wavelength ratio of wrinkles for different chiral graphene sheets under shear deformation using present MD simulations agrees well with that from the existing theory. These findings provide physical insights into the origins of the loading direction-dependent shear behavior of chiral graphene sheets and their potential applications in nanodevices.

  18. A 1290 MHZ profiler with RASS for monitoring wind and temperature in the boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelbart, D. [Deutscher Wetterdienst, Lindenberg (Germany). Meteorol. Obs.; Steinhagen, H. [Deutscher Wetterdienst, Lindenberg (Germany). Meteorol. Obs.; Goersdorf, U. [Deutscher Wetterdienst, Lindenberg (Germany). Meteorol. Obs.; Lippmann, J. [Deutscher Wetterdienst, Lindenberg (Germany). Meteorol. Obs.; Neisser, J. [Deutscher Wetterdienst, Lindenberg (Germany). Meteorol. Obs.

    1996-02-01

    A boundary layer wind profiler with RASS is described operating at 1290 MHz in a quasi-operational mode at the Meteorological Observatory Lindenberg of the German Weather Service (DWD). It provides vertical profiles of wind and temperature from the lower atmosphere with a height resolution of 50 m to 400 m and a time resolution of about 1 to 60 minutes. For an estimation of the system reliability, the availability of the measurements for all different height levels is analyzed. With regard to the data quality, a comparison of wind profiler/RASS and rawinsonde data is presented based on 856 wind and 451 temperature profiles. It reveals reasonable conformity of both sounding systems. Finally, case studies are shown, demonstrating the system ability to analyze some characteristic phenomena in the lower troposphere, which are unresolved temporally and spatially by the routine rawinsonde network. (orig.)

  19. Numerical simulation of shock initiation of Ni/Al multilayered composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sraj, Ihab; Knio, Omar M., E-mail: omar.knio@duke.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Duke University, 144 Hudson Hall, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Specht, Paul E.; Thadhani, Naresh N. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 771 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Weihs, Timothy P. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

    2014-01-14

    The initiation of chemical reaction in cold-rolled Ni/Al multilayered composites by shock compression is investigated numerically. A simplified approach is adopted that exploits the disparity between the reaction and shock loading timescales. The impact of shock compression is modeled using CTH simulations that yield pressure, strain, and temperature distributions within the composites due to the shock propagation. The resulting temperature distribution is then used as initial condition to simulate the evolution of the subsequent shock-induced mixing and chemical reaction. To this end, a reduced reaction model is used that expresses the local atomic mixing and heat release rates in terms of an evolution equation for a dimensionless time scale reflecting the age of the mixed layer. The computations are used to assess the effect of bilayer thickness on the reaction, as well as the impact of shock velocity and orientation with respect to the layering. Computed results indicate that initiation and evolution of the reaction are substantially affected by both the shock velocity and the bilayer thickness. In particular, at low impact velocity, Ni/Al multilayered composites with thick bilayers react completely in 100 ms while at high impact velocity and thin bilayers, reaction time was less than 100 μs. Quantitative trends for the dependence of the reaction time on the shock velocity are also determined, for different bilayer thickness and shock orientation.

  20. Upper mixed layer temperature anomalies at the North Atlantic storm-track zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Moshonkin

    1995-10-01

    Full Text Available Synoptic sea surface temperature anomalies (SSTAs were determined as a result of separation of time scales smaller than 183 days. The SSTAs were investigated using daily data of ocean weather station "C" (52.75°N; 35.5°W from 1 January 1976 to 31 December 1980 (1827 days. There were 47 positive and 50 negative significant SSTAs (lifetime longer than 3 days, absolute value greater than 0.10 °C with four main intervals of the lifetime repetitions: 1. 4–7 days (45% of all cases, 2. 9–13 days (20–25%, 3. 14–18 days (10–15%, and 4. 21–30 days (10–15% and with a magnitude 1.5–2.0 °C. An upper layer balance model based on equations for temperature, salinity, mechanical energy (with advanced parametrization, state (density, and drift currents was used to simulate SSTA. The original method of modelling taking into account the mean observed temperature profiles proved to be very stable. The model SSTAs are in a good agreement with the observed amplitudes and phases of synoptic SSTAs during all 5 years. Surface heat flux anomalies are the main source of SSTAs. The influence of anomalous drift heat advection is about 30–50% of the SSTA, and the influence of salinity anomalies is about 10–25% and less. The influence of a large-scale ocean front was isolated only once in February-April 1978 during all 5 years. Synoptic SSTAs develop just in the upper half of the homogeneous layer at each winter. We suggest that there are two main causes of such active sublayer formation: 1. surface heat flux in the warm sectors of cyclones and 2. predominant heat transport by ocean currents from the south. All frequency functions of the ocean temperature synoptic response to heat and momentum surface fluxes are of integral character (red noise, though there is strong resonance with 20-days period of wind-driven horizontal heat advection with mixed layer temperature; there are some other peculiarities on the time scales from 5.5 to 13 days. Observed and

  1. Temperature and Relative Humidity Vertical Profiles within Planetary Boundary Layer in Winter Urban Airshed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendl, Jan; Hovorka, Jan

    2017-12-01

    The planetary boundary layer is a dynamic system with turbulent flow where horizontal and vertical air mixing depends mainly on the weather conditions and geomorphology. Normally, air temperature from the Earth surface decreases with height but inversion situation may occur, mainly during winter. Pollutant dispersion is poor during inversions so air pollutant concentration can quickly rise, especially in urban closed valleys. Air pollution was evaluated by WHO as a human carcinogen (mostly by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) and health effects are obvious. Knowledge about inversion layer height is important for estimation of the pollution impact and it can give us also information about the air pollution sources. Temperature and relative humidity vertical profiles complement ground measurements. Ground measurements were conducted to characterize comprehensively urban airshed in Svermov, residential district of the city of Kladno, about 30 km NW of Prague, from the 2nd Feb. to the 3rd of March 2016. The Svermov is an air pollution hot-spot for long time benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) limit exceedances, reaching the highest B[a]P annual concentration in Bohemia - west part of the Czech Republic. Since the Svermov sits in a shallow valley, frequent vertical temperature inversion in winter and low emission heights of pollution sources prevent pollutant dispersal off the valley. Such orography is common to numerous small settlements in the Czech Republic. Ground measurements at the sports field in the Svermov were complemented by temperature and humidity vertical profiles acquired by a Vaisala radiosonde positioned at tethered He-filled balloon. Total number of 53 series of vertical profiles up to the height of 300 m was conducted. Meteorology parameters were acquired with 4 Hz frequency. The measurements confirmed frequent early-morning and night formation of temperature inversion within boundary layer up to the height of 50 m. This rather shallow inversion had significant

  2. Nonmonotonic behaviour of superconducting critical temperature of Nb/CuNi bilayers with a nanometer range of layer thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morari, R.; Antropov, E.; Socrovisciuc, A.; Prepelitsa, A.; Zdravkov, V.I.; Tagirov, L.R.; Kupriyanov, M.Yu.; Sidorenko, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    Present work reports the result of the proximity effect investigation for superconducting Nb/CuNi-bilayers with the thickness of the ferromagnetic layer (Cu x Ni 1-x ) being in the sub-nanometer range. It was found a non-monotonic behavior of the critical temperature T c , i.e. its growth with the increasing of the ferromagnetic layer thickness dF, for the series of the samples with constant thickness of Nb layer, (d Nb = const). (authors)

  3. Electrolyte bi-layering strategy to improve the performance of an intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shri Prakash, B.; Pavitra, R.; Senthil Kumar, S.; Aruna, S. T.

    2018-03-01

    Lowering of operation temperature has become one of the primary goals of solid oxide fuel (SOFC) research as reduced temperature improves the prospects for widespread commercialization of this energy system. Reduced operational temperature also mitigates the issues associated with high temperature SOFCs and paves way not only for the large scale stationary power generation but also makes SOFCs viable for portable and transport applications. However, there are issues with electrolyte and cathode materials at low temperatures, individually as well as in association with other components, which makes the performance of the SOFCs less satisfactory than expected at lowered temperatures. Bi-layering of electrolytes and impregnation of cathodes have emerged as two important strategies to overcome these issues and achieve higher performance at low temperatures. This review article provides the perspective on the strategy of bi-layering of electrolyte to achieve the desired high performance from SOFC at low to intermediate temperatures.

  4. Effect of eggshell temperature and a hole in the air cell on the perinatal development and physiology of layer hatchlings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, R.; Vries, de S.; Anker, van den I.; Meijerhof, R.; Kemp, B.; Brand, van den H.

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the effect of incubation conditions on layer hatchlings, an experiment was performed in which layer eggs were incubated at a normal (37.8°C) or high (38.9°C) eggshell temperature (EST) and a hole was punctured in the air cell of half of the eggs in both EST treatments from d 14 of

  5. Dislocation polymorphism transformation of 6061-T651 aluminum alloy processed by laser shock processing: Effect of tempering at the elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, X.D.; Ruan, L.; Yuan, S.Q.; Ren, N.F.; Zheng, L.M.; Zhan, Q.B.; Zhou, J.Z.; Yang, H.M.; Wang, Y.; Dai, F.Z.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of tempering on surface topography and dislocation configuration of 6061-T651 aluminum alloy by laser shock processing (LSP) were investigated at the elevated temperatures. Surface topography and surface roughness were tested by a Surfcom 130A-Monochrome surface rough-meter. Morphologies of precipitated phases were monitored by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the dislocation configurations of samples after LSP were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM). The results showed that LSP had a beneficial effect on micro-hardness at elevated temperature. There was a little change of the surface roughness as subjected to LSP. The main strengthening mechanism of micro-hardness was dislocation strengthening and fine grain strengthening, and precipitated phase strengthening was the main strengthening mechanism at elevated temperature. “Dislocation polymorphism transformation” (DPT) effect was affirmed at elevated temperature, and the elevated temperature was principal element for inducing the DPT effect of 6061-T651 aluminum alloy by LSP

  6. Neutral wetting brush layers for block copolymer thin films using homopolymer blends processed at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceresoli, M; Palermo, M; Ferrarese Lupi, F; Seguini, G; Perego, M; Zuccheri, G; Phadatare, S D; Antonioli, D; Gianotti, V; Sparnacci, K; Laus, M

    2015-01-01

    Binary homopolymer blends of two hydroxyl-terminated polystyrene (PS-OH) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA-OH) homopolymers (Mn ∼ 16000 g mol"−"1) were grafted on SiO_2 substrates by high-temperature (T > 150 °C), short-time (t < 600 s) thermal treatments. The resulting brush layer was tested to screen preferential interactions of the SiO_2 substrate with the different symmetric and asymmetric PS-b-PMMA block copolymers deposited on top of the grafted molecules. By properly adjusting the blend composition and the processing parameters, an efficient surface neutralization path was identified, enabling the formation, in the block copolymer film, of homogeneous textures of lamellae or cylinders perpendicularly oriented with respect to the substrate. A critical interplay between the phase segregation of the homopolymer blends and their grafting process on the SiO_2 was observed. In fact, the polar SiO_2 is preferential for the PMMA-rich phase that forms a homogeneous layer on the substrate, while the PS-rich phase is located at the polymer-air interface. During the thermal treatment, phase segregation and grafting proceed simultaneously. Complete wetting of the PS rich phase on the PMMA rich phase leads to the formation of a PS/PMMA bilayer. In this case, the progressive diffusion of PS chains toward the polymer-SiO_2 interface during the thermal treatment allows tuning of the brush layer composition. (paper)

  7. 30th International Symposium on Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Sadot, Oren; Igra, Ozer

    2017-01-01

    These proceedings collect the papers presented at the 30th International Symposium on Shock Waves (ISSW30), which was held in Tel-Aviv Israel from July 19 to July 24, 2015. The Symposium was organized by Ortra Ltd. The ISSW30 focused on the state of knowledge of the following areas: Nozzle Flow, Supersonic and Hypersonic Flows with Shocks, Supersonic Jets, Chemical Kinetics, Chemical Reacting Flows, Detonation, Combustion, Ignition, Shock Wave Reflection and Interaction, Shock Wave Interaction with Obstacles, Shock Wave Interaction with Porous Media, Shock Wave Interaction with Granular Media, Shock Wave Interaction with Dusty Media, Plasma, Magnetohyrdrodynamics, Re-entry to Earth Atmosphere, Shock Waves in Rarefied Gases, Shock Waves in Condensed Matter (Solids and Liquids), Shock Waves in Dense Gases, Shock Wave Focusing, Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability, Shock Boundary Layer Interaction, Multiphase Flow, Blast Waves, Facilities, Flow Visualization, and Numerical Methods. The two volumes serve as a reference ...

  8. Low-Temperature Deposition of Layered SnSe2 for Heterojunction Diodes

    KAUST Repository

    Serna, Martha I.

    2018-04-27

    Tin diselenide (SnSe) has been recently investigated as an alternative layered metal dichalcogenide due to its unique electrical and optoelectronics properties. Although there are several reports on the deposition of layered crystalline SnSe films by chemical and physical methods, synthesis methods like pulsed laser deposition (PLD) are not reported. An attractive feature of PLD is that it can be used to grow 2D films over large areas. In this report, a deposition process to grow stoichiometric SnSe on different substrates such as single crystals (Sapphire) and amorphous oxides (SiO and HfO) is reported. A detailed process flow for the growth of 2D SnSe at temperatures of 300 °C is presented, which is substantially lower than temperatures used in chemical vapor deposition and molecular beam epitaxy. The 2D SnSe films exhibit a mobility of ≈4.0 cm V s, and are successfully used to demonstrate SnSe/p-Si heterojunction diodes. The diodes show I /I ratios of 10-10 with a turn on voltage of <0.5 V, and ideality factors of 1.2-1.4, depending on the SnSe film growth conditions.

  9. Effect of process parameters on hardness, temperature profile and solidification of different layers processed by direct metal laser sintering (DMLS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Sazzad Hossain; Mian, Ahsan; Srinivasan, Raghavan

    2016-01-01

    In DMLS process objects are fabricated layer by layer from powdered material by melting induced by a controlled laser beam. Metallic powder melts and solidifies to form a single layer. Solidification map during layer formation is an important route to characterize micro-structure and grain morphology of sintered layer. Generally, solidification leads to columnar, equiaxed or mixture of these two types grain morphology depending on solidification rate and thermal gradient. Eutectic or dendritic structure can be formed in fully equiaxed zone. This dendritic growth has a large effect on material properties. Smaller dendrites generally increase ductility of the layer. Thus, materials can be designed by creating desired grain morphology in certain regions using DMLS process. To accomplish this, hardness, temperature distribution, thermal gradient and solidification cooling rate in processed layers will be studied under change of process variables by using finite element analysis, with specific application to Ti-6Al-4V.

  10. Effect of process parameters on hardness, temperature profile and solidification of different layers processed by direct metal laser sintering (DMLS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Sazzad Hossain; Mian, Ahsan; Srinivasan, Raghavan

    2016-07-01

    In DMLS process objects are fabricated layer by layer from powdered material by melting induced by a controlled laser beam. Metallic powder melts and solidifies to form a single layer. Solidification map during layer formation is an important route to characterize micro-structure and grain morphology of sintered layer. Generally, solidification leads to columnar, equiaxed or mixture of these two types grain morphology depending on solidification rate and thermal gradient. Eutectic or dendritic structure can be formed in fully equiaxed zone. This dendritic growth has a large effect on material properties. Smaller dendrites generally increase ductility of the layer. Thus, materials can be designed by creating desired grain morphology in certain regions using DMLS process. To accomplish this, hardness, temperature distribution, thermal gradient and solidification cooling rate in processed layers will be studied under change of process variables by using finite element analysis, with specific application to Ti-6Al-4V.

  11. Effect of process parameters on hardness, temperature profile and solidification of different layers processed by direct metal laser sintering (DMLS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Sazzad Hossain; Mian, Ahsan, E-mail: ahsan.mian@wright.edu; Srinivasan, Raghavan [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio 45435 (United States)

    2016-07-12

    In DMLS process objects are fabricated layer by layer from powdered material by melting induced by a controlled laser beam. Metallic powder melts and solidifies to form a single layer. Solidification map during layer formation is an important route to characterize micro-structure and grain morphology of sintered layer. Generally, solidification leads to columnar, equiaxed or mixture of these two types grain morphology depending on solidification rate and thermal gradient. Eutectic or dendritic structure can be formed in fully equiaxed zone. This dendritic growth has a large effect on material properties. Smaller dendrites generally increase ductility of the layer. Thus, materials can be designed by creating desired grain morphology in certain regions using DMLS process. To accomplish this, hardness, temperature distribution, thermal gradient and solidification cooling rate in processed layers will be studied under change of process variables by using finite element analysis, with specific application to Ti-6Al-4V.

  12. Physical Models of Layered Polar Firn Brightness Temperatures from 0.5 to 2 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shurun; Aksoy, Mustafa; Brogioni, Marco; Macelloni, Giovanni; Durand, Michael; Jezek, Kenneth C.; Wang, Tian-Lin; Tsang, Leung; Johnson, Joel T.; Drinkwater, Mark R.; hide

    2015-01-01

    We investigate physical effects influencing 0.5-2 GHz brightness temperatures of layered polar firn to support the Ultra Wide Band Software Defined Radiometer (UWBRAD) experiment to be conducted in Greenland and in Antarctica. We find that because ice particle grain sizes are very small compared to the 0.5-2 GHz wavelengths, volume scattering effects are small. Variations in firn density over cm- to m-length scales, however, cause significant effects. Both incoherent and coherent models are used to examine these effects. Incoherent models include a 'cloud model' that neglects any reflections internal to the ice sheet, and the DMRT-ML and MEMLS radiative transfer codes that are publicly available. The coherent model is based on the layered medium implementation of the fluctuation dissipation theorem for thermal microwave radiation from a medium having a nonuniform temperature. Density profiles are modeled using a stochastic approach, and model predictions are averaged over a large number of realizations to take into account an averaging over the radiometer footprint. Density profiles are described by combining a smooth average density profile with a spatially correlated random process to model density fluctuations. It is shown that coherent model results after ensemble averaging depend on the correlation lengths of the vertical density fluctuations. If the correlation length is moderate or long compared with the wavelength (approximately 0.6x longer or greater for Gaussian correlation function without regard for layer thinning due to compaction), coherent and incoherent model results are similar (within approximately 1 K). However, when the correlation length is short compared to the wavelength, coherent model results are significantly different from the incoherent model by several tens of kelvins. For a 10-cm correlation length, the differences are significant between 0.5 and 1.1 GHz, and less for 1.1-2 GHz. Model results are shown to be able to match the v

  13. Processes governing the temperature structure of the tropical tropopause layer (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birner, T.

    2013-12-01

    The tropical tropopause layer (TTL) is among the most important but least understood regions of the global climate system. The TTL sets the boundary condition for atmospheric tracers entering the stratosphere. Specifically, TTL temperatures control stratospheric water vapor concentrations, which play a key role in the radiative budget of the entire stratosphere with implications for tropospheric and surface climate. The TTL shows a curious stratification structure: temperature continues to decrease beyond the level of main convective outflow (~200 hPa) up to the cold point tropopause (~100 hPa), but TTL lapse rates are smaller than in the upper troposphere. A cold point tropopause well separated from the level of main convective outflow requires TTL cooling which may be the result of: 1) the detailed radiative balance in the TTL, 2) large-scale upwelling (forced by extratropical or tropical waves), 3) the large-scale hydrostatic response aloft deep convective heating, 4) overshooting convection, 5) breaking gravity waves. All of these processes may act in isolation or combine to produce the observed TTL temperature structure. Here, a critical discussion of these processes / mechanisms and their role in lifting the cold point tropopause above the level of main convective outflow is presented. Results are based on idealized radiative-convective equilibrium model simulations, contrasting single-column with cloud-resolving simulations, as well on simulations with chemistry-climate models and reanalysis data. While all of the above processes are capable of producing a TTL-like region in isolation, their combination is found to produce important feedbacks. In particular, both water vapor and ozone are found to have strong radiative effects on TTL temperatures, highlighting important feedbacks between transport circulations setting temperatures and tracer structures and the resulting tracer structures in turn affecting temperatures.

  14. Low-temperature atomic layer deposition of MgO thin films on Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vangelista, S; Mantovan, R; Lamperti, A; Tallarida, G; Kutrzeba-Kotowska, B; Spiga, S; Fanciulli, M

    2013-01-01

    Magnesium oxide (MgO) films have been grown by atomic layer deposition in the wide deposition temperature window of 80–350 °C by using bis(cyclopentadienyl)magnesium and H 2 O precursors. MgO thin films are deposited on both HF-last Si(1 0 0) and SiO 2 /Si substrates at a constant growth rate of ∼0.12 nm cycle −1 . The structural, morphological and chemical properties of the synthesized MgO thin films are investigated by x-ray reflectivity, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and atomic force microscopy measurements. MgO layers are characterized by sharp interface with the substrate and limited surface roughness, besides good chemical uniformity and polycrystalline structure for thickness above 7 nm. C–V measurements performed on Al/MgO/Si MOS capacitors, with MgO in the 4.6–11 nm thickness range, allow determining a dielectric constant (κ) ∼ 11. Co layers are grown by chemical vapour deposition in direct contact with MgO without vacuum-break (base pressure 10 −5 –10 −6  Pa). The as-grown Co/MgO stacks show sharp interfaces and no elements interdiffusion among layers. C–V and I–V measurements have been conducted on Co/MgO/Si MOS capacitors. The dielectric properties of MgO are not influenced by the further process of Co deposition. (paper)

  15. The effect of the KTP laser on smear layer and temperature change: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Dilara; Kuştarcı, Alper

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of potassium-titanyl-phosphate (KTP) laser irradiation on smear layer removal and temperature changes of the root surfaces. Two hundred four extracted single-root human premolars were included. The canals were instrumented and divided into two main groups: group A (smear layer examination n:119) and group B (temperature change examination n:85). Each group was divided into subgroups (n:17) according to the different five laser power settings: A1, B1: 1 W-5.33 J/cm 2 ; A2, B2: 1.5 W-7.52 J/cm 2 ; A3, B3: 2 W-10.3 J/cm 2 ; A4, B4: 3 W-15.5 J/cm 2 , A5, B5: 4 W-20.1 J/cm2, A6: positive control no laser irradiation-irrigated 2 mL for 2 min 2.5% NaOCl + 2 mL distilled water and A7: negative control groups no laser irradiation irrigated 2 mL for 2 min 17% EDTA + 2 mL for 2 min 2.5% NaOCl + 2 mL distilled water. The temperature elevations were measured with an infrared thermographic camera and smear layer examined by scanning electron microscope. According to Kruskal-Wallis and Tukey's tests, in all groups the highest smear scores were in the apical third. In all areas, there were statistically significant differences between negative control group (17% EDTA) and all other groups (p laser and positive control (2.5% NaOCl) groups. Statistically, in all thirds, the differences the 3 W and 4 W KTP laser groups between each other and all other groups were significant (p laser, increase in temperature values in all groups were found to be below 10 °C in 20 s.

  16. The influence of hard-baking temperature applied for SU8 sensor layer on the sensitivity of capacitive chemical sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klanjšek Gunde, Marta; Hauptman, Nina; Maček, Marijan; Kunaver, Matjaž

    2009-06-01

    SU8, the near-UV photosensitive epoxy-based polymer was used as a sensor layer in the capacitive chemical sensor, ready for integration with a generic double-metal CMOS technology. It was observed that the response of the sensor slowly increases with the temperature applied in hard-baking process as long as it remains below 300°C. At this temperature the response of the sensor abruptly increases and becomes almost threefold. It was shown that fully crosslinked structure of the sensor layer becomes opened and disordered when the sensor is hard-baked at temperatures between 300°C and 320°C, that is, still well below the degradation temperature of the polymer. These changes in chemical structure were analyzed by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The temperature-dependent changes of the sensor layer structure enable one to prepare a combination of capacitive chemical sensors with good discrimination between some volatile organic compounds.

