WorldWideScience

Sample records for shock emission model

  1. Modeling nonthermal emission from stellar bow shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, V.; López-Santiago, J.; Miceli, M.; Bonito, R.; de Castro, E.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Runaway O- and early B-type stars passing through the interstellar medium at supersonic velocities and characterized by strong stellar winds may produce bow shocks that can serve as particle acceleration sites. Previous theoretical models predict the production of high-energy photons by nonthermal radiative processes, but their efficiency is still debated. Aims: We aim to test and explain the possibility of emission from the bow shocks formed by runaway stars traveling through the interstellar medium by using previous theoretical models. Methods: We applied our model to AE Aurigae, the first reported star with an X-ray detected bow shock, to BD+43 3654, in which the observations failed in detecting high-energy emission, and to the transition phase of a supergiant star in the late stages of its life. Results: From our analysis, we confirm that the X-ray emission from the bow shock produced by AE Aurigae can be explained by inverse Compton processes involving the infrared photons of the heated dust. We also predict low high-energy flux emission from the bow shock produced by BD+43 3654, and the possibility of high-energy emission from the bow shock formed by a supergiant star during the transition phase from blue to red supergiant. Conclusions: Bow shocks formed by different types of runaway stars are revealed as a new possible source of high-energy photons in our neighborhood.

  2. A model for high-energy emission of the Intrabinary shock in pulsar binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Hongjun

    2018-01-01

    We present our studies of intrabinary shock emission for astrophysical binary systems with a neutron star. We construct a model for the shock emission and compare the model calculation with the light curve and the spectral energy distribution of the gamma-ray binary 1FGL J1018.6-5856. The model assumes a slow and a fast population of particles accelerated in the shock, and computes the high-energy emission spectra and orbital light curves produced by synchrotron, self-Compton and external Compton processes of the high-energy particles in the shock. The model allows one to study plasma properties and to constrain the binary geometry, most importantly the inclination angle (i). We discuss potential use of this model for other pulsar binaries to determine the inclination angle of the binary hence the mass of the neutron star.

  3. Modeling X-ray and gamma-ray emission in the intrabinary shock of pulsar binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, H.

    2017-10-01

    We present broadband SED and light curve, and a wind interaction model for the gamma-ray binary 1FGL J1018.6-5856 (J1018) which exhibits double peaks in the X-ray light curve. Assuming that the X-ray to low-energy gamma-ray emission is produced by synchrotron radiation and high-energy gamma rays by inverse Compton scattering in the intrabinary shock (IBS), we model the broadband SED and light curve of J1018 using a two-component model having slow electrons in the shock and fast bulk-accelerated electrons at the skin of the shock. The model explains the broadband SED and light curve of J1018 qualitatively well. In particular, modeling the synchrotron emission constrains the orbital geometry. We discuss potential use of the model for other pulsar binaries.

  4. 3-D Model of Broadband Emission from Supernova Remnants Undergoing Non-linear Diffusive Shock Acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Shiu-Hang; Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Ellison, Donald C.

    2008-07-02

    We present a 3-dimensional model of supernova remnants (SNRs) where the hydrodynamical evolution of the remnant is modeled consistently with nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration occurring at the outer blast wave. The model includes particle escape and diffusion outside of the forward shock, and particle interactions with arbitrary distributions of external ambient material, such as molecular clouds. We include synchrotron emission and cooling, bremsstrahlung radiation, neutral pion production, inverse-Compton (IC), and Coulomb energy-loss. Boardband spectra have been calculated for typical parameters including dense regions of gas external to a 1000 year old SNR. In this paper, we describe the details of our model but do not attempt a detailed fit to any specific remnant. We also do not include magnetic field amplification (MFA), even though this effect may be important in some young remnants. In this first presentation of the model we don't attempt a detailed fit to any specific remnant. Our aim is to develop a flexible platform, which can be generalized to include effects such as MFA, and which can be easily adapted to various SNR environments, including Type Ia SNRs, which explode in a constant density medium, and Type II SNRs, which explode in a pre-supernova wind. When applied to a specific SNR, our model will predict cosmic-ray spectra and multi-wavelength morphology in projected images for instruments with varying spatial and spectral resolutions. We show examples of these spectra and images and emphasize the importance of measurements in the hard X-ray, GeV, and TeV gamma-ray bands for investigating key ingredients in the acceleration mechanism, and for deducing whether or not TeV emission is produced by IC from electrons or pion-decay from protons.

  5. Reverse Shock Emission in Gamma-Ray Bursts Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Gao

    2015-01-01

    reverse shock which have been confirmed by observations. Investigations of the nature of the reverse shock emission can provide valuable insights into the intrinsic properties of the GRB ejecta. Here we briefly review the standard and the extended models of the reverse shock emission, discussing the connection between the theory and observations, including the implications of the latest observational advances.

  6. Modeling magnetohydrodynamics and non-equilibrium SoHO/UVCS line emission of CME shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, P.; Raymond, J. C.; Reale, F.

    The Coronal Mass Ejections are plasma clouds expelled from the Sun into the interplanetary medium. We study the propagation of shock waves in the solar corona generated during Coronal Mass Ejections by means of a numerical multi-dimensional MHD model. The model describes the MHD evolution of a compressible plasma in an ambient magnetic field including tensor thermal conduction, radiative losses as main physical effects. We use the MHD version of the FLASH parallel hydrodynamic code with adaptive mesh refinement, originally developed at the University of Chicago USA). The code is highly modular and made efficiently parallel with the Message Passing Interface library. We analyze the diagnostic signatures of shock fronts generated by supersonic CME fragments detectable with the UltraViolet Coronagraphic Spectrometer on board the SoHO mission. To this aim we perform 3D MHD simulations of the shock propagation for the time it takes to cross the UVCS slit positioned at a distance of a few solar radii from the solar surface. In the presence of highly effective thermal conduction the simulation takes 200000 time steps to cover 1000 s of evolution. Considering a 3-D domain of 256x256x512 grid cells this kind of simulations requires thousands of hours of computer time and therefore high performance computing (HPC) systems. The simulations were run on the CINECA IBM/SP5 HPC cluster within the INAF/CINECA agreement. We show simulation results and some implications for UVCS observations.

  7. A stock-flow consistent input-output model with applications to energy price shocks, interest rates, and heat emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Matthew; Hartley, Brian; Richters, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    By synthesizing stock-flow consistent models, input-output models, and aspects of ecological macroeconomics, a method is developed to simultaneously model monetary flows through the financial system, flows of produced goods and services through the real economy, and flows of physical materials through the natural environment. This paper highlights the linkages between the physical environment and the economic system by emphasizing the role of the energy industry. A conceptual model is developed in general form with an arbitrary number of sectors, while emphasizing connections with the agent-based, econophysics, and complexity economics literature. First, we use the model to challenge claims that 0% interest rates are a necessary condition for a stationary economy and conduct a stability analysis within the parameter space of interest rates and consumption parameters of an economy in stock-flow equilibrium. Second, we analyze the role of energy price shocks in contributing to recessions, incorporating several propagation and amplification mechanisms. Third, implied heat emissions from energy conversion and the effect of anthropogenic heat flux on climate change are considered in light of a minimal single-layer atmosphere climate model, although the model is only implicitly, not explicitly, linked to the economic model.

  8. Biophoton emission induced by heat shock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiro Kobayashi

    Full Text Available Ultraweak biophoton emission originates from the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS that are produced in mitochondria as by-products of cellular respiration. In healthy cells, the concentration of ROS is minimized by a system of biological antioxidants. However, heat shock changes the equilibrium between oxidative stress and antioxidant activity, that is, a rapid rise in temperature induces biophoton emission from ROS. Although the rate and intensity of biophoton emission was observed to increase in response to elevated temperatures, pretreatment at lower high temperatures inhibited photon emission at higher temperatures. Biophoton measurements are useful for observing and evaluating heat shock.

  9. H2 emission from non-stationary magnetized bow shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tram, L. N.; Lesaffre, P.; Cabrit, S.; Gusdorf, A.; Nhung, P. T.

    2018-01-01

    When a fast moving star or a protostellar jet hits an interstellar cloud, the surrounding gas gets heated and illuminated: a bow shock is born that delineates the wake of the impact. In such a process, the new molecules that are formed and excited in the gas phase become accessible to observations. In this paper, we revisit models of H2 emission in these bow shocks. We approximate the bow shock by a statistical distribution of planar shocks computed with a magnetized shock model. We improve on previous works by considering arbitrary bow shapes, a finite irradiation field and by including the age effect of non-stationary C-type shocks on the excitation diagram and line profiles of H2. We also examine the dependence of the line profiles on the shock velocity and on the viewing angle: we suggest that spectrally resolved observations may greatly help to probe the dynamics inside the bow shock. For reasonable bow shapes, our analysis shows that low-velocity shocks largely contribute to H2 excitation diagram. This can result in an observational bias towards low velocities when planar shocks are used to interpret H2 emission from an unresolved bow. We also report a large magnetization bias when the velocity of the planar model is set independently. Our 3D models reproduce excitation diagrams in BHR 71 and Orion bow shocks better than previous 1D models. Our 3D model is also able to reproduce the shape and width of the broad H2 1-0S(1) line profile in an Orion bow shock (Brand et al. 1989).

  10. Shock Detector for SURF model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-01-11

    SURF and its extension SURFplus are reactive burn models aimed at shock initiation and propagation of detonation waves in high explosives. A distinctive feature of these models is that the burn rate depends on the lead shock pressure. A key part of the models is an algorithm to detect the lead shock. Typically, shock capturing hydro algorithms have small oscillations behind a shock. Here we investigate how well the shock detection algorithm works for a nearly steady propagating detonation wave in one-dimension using the Eulerian xRage code.

  11. Unified model of plasma formation, bubble generation and shock wave emission in water for fs to ns laser pulses (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiao-Xuan; Freidank, Sebastian; Linz, Norbert; Paltauf, Günther; Zhang, Zhenxi; Vogel, Alfred

    2017-03-01

    We developed modeling tools for optical breakdown events in water that span various phases reaching from breakdown initiation via solvated electron generation, through laser induced-plasma formation and temperature evolution in the focal spot to the later phases of cavitation bubble dynamics and shock wave emission and applied them to a large parameter space of pulse durations, wavelengths, and pulse energies. The rate equation model considers the interplay of linear absorption, photoionization, avalanche ionization and recombination, traces thermalization and temperature evolution during the laser pulse, and portrays the role of thermal ionization that becomes relevant for T > 3000 K. Modeling of free-electron generation includes recent insights on breakdown initiation in water via multiphoton excitation of valence band electrons into a solvated state at Eini = 6.6 eV followed by up-conversion into the conduction band level that is located at 9.5 eV. The ability of tracing the temperature evolution enabled us to link the model of laser-induced plasma formation with a hydrodynamic model of plasma-induced pressure evolution and phase transitions that, in turn, traces bubble generation and dynamics as well as shock wave emission. This way, the amount of nonlinear energy deposition in transparent dielectrics and the resulting material modifications can be assessed as a function of incident laser energy. The unified model of plasma formation and bubble dynamics yields an excellent agreement with experimental results over the entire range of investigated pulse durations (femtosecond to nanosecond), wavelengths (UV to IR) and pulse energies.

  12. Galaxy-Wide Shocks in the H$\\alpha$ Emission of Nearby Galaxy Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, S. Alireza; Lotz, Jennifer M.

    2018-01-01

    We examine the properties of shocked gas produced as a result of binary galaxy interactions, using H$\\alpha$ emission in a sample 22 mergers observed with SparsePak Integral Field Unit (IFU) at Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO). Our sample consists of major and minor tidally interacting galaxies (mass ratio $1error of the fit parameters, and use the F-test to determine the best number of kinematic components for each fiber. We use both [N II]/H$\\alpha$ ratio and velocity dispersion of components to separate star-forming (HII) regions from shock-heated gas. We estimate the fraction of shocked H$\\alpha$ emission to the total H$\\alpha$ flux, $\\text{f}_\\text{shocked}$, and examine the spatial distribution of shocks. We find that close galaxy pairs have, on average, a higher shock fraction than wide pairs, and our coalesced mergers have the highest average $\\text{f}_\\text{shocked}$. Additionally, we find for the first time, correlations between mass ratio, mass of the companion, and $\\text{f}_\\text{shocked}$ in tidally interacting galaxy pairs. Among the non-coalesced systems in our sample, the galaxy pairs with more equal light ratio (stellar mass ratio) tend to have a higher average $\\text{f}_\\text{shocked}$. Also, the primary (more massive) companions are on average slightly more shocked than the secondary (less massive) ones. Utilizing dynamical models in the literature and this work, we inspect trends between $\\text{f}_\\text{shocked}$ and the reconstructed encounter parameters. In this very limited sample, we find that the orbital pericentric separation is correlated with shock fraction, consistent with shocks being produced by the chain of events caused by the tidal impulse during the first passage. These results lay a basis for furture analysis using the higher statistics provided by the on-going and future IFU galaxy surveys.

  13. Model for Shock Wave Chaos

    KAUST Repository

    Kasimov, Aslan R.

    2013-03-08

    We propose the following model equation, ut+1/2(u2−uus)x=f(x,us) that predicts chaotic shock waves, similar to those in detonations in chemically reacting mixtures. The equation is given on the half line, x<0, and the shock is located at x=0 for any t≥0. Here, us(t) is the shock state and the source term f is taken to mimic the chemical energy release in detonations. This equation retains the essential physics needed to reproduce many properties of detonations in gaseous reactive mixtures: steady traveling wave solutions, instability of such solutions, and the onset of chaos. Our model is the first (to our knowledge) to describe chaos in shock waves by a scalar first-order partial differential equation. The chaos arises in the equation thanks to an interplay between the nonlinearity of the inviscid Burgers equation and a novel forcing term that is nonlocal in nature and has deep physical roots in reactive Euler equations.

  14. Shock wave emission during the collapse of cavitation bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garen, W.; Hegedűs, F.; Kai, Y.; Koch, S.; Meyerer, B.; Neu, W.; Teubner, U.

    2016-07-01

    Shock wave emission induced by intense laser pulses is investigated experimentally. The present work focuses on the conditions of shock wave emission in glycerine and distilled water during the first bubble collapse. Experimental investigations are carried out in liquids as a function of temperature and viscosity. Comparison is made with the theoretical work of Poritsky (Proc 1st US Natl Congress Appl Mech 813-821, 1952) and Brennen (Cavitation and bubble dynamics, Oxford University Press 1995). To the best knowledge of the authors, this is the first experimental verification of those theories.

  15. Multiscale Modeling of Shocked Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ruqiang; Zhu, Jianbin

    2007-06-01

    Under shock compression, polycrystalline ceramics may undergo mesoscopically heterogeneous inelastic deformation via transgranular slip or twinning in some grains. Although polycrystal modeling, which accounts for crystal anisotropies and grain-to-grain topological variations and permits implementation of crystal plasticity models of interest, may be used to analyze such a deformation, the size affordable is too small to run wave propagation simulations needed to extract material properties from a plate impact experiment. To address this issue, we have developed a multiscale modeling technique, in which a Voronoi polycrystal is embedded in a homogeneous matrix of the size proper for simulating the experiment. The polycrystal model considers nonlinear crystal elasticity and microplasticity by limited slip systems. The matrix model uses the mean stress response predicted by elastic polycrystal simulation and a strength model combining the Drucker-Prager plasticity with a prescribed limiting strength. Two parametric optimizations are pursed iteratively. One is to optimize the matrix parameters to match the simulated wave profile with the measurement. The other is to optimize the polycrystal parameters to match the triaxial stress-strain curves volume-averaged over the polycrystal to those of the matrix. The technique has been applied to analyze the inelastic deformations of shocked alumina and silicon carbide. The results will be presented for demonstration.

  16. Simulation of Relativistic Shocks and Associated Self-Consistent Radiation for GRB Prompt Emission and Afterglows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Niemiec, J.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J.; Sol, H.; Pohl, M.; hide

    2010-01-01

    Plasma instabilities excited in collisionless shocks are responsible for particle acceleration. We have investigated the particle acceleration and shock structure associated with an unmagnetized relativistic electron-positron jet propagating into an unmagnetized electron-positron plasma. Cold jet electrons are thermalized and slowed while the ambient electrons are swept up to create a partially developed hydrodynamic-like shock structure. In the leading shock, electron density increases by a factor of about 3.5 in the simulation frame. Strong electromagnetic fields are generated in the trailing shock and provide an emission site. This simulation corresponds to a case for gamma-ray burst afterglows. We will simulate colliding shells as an internal shock model for prompt emission. Turbulent magnetic fields generated by a slower shell will be collided by a faster shell. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron s transverse deflection behind the shock. We calculate the radiation from deflected electrons in the turbulent magnetic fields. The properties of this radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts

  17. Converging shocks for DSD modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matignon, Christophe

    2013-06-01

    Modelling of pyrotechnic systems requires both, a good understanding and precise prediction capabilities of the dynamics of detonation. When using insensitive high explosives IHE (such as TATB-based explosives) the interaction of the detonation front with the confinement can lead to very different detonation velocities. One of the most popular engineering tools used to model this behaviour is the Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD). In the DSD assumption, the detonation front propagates at a normal shock velocity (Dn) which depends only on its local curvature (κ). For divergent detonations, the DSD limit is very well established both experimentally and theoretically and one can easily propose a model (which obeys the 1D quasi-steady weakly curved detonation theory) to reproduce this behavior. We propose to extend the DSD theory to slightly convergent detonation fronts and to validate it against experimental data. Two series of experiments were carried out. The first series was designed to collect precise information regarding converging detonation. Usually, in such configurations, the detonation is non steady, making precise and simultaneous measurements of velocity and curvature difficult to achieve. The originality of the proposed setup is to drive a self similar convergent detonation at constant speed in an IHE rod by an external explosive tube of greater detonation velocity (allowing an accurate recording of both velocity and curvature). A wide range EOS/reaction rate model (inspired from previous works of Wescott et al.) was then calibrated to reproduce both the strong shock initiation and the newly extended (Dn- κ) law. This model can be used to perform either direct numerical simulation (DNS) on fine resolved mesh grid, or its reduced PZR model (DSD based) on a much coarser grid. This model was then successfully validated against the second series of experiments involving a detonation propagating around an obstacle and exhibiting a non steady converging front

  18. Shock Acceleration Model with Postshock Turbulence for Giant Radio Relics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyesung

    2017-08-01

    We explore the shock acceleration model for giant radio relics, in which relativistic electrons are accelerated via diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) by merger-driven shocks in the outskirts of galaxy clusters. In addition to DSA, turbulent acceleration by compressive MHD modes downstream of the shock are included as well as energy losses of postshock electrons due to Coulomb scattering, synchrotron emission, and inverse Compton scattering off the cosmic background radiation. Considering that only a small fraction of merging clusters host radio relics, we favor a reacceleration scenario in which radio relics are generated preferentially by shocks encountering the regions containing low-energy (γ_{e} ≲ 300) cosmic ray electrons (CRe). We perform time-dependent DSA simulations of spherically expanding shocks with physical parameters relevant for the Sausage radio relic, and calculate the radio synchrotron emission from the accelerated CRe. We find that significant level of postshock turbulent acceleration is required in order to reproduce broad profiles of the observed radio flux densities of the Sausage relic. Moreover, the spectral curvature in the observed integrated radio spectrum can be explained, if the putative shock should have swept up and exited out of the preshock region of fossil CRe about 10 Myr ago.

  19. Emissions Modeling Clearinghouse

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Emissions Modeling Clearinghouse (EMCH) supports and promotes emissions modeling activities both internal and external to the EPA. Through this site, the EPA...

  20. Thermal infrared spectroscopy and modeling of experimentally shocked plagioclase feldspars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. R.; Horz, F.; Staid, M.I.

    2003-01-01

    Thermal infrared emission and reflectance spectra (250-1400 cm-1; ???7???40 ??m) of experimentally shocked albite- and anorthite-rich rocks (17-56 GPa) demonstrate that plagioclase feldspars exhibit characteristic degradations in spectral features with increasing pressure. New measurements of albite (Ab98) presented here display major spectral absorptions between 1000-1250 cm-1 (8-10 ??m) (due to Si-O antisymmetric stretch motions of the silica tetrahedra) and weaker absorptions between 350-700 cm-1 (14-29 ??m) (due to Si-O-Si octahedral bending vibrations). Many of these features persist to higher pressures compared to similar features in measurements of shocked anorthite, consistent with previous thermal infrared absorption studies of shocked feldspars. A transparency feature at 855 cm-1 (11.7 ??m) observed in powdered albite spectra also degrades with increasing pressure, similar to the 830 cm-1 (12.0 ??m) transparency feature in spectra of powders of shocked anorthite. Linear deconvolution models demonstrate that combinations of common mineral and glass spectra can replicate the spectra of shocked anorthite relatively well until shock pressures of 20-25 GPa, above which model errors increase substantially, coincident with the onset of diaplectic glass formation. Albite deconvolutions exhibit higher errors overall but do not change significantly with pressure, likely because certain clay minerals selected by the model exhibit absorption features similar to those in highly shocked albite. The implication for deconvolution of thermal infrared spectra of planetary surfaces (or laboratory spectra of samples) is that the use of highly shocked anorthite spectra in end-member libraries could be helpful in identifying highly shocked calcic plagioclase feldspars.

  1. High-energy Emission from Nonrelativistic Radiative Shocks: Application to Gamma-Ray Novae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vurm, Indrek; Metzger, Brian D.

    2018-01-01

    The observation of GeV gamma-rays from novae by Fermi/LAT demonstrates that the nonrelativistic radiative shocks in these systems can accelerate particles to energies of at least ∼10 GeV. The low-energy extension of the same nonthermal particle distribution inevitably gives rise to emission in the hard X-ray band. Above ≳ 10 {keV}, this radiation can escape the system without significant absorption/attenuation, and can potentially be detected by NuSTAR. We present theoretical models for hard X-ray and gamma-ray emission from radiative shocks in both leptonic and hadronic scenarios, accounting for the rapid evolution of the downstream properties due to the fast cooling of thermal plasma. We find that due to strong Coulomb losses, only a fraction of {10}-4{--}{10}-3 of the gamma-ray luminosity is radiated in the NuSTAR band; nevertheless, this emission could be detectable simultaneously with the LAT emission in bright gamma-ray novae with a ∼50 ks exposure. The spectral slope in hard X-rays is α ≈ 0 for typical nova parameters, thus serving as a testable prediction of the model. Our work demonstrates how combined hard X-ray and gamma-ray observations can be used to constrain properties of the nova outflow (velocity, density, and mass outflow rate) and particle acceleration at the shock. A very low X-ray to gamma-ray luminosity ratio ({L}{{X}}/{L}γ ≲ 5× {10}-4) would disfavor leptonic models for the gamma-ray emission. Our model can also be applied to other astrophysical environments with radiative shocks, including SNe IIn and colliding winds in massive star binaries.

  2. Thermal infrared spectroscopy and modeling of experimentally shocked basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. R.; Staid, M.I.; Kraft, M.D.

    2007-01-01

    New measurements of thermal infrared emission spectra (250-1400 cm-1; ???7-40 ??m) of experimentally shocked basalt and basaltic andesite (17-56 GPa) exhibit changes in spectral features with increasing pressure consistent with changes in the structure of plagioclase feldspars. Major spectral absorptions in unshocked rocks between 350-700 cm-1 (due to Si-O-Si octahedral bending vibrations) and between 1000-1250 cm-1 (due to Si-O antisymmetric stretch motions of the silica tetrahedra) transform at pressures >20-25 GPa to two broad spectral features centered near 950-1050 and 400-450 cm-1. Linear deconvolution models using spectral libraries composed of common mineral and glass spectra replicate the spectra of shocked basalt relatively well up to shock pressures of 20-25 GPa, above which model errors increase substantially, coincident with the onset of diaplectic glass formation in plagioclase. Inclusion of shocked feldspar spectra in the libraries improves fits for more highly shocked basalt. However, deconvolution models of the basaltic andesite select shocked feldspar end-members even for unshocked samples, likely caused by the higher primary glass content in the basaltic andesite sample.

  3. 3D numerical modeling of YSO accretion shocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsakos T.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of YSO accretion shocks is determined by radiative processes as well as the strength and structure of the magnetic field. A quasi-periodic emission signature is theoretically expected to be observed, but observations do not confirm any such pattern. In this work, we assume a uniform background field, in the regime of optically thin energy losses, and we study the multi-dimensional shock evolution in the presence of perturbations, i.e. clumps in the stream and an acoustic energy flux flowing at the base of the chromosphere. We perform 3D MHD simulations using the PLUTO code, modelling locally the impact of the infalling gas onto the chromosphere. We find that the structure and dynamics of the post-shock region is strongly dependent on the plasma-beta (thermal over magnetic pressure, different values of which may give distinguishable emission signatures, relevant for observations. In particular, a strong magnetic field effectively confines the plasma inside its flux tubes and leads to the formation of quasi-independent fibrils. The fibrils may oscillate out of phase and hence the sum of their contributions in the emission results in a smooth overall profile. On the contrary, a weak magnetic field is not found to have any significant effect on the shocked plasma and the turbulent hot slab that forms is found to retain its periodic signature.

  4. Predictive modeling of a radiative shock system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holloway, James Paul, E-mail: hagar@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Bingham, Derek [Statistics and Actuarial Science, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, V5A 1S6 (Canada); Chou, Chuan-Chih; Doss, Forrest; Paul Drake, R.; Fryxell, Bruce; Grosskopf, Michael; Holst, Bart van der [Atmospheric Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Mallick, Bani K. [Department of Statistics, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-3143 (United States); McClarren, Ryan [Institute for Applied Mathematics and Computational Science, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-3133 (United States); Mukherjee, Ashin; Nair, Vijay [Department of Statistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Powell, Kenneth G. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Ryu, D. [Department of Statistics, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-3143 (United States); Sokolov, Igor; Toth, Gabor [Atmospheric Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Zhang Zhanyang [Department of Statistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2011-09-15

    A predictive model is constructed for a radiative shock experiment, using a combination of a physics code and experimental measurements. The CRASH code can model the radiation hydrodynamics of the radiative shock launched by the ablation of a Be drive disk and driven down a tube filled with Xe. The code is initialized by a preprocessor that uses data from the Hyades code to model the initial 1.3 ns of the system evolution, with this data fit over seven input parameters by a Gaussian process model. The CRASH code output for shock location from 320 simulations is modeled by another Gaussian process model that combines the simulation data with eight field measurements of a CRASH experiment, and uses this joint model to construct a posterior distribution for the physical parameters of the simulation (model calibration). This model can then be used to explore sensitivity of the system to the input parameters. Comparison of the predicted shock locations in a set of leave-one-out exercises shows that the calibrated model can predict the shock location within experimental uncertainty.

  5. THE EFFECT OF TURBULENCE INTERMITTENCE ON THE EMISSION OF SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLES BY CORONAL AND INTERPLANETARY SHOCKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocharov, Leon [Sodankylä Geophysical Observatory (Oulu Unit), P.O. Box 3000, University of Oulu, FI-90014 Oulu (Finland); Laitinen, Timo [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Vainio, Rami [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 64, University of Helsinki, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland)

    2013-11-20

    Major solar energetic particle events are associated with shock waves in solar corona and solar wind. Fast scattering of charged particles by plasma turbulence near the shock wave increases the efficiency of the particle acceleration in the shock, but prevents particles from escaping ahead of the shock. However, the turbulence energy levels in neighboring magnetic tubes of solar wind may differ from each other by more than one order of magnitude. We present the first theoretical study of accelerated particle emission from an oblique shock wave propagating through an intermittent turbulence background that consists of both highly turbulent magnetic tubes, where particles are accelerated, and quiet tubes, via which the accelerated particles can escape to the non-shocked solar wind. The modeling results imply that the presence of the fast transport channels penetrating the shock and cross-field transport of accelerated particles to those channels may play a key role in high-energy particle emission from distant shocks and can explain the prompt onset of major solar energetic particle events observed near the Earth's orbit.

  6. POLARIZATION SIGNATURES OF RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SHOCKS IN THE BLAZAR EMISSION REGION. I. FORCE-FREE HELICAL MAGNETIC FIELDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Haocheng [Astrophysical Institute, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Deng, Wei; Li, Hui [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Böttcher, Markus [Centre for Space Research, North-West University, Potchefstroom, 2520 (South Africa)

    2016-01-20

    The optical radiation and polarization signatures in blazars are known to be highly variable during flaring activities. It is frequently argued that shocks are the main driver of the flaring events. However, the spectral variability modelings generally lack detailed considerations of the self-consistent magnetic field evolution modeling; thus, so far the associated optical polarization signatures are poorly understood. We present the first simultaneous modeling of the optical radiation and polarization signatures based on 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of relativistic shocks in the blazar emission environment, with the simplest physical assumptions. By comparing the results with observations, we find that shocks in a weakly magnetized environment will largely lead to significant changes in the optical polarization signatures, which are seldom seen in observations. Hence an emission region with relatively strong magnetization is preferred. In such an environment, slow shocks may produce minor flares with either erratic polarization fluctuations or considerable polarization variations, depending on the parameters; fast shocks can produce major flares with smooth polarization angle rotations. In addition, the magnetic fields in both cases are observed to actively revert to the original topology after the shocks. All these features are consistent with observations. Future observations of the radiation and polarization signatures will further constrain the flaring mechanism and the blazar emission environment.

  7. Shock Scattering in a Multiphase Flow Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klem, D

    2003-04-08

    Multiphase flow models have been proposed for use in situations which have combined Rayleigh-Taylor (RTI) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RMI) instabilities. Such an approach work poorly for the case of a heavy to light shock incidence on a developed interface. The physical original of this difficulty is traced to an inadequate model of the interfacial pressure term as it appears in the momentum and turbulence kinetic energy equations. Constraints on the form of a better model from a variety of sources are considered. In this context it is observed that a new constraint on closures arises. This occurs because of the discontinuity within the shock responsible for the RMI. The proposed model (Shock Scattering) is shown to give useful results.

  8. A model for shock wave chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Luiz; Kasimov, Aslan; Rosales, Rodolfo

    2012-11-01

    We propose the following simple model equation that describes chaotic shock waves: ut +1/2 (u2 -uus)x = f (x ,us) . It is given on the half-line x = 0 . Here us(t) is the shock state and f is a given source term [1]. The equation is a modification of the Burgers equation that includes non-locality via the presence of the shock-state value of the solution in the equation itself. The model predicts steady-state solutions, their instability through a Hopf bifurcation, and a sequence of period-doubling bifurcations leading to chaos. This dynamics is similar to that observed in the one-dimensional reactive Euler equations that describe detonations. We present nonlinear numerical simulations as well as a complete linear stability theory for the equation. Supported by DMS-0907955 and KAUST Office of Competitive Research Grants.

  9. Analytical model for fast-shock ignition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Ghasemi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A model and its improvements are introduced for a recently proposed approach to inertial confinement fusion, called fast-shock ignition (FSI. The analysis is based upon the gain models of fast ignition, shock ignition and considerations for the fast electrons penetration into the pre-compressed fuel to examine the formation of an effective central hot spot. Calculations of fast electrons penetration into the dense fuel show that if the initial electron kinetic energy is of the order ∼4.5 MeV, the electrons effectively reach the central part of the fuel. To evaluate more realistically the performance of FSI approach, we have used a quasi-two temperature electron energy distribution function of Strozzi (2012 and fast ignitor energy formula of Bellei (2013 that are consistent with 3D PIC simulations for different values of fast ignitor laser wavelength and coupling efficiency. The general advantages of fast-shock ignition in comparison with the shock ignition can be estimated to be better than 1.3 and it is seen that the best results can be obtained for the fuel mass around 1.5 mg, fast ignitor laser wavelength ∼0.3  micron and the shock ignitor energy weight factor about 0.25.

  10. Modeling the Shock Hugoniot in Porous Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Kyle R.; Shulenburger, Luke; Mattsson, Thomas R.; Lane, J. Matthew D.; Weck, Philippe F.; Vogler, Tracy J.; Desjarlais, Michael P.

    2017-06-01

    Porous materials are present in many scenarios from planetary science to ICF. Understanding how porosity modifies the behavior of the shock Hugoniot in an equation of state is key to being able to predictively simulate experiments. For example, modeling shocks in under-dense iron oxide can aid in understanding planetary formation and silica aerogel can be used to approximate the shock response of deuterium. Simulating the shock response of porous materials presents a variety of theoretical challenges, but by combining ab initio calculations with a surface energy and porosity model, we are able to accurately represent the shock Hugoniot. Finally, we show that this new approach can be used to calculate the Hugoniot of porous materials using existing tabular equations of state. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-mission laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. Evolution of the reverse shock emission from SNR 1987A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heng, K.; McCray, R.; Zhekov, A

    2006-01-01

    Stars: Circumstellar Matter, Shock Waves, ISM: Supernova Remnants, Stars: Supernovae: Individual: Alphanumeric: SN 1987A Udgivelsesdato: June 20......Stars: Circumstellar Matter, Shock Waves, ISM: Supernova Remnants, Stars: Supernovae: Individual: Alphanumeric: SN 1987A Udgivelsesdato: June 20...

  12. Neutrino and cosmic-ray emission from multiple internal shocks in gamma-ray bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Mauricio; Baerwald, Philipp; Murase, Kohta; Winter, Walter

    2015-04-10

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short-lived, luminous explosions at cosmological distances, thought to originate from relativistic jets launched at the deaths of massive stars. They are among the prime candidates to produce the observed cosmic rays at the highest energies. Recent neutrino data have, however, started to constrain this possibility in the simplest models with only one emission zone. In the classical theory of GRBs, it is expected that particles are accelerated at mildly relativistic shocks generated by the collisions of material ejected from a central engine. Here we consider neutrino and cosmic-ray emission from multiple emission regions since these internal collisions must occur at very different radii, from below the photosphere all the way out to the circumburst medium, as a consequence of the efficient dissipation of kinetic energy. We demonstrate that the different messengers originate from different collision radii, which means that multi-messenger observations open windows for revealing the evolving GRB outflows.

  13. Constitutive modeling of shock response of PTFE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Eric N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reanyansky, Anatoly D [DSTO, AUSTRALIA; Bourne, Neil K [AWE, UK; Millett, Jeremy C F [AWE, UK

    2009-01-01

    The PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) material is complex and attracts attention of the shock physics researchers because it has amorphous and crystalline components. In turn, the crystalline component has four known phases with the high pressure transition to phase III. At the same time, as has been recently studied using spectrometry, the crystalline region is growing with load. Stress and velocity shock-wave profiles acquired recently with embedded gauges demonstrate feature that may be related to impedance mismatches between the regions subjected to some transitions resulting in density and modulus variations. We consider the above mentioned amorphous-to-crystalline transition and the high pressure Phase II-to-III transitions as possible candidates for the analysis. The present work utilizes a multi-phase rate sensitive model to describe shock response of the PTFE material. One-dimensional experimental shock wave profiles are compared with calculated profiles with the kinetics describing the transitions. The objective of this study is to understand the role of the various transitions in the shock response of PTFE.

  14. Collisionless Electrostatic Shock Modeling and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-21

    release: distribution unlimited. PA#16490 Air Force Research Laboratory Collisionless Electrostatic Shock Modeling and Simulation Daniel W. Crews In-Space... Model • Simulation Results and Verification • Future Work 3Distribution A. Approved for public release: distribution unlimited. PA#16490 Background... model problem for simulation code validation. What’s the Point? 5Distribution A. Approved for public release: distribution unlimited. PA#16490 The

  15. Reflection and transmission of GMIR shock at the heliopause and their relation to the 2- and 3-kHz radio emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whang, Y. C.; Burlaga, L. F.

    1995-01-01

    We use Voyager 2 plasma and magnetic field data together with a one-fluid MHD model to study the interactions of the 1991 Global Merged Interaction Region (GMIR) shock with the heliopause. The 1991 GMIR is an extraordinarily large global solar wind structure in radial, longitudinal and latitudinal extents. It has a strong shock at the leading edge. After its penetration through the termination shock, the GMIR shock first propagates through the subsonic solar wind, then interacts with the heliopause. The interaction produces a transmitted shock propagating outward in the interstellar medium, and a reflected shock propagating backward in the subsonic solar wind. We identify the reflected shock and the transmitted shock as the possible source of the radio noise detected at Voyagers. The plasma frequency behind the reflected and the transmitted shock can be, respectively, responsible for the 2- and 3-kHz radio emissions. The two bands of radio noise are emitted from sources on both sides of the heliopause starting at about the same time. If the emission is generated by f(sub p)-radiation then the heliopause is located at R approximately 130 AU. If the emission is generated by 2f(sub p)-radiation the n R approximately 150 AU. Because the relative speed of the interstellar plasma with respect to the sun appears to be sub-Alfvenic, it is very unlikely there is a fast-bow shock of the heliosphere.

  16. Improved bow shock models for Herbig-Haro objects - Application to HH 2A-prime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, John C.; Hartmann, Lee; Hartigan, Patrick

    1988-01-01

    An improved version of the bow shock theory previously applied to Herbig-Haro objects is presented. The modifications provide a more accurate calculation of the ionization state of material entering the bow shock. The revised preionization does not drastically affect the emission-line predictions for a 200 km/s bow shock model, though the effects will be more severe for slower shock velocities. The line profiles of the new models resemble the observed profiles somewhat more closely, and the relative emission-line intensities typically differ by 30 percent from those predicted by the older models. The models agree well with new IUE spectra and existing optical data for HH 2A-prime.

  17. Wind-embedded shocks in FASTWIND: X-ray emission and K-shell absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, L. P.; Puls, J.; Sundqvist, J. O.; Hoffmann, T. L.

    2017-11-01

    EUV and X-ray radiation emitted from wind-embedded shocks can affect the ionization balance in the outer atmospheres of massive stars, and can also be the mechanism responsible for producing highly ionized atoms detected in the wind UV spectra. To investigate these processes, we implemented the emission from wind-embedded shocks and related physics into our atmosphere/spectrum synthesis code FASTWIND. We also account for the high energy absorption of the cool wind, by adding important K-shell opacities. Various tests justfying our approach have been described by Carneiro+(2016, A&A 590, A88). In particular, we studied the impact of X-ray emission on the ionization balance of important elements. In almost all the cases, the lower ionization stages (O iv, N iv, P v) are depleted and the higher stages (N v, O v, O vi) become enhanced. Moreover, also He lines (in particular He ii 1640 and He ii 4686) can be affected as well. Finally, we carried out an extensive discussion of the high-energy mass absorption coefficient, κν, regarding its spatial variation and dependence on T eff. We found that (i) the approximation of a radially constant κν can be justified for r >= 1.2R * and λ <= 18 Å, and also for many models at longer wavelengths. (ii) In order to estimate the actual value of this quantity, however, the He ii background needs to be considered from detailed modeling.

  18. A Prognostic Model for Development of Profound Shock among Children Presenting with Dengue Shock Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phung Khanh Lam

    Full Text Available To identify risk factors and develop a prediction model for the development of profound and recurrent shock amongst children presenting with dengue shock syndrome (DSS.We analyzed data from a prospective cohort of children with DSS recruited at the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit of the Hospital for Tropical Disease in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. The primary endpoint was "profound DSS", defined as ≥2 recurrent shock episodes (for subjects presenting in compensated shock, or ≥1 recurrent shock episodes (for subjects presenting initially with decompensated/hypotensive shock, and/or requirement for inotropic support. Recurrent shock was evaluated as a secondary endpoint. Risk factors were pre-defined clinical and laboratory variables collected at the time of presentation with shock. Prognostic model development was based on logistic regression and compared to several alternative approaches.The analysis population included 1207 children of whom 222 (18% progressed to "profound DSS" and 433 (36% had recurrent shock. Independent risk factors for both endpoints included younger age, earlier presentation, higher pulse rate, higher temperature, higher haematocrit and, for females, worse hemodynamic status at presentation. The final prognostic model for "profound DSS" showed acceptable discrimination (AUC=0.69 for internal validation and calibration and is presented as a simple score-chart.Several risk factors for development of profound or recurrent shock among children presenting with DSS were identified. The score-chart derived from the prognostic models should improve triage and management of children presenting with DSS in dengue-endemic areas.

  19. Photoacoustic shock wave emission and cavitation from structured optical fiber tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh, Milad; Gonzalez Avila, Silvestre Roberto; Wan, Yin Chi; Wang, Xincai; Zheng, Hongyu; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2015-11-01

    Fiber optics are used in medicine to deliver laser pulses for microsurgery. Upon absorption of a high-power laser pulse, a thermoelastic wave is emitted from the fiber tip. If a flat cleaved fiber is used, the photoacoustic field comprises a planar compressive shock wave and a tensile diffraction wave from the tip edge. Here we demonstrate that by modifying the geometry of a fiber tip, multiple shock waves can be generated from a single laser pulse. Flat cleaved fibers generate tension only along the fiber axis and with one compression-tension cycle from a laser pulse; however, structured fiber tips cause significant tension both along and off-axis, and generate multiple pressure cycles from a single laser pulse. Fast flash photography reveals that diffraction waves from the edges of the tip structures overlap and generate enough tension to form cavitation clouds. We numerically solve the linear wave equation to model the acoustic transients of structured fiber tips and achieve good agreement with pressure measurements from a fiber optic hydrophone. Multiple shock wave emission from a single laser pulse introduces structured fiber tips as a candidate to deliver histotripsy effects via a surgical catheter for micro-scale ablation of soft tissue.

  20. Latent Utility Shocks in a Structural Empirical Asset Pricing Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bent Jesper; Raahauge, Peter

    . We find that current dividendsdo not forecast future utility shocks, whereas current utility shocks do forecastfuture dividends. The estimated structural model produces a sequence of predictedutility shocks which provide better forecasts of future long-horizon stock market returnsthan the classical...

  1. Acoustic emission source modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hora P.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the acoustic emission (AE source modeling by means of FEM system COMSOL Multiphysics. The following types of sources are used: the spatially concentrated force and the double forces (dipole. The pulse excitation is studied in both cases. As a material is used steel. The computed displacements are compared with the exact analytical solution of point sources under consideration.

  2. Intrabinary shock emission from ``black widows'' and ``redbacks''

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roberts, M.S.E.; McLaughlin, M.A.; Gentile, P.; Aliu, E.; Hessels, J.W.T.; Ransom, S.M.; Ray, P.S.

    2014-01-01

    Eclipsing millisecond pulsars in close (Pb < 1 day) binary systems provide a different view of pulsar winds and shocks than do isolated pulsars. Since 2009, the numbers of these systems known in the Galactic field has increased enormously. We have been systematically studying many of these newly

  3. BROAD N{sub 2}H{sup +} EMISSION TOWARD THE PROTOSTELLAR SHOCK L1157-B1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Codella, C.; Fontani, F.; Gómez-Ruiz, A.; Vasta, M. [INAF, Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo Enrico Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Viti, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Ceccarelli, C.; Lefloch, B.; Podio, L. [UJF-Grenoble 1/CNRS-INSU, Institut de Planétologie et d' Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG) UMR 5274, Grenoble, F-38041 (France); Benedettini, M.; Busquet, G. [INAF, Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Roma (Italy); Caselli, P., E-mail: codella@rcetri.astro.it [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-10

    We present the first detection of N{sub 2}H{sup +} toward a low-mass protostellar outflow, namely, the L1157-B1 shock, at ∼0.1 pc from the protostellar cocoon. The detection was obtained with the IRAM 30 m antenna. We observed emission at 93 GHz due to the J = 1-0 hyperfine lines. Analysis of this emission coupled with HIFI CHESS multiline CO observations leads to the conclusion that the observed N{sub 2}H{sup +}(1-0) line originated from the dense (≥10{sup 5} cm{sup –3}) gas associated with the large (20''-25'') cavities opened by the protostellar wind. We find an N{sub 2}H{sup +} column density of a few 10{sup 12} cm{sup –2} corresponding to an abundance of (2-8) × 10{sup –9}. The N{sub 2}H{sup +} abundance can be matched by a model of quiescent gas evolved for more than 10{sup 4} yr, i.e., for more than the shock kinematical age (≅2000 yr). Modeling of C-shocks confirms that the abundance of N{sub 2}H{sup +} is not increased by the passage of the shock. In summary, N{sub 2}H{sup +} is a fossil record of the pre-shock gas, formed when the density of the gas was around 10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}, and then further compressed and accelerated by the shock.

  4. Shock-induced optical emission and high-pressure phase transformation of sapphire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning-Chao; Liu, Fu-Sheng; Wang, Wen-Peng; Sun, Yan-Yun; Liu, Qi-Jun; Peng, Xiao-Juan; Chen, Jun-Xiang

    2013-11-01

    Emission from sapphire window material was measured by spontaneous spectroscopic and multi-wavelength pyrometer techniques. The spectral distribution as a function of wavelength fit well to the grey-body spectrum. We analyzed the emissions and discovered that they arise from shear banding, which is a typical thermal radiation. It was found that the color temperature of shocked sapphire changes linearly and regularly with stress increases from 40 GPa to 59 GPa but becomes monotonic for stresses from 87 GPa to 120 GPa. The change in behavior indicates that a shock-induced phase transformation occurs between 59 GPa and 87 GPa.

  5. Shock-induced optical emission and high-pressure phase transformation of sapphire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ning-Chao [Laboratory of High Temperature and High Pressure Physics, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Liu, Fu-Sheng, E-mail: fusheng_l@sohu.com [Laboratory of High Temperature and High Pressure Physics, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Wang, Wen-Peng; Sun, Yan-Yun; Liu, Qi-Jun [Laboratory of High Temperature and High Pressure Physics, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Peng, Xiao-Juan; Chen, Jun-Xiang [National Key Laboratory of Shock Wave and Detonation Physics, Institute of Fluid Physics, CAEP, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2013-11-15

    Emission from sapphire window material was measured by spontaneous spectroscopic and multi-wavelength pyrometer techniques. The spectral distribution as a function of wavelength fit well to the grey-body spectrum. We analyzed the emissions and discovered that they arise from shear banding, which is a typical thermal radiation. It was found that the color temperature of shocked sapphire changes linearly and regularly with stress increases from 40 GPa to 59 GPa but becomes monotonic for stresses from 87 GPa to 120 GPa. The change in behavior indicates that a shock-induced phase transformation occurs between 59 GPa and 87 GPa.

  6. Shock-powered radio emission from V5589 Sagittarii (Nova Sgr 2012 #1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Jennifer H. S.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Chomiuk, Laura; Linford, Justin D.; Nelson, Thomas; Mukai, Koji; Finzell, Tom; Mioduszewski, Amy; Rupen, Michael P.; Walter, Frederick M.

    2016-08-01

    Since the Fermi discovery of γ-rays from novae, one of the biggest questions in the field has been how novae generate such high-energy emission. Shocks must be a fundamental ingredient. Six months of radio observations of the 2012 Nova V5589 Sgr with the VLA and 15 weeks of X-ray observations with Swift/XRT show that the radio emission consisted of: (1) a shock-powered, non-thermal flare; and (2) weak thermal emission from 10-5 M⊙ of freely expanding, photoionized ejecta. Absorption features in the optical spectrum and the peak optical brightness suggest that V5589 Sgr lies 4 kpc away (3.2-4.6 kpc). The shock-powered flare dominated the radio light curve at low frequencies before day 100. The spectral evolution of the radio flare, its high radio brightness temperature, the presence of unusually hard (kTx > 33 keV) X-rays, and the ratio of radio to X-ray flux near radio maximum all support the conclusions that the flare was shock-powered and non-thermal. Unlike most other novae with strong shock-powered radio emission, V5589 Sgr is not embedded in the wind of a red-giant companion. Based on the similar inclinations and optical line profiles of V5589 Sgr and V959 Mon, we propose that shocks in V5589 Sgr formed from collisions between a slow flow with an equatorial density enhancement and a subsequent faster flow. We speculate that the relatively high speed and low mass of the ejecta led to the unusual radio emission from V5589 Sgr, and perhaps also to the non-detection of γ-rays.

  7. Prediction dynamic model of shock train with complex background waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Chang, Jun-Tao; Xu, Ke-Jing; Yu, Da-Ren; Bao, Wen; Song, Yan-Ping

    2017-11-01

    Oblique shock waves are unavoidable in a rectangular hypersonic inlet, leading to a non-uniform flow field. While a significant body of the literature exists regarding the shock train modeling in a uniform incoming flow condition, few efforts have focused on the shock train behavior considering the influence of the shock wave boundary layer interactions. A low-order dynamic model of the shock train has been constructed with the help of the free interaction theory and a 1-D analysis approach. Experimental and numerical investigations have been carried out to evaluate the low-order model. The results show that the model has the capability of qualitatively analyzing the shock train behavior. In the cases with incident shocks, the rapid forward movement of the shock train has been observed by experiment. Besides this phenomenon was also modeled using the low-order model. Schlieren images show that when the shock train approaches the interaction zone, its behavior is characterized by oscillation and then follows a rapid forward movement with a linear increasing backpressure at 2.7 Ma. This phenomenon is analyzed theoretically based on the free interaction theory. Meanwhile with the help of the direct numerical simulation results from some existing studies, the flow structures in the interaction region and the following boundary layer also provide the evidence.

  8. Role of local absorption on the X-ray emission from MHD accretion shocks in classical T Tauri stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonito

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Accretion processes onto classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs are believed to generate shocks at the stellar surface due to the impact of supersonic downflowing plasma. Although current models of accretion streams provide a plausible global picture of this process, several aspects are still unclear. For example, the observed X-ray luminosity in accretion shocks is, in general, well below the predicted value. A possible explanation discussed in the literature is in terms of significant absorption of the emission due to the thick surrounding medium. Here we consider a 2D MHD model describing an accretion stream propagating through the atmosphere of a CTTS and impacting onto its chromosphere. The model includes all the relevant physics, namely the gravity, the thermal conduction, and the radiative cooling, and a realistic description of the unperturbed stellar atmosphere (from the chromosphere to the corona. From the model results, we synthesize the X-ray emission emerging from the hot slab produced by the accretion shock, exploring different configurations and strengths of the stellar magnetic field. The synthesis includes the local absorption by the thick surrounding medium and the Doppler shift of lines due to the component of plasma velocity along the line-of-sight. We explore the effects of absorption on the emerging X-ray spectrum, considering different inclinations of the accretion stream with respect to the observer. Finally we compare our results with the observations.

  9. Shock-drift particle acceleration in superluminal shocks - A model for hot spots in extragalactic radio sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begelman, Mitchell C.; Kirk, John G.

    1990-01-01

    Shock-drift acceleration at relativistic shock fronts is investigated using a fully relativistic treatment of both the microphysics of the shock-drift acceleration and the macrophysics of the shock front. By explicitly tracing particle trajectories across shocks, it is shown how the adiabatic invariance of a particle's magnetic moment breaks down as the upstream shock speed becomes relativistic, and is recovered at subrelativistic velocities. These calculations enable the mean increase in energy of a particle which encounters the shock with a given pitch angle to be calculated. The results are used to construct the downstream electron distribution function in terms of the incident distribution function and the bulk properties of the shock. The synchrotron emissivity of the transmitted distribution is calculated, and it is demonstrated that amplification factors are easily obtained which are more than adequate to explain the observed constrasts in surface brightness between jets and hot spots.

  10. Shock-drift particle acceleration in superluminal shocks - A model for hot spots in extragalactic radio sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begelman, M.C.; Kirk, J.G. (Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics, Boulder, CO (USA) Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Garching (Germany, F.R.))

    1990-04-01

    Shock-drift acceleration at relativistic shock fronts is investigated using a fully relativistic treatment of both the microphysics of the shock-drift acceleration and the macrophysics of the shock front. By explicitly tracing particle trajectories across shocks, it is shown how the adiabatic invariance of a particle's magnetic moment breaks down as the upstream shock speed becomes relativistic, and is recovered at subrelativistic velocities. These calculations enable the mean increase in energy of a particle which encounters the shock with a given pitch angle to be calculated. The results are used to construct the downstream electron distribution function in terms of the incident distribution function and the bulk properties of the shock. The synchrotron emissivity of the transmitted distribution is calculated, and it is demonstrated that amplification factors are easily obtained which are more than adequate to explain the observed constrasts in surface brightness between jets and hot spots. 72 refs.

  11. NORTRIP emission model user guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denby, Rolstad Bruce

    2012-07-01

    The NORTRIP emission model has been developed at NILU, in conjunction with other Nordic institutes, to model non-exhaust traffic induced emissions. This short summary document explains how to run the NORTRIP model from the MATLAB environment or by using the executable user interface version. It also provides brief information on input files and the model architecture.(Author)

  12. Broadband Electromagnetic Emission from PZT Ferroelectric Ceramics after Shock Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiodoras ANISIMOVAS

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It was experimentally registered pulsed electromagnetic (EM radiation in frequency range higher than television one using wideband horns with coaxial and waveguide outputs. The EM radiation was received during shock loading of lead zirconate titanate (PZT ceramics cylinders in conventional piezoelectric ignition mechanisms. Digital oscilloscope allows registering whole series of EM pulses and each pulse from the series transmitted from horn antenna of (1 – 18 GHz operating band frequencies. There is (1 – 4 ms delay between the shock and the first pulse of the series. Duration of the series is about (3 – 4 ms. The PZT cylinders were cleaved along their axes and the surfaces formed in the process were investigated by scanning electron microscope. It was concluded that from electrical point of view PZT ceramics contain interacting subsystems. It was found that EM radiation spectrum of pulse detected by waveguide detector heads has harmonics reaching 80 GHz. Presence of harmonics higher than 20 GHz indicates on radiation due to deceleration of electrons emitted during the switching. The EM pulses in the series appear randomly and have different amplitudes which partly confirmed thesis on independent switching dynamics of small volumes governed by a local electric field.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.4.3137

  13. Shock pressure induced by glass-confined laser shock peening: Experiments, modeling and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Xianqian; Song Hongwei; Wei Yanpeng; Wang Xi; Huang Chenguang [Key Laboratory for Hydrodynamics and Ocean Engineering, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Duan Zhuping [State Key Laboratory of Nonlinear Mechanics, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2011-09-01

    The shock pressure generated by the glass confined regime in laser shock peening and its attenuation in the target material are investigated. First, the particle velocity of the target back free surface induced by laser generated shock pressure of this regime is measured using a photonic Doppler velocimetry system. The temporal profile of the particle velocity at the back free surface, where the elastic precursor is captured, manifests a powerful diagnostic capability of this newly developed photonic Doppler velocimetry system for tracking the velocity on short time scales in shock-wave experiments. Second, a coupling pressure analytical model, in which the material constitutive models of confined layers and target material are considered, is proposed to predict the plasma pressure profile at the surface of target. Furthermore, using the predicted shock pressure profile as the input condition, the dynamic response of the target under the shock pressure is simulated by LS-DYNA. The simulated back free surface velocity profile agrees well with that measured by the photonic Doppler velocimetry system. Finally, the attenuation behavior of stress waves and particle velocities in the depth of the target is analyzed, and it indicates an exponential decay. The corresponding empirical formulas for the attenuation behavior are given based on the numerical results.

  14. Detonation Shock Dynamics Modelling with Arbitrary Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Alexander

    2017-06-01

    The Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD) model can be used to predict detonation wave propagation in a high explosive (HE). The detonation wave is prescribed a velocity that depends on its curvature. Additionally, the angle between the wave and the HE boundary may not exceed a specified ``boundary angle'', the value of which depends on the HE and its confining material(s). The level-set method is commonly used to drive DSD computation. Boundary conditions are applied to the level-set field at the charge edges to maintain the explosive boundary angle criteria. The position of the boundary must be accurate and continuous across adjacent cells to achieve accurate and robust results. This is mainly an issue for mixed material meshes where the boundary does not coincide with the cell boundaries. For such meshes, a set of volume fractions defines the amount of material in each cell. The boundary is defined implicitly by the volume fractions, and must be reconstructed to an explicit form for use in DSD. This work describes a novel synthesis of the level-set method and simulated annealing, an optimisation method used to reconstruct the boundary. The accuracy and robustness of the resulting DSD calculation are evaluated with a range of test problems.

  15. The shock-triggered statistical hot spot model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Larry Glenn

    2012-03-01

    The standard statistical hot spot model (SHSM) assumes that all hot-spot-triggered burn waves initiate simultaneously within homogenized volume elements. In reality the shock passes through such elements, lighting burn waves in a phased manner. Simple simulations are employed to illustrate the resulting shock-triggered heterogeneous reaction topology. These show that the conventional continuum prescription may not be satisfied. An alternative strategy yields a robust continuum description, and enables an extended analytic SHSM that reduces to the standard model as the burn-front to shock-speed ratio, β, approaches zero. Keywords: Detonation, Hot Spots, Heterogeneous Reaction, Reactive Burn Modeling, Homogenization

  16. Bow shock models of ultracompact H II regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mac Low, M.; Van Buren, D.; Wood, D.O.S.; Churchwell, E. (NASA, Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (USA) Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics, Boulder, CO (USA) JPL, Pasadena, CA (USA) Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (USA) Washburn Observatory, Madison, WI (USA))

    1991-03-01

    This paper presents models of ultracompact H II regions as the bow shocks formed by massive stars, with strong stellar winds, moving supersonically through molecular clouds. The morphologies, sizes and brightnesses of observed objects match the models well. Plausible models are provided for the ultracompact H II regions G12.21 - 0.1, G29.96 - 0.02, G34.26 + 0.15, and G43.89 - 0.78. To do this, the equilibrium shape of the wind-blown shell is calculated, assuming momentum conservation. Then the shell is illuminated with ionizing radiation from the central star, radiative transfer for free-free emission through the shell is performed, and the resulting object is visualized at various angles for comparison with radio continuum maps. The model unifies most of the observed morphologies of ultracompact H II regions, excluding only those objects with spherical shells. Ram pressure confinement greatly lengthens the life of ultracompact H II regions, explaining the large number that exist in the Galaxy despite their low apparent kinematic ages. 32 refs.

  17. Bow shock models of ultracompact H II regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Van Buren, Dave; Wood, Douglas O. S.; Churchwell, ED

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents models of ultracompact H II regions as the bow shocks formed by massive stars, with strong stellar winds, moving supersonically through molecular clouds. The morphologies, sizes and brightnesses of observed objects match the models well. Plausible models are provided for the ultracompact H II regions G12.21 - 0.1, G29.96 - 0.02, G34.26 + 0.15, and G43.89 - 0.78. To do this, the equilibrium shape of the wind-blown shell is calculated, assuming momentum conservation. Then the shell is illuminated with ionizing radiation from the central star, radiative transfer for free-free emission through the shell is performed, and the resulting object is visualized at various angles for comparison with radio continuum maps. The model unifies most of the observed morphologies of ultracompact H II regions, excluding only those objects with spherical shells. Ram pressure confinement greatly lengthens the life of ultracompact H II regions, explaining the large number that exist in the Galaxy despite their low apparent kinematic ages.

  18. Interfacial Pressures and Shocks in a Multiphase Flow mix Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klem, D E

    2004-10-01

    Multiphase flow models have been proposed for use in situations which have combined Rayleigh-Taylor (RTI) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RMI) instabilities [2, 3]. Such an approach works poorly for the case of a heavy to light shock incidence on a developed interface. I suggest that this difficulty can be overcome by adding an additional source to the turbulence kinetic energy equation. A variety of constraints on such a source are considered. In this context it is observed that a new constraint on closures arises. This occurs because of the discontinuity within the shock responsible for the RMI. The proposed model (Shock Scattering) is shown to give useful results.

  19. NEUTRINO CONSTRAINTS TO THE DIFFUSE GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM ACCRETION SHOCKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobardžić, A. [Department of Astronomy, Faculty of Mathematics, University of Belgrade, Studentski trg 16, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Prodanović, T., E-mail: aleksandra@matf.bg.ac.rs, E-mail: prodanvc@df.uns.ac.rs [Department of Physics, University of Novi Sad, Trg Dositeja Obradovića 4, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia)

    2015-06-20

    Accretion of gas during the large-scale structure formation has been thought to give rise to shocks that can accelerate cosmic rays. This process then results in an isotropic extragalactic gamma-ray emission contributing to the extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGRB) observed by Fermi-LAT. Unfortunately, this emission has been difficult to constrain and thus presents an uncertain foreground to any attempts to extract a potential dark matter signal. Recently, IceCube has detected high-energy isotropic neutrino flux that could be of an extragalactic origin. In general, neutrinos can be linked to gamma rays since cosmic-ray interactions produce neutral and charged pions where neutral pions decay into gamma rays, while charged pions decay to give neutrinos. By assuming that isotropic high-energy IceCube neutrinos are entirely produced by cosmic rays accelerated in accretion shocks during the process of structure formation, we obtain the strongest constraint to the gamma-ray emission from large-scale structure formation (strong) shocks and find that they can make at best ∼20% of the EGRB, corresponding to neutrino flux with spectral index α{sub ν} = 2, or ∼10% for spectral index α{sub ν} = 2.46. Since typical objects where cosmic rays are accelerated in accretion shocks are galaxy clusters, observed high-energy neutrino fluxes can then be used to determine the gamma-ray emission of a dominant cluster type and constrain acceleration efficiency, and thus probe the process of large-scale structure formation.

  20. Laser interferometry and emission spectroscopy measurements of cold-sprayed copper thermite shocked to 35 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neel, Christopher; Lacina, David; Johnson, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    Plate impact experiments were conducted on a cold-sprayed Al-CuO thermite at peak stresses between 5-35 GPa to determine the Hugoniot curve and characterize any shock induced energetic reaction. Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) measurements were used to obtain particle velocity histories and shock speed information for both the shock loading and unloading behavior of the material. A jump in shock velocity was observed in the Hugoniot curve when the material was shocked beyond 20 GPa, suggesting a volume-increasing reaction occurs in this shocked Al-CuO thermite near 20 GPa. To better characterize any shock-induced thermite reactions, emission spectroscopy measurements were obtained at stresses above 20 GPa. The best time-resolved spectra obtained thus far, at 25 GPa, does not support the fast thermite reaction hypothesis.

  1. Rabbit model of uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock and hypotensive resuscitation

    OpenAIRE

    Rezende-Neto,J.B.; Rizoli,S.B.; Andrade,M.V.; Lisboa,T.A.; Cunha-Melo,J.R.

    2010-01-01

    Clinically relevant animal models capable of simulating traumatic hemorrhagic shock are needed. We developed a hemorrhagic shock model with male New Zealand rabbits (2200-2800 g, 60-70 days old) that simulates the pre-hospital and acute care of a penetrating trauma victim in an urban scenario using current resuscitation strategies. A laparotomy was performed to reproduce tissue trauma and an aortic injury was created using a standardized single puncture to the left side of the infrarenal aort...

  2. Polarized Balmer line emission from supernova remnant shock waves efficiently accelerating cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoda, Jiro; Ohira, Yutaka; Yamazaki, Ryo; Laming, J. Martin; Katsuda, Satoru

    2018-01-01

    Linearly polarized Balmer line emissions from supernova remnant shocks are studied taking into account the energy loss of the shock owing to the production of non-thermal particles. The polarization degree depends on the downstream temperature and the velocity difference between upstream and downstream regions. The former is derived once the line width of the broad component of the H α emission is observed. Then, the observation of the polarization degree tells us the latter. At the same time, the estimated value of the velocity difference independently predicts adiabatic downstream temperature that is derived from Rankine Hugoniot relations for adiabatic shocks. If the actually observed downstream temperature is lower than the adiabatic temperature, there is a missing thermal energy which is consumed for particle acceleration. It is shown that a larger energy-loss rate leads to more highly polarized H α emission. Furthermore, we find that polarized intensity ratio of H β to H α also depends on the energy-loss rate and that it is independent of uncertain quantities such as electron temperature, the effect of Lyman line trapping and our line of sight.