  17. Remote sensing of height of a fog layer and temperature of fog droplets using infrared thermometer and meteorological satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, K.; Abe, H.

    1998-01-01

    To study meteorological characteristics of cool foggy easterly (Yamase), by which rice production in the Tohoku region was frequently damaged, we measured temperature of the fog layer resulted from Yamase, using infrared thermal indicator and meteorological satellite (HIMAWARI). These temperature data were compared with wet-bulb and dry-bulb temperatures obtained by a ventilated psychrometer. Generally, the temperature of fog droplets estimated from infrared thermal indicator was higher than the wet-bulb temperature by about 0∼1°C. This result indicates clearly that fog droplets were cooled by evaporation on the droplet surface. Under the conditions that the fog layer is homogeneous in liquid water content and fog droplet size distribution, the height of the fog layer can be estimated by the observation of visibility and relative solar radiation flux. (author)

  18. Regional variations in upper mantle compressional velocities beneath southern California 1. Post-shock temperatures: Their experimental determination, calculation, and implications, 2.. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raikes, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    The compressional velocity within the upper mantle beneath Southern California is investigated through observations of the dependence of teleseismic P-delays at all stations of the array on the distance and azimuth to the event. The variation of residuals with azimuth was found to be as large as 1.3 sec at a single station; the delays were stable as a function of time, and no evidence was found for temporal velocity variations related to seismic activity in the area. These delays were used in the construction of models for the upper mantle P-velocity structure to depths of 150 km, both by ray tracing and inversion techniques. The models exhibit considerable lateral heterogeneity including a region of low velocity beneath the Imperial Valley, and regions of increased velocity beneath the Sierra Nevada and much of the Transverse Ranges. The development is described of a technique for the experimental determination of post-shock temperatures, and its application to several metals and silicates shocked to pressures in the range 5 to 30 GPa. The technique utilizes an infra-red radiation detector to determine the brightness temperature of the free surface of the sample after the shock wave has passed through it.

  19. Effect of temperature on compact layer of Pt electrode in PEMFCs by first-principles molecular dynamics calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, China University of Petroleum (Beijing), Beijing 102249 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Failure, Corrosion and Protection of Oil/gas Facilities, China University of Petroleum (Beijing), Beijing 102249 (China); Chen, Changfeng, E-mail: chen_c_f@163.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, China University of Petroleum (Beijing), Beijing 102249 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Failure, Corrosion and Protection of Oil/gas Facilities, China University of Petroleum (Beijing), Beijing 102249 (China); Yu, Haobo [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, China University of Petroleum (Beijing), Beijing 102249 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Failure, Corrosion and Protection of Oil/gas Facilities, China University of Petroleum (Beijing), Beijing 102249 (China); Lu, Guiwu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, China University of Petroleum (Beijing), Beijing 102249 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • The structures of water compact layer on Pt(111) at different temperature were calculated. • The feature of chemical bond between water molecules and Pt (111) surface was discussed with temperature increased. • Temperature dependence of electrical strengths and capacitances of compact layer on Pt (111) surface was calculated. - Abstract: Formation of the double-layer electric field and capacitance of the water-metal interface is of significant interest in physicochemical processes. In this study, we perform first- principles molecular dynamics simulations on the water/Pt(111) interface to investigate the temperature dependence of the compact layer electric field and capacitance based on the calculated charge densities. On the Pt (111) surface, water molecules form ice-like structures that exhibit more disorder along the height direction with increasing temperature. The O−H bonds of more water molecules point toward the Pt surface to form Pt−H covalent bonds with increasing temperature, which weaken the corresponding O−H bonds. In addition, our calculated capacitance at 300 K is 15.2 mF/cm{sup 2}, which is in good agreement with the experimental results. As the temperature increases from 10 to 450 K, the field strength and capacitance of the compact layer on Pt (111) first increase and then decrease slightly, which is significant for understanding the water/Pt interface from atomic level.

  20. Low-Temperature Process for Atomic Layer Chemical Vapor Deposition of an Al2O3 Passivation Layer for Organic Photovoltaic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hoonbae; Lee, Jihye; Sohn, Sunyoung; Jung, Donggeun

    2016-05-01

    Flexible organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells have drawn extensive attention due to their light weight, cost efficiency, portability, and so on. However, OPV cells degrade quickly due to organic damage by water vapor or oxygen penetration when the devices are driven in the atmosphere without a passivation layer. In order to prevent damage due to water vapor or oxygen permeation into the devices, passivation layers have been introduced through methods such as sputtering, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, and atomic layer chemical vapor deposition (ALCVD). In this work, the structural and chemical properties of Al2O3 films, deposited via ALCVD at relatively low temperatures of 109 degrees C, 200 degrees C, and 300 degrees C, are analyzed. In our experiment, trimethylaluminum (TMA) and H2O were used as precursors for Al2O3 film deposition via ALCVD. All of the Al2O3 films showed very smooth, featureless surfaces without notable defects. However, we found that the plastic flexible substrate of an OPV device passivated with 300 degrees C deposition temperature was partially bended and melted, indicating that passivation layers for OPV cells on plastic flexible substrates need to be formed at temperatures lower than 300 degrees C. The OPV cells on plastic flexible substrates were passivated by the Al2O3 film deposited at the temperature of 109 degrees C. Thereafter, the photovoltaic properties of passivated OPV cells were investigated as a function of exposure time under the atmosphere.

  1. Sea Surface Temperature from MODIS during Saharan Air Layer outbreaks: Multichannel vs Optimal Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczodrak, G.; Minnett, P. J.

    2017-12-01

    The current Sea-Surface Temperature (SST) retrieval algorithms applied to MODIS and VIIRS data are build on the Non-Linear SST algorithm (NLSST Walton et al., 1998). This algorithm is based on combination of top-of-atmosphere brightness temperatures, T11 and T12 measured at λ= 11µm and 12µm. The algorithm has a set of coefficients derived using collocated measurements of SST temperature from drifting buoys (Match-Up Data Base - MUDB). NLSST produces accurate SST retrievals in conditions that are similar to those of the represented in the MUDB. When conditions deviate from typical, the errors are larger. An alternative approach of estimating the SST from radiance measurements is based on the Optimal Estimation (OE). The OE approach is not tied to a MUDB so OESST should be free of the systematic biases seen in NLSST retrievals in anomalous conditions. OE uses prior knowledge or estimation of a system as an input of a forward model to simulate `observations' and seeks to minimize the difference between these simulated observation and actual measurements in the space of the state variables. One situation that leads to significant bias in NLSST occurs in Northern Atlantic near the African coast during Saharan Air Layer (SAL) outbreaks. Typically, the atmosphere in this region is moist and these conditions are represented in the coefficients of the NLSST algorithm. During SAL events, moist air is replaced by a layer of very dry air; the established coefficients are no longer representative. During a number of research cruises in the North Atlantic affected by the SAL, we have collected radiometric SST measurements from ships using the Marine Atmosphere Emitted Radiance Interferometer (M-AERI), and frequent measurements of the atmospheric state with radiosondes launched from the ships. Using these data, we investigate if the OE approach is capable of improving the accuracy of the SST retrieval from MODIS under the conditions of the dry air outbreak from the Sahara.

  2. Spin transfer in an open ferromagnetic layer: from negative damping to effective temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wegrowe, J-E; Ciornei, M C; Drouhin, H-J [Laboratoire des Solides Irradies, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS-UMR 7642 and CEA/DSM/DRECAM, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2007-04-23

    Spin transfer is a typical spintronics effect that allows a ferromagnetic layer to be switched by spin injection. All experimental results concerning spin transfer (quasi-static hysteresis loops or AC resonance measurements) are described on the basis of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation of the magnetization, in which additional current dependent terms are added, like current dependent effective fields and current dependent damping factors, that can be positive or negative. The origin of these terms can be investigated further by performing stochastic experiments, like one-shot relaxation experiments under spin injection in the activation regime of the magnetization. In this regime, the Neel-Brown activation law is observed which leads to the introduction of a current dependent effective temperature. In order to define these counterintuitive parameters (effective temperature and negative damping), a detailed thermokinetic analysis of the different sub-systems involved is performed. This report presents a thermokinetic description of the different forms of energy exchanged between the electric and the ferromagnetic sub-systems at a normal/ferromagnetic junction. The derivation of the Fokker-Planck equation in the framework of the thermokinetic theory allows the transport parameters to be defined from the entropy variation and refined with the Onsager reciprocity relations and symmetry properties of the magnetic system. The contribution of the spin polarized current is introduced as an external source term in the conservation laws of the ferromagnetic layer. Due to the relaxation time separation, this contribution can be reduced to an effective damping. The flux of energy transferred between the ferromagnet and the spin polarized current can be positive or negative, depending on the spin accumulation configuration. The effective temperature is deduced in the activation (stationary) regime, provided that the relaxation time that couples the magnetization to the

  3. Study of cross-spectra of velocity components and temperature series in a nocturnal boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqueda, Gregorio; Sastre, Mariano; Viñas, Carmen; Viana, Samuel; Yagüe, Carlos

    2010-05-01

    The main characteristic of the Planetary Boundary Layer is the turbulent flow that can be understood as the motions of many superimposed eddies with different scales, which are very irregular and produce mixing among the atmospheric properties. Spectral analysis is a widely used statistical tool to know the size of eddies into the flow. The Turbulent Kinetic Energy is split in fractions for each scale of eddy by mean the power spectrum of the wind velocity components. Also, the fluctuation of the other variables as temperature, humidity, gases concentrations or material particles presents in the atmosphere can be divided according to the importance of different scales in a similar way than the wind. A Cross-spectrum between two time series is used in meteorology to know their correlation in frequency space. Specially, coespectrum, or real part of cross-spectrum, amplitud and coherence give us many information about the low or high correlation between two variables in a particular frecuency or scale (Stull, 1988). In this work we have investigated cross-spectra of velocity components and temperature measured along the summer 2009 at the CIBA, Research Centre for the Lower Atmosphere, located in Valladolid province (Spain), which is on a quite flat terrain (Cuxart et al., 2000; Viana et al., 2009). In these experimental dataset, among other instrumentation, two sonic anemometers (20 Hz, sampling rate) at 1.5 m and 10 m height are available. Cross-spectra between variables of the two levels, specially, wind vertical component and sonic temperature, under stable stratification are studied in order to improve the knowledge of the proprieties of the momentum and heat fluxes near the ground in the PBL. Nevertheless, power spectral of horizontal components of the wind, at both levels, have been also analysed. The spectra and cross-spectra were performed by mean the Blackman-Tukey method, widely utilised in the time series studies (Blackman & Tukey, 1958) and, where it is

  4. Observing the morphology of single-layered embedded silicon nanocrystals by using temperature-stable TEM membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Gutsch

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We use high-temperature-stable silicon nitride membranes to investigate single layers of silicon nanocrystal ensembles by energy filtered transmission electron microscopy. The silicon nanocrystals are prepared from the precipitation of a silicon-rich oxynitride layer sandwiched between two SiO2 diffusion barriers and subjected to a high-temperature annealing. We find that such single layers are very sensitive to the annealing parameters and may lead to a significant loss of excess silicon. In addition, these ultrathin layers suffer from significant electron beam damage that needs to be minimized in order to image the pristine sample morphology. Finally we demonstrate how the silicon nanocrystal size distribution develops from a broad to a narrow log-normal distribution, when the initial precipitation layer thickness and stoichiometry are below a critical value.

  5. Study on coated layer material performance of coated particle fuel FBR (2). High temperature property and capability of coating to thick layer of TiN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naganuma, Masayuki; Mizuno, Tomoyasu

    2002-08-01

    'Helium Gas Cooled Coated Particle Fuel FBR' is one of attractive core concepts in the Feasibility Study on Commercialized Fast Reactor Cycle System in Japan, and the design study is presently proceeded. As one of key technologies of this concept, the coated layer material is important, and ceramics is considered to be a candidate material because of the superior refractory. Based on existing knowledge, TiN is regarded to be a possible candidate material, to which some property tests and evaluations have been conducted. In this study, preliminary tests about the high temperature property and the capability of thick layer coating of TiN have been conducted. Results of these tests come to the following conclusions. Heating tests of two kinds of TiN layer specimens coated by PVD (Physical Vapor Deposition) and CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) were conducted. As a result, as for CVD coating specimens, remarkable charge was not observed on the layer up to 2,000degC, therefore we concluded that the layer by CVD had applicability up to high temperature of actual operation level. On the other hand, as for PVD coating specimens, an unstable behavior that the layer changed to a mesh like texture was observed on a 2,000degC heated specimen, therefore the applied PVD method is not considered to be promising as the coating technique. The surface conditions of some parts inside CVD device were investigated in order to evaluate possibility of TiN thick coating (∼100 μm). As a result, around 500 μm of TiN coating layer was observed on the condition of multilayer. Therefore, we conclude that CVD has capability of coating up to thick layer in actual coated particle fuel fabrication. (author)

  6. Dynamics and characteristics of soil temperature and moisture of active layer in central Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, L.; Hu, G.; Wu, X.; Tian, L.

    2017-12-01

    Research on the hydrothermal properties of active layer during the thawing and freezing processes was considered as a key question to revealing the heat and moisture exchanges between permafrost and atmosphere. The characteristics of freezing and thawing processes at Tanggula (TGL) site in permafrost regions on the Tibetan Plateau, the results revealed that the depth of daily soil temperature transmission was about 40 cm shallower during thawing period than that during the freezing period. Soil warming process at the depth above 140 cm was slower than the cooling process, whereas they were close below 140 cm depth. Moreover, the hydro-thermal properties differed significantly among different stages. Precipitation caused an obviously increase in soil moisture at 0-20 cm depth. The vertical distribution of soil moisture could be divided into two main zones: less than 12% in the freeze state and greater than 12% in the thaw state. In addition, coupling of moisture and heat during the freezing and thawing processes also showed that soil temperature decreased faster than soil moisture during the freezing process. At the freezing stage, soil moisture exhibited an exponential relationship with the absolute soil temperature. Energy consumed for water-ice conversion during the freezing process was 149.83 MJ/m2 and 141.22 MJ/m2 in 2011 and 2012, respectively, which was estimated by the soil moisture variation.

  7. Characterization of microcrystalline I-layer for solar cells prepared in low temperature - plastic compatible process

    KAUST Repository

    Sliz, Rafal

    2012-06-01

    Microcrystalline silicon (mc-Si) lms deposited using a Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition (PECVD) process constitute an important material for manufacturing low-cost, large-area thin-lm devices, such as solar cells or thin-lm transistors. Although the deposition of electronic-grade mc-Si using the PECVD process is now well established, the high substrate temperature required (~400°C) does not lend itself to electronic devices with exible form factors fabricated on low-cost plastic substrates. In this study, we rst investigated an intrinsic mc-Si layer deposited at plastic-compatible substrate temperatures (~150°C) by characterising the properties of the lm and then evaluated its applicability to p-i-n solar cells though device characterisation. When the performance of the solar cell was correlated with lm properties, it was found that, although it compared unfavourably with mc-Si deposited at higher temperatures, it remained a very promising option. Nonetheless, further development is required to increase the overall eciency of mc-Si exible solar cells.

  8. Characterization of ZnO film grown on polycarbonate by atomic layer deposition at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Gyeong Beom; Han, Gwon Deok; Shim, Joon Hyung; Choi, Byoung-Ho, E-mail: bhchoi@korea.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-707 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    ZnO is an attractive material for use in various technological products such as phosphors, gas sensors, and transparent conductors. Recently, aluminum-doped zinc oxide has received attention as a potential replacement for indium tin oxide, which is one of the transparent conductive oxides used in flat panel displays, organic light-emitting diodes, and organic solar cells. In this study, the characteristics of ZnO films deposited on polycarbonate (PC) substrates by atomic layer deposition (ALD) are investigated for various process temperatures. The growth mechanism of these films was investigated at low process temperatures using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XRD and XPS were used to determine the preferred orientation and chemical composition of the films, respectively. Furthermore, the difference of the deposition mechanisms on an amorphous organic material, i.e., PC substrate and an inorganic material such as silicon was discussed from the viewpoint of the diffusion and deposition of precursors. The structure of the films was also investigated by chemical analysis in order to determine the effect of growth temperature on the films deposited by ALD.

  9. Low-Temperature Crystalline Titanium Dioxide by Atomic Layer Deposition for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Chandiran, Aravind Kumar

    2013-04-24

    Low-temperature processing of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) is crucial to enable commercialization with low-cost, plastic substrates. Prior studies have focused on mechanical compression of premade particles on plastic or glass substrates; however, this did not yield sufficient interconnections for good carrier transport. Furthermore, such compression can lead to more heterogeneous porosity. To circumvent these problems, we have developed a low-temperature processing route for photoanodes where crystalline TiO2 is deposited onto well-defined, mesoporous templates. The TiO2 is grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD), and the crystalline films are achieved at a growth temperature of 200 C. The ALD TiO2 thickness was systematically studied in terms of charge transport and performance to lead to optimized photovoltaic performance. We found that a 15 nm TiO2 overlayer on an 8 μm thick SiO2 film leads to a high power conversion efficiency of 7.1% with the state-of-the-art zinc porphyrin sensitizer and cobalt bipyridine redox mediator. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  10. α-Ga2O3 grown by low temperature atomic layer deposition on sapphire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J. W.; Jarman, J. C.; Johnstone, D. N.; Midgley, P. A.; Chalker, P. R.; Oliver, R. A.; Massabuau, F. C.-P.

    2018-04-01

    α-Ga2O3 is a metastable phase of Ga2O3 of interest for wide bandgap engineering since it is isostructural with α-In2O3 and α-Al2O3. α-Ga2O3 is generally synthesised under high pressure (several GPa) or relatively high temperature (∼500 °C). In this study, we report the growth of α-Ga2O3 by low temperature atomic layer deposition (ALD) on sapphire substrate. The film was grown at a rate of 0.48 Å/cycle, and predominantly consists of α-Ga2O3 in the form of (0001) -oriented columns originating from the interface with the substrate. Some inclusions were also present, typically at the tips of the α phase columns and most likely comprising ε-Ga2O3. The remainder of the Ga2O3 film - i.e. nearer the surface and between the α-Ga2O3 columns, was amorphous. The film was found to be highly resistive, as is expected for undoped material. This study demonstrates that α-Ga2O3 films can be grown by low temperature ALD and suggests the possibility of a new range of ultraviolet optoelectronic and power devices grown by ALD. The study also shows that scanning electron diffraction is a powerful technique to identify the different polymorphs of Ga2O3 present in multiphase samples.

  11. Energy- and temperature dependences of secondary electron emission of CsI- and CsBr layers doped with Cd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galij, P.V.; Tsal', N.A.

    1983-01-01

    The energy and temperature dependences of the secondary electron emission coefficient (SEEC) of CsI-Cd-, CsBr-Cd-, CsI-CsBr layers have been studied. The effect of bivalent cadmium impurity on the SEEC value is investigated. It is shown that implantation of small amounts of Cd 2+ impurity into the lattice of the initial monocrystals might increase the SEEC values of the layers. Temperature dependences (TD) of SEEC are measured and the possibility of comparing experimental results with the Dekker formula is analyzed. A conclusion is drawn that the Dekker model well describes the TD of SEEC of doped layers at temperatures T < or approximately 100 deg C. At elevated temperatures., along with secondary electron scattering on phonons, one should take into account their scattering on vacancies

  12. Enhanced room-temperature spin Seebeck effect in a YIG/C60/Pt layered heterostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, R.; Kalappattil, V.; Geng, R.; Luong, H.; Pham, M.; Nguyen, T.; Liu, Tao; Wu, Mingzhong; Phan, M. H.; Srikanth, H.

    2018-05-01

    We report on large enhancement of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (LSSE) in the Y3Fe5O12 (YIG)/Pt system at room temperature due to the addition of a thin layer of organic semiconductor (C60) in between the YIG and the Pt. LSSE measurements show that the LSSE voltage increases significantly, from the initial value of 150 nV for the YIG/Pt structure to 240 nV for the YIG/C60(5nm)/Pt structure. Radio-frequency transverse susceptibility experiments reveal a significant decrease in the surface perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) of the YIG film when C60 is deposited on it. These results suggest that the LSSE enhancement may be attributed to increased spin mixing conductance, the decreased PMA, and the large spin diffusion length of C60.

  13. Atmospheric Boundary Layer temperature and humidity from new-generation Raman lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froidevaux, Martin; Higgins, Chad; Simeonov, Valentin; Pardyjak, Eric R.; Parlange, Marc B.

    2010-05-01

    Mixing ratio and temperature data, obtained with EPFL Raman lidar during the TABLE-08 experiment are presented. The processing methods will be discussed along with fundamental physics. An independent calibration is performed at different distances along the laser beam, demonstrating that the multi-telescopes design of the lidar system is reliable for field application. The maximum achievable distance as a function of time and/or space averaging will also be discussed. During the TABLE-08 experiment, different type of lidar measurements have been obtained including: horizontal and vertical time series, as well as boundary layer "cuts", during day and night. The high resolution data, 1s in time and 1.25 m in space, are used to understand the response of the atmosphere to variations in surface variability.

  14. Generation of Pc 1 waves by the ion temperature anisotropy associated with fast shocks caused by sudden impulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandt, M.E.; Lee, L.C.

    1991-01-01

    Observations have reported on the high correlation of Pc 1 events with magnetospheric compressions. A number of mechanisms have been suggested for the generation of the Pc 1 waves. In this paper, the authors propose a new mechanism which leads to the generation of Pc 1 waves. The interaction of a dynamic pressure pulse (Δρυ 2 ) with the Earth's bow shock leads to the formation of a weak fast mode shock propagating into the magnetosheath. The shock wave can pass right through a tangential discontinuity (magnetopause) and into the magnetosphere, without disturbing either of the structures. In a quasi-perpendicular geometry, the shock wave exhibits anisotropic heating with T perpendicular > T parallel . This anisotropy drives unstable ion cyclotron waves which they believe can contribute to the generation of the Pc 1 waves which are detected. The viability of the mechanism is demonstrated with simulations. This mechanism could explain peak in the occurrence of observed Pc 1 waves in the postnoon sector where a field-aligned discontinuity in the solar wind would most often be parallel to the magnetopause surface due to the average Parker spiral magnetic field configuration

  15. Atomically engineered ferroic layers yield a room-temperature magnetoelectric multiferroic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundy, Julia A.; Brooks, Charles M.; Holtz, Megan E.; Moyer, Jarrett A.; Das, Hena; Rébola, Alejandro F.; Heron, John T.; Clarkson, James D.; Disseler, Steven M.; Liu, Zhiqi; Farhan, Alan; Held, Rainer; Hovden, Robert; Padgett, Elliot; Mao, Qingyun; Paik, Hanjong; Misra, Rajiv; Kourkoutis, Lena F.; Arenholz, Elke; Scholl, Andreas; Borchers, Julie A.; Ratcliff, William D.; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Fennie, Craig J.; Schiffer, Peter; Muller, David A.; Schlom, Darrell G.