  3. Shock wave emission upon spherical bubble collapse during cavitation-induced megasonic surface cleaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minsier, V; Proost, J

    2008-04-01

    When a gas bubble in a liquid interacts with an acoustic wave near a solid surface, the bubble first expands and then collapses. In this paper, a mathematical framework combining the Gilmore model and the method of characteristics is presented to model the shock wave emitted at the end of the bubble collapse. It allows to describe the liquid velocity at the shock front as a function of the radial distance to the bubble center in the case of spherical bubble collapse. Numerical calculations of the liquid velocity at the shock front have shown that this velocity increases with the acoustic amplitude and goes through a maximum as a function of the initial bubble radius. Calculations for different gas state equations inside the bubble show that the Van der Waals law predicts a slightly higher liquid velocity at the shock front than when considering a perfect gas law. Finally, decreasing the value of the surface tension at the bubble/liquid interface results in an increase of the liquid velocity at the shock front. Our calculations indicate that the strength of the shock waves emitted upon spherical bubble collapse can cause delamination of typical device structures used in microelectronics.

  4. Solar Flare Termination Shock and Synthetic Emission Line Profiles of the Fe xxi 1354.08 Å Line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Lijia [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Li, Gang [Department of Space Science and CSPAR, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL (United States); Reeves, Kathy; Raymond, John, E-mail: gang.li@uah.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Solar flares are among the most energetic phenomena that occur in the solar system. In the standard solar flare model, a fast mode shock, often referred to as the flare termination shock (TS), can exist above the loop-top source of hard X-ray emissions. The existence of the TS has been recently related to spectral hardening of a flare’s hard X-ray spectra at energies >300 keV. Observations of the Fe xxi 1354.08 Å line during solar flares by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph ( IRIS ) spacecraft have found significant redshifts with >100 km s{sup −1}, which is consistent with a reconnection downflow. The ability to detect such a redshift with IRIS suggests that one may be able to use IRIS observations to identify flare TSs. Using a magnetohydrodynamic simulation to model magnetic reconnection of a solar flare and assuming the existence of a TS in the downflow of the reconnection plasma, we model the synthetic emission of the Fe xxi 1354.08 line in this work. We show that the existence of the TS in the solar flare may manifest itself in the Fe xxi 1354.08 Å line.

  5. A Conditional Approach to Panel Data Models with Common Shocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Forchini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the effects of common shocks on the OLS estimators of the slopes’ parameters in linear panel data models. The shocks are assumed to affect both the errors and some of the explanatory variables. In contrast to existing approaches, which rely on using results on martingale difference sequences, our method relies on conditional strong laws of large numbers and conditional central limit theorems for conditionally-heterogeneous random variables.

  6. Farby-Perot observations and new models of the HH 47A and HH 47D bow shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Jon A.; Hartigan, Patrick; Heathcote, Steve; Raymond, John C.; Cecil, Gerald

    1994-01-01

    We present new models for the HH 47A and HH 47D bow shocks based on line flux and velocity maps obtained with an imaging Fabry-Perot spectrometer. We confirm that HH 47A and HH 47D each show a bow shock/Mach disk morphology, and that velocity variability in the outflow can account for the observed structures. While it was suggested a decade ago that the inner working surface HH 47A appears to be traveling into the wake of HH 47D, we find kinematic evidence that the outer bow shock HH 47D is also not the primary ejection event in the outflow but follows in the wake of previously ejected material. By comparing the observed line ratios and line profiles to those predicted by our bow shock models, we find that both bow shocks have substantially lower shock velocities than their space motions would imply, and that the emission from each bow shock is systematically blueshifted from the rest-frame velocity of the ambient emission, indicating a comoving preshock medium. We derive kinematic ages of approximately 1150 yr for HH 47D and approximately 550 yr for HH 47A, which implies that the stellar driving source may undergo repetitive eruptions similar to FU Orionis-type outbursts every several hundred years. This timescale is similar to estimates made by Reipurth and collaborators for the separation between major outbursts in the HH 34 and HH 111 stellar jets.

  7. Constraining Emission Models of Luminous Blazar Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikora, Marek; /Warsaw, Copernicus Astron. Ctr.; Stawarz, Lukasz; /Kipac, Menlo Park /Jagiellonian U., Astron. Observ. /SLAC; Moderski, Rafal; Nalewajko, Krzysztof; /Warsaw, Copernicus Astron. Ctr.; Madejski, Greg; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2009-10-30

    Many luminous blazars which are associated with quasar-type active galactic nuclei display broad-band spectra characterized by a large luminosity ratio of their high-energy ({gamma}-ray) and low-energy (synchrotron) spectral components. This large ratio, reaching values up to 100, challenges the standard synchrotron self-Compton models by means of substantial departures from the minimum power condition. Luminous blazars have also typically very hard X-ray spectra, and those in turn seem to challenge hadronic scenarios for the high energy blazar emission. As shown in this paper, no such problems are faced by the models which involve Comptonization of radiation provided by a broad-line-region, or dusty molecular torus. The lack or weakness of bulk Compton and Klein-Nishina features indicated by the presently available data favors production of {gamma}-rays via up-scattering of infrared photons from hot dust. This implies that the blazar emission zone is located at parsec-scale distances from the nucleus, and as such is possibly associated with the extended, quasi-stationary reconfinement shocks formed in relativistic outflows. This scenario predicts characteristic timescales for flux changes in luminous blazars to be days/weeks, consistent with the variability patterns observed in such systems at infrared, optical and {gamma}-ray frequencies. We also propose that the parsec-scale blazar activity can be occasionally accompanied by dissipative events taking place at sub-parsec distances and powered by internal shocks and/or reconnection of magnetic fields. These could account for the multiwavelength intra-day flares occasionally observed in powerful blazars sources.

  8. Modeling and analysis of AGS thermal shock experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Kim, S.H.; Haines, J.R.

    1998-11-01

    An overview is provided on modeling and analysis of thermal shock experiments conducted with high-energy, short-pulse energy deposition in a mercury filled container in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The simulation framework utilized along with results of simulations for pressure and strain profiles are presented. While the magnitude of peak strain predictions versus data are in reasonable agreement, the temporal variations were found to differ significantly in selected cases, indicating lack of modeling of certain physical phenomena or due to uncertainties in the experimental data gathering techniques. Key thermal-shock related issues and uncertainties are highlighted.

  9. Bow shock models for the velocity structure of ultracompact H II regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Buren, Dave; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark

    1992-01-01

    The velocity structure of ultracompact H II regions is modeled assuming that O stars moving supersonically through molecular clouds sweep up bow shocks to produce the observed objects. The expected radio recombination line emission is calculated for the case of an optically thin continuum and the strong effect of changing the viewing angle is shown. The kinematic information removes the degeneracy with ram pressure of a previous model, allowing measurement of stellar velocity vectors and cloud densities. A detailed model for G29.96-0.02 shows good agreement with observations by Wood and Churchwell, supporting the bow shock hypothesis. It is found that the exciting star of G29 is moving at 20 km/s relative to the gas, suggesting that O stars acquire a large velocity dispersion early in their lives.

  10. EU emissions trading. The need for cap adjustment in response to external shocks and unexpected developments?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diekmann, Jochen [DIW, Berlin (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    In this paper the advantages and disadvantages of the various adaptation options will be discussed from an economic perspective. Firstly, the criteria for identifying a need for potentially legitimate adaptation should be investigated. Furthermore, the issue of appropriate timely intervention points prior to or within the trading period will be discussed. In what periods and scenarios are adjustments to the cap worthwhile from an economic perspective? To what extent could minimum prices or price ranges make sense? What role could a strategic reserve play? By addressing these issues, it will be fundamentally discussed as to how the emissions trading scheme could be further developed and strengthened by greater flexibility. After a brief characterisation of emissions trading in theory and practice in Chapter 2, Chapter 3 will identify potential external shocks and unexpected developments which may impair the functioning of an emissions trading scheme. The current problems of cap setting for the third trading period of the EU ETS will be described in Chapter 4. Against this background, cap adjustments will be discussed in Chapter 5, minimum and maximum prices in Chapter 6 and strategic reserves in emissions trading in Chapter 7. The conclusions are summarised in Chapter 8.

  11. MOVES (MOTOR VEHICLE EMISSION SIMULATOR) MODEL ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    A computer model, intended to eventually replace the MOBILE model and to incorporate the NONROAD model, that will provide the ability to estimate criteria and toxic air pollutant emission factors and emission inventories that are specific to the areas and time periods of interest, at scales ranging from local to national. Development of a new emission factor and inventory model for mobile source emissions. The model will be used by air pollution modelers within EPA, and at the State and local levels.

  12. Molecular Line Emission from Multifluid Shock Waves. I. Numerical Methods and Benchmark Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciolek, Glenn E.; Roberge, Wayne G.

    2013-05-01

    We describe a numerical scheme for studying time-dependent, multifluid, magnetohydrodynamic shock waves in weakly ionized interstellar clouds and cores. Shocks are modeled as propagating perpendicular to the magnetic field and consist of a neutral molecular fluid plus a fluid of ions and electrons. The scheme is based on operator splitting, wherein time integration of the governing equations is split into separate parts. In one part, independent homogeneous Riemann problems for the two fluids are solved using Godunov's method. In the other, equations containing the source terms for transfer of mass, momentum, and energy between the fluids are integrated using standard numerical techniques. We show that, for the frequent case where the thermal pressures of the ions and electrons are Lt magnetic pressure, the Riemann problems for the neutral and ion-electron fluids have a similar mathematical structure which facilitates numerical coding. Implementation of the scheme is discussed and several benchmark tests confirming its accuracy are presented, including (1) MHD wave packets ranging over orders of magnitude in length- and timescales, (2) early evolution of multifluid shocks caused by two colliding clouds, and (3) a multifluid shock with mass transfer between the fluids by cosmic-ray ionization and ion-electron recombination, demonstrating the effect of ion mass loading on magnetic precursors of MHD shocks. An exact solution to an MHD Riemann problem forming the basis for an approximate numerical solver used in the homogeneous part of our scheme is presented, along with derivations of the analytic benchmark solutions and tests showing the convergence of the numerical algorithm.

  13. Effects of temperature shock on N2O emissions from denitrifying activated sludge and associated active bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojun; Ye, Chengsong; Zhang, Zhaoji; Guo, Yan; Yang, Ruili; Chen, Shaohua

    2017-10-20

    To investigate the effects of temperature shock on N2O emissions, four treatments with rapidly changing incubation temperature from the control (20 °C) to 4, 12, 25, or 34 °C were conducted. Results showed that higher N2O emissions (0.023-0.37%) were observed when reactor contents received temperature shocks. N2O emissions increased as the temperature interval increased. Nitrate, nitrite, and nitrous oxide reduction rates generally followed the order: 34 °C > 25 °C > 20 °C > 12 °C > 4°C. Overall, the low-temperature shocks down-regulated and high-temperature shocks up-regulated the expression of denitrifying genes. However, the transcription rate of norB/nosZ and nirS/nosZ could not explain higher N2O emission. The increased N2O emissions might be more related to post-transcriptional regulation and enzyme activity (Q10 value). The results of cDNA sequencing showed that the active microbial community was relatively stable. Among the members of top 15 genera with active transcripts, Flavobacterium, Comamonadaceae and Xanthomonadales were the dominant denitrifying bacteria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Surface Ship Shock Modeling and Simulation: Two-Dimensional Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young S. Shin

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The modeling and simulation of the response of a surface ship system to underwater explosion requires an understanding of many different subject areas. These include the process of underwater explosion events, shock wave propagation, explosion gas bubble behavior and bubble-pulse loading, bulk and local cavitation, free surface effect, fluid-structure interaction, and structural dynamics. This paper investigates the effects of fluid-structure interaction and cavitation on the response of a surface ship using USA-NASTRAN-CFA code. First, the one-dimensional Bleich-Sandler model is used to validate the approach, and second, the underwater shock response of a two-dimensional mid-section model of a surface ship is predicted with a surrounding fluid model using a constitutive equation of a bilinear fluid which does not allow transmission of negative pressures.

  15. A heuristic model of stone comminution in shock wave lithotripsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nathan B; Zhong, Pei

    2013-08-01

    A heuristic model is presented to describe the overall progression of stone comminution in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL), accounting for the effects of shock wave dose and the average peak pressure, P+(avg), incident on the stone during the treatment. The model is developed through adaptation of the Weibull theory for brittle fracture, incorporating threshold values in dose and P+(avg) that are required to initiate fragmentation. The model is validated against experimental data of stone comminution from two stone types (hard and soft BegoStone) obtained at various positions in lithotripter fields produced by two shock wave sources of different beam width and pulse profile both in water and in 1,3-butanediol (which suppresses cavitation). Subsequently, the model is used to assess the performance of a newly developed acoustic lens for electromagnetic lithotripters in comparison with its original counterpart both under static and simulated respiratory motion. The results have demonstrated the predictive value of this heuristic model in elucidating the physical basis for improved performance of the new lens. The model also provides a rationale for the selection of SWL treatment protocols to achieve effective stone comminution without elevating the risk of tissue injury.

  16. Multi-messenger Light Curves from Gamma-Ray Bursts in the Internal Shock Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bustamante, Mauricio [Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics (CCAPP), The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Heinze, Jonas; Winter, Walter [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Murase, Kohta, E-mail: bustamanteramirez.1@osu.edu, E-mail: walter.winter@desy.de, E-mail: jonas.heinze@desy.de, E-mail: murase@psu.edu [Center for Particle and Gravitational Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA16802 (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are promising as sources of neutrinos and cosmic rays. In the internal shock scenario, blobs of plasma emitted from a central engine collide within a relativistic jet and form shocks, leading to particle acceleration and emission. Motivated by present experimental constraints and sensitivities, we improve the predictions of particle emission by investigating time-dependent effects from multiple shocks. We produce synthetic light curves with different variability timescales that stem from properties of the central engine. For individual GRBs, qualitative conclusions about model parameters, neutrino production efficiency, and delays in high-energy gamma-rays can be deduced from inspection of the gamma-ray light curves. GRBs with fast time variability without additional prominent pulse structure tend to be efficient neutrino emitters, whereas GRBs with fast variability modulated by a broad pulse structure can be inefficient neutrino emitters and produce delayed high-energy gamma-ray signals. Our results can be applied to quantitative tests of the GRB origin of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, and have the potential to impact current and future multi-messenger searches.

  17. Multi-messenger light curves from gamma-ray bursts in the internal shock model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bustamante, Mauricio [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics (CCAPP); Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Physics; Murase, Kohta [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Center for Particle and Gravitational Astrophysics; Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Astronomy and Astrophysics; Winter, Walter [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are promising as sources of neutrinos and cosmic rays. In the internal shock scenario, blobs of plasma emitted from a central engine collide within a relativistic jet and form shocks, leading to particle acceleration and emission. Motivated by present experimental constraints and sensitivities, we improve the predictions of particle emission by investigating time-dependent effects from multiple shocks. We produce synthetic light curves with different variability timescales that stem from properties of the central engine. For individual GRBs, qualitative conclusions about model parameters, neutrino production efficiency, and delays in high-energy gamma rays can be deduced from inspection of the gamma-ray light curves. GRBs with fast time variability without additional prominent pulse structure tend to be efficient neutrino emitters, whereas GRBs with fast variability modulated by a broad pulse structure tend to be inefficient neutrino emitters and produce delayed high-energy gamma-ray signals. Our results can be applied to quantitative tests of the GRB origin of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, and have the potential to impact current and future multi-messenger searches.

  18. Modeling of PZT Ferroelectric Ceramic Depolarization Driven by Shock Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Chao-Hui; Peng, Yu-Fei; Long, Ji-Dong; Wang, Qiang; Wang, Wen-Dou

    2011-08-01

    Shock-induced phase transition of ferroelectric ceramic PZT 95/5 causes elastic stiffening and depolarization, releasing stored electrostatic energy into the load circuit. We develop a model to describe the response of the PZT ferroelectric ceramic and implement it into simulation codes. The model is based on the phenomenological theory of phase transition dynamics and takes into account the effects of the self-generated intensive electrical field and stress. Connected with the discharge model and external circuit, the whole transient process of PZT ceramic depoling can be investigated. The results show the finite transition velocity of the ferroelectric phase and the double wave structure caused by phase transition. Simulated currents are compared with the results from experiments with shock pressures varying from 0.4 to 2.8 GPa.

  19. Bursts and shocks in a continuum shell model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ken Haste; Bohr, Tomas; Jensen, M.H.

    1998-01-01

    We study a burst event, i.e., the evolution of an initial condition having support only in a finite interval of k-space, in the continuum shell model due to Parisi. We show that the continuum equation without forcing or dissipation can be explicitly written in characteristic form and that the right...... and left moving parts can be solved exactly. When this is supplemented by the approximate shock condition it is possible to find the symptotic form of the burst....

  20. HST-COS Observations on Hydrogen, Helium, Carbon, and Nitrogen Emission from the SN 1987A Reverse Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Kevin; McCray, Richard; Penton, Steven V.; Kirshner, Robert P.; Challis, Peter; Laming, J. Martin; Bouchet, Patrice; Chevalier, Roger; Garnavich, Peter M.; Fransson, Claes; hide

    2011-01-01

    We present the most sensitive ultraviolet observations of Supernova 1987 A to date. Imaging spectroscopy from the Hubble Space Telescope-Cosmic Origins Spectrograph shows many narrow (Delta v approximates 300 km/s) emission lines from the circumstellar ring, broad Delta v approximates 10-20 x 10(exp 3) km/s) emission lines from the reverse shock, and ultraviolet continuum emission. The high signal-to-noise ratio (>40 per resolution element) broad Ly-alpha emission is excited by soft X-ray and EUV heating of mostly neutral gas in the circumstellar ring and outer supernova debris. The ultraviolet continuum at lambda > 1350 A can be explained by H-I two-photon (2s(exp 2)S(sub 1/2)-l(exp 2)S(sub 1/2)) emission from the same region. We confirm our earlier, tentative detection of N V lambda 1240 emission from the reverse shock and present the first detections of broad He II lambda1640, C IV lambda 1550, and N IV ] lambda1486 emission lines from the reverse shock. The helium abundance in the high-velocity material is He/H = 0.14 +/- 0.06. The N V /H alpha line ratio requires partial ion-electron equilibration (T(sub e)/T(sub p) approximately equal to 0.14-0.35). We find that the N/C abundance ratio in the gas crossing the reverse shock is significantly higher than that in the circumstellar ring, a result that may be attributed to chemical stratification in the outer envelope of the supernova progenitor. The N/C abundance may have been stratified prior to the ring expUlsion, or this result may indicate continued CNO processing in the progenitor subsequent to the expUlsion of the circumstellar ring.

  1. Modeling Ultraviolet Emissions Near Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linker, Jon A.

    2000-01-01

    In this report, we describe work awarded to Science Applications International Corporation, for the period 6/l/99 to 5/31/00. During this time period, we have investigated the interaction of Io, Jupiter's innermost Galilean satellite, with the Io plasma torus, and the role this interaction plays in producing ultraviolet (UV) emissions from neutral oxygen and sulfur. Io, the innermost of Jupiter's Galilean satellites, plays a unique role in the jovian magnetosphere. Neutral material that escapes from Io is ionized to form the lo torus, a dense, heavy-ion plasma that corotates with Jupiter and interacts with Io. Io supplies not only the torus, but is a major source of plasma for the entire magnetosphere. Ionization and charge-exchange of neutrals near lo strongly influences the plasma interaction, and Io's neutral atmosphere plays an important role in the generation of currents that couple Io to Jupiter. There have been no in situ measurements of the neutral density near Io, but remote observations of neutrals near lo have been performed for many years. Recent observations from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have shown detailed structure in UV emissions from neutral species near Io. Electron-impact of the neutrals by the Io torus plasma is the primary mechanism responsible for exciting these emissions. Previously, we have modeled the Io plasma environment using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations, and we have shown that the interaction between Io and the plasma torus plays an important role in producing the morphology of the observed emissions. In the past year, we have extended these studies to use both UV observations and Galileo particle and field measurements to investigate the Io interaction.

  2. Rabbit model of uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock and hypotensive resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.B. Rezende-Neto

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Clinically relevant animal models capable of simulating traumatic hemorrhagic shock are needed. We developed a hemorrhagic shock model with male New Zealand rabbits (2200-2800 g, 60-70 days old that simulates the pre-hospital and acute care of a penetrating trauma victim in an urban scenario using current resuscitation strategies. A laparotomy was performed to reproduce tissue trauma and an aortic injury was created using a standardized single puncture to the left side of the infrarenal aorta to induce hemorrhagic shock similar to a penetrating mechanism. A 15-min interval was used to simulate the arrival of pre-hospital care. Fluid resuscitation was then applied using two regimens: normotensive resuscitation to achieve baseline mean arterial blood pressure (MAP, 10 animals and hypotensive resuscitation at 60% of baseline MAP (10 animals. Another 10 animals were sham operated. The total time of the experiment was 85 min, reproducing scene, transport and emergency room times. Intra-abdominal blood loss was significantly greater in animals that underwent normotensive resuscitation compared to hypotensive resuscitation (17.1 ± 2.0 vs 8.0 ± 1.5 mL/kg. Antithrombin levels decreased significantly in normotensive resuscitated animals compared to baseline (102 ± 2.0 vs 59 ± 4.1%, sham (95 ± 2.8 vs 59 ± 4.1%, and hypotensive resuscitated animals (98 ± 7.8 vs 59 ± 4.1%. Evidence of re-bleeding was also noted in the normotensive resuscitation group. A hypotensive resuscitation regimen resulted in decreased blood loss in a clinically relevant small animal model capable of reproducing hemorrhagic shock caused by a penetrating mechanism.

  3. Dyanmic Response to Monetary Shocks in a Search Model of the Labor Market

    OpenAIRE

    Alvaro Riascos

    2002-01-01

    This paper studies the dynamic response of a few key macroeconomic variables to each one of three exogenous shocks: monetary, government spending and technological shocks. By using a cash in advance model with two market frictions, one in the intermediation of loanable funds, and one in the labor market, we address the ability of the model to simulate data embedded with the same dynamic response to shocks observed in historical data (i.e we estimate dynamic multipliers to exogenous shocks by ...

  4. Modeling the Shock Ignition of a Copper Oxide Aluminum Thermite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kibaek; Stewart, D. Scott; Clemenson, Michael; Glumac, Nick; Murzyn, Christopher

    2015-06-01

    An experimental ``striker confinement'' shock compression test was developed in the Glumac-group at the University of Illinois to study ignition and reaction in composite reactive materials. These include thermitic and intermetallic reactive powders. The test places a sample of materials such as a thermite mixture of copper oxide and aluminum powders that are initially compressed to about 80 percent full density. Two RP-80 detonators simultaneously push steel bars into reactive material and the resulting compression causes shock compaction of the material and rapid heating. At that point one observes significant reaction and propagation of fronts. But the fronts are peculiar in that they are comprised of reactive events that can be traced to the reaction/diffusion of the initially separated reactants of copper oxide and aluminum that react at their mutual interfaces that nominally make copper liquid and aluminum oxide products. We discuss our model of the shock ignition of the copper oxide aluminum thermite in the context of the striker experiment and how a Gibbs formulation model, that includes multi-components for liquid and solid phases of aluminum, copper oxide, copper and aluminum oxide can predict the events observed at the particle scale in the experiments. Supported by HDTRA1-10-1-0020 (DTRA), N000014-12-1-0555 (ONR).

  5. Study of self-generated electric field at shock front by broadband proton probing and soft X-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Rui; Sio, Hong; Wilks, Scott; McGuffey, Christopher; Bailly-Grandvaux, Mathieu; Heeter, Bob; Beg, Farhat; Collins, Gilbert; Ping, Yuan; MIT Collaboration; LLNL Collaboration; UCSD Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    Self-generated electric fields arise from gradients in the electron pressure at shock fronts. We report observations of such E-fields from experiments conducted on OMEGA EP. In the experiments, strong shock waves were generated in low density gas under a quasi-planar geometry and diagnosed by broadband proton radiography. The broad proton spectrum allows energy-dependent measurements of deflection from which one can quantitatively constrain the electrical potential and field thickness. Three UV beams delivering up to 6.4 kJ energy in 2ns were used for shock generation and a short laser pulse of energy up to 850 J, 10 ps duration, was used to accelerate the broadband proton beam for point-projection radiography. Observations show the existence of electric fields with potential 300 V at the front of a Mach 9 shock in helium gas. A Mach 16 shock is also studied, from which both the field thickness and electric potential are reproduced. Simultaneous spatially resolved soft-x-ray spectroscopy provided additional measurements of shock velocity, particle velocity and thermal emission. This work was performed under DOE contract DE-AC52-07NA27 344 with support from OFES Early Career program and LLNL LDRD program. This work has been partially supported by the University of California Office of the President Lab Fee Grant Number LFR-17-449059.

  6. Evaluation of green house gas emissions models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The objective of the project is to evaluate the GHG emissions models used by transportation agencies and industry leaders. Factors in the vehicle : operating environment that may affect modal emissions, such as, external conditions, : vehicle fleet c...

  7. Bubble Dynamics and Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This volume of the Shock Wave Science and Technology Reference Library is concerned with the interplay between bubble dynamics and shock waves. It is divided into four parts containing twelve chapters written by eminent scientists. Topics discussed include shock wave emission by laser generated bubbles (W Lauterborn, A Vogel), pulsating bubbles near boundaries (DM Leppinen, QX Wang, JR Blake), interaction of shock waves with bubble clouds (CD Ohl, SW Ohl), shock propagation in polydispersed bubbly liquids by model equations (K Ando, T Colonius, CE Brennen. T Yano, T Kanagawa,  M Watanabe, S Fujikawa) and by DNS (G Tryggvason, S Dabiri), shocks in cavitating flows (NA Adams, SJ Schmidt, CF Delale, GH Schnerr, S Pasinlioglu) together with applications involving encapsulated bubble dynamics in imaging (AA Doinikov, A Novell, JM Escoffre, A Bouakaz),  shock wave lithotripsy (P Zhong), sterilization of ships’ ballast water (A Abe, H Mimura) and bubbly flow model of volcano eruptions ((VK Kedrinskii, K Takayama...

  8. Coherent THz electromagnetic radiation emission as a diagnostic of ultrafast phase transformations in shocked CdSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Evan; Armstrong, Michael; Kim, Kiyong; Glownia, James; Howard, William; Piner, Edwin; Roberts, John

    2009-06-01

    We review our experimental observations of THz radiation from shocked piezoelectric materials. Using molecular dynamics simulations coupled to Maxwell's equations, we show that the ultrafast transformation of wurtzite CdSe to high pressure phases under shock compression is accompanied by detectable electromagnetic radiation emission. The radiation is in the 100 GHz frequency range, corresponding to the timescale of the onset of the phase transformation. The sign of the electric field contains information about the atomic transformation pathway. This work was performed in part under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. GRB 091208B: FIRST DETECTION OF THE OPTICAL POLARIZATION IN EARLY FORWARD SHOCK EMISSION OF A GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uehara, T.; Chiyonobu, S.; Fukazawa, Y.; Ikejiri, Y.; Itoh, R.; Komatsu, T.; Miyamoto, H.; Nagae, O.; Sakimoto, K.; Sasada, M.; Tanaka, H.; Yamanaka, M. [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, Kagamiyama 1-3-1, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Toma, K. [Department of Earth and Space Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka 560-0043 (Japan); Kawabata, K. S.; Mizuno, T.; Ohsugi, T.; Uemura, M. [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Inoue, T.; Yamashita, T. [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Aoyama Gakuin University, Fuchinobe, Chuou-ku, Sagamihara 252-5258 (Japan); Nakaya, H., E-mail: uehara@hep01.hepl.hiroshima-u.ac.jp [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); and others

    2012-06-10

    We report that the optical polarization in the afterglow of GRB 091208B is measured at t = 149-706 s after the burst trigger, and the polarization degree is P = 10.4( {+-} 2.5%. The optical light curve at this time shows a power-law decay with index -0.75 {+-} 0.02, which is interpreted as the forward shock synchrotron emission, and thus this is the first detection of the early-time optical polarization in the forward shock (rather than that in the reverse shock reported by Steele et al.). This detection disfavors the afterglow model in which the magnetic fields in the emission region are random on the plasma skin depth scales, such as those amplified by the plasma instabilities, e.g., Weibel instability. We suggest that the fields are amplified by the magnetohydrodynamic instabilities, which would be tested by future observations of the temporal changes of the polarization degrees and angles for other bursts.

  10. An Improved Shock Model for Bare and Covered Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtes, Gert; Bouma, Richard

    2017-06-01

    TNO developed a toolbox to estimate the probability of a violent event on a ship or other platform, when the munition bunker is hit by e.g. a bullet or fragment from a missile attack. To obtain the proper statistical output, several millions of calculations are needed to obtain a reliable estimate. Because millions of different scenarios have to be calculated, hydrocode calculations cannot be used for this type of application, but a fast and good engineering solutions is needed. At this moment the Haskins and Cook-model is used for this purpose. To obtain a better estimate for covered explosives and munitions, TNO has developed a new model which is a combination of the shock wave model at high pressure, as described by Haskins and Cook, in combination with the expanding shock wave model of Green. This combined model gives a better fit with the experimental values for explosives response calculations, using the same critical energy fluence values for covered as well as for bare explosives. In this paper the theory is explained and results of the calculations for several bare and covered explosives will be presented. To show this, the results will be compared with the experimental values from literature for composition B, Composition B-3 and PBX-9404.

  11. Biogenic emissions modeling for Southeastern Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estes, M.; Jacob, D.; Jarvie, J. [Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission, Austin, TX (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    The Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC) modeling staff performed biogenic hydrocarbon emissions modeling in support of gridded photochemical modeling for ozone episodes in 1992 and 1993 for the Coastal Oxidant Assessment for Southeast Texas (COAST) modeling domain. This paper summarizes the results of the biogenic emissions modeling and compares preliminary photochemical modeling results to ambient air monitoring data collected during the 1993 COAST study. Biogenic emissions were estimated using BIOME, a gridded biogenic emissions model that uses region-specific land use and biomass density data, and plant species-specific emission factor data. Ambient air monitoring data were obtained by continuous automated gas chromatography at two sites, one-hour canister samples at 5 sites, and 24-hour canister samples at 13 other sites. The concentrations of Carbon Bond-IV species (as determined from urban airshed modeling) were compared to measured hydrocarbon concentrations. In this paper, we examined diurnal and seasonal variations, as well as spatial variations.

  12. A SIMPLE EXPERIMENTAL MODEL OF HEAT SHOCK RESPONSE IN RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tufi Neder Meyer

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To obtain a simple model for the elicitation of the heat shock response in rats. Design: Laboratory study. Setting: University research laboratories. Sample: Seventy-nine adult male albino rats (weight range 200 g to 570 g. Procedures: Exposure to heat stress by heating animals in a warm bath for 5 min after their rectal temperatures reached 107.60 F (420 C. Liver and lung samples were collected for heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70 detection (Western analysis. Results: Western analysis was positive for HSP70 in the liver and in the lungs of heated animals. There was a temporal correlation between heating and HSP70 detection: it was strongest 1 day after heating and reduced afterwards. No heated animals died. Conclusion: These data show that heating rats in a warm (45o C bath, according to parameters set in this model, elicits efficiently the heat shock response.OBJETIVO: Obter um modelo simples para tentar esclarecer a resposta ao choque térmico em ratos. LOCAL: Laboratório de pesquisa da Universidade. MÉTODO: Amostra: 79 ratos albinos, adultos, entre 200g a 570g. Procedimentos: Exposição ao calor, em banho quente, por 5 minutos, após a temperatura retal chegar a 42 graus centigrados. Biópsias de fígado e pulmão foram obtidas para detectar a proteina 70 (HSP 70, pelo "Western blot". RESULTADOS: As análises foram positivas nos animais aquecidos, com uma correlação entre aquecimento e constatação da HSP 70. Foi mais elevada no primeiro dia e não houve óbitos nos animais aquecidos. CONCLUSÃO: Os ratos aquecidos a 45 graus centígrados respondem eficientemente ao choque térmico.

  13. Slow shock interactions in the heliosphere using an adaptive grid MHD model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-C. Wu

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available A one-dimensional (1-D, time-dependent, adaptive-grid MHD model with solar wind structure has been used in the past to study the interaction of shocks. In the present study, we wish to study some fundamental processes that may be associated with slow shock genesis and their possible interactions with other discontinuities. This adaptive-grid model, suitable for appropriate spatial and temporal numerical simulations, is used for this purpose because its finer grid sizes in the vicinity of the steep gradients at shocks make it possible to delineate the physical parameters on both sides of the shocks. We found that a perturbation with deceleration of solar wind will generate an ensemble consisting of a forward slow shock, a fast forward wave and a reverse slow shock. On the other hand, a perturbation with an increase in acceleration of solar wind will generate both a slow shock and a fast shock. These two perturbations, although not unique, may be representative of momentum and pressure changes at the solar surface. During the transition of a fast shock overtaking a slow shock from behind, the slow shock might disappear temporarily. Also, during the process of the merging of two slow shocks, a slow shock-like structure is formed first; later, the slow shock-like structure evolves into an intermediate shock-like structure. This intermediate shock-like structure then evolves into an intermediate wave and a slow shock-like structure. Finally, the slow shock-like structure evolves into a slow shock, but the intermediate wave disappears by interacting with the non-uniform solar wind. This complex behavior demonstrates the non-unique nature of the formation of slow shocks, intermediate shocks and their derivative structures. We emphasize the main aim of this work to be both: (a non-unique input physical parameters to explain the paucity of observed slow shocks, as well as (b the impossibility of backward tracing to the history of input boundary

  14. Slow shock interactions in the heliosphere using an adaptive grid MHD model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-C. Wu

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available A one-dimensional (1-D, time-dependent, adaptive-grid MHD model with solar wind structure has been used in the past to study the interaction of shocks. In the present study, we wish to study some fundamental processes that may be associated with slow shock genesis and their possible interactions with other discontinuities. This adaptive-grid model, suitable for appropriate spatial and temporal numerical simulations, is used for this purpose because its finer grid sizes in the vicinity of the steep gradients at shocks make it possible to delineate the physical parameters on both sides of the shocks. We found that a perturbation with deceleration of solar wind will generate an ensemble consisting of a forward slow shock, a fast forward wave and a reverse slow shock. On the other hand, a perturbation with an increase in acceleration of solar wind will generate both a slow shock and a fast shock. These two perturbations, although not unique, may be representative of momentum and pressure changes at the solar surface.

    During the transition of a fast shock overtaking a slow shock from behind, the slow shock might disappear temporarily. Also, during the process of the merging of two slow shocks, a slow shock-like structure is formed first; later, the slow shock-like structure evolves into an intermediate shock-like structure. This intermediate shock-like structure then evolves into an intermediate wave and a slow shock-like structure. Finally, the slow shock-like structure evolves into a slow shock, but the intermediate wave disappears by interacting with the non-uniform solar wind. This complex behavior demonstrates the non-unique nature of the formation of slow shocks, intermediate shocks and their derivative structures.

    We emphasize the main aim of this work to be both: (a non-unique input physical parameters to explain the paucity of observed slow shocks, as well as (b the impossibility

  15. Genetic Algorithm Based Microscale Vehicle Emissions Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sicong Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a need to match emission estimations accuracy with the outputs of transport models. The overall error rate in long-term traffic forecasts resulting from strategic transport models is likely to be significant. Microsimulation models, whilst high-resolution in nature, may have similar measurement errors if they use the outputs of strategic models to obtain traffic demand predictions. At the microlevel, this paper discusses the limitations of existing emissions estimation approaches. Emission models for predicting emission pollutants other than CO2 are proposed. A genetic algorithm approach is adopted to select the predicting variables for the black box model. The approach is capable of solving combinatorial optimization problems. Overall, the emission prediction results reveal that the proposed new models outperform conventional equations in terms of accuracy and robustness.

  16. Modeling of pesticide emissions from agricultural ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rong

    2012-04-01

    Pesticides are applied to crops and soils to improve agricultural yields, but the use of pesticides has become highly regulated because of concerns about their adverse effects on human health and environment. Estimating pesticide emission rates from soils and crops is a key component for risk assessment for pesticide registration, identification of pesticide sources to the contamination of sensitive ecosystems, and appreciation of transport and fate of pesticides in the environment. Pesticide emission rates involve processes occurring in the soil, in the atmosphere, and on vegetation surfaces and are highly dependent on soil texture, agricultural practices, and meteorology, which vary significantly with location and/or time. To take all these factors into account for simulating pesticide emissions from large agricultural ecosystems, this study coupled a comprehensive meteorological model with a dynamic pesticide emission model. The combined model calculates hourly emission rates from both emission sources: current applications and soil residues resulting from historical use. The coupled modeling system is used to compute a gridded (36 × 36 km) hourly toxaphene emission inventory for North America for the year 2000 using a published U.S. toxaphene residue inventory and a Mexican toxaphene residue inventory developed using its historical application rates and a cropland inventory. To my knowledge, this is the first such hourly toxaphene emission inventory for North America. Results show that modeled emission rates have strong diurnal and seasonal variations at a given location and over the entire domain. The simulated total toxaphene emission from contaminated agricultural soils in North America in 2000 was about 255 t, which compares reasonably well to a published annual estimate. Most emissions occur in spring and summer, with domain-wide emission rates in April, May and, June of 36, 51, and 35 t/month, respectively. The spatial distribution of emissions depends

  17. Modeling and Analysis of AGS (1998) Thermal Shock Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haines, J.R.; Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    1999-11-14

    An overview is provided on modeling and analysis of thermal shock experiments conducted during 1998 with high-energy, short-pulse energy deposition in a mercury filled container in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The simulation framework utilized along with the results of simulations for pressure and strain profiles are presented. While the magnitude of penk strain predictions versus data are in reasonable agreement, the temporal variations were found to differ significantly in selected cases, indicating lack of modeling of certain physical phenomena or due to uncertainties in the experimental data gathering techniques. Key thermal-shock related issues and uncertainties are highlighted. Specific experiments conducted at BNL's AGS facility during 1998 (the subject of this paper) involved high-energy (24 GeV) proton energy deposition in the mercury target over a time frame of - 0.1s. The target consisted of an - 1 m. long cylindrical stainless steel shell with a hemispherical dome at the leading edge. It was filled with mercury at room temperature and pressure. Several optical strain gages were attached to the surface of the steel target. Figure 1 shows a schematic representation of the test vessel along with the main dimensions and positions of three optical strain gages at which meaningful data were obtained. As

  18. Shock-darkening in ordinary chondrites: Modeling of the pressure-temperature conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, J.; Kohout, T.; Wünnemann, K.

    2017-09-01

    Shock-darkening in ordinary chondrites is the melting of iron sulfides and metals into a network of veins. It leads to optical darkening and makes asteroid classification more difficult. In such cases, S-type asteroids (chondritic silicate composition) spectra look like C-type asteroids (associated with carbonacaeous chondrites). Using the shock physics code iSALE (Wünnemann et al. 2008) we determined the shock-darkening pressure range to be 40-50 GPa for the melting of iron sulfides. Apart from our results, this work brings a new understanding of shock waves interactions in heterogeneous medium and in modeling of shock metamorphism.

  19. Modeling Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Dairy Farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evaluation and mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions from dairy farms requires a comprehensive approach that integrates the impacts and interactions of all important sources and sinks. This approach requires some form of modeling. Types of models commonly used include empirical emission factors, pr...

  20. Gain Scheduling Control of Nonlinear Shock Motion Based on Equilibrium Manifold Linearization Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cui Tao Yu Daren Bao Wen Yang Yongbin

    2007-01-01

    The equilibrium manifold linearization model of nonlinear shock motion is of higher accuracy and lower complexity over other models such as the small perturbation model and the piecewise-linear model...

  1. The Effects of Permanent Technology Shocks on Labour Productivity and Hours in the RBC Model

    OpenAIRE

    Lindé, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    Recent work on the effects of permanent technology shocks argue that the basic RBC model cannot account for a negative correlation between hours worked and labour productivity. In this Paper, I show that this conjecture is not necessarily correct. In the basic RBC model, I find that hours worked fall and labour productivity rises after a positive permanent technology shock once one allows for the possibility that the process for the permanent technology shock is persistent in growth rates. A ...

  2. Quantification model of the consequences of monetary policy shocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coralia Emilia POPA

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The monetary analysis based on the BVAR (Bayesian Vector Autoregression model is extremely important in the monetary policy implementation strategy, the information provided is important not only for the Central Bank, but also for the economic agents and the population. Therefore, conducting this analysis at the level of Romania helps to understand better the mechanism by which monetary policy is transmitted in order to achieve the set target, namely inflation targeting, but it also provides us with important information regarding the accession to the euro area. The model we are trying to test helps us understand through the correlations between the interest rate, GDP and the inflation rate how monetary policy responds to shocks. The model follows the methodology presented by Sims and Zha (1998 in the paper "Bayesian Methods for Dynamic Multivariate Models and Using the Bayesian Autoregressive Vector". In the analysis of this model, quarterly data for a minimum of three years, three variables are used to make the results relevant. The data needed to model the model are used in logarithmic form, except for the interest rate, and the outcome is applied to a differentiated premium operator. Of the variables used, the interest rate is the only one that does not allow seasonal adjustment.

  3. Microscopic Fuel Consumption and Emission Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Kyoungho

    1998-01-01

    Mathematical models to predict vehicle fuel consumption and emission metrics are presented in this thesis. Vehicle fuel consumption and emissions are complex functions to be approximated in practice due to numerous variables affecting their outcome. Vehicle energy and emissions are particularly sensitive to changes in vehicle state variables such as speed and acceleration, ambient conditions such as temperature, and driver control inputs such as acceleration pedal position and gear shift spee...

  4. Testing the Empirical Shock Arrival Model Using Quadrature Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Makela, P.; Xie, H.; Yashiro, S.

    2013-01-01

    The empirical shock arrival (ESA) model was developed based on quadrature data from Helios (in situ) and P-78 (remote sensing) to predict the Sun-Earth travel time of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The ESA model requires earthward CME speed as input, which is not directly measurable from coronagraphs along the Sun-Earth line. The Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) and the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) were in quadrature during 20102012, so the speeds of Earth-directed CMEs were observed with minimal projection effects. We identified a set of 20 full halo CMEs in the field of view of SOHO that were also observed in quadrature by STEREO. We used the earthward speed from STEREO measurements as input to the ESA model and compared the resulting travel times with the observed ones from L1 monitors. We find that the model predicts the CME travel time within about 7.3 h, which is similar to the predictions by the ENLIL model. We also find that CME-CME and CME-coronal hole interaction can lead to large deviations from model predictions.

  5. Experimental models of sepsis and septic shock: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrido Alejandra G.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in surgical patients and trauma victims, mainly due to sepsis-induced multiple organ dysfunction. In contrast to preclinical studies, most clinical trials of promising new treatment strategies for sepsis have fails to demonstrate efficacy. Although many reasons could account for this discrepancy, the misinterpretation of preclinical data obtained from experimental studies, and especially the use of animal models that do not adequately mimic human sepsis may have been contributing factors. In this review, the benefits and limitations of various animal models of sepsis are discussed to clarify the extend to which findings are relevant to human sepsis, particularly with respect to the subsequent design and execution of clinical trials. Such models include intravascular infusion of endotoxin or live bacteria, bacterial peritonitis, cecal ligation and perforation, soft tissue infection, pneumonia or meningitis models, using different animal species including rats, mice, rabbits, dogs, pigs, sheep and nonhuman primates. Despite several limitations, animal models remain essential in the development of all new therapies for sepsis and septic shock, because they provide fundamental information about the pharmacokinetics, toxicity, and mechanism of drug action that cannot be duplicated by other methods. New therapeutic agents should be studies in infection models, even after the initiation of the septic process. Furthermore, debility conditions need to be reproduced to avoid the exclusive use of healthy animals, which often do not represent the human septic patient.

  6. Equivalent Continuum Modeling for Shock Wave Propagation in Jointed Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorobiev, O; Antoun, T

    2009-12-11

    This study presents discrete and continuum simulations of shock wave propagating through jointed media. The simulations were performed using the Lagrangian hydrocode GEODYN-L with joints treated explicitly using an advanced contact algorithm. They studied both isotropic and anisotropic joint representations. For an isotropically jointed geologic medium, the results show that the properties of the joints can be combined with the properties of the intact rock to develop an equivalent continuum model suitable for analyzing wave propagation through the jointed medium. For an anisotropically jointed geologic medium, they found it difficult to develop an equivalent continuum (EC) model that matches the response derived from mesoscopic simulation. They also performed simulations of wave propagation through jointed media. Two appraoches are suggested for modeling the rock mass. In one approach, jointed are modeled explicitly in a Lagrangian framework with appropriate contact algorithms used to track motion along the interfaces. In the other approach, the effect of joints is taken into account using a constitutive model derived from mesoscopic simulations.

  7. Extended charge banking model of dual path shocks for implantable cardioverter defibrillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosdall, Derek J; Sweeney, James D

    2008-08-01

    Single path defibrillation shock methods have been improved through the use of the Charge Banking Model of defibrillation, which predicts the response of the heart to shocks as a simple resistor-capacitor (RC) circuit. While dual path defibrillation configurations have significantly reduced defibrillation thresholds, improvements to dual path defibrillation techniques have been limited to experimental observations without a practical model to aid in improving dual path defibrillation techniques. The Charge Banking Model has been extended into a new Extended Charge Banking Model of defibrillation that represents small sections of the heart as separate RC circuits, uses a weighting factor based on published defibrillation shock field gradient measures, and implements a critical mass criteria to predict the relative efficacy of single and dual path defibrillation shocks. The new model reproduced the results from several published experimental protocols that demonstrated the relative efficacy of dual path defibrillation shocks. The model predicts that time between phases or pulses of dual path defibrillation shock configurations should be minimized to maximize shock efficacy. Through this approach the Extended Charge Banking Model predictions may be used to improve dual path and multi-pulse defibrillation techniques, which have been shown experimentally to lower defibrillation thresholds substantially. The new model may be a useful tool to help in further improving dual path and multiple pulse defibrillation techniques by predicting optimal pulse durations and shock timing parameters.

  8. Optimization Model for Reducing Emissions of Greenhouse ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA Vehicle Greenhouse Gas (VGHG) model is used to apply various technologies to a defined set of vehicles in order to meet a specified GHG emission target, and to then calculate the costs and benefits of doing so. To facilitate its analysis of the costs and benefits of the control of GHG emissions from cars and trucks.

  9. Modeling Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Enteric Fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kebreab, E.; Tedeschi, L.; Dijkstra, J.; Ellis, J.L.; Bannink, A.; France, J.

    2016-01-01

    Livestock directly contribute to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions mainly through methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. For cost and practicality reasons, quantification of GHG has been through development of various types of mathematical models. This chapter addresses the utility and

  10. Modelling of thermal shock experiments of carbon based materials in JUDITH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogorodnikova, O. V.; Pestchanyi, S.; Koza, Y.; Linke, J.

    2005-03-01

    The interaction of hot plasma with material in fusion devices can result in material erosion and irreversible damage. Carbon based materials are proposed for ITER divertor armour. To simulate carbon erosion under high heat fluxes, electron beam heating in the JUDITH facility has been used. In this paper, carbon erosion under energetic electron impact is modeled by the 3D thermomechanics code 'PEGASUS-3D'. The code is based on a crack generation induced by thermal stress. The particle emission observed in thermal shock experiments is a result of breaking bonds between grains caused by thermal stress. The comparison of calculations with experimental data from JUDITH shows good agreement for various incident power densities and pulse durations. A realistic mean failure stress has been found. Pre-heating of test specimens results in earlier onset of brittle destruction and enhanced particle loss in agreement with experiments.

  11. Comparison Between Surf and Multi-Shock Forest Fire High Explosive Burn Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenfield, Nicholas Alexander [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-18

    PAGOSA1 has several different burn models used to model high explosive detonation. Two of these, Multi-Shock Forest Fire and Surf, are capable of modeling shock initiation. Accurately calculating shock initiation of a high explosive is important because it is a mechanism for detonation in many accident scenarios (i.e. fragment impact). Comparing the models to pop-plot data give confidence that the models are accurately calculating detonation or lack thereof. To compare the performance of these models, pop-plots2 were created from simulations where one two cm block of PBX 9502 collides with another block of PBX 9502.

  12. Modeling of greenhouse gas emission from livestock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjo eJose

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects of climate change on humans and other living ecosystems is an area of on-going research. The ruminant livestock sector is considered to be one of the most significant contributors to the existing greenhouse gas (GHG pool. However the there are opportunities to combat climate change by reducing the emission of GHGs from ruminants. Methane (CH4 and nitrous oxide (N2O are emitted by ruminants via anaerobic digestion of organic matter in the rumen and manure, and by denitrification and nitrification processes which occur in manure. The quantification of these emissions by experimental methods is difficult and takes considerable time for analysis of the implications of the outputs from empirical studies, and for adaptation and mitigation strategies to be developed. To overcome these problems computer simulation models offer substantial scope for predicting GHG emissions. These models often include all farm activities while accurately predicting the GHG emissions including both direct as well as indirect sources. The models are fast and efficient in predicting emissions and provide valuable information on implementing the appropriate GHG mitigation strategies on farms. Further, these models help in testing the efficacy of various mitigation strategies that are employed to reduce GHG emissions. These models can be used to determine future adaptation and mitigation strategies, to reduce GHG emissions thereby combating livestock induced climate change.

  13. Exploration of CdTe quantum dots as mesoscale pressure sensors via time-resolved shock-compression photoluminescent emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Zhitao; Banishev, Alexandr A.; Lee, Gyuhyon; Scripka, David A.; Breidenich, Jennifer; Xiao, Pan; Christensen, James; Zhou, Min; Summers, Christopher J.; Dlott, Dana D.; Thadhani, Naresh N.

    2016-07-01

    The nanometer size of CdTe quantum dots (QDs) and their unique optical properties, including size-tunable narrow photoluminescent emission, broad absorption, fast photoluminescence decay, and negligible light scattering, are ideal features for spectrally tagging the shock response of localized regions in highly heterogeneous materials such as particulate media. In this work, the time-resolved laser-excited photoluminescence response of QDs to shock-compression was investigated to explore their utilization as mesoscale sensors for pressure measurements and in situ diagnostics during shock loading experiments. Laser-driven shock-compression experiments with steady-state shock pressures ranging from 2.0 to 13 GPa were performed on nanocomposite films of CdTe QDs dispersed in a soft polyvinyl alcohol polymer matrix and in a hard inorganic sodium silicate glass matrix. Time-resolved photoluminescent emission spectroscopy was used to correlate photoluminescence changes with the history of shock pressure and the dynamics of the matrix material surrounding the QDs. The results revealed pressure-induced blueshifts in emitted wavelength, decreases in photoluminescent emission intensity, reductions in peak width, and matrix-dependent response times. Data obtained for these QD response characteristics serve as indicators for their use as possible time-resolved diagnostics of the dynamic shock-compression response of matrix materials in which such QDs are embedded as in situ sensors.

  14. Exploration of CdTe quantum dots as mesoscale pressure sensors via time-resolved shock-compression photoluminescent emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Zhitao [Georgia Tech Research Institute, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0826 (United States); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0245 (United States); Banishev, Alexandr A.; Christensen, James; Dlott, Dana D. [School of Chemical Sciences and Fredrick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Lee, Gyuhyon; Scripka, David A.; Breidenich, Jennifer; Summers, Christopher J.; Thadhani, Naresh N., E-mail: naresh.thadhani@mse.gatech.edu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0245 (United States); Xiao, Pan [LNM, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0405 (United States); Zhou, Min [George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0405 (United States)

    2016-07-28

    The nanometer size of CdTe quantum dots (QDs) and their unique optical properties, including size-tunable narrow photoluminescent emission, broad absorption, fast photoluminescence decay, and negligible light scattering, are ideal features for spectrally tagging the shock response of localized regions in highly heterogeneous materials such as particulate media. In this work, the time-resolved laser-excited photoluminescence response of QDs to shock-compression was investigated to explore their utilization as mesoscale sensors for pressure measurements and in situ diagnostics during shock loading experiments. Laser-driven shock-compression experiments with steady-state shock pressures ranging from 2.0 to 13 GPa were performed on nanocomposite films of CdTe QDs dispersed in a soft polyvinyl alcohol polymer matrix and in a hard inorganic sodium silicate glass matrix. Time-resolved photoluminescent emission spectroscopy was used to correlate photoluminescence changes with the history of shock pressure and the dynamics of the matrix material surrounding the QDs. The results revealed pressure-induced blueshifts in emitted wavelength, decreases in photoluminescent emission intensity, reductions in peak width, and matrix-dependent response times. Data obtained for these QD response characteristics serve as indicators for their use as possible time-resolved diagnostics of the dynamic shock-compression response of matrix materials in which such QDs are embedded as in situ sensors.

  15. LOW-VELOCITY SHOCKS TRACED BY EXTENDED SiO EMISSION ALONG THE W43 RIDGES: WITNESSING THE FORMATION OF YOUNG MASSIVE CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen-Luong, Q.; Martin, P. G. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Motte, F.; Louvet, F.; Hill, T.; Hennemann, M.; Didelon, P. [Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay, CEA/IRFU - CNRS/INSU - Université Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, Bât. 709, CEA-Saclay, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Carlhoff, P.; Schilke, P. [I. Physikalisches Institut, Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Str. 77, D-50937 Köln (Germany); Lesaffre, P.; Gusdorf, A. [ENS, LERMA, UMR 8112, CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, 24 rue Lhomond 75005 Paris, France LRA/ENS (France); Schneider, N.; Bontemps, S.; Duarte-Cabral, A. [Université de Bordeaux, LAB, CNRS, UMR 5804, F-33270 Floirac (France); Menten, K. M.; Wyrowski, F. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Bendo, G. [UK ALMA Regional Centre Node, Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Roussel, H. [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095 CNRS, Université Pierre and Marie Curie, 98 bis boulevard Arago, F-75014, Paris (France); Bernard, J.-P. [Université de Toulouse, UPS, CESR, 9 Avenue du Colonel Roche, F-31028 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Bronfman, L., E-mail: qnguyen@cita.utoronto.ca [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); and others

    2013-10-01

    The formation of high-mass stars is tightly linked to that of their parental clouds. Here, we focus on the high-density parts of W43, a molecular cloud undergoing an efficient event of star formation. Using a column density image derived from Herschel continuum maps, we identify two high-density filamentary clouds, called the W43-MM1 and W43-MM2 ridges. Both have gas masses of 2.1 × 10{sup 4} M{sub ☉} and 3.5 × 10{sup 4} M{sub ☉} above >10{sup 23} cm{sup -2} and within areas of ∼6 and ∼14 pc{sup 2}, respectively. The W43-MM1 and W43-MM2 ridges are structures that are coherent in velocity and gravitationally bound, despite their large velocity dispersion measured by the N{sub 2}H{sup +} (1-0) lines of the W43-HERO IRAM large program. Another intriguing result is that these ridges harbor widespread (∼10 pc{sup 2}) bright SiO (2-1) emission, which we interpret to be the result of low-velocity shocks (≤10 km s{sup –1}). We measure a significant relationship between the SiO (2-1) luminosity and velocity extent and show that it distinguishes our observations from the high-velocity shocks associated with outflows. We use state-of-the-art shock models to demonstrate that a small percentage (10%) of Si atoms in low-velocity shocks, observed initially in gas phase or in grain mantles, can explain the observed SiO column density in the W43 ridges. The spatial and velocity overlaps between the ridges of high-density gas and the shocked SiO gas suggest that ridges could be forming via colliding flows driven by gravity and accompanied by low-velocity shocks. This mechanism may be the initial conditions for the formation of young massive clusters.

  16. A minimal titration modelization of the mammalian dynamical heat shock response

    CERN Document Server

    Aude, Sivéry; Thommen, Quentin

    2015-01-01

    Environmental stress, such as oxidative or heat stress, induces the activation of the Heat Shock Response (HSR) which leads to an increase in the heat shock proteins (HSPs) level. These HSPs act as molecular chaperones to maintain proteostasis. Even if the main heat shock response partners are well known, a detailed description of the dynamical properties of the HSR network is still missing. In this study, we derive a minimal mathematical model of cellular response to heat shock that reproduces available experimental data sets both on transcription factor activity and cell viability. This simplistic model highlights the key mechanistic processes that rule the HSR network and reveals (i) the titration of Heat Shock Factor 1 (HSF1) by chaperones as the guiding line of the network, (ii) that protein triage governs the fate of damaged proteins and (iii) three different temperature regimes describing normal, acute or chronic stress.

  17. Modelling the high-energy emission from gamma-ray binaries using numerical relativistic hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubus, G.; Lamberts, A.; Fromang, S.

    2015-09-01

    Context. Detailed modelling of the high-energy emission from gamma-ray binaries has been propounded as a path to pulsar wind physics. Aims: Fulfilling this ambition requires a coherent model of the flow and its emission in the region where the pulsar wind interacts with the stellar wind of its companion. Methods: We have developed a code that follows the evolution and emission of electrons in the shocked pulsar wind based on inputs from a relativistic hydrodynamical simulation. The code is used to model the well-documented spectral energy distribution and orbital modulations from LS 5039. Results: The pulsar wind is fully confined by a bow shock and a back shock. The particles are distributed into a narrow Maxwellian, emitting mostly GeV photons, and a power law radiating very efficiently over a broad energy range from X-rays to TeV gamma rays. Most of the emission arises from the apex of the bow shock. Doppler boosting shapes the X-ray and very high energy (VHE) lightcurves, constraining the system inclination to i ≈ 35°. There is tension between the hard VHE spectrum and the level of X-ray to MeV emission, which requires differing magnetic field intensities that are hard to achieve with constant magnetisation σ and Lorentz factor Γp of the pulsar wind. Our best compromise implies σ ≈ 1 and Γp ≈ 5 × 103, so respectively higher and lower than the typical values in pulsar wind nebulae. Conclusions: The high value of σ derived here, where the wind is confined close to the pulsar, supports the classical picture that has pulsar winds highly magnetised at launch. However, such magnetisations will require that further investigations are based on relativistic MHD simulations. Movies associated to Figs. A.1-A.4 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. 40 CFR 80.42 - Simple emissions model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Simple emissions model. 80.42 Section...) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Reformulated Gasoline § 80.42 Simple emissions model. (a) VOC emissions. The following equations shall comprise the simple model for VOC emissions. The simple model for...

  19. On the proper Mach number and ratio of specific heats for modeling the Venus bow shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatrallyay, M.; Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Barnes, A.; Mihalov, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    Observational data from the Pioneer Venus Orbiter are used to investigate the physical characteristics of the Venus bow shock, and to explore some general issues in the numerical simulation of collisionless shocks. It is found that since equations from gas-dynamic (GD) models of the Venus shock cannot in general replace MHD equations, it is not immediately obvious what the optimum way is to describe the desired MHD situation with a GD code. Test case analysis shows that for quasi-perpendicular shocks it is safest to use the magnetospheric Mach number as an input to the GD code. It is also shown that when comparing GD predicted temperatures with MHD predicted temperatures total energy should be compared since the magnetic energy density provides a significant fraction of the internal energy of the MHD fluid for typical solar wind parameters. Some conclusions are also offered on the properties of the terrestrial shock.

  20. Predicting effects of cold shock: modeling the decline of a thermal plume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, C.D.; Trent, D.S.; Schneider, M.J.

    1977-10-01

    Predicting direct impact of cold shock on aquatic organisms after termination of power plant thermal discharges requires thermal tests that provide quantitative data on the resistance of acclimated species to lower temperatures. Selected examples from the literature on cold shock resistance of freshwater and marine fishes are illustrated to show predictive use. Abrupt cold shock data may be applied to field situations involving either abrupt or gradual temperature declines but yield conservative estimates under the latter conditions. Gradual cold shock data may be applied where heated plumes gradually dissipate because poikilotherms partially compensate for lowering temperature regimes. A simplified analytical model is presented for estimating thermal declines in terminated plumes originating from offshore, submerged discharges where shear current and boundary effects are minimal. When applied to site-specific conditions, the method provides time-temperature distributions for correlation with cold resistance data and, therefore, aids in assessing cold shock impact on aquatic biota.

  1. Turbulence Models: Shock Boundary Layer Interaction at M=2.05

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Exp: Shock Boundary Layer Interaction at M=2.05. This web page provides data from experiments that may be useful for the validation of turbulence models. This...

  2. Modeling Mitigation Effects of Watershield on Shock Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.S. Shin

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The object of this analysis is to investigate mitigation effects of watershield on air blast waves. To examine the water mitigation concept, features of the free-field detonation process are studied from a series of one-dimensional simulations using a multimaterial Eulerian finite element technique. Five different shock Hugoniots for water are compared, and the most accurate data are suggested. To verify the numerical procedure, results are compared with available experimental data for UNDEX problem and analytical predictions for air shocks. For the case of contact watershield, the magnitude of peak pressure generally decreases and the shock arrival time increases with increasing thickness of watershield. The total pressure impulse is reduced significantly at near field. Non-contact watershield was also examined, and was found to provide a better design criterion based on the further decay of peak pressure.

  3. Hydrodynamic modeling and simulations of shock ignition thresholds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lafon M.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Shock Ignition (SI scheme [1] offers to reduce the laser requirements by relaxing the implosion phase to sub-ignition velocities and later adding an intense laser spike. Depending on laser energy, target characteristics and implosion velocity, high gains are expected [2,3]. Relevant intensities for scaled targets imploded in the velocity range from 150 to 400 km/s are defined at ignition thresholds. A range of moderate implosion velocities is specified to match safe implosions. These conditions for target design are then inferred for relevant NIF and LMJ shock-ignited targets.

  4. Assessment of CFD Modeling Capability for Hypersonic Shock Wave Boundary Layer Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-30

    RUTGERS UNIVERSITY Final Technical Report ONR Grant N00014-14-1-0827 Assessment of CFD Modeling Capability for Hypersonic Shock Wave Boundary...Layer Interactions 30 November 2015 Doyle Knight Dept Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey 98 Brett...30 September 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Assessment of CFD Modeling Capability for Hypersonic Shock Wave Boundary Layer Interactions 5a. CONTRACT

  5. Improved Reactive Flow Modeling of the LX-17 Double Shock Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehagen, Thomas J.; Vitello, Peter

    2017-06-01

    Over driven double shock experiments provide a measurement of the properties of the reaction product states of the insensitive high explosive LX-17 (92.5% TATB and 7.5% Kel-F by weight). These experiments used two flyer materials mounted on the end of a projectile to send an initial shock through the LX-17, followed by a second shock of a higher magnitude into the detonation products. In the experiments, the explosive was initially driven by the flyer plate to pressures above the Chapman-Jouguet state. The particle velocity history was recorded by Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) probes pointing at an aluminum foil coated LiF window. The PDV data shows a sharp initial shock and decay, followed by a rounded second shock. Here, the experimental results are compared to 2D and 3D Cheetah reactive flow modeling. Our default Cheetah reactive flow model fails to accurately reproduce the decay of the first shock or the curvature or strength of the second shock. A new model is proposed in which the carbon condensate produced in the reaction zone is controlled by a kinetic rate. This allows the carbon condensate to be initially out of chemical equilibrium with the product gas. This new model reproduces the initial detonation peak and decay, and matches the curvature of the second shock, however, it still over-predicts the strength of the second shock. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. Experimental characterization of nanoparticles emissions during Laser Shock Processing of AA6061, AISI304 and Ti6Al4V

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João F. Gomes

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an experimental study on the emission of nanometric size particles during laser shock processing of metallic materials: stainless steel, aluminum and titanium alloys which are the most common ones processed by this technique. The emission of nanometric size particles was confirmed to consist of aggregates composed of smaller spherical particles in the range of 10-20 nm, covered by a small concentric “layer” probably of metal oxides. The analysis of the nanoparticles showed the presence of the main elements present in the tested alloys as well as high oxygen content, which is another indication of the presence of oxides of Fe, Al and Ti. The amount of emitted nanoparticles, showed considerable increases over the baseline measured for the working environment, and these increases correspond to the more intense pulses of the laser beam. The material density was seen to highly affect the quantity of emitted nanoparticles. During LSP of aluminium alloy (the lighter material a large quantity of nanoparticles was measured, while in LSP of stainless steel few nanoparticles were observed, and this is the denser material, among the three tested. Titanium alloy results in intermediate values. The study of these emissions is innovative and relevant for industrial environments where the manufacturing process is in use.