    2016-09-01

    Materials that exhibit simultaneous order in their electric and magnetic ground states hold promise for use in next-generation memory devices in which electric fields control magnetism. Such materials are exceedingly rare, however, owing to competing requirements for displacive ferroelectricity and magnetism. Despite the recent identification of several new multiferroic materials and magnetoelectric coupling mechanisms, known single-phase multiferroics remain limited by antiferromagnetic or weak ferromagnetic alignments, by a lack of coupling between the order parameters, or by having properties that emerge only well below room temperature, precluding device applications. Here we present a methodology for constructing single-phase multiferroic materials in which ferroelectricity and strong magnetic ordering are coupled near room temperature. Starting with hexagonal LuFeO3—the geometric ferroelectric with the greatest known planar rumpling—we introduce individual monolayers of FeO during growth to construct formula-unit-thick syntactic layers of ferrimagnetic LuFe2O4 (refs 17, 18) within the LuFeO3 matrix, that is, (LuFeO3)m/(LuFe2O4)1 superlattices. The severe rumpling imposed by the neighbouring LuFeO3 drives the ferrimagnetic LuFe2O4 into a simultaneously ferroelectric state, while also reducing the LuFe2O4 spin frustration. This increases the magnetic transition temperature substantially—from 240 kelvin for LuFe2O4 (ref. 18) to 281 kelvin for (LuFeO3)9/(LuFe2O4)1. Moreover, the ferroelectric order couples to the ferrimagnetism, enabling direct electric-field control of magnetism at 200 kelvin. Our results demonstrate a design methodology for creating higher-temperature magnetoelectric multiferroics by exploiting a combination of geometric frustration, lattice distortions and epitaxial engineering.

  16. Thickness dependence of the levitation performance of double-layer high-temperature superconductor bulks above a magnetic rail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, R.X.; Zheng, J.; Liao, X.L.; Che, T.; Gou, Y.F.; He, D.B.; Deng, Z.G.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Thickness optimization of double-layer bulk HTSC arrangement is studied. • The new bulk HTSC arrangement makes better use of the flux distribution of the magnetic rails. • Levitation performance can be enhanced with the optimization. • The optimization can meet large levitation force requirements for HTS Maglev system. - Abstract: A double-layer high-temperature superconductor (HTSC) arrangement was proposed and proved to be able to bring improvements to both levitation force and guidance force compared with present single-layer HTSC arrangement. To fully exploit the applied magnetic field by a magnetic rail, the thickness dependence of a double-layer HTSC arrangement on the levitation performance was further investigated in the paper. In this study, the lower-layer bulk was polished step by step to different thicknesses, and the upper-layer bulk with constant thickness was directly superimposed on the lower-layer one. The levitation force and the force relaxation of the double-layer HTSC arrangement were measured above a Halbach magnetic rail. Experimental result shows that a bigger levitation force and a less levitation force decay could be achieved by optimizing the thickness of the lower-layer bulk HTSC. This thickness optimization method could be applied together with former reported double-layer HTSC arrangement method with aligned growth sector boundaries pattern. This series of study on the optimized combination method do bring a significant improvement on the levitation performance of present HTS maglev systems

  17. Thickness dependence of the levitation performance of double-layer high-temperature superconductor bulks above a magnetic rail

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, R.X.; Zheng, J.; Liao, X.L.; Che, T.; Gou, Y.F.; He, D.B.; Deng, Z.G., E-mail: zgdeng@gmail.com

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Thickness optimization of double-layer bulk HTSC arrangement is studied. • The new bulk HTSC arrangement makes better use of the flux distribution of the magnetic rails. • Levitation performance can be enhanced with the optimization. • The optimization can meet large levitation force requirements for HTS Maglev system. - Abstract: A double-layer high-temperature superconductor (HTSC) arrangement was proposed and proved to be able to bring improvements to both levitation force and guidance force compared with present single-layer HTSC arrangement. To fully exploit the applied magnetic field by a magnetic rail, the thickness dependence of a double-layer HTSC arrangement on the levitation performance was further investigated in the paper. In this study, the lower-layer bulk was polished step by step to different thicknesses, and the upper-layer bulk with constant thickness was directly superimposed on the lower-layer one. The levitation force and the force relaxation of the double-layer HTSC arrangement were measured above a Halbach magnetic rail. Experimental result shows that a bigger levitation force and a less levitation force decay could be achieved by optimizing the thickness of the lower-layer bulk HTSC. This thickness optimization method could be applied together with former reported double-layer HTSC arrangement method with aligned growth sector boundaries pattern. This series of study on the optimized combination method do bring a significant improvement on the levitation performance of present HTS maglev systems.

  18. Optoelectronic devices, low temperature preparation methods, and improved electron transport layers

    KAUST Repository

    Eita, Mohamed S.

    2016-08-04

    An optoelectronic device such as a photovoltaic device which has at least one layer, such as an electron transport layer, which comprises a plurality of alternating, oppositely charged layers including metal oxide layers. The metal oxide can be zinc oxide. The plurality of layers can be prepared by layer-by-layer processing in which alternating layers are built up step-by-step due to electrostatic attraction. The efficiency of the device can be increased by this processing method compared to a comparable method like sputtering. The number of layers can be controlled to improve device efficiency. Aqueous solutions can be used which is environmentally friendly. Annealing can be avoided. A quantum dot layer can be used next to the metal oxide layer to form a quantum dot heterojunction solar device.

  19. Thermal expansion, anharmonicity and temperature-dependent Raman spectra of single- and few-layer MoSe₂ and WSe₂.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Late, Dattatray J; Shirodkar, Sharmila N; Waghmare, Umesh V; Dravid, Vinayak P; Rao, C N R

    2014-06-06

    We report the temperature-dependent Raman spectra of single- and few-layer MoSe2 and WSe2 in the range 77-700 K. We observed linear variation in the peak positions and widths of the bands arising from contributions of anharmonicity and thermal expansion. After characterization using atomic force microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, the temperature coefficients of the Raman modes were determined. Interestingly, the temperature coefficient of the A(2)(2u) mode is larger than that of the A(1g) mode, the latter being much smaller than the corresponding temperature coefficients of the same mode in single-layer MoS2 and of the G band of graphene. The temperature coefficients of the two modes in single-layer MoSe2 are larger than those of the same modes in single-layer WSe2. We have estimated thermal expansion coefficients and temperature dependence of the vibrational frequencies of MoS2 and MoSe2 within a quasi-harmonic approximation, with inputs from first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. We show that the contrasting temperature dependence of the Raman-active mode A(1g) in MoS2 and MoSe2 arises essentially from the difference in their strain-phonon coupling. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. The Mobility Enhancement of Indium Gallium Zinc Oxide Transistors via Low-temperature Crystallization using a Tantalum Catalytic Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yeonwoo; Kim, Sang Tae; Kim, Kuntae; Kim, Mi Young; Oh, Saeroonter; Jeong, Jae Kyeong

    2017-09-07

    High-mobility indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) are achieved through low-temperature crystallization enabled via a reaction with a transition metal catalytic layer. For conventional amorphous IGZO TFTs, the active layer crystallizes at thermal annealing temperatures of 600 °C or higher, which is not suitable for displays using a glass substrate. The crystallization temperature is reduced when in contact with a Ta layer, where partial crystallization at the IGZO back-channel occurs with annealing at 300 °C, while complete crystallization of the active layer occurs at 400 °C. The field-effect mobility is significantly boosted to 54.0 cm 2 /V·s for the IGZO device with a metal-induced polycrystalline channel formed at 300 °C compared to 18.1 cm 2 /V·s for an amorphous IGZO TFT without a catalytic layer. This work proposes a facile and effective route to enhance device performance by crystallizing the IGZO layer with standard annealing temperatures, without the introduction of expensive laser irradiation processes.

  1. Upper mixed layer temperature anomalies at the North Atlantic storm-track zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshonkin, S. N.; Diansky, N. A.

    1995-10-01

    Synoptic sea surface temperature anomalies (SSTAs) were determined as a result of separation of time scales smaller than 183 days. The SSTAs were investigated using daily data of ocean weather station C (52.75°N; 35.5°W) from 1 January 1976 to 31 December 1980 (1827 days). There were 47 positive and 50 negative significant SSTAs (lifetime longer than 3 days, absolute value greater than 0.10 °C) with four main intervals of the lifetime repetitions: 1. 4-7 days (45% of all cases), 2. 9-13 days (20-25%), 3. 14-18 days (10-15%), and 4. 21-30 days (10-15%) and with a magnitude 1.5-2.0 °C. An upper layer balance model based on equations for temperature, salinity, mechanical energy (with advanced parametrization), state (density), and drift currents was used to simulate SSTA. The original method of modelling taking into account the mean observed temperature profiles proved to be very stable. The model SSTAs are in a good agreement with the observed amplitudes and phases of synoptic SSTAs during all 5 years. Surface heat flux anomalies are the main source of SSTAs. The influence of anomalous drift heat advection is about 30-50% of the SSTA, and the influence of salinity anomalies is about 10-25% and less. The influence of a large-scale ocean front was isolated only once in February-April 1978 during all 5 years. Synoptic SSTAs develop just in the upper half of the homogeneous layer at each winter. We suggest that there are two main causes of such active sublayer formation: 1. surface heat flux in the warm sectors of cyclones and 2. predominant heat transport by ocean currents from the south. All frequency functions of the ocean temperature synoptic response to heat and momentum surface fluxes are of integral character (red noise), though there is strong resonance with 20-days period of wind-driven horizontal heat advection with mixed layer temperature; there are some other peculiarities on the time scales from 5.5 to 13 days. Observed and modelled frequency functions

  2. Effect of layer number on recovery rate of WS{sub 2} nanosheets for ammonia detection at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Ziyu [State Key Laboratory of Materials Processing and Die Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), No. 1037, Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430074 (China); Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Zeng, Dawen, E-mail: dwzeng@mail.hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Materials Processing and Die Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), No. 1037, Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430074 (China); Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Zhang, Jia; Wu, Congyi; Wen, Yanwei; Shan, Bin; Xie, Changsheng [State Key Laboratory of Materials Processing and Die Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), No. 1037, Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2017-08-31

    Highlights: • Reasons for room-temperature difficult recovery of WS{sub 2} sensors for NH{sub 3} detection. • The excellent recovery within 271.9 s was observed for single-layer WS{sub 2} sensor. • The recovery time of WS{sub 2} sensor has a anti-linear relation with number of layer. - Abstract: Tungsten disulfide (WS{sub 2}), as a representative layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), is expected as a promising candidate for high-performance NH{sub 3} sensor at room temperature. Unfortunately, the common WS{sub 2} based NH{sub 3} sensors are difficult to recovery at room temperature, which severely limits its application. Hence, how to improve recovery has become an urgent problem to be solved. Herein, we prepare five types of WS{sub 2} nanosheets with different layer numbers from bulk to monolayer, and find that the recovery time of NH{sub 3} gas sensor is rapidly linear shorten as the number of layers decreasing. Through the first-principles calculation of the interaction between NH{sub 3} and WS{sub 2} substance, the different binding energy between ammonia and the surface (−0.179 eV) and interlayer (−0.356 eV) of layered WS{sub 2}, as well as the different electron transfer way, should be responsible for the difficult recovery rate of various WS{sub 2} samples. Therefore, reducing the number of layer of WS{sub 2} is a promising approach to speed up recovery. Based on this conclusion, we successfully prepare a fast recoverable ammonia gas sensor based on single layer WS{sub 2}, which exhibits exciting fast recovery within 271.9 s at room temperature without any condition. Moreover, our work also can act as a reference for other gas detection of TMDs based gas sensor to improve the gas performance at room-temperature.

  3. Grain Oriented Perovskite Layer Structure Ceramics for High-Temperature Piezoelectric Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuierer, Paul Anton

    The perovskite layer structure (PLS) compounds have the general formula (A^{2+}) _2(B^{5+})_2 O_7, or (A^ {3+})_2(B^{4+ })_2O_7, and crystallize in a very anisotropic layered structure consisting of parallel slabs made up of perovskite units. Several of these compounds possess the highest Curie temperatures (T_{rm c} ) of any known ferroelectrics. Two examples are Sr_2Nb_2O _7 with T_{rm c} of 1342^circC, and La_2Ti_2O _7 with T_{rm c} of 1500^circC. This thesis is an investigation of PLS ceramics and their feasibility as a high temperature transducer material. Piezoelectricity in single crystals has been measured, but the containerless float zone apparatus necessary to grow high quality crystals of these refractory compounds is expensive and limited to a small number of research groups. Previous attempts to pole polycrystalline Sr_2Nb _2O_7 have failed, and to this point piezoelectricity has been absent. The initiative taken in this research was to investigate PLS ceramics by way of composition and processing schemes such that polycrystalline bodies could be electrically poled. The ultimate objective then was to demonstrate piezoelectricity in PLS ceramics, especially at high temperatures. Donor-doping of both La_2Ti _2O_7 and Sr_2Nb_2O _7 was found to increase volume resistivities at elevated temperatures, an important parameter to consider during the poling process. Sr_2Ta _2O_7 (T _{rm c} = -107 ^circC) was used to make solid solution compositions with moderately high Curie temperatures, of about 850^circC, and lower coercive fields. A hot-forging technique was employed to produce ceramics with high density (>99% of theoretical) and high degree of grain orientation (>90%). Texturing was characterized by x-ray diffraction and microscopy. Considerable anisotropy was observed in physical and electrical properties, including thermal expansion, resistivity, dielectric constant, and polarization. The direction perpendicular to the forging axis proved to be the

  4. Physics of Collisionless Shocks Space Plasma Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Balogh, André

    2013-01-01

    The present book provides a contemporary systematic treatment of shock waves in high-temperature collisionless plasmas as are encountered in near Earth space and in Astrophysics. It consists of two parts. Part I develops the complete theory of shocks in dilute hot plasmas under the assumption of absence of collisions among the charged particles when the interaction is mediated solely by the self-consistent electromagnetic fields. Such shocks are naturally magnetised implying that the magnetic field plays an important role in their evolution and dynamics. This part treats both subcritical shocks, which dissipate flow energy by generating anomalous resistance or viscosity, and supercritical shocks. The main emphasis is, however, on super-critical shocks where the anomalous dissipation is insufficient to retard the upstream flow. These shocks, depending on the direction of the upstream magnetic field, are distinguished as quasi-perpendicular and quasi-parallel shocks which exhibit different behaviours, reflecti...

  5. Alkali-resistant low-temperature atomic-layer-deposited oxides for optical fiber sensor overlays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosiel, K.; Dominik, M.; Ściślewska, I.; Kalisz, M.; Guziewicz, M.; Gołaszewska, K.; Niedziółka-Jonsson, J.; Bock, W. J.; Śmietana, M.

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents an investigation of properties of selected metallic oxides deposited at a low temperature (100 °C) by atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique, relating to their applicability as thin overlays for optical fiber sensors resistant in alkaline environments. Hafnium oxide (Hf x O y with y/x approx. 2.70), tantalum oxide (Ta x O y with y/x approx. 2.75) and zirconium oxide (Zr x O y with y/x approx. 2.07), which deposition was based, respectively, on tetrakis(ethylmethyl)hafnium, tantalum pentachloride and tetrakis(ethylmethyl)zirconium with deionized water, were tested as thin layers on planar Si (100) and glass substrates. Growth per cycle (GPC) in the ALD processes was 0.133-0.150 nm/cycle. Run-to-run GPC reproducibility of the ALD processes was best for Hf x O y (0.145 ± 0.001 nm/cycle) and the poorest for Ta x O y (0.133 ± 0.003 nm/cycle). Refractive indices n of the layers were 2.00-2.10 (at the wavelength λ = 632 nm), with negligible k value (at λ for 240-930 nm). The oxides examined by x-ray diffractometry proved to be amorphous, with only small addition of crystalline phases for the Zr x O y . The surfaces of the oxides had grainy but smooth topographies with root-mean square roughness ˜0.5 nm (at 10 × 10 μm2 area) according to atomic force microscopy. Ellipsometric measurements, by contrast, suggest rougher surfaces for the Zr x O y layers. The surfaces were also slightly rougher on the glass-based samples than on the Si-based ones. Nanohardness and Young modules were 4.90-8.64 GPa and 83.7-104.4 GPa, respectively. The tests of scratch resistance revealed better tribological properties for the Hf x O y and the Ta x O y than for the Zr x O y . The surfaces were hydrophilic, with wetting angles of 52.5°-62.9°. The planar oxides on Si, being resistive even to concentrated alkali (pH 14), proved to be significantly more alkali-resistive than Al2O3. The Ta x O y overlay was deposited on long-period grating sensor induced in optical

  6. Characterization of heat shock protein 70 transcript from Nilaparvata lugens (Stål): Its response to temperature and insecticide stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Kai; Chen, Xia; Liu, Wenting; Zhang, Zhichao; Wang, Ying; You, Keke; Li, Yue; Zhang, Rongbin; Zhou, Qiang

    2017-10-01

    The brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens, possesses a strong adaptability to extreme temperature and insecticide stresses. Heat shock proteins (Hsps) are highly conserved molecular chaperones and play a pivotal role in response to various environmental stresses in insects. However, little is known about the response of Hsps to stresses in N. lugens. In the present study, an inducible Hsp70 (NlHsp70) was isolated from this insect and transcriptional expression patterns of NlHsp70 under temperature and insecticide stresses were analyzed. The full-length of NlHsp70 was 2805bp with an open reading frame (ORF) of 1896bp, showing high homology to its counterparts in other species. Expression of NlHsp70 was not altered by heat shock for 1h, nor following recovery from thermal stress. Conversely, decreased expression of NlHsp70 was observed in response to cold shock. In addition, the expression of NlHsp70 increased after imidacloprid exposure. RNA interference experiment combined with insecticide injury assay also demonstrated that NlHsp70 was essential for resistance against insecticide exposure. These observations indicated that NlHsp70 was an important gene involved in the resistance or tolerance to environmental stresses in N. lugens. Interestingly, weak changes in mRNA expression levels of two thermal-inducible Hsp genes, NlHsp90 and NlHsc70 were observed in imidacloprid-exposed N. lugens adults, suggesting that different Hsps may respond differential to the extreme temperature and insecticide stresses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. In situ observation of carbon nanotube layer growth on microbolometers with substrates at ambient temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svatoš, Vojtěch; Gablech, Imrich; Ilic, B. Robert; Pekárek, Jan; Neužil, Pavel

    2018-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have near unity infrared (IR) absorption efficiency, making them extremely attractive for IR imaging devices. Since CNT growth occurs at elevated temperatures, the integration of CNTs with IR imaging devices is challenging and has not yet been achieved. Here, we show a strategy for implementing CNTs as IR absorbers using differential heating of thermally isolated microbolometer membranes in a C2H2 environment. During the process, CNTs were catalytically grown on the surface of a locally heated membrane, while the substrate was maintained at an ambient temperature. CNT growth was monitored in situ in real time using optical microscopy. During growth, we measured the intensity of light emission and the reflected light from the heated microbolometer. Our measurements of bolometer performance show that the CNT layer on the surface of the microbolometer membrane increases the IR response by a factor of (2.3 ± 0.1) (mean ± one standard deviation of the least-squares fit parameters). This work opens the door to integrating near unity IR absorption, CNT-based, IR absorbers with hybrid complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor focal plane array architectures.

  8. Dynamic Leidenfrost temperature on micro-textured surfaces: Acoustic wave absorption into thin vapor layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerng, Dong Wook; Kim, Dong Eok

    2018-01-01

    The dynamic Leidenfrost phenomenon is governed by three types of pressure potentials induced via vapor hydrodynamics, liquid dynamic pressure, and the water hammer effect resulting from the generation of acoustic waves at the liquid-vapor interface. The prediction of the Leidenfrost temperature for a dynamic droplet needs quantitative evaluation and definition for each of the pressure fields. In particular, the textures on a heated surface can significantly affect the vapor hydrodynamics and the water hammer pressure. We present a quantitative model for evaluating the water hammer pressure on micro-textured surfaces taking into account the absorption of acoustic waves into the thin vapor layer. The model demonstrates that the strength of the acoustic flow into the liquid droplet, which directly contributes to the water hammer pressure, depends on the magnitude of the acoustic resistance (impedance) in the droplet and the vapor region. In consequence, the micro-textures of the surface and the increased spacing between them reduce the water hammer coefficient ( kh ) defined as the ratio of the acoustic flow into the droplet to total generated flow. Aided by numerical calculations that solve the laminar Navier-Stokes equation for the vapor flow, we also predict the dynamic Leidenfrost temperature on a micro-textured surface with reliable accuracy consistent with the experimental data.

  9. Direct observation of effective temperature of Ta atom in layer compound TaS2 by neutron resonance absorption spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuda, Koji; Kamiyama, Takashi; Kiyanagi, Yoshiaki; Moreh, R.; Ikeda, Susumu

    2001-01-01

    A neutron resonance absorption spectrometer, DOG has been installed at KENS, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization Neutron Source, which enables us to investigate the motions of a particular element by analyzing the line width of resonance absorption spectrum. We measured the temperature dependence of the effective temperature of Ta motion in TaS 2 as well as in Ta metal using DOG. The effective temperatures extracted from the observed absorption spectrum agree well with the calculated values from the phonon density of states of Ta metal over a wide temperature range of 10 to 300 K. We also succeeded in measuring both the angular dependence and the temperature dependence of effective temperatures of Ta in a layer compound TaS 2 . Based on the temperature dependence of the effective temperature, the partial phonon density of states of Ta in TaS 2 was discussed. (author)

  10. Thermal conductance of interfaces with molecular layers - low temperature transient absorption study on gold nanorods supported on self assembled monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Huang, Jingyu; Murphy, Catherine; Cahill, David; University of Illinois At Urbana Champaign, Department of Materials Science; Engineering Team; Department Collaboration

    2011-03-01

    While heat transfer via phonons across solid-solid boundary has been a core field in condense matter physics for many years, vibrational energy transport across molecular layers has been less well elucidated. We heat rectangular-shaped gold nanocrystals (nanorods) with Ti-sapphire femtosecond pulsed laser at their longitudinal surface plasmon absorption wavelength to watch how their temperature evolves in picoseconds transient. We observed single exponential decay behavior, which suggests that the heat dissipation is only governed by a single interfacial conductance value. The ``RC'' time constant was 300ps, corresponding to a conductance value of 95MW/ m 2 K. This interfacial conductance value is also a function of ambient temperature since at temperatures as low as 80K, which are below the Debye temperature of organic layers, several phonon modes were quenched, which shut down the dominating channels that conduct heat at room temperature.

  11. Cirrus cloud-temperature interactions in the tropical tropopause layer: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Taylor

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Thin cirrus clouds in the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL have important ramifications for radiative transfer, stratospheric humidity, and vertical transport. A horizontally extensive and vertically thin cirrus cloud in the TTL was detected by the Cloud Aerosol LIDAR and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO on 27–29 January 2009 in the Tropical Eastern Pacific region, distant from any regions of deep convection. These observations indicate that the cloud is close to 3000 km in length along the CALIPSO orbit track. Measurements over this three day period indicate that the cloud event extended over a region from approximately 15° S to 10° N and 90° W to 150° W and may be one of the most extensive cirrus events ever observed. Coincident temperature observations from the Constellation of Observing Satellites for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC suggest that the cloud formed in-situ as a result of a cold anomaly arising from a midlatitude intrusion. The event appears to last for up to 2 days and the temperature observations do not show any indication of the expected infrared heating. It is hypothesized that the cloud could be maintained by either nucleation of numerous small ice crystals that don't sediment or by multiple localized ice nucleation events driven by temperature variability at scales smaller than the overall cloud field, producing small ice-crystal sizes which have sufficiently long residence times (≈53 h to maintain the cloud. It is possible that the residence times are augmented by vertical motion which could also act to offset the expected infrared heating. Further observations of similar events will be required in order to conclusively explain this curious cloud.

  12. Ion temperature measurements in the scrape-off layer of the Tore Supra Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocan, M.

    2009-10-01

    The thesis describes measurements of the scrape-off layer (SOL) ion temperature T i with a retarding field analyzer (RFA) in the limiter tokamak Tore Supra. Considerable emphasis is placed on study of the instrumental effects of RFAs and their influence on T i measurements. In general, the influence of instrumental effects on T i measurements is found to be relatively small. The instrumental study is followed by systematic measurements of T i (as well as other parameters) in the Tore Supra SOL. This includes the scaling of SOL temperatures and electron density with the main plasma parameters (such as the plasma density, toroidal magnetic field, working gas, and the radiated power fraction). Except at very high densities or in detached plasmas, SOL T i is found to be higher than T e by up to a factor of 7. While SOL T i is found to vary by almost two orders of magnitude, following the variation of the core temperatures, SOL T e changes only little and seems to be decoupled from the core plasma. The first continuous T i /T e profile from the edge of the confined plasma into the SOL is constructed using data from different tokamaks. It is shown that T i /T e > 1 in the SOL but also in the confined plasma, and increases with radius. The first evidence of poloidal asymmetry of the radial ion and electron energy transport in the SOL is reported. Implications for ITER start-up phase are discussed. Correlation of the asymmetries of SOL T i and T e measured from both directions along the magnetic field lines with changes of the parallel Mach number is studied. SOL T i was measured for the first time in Tore Supra by charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) and compared to RFA data. A factor of 4 higher T i measured by CXRS is a subject of further analysis. (A.C.)

  13. The Effect of High Temperature Annealing on the Grain Characteristics of a Thin Chemical Vapor Deposition Silicon Carbide Layer.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isabella J van Rooyen; Philippus M van Rooyen; Mary Lou Dunzik-Gougar

    2013-08-01

    The unique combination of thermo-mechanical and physiochemical properties of silicon carbide (SiC) provides interest and opportunity for its use in nuclear applications. One of the applications of SiC is as a very thin layer in the TRi-ISOtropic (TRISO) coated fuel particles for high temperature gas reactors (HTGRs). This SiC layer, produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), is designed to withstand the pressures of fission and transmutation product gases in a high temperature, radiation environment. Various researchers have demonstrated that macroscopic properties can be affected by changes in the distribution of grain boundary plane orientations and misorientations [1 - 3]. Additionally, various researchers have attributed the release behavior of Ag through the SiC layer as a grain boundary diffusion phenomenon [4 - 6]; further highlighting the importance of understanding the actual grain characteristics of the SiC layer. Both historic HTGR fission product release studies and recent experiments at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) [7] have shown that the release of Ag-110m is strongly temperature dependent. Although the maximum normal operating fuel temperature of a HTGR design is in the range of 1000-1250°C, the temperature may reach 1600°C under postulated accident conditions. The aim of this specific study is therefore to determine the magnitude of temperature dependence on SiC grain characteristics, expanding upon initial studies by Van Rooyen et al, [8; 9].

  14. An Algorithm to Generate Deep-Layer Temperatures from Microwave Satellite Observations for the Purpose of Monitoring Climate Change. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Mitchell D.; Fleming, Henry E.

    1994-01-01

    An algorithm for generating deep-layer mean temperatures from satellite-observed microwave observations is presented. Unlike traditional temperature retrieval methods, this algorithm does not require a first guess temperature of the ambient atmosphere. By eliminating the first guess a potentially systematic source of error has been removed. The algorithm is expected to yield long-term records that are suitable for detecting small changes in climate. The atmospheric contribution to the deep-layer mean temperature is given by the averaging kernel. The algorithm computes the coefficients that will best approximate a desired averaging kernel from a linear combination of the satellite radiometer's weighting functions. The coefficients are then applied to the measurements to yield the deep-layer mean temperature. Three constraints were used in deriving the algorithm: (1) the sum of the coefficients must be one, (2) the noise of the product is minimized, and (3) the shape of the approximated averaging kernel is well-behaved. Note that a trade-off between constraints 2 and 3 is unavoidable. The algorithm can also be used to combine measurements from a future sensor (i.e., the 20-channel Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU)) to yield the same averaging kernel as that based on an earlier sensor (i.e., the 4-channel Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU)). This will allow a time series of deep-layer mean temperatures based on MSU measurements to be continued with AMSU measurements. The AMSU is expected to replace the MSU in 1996.

  15. Effect of active layer deposition temperature on the performance of sputtered amorphous In—Ga—Zn—O thin film transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Jie; Shi Junfei; Dong Chengyuan; Chen Yuting; Zhou Daxiang; Hu Zhe; Zhan Runze; Zou Zhongfei

    2014-01-01

    The effect of active layer deposition temperature on the electrical performance of amorphous InGaZnO (a-IGZO) thin film transistors (TFTs) is investigated. With increasing annealing temperature, TFT performance is firstly improved and then degraded generally. Here TFTs with best performance defined as ''optimized-annealed'' are selected to study the effect of active layer deposition temperature. The field effect mobility reaches maximum at deposition temperature of 150 °C while the room-temperature fabricated device shows the best subthreshold swing and off-current. From Hall measurement results, the carrier concentration is much higher for intentional heated a-IGZO films, which may account for the high off-current in the corresponding TFT devices. XPS characterization results also reveal that deposition temperature affects the atomic ratio and O1s spectra apparently. Importantly, the variation of field effect mobility of a-IGZO TFTs with deposition temperature does not coincide with the tendencies in Hall mobility of a-IGZO thin films. Based on the further analysis of the experimental results on a-IGZO thin films and the corresponding TFT devices, the trap states at front channel interface rather than IGZO bulk layer properties may be mainly responsible for the variations of field effect mobility and subthreshold swing with IGZO deposition temperature. (semiconductor devices)

  16. Effect of calcination temperature on microstructure and electrochemical performance of lithium-rich layered oxide cathode materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Quanxin; Peng, Fangwei; Li, Ruhong; Yin, Shibo; Dai, Changsong

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A series of Li-rich layered oxide cathode materials (Li_1_._2Mn_0_._5_6Ni_0_._1_6Co_0_._0_8O_2) were successfully synthesized via a two-step synthesis method. • The effects of calcination temperature on the cathode materials were researched in detail. • A well-crystallized layered structure was obtained as the calcination temperature increased. • The samples calcined in a range of 850–900 °C exhibited excellent electrochemical performance. - Abstract: Lithium-rich layered oxide cathode materials (Li_1_._2Mn_0_._5_6Ni_0_._1_6Co_0_._0_8O_2 (LLMO)) were synthesized via a two-step synthesis method involving co-precipitation and high-temperature calcination. The effects of calcination temperature on the cathode materials were studied in detail. Structural and morphological characterizations revealed that a well-crystallized layered structure was obtained at a higher calcination temperature. Electrochemical performance evaluation revealed that a cathode material obtained at a calcination temperature of 850 °C delivered a high initial discharge capacity of 266.8 mAh g"−"1 at a 0.1 C rate and a capacity retention rate of 95.8% after 100 cycles as well as excellent rate capability. Another sample calcinated at 900 °C exhibited good cycling stability. It is concluded that the structural stability and electrochemical performance of Li-rich layered oxide cathode materials were strongly dependent on calcination temperatures. The results suggest that a calcination temperature in a range of 850–900 °C could promote electrochemical performance of this type of cathode materials.

  17. Effect of calcination temperature on microstructure and electrochemical performance of lithium-rich layered oxide cathode materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Quanxin; Peng, Fangwei; Li, Ruhong; Yin, Shibo; Dai, Changsong, E-mail: changsd@hit.edu.cn

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • A series of Li-rich layered oxide cathode materials (Li{sub 1.2}Mn{sub 0.56}Ni{sub 0.16}Co{sub 0.08}O{sub 2}) were successfully synthesized via a two-step synthesis method. • The effects of calcination temperature on the cathode materials were researched in detail. • A well-crystallized layered structure was obtained as the calcination temperature increased. • The samples calcined in a range of 850–900 °C exhibited excellent electrochemical performance. - Abstract: Lithium-rich layered oxide cathode materials (Li{sub 1.2}Mn{sub 0.56}Ni{sub 0.16}Co{sub 0.08}O{sub 2} (LLMO)) were synthesized via a two-step synthesis method involving co-precipitation and high-temperature calcination. The effects of calcination temperature on the cathode materials were studied in detail. Structural and morphological characterizations revealed that a well-crystallized layered structure was obtained at a higher calcination temperature. Electrochemical performance evaluation revealed that a cathode material obtained at a calcination temperature of 850 °C delivered a high initial discharge capacity of 266.8 mAh g{sup −1} at a 0.1 C rate and a capacity retention rate of 95.8% after 100 cycles as well as excellent rate capability. Another sample calcinated at 900 °C exhibited good cycling stability. It is concluded that the structural stability and electrochemical performance of Li-rich layered oxide cathode materials were strongly dependent on calcination temperatures. The results suggest that a calcination temperature in a range of 850–900 °C could promote electrochemical performance of this type of cathode materials.

  18. Effects of buffer layer temperature on the magnetic properties of NdFeB thin film magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.B.; Cho, S.H.; Kim, H.T.; Ryu, K.S.; Lee, S.H.; Lee, K.H.; Kapustin, G.A.

    2004-01-01

    Effects of the buffer layer temperature (T b ) on the magnetic properties and microstructure of [Mo/NdFeB/Mo]-type thin films have been investigated. The Mo-buffer layer with low T b is composed of fine grains while that with high T b has coarse grains. The subsequent NdFeB layer also grows with fine or coarse grains following the buffer layer structure. The NdFeB layer grown on a low T b buffer shows high coercivity and strong perpendicular anisotropy. The best magnetic properties of i H c =1.01 MA/m (12.7 kOe), B r =1.31 T (13.1 kG) and BH max =329 kJ/m 3 (41.4 MGOe) were obtained from the film with T b =400 deg. C

  19. Reducing the layer number of AB stacked multilayer graphene grown on nickel by annealing at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, J Marquez; Giamini, S A; Kelaidis, N; Tsipas, P; Tsoutsou, D; Kordas, G; Raptis, Y S; Boukos, N; Dimoulas, A

    2015-10-09

    Controlling the number of layers of graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition is crucial for large scale graphene application. We propose here an etching process of graphene which can be applied immediately after growth to control the number of layers. We use nickel (Ni) foil at high temperature (T = 900 °C) to produce multilayer-AB-stacked-graphene (MLG). The etching process is based on annealing the samples in a hydrogen/argon atmosphere at a relatively low temperature (T = 450 °C) inside the growth chamber. The extent of etching is mainly controlled by the annealing process duration. Using Raman spectroscopy we demonstrate that the number of layers was reduced, changing from MLG to few-layer-AB-stacked-graphene and in some cases to randomly oriented few layer graphene near the substrate. Furthermore, our method offers the significant advantage that it does not introduce defects in the samples, maintaining their original high quality. This fact and the low temperature our method uses make it a good candidate for controlling the layer number of already grown graphene in processes with a low thermal budget.

  20. Effects of Pregnant Leach Solution Temperature on the Permeability of Gravelly Drainage Layer of Heap Leaching Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mehdi amini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In copper heap leaching structures, the ore is leached by an acidic solution. After dissolving the ore mineral, the heap is drained off in the acidic solution using a drainage system (consisting of a network of perforated polyethylene pipes and gravelly drainage layers and is, then, transferred to the leaching plant for copper extraction where the copper is extracted and the remaining solution is dripped over the ore heap for re-leaching. In this process, the reaction between the acidic solution and copper oxide ore is exothermal and the pregnant leach solution (PLS, which is drained off the leaching heap, has a higher temperature than the dripped acidic solution. The PLS temperature variations cause some changes in the viscosity and density which affect the gravelly drainage layer's permeability. In this research, a special permeability measuring system was devised for determining the effects of the PLS temperature variations on the permeability coefficient of the gravelly drainage layer of heap leaching structures. The system, consisting of a thermal acid resistant element and a thermocouple, controls the PLS temperature, which helps measure the permeability coefficient of the gravelly drainage layer. The PLS and gravelly drainage layer of Sarcheshmeh copper mine heap leaching structure No. 1 were used in this study. The permeability coefficient of the gravelly soil was measured against the PLS and pure water at temperatures varying between 3°C to 60°C. Also, the viscosity and density of the PLS and pure water were measured at these temperatures and, using existing theoretical relations, the permeability coefficient of the gravel was computed. A comparison between the experimental and theoretical results revealed a good conformity between the two sets of results. Finally, a case (Taft heap leaching structure, Yazd, Iran was studied and its gravelly drainage layer was designed based on the results of the present research.

  1. Temperature coefficient of elastic constants of SiO2 over-layer on LiNbO3 for a temperature stable SAW device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomar, Monika; Gupta, Vinay; Sreenivas, K

    2003-01-01

    The influence of sputtered SiO 2 over-layer on the SAW propagation characteristics of a 128 deg. rotated Y-cut X-propagating lithium niobate SAW filter has been studied. Experimentally measured SAW phase velocity and temperature coefficient of delay (TCD), with varying SiO 2 over-layer thickness, show a significant deviation from the theoretically calculated values using the bulk material parameters of SiO 2 . The observed deviation is attributed to the differences in the material parameters (density, elastic and dielectric constants and their temperature coefficient) of the deposited SiO 2 over-layer. The density and the dielectric constant of the deposited SiO 2 layer were determined separately, and the elastic constants and their temperature coefficients were estimated by fitting the experimental velocity and TCD data, respectively. The deviation in the dielectric constant and the density in comparison to the bulk was insignificant, and the estimated values of the elastic constants (C 11 = 0.75x10 11 N m -2 and C 44 0.225x10 11 N m -2 ) were found to be lower, and the respective temperature coefficients (5.0x10 -4 deg C -1 and 2.0x10 -4 deg C -1 ) were high in comparison to the bulk material parameters

  2. Temperature coefficient of elastic constants of SiO{sub 2} over-layer on LiNbO{sub 3} for a temperature stable SAW device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomar, Monika; Gupta, Vinay; Sreenivas, K [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India)

    2003-08-07

    The influence of sputtered SiO{sub 2} over-layer on the SAW propagation characteristics of a 128 deg. rotated Y-cut X-propagating lithium niobate SAW filter has been studied. Experimentally measured SAW phase velocity and temperature coefficient of delay (TCD), with varying SiO{sub 2} over-layer thickness, show a significant deviation from the theoretically calculated values using the bulk material parameters of SiO{sub 2}. The observed deviation is attributed to the differences in the material parameters (density, elastic and dielectric constants and their temperature coefficient) of the deposited SiO{sub 2} over-layer. The density and the dielectric constant of the deposited SiO{sub 2} layer were determined separately, and the elastic constants and their temperature coefficients were estimated by fitting the experimental velocity and TCD data, respectively. The deviation in the dielectric constant and the density in comparison to the bulk was insignificant, and the estimated values of the elastic constants (C{sub 11} = 0.75x10{sup 11} N m{sup -2} and C{sub 44} 0.225x10{sup 11} N m{sup -2}) were found to be lower, and the respective temperature coefficients (5.0x10{sup -4} deg C{sup -1} and 2.0x10{sup -4} deg C{sup -1}) were high in comparison to the bulk material parameters.

  3. Atmospheric boundary layer response to sea surface temperatures during the SEMAPHORE experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordani, Hervé; Planton, Serge; Benech, Bruno; Kwon, Byung-Hyuk

    1998-10-01

    The sensitivity of the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) subjected to sea surface temperatures (SST) during the Structure des Echanges Mer-Atmosphere, Proprietes des Heterogeneites Oceaniques: Recherche Experimentale (SEMAPHORE) experiment in 1993 has been studied. Atmospheric analyses produced by the Action de Recherche, Petite Echelle, Grande Echelle (ARPEGE) operational model at the French meteorological weather service assimilated data sets collected between October 7 and November 17, 1993, merged with the Global Telecommunication System (GTS) data. Analyses were validated against independent data from aircraft instruments collected along a section crossing the Azores oceanic front, not assimilated into the model. The responses of the mean MABL in the aircraft cross section to changes in SST gradients of about 1°C/100 km were the presence of an atmospheric front with horizontal gradients of 1°C/100 km and an increase of the wind intensity from the cold to the warm side during an anticyclonic synoptic situation. The study of the spatiotemporal characteristics of the MABL shows that during 3 days of an anticyclonic synoptic situation the SST is remarkably stationary because it is principally controlled by the Azores ocean current, which has a timescale of about 10 days. However, the temperature and the wind in the MABL are influenced by the prevailing atmospheric conditions. The ocean does not appear to react to the surface atmospheric forcing on the timescale of 3 days, whereas the atmospheric structures are modified by local and synoptic-scale advection. The MABL response appears to be much quicker than that of the SSTs. The correlation between the wind and the thermal structure in the MABL is dominated by the ageostrophic and not by the geostrophic component. In particular, the enhancement of the wind on either side of the SST front is mainly due to the ageostrophic component. Although the surface heat fluxes are not the only cause of ageostrophy, the

  4. Single-particle thermal diffusion of charged colloids: Double-layer theory in a temperature gradient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhont, J.K.G.; Briels, Willem J.

    2008-01-01

    The double-layer contribution to the single-particle thermal diffusion coefficient of charged, spherical colloids with arbitrary double-layer thickness is calculated and compared to experiments. The calculation is based on an extension of the Debye-Hückel theory for the double-layer structure that

  5. The resistance to deformation and facture of magnesium ma2-1 under shock-wave loading at 293 k and 823 k of the temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garkushin, Gennady; Kanel, Gennady I.; Razorenov, Sergey V.

    2012-03-01

    The Hugoniot elastic limit and spall strength of Ma2-1 magnesium deformable alloy were measured at the sample thickness varied from 0.25 mm to 10 mm at room and elevated temperatures. By means of analysis of decay of an elastic precursor wave it is found that initial plastic strain rate decreases from 2×105 s-1 at distance of 0.25 mm to 103 s-1 at distance of 10 mm. The strain rate in plastic shock wave is by order of magnitude higher at the same value of the shear stress. The spall strength of the alloy grows with increasing the strain rate and decreases with approach to the solidus temperature.

  6. Highly efficient low color temperature organic LED using blend carrier modulation layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yao-Ching; Chen, Szu-Hao; Shen, Shih-Ming; Wang, Ching-Chiun; Chen, Chien-Chih; Jou, Jwo-Huei

    2012-10-01

    Color temperature (CT) of light has great effect on human physiology and psychology, and low CT light, minimizing melatonin suppression and decreasing the risk of breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer. We demonstrates the incorporation of a blend carrier modulation interlayer (CML) between emissive layers to improve the device performance of low CT organic light emitting diodes, which exhibits an external quantum efficiency of 22.7% and 36 lm W-1 (54 cd A-1) with 1880 K at 100 cd m-2, or 20.8% and 29 lm W-1 (50 cd A-1) with 1940 K at 1000 cd m-2. The result shows a CT much lower than that of incandescent bulbs, which is 2500 K with 15 lmW-1 efficiency, and even as low as that of candles, which is 2000 K with 0.1 lmW-1. The high efficiency of the proposed device may be attributed to its CML, which helps effectively distribute the entering carriers into the available recombination zones.

  7. Field Portable Low Temperature Porous Layer Open Tubular Cryoadsorption Headspace Sampling and Analysis Part II: Applications*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, Megan; Bukovsky-Reyes, Santiago; Bruno, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper details the sampling methods used with the field portable porous layer open tubular cryoadsorption (PLOT-cryo) approach, described in Part I of this two-part series, applied to several analytes of interest. We conducted tests with coumarin and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (two solutes that were used in initial development of PLOT-cryo technology), naphthalene, aviation turbine kerosene, and diesel fuel, on a variety of matrices and test beds. We demonstrated that these analytes can be easily detected and reliably identified using the portable unit for analyte collection. By leveraging efficiency-boosting temperature control and the high flow rate multiple capillary wafer, very short collection times (as low as 3 s) yielded accurate detection. For diesel fuel spiked on glass beads, we determined a method detection limit below 1 ppm. We observed greater variability among separate samples analyzed with the portable unit than previously documented in work using the laboratory-based PLOT-cryo technology. We identify three likely sources that may help explain the additional variation: the use of a compressed air source to generate suction, matrix geometry, and variability in the local vapor concentration around the sampling probe as solute depletion occurs both locally around the probe and in the test bed as a whole. This field-portable adaptation of the PLOT-cryo approach has numerous and diverse potential applications. PMID:26726934

  8. Field portable low temperature porous layer open tubular cryoadsorption headspace sampling and analysis part II: Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, Megan; Bukovsky-Reyes, Santiago; Bruno, Thomas J

    2016-01-15

    This paper details the sampling methods used with the field portable porous layer open tubular cryoadsorption (PLOT-cryo) approach, described in Part I of this two-part series, applied to several analytes of interest. We conducted tests with coumarin and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (two solutes that were used in initial development of PLOT-cryo technology), naphthalene, aviation turbine kerosene, and diesel fuel, on a variety of matrices and test beds. We demonstrated that these analytes can be easily detected and reliably identified using the portable unit for analyte collection. By leveraging efficiency-boosting temperature control and the high flow rate multiple capillary wafer, very short collection times (as low as 3s) yielded accurate detection. For diesel fuel spiked on glass beads, we determined a method detection limit below 1 ppm. We observed greater variability among separate samples analyzed with the portable unit than previously documented in work using the laboratory-based PLOT-cryo technology. We identify three likely sources that may help explain the additional variation: the use of a compressed air source to generate suction, matrix geometry, and variability in the local vapor concentration around the sampling probe as solute depletion occurs both locally around the probe and in the test bed as a whole. This field-portable adaptation of the PLOT-cryo approach has numerous and diverse potential applications. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Temperature dependence of parametric instabilities in the context of the shock-ignition approach to inertial confinement fusion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Weber, Stefan A.; Riconda, C.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 3, Feb (2015), e6 ISSN 2095-4719 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0061; GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0279 Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061; LaserZdroj (OP VK 3)(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0279 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : inertial confinement fusion * shock ignition * laser- plasma interaction * parametric instabilities Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  10. Variability of OH rotational temperatures on time scales from hours to 15 years by kinetic temperature variations, emission layer changes, and non-LTE effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Rotational temperatures derived from hydroxyl (OH) line emission are frequently used to study atmospheric temperatures at altitudes of about 87 km. While the measurement only requires intensities of a few bright lines of an OH band, the interpretation can be complicated. Ground-based temperatures are averages for the entire, typically 8 km wide emission layer. Variations in the rotational temperature are then caused by changes of the kinetic temperature and the OH emission profile. The latter can also be accompanied by differences in the layer-averaged efficiency of the thermalisation of the OH rotational level populations. Since this especially depends on the frequency of collisions with O_2, which is low at high altitudes, the non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) contribution to the measured temperatures can be significant and variable. In order to understand the impact of the different sources of OH rotational temperature variations from time scales of hours to a solar cycle, we have studied spectra from the astronomical echelle spectrographs X-shooter and UVES located at Cerro Paranal in Chile. While the X-shooter data spanning 3.5 years allowed us to measure temperatures for 25 OH and two O_2 bands, the UVES spectra cover no more than 10 OH bands simultaneously but a period of about 15 years. These data have been complemented by kinetic temperature and OH and O_2 emission profiles from the multi-channel radiometer SABER on the TIMED satellite. Taking the O_2 and SABER kinetic temperatures as reference and considering the different band-dependent emission profiles, we could evaluate the contribution of non-LTE effects to the measured OH rotational temperatures depending on line set, band, and time. Non-LTE contributions are significant for most bands and can exceed 10 K. The amplitudes of their average nocturnal and seasonal variation are of the order of 1 to 2 K.

  11. A mechanistic model of an upper bound on oceanic carbon export as a function of mixed layer depth and temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Li

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Export production reflects the amount of organic matter transferred from the ocean surface to depth through biological processes. This export is in large part controlled by nutrient and light availability, which are conditioned by mixed layer depth (MLD. In this study, building on Sverdrup's critical depth hypothesis, we derive a mechanistic model of an upper bound on carbon export based on the metabolic balance between photosynthesis and respiration as a function of MLD and temperature. We find that the upper bound is a positively skewed bell-shaped function of MLD. Specifically, the upper bound increases with deepening mixed layers down to a critical depth, beyond which a long tail of decreasing carbon export is associated with increasing heterotrophic activity and decreasing light availability. We also show that in cold regions the upper bound on carbon export decreases with increasing temperature when mixed layers are deep, but increases with temperature when mixed layers are shallow. A meta-analysis shows that our model envelopes field estimates of carbon export from the mixed layer. When compared to satellite export production estimates, our model indicates that export production in some regions of the Southern Ocean, particularly the subantarctic zone, is likely limited by light for a significant portion of the growing season.