  7. Simultaneous modelling of X-ray emission and optical polarization of intermediate polars: the case of V405 Aur

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Lima, I.; Vilega Rodrigues, C.; Medeiros Gomes Silva, K.; Luna, G.; D Amico, F.; Goulart Coelho, J.

    2017-10-01

    Intermediate polars are compact binaries in which mass transfer occurs from a low-mass star onto a magnetic white dwarf. A shock structure is formed in the magnetic accretion column nearby the white-dwarf surface. High-energy emission is produced in the post-shock region and the main physical process envolved is bremsstrahlung and line emission. Some systems show optical polarization, which may be also originated in the post-shock region. Our main goal is to study the magnetic structure of intermediate polars by simultaneously modelling optical polarimetry and X-ray data using the CYCLOPS code. This code was developed by our group to peform multi-wavelength fitting of the accretion column flux. It considers cyclotron and free-free emission from a 3D post-shock region, which is non-homogeneous in terms of density, temperature, and magnetic field. In this study, we present our modelling of the optical polarization and X-ray emission of V405 Aurigae, the intermediate polar that has the highest magnetic field. Previous studies of this system were not successful in proposing a geometry that explains both the optical and X-ray emissions.

  8. An In Silico Model of Endotoxic Shock Mediators (Briefing Charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-12

    and these dose metrics help to elucidate mechanisms of host response dynamics and improve cross -species extrapolation of response data. 15. SUBJECT...Endotoxin/LPS platelet activation macrophage neutrophil activation, release of oxygen radicals Endothelial damage ENDOTOXIC SHOCK Tissue injury...plasma vascular endothelium receptor on off Added receptor binding to platelets and red blood cells PAF receptors are also l cated in

  9. Speed evolution of fast CME/shocks with SOHO/LASCO, WIND/WAVES, IPS and in-situ WIND data: analysis of kilometric type-II emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gonzalez-Esparza

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Fast CME/shocks propagating in the interplanetary medium can generate kilometric Type II (km-TII radio emissions at the local plasma frequency and/or its harmonic, so these radio emissions provide a means of remotely tracking CME/shocks. We apply a new analysis technique, using the frequency drift of km-TII spectrum obtained by the Thermal Noise Receiver (TNR of the WIND/WAVES experiment, to infer, at some adequate intervals, the propagation speed of six CME/shocks. We combine these results with previously reported speeds from coronagraph white light and interplanetary scintillation observations, and in-situ measurements, to study the temporal speed evolution of the six events. The speed values obtained by the km-TII analysis are in a reasonable agreement with the speed measurements obtained by other techniques at different heliocentric distance ranges. The combination of all the speed measurements show a gradual deceleration of the CME/shocks as they propagate to 1 AU. This new technique can be useful in studying the evolution of fast CME/shocks when adequate intervals of km-TII emissions are available.

  10. The Role of Uncoupling Protein 2 During Myocardial Dysfunction in a Canine Model of Endotoxin Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoting; Liu, Dawei; Chai, Wenzhao; Long, Yun; Su, Longxiang; Yang, Rongli

    2015-03-01

    To explore the role of uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) during myocardial dysfunction in a canine model of endotoxin shock, 26 mongrel canines were randomly divided into the following four groups: A (control group; n = 6), B2 (shock after 2 h; n = 7), B4 (shock after 4 h; n = 7), and B6 (shock after 6 h; n = 6). Escherichia coli endotoxin was injected into the canines via the central vein, and hemodynamics were monitored. Energy metabolism, UCP2 mRNA and protein expression, and UCP2 localization were analyzed, and the correlation between energy metabolism changes, and UCP2 expression was determined. After the canine endotoxin shock model was successfully established, the expression of UCP2 mRNA and protein was found to increase, with later time points showing significant increases (P shock (P shock, and UCP2 may play an important role in this process. The negative correlation between UCP2 expression and energy metabolism requires further study, as the results might contribute to the treatment of sepsis with heart failure.

  11. Review of effective emissions modeling and computation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Paoli

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available An important issue in the evaluation of the environmental impact of emissions from concentrated sources such as transport modes, is to understand how processes occurring at the scales of exhaust plumes can influence the physical and chemical state of the atmosphere at regional and global scales. Indeed, three-dimensional global circulation models or chemistry transport models generally assume that emissions are instantaneously diluted into large-scale grid boxes, which may lead, for example, to overpredict the efficiency of NOx to produce ozone. In recent times, various methods have been developed to incorporate parameterizations of plume processes into global models that are based e.g. on correcting the original emission indexes or on introducing "subgrid" reaction rates in the models. This paper provides a review of the techniques proposed so far in the literature to account for local conversion of emissions in the plume, as well as the implementation of these techniques into atmospheric codes.

  12. Laser-shocked energetic materials for laboratory-scale characterization and model validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottfried, Jennifer

    The development of laboratory-scale methods for characterizing the properties of energetic materials, i.e., using only milligram quantities of material, is essential for the development of new types of explosives and propellants for use in military applications. Laser-based excitation methods for initiating or exciting the energetic material offer several advantages for investigating the response of energetic materials to various stimuli: 1) very small quantities of material can be studied prior to scale-up synthesis, 2) no detonation of bulk energetic material is required, eliminating the need for expensive safety precautions, and 3) extensive diagnostics can be incorporated into the experimental setup to provide as much information as possible per shot. In this presentation, progress in our laboratory developing three laser-based methods for characterizing energetic materials will be discussed. Direct excitation of a sample residue using a focused nanosecond laser pulse enables estimation of the performance of the energetic material based on the measured shock wave velocity with a technique called laser-induced air shock from energetic materials (LASEM); recent LASEM results on novel energetic materials will be presented. Impact ignition of energetic materials has also been investigated using laser-driven flyer plates. High-speed schlieren imaging of the flyer plate launch has demonstrated that late-time emission from the impacted energetic material is caused by the reaction of particles ejected off the sample surface with the flyer plate launch products. Finally, the role of a rapid temperature jump (1014 K/s) in the initiation of the explosive cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) has been investigated by indirect ultrafast laser heating. Although the temperature jump was insufficient to decompose the RDX, it did induce a temporary electronic excitation of the heated explosive molecules. These results are being used to validate multiscale models in order to

  13. Coherent Thz Electromagnetic Radiation Emission as a Shock Wave Diagnostic and Probe of Ultrafast Phase Transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Evan J.; Armstrong, Michael R.; Kim, Ki-Yong; Glownia, James H.; Howard, William M.; Piner, Edwin L.; Roberts, John C.

    2009-12-01

    We present the first experimental observations of terahertz frequency radiation emitted when a terahertz frequency acoustic wave propagates past an interface between materials of differing piezoelectric coefficients. We show that this fundamentally new phenomenon can be used to probe structural properties of thin films. Then, we present molecular dynamics simulations showing that detectable THz frequency radiation can be emitted when a wurtzite structure crystal transforms to a rocksalt structure under shock compression on picosecond timescales. We show that information about the kinetics of the transformation is contained in the time-dependence of the THz field.

  14. Effects of low ambient temperature on hemodynamics and oxygen dynamics in a porcine hemorrhagic shock model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-feng ZHANG

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the effects of low ambient temperature on hemodynamics and oxygen dynamics in a porcine hemorrhagic shock model. Methods  Thirty-two healthy adult Bama miniature pigs were randomly divided into four groups (8 each: control (group C, shock under room temperature (22℃, group R, shock under low ambient temperature (–10℃, group L and shock under normal body temperature (keep pulmonary arterial temperature ranged from 38.5 to 39.5℃, group N. The hemorrhagic shock model was reproduced by venous bleeding (40% of total blood volume, and the core temperature (pulmonary arterial temperature and rectal temperature, heart rate (HR, mean arterial pressure (MAP, pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP, pulmonary arterial wedge pressure (PAWP, central venous pressure (CVP, cardiac output (CO, hemoglobin (Hb, saturation of mixed venous blood (SvO2 and blood gas analysis were recorded before reproduction of shock and at different time points after hemorrhagic shock. The whole body oxygen delivery index (DO2I, oxygen uptake index (VO2I, and oxygen extraction ratio (O2ER were calculated. Results  Four pigs died in group N during the experiment, meanwhile, no pig died in other groups. The core temperature in group C, R and L decreased significantly compared with group N (P<0.05, and the core temperature in group L was significantly lower than that in groups C and R from 120 minutes after shock. No difference was found in hemodynamics, oxygen dynamics and prognosis between group R and group L. The HR and VO2I in group N were significantly higher than those in group L and group R, while there was no difference in other indices between the 3 groups. Conclusion  The hemodynamics and oxygen dynamics indices don't worsen in hemorrhagic shock pigs under low ambient temperature, possibly resulting from induced hypothermia caused by anesthesia.

  15. Plume emission, shock wave and surface wave formation during excimer laser ablation of the cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bor, Z; Hopp, B; Rácz, B; Szabó, G; Ratkay, I; Süveges, I; Füst, A; Mohay, J

    1993-01-01

    Excimer lasers are now used for corneal surgery; however, the physical processes occurring during photoablation of the cornea are incompletely understood. High speed laser-based photographic arrangement was constructed. The temporal resolution was better than 1 ns. The setup could work as a Schlieren arrangement, which is sensitive to the refractive index change caused by the shock wave propagating in the air above the eye. With minor changes the setup was converted into a shadowgraph, which could detect the ablation plume and the waves propagating on the surface of the eye. Due to the impact of the excimer laser pulse onto the surface of the cornea, a shock wave was generated in the air. The shadowgraph clearly showed the ejection of the ablated cornea. The ejection velocity of the plume was found to be over 600 m/s. It was shown for the first time that the recoil forces of the plume are generating a wave on the surface of the eye. The laser-based high speed photographic arrangement is a powerful arrangement in the study of physical effects occurring during photoablation of the cornea.

  16. How Bad or Good Are the External Forward Shock Afterglow Models of Gamma-Ray Bursts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang-Gao; Zhang, Bing; Liang, En-Wei; Gao, He; Li, Liang; Deng, Can-Min; Qin, Song-Mei; Tang, Qing-Wen; Kann, D. Alexander; Ryde, Felix; Kumar, Pawan

    2015-07-01

    The external forward shock models have been the standard paradigm to interpret the broadband afterglow data of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). One prediction of the models is that some afterglow temporal breaks at different energy bands should be achromatic; that is, the break times should be the same in different frequencies. Multiwavelength observations in the Swift era have revealed chromatic afterglow behaviors at least in some GRBs, casting doubts on the external forward shock origin of GRB afterglows. In this paper, using a large sample of GRBs with both X-ray and optical afterglow data, we perform a systematic study to address the question: how bad or good are the external forward shock models? Our sample includes 85 GRBs up to 2014 March with well-monitored X-ray and optical light curves. Based on how well the data abide by the external forward shock models, we categorize them into five grades and three samples. The first two grades (Grade I and II) include 45 of 85 GRBs. They show evidence of, or are consistent with having, an achromatic break. The temporal and spectral behaviors in each afterglow segment are consistent with the predictions (the “closure relations”) of the forward shock models. These GRBs are included in the Gold sample. The next two grades (Grade III and IV) include 37 of 85 GRBs. They are also consistent with having an achromatic break, even though one or more afterglow segments do not comply with the closure relations. These GRBs are included in the Silver sample. Finally, Grade V (3/85) shows direct evidence of chromatic behaviors, suggesting that the external shock models are inconsistent with the data. These are included in the Bad sample. We further perform statistical analyses of various observational properties (temporal index α, spectral index β, break time tb) and model parameters (energy injection index q, electron spectral index p, jet opening angle {θ }j, radiative efficiency ηγ, and so on) of the GRBs in the Gold sample

  17. Mortality Prediction Model of Septic Shock Patients Based on Routinely Recorded Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Carrara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the problem of mortality prediction in two datasets, the first composed of 23 septic shock patients and the second composed of 73 septic subjects selected from the public database MIMIC-II. For each patient we derived hemodynamic variables, laboratory results, and clinical information of the first 48 hours after shock onset and we performed univariate and multivariate analyses to predict mortality in the following 7 days. The results show interesting features that individually identify significant differences between survivors and nonsurvivors and features which gain importance only when considered together with the others in a multivariate regression model. This preliminary study on two small septic shock populations represents a novel contribution towards new personalized models for an integration of multiparameter patient information to improve critical care management of shock patients.

  18. Validation of the measure automobile emissions model : a statistical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-09-01

    The Mobile Emissions Assessment System for Urban and Regional Evaluation (MEASURE) model provides an external validation capability for hot stabilized option; the model is one of several new modal emissions models designed to predict hot stabilized e...

  19. Comparative Evaluation of Crystalloid Resuscitation Rate in a Human Model of Compensated Haemorrhagic Shock

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Loretta; Lau, Lawrence; Churilov, Leonid; Riedel, Bernhard; McNicol, Larry; Hahn, Robert G; Weinberg, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: The most effective rate of fluid resuscitation in haemorrhagic shock is unknown. Methods: We performed a randomized crossover pilot study in a healthy volunteer model of compensated haemorrhagic shock. Following venesection of 15?mL/kg of blood, participants were randomized to 20?mL/kg of crystalloid over 10 min (FAST treatment) or 30 min (SLOW treatment). The primary end point was oxygen delivery (DO2). Secondary end points included pressure and flow-based haemodynamic...

  20. Comparison of Hydroxocobalamin Versus Norepinephrine Versus Saline in a Swine Model of Servere Septic Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-20

    Comparison of hydroxocbalamin versus norepinephrine versus saline in a swine model of severe septic shock. Background: Sepsis is associated with a mortality ...of nearly 30%. Mortality is due, in part, to an uncontrolled inflammatory response. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 {MMP-9) and heat shock protein 70...lipopolysaccharide {LPS)-induced endotoxemia. Methods: Swine {45-55 kg) were anesthetized, intubated, and instrumented with continuous femoral and

  1. Neutrino and cosmic-ray emission from multiple internal shocks in gamma-ray bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bustamante, Mauricio; Baerwald, Philipp; Murase, Kohta

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are short-lived, luminous explosions at cosmological distances, thought to originate from relativistic jets launched at the deaths of massive stars. They are among the prime candidates to produce the observed cosmic rays at the highest energies. Recent neutrino data have, however...... and cosmic-ray emission from multiple emission regions since these internal collisions must occur at very different radii, from below the photosphere all the way out to the circumburst medium, as a consequence of the efficient dissipation of kinetic energy. We demonstrate that the different messengers...

  2. Finite element modelling of radial shock wave therapy for chronic plantar fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhamaali, Zaied K; Crocombe, Andrew D; Solan, Matthew C; Cirovic, Srdjan

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic use of high-amplitude pressure waves, or shock wave therapy (SWT), is emerging as a popular method for treating musculoskeletal disorders. However, the mechanism(s) through which this technique promotes healing are unclear. Finite element models of a shock wave source and the foot were constructed to gain a better understanding of the mechanical stimuli that SWT produces in the context of plantar fasciitis treatment. The model of the shock wave source was based on the geometry of an actual radial shock wave device, in which pressure waves are generated through the collision of two metallic objects: a projectile and an applicator. The foot model was based on the geometry reconstructed from magnetic resonance images of a volunteer and it comprised bones, cartilage, soft tissue, plantar fascia, and Achilles tendon. Dynamic simulations were conducted of a single and of two successive shock wave pulses administered to the foot. The collision between the projectile and the applicator resulted in a stress wave in the applicator. This wave was transmitted into the soft tissue in the form of compression-rarefaction pressure waves with an amplitude of the order of several MPa. The negative pressure at the plantar fascia reached values of over 1.5 MPa, which could be sufficient to generate cavitation in the tissue. The results also show that multiple shock wave pulses may have a cumulative effect in terms of strain energy accumulation in the foot.

  3. Application of the emission inventory model TEAM: Uncertainties in dioxin emission estimates for central Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pulles, M.P.J.; Kok, H.; Quass, U.

    2006-01-01

    This study uses an improved emission inventory model to assess the uncertainties in emissions of dioxins and furans associated with both knowledge on the exact technologies and processes used, and with the uncertainties of both activity data and emission factors. The annual total emissions for the

  4. Kinetic modeling of methyl butanoate in shock tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Lam K; Lin, Kuang C; Violi, Angela

    2008-12-25

    An increased necessity for energy independence and heightened concern about the effects of rising carbon dioxide levels have intensified the search for renewable fuels that could reduce our current consumption of petrol and diesel. One such fuel is biodiesel, which consists of the methyl esters of fatty acids. Methyl butanoate (MB) contains the essential chemical structure of the long-chain fatty acids and a shorter, but similar, alkyl chain. This paper reports on a detailed kinetic mechanism for MB that is assembled using theoretical approaches. Thirteen pathways that include fuel decomposition, isomerization, and propagation steps were computed using ab initio calculations [J. Org. Chem. 2008, 73, 94]. Rate constants from first principles for important reactions in CO(2) formation, namely CH(3)OCO=CH(3) + CO(2) (R1) and CH(3)OCO=CH(3)O + CO (R2) reactions, are computed at high levels of theory and implemented in the mechanism. Using the G3B3 potential energy surface together with the B3LYP/6-31G(d) gradient, Hessian and geometries, the rate constants for reactions R1 and R2 are calculated using the Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory with corrections from treatments for tunneling, hindered rotation, and variational effects. The calculated rate constants of reaction R1 differ from the data present in the literature by at most 20%, while those of reaction R2 are about a factor of 4 lower than the available values. The new kinetic model derived from ab initio simulations is combined with the kinetic mechanism presented by Fisher et al. [Proc. Combust. Inst. 2000, 28, 1579] together with the addition of the newly found six-centered unimolecular elimination reaction that yields ethylene and methyl acetate, MB = C(2)H(4) + CH(3)COOCH(3). This latter pathway requires the inclusion of the CH(3)COOCH(3) decomposition model suggested by Westbrook et al. [Proc. Combust. Inst. 2008, accepted]. The newly composed kinetic mechanism for MB is used to study the CO(2) formation

  5. Epicardial shock-wave therapy improves ventricular function in a porcine model of ischaemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holfeld, Johannes; Zimpfer, Daniel; Albrecht-Schgoer, Karin; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Paulus, Patrick; Dumfarth, Julia; Thomas, Anita; Lobenwein, Daniela; Tepeköylü, Can; Rosenhek, Raphael; Schaden, Wolfgang; Kirchmair, Rudolf; Aharinejad, Seyedhossein; Grimm, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Previously we have shown that epicardial shock-wave therapy improves left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) in a rat model of myocardial infarction. In the present experiments we aimed to address the safety and efficacy of epicardial shock-wave therapy in a preclinical large animal model and to further evaluate mechanisms of action of this novel therapy. Four weeks after left anterior descending (LAD) artery ligation in pigs, the animals underwent re-thoracotomy with (shock-wave group, n = 6) or without (control group, n = 5) epicardial shock waves (300 impulses at 0.38 mJ/mm2 ) applied to the infarcted anterior wall. Efficacy endpoints were improvement of LVEF and induction of angiogenesis 6 weeks after shock-wave therapy. Safety endpoints were haemodynamic stability during treatment and myocardial damage. Four weeks after LAD ligation, LVEF decreased in both the shock-wave (43 ± 3%, p heart failure exerted a positive effect on LVEF improvement and did not show any adverse effects. Angiogenesis was induced by stimulation of VEGF receptors. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Evaluation of a Model-Based Hemodynamic Monitoring Method in a Porcine Study of Septic Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Revie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The accuracy and clinical applicability of an improved model-based system for tracking hemodynamic changes is assessed in an animal study on septic shock. Methods. This study used cardiovascular measurements recorded during a porcine trial studying the efficacy of large-pore hemofiltration for treating septic shock. Four Pietrain pigs were instrumented and induced with septic shock. A subset of the measured data, representing clinically available measurements, was used to identify subject-specific cardiovascular models. These models were then validated against the remaining measurements. Results. The system accurately matched independent measures of left and right ventricle end diastolic volumes and maximum left and right ventricular pressures to percentage errors less than 20% (except for the 95th percentile error in maximum right ventricular pressure and all R2>0.76. An average decrease of 42% in systemic resistance, a main cardiovascular consequence of septic shock, was observed 120 minutes after the infusion of the endotoxin, consistent with experimentally measured trends. Moreover, modelled temporal trends in right ventricular end systolic elastance and afterload tracked changes in corresponding experimentally derived metrics. Conclusions. These results demonstrate that this model-based method can monitor disease-dependent changes in preload, afterload, and contractility in porcine study of septic shock.

  7. Structural model of dodecameric heat-shock protein Hsp21

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rutsdottir, Gudrun; Härmark, Johan; Weide, Yoran

    2017-01-01

    Small heat-shock proteins (sHsps) prevent aggregation of thermosensitive client proteins in a first line of defense against cellular stress. The mechanisms by which they perform this function have been hard to define due to limited structural information; currently, there is only one high-resolution...... from previous undefined or inwardly facing arms. To test the importance of the IXVXI motif, we created the point mutant V181A, which, as expected, disrupts the Hsp21 dodecamer and decreases chaperone activity. Finally, our data emphasize that sHsp chaperone efficiency depends on oligomerization...

  8. Studies on blast traumatic brain injury using in-vitro model with shock tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arun, Peethambaran; Spadaro, John; John, Jennifer; Gharavi, Robert B; Bentley, Timothy B; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P

    2011-06-11

    One of the major limitations in studying the mechanisms of blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) or screening therapeutics for protection is the lack of suitable laboratory model systems that can closely mimic the complex blast exposure. Although animal models of bTBI that use shock tubes to mimic blast exposure are available, no high throughput shock tube-based in-vitro models have been reported. Here, we report an in-vitro bTBI model using a compressed air-driven shock tube and mouse neuroblastoma/rat glioblastoma hybrid cells (NG108-15) or SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells in tissue culture plates. Our data showed significant neurobiological effects with decreased adenosine triphosphate levels, increased cellular injury, lactate dehydrogenase release, and reactive oxygen species formation after blast exposure.

  9. THE EXTREMELY HIGH PEAK ENERGY OF GRB 110721A IN THE CONTEXT OF A DISSIPATIVE PHOTOSPHERE SYNCHROTRON EMISSION MODEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veres, Peter; Zhang Binbin; Meszaros, Peter, E-mail: veresp@psu.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2012-12-20

    The Fermi observations of GRB 110721A have revealed an unusually high peak energy {approx}15 MeV in the first time bin of the prompt emission. We find that an interpretation is unlikely in terms of internal shock models, and confirm that a standard blackbody photospheric model also falls short. On the other hand, we show that dissipative photospheric synchrotron models ranging from extreme magnetically dominated to baryon dominated dynamics are able to accommodate such high peak values.

  10. Integrated modeling/analyses of thermal-shock effects in SNS targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Haines, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-06-01

    In a spallation neutron source (SNS), extremely rapid energy pulses are introduced in target materials such as mercury, lead, tungsten, uranium, etc. Shock phenomena in such systems may possibly lead to structural material damage beyond the design basis. As expected, the progression of shock waves and interaction with surrounding materials for liquid targets can be quite different from that in solid targets. The purpose of this paper is to describe ORNL`s modeling framework for `integrated` assessment of thermal-shock issues in liquid and solid target designs. This modeling framework is being developed based upon expertise developed from past reactor safety studies, especially those related to the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project. Unlike previous separate-effects modeling approaches employed (for evaluating target behavior when subjected to thermal shocks), the present approach treats the overall problem in a coupled manner using state-of-the-art equations of state for materials of interest (viz., mercury, tungsten and uranium). That is, the modeling framework simultaneously accounts for localized (and distributed) compression pressure pulse generation due to transient heat deposition, the transport of this shock wave outwards, interaction with surrounding boundaries, feedback to mercury from structures, multi-dimensional reflection patterns & stress induced (possible) breakup or fracture.

  11. UNUSUAL SHOCK-EXCITED OH MASER EMISSION IN A YOUNG PLANETARY NEBULA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, Hai-Hua; Shen, Zhi-Qiang [Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Rd, Shanghai, 200030 (China); Walsh, Andrew J. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth WA 6845 (Australia); Gómez, José F. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía, CSIC, Glorieta de la Astronomía s/n, E-18008, Granada (Spain); Imai, Hiroshi [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Kagoshima University, 1-21-35 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Green, James A. [SKA Organisation, Jodrell Bank Observatory, Lower Withington, Macclesfield, Cheshire SK11 9DL (United Kingdom); Dawson, Joanne R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and MQ Research Centre in Astronomy, Astrophysics and Astrophotonics, Macquarie University, NSW 2109 (Australia); Ellingsen, Simon P. [School of Physical Sciences, Private Bag 37, University of Tasmania, Hobart 7001, TAS (Australia); Breen, Shari L. [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Jones, Paul A.; Cunningham, Maria R. [School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Gibson, Steven J., E-mail: haihua.qiao@curtin.edu.au [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, 1906 College Heights Blvd, Bowling Green, KY 42101 (United States)

    2016-01-20

    We report on OH maser emission toward G336.644−0.695 (IRAS 16333−4807), which is a H{sub 2}O maser-emitting Planetary Nebula (PN). We have detected 1612, 1667, and 1720 MHz OH masers at two epochs using the Australia Telescope Compact Array, hereby confirming it as the seventh known case of an OH-maser-emitting PN. This is only the second known PN showing 1720 MHz OH masers after K 3−35 and the only evolved stellar object with 1720 MHz OH masers as the strongest transition. This PN is one of a group of very young PNe. The 1612 MHz and 1667 MHz masers are at a similar velocity to the 22 GHz H{sub 2}O masers, whereas the 1720 MHz masers show a variable spectrum, with several components spread over a higher velocity range (up to 36 km s{sup −1}). We also detect Zeeman splitting in the 1720 MHz transition at two epochs (with field strengths of ∼2 to ∼10 mG), which suggests the OH emission at 1720 MHz is formed in a magnetized environment. These 1720 MHz OH masers may trace short-lived equatorial ejections during the formation of the PN.

  12. Injection Efficiency of Low-energy Particles at Oblique Shocks with a Focused Transport Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, P.; Zhang, M.; Rassoul, H.

    2013-12-01

    There is strong evidence that a small portion of thermal and suprathermal particles from hot coronal material or remnants of previous solar energetic particle (SEP) events serve as the source of large SEP events (Desai et al. 2006). To build more powerful SEP models, it is necessary to model the detailed particle injection and acceleration process for source particles especially at lower energies. We present a test particle simulation on the injection and acceleration of low-energy suprathermal particles by Laminar nonrelativistic oblique shocks in the framework of the focused transport theory, which is proved to contain all necessary physics of shock acceleration, but avoid the limitation of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). The injection efficiency as a function of Mach number, obliquity, injection speed, shock strength, cross-shock potential and the degree of turbulence is calculated. This test particle simulation proves that the focused transport theory is an extension of DSA theory with the capability of predicting the efficiency of particle injection. The results can be applied to modeling the SEP acceleration from source particles.

  13. Fossil Fuel Emission Verification Modeling at LLNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron-Smith, P; Kosovic, B; Guilderson, T; Monache, L D; Bergmann, D

    2009-08-06

    We have an established project at LLNL to develop the tools needed to constrain fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions using measurements of the carbon-14 isotope in atmospheric samples. In Figure 1 we show the fossil fuel plumes from Los Angeles and San Francisco for two different weather patterns. Obviously, a measurement made at any given location is going to depend on the weather leading up to the measurement. Thus, in order to determine the GHG emissions from some region using in situ measurements of those GHGs, we use state-of-the-art global and regional atmospheric chemistry-transport codes to simulate the plumes: the LLNL-IMPACT model (Rotman et al., 2004) and the WRFCHEM community code (http://www.wrf-model.org/index.php). Both codes can use observed (aka assimilated) meteorology in order to recreate the actual transport that occurred. The measured concentration of each tracer at a particular spatio-temporal location is a linear combination of the plumes from each region at that location (for non-reactive species). The challenge is to calculate the emission strengths for each region that fit the observed concentrations. In general this is difficult because there are errors in the measurements and modeling of the plumes. We solve this inversion problem using the strategy illustrated in Figure 2. The Bayesian Inference step combines the a priori estimates of the emissions, and their uncertainty, for each region with the results of the observations, and their uncertainty, and an ensemble of model predicted plumes for each region, and their uncertainty. The result is the mathematical best estimate of the emissions and their errors. In the case of non-linearities, or if we are using a statistical sampling technique such as a Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique, then the process is iterated until it converges (ie reaches stationarity). For the Bayesian inference we can use both a direct inversion capability, which is fast but requires assumptions of linearity and

  14. Onion-shell model for cosmic ray electrons and radio synchrotron emission in supernova remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, R.; Drury, L. O.; Voelk, H. J.; Bogdan, T. J.

    1985-01-01

    The spectrum of cosmic ray electrons, accelerated in the shock front of a supernova remnant (SNR), is calculated in the test-particle approximation using an onion-shell model. Particle diffusion within the evolving remnant is explicity taken into account. The particle spectrum becomes steeper with increasing radius as well as SNR age. Simple models of the magnetic field distribution allow a prediction of the intensity and spectrum of radio synchrotron emission and their radial variation. The agreement with existing observations is satisfactory in several SNR's but fails in other cases. Radiative cooling may be an important effect, especially in SNR's exploding in a dense interstellar medium.

  15. A multiple-scales model of the shock-cell structure of imperfectly expanded supersonic jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, C. K. W.; Jackson, J. A.; Seiner, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the development of an analytical model of the quasi-periodic shock-cell structure of an imperfectly expanded supersonic jet. The investigation represents a part of a program to develop a mathematical theory of broadband shock-associated noise of supersonic jets. Tam and Tanna (1982) have suggested that this type of noise is generated by the weak interaction between the quasi-periodic shock cells and the downstream-propagating large turbulence structures in the mixing layer of the jet. In the model developed in this paper, the effect of turbulence in the mixing layer of the jet is simulated by the addition of turbulent eddy-viscosity terms to the momentum equation. Attention is given to the mean-flow profile and the numerical solution, and a comparison of the numerical results with experimental data.

  16. Shock structure and temperature overshoot in macroscopic multi-temperature model of mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madjarević, Damir, E-mail: damirm@uns.ac.rs; Simić, Srboljub, E-mail: ssimic@uns.ac.rs [Department of Mechanics, Faculty of Technical Sciences, University of Novi Sad, Trg Dositeja Obradovića 6, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia); Ruggeri, Tommaso, E-mail: tommaso.ruggeri@unibo.it [Department of Mathematics and Research Center of Applied Mathematics, University of Bologna, Via Saragozza 8, 40123 Bologna (Italy)

    2014-10-15

    The paper discusses the shock structure in macroscopic multi-temperature model of gaseous mixtures, recently established within the framework of extended thermodynamics. The study is restricted to weak and moderate shocks in a binary mixture of ideal gases with negligible viscosity and heat conductivity. The model predicts the existence of temperature overshoot of heavier constituent, like more sophisticated approaches, but also puts in evidence its non-monotonic behavior not documented in other studies. This phenomenon is explained as a consequence of weak energy exchange between the constituents, either due to large mass difference, or large rarefaction of the mixture. In the range of small Mach number it is also shown that shock thickness (or equivalently, the inverse of Knudsen number) decreases with the increase of Mach number, as well as when the mixture tends to behave like a single-component gas (small mass difference and/or presence of one constituent in traces)

  17. Transfer function analysis of baroreflex function in a rabbit model of endotoxic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Collin H H; Chan, Gregory S H; Middleton, Paul M; Cave, Grant; Harvey, Martyn; Savkin, Andrey V; Lovell, Nigel H

    2009-01-01

    Sepsis is characterized by profound cardiovascular abnormalities which may result from the derangements in the arterial baroreflex system and other autonomic regulatory functions. In this study, a mechanically ventilated and anesthetized rabbit model of endotoxic shock was utilized to mimic the behaviors of the cardiovascular system in a sepsis patient. 13 adult New Zealand white rabbits were studied, with 8 of them injected with endotoxin and the remaining given saline solution as sham fluid. Measurements of heart period (RRi) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) were obtained pre-and post-intervention after a 90 minute period, which allowed spectral and cross-spectral analysis of heart rate and blood pressure variabilities to be performed. A significant increase of blood lactate level (p distributive shock. Based on this model, the novel findings were that in the low frequency (LF) and mid frequency (MF) bands, there was a decrease in coherence (p shock.

  18. A minimal titration model of the mammalian dynamical heat shock response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivéry, Aude; Courtade, Emmanuel; Thommen, Quentin

    2016-12-01

    Environmental stress, such as oxidative or heat stress, induces the activation of the heat shock response (HSR) and leads to an increase in the heat shock proteins (HSPs) level. These HSPs act as molecular chaperones to maintain cellular proteostasis. Controlled by highly intricate regulatory mechanisms, having stress-induced activation and feedback regulations with multiple partners, the HSR is still incompletely understood. In this context, we propose a minimal molecular model for the gene regulatory network of the HSR that reproduces quantitatively different heat shock experiments both on heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) and HSPs activities. This model, which is based on chemical kinetics laws, is kept with a low dimensionality without altering the biological interpretation of the model dynamics. This simplistic model highlights the titration of HSF1 by chaperones as the guiding line of the network. Moreover, by a steady states analysis of the network, three different temperature stress regimes appear: normal, acute, and chronic, where normal stress corresponds to pseudo thermal adaption. The protein triage that governs the fate of damaged proteins or the different stress regimes are consequences of the titration mechanism. The simplicity of the present model is of interest in order to study detailed modelling of cross regulation between the HSR and other major genetic networks like the cell cycle or the circadian clock.

  19. Shock-to-detonation transition of RDX and NTO based composite high explosives: experiments and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudin, Gerard; Roudot, Marie; Genetier, Marc

    2013-06-01

    Composite HMX and NTO based high explosives (HE) are widely used in ammunitions. Designing modern warheads needs robust and reliable models to compute shock ignition and detonation propagation inside HE. Comparing to a pressed HE, a composite HE is not porous and the hot-spots are mainly located at the grain - binder interface leading to a different behavior during shock-to-detonation transition. An investigation of how shock-to-detonation transition occurs inside composite HE containing RDX and NTO is proposed in this lecture. Two composite HE have been studied. The first one is HMX - HTPB 82:18. The second one is HMX - NTO - HTPB 12:72:16. These HE have been submitted to plane sustained shock waves at different pressure levels using a laboratory powder gun. Pressure signals are measured using manganin gauges inserted at several distances inside HE. The corresponding run-distances to detonation are determined using wedge test experiments where the plate impact is performed using a powder gun. Both HE exhibit a single detonation buildup curve in the distance - time diagram of shock-to-detonation transition. This feature seems a common shock-to-detonation behavior for composite HE without porosity. This behavior is also confirmed for a RDX - HTPB 85:15 based composite HE. Such a behavior is exploited to determine the heterogeneous reaction rate versus the shock pressure using a method based on the Cauchy-Riemann problem inversion. The reaction rate laws obtained allow to compute both run-distance to detonation and pressure signals.

  20. Modeling regional-scale wildland fire emissions with the wildland fire emissions information system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nancy H.F. French; Donald McKenzie; Tyler Erickson; Benjamin Koziol; Michael Billmire; K. Endsley; Naomi K.Y. Scheinerman; Liza Jenkins; Mary E. Miller; Roger Ottmar; Susan Prichard

    2014-01-01

    As carbon modeling tools become more comprehensive, spatial data are needed to improve quantitative maps of carbon emissions from fire. The Wildland Fire Emissions Information System (WFEIS) provides mapped estimates of carbon emissions from historical forest fires in the United States through a web browser. WFEIS improves access to data and provides a consistent...

  1. Modeling plasma glow discharges in Air near a Mach 3 bow shock with KRONOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassou, Sebastien; Labaune, Julien; Packan, Denis; Elias, Paul-Quentin

    2016-09-01

    In this work, plasma glow discharge in Air is modeled near a Mach 3 bow shock. Numerical simulations are performed using the coupling KRONOS which have been developed at ONERA. The flow field is modeled using the code CFD: CEDRE from ONERA and the electrical and plasma part by the EDF open-source code CODE_SATURNE. The plasma kinetic modeling consists on a two-term Boltzmann equation solver and a chemical reaction solver depending of the electric field. The coupling KRONOS is fully parallelized and run on ONERA supercomputers. The shock wave is formed by the propagation of a supersonic flow (M = 3) through a truncated conical model mounted with a central spike. Depending on the spike's voltage value, corona, glow or arc regime could be obtained in a steady flow. The parameters for the supersonic flow and the spike configurations are chosen to be in glow discharge regime and to reproduce the experimental setup. In our simulations, 12 species and 80 reactions (ionization, electronic or vibrational excitation, attachment etc ...) are considered to properly model the glow discharge and the afterglow. In a stationary flow, glow discharge is observed only at the upstream of the shock wave near the high voltage spike. Behind the bow shock, in the afterglow, negative ions are provided by electrons attachment with O2. The negative ions flow convection ensures the electrical conduction and the establishment of the glow discharge.

  2. Pressure measurements and an analytical model for laser-generated shock waves in solids at low irradiance

    CERN Document Server

    Romain, J P; Dayma, G; Boustie, M; Resseguier, T D; Combis, P

    2002-01-01

    Low amplitude shock waves (from 1 to 300 bar) have been generated in gold layers deposited on a quartz substrate, by laser pulses at an incident fluence from 0.4 to 4.0 J cm sup - sup 2. The quartz was used as a pressure gauge for recording the induced shock profile. At a fluence <1.4 J cm sup - sup 2 , the shock pressure does not exceed 10 bar and the shock front is followed by a tension peak typical of an absorption in solid state. An analytical model of the compression-tension process has been developed, accounting for shock pressure and shock profile evolution as a function of irradiation conditions and material properties. From this model a mechanical interpretation is given to previous observations of spalling of the irradiated target surface.

  3. SHOCK-ENHANCED C{sup +} EMISSION AND THE DETECTION OF H{sub 2}O FROM THE STEPHAN'S QUINTET GROUP-WIDE SHOCK USING HERSCHEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appleton, P. N.; Lord, S.; Lu, N. [NASA Herschel Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Guillard, P. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Boulanger, F.; Pineau des Forêts, G. [Institut d' Astrophysique Spatialé, Universite Paris Sud 11, Orsay (France); Cluver, M. E.; Konstantopoulos, I. [Australian Astronomical Observatory, Epping, NSW (Australia); Ogle, P. [NASA Extragalactic Database, IPAC, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Falgarone, E. [Ecole Normale Supérieure/Observatoire de Paris, F-75231 Paris (France); O' Sullivan, E. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Duc, P.-A. [Laboratoire AIM, Saclay, Paris (France); Gallagher, S. [University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario (Canada); Gao, Y. [Purple Mountain Observatory, Nanjing (China); Jarrett, T. [Astronomy Department, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Lisenfeld, U. [Universidad de Granada, Granada (Spain); Peterson, B. W. [University of Wisconsin-Barron County, Rice Lake, WI 54868 (United States); Struck, C. [Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Sturm, E. [Max Planck Institute fur Extraterrestische Physik, Munich (Germany); Tuffs, R., E-mail: apple@ipac.caltech.edu [MPI-Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); and others

    2013-11-01

    We present the first Herschel spectroscopic detections of the [O I] 63 μm and [C II] 158 μm fine-structure transitions, and a single para-H{sub 2}O line from the 35 × 15 kpc{sup 2} shocked intergalactic filament in Stephan's Quintet. The filament is believed to have been formed when a high-speed intruder to the group collided with a clumpy intergroup gas. Observations with the PACS spectrometer provide evidence for broad (>1000 km s{sup –1}) luminous [C II] line profiles, as well as fainter [O I] 63 μm emission. SPIRE FTS observations reveal water emission from the p-H{sub 2}O (1{sub 11}-0{sub 00}) transition at several positions in the filament, but no other molecular lines. The H{sub 2}O line is narrow and may be associated with denser intermediate-velocity gas experiencing the strongest shock-heating. The [C II]/PAH{sub tot} and [C II]/FIR ratios are too large to be explained by normal photo-electric heating in photodissociation regions. H II region excitation or X-ray/cosmic-ray heating can also be ruled out. The observations lead to the conclusion that a large fraction the molecular gas is diffuse and warm. We propose that the [C II], [O I], and warm H{sub 2} line emission is powered by a turbulent cascade in which kinetic energy from the galaxy collision with the intergalactic medium is dissipated to small scales and low velocities, via shocks and turbulent eddies. Low-velocity magnetic shocks can help explain both the [C II]/[O I] ratio, and the relatively high [C II]/H{sub 2} ratios observed. The discovery that [C II] emission can be enhanced, in large-scale turbulent regions in collisional environments, has implications for the interpretation of [C II] emission in high-z galaxies.

  4. Use of high-dose nandrolone aggravates septic shock in a mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che Lin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Nandrolone, an anabolic-androgenic steroid, is widely misused by athletes who wish to rapidly increase muscle mass and performance. An increasing number of reports have indicated that nandrolone may affect and modulate the immune system. This study aimed to investigate the effects of nandrolone on septic shock-caused immune responses and the cellular mechanism of action using a sepsis murine model. Before septic shock induction, BALB/c mice were given a high dose of nandrolone or peanut oil only. After septic shock induction, mice were sacrificed at different time points. Their blood and tissue specimens were analyzed. It was found that the high-dose nandrolone group had significantly increased mortality compared with the control group (p<0.001. The serum malondialdehyde level was significantly increased in the high-dose group compared with the control group. Animals administered a high dose of nandrolone had significantly increased hepatic tumor necrosis factor-α or splenic interferon-γ at 0 and 6 hours. In lung tissue, insulin-like growth factor-1, insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor, and IGFBP1 and IGFBP2 mRNA expression were increased in the high-dose nandrolone group at 6 hours. Nandrolone abuse may hasten the death of patients with septic shock and may aggravate septic shock in mice.

  5. Analytical and numerical modelling of thermoviscous shocks in their interactions in nonlinear fluids including dissipation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Anders Rønne; Sørensen, Mads Peter; Gaididei, Yuri Borisovich

    2010-01-01

    A wave equation, that governs finite amplitude acoustic disturbances in a thermoviscous Newtonian fluid, and includes nonlinear terms up to second order, is proposed. The equation preserves the Hamiltonian structure of the fundamental fluid dynamical equations in the non dissipative limit. An exact...... thermoviscous shock solution is derived. This solution is, in an overall sense, equivalent to the Taylor shock solution of the Burgers equation. However, in contrast to the Burgers equation, the model equation considered here is capable to describe waves propagating in opposite directions. Studies of head...

  6. Laser Beam Propagation Through Inhomogeneous Media with Shock-Like Profiles: Modeling and Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamovsky, Grigory; Ida, Nathan

    1997-01-01

    Wave propagation in inhomogeneous media has been studied for such diverse applications as propagation of radiowaves in atmosphere, light propagation through thin films and in inhomogeneous waveguides, flow visualization, and others. In recent years an increased interest has been developed in wave propagation through shocks in supersonic flows. Results of experiments conducted in the past few years has shown such interesting phenomena as a laser beam splitting and spreading. The paper describes a model constructed to propagate a laser beam through shock-like inhomogeneous media. Numerical techniques are presented to compute the beam through such media. The results of computation are presented, discussed, and compared with experimental data.

  7. Mathematical Modeling of the Heat-Shock Response in HeLa Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Guisbert, E., D. M. Czyz, ., R. I. Morimoto. 2013. Identification of a tissue-selective heat shock response regulatory network. PLoS Genet . 9...Med. Sci. Sports . 21:742–748. 46. Rakesh, V., J. D. Stallings, ., J. Reifman. 2013. A 3-D mathematical model to identify organ-specific risks in rats

  8. Modeling wall effects in a micro-scale shock tube using hybrid MD-DSMC algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watvisave, D. S.; Puranik, B. P.; Bhandarkar, U. V.

    2016-07-01

    Wall effects in a micro-scale shock tube are investigated using the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method as well as a hybrid Molecular Dynamics-Direct Simulation Monte Carlo algorithm. In the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo simulations, the Cercignani-Lampis-Lord model of gas-surface interactions is employed to incorporate the wall effects, and it is shown that the shock attenuation is significantly affected by the choice of the values of tangential momentum accommodation coefficient. A loosely coupled Molecular Dynamics-Direct Simulation Monte Carlo approach is then employed to demonstrate incomplete accommodation in micro-scale shock tube flows. This approach uses fixed values of the accommodation coefficients in the gas-surface interaction model, with their values determined from a separate dynamically similar Molecular Dynamics simulation. Finally, a completely coupled Molecular Dynamics-Direct Simulation Monte Carlo algorithm is used, wherein the bulk of the flow is modeled using Direct Simulation Monte Carlo, while the interaction of gas molecules with the shock tube walls is modeled using Molecular Dynamics. The two regions are separate and coupled both ways using buffer zones and a bootstrap coupling algorithm that accounts for the mismatch of the number of molecules in both regions. It is shown that the hybrid method captures the effect of local properties that cannot be captured using a single value of accommodation coefficient for the entire domain.

  9. The Sandia MEMS Passive Shock Sensor : FY08 testing for functionality, model validation, and technology readiness.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walraven, Jeremy Allen; Blecke, Jill; Baker, Michael Sean; Clemens, Rebecca C.; Mitchell, John Anthony; Brake, Matthew Robert; Epp, David S.; Wittwer, Jonathan W.

    2008-10-01

    This report summarizes the functional, model validation, and technology readiness testing of the Sandia MEMS Passive Shock Sensor in FY08. Functional testing of a large number of revision 4 parts showed robust and consistent performance. Model validation testing helped tune the models to match data well and identified several areas for future investigation related to high frequency sensitivity and thermal effects. Finally, technology readiness testing demonstrated the integrated elements of the sensor under realistic environments.

  10. Modeling natural emissions in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) Model-I: building an emissions data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. N.; Mueller, S. F.

    2010-05-01

    A natural emissions inventory for the continental United States and surrounding territories is needed in order to use the US Environmental Protection Agency Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) Model for simulating natural air quality. The CMAQ air modeling system (including the Sparse Matrix Operator Kernel Emissions (SMOKE) emissions processing system) currently estimates non-methane volatile organic compound (NMVOC) emissions from biogenic sources, nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from soils, ammonia from animals, several types of particulate and reactive gas emissions from fires, as well as sea salt emissions. However, there are several emission categories that are not commonly treated by the standard CMAQ Model system. Most notable among these are nitrogen oxide emissions from lightning, reduced sulfur emissions from oceans, geothermal features and other continental sources, windblown dust particulate, and reactive chlorine gas emissions linked with sea salt chloride. A review of past emissions modeling work and existing global emissions data bases provides information and data necessary for preparing a more complete natural emissions data base for CMAQ applications. A model-ready natural emissions data base is developed to complement the anthropogenic emissions inventory used by the VISTAS Regional Planning Organization in its work analyzing regional haze based on the year 2002. This new data base covers a modeling domain that includes the continental United States plus large portions of Canada, Mexico and surrounding oceans. Comparing July 2002 source data reveals that natural emissions account for 16% of total gaseous sulfur (sulfur dioxide, dimethylsulfide and hydrogen sulfide), 44% of total NOx, 80% of reactive carbonaceous gases (NMVOCs and carbon monoxide), 28% of ammonia, 96% of total chlorine (hydrochloric acid, nitryl chloride and sea salt chloride), and 84% of fine particles (i.e., those smaller than 2.5 μm in size) released into the atmosphere

  11. Modeling natural emissions in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model - Part 1: Building an emissions data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. N.; Mueller, S. F.

    2010-01-01

    A natural emissions inventory for the continental United States and surrounding territories is needed in order to use the US Environmental Protection Agency Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) Model for simulating natural air quality. The CMAQ air modeling system (including the Sparse Matrix Operator Kernel Emissions (SMOKE) emissions processing system) currently estimates volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from biogenic sources, nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from soils, ammonia from animals, several types of particulate and reactive gas emissions from fires, as well as windblown dust and sea salt emissions. However, there are several emission categories that are not commonly treated by the standard CMAQ Model system. Most notable among these are nitrogen oxide emissions from lightning, reduced sulfur emissions from oceans, geothermal features and other continental sources, and reactive chlorine gas emissions linked with sea salt chloride. A review of past emissions modeling work and existing global emissions data bases provides information and data necessary for preparing a more complete natural emissions data base for CMAQ applications. A model-ready natural emissions data base is developed to complement the anthropogenic emissions inventory used by the VISTAS Regional Planning Organization in its work analyzing regional haze based on the year 2002. This new data base covers a modeling domain that includes the continental United States plus large portions of Canada, Mexico and surrounding oceans. Comparing July 2002 source data reveals that natural emissions account for 16% of total gaseous sulfur (sulfur dioxide, dimethylsulfide and hydrogen sulfide), 44% of total NOx, 80% of reactive carbonaceous gases (VOCs and carbon monoxide), 28% of ammonia, 96% of total chlorine (hydrochloric acid, nitryl chloride and sea salt chloride), and 84% of fine particles (i.e., those smaller than 2.5 μm in size) released into the atmosphere. The seasonality and

  12. Seasonal isoprene emission rates and model comparisons using whole-tree emissions from white oak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pier, P. A.; McDuffie, C.

    1997-10-01

    Whole-tree isoprene emission rates of a chambered white oak were measured throughout the growing season to develop a seasonal emissions model and to compare with emissions estimated using current leaf algorithms and forest canopy models. Emissions increased from mid-May to a maximum in mid-July, and the highest rates occurred late in June and throughout July. Rates decreased from early August to mid-October. A model developed to characterize the whole-tree emissions accounted for 80% of the variability of observed emissions over the growing season. Peak isoprene emissions and photosynthesis occurred at the same time, but peak emissions continued longer, suggesting that peak photosynthetic rates were not necessary for peak isoprene emissions. Measured light intensities 2 m and 3.3 m down into the tree canopy corresponded to intensities estimated by using current canopy models; however, intensities at l m were 14% lower than predicted by modeling. Measured median leaf-to-air temperature differences were 2.0°C at the canopy top and 0.5°C or less in the canopy. Median values of leaf temperatures estimated using a leaf energy balance procedure were slightly lower than air temperatures at all canopy levels, although differences were not more than 0.9°C. The most recently developed biogenic emissions model, which assumes that leaf and air temperatures are the same, predicted July whole-tree emission rates fairly closely, although high emission rates were slightly underpredicted using the model. Leaf temperature adjustments used in previous canopy models were applied to this model, and in this case, predicted rates underestimated measured rates when measured rates exceeded 80 μg C g-1 h-1.

  13. A combined trauma model of chest and abdominal trauma with hemorrhagic shock--description of a new porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Frank; Weuster, Matthias; Mommsen, Philipp; Mohr, Juliane; Fröhlich, Matthias; Witte, Ingo; Keibl, Claudia; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Seekamp, Andreas; Pape, Hans-Christoph; Flohe, Sascha; van Griensven, Martijn

    2012-12-01

    Despite the high incidence and prognostic relevance of hemorrhagic shock and abdominal and blunt chest trauma in multiply injured patients, there are no animal models combining these injuries. Therefore, we established a new porcine multiple trauma model consisting of blunt chest trauma, penetrating abdominal trauma (two incisions in the right upper liver lobe using a four-edged scalpel and subsequent liver packing), and pressure-controlled hemorrhagic shock with a mean arterial pressure of 30 ± 5 mmHg (a maximum of 45% of the total blood volume). The combined traumatic insult led to severe signs of hemorrhagic shock and impaired pulmonary function. In conclusion, a consistent, reproducible, and clinically relevant porcine model of multisystem injury with controlled (pressure-controlled blood withdrawal) and uncontrolled components of hemorrhage (liver laceration) with the potential for rebleeding was established.

  14. Modelling the thermal X-ray emission around the Galactic centre from colliding Wolf-Rayet winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Christopher M. P.; Wang, Q. Daniel; Cuadra, Jorge

    2017-11-01

    We compute the thermal X-ray emission from hydrodynamic simulations of the 30 Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars orbiting within a parsec of Sgr A*, with the aim of interpreting the Chandra X-ray observations of this region. The model well reproduces the spectral shape of the observations, indicating that the shocked WR winds are the dominant source of this thermal emission. The model X-ray flux is tied to the strength of the Sgr A* outflow, which clears out hot gas from the vicinity of Sgr A*. A moderate outflow best fits the present-day observations, even though this supermassive black hole (SMBH) outflow ended ~100 yr ago.

  15. Experimentally validated multiphysics computational model of focusing and shock wave formation in an electromagnetic lithotripter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fovargue, Daniel E; Mitran, Sorin; Smith, Nathan B; Sankin, Georgy N; Simmons, Walter N; Zhong, Pei

    2013-08-01

    A multiphysics computational model of the focusing of an acoustic pulse and subsequent shock wave formation that occurs during extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy is presented. In the electromagnetic lithotripter modeled in this work the focusing is achieved via a polystyrene acoustic lens. The transition of the acoustic pulse through the solid lens is modeled by the linear elasticity equations and the subsequent shock wave formation in water is modeled by the Euler equations with a Tait equation of state. Both sets of equations are solved simultaneously in subsets of a single computational domain within the BEARCLAW framework which uses a finite-volume Riemann solver approach. This model is first validated against experimental measurements with a standard (or original) lens design. The model is then used to successfully predict the effects of a lens modification in the form of an annular ring cut. A second model which includes a kidney stone simulant in the domain is also presented. Within the stone the linear elasticity equations incorporate a simple damage model.

  16. Model for estimating the effects of surface roughness on mass ejection from shocked materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asay, J R; Bertholf, L D

    1978-10-01

    A statistical model is presented for estimating the effects of surface roughness on mass ejection from shocked surfaces. In the model, roughness is characterized by the total volume of defects, such as pits, scratches and machine marks, on a surface. The amount of material ejected from these defects during shock loading can be estimated by assuming that jetting from surface depressions is the primary mode of ejection and by making simplifying assumptions about jetting processes. Techniques are discussed for estimating the effects of distribution in defect size and shape, and results are presented for several different geometries of defects. The model is used to compare predicted and measured ejecta masses from six different materials. Surface defects in these materials range from pits and scratches on polished surfaces to prepared defects such as machined or porous surfaces. Good agreement is achieved between predicted and measured results which suggests general applicability of the model.

  17. Stochastic modeling for reliability shocks, burn-in and heterogeneous populations

    CERN Document Server

    Finkelstein, Maxim

    2013-01-01

    Focusing on shocks modeling, burn-in and heterogeneous populations, Stochastic Modeling for Reliability naturally combines these three topics in the unified stochastic framework and presents numerous practical examples that illustrate recent theoretical findings of the authors.  The populations of manufactured items in industry are usually heterogeneous. However, the conventional reliability analysis is performed under the implicit assumption of homogeneity, which can result in distortion of the corresponding reliability indices and various misconceptions. Stochastic Modeling for Reliability fills this gap and presents the basics and further developments of reliability theory for heterogeneous populations. Specifically, the authors consider burn-in as a method of elimination of ‘weak’ items from heterogeneous populations. The real life objects are operating in a changing environment. One of the ways to model an impact of this environment is via the external shocks occurring in accordance with some stocha...

  18. Modeling Shock Train Leading Edge Detection in Dual-Mode Scramjets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladeinde, Foluso; Lou, Zhipeng; Li, Wenhai

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study is to accurately model the detection of shock train leading edge (STLE) in dual-mode scramjet (DMSJ) engines intended for hypersonic flight in air-breathing propulsion systems. The associated vehicles have applications in military warfare and intelligence, and there is commercial interest as well. Shock trains are of interest because they play a significant role in the inability of a DMSJ engine to develop the required propulsive force. The experimental approach to STLE detection has received some attention; as have numerical calculations. However, virtually all of the numerical work focus on mechanically- (i.e., pressure-) generated shock trains, which are much easier to model relative to the phenomenon in the real system where the shock trains are generated by combustion. A focus on combustion, as in the present studies, enables the investigation of the effects of equivalence ratio, which, together with the Mach number, constitutes an important parameter determining mode transition. The various numerical approaches implemented in our work will be reported, with result comparisons to experimental data. The development of an STLE detection procedure in an a priori manner will also be discussed.

  19. Simulating industrial emissions using atmospheric dispersion modeling system: model performance and source emission factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Fadel, M; Abi-Esber, L

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, the Gaussian Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling System (ADMS4) was coupled with field observations of surface meteorology and concentrations of several air quality indicators (nitrogen oxides (NOx), carbon monoxide (CO), fine particulate matter (PM10) and sulfur dioxide (SO2)) to test the applicability of source emission factors set by the European Environment Agency (EEA) and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) at an industrial complex. Best emission factors and data groupings based on receptor location, type of terrain and wind speed, were relied upon to examine model performance using statistical analyses of simulated and observed data. The model performance was deemed satisfactory for several scenarios when receptors were located at downwind sites with index of agreement 'd' values reaching 0.58, fractional bias 'FB' and geometric mean bias 'MG' values approaching 0 and 1, respectively, and normalized mean square error 'NMSE' values as low as 2.17. However, median ratios of predicted to observed concentrations 'Cp/Co' at variable downstream distances were 0.01, 0.36, 0.76 and 0.19 for NOx, CO, PM10 and SO2, respectively, and the fraction of predictions within a factor of two of observations 'FAC2' values were lower than 0.5, indicating that the model could not adequately replicate all observed variations in emittant concentrations. Also, the model was found to be significantly sensitive to the input emission factor bringing into light the deficiency in regulatory compliance modeling which often uses internationally reported emission factors without testing their applicability.

  20. Combustion Processes in Model SCRAM Jet Combustor Using Detonation Driven Shock Tunnel

    OpenAIRE

    小原, 哲郎; 伊藤, 豪明; 大八木, 重治; 金, 泰煥; 坪井, 伸幸

    2006-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in order to investigate mixing and combustion processes in a model SCRAM (Supersonic Combustion RAM) jet combustor equipped with a backward-facing step. A detonation-driven shock tunnel was used to generate high-enthalpy flow of Mach number three. Firstly, an influence of installing a sidewall on the combustor model was investigated. Secondly, flow-fields around the step were visualized using high-speed video camera with an aid of schlieren technique. A hydrogen fue...

  1. A Novel Porcine Model of Septic Shock Induced by Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome due to Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Wang

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: In the present study, we developed a novel porcine model of septic shock induced by ARDS due to severe MRSA pneumonia with characteristic hyperdynamic and hypodynamic phases in 24 h, which mimicked the hemodynamic changing of septic shock in human.

  2. Predicting vehicular emissions in high spatial resolution using pervasively measured transportation data and microscopic emissions model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyhan, Marguerite; Sobolevsky, Stanislav; Kang, Chaogui; Robinson, Prudence; Corti, Andrea; Szell, Michael; Streets, David; Lu, Zifeng; Britter, Rex; Barrett, Steven R. H.; Ratti, Carlo

    2016-06-07

    Air pollution related to traffic emissions pose an especially significant problem in cities; this is due to its adverse impact on human health and well-being. Previous studies which have aimed to quantify emissions from the transportation sector have been limited by either simulated or coarsely resolved traffic volume data. Emissions inventories form the basis of urban pollution models, therefore in this study, Global Positioning System (GPS) trajectory data from a taxi fleet of over 15,000 vehicles were analyzed with the aim of predicting air pollution emissions for Singapore. This novel approach enabled the quantification of instantaneous drive cycle parameters in high spatio-temporal resolution, which provided the basis for a microscopic emissions model. Carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx), volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and particulate matter (PM) emissions were thus estimated. Highly localized areas of elevated emissions levels were identified, with a spatio-temporal precision not possible with previously used methods for estimating emissions. Relatively higher emissions areas were mainly concentrated in a few districts that were the Singapore Downtown Core area, to the north of the central urban region and to the east of it. Daily emissions quantified for the total motor vehicle population of Singapore were found to be comparable to another emissions dataset Results demonstrated that high resolution spatio-temporal vehicle traces detected using GPS in large taxi fleets could be used to infer highly localized areas of elevated acceleration and air pollution emissions in cities, and may become a complement to traditional emission estimates, especially in emerging cities and countries where reliable fine-grained urban air quality data is not easily available. This is the first study of its kind to investigate measured microscopic vehicle movement in tandem with microscopic emissions modeling for a substantial study domain.

  3. Real temperature calculation of shock wave driven by sub-nanosecond laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Mahdieh, M H

    2003-01-01

    Time history of thermal band emission of a shock front, when breakout from aluminium target into vacuum, has been calculated numerically. It is assumed that the shock is produced by irradiation of high intensity sub-nanosecond pulsed laser on the surface of aluminium planar targets in vacuum. The opacity of dense plasma at the shock front and in the vacuum-aluminium interface, and its effects on thermal emissions was considered in these calculations. Using the results of an experiment that was recently reported and those of our model, the real temperature of the shock front was estimated. In that experiment simultaneous measurements of the colour temperature of dense plasma in a shock front, and the shock velocity at the time of shock breakout from the aluminium targets into the vacuum were reported for the study of the equation of state (EOS). The results of the model show a good agreement with the SESAME library EOS.

  4. Oscillations in a Growth Model with Capital, Technology and Environment with Exogenous Shocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Bin Zhang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper generalizes the dynamic growth model with wealth accumulation, technological change and environmental change by Zhang (2012 by making all the parameters as time-dependent parameters. The model treats physical capital accumulation, knowledge creation and utilization, and environmental change as endogenous variables. It synthesizes the basic ideas of the neoclassical growth theory, Arrow’s learning-by-doing model and the traditional dynamic models of environmental change within a comprehensive framework. The behavior of the household is described with an alternative approach to household behavior. We simulated the model to demonstrate existence of equilibrium points, motion of the dynamic system, and oscillations due to different exogenous shocks.

  5. MODELING THE EARLY MULTIWAVELENGTH EMISSION IN GRB 130427A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraija, N.; Lee, W. [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. Postal 70-264, Cd. Universitaria, DF 04510, México (Mexico); Veres, P., E-mail: nifraija@astro.unam.mx, E-mail: wlee@astro.unam.mx, E-mail: pv0004@uah.edu [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR), University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

    2016-02-20

    One of the most powerful gamma-ray bursts, GRB 130427A was swiftly detected from GeV γ-rays to optical wavelengths. In the GeV band, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope observed the highest-energy photon ever recorded of 95 GeV and a bright peak in the early phase followed by emission temporally extended for more than 20 hr. In the optical band, a bright flash with a magnitude of 7.03 ± 0.03 in the time interval from 9.31 to 19.31 s after the trigger was reported by RAPTOR in r band. We study the origin of the GeV γ-ray emission, using the multiwavelength observation detected in X-ray and optical bands. The origin of the temporally extended LAT, X-ray, and optical flux is naturally interpreted as synchrotron radiation, and the 95 GeV photon and the integral flux upper limits placed by the high-altitude water Cerenkov observatory are consistent with synchrotron self-Compton from an adiabatic forward shock propagating into the stellar wind of its progenitor. The extreme LAT peak and the bright optical flash are explained through synchrotron self-Compton and synchrotron emission from the reverse shock, respectively, when the ejecta evolves in the thick-shell regime and carries a significant magnetic field.