  12. Effect of sintering temperatures and screen printing types on TiO2 layers in DSSC applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supriyanto, Agus; Furqoni, Lutfi; Nurosyid, Fahru; Hidayat, Jojo; Suryana, Risa

    2016-03-01

    Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell (DSSC) is a candidate solar cell, which has a big potential in the future due to its eco-friendly material. This research is conducted to study the effect of sintering temperature and the type of screen-printing toward the characteristics of TiO2 layer as a working electrode in DSSC. TiO2 layers were fabricated using a screen-printing method with a mesh size of T-49, T-55, and T-61. TiO2 layers were sintered at temperatures of 600°C and 650°C for 60 min. DSSC structure was composed of TiO2 as semiconductors, ruthenium complex as dyes, and carbon as counter electrodes. The morphology of TiO2 layer was observed by using Nikon E2 Digital Camera Microscopy. The efficiencies of DSSC were calculated from the I-V curves. The highest efficiency is 0.015% at TiO2 layer fabricated with screen type T-61 and at a sintering temperature of 650°C.

  13. Structure and properties of nitrided surface layer produced on NiTi shape memory alloy by low temperature plasma nitriding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czarnowska, Elżbieta; Borowski, Tomasz; Sowińska, Agnieszka; Lelątko, Józef; Oleksiak, Justyna; Kamiński, Janusz; Tarnowski, Michał; Wierzchoń, Tadeusz

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Low temperature plasma nitriding process of NiTi shape memory alloy is presented. • The possibility of treatment details of sophisticated shape. • TiN surface layer has diffusive character. • TiN surface layer increases corrosion resistance of NiTi alloy. • Produced TiN layer modify the biological properties of NiTi alloy. - Abstract: NiTi shape memory alloys are used for bone and cardiological implants. However, on account of the metallosis effect, i.e. the release of the alloy elements into surrounding tissues, they are subjected to various surface treatment processes in order to improve their corrosion resistance and biocompatibility without influencing the required shape memory properties. In this paper, the microstructure, topography and morphology of TiN surface layer on NiTi alloy, and corrosion resistance, both before and after nitriding in low-temperature plasma at 290 °C, are presented. Examinations with the use of the potentiodynamic and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy methods were carried out and show an increase of corrosion resistance in Ringer's solution after glow-discharge nitriding. This surface titanium nitride layer also improved the adhesion of platelets and the proliferation of osteoblasts, which was investigated in in vitro experiments with human cells. Experimental data revealed that nitriding NiTi shape memory alloy under low-temperature plasma improves its properties for bone implant applications

  14. Effect of sintering temperatures and screen printing types on TiO{sub 2} layers in DSSC applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Supriyanto, Agus; Furqoni, Lutfi; Nurosyid, Fahru, E-mail: nurosyid@yahoo.com; Suryana, Risa [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Sebel as Maret University Jl. Ir. Sutami 36A Kentingan Surakarta 57126 (Indonesia); Hidayat, Jojo [Research Center for Electronics and Telecommunication, Indonesian Institute of Sciences (PPET-LIPI) Kampus LIPI Gd. 20 Jl. Sangkuriang Bandung (Indonesia)

    2016-03-29

    Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell (DSSC) is a candidate solar cell, which has a big potential in the future due to its eco-friendly material. This research is conducted to study the effect of sintering temperature and the type of screen-printing toward the characteristics of TiO{sub 2} layer as a working electrode in DSSC. TiO{sub 2} layers were fabricated using a screen-printing method with a mesh size of T-49, T-55, and T-61. TiO{sub 2} layers were sintered at temperatures of 600°C and 650°C for 60 min. DSSC structure was composed of TiO{sub 2} as semiconductors, ruthenium complex as dyes, and carbon as counter electrodes. The morphology of TiO{sub 2} layer was observed by using Nikon E2 Digital Camera Microscopy. The efficiencies of DSSC were calculated from the I-V curves. The highest efficiency is 0.015% at TiO{sub 2} layer fabricated with screen type T-61 and at a sintering temperature of 650°C.

  15. Effect of sintering temperatures and screen printing types on TiO_2 layers in DSSC applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supriyanto, Agus; Furqoni, Lutfi; Nurosyid, Fahru; Suryana, Risa; Hidayat, Jojo

    2016-01-01

    Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell (DSSC) is a candidate solar cell, which has a big potential in the future due to its eco-friendly material. This research is conducted to study the effect of sintering temperature and the type of screen-printing toward the characteristics of TiO_2 layer as a working electrode in DSSC. TiO_2 layers were fabricated using a screen-printing method with a mesh size of T-49, T-55, and T-61. TiO_2 layers were sintered at temperatures of 600°C and 650°C for 60 min. DSSC structure was composed of TiO_2 as semiconductors, ruthenium complex as dyes, and carbon as counter electrodes. The morphology of TiO_2 layer was observed by using Nikon E2 Digital Camera Microscopy. The efficiencies of DSSC were calculated from the I-V curves. The highest efficiency is 0.015% at TiO_2 layer fabricated with screen type T-61 and at a sintering temperature of 650°C.

  16. Structure and properties of nitrided surface layer produced on NiTi shape memory alloy by low temperature plasma nitriding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czarnowska, Elżbieta [Children' s Memorial Health Institute, Pathology Department, Al. Dzieci Polskich 20, 04-730 Warsaw (Poland); Borowski, Tomasz [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Wołoska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Sowińska, Agnieszka [Children' s Memorial Health Institute, Pathology Department, Al. Dzieci Polskich 20, 04-730 Warsaw (Poland); Lelątko, Józef [Silesia University, Faculty of Computer Science and Materials Science, 75 Pułku Piechoty 1A, 41-500 Chorzów (Poland); Oleksiak, Justyna; Kamiński, Janusz; Tarnowski, Michał [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Wołoska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Wierzchoń, Tadeusz, E-mail: twierz@inmat.pw.edu.pl [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Wołoska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Low temperature plasma nitriding process of NiTi shape memory alloy is presented. • The possibility of treatment details of sophisticated shape. • TiN surface layer has diffusive character. • TiN surface layer increases corrosion resistance of NiTi alloy. • Produced TiN layer modify the biological properties of NiTi alloy. - Abstract: NiTi shape memory alloys are used for bone and cardiological implants. However, on account of the metallosis effect, i.e. the release of the alloy elements into surrounding tissues, they are subjected to various surface treatment processes in order to improve their corrosion resistance and biocompatibility without influencing the required shape memory properties. In this paper, the microstructure, topography and morphology of TiN surface layer on NiTi alloy, and corrosion resistance, both before and after nitriding in low-temperature plasma at 290 °C, are presented. Examinations with the use of the potentiodynamic and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy methods were carried out and show an increase of corrosion resistance in Ringer's solution after glow-discharge nitriding. This surface titanium nitride layer also improved the adhesion of platelets and the proliferation of osteoblasts, which was investigated in in vitro experiments with human cells. Experimental data revealed that nitriding NiTi shape memory alloy under low-temperature plasma improves its properties for bone implant applications.

  17. Temperature distribution in the upper layers of the northern and eastern Arabian Sea during Indo-Soviet monsoon experiment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshBabu, V.; Rao, L.V.G.; Varkey, M.J.; Udayavarma, P.

    to increase gradually from about 20-30 m in May to 40-50 m in July. Significant, fall (of about 1 degrees C) in the temperature of the surface waters along the meridional section was observed from May to July. Along this section, in July the mixed layer...

  18. Strain and defect microstructure in ion-irradiated GeSi/Si strained layers as a function of annealing temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasko, J.M.; Elliman, R.G.; Zou, J.; Cockayne, D.J.H.; Fitz Gerald, J.D.

    1998-01-01

    High energy (1 MeV), ion irradiation of GeSi/Si strained layers at elevated temperatures can cause strain relaxation. In this study, the effect of subsequent thermal annealing was investigated. Three distinct annealing stages were identified and correlated with the evolution of the defect microstructure. In the temperature range from 350 to 600 deg C, a gradual recovery of strain is observed. This is believed to result from the annealing of small defect clusters and the growth of voids. The voids are visible at annealing temperatures in excess of 600 deg C, consistent with an excess vacancy concentration in the irradiated alloy layer. The 600 to 750 deg C range is marked by pronounced maximal recovery of strain, and is correlated with the dissolution of faulted loops in the substrate. At temperatures in the range 750-1000 deg C, strain relaxation is observed and is correlated with the growth of intrinsic dislocations within the alloy layer. These dislocations nucleate at the alloy-substrate interface and grow within the alloy layer, towards the surface. (authors)

  19. Effects of buffer layer annealing temperature on the structural and optical properties of hydrothermal grown ZnO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, X.Q.; Kim, C.R.; Lee, J.Y.; Heo, J.H.; Shin, C.M. [Department of Nano Systems Engineering, Center for Nano Manufacturing, Inje University, Obang-dong, Gimhae, Gyeongnam 621-749 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, H., E-mail: hhryu@inje.ac.kr [Department of Nano Systems Engineering, Center for Nano Manufacturing, Inje University, Obang-dong, Gimhae, Gyeongnam 621-749 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, J.H. [Major of Nano Semiconductor, Korea Maritime University, 1 Dongsam-dong, Yeongdo-Ku, Busan 606-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, H.C. [Department of Mechatronics Engineering, Korea Maritime University, 1 Dongsam-dong, Yeongdo-Ku, Busan 606-791 (Korea, Republic of); Son, C.S. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Silla University, Gwaebeop-dong, Sasang-gu, Busan 617-736 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, W.J. [Department of Nano Engineering, Dong-Eui University, 995 Eomgwangno, Busanjin-gu, Busan 614-714 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, W.G. [School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Kookmin University, 861-1 Jeongneung-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-702 (Korea, Republic of); Tan, S.T. [Institute of Microelectronics, 11 Science Park Road, Science Park II, Singapore 117685 (Singapore); Zhao, J.L. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Sun, X.W. [Institute of Microelectronics, 11 Science Park Road, Science Park II, Singapore 117685 (Singapore); School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2009-02-01

    ZnO was deposited on bare Si(1 0 0), as-deposited, and annealed ZnO/Si(1 0 0) substrates by hydrothermal synthesis. The effects of a ZnO buffer layer and its thermal annealing on the properties of the ZnO deposited by hydrothermal synthesis were studied. The grain size and root mean square (RMS) roughness values of the ZnO buffer layer increased after thermal annealing of the buffer layer. The effect of buffer layer annealing temperature on the structural and optical properties was investigated by photoluminescence, X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Hydrothermal grown ZnO deposited on ZnO/Si(1 0 0) annealed at 750 deg. C with the concentration of 0.3 M exhibits the best structural and optical properties.

  20. Broadband Shock Noise in Internally-Mixed Dual-Stream Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, James E.

    2009-01-01

    Broadband shock noise (BBSN) has been studied in some detail in single-flow jets and recently in dual-stream jets with separate flow exhaust systems. Shock noise is of great concern in these latter cases because of the noise created for the aircraft cabin by the underexpanded nozzle flow at cruise. Another case where shock noise is of concern is in the case of future supersonic aircraft that are expected to have bypass ratios small enough to justify internally mixed exhaust systems, and whose mission will push cycles to the point of imperfectly expanded flows. Dual-stream jets with internally mixed plume have some simplifying aspects relative to the separate flow jets, having a single shock structure given by the common nozzle pressure. This is used to separate the contribution of the turbulent shear layer to the broadband shock noise. Shock structure is held constant while the geometry and strength of the inner and merged shear layers are varying by changing splitter area ratio and core stream temperature. Flow and noise measurements are presented which document the efforts at separating the contribution of the inner shear layer to the broadband shock noise.

  1. MOHOS-type memory performance using HfO2 nanoparticles as charge trapping layer and low temperature annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina, Joel; Ortega, Rafael; Calleja, Wilfrido; Rosales, Pedro; Zuniga, Carlos; Torres, Alfonso

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► HfO 2 nanoparticles used as charge trapping layer in MOHOS memory devices. ► Increasing HfO 2 nanoparticles concentration enhances charge injection and trapping. ► Enhancement of memory performance with low temperature annealing. ► Charge injection is done without using any hot-carrier injection mechanism. ► Using injected charge density is better for comparison of scaled memory devices. - Abstract: In this work, HfO 2 nanoparticles (np-HfO 2 ) are embedded within a spin-on glass (SOG)-based oxide matrix and used as a charge trapping layer in metal–oxide–high-k–oxide–silicon (MOHOS)-type memory applications. This charge trapping layer is obtained by a simple sol–gel spin coating method after using different concentrations of np-HfO 2 and low temperature annealing (down to 425 °C) in order to obtain charge–retention characteristics with a lower thermal budget. The memory's charge trapping characteristics are quantized by measuring both the flat-band voltage shift of MOHOS capacitors (writing/erasing operations) and their programming retention times after charge injection while correlating all these data to np-HfO 2 concentration and annealing temperature. Since a large memory window has been obtained for our MOHOS memory, the relatively easy injection/annihilation (writing/erasing) of charge injected through the substrate opens the possibility to use this material as an effective charge trapping layer. It is shown that by using lower annealing temperatures for the charge trapping layer, higher densities of injected charge are obtained along with enhanced retention times. In conclusion, by using np-HfO 2 as charge trapping layer in memory devices, moderate programming and retention characteristics have been obtained by this simple and yet low-cost spin-coating method.

  2. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. Part 1: Pressure distribution. Part 2: Wall shear stress. Part 3: Simplified formulas for the prediction of surface pressures and skin friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, T. C., Jr.; Liou, M. S.; Messiter, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    An asymptotic description is derived for the interaction between a shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer in transonic flow, for a particular limiting case. The dimensionless difference between the external flow velocity and critical sound speed is taken to be much smaller than one, but large in comparison with the dimensionless friction velocity. The basic results are derived for a flat plate, and corrections for longitudinal wall curvature and for flow in a circular pipe are also shown. Solutions are given for the wall pressure distribution and the shape of the shock wave. Solutions for the wall shear stress are obtained, and a criterion for incipient separation is derived. Simplified solutions for both the wall pressure and skin friction distributions in the interaction region are given. These results are presented in a form suitable for use in computer programs.

  3. Sensitivity of the crystal quality of SiGe layers grown at low temperatures by trisilane and germane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abedin, A., E-mail: aabedin@kth.se; Moeen, M.; Cappetta, C.; Östling, M.; Radamson, H.H., E-mail: rad@kth.se

    2016-08-31

    This work investigates the crystal quality of SiGe layers grown at low temperatures using trisilane, and germane precursors. The crystal quality sensitivity was monitored for hydrogen chloride and/or minor oxygen amount during SiGe epitaxy or at the interface of SiGe/Si layers. The quality of the epi-layers was examined by quantifying noise parameter, K{sub 1/f} obtained from the power spectral density vs. 1/f curves. The results indicate that while it is difficult to detect small defect densities in SiGe layers by physical material characterization, the noise measurement could reveal the effects of oxygen contamination as low as 0.16 mPa inside and in the interface of the layers. - Highlights: • SiGe layers were grown using trisilane and germane. • Effect of HCl flow on Ge content and growth rate was investigated. • O{sub 2} partial pressures up to 4.3 mPa did not affect x-ray diffraction pattern. • O{sub 2} partial pressures as low as 0.16 mPa increased the noise level. • HCl increased metal contaminations of the layers and the noise level consequently.

  4. Continuous growth of low-temperature Si epitaxial layer with heavy phosphorous and boron doping using photoepitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, T.; Minakata, H.; Ito, T.

    1990-01-01

    The authors grew p + -n + silicon epitaxial layers, heavily doped with phosphorus and boron, continuously at 650 degrees C using low-temperature photoepitaxy. Then N + photoepitaxial layer with a phosphorus concentration above 10 17 cm -3 grown on p - substrate shows high-density surface pits, and as a result, poor crystal quality. However, when this n + photoepitaxial layer is grown continuously on a heavily boron-doped p + photoepitaxial layer, these surface pits are drastically decreased, disappearing completely above a hole concentration of 10 19 cm -3 in the p + photoepitaxial layer. The phosphorus activation ratio and electron Hall mobility in the heavily phosphorus-doped n + photoexpitaxial layer were also greatly improved. The authors investigated the cause of the surface pitting using a scanning transmission electron microscope, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. They characterized the precipitation of phosphorus atoms on the crystal surface at the initial stage of the heavily phosphorus-doped n + photoexpitaxial layer growth

  5. Room temperature plasma oxidation: A new process for preparation of ultrathin layers of silicon oxide, and high dielectric constant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinoco, J.C.; Estrada, M.; Baez, H.; Cerdeira, A.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present basic features and oxidation law of the room temperature plasma oxidation (RTPO), as a new process for preparation of less than 2 nm thick layers of SiO 2 , and high-k layers of TiO 2 . We show that oxidation rate follows a potential law dependence on oxidation time. The proportionality constant is function of pressure, plasma power, reagent gas and plasma density, while the exponent depends only on the reactive gas. These parameters are related to the physical phenomena occurring inside the plasma, during oxidation. Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (MOS) capacitors fabricated with these layers are characterized by capacitance-voltage, current-voltage and current-voltage-temperature measurements. Less than 2.5 nm SiO 2 layers with surface roughness similar to thermal oxide films, surface state density below 3 x 10 11 cm -2 and current density in the expected range for each corresponding thickness, were obtained by RTPO in a parallel-plate reactor, at 180 mW/cm 2 and pressure range between 9.33 and 66.5 Pa (0.07 and 0.5 Torr) using O 2 and N 2 O as reactive gases. MOS capacitors with TiO 2 layers formed by RTPO of sputtered Ti layers are also characterized. Finally, MOS capacitors with stacked layers of TiO 2 over SiO 2 , both layers obtained by RTPO, were prepared and evaluated to determine the feasibility of the use of TiO 2 as a candidate for next technology nodes

  6. Effect of applied DC voltages and temperatures on space charge behaviour of multi-layer oil-paper insulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang Chao; Liao Ruijin [The State Key Laboratory of Power Transmission Equipment and System Security and New Technology, Chongqing University (China); Chen, G [School of Electronics and Computer Science, University of Southampton (United Kingdom); Fu, M, E-mail: tangchao_1981@163.co [AVERA T and D Technology Centre, Stafford (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-01

    In this paper, space charge in a multi-layer oil-paper insulation system was investigated using the pulsed electroacoustic (PEA) technique. A series of measurements had been carried following subjection of the insulation system to different applied voltages and different temperatures. Charge behaviours in the insulation system were analyzed and the influence of temperature on charge dynamics was discussed. The test results shows that homocharge injection takes place under all the test conditions, the applied DC voltage mainly affects the amount of space charge, while the temperature has greater influence on the distribution and mobility of space charge inside oil-paper samples.

  7. Influence of Drying Temperature on the Structural, Optical, and Electrical Properties of Layer-by-Layer ZnO Nanoparticles Seeded Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Shariffudin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Layer-by-layer zinc oxide (ZnO nanoparticles have been prepared using sol-gel spin coating technique. The films were dried at different temperature from 100°C to 300°C to study its effect to the surface morphology, optical and electrical properties of the films. Film dried at 200°C shows the highest (0 0 2 peak of X-ray diffraction pattern which is due to complete decomposition of zinc acetate and complete vaporization of the stabilizer and solvent. It was found that the grain size increased with the increased of drying temperature from 100 to 200°C, but for films dried at above 200°C, the grain size decreased. Photoluminescence measurements show a sharp ultraviolet emission centred at 380 nm and a very low intensity visible emission. Blue visible emission was detected for sample dried at temperature below 200°C, while for films dried above 250°C, the visible emission is red shifted. The films were transparent in the visible range from 400 to 800 nm with average transmittance of above 85%. Linear I-V characteristics were shown confirming the ohmic behaviour of the gold contacts to the films. A minimum resistivity was given by 5.08 Ω · cm for the film dried at 300°C.

  8. Electrodeposited Ag-Stabilization Layer for High Temperature Superconducting Coated Conductors: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, R. N.; Mann, J.; Qiao, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Selvamanickam, V.

    2010-11-01

    We developed a non-aqueous based electrodepostion process of Ag-stabilization layer on YBCO superconductor tapes. The non-aqueous electroplating solution is non-reactive to the HTS layer thus does not detoriate the critical current capability of the superconductor layer when plated directly on the HTS tape. The superconducting current capabilities of these tapes were measured by non-contact magnetic measurements.

  9. Collisionless shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagdeev, R.Z.; Kennel, C.F.

    1991-01-01

    Collisionless shocks cannot occur naturally on the earth, because nearly all matter here consists of electrically neutral atoms and molecules. In space, however, high temperatures and ultraviolet radiation from hot stars decompose atoms into their constituent nuclei and electrons, producing a soup of electrically charged particles known as a plasma. Plasma physicists proposed that the collective electrical and magnetic properties of plasmas could produce interactions that take the place of collisions and permit shocks to form. In 1964 the theoretical work found its first experimental confirmation. Norman F. Ness and his colleagues at the Goddard Space Flight Center, using data collected from the iMP-1 spacecraft, detected clear signs that a collisionless shock exists where the solar wind encounters the earth's magnetic field. More recent research has demonstrated that collisionless shocks appear in a dazzling array of astronomical settings. For example, shocks have been found in the solar wind upstream (sunward) of all the planet and comets that have been visited by spacecraft. Violent flares on the sun generate shocks that propagate to the far reaches of the solar system; tremendous galactic outbursts create disruptions in the intergalactic medium that are trillions of times larger. In addition, many astrophysicists think that shocks from supernova explosions in our galaxy accelerate cosmic rays, a class of extraordinarily energetic elementary particles and atomic nuclei that rain down on the earth from all directions

  10. Multi-layer casing of a steam turbine for high steam pressures and temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remberg, A.

    1978-01-01

    In previous turbine casings there is no sealing provided between the inner layer and the outer layer, so that the steam pressure acts fully on the casing top and on the shaft seal housing situated there. To reduce the displacement which occurs there due to pressure differences in the various steam spaces, the normal inner casing is made with the shaft sealing housing in an inner layer, which cannot be divided in the axial direction. The inner layer can be inserted from the high pressure side into the unit outer casing. A horizontal section through the turbine in the attached drawing makes the construction and operation of the invention clear. (GL) [de

  11. Research on shock wave characteristics in the isolator of central strut rocket-based combined cycle engine under Ma5.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xianggeng; Xue, Rui; Qin, Fei; Hu, Chunbo; He, Guoqiang

    2017-11-01

    A numerical calculation of shock wave characteristics in the isolator of central strut rocket-based combined cycle (RBCC) engine fueled by kerosene was carried out in this paper. A 3D numerical model was established by the DES method. The kerosene chemical kinetic model used the 9-component and 12-step simplified mechanism model. Effects of fuel equivalence ratio, inflow total temperature and central strut rocket on-off on shock wave characteristics were studied under Ma5.5. Results demonstrated that with the increase of equivalence ratio, the leading shock wave moves toward upstream, accompanied with higher possibility of the inlet unstart. However, the leading shock wave moves toward downstream as the inflow total temperature rises. After the central strut rocket is closed, the leading shock wave moves toward downstream, which can reduce risks of the inlet unstart. State of the shear layer formed by the strut rocket jet flow and inflow can influence the shock train structure significantly.