  6. Modeling the Early Multiwavelength Emission in GRB130427A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraija, N.; Lee, W.; Veres, P.

    2016-02-01

    One of the most powerful gamma-ray bursts, GRB 130427A was swiftly detected from GeV γ-rays to optical wavelengths. In the GeV band, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope observed the highest-energy photon ever recorded of 95 GeV and a bright peak in the early phase followed by emission temporally extended for more than 20 hr. In the optical band, a bright flash with a magnitude of 7.03 ± 0.03 in the time interval from 9.31 to 19.31 s after the trigger was reported by RAPTOR in r band. We study the origin of the GeV γ-ray emission, using the multiwavelength observation detected in X-ray and optical bands. The origin of the temporally extended LAT, X-ray, and optical flux is naturally interpreted as synchrotron radiation, and the 95 GeV photon and the integral flux upper limits placed by the high-altitude water Cerenkov observatory are consistent with synchrotron self-Compton from an adiabatic forward shock propagating into the stellar wind of its progenitor. The extreme LAT peak and the bright optical flash are explained through synchrotron self-Compton and synchrotron emission from the reverse shock, respectively, when the ejecta evolves in the thick-shell regime and carries a significant magnetic field.

  7. When Do Internal Shocks End and External Shocks Begin? Early-Time Broadband Modeling of GRB 051111

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, N. R.; Li, W.; Perley, D.; Huang, K. Y.; Urata, Y.; Prochaska, J. X.; Bloom, J. S.; Filippenko, A. V.; Foley, R. J.; Kocevski, D.; Chen, H.-W.; Qiu, Y.; Kuo, P. H.; Huang, F. Y.; Ip, W. H.; Tamagawa, T.; Onda, K.; Tashiro, M.; Makishima, K.; Nishihara, S.; Sarugaku, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Even with the renaissance in gamma-ray burst (GRB) research fostered by the Swift satellite, few bursts have both contemporaneous observations at long wavelengths and exquisite observations at later times across the electromagnetic spectrum. We present here contemporaneous imaging with the KAIT robotic optical telescope, dense optical sampling with Lulin, supplemented with infrared data from PAIRITEL and radio to gamma-ray data from the literature. For the first time, we can test the constancy of microphysical parameters in the internal-external shock paradigm and carefully trace the flow of energy from the GRB to the surrounding medium. KAIT data taken change is apparent in observations beginning ~1.5 minutes after the GRB and lasting for the first hour after the burst. There are achromatic flux modulations about the best-fit model at late (t~104 s) times, possibly due to variations in the external density. We find that the host galaxy extinction is well fit by a curve similar to that of the Small Magellanic Cloud. Low visual extinction, AV~0.2 mag, combined with high column densities determined from the X-ray and optical spectroscopy (NH>1021 cm-2), indicate a low dust-to-metals ratio and a possible overabundance of the light metals. An apparent small ratio of total to selective extinction (RV~2) argues against dust destruction by the GRB. Time constancy of both the IR/optical/UV spectral energy distribution and the soft X-ray absorption suggests that the absorbing material is not local to the GRB.

  8. Evaluation of kriging based surrogate models constructed from mesoscale computations of shock interaction with particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Oishik, E-mail: oishik-sen@uiowa.edu [Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Gaul, Nicholas J., E-mail: nicholas-gaul@ramdosolutions.com [RAMDO Solutions, LLC, Iowa City, IA 52240 (United States); Choi, K.K., E-mail: kyung-choi@uiowa.edu [Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Jacobs, Gustaaf, E-mail: gjacobs@sdsu.edu [Aerospace Engineering, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92115 (United States); Udaykumar, H.S., E-mail: hs-kumar@uiowa.edu [Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Macro-scale computations of shocked particulate flows require closure laws that model the exchange of momentum/energy between the fluid and particle phases. Closure laws are constructed in this work in the form of surrogate models derived from highly resolved mesoscale computations of shock-particle interactions. The mesoscale computations are performed to calculate the drag force on a cluster of particles for different values of Mach Number and particle volume fraction. Two Kriging-based methods, viz. the Dynamic Kriging Method (DKG) and the Modified Bayesian Kriging Method (MBKG) are evaluated for their ability to construct surrogate models with sparse data; i.e. using the least number of mesoscale simulations. It is shown that if the input data is noise-free, the DKG method converges monotonically; convergence is less robust in the presence of noise. The MBKG method converges monotonically even with noisy input data and is therefore more suitable for surrogate model construction from numerical experiments. This work is the first step towards a full multiscale modeling of interaction of shocked particle laden flows.

  9. ATLS Hypovolemic Shock Classification by Prediction of Blood Loss in Rats Using Regression Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soo Beom; Choi, Joon Yul; Park, Jee Soo; Kim, Deok Won

    2016-07-01

    In our previous study, our input data set consisted of 78 rats, the blood loss in percent as a dependent variable, and 11 independent variables (heart rate, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure, pulse pressure, respiration rate, temperature, perfusion index, lactate concentration, shock index, and new index (lactate concentration/perfusion)). The machine learning methods for multicategory classification were applied to a rat model in acute hemorrhage to predict the four Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) hypovolemic shock classes for triage in our previous study. However, multicategory classification is much more difficult and complicated than binary classification. We introduce a simple approach for classifying ATLS hypovolaemic shock class by predicting blood loss in percent using support vector regression and multivariate linear regression (MLR). We also compared the performance of the classification models using absolute and relative vital signs. The accuracies of support vector regression and MLR models with relative values by predicting blood loss in percent were 88.5% and 84.6%, respectively. These were better than the best accuracy of 80.8% of the direct multicategory classification using the support vector machine one-versus-one model in our previous study for the same validation data set. Moreover, the simple MLR models with both absolute and relative values could provide possibility of the future clinical decision support system for ATLS classification. The perfusion index and new index were more appropriate with relative changes than absolute values.

  10. Modeling Three-Dimensional Shock Initiation of PBX 9501 in ALE3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leininger, L; Springer, H K; Mace, J; Mas, E

    2008-07-08

    A recent SMIS (Specific Munitions Impact Scenario) experimental series performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory has provided 3-dimensional shock initiation behavior of the HMX-based heterogeneous high explosive, PBX 9501. A series of finite element impact calculations have been performed in the ALE3D [1] hydrodynamic code and compared to the SMIS results to validate and study code predictions. These SMIS tests used a powder gun to shoot scaled NATO standard fragments into a cylinder of PBX 9501, which has a PMMA case and a steel impact cover. This SMIS real-world shot scenario creates a unique test-bed because (1) SMIS tests facilitate the investigation of 3D Shock to Detonation Transition (SDT) within the context of a considerable suite of diagnostics, and (2) many of the fragments arrive at the impact plate off-center and at an angle of impact. A particular goal of these model validation experiments is to demonstrate the predictive capability of the ALE3D implementation of the Tarver-Lee Ignition and Growth reactive flow model [2] within a fully 3-dimensional regime of SDT. The 3-dimensional Arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamic model in ALE3D applies the Ignition and Growth (I&G) reactive flow model with PBX 9501 parameters derived from historical 1-dimensional experimental data. The model includes the off-center and angle of impact variations seen in the experiments. Qualitatively, the ALE3D I&G calculations reproduce observed 'Go/No-Go' 3D Shock to Detonation Transition (SDT) reaction in the explosive, as well as the case expansion recorded by a high-speed optical camera. Quantitatively, the calculations show good agreement with the shock time of arrival at internal and external diagnostic pins. This exercise demonstrates the utility of the Ignition and Growth model applied for the response of heterogeneous high explosives in the SDT regime.

  11. Modeling The Shock Initiation of PBX-9501 in ALE3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leininger, L; Springer, H K; Mace, J; Mas, E

    2008-07-01

    The SMIS (Specific Munitions Impact Scenario) experimental series performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory has determined the 3-dimensional shock initiation behavior of the HMX-based heterogeneous high explosive, PBX 9501. A series of finite element impact calculations have been performed in the ALE3D [1] hydrodynamic code and compared to the SMIS results to validate the code predictions. The SMIS tests use a powder gun to shoot scaled NATO standard fragments at a cylinder of PBX 9501, which has a PMMA case and a steel impact cover. The SMIS real-world shot scenario creates a unique test-bed because many of the fragments arrive at the impact plate off-center and at an angle of impact. The goal of this model validation experiments is to demonstrate the predictive capability of the Tarver-Lee Ignition and Growth (I&G) reactive flow model [2] in this fully 3-dimensional regime of Shock to Detonation Transition (SDT). The 3-dimensional Arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian hydrodynamic model in ALE3D applies the Ignition and Growth (I&G) reactive flow model with PBX 9501 parameters derived from historical 1-dimensional experimental data. The model includes the off-center and angle of impact variations seen in the experiments. Qualitatively, the ALE3D I&G calculations accurately reproduce the 'Go/No-Go' threshold of the Shock to Detonation Transition (SDT) reaction in the explosive, as well as the case expansion recorded by a high-speed optical camera. Quantitatively, the calculations show good agreement with the shock time of arrival at internal and external diagnostic pins. This exercise demonstrates the utility of the Ignition and Growth model applied in a predictive fashion for the response of heterogeneous high explosives in the SDT regime.

  12. Self-sustained asymmetry of lepton-number emission: a new phenomenon during the supernova shock-accretion phase in three dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamborra, Irene; Raffelt, Georg G. [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Föhringer Ring 6, D-80805 München (Germany); Hanke, Florian; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Müller, Bernhard [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Marek, Andreas [Rechenzentrum der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85741 Garching (Germany)

    2014-09-10

    During the stalled-shock phase of our three-dimensional, hydrodynamical core-collapse simulations with energy-dependent, three-flavor neutrino transport, the lepton-number flux (ν {sub e} minus ν-bar {sub e}) emerges predominantly in one hemisphere. This novel, spherical-symmetry breaking neutrino-hydrodynamical instability is termed LESA for 'Lepton-number Emission Self-sustained Asymmetry'. While the individual ν {sub e} and ν-bar {sub e} fluxes show a pronounced dipole pattern, the heavy-flavor neutrino fluxes and the overall luminosity are almost spherically symmetric. Initially, LESA seems to develop stochastically from convective fluctuations. It exists for hundreds of milliseconds or more and persists during violent shock sloshing associated with the standing accretion shock instability. The ν {sub e} minus ν-bar {sub e} flux asymmetry originates predominantly below the neutrinosphere in a region of pronounced proto-neutron star (PNS) convection, which is stronger in the hemisphere of enhanced lepton-number flux. On this side of the PNS, the mass accretion rate of lepton-rich matter is larger, amplifying the lepton-emission asymmetry, because the spherical stellar infall deflects on a dipolar deformation of the stalled shock. The increased shock radius in the hemisphere of less mass accretion and minimal lepton-number flux ( ν-bar {sub e} flux maximum) is sustained by stronger convection on this side, which is boosted by stronger neutrino heating due to 〈ϵ{sub ν-bar{sub e}}〉>〈ϵ{sub ν{sub e}}〉. Asymmetric heating thus supports the global deformation despite extremely nonstationary convective overturn behind the shock. While these different elements of the LESA phenomenon form a consistent picture, a full understanding remains elusive at present. There may be important implications for neutrino-flavor oscillations, the neutron-to-proton ratio in the neutrino-heated supernova ejecta, and neutron-star kicks, which remain to be

  13. European initiatives for modeling emissions from transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joumard, Robert; Hickman, A. John; Samaras, Zissis

    1998-01-01

    In Europe there have been many cooperative studies into transport emission inventories since the late 80s. These cover the scope of CORINAIR program involving experts from seven European Community laboratories addressing only road transport emissions at national level. These also include the late...

  14. Spatial emission modelling for residential wood combustion in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plejdrup, Marlene Schmidt; Nielsen, Ole-Kenneth; Brandt, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    . This paper describes the new Danish model for high resolution spatial distribution of emissions from RWC to air. The new spatial emission model is based on information regarding building type, and primary and supplementary heating installations from the Danish Building and Dwelling Register (BBR), which...... holds detailed data for all buildings in Denmark. The new model provides a much more accurate distribution of emissions than the previous model used in Denmark, as the resolution has been increased from municipality level to a 1 km × 1 km resolution, and the distribution key has been significantly...... spatial distribution of emissions. In previous studies as well as in the model previously used in Denmark, the spatial resolution is limited, e.g. municipality or county level. Further, in many cases models are mainly relying on population density data as the spatial proxy for distributing the emissions...

  15. Accuracy Analysis of DSMC Chemistry Models Applied to a Normal Shock Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-20

    that a number of previous DSMC chemistry models [19, 20] have also included this favoring effect in various ways. Recombination reactions are not...negligible effect , but further work is needed to test this assumption. FLOW CONDITIONS The two shock conditions simulated here are based on two cases from...used, with underpopulated low (except for the ground state) and overpopulated high vibrational levels. The main reason for such a non-equilibrium is

  16. Analysis and Modeling of Jovian Radio Emissions Observed by Galileo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menietti, J. D.

    2003-01-01

    Our studies of Jovian radio emission have resulted in the publication of five papers in refereed journals, with three additional papers in progress. The topics of these papers include the study of narrow-band kilometric radio emission; the apparent control of radio emission by Callisto; quasi-periodic radio emission; hectometric attenuation lanes and their relationship to Io volcanic activity; and modeling of HOM attenuation lanes using ray tracing. A further study of the control of radio emission by Jovian satellites is currently in progress. Abstracts of each of these papers are contained in the Appendix. A list of the publication titles are also included.

  17. Resilience in shock and swim stress models of depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Charles Drugan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Experimental models of depression often entail exposing a rodent to a stressor and subsequently characterizing changes in learning and anhedonia, which may reflect symptoms of human depression. Importantly, not all people and not all laboratory rats exposed to stressors develop depressed behavior; these resilient individuals are the focus of our review. Herein we describe research from the learned helplessness and intermittent swim stress models of depression in which rats that were allowed to cope with the stressor appear to be behaviorally and neurochemically similar to rats that were not allowed to cope yet appeared resilient in behavioral tests. For example, rats exposed to inescapable tailshock, but do not develop learned helplessness, exhibit altered sensitivity to the behavioral effects of GABAA receptor antagonists and reduced in vitro benzodiazepine receptor ligand binding. This pattern suggested that resilience might involve activation of an endogenous benzodiazepine-like compound, possibly an allostatic modulator of the GABAA receptor like allopregnanolone. From the intermittent swim stress model, we have observed in resilient rats protection from stressor-induced glucocorticoid increases and immune activation. In order to identify the neural mediators of these correlates of resilience, non-invasive measures are needed to predict the resilient or vulnerable phenotype prior to analysis of neural endpoints. To this end, we found that ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs appear to predict the resilient phenotype in the intermittent swim stress paradigm. We propose that combining non-invasive predictive measures, such as USVs with biological endpoint measures, will facilitate future research into the neural correlates of resilience.

  18. Exploring the Efficacy and Limitations of Shock-cooling Models: New Analysis of Type II Supernovae Observed by the Kepler Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Adam; Gal-Yam, Avishay

    2017-10-01

    Modern transient surveys have begun discovering and following supernovae (SNe) shortly after first light—providing systematic measurements of the rise of Type II SNe. We explore how analytic models of early shock-cooling emission from core-collapse SNe can constrain the progenitor’s radius, explosion velocity, and local host extinction. We simulate synthetic photometry in several realistic observing scenarios; assuming the models describe the typical explosions well, we find that ultraviolet observations can constrain the progenitor’s radius to a statistical uncertainty of ±10%-15%, with a systematic uncertainty of ±20%. With these observations the local host extinction (A V ) can be constrained to a factor of two and the shock velocity to ±5% with a systematic uncertainty of ±10%. We also reanalyze the SN light curves presented by Garnavich et al. (2016) and find that KSN 2011a can be fit by a blue supergiant model with a progenitor radius of {R}sevidence for a shock-breakout flare in the light curve of KSN 2011d.

  19. Recent results of full-spatial scale modeling of fast ignition and shock ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonge, J.; May, J.; Mori, W. B.; Fiuza, F.; Marti, M.; Fonseca, R. A.; Davies, J. R.; Silva, L. O.

    2010-11-01

    We show recent results of full-spatial scale modeling of fast ignition and shock ignition, from both full-PIC and the recently developed hybrid-PIC capability of OSIRIS 2.0. Our results show full-scale modeling of fast ignition over full density and time scales, where laser absorption, electron beam divergence, and energy deposition in the compressed core will be addressed in a self-consistent manner. Full-PIC and hybrid-PIC simulations of isolated targets will be presented, illustrating the importance of this type of modeling in order to accurately infer the beam divergence and transport properties. We will also demonstrate the possibility of performing full-scale simulations of shock ignition with the new hybrid-PIC capability, using compressed target profiles from hydrodynamic simulations, and studying the self-consistent laser absorption, electron transport, and energy deposition that can lead to the generation of the shock required for ignition. Work supported by DOE under DE-FC02-04-ER54789 and DE-FG52-09NA29552, and NSF under NSF-Phy-0904039, FCT (Portugal), and the HiPER project. Simulations performed on Hoffman at UCLA, Thresher at SDSC, and Intrepid at ANL supported by Incite grant FastIgnitionPIC.

  20. A whole farm model for quantifying total greenhouse gas emissions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A whole farm model for quantifying total greenhouse gas emissions on South African dairy farms. ... South African Journal of Animal Science ... The model, which is based on a whole farm management approach, accounts for the variability that occurs in GHG emissions among farm production and management practices.

  1. A joint model of pulsar radio and gamma ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, G.

    The radiation of radio pulsars have been observed from radio to gamma -rays for many years. Observations present abundance infor-mation. Theoretical models for radio and gamma-rays are presented separately. Until now we do not found a model can show emission from radio to gamma -rays at the same time detailedly. For a certain pul-sar, the emission from radio to gamma-rays can be observed at the same time (such as Crab pulsar and so on). So a reasonable model should present the emission from radio to gamma - rays at the same time more detailedly. A joint model for emission from radio to gamma -rays is presented in this paper. Which can show emission characters for both radio and gamma -ray emission band. Such as core and cone emis -s i o n beams at radio emission band, and gamma - rays for Geminga-like, Crab-like and Vela - like emission beams can be shown at the same time. First of all, an inverse Compton scattering model(ICS model, partly see ICS I A &A 1998; ICS II A &A 2001; ICS III ApJ 2000) of radio pulsars will be introduced more detailedly. Then a new model for gamma - ray emission will be introduced. In this model both radio and gamma-ray emission mechanisms are jointed, and the emission beams from radio to gamma -rays can be presented. Various kind of pulse profiles and other observational characteristics can be shown and the theory in agreement with observations well.

  2. Future aerosol emissions: a multi-model comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Steven J.; Rao, Shilpa; Riahi, Keywan; van Vuuren, Detlef P.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, Page

    2016-08-02

    This paper compares projections over the 21st century of SO2, BC, and OC emissions from three technologically detailed, long-term integrated assessment models. The character of the projections and the response of emissions due to a comprehensive climate policy are discussed. In a continuation of historical experience, aerosol and precursor emissions are increasingly decoupled from carbon dioxide emissions over the 21st century. Implementation of a comprehensive climate policy further reduces emissions, although there is significant variation in this response by sector and by model. Differences in model responses can be traced to specific characteristics of reference case end-use and supply-side technology deployment and emissions control assumptions, which are detailed by sector.

  3. A Data-driven Analytic Model for Proton Acceleration by Large-scale Solar Coronal Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozarev, Kamen A.; Schwadron, Nathan A.

    2016-11-01

    We have recently studied the development of an eruptive filament-driven, large-scale off-limb coronal bright front (OCBF) in the low solar corona, using remote observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory’s Advanced Imaging Assembly EUV telescopes. In that study, we obtained high-temporal resolution estimates of the OCBF parameters regulating the efficiency of charged particle acceleration within the theoretical framework of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). These parameters include the time-dependent front size, speed, and strength, as well as the upstream coronal magnetic field orientations with respect to the front’s surface normal direction. Here we present an analytical particle acceleration model, specifically developed to incorporate the coronal shock/compressive front properties described above, derived from remote observations. We verify the model’s performance through a grid of idealized case runs using input parameters typical for large-scale coronal shocks, and demonstrate that the results approach the expected DSA steady-state behavior. We then apply the model to the event of 2011 May 11 using the OCBF time-dependent parameters derived by Kozarev et al. We find that the compressive front likely produced energetic particles as low as 1.3 solar radii in the corona. Comparing the modeled and observed fluences near Earth, we also find that the bulk of the acceleration during this event must have occurred above 1.5 solar radii. With this study we have taken a first step in using direct observations of shocks and compressions in the innermost corona to predict the onsets and intensities of solar energetic particle events.

  4. Modeling Hot-Spot Contributions in Shocked High Explosives at the Mesoscale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrier, Danielle [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-08-12

    When looking at performance of high explosives, the defects within the explosive become very important. Plastic bonded explosives, or PBXs, contain voids of air and bonder between the particles of explosive material that aid in the ignition of the explosive. These voids collapse in high pressure shock conditions, which leads to the formation of hot spots. Hot spots are localized high temperature and high pressure regions that cause significant changes in the way the explosive material detonates. Previously hot spots have been overlooked with modeling, but now scientists are realizing their importance and new modeling systems that can accurately model hot spots are underway.

  5. Modeling of pollutant emissions from road transport; Modelisation des emissions de polluants par le transport routier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    COPERT III (computer programme to calculate emissions from road transport) is the third version of an MS Windows software programme aiming at the calculation of air pollutant emissions from road transport. COPERT estimates emissions of all regulated air pollutants (CO, NO{sub x}, VOC, PM) produced by different vehicle categories as well as CO{sub 2} emissions on the basis of fuel consumption. This research seminar was organized by the French agency of environment and energy mastery (Ademe) around the following topics: the uncertainties and sensitiveness analysis of the COPERT III model, the presentation of case studies that use COPERT III for the estimation of road transport emissions, and the future of the modeling of road transport emissions: from COPERT III to ARTEMIS (assessment and reliability of transport emission models and inventory systems). This document is a compilation of 8 contributions to this seminar and dealing with: the uncertainty and sensitiveness analysis of the COPERT III model; the road mode emissions of the ESCOMPTE program: sensitivity study; the sensitivity analysis of the spatialized traffic at the time-aggregation level: application in the framework of the INTERREG project (Alsace); the road transport aspect of the regional air quality plan of Bourgogne region: exhaustive consideration of the road network; intercomparison of tools and methods for the inventory of emissions of road transport origin; evolution of the French park of vehicles by 2025: new projections; application of COPERT III to the French context: a new version of IMPACT-ADEME; the European ARTEMIS project: new structural considerations for the modeling of road transport emissions. (J.S.)

  6. Shock Initiation Experiments with Ignition and Growth Modeling on the HMX-Based Explosive LX-14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandersall, Kevin S.; Dehaven, Martin R.; Strickland, Shawn L.; Tarver, Craig M.; Springer, H. Keo; Cowan, Matt R.

    2017-06-01

    Shock initiation experiments on the HMX-based explosive LX-14 were performed to obtain in-situ pressure gauge data, characterize the run-distance-to-detonation behavior, and provide a basis for Ignition and Growth reactive flow modeling. A 101 mm diameter gas gun was utilized to initiate the explosive charges with manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge packages placed between sample disks pressed to different densities ( 1.57 or 1.83 g/cm3 that corresponds to 85 or 99% of theoretical maximum density (TMD), respectively). The shock sensitivity was found to increase with decreasing density as expected. Ignition and Growth model parameters were derived that yielded reasonable agreement with the experimental data at both initial densities. The shock sensitivity at the tested densities will be compared to prior work published on other HMX-based formulations. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. This work was funded in part by the Joint DoD-DOE Munitions Program.

  7. Optimal Design and Model Validation for Combustion Experiments in a Shock Tube

    KAUST Repository

    Long, Quan

    2014-01-06

    We develop a Bayesian framework for the optimal experimental design of the shock tube experiments which are being carried out at the KAUST Clean Combustion Center. The unknown parameters are the pre-exponential parameters and the activation energies in the reaction rate functions. The control parameters are the initial hydrogen concentration and the temperature. First, we build a polynomial based surrogate model for the observable related to the reactions in the shock tube. Second, we use a novel MAP based approach to estimate the expected information gain in the proposed experiments and select the best experimental set-ups corresponding to the optimal expected information gains. Third, we use the synthetic data to carry out virtual validation of our methodology.

  8. Modeling of skin cooling, blood flow, and optical properties in wounds created by electrical shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thu T. A.; Shupp, Jeffrey W.; Moffatt, Lauren T.; Jordan, Marion H.; Jeng, James C.; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.

    2012-02-01

    High voltage electrical injuries may lead to irreversible tissue damage or even death. Research on tissue injury following high voltage shock is needed and may yield stage-appropriate therapy to reduce amputation rate. One of the mechanisms by which electricity damages tissue is through Joule heating, with subsequent protein denaturation. Previous studies have shown that blood flow had a significant effect on the cooling rate of heated subcutaneous tissue. To assess the thermal damage in tissue, this study focused on monitoring changes of temperature and optical properties of skin next to high voltage wounds. The burns were created between left fore limb and right hind limb extremities of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats by a 1000VDC delivery shock system. A thermal camera was utilized to record temperature variation during the exposure. The experimental results were then validated using a thermal-electric finite element model (FEM).

  9. Explosively Generated Plasmas: Measurement and Models of Shock Generation and Material Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Samuel; Elert, Mark; Giannuzzi, Paul; Le, Ryan; McCarthy, Daniel; Schweigert, Igor

    2017-06-01

    Explosively generated plasmas (EGPs) are created by the focusing of a shock produced from an explosive driver via a conical waveguide. In the waveguide, the gases from the explosive along with the trapped air are accelerated and compressed (via Mach stemming) to such extent that plasma is produced. These EGPs have been measured in controlled experiments to achieve temperatures on the order of 1 eV and velocities as high as 25 km/s. We have conducted a combined modeling and measurement effort to increase the understanding for design purposes of the shock generation of EGPs and the interaction of EGP with explosive materials. Such efforts have led to improved measures of pressure and temperature, spatial structure of the plasma, and the decomposition/deflagration behavior of RDX upon exposure to an EGP. Funding provided by the Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) Munitions Response program area.

  10. EPA's area source emissions model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, W.R.; Pace, T.G. III

    1999-07-01

    Each year, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) develops emission estimates for the criteria pollutants for the entire US in order to assess trends in these emissions. These annual emission estimates are developed for point, area, and mobile sources. Area sources are normally calculated using a variety of estimation procedures that are documented in the National Air Pollution Emission Trends, Procedures Document 1900--1996. The emission estimation procedures outlined in that document represent a number of related, but cumbersome estimation tools to derive either a top-down estimate or a county-level bottom-up emissions inventory for area sources. With promulgation of the revised ozone and particulate matter (PM) National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS), an area source emission estimation model consolidating methods used in producing the Trends emission estimates is highly desirable. This paper describes the goals, design, and development of an Area Source Emissions Model (ASEM). The model will estimate area source emissions of PM{sub 2.5} and its most important precursors (ammonia [NH{sub 3}], nitrogen oxides [NO{sub x}] and sulfur oxides [SO{sub 2}]). This model will facilitate: (1) the use of consistent methodologies and the use of consistent activity data to estimate emissions from area sources and will enable the user to vary selected parameters and recalculate the emissions estimate for one or more categories; (2) ease of calculation when using location-specific data; and (3) development of summary outputs and exchange of the data among States and with the EPA. This paper discusses the alpha test version, plans for the beta test version, and a discussion of future plans for the model.

  11. Systemic central venous oxygen saturation is associated with clot strength during traumatic hemorrhagic shock: A preclinical observational model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brophy Donald F

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clot strength by Thrombelastography (TEG is associated with mortality during trauma and has been linked to severity of tissue hypoperfusion. However, the optimal method for monitoring this important relationship remains undefined. We hypothesize that oxygen transport measurements will be associated with clot strength during traumatic shock, and test this hypothesis using a swine model of controlled traumatic shock. Methods N = 33 swine were subjected to femur fracture and hemorrhagic shock by controlled arterial bleeding to a predetermined level of oxygen debt measured by continuous indirect calorimetry. Hemodynamics, oxygen consumption, systemic central venous oxygenation (ScvO2, base excess, lactate, and clot maximal amplitude by TEG (TEG-MA as clot strength were measured at baseline and again when oxygen debt = 80 ml/kg during shock. Oxygen transport and metabolic markers of tissue perfusion were then evaluated for significant associations with TEG-MA. Forward stepwise selection was then used to create regression models identifying the strongest associations between oxygen transport and TEG-MA independent of other known determinants of clot strength. Results Multiple markers of tissue perfusion, oxygen transport, and TEG-MA were all significantly altered during shock compared to baseline measurements (p 2 demonstrated a strong bivariate association with TEG-MA measured during shock (R = 0.7, p 2 measured during shock was also selected by forward stepwise selection as an important covariate in linear regression models of TEG-MA after adjusting for the covariates fibrinogen, pH, platelet count, and hematocrit (Whole model R2 = 0.99, p ≤ 0.032. Conclusions Among multiple measurements of oxygen transport, only ScvO2 was found to retain a significant association with TEG-MA during shock after adjusting for multiple covariates. ScvO2 should be further studied for its utility as a clinical marker of both tissue hypoxia and clot

  12. Assessment of a modified acoustic lens for electromagnetic shock wave lithotripters in a swine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, John G; Neisius, Andreas; Smith, Nathan; Sankin, Georgy; Astroza, Gaston M; Lipkin, Michael E; Simmons, W Neal; Preminger, Glenn M; Zhong, Pei

    2013-09-01

    The acoustic lens of the Modularis electromagnetic shock wave lithotripter (Siemens, Malvern, Pennsylvania) was modified to produce a pressure waveform and focal zone more closely resembling that of the original HM3 device (Dornier Medtech, Wessling, Germany). We assessed the newly designed acoustic lens in vivo in an animal model. Stone fragmentation and tissue injury produced by the original and modified lenses of the Modularis lithotripter were evaluated in a swine model under equivalent acoustic pulse energy (about 45 mJ) at 1 Hz pulse repetition frequency. Stone fragmentation was determined by the weight percent of stone fragments less than 2 mm. To assess tissue injury, shock wave treated kidneys were perfused, dehydrated, cast in paraffin wax and sectioned. Digital images were captured every 120 μm and processed to determine functional renal volume damage. After 500 shocks, the mean ± SD stone fragmentation efficiency produced by the original and modified lenses was 48% ± 12% and 52% ± 17%, respectively (p = 0.60). However, after 2,000 shocks, the modified lens showed significantly improved stone fragmentation compared to the original lens (mean 86% ± 10% vs 72% ± 12%, p = 0.02). Tissue injury caused by the original and modified lenses was minimal at a mean of 0.57% ± 0.44% and 0.25% ± 0.25%, respectively (p = 0.27). With lens modification the Modularis lithotripter demonstrates significantly improved stone fragmentation with minimal tissue injury at a clinically relevant acoustic pulse energy. This new lens design could potentially be retrofitted to existing lithotripters, improving the effectiveness of electromagnetic lithotripters. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The physiology of blood loss and shock: New insights from a human laboratory model of hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Alicia M; Howard, Jeffrey T; Convertino, Victor A

    2017-04-01

    The ability to quickly diagnose hemorrhagic shock is critical for favorable patient outcomes. Therefore, it is important to understand the time course and involvement of the various physiological mechanisms that are active during volume loss and that have the ability to stave off hemodynamic collapse. This review provides new insights about the physiology that underlies blood loss and shock in humans through the development of a simulated model of hemorrhage using lower body negative pressure. In this review, we present controlled experimental results through utilization of the lower body negative pressure human hemorrhage model that provide novel insights on the integration of physiological mechanisms critical to the compensation for volume loss. We provide data obtained from more than 250 human experiments to classify human subjects into two distinct groups: those who have a high tolerance and can compensate well for reduced central blood volume (e.g. hemorrhage) and those with low tolerance with poor capacity to compensate.We include the conceptual introduction of arterial pressure and cerebral blood flow oscillations, reflex-mediated autonomic and neuroendocrine responses, and respiration that function to protect adequate tissue oxygenation through adjustments in cardiac output and peripheral vascular resistance. Finally, unique time course data are presented that describe mechanistic events associated with the rapid onset of hemodynamic failure (i.e. decompensatory shock). Impact Statement Hemorrhage is the leading cause of death in both civilian and military trauma. The work submitted in this review is important because it advances the understanding of mechanisms that contribute to the total integrated physiological compensations for inadequate tissue oxygenation (i.e. shock) that arise from hemorrhage. Unlike an animal model, we introduce the utilization of lower body negative pressure as a noninvasive model that allows for the study of progressive

  14. Modeling carbon emissions from urban traffic system using mobile monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Daniel Jian; Zhang, Ying; Xue, Rui; Zhang, Yi

    2017-12-01

    Comprehensive analyses of urban traffic carbon emissions are critical in achieving low-carbon transportation. This paper started from the architecture design of a carbon emission mobile monitoring system using multiple sets of equipment and collected the corresponding data about traffic flow, meteorological conditions, vehicular carbon emissions and driving characteristics on typical roads in Shanghai and Wuxi, Jiangsu province. Based on these data, the emission model MOVES was calibrated and used with various sensitivity and correlation evaluation indices to analyze the traffic carbon emissions at microscopic, mesoscopic and macroscopic levels, respectively. The major factors that influence urban traffic carbon emissions were investigated, so that emission factors of CO, CO2 and HC were calculated by taking representative passenger cars as a case study. As a result, the urban traffic carbon emissions were assessed quantitatively, and the total amounts of CO, CO2 and HC emission from passenger cars in Shanghai were estimated as 76.95kt, 8271.91kt, and 2.13kt, respectively. Arterial roads were found as the primary line source, accounting for 50.49% carbon emissions. In additional to the overall major factors identified, the mobile monitoring system and carbon emission quantification method proposed in this study are of rather guiding significance for the further urban low-carbon transportation development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Experimental study of the emission of electronically excited CH*, C*2, OH*, and CO*2 during ignition of hydrocarbons behind reflected shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereza, A. M.; Demidenko, T. S.; Garmash, A. A.; Smirnov, V. N.; Shumova, V. V.; Vlasov, P. A.

    2016-11-01

    The autoignition of simple hydrocarbons, such as ethane, ethylene, and acetylene, in mixtures with oxygen diluted with Ar behind reflected shock waves in a temperature range of 1150-1800 K and a pressure of ∼ 0.1 MPa is studied using the chemiluminescence from electronically excited CH* (λ = 430 nm), C2* (λ = 516.5 nm), OH* (λ = 308 nm), and CO2* (λ = 363 nm). Our experimental results are in good agreement with the published data obtained under similar conditions. Numerical simulations within the framework of a well-tested kinetic mechanism closely reproduce the measured values of the ignition delay times and time profiles of the emission signals. A comparison of the experimental and calculated shapes of the emission signals made it possible to identify key reactions responsible for the chemiluminescence of the indicated emitters.

  16. Methane emissions from rice paddies : experiments and modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Bodegom, van, P.M.

    2000-01-01

    This thesis describes model development and experimentation on the comprehension and prediction of methane (CH 4 ) emissions from rice paddies. The large spatial and temporal variability in CH 4 emissions and the dynamic non-linear relationships between processes underlying CH 4 emissions impairs the applicability of empirical relations. Mechanistic concepts are therefore starting point of analysis throughout the th...

  17. Metabolomics classifies phase of care and identifies risk for mortality in a porcine model of multiple injuries and hemorrhagic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lexcen, Daniel R; Lusczek, Elizabeth R; Witowski, Nancy E; Mulier, Kristine E; Beilman, Greg J

    2012-08-01

    Early recognition and intervention in hemorrhagic shock is essential to improved outcomes. However, the lack of robust diagnostic tools readily available to identify patients in the field inhibits the ability to provide timely intervention. Therefore, the development of a reliable prognostic indicator, such as a serum biomarker or a metabolic profile, has significant potential to improve far-forward trauma care. In this study, we used metabolomics as a tool to identify a metabolic state associated with the hemorrhagic shock and outcome in our porcine model of multiple injuries, shock, and resuscitation. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to evaluate serum metabolites from 23 animals that underwent multiple injuries, controlled hemorrhage, and 20 hours of a standard resuscitation protocol. Serum samples were collected from the animals at baseline (before hemorrhage), at shock (after 45 minutes of shock), and at 8 hours of full resuscitation. We were able to demonstrate shifts in the metabolome throughout different time points and construct a metabolic profile associated with mortality using partial least squares discriminate analysis. The metabolites most responsible for the classification of hemorrhagic shock in our model serve as markers for ischemia, changes in energy production, and cellular damage. Hemorrhagic shock was characterized by marked increases in tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, glycolytic-gluconeogenic by-products, purine-pyrimidine catabolism, and fatty acid oxidation. The results of this study demonstrate the potential for metabolomics as a tool to classify the metabolic flux, to identify relevant biochemical pathways, and to identify clinically useful biomarkers.

  18. Empirical Model Development for Predicting Shock Response on Composite Materials Subjected to Pyroshock Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentz, Steven J.; Ordway, David O; Parsons, David S.; Garrison, Craig M.; Rodgers, C. Steven; Collins, Brian W.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) received a request to develop an analysis model based on both frequency response and wave propagation analyses for predicting shock response spectrum (SRS) on composite materials subjected to pyroshock loading. The model would account for near-field environment (approx. 9 inches from the source) dominated by direct wave propagation, mid-field environment (approx. 2 feet from the source) characterized by wave propagation and structural resonances, and far-field environment dominated by lower frequency bending waves in the structure. This report documents the outcome of the assessment.

  19. Empirical Model Development for Predicting Shock Response on Composite Materials Subjected to Pyroshock Loading: Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentz, Steven J.; Ordway, David O.; Parsons, David S.; Garrison, Craig M.; Rodgers, C. Steven; Collins, Brian W.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) received a request to develop an analysis model based on both frequency response and wave propagation analyses for predicting shock response spectrum (SRS) on composite materials subjected to pyroshock loading. The model would account for near-field environment (approx. 9 inches from the source) dominated by direct wave propagation, mid-field environment (approx. 2 feet from the source) characterized by wave propagation and structural resonances, and far-field environment dominated by lower frequency bending waves in the structure. This document contains appendices to the Volume I report.

  20. Empirical Model Development for Predicting Shock Response on Composite Materials Subjected to Pyroshock Loading. [Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentz, Steven J.; Ordway, David O.; Parsons, David S.; Garrison, Craig M.; Rodgers, C. Steven; Collins, Brian W.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) received a request to develop an analysis model based on both frequency response and wave propagation analyses for predicting shock response spectrum (SRS) on composite materials subjected to pyroshock loading. The model would account for near-field environment (9 inches from the source) dominated by direct wave propagation, mid-field environment (approximately 2 feet from the source) characterized by wave propagation and structural resonances, and far-field environment dominated by lower frequency bending waves in the structure. This document contains appendices to the Volume I report.

  1. Spatial emission modelling for residential wood combustion in Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plejdrup, Marlene S.; Nielsen, Ole-Kenneth; Brandt, Jørgen

    2016-11-01

    Residential wood combustion (RWC) is a major contributor to atmospheric pollution especially for particulate matter. Air pollution has significant impact on human health, and it is therefore important to know the human exposure. For this purpose, it is necessary with a detailed high resolution spatial distribution of emissions. In previous studies as well as in the model previously used in Denmark, the spatial resolution is limited, e.g. municipality or county level. Further, in many cases models are mainly relying on population density data as the spatial proxy for distributing the emissions. This paper describes the new Danish model for high resolution spatial distribution of emissions from RWC to air. The new spatial emission model is based on information regarding building type, and primary and supplementary heating installations from the Danish Building and Dwelling Register (BBR), which holds detailed data for all buildings in Denmark. The new model provides a much more accurate distribution of emissions than the previous model used in Denmark, as the resolution has been increased from municipality level to a 1 km × 1 km resolution, and the distribution key has been significantly improved so that it no longer puts an excessive weight on population density. The new model has been verified for the city of Copenhagen, where emissions estimated using both the previous and the new model have been compared to the emissions estimated in a case study. This comparison shows that the new model with the developed weighting factors (76 ton PM2.5) is in good agreement with the case study (95 ton PM2.5), and that the new model has improved the spatial emission distribution significantly compared to the previous model (284 ton PM2.5). Additionally, a sensitivity analysis was done to illustrate the impact of the weighting factors on the result, showing that the new model independently of the weighting factors chosen produce a more accurate result than the old model.

  2. Pediatric Sepsis Biomarker Risk Model-II: Redefining the Pediatric Sepsis Biomarker Risk Model With Septic Shock Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Hector R; Cvijanovich, Natalie Z; Anas, Nick; Allen, Geoffrey L; Thomas, Neal J; Bigham, Michael T; Weiss, Scott L; Fitzgerald, Julie; Checchia, Paul A; Meyer, Keith; Quasney, Michael; Hall, Mark; Gedeit, Rainer; Freishtat, Robert J; Nowak, Jeffrey; Raj, Shekhar S; Gertz, Shira; Howard, Kelli; Harmon, Kelli; Lahni, Patrick; Frank, Erin; Hart, Kimberly W; Nguyen, Trung C; Lindsell, Christopher J

    2016-11-01

    The Pediatric Sepsis Biomarker Risk Model (PERSEVERE), a pediatric sepsis risk model, uses biomarkers to estimate baseline mortality risk for pediatric septic shock. It is unknown how PERSEVERE performs within distinct septic shock phenotypes. We tested PERSEVERE in children with septic shock and thrombocytopenia-associated multiple organ failure (TAMOF), and in those without new onset thrombocytopenia but with multiple organ failure (MOF). PERSEVERE-based mortality risk was generated for each study subject (n = 660). A priori, we determined that if PERSEVERE did not perform well in both the TAMOF and the MOF cohorts, we would revise PERSEVERE to incorporate admission platelet counts. Multiple PICUs in the United States. Standard care. PERSEVERE performed well in the TAMOF cohort (areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves [AUC], 0.84 [95% CI, 0.77-0.90]), but less well in the MOF cohort (AUC, 0.71 [0.61-0.80]). PERSEVERE was revised using 424 subjects previously reported in the derivation phase. PERSEVERE-II had an AUC of 0.89 (0.85-0.93) and performed equally well across TAMOF and MOF cohorts. PERSEVERE-II performed well when tested in 236 newly enrolled subjects. Sample size calculations for a clinical trial testing the efficacy of plasma exchange for children with septic shock and TAMOF indicated PERSEVERE-II-based stratification could substantially reduce the number of patients necessary, when compared with no stratification. Testing PERSEVERE in the context of septic shock phenotypes prompted a revision incorporating platelet count. PERSEVERE-II performs well upon testing, independent of TAMOF or MOF status. PERSEVERE-II could potentially serve as a prognostic enrichment tool.

  3. Modeling volatile isoprenoid emissions--a story with split ends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grote, R; Niinemets, U

    2008-01-01

    Accurate prediction of plant-generated volatile isoprenoid fluxes is necessary for reliable estimation of atmospheric ozone and aerosol formation potentials. In recent years, significant progress has been made in understanding the environmental and physiological controls on isoprenoid emission and in scaling these emissions to canopy and landscape levels. We summarize recent developments and compare different approaches for simulating volatile isoprenoid emission and scaling up to whole forest canopies with complex architecture. We show that the current developments in modeling volatile isoprenoid emissions are "split-ended" with simultaneous but separated efforts in fine-tuning the empirical emission algorithms and in constructing process-based models. In modeling volatile isoprenoid emissions, simplified leaf-level emission algorithms (Guenther algorithms) are highly successful, particularly after scaling these models up to whole regions, where the influences of different ecosystem types, ontogenetic stages, and variations in environmental conditions on emission rates and dynamics partly cancel out. However, recent experimental evidence indicates important environmental effects yet unconsidered and emphasize, the importance of a highly dynamic plant acclimation in space and time. This suggests that current parameterizations are unlikely to hold in a globally changing and dynamic environment. Therefore, long-term predictions using empirical algorithms are not necessarily reliable. We show that process-based models have large potential to capture the influence of changing environmental conditions, in particular if the leaf models are linked with physiologically based whole-plant models. This combination is also promising in considering the possible feedback impacts of emissions on plant physiological status such as mitigation of thermal and oxidative stresses by volatile isoprenoids. It might be further worth while to incorporate main features of these approaches

  4. Improving ammonia emissions in air quality modelling for France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaoui-Laguel, Lynda; Meleux, Frédérik; Beekmann, Matthias; Bessagnet, Bertrand; Génermont, Sophie; Cellier, Pierre; Létinois, Laurent

    2014-08-01

    We have implemented a new module to improve the representation of ammonia emissions from agricultural activities in France with the objective to evaluate the impact of such emissions on the formation of particulate matter modelled with the air quality model CHIMERE. A novel method has been set up for the part of ammonia emissions originating from mineral fertilizer spreading. They are calculated using the one dimensional 1D mechanistic model “VOLT'AIR” which has been coupled with data on agricultural practices, meteorology and soil properties obtained at high spatial resolution (cantonal level). These emissions display high spatiotemporal variations depending on soil pH, rates and dates of fertilization and meteorological variables, especially soil temperature. The emissions from other agricultural sources (animal housing, manure storage and organic manure spreading) are calculated using the national spatialised inventory (INS) recently developed in France. The comparison of the total ammonia emissions estimated with the new approach VOLT'AIR_INS with the standard emissions provided by EMEP (European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme) used currently in the CHIMERE model shows significant differences in the spatiotemporal distributions. The implementation of new ammonia emissions in the CHIMERE model has a limited impact on ammonium nitrate aerosol concentrations which only increase at most by 10% on the average for the considered spring period but this impact can be more significant for specific pollution episodes. The comparison of modelled PM10 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 10 μm) and ammonium nitrate aerosol with observations shows that the use of the new ammonia emission method slightly improves the spatiotemporal correlation in certain regions and reduces the negative bias on average by 1 μg m-3. The formation of ammonium nitrate aerosol depends not only on ammonia concentrations but also on nitric acid availability, which

  5. Finite element modelling of shock-induced damages on ceramic hip prostheses

    CERN Document Server

    Uribe, Juliana; Geringer, Jean; 10.5402/2011/121486

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was to simulate the behaviour of hip prostheses under mechanical shocks. When hip joint is replaced by prosthesis, during the swing phase of the leg, a microseparation between the prosthetic head and the cup could occur. Two different sizes of femoral heads were studied: 28 and 32 mm diameter, made, respectively, in alumina and zirconia. The shock-induced stress was determined numerically using finite element analysis (FEA), Abaqus software. The influence of inclination, force, material, and microseparation was studied. In addition, an algorithm was developed from a probabilistic model, Todinov's approach, to predict lifetime of head and cup. Simulations showed maximum tensile stresses were reached on the cup's surfaces near to rim. The worst case was the cup-head mounted at 30^{\\circ}. All simulations and tests showed bulk zirconia had a greater resistance to shocks than bulk alumina. The probability of failure could be bigger than 0.9 when a porosity greater than 0.7% vol. is present in...

  6. Confinement effects in shock/turbulent-boundary-layer interaction through wall-modeled LES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermejo-Moreno, Ivan; Campo, Laura; Larsson, Johan; Bodart, Julien; Helmer, David; Eaton, John

    2016-11-01

    Wall-modeled large-eddy simulations (WMLES) are used to investigate three-dimensional effects imposed by lateral confinement on the interaction of oblique shock waves impinging on turbulent boundary layers (TBLs) developed along the walls of a nearly-square duct. A constant Mach number, M = 2 . 05 , of the incoming air stream is considered, with a Reynolds number based on the incoming turbulent boundary layer momentum thickness Reθ 14 , 000 . The strength of the impinging shock is varied by increasing the height of a compression wedge located at a constant streamwise location that spans the top wall of the duct at a 20° angle. Simulation results are first validated with particle image velocimetry (PIV) experimental data obtained at several vertical planes. Emphasis is placed on the study of the instantaneous and time-averaged structure of the flow for the stronger-interaction case, which shows mean flow reversal. By performing additional spanwise-periodic simulations, it is found that the structure and location of the shock system and separation bubble are significantly modified by the lateral confinement. Low-frequency unsteadiness and downstream evolution of corner flows are also investigated. Financial support from the United States Department of Energy under the PSAAP program is gratefully acknowledged.

  7. Protein C preserves microcirculation in a model of neonatal septic shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Fischer

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Doris Fischer1, Marcel F Nold2, Claudia A Nold-Petry2, Antonio Furlan2, Alex Veldman31Department of Pediatrics, Hospital of the J W Goethe University, Frankfurt, Germany; 2Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO, USA; 3Monash Newborn, Monash Medical Centre, Melbourne, VIC, AustraliaObjectives: Sepsis remains a disease with a high mortality in neonates. Microcirculatory impairment plays a pivotal role in the development of multiorgan failure in septic newborns. The hemodynamic effects of recombinant activated protein C (rhAPC were tested in an animal model of neonatal septic shock focusing on intestinal microcirculation.Materials and methods: Endotoxic shock was triggered by intravenous application of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccarides in newborn piglets. Thereafter, five animals received a continuous infusion of 24 µg/kg/h rhAPC, and five received vehicle for control. Over the course of three hours, intestinal microcirculation was assessed by intravital microscopy every 30 min. Macrocirculation and blood counts were monitored simultaneously.Results: After a short hypotensive period in all animals, the arterial blood pressure returned to baseline in the rhAPC-treated piglets, whereas the hypotension became increasingly severe in the controls. By 90 min, mean blood pressure in the controls was significantly lower than in the treatment group. Similar observations were made regaring microcirculation. After an early impairment in all study animals, functional capillary density and intestinal microcirculatory red blood cell velocity and red blood cell flow recovered in the rhAPC group, but deteriorated further in the control piglets.Conclusion: Recombinant activated protein C protects macro- and microcirculation from endotoxic shock.Keywords: protein C, neonatal septic shock, microcirculation, intravital microscopy

  8. X-ray study of bow shocks in runaway stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Becker, M.; del Valle, M. V.; Romero, G. E.; Peri, C. S.; Benaglia, P.

    2017-11-01

    Massive runaway stars produce bow shocks through the interaction of their winds with the interstellar medium, with the prospect for particle acceleration by the shocks. These objects are consequently candidates for non-thermal emission. Our aim is to investigate the X-ray emission from these sources. We observed with XMM-Newton a sample of five bow shock runaways, which constitutes a significant improvement of the sample of bow shock runaways studied in X-rays so far. A careful analysis of the data did not reveal any X-ray emission related to the bow shocks. However, X-ray emission from the stars is detected, in agreement with the expected thermal emission from stellar winds. On the basis of background measurements we derive conservative upper limits between 0.3 and 10 keV on the bow shocks emission. Using a simple radiation model, these limits together with radio upper limits allow us to constrain some of the main physical quantities involved in the non-thermal emission processes, such as the magnetic field strength and the amount of incident infrared photons. The reasons likely responsible for the non-detection of non-thermal radiation are discussed. Finally, using energy budget arguments, we investigate the detectability of inverse Compton X-rays in a more extended sample of catalogued runaway star bow shocks. From our analysis we conclude that a clear identification of non-thermal X-rays from massive runaway bow shocks requires one order of magnitude (or higher) sensitivity improvement with respect to present observatories.

  9. Probabilistic Model for the Simulation of Secondary Electron Emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furman, M

    2004-05-17

    We provide a detailed description of a model and its computational algorithm for the secondary electron emission process. The model is based on a broad phenomenological fit to data for the secondary emission yield (SEY) and the emitted-energy spectrum. We provide two sets of values for the parameters by fitting our model to two particular data sets, one for copper and the other one for stainless steel.

  10. Shock breakout theory

    OpenAIRE

    Waxman, Eli; Katz, Boaz

    2016-01-01

    The earliest supernova (SN) emission is produced when the optical depth of the plasma lying ahead of the shock, which ejects the envelope, drops below c/v, where v is the shock velocity. This "breakout" may occur when the shock reaches the edge of the star, producing a bright X-ray/UV flash on time scales of seconds to a fraction of an hour, followed by UV/optical "cooling" emission from the expanding cooling envelope on a day time-scale. If the optical depth of circumstellar material (CSM) e...

  11. A new modelling approach for road traffic emissions: VERSIT+

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, R.; Smokers, R.T.M.; Rabé, E.L.M.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of VERSIT+ LD is to predict traffic stream emissions for light-duty vehicles in any particular traffic situation. With respect to hot running emissions, VERSIT+ LD consists of a set of statistical models for detailed vehicle categories that have been constructed using multiple linear

  12. Methane emissions from rice paddies : experiments and modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodegom, van P.M.

    2000-01-01

    This thesis describes model development and experimentation on the comprehension and prediction of methane (CH 4 ) emissions from rice paddies. The large spatial and temporal variability in CH 4 emissions and the dynamic non-linear relationships

  13. Understanding Shock Dynamics in the Inner Heliosphere with Modeling and Type II Radio Data: the 2010-04-03 Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hong Na; Odstrcil, Dusan; Mays, L.; Cyr, O. C. St.; Gopalswamy, N.; Cremades, H.

    2012-01-01

    The 2010 April 03 solar event was studied using observations from STEREO SECCHI, SOHO LASCO, and Wind kilometric Type II data (kmTII) combined with WSA-Cone-ENLIL model simulations performed at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC). In particular, we identified the origin of the coronal mass ejection (CME) using STEREO EUVI and SOHO EIT images. A flux-rope model was fit to the SECCHI A and B, and LASCO images to determine the CMEs direction, size, and actual speed. J-maps from STEREO COR2HI-1HI-2 and simulations fromCCMC were used to study the formation and evolution of the shock in the inner heliosphere. In addition, we also studied the time-distance profile of the shock propagation from kmTII radio burst observations. The J-maps together with in-situ datafrom the Wind spacecraft provided an opportunity to validate the simulation results andthe kmTII prediction. Here we report on a comparison of two methods of predictinginterplanetary shock arrival time: the ENLIL model and the kmTII method; andinvestigate whether or not using the ENLIL model density improves the kmTIIprediction. We found that the ENLIL model predicted the kinematics of shock evolutionwell. The shock arrival times (SAT) and linear-fit shock velocities in the ENLILmodel agreed well with those measurements in the J-maps along both the CME leading edge and the Sun-Earth line. The ENLIL model also reproduced most of the largescale structures of the shock propagation and gave the SAT prediction at Earth with an error of 17 hours. The kmTII method predicted the SAT at Earth with an error of 15 hours when using n0 4.16 cm3, the ENLIL model plasma density near Earth; but itimproved to 2 hours when using n0 6.64 cm3, the model density near the CMEleading edge at 1 AU.

  14. Modelling, Testing and Analysis of a Regenerative Hydraulic Shock Absorber System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruichen Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available To improve vehicle fuel economy whilst enhancing road handling and ride comfort, power generating suspension systems have recently attracted increased attention in automotive engineering. This paper presents our study of a regenerative hydraulic shock absorber system which converts the oscillatory motion of a vehicle suspension into unidirectional rotary motion of a generator. Firstly a model which takes into account the influences of the dynamics of hydraulic flow, rotational motion and power regeneration is developed. Thereafter the model parameters of fluid bulk modulus, motor efficiencies, viscous friction torque, and voltage and torque constant coefficients are determined based on modelling and experimental studies of a prototype system. The model is then validated under different input excitations and load resistances, obtaining results which show good agreement between prediction and measurement. In particular, the system using piston-rod dimensions of 50–30 mm achieves recoverable power of 260 W with an efficiency of around 40% under sinusoidal excitation of 1 Hz frequency and 25 mm amplitude when the accumulator capacity is set to 0.32 L with the load resistance 20 Ω. It is then shown that the appropriate damping characteristics required from a shock absorber in a heavy-haulage vehicle can be met by using variable load resistances and accumulator capacities in a device akin to the prototype. The validated model paves the way for further system optimisation towards maximising the performance of regeneration, ride comfort and handling.

  15. Body-Fitted Detonation Shock Dynamics and the Pseudo-Reaction-Zone Energy Release Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Chad; Quirk, James; Short, Mark; Chqiuete, Carlos

    2016-11-01

    Programmed-burn methods are a class of models used to propagate a detonation wave, without the high resolution cost associated with a direct numerical simulation. They separate the detonation evolution calculation into two components: timing and energy release. The timing component is usually calculated with a Detonation Shock Dynamics model, a surface evolution representation that relates the normal velocity of the surface (Dn) to its local curvature. The energy release component must appropriately capture the degree of energy change associated with chemical reaction while simultaneously remaining synchronized with the timing component. The Pseudo-Reaction-Zone (PRZ) model is a reactive burn like energy release model, converting reactants into products, but with a conversion rate that is a function of the DSD surface Dn field. As such, it requires the DSD calculation produce smooth Dn fields, a challenge in complex geometries. We describe a new body-fitted approach to the Detonation Shock Dynamics calculation which produces the required smooth Dn fields, and a method for calibrating the PRZ model such that the rate of energy release remains as synced as possible with the timing component. We show results for slab, rate-stick and arc geometries.

  16. A First-Principles Spectral Model for Blazar Jet Acceleration and Emission with Klein-Nishina Scattering of Multiple Broad Line Region Emission Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Tiffany R.; Finke, Justin; Becker, Peter A.

    2017-08-01

    Blazars are a sub-class of active galactic nuclei, with a polar jet aligned along our line of sight. Emission from blazar jets is observed across the electromagnetic spectrum. In our model we assume that the emission emanates from one homogeneous zone in the jet, which is in the process of passing through the Broad Line Region (BLR). We start from first-principles to build up a particle transport model, whose solution is the electron distribution, rather than assuming a convenient functional form. Our transport model considers shock acceleration, adiabatic expansion, stochastic acceleration, Bohm diffusion, synchrotron radiation, and Klein-Nishina radiation pulling seed photons from the BLR and dusty torus. We obtain the steady-state electron distribution computationally, and calculate individual spectral contributions due to synchrotron with self-absorption, disk, synchrotron self-Compton, and external-Compton emission, using numerical integration. We compare the resulting radiation spectrum with multi-wavelength data for 3C 279, during quiescence and two flares. Our preliminary results suggest that the jet emission is produced in a region with a sub-equipartition magnetic field, and that the magnetic field in the jet decreases during flaring events, implying that reconnection may play a role in blazar flares.

  17. Spatial distribution of emissions to air - the SPREAD model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plejdrup, M.S.; Gyldenkaerne, S.

    2011-04-15

    The National Environmental Research Institute (NERI), Aarhus University, completes the annual national emission inventories for greenhouse gases and air pollutants according to Denmark's obligations under international conventions, e.g. the climate convention, UNFCCC and the convention on long-range transboundary air pollution, CLRTAP. NERI has developed a model to distribute emissions from the national emission inventories on a 1x1 km grid covering the Danish land and sea territory. The new spatial high resolution distribution model for emissions to air (SPREAD) has been developed according to the requirements for reporting of gridded emissions to CLRTAP. Spatial emission data is e.g. used as input for air quality modelling, which again serves as input for assessment and evaluation of health effects. For these purposes distributions with higher spatial resolution have been requested. Previously, a distribution on the 17x17 km EMEP grid has been set up and used in research projects combined with detailed distributions for a few sectors or sub-sectors e.g. a distribution for emissions from road traffic on 1x1 km resolution. SPREAD is developed to generate improved spatial emission data for e.g. air quality modelling in exposure studies. SPREAD includes emission distributions for each sector in the Danish inventory system; stationary combustion, mobile sources, fugitive emissions from fuels, industrial processes, solvents and other product use, agriculture and waste. This model enables generation of distributions for single sectors and for a number of sub-sectors and single sources as well. This report documents the methodologies in this first version of SPREAD and presents selected results. Further, a number of potential improvements for later versions of SPREAD are addressed and discussed. (Author)

  18. Modeling and experimental investigations of the shock response of viscoelastic foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deigan, Richard J.

    This dissertation presents a new constitutive model for closed-cell foams tailored for compressive shock loads and an experimental investigation of two commercial foam products. The new model requires just two characterization experiments to find material parameters, making it far more convenient than other approaches. A specific form of the hyperelastic free energy function is developed that permits an extension of a three-phase composite theory to finite strain hyperelasticity providing the following advantages: (1) identification of the hyperelastic free energy contributions associated with the gas and material phases, (2) elimination of deviatoric experiments for parameter determination, and (3) proper behavior at the densification limit. A viscoelastic model of the matrix shear modulus is used to introduce rate effects and plasticity. A time-incremental formulation of the constitutive model is developed and implemented using a finite element approach. Model results are compared with data obtained in high strain-rate experiments.

  19. A mesoscopic reaction rate model for shock initiation of multi-component PBX explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y R; Duan, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Ou, Z C; Huang, F L

    2016-11-05

    The primary goal of this research is to develop a three-term mesoscopic reaction rate model that consists of a hot-spot ignition, a low-pressure slow burning and a high-pressure fast reaction terms for shock initiation of multi-component Plastic Bonded Explosives (PBX). Thereinto, based on the DZK hot-spot model for a single-component PBX explosive, the hot-spot ignition term as well as its reaction rate is obtained through a "mixing rule" of the explosive components; new expressions for both the low-pressure slow burning term and the high-pressure fast reaction term are also obtained by establishing the relationships between the reaction rate of the multi-component PBX explosive and that of its explosive components, based on the low-pressure slow burning term and the high-pressure fast reaction term of a mesoscopic reaction rate model. Furthermore, for verification, the new reaction rate model is incorporated into the DYNA2D code to simulate numerically the shock initiation process of the PBXC03 and the PBXC10 multi-component PBX explosives, and the numerical results of the pressure histories at different Lagrange locations in explosive are found to be in good agreements with previous experimental data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Spatial distribution of emissions to air – the SPREAD model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plejdrup, Marlene Schmidt; Gyldenkærne, Steen

    of distributions for single sectors and for a number of sub-sectors and single sources as well. This report documents the methodologies in this first version of SPREAD and presents selected results. Further, a number of potential improvements for later versions of SPREAD are addressed and discussed.......-range transboundary air pollution, CLRTAP. NERI has developed a model to distribute emissions from the national emission inventories on a 1x1 km grid covering the Danish land and sea territory. The new spatial high resolution distribution model for emissions to air (SPREAD) has been developed according......, a distribution on the 17x17 km EMEP grid has been set up and used in research projects combined with detailed distributions for a few sectors or sub-sectors e.g. a distribution for emissions from road traffic on 1x1 km resolution. SPREAD is developed to generate improved spatial emission data for e.g. air...

  1. A novel antibiotic based long term model of ovine smoke inhalation injury and septic shock

    OpenAIRE

    Nakano, Yoshimitsu; Maybauer, Marc O.; Maybauer, Dirk M.; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Traber, Daniel L

    2010-01-01

    We modified our established and clinically relevant ARDS model of smoke inhalation injury and septic shock by administration of combined antibiotics (AB) such as piperacillin and ciprofloxacin, to more closely mimic the clinical intensive care setting. Twenty-three sheep were subjected to the injury, and allocated to 4 groups for a 96hrs study period: sham (n=5 non-injured); control (n=6: injured); AB6h (n=6: injured, antibiotics started 6hrs post-injury); AB12h (n=6: injured, antibiotics sta...