  12. Simple model for vibration-translation exchange at high temperatures: effects of multiquantum transitions on the relaxation of a N2 gas flow behind a shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliat, A; Vedula, P; Josyula, E

    2011-02-01

    In this paper a simple model is proposed for computation of rate coefficients related to vibration-translation transitions based on the forced harmonic oscillator theory. This model, which is developed by considering a quadrature method, provides rate coefficients that are in very good agreement with those found in the literature for the high temperature regime (≳10,000 K). This model is implemented to study a one-dimensional nonequilibrium inviscid N(2) flow behind a plane shock by considering a state-to-state approach. While the effects of ionization and chemical reactions are neglected in our study, our results show that multiquantum transitions have a great influence on the relaxation of the macroscopic parameters of the gas flow behind the shock, especially on vibrational distributions of high levels. All vibrational states are influenced by multiquantum processes, but the effective number of transitions decreases inversely according to the vibrational quantum number. For the initial conditions considered in this study, excited electronic states are found to be weakly populated and can be neglected in modeling. Moreover, the computing time is considerably reduced with the model described in this paper compared to others found in the literature. ©2011 American Physical Society

  13. Entropy jump across an inviscid shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Manuel D.; Iollo, Angelo

    1995-01-01

    The shock jump conditions for the Euler equations in their primitive form are derived by using generalized functions. The shock profiles for specific volume, speed, and pressure are shown to be the same, however density has a different shock profile. Careful study of the equations that govern the entropy shows that the inviscid entropy profile has a local maximum within the shock layer. We demonstrate that because of this phenomenon, the entropy, propagation equation cannot be used as a conservation law.

  14. Environmental temperature and stocking density effects on acute phase proteins, heat shock protein 70, circulating corticosterone and performance in broiler chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Pardis; Zulkifli, Idrus; Amat Jajuli, Nurfarahin; Farjam, Abdoreza Soleimani; Ramiah, Suriya Kumari; Amir, Anna Aryani; O'Reily, Emily; Eckersall, David

    2015-11-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine the effect of different stocking densities on serum corticosterone (CORT), ovotransferrin (OVT), α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) and ceruloplasmin (CP) concentrations, brain heat shock protein (HSP) 70 expression and performance in broiler chickens exposed to unheated and heated conditions. Day-old chicks were stocked at 0.100 m2/bird (low density (LD)) or 0.063 m2/bird (high density (HD)), in battery cages and housed in environmentally controlled rooms. From 21 to 35 days of age, birds from each stocking density group were exposed to either 24 or 32 °C. Growth performance was recorded during the heat treatment period, and blood and brain samples were collected to determine CORT, OVT, AGP, CP and HSP 70 levels on day 35. Heat treatment but not stocking density was detrimental to growth performance. There were significant temperature × density interactions for CORT, CP and OVT on day 35. Although HD elevated CORT, CP and OVT when compared to LD, the effects of the former were more obvious under heated condition. Both temperature and density had significant effect on AGP and HSP 70. In conclusion, irrespective of temperature, high stocking density was physiologically stressful to broiler chickens, as indicated by CORT, AGP, CP, OVT and HSP 70, but not detrimental to growth performance and survivability. As it was shown in the present study, AGP, CP and OVT could be useful biomarkers to determine the effect of overcrowding and high temperature on the welfare of broiler chickens.

  15. O3 Layers via Spray Pyrolysis at Low Temperatures and Their Application in High Electron Mobility Transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Isakov, Ivan

    2017-04-06

    The growth mechanism of indium oxide (InO) layers processed via spray pyrolysis of an aqueous precursor solution in the temperature range of 100-300 °C and the impact on their electron transporting properties are studied. Analysis of the droplet impingement sites on the substrate\\'s surface as a function of its temperature reveals that Leidenfrost effect dominated boiling plays a crucial role in the growth of smooth, continuous, and highly crystalline InO layers via a vapor phase-like process. By careful optimization of the precursor formulation, deposition conditions, and choice of substrate, this effect is exploited and ultrathin and exceptionally smooth layers of InO are grown over large area substrates at temperatures as low as 252 °C. Thin-film transistors (TFTs) fabricated using these optimized InO layers exhibit superior electron transport characteristics with the electron mobility reaching up to 40 cm V s, a value amongst the highest reported to date for solution-processed InO TFTs. The present work contributes enormously to the basic understanding of spray pyrolysis and highlights its tremendous potential for large-volume manufacturing of high-performance metal oxide thin-film transistor electronics.

  16. O3 Layers via Spray Pyrolysis at Low Temperatures and Their Application in High Electron Mobility Transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Isakov, Ivan; Faber, Hendrik; Grell, Max; Wyatt-Moon, Gwenhivir; Pliatsikas, Nikos; Kehagias, Thomas; Dimitrakopulos, George P.; Patsalas, Panos P.; Li, Ruipeng; Anthopoulos, Thomas D.

    2017-01-01

    The growth mechanism of indium oxide (InO) layers processed via spray pyrolysis of an aqueous precursor solution in the temperature range of 100-300 °C and the impact on their electron transporting properties are studied. Analysis of the droplet impingement sites on the substrate's surface as a function of its temperature reveals that Leidenfrost effect dominated boiling plays a crucial role in the growth of smooth, continuous, and highly crystalline InO layers via a vapor phase-like process. By careful optimization of the precursor formulation, deposition conditions, and choice of substrate, this effect is exploited and ultrathin and exceptionally smooth layers of InO are grown over large area substrates at temperatures as low as 252 °C. Thin-film transistors (TFTs) fabricated using these optimized InO layers exhibit superior electron transport characteristics with the electron mobility reaching up to 40 cm V s, a value amongst the highest reported to date for solution-processed InO TFTs. The present work contributes enormously to the basic understanding of spray pyrolysis and highlights its tremendous potential for large-volume manufacturing of high-performance metal oxide thin-film transistor electronics.

  17. Low temperature step-graded InAlAs/GaAs metamorphic buffer layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang, X Z; Wu, S D; Liu, C; Wang, W X; Guo, L W; Huang, Q; Zhou, J M

    2006-01-01

    Low-temperature step-graded InAlAs metamorphic buffer layers on GaAs substrate grown by molecular beam epitaxy were investigated. The strain relaxation and the composition of the top InAlAs layer were determined by high-resolution triple-axis x-ray diffraction measurements, which show that the top InAlAs layer is nearly fully relaxed. Surface morphology was observed by reflection high-energy electron diffraction pattern and atomic force microscopy. Under a selected range of growth parameters, the root mean square surface roughness of the sample grown at 380 deg. C is 0.802 nm, which has the smallest value compared with those of other samples. Furthermore, The ω-2θ and ω scans of the triple-axis x-ray diffraction, and photoluminescence show the sample grown at 380 deg. C has better crystalline quality. With decreasing As overpressure at this growth temperature, crystalline quality became poor and could not maintain two dimensional growth with increasing overpressure. The carrier concentrations and Hall mobilities of the InAlAs/ InGaAs/GaAs MM-HEMT structure on low-temperature step-graded InAlAs metamorphic buffer layers grown in optimized conditions are high enough to make devices

  18. Development of a double-layered ceramic filter for aerosol filtration at high-temperatures: the filter collection efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas, Normanda L; Gonçalves, José A S; Innocentini, Murilo D M; Coury, José R

    2006-08-25

    The performance of double-layered ceramic filters for aerosol filtration at high temperatures was evaluated in this work. The filtering structure was composed of two layers: a thin granular membrane deposited on a reticulate ceramic support of high porosity. The goal was to minimize the high pressure drop inherent of granular structures, without decreasing their high collection efficiency for small particles. The reticulate support was developed using the technique of ceramic replication of polyurethane foam substrates of 45 and 75 pores per inch (ppi). The filtering membrane was prepared by depositing a thin layer of granular alumina-clay paste on one face of the support. Filters had their permeability and fractional collection efficiency analyzed for filtration of an airborne suspension of phosphatic rock in temperatures ranging from ambient to 700 degrees C. Results revealed that collection efficiency decreased with gas temperature and was enhanced with filtration time. Also, the support layer influenced the collection efficiency: the 75 ppi support was more effective than the 45 ppi. Particle collection efficiency dropped considerably for particles below 2 microm in diameter. The maximum collection occurred for particle diameters of approximately 3 microm, and decreased again for diameters between 4 and 8 microm. Such trend was successfully represented by the proposed correlation, which is based on the classical mechanisms acting on particle collection. Inertial impaction seems to be the predominant collection mechanism, with particle bouncing/re-entrainment acting as detachment mechanisms.

  19. Replacement of unsteady heat transfer coefficient by equivalent steady-state one when calculating temperature oscillations in a thermal layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supel'nyak, M. I.

    2017-11-01

    Features of calculation of temperature oscillations which are damped in a surface layer of a solid and which are having a small range in comparison with range of temperature of the fluid medium surrounding the solid at heat transfer coefficient changing in time under the periodic law are considered. For the specified case the equations for approximate definition of constant and oscillating components of temperature field of a solid are received. The possibility of use of appropriately chosen steady-state coefficient when calculating the temperature oscillations instead of unsteady heat-transfer coefficient is investigated. Dependence for definition of such equivalent constant heat-transfer coefficient is determined. With its help the research of temperature oscillations of solids with canonical form for some specific conditions of heat transfer is undertaken. Comparison of the obtained data with results of exact solutions of a problem of heat conductivity by which the limits to applicability of the offered approach are defined is carried out.

  20. Investigations on the growth of a-oriented layers of high temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodtke, E.

    1992-10-01

    The properties of a-oriented YBaCuO and PrBaCuO layers were investigated. The layers are grown in a modified template method and analyzed by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and Hall measurements. (WL)

  1. A quality-control procedure for surface temperature and surface layer inversion in the XBT data archive from the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pankajakshan, T.; Ghosh, A.K.; Pattanaik, J.; Ratnakaran, L.

    and surface layer temperature inversion. XBT surface temperatrues (XST) are compared with the surface temperature from simultaneous CTD observations from four cruises and the former were found to be erroneous in a number of stations. XSTs are usually corrected...

  2. Telemetric Evaluation of Body Temperature and Physical Activity as Predictors of Mortality in a Murine Model of Staphylococcal Enterotoxic Shock

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vlach, Kim

    2000-01-01

    .... This study determined whether body temperature and physical activity, monitored telemetrically, could predict impending death and provide an earlier, more humane experimental endpoint. Methods...

  3. Interplay of Interfacial Layers and Blend Composition To Reduce Thermal Degradation of Polymer Solar Cells at High Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Dkhil, Sadok; Pfannmöller, Martin; Schröder, Rasmus R; Alkarsifi, Riva; Gaceur, Meriem; Köntges, Wolfgang; Heidari, Hamed; Bals, Sara; Margeat, Olivier; Ackermann, Jörg; Videlot-Ackermann, Christine

    2018-01-31

    The thermal stability of printed polymer solar cells at elevated temperatures needs to be improved to achieve high-throughput fabrication including annealing steps as well as long-term stability. During device processing, thermal annealing impacts both the organic photoactive layer, and the two interfacial layers make detailed studies of degradation mechanism delicate. A recently identified thermally stable poly[[4,8-bis[(2-ethylhexyl)oxy]benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene-2,6-diyl][3-fluoro-2-[(2-ethylhexyl)carbonyl]thieno[3,4-b]thiophenediyl

  4. Real-time observation of coadsorption layers on Ru(001) using a temperature-programmed ESDIAD/TOF system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, T.; Itai, Y.; Iwasawa, Y.

    1997-11-01

    For the purpose of utilizing ESDIAD as a real-time probe for surface processes, we have developed an instrument which can measure ESDIAD images and time of flight (TOF) spectra of desorbing ions in temperature-programmed surface processes. TOF measurements are carried out to identify the mass and to determine the kinetic energy distribution of the desorbed ions. This temperature-programmed (TP-) ESDIAD/TOF system was used to observe coadsorption layers of methylamine and CO on Ru(001) which have been previously studied by our group using LEED, TPD and HREELS, also drawing upon a comparison of findings with the coadsorption system of CO and ammonia. ESDIAD images acquired for temperature-programmed surface processes in real time were found to provide new insight into the dynamic behaviour of the coadsorption layers. As to the pure adsorption of ammonia and methylamine, the second and the first (chemisorbed) layers can be easily discriminated in their different ESD detection efficiency due to the difference in neutralization rate. The intensity change of H + ions with temperature shows the process of the decomposition of methylamine to be dependent on CO coverage. The intensity of O + originating from CO changes due to the change of CO adsorption site in the reaction process. The angular distribution of H + ions which correspond to CH2NH…Ru species appears at 250-300 K in the presence of high CO pre-coverage.

  5. Increase of the blocking temperature of Fe–Ag granular multilayers with increasing number of the layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balogh, Judit [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Kaptás, Dénes, E-mail: kaptas.denes@wigner.mta.hu [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Kiss, László F. [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Dézsi, István [Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Nakanishi, Akio [Department of Physics, Shiga University of Medical Science, Shiga 520-2192 (Japan); Devlin, Eamonn; Vasilakaki, Marianna; Margaris, George; Trohidou, Kalliopi N. [Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, NCSR “Demokritos”, Aghia Paraskevi, 15310 Athens (Greece)

    2016-03-01

    Multilayers of 0.4 nm Fe and 5 nm Ag with repetition number, n=1, 2, 5, 10 and 20 were prepared by vacuum evaporation onto Si wafer. The blocking temperature was determined by measuring the field cooled and zero field cooled magnetization curves with a SQUID magnetometer and it was found to increase by almost an order of magnitude from around 20 K for the single Fe layer sample up to around 160 K for n=20. Significant increase of the average size of the superparamagnetic Fe grains by increasing the number of the Fe layers was excluded by conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy measurements of the paramagnetic state. The role of the dipole–dipole interactions and their interplay with the out-of-plain magnetic anisotropy in the variation of the blocking temperature has been investigated by Monte-Carlo simulations. - Highlights: • Multilayers of [0.4 nm Fe/5 nm Ag]{sub n} (n=1,2,5,10, and 20) were grown over Si. • Large increase of the superparamagnetic blocking temperature up to n=10 is observed. • The average Fe grain size does not change in the subsequent layers. • Perpendicular anisotropy enhances the dipolar coupling and the blocking temperature.

  6. High-temperature shock tube and modeling studies on the reactions of methanol with D-atoms and CH3-radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peukert, S L; Michael, J V

    2013-10-10

    The shock tube technique has been used to study the hydrogen abstraction reactions D + CH3OH → CH2O + H + HD (A) and CH3 + CH3OH → CH2O + H + CH4 (B). For reaction A, the experiments span a T-range of 1016 K ≤ T ≤ 1325 K, at pressures 0.25 bar ≤ P ≤ 0.46 bar. The experiments on reaction B, CH3 + CH3OH, cover a T-range of 1138 K ≤ T ≤ 1270 K, at pressures around 0.40 bar. Reflected shock tube experiments, monitoring the depletion of D-atoms by applying D-atom atomic resonance absorption spectrometry (ARAS), were performed on reaction A using gas mixtures of C2D5I and CH3OH in Kr bath gas. C2D5I was used as precursor for D-atoms. For reaction B, reflected shock tube experiments monitoring H-atom formation with H-ARAS, were carried out using gas mixtures of diacetyl ((CH3CO)2) and CH3OH in Kr bath gas. (CH3CO)2 was used as the source of CH3-radicals. Detailed reaction models were assembled to fit the D-atom and H-atom time profiles in order to obtain experimental rate constants for reactions A and B. Total rate constants from the present experiments on D + CH3OH and CH3 + CH3OH can be represented by the Arrhenius equations kA(T) = 1.51 × 10(-10) exp(-3843 K/T) cm(3) molecules(-1) s(-1) (1016 K ≤ T ≤ 1325 K) and kB(T) = 9.62 × 10(-12) exp(-7477 K/T) cm(3) molecules(-1) s(-1) (1138 K ≤ T ≤ 1270 K). The experimentally obtained rate constants were compared with available rate data from the literature. The results from quantum chemical studies on reaction A were found to be in good agreement with the present results. The present work represents the first direct experimental study on these bimolecular reactions at combustion temperatures and is important to the high-temperature oxidation of CH3OH.

  7. Effect of etching stop layer on characteristics of amorphous IGZO thin film transistor fabricated at low temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xifeng Li

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Transparent bottom-gate amorphous Indium-Gallium-Zinc Oxide (a-IGZO thin-film transistors (TFTs had been successfully fabricated at relative low temperature. The influence of reaction gas ratio of N2O and SiH4 during the growth of etching stop layer (SiOx on the characteristics of a-IGZO TFTs was investigated. The transfer characteristics of the TFTs were changed markedly because active layer of a-IGZO films was modified by plasma in the growth process of SiOx. By optimizing the deposition parameters of etching stop layer process, a-IGZO TFTs were manufactured and exhibited good performance with a field-effect mobility of 8.5 cm2V-1s-1, a threshold voltage of 1.3 V, and good stability under gate bias stress of 20 V for 10000 s.

  8. A porous layer: an evidence for the deterioration of MOVPE InN grown at high temperature (∝650 C)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugita, K.; Hashimoto, A.; Yamamoto, A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper indicates an evidence for the deterioration of the MOVPE InN during the growth at high temperature (∝650 C). It is noted that the deterioration occurs near the interface and InN film becomes porous layer during the further growth. The porous layer has high electron density. The rate-limiting process of N-face InN decomposition depends on atomic hydrogen. The atomic hydrogen produced by the decomposition of NH 3 is responsible for the deterioration of InN film. The crystal quality of InN improves with decreasing the porous layer which is important for MOVPE InN. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. Low Temperature Processed Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) Device by Oxidation Effect from Capping Layer

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Zhenwei; Al-Jawhari, Hala A.; Nayak, Pradipta K.; Caraveo-Frescas, J. A.; Wei, Nini; Hedhili, Mohamed N.; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2015-01-01

    , which is significantly lower than the temperature generally required to form tin dioxide. Based on this approach, CMOS inverters based entirely on tin oxide TFTs were fabricated. Our method provides a solution to lower the process temperature for tin

  10. Transcriptional profile of breast muscle in heat stressed layers is similar to that of broiler chickens at control temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahoor, Imran; de Koning, Dirk-Jan; Hocking, Paul M

    2017-09-20

    In recent years, the commercial importance of changes in muscle function of broiler chickens and of the corresponding effects on meat quality has increased. Furthermore, broilers are more sensitive to heat stress during transport and at high ambient temperatures than smaller egg-laying chickens. We hypothesised that heat stress would amplify muscle damage and expression of genes that are involved in such changes and, thus, lead to the identification of pathways and networks associated with broiler muscle and meat quality traits. Broiler and layer chickens were exposed to control or high ambient temperatures to characterise differences in gene expression between the two genotypes and the two environments. Whole-genome expression studies in breast muscles of broiler and layer chickens were conducted before and after heat stress; 2213 differentially-expressed genes were detected based on a significant (P heat-stressed layers. Expression of these genes was further increased in heat-stressed broilers. Differences in gene expression between broiler and layer chickens under control and heat stress conditions suggest that damage of breast muscles in broilers at normal ambient temperatures is similar to that in heat-stressed layers and is amplified when broilers are exposed to heat stress. The patterns of gene expression of the two genotypes under heat stress were almost the polar opposite of each other, which is consistent with the conclusion that broiler chickens were not able to cope with heat stress by dissipating their body heat. The differentially expressed gene networks and pathways were consistent with the pathological changes that are observed in the breast muscle of heat-stressed broilers.

  11. Analysis of influence of buffer layers on microwave propagation through high-temperature superconducting thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceremuga, J.; Barton, M.; Miranda, F.

    1994-01-01

    Methods of analysis of microwave propagation through superconducting thin films with buffer layers on dielectric substrates have been discussed. Expressions describing the transmission coefficient S 21 through the structure and the complex conductivity sigma of a superconductor in an analytical form have been derived. The derived equations are valid for microwave propagation in waveguides as well as in free space with relevant definition of impedances. Using the obtained solutions, the influences of buffer layers' parameters (thickness, relative permittivity and loss tangent) on the transmission coefficient has been investigated using MATLAB. Simulations have been performed for 10 GHz transmission through YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 films on sapphire with SrTiO 3 and CeO 2 buffer layers and on silicon with CaF 2 and YSZ buffer layers. To illustrate the simulations, measurements of the transmission through YBCO film on sapphire with SrTiO 3 buffer layer have been performed. It has been shown that even lossy buffer layers have very little impact (smaller than 1% in magnitude and 0.3% in phase) on the transmission coefficient through superconducting thin films, providing their thickness is below 10 mu m. (author)

  12. Shock absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemeth, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    A shock absorber for the support of piping and components in a nuclear power plant is described. It combines a high degree of stiffness under sudden shocks, e.g. seismic disturbances, with the ability to allow for thermal expansion without resistance when so required. (JIW)

  13. Electron microscopy observation of TiO2 nanocrystal evolution in high-temperature atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jian; Li, Zhaodong; Kvit, Alexander; Krylyuk, Sergiy; Davydov, Albert V; Wang, Xudong

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of amorphous and crystalline phases during atomic layer deposition (ALD) is essential for creating high quality dielectrics, multifunctional films/coatings, and predictable surface functionalization. Through comprehensive atomistic electron microscopy study of ALD TiO2 nanostructures at designed growth cycles, we revealed the transformation process and sequence of atom arrangement during TiO2 ALD growth. Evolution of TiO2 nanostructures in ALD was found following a path from amorphous layers to amorphous particles to metastable crystallites and ultimately to stable crystalline forms. Such a phase evolution is a manifestation of the Ostwald-Lussac Law, which governs the advent sequence and amount ratio of different phases in high-temperature TiO2 ALD nanostructures. The amorphous-crystalline mixture also enables a unique anisotropic crystal growth behavior at high temperature forming TiO2 nanorods via the principle of vapor-phase oriented attachment.

  14. Zinc tin oxide as high-temperature stable recombination layer for mesoscopic perovskite/silicon monolithic tandem solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Werner, Jérémie

    2016-12-05

    Perovskite/crystalline silicon tandem solar cells have the potential to reach efficiencies beyond those of silicon single-junction record devices. However, the high-temperature process of 500 °C needed for state-of-the-art mesoscopic perovskite cells has, so far, been limiting their implementation in monolithic tandem devices. Here, we demonstrate the applicability of zinc tin oxide as a recombination layer and show its electrical and optical stability at temperatures up to 500 °C. To prove the concept, we fabricate monolithic tandem cells with mesoscopic top cell with up to 16% efficiency. We then investigate the effect of zinc tin oxide layer thickness variation, showing a strong influence on the optical interference pattern within the tandem device. Finally, we discuss the perspective of mesoscopic perovskite cells for high-efficiency monolithic tandem solar cells. © 2016 Author(s)

  15. Resistivity of atomic layer deposition grown ZnO: The influence of deposition temperature and post-annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laube, J., E-mail: laube@imtek.de; Nübling, D.; Beh, H.; Gutsch, S.; Hiller, D.; Zacharias, M.

    2016-03-31

    Conductive zinc oxide (ZnO) films deposited by atomic layer deposition were studied as function of post-annealing treatments. Effusion experiments were conducted on ZnO films deposited at different temperatures. The influence of different annealing atmospheres on the resistivity of the films was investigated and compared to reference samples. It was found that the influence of the deposition temperature on the resistivity is much higher than that of subsequent annealings. This leads to the conclusion that reduction of the resistivity by diffusion of different gases, such as oxygen and hydrogen, into annealed ZnO films is unlikely. - Highlights: • Conformal growth of ZnO-ALD over a temperature range of 25 °C up to 300 °C. • Post-annealing in different atmospheres (H{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, vacuum) and temperatures. • Analysis of film-conductivity and effusion characteristic.

  16. Influence of processing parameters on the characteristics of surface layers of low temperature plasma nitrocarburized AISI 630 martensitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Insup

    2017-11-01

    Plasma nitrocarburizing was performed on solution-treated AISI 630 martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steel samples with a gas mixture of H2, N2, and CH4 with changing temperature, discharge voltage and amount of CH4. When nitrocarburized with increasing temperature from 380 °C to 430 °C at fixed 25% N2 and 6% CH4, the thickness of expanded martensite (α'N) layer and surface hardness increased up to 10 μm and 1323 HV0.05, respectively but the corrosion resistance decreased. Though the increase of discharge voltage from 400 V to 600 V increased α'N layer thickness and surface hardness (up to 13 μm and 1491 HV0.05, respectively), the treated samples still showed very poor corrosion behavior. Thus, to further improve the corrosion resistance, the influence of variation of the amount of CH4 in the nitrocarburizing process was investigated. Increasing the CH4 percentage aided higher corrosion resistance, although it decreased the α'N layer thickness. The most appropriate conditions for moderate α'N layer thickness, high surface hardness and better corrosion resistance than the solution-treated bare sample were established, which is plasma nitrocarburizing at 400 °C with 400 V discharge voltage and containing 25% N2 and 4% CH4.

  17. A green synthesis of a layered titanate, potassium lithium titanate; lower temperature solid-state reaction and improved materials performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Makoto; Morita, Masashi; Igarashi, Shota; Sato, Soh

    2013-01-01

    A layered titanate, potassium lithium titanate, with the size range from 0.1 to 30 µm was prepared to show the effects of the particle size on the materials performance. The potassium lithium titanate was prepared by solid-state reaction as reported previously, where the reaction temperature was varied. The reported temperature for the titanate preparation was higher than 800 °C, though 600 °C is good enough to obtain single-phase potassium lithium titanate. The lower temperature synthesis is cost effective and the product exhibit better performance as photocatalysts due to surface reactivity. - Graphical abstract: Finite particle of a layered titanate, potassium lithium titanate, was prepared by solid-state reaction at lower temperature to show modified materials performance. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Potassium lithium titanate was prepared by solid-state reaction. • Lower temperature reaction resulted in smaller sized particles of titanate. • 600 °C was good enough to obtain single phased potassium lithium titanate. • The product exhibited better performance as photocatalyst

  18. Thermal stability and high temperature polymorphism of topochemically-prepared Dion–Jacobson triple-layered perovskites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guertin, Stephen L.; Josepha, Elisha A.; Montasserasadi, Dariush; Wiley, John B., E-mail: jwiley@uno.edu

    2015-10-25

    The thermal stability of six Dion–Jacobson-related triple layered perovskites, ACa{sub 2}Nb{sub 3}O{sub 10} (A = H, NH{sub 4}, Li, Na, K, CuCl), was explored to 1000 °C. Each compound was produced topochemically by low-temperature (<500 °C) ion exchange from RbCa{sub 2}Nb{sub 3}O{sub 10}. The thermal behavior of the series was examined by variable temperature X-ray powder diffraction experiments in tandem with thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. Five of the species were found to be low temperature/metastable phases, decomposing below 900 °C, where the stability of the series decreased with decreasing interlayer cation size. The compounds, A = Li, Na, K, exhibited high temperature polymorphism, with a completely reversible transition evident for KCa{sub 2}Nb{sub 3}O{sub 10}. - Highlights: • Thermal stability of topochemically prepared triple-layered perovskites studied. • Clear correlation seen between stability and identity of interlayer cation. • Several in ACa{sub 2}Nb{sub 3}O{sub 10} series (A = Li, Na, K) exhibit high temperature polymorphism.

  19. Low-temperature ({<=}200 Degree-Sign C) plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition of dense titanium nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samal, Nigamananda; Du Hui; Luberoff, Russell; Chetry, Krishna; Bubber, Randhir; Hayes, Alan; Devasahayam, Adrian [Veeco Instruments, 1 Terminal Drive, Plainview, New York 11803 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Titanium nitride (TiN) has been widely used in the semiconductor industry for its diffusion barrier and seed layer properties. However, it has seen limited adoption in other industries in which low temperature (<200 Degree-Sign C) deposition is a requirement. Examples of applications which require low temperature deposition are seed layers for magnetic materials in the data storage (DS) industry and seed and diffusion barrier layers for through-silicon-vias (TSV) in the MEMS industry. This paper describes a low temperature TiN process with appropriate electrical, chemical, and structural properties based on plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition method that is suitable for the DS and MEMS industries. It uses tetrakis-(dimethylamino)-titanium as an organometallic precursor and hydrogen (H{sub 2}) as co-reactant. This process was developed in a Veeco NEXUS Trade-Mark-Sign chemical vapor deposition tool. The tool uses a substrate rf-biased configuration with a grounded gas shower head. In this paper, the complimentary and self-limiting character of this process is demonstrated. The effects of key processing parameters including temperature, pulse time, and plasma power are investigated in terms of growth rate, stress, crystal morphology, chemical, electrical, and optical properties. Stoichiometric thin films with growth rates of 0.4-0.5 A/cycle were achieved. Low electrical resistivity (<300 {mu}{Omega} cm), high mass density (>4 g/cm{sup 3}), low stress (<250 MPa), and >85% step coverage for aspect ratio of 10:1 were realized. Wet chemical etch data show robust chemical stability of the film. The properties of the film have been optimized to satisfy industrial viability as a Ruthenium (Ru) preseed liner in potential data storage and TSV applications.

  20. STRESSES IN CEMENT-CONCRETE PAVEMENT SURFACING CAUSED BY THERMAL SHOCK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Pshembaev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is necessary to mention specially so-called thermal shock among various impacts on highway surface. Ice layer is formed on a concrete surface during the winter period of pavement surfacing operation. Sodium chloride which lowers temperature of water-ice transition temperature and causes ice thawing at negative temperature is usually used to remove ice from the pavement surface. Consequently, temperature in the concrete laying immediately under a thawing ice layer is coming down with a run that leads to significant stresses. Such phenomenon is known as a thermal shock with a meaning of local significant change in temperature. This process is under investigation, it has practical importance for an estimation of strength and longevity of a cement-concrete pavement surfacing and consequently it is considered as rather topical issue. The purpose of investigations is to develop a mathematical model and determination of shock blow permissible gradients for a cementconcrete road covering. Finite difference method has been used in order to determine stressed and deformed condition of the cement-concrete pavement surfacing of highways. A computer program has been compiled and it permits to carry out calculation of a road covering at various laws of temperature distribution in its depth. Regularities in distribution of deformation and stresses in the cement-concrete pavement surfacing of highways at thermal shock have been obtained in the paper. A permissible parameter of temperature distribution in pavement surfacing thickness has been determined in the paper. A strength criterion based on the process of micro-crack formation and development in concrete has been used for making calculations. It has been established that the thermal shock causes significant temperature gradients on the cement-concrete surfacing that lead to rather large normal stresses in the concrete surface layer. The possibility of micro-crack formation in a road covering is

  1. Effect of heat shock and recovery temperature on variability of single cell lag time of Cronobacter turicensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y Zh; Métris, A; Stasinopoulos, D M; Forsythe, S J; Sutherland, J P

    2015-02-01

    The effect of heat stress and subsequent recovery temperature on the individual cellular lag of Cronobacter turicensis was analysed using optical density measurements. Low numbers of cells were obtained through serial dilution and the time to reach an optical density of 0.035 was determined. Assuming the lag of a single cell follows a shifted Gamma distribution with a fixed shape parameter, the effect of recovery temperature on the individual lag of untreated and sublethally heat treated cells of Cr. turicensis were modelled. It was found that the shift parameter (Tshift) increased asymptotically as the temperature decreased while the logarithm of the scale parameter (θ) decreased linearly with recovery temperature. To test the validity of the model in food, growth of low numbers of untreated and heat treated Cr. turicensis in artificially contaminated infant first milk was measured experimentally and compared with predictions obtained by Monte Carlo simulations. Although the model for untreated cells slightly underestimated the actual growth in first milk at low temperatures, the model for heat treated cells was in agreement with the data derived from the challenge tests and provides a basis for reliable quantitative microbiological risk assessments for Cronobacter spp. in infant milk. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Heterologous expression of three Camellia sinensis small heat shock protein genes confers temperature stress tolerance in yeast and Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingle; Zou, Zhongwei; Li, Qinghui; Xin, Huahong; Zhu, Xujun; Chen, Xuan; Li, Xinghui

    2017-07-01

    CsHSP17.7, CsHSP18.1, and CsHSP21.8 expressions are induced by heat and cold stresses, and CsHSP overexpression confers tolerance to heat and cold stresses in transgenic Pichia pastoris and Arabidopsis thaliana. Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) are crucial for protecting plants against biotic and abiotic stresses, especially heat stress. However, knowledge concerning the functions of Camellia sinensis sHSP in heat and cold stresses remains poorly understood. In this study, three C. sinensis sHSP genes (i.e., CsHSP17.7, CsHSP18.1, and CsHSP21.8) were isolated and characterized using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) technology. The CsHSPs expression levels in C. sinensis leaves were significantly up-regulated by heat and cold stresses. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that CsHSP17.7, CsHSP18.1, and CsHSP21.8 belong to sHSP Classes I, II, and IV, respectively. Heterologous expression of the three CsHSP genes in Pichia pastoris cells enhanced heat and cold stress tolerance. When exposed to heat and cold treatments, transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants overexpressing CsHSP17.7, CsHSP18.1, and CsHSP21.8 had lower malondialdehyde contents, ion leakage, higher proline contents, and transcript levels of stress-related genes (e.g., AtPOD, AtAPX1, AtP5CS2, and AtProT1) compared with the control line. In addition, improved seed germination vigor was also observed in the CsHSP-overexpressing seeds under heat stress. Taken together, our results suggest that the three identified CsHSP genes play key roles in heat and cold tolerance.

  3. MOHOS-type memory performance using HfO{sub 2} nanoparticles as charge trapping layer and low temperature annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina, Joel, E-mail: jmolina@inaoep.mx [National Institute of Astrophysics, Optics and Electronics. Electronics Department, Luis Enrique Erro 1, Tonantzintla, Puebla 72000 (Mexico); Ortega, Rafael; Calleja, Wilfrido; Rosales, Pedro; Zuniga, Carlos; Torres, Alfonso [National Institute of Astrophysics, Optics and Electronics. Electronics Department, Luis Enrique Erro 1, Tonantzintla, Puebla 72000 (Mexico)

    2012-09-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HfO{sub 2} nanoparticles used as charge trapping layer in MOHOS memory devices. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increasing HfO{sub 2} nanoparticles concentration enhances charge injection and trapping. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enhancement of memory performance with low temperature annealing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Charge injection is done without using any hot-carrier injection mechanism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using injected charge density is better for comparison of scaled memory devices. - Abstract: In this work, HfO{sub 2} nanoparticles (np-HfO{sub 2}) are embedded within a spin-on glass (SOG)-based oxide matrix and used as a charge trapping layer in metal-oxide-high-k-oxide-silicon (MOHOS)-type memory applications. This charge trapping layer is obtained by a simple sol-gel spin coating method after using different concentrations of np-HfO{sub 2} and low temperature annealing (down to 425 Degree-Sign C) in order to obtain charge-retention characteristics with a lower thermal budget. The memory's charge trapping characteristics are quantized by measuring both the flat-band voltage shift of MOHOS capacitors (writing/erasing operations) and their programming retention times after charge injection while correlating all these data to np-HfO{sub 2} concentration and annealing temperature. Since a large memory window has been obtained for our MOHOS memory, the relatively easy injection/annihilation (writing/erasing) of charge injected through the substrate opens the possibility to use this material as an effective charge trapping layer. It is shown that by using lower annealing temperatures for the charge trapping layer, higher densities of injected charge are obtained along with enhanced retention times. In conclusion, by using np-HfO{sub 2} as charge trapping layer in memory devices, moderate programming and retention characteristics have been obtained by this simple and yet low-cost spin-coating method.

  4. Direct synthesis of multi-layer graphene film on various substrates by microwave plasma at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun Jae [Plasma Technology Research Center, 814-2 Osickdo-dong (SGFEZ), Gunsan, Jeollabuk-do 573-540 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Byung Wook; Kim, Tae Yoo; Lee, Jung Woo [School of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Advanced Materials and Process Research Center (AMPRC), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Yong Ho; Choi, Yong Sup [Plasma Technology Research Center, 814-2 Osickdo-dong (SGFEZ), Gunsan, Jeollabuk-do 573-540 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Young Il, E-mail: physein01@skku.edu [School of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Advanced Materials and Process Research Center (AMPRC), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Su Jeong, E-mail: suhsj@skku.edu [School of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Advanced Materials and Process Research Center (AMPRC), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-31

    We introduce a possible route for vertically standing multi-layer graphene films (VMGs) on various substrates at low temperature by electron cyclone resonance microwave plasma. VMG films on various substrates, including copper sheet, glass and silicon oxide wafer, were analyzed by studying their structural, electrical, and optical properties. The density and temperature of plasma were measured using Cylindrical Langmuir probe analysis. The morphologies and microstructures of multi-layer graphene were characterized using field emission scattering electron microscope, high resolution transmission electron microscope, and Raman spectra measurement. The VMGs on different substrates at the same experimental conditions synthesized the wrinkled VMGs with different heights. In addition, the transmittance and electrical resistance were measured using ultra-violet visible near-infrared spectroscopy and 4 probe point surface resistance measurement. The VMGs on glass substrate obtained a transmittance of 68.8% and sheet resistance of 796 Ω/square, whereas the VMGs on SiO{sub 2} wafer substrate showed good sheet resistance of 395 Ω/square and 278 Ω/square. The results presented herein demonstrate a simple method of synthesizing of VMGs on various substrates at low temperature for mass production, in which the VMGs can be used in a wide range of application fields for energy storage, catalysis, and field emission due to their unique orientation. - Highlights: • We present for synthesis method of graphene at low temperature on various substrates. • We grow the graphene films at low temperature under of 432 °C. • Structural information of graphene films were studied upon Raman spectroscopy. • Inter-layer spacing of vertically standing graphene relies on synthesis time. • We measured a transmittance and a resistance for graphene films on difference substrate.

  5. demystifying the shock of shocking

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (with a pulse), atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter. The energy dose in cardioversion is less (0.5. - 2 J/kg) than in defibrillation (2 - 4 J/kg). In cardioversion the shock is discharged synchronously with the native R wave of the patient. Without synchronisation,. VF can be induced if a shock is delivered during the refractory period ...

  6. Low frequency solitons and double layers in a magnetized plasma with two temperature electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rufai, O. R. [Department of Physics, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Bharuthram, R. [Office of the Deputy Vice Chancellor (Academic), University of the Western Cape, Bellville (South Africa); Singh, S. V. [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, New Panvel (W), Navi Mumbai-410218 (India); School of Chemistry and Physics, University of Kwa-Zulu Natal, Durban (South Africa); Lakhina, G. S. [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, New Panvel (W), Navi Mumbai-410218 (India)

    2012-12-15

    Finite amplitude non-linear ion-acoustic solitary waves and double layers are studied in a magnetized plasma with cold ions fluid and two distinct groups of Boltzmann electrons, using the Sagdeev pseudo-potential technique. The conditions under which the solitary waves and double layers can exist are found both analytically and numerically. We have shown the existence of negative potential solitary waves and double layers for subsonic Mach numbers, whereas in the unmagnetized plasma they can only in the supersonic Mach number regime. For the plasma parameters in the auroral region, the electric field amplitude of the solitary structures comes out to be 49 mV/m which is in agreement of the Viking observations in this region.

  7. Low frequency solitons and double layers in a magnetized plasma with two temperature electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rufai, O. R.; Bharuthram, R.; Singh, S. V.; Lakhina, G. S.

    2012-01-01

    Finite amplitude non-linear ion-acoustic solitary waves and double layers are studied in a magnetized plasma with cold ions fluid and two distinct groups of Boltzmann electrons, using the Sagdeev pseudo-potential technique. The conditions under which the solitary waves and double layers can exist are found both analytically and numerically. We have shown the existence of negative potential solitary waves and double layers for subsonic Mach numbers, whereas in the unmagnetized plasma they can only in the supersonic Mach number regime. For the plasma parameters in the auroral region, the electric field amplitude of the solitary structures comes out to be 49 mV/m which is in agreement of the Viking observations in this region.

  8. Inverse estimation for temperatures of outer surface and geometry of inner surface of furnace with two layer walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.-K.; Su, C.-R.

    2008-01-01

    This study provides an inverse analysis to estimate the boundary thermal behavior of a furnace with two layer walls. The unknown temperature distribution of the outer surface and the geometry of the inner surface were estimated from the temperatures of a small number of measured points within the furnace wall. The present approach rearranged the matrix forms of the governing differential equations and then combined the reversed matrix method, the linear least squares error method and the concept of virtual area to determine the unknown boundary conditions of the furnace system. The dimensionless temperature data obtained from the direct problem were used to simulate the temperature measurements. The influence of temperature measurement errors upon the precision of the estimated results was also investigated. The advantage of this approach is that the unknown condition can be directly solved by only one calculation process without initially guessed temperatures, and the iteration process of the traditional method can be avoided in the analysis of the heat transfer. Therefore, the calculation in this work is more rapid and exact than the traditional method. The result showed that the estimation error of the geometry increased with increasing distance between measured points and inner surface and in preset error, and with decreasing number of measured points. However, the geometry of the furnace inner surface could be successfully estimated by only the temperatures of a small number of measured points within and near the outer surface under reasonable preset error

  9. On the Temperature and Humidity Dissimilarity in the Marine Surface Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsén, Xiaoli Guo; Kelly, Mark C.; Sempreviva, Anna Maria

    2014-01-01

    there is an efficient latent heat transfer but negligible sensible heat transfer. Our data suggest that parametrization of humidity fluxes via similarity theory could still be reliable when the correlation coefficient >0.5, and in near-neutral conditions the humidity flux can be estimated without use of the sensible...... of the boundary-layer scale in breaking the “same source, same sink” assumption for scalar similarity. This is supported by the combination of our spectral analysis of scalar fluxes and corresponding measured and modelled boundary-layer depth. This assumption is also broken in near-neutral conditions, when...... heat flux....

  10. Enhanced levels of cold shock proteins in Listeria monocytogenes LO28 upon exposure to low temperature and high hydrostatic pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wemekamp-Kamphuis, H.H.; Karatzas, A.K.; Wouters, J.A.; Abee, T.

    2002-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a psychrotrophic food-borne pathogen that is problematic for the food industry because of its ubiquitous distribution in nature and its ability to grow at low temperatures and in the presence of high salt concentrations. Here we demonstrate that the process of adaptation to

  11. Shock waves in relativistic nuclear matter, I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gleeson, A.M.; Raha, S.

    1979-02-01

    The relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot relations are developed for a 3-dimensional plane shock and a 3-dimensional oblique shock. Using these discontinuity relations together with various equations of state for nuclear matter, the temperatures and the compressibilities attainable by shock compression for a wide range of laboratory kinetic energy of the projectile are calculated. 12 references

  12. Evolution of Ternary AuAgPd Nanoparticles by the Control of Temperature, Thickness, and Tri-Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundar Kunwar

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Metallic alloy nanoparticles (NPs possess great potential to enhance the optical, electronic, chemical, and magnetic properties for various applications by the control of morphology and elemental composition. This work presents the fabrication of ternary AuAgPd alloy nanostructures on sapphire (0001 via the solid-state dewetting of sputter-deposited tri-metallic layers. Based on the systematic control of temperature, thickness, and deposition order of tri-layers, the composite AuAgPd alloy nanoparticles (NPs with various shape, size, and density are demonstrated. The metallic tri-layers exhibit various stages of dewetting based on the increasing growth temperatures between 400 and 900 °C at 15 nm tri-layer film thickness. Specifically, the nucleation of tiny voids and hillocks, void coalescence, the growth and isolated nanoparticle formation, and the shape transformation with Ag sublimation are observed. With the reduced film thickness (6 nm, tiny alloy NPs with improved structural uniformity and spatial arrangement are obtained due to enhanced dewetting. The growth trend of alloy NPs is drastically altered by changing the deposition order of metallic tri-layers. The overall evolution is governed by the surface diffusion and inter-mixing of metallic atoms, Rayleigh-like instability, surface and interface energy minimization, and equilibrium state of the system. The UV-VIS-NIR reflectance spectra reveal the formation of an absorption band and reflectance maxima at specific wavelengths based on the morphology and composition of AuAgPd alloy NPs. In addition, Raman spectra analysis shows the modulation of intensity and peak position of natural vibration modes of sapphire (0001.

  13. Measurements in Regions of Shock Wave/Turbulent Boundary Layer Interaction from Mach 3 to 10 for Open and Blind Code Evaluation/Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    34Blind" Code Evaluation/Validation Michael S. Holden, Timothy P. Wadhams, Matthew G. MacLean, Aaron Dufrene CUBRC , Inc March 2013 Final...298 Back (Rev. 8/98) *Fellow, AIAA, Vice President-Hypersonics, CUBRC , 4455 Genesee Street, Buffalo, NY 14225 ** Member, AIAA, Project Engineers... CUBRC , 4455 Genesee Street, Buffalo, NY 14225 This work was supported by AFOSR Grant No. FA9550-11-1-0290 MEASUREMENTS IN REGIONS OF SHOCK WAVE

  14. Interferometric studies of the pre-plasma influence on the laser energy transfer to the shock wave with the use of two-layer planar targets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalinowska, Z.; Pisarczyk, T.; Badziak, J.; Borodziuk, S.; Chodukowski, T.; Kasperczuk, A.; Gus´kov, S.Y.; Demchenko, N. N.; Ullschmied, Jiří; Renner, Oldřich; Krouský, Eduard; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Skála, Jiří; Šmíd, Michal; Pisarczyk, P.

    T161, May (2014), 014023-014023 ISSN 0031-8949 Grant - others:FP7(XE) 284464 Program:FP7 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : ablation pressure * fast electron * interferometry * resonance absorption * scale length of electron density * shock ignition conception Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics; BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics (FZU-D) Impact factor: 1.126, year: 2014 http://iopscience.iop.org/1402-4896/2014/T161/014023

  15. Radiation- and pair-loaded shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2018-06-01

    We consider the structure of mildly relativistic shocks in dense media, taking into account the radiation and pair loading, and diffusive radiation energy transfer within the flow. For increasing shock velocity (increasing post-shock temperature), the first important effect is the efficient energy redistribution by radiation within the shock that leads to the appearance of an isothermal jump, whereby the flow reaches the final state through a discontinuous isothermal transition. The isothermal jump, on scales much smaller than the photon diffusion length, consists of a weak shock and a quick relaxation to the isothermal conditions. Highly radiation-dominated shocks do not form isothermal jump. Pair production can mildly increase the overall shock compression ratio to ≈10 (4 for matter-dominated shocks and 7 of the radiation-dominated shocks).