  2. Jet formation and shock wave emission during collapse of ultrasound-induced cavitation bubbles and their role in the therapeutic applications of high-intensity focused ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brujan, E A [Department of Hydraulics, University Polytechnica, Spl. Independentei 313, 060042 Bucharest (Romania); Ikeda, T [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Matsumoto, Y [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2005-10-21

    The dynamics of inertial cavitation bubbles produced by short pulses of high-intensity focused ultrasound near a rigid boundary are studied to get a better understanding of the role of jet formation and shock wave emission during bubble collapse in the therapeutic applications of ultrasound. The bubble dynamics are investigated by high-speed photography with up to 2 million frames/s and acoustic measurements, as well as by numerical calculations. The significant parameter of this study is the dimensionless stand-off, {gamma}, which is defined as the distance of the bubble centre at its maximum expansion scaled by the maximum bubble radius. High-speed photography is applied to observe the bubble motion and the velocity of the liquid jet formed during bubble collapse. Hydrophone measurements are used to determine the pressure and the duration of the shock wave emitted during bubble rebound. Calculations yield the variation with time of the bubble wall, the maximum velocity and the kinetic energy of the re-entrant jet. The comparisons between experimental and numerical data are favourable with regard to both shape history and translational motion of the bubble. The acoustic energy constitutes the largest individual amount in the energy balance of bubble collapse. The ratio of the shock wave energy, measured at 10 mm from the emission centre, to the cavitation bubble energy was 1:2.4 at {gamma} = 1.55 and 1:3.5 at {gamma} = 1. At this distance, the shock wave pressure ranges from 0.122 MPa, at {gamma} = 1, to 0.162 MPa, at {gamma} 1.55, and the temporal duration at the half maximum level is 87 ns. The maximum jet velocity ranges from 27 m s{sup -1}, at {gamma} = 1, to 36 m s{sup -1}, at {gamma} = 1.55. For {gamma} < 1.2, the re-entrant jet can generate an impact pressure on the nearby boundary larger than 50 MPa. We discuss the implications of the results for the therapeutic applications of high-intensity focused ultrasound.

  3. Tracking the CME-driven shock wave on 2012 march 5 and radio triangulation of associated radio emission

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Magdalenic, J.; Marqué, C.; Krupař, Vratislav; Mierla, M.; Zhukov, A. N.; Rodriguez, L.; Maksimovic, M.; Cecconi, B.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 791, č. 2 (2014), s. 1-14 ISSN 0004-637X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/10/2279 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : coronal mass ejections (CMEs) * shock waves * Sun: corona * Sun: flares * Sun: radio radiation Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 5.993, year: 2014 http://iopscience.iop.org/0004-637X/791/2/115

  4. Modelling Emission of Pollutants from transportation using mobile sensing data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehmann, Anders

    to use data acquired from smartphones to im- prove transportation related air quality models and models for climate gas emission from transportation. These models can be used for planning of transportation net- works, monitoring of air quality, and automate transport related green accounting. More...... of individual drivers, by deducing driving modes from accelerometer data. The work presented in this thesis spans different and diverse research fields. Trans- portation models are a subfield of econometrics, air quality modelling is a subfield of atmospheric chemistry, and driving mode detection and efficient...... database imple- mentations are a subfield of computer science. I have worked to bring these diverse research fields together to solve the challenge of improving modelling of transporta- tion related air quality emissions as well as modelling of transportation related climate gas emissions. The main...

  5. Wind Tunnel Model Design for Sonic Boom Studies of Nozzle Jet with Shock Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliff, Susan E.; Denison, Marie; Sozer, Emre; Moini-Yekta, Shayan

    2016-01-01

    NASA and Industry are performing vehicle studies of configurations with low sonic boom pressure signatures. The computational analyses of modern configuration designs have matured to the point where there is confidence in the prediction of the pressure signature from the front of the vehicle, but uncertainty in the aft signatures with often greater boundary layer effects and nozzle jet pressures. Wind tunnel testing at significantly lower Reynolds numbers than in flight and without inlet and nozzle jet pressures make it difficult to accurately assess the computational solutions of flight vehicles. A wind tunnel test in the NASA Ames 9- by 7-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel from Mach 1.6 to 2.0 will be used to assess the effects of shocks from components passing through nozzle jet plumes on the sonic boom pressure signature and provide datasets for comparison with CFD codes. A large number of high-fidelity numerical simulations of wind tunnel test models with a variety of shock generators that simulate horizontal tails and aft decks have been studied to provide suitable models for sonic boom pressure measurements using a minimally intrusive pressure rail in the wind tunnel. The computational results are presented and the evolution of candidate wind tunnel models is summarized and discussed in this paper.

  6. Microscale simulations of shock interaction with large assembly of particles for developing point-particle models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Siddharth; Neal, Chris; Mehta, Yash; Sridharan, Prasanth; Jackson, Thomas; Balachandar, S.

    2017-01-01

    Micrsoscale simulations are being conducted for developing point-particle and other related models that are needed for the mesoscale and macroscale simulations of explosive dispersal of particles. These particle models are required to compute (a) instantaneous aerodynamic force on the particle and (b) instantaneous net heat transfer between the particle and the surrounding. A strategy for a sequence of microscale simulations has been devised that allows systematic development of the hybrid surrogate models that are applicable at conditions representative of the explosive dispersal application. The ongoing microscale simulations seek to examine particle force dependence on: (a) Mach number, (b) Reynolds number, and (c) volume fraction (different particle arrangements such as cubic, face-centered cubic (FCC), body-centered cubic (BCC) and random). Future plans include investigation of sequences of fully-resolved microscale simulations consisting of an array of particles subjected to more realistic time-dependent flows that progressively better approximate the actual problem of explosive dispersal. Additionally, effects of particle shape, size, and number in simulation as well as the transient particle deformation dependence on various parameters including: (a) particle material, (b) medium material, (c) multiple particles, (d) incoming shock pressure and speed, (e) medium to particle impedance ratio, (f) particle shape and orientation to shock, etc. are being investigated.

  7. Shock Melting of Permafrost on Mars: Water Ice Multiphase Equation of State for Numerical Modeling and Its Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, B. A.

    2005-01-01

    The presence of water/ice/brine in upper layers of Martian crust affects many processes of impact cratering. Modeling of these effects promises better understanding of Martian cratering records. We present here the new ANEOS-based multiphase equation of state for water/ice constructed for usage in hydrocodes and first numerical experiments on permafrost shock melting. Preliminary results show that due to multiple shock compression of ice inclusions in rocks the entropy jump in shocked ice is smaller than in pure ice for the same shock pressure. Hence previous estimates of ice melting during impact cratering on Mars should be re-evaluated. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  8. Geometrical shock dynamics for magnetohydrodynamic fast shocks

    KAUST Repository

    Mostert, W.

    2016-12-12

    We describe a formulation of two-dimensional geometrical shock dynamics (GSD) suitable for ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fast shocks under magnetic fields of general strength and orientation. The resulting area–Mach-number–shock-angle relation is then incorporated into a numerical method using pseudospectral differentiation. The MHD-GSD model is verified by comparison with results from nonlinear finite-volume solution of the complete ideal MHD equations applied to a shock implosion flow in the presence of an oblique and spatially varying magnetic field ahead of the shock. Results from application of the MHD-GSD equations to the stability of fast MHD shocks in two dimensions are presented. It is shown that the time to formation of triple points for both perturbed MHD and gas-dynamic shocks increases as (Formula presented.), where (Formula presented.) is a measure of the initial Mach-number perturbation. Symmetry breaking in the MHD case is demonstrated. In cylindrical converging geometry, in the presence of an azimuthal field produced by a line current, the MHD shock behaves in the mean as in Pullin et al. (Phys. Fluids, vol. 26, 2014, 097103), but suffers a greater relative pressure fluctuation along the shock than the gas-dynamic shock. © 2016 Cambridge University Press

  9. MODELING TRITIUM TRANSPORT, DEPOSITION AND RE-EMISSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viner, B.

    2012-04-03

    The atmospheric release of tritium oxide (HTO) potentially impacts human health, typically through inhalation or absorption. Due to HTO's similarity to water, vegetation will absorb HTO by solution in the leaf water and then re-emit it, creating a number of secondary sources of HTO. Currently, models used for emergency response at Savannah River Site incorporate the transport and deposition of HTO but do not provide estimates for its potential re-emission from vegetation or soil surface though re-emission could result in prolonged exposure and greater than predicted dose for an individual downwind. A simple model of HTO transport, deposition and re-emission has been developed to examine the potential increase in exposure and dose. The model simulates an initial release of HTO that moves with a mean wind and expands through diffusion as a Gaussian puff. Deposition is modeled using previous estimates of deposition velocity for HTO and re-emission is modeled using a time constant that describes how quickly HTO is transferred between the surface and atmosphere. Additional puffs are created to simulate re-emission of HTO as well as horizontal diffusion across model grid cells. An evaluation of field data indicates that the use of a re-emission module tends to improve model predictions through improved prediction of peak concentration magnitude and location. When considering dose, nearly all of the released material is included in the dose calculation when re-emission is included. Although exposure to HTO through re-emission occurs over a few hours, the incremental increase in dose is relatively small because the atmospheric concentration of re-emitted HTO is much lower than the initial release.

  10. Confronting GRB prompt emission with a model for subphotospheric dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlgren, Björn; Larsson, Josefin; Nymark, Tanja; Ryde, Felix; Pe'er, Asaf

    2015-11-01

    The origin of the prompt emission in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is still an unsolved problem and several different mechanisms have been suggested. Here, we fit Fermi GRB data with a photospheric emission model which includes dissipation of the jet kinetic energy below the photosphere. The resulting spectra are dominated by Comptonization and contain no significant contribution from synchrotron radiation. In order to fit to the data, we span a physically motivated part of the model's parameter space and create DREAM (Dissipation with Radiative Emission as A table Model), a table model for XSPEC. We show that this model can describe different kinds of GRB spectra, including GRB 090618, representing a typical Band function spectrum, and GRB 100724B, illustrating a double peaked spectrum, previously fitted with a Band+blackbody model, suggesting they originate from a similar scenario. We suggest that the main difference between these two types of bursts is the optical depth at the dissipation site.

  11. Modeling emission rates and exposures from outdoor cooking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Rufus; Princevac, Marko; Weltman, Robert; Ghasemian, Masoud; Arora, Narendra K.; Bond, Tami

    2017-09-01

    Approximately 3 billion individuals rely on solid fuels for cooking globally. For a large portion of these - an estimated 533 million - cooking is outdoors, where emissions from cookstoves pose a health risk to both cooks and other household and village members. Models that estimate emissions rates from stoves in indoor environments that would meet WHO air quality guidelines (AQG), explicitly don't account for outdoor cooking. The objectives of this paper are to link health based exposure guidelines with emissions from outdoor cookstoves, using a Monte Carlo simulation of cooking times from Haryana India coupled with inverse Gaussian dispersion models. Mean emission rates for outdoor cooking that would result in incremental increases in personal exposure equivalent to the WHO AQG during a 24-h period were 126 ± 13 mg/min for cooking while squatting and 99 ± 10 mg/min while standing. Emission rates modeled for outdoor cooking are substantially higher than emission rates for indoor cooking to meet AQG, because the models estimate impact of emissions on personal exposure concentrations rather than microenvironment concentrations, and because the smoke disperses more readily outdoors compared to indoor environments. As a result, many more stoves including the best performing solid-fuel biomass stoves would meet AQG when cooking outdoors, but may also result in substantial localized neighborhood pollution depending on housing density. Inclusion of the neighborhood impact of pollution should be addressed more formally both in guidelines on emissions rates from stoves that would be protective of health, and also in wider health impact evaluation efforts and burden of disease estimates. Emissions guidelines should better represent the different contexts in which stoves are being used, especially because in these contexts the best performing solid fuel stoves have the potential to provide significant benefits.

  12. How Non-Gaussian Shocks Affect Risk Premia in Non-Linear DSGE Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Martin Møller

    This paper studies how non-Gaussian shocks affect risk premia in DSGE models approximated to second and third order. Based on an extension of the results in Schmitt-Grohé & Uribe (2004) to third order, we derive propositions for how rare disasters, stochastic volatility, and GARCH affect any risk...... premia in a wide class of DSGE models. To quantify these effects, we then set up a standard New Keynesian DSGE model where total factor productivity includes rare disasters, stochastic volatility, and GARCH. We …find that rare disasters increase the mean level of the 10-year nominal term premium, whereas...... a key effect of stochastic volatility and GARCH is an increase in the variability of this premium....

  13. Wind Tunnel Model Design for Sonic Boom Studies of Nozzle Jet Flows with Shock Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliff, Susan E.; Denison, Marie; Moini-Yekta, Shayan; Morr, Donald E.; Durston, Donald A.

    2016-01-01

    NASA and the U.S. aerospace industry are performing studies of supersonic aircraft concepts with low sonic boom pressure signatures. The computational analyses of modern aircraft designs have matured to the point where there is confidence in the prediction of the pressure signature from the front of the vehicle, but uncertainty remains in the aft signatures due to boundary layer and nozzle exhaust jet effects. Wind tunnel testing without inlet and nozzle exhaust jet effects at lower Reynolds numbers than in-flight make it difficult to accurately assess the computational solutions of flight vehicles. A wind tunnel test in the NASA Ames 9- by 7-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel is planned for February 2016 to address the nozzle jet effects on sonic boom. The experiment will provide pressure signatures of test articles that replicate waveforms from aircraft wings, tails, and aft fuselage (deck) components after passing through cold nozzle jet plumes. The data will provide a variety of nozzle plume and shock interactions for comparison with computational results. A large number of high-fidelity numerical simulations of a variety of shock generators were evaluated to define a reduced collection of suitable test models. The computational results of the candidate wind tunnel test models as they evolved are summarized, and pre-test computations of the final designs are provided.

  14. A novel antibiotic based long term model of ovine smoke inhalation injury and septic shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Yoshimitsu; Maybauer, Marc O.; Maybauer, Dirk M.; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Traber, Daniel L.

    2010-01-01

    We modified our established and clinically relevant ARDS model of smoke inhalation injury and septic shock by administration of combined antibiotics (AB) such as piperacillin and ciprofloxacin, to more closely mimic the clinical intensive care setting. Twenty-three sheep were subjected to the injury, and allocated to 4 groups for a 96hrs study period: sham (n=5 non-injured); control (n=6: injured); AB6h (n=6: injured, antibiotics started 6hrs post-injury); AB12h (n=6: injured, antibiotics started 12hrs post-injury). All sham animals survived 96hrs. Control, AB6h, AB12h groups reached criteria of septic shock within 12hrs post-injury. All controls died within 36hrs. Eighty three percent of AB6h and fifty percent of AB12h survived 96hrs. Median survival times were significantly improved in the treated groups compared with the control group: 24hrs in control vs. 80.5hrs in AB6h, and 65hrs in AB12h animals. Combined Ciprofloxacin and Piperacillin therapy was effective, reduced nitric oxide production and mortality, and will allow future long-term studies in this model. PMID:20395054

  15. A novel antibiotic based long-term model of ovine smoke inhalation injury and septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Yoshimitsu; Maybauer, Marc O; Maybauer, Dirk M; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Traber, Daniel L

    2010-11-01

    We modified our established and clinically relevant ARDS model of smoke inhalation injury and septic shock by administration of combined antibiotics (AB) such as piperacillin and ciprofloxacin, to more closely mimic the clinical intensive care setting. Twenty-three sheep were subjected to the injury, and allocated to four groups for a 96 h study period: sham (n=5 non-injured); control (n=6: injured); AB6h (n=6: injured, antibiotics started 6 h post-injury); AB12h (n=6: injured, antibiotics started 12 h post-injury). All sham animals survived 96 h. Control, AB6h, AB12h groups reached criteria of septic shock within 12 h post-injury. All controls died within 36 h. Eighty three percent of AB6h and fifty percent of AB12h survived 96 h. Median survival times were significantly improved in the treated groups compared with the control group: 24 h in control vs. 80.5 h in AB6h, and 65 h in AB12h animals. Combined ciprofloxacin and piperacillin therapy was effective, reduced nitric oxide production and mortality, and will allow future long-term studies in this model. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  16. Constitutive modeling of shock response of phase-transforming and porous materials with strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnyansky, A. D.

    2010-10-01

    The paper analyzes constitutive behavior of phase-transforming materials and metal powders loaded by shock waves. A two-phase material model developed earlier is extended to the case of materials with strength. Available experimental free surface velocities of iron samples under the α-ɛ phase transition and shock velocity data for porous aluminum and copper are analyzed numerically with the present model. The phase transition hysteresis is demonstrated by numerical analysis of experimental free surface velocities. Possible role of the martensitic mechanism in the hysteresis is emphasized. The calculated anomalous Hugoniots as well as pressure equilibrium (PE) and pressure-temperature equilibrium (PTE) Hugoniots are compared with available experiments for aluminum and copper powders. It is argued that a large nonequilibrium interphase heat transfer zone for aluminum powders results in a scatter of experimental Hugoniot points between the PE and PTE Hugoniots in low pressure region. In turn, in high pressure region, the effect of strength on porous Hugoniot may increase with porosity due to an extra dissipation, which improves description of experiments for an extremely porous aluminum.

  17. High temperature shock tube experiments and kinetic modeling study of diisopropyl ketone ignition and pyrolysis

    KAUST Repository

    Barari, Ghazal

    2017-03-10

    Diisopropyl ketone (DIPK) is a promising biofuel candidate, which is produced using endophytic fungal conversion. In this work, a high temperature detailed combustion kinetic model for DIPK was developed using the reaction class approach. DIPK ignition and pyrolysis experiments were performed using the UCF shock tube. The shock tube oxidation experiments were conducted between 1093K and 1630K for different reactant compositions, equivalence ratios (φ=0.5–2.0), and pressures (1–6atm). In addition, methane concentration time-histories were measured during 2% DIPK pyrolysis in argon using cw laser absorption near 3400nm at temperatures between 1300 and 1400K near 1atm. To the best of our knowledge, current ignition delay times (above 1050K) and methane time histories are the first such experiments performed in DIPK at high temperatures. Present data were used as validation targets for the new kinetic model and simulation results showed fair agreement compared to the experiments. The reaction rates corresponding to the main consumption pathways of DIPK were found to have high sensitivity in controlling the reactivity, so these were adjusted to attain better agreement between the simulation and experimental data. A correlation was developed based on the experimental data to predict the ignition delay times using the temperature, pressure, fuel concentration and oxygen concentration.

  18. Efficient modelling of IC conducted emission for power integrity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemzadeh, R.; Ludwig, S.; Radić-Weissenfeld, Lj.; Mathis, W.

    2009-05-01

    In this paper two methodologies to reduce the complexity of IC conducted emission models for Power Integrity analysis in ICs are presented. The methodologies differ concerning the applicability in simulation tools, complexity and accuracy of the generated models. The first methodology uses a complex model and reduces its order to generate a model with a fewer number of elements. This methodology therefore involves a model order reduction approach. A second minimum complexity, module based modelling approach is introduced for rough estimations, as the order reduced model is still too complex for some applications. The two methodologies are applied to an IC conducted emission model of two digital modules of a 32 Bit microcontroller. The results of the three models are compared and discussed. Fields of application for the introduced modelling approaches are the estimation of the magnitude and time behaviour of the supply current as well as the determination of the number and position of the IC's supply pins.

  19. The small heat shock proteins from Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans: gene expression, phylogenetic analysis, and structural modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribeiro Daniela A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is an acidophilic, chemolithoautotrophic bacterium that has been successfully used in metal bioleaching. In this study, an analysis of the A. ferrooxidans ATCC 23270 genome revealed the presence of three sHSP genes, Afe_1009, Afe_1437 and Afe_2172, that encode proteins from the HSP20 family, a class of intracellular multimers that is especially important in extremophile microorganisms. Results The expression of the sHSP genes was investigated in A. ferrooxidans cells submitted to a heat shock at 40°C for 15, 30 and 60 minutes. After 60 minutes, the gene on locus Afe_1437 was about 20-fold more highly expressed than the gene on locus Afe_2172. Bioinformatic and phylogenetic analyses showed that the sHSPs from A. ferrooxidans are possible non-paralogous proteins, and are regulated by the σ32 factor, a common transcription factor of heat shock proteins. Structural studies using homology molecular modeling indicated that the proteins encoded by Afe_1009 and Afe_1437 have a conserved α-crystallin domain and share similar structural features with the sHSP from Methanococcus jannaschii, suggesting that their biological assembly involves 24 molecules and resembles a hollow spherical shell. Conclusion We conclude that the sHSPs encoded by the Afe_1437 and Afe_1009 genes are more likely to act as molecular chaperones in the A. ferrooxidans heat shock response. In addition, the three sHSPs from A. ferrooxidans are not recent paralogs, and the Afe_1437 and Afe_1009 genes could be inherited horizontally by A. ferrooxidans.

  20. Modeling natural emissions in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ Model–I: building an emissions data base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. F. Mueller

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A natural emissions inventory for the continental United States and surrounding territories is needed in order to use the US Environmental Protection Agency Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ Model for simulating natural air quality. The CMAQ air modeling system (including the Sparse Matrix Operator Kernel Emissions (SMOKE emissions processing system currently estimates non-methane volatile organic compound (NMVOC emissions from biogenic sources, nitrogen oxide (NOx emissions from soils, ammonia from animals, several types of particulate and reactive gas emissions from fires, as well as sea salt emissions. However, there are several emission categories that are not commonly treated by the standard CMAQ Model system. Most notable among these are nitrogen oxide emissions from lightning, reduced sulfur emissions from oceans, geothermal features and other continental sources, windblown dust particulate, and reactive chlorine gas emissions linked with sea salt chloride. A review of past emissions modeling work and existing global emissions data bases provides information and data necessary for preparing a more complete natural emissions data base for CMAQ applications. A model-ready natural emissions data base is developed to complement the anthropogenic emissions inventory used by the VISTAS Regional Planning Organization in its work analyzing regional haze based on the year 2002. This new data base covers a modeling domain that includes the continental United States plus large portions of Canada, Mexico and surrounding oceans. Comparing July 2002 source data reveals that natural emissions account for 16% of total gaseous sulfur (sulfur dioxide, dimethylsulfide and hydrogen sulfide, 44% of total NOx, 80% of reactive carbonaceous gases (NMVOCs and carbon monoxide, 28% of ammonia, 96% of total chlorine (hydrochloric acid, nitryl chloride and sea salt chloride, and 84% of fine particles (i.e., those smaller than 2.5 μm in size released into the

  1. Cardiogenic shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shock - cardiogenic ... electrical system of the heart (heart block) Cardiogenic shock occurs when the heart is unable to pump ... orthostatic hypotension) Weak (thready) pulse To diagnose cardiogenic shock, a catheter (tube) may be placed in the ...

  2. On the Computation of Secondary Electron Emission Models

    OpenAIRE

    Clerc, Sebastien; Dennison, JR; Hoffmann, Ryan; Abbott, Jonathon

    2006-01-01

    Secondary electron emission is a critical contributor to the charge particle current balance in spacecraft charging. Spacecraft charging simulation codes use a parameterized expression for the secondary electron (SE) yield delta(Eo) as a function of the incident electron energy Eo. Simple three-step physics models of the electron penetration, transport, and emission from a solid are typically expressed in terms of the incident electron penetration depth at normal incidence R(Eo) and the mean ...

  3. Numerical modeling of nitrogen oxide emission and experimental verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szecowka Lech

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of nitrogen reduction in combustion process with application of primary method are presented in paper. The reduction of NOx emission, by the recirculation of combustion gasses, staging of fuel and of air was investigated, and than the reduction of NOx emission by simultaneous usage of the mentioned above primary method with pulsatory disturbances.The investigations contain numerical modeling of NOx reduction and experimental verification of obtained numerical calculation results.

  4. Physical effects on visible temperature measurements of shocked foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benage, J.; Falk, K.; Fryer, C.; Greef, C.; Williams, J.; Schmidt, D.; McCoy, C.; Boehly, T.

    2013-10-01

    We have conducted a series of experiments measuring the temperature of shock compressed foams at pressures from ~ 50 to >300 GPA. These experiments were carried out at the OMEGA laser facility and utilized the streaked optical pyrometer (SOP) to measure the optical emission from the shocked foam targets and infer the temperature. A comparison of our results to both standard equation of state (EOS) tables and to quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations result in temperatures that are below these theoretical predictions, especially at the higher pressures. This indicates either an error in these models or a limitation with this type of measurement technique. In order to estimate whether the emission from the shock front is consistent with the bulk temperature of the shocked material, a series of high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations were performed. We find these simulations predict emission more consistent with the measurements at high pressures, similar to previous results for shocked Silicon. The effect of specific physics issues at the shock front, including temperature relaxation, electron thermal conduction, and radiation transport are evaluated to determine the magnitude of their affect on the emission. Both experimental and simulations results will be presented. Work performed under the auspices of the NNSA/DOE.

  5. Reorganization of pathological control functions of memory-A neural model for tissue healing by shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wess, Othmar

    2005-04-01

    Since 1980 shock waves have proven effective in the field of extracorporeal lithotripsy. More than 10 years ago shock waves were successfully applied for various indications such as chronic pain, non-unions and, recently, for angina pectoris. These fields do not profit from the disintegration power but from stimulating and healing effects of shock waves. Increased metabolism and neo-vascularization are reported after shock wave application. According to C. J. Wang, a biological cascade is initiated, starting with a stimulating effect of physical energy resulting in increased circulation and metabolism. Pathological memory of neural control patterns is considered the reason for different pathologies characterized by insufficient metabolism. This paper presents a neural model for reorganization of pathological reflex patterns. The model acts on associative memory functions of the brain based on modification of synaptic junctions. Accordingly, pathological memory effects of the autonomous nervous system are reorganized by repeated application of shock waves followed by development of normal reflex patterns. Physiologic control of muscle and vascular tone is followed by increased metabolism and tissue repair. The memory model may explain hyper-stimulation effects in pain therapy.

  6. An Inverse Compton Scattering Model of Pulsar Emission. III. Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, R. X.; Liu, J. F.; Han, J. L.; Qiao, G. J.

    2000-05-01

    Qiao and his collaborators recently proposed an inverse Compton scattering model to explain radio emission from pulsars. In this paper, we investigate the polarization properties of pulsar emission in the model. First of all, using the lower frequency approximation, we derived the analytical amplitude of the inverse Compton scattered wave of a single electron in a strong magnetic field. We found that the outgoing radio emission of a single relativistic electron scattering off the ``low-frequency waves'' produced by gap sparking should be linearly polarized and have no circular polarization at all. However, considering the coherency of the emission from a bunch of electrons, we found that the outgoing radiation from the inner part of the emission beam, i.e., that from the lower emission altitudes, preferentially has to have circular polarization. Computer simulations show that the polarization properties, such as the sense reversal of circular polarization near the pulse center, the S-shape of position angle swing of the linear polarization, and a strong linear polarization in conal components, can be reproduced in the ICS model.

  7. Modeling the effects of atmospheric emissions on groundwater composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Theresa Jean [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1994-01-01

    A composite model of atmospheric, unsaturated and groundwater transport is developed to evaluate the processes determining the distribution of atmospherically derived contaminants in groundwater systems and to test the sensitivity of simulated contaminant concentrations to input parameters and model linkages. One application is to screen specific atmospheric emissions for their potential in determining groundwater age. Temporal changes in atmospheric emissions could provide a recognizable pattern in the groundwater system. The model also provides a way for quantifying the significance of uncertainties in the tracer source term and transport parameters on the contaminant distribution in the groundwater system, an essential step in using the distribution of contaminants from local, point source atmospheric emissions to examine conceptual models of groundwater flow and transport.

  8. Arrival times of Flare/Halo CME associated shocks at the Earth: comparison of the predictions of three numerical models with these observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. P. McKenna-Lawlor

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The arrival times at L1 of eleven travelling shocks associated both with X-ray flaring and with halo CMEs recorded aboard SOHO/LASCO have been considered. Close to the Sun the velocities of these events were estimated using either Type II radio records or CME speeds. Close to the Earth the shocks were detected in the data of various solar wind plasma, interplanetary magnetic field (IMF and energetic particle experiments aboard SOHO, ACE, WIND, INTERBALL-1 and IMP-8. The real-time shock arrival predictions of three numerical models, namely the Shock Time of Arrival Model (STOA, the Interplanetary Shock Propagation Model (ISPM and the Hakamada-Akasofu-Fry Solar Wind Model (HAFv.2 were tested against these observations. This is the first time that energetic protons (tens of keV to a few MeV have been used to complement plasma and IMF data in validating shock propagation models. The models were all generally successful in predicting shock arrivals. STOA provided the smallest values of the "predicted minus measured" arrival times and displayed a typical predictive precision better than about 8 h. The ratio of the calculated standard deviation of the transit times to Earth to the standard deviation of the measurements was estimated for each model (treating interacting events as composite shocks and these ratios turned out to be 0.60, 1.15 and 1.02 for STOA, ISPM and HAFv.2, respectively. If an event in the sample for which the shock velocity was not well known is omitted from consideration, these ratios become 0.36, 0.76 and 0.81, respectively. Larger statistical samples should now be tested. The ratio of the in situ shock velocity and the "Sun to L1" transit velocity (Vsh /Vtr was in the range of 0.7–0.9 for individual, non-interacting, shock events. HAFv.2 uniquely provided information on those changes in the COBpoint (the moving Connection point on the shock along the IMF to the OBserver which directly influenced energetic particle rise times

  9. Effect of GPS errors on Emission model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehmann, Anders; Gross, Allan

    n this paper we will show how Global Positioning Services (GPS) data obtained from smartphones can be used to model air quality in urban settings. The paper examines the uncertainty of smartphone location utilising GPS, and ties this location uncertainty to air quality models. The results presented...

  10. Innovations in projecting emissions for air quality modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air quality modeling is used in setting air quality standards and in evaluating their costs and benefits. Historically, modeling applications have projected emissions and the resulting air quality only 5 to 10 years into the future. Recognition that the choice of air quality mana...

  11. Inverse modeling of European CH4 emissions 2001–2006

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergamaschi, P.; Krol, M.C.; Meirink, J.F.; Dentener, F.; Segers, A.; Aardenne, van J.A.; Monni, S.; Vermeulen, A.T.

    2010-01-01

    European CH4 emissions are estimated for the period 2001–2006 using a fourdimensional variational (4DVAR) inverse modeling system, based on the atmospheric zoom model TM5. Continuous observations are used from various European monitoring stations, complemented by European and global flask samples

  12. Efficacy of Methylene Blue in an Experimental Model of Calcium Channel Blocker Induced Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, David H.; Donovan, Sean; Nelson, Lewis S.; Bania, Theodore C.; Hoffman, Robert S.; Chu, Jason

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Calcium channel blocker poisonings account for a substantial number of reported deaths from cardiovascular drugs. While supportive care is the mainstay of treatment, experimental therapies such as high dose insulin-euglycemia and lipid emulsion have been studied in animal models and used in humans. In the most severe cases even aggressive care is inadequate and deaths occur. In both experimental models and clinical cases of vasodilatory shock, methylene blue improves hemodynamic measures. Methylene blue acts as both a nitric oxide scavenger and inhibits guanylate cyclase that is responsible for the production of cGMP. Excessive cGMP production is associated with refractory vasodilatory shock in sepsis and anaphylaxis. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of methylene blue in an animal model of amlodipine-induced shock. METHODS Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized, ventilated and instrumented for continuous blood pressure and heart rate monitoring. The dose of amlodipine that produced death within 60 minutes was 17 mg/kg/hour (LD50). Rats were divided into 2 groups: amlodipine followed by methylene blue or amlodipine followed by normal saline (NS) with 15 rats in each group. Rats received methylene blue at 2 mg/kg over 5 mins or an equivalent amount of NS in three intervals from the start of the protocol: Minute 5, 30, and 60. The animals were observed for a total of 2 hours after the start of the protocol. Mortality risk and survival time were analyzed using Fisher’s exact test and Kaplan Meier survival analysis with the log rank test. RESULTS Overall, 1/15 (7%) rats in the saline-treated group survived to 120 minutes compared with 5/15 (33%) rats in the methylene blue-treated group (difference −26%, 95% CI –54%, 0.3%). The median survival time for the NS group was 42 min (95% CI, 28.1,55.9) and the methylene blue group was 109 min (95% CI, 93.9,124.1). Heart rate and MAP differences between groups were analyzed until 60 minutes

  13. Modeling of dissociation and energy transfer in shock-heated nitrogen flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munafò, A., E-mail: munafo@illinois.edu [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Talbot Laboratory, 104 S. Wright St., Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California 94035 (United States); Liu, Y., E-mail: yen.liu@nasa.gov [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California 94035 (United States); Panesi, M., E-mail: mpanesi@illinois.edu [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Talbot Laboratory, 104 S. Wright St., Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    This work addresses the modeling of dissociation and energy transfer processes in shock heated nitrogen flows by means of the maximum entropy linear model and a newly proposed hybrid bin vibrational collisional model. Both models aim at overcoming two of the main limitations of the state of the art non-equilibrium models: (i) the assumption of equilibrium between rotational and translational energy modes of the molecules and (ii) the reliance on the quasi-steady-state distribution for the description of the population of the internal levels. The formulation of the coarse-grained models is based on grouping the energy levels into bins, where the population is assumed to follow a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution at its own temperature. Different grouping strategies are investigated. Following the maximum entropy principle, the governing equations are obtained by taking the zeroth and first-order moments of the rovibrational master equations. The accuracy of the proposed models is tested against the rovibrational master equation solution for both flow quantities and population distributions. Calculations performed for free-stream velocities ranging from 5 km/s to 10 km/s demonstrate that dissociation can be accurately predicted by using only 2-3 bins. It is also shown that a multi-temperature approach leads to an under-prediction of dissociation, due to the inability of the former to account for the faster excitation of high-lying vibrational states.

  14. Depletion of myocardial glucose is observed during endotoxemic but not hemorrhagic shock in a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Michelle S; Shekar, Kiran; Brand, Björn A; Norin, Carl; Barnett, Adrian G

    2013-07-25

    Metabolic dysfunction is one of the hallmarks of sepsis yet little is known about local changes in key organs such as the heart. The aim of this study was to compare myocardial metabolic changes by direct measurements of substrates, such as glucose, lactate and pyruvate, using microdialysis (MD) in in-vivo porcine endotoxemic and hemorrhagic shock. To assess whether these changes were specific to the heart, we simultaneously investigated substrate levels in skeletal muscle. Twenty-six female pigs were randomized to three groups: control (C) n = 8, endotoxemic shock (E) n = 9 and hemorrhagic shock (H) n = 9. Interstitial myocardial pyruvate, lactate and glucose were measured using MD. Skeletal muscle MD was also performed in all three groups. Marked decreases in myocardial glucose were observed in the E group but not in the H group compared to controls (mean difference (CI) in mmol/L: C versus E -1.5(-2.2 to -0.8), P shock groups with no differences between the two types of shock. There was no evidence of myocardial anaerobic metabolism, with normal lactate:pyruvate (L:P) ratios seen in all animals regardless of the type of shock. Endotoxemia, but not hemorrhage, induces a rapid decrease of myocardial glucose levels. Despite the decrease in glucose, myocardial lactate and pyruvate concentrations were elevated and not different than in hemorrhagic shock. In skeletal muscle, substrate patterns during endotoxemic shock mimicked those seen in myocardium. During hemorrhagic shock the skeletal muscle response was characterized by a lack of increase in pyruvate and higher L:P ratios. Hence, metabolic patterns in the myocardium during endotoxemic shock are different than those seen during hemorrhagic shock. Skeletal muscle and myocardium displayed similar substrate patterns during endotoxemic shock but differed during hemorrhagic shock.

  15. Comparison of Consent Models in a Randomized Trial of Corticosteroids in Pediatric Septic Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Kusum; O'Hearn, Katharine; McNally, James Dayre; Acharya, Anand; Wong, Hector R; Lawson, Margaret; Ramsay, Tim; McIntyre, Lauralyn; Gilfoyle, Elaine; Tucci, Marisa; Wensley, David; Gottesman, Ronald; Morrison, Gavin; Choong, Karen

    2017-11-01

    To describe the use of deferred and prior informed consent models in the context of a low additional risk to standard of care, placebo-controlled randomized controlled trial of corticosteroids in pediatric septic shock. An observational substudy of consent processes in a randomized controlled trial of hydrocortisone versus placebo. Seven tertiary level PICUs in Canada. Children newborn to 17 years inclusive admitted to PICU with suspected septic shock between July 2014 and March 2016. None. Information on the number of families approached, consent rates obtained, and spontaneously volunteered reasons for nonparticipation were collected for both deferred and informed consent. The research ethics board of five of seven centers approved a deferred consent model; however, implementation criteria for use of this model varied across sites. The consent rate using deferred versus prior informed consent was significantly higher (83%; 35/42 vs 58%; 15/26; p = 0.02). The mean times from meeting inclusion criteria to randomization (1.8 ± 1.8 vs 3.6 ± 2.1 hr; p = 0.007) and study drug administration (3.4 ± 2.7 hr vs 4.8 ± 2.1 hr; p = 0.05) were significantly shorter with the use of deferred consent versus prior informed consent. No family member or research ethics board expressed concern following use of deferred consent. Deferred consent was acceptable in time-sensitive critical care research to most research ethics boards, families, and healthcare providers and resulted in higher consent rates and more efficient recruitment. Larger studies on deferred consent and consistency interpreting jurisdictional guidelines are needed to advance pediatric acute care.

  16. Mixed butanols addition to gasoline surrogates: Shock tube ignition delay time measurements and chemical kinetic modeling

    KAUST Repository

    AlRamadan, Abdullah S.

    2015-10-01

    The demand for fuels with high anti-knock quality has historically been rising, and will continue to increase with the development of downsized and turbocharged spark-ignition engines. Butanol isomers, such as 2-butanol and tert-butanol, have high octane ratings (RON of 105 and 107, respectively), and thus mixed butanols (68.8% by volume of 2-butanol and 31.2% by volume of tert-butanol) can be added to the conventional petroleum-derived gasoline fuels to improve octane performance. In the present work, the effect of mixed butanols addition to gasoline surrogates has been investigated in a high-pressure shock tube facility. The ignition delay times of mixed butanols stoichiometric mixtures were measured at 20 and 40bar over a temperature range of 800-1200K. Next, 10vol% and 20vol% of mixed butanols (MB) were blended with two different toluene/n-heptane/iso-octane (TPRF) fuel blends having octane ratings of RON 90/MON 81.7 and RON 84.6/MON 79.3. These MB/TPRF mixtures were investigated in the shock tube conditions similar to those mentioned above. A chemical kinetic model was developed to simulate the low- and high-temperature oxidation of mixed butanols and MB/TPRF blends. The proposed model is in good agreement with the experimental data with some deviations at low temperatures. The effect of mixed butanols addition to TPRFs is marginal when examining the ignition delay times at high temperatures. However, when extended to lower temperatures (T < 850K), the model shows that the mixed butanols addition to TPRFs causes the ignition delay times to increase and hence behaves like an octane booster at engine-like conditions. © 2015 The Combustion Institute.

  17. Modelling carbon dioxide emissions from agricultural soils in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Dhananjay; Wang, Junye

    2017-11-01

    Agricultural soils are a leading source of atmospheric greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and are major contributors to global climate change. Carbon dioxide (CO2) makes up 20% of the total GHG emitted from agricultural soil. Therefore, an evaluation of CO2 emissions from agricultural soil is necessary in order to make mitigation strategies for environmental efficiency and economic planning possible. However, quantification of CO2 emissions through experimental methods is constrained due to the large time and labour requirements for analysis. Therefore, a modelling approach is needed to achieve this objective. In this paper, the DeNitrification-DeComposition (DNDC), a process-based model, was modified to predict CO2 emissions for Canada from regional conditions. The modified DNDC model was applied at three experimental sites in the province of Saskatchewan. The results indicate that the simulations of the modified DNDC model are in good agreement with observations. The agricultural management of fertilization and irrigation were evaluated using scenario analysis. The simulated total annual CO2 flux changed on average by ±13% and ±1% following a ±50% variance of the total amount of N applied by fertilising and the total amount of water through irrigation applications, respectively. Therefore, careful management of irrigation and applications of fertiliser can help to reduce CO2 emissions from the agricultural sector. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Particle force model effects in a shock-driven multiphase instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, W. J.; Denissen, N.; McFarland, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    This work presents simulations on a shock-driven multiphase instability (SDMI) at an initial particle volume fraction of 1% with the addition of a suite of particle force models applicable in dense flows. These models include pressure-gradient, added-mass, and interparticle force terms in an effort to capture the effects neighboring particles have in non-dilute flow regimes. Two studies are presented here: the first seeks to investigate the individual contributions of the force models, while the second study focuses on examining the effect of these force models on the hydrodynamic evolution of a SDMI with various particle relaxation times (particle sizes). In the force study, it was found that the pressure gradient and interparticle forces have little effect on the instability under the conditions examined, while the added-mass force decreases the vorticity deposition and alters the morphology of the instability. The relaxation-time study likewise showed a decrease in metrics associated with the evolution of the SDMI for all sizes when the particle force models were included. The inclusion of these models showed significant morphological differences in both the particle and carrier species fields, which increased as particle relaxation times increased.

  19. MODELLING CO2 EMISSIONS IMPACTS ON CROATIAN POWER SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Pašičko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Today's electrical energy landscape is characterized by new challenges such as deregulation, liberalization of energy markets, increased competition, growing demands on security of supply, price insecurities, and demand to cut CO2 emissions. All mentioned challenges are calling for consideration of various options (like nuclear, coal, gas or renewable scenarios and for better understanding of energy systems modelling in order to optimize proper energy mix. Existing models are not sufficient any more and planners will need to think differently in order to face these challenges. European emission trading scheme (EU ETS started in 2005 and it has great influence on power system short term and long term planning. Croatia is obliged to establish a national scheme for trading of greenhouse gas emission allowances from the year 2010, which will be focused on monitoring and reporting only until accession to EU when it will be linked with EU ETS. Thus, for Croatian power system it is very important to analyze possible impacts of CO2 emissions. Analysis presented in this paper was done by two different models: mathematical model, based on short run marginal costs (SRMC, relevant for fuel switch in existing power plant and merit order change and long run marginal costs (LRMC, relevant for new investment decisions; and electricity market simulation model PLEXOS, which was used for modelling Croatian power system during development of the Croatian energy strategy in 2008. Results of the analysis show important impacts that emission trading has on Croatian power system, such as influence of emission price rise on price of electricity and on emission quantity, and changes in power plants output that appear with emission price rise. Breakeven point after which gas power plant becomes more competitive than coal is 62 €/tCO2 for SRMC and 40 €/tCO2 for LRMC. With CO2 prices above 31 €/tCO2 wind is more competitive than gas or coal, which emphasizes

  20. Measurement and modeling ammonia emissions from broiler litter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zifei

    Ammonia is a very important atmospheric pollutant. Agricultural activities, livestock production in particular, have been reported to be the largest contributor of ammonia emissions into the atmosphere. Accurate estimation of ammonia emission rate from individual operations or sources is important and yet a challenging task for both regulatory agencies and animal producers. The overall research objective of this study was to develop an emission model which can be used to estimate ammonia emission from broiler litter. In the reported model, the ammonia flux is essentially a function of the litter's total ammoniacal nitrogen (TAN) content, moisture content, pH, and temperature, as well as the Freundlich partition coefficient (Kf), mass transfer coefficient (KG), ventilation rate (Q), and emission surface area (A). A dynamic flow-through chamber system and a wind tunnel were designed to measure ammonia fluxes from broiler litter. The dynamic flow-through chamber experiments evaluated the reported model with various litter samples under a constant temperature and wind profile. The wind tunnel experiments evaluated the reported model under various temperatures and wind profiles. Regression sub-models were developed to estimate Kf as a function of litter pH and temperature and to estimate KG as a function of air velocity and temperature. Sensitivity analysis of the model showed that ammonia flux is very sensitive to litter pH and to a lesser extent temperature. A validation metric based on the mean and covariance in the measurement and in the model parameters were used to validate the model in the presence of measurement and model parameter uncertainties.

  1. Assessment of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Models for Shock Boundary-Layer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBonis, James R.; Oberkampf, William L.; Wolf, Richard T.; Orkwis, Paul D.; Turner, Mark G.; Babinsky, Holger

    2011-01-01

    A workshop on the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) prediction of shock boundary-layer interactions (SBLIs) was held at the 48th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting. As part of the workshop numerous CFD analysts submitted solutions to four experimentally measured SBLIs. This paper describes the assessment of the CFD predictions. The assessment includes an uncertainty analysis of the experimental data, the definition of an error metric and the application of that metric to the CFD solutions. The CFD solutions provided very similar levels of error and in general it was difficult to discern clear trends in the data. For the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes methods the choice of turbulence model appeared to be the largest factor in solution accuracy. Large-eddy simulation methods produced error levels similar to RANS methods but provided superior predictions of normal stresses.

  2. FORECASTING MODEL OF GHG EMISSION IN MANUFACTURING SECTORS OF THAILAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pruethsan Sutthichaimethee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to analyze the modeling and forecasting the GHG emission of energy consumption in manufacturing sectors. The scope of the study is to analysis energy consumption and forecasting GHG emission of energy consumption for the next 10 years (2016-2025 and 25 years (2016-2040 by using ARIMAX model from the Input-output table of Thailand. The result shows that iron and steel has the highest value of energy consumption and followed by cement, fluorite, air transport, road freight transport, hotels and places of loading, coal and lignite, petrochemical products, other manufacturing, road passenger transport, respectively. The prediction results show that these models are effective in forecasting by measured by using RMSE, MAE, and MAPE. The results forecast of each model is as follows: 1 Model 1(2,1,1 shows that GHG emission will be increasing steadily and increasing at 25.17% by the year 2025 in comparison to 2016. 2 Model 2 (2,1,2 shows that GHG emission will be rising steadily and increasing at 41.51% by the year 2040 in comparison to 2016.

  3. A Model of Pulsar Radio and Gamma-ray Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, G. J.; Lee, K. J.; Wang, H. G.; Xu, R. X.

    2007-06-01

    A joint model for a pulsar's radio and γ-ray emission is introduced in this paper. This model is informed by two main concepts. One is inverse Compton scattering (ICS) mechanism for radio emission. The other one is an inner annular region for high energy radiation. In the model the geometry of both radio and γ-ray emission beams can be reproduced. Various morphologies of the radio and γ-ray pulse profiles can also be reproduced by this model. At the radio band, the core and conal emission components are natural results. For the γ-ray band the Geminga-like, Crab-like and Vela-like gamma-ray pulse profiles and their phase shifts relative to radio pulse profiles can be reproduced. There are also some observations, which cannot be understood by traditional models, such as the observed ``bi-drifting'' phenomenon of PSR J0815+09 which can be well understand in this model. It is also pointed out that pulsars as neutron stars or alternately as strange stars may be tested through radiation.

  4. Modeling the gamma-ray emission produced by runaway cosmic rays in the environment of RX J1713.7-3946

    OpenAIRE

    Casanova, S.; Jones, D. I.; Aharonian, F. A.; Fukui, Y.; Gabici, S.; Kawamura, A.; Onishi, T.; Rowell, G.; Sano, H.; Torii, K.; Yamamoto, H.

    2010-01-01

    Diffusive shock acceleration in supernova remnants is the most widely invoked paradigm to explain the Galactic cosmic ray spectrum. Cosmic rays escaping supernova remnants diffuse in the interstellar medium and collide with the ambient atomic and molecular gas. From such collisions gamma-rays are created, which can possibly provide the first evidence of a parent population of runaway cosmic rays. We present model predictions for the GeV to TeV gamma-ray emission produced by the collisions of ...

  5. Shock tube and modeling study of 2,7-dimethyloctane pyrolysis and oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Sijie

    2015-05-01

    High molecular weight iso-paraffinic molecules are found in conventional petroleum, Fischer-Tropsch (FT), and other alternative hydrocarbon fuels, yet fundamental combustion studies on this class of compounds are lacking. In the present work, ignition delay time measurements in 2,7-dimethyloctane/air were carried out behind reflected shock waves using conventional and constrained reaction volume (CRV) methods. The ignition delay time measurements covered the temperature range 666-1216K, pressure range 12-27atm, and equivalence ratio of 0.5 and 1. The ignition delay time temperatures span the low-, intermediate- and high-temperature regimes for 2,7-dimethyloctane (2,7-DMO) oxidation. Clear evidence of negative temperature coefficient behavior was observed near 800K. Fuel time-history measurements were also carried out in pyrolysis experiments in mixtures of 2000ppm 2,7-DMO/argon at pressures near 16 and 35atm, and in the temperature range of 1126-1455K. Based on the fuel removal rates, the overall 2,7-DMO decomposition rate constant can be represented with k =4.47×105 exp(-23.4[kcal/mol]/RT) [1/s]. Ethylene time-history measurements in pyrolysis experiments at 16atm are also provided. The current shock tube dataset was simulated using a novel chemical kinetic model for 2,7-DMO. The reaction mechanism includes comprehensive low- and high-temperature reaction classes with rate constants assigned using established rules. Comparisons between the simulated and experimental data show simulations reproduce the qualitative trends across the entire range of conditions tested. However, the present kinetic modeling simulations cannot quantitatively reproduce a number of experimental data points, and these are analyzed herein.

  6. Modeling Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation From Emissions of Combustion Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jathar, Shantanu Hemant

    Atmospheric aerosols exert a large influence on the Earth's climate and cause adverse public health effects, reduced visibility and material degradation. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA), defined as the aerosol mass arising from the oxidation products of gas-phase organic species, accounts for a significant fraction of the submicron atmospheric aerosol mass. Yet, there are large uncertainties surrounding the sources, atmospheric evolution and properties of SOA. This thesis combines laboratory experiments, extensive data analysis and global modeling to investigate the contribution of semi-volatile and intermediate volatility organic compounds (SVOC and IVOC) from combustion sources to SOA formation. The goals are to quantify the contribution of these emissions to ambient PM and to evaluate and improve models to simulate its formation. To create a database for model development and evaluation, a series of smog chamber experiments were conducted on evaporated fuel, which served as surrogates for real-world combustion emissions. Diesel formed the most SOA followed by conventional jet fuel / jet fuel derived from natural gas, gasoline and jet fuel derived from coal. The variability in SOA formation from actual combustion emissions can be partially explained by the composition of the fuel. Several models were developed and tested along with existing models using SOA data from smog chamber experiments conducted using evaporated fuel (this work, gasoline, fischertropschs, jet fuel, diesels) and published data on dilute combustion emissions (aircraft, on- and off-road gasoline, on- and off-road diesel, wood burning, biomass burning). For all of the SOA data, existing models under-predicted SOA formation if SVOC/IVOC were not included. For the evaporated fuel experiments, when SVOC/IVOC were included predictions using the existing SOA model were brought to within a factor of two of measurements with minor adjustments to model parameterizations. Further, a volatility

  7. Modeling study of natural emissions, source apportionment, and emission control of atmospheric mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Suraj K.

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic pollutant and is important to understand its cycling in the environment. In this dissertation, a number of modeling investigations were conducted to better understand the emission from natural surfaces, the source-receptor relationship of the emissions, and emission reduction of atmospheric mercury. The first part of this work estimates mercury emissions from vegetation, soil and water surfaces using a number of natural emission processors and detailed (LAI) Leaf Area Index data from GIS (Geographic Information System) satellite products. East Asian domain was chosen as it contributes nearly 50% of the global anthropogenic mercury emissions into the atmosphere. The estimated annual natural mercury emissions (gaseous elemental mercury) in the domain are 834 Mg yr-1 with 462 Mg yr-1 contributing from China. Compared to anthropogenic sources, natural sources show greater seasonal variability (highest in simmer). The emissions are significant, sometimes dominant, contributors to total mercury emission in the regions. The estimates provide possible explanation for the gaps between the anthropogenic emission estimates based on activity data and the emission inferred from field observations in the regions. To understand the contribution of domestic emissions to mercury deposition in the United States, the second part of the work applies the mercury model of Community Multi-scale Air Quality Modeling system (CMAQ-Hg v4.6) to apportion the various emission sources attributing to the mercury wet and dry deposition in the 6 United States receptor regions. Contributions to mercury deposition from electric generating units (EGU), iron and steel industry (IRST), industrial point sources excluding EGU and IRST (OIPM), the remaining anthropogenic sources (RA), natural processes (NAT), and out-of-boundary transport (BC) in domain was estimated. The model results for 2005 compared reasonably well to field observations made by MDN (Mercury Deposition Network

  8. Shock Wave Solutions for Some Nonlinear Flow Models Arising in the Study of a Non-Newtonian Third Grade Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is based upon constructing a new class of closed-form shock wave solutions for some nonlinear problems arising in the study of a third grade fluid model. The Lie symmetry reduction technique has been employed to reduce the governing nonlinear partial differential equations into nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The reduced equations are then solved analytically, and the shock wave solutions are constructed. The conditions on the physical parameters of the flow problems also fall out naturally in the process of the derivation of the solutions.

  9. Modeling Gamma-Ray Emission From the High-Mass X-Ray Binary LS 5039

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stan Owocki

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A few high-mass X-ray binaries–consisting of an OB star plus compact companion– have been observed by Fermi and ground-based Cerenkov telescopes like High Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS to be sources of very high energy (VHE; up to 30 TeV γ-rays. This paper focuses on the prominent γ-ray source, LS 5039, which consists of a massive O6.5V star in a 3.9-day-period, mildly elliptical (e ≈ 0.24 orbit with its companion, assumed here to be an unmagnetized compact object (e.g., black hole. Using three dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the Bondi-Hoyle accretion of the O-star wind onto the companion, we find that the orbital phase variation of the accretion follows very closely the simple Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton (BHL rate for the local radius and wind speed. Moreover, a simple model, wherein intrinsic emission of γ-rays is assumed to track this accretion rate, reproduces quite well Fermi observations of the phase variation of γ-rays in the energy range 0.1-10 GeV. However for the VHE (0.1-30 TeV radiation observed by the HESS Cerenkov telescope, it is important to account also for photon-photon interactions between the γ-rays and the stellar optical/UV radiation, which effectively attenuates much of the strong emission near periastron. When this is included, we find that this simple BHL accretion model also quite naturally fits the HESS light curve, thus making it a strong alternative to the pulsar-wind-shock models commonly invoked to explain such VHE γ-ray emission in massive-star binaries.

  10. CME Flux Rope and Shock Identifications and Locations: Comparison of White Light Data, Graduated Cylindrical Shell Model, and MHD Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, J. M.; Cairns, Iver H.; Xie, Hong; St. Cyr, O. C.; Gopalswamy, N.

    2016-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are major transient phenomena in the solar corona that are observed with ground-based and spacecraft-based coronagraphs in white light or with in situ measurements by spacecraft. CMEs transport mass and momentum and often drive shocks. In order to derive the CME and shock trajectories with high precision, we apply the graduated cylindrical shell (GCS) model to fit a flux rope to the CME directed toward STEREO A after about 19:00 UT on 29 November 2013 and check the quality of the heliocentric distance-time evaluations by carrying out a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of the same CME with the Block Adaptive Tree Solar-Wind Roe Upwind Scheme (BATS-R-US) code. Heliocentric distances of the CME and shock leading edges are determined from the simulated white light images and magnetic field strength data. We find very good agreement between the predicted and observed heliocentric distances, showing that the GCS model and the BATS-R-US simulation approach work very well and are consistent. In order to assess the validity of CME and shock identification criteria in coronagraph images, we also compute synthetic white light images of the CME and shock. We find that the outer edge of a cloud-like illuminated area in the observed and predicted images in fact coincides with the leading edge of the CME flux rope and that the outer edge of a faint illuminated band in front of the CME leading edge coincides with the CME-driven shock front.

  11. Comparing emission inventories and model-ready emission datasets between Europe and North America for the AQMEII project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouliot, George; Pierce, Thomas; Denier van der Gon, Hugo; Schaap, Martijn; Moran, Michael; Nopmongcol, Uarporn

    2012-06-01

    This paper highlights the similarities and differences in how emission inventories and datasets were developed and processed across North America and Europe for the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII) project and then characterizes the emissions for the two domains. We focus specifically on the creation of “model-ready” gridded emission datasets for 2006 across the two continental study domains. The practice of creating and processing the two inventories is discussed with a focus on emission factors, spatial allocation, temporal variability, speciation of PM and VOCs, and the mechanics of distributing the data and supporting emission algorithms to the modeling community. The spatial and temporal distribution on common scales is compared for the pollutants of primary concern: NOx, VOCs, SO2, PM2.5, CO, and NH3. Because of differences of population distribution, emissions across North America tend to be more heterogeneous in spatial coverage than in Europe. The temporal patterns in the estimated emissions are largely the result of assumptions used to characterize human activity, with the exception of “natural” emissions, which are modulated by meteorological variability, and emissions from large electric generating units in the U.S., which have the benefit of continuous emission monitors that provide hourly resolved profiles. Emission estimates in both study domains are challenged by several important but poorly characterized emission source sectors, notably road dust, agricultural operations, biomass burning, and road transport. Finally, this paper provides insight on the strengths and weaknesses of emission inventory preparation practices on both continents. One important outcome of this comparison of 2006 emissions between Europe and North America is the greater understanding provided into how the emission estimates developed for the AQMEII project impact regional air quality model performance.

  12. Dislocation unpinning model of acoustic emission from alkali halide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dislocation unpinning model of acoustic emission from alkali halide crystals. B P CHANDRA1, ANUBHA S GOUR1, VIVEK K CHANDRA2 and YUVRAJ PATIL3. 1School of Studies in Physics, Pt. Ravi Shankar Shukia University, Raipur 492 010, India. 2Department of Electronics and Telecommunication, Raipur Institute of ...

  13. Theoretical Models of Culture Shock and Adaptation in International Students in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuefang; Jindal-Snape, Divya; Topping, Keith; Todman, John

    2008-01-01

    Theoretical concepts of culture shock and adaptation are reviewed, as applied to the pedagogical adaptation of student sojourners in an unfamiliar culture. The historical development of "traditional" theories of culture shock led to the emergence of contemporary theoretical approaches, such as "culture learning", "stress and coping" and "social…

  14. Modelling nitrous oxide emissions from organic soils in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppelt, Thomas; Dechow, Rene; Gebbert, Sören; Freibauer, Annette

    2013-04-01

    The greenhouse gas emission potential of peatland ecosystems are mandatory for a complete annual emission budget in Europe. The GHG-Europe project aims to improve the modelling capabilities for greenhouse gases, e.g., nitrous oxide. The heterogeneous and event driven fluxes of nitrous oxide are challenging to model on European scale, especially regarding the upscaling purpose and certain parameter estimations. Due to these challenges adequate techniques are needed to create a robust empirical model. Therefore a literature study of nitrous oxide fluxes from organic soils has been carried out. This database contains flux data from boreal and temperate climate zones and covers the different land use categories: cropland, grassland, forest, natural and peat extraction sites. Especially managed crop- and grassland sites feature high emission potential. Generally nitrous oxide emissions increases significantly with deep drainage and intensive application of nitrogen fertilisation. Whereas natural peatland sites with a near surface groundwater table can act as nitrous oxide sink. An empirical fuzzy logic model has been applied to predict annual nitrous oxide emissions from organic soils. The calibration results in two separate models with best model performances for bogs and fens, respectively. The derived parameter combinations of these models contain mean groundwater table, nitrogen fertilisation, annual precipitation, air temperature, carbon content and pH value. Influences of the calibrated parameters on nitrous oxide fluxes are verified by several studies in literature. The extrapolation potential has been tested by an implemented cross validation. Furthermore the parameter ranges of the calibrated models are compared to occurring values on European scale. This avoid unknown systematic errors for the regionalisation purpose. Additionally a sensitivity analysis specify the model behaviour for each alternating parameter. The upscaling process for European peatland

  15. Electronic field emission models beyond the Fowler-Nordheim one

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepetit, Bruno

    2017-12-01

    We propose several quantum mechanical models to describe electronic field emission from first principles. These models allow us to correlate quantitatively the electronic emission current with the electrode surface details at the atomic scale. They all rely on electronic potential energy surfaces obtained from three dimensional density functional theory calculations. They differ by the various quantum mechanical methods (exact or perturbative, time dependent or time independent), which are used to describe tunneling through the electronic potential energy barrier. Comparison of these models between them and with the standard Fowler-Nordheim one in the context of one dimensional tunneling allows us to assess the impact on the accuracy of the computed current of the approximations made in each model. Among these methods, the time dependent perturbative one provides a well-balanced trade-off between accuracy and computational cost.

  16. Behavioral and molecular responses to electroconvulsive shock differ between genetic and environmental rat models of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jie; Min, Su; Wei, Ke; Cao, Jun; Wang, Bin; Li, Ping; Dong, Jun; Liu, Yuanyuan

    2015-04-30

    Depression׳s causes play a role in individuals׳ different responses to antidepressant treatments, which require advancements. We investigated the mechanisms behind and responses to a highly effective antidepressant treatment, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), in rat models with different (genetic or environmental) depression causes. Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats and Wistar rats treated with chronic unpredictable mild stresses (CUMS) were used as genetic and environmental rat models of depression, respectively. The rats underwent electroconvulsive shock (ECS, the animal analog of ECT) or sham ECS. We performed a sucrose preference test, open field test, and Morris water maze to assess behavior. Hippocampal neuron numbers were measured with Nissl stain. Hippocampal BDNF, CREB, and p-CREB proteins were assayed with ELISA or western blotting. The main results showed that ECS impaired WKY rats׳ memories but improved CUMS rats׳ memories. It elevated hippocampal BDNF and CREB proteins only in CUMS rats, while it improved depressive behavior and hippocampal p-CREB protein levels in both rats, with more effective regulations in the CUMS rats. ECS did not change the hippocampal neuron number in both rats. These findings suggest that ECS exerted up-regulating effects on hippocampal BDNF and CREB (and its phosphorylation) in depressed rats, and the environmental model responded better. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Estimates of global terrestrial isoprene emissions using MEGAN (Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Guenther

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive gases and aerosols are produced by terrestrial ecosystems, processed within plant canopies, and can then be emitted into the above-canopy atmosphere. Estimates of the above-canopy fluxes are needed for quantitative earth system studies and assessments of past, present and future air quality and climate. The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN is described and used to quantify net terrestrial biosphere emission of isoprene into the atmosphere. MEGAN is designed for both global and regional emission modeling and has global coverage with ~1 km2 spatial resolution. Field and laboratory investigations of the processes controlling isoprene emission are described and data available for model development and evaluation are summarized. The factors controlling isoprene emissions include biological, physical and chemical driving variables. MEGAN driving variables are derived from models and satellite and ground observations. Tropical broadleaf trees contribute almost half of the estimated global annual isoprene emission due to their relatively high emission factors and because they are often exposed to conditions that are conducive for isoprene emission. The remaining flux is primarily from shrubs which have a widespread distribution. The annual global isoprene emission estimated with MEGAN ranges from about 500 to 750 Tg isoprene (440 to 660 Tg carbon depending on the driving variables which include temperature, solar radiation, Leaf Area Index, and plant functional type. The global annual isoprene emission estimated using the standard driving variables is ~600 Tg isoprene. Differences in driving variables result in emission estimates that differ by more than a factor of three for specific times and locations. It is difficult to evaluate isoprene emission estimates using the concentration distributions simulated using chemistry and transport models, due to the substantial uncertainties in other model components, but at

  18. Methods for Developing Emissions Scenarios for Integrated Assessment Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prinn, Ronald [MIT; Webster, Mort [MIT

    2007-08-20

    The overall objective of this research was to contribute data and methods to support the future development of new emissions scenarios for integrated assessment of climate change. Specifically, this research had two main objectives: 1. Use historical data on economic growth and energy efficiency changes, and develop probability density functions (PDFs) for the appropriate parameters for two or three commonly used integrated assessment models. 2. Using the parameter distributions developed through the first task and previous work, we will develop methods of designing multi-gas emission scenarios that usefully span the joint uncertainty space in a small number of scenarios. Results on the autonomous energy efficiency improvement (AEEI) parameter are summarized, an uncertainty analysis of elasticities of substitution is described, and the probabilistic emissions scenario approach is presented.