  16. Low-temperature processed SnO{sub 2} compact layer for efficient mesostructure perovskite solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Jinxia; Xiong, Qiu; Feng, Bingjie; Xu, Yang; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Hao, E-mail: nanoguy@126.com

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Low-temperature processed 70 nm cl-SnO{sub 2} device exhibits maximum PCE. • Champion PSC after SnCl{sub 4} treatment acquires PCE of 15.07%. • Cl-SnO{sub 2} PSC via SnCl{sub 4} treatment exhibits superior stability to cl-TiO{sub 2} based PSC. - Abstract: SnO{sub 2} nanoparticle film has been synthesized via low- temperature (∼180 °C) solution-processing and proposed as compact layer in mesostructure perovskite-type solar cell (PSC). Low-temperature processed SnO{sub 2} compact layer (cl-SnO{sub 2}) brings perfect crystal-lattice and band-gap matching between electron selective layer and FTO substrate and close interface-contact between cl-SnO{sub 2} and mesoporous TiO{sub 2} layer (mp-TiO{sub 2}), which contributes to suppressing carrier recombination and optimizing device performance. In varied thickness cells, 70 nm cl-SnO{sub 2} device exhibits maximum power conversion efficiency (PCE). In order to further restrain photoelectron recombination and improve the photovoltaic performance, the surface modification of cl-SnO{sub 2} by SnCl{sub 4} aqueous solution has been carried out. The recombination behavior in the cell interior is greatly retarded via SnCl{sub 4} treatment and champion PSC after SnCl{sub 4} treatment has acquire PCE of 15.07%, which is higher than PCE of cl-TiO{sub 2} based PSC fabricated with same mp-TiO{sub 2} and perovskite procedures (13.3%). The stability of cl-SnO{sub 2} PSC via SnCl{sub 4} treatment has also been measured and its PCE reduces to 13.0% after 2 weeks in air.

  17. CARS measurement of vibrational and rotational temperature with high power laser and high speed visualization of total radiation behind hypervelocity shock waves of 5-7km/s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Kotaro; Bindu, Venigalla Hima; Niinomi, Shota; Ota, Masanori; Maeno, Kazuo

    2010-09-01

    Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) method is commonly used for measuring molecular structure or condition. In the aerospace technology, this method is applies to measure the temperature in thermic fluid with relatively long time duration of millisecond or sub millisecond. On the other hand, vibrational/rotational temperatures behind hypervelocity shock wave are important for heat-shield design in phase of reentry flight. The non-equilibrium flow with radiative heating from strongly shocked air ahead of the vehicles plays an important role on the heat flux to the wall surface structure as well as convective heating. In this paper CARS method is applied to measure the vibrational/rotational temperature of N2 behind hypervelocity shock wave. The strong shock wave in front of the reentering space vehicles can be experimentally realigned by free-piston, double-diaphragm shock tube with low density test gas. However CARS measurement is difficult for our experiment. Our measurement needs very short pulse which order of nanosecond and high power laser for CARS method. It is due to our measurement object is the momentary phenomena which velocity is 7km/s. In addition the observation section is low density test gas, and there is the strong background light behind the shock wave. So we employ the CARS method with high power, order of 1J/pulse, and very short pulse (10ns) laser. By using this laser the CARS signal can be acquired even in the strong radiation area. Also we simultaneously try to use the CCD camera to obtain total radiation with CARS method.

  18. Dietary supplementation of Zingiber officinale and Zingiber zerumbet to heat-stressed broiler chickens and its effect on heat shock protein 70 expression, blood parameters and body temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasheimi, S R; Zulkifli, I; Somchit, M N; Zunita, Z; Loh, T C; Soleimani, A F; Tang, S C

    2013-08-01

    The present study was conducted to assess the effects of dietary supplementation of Zingiber officinale and Zingiber zerumbet and to heat-stressed broiler chickens on heat shock protein (HSP) 70 density, plasma corticosterone concentration (CORT), heterophil to lymphocyte ratio (HLR) and body temperature. Beginning from day 28, chicks were divided into five dietary groups: (i) basal diet (control), (ii) basal diet +1%Z. zerumbet powder (ZZ1%), (iii) basal diet +2%Z. zerumbet powder (ZZ2%), (iv) basal diet +1%Z. officinale powder (ZO1%) and (v) basal diet +2%Z. officinale powder (ZO2%). From day 35-42, heat stress was induced by exposing birds to 38±1°C and 80% RH for 2 h/day. Irrespective of diet, heat challenge elevated HSP70 expression, CORT and HLR on day 42. On day 42, following heat challenge, the ZZ1% birds showed lower body temperatures than those of control, ZO1% and ZO2%. Neither CORT nor HLR was significantly affected by diet. The ZO2% and ZZ2% diets enhanced HSP70 expression when compared to the control groups. We concluded that dietary supplementation of Z. officinale and Z. zerumbet powder may induce HSP70 reaction in broiler chickens exposed to heat stress. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. 29th International Symposium on Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Ranjan, Devesh

    2015-01-01

    This proceedings present the results of the 29th International Symposium on Shock Waves (ISSW29) which was held in Madison, Wisconsin, U.S.A., from July 14 to July 19, 2013. It was organized by the Wisconsin Shock Tube Laboratory, which is part of the College of Engineering of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The ISSW29 focused on the following areas: Blast Waves, Chemically Reactive Flows, Detonation and Combustion,  Facilities, Flow Visualization, Hypersonic Flow, Ignition, Impact and Compaction, Industrial Applications, Magnetohydrodynamics, Medical and Biological Applications, Nozzle Flow, Numerical Methods, Plasmas, Propulsion, Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability, Shock-Boundary Layer Interaction, Shock Propagation and Reflection, Shock Vortex Interaction, Shock Waves in Condensed Matter, Shock Waves in Multiphase Flow, as well as Shock Waves in Rarefield Flow. The two Volumes contain the papers presented at the symposium and serve as a reference for the participants of the ISSW 29 and individuals interes...

  20. Bulk heterojunction perovskite solar cells based on room temperature deposited hole-blocking layer: Suppressed hysteresis and flexible photovoltaic application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiliang; Yang, Guang; Zheng, Xiaolu; Lei, Hongwei; Chen, Cong; Ma, Junjie; Wang, Hao; Fang, Guojia

    2017-05-01

    Perovskite solar cells have developed rapidly in recent years as the third generation solar cells. In spite of the great improvement achieved, there still exist some issues such as undesired hysteresis and indispensable high temperature process. In this work, bulk heterojunction perovskite-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester solar cells have been prepared to diminish hysteresis using a facile two step spin-coating method. Furthermore, high quality tin oxide films are fabricated using pulse laser deposition technique at room temperature without any annealing procedure. The as fabricated tin oxide film is successfully applied in bulk heterojunction perovskite solar cells as a hole blocking layer. Bulk heterojunction devices based on room temperature tin oxide exhibit almost hysteresis-free characteristics with power conversion efficiency of 17.29% and 14.0% on rigid and flexible substrates, respectively.

  1. High-rate deposition of epitaxial layers for efficient low-temperature thin film epitaxial silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberbeck, L.; Schmidt, J.; Wagner, T.A.; Bergmann, R.B. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Physical Electronics

    2001-07-01

    Low-temperature deposition of Si for thin-film solar cells has previously been hampered by low deposition rates and low material quality, usually reflected by a low open-circuit voltage of these solar cells. In contrast, ion-assisted deposition produces Si films with a minority-carrier diffusion length of 40 {mu}m, obtained at a record deposition rate of 0.8 {mu}m/min and a deposition temperature of 650{sup o}C with a prebake at 810{sup o}C. A thin-film Si solar cell with a 20-{mu}m-thick epitaxial layer achieves an open-circuit voltage of 622 mV and a conversion efficiency of 12.7% without any light trapping structures and without high-temperature solar cell process steps. (author)

  2. Electrical properties of cubic InN and GaN epitaxial layers as a function of temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, J.R.L.; Chitta, V.A.; Abramof, E.

    2000-01-01

    Carrier concentration and mobility were measured for intrinsic cubic InN and GaN, and for Si-doped cubic GaN as a function of temperature. Metallic n-type conductivity was found for the InN, while background p-type conductivity was observed for the intrinsic GaN layer. Doping the cubic GaN with Si two regimes were observed. For low Si-doping concentrations, the samples remain p-type. Increasing the Si-doping level, the background acceptors are compensated and the samples became highly degenerated n-type. From the carrier concentration dependence on temperature, the activation energy of the donor and acceptor levels was determined. Attempts were made to determine the scattering mechanisms responsible for the behavior of the mobility as a function of temperature

  3. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) grown bi-layer graphene transistor characteristics at high temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Qaisi, Ramy M.

    2014-05-15

    We report the characteristics of atmospheric chemical vapor deposition grown bilayer graphene transistors fabricated on ultra-scaled (10 nm) high-κ dielectric aluminum oxide (Al2O3) at elevated temperatures. We observed that the drive current increased by >400% as temperature increased from room temperature to 250 °C. Low gate leakage was maintained for prolonged exposure at 100 °C but increased significantly at temperatures >200 °C. These results provide important insights for considering chemical vapor deposition graphene on aluminum oxide for high temperature applications where low power and high frequency operation are required. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) grown bi-layer graphene transistor characteristics at high temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Qaisi, Ramy M.; Smith, Casey; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    We report the characteristics of atmospheric chemical vapor deposition grown bilayer graphene transistors fabricated on ultra-scaled (10 nm) high-κ dielectric aluminum oxide (Al2O3) at elevated temperatures. We observed that the drive current increased by >400% as temperature increased from room temperature to 250 °C. Low gate leakage was maintained for prolonged exposure at 100 °C but increased significantly at temperatures >200 °C. These results provide important insights for considering chemical vapor deposition graphene on aluminum oxide for high temperature applications where low power and high frequency operation are required. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Influence of interface scattering on shock waves in heterogeneous solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang Shiming; Ravichandran, Guruswami; Grady, Dennis E.

    2002-01-01

    In heterogeneous media, the scattering due to interfaces between dissimilar materials play an important role in shock wave dissipation and dispersion. In this work the influence of interface scattering effect on shock waves was studied by impacting flyer plates onto periodically layered polycarbonate/6061 aluminum, polycarbonate/304 stainless steel and polycarbonate/glass composites. The experimental results (using VISAR and stress gauges) indicate that the rise time of the shock front decreases with increasing shock strength, and increases with increasing mechanical impedance mismatch between layers; the strain rate at the shock front increases by about the square of the shock stress. Experimental and numerical results also show that due to interface scattering effect the shock wave velocity in periodically layered composites decreases. In some cases the shock velocity of a layered heterogeneous composite can be lower than that of either of its components

  6. Effects of Precipitation on Ocean Mixed-Layer Temperature and Salinity as Simulated in a 2-D Coupled Ocean-Cloud Resolving Atmosphere Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaofan; Sui, C.-H.; Lau, K-M.; Adamec, D.

    1999-01-01

    A two-dimensional coupled ocean-cloud resolving atmosphere model is used to investigate possible roles of convective scale ocean disturbances induced by atmospheric precipitation on ocean mixed-layer heat and salt budgets. The model couples a cloud resolving model with an embedded mixed layer-ocean circulation model. Five experiment are performed under imposed large-scale atmospheric forcing in terms of vertical velocity derived from the TOGA COARE observations during a selected seven-day period. The dominant variability of mixed-layer temperature and salinity are simulated by the coupled model with imposed large-scale forcing. The mixed-layer temperatures in the coupled experiments with 1-D and 2-D ocean models show similar variations when salinity effects are not included. When salinity effects are included, however, differences in the domain-mean mixed-layer salinity and temperature between coupled experiments with 1-D and 2-D ocean models could be as large as 0.3 PSU and 0.4 C respectively. Without fresh water effects, the nocturnal heat loss over ocean surface causes deep mixed layers and weak cooling rates so that the nocturnal mixed-layer temperatures tend to be horizontally-uniform. The fresh water flux, however, causes shallow mixed layers over convective areas while the nocturnal heat loss causes deep mixed layer over convection-free areas so that the mixed-layer temperatures have large horizontal fluctuations. Furthermore, fresh water flux exhibits larger spatial fluctuations than surface heat flux because heavy rainfall occurs over convective areas embedded in broad non-convective or clear areas, whereas diurnal signals over whole model areas yield high spatial correlation of surface heat flux. As a result, mixed-layer salinities contribute more to the density differences than do mixed-layer temperatures.

  7. Effects of Co layer thickness and annealing temperature on the magnetic properties of inverted [Pt/Co] multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Tae Young; Chan Won, Young; Su Son, Dong; Lee, Seong-Rae; Ho Lim, Sang

    2013-01-01

    The effects of Co layer thickness and annealing temperature on the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) properties of inverted [Pt (0.2 nm)/Co (t Co )] 6 multilayers (where t Co indicates the thickness of the Co layer) have been investigated. The cross-sectional microstructure, as observed from the high-resolution transmission electron microscope images, shows a clear layered structure with atomically flat interfaces both in the as-deposited state as well as after annealing, indicating the interface effects for PMA. The effective PMA energy density (K eff ) increases significantly with an increase in t Co from 0.2 to 0.28 nm and then becomes almost saturated with further increases in t Co , followed by a slight reduction at the highest Co thickness, t Co  = 0.6 nm. In order to explain the t Co dependence on K eff , the intrinsic PMA energy density (K i ) is calculated by additionally measuring a similar set of results for the saturation magnetization. The K i value increases nearly linearly with the increase in t Co from 0.2 to 0.5 nm, followed by saturation at a higher t Co value of 0.6 nm. Owing to a close relationship between K i and the quality of the interfaces, these results indicate a similar t Co dependence on the quality of the interfaces. This is further supported from the magnetic measurements of the samples annealed at the highest temperature of 500 °C, where a second phase is formed, which show a similar t Co dependence on the amount of the second phase. The K i value is nearly independent of the annealing temperature at t Co  ≤ 0.4 nm, above which a substantial reduction is observed, when the annealing temperature exceeds 500 °C

  8. Shock Tube Ignition Delay Data Affected by Localized Ignition Phenomena

    KAUST Repository

    Javed, Tamour; Badra, J.; Jaasim, Mohammed; Es-sebbar, Et-touhami; Labastida, M.F.; Chung, Suk-Ho; Im, Hong G.; Farooq, Aamir

    2016-01-01

    Shock tubes have conventionally been used for measuring high-temperature ignition delay times ~ O(1 ms). In the last decade or so, the operating regime of shock tubes has been extended to lower temperatures by accessing longer observation times

  9. Growth and characterization of III-N ternary thin films by plasma assisted atomic layer epitaxy at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nepal, Neeraj; Anderson, Virginia R.; Hite, Jennifer K.; Eddy, Charles R.

    2015-08-31

    We report the growth and characterization of III-nitride ternary thin films (Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N, In{sub x}Al{sub 1−x}N and In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N) at ≤ 500 °C by plasma assisted atomic layer epitaxy (PA-ALE) over a wide stoichiometric range including the range where phase separation has been an issue for films grown by molecular beam epitaxy and metal organic chemical vapor deposition. The composition of these ternaries was intentionally varied through alterations in the cycle ratios of the III-nitride binary layers (AlN, GaN, and InN). By this digital alloy growth method, we are able to grow III-nitride ternaries by PA-ALE over nearly the entire stoichiometry range including in the spinodal decomposition region (x = 15–85%). These early efforts suggest great promise of PA-ALE at low temperatures for addressing miscibility gap challenges encountered with conventional growth methods and realizing high performance optoelectronic and electronic devices involving ternary/binary heterojunctions, which are not currently possible. - Highlights: • III-N ternaries grown at ≤ 500 °C by plasma assisted atomic layer epitaxy • Growth of InGaN and AlInN in the spinodal decomposition region (15–85%) • Epitaxial, smooth and uniform III-N film growth at low temperatures.

  10. Growth and characterization of III-N ternary thin films by plasma assisted atomic layer epitaxy at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nepal, Neeraj; Anderson, Virginia R.; Hite, Jennifer K.; Eddy, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    We report the growth and characterization of III-nitride ternary thin films (Al x Ga 1−x N, In x Al 1−x N and In x Ga 1−x N) at ≤ 500 °C by plasma assisted atomic layer epitaxy (PA-ALE) over a wide stoichiometric range including the range where phase separation has been an issue for films grown by molecular beam epitaxy and metal organic chemical vapor deposition. The composition of these ternaries was intentionally varied through alterations in the cycle ratios of the III-nitride binary layers (AlN, GaN, and InN). By this digital alloy growth method, we are able to grow III-nitride ternaries by PA-ALE over nearly the entire stoichiometry range including in the spinodal decomposition region (x = 15–85%). These early efforts suggest great promise of PA-ALE at low temperatures for addressing miscibility gap challenges encountered with conventional growth methods and realizing high performance optoelectronic and electronic devices involving ternary/binary heterojunctions, which are not currently possible. - Highlights: • III-N ternaries grown at ≤ 500 °C by plasma assisted atomic layer epitaxy • Growth of InGaN and AlInN in the spinodal decomposition region (15–85%) • Epitaxial, smooth and uniform III-N film growth at low temperatures

  11. Optimisation of the microporous layer for a polybenzimidazole-based high temperature PEMFC - effect of carbon content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobato, J.; Canizares, P.; Rodrigo, M.A.; Ubeda, D.; Pinar, F.J.; Linares, J.J. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Castilla-La Mancha, Av. Camilo Jose Cela, n 12. 13071, Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2010-10-15

    This work aims at studying the role of the microporous layer (MPL) in electrodes prepared for high temperature PBI-based PEMFC. The two main components of this layer are carbon black and a polymeric binder (Teflon). This work addresses the effect of the MPL carbon amount on the performance of a high temperature PEMFC. Thus, gas diffusion layers (GDLs) containing MPL with different carbon contents (from 0.5 to 4 mg cm{sup -2}) were prepared. Firstly, they were physically characterised by Hg-porosimetry measuring pore size distribution, porosity, tortuosity and mean pore size. Permeability measurements were also performed. The higher the carbon content was the lower both porosity and permeability were. Afterwards, electrodes were prepared with these GDLs and were electrochemically characterised. Electrochemical surface area (ESA) was determined and fuel cell performance was evaluated under different fuel and comburent stoichiometries, supporting these results with impedance spectra. This made it possible to see the benefits of the MPL inclusion in the electrode structure, with a significant increase in the fuel cell performance and ESA. Once the goodness of the MPL was confirmed, result analysis led to an optimum MPL composition of 2 mg cm{sup -2} of carbon for both electrodes, anode and cathode. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  12. Effects of anodizing conditions and annealing temperature on the morphology and crystalline structure of anodic oxide layers grown on iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlik, Anna; Hnida, Katarzyna; Socha, Robert P.; Wiercigroch, Ewelina; Małek, Kamilla; Sulka, Grzegorz D.

    2017-12-01

    Anodic iron oxide layers were formed by anodization of the iron foil in an ethylene glycol-based electrolyte containing 0.2 M NH4F and 0.5 M H2O at 40 V for 1 h. The anodizing conditions such as electrolyte composition and applied potential were optimized. In order to examine the influence of electrolyte stirring and applied magnetic field, the anodic samples were prepared under the dynamic and static conditions in the presence or absence of magnetic field. It was shown that ordered iron oxide nanopore arrays could be obtained at lower anodizing temperatures (10 and 20 °C) at the static conditions without the magnetic field or at the dynamic conditions with the applied magnetic field. Since the as-prepared anodic layers are amorphous in nature, the samples were annealed in air at different temperatures (200-500 °C) for a fixed duration of time (1 h). The morphology and crystal phases developed after anodization and subsequent annealing were characterized using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Raman spectroscopy. The results proved that the annealing process transforms the amorphous layer into magnetite and hematite phases. In addition, the heat treatment results in a substantial decrease in the fluorine content and increase in the oxygen content.

  13. Collisionless Electrostatic Shock Modeling and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-21

    equations with piston -like boundary conditions gives a solution for the shock behavior. • Assumes cold upstream ions, therefore neglecting shock...temperature ratio (>10) – Wave Train Wavelength – Shock-Front Mach Number – Reflected Ion Beam Velocity Gathering Experiment Data – Double Plasma Device...experimental shock data. • Inconsistencies in published 1969 double -plasma device data hampered validation. Future Work: Extension to Moderately

  14. Method for Aluminum Oxide Thin Films Prepared through Low Temperature Atomic Layer Deposition for Encapsulating Organic Electroluminescent Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Ying Li

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Preparation of dense alumina (Al2O3 thin film through atomic layer deposition (ALD provides a pathway to achieve the encapsulation of organic light emitting devices (OLED. Unlike traditional ALD which is usually executed at higher reaction n temperatures that may affect the performance of OLED, this application discusses the development on preparation of ALD thin film at a low temperature. One concern of ALD is the suppressing effect of ambient temperature on uniformity of thin film. To mitigate this issue, the pumping time in each reaction cycle was increased during the preparation process, which removed reaction byproducts and inhibited the formation of vacancies. As a result, the obtained thin film had both high uniformity and density properties, which provided an excellent encapsulation performance. The results from microstructure morphology analysis, water vapor transmission rate, and lifetime test showed that the difference in uniformity between thin films prepared at low temperatures, with increased pumping time, and high temperatures was small and there was no obvious influence of increased pumping time on light emitting performance. Meanwhile, the permeability for water vapor of the thin film prepared at a low temperature was found to reach as low as 1.5 × 10−4 g/(m2·day under ambient conditions of 25 °C and 60% relative humidity, indicating a potential extension in the lifetime for the OLED.

  15. Hypovolemic shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the person's position unless they are in immediate danger. Do not give fluids by mouth. If person ... the patient with shock. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  16. Soft-sphere simulations of a planar shock interaction with a granular bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Cameron; Balachandar, S.; McGrath, Thomas P.

    2018-03-01

    Here we consider the problem of shock propagation through a layer of spherical particles. A point particle force model is used to capture the shock-induced aerodynamic force acting upon the particles. The discrete element method (DEM) code liggghts is used to implement the shock-induced force as well as to capture the collisional forces within the system. A volume-fraction-dependent drag correction is applied using Voronoi tessellation to calculate the volume of fluid around each individual particle. A statistically stationary frame is chosen so that spatial and temporal averaging can be performed to calculate ensemble-averaged macroscopic quantities, such as the granular temperature. A parametric study is carried out by varying the coefficient of restitution for three sets of multiphase shock conditions. A self-similar profile is obtained for the granular temperature that is dependent on the coefficient of restitution. A traveling wave structure is observed in the particle concentration downstream of the shock and this instability arises from the volume-fraction-dependent drag force. The intensity of the traveling wave increases significantly as inelastic collisions are introduced. Downstream of the shock, the variance in Voronoi volume fraction is shown to have a strong dependence upon the coefficient of restitution, indicating clustering of particles induced by collisional dissipation. Statistics of the Voronoi volume are computed upstream and downstream of the shock and compared to theoretical results for randomly distributed hard spheres.

  17. Shock absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Housman, J.J.

    1978-01-01

    A shock absorber is described for use in a hostile environment at the end of a blind passage for absorbing impact loads. The shock absorber includes at least one element which occupies the passage and which is comprised of a porous brittle material which is substantially non-degradable in the hostile environment. A void volume is provided in the element to enable the element to absorb a predetermined level of energy upon being crushed due to impact loading

  18. NOAA Climate Data Record for Mean Layer Temperature (Upper Troposphere & Lower Stratosphere) from UCAR, Version 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Temperatures of Troposphere / Stratosphere (TTS) (AMSU channel 7 and MSU channel 3) CDR is generated by using National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration...

  19. NOAA Climate Data Record for Mean Layer Temperature (Lower Stratosphere) from UCAR, Version 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Temperatures in the Lower Stratosphere (TLS) (AMSU channel 9 and MSU channel 4) CDR is generated by using National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA),...

  20. Stable Inverted Low-Bandgap Polymer Solar Cells with Aqueous Solution Processed Low-Temperature ZnO Buffer Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunfu Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficient inverted low-bandgap polymer solar cells with an aqueous solution processed low-temperature ZnO buffer layer have been investigated. The low-bandgap material PTB-7 is employed so that more solar light can be efficiently harvested, and the aqueous solution processed ZnO electron transport buffer layer is prepared at 150°C so that it can be compatible with the roll-to-roll process. Power conversion efficiency (PCE of the inverted device reaches 7.12%, which is near the control conventional device. More importantly, the inverted device shows a better stability, keeping more than 90% of its original PCE after being stored for 625 hours, while PCE of the conventional device is only 75% of what it was. In addition, it is found that the ZnO thin film annealed in N2 can obviously increase PCE of the inverted device further to 7.26%.