  19. Treatment with beta-hydroxybutyrate and melatonin is associated with improved survival in a porcine model of hemorrhagic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulier, Kristine E; Lexcen, Daniel R; Luzcek, Elizabeth; Greenberg, Joseph J; Beilman, Gregory J

    2012-02-01

    The neuroprotective ketone β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) and the antioxidant melatonin have been found at elevated levels in hibernating mammals. Previous studies in rat models of hemorrhagic shock have suggested a benefit. We compared infusion of 4M BHB and 43 mM melatonin (BHB/M) to 4M sodium chloride and 20% DMSO (control solution) to evaluate for potential benefits in porcine hemorrhagic shock. Hemorrhagic shock was induced to obtain systolic blood pressures <50 mmHg for 60 min. Pigs were treated with a bolus of either BHB/M (n=9) or control solution (n=8) followed by 4-h infusion of the either BHB/M or control solution. All animals were then resuscitated for 20 h after shock. Physiological data were continually recorded, and blood samples were taken at intervals throughout the experiment. Serum samples were analyzed via high resolution NMR for metabolomic response. BHB/M treatment significantly increased 24-h survival time when compared to treatment with control solution (100% versus 62%; p=0.050), with a trend toward decreased volume of resuscitative fluid administered to animals receiving BHB/M. BHB/M-treated animals had lower base deficit and higher oxygen consumption when compared to animals receiving control solution. Serum metabolite profiles revealed increases in β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), succinate, 2-oxovalerate and adipate with BHB/M treatment as compared with animals treated with control infusion. Infusion of BHB/M conferred a survival benefit over infusion of control solution in hemorrhagic shock. BHB and its products of metabolism are identified in serum of animals subjected to shock and treated with BHB/M. Further preclinical studies are needed to clarify the mechanisms of action of this promising treatment strategy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. 3D Magnetohydrodynamic Models of Nonthermal Photon Emission in the Binary System γ 2 Velorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitberger, K.; Kissmann, R.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.

    2017-09-01

    Recent reports claiming an association of the massive star binary system {γ }2 Velorum (WR 11) with a high-energy γ-ray source observed by Fermi-LAT contrast the so far exclusive role of η Carinae as the hitherto only detected γ-ray emitter in the source class of particle-accelerating colliding-wind binary (CWB) systems. We offer support to this claim of association by providing dedicated model predictions for the nonthermal photon emission spectrum of {γ }2 Velorum. We use 3D magnetohydrodynamic modeling (MHD) to investigate the structure and conditions of the wind-collision region (WCR) of {γ }2 Velorum including the important effect of radiative braking in the stellar winds. A transport equation is then solved for the entire computational domain to study the propagation of relativistic electrons and protons. The resulting distributions of particles are subsequently used to compute nonthermal photon emission components. In agreement with observation in X-ray spectroscopy, our simulations yield a large shock-cone opening angle. We find the nonthermal γ-ray emission of {γ }2 Velorum to be of hadronic origin owing to the strong radiation fields in the binary system, which inhibit the acceleration of electrons to energies sufficiently high for efficient inverse-Compton radiation. We also discuss the strong dependence of a hadronic γ-ray component on the energy-dependent diffusion used in the simulations. Of two mass-loss rates for the WR star found in literature, only the higher rate is able to accommodate the observed γ-ray spectrum with reasonable values for important simulation parameters such as the injection ratio of high-energy particles within the WCR.

  1. SPATIOTEMPORAL MODELLING OF DUST STORM SOURCES EMISSION IN WEST ASIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Khodabandehloo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Dust aerosol is the largest contributor to aerosol mass concentrations in the troposphere and has considerable effects on the air quality of spatial and temporal scales. Arid and semi-arid areas of the West Asia are one of the most important regional dust sources in the world. These phenomena directly or indirectly affecting almost all aspects life in almost 15 countries in the region. So an accurate estimate of dust emissions is very crucial for making a common understanding and knowledge of the problem. Because of the spatial and temporal limits of the ground-based observations, remote sensing methods have been found to be more efficient and useful for studying the West Asia dust source. The vegetation cover limits dust emission by decelerating the surface wind velocities and therefore reducing the momentum transport. While all models explicitly take into account the change of wind speed and soil moisture in calculating dust emissions, they commonly employ a "climatological" land cover data for identifying dust source locations and neglect the time variation of surface bareness. In order to compile the aforementioned model, land surface features such as soil moisture, texture, type, and vegetation and also wind speed as atmospheric parameter are used. Having used NDVI data show significant change in dust emission, The modeled dust emission with static source function in June 2008 is 17.02 % higher than static source function and similar result for Mach 2007 show the static source function is 8.91 % higher than static source function. we witness a significant improvement in accuracy of dust forecasts during the months of most soil vegetation changes (spring and winter compared to outputs resulted from static model, in which NDVI data are neglected.

  2. A reactive burn model for shock initiation in a PBX: scaling and separability based on the hot spot concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Show, Milton S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    In the formulation of a reactive burn model for shock initiation, we endeavor to incorporate a number of effects based on the underlying physical concept of hot spot ignition followed by the growth of reaction due to diverging deflagration fronts. The passage of a shock front sets the initial condition for reaction, leading to a fraction of the hot spots that completely burn while others will quench. The form of the rate model is chosen to incorporate approximations based on the physical picture. In particular, the approximations imply scaling relations that are then used to mathematically separate various contributions. That is, the model is modular and refinements can be applied separately without changing the other contributions. For example, the effect of initial temperature, porosity, etc. predominantly enter the characterization of the non-quenching hot spot distribution. A large collection of velocity gauge data is shown to be well represented by the model with a very small number of parameters.

  3. Application of a dynamic-mixture shock-wave model to the metal-matrix composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grujicic, M., E-mail: gmica@clemson.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Pandurangan, B.; Bell, W.C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B.A. [Army Research Laboratory, Survivability Materials Branch, Aberdeen, Proving Ground, MD 21005-5069 (United States)

    2011-10-25

    Highlights: {yields} Propagation of shocks within metal matrix composites is analyzed computationally. {yields} A dynamic mixture model is employed to account for the composite material behavior. {yields} The approach is applied to SiC-reinforced aluminum-matrix composites. {yields} The results are in reasonably good agreement with their experimental counterparts. - Abstract: The so-called 'dynamic mixture' model is applied to a prototypical metal matrix composite (MMC) system (consisting of an aluminum matrix and SiC particulates) in order to investigate the propagation of planar (i.e. one directional), longitudinal (i.e. uniaxial strain), steady (i.e. time-invariant) structured shock waves. Waves of this type are typically generated during blast-wave loading or ballistic impact and play a major role in the way blast/ballistic impact loads are introduced into a structure. Hence, the knowledge of their propagation behavior is critical for designing structures with superior blast and impact protection capacities. To validate the computational procedure used, the structured shock-wave analysis is first applied to a homogeneous (i.e. single component) metallic system (commercially pure niobium). Next, the analysis is applied to the aforementioned MMC (in the limit of intermediate to strong shocks) when the contribution of the stress deviator to the total stress state can be neglected. Finally, the computational results are compared with their experimental counterparts available in the open literature in order to validate the dynamic-mixture method used.

  4. Corner turning and shock desensitization experiments plus numerical modeling of detonation waves in the triaminotrinitrobenzene based explosive LX-17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarver, Craig M

    2010-03-04

    Five new experiments are reported that tested both detonation wave corner turning and shock desensitization properties of the triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) based plastic bonded explosive (PBX) LX-17. These experiments used small pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) charges to initiate hemispherical ultrafine TATB (UF TATB) boosters, which then initiated LX-17 hemispherical detonations. The UF TATB boosters were placed under steel shadow plates embedded in the LX-17 cylindrical charges, which were covered by thin aluminum plates. The LX-17 detonation waves propagated outward until they reached the aluminum plates, which were instrumented with photonic Doppler velocimetry probes to measure their axial free surface velocities. X-ray radiographs and framing camera images were taken at various times. The LX-17 detonations propagated around the two corners of the steel shadow plates and into thin LX-17 layers placed between the steel and the top aluminum plates. The detonation waves were met there by weak diverging shocks that propagated through the steel plates and imparted 1-2 GPa pressures to these unreacted LX-17 layers. These weak shock waves compressed and desensitized the unreacted LX-17, resulting in failures of the LX-17 detonation waves. The hydrodynamics of double corner turning and shock desensitization in the five experiments were modeled in two dimensions using the Ignition and Growth LX-17 detonation reactive flow model. The calculated arrival times and axial free surface velocity histories of the top aluminum plates were in excellent agreement with the experimental measurements.

  5. Modeling of methane emissions using artificial neural network approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamenković Lidija J.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop a model for forecasting CH4 emissions at the national level, using Artificial Neural Networks (ANN with broadly available sustainability, economical and industrial indicators as their inputs. ANN modeling was performed using two different types of architecture; a Backpropagation Neural Network (BPNN and a General Regression Neural Network (GRNN. A conventional multiple linear regression (MLR model was also developed in order to compare model performance and assess which model provides the best results. ANN and MLR models were developed and tested using the same annual data for 20 European countries. The ANN model demonstrated very good performance, significantly better than the MLR model. It was shown that a forecast of CH4 emissions at the national level using the ANN model can be made successfully and accurately for a future period of up to two years, thereby opening the possibility to apply such a modeling technique which can be used to support the implementation of sustainable development strategies and environmental management policies. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172007

  6. Efficient modelling of IC conducted emission for power integrity analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Kazemzadeh

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper two methodologies to reduce the complexity of IC conducted emission models for Power Integrity analysis in ICs are presented. The methodologies differ concerning the applicability in simulation tools, complexity and accuracy of the generated models. The first methodology uses a complex model and reduces its order to generate a model with a fewer number of elements. This methodology therefore involves a model order reduction approach. A second minimum complexity, module based modelling approach is introduced for rough estimations, as the order reduced model is still too complex for some applications. The two methodologies are applied to an IC conducted emission model of two digital modules of a 32 Bit microcontroller. The results of the three models are compared and discussed. Fields of application for the introduced modelling approaches are the estimation of the magnitude and time behaviour of the supply current as well as the determination of the number and position of the IC's supply pins.

  7. Efficacy of methylene blue in an experimental model of calcium channel blocker-induced shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, David H; Donovan, Sean; Nelson, Lewis S; Bania, Theodore C; Hoffman, Robert S; Chu, Jason

    2015-04-01

    Calcium channel blocker poisonings account for a substantial number of reported deaths from cardiovascular drugs. Although supportive care is the mainstay of treatment, experimental therapies such as high-dose insulin-euglycemia and lipid emulsion have been studied in animal models and used in humans. In the most severe cases, even aggressive care is inadequate and deaths occur. In both experimental models and clinical cases of vasodilatory shock, methylene blue improves hemodynamic measures. It acts as a nitric oxide scavenger and inhibits guanylate cyclase that is responsible for the production of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). Excessive cGMP production is associated with refractory vasodilatory shock in sepsis and anaphylaxis. The aim of this study is to determine the efficacy of methylene blue in an animal model of amlodipine-induced shock. Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized, ventilated, and instrumented for continuous blood pressure and pulse rate monitoring. The dose of amlodipine that produced death within 60 minutes was 17 mg/kg per hour (LD50). Rats were divided into 2 groups: amlodipine followed by methylene blue or amlodipine followed by normal saline solution, with 15 rats in each group. Rats received methylene blue at 2 mg/kg during 5 minutes or an equivalent amount of normal saline solution in 3 intervals from the start of the protocol: minutes 5, 30, and 60. The animals were observed for a total of 2 hours after the start of the protocol. Mortality risk and survival time were analyzed with Fisher's exact test and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis with the log rank test. Overall, 1 of 15 rats (7%) in the saline solution-treated group survived to 120 minutes compared with 5 of 15 (33%) in the methylene blue-treated group (difference -26%; 95% confidence interval [CI] -54% to 0.3%). The median survival time for the normal saline solution group was 42 minutes (95% CI 28.1 to 55.9 minutes); for the methylene blue group, 109 minutes (95% CI 93.9 to

  8. The Supercritical Pile Model: Prompt Emission Across the Electromagnetic Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazanas, Demos; Mastichiadis, A.

    2008-01-01

    The "Supercritical Pile" GRB model is an economical model that provides the dissipation necessary to convert explosively the energy stored in relativistic protons in the blast wave of a GRB into radiation; at the same time it produces spectra whose luminosity peaks at 1 MeV in the lab frame, the result of the kinematics of the proton-photon - pair production reaction that effects the conversion of proton energy to radiation. We outline the fundamental notions behind the "Supercritical Pile" model and discuss the resulting spectra of the prompt emission from optical to gamma-ray energies of order Gamma^2 m_ec^2, (Gamma is the Lorentz factor of the blast wave) present even in the absence of an accelerated particle distribution and compare our results to bursts that cover this entire energy range. Particular emphasis is given on the emission at the GLAST energy range both in the prompt and the afterglow stages of the burst.

  9. Modeling of near-continuum laminar boundary layer shocks using DSMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumuklu, Ozgur; Levin, Deborah A.; Gimelshein, Sergey F.; Austin, Joanna M.

    2016-11-01

    The hypersonic flow of nitrogen gas over a double wedge was simulated by the DSMC method using two-dimensional and three-dimensional geometries. The numerical results were compared with experiments conducted in the HET facility for a high-enthalpy pure nitrogen flow corresponding to a free stream Mach number of approximately seven. Since the conditions for the double wedge case are near-continuum and surface heat flux and size of the separation are sensitive to DSMC numerical parameters, special attention was paid to the convergence of these parameters for both geometries. At the beginning of the simulation, the separation zone was predicted to be small and the heat flux values for the 2-D model were comparable to the experimental data. However, for increasing time, it was observed that the heat flux values and shock profile strongly deviated from the experiment. Investigation of a three-dimensional model showed that the flow is truly three-dimensional and the side edge pressure relief provides good agreement between simulations and the experiment.

  10. Modeling Wideband Electromagnetic Emission of Compact Intracloud Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydenko, Stanislav; Iudin, Dmitry

    2017-04-01

    -scale breakdown currents. It is shown that HF/VHF emission at the preliminary stage is negligible as compared to the emission at the main stage, when a powerful narrow burst of the high-frequency emission forms. It is shown that the burst of HF/VHF emission correlates well with the initial peak of NBP, and the spectrum of the burst corresponds well to power law with an exponent between -2 and -1. Model results are compared with satellite observations of VHF emission of CID.

  11. Generating emissions and meteorology to model the impacts of biomass burning emissions on regional air quality in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Carter, WS

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Biomass burning is a source category that is often ignored in pollution dispersion modelling simulations. This study presents a unique contribution to the quantification of emissions from biomass burning for high resolution modelling. Previous work...

  12. AN EXTERNAL SHOCK ORIGIN OF GRB 141028A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgess, J. Michael; Bégué, Damien; Ryde, Felix [The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Omodei, Nicola [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Pe’er, Asaf [Physics Department, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Racusin, J. L.; Cucchiara, A., E-mail: jamesb@kth.se, E-mail: damienb@kth.se [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-05-10

    The prompt emission of the long, smooth, and single-pulsed gamma-ray burst, GRB 141028A, is analyzed under the guise of an external shock model. First, we fit the γ -ray spectrum with a two-component photon model, namely, synchrotron+blackbody, and then fit the recovered evolution of the synchrotron νF{sub ν} peak to an analytic model derived considering the emission of a relativistic blast wave expanding into an external medium. The prediction of the model for the νF{sub ν} peak evolution matches well with the observations. We observe the blast wave transitioning into the deceleration phase. Furthermore, we assume the expansion of the blast wave to be nearly adiabatic, motivated by the low magnetic field deduced from the observations. This allows us to recover within an order of magnitude the flux density at the νF{sub ν} peak, which is remarkable considering the simplicity of the analytic model. Under this scenario we argue that the distinction between prompt and afterglow emission is superfluous as both early-time emission and late-time emission emanate from the same source. While the external shock model is clearly not a universal solution, this analysis opens the possibility that at least some fraction of GRBs can be explained with an external shock origin of their prompt phase.

  13. A Recipe for implementing the Arrhenius-Shock-Temperature State Sensitive WSD (AWSD) model, with parameters for PBX 9502

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aslam, Tariq Dennis [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-03

    A reactive ow model for the tri-amino-tri-nitro-benzene (TATB) based plastic bonded explosive PBX 9502 is presented. This newly devised model is based primarily on the shock temperature of the material, along with local pressure, and accurately models a broader range of detonation and initiation scenarios. The equation of state for the reactants and products, as well as the thermodynamic closure of pressure and temperature equilibration are carried over from the Wescott-Stewart-Davis (WSD) model7,8. Thus, modifying an existing WSD model in a hydrocode should be rather straightforward.

  14. A prognostic pollen emissions model for climate models (PECM1.0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, Matthew C.; Steiner, Allison L.

    2017-11-01

    We develop a prognostic model called Pollen Emissions for Climate Models (PECM) for use within regional and global climate models to simulate pollen counts over the seasonal cycle based on geography, vegetation type, and meteorological parameters. Using modern surface pollen count data, empirical relationships between prior-year annual average temperature and pollen season start dates and end dates are developed for deciduous broadleaf trees (Acer, Alnus, Betula, Fraxinus, Morus, Platanus, Populus, Quercus, Ulmus), evergreen needleleaf trees (Cupressaceae, Pinaceae), grasses (Poaceae; C3, C4), and ragweed (Ambrosia). This regression model explains as much as 57 % of the variance in pollen phenological dates, and it is used to create a climate-flexible phenology that can be used to study the response of wind-driven pollen emissions to climate change. The emissions model is evaluated in the Regional Climate Model version 4 (RegCM4) over the continental United States by prescribing an emission potential from PECM and transporting pollen as aerosol tracers. We evaluate two different pollen emissions scenarios in the model using (1) a taxa-specific land cover database, phenology, and emission potential, and (2) a plant functional type (PFT) land cover, phenology, and emission potential. The simulated surface pollen concentrations for both simulations are evaluated against observed surface pollen counts in five climatic subregions. Given prescribed pollen emissions, the RegCM4 simulates observed concentrations within an order of magnitude, although the performance of the simulations in any subregion is strongly related to the land cover representation and the number of observation sites used to create the empirical phenological relationship. The taxa-based model provides a better representation of the phenology of tree-based pollen counts than the PFT-based model; however, we note that the PFT-based version provides a useful and climate-flexible emissions model for the

  15. A prognostic pollen emissions model for climate models (PECM1.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Wozniak

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We develop a prognostic model called Pollen Emissions for Climate Models (PECM for use within regional and global climate models to simulate pollen counts over the seasonal cycle based on geography, vegetation type, and meteorological parameters. Using modern surface pollen count data, empirical relationships between prior-year annual average temperature and pollen season start dates and end dates are developed for deciduous broadleaf trees (Acer, Alnus, Betula, Fraxinus, Morus, Platanus, Populus, Quercus, Ulmus, evergreen needleleaf trees (Cupressaceae, Pinaceae, grasses (Poaceae; C3, C4, and ragweed (Ambrosia. This regression model explains as much as 57 % of the variance in pollen phenological dates, and it is used to create a climate-flexible phenology that can be used to study the response of wind-driven pollen emissions to climate change. The emissions model is evaluated in the Regional Climate Model version 4 (RegCM4 over the continental United States by prescribing an emission potential from PECM and transporting pollen as aerosol tracers. We evaluate two different pollen emissions scenarios in the model using (1 a taxa-specific land cover database, phenology, and emission potential, and (2 a plant functional type (PFT land cover, phenology, and emission potential. The simulated surface pollen concentrations for both simulations are evaluated against observed surface pollen counts in five climatic subregions. Given prescribed pollen emissions, the RegCM4 simulates observed concentrations within an order of magnitude, although the performance of the simulations in any subregion is strongly related to the land cover representation and the number of observation sites used to create the empirical phenological relationship. The taxa-based model provides a better representation of the phenology of tree-based pollen counts than the PFT-based model; however, we note that the PFT-based version provides a useful and climate-flexible emissions

  16. Turbulence Models: Data from Other Experiments: Shock Wave / Turbulent Boundary Layer Flows at High Mach Numbers

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Shock Wave / Turbulent Boundary Layer Flows at High Mach Numbers. This web page provides data from experiments that may be useful for the validation of turbulence...

  17. Comparison of shock-first strategy and cardiopulmonary resuscitation-first strategy in a porcine model of prolonged cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhi-Jun; Li, Chun-Sheng; Yin, Wen-Peng; Hou, Xiao-Min; Gu, Wei; Zhang, Da

    2013-02-01

    The choice of a shock-first or a cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)-first strategy in the treatment of prolonged cardiac arrest (CA) is still controversial. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of these strategies on oxygen metabolism and resuscitation outcomes in a porcine model of 8min CA. Ventricular fibrillation (VF) was electrically induced. After 8min of untreated VF, 24 male inbred Wu-Zhi-Shan miniature pigs were randomized to receive either defibrillation first (ID group) or chest compression first (IC group). In the ID group, a shock was delivered immediately. If the defibrillation attempt failed to attain restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), manual chest compressions were rapidly initiated at a rate of 100compressionsmin(-1), and the compression-to-ventilation ratio was 30:2. If VF persisted after five cycles of CPR, a second defibrillation attempt was made. In the IC group, chest compressions were delivered first, followed by a shock. Hemodynamic variables, the VF waveform and blood gas analysis outcomes were recorded. Oxygen metabolism parameters and the amplitude spectrum area (AMSA) of the VF waveform were computed. There were no significant differences in the rate of ROSC and 24h survival between two groups. The ID group had lower lactic acid levels, higher cardiac output, better oxygen consumption and better oxygen extraction ratio at 4 and 6h after ROSC than the IC group. In a porcine model of prolonged CA, the choice of a shock-first or CPR-first strategy did not affect the rate of ROSC and 24h survival, but the shock-first strategy might result in better hemodynamic status and better oxygen metabolism than the CPR-first strategy at the first 6h after ROSC. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Simulations of the galaxy cluster CIZA J2242.8+5301 - I. Thermal model and shock properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnert, J. M. F.; Beck, A. M.; Dolag, K.; Röttgering, H. J. A.

    2017-11-01

    The giant radio relic in CIZA J2242.8+5301 provides clear evidence of an Mpc-sized shock in a massive merging galaxy cluster. Here, we present idealized SPH hydrodynamical and collisionless dark matter simulations, aiming to find a model that is consistent with that large range of observations of this galaxy cluster. We first show that in the northern shock, the observed radio spectral index profile and integrated radio spectrum are consistent with the observed upstream X-ray temperature. Using simulations, we first find that only a cool-core versus non-cool-core merger can lead to the observed elongated X-ray morphology. We then carry out simulations for two merging clusters assuming a range of NFW and β-model density profiles and hydrostatic equilibrium. We find a fiducial model that mimics the overall morphology of the shock structures, has a total mass of 1.6 × 1015 M⊙ and a mass ratio of 1.76. For this model, the derived Mach number for the northern shock is 4.5. This is almost a factor 2 higher compared to the observational determination of the Mach number using X-ray observations or measurements of the radio injection spectral index. We could not find numerical models that both fit the X-ray properties and yielded such low Mach numbers. We discuss various ways of understanding this difference and argue that deep X-ray observations of CIZA J2242.8+5301 will be able to test our model and reconcile the differences.

  19. Heat Shock Response Associated with Hepatocarcinogenesis in a Murine Model of Hereditary Tyrosinemia Type I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angileri, Francesca; Morrow, Geneviève; Roy, Vincent; Orejuela, Diana; Tanguay, Robert M., E-mail: robert.tanguay@ibis.ulaval.ca [Laboratory of Cell and Developmental Genetics, Department of Molecular Biology, Medical Biochemistry and Pathology, Institut de Biologie Intégrative et des Systèmes (IBIS) and PROTEO, 1030 avenue de la médecine, Université Laval, Québec G1V 0A6 (Canada)

    2014-04-23

    Hereditary Tyrosinemia type 1 (HT1) is a metabolic liver disease caused by genetic defects of fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH), an enzyme necessary to complete the breakdown of tyrosine. The severe hepatic dysfunction caused by the lack of this enzyme is prevented by the therapeutic use of NTBC (2-[2-nitro-4-(trifluoromethyl)benzoyl]cyclohexane-1,3-dione). However despite the treatment, chronic hepatopathy and development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are still observed in some HT1 patients. Growing evidence show the important role of heat shock proteins (HSPs) in many cellular processes and their involvement in pathological diseases including cancer. Their survival-promoting effect by modulation of the apoptotic machinery is often correlated with poor prognosis and resistance to therapy in a number of cancers. Here, we sought to gain insight into the pathophysiological mechanisms associated with liver dysfunction and tumor development in a murine model of HT1. Differential gene expression patterns in livers of mice under HT1 stress, induced by drug retrieval, have shown deregulation of stress and cell death resistance genes. Among them, genes coding for HSPB and HSPA members, and for anti-apoptotic BCL-2 related mitochondrial proteins were associated with the hepatocarcinogenetic process. Our data highlight the variation of stress pathways related to HT1 hepatocarcinogenesis suggesting the role of HSPs in rendering tyrosinemia-affected liver susceptible to the development of HCC.

  20. Integrated modelling approach for the evaluation of low emission zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Daniela; Tchepel, Oxana; Antunes, António Pais

    2016-07-15

    Low emission zones (LEZ) are areas where the most polluting vehicles are restricted or deterred from entering. In recent years, LEZ became a popular option to reduce traffic-related air pollution and have been implemented in many cities worldwide, notably in Europe. However, the evidence about their effectiveness is inconsistent. This calls for the development of tools to evaluate ex-ante the air quality impacts of a LEZ. The integrated modelling approach we propose in this paper aims to respond to this call. It links a transportation model with an emissions model and an air quality model operating over a GIS-based platform. Through the application of the approach, it is possible to estimate the changes induced by the creation of a LEZ applied to private cars with respect to air pollution levels not only inside the LEZ, but also, more generally, in the city where it is located. The usefulness of the proposed approach was demonstrated for a case study involving the city of Coimbra (Portugal), where the creation of a LEZ is being sought to mitigate the air quality problems that its historic centre currently faces. The main result of this study was that PM10 and NO2 emissions from private cars would decrease significantly inside the LEZ (63% and 52%, respectively) but the improvement in air quality would be small and exceedances to the air pollution limits adopted in the European Union would not be fully avoided. In contrast, at city level, total emissions increase and a deterioration of air quality is expected to occur. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Modelling the ArH+ emission from the Crab nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priestley, F. D.; Barlow, M. J.; Viti, S.

    2017-12-01

    We have performed combined photoionization and photodissociation region (PDR) modelling of a Crab nebula filament subjected to the synchrotron radiation from the central pulsar wind nebula, and to a high flux of charged particles; a greatly enhanced cosmic-ray ionization rate over the standard interstellar value, ζ0, is required to account for the lack of detected [C I] emission in published Herschel SPIRE FTS observations of the Crab nebula. The observed line surface brightness ratios of the OH+ and ArH+ transitions seen in the SPIRE FTS frequency range can only be explained with both a high cosmic-ray ionization rate and a reduced ArH+ dissociative recombination rate compared to that used by previous authors, although consistent with experimental upper limits. We find that the ArH+/OH+ line strengths and the observed H2 vibration-rotation emission can be reproduced by model filaments with nH = 2 × 104 cm-3, ζ = 107ζ0 and visual extinctions within the range found for dusty globules in the Crab nebula, although far-infrared emission from [O I] and [C II] is higher than the observational constraints. Models with nH = 1900 cm-3 underpredict the H2 surface brightness, but agree with the ArH+ and OH+ surface brightnesses and predict [O I] and [C II] line ratios consistent with observations. These models predict HeH+ rotational emission above detection thresholds, but consideration of the formation time-scale suggests that the abundance of this molecule in the Crab nebula should be lower than the equilibrium values obtained in our analysis.

  2. Traumatic shock: the fifth shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Maighdlin W; Watson, Gregory A

    2013-01-01

    Although, historically, shock associated with traumatic injury has been evaluated through knowledge of the 4 recognized shock patterns--cardiogenic, obstructive, distributive, and hypovolemic--many trauma practitioners view traumatic shock as a unique fifth shock pattern. Although secondary to a systemic inflammatory response syndrome triggered by endogenous danger signals, traumatic shock represents a unique pathological condition that begins with multiple, usually blunt, trauma and may conclude with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome and death. While varying mechanisms of injury may lead to different presentations of shock and cardiovascular decompensation, a unifying theme of traumatic shock is an overwhelming inflammatory response driven by proinflammatory cytokines, and the downstream results of this cytokine storm including, but not limited to, acute respiratory distress syndrome, coagulopathy, sepsis, and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Treatment is primarily supportive; however, research into novel therapeutics for traumatic shock is ongoing and promises some direction for future care.

  3. Shock Waves in Gas Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolrahman Razani

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Shock wave theory was studied in literature by many authors. This article presents a survey with references about various topics related to shock waves: Hyperbolic conservation laws, Well-posedness theory, Compactness theory, Shock and reaction-diffusion wave, The CJ and ZND theory, Existence of detonation in Majda's model, Premixed laminar flame, Multidimensional gas flows, Multidimensional Riemann problem.

  4. Kinetic modeling in pre-clinical positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntner, Claudia

    2014-12-01

    Pre-clinical positron emission tomography (PET) has evolved in the last few years from pure visualization of radiotracer uptake and distribution towards quantification of the physiological parameters. For reliable and reproducible quantification the kinetic modeling methods used to obtain relevant parameters of radiotracer tissue interaction are important. Here we present different kinetic modeling techniques with a focus on compartmental models including plasma input models and reference tissue input models. The experimental challenges off deriving the plasma input function in rodents and the effect of anesthesia are discussed. Finally, in vivo application of kinetic modeling in various areas of pre-clinical research is presented and compared to human data. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  5. Continuum dislocation-density based models for the dynamic shock response of single-crystal and polycrystalline materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luscher, Darby

    2017-06-01

    The dynamic thermomechanical responses of polycrystalline materials under shock loading are often dominated by the interaction of defects and interfaces. For example, polymer-bonded explosives (PBX) can initiate under weak shock impacts whose energy, if distributed homogeneously throughout the material, translates to temperature increases that are insufficient to drive the rapid chemistry observed. In such cases, heterogeneous thermomechanical interactions at the mesoscale (i.e. between single-crystal and macroscale) lead to the formation of localized hot spots. Within metals, a prescribed deformation associated with a shock wave may be accommodated by crystallographic slip, provided a sufficient population of mobile dislocations is available. However, if the deformation rate is large enough, there may be an insufficient number of freely mobile dislocations. In these cases, additional dislocations may be nucleated, or alternate mechanisms (e.g. twinning, damage) activated in order to accommodate the deformation. Direct numerical simulation at the mesoscale offers insight into these physical processes that can be invaluable to the development of macroscale constitutive theories, if the mesoscale models adequately represent the anisotropic nonlinear thermomechanical response of individual crystals and their interfaces. This talk will briefly outline a continuum mesoscale modeling framework founded upon local and nonlocal variations of dislocation-density based crystal plasticity theory. The nonlocal theory couples continuum dislocation transport with the local theory. In the latter, dislocation transport is modeled by enforcing dislocation conservation at a slip-system level through the solution of advection-diffusion equations. The configuration of geometrically necessary dislocation density gives rise to a back-stress that inhibits or accentuates the flow of dislocations. Development of the local theory and application to modeling the explosive molecular crystal

  6. A generalised model for traffic induced road dust emissions. Model description and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Janne; Denby, Bruce

    2011-07-01

    This paper concerns the development and evaluation of a new and generalised road dust emission model. Most of today's road dust emission models are based on local measurements and/or contain empirical emission factors that are specific for a given road environment. In this study, a more generalised road dust emission model is presented and evaluated. We have based the emissions on road, tyre and brake wear rates and used the mass balance concept to describe the build-up of road dust on the road surface and road shoulder. The model separates the emissions into a direct part and a resuspension part, and treats the road surface and road shoulder as two different sources. We tested the model under idealized conditions as well as on two datasets in and just outside of Oslo in Norway during the studded tyre season. We found that the model reproduced the observed increase in road dust emissions directly after drying of the road surface. The time scale for the build-up of road dust on the road surface is less than an hour for medium to heavy traffic density. The model performs well for temperatures above 0 °C and less well during colder periods. Since the model does not yet include salting as an additional mass source, underestimations are evident under dry periods with temperatures around 0 °C, under which salting occurs. The model overestimates the measured PM 10 (particulate matter less than 10 μm in diameter) concentrations under heavy precipitation events since the model does not take the amount of precipitation into account. There is a strong sensitivity of the modelled emissions to the road surface conditions and the current parameterisations of the effect of precipitation, runoff and evaporation seem inadequate.

  7. Modelling of pesticide emissions for Life Cycle Inventory analysis: Model development, applications and implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dijkman, Teunis Johannes

    implications for the comparison of toxicity impacts between conventional and organic agriculture. However, the difference in pesticide use and the corresponding environmental impacts is only one of the many aspects that are relevant to assess when discussing sustainability of both types of agriculture......, pesticide emissions to surface water calculated by PestLCI 2.0 were generally higher, which was attributed to differences in the modelling approach between the two models. The model comparison for emissions to groundwater showed that PestLCI 2.0 calculated higher emissions than FOCUSPEARL 4.4.4 (modelling...... chromatographic flow of water through the soil), which was attributed to the omission of emissions via macropore flow in the latter model. The comparison was complicated by the fact that the scenarios used were not fully identical. In order to quantify the implications of using PestLCI 2.0, human toxicity...

  8. A Novel mouse model of enhanced proteostasis: Full-length human heat shock factor 1 transgenic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Anson, E-mail: piercea2@uthscsa.edu [Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, 78229 (United States); Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, 78229 (United States); The Department of Veteran' s Affairs, South Texas Veterans Health Care System, San Antonio, Texas, 78284 (United States); Wei, Rochelle; Halade, Dipti [Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, 78229 (United States); Yoo, Si-Eun [Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, 78229 (United States); Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, 78229 (United States); Ran, Qitao; Richardson, Arlan [Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, 78229 (United States); Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, 78229 (United States); The Department of Veteran' s Affairs, South Texas Veterans Health Care System, San Antonio, Texas, 78284 (United States)

    2010-11-05

    Research highlights: {yields} Development of mouse overexpressing native human HSF1 in all tissues including CNS. {yields} HSF1 overexpression enhances heat shock response at whole-animal and cellular level. {yields} HSF1 overexpression protects from polyglutamine toxicity and favors aggresomes. {yields} HSF1 overexpression enhances proteostasis at the whole-animal and cellular level. -- Abstract: The heat shock response (HSR) is controlled by the master transcriptional regulator heat shock factor 1 (HSF1). HSF1 maintains proteostasis and resistance to stress through production of heat shock proteins (HSPs). No transgenic model exists that overexpresses HSF1 in tissues of the central nervous system (CNS). We generated a transgenic mouse overexpressing full-length non-mutant HSF1 and observed a 2-4-fold increase in HSF1 mRNA and protein expression in all tissues studied of HSF1 transgenic (HSF1{sup +/0}) mice compared to wild type (WT) littermates, including several regions of the CNS. Basal expression of HSP70 and 90 showed only mild tissue-specific changes; however, in response to forced exercise, the skeletal muscle HSR was more elevated in HSF1{sup +/0} mice compared to WT littermates and in fibroblasts following heat shock, as indicated by levels of inducible HSP70 mRNA and protein. HSF1{sup +/0} cells elicited a significantly more robust HSR in response to expression of the 82 repeat polyglutamine-YFP fusion construct (Q82YFP) and maintained proteasome-dependent processing of Q82YFP compared to WT fibroblasts. Overexpression of HSF1 was associated with fewer, but larger Q82YFP aggregates resembling aggresomes in HSF1{sup +/0} cells, and increased viability. Therefore, our data demonstrate that tissues and cells from mice overexpressing full-length non-mutant HSF1 exhibit enhanced proteostasis.

  9. N-Acetylcysteine and Desferoxamine Reduce Pulmonary Oxidative Stress Caused by Hemorrhagic Shock in a Porcine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Alexandra; Staikou, Chryssoula; Karmaniolou, Iosifina; Orfanos, Nikolaos; Mylonas, Anastassios; Nomikos, Tzortzis; Pafiti, Agathi; Papalois, Apostolos; Arkadopoulos, Nikolaos; Smyrniotis, Vassilios; Theodoraki, Kassiani

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the pulmonary oxidative stress and possible protective effect of N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) and Desferoxamine (DFX)in a porcine model subjected to hemorrhagic shock. Twenty-one pigs were randomly allocated to Group-A (sham, n = 5), Group-B (fluid resuscitation, n = 8) and Group-C (fluid, NAC and DFX resuscitation, n = 8). Groups B and C were subjected to a 40-min shock period induced by liver trauma, followed by a 60-min resuscitation period. During shock, the mean arterial pressure (MAP) was maintained at 30-40 mmHg. Resuscitation consisted of crystalloids (35 mL/kg) and colloids (18 mL/kg) targeting to MAP normalization (baseline values ± 10%). In addition, Group-C received pretreatment with NAC 200 mg/kg plus DFX 2 g as intravenous infusions. Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances (TBARS), protein carbonyls and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity were determined in lung tissue homogenates. Also, histological examination of pulmonary tissue specimens was performed. TBARS were higher in Group-B than in Group-A or Group-C: 2.90 ± 0.47, 0.57 ± 0.10, 1.78 ± 0.47 pmol/μg protein, respectively (p 0.05). GPx activity did not differ significantly between the three groups (p > 0.05). Lung histology was improved in Group-C versus Group-B, with less alveolar collapse, interstitial edema and inflammation. NAC plus DFX prevented the increase of pulmonary oxidative stress markers and protein damage after resuscitated hemorrhagic shock and had beneficial effect on lung histology. NAC/DFX combination may be used in the multimodal treatment of hemorrhagic shock, since it may significantly prevent free radical injury in the lung.

  10. AN APPROACH TO A UNIFIED PROCESS-BASED REGIONAL EMISSION FLUX MODELING PLATFORM

    Science.gov (United States)

    The trend towards episodic modeling of environmentally-dependent emissions is increasing, with models available or under development for dust, ammonia, biogenic volatile organic compounds, soil nitrous oxide, pesticides, sea salt, and chloride, mercury, and wildfire emissions. T...

  11. Modeling the Dust Infrared Emission from Nearby Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Aigen; Draine, Bruce

    2005-06-01

    Based on the silicate-graphite-PAHs interstellar grain model, we propose to model the dust IR emission from nearby galaxies obtained by Spitzer on a pixel-by-pixel basis. The dust, consisting of a mixture of silicate grains and carbonaceous grains (graphite and PAHs) and spanning a wide range of sizes from a few angstroms to a few micrometers, is heated by starlight with a range of intensities in each pixel. By fitting the IRAC, MIPS photometry and IRS spectroscopy of each pixel, we will be able (1) to determine the spatial distribution of dust, the spatial distribution of starlight intensity, and the regional variation of the PAH abundance and properties within a galaxy, (2) to see how the dust mass and the abundance and properties of the PAHs vary from galaxy to galaxy, and (3) to relate the dust mass and the PAH abundance and properties with environmental conditions and galaxy type. We will calculate the temperature probability distribution functions for small grains (neutral PAHs and charged PAHs; silicate and graphite grains smaller than 250 Angstrom), as well as the steady temperatures of large graphite and silicate grains, for a wide range of sizes, exposed to starlight of a wide range of intensities and of a wide range of spectral shapes. We will build a ``library'' of temperature probability distribution functions and model IR emission spectra for each grain species of each grain size, heated by each starlight intensity of each starlight spectrum. This ``library'' will be made available to the astronomical community on WWW at http://www.astro.princeton.edu/~draine/dust/dust.html. This ``library'' will be very useful for interpreting the IR emission data (particularly the PAH emission features) obtained by Spitzer for both Galactic and extragalactic objects.

  12. Model evaluation of marine primary organic aerosol emission schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gantt

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, several marine primary organic aerosol (POA emission schemes have been evaluated using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model in order to provide guidance for their implementation in air quality and climate models. These emission schemes, based on varying dependencies of chlorophyll a concentration ([chl a] and 10 m wind speed (U10, have large differences in their magnitude, spatial distribution, and seasonality. Model comparison with weekly and monthly mean values of the organic aerosol mass concentration at two coastal sites shows that the source function exclusively related to [chl a] does a better job replicating surface observations. Sensitivity simulations in which the negative U10 and positive [chl a] dependence of the organic mass fraction of sea spray aerosol are enhanced show improved prediction of the seasonality of the marine POA concentrations. A top-down estimate of submicron marine POA emissions based on the parameterization that compares best to the observed weekly and monthly mean values of marine organic aerosol surface concentrations has a global average emission rate of 6.3 Tg yr−1. Evaluation of existing marine POA source functions against a case study during which marine POA contributed the major fraction of submicron aerosol mass shows that none of the existing parameterizations are able to reproduce the hourly-averaged observations. Our calculations suggest that in order to capture episodic events and short-term variability in submicron marine POA concentration over the ocean, new source functions need to be developed that are grounded in the physical processes unique to the organic fraction of sea spray aerosol.

  13. Modeling methane emissions by cattle production systems in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelan-Ortega, O. A.; Ku Vera, J.; Molina, L. T.

    2013-12-01

    Methane emissions from livestock is one of the largest sources of methane in Mexico. The purpose of the present paper is to provide a realistic estimate of the national inventory of methane produced by the enteric fermentation of cattle, based on an integrated simulation model, and to provide estimates of CH4 produced by cattle fed typical diets from the tropical and temperate climates of Mexico. The Mexican cattle population of 23.3 million heads was divided in two groups. The first group (7.8 million heads), represents cattle of the tropical climate regions. The second group (15.5 million heads), are the cattle in the temperate climate regions. This approach allows incorporating the effect of diet on CH4 production into the analysis because the quality of forages is lower in the tropics than in temperate regions. Cattle population in every group was subdivided into two categories: cows (COW) and other type of cattle (OTHE), which included calves, heifers, steers and bulls. The daily CH4 production by each category of animal along an average production cycle of 365 days was simulated, instead of using a default emission factor as in Tier 1 approach. Daily milk yield, live weight changes associated with the lactation, and dry matter intake, were simulated for the entire production cycle. The Moe and Tyrrell (1979) model was used to simulate CH4 production for the COW category, the linear model of Mills et al. (2003) for the OTHE category in temperate regions and the Kurihara et al. (1999) model for the OTHE category in the tropical regions as it has been developed for cattle fed tropical diets. All models were integrated with a cow submodel to form an Integrated Simulation Model (ISM). The AFRC (1993) equations and the lactation curve model of Morant and Gnanasakthy (1989) were used to construct the cow submodel. The ISM simulates on a daily basis the CH4 production, milk yield, live weight changes associated with lactation and dry matter intake. The total daily CH

  14. Splenectomy Versus Sham Splenectomy in a Swine Model of Controlled Hemorrhagic Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boysen, Søren R; Caulkett, Nigel A; Brookfield, Caroline E; Warren, Amy; Pang, Jessica M

    2016-10-01

    Splenectomy is controversial in acute hemorrhagic shock models. To compare splenectomized (SP) versus sham-splenectomized (SSP) swine during acute controlled hemorrhage. Twenty-six male Landrace White swine (mean body weight ± standard deviation, 33.8 ± 2.9 kg) were used. Ethics approval was obtained. Landrace swine underwent splenectomy (n = 13) or sham-splenectomy (n = 13), were bled to mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) of 40 mm Hg, which was held for 60 min, given 125 mL IV RescueFlow, held for a further 60 min, given whole blood, and held for a final 60 min. Tissue oxygen saturation, thromboelastography, oncotic pressure, urine volume and specific gravity, complete blood count, serum chemistry, body temperature, hematocrit, total solids, arterial and mixed venous blood gas, bispectral index, SAP, MAP, DAP, cardiac index, total blood volume (TBV) removed and returned, rate of hemorrhage and transfusion, spleen weight, heart rate (HR), arterial pH, lactate, PaO2, PaCO2, respiratory rate, cranial mesenteric and renal artery blood flow were recorded. Groups were compared using two-way ANOVA with post hoc Bonferroni (P splenectomy for the duration of the experiment (P splenectomy (P Splenectomy likely accounts for the transient increase in hematocrit and the higher HR in SP swine prior to hemorrhage, and the differences in TBV removed between the two groups during hemorrhage. With a fixed end point model using a moderate rate of acute hemorrhage and an MAP of 40 mm Hg, splenectomy is not necessary and may confound results.

  15. PSR B2111+46: a test of the inverse Compton scattering model of radio emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H.; Qiao, G. J.; Han, J. L.; Lee, K. J.; Wang, H. G.

    2007-04-01

    The region in which pulsars radiate is very important to constrain pulsar emission mechanisms. A three-dimensional (3D) method to calculate emission heights is developed in this paper. As an example, radiation regions for different components at different frequencies have been calculated for PSR B2111+46. Emission components at seven frequencies are fitted with Gaussian components, then the radiation heights for emission components are calculated. We found that different emission components, even if at the same radio frequency, are radiated from different heights. This is probably a common phenomena and challenges any emission mechanisms. The inverse Compton scattering emission model for pulsar radio emission can explain these results well.

  16. Impact of transport model errors on the global and regional methane emissions estimated by inverse modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Locatelli, R.; Bousquet, P.; Chevallier, F.; Fortems-Cheney, A.; Szopa, S.; Saunois, M.; Agusti-Panareda, A.; Bergmann, D.; Bian, H.; Cameron-Smith, P.; Chipperfield, M.P.; Gloor, E.; Houweling, S.; Kawa, S.R.; Krol, M.C.; Patra, P.K.; Prinn, R.G.; Rigby, M.; Saito, R.; Wilson, C.

    2013-01-01

    A modelling experiment has been conceived to assess the impact of transport model errors on methane emissions estimated in an atmospheric inversion system. Synthetic methane observations, obtained from 10 different model outputs from the international TransCom-CH4 model inter-comparison exercise,

  17. Energy demand modelling and GHG emission reduction: case study Croatia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pukšec, Tomislav; Mathiesen, Brian Vad; Novosel, Tomislav

    2013-01-01

    and develop new energy policy towards energy efficiency and renewable energy sources, in order to comply with all of the presented tasks. Planning future energy demand, considering various policy options like regulation, fiscal and financial measures, becomes one of the crucial issues of future national...... energy strategy. This paper analyses Croatian long term energy demand and its effect on the future national GHG emissions. For that purpose the national energy demand model was constructed (NeD model). The model is comprised out of six modules each representing one sector, following Croatian national...... energy balance; industry, transport, households, services, agriculture and construction. For three of the modules (industry, transport and households) previously developed long term energy demand models were used, while for the remaining three new models were constructed. As an additional feature, new...

  18. Wind Magnetic Clouds for 2010-2012: Model Parameter Fittings, Associated Shock Waves, and Comparisons to Earlier Periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepping, R. P.; Wu, C.-C.; Berdichevsky, D. B.; Szabo, A.

    2015-01-01

    We fitted the parameters of magnetic clouds (MCs) as identified in the Wind spacecraft data from early 2010 to the end of 2012 using the model of Lepping, Jones, and Burlaga (J. Geophys. Res. 95, 1195, 1990). The interval contains 48 MCs and 39 magnetic cloud-like (MCL) events. This work is a continuation of MC model fittings of the earlier Wind sets, including those in a recent publication, which covers 2007 to 2009. This period (2010 - 2012) mainly covers the maximum portion of Solar Cycle 24. Between the previous and current interval, we document 5.7 years of MCs observations. For this interval, the occurrence frequency of MCs markedly increased in the last third of the time. In addition, over approximately the last six years, the MC type (i.e. the profile of the magnetic-field direction within an MC, such as North-to-South, South-to-North, all South) dramatically evolved to mainly North-to-South types when compared to earlier years. Furthermore, this evolution of MC type is consistent with global solar magnetic-field changes predicted by Bothmer and Rust (Coronal Mass Ejections, 139, 1997). Model fit parameters for the MCs are listed for 2010 - 2012. For the 5.7 year interval, the observed MCs are found to be slower, weaker in estimated axial magnetic-field intensity, and shorter in duration than those of the earlier 12.3 years, yielding much lower axial magnetic-field fluxes. For about the first half of this 5.7 year period, i.e. up to the end of 2009, there were very few associated MC-driven shock waves (distinctly fewer than the long-term average of about 50 % of MCs). But since 2010, such driven shocks have increased markedly, reflecting similar statistics as the long-term averages. We estimate that 56 % of the total observed MCs have upstream shocks when the full interval of 1995 - 2012 is considered. However, only 28 % of the total number of MCLs have driven shocks over the same period. Some interplanetary shocks during the 2010 - 2012 interval are seen

  19. Comparing emission inventories and model-ready emission datasets between Europe and North America for the AQMEII project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouliot, G.; Pierce, T.; Denier van der Gon, H.; Schaap, M.; Moran, M.; Nopmongcol, U.

    2012-01-01

    This paper highlights the similarities and differences in how emission inventories and datasets were developed and processed across North America and Europe for the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII) project and then characterizes the emissions for the two domains. We

  20. Modeling Air Pollution in Beijing: Emission Reduction vs. Meteorological Influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risse, Eicke-Alexander; Hao, Nan; Trautmann, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    This case study uses the Chemical Transport Model WRF-Chem to simulate and measure the efficiency of temporal large-scale emission reductions under different meteorological conditions. The Nov. 2014 Asian Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit provides a unique opportunity for this study due to the extraordinarily good and well-measured air quality which is believed to be induced by intense emission- reduction measures by the Chinese government. Four cases are simulated to inter-compare between favorable und unfavorablemeteorological conditions (in terms of air quality) as well as reduced and non-reduced emissions. Key variables of the simulation results are evaluated against AERONET measurements of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) and air-quality measurements by the Chinese Ministry of Environment (CME). The inter-comparison is then performed on time- and volume-averaged total concentrations of the key variables Nitrogenous Oxide (NOx) and Particulate Matter (PM2.5 and PM10).The simulation settings and some important facts about the model are shown in table 1.

  1. Modeling of Acoustic Emission Signal Propagation in Waveguides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea-Manuela Zelenyak

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic emission (AE testing is a widely used nondestructive testing (NDT method to investigate material failure. When environmental conditions are harmful for the operation of the sensors, waveguides are typically mounted in between the inspected structure and the sensor. Such waveguides can be built from different materials or have different designs in accordance with the experimental needs. All these variations can cause changes in the acoustic emission signals in terms of modal conversion, additional attenuation or shift in frequency content. A finite element method (FEM was used to model acoustic emission signal propagation in an aluminum plate with an attached waveguide and was validated against experimental data. The geometry of the waveguide is systematically changed by varying the radius and height to investigate the influence on the detected signals. Different waveguide materials were implemented and change of material properties as function of temperature were taken into account. Development of the option of modeling different waveguide options replaces the time consuming and expensive trial and error alternative of experiments. Thus, the aim of this research has important implications for those who use waveguides for AE testing.

  2. Hemorrhagic shock-induced endothelial cell activation in a spontaneous breathing and a mechanical ventilation hemorrhagic shock model is induced by a proinflammatory response and not by hypoxia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meurs, M. van; Wulfert, F.M.; Jongman, R.M.; Schipper, M.; Houwertjes, M.C.; Vaneker, M.; Scheffer, G.J.; Teppema, L.J.; Aarts, L.P.; Heeringa, P.; Zijlstra, J.G.; Molema, G.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The interaction between neutrophils and activated endothelium is essential for the development of multiple organ dysfunction in patients with hemorrhagic shock (HS). Mechanical ventilation frequently is used in patients with HS. The authors sought to investigate the consequences of

  3. Hemorrhagic Shock-induced Endothelial Cell Activation in a Spontaneous Breathing and a Mechanical Ventilation Hemorrhagic Shock Model Is Induced by a Proinflammatory Response and Not by Hypoxia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meurs, Matijs; Wulfert, Francis M.; Jongman, Rianne M.; Schipper, Martin; Houwertjes, Martin C.; Vaneker, Michiel; Scheffer, Gert Jan; Teppema, Luc J.; Aarts, Leon P. H. J.; Heeringa, Peter; Zijlstra, Jan G.; Molema, Grietje

    Introduction: The interaction between neutrophils and activated endothelium is essential for the development of multiple organ dysfunction in patients with hemorrhagic shock (HS). Mechanical ventilation frequently is used in patients with HS. The authors sought to investigate the consequences of

  4. Molecular modeling of transmembrane delivery of paclitaxel by shock waves with nanobubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xue-mei; Yuan, Bing; Zhang, Xian-ren; Yang, Kai; Ma, Yu-qiang

    2017-01-01

    The development of advanced delivery strategies for anticancer drugs that can permeate through cellular membranes is urgently required for biomedical applications. In this work, we investigated the dynamic transmembrane behavior of paclitaxel (PTX), a powerful anticancer drug, under the combined impact of shock waves and nanobubbles, by using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. Our simulations show that the PTX molecule experiences complicated motion modes during the action process with the membrane, as a consequence of its interplay with the lipid bilayer and water, under the joint effect of the shock wave and nanobubble. Moreover, it was found that the transmembrane movement of PTX is closely associated with the conformation changes of PTX, as well as the structural changes of the membrane (e.g., compression and poration in membrane). The nanobubble collapse induced by the shock wave, the proper PTX location with respect to the nanobubble, and a suitable nanobubble size and shock impulse are all necessary for the delivery of PTX into the cell. This work provides a molecular understanding of the interaction mechanism between drug molecules and cell membranes under the influence of shock waves and nanobubbles, and paves the way for exploiting targeted drug delivery systems that combine nanobubbles and ultrasound.

  5. Model of automobile emission checking by wireless technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikumar, R; Sivasundhararaja, D; Kumar, R Anand

    2010-07-01

    Air contains a lot of pollutants and most of these pollutants are toxic. Carbon monoxide (CO) is one of the five primary pollutants, which together contributes more than 90% of global atmospheric pollution. Therefore, CO has been chosen for this analytical study. The main source of CO is the exhaust from automobiles only. In the present situation, the usage of motor vehicles rapidly expanded. The number of vehicles cannot be reduced but their emission (which is a cause for pollution) can be effectively controlled. In this direction, a model has been developed in this study to sense the level of carbon monoxide emitted from the automobiles. When the exhaust reaches a harmful level it sends the data about the vehicle number and the concentration of CO to the emission-testing centre (PC). As a result the government can take necessary action to seize the particular vehicle emitting more carbon monoxide than the permitted level.

  6. Modeling coherent cherenkov radio emissions from high energy electromagnetic showers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoessow, P.

    1998-04-24

    A technique currently under study for the detection of ultrahigh energy cosmic ray neutrinos involves the measurement of radio emissions from the electromagnetic shower generated by the neutrino in a large volume of naturally occurring dielectric such as the Antarctic ice cap or salt domes. The formation of an electron excess in the shower leads to the emission of coherent Cherenkov radiation, an effect similar to the generation of wakefields in dielectric loaded structures. We have used the finite difference time domain (FDTD) wakefield code ARRAKIS to model coherent Cherenkov radiation fields from high energy showers; we present as an example calculations of expected signals in a proof of principle experiment proposed for the Fermilab Main Injector.

  7. A process based model for methane emission predictions from flooded rice paddies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodegom, van P.M.; Wassmann, R.; Metra-Corton, T.M.

    2001-01-01

    Estimation and prediction of methane emission from flooded rice paddies is impaired by the large spatial and temporal variability in methane emissions and by the dynamic nonlinear relations between processes underlying methane emissions. This paper describes a process-based model on methane emission

  8. 40 CFR 86.410-90 - Emission standards for 1990 and later model year motorcycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... model year motorcycles. 86.410-90 Section 86.410-90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... ENGINES Emission Regulations for 1978 and Later New Motorcycles, General Provisions § 86.410-90 Emission standards for 1990 and later model year motorcycles. (a)(1) Exhaust emissions from 1990 and later model year...

  9. Instabilities and Turbulence in a Cygnus Loop Shock Front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, John

    2017-08-01

    The [O III] emission in old supernova remnants takes the form of long, crisp filaments, while the H alpha and [S II] emission is frothy and clumpy. That indicates that instabilities in cooling gas behind the shock produce strong turbulence. This very rapid generation of turbulence is not considered in the picture of global turbulence in the ISM, and it amplifies magnetic fields and boosts the energy of cosmic rays. It can also affect the overall emission spectrum of the shocked gas in ways not considered in the 1D models used to interpret spectra of SNRs, HH objects and AGN. We propose to quantify and understand the mechanism for generating turbulence by obtaining narrow band WFC3 images and STIS UV and optical spectra to complement an existing Heritage mosaic of WFC3 images of the western Cygnus Loop (Veil Nebula). This is a unique opportunity to fully characterize the post-shock flow in a supernova remnant shock because the Cygnus Loop is nearby and nearly unreddened. It is crucial both for the understanding of turbulence and for interpreting the spectra of unresolved shocks in more distant SNRs, in AGN and in HH objects.

  10. Vorticity transport in shock driven plasma flows: A comparison of MHD and two-fluid models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Daryl; Wheatley, Vincent; Pullin, Dale; Samtaney, Ravi

    2015-11-01

    Suppression of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in a plasma, through the application of a seed magnetic field, has been studied in the framework of ideal magnetohydrodymanics. These studies have shown that suppression is achieved through the transport of vorticity by magnetohydrodynamic waves away from a perturbed fluid-fluid interface where it was baroclinically generated by shock impact. The implementation of a more physically accurate, fully electromagnetic, two-fluid plasma representation allows a more realistic investigation of vorticity transport in shock driven plasma flows. Results comparing ideal one-dimensional two-fluid and magnetohydrodymanic flows are presented. Substantial increases in the complexity of the flow field and vorticity transport dynamics are observed with important ramifications for the stabilization of shock driven interfaces. This work was partially supported by the KAUST Office of Sponsored Research under Award URF/1/2162-01.

  11. An improved model for estimating pesticide emissions for agricultural LCA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dijkman, Teunis Johannes; Birkved, Morten; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2011-01-01

    , and thus the initial leaching rate of pesticide through preferential flow. A third improvement of the updated model is a simplified user interface which makes the model easier to evaluate and operate. The updated PestLCI model is demonstrated on cases involving different climatic circumstances...... products, off-target pesticide emissions need to be quantified as accurately as possible because of the considerable toxicity effects associated with chemicals designed to have a high impact on biological organisms like for example insects or weed plants. PestLCI was developed to estimate the fractions...... of the applied pesticide that is emitted from a field to the surrounding environmental compartments: air, surface water, and ground water. However, the applicability of the model has been limited to 1 typical Danish soil type and 1 climatic profile obtained from the national Danish meteorological station...

  12. Relativistic jet with shock waves like model of superluminal radio source. Jet relativista con ondas de choque como modelo de radio fuentes superluminales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberdi, A.; Gomez, J.L.; Marcaide, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    The structure of the compact radio sources at milliarcsecond angular resolution can be explained in terms of shock waves propagating along bent jets. These jets consist of narrow-angle cones of plasma flowing at bulk relativistic velocities, within tangled magnetic fields, emitting synchrotron radiation. We have developed a numerical code which solves the synchrotron radiation transfer equations to compute the total and polarized emission of bent shocked relativistic jets, and we have applied it to reproduce the compact structure, kenimatic evolution and time flux density evolution of the superluminal radio source 4C 39.25 and to obtain its jet physical parameters. (Author) 23 ref.

  13. Constraints on pulsed emission model for repeating FRB 121102

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisaka, Shota; Enoto, Teruaki; Shibata, Shinpei

    2017-12-01

    Recent localization of the repeating fast radio burst (FRB) 121102 revealed the distance of its host galaxy and luminosities of the bursts. We investigated constraints on the young neutron star (NS) model, that (a) the FRB intrinsic luminosity is supported by the spin-down energy, and (b) the FRB duration is shorter than the NS rotation period. In the case of a circular cone emission geometry, conditions (a) and (b) determine the NS parameters within very small ranges, compared with that from only condition (a) discussed in previous works. Anisotropy of the pulsed emission does not affect the area of the allowed parameter region by virtue of condition (b). The determined parameters are consistent with those independently limited by the properties of the possible persistent radio counterpart and the circumburst environments such as surrounding materials. Since the NS in the allowed parameter region is older than the spin-down timescale, the hypothetical GRP (giant radio pulse)-like model expects a rapid radio flux decay of ≲1 Jy within a few years as the spin-down luminosity decreases. The continuous monitoring will provide constraints on the young NS models. If no flux evolution is seen, we need to consider an alternative model, e.g., the magnetically powered flare.

  14. Large Scale Earth's Bow Shock with Northern IMF as simulated by PIC code in parallel with MHD model

    CERN Document Server

    Baraka, Suleiman M

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a 3D kinetic model (Particle-in-Cell PIC ) for the description of the large scale Earth's bow shock. The proposed version is stable and does not require huge or extensive computer resources. Because PIC simulations work with scaled plasma and field parameters, we also propose to validate our code by comparing its results with the available MHD simulations under same scaled Solar wind ( SW ) and ( IMF ) conditions. We report new results from the two models. In both codes the Earth's bow shock position is found to be ~14.8 RE along the Sun-Earth line, and ~ 29 RE on the dusk side. Those findings are consistent with past in situ observations. Both simulations reproduce the theoretical jump conditions at the shock. However, the PIC code density and temperature distributions are inflated and slightly shifted sunward when compared to the MHD results. Kinetic electron motions and reflected ions upstream may cause this sunward shift. Species distributions in the foreshock region are depicted...

  15. On the high-temperature combustion of n-butanol: Shock tube data and an improved kinetic model

    KAUST Repository

    Vasu, Subith S.

    2013-11-21

    The combustion of n-butanol has received significant interest in recent years, because of its potential use in transportation applications. Researchers have extensively studied its combustion chemistry, using both experimental and theoretical methods; however, additional work is needed under specific conditions to improve our understanding of n-butanol combustion. In this study, we report new OH time-history data during the high-temperature oxidation of n-butanol behind reflected shock waves over the temperature range of 1300-1550 K and at pressures near 2 atm. These data were obtained at Stanford University, using narrow-line-width ring dye laser absorption of the R1(5) line of OH near 306.7 nm. Measured OH time histories were modeled using comprehensive n-butanol literature mechanisms. It was found that n-butanol unimolecular decomposition rate constants commonly used in chemical kinetic models, as well as those determined from theoretical studies, are unable to predict the data presented herein. Therefore, an improved high-temperature mechanism is presented here, which incorporates recently reported rate constants measured in a single pulse shock tube [C. M. Rosado-Reyes and W. Tsang, J. Phys. Chem. A 2012, 116, 9825-9831]. Discussions are presented on the validity of the proposed mechanism against other literature shock tube experiments. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  16. Biology of the Heat Shock Response and Protein Chaperones: Budding Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) as a Model System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verghese, Jacob; Abrams, Jennifer; Wang, Yanyu

    2012-01-01

    Summary: The eukaryotic heat shock response is an ancient and highly conserved transcriptional program that results in the immediate synthesis of a battery of cytoprotective genes in the presence of thermal and other environmental stresses. Many of these genes encode molecular chaperones, powerful protein remodelers with the capacity to shield, fold, or unfold substrates in a context-dependent manner. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae continues to be an invaluable model for driving the discovery of regulatory features of this fundamental stress response. In addition, budding yeast has been an outstanding model system to elucidate the cell biology of protein chaperones and their organization into functional networks. In this review, we evaluate our understanding of the multifaceted response to heat shock. In addition, the chaperone complement of the cytosol is compared to those of mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum, organelles with their own unique protein homeostasis milieus. Finally, we examine recent advances in the understanding of the roles of protein chaperones and the heat shock response in pathogenic fungi, which is being accelerated by the wealth of information gained for budding yeast. PMID:22688810

  17. Three-dimensional, time-dependent, MHD model of a solar flare-generated interplanetary shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryer, M.; Wu, S. T.; Han, S. M.

    1986-01-01

    A three-dimensional time-dependent MHD model of the propagation of an interplanetary shock wave into an ambient three-dimensional heliospheric solar wind is initialized with a peak velocity of 1000 km/s at the center of a right circular cone of 18 deg included angle at 18 solar radii. Differences from a previous 2-1/2 simulation (Wu et al., 1983; Gislason et al., 1984; Dryer et al., 1984) include diminuation of the solar peak velocity and concentration of the peak density at each radius. The IMF magnitude starts with high-latitude peaks, and helical-like IMF rotation is noted due to a large-amplitude nonlinear Alfven wave in the shocked plasma.

  18. An External Shock Origin of GRB 141028A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Michael; Bégué, Damien

    2016-07-01

    The prompt emission of the long, smooth, and single-pulsed gamma-ray burst, GRB 141028A, is analyzed under the guise of an external shock model. First, we fit the γ-ray spectrum with a two-component photon model, namely synchrotron+blackbody, and then fit the recovered evolution of the synchrotron ν F_{ν} peak to an analytic model derived considering the emission of a relativistic blast-wave expanding into an external medium. The prediction of the model for the ν F_{ν} peak evolution matches well with the observations. We observe the blast-wave transitioning into the deceleration phase. Further we assume the expansion of the magnetic field deduced from the observations. This allows us to recover within an order of magnitude the flux density at the ν F_{ν} peak, which is remarkable considering the simplicity of the analytic model. Under this scenario we argue that the distinction between prompt and afterglow emission is superfluous as both early and late time emission emanate from the same source. While the external shock model is clearly not a universal solution, this analysis opens the possibility that at least some fraction of GRBs can be explained with an external shock origin of their prompt phase.

  19. Modeling RF Emissions from Particle Showers in Dense Mediums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyneman, Rachel; Belov, Konstantin; Wissel, Stephanie

    2014-03-01

    The Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) experiment has recorded multiple Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray (UHECR) events via radio-frequency emissions from secondary particle showers in the Earth's atmosphere. The energy of these UHECR particles is reconstructed using Monte Carlo simulations based on first principles. The goal of the SLAC T-510 experiment is to validate these simulations and to provide an energy calibration for ANITA data analysis. We incorporated an RF emission simulation based on ZHS code into the GEANT4 toolkit, used for modeling the passage of particles in accelerator experiments. We predict strong radio emissions at the Cherenkov angle from a cascade of secondary particles in a polyethylene target in moderate magnetic fields. We see a strong dependence of the horizontally polarized component of the electric field on top of the Cherenkov cone on the magnetic field strength. We also observe a skewing of the Cherenkov cone as the magnetic field increases, which we believe to be an indication of the Askaryan effect. Special thanks to the National Science Foundation and the Research Experience for Undergraduates program.

  20. Understanding the Pulsar High Energy Emission: Macroscopic and Kinetic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalapotharakos, Constantinos; Brambilla, Gabriele; Timokhin, Andrey; Kust Harding, Alice; Kazanas, Demos

    2017-08-01

    Pulsars are extraordinary objects powered by the rotation of magnetic fields of order 10^8, 10^12G anchored onto neutron stars and rotating with periods 10^(-3)-10s. These fields mediate the conversion of their rotational energy into MHD winds and at the same time accelerate particles to energies sufficiently high to produce GeV photons. Fermi, since its launch in 2008, has established several trends among the observed gamma-ray pulsar properties playing a catalytic role in the current modeling of the high energy emission in pulsar magnetospheres. We judiciously use the guidance provided by the Fermi data to yield meaningful constraints on the macroscopic parameters of our global dissipative pulsar magnetosphere models. Our FIDO (Force-Free Inside, Dissipative Outside) models indicate that the dissipative regions lie outside the light cylinder near the equatorial current sheet. Our models reproduce the light-curve phenomenology while a detailed comparison of the model spectral properties with those observed by Fermi reveals the dependence of the macroscopic conductivity parameter on the spin-down rate providing a unique insight into the understanding of the physical mechanisms behind the high-energy emission in pulsar magnetospheres. Finally, we further exploit these important results by building self-consistent 3D global kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) models which, eventually, provide the dependence of the macroscopic parameter behavior (e.g. conductivity) on the microphysical properties (e.g. particle multiplicities, particle injection rates). Our PIC models provide field structures and particle distributions that are not only consistent with each other but also able to reproduce a broad range of the observed gamma-ray phenomenology (light curves and spectral properties) of both young and millisecond pulsars.

  1. Inverse modelling of national and European CH4 emissions using the atmospheric zoom model TM5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergamaschi, P.; Krol, M.; Dentener, F.; Vermeulen, A.; Meinhardt, F.; Graul, R.; Ramonet, M.; Peters, W.; Dlugokencky, E. J.

    2005-01-01

    A synthesis inversion based on the atmospheric zoom model TM5 is used to derive top-down estimates of CH4 emissions from individual European countries for the year 2001. We employ a model zoom over Europe with 1° × 1° resolution that is two-way nested into the global model domain (with resolution of

  2. Arrival times of Flare/Halo CME associated shocks at the Earth: comparison of the predictions of three numerical models with these observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. P. McKenna-Lawlor

    Full Text Available The arrival times at L1 of eleven travelling shocks associated both with X-ray flaring and with halo CMEs recorded aboard SOHO/LASCO have been considered. Close to the Sun the velocities of these events were estimated using either Type II radio records or CME speeds. Close to the Earth the shocks were detected in the data of various solar wind plasma, interplanetary magnetic field (IMF and energetic particle experiments aboard SOHO, ACE, WIND, INTERBALL-1 and IMP-8. The real-time shock arrival predictions of three numerical models, namely the Shock Time of Arrival Model (STOA, the Interplanetary Shock Propagation Model (ISPM and the Hakamada-Akasofu-Fry Solar Wind Model (HAFv.2 were tested against these observations. This is the first time that energetic protons (tens of keV to a few MeV have been used to complement plasma and IMF data in validating shock propagation models. The models were all generally successful in predicting shock arrivals. STOA provided the smallest values of the "predicted minus measured" arrival times and displayed a typical predictive precision better than about 8 h. The ratio of the calculated standard deviation of the transit times to Earth to the standard deviation of the measurements was estimated for each model (treating interacting events as composite shocks and these ratios turned out to be 0.60, 1.15 and 1.02 for STOA, ISPM and HAFv.2, respectively. If an event in the sample for which the shock velocity was not well known is omitted from consideration, these ratios become 0.36, 0.76 and 0.81, respectively. Larger statistical samples should now be tested. The ratio of the in situ shock velocity and the "Sun to L1" transit velocity (Vsh /Vtr was in the range of 0.7–0.9 for individual, non-interacting, shock events. HAFv.2 uniquely provided information on those changes in the COBpoint (the moving Connection point on the shock along the IMF to the OBserver which directly influenced energetic

  3. Shock wave dynamics of novel aluminized detonations and empirical model for temperature evolution from post-detonation combustion fireballs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, J. Motos

    Optical forensics of explosion events can play a vital role in investigating the chain of events leading up to the explosion by possibly identifying key spectral characteristics and even molecules in the post-detonation fireball that may serve as the fingerprint for a particular explosive type used. This research characterizes the blast wave and temperature evolution of an explosion fireball in order to improve the classification of aluminized conventional munitions based on a single explosive type such as RDX. High speed 4 kHz visible imagery is collected for 13 field detonations of aluminized novel munitions to study fireball and shock wave dynamics. The 238 mus temporal resolution visible imagery and the 12 ms temporal resolution FTS spectra are the data sets upon which shock wave dynamics and the time dependence of the fireball temperature are studied, respectively. The Sedov-Taylor point blast theory is fitted to data where a constant release (s = 1) of energy upon detonation suggests shock energies of 0.5--8.9 MJ corresponding to efficiencies of 2--15 percent of the RDX heats of detonation with blast dimensionalities indicative of the spherical geometry observed in visible imagery. A drag model fit to data shows initial shock wave speeds of Mach 4.7--8.2 and maximum fireball radii ranging from 4.3--5.8 m with most of the radii reached by 50 ms upon detonation. Initial shock speeds are four times lower than theoretical maximum detonation speed of RDX and likely contributes to the low efficiencies. An inverse correlation exists between blast wave energy and overall aluminum or liner content in the test articles. A two-color best fit Planckian is used to extract temperature profiles from collected Fourier-transform spectrometer spectra. The temperatures decay from initial values of 1290--1850 K to less than 1000 K within 1 s after detonation. A physics-based low-dimensionality empirical model is developed to represent the temperature evolution of post

  4. Modeling Atmospheric Emission for CMB Ground-based Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errard, J.; Ade, P. A. R.; Akiba, Y.; Arnold, K.; Atlas, M.; Baccigalupi, C.; Barron, D.; Boettger, D.; Borrill, J.; Chapman, S.; Chinone, Y.; Cukierman, A.; Delabrouille, J.; Dobbs, M.; Ducout, A.; Elleflot, T.; Fabbian, G.; Feng, C.; Feeney, S.; Gilbert, A.; Goeckner-Wald, N.; Halverson, N. W.; Hasegawa, M.; Hattori, K.; Hazumi, M.; Hill, C.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hori, Y.; Inoue, Y.; Jaehnig, G. C.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jeong, O.; Katayama, N.; Kaufman, J.; Keating, B.; Kermish, Z.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.; Le Jeune, M.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Leon, D.; Linder, E.; Matsuda, F.; Matsumura, T.; Miller, N. J.; Myers, M. J.; Navaroli, M.; Nishino, H.; Okamura, T.; Paar, H.; Peloton, J.; Poletti, D.; Puglisi, G.; Rebeiz, G.; Reichardt, C. L.; Richards, P. L.; Ross, C.; Rotermund, K. M.; Schenck, D. E.; Sherwin, B. D.; Siritanasak, P.; Smecher, G.; Stebor, N.; Steinbach, B.; Stompor, R.; Suzuki, A.; Tajima, O.; Takakura, S.; Tikhomirov, A.; Tomaru, T.; Whitehorn, N.; Wilson, B.; Yadav, A.; Zahn, O.

    2015-08-01

    Atmosphere is one of the most important noise sources for ground-based cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments. By increasing optical loading on the detectors, it amplifies their effective noise, while its fluctuations introduce spatial and temporal correlations between detected signals. We present a physically motivated 3D-model of the atmosphere total intensity emission in the millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths. We derive a new analytical estimate for the correlation between detectors time-ordered data as a function of the instrument and survey design, as well as several atmospheric parameters such as wind, relative humidity, temperature and turbulence characteristics. Using an original numerical computation, we examine the effect of each physical parameter on the correlations in the time series of a given experiment. We then use a parametric-likelihood approach to validate the modeling and estimate atmosphere parameters from the polarbear-i project first season data set. We derive a new 1.0% upper limit on the linear polarization fraction of atmospheric emission. We also compare our results to previous studies and weather station measurements. The proposed model can be used for realistic simulations of future ground-based CMB observations.

  5. MHz to THz: Spectral Modeling of CMB Foreground Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogut, Alan

    Measurements of the linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) provide a critical test of the inflationary paradigm. Gravity waves excited during an inflationary epoch in the early universe interact with the CMB to impart a characteristic signal in linear polarization. The distinctive spatial pattern and frequency dependence of the inflationary signal provide a unique signature to characterize physics at energies approaching Grand Unification, a trillion times beyond the energies accessible to direct experimentation using particle accelerators. Detecting the inflationary signal will be difficult. At predicted amplitudes of 30--100 nK, the signal is faint compared to astrophysical foreground emission from sources within the Galaxy. Measurements of the Galactic synchrotron and dust foregrounds show these sources to be more than an order of magnitude brighter than the inflationary signal. Robust detection and characterization of the gravity-wave signal requires subtracting these polarized foregrounds to accuracy of a few percent or better. Despite the importance of accurate foreground subtraction for both polarized and unpolarized CMB analyses, considerable uncertainty exists in the frequency dependence of the dominant synchrotron and dust foregrounds. Published maps of the synchrotron spectral index differ at levels Delta beta > 0.2, while estimates of the dust spectral index differ by comparable amounts. Foreground uncertainty at this level would prevent detection of the inflationary signal, even when scaled from nearby ``guard'' channels surrounding the foreground minimum near 60 GHz. We propose to use multi-frequency parametric fitting to model the frequency spectrum of diffuse astrophysical foregrounds over the full sky. Archival data sets spanning 5 decades in frequency from 22 MHz to 3 THz allow self-consistent determination of the spectral index and curvature for both synchrotron and dust emission. Broad frequency coverage minimizes confusion

  6. Parameter study of a model for NOx emissions from PFBC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anker Degn; Johnsson, Jan Erik

    1996-01-01

    from the literature. In general, the trends predicted by the model are in good agreement with the experimental observations. The sensitivity of the simulated NO emission with respect to combustion parameters in the model is investigated. The analysis shows that the most important combustion parameters...... are the rates of CO and CH4 combustion, but the CO/(CO+CO2) ratio from char combustion is important too. A rate of production analysis for the nitrogenous species is used to identify the important reactions. According to the kinetic model, the reduction of NO by CO catalyzed by bed material is very important......, especially at low temperatures where the CO concentration in the bed is high. The total reduction of NO by char and by CO catalyzed by char increases with increasing temperature, but is lower than usually attributed to these reactions. 20-30 % of the fuel-N in the form of NH3 is oxidized catalytically to N2...

  7. Catastrophe modelling: deriving the 1-in-200 year mortality shock for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper investigates catastrophe risk for South African life insurers by considering the additional deaths that could arise from a 1-in-200 year mortality shock. Existing South African academic research on catastrophic risk has mostly focused on property losses and the resulting impact on property insurance companies.

  8. Monitoring Microcirculatory Blood Flow with a New Sublingual Tonometer in a Porcine Model of Hemorrhagic Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péter Palágyi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue capnometry may be suitable for the indirect evaluation of regional hypoperfusion. We tested the performance of a new sublingual capillary tonometer in experimental hemorrhage. Thirty-six anesthetized, ventilated mini pigs were divided into sham-operated (n=9 and shock groups (n=27. Hemorrhagic shock was induced by reducing mean arterial pressure (MAP to 40 mmHg for 60 min, after which fluid resuscitation started aiming to increase MAP to 75% of the baseline value (60–180 min. Sublingual carbon-dioxide partial pressure was measured by tonometry, using a specially coiled silicone rubber tube. Mucosal red blood cell velocity (RBCV and capillary perfusion rate (CPR were assessed by orthogonal polarization spectral (OPS imaging. In the 60 min shock phase a significant drop in cardiac index was accompanied by reduction in sublingual RBCV and CPR and significant increase in the sublingual mucosal-to-arterial PCO2 gap (PSLCO2 gap, which significantly improved during the 120 min resuscitation phase. There was significant correlation between PSLCO2 gap and sublingual RBCV (r=-0.65, p<0.0001, CPR (r=-0.64, p<0.0001, central venous oxygen saturation (r=-0.50, p<0.0001, and central venous-to-arterial PCO2 difference (r=0.62, p<0.0001. This new sublingual tonometer may be an appropriate tool for the indirect evaluation of circulatory changes in shock.

  9. Heat Shock Partially Dissociates the Overlapping Modules of the Yeast Protein-Protein Interaction Network: A Systems Level Model of Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalik, Ágoston; Csermely, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Network analysis became a powerful tool giving new insights to the understanding of cellular behavior. Heat shock, the archetype of stress responses, is a well-characterized and simple model of cellular dynamics. S. cerevisiae is an appropriate model organism, since both its protein-protein interaction network (interactome) and stress response at the gene expression level have been well characterized. However, the analysis of the reorganization of the yeast interactome during stress has not been investigated yet. We calculated the changes of the interaction-weights of the yeast interactome from the changes of mRNA expression levels upon heat shock. The major finding of our study is that heat shock induced a significant decrease in both the overlaps and connections of yeast interactome modules. In agreement with this the weighted diameter of the yeast interactome had a 4.9-fold increase in heat shock. Several key proteins of the heat shock response became centers of heat shock-induced local communities, as well as bridges providing a residual connection of modules after heat shock. The observed changes resemble to a ‘stratus-cumulus’ type transition of the interactome structure, since the unstressed yeast interactome had a globally connected organization, similar to that of stratus clouds, whereas the heat shocked interactome had a multifocal organization, similar to that of cumulus clouds. Our results showed that heat shock induces a partial disintegration of the global organization of the yeast interactome. This change may be rather general occurring in many types of stresses. Moreover, other complex systems, such as single proteins, social networks and ecosystems may also decrease their inter-modular links, thus develop more compact modules, and display a partial disintegration of their global structure in the initial phase of crisis. Thus, our work may provide a model of a general, system-level adaptation mechanism to environmental changes. PMID:22022244

  10. Evaluating NOx emission inventories for regulatory air quality modeling using satellite and air quality model data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemball-Cook, Susan; Yarwood, Greg; Johnson, Jeremiah; Dornblaser, Bright; Estes, Mark

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of NOx emissions in the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality's (TCEQ) State Implementation Plan (SIP) modeling inventories of the southeastern U.S. We used retrieved satellite tropospheric NO2 columns from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) together with NO2 columns from the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with Extensions (CAMx) to make top-down NOx emissions estimates using the mass balance method. Two different top-down NOx emissions estimates were developed using the KNMI DOMINO v2.0 and NASA SP2 retrievals of OMI NO2 columns. Differences in the top-down NOx emissions estimates made with these two operational products derived from the same OMI radiance data were sufficiently large that they could not be used to constrain the TCEQ NOx emissions in the southeast. The fact that the two available operational NO2 column retrievals give such different top-down NOx emissions results is important because these retrievals are increasingly being used to diagnose air quality problems and to inform efforts to solve them. These results reflect the fact that NO2 column retrievals are a blend of measurements and modeled data and should be used with caution in analyses that will inform policy development. This study illustrates both benefits and challenges of using satellite NO2 data for air quality management applications. Comparison with OMI NO2 columns pointed the way toward improvements in the CAMx simulation of the upper troposphere, but further refinement of both regional air quality models and the NO2 column retrievals is needed before the mass balance and other emission inversion methods can be used to successfully constrain NOx emission inventories used in U.S. regulatory modeling.

  11. Empirical Model Development for Predicting Shock Response on Composite Materials Subjected to Pyroshock Loading. Volume 2, Part 1; Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentz, Steven J.; Ordway, David O.; Parsons, David S.; Garrison, Craig M.; Rodgers, C. Steven; Collins, Brian W.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) received a request to develop an analysis model based on both frequency response and wave propagation analyses for predicting shock response spectrum (SRS) on composite materials subjected to pyroshock loading. The model would account for near-field environment (approximately 9 inches from the source) dominated by direct wave propagation, mid-field environment (approximately 2 feet from the source) characterized by wave propagation and structural resonances, and far-field environment dominated by lower frequency bending waves in the structure. This document contains appendices to the Volume I report.

  12. Derivation of motor vehicle tailpipe particle emission factors suitable for modelling urban fleet emissions and air quality assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, Diane U; Kelly, Joe; Mengersen, Kerrie; Jayaratne, Rohan; Ferreira, Luis; Morawska, Lidia

    2010-03-01

    Urban motor vehicle fleets are a major source of particulate matter pollution, especially of ultrafine particles (diameters vehicle particle emission factors derived using a wide range of different measurement methods for different particle sizes, conducted in different parts of the world. Therefore, the choice as to which are the most suitable particle emission factors to use in transport modelling and health impact assessments presented as a very difficult task. The aim of this study was to derive a comprehensive set of tailpipe particle emission factors for different vehicle and road type combinations, covering the full size range of particles emitted, which are suitable for modelling urban fleet emissions. A large body of data available in the international literature on particle emission factors for motor vehicles derived from measurement studies was compiled and subjected to advanced statistical analysis, to determine the most suitable emission factors to use in modelling urban fleet emissions. This analysis resulted in the development of five statistical models which explained 86%, 93%, 87%, 65% and 47% of the variation in published emission factors for particle number, particle volume, PM(1), PM(2.5) and PM(10), respectively. A sixth model for total particle mass was proposed but no significant explanatory variables were identified in the analysis. From the outputs of these statistical models, the most suitable particle emission factors were selected. This selection was based on examination of the statistical robustness of the statistical model outputs, including consideration of conservative average particle emission factors with the lowest standard errors, narrowest 95% confidence intervals and largest sample sizes and the explanatory model variables, which were vehicle type (all particle metrics), instrumentation (particle number and PM(2.5)), road type (PM(10)) and size range measured and speed limit on the road (particle volume). A multiplicity of

  13. Hydrodynamic modeling of accretion shocks on a star with radiative transport and a chromospheric model

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sá, L.; Chièze, J.-P.; Stehlé, C.; Hubeny, I.; Delahaye, F.; Lanz, T.

    2012-12-01

    The aim of the project (ANR STARSHOCK) is to understand the dynamics and the radiative properties of accretion columns, linking the circumstellar disk to the surface photosphere of Young Stellar Objects. The hydrodynamics is computed first, using a high resolution hydrodynamic 1D ALE code (ASTROLABE) coupled to radiative transfer and line cooling, along with a model for the acoustic heating of the chromospheric plasma. Spectra are then post-processed with a 1D radiative transfer code (SYNSPEC), using DFE solver and an extended atomic database covering a wavelength range from X rays to visible.

  14. 40 CFR 86.410-2006 - Emission standards for 2006 and later model year motorcycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... model year motorcycles. 86.410-2006 Section 86.410-2006 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... VEHICLES AND ENGINES Emission Regulations for 1978 and Later New Motorcycles, General Provisions § 86.410-2006 Emission standards for 2006 and later model year motorcycles. (a)(1) Exhaust emissions from Class...

  15. Auroral radio emission from ultracool dwarfs: a Jovian model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnpenney, S.; Nichols, J. D.; Wynn, G. A.; Casewell, S. L.

    2017-10-01

    A number of fast-rotating ultracool dwarfs (UCDs) emit pulsed coherent radiation, attributed to the electron-cyclotron maser instability, a phenomenon that occurs in the Solar system at planets with strong auroral emission. In this paper, we examine magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling currents in UCDs, adopting processes used in models of Jovian emission. We consider the angular velocity gradient arising from a steady outward flux of angular momentum from an internal plasma source, as analogous to the Jovian main oval current system, as well as the interaction of a rotating magnetosphere with the external medium. Both of these mechanisms are seen in the Solar system to be responsible for the production of radio emission. We present the results of an investigation over a range of relevant plasma and magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling parameters to determine regimes consistent with observed UCD radio luminosities. Both processes are able to explain observed UCD luminosities with ionospheric Pedersen conductances of ˜1-2 mho, either for a closed magnetosphere with a plasma mass outflow rate of ˜105 kg s-1, I.e. a factor of ˜100 larger than that observed at Jupiter's moon Io, or for a dwarf with an open magnetosphere moving through the interstellar medium at ˜50 km s-1 and a plasma mass outflow rate of ˜1000 kg s-1. The radio luminosity resulting from these mechanisms has opposing dependencies on the magnetic field strength, a point that may be used to discriminate between the two models as more data become available.

  16. Shock Dynamics in Stellar Outbursts. I. Shock Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ro, Stephen; Matzner, Christopher D., E-mail: ro@astro.utoronto.ca [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada)

    2017-05-20

    Wave-driven outflows and non-disruptive explosions have been implicated in pre-supernova outbursts, supernova impostors, luminous blue variable eruptions, and some narrow-line and superluminous supernovae. To model these events, we investigate the dynamics of stars set in motion by strong acoustic pulses and wave trains, focusing on nonlinear wave propagation, shock formation, and an early phase of the development of a weak shock. We identify the shock formation radius, showing that a heuristic estimate based on crossing characteristics matches an exact expansion around the wave front and verifying both with numerical experiments. Our general analytical condition for shock formation applies to one-dimensional motions within any static environment, including both eruptions and implosions. We also consider the early phase of shock energy dissipation. We find that waves of super-Eddington acoustic luminosity always create shocks, rather than damping by radiative diffusion. Therefore, shock formation is integral to super-Eddington outbursts.

  17. Scenario and modelling uncertainty in global mean temperature change derived from emission driven Global Climate Models

    OpenAIRE

    B. B. B. Booth; D. Bernie; D. McNeall; E. Hawkins; J. Caesar; C. Boulton; P. Friedlingstein; D. Sexton

    2012-01-01

    We compare future changes in global mean temperature in response to different future scenarios which, for the first time, arise from emission driven rather than concentration driven perturbed parameter ensemble of a Global Climate Model (GCM). These new GCM simulations sample uncertainties in atmospheric feedbacks, land carbon cycle, ocean physics and aerosol sulphur cycle processes. We find broader ranges of projected temperature responses arising when considering emission rather than concen...

  18. Description and History of the MOBILE Highway Vehicle Emission Factor Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    MOBILE is an EPA model for estimating pollution from highway vehicles. It has been superseded by the Motor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES). MOBILE calculates emissions of hydrocarbons (HC), oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and carbon monoxide (CO).

  19. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Model (GEM) for Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicle Compliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA’s Greenhouse Gas Emissions Model (GEM) is a free, desktop computer application that estimates the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and fuel efficiency performance of specific aspects of heavy-duty vehicles.

  20. Charge Exchange: Velocity Dependent X-ray Emission Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumbee, Renata

    2017-06-01

    Atomic collisions play a fundamental role in astrophysics, plasma physics, and fusion physics. Here, we focus on charge exchange (CX) between hot ions and neutral atoms and molecules. Even though charge exchange calculations can provide vital information, including neutral and ion density distributions, ion temperatures, elemental abundances, and ion charge state distributions in the environments considered, both theoretical calculations and laboratory studies of these processes lack the necessary reliability and/or coverage. In order to better understand the spectra we observe in astrophysical environments in which both hot plasma and neutral gas are present, including comets, the heliosphere, supernova remnants, galaxy clusters, star forming galaxies, the outflows of starburst galaxies, and cooling flows of hot gas in the intracluster medium, a thorough CX X-ray model is needed. Included in this model should be a complete set of X-ray line ratios for relevant ion and neutral interactions for a range of energies.In this work, theoretical charge exchange emission spectra are produced using cross sections calculated with widely applied approaches including the quantum mechanical molecular orbital close coupling (QMOCC), atomic orbital close coupling (AOCC), classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC), and the multichannel Landau-Zener (MCLZ) methods. When possible, theoretical data are benchmarked to experiments. Using a comprehensive, but still far from complete, CX database, new models are performed for a variety of X-ray emitting environments. In an attempt to describe the excess emission in X-rays of the starburst galaxy M82, Ne X CX line ratios are compared to line ratios observed in the region. A more complete XSPEC X-ray emission model is produced for H-like and He-like C-Al ions colliding with H and He for a range of energies; 200 to 5000 eV/u. This model is applied to the northeast rim of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant in an attempt to determine the

  1. Empirical model of odor emission from deep-pit swine finishing barns to derive a standardized odor emission factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauberger, Günther; Lim, Teng-Teeh; Ni, Ji-Qin; Bundy, Dwaine S.; Haymore, Barry L.; Diehl, Claude A.; Duggirala, Ravi K.; Heber, Albert J.

    2013-02-01

    Odor emission from swine housing is influenced by the herd characteristics and building environment. The following three specific factors were identified as inputs to a swine house odor emission model: indoor temperature, barn ventilation rate, and pig activity. Model input parameters were determined based on tests of four, identical, 1000-head, mechanically-ventilated swine finishing houses. Each building had two sidewall curtains, a curtain on the west end wall, five exhaust fans on the east end wall, four pit ventilation fans, and long-term manure storage beneath a fully slatted floor. Odor concentrations of 112 odor samples were determined using dynamic forced-choice olfactometry with four to six trained panelists. The emission model showed that the standard live mass specific odor emission factor was 48 OU s-1 per 500 kg live mass or animal unit (AU), and it corresponded to an indoor temperature of T0 = 20 °C, a ventilation rate of V0 = 200 m3 h-1 (55.6 × 10-3 m3 s-1) per pig (maximum capacity for summer time), and the daily mean animal activity. The rate of odor emission from a swine finishing house can be calculated based on these parameters coupled with the number of animals, the mean live mass, and the standard live mass specific odor emission factor. Using this process-based odor emission model, the odor emission estimation and therefore the input for odor dispersion models can be improved to obtain more reliable estimates of separation distance for siting future pig farms.

  2. Analysis of US emissions from two mobile source emissions models: magnitude, spatial and temporal patterns, and effects on photochemical modeling outputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, H. A.; Phillips, S.; Possiel, N.; Pouliot, G.; Koupal, J.; Michaels, H.

    2011-12-01

    Recently EPA's Office of Transportation and Air Quality (OTAQ) released a new model to estimate emissions from onroad mobile sources. This new model, MOVES, is being phased in to replace the existing MOBILE6 model and has already been used in air quality modeling in support of several EPA rules. Preliminary NOx emissions estimates using monthly average temperatures and state-level fleet characteristics from MOVES are 70% higher nationwide than estimates from MOBILE6 for a 2005 annual inventory. In this talk, we will present MOVES emissions using more refined inputs including hourly temperature and speed values and county-level fleet characteristics. We compare the nationwide totals and spatial and temporal variability in emissions of NOx and VOC from the new MOVES run with the old MOBILE6 outputs for two months, January and July 2006. In addition, these emissions have been input into CMAQ photochemical modeling simulations. We present the differences in CMAQ estimates of NOx and ozone concentration across the US using MOVES versus MOBILE6 mobile source emissions inputs. In addition, we evaluate any changes in the responsiveness of the model predicted ozone concentrations to emissions reductions between the two mobile emissions models.

  3. Impact of transport model errors on the global and regional methane emissions estimated by inverse modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Locatelli

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A modelling experiment has been conceived to assess the impact of transport model errors on methane emissions estimated in an atmospheric inversion system. Synthetic methane observations, obtained from 10 different model outputs from the international TransCom-CH4 model inter-comparison exercise, are combined with a prior scenario of methane emissions and sinks, and integrated into the three-component PYVAR-LMDZ-SACS (PYthon VARiational-Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique model with Zooming capability-Simplified Atmospheric Chemistry System inversion system to produce 10 different methane emission estimates at the global scale for the year 2005. The same methane sinks, emissions and initial conditions have been applied to produce the 10 synthetic observation datasets. The same inversion set-up (statistical errors, prior emissions, inverse procedure is then applied to derive flux estimates by inverse modelling. Consequently, only differences in the modelling of atmospheric transport may cause differences in the estimated fluxes. In our framework, we show that transport model errors lead to a discrepancy of 27 Tg yr−1 at the global scale, representing 5% of total methane emissions. At continental and annual scales, transport model errors are proportionally larger than at the global scale, with errors ranging from 36 Tg yr−1 in North America to 7 Tg yr−1 in Boreal Eurasia (from 23 to 48%, respectively. At the model grid-scale, the spread of inverse estimates can reach 150% of the prior flux. Therefore, transport model errors contribute significantly to overall uncertainties in emission estimates by inverse modelling, especially when small spatial scales are examined. Sensitivity tests have been carried out to estimate the impact of the measurement network and the advantage of higher horizontal resolution in transport models. The large differences found between methane flux estimates inferred in these different configurations highly

  4. Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestration and Land Use Emissions Using Detailed Model Results and Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Atul Jain

    2005-04-17

    This report outlines the progress on the development and application of Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestrations and Land Use Emissions supported by the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), U.S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DOE-DE-FG02-01ER63069. The overall objective of this collaborative project between the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was to unite the latest advances in carbon cycle research with scientifically based models and policy-related integrated assessment tools that incorporate computationally efficient representations of the latest knowledge concerning science and emission trajectories, and their policy implications. As part of this research we accomplished the following tasks that we originally proposed: (1) In coordination with LLNL and ORNL, we enhanced the Integrated Science Assessment Model's (ISAM) parametric representation of the ocean and terrestrial carbon cycles that better represent spatial and seasonal variations, which are important to study the mechanisms that influence carbon sequestration in the ocean and terrestrial ecosystems; (2) Using the MiniCAM modeling capability, we revised the SRES (IPCC Special Report on Emission Scenarios; IPCC, 2000) land use emission scenarios; and (3) On the application front, the enhanced version of ISAM modeling capability is applied to understand how short- and long-term natural carbon fluxes, carbon sequestration, and human emissions contribute to the net global emissions (concentrations) trajectories required to reach various concentration (emission) targets. Under this grant, 21 research publications were produced. In addition, this grant supported a number of graduate and undergraduate students whose fundamental research was to learn a disciplinary field in climate change (e.g., ecological dynamics

  5. Modeling of a Two-Phase Jet Pump with Phase Change, Shocks and Temperature-Dependent Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherif, S. A.

    1998-01-01

    One of the primary motivations behind this work is the attempt to understand the physics of a two-phase jet pump which constitutes part of a flow boiling test facility at NASA-Marshall. The flow boiling apparatus is intended to provide data necessary to design highly efficient two-phase thermal control systems for aerospace applications. The facility will also be capable of testing alternative refrigerants and evaluate their performance using various heat exchangers with enhanced surfaces. The test facility is also intended for use in evaluating single-phase performance of systems currently using CFC refrigerants. Literature dealing with jet pumps is abundant and covers a very wide array of application areas. Example application areas include vacuum pumps which are used in the food industry, power station work, and the chemical industry; ejector systems which have applications in the aircraft industry as cabin ventilators and for purposes of jet thrust augmentation; jet pumps which are used in the oil industry for oil well pumping; and steam-jet ejector refrigeration, to just name a few. Examples of work relevant to this investigation includes those of Fairuzov and Bredikhin (1995). While past researchers have been able to model the two-phase flow jet pump using the one-dimensional assumption with no shock waves and no phase change, there is no research known to the author apart from that of Anand (1992) who was able to account for condensation shocks. Thus, one of the objectives of this work is to model the dynamics of fluid interaction between a two-phase primary fluid and a subcooled liquid secondary fluid which is being injected employing atomizing spray injectors. The model developed accounts for phase transformations due to expansion, compression, and mixing. It also accounts for shock waves developing in the different parts of the jet pump as well as temperature and pressure dependencies of the fluid properties for both the primary two-phase mixture and the

  6. SHOCK WAVE IN IONOSPHERE DURING EARTHQUAKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Kuznetsov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Fundamentally new model of the shock wave (SW generation in atmosphere and ionosphere during earthquake is proposed. The model proceeds from the idea of cooperative shock water crystallization in a cloud

  7. Curved Radio Spectra of Weak Cluster Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyesung; Ryu, Dongsu

    2015-08-01

    In order to understand certain observed features of arc-like giant radio relics such as the rareness, uniform surface brightness, and curved integrated spectra, we explore a diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) model for radio relics in which a spherical shock impinges on a magnetized cloud containing fossil relativistic electrons. Toward this end, we perform DSA simulations of spherical shocks with the parameters relevant for the Sausage radio relic in cluster CIZA J2242.8+5301, and calculate the ensuing radio synchrotron emission from re-accelerated electrons. Three types of fossil electron populations are considered: a delta-function like population with the shock injection momentum, a power-law distribution, and a power law with an exponential cutoff. The surface brightness profile of the radio-emitting postshock region and the volume-integrated radio spectrum are calculated and compared with observations. We find that the observed width of the Sausage relic can be explained reasonably well by shocks with speed {u}{{s}}˜ 3× {10}3 {km} {{{s}}}-1 and sonic Mach number {M}{{s}}˜ 3. These shocks produce curved radio spectra that steepen gradually over (0.1-10){ν }{br} with a break frequency {ν }{br}˜ 1 GHz if the duration of electron acceleration is ˜60-80 Myr. However, the abrupt increase in the spectral index above ˜1.5 GHz observed in the Sausage relic seems to indicate that additional physical processes, other than radiative losses, operate for electrons with {γ }{{e}}≳ {10}4.

  8. Modelling of acoustic emission generated in involute spur gear pair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ram Bihari; Parey, Anand; Tandon, Naresh

    2017-04-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) is an important technique for the condition monitoring and diagnostics of various mechanical system components like gear, bearing, macahine tool etc. Several researchers have found experimentally that gear operating parameters such as speed, load, specific film thickness, temperature etc. influence the energy of AE generated during meshing of the gears. But there is lack of mathematical model to comprehend the actual physical mechanism in the gear for the same. In this study, a theoretical model has been developed to establish a rapport between gear operating parameters and energy of AE on the bases of asperity contact and friction between involute surfaces of gear using Hertzian contact approach, statistical concepts, and varying sliding velocity of gear tooth mechanism. The effects of load sharing, lubrication, and dynamic load condition during the gear mesh cycle are also considered in the developed model. An experimental study has been performed for validation of developed theoretical model. A satisfactory validation has been perceived between the AE rms (root mean square) predicted by the developed theoretical model and obtained experimental results.

  9. Numerical modeling of an experimental shock tube for traumatic brain injury studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Michael; Regele, Jonathan D.

    2015-11-01

    Unfortunately, Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) are encountered commonly by both civilians and military soldiers throughout the world. Over a decade of medical history suggests that traumatic brain injury (TBI) may result from exposure to the blast waves created by these explosions, even if the person does not experience any immediate injury or lose consciousness. Medical researchers study the exposure of mice and rats to blast waves created in specially designed shock tubes to understand the effect on brain tissue. A newly developed table-top shock tube with a short driver section has been developed for mice experiments to reduce the time necessary to administer the blast radiation and increase the amount of statistical information available. In this study, numerical simulations of this shock tube are performed to assess how the blast wave takes its shape. The pressure profiles obtained from the numerical results are compared with the pressure histories from the experimental pressure transducers. The results show differences in behavior from what was expected, but the blast wave may still be an effective means of studying TBI.

  10. A Multi-wavelength Study of an Isolated MSP Bow Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Roger W.; Slane, Patrick; Green, Andrew

    2017-08-01

    PSR J2124-3358 is the only single MSP known to sport an Halpha bow shock. This shock, now also seen in the UV, encloses an unusual X-ray pulsar wind nebula (PWN) with a long off-axis trail. Combining the X-ray and UV images with AAT/KOALA integral field spectroscopy of the Halpha emission, we have an unusually complete picture of the pulsar's (101 km/s transverse) motion and the latitudinal distribution of its wind flux. These images reveal the 3-D orientation of a hard-spectrum PWN jet and a softer equatorial outflow. Within the context of a thin shock model, we can constrain the total energy output of the pulsar and the neutron star moment of inertia. The IFU spectra show extreme Balmer dominance, which also constrains the nature of the UV shock emission.

  11. Kinetic Simulations of Particle Acceleration at Shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caprioli, Damiano [Princeton University; Guo, Fan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-07-16

    Collisionless shocks are mediated by collective electromagnetic interactions and are sources of non-thermal particles and emission. The full particle-in-cell approach and a hybrid approach are sketched, simulations of collisionless shocks are shown using a multicolor presentation. Results for SN 1006, a case involving ion acceleration and B field amplification where the shock is parallel, are shown. Electron acceleration takes place in planetary bow shocks and galaxy clusters. It is concluded that acceleration at shocks can be efficient: >15%; CRs amplify B field via streaming instability; ion DSA is efficient at parallel, strong shocks; ions are injected via reflection and shock drift acceleration; and electron DSA is efficient at oblique shocks.

  12. Modeling natural emissions in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ model – Part 2: Modifications for simulating natural emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. F. Mueller

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ model version 4.6 has been revised with regard to the representation of chlorine (HCl, ClNO2 and sulfur (dimethylsulfide, or DMS, and H2S, and evaluated against observations and earlier published models. Chemistry parameterizations were based on published reaction kinetic data and a recently developed cloud chemistry model that includes heterogeneous reactions of organic sulfur compounds. Evaluation of the revised model was conducted using a recently enhanced data base of natural emissions that includes ocean and continental sources of DMS, H2S, chlorinated gases and lightning NOx for the continental United States and surrounding regions. Results using 2002 meteorology and emissions indicated that most simulated "natural" (plus background chemical and aerosol species exhibit the expected seasonal variations at the surface. Ozone exhibits a winter and early spring maximum consistent with ozone data and an earlier published model. Ozone distributions reflect the influences of atmospheric dynamics and pollutant background levels imposed on the CMAQ simulation by boundary conditions derived from a global model. A series of model experiments reveals that the consideration of gas-phase organic sulfur chemistry leads to sulfate aerosol increases over most of the continental United States. Cloud chemistry parameterization changes result in widespread decreases in SO2 across the modeling domain and both increases and decreases in sulfate. Most cloud-mediated sulfate increases occurred mainly over the Pacific Ocean (up to about 0.1 μg m−3 but also over and downwind from the Gulf of Mexico (including parts of the eastern US. Geographic variations in simulated SO2 and sulfate are due to the link between DMS/H2S and their byproduct SO2, the heterogeneity of cloud cover and precipitation (precipitating clouds act as

  13. Experimental and Numerical Study on Shock Layer Radiation for Planetary Entry Flights

    OpenAIRE

    山田, 剛治; 吾郷, 祥太; 久保, 優斗; 松野, 隆; 川添, 博光; Yamada, Gouji; Ago, Shota; Kubo, Yuto; Matsuno, Takashi; Kawazoe, Hiromitsu

    2013-01-01

    In this study, shock layer radiation is investigated by experimental and numerical approach. Radiation profiles of N2, N2(+), and N are observed in two test conditions of initial pressure and velocity by time-resolved emission spectroscopy. Flow properties behind shock front are computed by the CFD code with two-temperature thermochemical model. The results are used as inputs for the radiation analysis code “SPRADIAN 2” to derive the radiation profiles behind shock front along the line of sig...

  14. Estimating greenhouse gas emissions of European cities--modeling emissions with only one spatial and one socioeconomic variable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, Albert H; Lauf, Steffen; Förster, Michael; Kleinschmit, Birgit

    2015-07-01

    Substantive and concerted action is needed to mitigate climate change. However, international negotiations struggle to adopt ambitious legislation and to anticipate more climate-friendly developments. Thus, stronger actions are needed from other players. Cities, being greenhouse gas emission centers, play a key role in promoting the climate change mitigation movement by becoming hubs for smart and low-carbon lifestyles. In this context, a stronger linkage between greenhouse gas emissions and urban development and policy-making seems promising. Therefore, simple approaches are needed to objectively identify crucial emission drivers for deriving appropriate emission reduction strategies. In analyzing 44 European cities, the authors investigate possible socioeconomic and spatial determinants of urban greenhouse gas emissions. Multiple statistical analyses reveal that the average household size and the edge density of discontinuous dense urban fabric explain up to 86% of the total variance of greenhouse gas emissions of EU cities (when controlled for varying electricity carbon intensities). Finally, based on these findings, a multiple regression model is presented to determine greenhouse gas emissions. It is independently evaluated with ten further EU cities. The reliance on only two indicators shows that the model can be easily applied in addressing important greenhouse gas emission sources of European urbanites, when varying power generations are considered. This knowledge can help cities develop adequate climate change mitigation strategies and promote respective policies on the EU or the regional level. The results can further be used to derive first estimates of urban greenhouse gas emissions, if no other analyses are available. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. What Causes Cardiogenic Shock?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Shock Cardiogenic Shock Causes Immediate Causes Cardiogenic shock occurs if the ... is cardiogenic shock. Tests and Procedures To Diagnose Shock and Its Underlying Causes Blood Pressure Test Medical ...

  16. What Is Cardiogenic Shock?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Shock Cardiogenic Shock Causes Immediate Causes Cardiogenic shock occurs if the ... is cardiogenic shock. Tests and Procedures To Diagnose Shock and Its Underlying Causes Blood Pressure Test Medical ...

  17. Atmospheric modeling to assess wind dependence in tracer dilution method measurements of landfill methane emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Diane M; Chow, Fotini K; Delkash, Madjid; Imhoff, Paul T

    2018-03-01

    The short-term temporal variability of landfill methane emissions is not well understood due to uncertainty in measurement methods. Significant variability is seen over short-term measurement campaigns with the tracer dilution method (TDM), but this variability may be due in part to measurement error rather than fluctuations in the actual landfill emissions. In this study, landfill methane emissions and TDM-measured emissions are simulated over a real landfill in Delaware, USA using the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) for two emissions scenarios. In the steady emissions scenario, a constant landfill emissions rate is prescribed at each model grid point on the surface of the landfill. In the unsteady emissions scenario, emissions are calculated at each time step as a function of the local surface wind speed, resulting in variable emissions over each 1.5-h measurement period. The simulation output is used to assess the standard deviation and percent error of the TDM-measured emissions. Eight measurement periods are simulated over two different days to look at different conditions. Results show that standard deviation of the TDM- measured emissions does not increase significantly from the steady emissions simulations to the unsteady emissions scenarios, indicating that the TDM may have inherent errors in its prediction of emissions fluctuations. Results also show that TDM error does not increase significantly from the steady to the unsteady emissions simulations. This indicates that introducing variability to the landfill emissions does not increase errors in the TDM at this site. Across all simulations, TDM errors range from -15% to 43%, consistent with the range of errors seen in previous TDM studies. Simulations indicate diurnal variations of methane emissions when wind effects are significant, which may be important when developing daily and annual emissions estimates from limited field data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Sensitivity of wetland methane emissions to model assumptions: application and model testing against site observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Meng

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Methane emissions from natural wetlands and rice paddies constitute a large proportion of atmospheric methane, but the magnitude and year-to-year variation of these methane sources are still unpredictable. Here we describe and evaluate the integration of a methane biogeochemical model (CLM4Me; Riley et al., 2011 into the Community Land Model 4.0 (CLM4CN in order to better explain spatial and temporal variations in methane emissions. We test new functions for soil pH and redox potential that impact microbial methane production in soils. We also constrain aerenchyma in plants in always-inundated areas in order to better represent wetland vegetation. Satellite inundated fraction is explicitly prescribed in the model, because there are large differences between simulated fractional inundation and satellite observations, and thus we do not use CLM4-simulated hydrology to predict inundated areas. A rice paddy module is also incorporated into the model, where the fraction of land used for rice production is explicitly prescribed. The model is evaluated at the site level with vegetation cover and water table prescribed from measurements. Explicit site level evaluations of simulated methane emissions are quite different than evaluating the grid-cell averaged emissions against available measurements. Using a baseline set of parameter values, our model-estimated average global wetland emissions for the period 1993–2004 were 256 Tg CH4 yr−1 (including the soil sink and rice paddy emissions in the year 2000 were 42 Tg CH4 yr−1. Tropical wetlands contributed 201 Tg CH4 yr−1, or 78% of the global wetland flux. Northern latitude (>50 N systems contributed 12 Tg CH4 yr−1. However, sensitivity studies show a large range (150–346 Tg CH4 yr−1 in predicted global methane emissions (excluding emissions from rice paddies. The large range is

  19. Modelling of ammonia emissions from dairy cow houses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monteny, G.J.

    2000-01-01

    Dairy cow husbandry contributes to environmental acidification through the emission of ammonia. In-depth knowledge on the processes and variable factors that play a role in the emission of ammonia from dairy cow houses benefits the production of emission data, the development of low

  20. Spontaneous emission of light from atoms: the model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marecki, P. [Wyzsza Szkola Informatyki i Zarzadzania, ul. Legionow 81, 43-300 Bielsko-Biala (Poland); Szpak, N. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, J. W. Goethe University, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2005-07-08

    We investigate (non-relativistic) atomic systems interacting with quantum electromagnetic field (QEF). The resulting model describes spontaneous emission of light from a two-level atom surrounded by various initial states of the QEF. We assume that the quantum field interacts with the atom via the standard, minimal-coupling Hamiltonian, with the A{sup 2} term neglected. We also assume that there will appear at most single excitations (photons). By conducting the analysis on a general level we allow for an arbitrary initial state of the QEF (which can be for instance: the vacuum, the ground state in a cavity, or the squeezed state). We derive a Volterra-type equation which governs the time evolution of the amplitude of the excited state. The two-point function of the initial state of the QEF, integrated with a combination of atomic wavefunctions, forms the kernel of this equation. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  1. Pulsar Braking Index: A Test of Emission Models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, R. X.; Qiao, G. J.

    2001-11-01

    Pulsar braking torques due to magnetodipole radiation and the unipolar generator are considered, which results in a braking index n of less than 3 and could be employed to test the emission models. Improved equations for the pulsar braking index and magnetic field are presented, which are true if the rotation energy-loss rate equals the sum of the energy-loss rate of dipole radiation and of relativistic particles powered by a unipolar generator. The magnetic field calculated conventionally could be good enough, but only if it were modified by a factor of at most ~0.6. Both inner and outer gaps may coexist in the magnetosphere of the Vela pulsar.

  2. Using a traffic simulation model (VISSIM) with an emissions model (MOVES) to predict emissions from vehicles on a limited-access highway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Senna, Hatem; Radwan, Essam; Westerlund, Kurt; Cooper, C David

    2013-07-01

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) estimates that baseline global GHG emissions may increase 25-90% from 2000 to 2030, with carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions growing 40-110% over the same period. On-road vehicles are a major source of CO2 emissions in all the developed countries, and in many of the developing countries in the world. Similarly, several criteria air pollutants are associated with transportation, for example, carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NO(x)), and particulate matter (PM). Therefore, the need to accurately quantify transportation-related emissions from vehicles is essential. The new US. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) mobile source emissions model, MOVES2010a (MOVES), can estimate vehicle emissions on a second-by-second basis, creating the opportunity to combine a microscopic traffic simulation model (such as VISSIM) with MOVES to obtain accurate results. This paper presents an examination of four different approaches to capture the environmental impacts of vehicular operations on a 10-mile stretch of Interstate 4 (I-4), an urban limited-access highway in Orlando, FL. First (at the most basic level), emissions were estimated for the entire 10-mile section "by hand" using one average traffic volume and average speed. Then three advanced levels of detail were studied using VISSIM/MOVES to analyze smaller links: average speeds and volumes (AVG), second-by-second link drive schedules (LDS), and second-by-second operating mode distributions (OPMODE). This paper analyzes how the various approaches affect predicted emissions of CO, NO(x), PM2.5, PM10, and CO2. The results demonstrate that obtaining precise and comprehensive operating mode distributions on a second-by-second basis provides more accurate emission estimates. Specifically, emission rates are highly sensitive to stop-and-go traffic and the associated driving cycles of acceleration, deceleration, and idling. Using the AVG or LDS approach may overestimate or

  3. Interplanetary Shocks Lacking Type 2 Radio Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Xie, H.; Maekela, P.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.; Kaiser, M. L.; Howard, R. A.; Bougeret, J.-L.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the radio-emission characteristics of 222 interplanetary (IP) shocks detected by spacecraft at Sun-Earth L1 during solar cycle 23 (1996 to 2006, inclusive). A surprisingly large fraction of the IP shocks (approximately 34%) was radio quiet (RQ; i.e., the shocks lacked type II radio bursts). We examined the properties of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and soft X-ray flares associated with such RQ shocks and compared them with those of the radio-loud (RL) shocks. The CMEs associated with the RQ shocks were generally slow (average speed approximately 535 km/s) and only approximately 40% of the CMEs were halos. The corresponding numbers for CMEs associated with RL shocks were 1237 km/s and 72%, respectively. Thus, the CME kinetic energy seems to be the deciding factor in the radio-emission properties of shocks. The lower kinetic energy of CMEs associated with RQ shocks is also suggested by the lower peak soft X-ray flux of the associated flares (C3.4 versus M4.7 for RL shocks). CMEs associated with RQ CMEs were generally accelerating within the coronagraph field of view (average acceleration approximately +6.8 m/s (exp 2)), while those associated with RL shocks were decelerating (average acceleration approximately 3.5 m/s (exp 2)). This suggests that many of the RQ shocks formed at large distances from the Sun, typically beyond 10 Rs, consistent with the absence of metric and decameter-hectometric (DH) type II radio bursts. A small fraction of RL shocks had type II radio emission solely in the kilometric (km) wavelength domain. Interestingly, the kinematics of the CMEs associated with the km type II bursts is similar to those of RQ shocks, except that the former are slightly more energetic. Comparison of the shock Mach numbers at 1 AU shows that the RQ shocks are mostly subcritical, suggesting that they were not efficient in accelerating electrons. The Mach number values also indicate that most of these are quasi-perpendicular shocks. The radio-quietness is

  4. Formulation of a mathematical model for the analysis of the emission ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Formulation of a mathematical model for the analysis of the emission of carbon dioxide from gaseous fuel using least square method. ... Government to take control measures in curtailing the emission of Carbon Dioxide in the country. Keywords: Gaseous fuel, Automobile, Fossil fuels, Pollutants, Carbon Dioxide, Emissions ...

  5. An alternative modelling approach to predict emissions of N2O and NO from forest soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijn, de A.M.G.; Grote, R.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.

    2011-01-01

    Emissions of N2O from forest soils in Europe are an important source of global greenhouse gas emissions. However, influencing the emission rates by forest management is difficult because the relations and feedbacks between forest and soils are complex. Process-based models covering both vegetation

  6. Uncertainty propagation analysis of an N2O emission model at the plot and landscape scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nol, L.; Heuvelink, G.B.M.; Veldkamp, A.; Vries, de W.; Kros, J.

    2010-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) emission from agricultural land is an important component of the total annual greenhouse gas (GHG) budget. In addition, uncertainties associated with agricultural N2O emissions are large. The goals of this work were (i) to quantify the uncertainties of modelled N2O emissions

  7. Early Time Optical Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopac, D.; Gomboc, A.; Japelj, J.

    We present the study of a sample of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) with contemporaneous early time optical and gamma-ray detections. By performing detailed temporal and spectral analysis of 18 GRBs which show optical peaks during prompt gamma-ray emission, we find that in most cases early time optical emission shows sharp and steep behavior, with a rich diversity of GRBs' broadband spectral properties. These observational results, supported by a simple internal shock dissipation model, show that the standard external shock interpretation for early time optical emission is disfavored in most cases where early time optical peaks are sharp (Delta t/t robotic optical telescopes.

  8. The effects of hemorrhagic shock secondary to hepatectomy in a swine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylonas, Anastasios I; Orfanos, Nikolaos F; Karmaniolou, Iosifina I; Lolis, Evangelos D; Stergiou, Eirini P; Papalois, Apostolos E; Nomikos, Tzortzis N; Kondi-Pafiti, Agathi I; Smyrniotis, Vasileios E; Arkadopoulos, Nikolaos F

    2015-05-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury caused by severe hemorrhagic shock and subsequent resuscitation leads to deterioration of hepatic homeostasis and possibly to liver failure. The present study focuses on determining whether there is a different biological response to hemorrhagic shock by different sources of hemorrhage, hepatic hemorrhage (HH) versus peripheral hemorrhage. Twenty-one male swine (Sus scrofa domesticus) were randomly allocated in three groups as follows: sham group (S, n = 5), central venous hemorrhage group, (CVH) (n = 8), and HH group (n = 8). Hepatectomy of the left liver lobe was carried out in groups CVH and HH, and the animals were subjected to controlled bleeding from the internal jugular vein and the traumatic liver surface, respectively. After 10 min of hemorrhage, shock was maintained for 30 min at mean arterial pressure levels of 30 mm Hg-40 mm Hg and resuscitation was initiated with crystalloids and colloids. Hemodynamic parameters and fluid balance were monitored throughout the 6 h of total duration of the experiment. Blood samples were collected at 0-, 40-, and 360-min time points for transaminases, albumin, and interleukin-6 measurement. Hepatic tissue was harvested at the end of the experiment for oxidative marker and proliferation analysis. Although blood loss was comparable between the two groups, the amount of fluids needed for resuscitation was higher for the HH group. Inflammatory response, measured by interleukin-6, was found higher in HH group. Oxidative stress markers did not reveal statistically significant difference between the two groups. Liver hemorrhage decreased hepatocellular proliferation measured by proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Our study provides evidence that HH entails worse consequences for the hepatocytes than systemic hemorrhage. Higher needs for resuscitation fluids, decreased proliferation, and augmented inflammatory response when HH takes place are findings with possible clinical importance in

  9. Methane emissions from a landfill in north-east India: Performance of various landfill gas emission models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollapalli, Muralidhar; Kota, Sri Harsha

    2017-11-22

    Rapid urbanization and economic growth has led to significant increase in municipal solid waste generation in India during the last few decades and its management has become a major issue because of poor waste management practices. Solid waste generated is deposited into open dumping sites with hardly any segregation and processing. Carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) are the major greenhouse gases that are released from the landfill sites due to the biodegradation of organic matter. In this present study, CH4 and CO2 emissions from a landfill in north-east India are estimated using a flux chamber during September, 2015 to August, 2016. The average emission rates of CH4 and CO2 are 68 and 92 mg/min/m2, respectively. The emissions are highest in the summer whilst being lowest in winter. The diurnal variation of emissions indicated that the emissions follow a trend similar to temperature in all the seasons. Correlation coefficients of CH4 and temperature in summer, monsoon and winter are 0.99, 0.87 and 0.97, respectively. The measured CH4 in this study is in the range of other studies around the world. Modified Triangular Method (MTM), IPCC model and the USEPA Landfill gas emissions model (LandGEM) were used to predict the CH4 emissions during the study year. The consequent simulation results indicate that the MTM, LandGEM-Clean Air Act, LandGEM-Inventory and IPCC models predict 1.9, 3.3, 1.6 and 1.4 times of the measured CH4 emission flux in this study. Assuming that this higher prediction of CH4 levels observed in this study holds well for other landfills in this region, a new CH4 emission inventory (Units: Tonnes/year), with a resolution of 0.10 × 0.10 has been developed. This study stresses the importance of biodegradable composition of waste and meteorology, and also points out the drawbacks of the widely used landfill emission models. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Regional emission metrics for short-lived climate forcers from multiple models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Aamaas

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available For short-lived climate forcers (SLCFs, the impact of emissions depends on where and when the emissions take place. Comprehensive new calculations of various emission metrics for SLCFs are presented based on radiative forcing (RF values calculated in four different (chemical-transport or coupled chemistry–climate models. We distinguish between emissions during summer (May–October and winter (November–April for emissions in Europe and East Asia, as well as from the global shipping sector and global emissions. The species included in this study are aerosols and aerosol precursors (BC, OC, SO2, NH3, as well as ozone precursors (NOx, CO, VOCs, which also influence aerosols to a lesser degree. Emission metrics for global climate responses of these emissions, as well as for CH4, have been calculated using global warming potential (GWP and global temperature change potential (GTP, based on dedicated RF simulations by four global models. The emission metrics include indirect cloud effects of aerosols and the semi-direct forcing for BC. In addition to the standard emission metrics for pulse and sustained emissions, we have also calculated a new emission metric designed for an emission profile consisting of a ramping period of 15 years followed by sustained emissions, which is more appropriate for a gradual implementation of mitigation policies.For the aerosols, the emission metric values are larger in magnitude for emissions in Europe than East Asia and for summer than winter. A variation is also observed for the ozone precursors, with largest values for emissions in East Asia and winter for CO and in Europe and summer for VOCs. In general, the variations between the emission metrics derived from different models are larger than the variations between regions and seasons, but the regional and seasonal variations for the best estimate also hold for most of the models individually. Further, the estimated climate impact of an illustrative mitigation

  11. Septic Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Christopher W.; Rosengart, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Septic shock is a clinical emergency that occurs in more than 230 000 US patients each year. OBSERVATIONS AND ADVANCES In the setting of suspected or documented infection, septic shock is typically defined in a clinical setting by low systolic (≤90 mm Hg) or mean arterial blood pressure (≤65 mm Hg) accompanied by signs of hypoperfusion (eg, oliguria, hyperlactemia, poor peripheral perfusion, or altered mental status). Focused ultrasonography is recommended for the prompt recognition of complicating physiology (eg, hypovolemia or cardiogenic shock), while invasive hemodynamic monitoring is recommended only for select patients. In septic shock, 3 randomized clinical trials demonstrate that protocolized care offers little advantage compared with management without a protocol. Hydroxyethyl starch is no longer recommended, and debate continues about the role of various crystalloid solutions and albumin. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The prompt diagnosis of septic shock begins with obtainment of medical history and performance of a physical examination for signs and symptoms of infection and may require focused ultrasonography to recognize more complex physiologic manifestations of shock. Clinicians should understand the importance of prompt administration of intravenous fluids and vasoactive medications aimed at restoring adequate circulation, and the limitations of protocol-based therapy, as guided by recent evidence. PMID:26284722

  12. Inverse modelling of national and European CH4 emissions using the atmospheric zoom model TM5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Bergamaschi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A synthesis inversion based on the atmospheric zoom model TM5 is used to derive top-down estimates of CH4 emissions from individual European countries for the year 2001. We employ a model zoom over Europe with 1° × 1° resolution that is two-way nested into the global model domain (with resolution of 6° × 4°. This approach ensures consistent boundary conditions for the zoom domain and thus European top-down estimates consistent with global CH4 observations. The TM5 model, driven by ECMWF analyses, simulates synoptic scale events at most European and global sites fairly well, and the use of high-frequency observations allows exploiting the information content of individual synoptic events. A detailed source attribution is presented for a comprehensive set of 56 monitoring sites, assigning the atmospheric signal to the emissions of individual European countries and larger global regions. The available observational data put significant constraints on emissions from different regions. Within Europe, in particular several Western European countries are well constrained. The inversion results suggest up to 50-90% higher anthropogenic CH4 emissions in 2001 for Germany, France and UK compared to reported UNFCCC values (EEA, 2003. A recent revision of the German inventory, however, resulted in an increase of reported CH4 emissions by 68.5% (EEA, 2004, being now in very good agreement with our top-down estimate. The top-down estimate for Finland is distinctly smaller than the a priori estimate, suggesting much smaller CH4 emissions from Finnish wetlands than derived from the bottom-up inventory. The EU-15 totals are relatively close to UNFCCC values (within 4-30% and appear very robust for different inversion scenarios.

  13. Modelling Holocene carbon accumulation and methane emissions of boreal wetlands – an Earth system model approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Schuldt

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the Last Glacial Maximum, boreal wetlands have accumulated substantial amounts of peat, estimated at 180–621 Pg of carbon. Wetlands have significantly affected the atmospheric greenhouse gas composition in the past and will play a significant role in future changes of atmospheric CO2 and CH4 concentrations. In order to investigate those changes with an Earth system model, biogeochemical processes in boreal wetlands need to be accounted for. Thus, a model of peat accumulation and decay was developed and included in the land surface model JSBACH of the Max Planck Institute Earth System Model (MPI-ESM. Here we present the evaluation of model results from 6000 yr BP to the pre-industrial period. Over this period of time, 240 Pg of peat carbon accumulated in the model in the areas north of 40° N. Simulated peat accumulation rates agree well with those reported for boreal wetlands. The model simulates CH4 emissions of 49.3 Tg CH4 yr−1 for 6000 yr BP and 51.5 Tg CH4 yr−1 for pre-industrial times. This is within the range of estimates in the literature, which range from 32 to 112 Tg CH4 yr−1 for boreal wetlands. The modelled methane emission for the West Siberian Lowlands and Hudson Bay Lowlands agree well with observations. The rising trend of methane emissions over the last 6000 yr is in agreement with measurements of Antarctic and Greenland ice cores.

  14. Estimation of emissions of nonmethane organic compounds from a closed landfill site using a landfill gas emission model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nwachukwu, A.N. [Williamson Research Centre for Molecular Environmental Sciences, School of Earth, Atmospheric and Environmental Science, University of Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Diya, A.W. [Health Sciences Research Group, School of Medicine, University of Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    Nonmethane organic compounds (NMOC) emissions from landfills often constitute significant risks both to human health and the general environment. To date very little work has been done on tracking the emissions of NMOC from landfills. To this end, a concerted effort was made to investigate the total annual mass emission rate of NMOC from a closed landfill site in South Manchester, United Kingdom. This was done by using field estimates of NMOC concentration and the landfill parameters into the Landfill Gas Emission Model embedded in ACTS and RISK software. Two results were obtained: (i) a deterministic outcome of 1.7218 x 10-7 kg/year, which was calculated from mean values of the field estimates of NMOC concentration and the landfill parameters, and (ii) a probabilistic outcome of 1.66 x 10-7 - 1.78 x 10-7 kg/year, which is a range of value obtained after Monte Carlo simulation of the uncertain parameters of the landfill including NMOC concentration. A comparison between these two results suggests that the probabilistic outcome is a more representative and reliable estimate of the total annual mass emission of NMOC especially given the variability of the parameters of the model. Moreover, a comparison of the model result and the safety standard of 5.0 x 10-5 kg/year indicate that the mass emission of NMOC from the studied landfill is significantly less than previously thought. However, given that this can accumulate to a dangerous level over a long period of time (such as the age of this landfill site); it may have started affecting the health of the people living within the vicinity of the landfill. A case is therefore made for more studies to be carried out on the emissions of other gases such as CH4 and CO2 from the studied landfill site, as this would help to understand the synergistic effect of the various gases being emitted from the landfill.

  15. Modeling of the electron distribution based on bremsstrahlung emission during lower hybrid current drive on PLT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, J.E.; von Goeler, S.; Bernabei, S.; Bitter, M.; Chu, T.K.; Efthimion, P.; Fisch, N.; Hooke, W.; Hosea, J.; Jobes, F.

    1985-03-01

    Lower hybrid current drive requires the generation of a high energy electron tail anisotropic in velocity. Measurements of bremsstrahlung emission produced by this tail are compared with the calculated emission from reasonable model distributions. The physical basis and the sensitivity of this modeling process are described and the plasma properties of current driven discharges which can be derived from the model are discussed.

  16. Implementation of the MEGAN (v2.1) biogenic emission model in the ECHAM6-HAMMOZ chemistry climate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrot, Alexandra-Jane; Stanelle, Tanja; Schröder, Sabine; Siegenthaler, Colombe; Taraborrelli, Domenico; Schultz, Martin G.

    2017-02-01

    A biogenic emission scheme based on the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) version 2.1 (Guenther et al., 2012) has been integrated into the ECHAM6-HAMMOZ chemistry climate model in order to calculate the emissions from terrestrial vegetation of 32 compounds. The estimated annual global total for the reference simulation is 634 Tg C yr-1 (simulation period 2000-2012). Isoprene is the main contributor to the average emission total, accounting for 66 % (417 Tg C yr-1), followed by several monoterpenes (12 %), methanol (7 %), acetone (3.6 %), and ethene (3.6 %). Regionally, most of the high annual emissions are found to be associated with tropical regions and tropical vegetation types. In order to evaluate the implementation of the biogenic model in ECHAM-HAMMOZ, global and regional biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions of the reference simulation were compared to previous published experiment results with MEGAN. Several sensitivity simulations were performed to study the impact of different model input and parameters related to the vegetation cover and the ECHAM6 climate. BVOC emissions obtained here are within the range of previous published estimates. The large range of emission estimates can be attributed to the use of different input data and empirical coefficients within different setups of MEGAN. The biogenic model shows a high sensitivity to the changes in plant functional type (PFT) distributions and associated emission factors for most of the compounds. The global emission impact for isoprene is about -9 %, but reaches +75 % for α-pinene when switching from global emission factor maps to PFT-specific emission factor distributions. The highest sensitivity of isoprene emissions is calculated when considering soil moisture impact, with a global decrease of 12.5 % when the soil moisture activity factor is included in the model parameterization. Nudging ECHAM6 climate towards ERA-Interim reanalysis has an impact on the

  17. Isoprene emissions modelling for West Africa: MEGAN model evaluation and sensitivity analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ferreira

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Isoprene emissions are the largest source of reactive carbon to the atmosphere, with the tropics being a major source region. These natural emissions are expected to change with changing climate and human impact on land use. As part of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (AMMA project the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN has been used to estimate the spatial and temporal distribution of isoprene emissions over the West African region. During the AMMA field campaign, carried out in July and August 2006, isoprene mixing ratios were measured on board the FAAM BAe-146 aircraft. These data have been used to make a qualitative evaluation of the model performance.

    MEGAN was firstly applied to a large area covering much of West Africa from the Gulf of Guinea in the south to the desert in the north and was able to capture the large scale spatial distribution of isoprene emissions as inferred from the observed isoprene mixing ratios. In particular the model captures the transition from the forested area in the south to the bare soils in the north, but some discrepancies have been identified over the bare soil, mainly due to the emission factors used. Sensitivity analyses were performed to assess the model response to changes in driving parameters, namely Leaf Area Index (LAI, Emission Factors (EF, temperature and solar radiation.

    A high resolution simulation was made of a limited area south of Niamey, Niger, where the higher concentrations of isoprene were observed. This is used to evaluate the model's ability to simulate smaller scale spatial features and to examine the influence of the driving parameters on an hourly basis through a case study of a flight on 17 August 2006.

    This study highlights the complex interactions between land surface processes and the meteorological dynamics and chemical composition of the PBL. This has implications for quantifying the impact of biogenic emissions

  18. Biomass burning emissions over northern Australia constrained by aerosol measurements: I—Modelling the distribution of hourly emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, C. P. (Mick); Luhar, Ashok K.; Mitchell, Ross M.

    Emissions of aerosol from biomass burning in northern Australia are globally significant, yet existing estimates of their magnitude are essentially unconstrained by observation. This two-part series (see Part II by Luhar et al. [2008. Biomass burning emissions over northern Australia constrained by aerosol measurements: II—Model validation, and impacts on air quality and radiative forcing. Atmospheric Environment, submitted for publication] seeks to address this by first formulating a scheme to determine the emissions from the Top End region of the Northern Territory during the 2004 burning season at a high temporal and spatial resolution (1 h, 1 km). The emissions are then validated using a meteorological and transport model called TAPM coupled with a variety of field measurements. The high resolution not only enables validation against various meteorological and aerosol data sets, but also allows prediction of local air quality events. Essential inputs to the emission calculations are satellite-based measurements of fire scars, yielding burnt areas, and hotspots, providing timing information on daily basis. It is shown that hotspots without associated fire scars must be taken into account in order to produce credible aerosol fields. Prediction of emissions at hourly time resolution is enabled by assigning a diurnal variation based on a McArthur fire danger meter. The total carbon emission for the 2004 season is computed to be 67.6 Tg, in remarkable agreement with the bulk estimate of 64.3 Tg derived for the Australian National Greenhouse Gas Inventory, and comparable to the figure of 57.0 Tg determined from the Global Fire Emissions Database (GFEDv2). The total PM 2.5 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 μm or less) emission is computed to be 0.67 Tg. The transport modelling shows that emissions leaving the study region are largely advected to the west over the Timor Sea towards the Indonesian archipelago from April to September, shifting to

  19. Finite Element and Plate Theory Modeling of Acoustic Emission Waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, W. H.; Hamstad, M. A.; Gary, J.; OGallagher, A.

    1998-01-01

    A comparison was made between two approaches to predict acoustic emission waveforms in thin plates. A normal mode solution method for Mindlin plate theory was used to predict the response of the flexural plate mode to a point source, step-function load, applied on the plate surface. The second approach used a dynamic finite element method to model the problem using equations of motion based on exact linear elasticity. Calculations were made using properties for both isotropic (aluminum) and anisotropic (unidirectional graphite/epoxy composite) materials. For simulations of anisotropic plates, propagation along multiple directions was evaluated. In general, agreement between the two theoretical approaches was good. Discrepancies in the waveforms at longer times were caused by differences in reflections from the lateral plate boundaries. These differences resulted from the fact that the two methods used different boundary conditions. At shorter times in the signals, before reflections, the slight discrepancies in the waveforms were attributed to limitations of Mindlin plate theory, which is an approximate plate theory. The advantages of the finite element method are that it used the exact linear elasticity solutions, and that it can be used to model real source conditions and complicated, finite specimen geometries as well as thick plates. These advantages come at a cost of increased computational difficulty, requiring lengthy calculations on workstations or supercomputers. The Mindlin plate theory solutions, meanwhile, can be quickly generated on personal computers. Specimens with finite geometry can also be modeled. However, only limited simple geometries such as circular or rectangular plates can easily be accommodated with the normal mode solution technique. Likewise, very limited source configurations can be modeled and plate theory is applicable only to thin plates.

  20. Thermal shock fracture mechanics analysis of a semi-infinite medium based on the dual-phase-lag heat conduction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B.; Li, J. E.; Yang, C.

    2015-01-01

    The generalized lagging behaviour in solids is very important in understanding heat conduction in small-scale and high-rate heating. In this paper, an edge crack in a semi-infinite medium subjected to a heat shock on its surface is studied under the framework of the dual-phase-lag (DPL) heat conduction model. The transient thermal stress in the medium without crack is obtained first. This stress is used as the crack surface traction with an opposite sign to formulate the crack problem. Numerical results of thermal stress intensity factor are obtained as the functions of crack length and thermal shock time. Crack propagation predictions are conducted and results based on the DPL model and those based on the classical Fourier heat conduction model are compared. The thermal shock strength that the medium can sustain without catastrophic failure is established according to the maximum local stress criterion and the stress intensity factor criterion. PMID:25663805

  1. Cathelicidin peptide sheep myeloid antimicrobial peptide-29 prevents endotoxin-induced mortality in rat models of septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacometti, Andrea; Cirioni, Oscar; Ghiselli, Roberto; Mocchegiani, Federico; D'Amato, Giuseppina; Circo, Raffaella; Orlando, Fiorenza; Skerlavaj, Barbara; Silvestri, Carmela; Saba, Vittorio; Zanetti, Margherita; Scalise, Giorgio

    2004-01-15

    The present study was designed to investigate the antiendotoxin activity and therapeutic efficacy of sheep myeloid antimicrobial peptide (SMAP)-29, a cathelicidin-derived peptide. The in vitro ability of SMAP-29 to bind LPS from Escherichia coli 0111:B4 was determined using a sensitive limulus chromogenic assay. Two rat models of septic shock were performed: (1) rats were injected intraperitoneally with 1 mg E. coli 0111:B4 LPS and (2) intraabdominal sepsis was induced via cecal ligation and single puncture. All animals were randomized to receive parenterally isotonic sodium chloride solution, 1 mg/kg SMAP-29, 1 mg/kg polymyxin B or 20 mg/kg imipenem. The main outcome measures were: abdominal exudate and plasma bacterial growth, plasma endotoxin and tumor necrosis factor-alpha concentrations, and lethality. The in vitro study showed that SMAP-29 completely inhibited the LPS procoagulant activity at approximately 10 microM peptide concentration. The in vivo experiments showed that all compounds reduced the lethality when compared with control animals. SMAP-29 achieved a substantial decrease in endotoxin and tumor necrosis factor-alpha plasma concentrations when compared with imipenem and saline treatment and exhibited a slightly lower antimicrobial activity than imipenem. No statistically significant differences were noted between SMAP-29 and polymyxin B. SMAP-29, because of its double antiendotoxin and antimicrobial activities, could be an interesting compound for septic shock treatment.

  2. Gas tonometry for evaluation of gastrointestinal mucosal perfusion: experimental models of trauma, shock and complex surgical maneuvers - Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figueiredo Luiz Francisco Poli de

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Substantial clinical and animal evidences indicate that the mesenteric circulatory bed, particularly the gut mucosa, is highly vulnerable to reductions in oxygen supply and prone to early injury in the course of hemodynamic changes induced by trauma, shock, sepsis and several complex surgical maneuvers. Gut hypoxia or ischemia is one possible contributing factor to gastrointestinal tract barrier dysfunction that may be associated with the development of systemic inflammatory response and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, a common cause of death after trauma, sepsis or major surgeries. Monitoring gut perfusion during experiments may provide valuable insights over new interventions and therapies highly needed to reduce trauma and sepsis-related morbidity and mortality. We present our experience with gas tonometry as a monitor of the adequacy of gastrointestinal mucosal perfusion in clinical and experimental models of trauma, shock and surgical maneuvers associated with abrupt hemodynamic changes, such as aortic occlusion and hepatic vascular exclusion. Next issue we will be presenting our experience with gas tonometry in experimental and clinical sepsis.

  3. The brain metabolic activity after resuscitation with liposome-encapsulated hemoglobin in a rat model of hypovolemic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Geeta; Hedrick, Andria F; Yadav, Vivek R; Xie, Jun; Hussain, Alamdar; Awasthi, Vibhudutta

    2015-09-01

    We examined the effect of resuscitation with liposome-encapsulated hemoglobin (LEH) on cerebral bioenergetics in a rat model of 45% hypovolemia. The rats were resuscitated with isovolemic LEH or saline after 15 minutes of shock and followed up to 6 hours. Untreated hypovolemic rats received no fluid. The cerebral uptake of F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was measured by PET, and at 6 hours, the brain was collected for various assays. Hypovolemia decreased cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP), phosphocreatine, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)/NADH ratio, citrate synthase activity, glucose-6-phosphate, and nerve growth factor (NGF), even when FDG uptake remained unchanged. The FDG uptake was reduced by saline, but not by LEH infusion. The reduced FDG uptake in saline group was associated with a decrease in hexokinase I expression. The LEH infusion effectively restored ATP content, NAD/NADH ratio, and NGF expression, and reduced the hypovolemia-induced accumulation of pyruvate and ubiquitinated proteins; in comparison, saline was significantly less effective. The LEH infusion was associated with low pH and high anion gap, indicating anionic gap acidosis. The results suggest that hypovolemic shock perturbs glucose metabolism at the level of pyruvate utilization, resulting in deranged cerebral energy stores. The correction of volume and oxygen deficits by LEH recovers the cerebral metabolism and creates a prosurvival phenotype.

  4. Recent developments of inverse Compton scattering model of pulsar radio emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, G. J.; Xu, R. X.; Liu, J. F.; Zhang, B.; Han, J. L.

    Many theoretical efforts were made to understand the core and conal emission identified from observations by Rankin (1983) and Lyne and Manchester (1988). One of them, named as inverse Compton scattering (ICS) model (Qiao & Lin 1998), has been proposed. It is found in the model that: there are central or `core' emission beam, and one or two hollow conical emission beams; the different emission components are emitted at different heights; owing to different radiation components emitted from different height, the observed emission beams can be shifted from each other due to retardation and aberration effects; the sizes of emission components change with frequencies. Recent developments of the model include: simulations of pulse profiles at different frequencies; studying the basic polarization properties of inverse Compton scattering in strong magnetic fields; computing the polarizations and spectrum of core and cones. A new classification system was also proposed. The main results calculated from the model are consistent with the observations.

  5. Anti-inflammatory effect of a Nuphar lutea partially purified leaf extract in murine models of septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, J; Levi, T; Golan-Goldhirsh, A; Gopas, J

    2015-02-23

    Various plant organs of Nuphar lutea (L.) SM. (Nymphaeaceae) are used in traditional medicine for the treatment of arthritis, fever, aches, pains and inflammation. The main purpose of this study was to determine the anti-inflammatory effect of Nuphar lutea leaf extract (NUP) in two septic shock models: (1) Survival of mice challenged with a lethal dose of LPS, determination of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines in serum, as well as in peritoneal macrophages in cell culture. (2) The effect of NUP in a murine model of fecal-induced peritonitis. NUP pre-treatment partially protected mice in two models of acute septic shock. We concluded that NUP is anti-inflammatory by inhibiting the NF-κB pathway, modulating cytokine production and ERK phosphorylation. A significant average survival rate (60%) of LPS lethally-challenged mice was achieved by pre-treatment with NUP. In addition, NUP pre-treatment reduced nuclear NF-κB translocation in peritoneal macrophages. The production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-12, in the sera of LPS-treated mice or in the supernatants of peritoneal macrophages stimulated with LPS for 2-6 h was also decreased by NUP. Pre-treatment with NUP caused a significant increase in the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. The NUP pre-treatment reduced and delayed mortality in mice with fecal-induced peritonitis. Our studies also revealed that NUP pre-treatment induced a dose-dependent phosphorylation of ERK in peritoneal macrophages. Since most of the reports about the anti-inflammatory effect of Nuphar lutea refer to rhizome and root powder and extracts, it is important to clarify the effectiveness of leaf extract as a source for such activity. NUP pre-treatment partially protected mice in two models of acute septic shock. We concluded that NUP is anti-inflammatory by inhibiting the NF-κB pathway, modulating cytokine production and ERK phosphorylation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Emissions modeling of fluidised bed co-combustion of poultry litter and peat

    OpenAIRE

    Henihan, Anne Marie; Leahy, Martin J.; Leahy, J. J.; Cummins, E; B. P. Kelleher

    2003-01-01

    peer-reviewed Gaseous emissions from the fluidised bed co-combustion of 50% w/w chicken litter and peat were monitored and recorded. Emission data were used to create a dispersion model for a proposed site on a poultry farm in Ireland. Variables within the combustion unit influenced both combustion and emission levels of pollutants such as SO2 and NOx, CO. Concentrations of atmospheric pollutants decreased with use of the correct ratio between fluidising and secondary air. Dispersion model...

  7. Mathematical modelling of positive carbon-climate feedback: permafrost lake methane emission case

    OpenAIRE

    I. A. Sudakov; Vakulenko, S. A.

    2012-01-01

    The permafrost methane emission problem is in the focus of attention of different climate models. We present new approach to the permafrost methane emission modeling. The tundra permafrost lakes is potential source of methane emission. Typically, tundra landscape contains a number of small lakes and warming leads to lake extension. We are making use of this process by the nonlinear theory of phase transitions. We find that climate catastrophe possibility depends on a feedbac...

  8. Global terrestrial isoprene emission models: sensitivity to variability in climate and vegetation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Arneth

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to its effects on the atmospheric lifetime of methane, the burdens of tropospheric ozone and growth of secondary organic aerosol, isoprene is central among the biogenic compounds that need to be taken into account for assessment of anthropogenic air pollution-climate change interactions. Lack of process-understanding regarding leaf isoprene production as well as of suitable observations to constrain and evaluate regional or global simulation results add large uncertainties to past, present and future emissions estimates. Focusing on contemporary climate conditions, we compare three global isoprene models that differ in their representation of vegetation and isoprene emission algorithm. We specifically aim to investigate the between- and within model variation that is introduced by varying some of the models' main features, and to determine which spatial and/or temporal features are robust between models and different experimental set-ups. In their individual standard configurations, the models broadly agree with respect to the chief isoprene sources and emission seasonality, with maximum monthly emission rates around 20–25 Tg C, when averaged by 30-degree latitudinal bands. They also indicate relatively small (approximately 5 to 10 % around the mean interannual variability of total global emissions. The models are sensitive to changes in one or more of their main model components and drivers (e.g., underlying vegetation fields, climate input which can yield increases or decreases in total annual emissions of cumulatively by more than 30 %. Varying drivers also strongly alters the seasonal emission pattern. The variable response needs to be interpreted in view of the vegetation emission capacities, as well as diverging absolute and regional distribution of light, radiation and temperature, but the direction of the simulated emission changes was not as uniform as anticipated. Our results highlight the need for modellers to evaluate their

  9. [Obstructive shock].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pich, H; Heller, A R

    2015-05-01

    An acute obstruction of blood flow in central vessels of the systemic or pulmonary circulation causes the clinical symptoms of shock accompanied by disturbances of consciousness, centralization, oliguria, hypotension and tachycardia. In the case of an acute pulmonary embolism an intravascular occlusion results in an acute increase of the right ventricular afterload. In the case of a tension pneumothorax, an obstruction of the blood vessels supplying the heart is caused by an increase in extravascular pressure. From a hemodynamic viewpoint circulatory shock caused by obstruction is closely followed by cardiac deterioration; however, etiological and therapeutic options necessitate demarcation of cardiac from non-cardiac obstructive causes. The high dynamics of this potentially life-threatening condition is a hallmark of all types of obstructive shock. This requires an expeditious and purposeful diagnosis and a rapid and well-aimed therapy.

  10. Evaluation of a plot-scale methane emission model using eddy covariance observations and footprint modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Budishchev

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Most plot-scale methane emission models – of which many have been developed in the recent past – are validated using data collected with the closed-chamber technique. This method, however, suffers from a low spatial representativeness and a poor temporal resolution. Also, during a chamber-flux measurement the air within a chamber is separated from the ambient atmosphere, which negates the influence of wind on emissions. Additionally, some methane models are validated by upscaling fluxes based on the area-weighted averages of modelled fluxes, and by comparing those to the eddy covariance (EC flux. This technique is rather inaccurate, as the area of upscaling might be different from the EC tower footprint, therefore introducing significant mismatch. In this study, we present an approach to validate plot-scale methane models with EC observations using the footprint-weighted average method. Our results show that the fluxes obtained by the footprint-weighted average method are of the same magnitude as the EC flux. More importantly, the temporal dynamics of the EC flux on a daily timescale are also captured (r2 = 0.7. In contrast, using the area-weighted average method yielded a low (r2 = 0.14 correlation with the EC measurements. This shows that the footprint-weighted average method is preferable when validating methane emission models with EC fluxes for areas with a heterogeneous and irregular vegetation pattern.

  11. Impacts of climate and emission changes on nitrogen deposition in Europe: a multi-model study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Simpson

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The impact of climate and emissions changes on the deposition of reactive nitrogen (Nr over Europe was studied using four offline regional chemistry transport models (CTMs driven by the same global projection of future climate over the period 2000–2050. Anthropogenic emissions for the years 2005 and 2050 were used for simulations of both present and future periods in order to isolate the impact of climate change, hemispheric boundary conditions and emissions, and to assess the robustness of the results across the different models. The results from these four CTMs clearly show that the main driver of future N-deposition changes is the specified emission change. Under the specified emission scenario for 2050, emissions of oxidised nitrogen were reduced substantially, whereas emissions of NH3 increase to some extent, and these changes are largely reflected in the modelled concentrations and depositions. The lack of sulfur and oxidised nitrogen in the future atmosphere results in a much larger fraction of NHx being present in the form of gaseous ammonia. Predictions for wet and total deposition were broadly consistent, although the three fine-scale models resolve European emission areas and changes better than the hemispheric-scale model. The biggest difference in the models is for predictions of individual N compounds. One model (EMEP was used to explore changes in critical loads, also in conjunction with speculative climate-induced increases in NH3 emissions. These calculations suggest that the area of ecosystems that exceeds critical loads is reduced from 64% for year 2005 emissions levels to 50% for currently estimated 2050 levels. A possible climate-induced increase in NH3 emissions could worsen the situation, with areas exceeded increasing again to 57% (for a 30% NH3 emission increase.

  12. Modeling methane emissions from arctic lakes: Model development and site-level study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zeli; Zhuang, Qianlai; Walter Anthony, Katey

    2015-06-01

    To date, methane emissions from lakes in the pan-arctic region are poorly quantified. In order to investigate the response of methane emissions from this region to global warming, a process-based climate-sensitive lake biogeochemical model was developed. The processes of methane production, oxidation, and transport were modeled within a one-dimensional sediment and water column. The sizes of 14C-enriched and 14C-depleted carbon pools were explicitly parameterized. The model was validated using observational data from five lakes located in Siberia and Alaska, representing a large variety of environmental conditions in the arctic. The model simulations agreed well with the measured water temperature and dissolved CH4 concentration (mean error less than 1°C and 0.2 μM, respectively). The modeled CH4 fluxes were consistent with observations in these lakes. We found that bubbling-rate-controlling nitrogen (N2) stripping was the most important factor in determining CH4 fraction in bubbles. Lake depth and ice cover thickness in shallow waters were also controlling factors. This study demonstrated that the thawing of Pleistocene-aged organic-rich yedoma can fuel sediment methanogenesis by supplying a large quantity of labile organic carbon. Observations and modeling results both confirmed that methane emission rate at thermokarst margins of yedoma lakes was much larger (up to 538 mg CH4 m-2 d-1) than that at nonthermokarst zones in the same lakes and a nonyedoma, nonthermokarst lake (less than 42 mg CH4 m-2 d-1). The seasonal variability of methane emissions can be explained primarily by energy input and organic carbon availability.

  13. Process-based modelling of ammonia emission over a urine patch - Towards developing a field scale emission model for regional use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moring, Andrea; Vieno, Massimo; Doherty, Ruth; Sutton, Mark A.

    2014-05-01

    This work investigates the influence of meteorological factors on ammonia related atmospheric processes, with a special focus on emission from grazing. For this purpose we are developing a process-based model (GAG: Generation of Ammonia from Grazing) driven by meteorology that can simulate the ammonia emission from a field covered by urine patches. The aim of this work is to implement the GAG model into the EMEP atmospheric chemical transport model (ACTM), and examine the changes of surface ammonia concentrations under future climate scenarios. The research is carried out within the framework of the ECLAIRE project (Effects of Climate Change on Air Pollution and Response Strategies for European Ecosystems). To estimate the sensitivity of surface concentrations of ammonia to a temperature dependent emission approach, we applied a temperature function in the EMEP model for the agricultural ammonia emissions from the UK. With the original emissions the resulting surface ammonia concentration has a bimodal seasonal tendency, with a peak in the beginning of the spring when agricultural management starts and with a second maximum during the autumn when fertilizer is typically spread. With our new temperature dependent approach the seasonal cycle became unimodal with a peak in June. This significant difference supports the need for a dynamic emission approach in ACTMs. The GAG model currently works for a single urine patch. Before it calculates the ammonia emission flux over the urine patch the model simulates the ammoniacal nitrogen budget and the water budget under the patch. The preliminary results for emission fluxes are in good agreement with the measurements. However, the differences highlight that further improvements are necessary.

  14. The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature version 2.1 (MEGAN2.1: an extended and updated framework for modeling biogenic emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Guenther

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature version 2.1 (MEGAN2.1 is a modeling framework for estimating fluxes of biogenic compounds between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere using simple mechanistic algorithms to account for the major known processes controlling biogenic emissions. It is available as an offline code and has also been coupled into land surface and atmospheric chemistry models. MEGAN2.1 is an update from the previous versions including MEGAN2.0, which was described for isoprene emissions by Guenther et al. (2006 and MEGAN2.02, which was described for monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions by Sakulyanontvittaya et al. (2008. Isoprene comprises about half of the total global biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC emission of 1 Pg (1000 Tg or 1015 g estimated using MEGAN2.1. Methanol, ethanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, α-pinene, β-pinene, t-β-ocimene, limonene, ethene, and propene together contribute another 30% of the MEGAN2.1 estimated emission. An additional 20 compounds (mostly terpenoids are associated with the MEGAN2.1 estimates of another 17% of the total emission with the remaining 3% distributed among >100 compounds. Emissions of 41 monoterpenes and 32 sesquiterpenes together comprise about 15% and 3%, respectively, of the estimated total global BVOC emission. Tropical trees cover about 18% of the global land surface and are estimated to be responsible for ~80% of terpenoid emissions and ~50% of other VOC emissions. Other trees cover about the same area but are estimated to contribute only about 10% of total emissions. The magnitude of the emissions estimated with MEGAN2.1 are within the range of estimates reported using other approaches and much of the differences between reported values can be attributed to land cover and meteorological driving variables. The offline version of MEGAN2.1 source code and driving variables is available from

  15. Community-LINE Source Model (C-LINE) to estimate roadway emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    C-LINE is a web-based model that estimates emissions and dispersion of toxic air pollutants for roadways in the U.S. This reduced-form air quality model examines what-if scenarios for changes in emissions such as traffic volume fleet mix and vehicle speed.

  16. Fashion consumer behaviour impact on the model of last mile urban area emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spijkerman, Rene

    2016-01-01

    To enhance the validity of a mobility emission-effects model, a research is conducted on consumer behaviour. Consumer mobilitypreferences are the main determining factor in the proposed model that describes the kilometre and emission outcome under several scenarios. Motorized mobility of consumers

  17. Modeling Nitrous Oxide emissions and identifying emission controlling factors for a spruce forest ecosystem on drained organic soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hongxing; Kasimir, Åsa; Jansson, Per-Erik; Svensson, Magnus; Meyer, Astrid; Klemedtsson, Leif

    2015-04-01

    High Nitrous Oxide (N2O) emission has been identified in hemiboreal forests on drained organic soils. However, the controlling factors regulating the emissions have been unclear. To examine the importance of different factors on the N2O emission in a spruce forest on drained organic soil, a process-based model, CoupModel, was calibrated by the generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation (GLUE) method. The calibrated model reproduced most of the high resolution data (total net radiation, soil temperature, groundwater level, net ecosystem exchange, etc.) very well, as well as accumulated measured N2O emissions, but showed difficulties to capture all the measured emission peaks. Parameter uncertainties could be reduced by combining selected criteria with the measurement data. The model showed the N2O emissions during the summer to be controlled mainly by the competition between plants and microbes while during the winter season snow melt periods are important. The simulated N budget shows >100 kg N ha-1 yr-1 to be in circulation between soil and plants and back again. Each year the peat mineralization adds about 60 kg N ha-1 and atmospheric deposition 12 kg N ha-1. Most of the mineralized litter and peat N is directly taken up by the plants but only a part accumulates in the plant biomass. As long as no timber is harvested the main N loss from the system is through nitrate leaching (30 kg N ha-1 yr-1) and gas emissions (20 kg N ha-1 yr-1), 55% as NO, 27% as N2O and 18% as N2. Regarding N2O gas emissions, our modeling indicates denitrification to be the most responsible process, of the size 6 kg N ha-1 yr-1, which could be compared to 0.04 kg N ha-1 yr-1 from nitrification. Our modelling also reveal 88% of the N2O mainly to be produced by denitrification in the capillary fringe (c.a. 40-60 cm below soil surface) of the anaerobic zone using nitrate produced in the upper more aerobic layers. We conclude N2O production/emission to be controlled mainly by the complex

  18. THERMAL SHOCK RESISTANCE OF A SODA LIME GLASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. MALOU

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We studied the thermal shock of a three millimeters thickness soda lime glass using the hot-cold thermal shock technique. The cooling was made by ambient air jet on previously warmed samples. The heat transfer coefficient was about 600 W/°C.m2 (Biot number β = 0.3. The thermal shock duration was fixed at 6 seconds. The hot temperature was taken between 100°C and 550°C while the cold temperature of the air flux was kept constant at 20°C. The acoustic emission technique was used for determining the failure time and the critical temperature difference (ΔTC. By referring to experimental results, thermal shock modelling computations are conducted. Our aim is especially focused on the fracture initiation moments during the cooling process and on the crack initiation sites. The used modeling is based on the local approach of the thermal shock during the experimental data treatment. For each test, the temperature profile and the transient stress state through the samples thickness are determined. By applying the linear superposition property of the stress intensity factors, evolution of the stress intensity factor KI in function of the pre-existing natural flaws in the glass surface is established. The size of the critical flaw is determined by the linear fracture mechanics laws. Computation results confirm the experimental values of the critical difference temperature obtained that is the source of the glass degradation.

  19. Shockingly low water abundances in Herschel/PACS observations of low-mass protostars in Perseus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karska, A.; Kristensen, L. E.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Drozdovskaya, M. N.; Mottram, J. C.; Herczeg, G. J.; Bruderer, S.; Cabrit, S.; Evans, N. J.; Fedele, D.; Gusdorf, A.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Kaufman, M. J.; Melnick, G. J.; Neufeld, D. A.; Nisini, B.; Santangelo, G.; Tafalla, M.; Wampfler, S. F.

    2014-12-01

    Context. Protostars interact with their surroundings through jets and winds impinging on the envelope and creating shocks, but the nature of these shocks is still poorly understood. Aims: Our aim is to survey far-infrared molecular line emission from a uniform and significant sample of deeply-embedded low-mass young stellar objects (YSOs) in order to characterize shocks and the possible role of ultraviolet radiation in the immediate protostellar environment. Methods: Herschel/PACS spectral maps of 22 objects in the Perseus molecular cloud were obtained as part of the William Herschel Line Legacy (WILL) survey. Line emission from H2O, CO, and OH is tested against shock models from the literature. Results: Observed line ratios are remarkably similar and do not show variations with physical parameters of the sources (luminosity, envelope mass). Most ratios are also comparable to those found at off-source outflow positions. Observations show good agreement with the shock models when line ratios of the same species are compared. Ratios of various H2O lines provide a particularly good diagnostic of pre-shock gas densities, nH ~ 105 cm-3, in agreement with typical densities obtained from observations of the post-shock gas when a compression factor on the order of 10 is applied (for non-dissociative shocks). The corresponding shock velocities, obtained from comparison with CO line ratios, are above 20 km s-1. However, the observations consistently show H2O-to-CO and H2O-to-OH line ratios that are one to two orders of magnitude lower than predicted by the existing shock models. Conclusions: The overestimated model H2O fluxes are most likely caused by an overabundance of H2O in the models since the excitation is well-reproduced. Illumination of the shocked material by ultraviolet photons produced either in the star-disk system or, more locally, in the shock, would decrease the H2O abundances and reconcile the models with observations. Detections of hot H2O and strong OH

  20. Toxic shock syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome; Toxic shock-like syndrome; TSLS ... Toxic shock syndrome is caused by a toxin produced by some types of staphylococcus bacteria. A similar problem, called toxic shock- ...

  1. Minimal interruption of cardiopulmonary resuscitation for a single shock as mandated by automated external defibrillations does not compromise outcomes in a porcine model of cardiac arrest and resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristagno, Giuseppe; Tang, Wanchun; Russell, James K; Jorgenson, Dawn; Wang, Hao; Sun, Shijie; Weil, Max Harry

    2008-11-01

    experimental model of cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation, minimal automated external defibrillation-mandated interruption of chest compressions for a single-shock algorithm did not have adverse effects on postresuscitation myocardial or neurologic function. All animals, whether subjected to cardiopulmonary resuscitation interruptions or not, survived.

  2. Numerical Simulation of Focused Shock Shear Waves in Soft Solids and a Two-Dimensional Nonlinear Homogeneous Model of the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giammarinaro, B; Coulouvrat, F; Pinton, G

    2016-04-01

    Shear waves that propagate in soft solids, such as the brain, are strongly nonlinear and can develop into shock waves in less than one wavelength. We hypothesize that these shear shock waves could be responsible for certain types of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) and that the spherical geometry of the skull bone could focus shear waves deep in the brain, generating diffuse axonal injuries. Theoretical models and numerical methods that describe nonlinear polarized shear waves in soft solids such as the brain are presented. They include the cubic nonlinearities that are characteristic of soft solids and the specific types of nonclassical attenuation and dispersion observed in soft tissues and the brain. The numerical methods are validated with analytical solutions, where possible, and with self-similar scaling laws where no known solutions exist. Initial conditions based on a human head X-ray microtomography (CT) were used to simulate focused shear shock waves in the brain. Three regimes are investigated with shock wave formation distances of 2.54 m, 0.018 m, and 0.0064 m. We demonstrate that under realistic loading scenarios, with nonlinear properties consistent with measurements in the brain, and when the shock wave propagation distance and focal distance coincide, nonlinear propagation can easily overcome attenuation to generate shear shocks deep inside the brain. Due to these effects, the accelerations in the focal are larger by a factor of 15 compared to acceleration at the skull surface. These results suggest that shock wave focusing could be responsible for diffuse axonal injuries.

  3. Shock wave treatment induces angiogenesis and mobilizes endogenous CD31/CD34-positive endothelial cells in a hindlimb ischemia model: implications for angiogenesis and vasculogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepeköylü, Can; Wang, Feng-Sheng; Kozaryn, Radoslaw; Albrecht-Schgoer, Karin; Theurl, Markus; Schaden, Wolfgang; Ke, Huei-Jin; Yang, Yaju; Kirchmair, Rudolf; Grimm, Michael; Wang, Ching-Jen; Holfeld, Johannes

    2013-10-01

    Shock waves have been shown to induce recruitment of intravenously injected endothelial progenitor cells to ischemic hind limbs in rats. We hypothesized that shock wave treatment as sole therapy would induce angiogenesis in this ischemia model and would lead to mobilization of endogenous endothelial (progenitor) cells. A total of 18 rats, aged 5 weeks old, were subdivided into 3 groups: sham (n = 6), ischemic muscle with shock wave treatment (shock wave treatment group, n = 6), and without shock wave treatment (control, n = 6). Hind limb ischemia was induced by ligation of the femoral artery. Three weeks later, shock wave treatment (300 impulses at 0.1 mJ/mm(2)) was applied to the adductor muscle; the controls were left untreated. Muscle samples were analyzed using real-time polymerase chain reaction for angiogenic factors and chemoattractants for endothelial progenitor cell mobilization. Fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis of the peripheral blood was performed for CD31/CD34-positive cells. Perfusion was measured using laser Doppler imaging. Functional improvement was evaluated by walking analysis. Angiogenic factors/endothelial progenitor cell chemoattractants, stromal cell-derived factor-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor, were increased in the treatment group, as shown by real-time polymerase chain reaction, indicating the mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells. Fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis of the peripheral blood revealed high numbers of CD31/CD34-positive cells in the treatment group. Greater numbers of capillaries were found in the treated muscles. Blood perfusion increased markedly in the treatment group and led to functional restoration, as shown by the results from the walking analysis. Shock wave therapy therefore could develop into a feasible alternative to stem cell therapy in regenerative medicine, in particular for ischemic heart and limb disease. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic

  4. Effect of an isotropic outflow from the Galactic Centre on the bow-shock evolution along the orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajaček, M.; Eckart, A.; Karas, V.; Kunneriath, D.; Shahzamanian, B.; Sabha, N.; Mužić, K.; Valencia-S., M.

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the observations of several infrared-excess bow-shock sources and proplyd-like objects near the Galactic Centre, we analyse the effect of a potential outflow from the centre on bow-shock properties. We show that due to the non-negligible isotropic central outflow the bow-shock evolution along the orbit becomes asymmetric between the pre-peribothron and post-peribothron phases. This is demonstrated by the calculation of the bow-shock size evolution, the velocity along the shocked layer, the surface density of the bow shock, and by emission-measure maps close to the peribothron passage. Within the ambient velocity range of ≲2000 km s-1 the asymmetry is profound and the changes are considerable for different outflow velocities. As a case study we perform model calculations for the Dusty S-cluster Object (DSO/G2) as a potential young stellar object that is currently being monitored and has passed the pericentre at ˜2000 Schwarzschild radii from the supermassive black hole (Sgr A*) in 2014. We show that the velocity field of the shocked layer can contribute to the observed increasing line width of the DSO source up to the peribothron. Subsequently, supposing that the line emission originates in the bow shock, a decrease of the line width is expected. Furthermore, the decline of the bow-shock emission measure in the post-peribothron phase could help to reveal the emission of the putative star. The dominant contribution of circumstellar matter (either inflow or outflow) is consistent with the observed stable luminosity and compactness of the DSO/G2 source during its pericentre passage.

  5. Assessing uncertainties in crop and pasture ensemble model simulations of productivity and N2O emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simulation models are extensively used to predict agricultural productivity and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. However, the uncertainties of (reduced) model ensemble simulations have not been assessed systematically for variables affecting food security and climate change mitigation, within multisp...

  6. Spatial and temporal variations in ammonia emissions - a freely accessible model code for Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøth, Carsten Ambelas; Geels, Camilla; Berge, H.

    2011-01-01

    Deriving a parameterisation of ammonia emissions for use in chemistry-transport models (CTMs) is a complex problem as the emission varies locally as a result of local climate and local agricultural management. In current CTMs such factors are generally not taken into account. This paper demonstra......Deriving a parameterisation of ammonia emissions for use in chemistry-transport models (CTMs) is a complex problem as the emission varies locally as a result of local climate and local agricultural management. In current CTMs such factors are generally not taken into account. This paper...

  7. Modelling cost-effectiveness of interrelated emission reduction strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, J.C.

    2003-01-01

    Keywords:Environmental pollution; Acidification; Global warming; Agriculture; Abatement cost; Environmental policy interrelations; Ammonia; Nitrous Oxide; MethaneAgriculture is an important source of ammonia, contributing to acidification and eutrophication, as well as emissions of the greenhouse

  8. High temporal resolution modelling of environmentally-dependent seabird ammonia emissions: Description and testing of the GUANO model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddick, S. N.; Blackall, T. D.; Dragosits, U.; Tang, Y. S.; Moring, A.; Daunt, F.; Wanless, S.; Hamer, K. C.; Sutton, M. A.

    2017-07-01

    Many studies in recent years have highlighted the ecological implications of adding reactive nitrogen (Nr) to terrestrial ecosystems. Seabird colonies represent a situation with concentrated sources of Nr, through excreted and accumulated guano, often occurring in otherwise nutrient-poor areas. To date, there has been little attention given to modelling N flows in this context, and particularly to quantifying the relationship between ammonia (NH3) emissions and meteorology. This paper presents a dynamic mass-flow model (GUANO) that simulates temporal variations in NH3 emissions from seabird guano. While the focus is on NH3 emissions, the model necessarily also treats the interaction with wash-off as far as this affects NH3. The model is validated using NH3 emissions measurements from seabird colonies across a range of climates, from sub-polar to tropical. In simulations for hourly time-resolved data, the model is able to capture the observed dependence of NH3 emission on environmental variables. With temperature and wind speed having the greatest effects on emission for the cases considered. In comparison with empirical data, the percentage of excreted nitrogen that volatilizes as NH3 is found to range from 2% to 67% (based on measurements), with the GUANO model providing a range of 2%-82%. The model provides a tool that can be used to investigate the meteorological dependence of NH3 emissions from seabird guano and provides a starting point to refine models of NH3 emissions from other sources.

  9. Proposal for combined conducted and radiated emission modelling for Integrated Circuit

    OpenAIRE

    Serpaud, Sébastien; Ghfiri, C.; Boyer, Alexandre; Durier, A

    2017-01-01

    International audience; This paper describes a methodology to build a combined conducted and radiated emission model for integrated circuits. The development of emission models of a FPGA extracted from two different approaches is presented and discussed. The first approach allows to build a predictable model from FPGA implementation and some passive measurement on FPGA device. The second approach allows to build a model from only the near field measurement. In conclusion, the accuracy of both...

  10. A dislocation density-based continuum model of the anisotropic shock response of single crystal α-cyclotrimethylene trinitramine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luscher, D. J.; Addessio, F. L.; Cawkwell, M. J.; Ramos, K. J.

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a model for the finite deformation thermomechanical response of α-cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX). Our model accounts for nonlinear thermoelastic lattice deformation through a free energy-based equation of state developed by Cawkwell et al. (2016) in combination with temperature and pressure dependent elastic constants, as well as dislocation-mediated plastic slip on a set of slip systems motivated by experimental observation. The kinetics of crystal plasticity are modeled using the Orowan equation relating slip rate to dislocation density and the dislocation velocity developed by Austin and McDowell (2011), which naturally accounts for transition from thermally activated to dislocation drag limited regimes. Evolution of dislocation density is specified in terms of local ordinary differential equations reflecting dislocation-dislocation interactions. This paper presents details of the theory and parameterization of the model, followed by discussion of simulations of flyer plate impact experiments. Impact conditions explored within this combined simulation and experimental effort span shock pressures ranging from 1 to 3 GPa for four crystallographic orientations and multiple specimen thicknesses. Simulation results generated using this model are shown to be in strong agreement with velocimetry measurements from the corresponding plate impact experiments. Finally, simulation results are used to motivate conclusions about the nature of dislocation-mediated plasticity in RDX.

  11. Direct Nitrous Oxide Emissions From Tropical And Sub-Tropical Agricultural Systems - A Review And Modelling Of Emission Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanito, Fabrizio; Lebender, Ulrike; Cornulier, Thomas; Sapkota, Tek B.; Brentrup, Frank; Stirling, Clare; Hillier, Jon

    2017-03-01

    There has been much debate about the uncertainties associated with the estimation of direct and indirect agricultural nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions in developing countries and in particular from tropical regions. In this study, we report an up-to-date review of the information published in peer-review journals on direct N2O emissions from agricultural systems in tropical and sub-tropical regions. We statistically analyze net-N2O-N emissions to estimate tropic-specific annual N2O emission factors (N2O-EFs) using a Generalized Additive Mixed Model (GAMM) which allowed the effects of multiple covariates to be modelled as linear or smooth non-linear continuous functions. Overall the mean N2O-EF was 1.2% for the tropics and sub-tropics, thus within the uncertainty range of IPCC-EF. On a regional basis, mean N2O-EFs were 1.4% for Africa, 1.1%, for Asia, 0.9% for Australia and 1.3% for Central & South America. Our annual N2O-EFs, estimated for a range of fertiliser rates using the available data, do not support recent studies hypothesising non-linear increase N2O-EFs as a function of applied N. Our findings highlight that in reporting annual N2O emissions and estimating N2O-EFs, particular attention should be paid in modelling the effect of study length on response of N2O.

  12. PBA regulates neurogenesis and cognition dysfunction after repeated electroconvulsive shock in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhao-Hui; Kang, Xiang; Yang, Liu; Niu, Yi; Lu, Ye; Nie, Li

    2015-12-15

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) was widely used to treat the refractory depression. But ECT led to the cognitive deficits plaguing the depression patients. The underlying mechanisms of the cognitive deficits remain elusive. Repeated electroconvulsive shock (rECS) was used to simulate ECT and explore the mechanisms of ECT during the animal studies. Previous studies showed rECS could lead to neurogenesis and cognitive impairment. But it was well known that neurogenesis could improve the cognition. So these suggested that the mechanism of the cognitive deficit after rECS was very complex. In present study, we explored the probable mechanisms of the cognitive deficit after rECS from neurogenesis aspect. We found the cognitive deficit was reversible and neurogenesis could bring a long-term beneficial effect on cognition. Astrogliosis and NR1 down-regulation probably participated in the reversible cognitive deficits after rECS. Phenylbutyric acid (PBA), generally as an agent to investigate the roles of histone acetylation, could prevent the reversible cognitive dysfunction, but PBA could diminish the long-term effect of enhanced cognition by rECS. These suggested that ECT could possibly bring the long-term beneficial cognitive effect by regulating neurogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Oscillating nonlinear acoustic shock waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaididei, Yuri; Rasmussen, Anders Rønne; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    2016-01-01

    We investigate oscillating shock waves in a tube using a higher order weakly nonlinear acoustic model. The model includes thermoviscous effects and is non isentropic. The oscillating shock waves are generated at one end of the tube by a sinusoidal driver. Numerical simulations show...... that at resonance a stationary state arise consisting of multiple oscillating shock waves. Off resonance driving leads to a nearly linear oscillating ground state but superimposed by bursts of a fast oscillating shock wave. Based on a travelling wave ansatz for the fluid velocity potential with an added 2'nd order...... polynomial in the space and time variables, we find analytical approximations to the observed single shock waves in an infinitely long tube. Using perturbation theory for the driven acoustic system approximative analytical solutions for the off resonant case are determined....

  14. Iwamoto-Harada model of pre-equiluibrium cluster emission: Should we care about angular momentum?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Běták Emil

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Whereas the emission of nucleons in low-energy nuclear reactions (say, below the pion threshold can be nicely described using statistical models (compound nucleus plus pre-equilibrium, that of the complex particles, i.e. light clusters up to α's, is far from satisfactory state. The Iwamoto-Harada model of pre-equilibrium cluster emission was formulated within spin-independent version of the exciton model. The inclusion of angular momentum into the pre-equilibrium reactions proved to be important and essential for the γ emission. The angular-momentum couplings have not yet been applied to the light cluster emission; however, the connection with deformation suggested by Blann has been shown to have visible effects. Our study is aimed to consider, whether and how the angular-momentum couplings influence the light cluster emission within the Iwamoto-Harada model.

  15. The Effect of Infrarenal Aortic Balloon Occlusion on Weaning from Supraceliac Aortic Balloon Occlusion in a Porcine Model (Sus scrofa) of Hemorrhagic Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-15

    all animals , and continued for six hours. Half of the animals were randomly assigned to Zone-3 REBOA for an additional 45 minutes following Zone-1...concentration or resuscitation requirements.Conclusion: In an animal model of hemorrhagic shock and Zone-1 REBOA, subsequent Zone-3 aortic occlusion did not add

  16. Resolving the shocked gas in HH54 with Herschel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerkeli, P.; Liseau, R.; Brinch, C.

    2014-01-01

    as well. The observed features in the line profiles are reproduced using a 3D radiative transfer model of a bow-shock, constructed with the Line Modeling Engine code (LIME). Results. The FIR emission is confined to the HH 54 region and a coherent displacement of the location of the emission maximum of CO...... with increasing J is observed. The peak positions of the high-J CO lines are shifted upstream from the lower J CO lines and coincide with the position of the spectral feature identified previously in CO (10−9) profiles with HIFI. This indicates a hotter molecular component in the upstream gas with distinct....... The spatial proximity of this knot to the peaks of the atomic fine-structure emission lines observed with Spitzer and PACS ([O i]63, 145 μm) suggests that it may be associated with the dissociative shock as the jet impacts slower moving gas in the HH 54 bow-shock....

  17. 40 CFR 1039.101 - What exhaust emission standards must my engines meet after the 2014 model year?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... emission standards must my engines meet after the 2014 model year? The exhaust emission standards of this section apply after the 2014 model year. Certain of these standards also apply for model year 2014 and... emission standards that apply to 2014 and earlier model years. Section 1039.105 specifies smoke standards...

  18. The First Reported Infrared Emission from the SN1006 Remnant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, P. Frank; Williams, Brian J.; Blair, William P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Long, Knox S.; Raymond, John C.; Reynolds, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    We report results of infrared imaging and spectroscopic observations of the SN 1006 remnant, carried out with the Spitzer Space Telescope. The 24 m image from MIPS clearly shows faint filamentary emission along the northwest rim of the remnant shell, nearly coincident with the Balmer filaments that delineate the present position of the expanding shock. The 24 m emission traces the Balmer filaments almost perfectly, but lies a few arcsec within, indicating an origin in interstellar dust heated by the shock. Subsequent decline in the IR behind the shock is presumably due largely to grain destruction through sputtering. The emission drops far more rapidly than current models predict, however, even for a higher proportion of small grains than would be found closer to the Galactic plane. The rapid drop may result in part from a grain density that has always been lowera relic effect from an earlier epoch when the shock was encountering a lower densitybut higher grain destruction rates still seem to be required. Spectra from three positions along the NW filament from the IRS instrument all show only a featureless continuum, consistent with thermal emission from warm dust. The dust-to-gas mass ratio in the pre-shock interstellar medium is lower than that expected for the Galactic ISM-as has also been observed in the analysis of IR emission from other SNRs but whose cause remains unclear. As with other SNIa remnants, SN1006 shows no evidence for dust grain formation in the supernova ejecta.

  19. Greenhouse gas emissions from Indian rice fields: calibration and upscaling using the DNDC model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Pathak

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The Denitrification and Decomposition (DNDC model was evaluated for its ability to simulate methane (CH4, nitrous oxide (N2O and carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions from Indian rice fields with various management practices. The model was calibrated and validated for field experiments in New Delhi, India. The observed yield, N uptake and greenhouse gas (GHG emissions were in good agreement with the values predicted by the model. The model was then applied for estimation of GHG emissions from rice fields in India using a newly compiled soil/climate/land use database. Continuous flooding of rice fields (42.25 million ha resulted in annual net emissions of 1.07-1.10, 0.04-0.05 and 21.16-60.96 Tg of CH4-C, N2O-N and CO2-C, respectively, with a cumulated global warming potential (GWP of 130.93-272.83 Tg CO2 equivalent. Intermittent flooding of rice fields reduced annual net emissions to 0.12-0.13 Tg CH4-C and 16.66-48.80 Tg CO2-C while N2O emission increased to 0.05-0.06 Tg N2O-N. The GWP, however, reduced to 91.73-211.80 Tg CO2 equivalent. The study suggested that the model could be applied for estimating the GHG emissions and the influences of agronomic management, soil and climatic parameters on the GHG emissions from rice fields in India.

  20. Modelling combustion reactions for gas flaring and its resulting emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Saheed Ismail

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Flaring of associated petroleum gas is an age long environmental concern which remains unabated. Flaring of gas maybe a very efficient combustion process especially steam/air assisted flare and more economical than utilization in some oil fields. However, it has serious implications for the environment. This study considered different reaction types and operating conditions for gas flaring. Six combustion equations were generated using the mass balance concept with varying air and combustion efficiency. These equations were coded with a computer program using 12 natural gas samples of different chemical composition and origin to predict the pattern of emission species from gas flaring. The effect of key parameters on the emission output is also shown. CO2, CO, NO, NO2 and SO2 are the anticipated non-hydrocarbon emissions of environmental concern. Results show that the quantity and pattern of these chemical species depended on percentage excess/deficiency of stoichiometric air, natural gas type, reaction type, carbon mass content, impurities, combustion efficiency of the flare system etc. These emissions degrade the environment and human life, so knowing the emission types, pattern and flaring conditions that this study predicts is of paramount importance to governments, environmental agencies and the oil and gas industry.

  1. Dust Destruction in a Non-radiative Shock in the Cygnus Loop Supernova Remnant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankrit, Ravi; Williams, Brian J.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Raymond, John C.; Blair, William P.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Long, Knox S.; Reynolds, Stephen P.

    2010-04-01

    We present 24 μm and 70 μm images of a non-radiative shock in the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant, obtained with the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. The post-shock region is resolved in these images. The ratio of the 70 μm to the 24 μm flux rises from about 14 at a distance 0farcm1 behind the shock front to about 22 in a zone 0farcm75 further downstream, as grains are destroyed in the hot plasma. Models of dust emission and destruction using post-shock electron temperatures between 0.15 keV and 0.30 keV and post-shock densities, n H~ 2.0 cm-3, predict flux ratios that match the observations. Non-thermal sputtering (i.e., sputtering due to bulk motion of the grains relative to the gas) contributes significantly to the dust destruction under these shock conditions. From the model calculations, we infer that about 35% by mass of the grains are destroyed over a 0.14 pc region behind the shock front. Based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope.

  2. Modeling methane and nitrous oxide emissions from direct-seeded rice systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmonds, Maegen B.; Li, Changsheng; Lee, Juhwan; Six, Johan; van Kessel, Chris; Linquist, Bruce A.

    2015-10-01

    Process-based modeling of CH4 and N2O emissions from rice fields is a practical tool for conducting greenhouse gas inventories and estimating mitigation potentials of alternative practices at the scale of management and policy making. However, the accuracy of these models in simulating CH4 and N2O emissions in direct-seeded rice systems under various management practices remains a question. We empirically evaluated the denitrification-decomposition model for estimating CH4 and N2O fluxes in California rice systems. Five and nine site-year combinations were used for calibration and validation, respectively. The model was parameterized for two cultivars, M206 and Koshihikari, and able to simulate 30% and 78% of the variation in measured yields, respectively. Overall, modeled and observed seasonal CH4 emissions were similar (R2 = 0.85), but there was poor correspondence in fallow period CH4 emissions and in seasonal and fallow period N2O emissions. Furthermore, management effects on seasonal CH4 emissions were highly variable and not well represented by the model (0.2-465% absolute relative deviation). Specifically, simulated CH4 emissions were oversensitive to fertilizer N rate but lacked sensitivity to the type of seeding system (dry seeding versus water seeding) and prior fallow period straw management. Additionally, N2O emissions were oversensitive to fertilizer N rate and field drainage. Sensitivity analysis showed that CH4 emissions were highly sensitive to changes in the root to total plant biomass ratio, suggesting that it is a significant source of model uncertainty. These findings have implications for model-directed field research that could improve model representation of paddy soils for application at larger spatial scales.

  3. Photochemical modeling in California with two chemical mechanisms: model intercomparison and response to emission reductions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chenxia; Kelly, James T; Avise, Jeremy C; Kaduwela, Ajith P; Stockwell, William R

    2011-05-01

    An updated version of the Statewide Air Pollution Research Center (SAPRC) chemical mechanism (SAPRC07C) was implemented into the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) version 4.6. CMAQ simulations using SAPRC07C and the previously released version, SAPRC99, were performed and compared for an episode during July-August, 2000. Ozone (O3) predictions of the SAPRC07C simulation are generally lower than those of the SAPRC99 simulation in the key areas of central and southern California, especially in areas where modeled concentrations are greater than the federal 8-hr O3 standard of 75 parts per billion (ppb) and/or when the volatile organic compound (VOC)/nitrogen oxides (NOx) ratio is less than 13. The relative changes of ozone production efficiency (OPE) against the VOC/NOx ratio at 46 sites indicate that the OPE is reduced in SAPRC07C compared with SAPRC99 at most sites by as much as approximately 22%. The SAPRC99 and SAPRC07C mechanisms respond similarly to 20% reductions in anthropogenic VOC emissions. The response of the mechanisms to 20% NOx emissions reductions can be grouped into three cases. In case 1, in which both mechanisms show a decrease in daily maximum 8-hr O3 concentration with decreasing NOx emissions, the O3 decrease in SAPRC07C is smaller. In case 2, in which both mechanisms show an increase in O3 with decreasing NOx emissions, the O3 increase is larger in SAPRC07C. In case 3, SAPRC07C simulates an increase in O3 in response to reduced NOx emissions whereas SAPRC99 simulates a decrease in O3 for the same region. As a result, the areas where NOx controls would be disbeneficial are spatially expanded in SAPRC07C. Although the results presented here are valuable for understanding differences in predictions and model response for SAPRC99 and SAPRC07C, the study did not evaluate the impact of mechanism differences in the context of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's guidance for using numerical models in demonstrating air quality attainment

  4. Modelling the spatial distribution of SO2 and NO(x) emissions in Ireland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluizenaar, Y.de; Aherne, J.; Farrell, E.P.

    2001-01-01

    The spatial distributions of sulphur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) emissions are essential inputs to models of atmospheric transport and deposition. Information of this type is required for international negotiations on emission reduction through the critical load approach.

  5. Estimating the costs of reducing CO2 emission via avoided deforestation with integrated assessment modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overmars, K.P.; Tabeau, A.A.; Stehfest, E.; Meijl, van J.C.M.

    2012-01-01

    Estimates for deforestation and forest degradation were shown to account for about 17% of greenhouse gas emissions. The implementation of REDD is suggested to provide substantial emission reductions at low costs. Proper calculation of such a costs requires integrated modeling approach involving

  6. Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Z

    2005-01-01

    The International Symposium on Shock Waves (ISSW) is a well established series of conferences held every two years in a different location. A unique feature of the ISSW is the emphasis on bridging the gap between physicists and engineers working in fields as different as gas dynamics, fluid mechanics and materials sciences. The main results presented at these meetings constitute valuable proceedings that offer anyone working in this field an authoritative and comprehensive source of reference.

  7. Modelling the impacts of ammonia emissions reductions on North American air quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Makar

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A unified regional air-quality modelling system (AURAMS was used to investigate the effects of reductions in ammonia emissions on regional air quality, with a focus on particulate-matter formation. Three simulations of one-year duration were performed for a North American domain: (1 a base-case simulation using 2002 Canadian and US national emissions inventories augmented by a more detailed Canadian emissions inventory for agricultural ammonia; (2 a 30% North-American-wide reduction in agricultural ammonia emissions; and (3 a 50% reduction in Canadian beef-cattle ammonia emissions. The simulations show that a 30% continent-wide reduction in agricultural ammonia emissions lead to reductions in median hourly PM2.5 mass of <1 μg m−3 on an annual basis. The atmospheric response to these emission reductions displays marked seasonal variations, and on even shorter time scales, the impacts of the emissions reductions are highly episodic: 95th-percentile hourly PM2.5 mass decreases can be up to a factor of six larger than the median values.

    A key finding of the modelling work is the linkage between gas and aqueous chemistry and transport; reductions in ammonia emissions affect gaseous ammonia concentrations close to the emissions site, but substantial impacts on particulate matter and atmospheric deposition often occur at considerable distances downwind, with particle nitrate being the main vector of ammonia/um transport. Ammonia emissions reductions therefore have trans-boundary consequences downwind. Calculations of critical-load exceedances for sensitive ecosystems in Canada suggest that ammonia emission reductions will have a minimal impact on current ecosystem acidification within Canada, but may have a substantial impact on future ecosystem acidification. The 50% Canadian beef-cattle ammonia emissions reduction scenario was used to examine model sensitivity to uncertainties in the new Canadian

  8. Particle drift, diffusion, and acceleration at shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokipii, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    The gradient and curvature drifts implicit in change of the ambient magnetic field at a hydromagnetic shock wave are incorporated into the diffusive theory of shock acceleration of charged particles. The conventional jump condition at the shock is modified by a term incorporating the large drift along the shock plane. This term vanished identically for one-dimensional systems, but must be included in general for shocks which are finite in transverse extent or which have transverse structure. It is found that the effect of the drift is such that the transverse drift rate is proportional to the acceleration rate, and for perpendicular shocks is exactly equal to the rate of change of energy in the V x B electric field observed in the shock frame. This establishes a connection with the 'shock drift' models which neglect diffusion.

  9. Nonparametric Regression with Common Shocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo A. Souza-Rodrigues

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers a nonparametric regression model for cross-sectional data in the presence of common shocks. Common shocks are allowed to be very general in nature; they do not need to be finite dimensional with a known (small number of factors. I investigate the properties of the Nadaraya-Watson kernel estimator and determine how general the common shocks can be while still obtaining meaningful kernel estimates. Restrictions on the common shocks are necessary because kernel estimators typically manipulate conditional densities, and conditional densities do not necessarily exist in the present case. By appealing to disintegration theory, I provide sufficient conditions for the existence of such conditional densities and show that the estimator converges in probability to the Kolmogorov conditional expectation given the sigma-field generated by the common shocks. I also establish the rate of convergence and the asymptotic distribution of the kernel estimator.

  10. A whole farm model for quantifying total greenhouse gas emissions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Valued Acer Customer

    2017-10-13

    Oct 13, 2017 ... dairy farm management systems (FMS), which broadly include typical dairy production systems in South. Africa. These are ... Intensive and semi-intensive production systems produce ..... A statistical approach is used to estimate enteric CH4 emissions from metabolizable energy intake. (MEI) in Option 3.

  11. Effective pollutant emission heights for atmospheric transport modelling based on real-world information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pregger, Thomas; Friedrich, Rainer

    2009-02-01

    Emission data needed as input for the operation of atmospheric models should not only be spatially and temporally resolved. Another important feature is the effective emission height which significantly influences modelled concentration values. Unfortunately this information, which is especially relevant for large point sources, is usually not available and simple assumptions are often used in atmospheric models. As a contribution to improve knowledge on emission heights this paper provides typical default values for the driving parameters stack height and flue gas temperature, velocity and flow rate for different industrial sources. The results were derived from an analysis of the probably most comprehensive database of real-world stack information existing in Europe based on German industrial data. A bottom-up calculation of effective emission heights applying equations used for Gaussian dispersion models shows significant differences depending on source and air pollutant and compared to approaches currently used for atmospheric transport modelling.

  12. Middle East emissions of VOCs estimated using OMI HCHO observations and the MAGRITTE regional model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Jean-Francois; Stavrakou, Trisevgeni; Bauwens, Maite; De Smedt, Isabelle; Van Roozendael, Michel

    2017-04-01

    Air quality in the Middle East has considerably deteriorated in the last decades. In particular tropospheric ozone reaches very high levels during summer due to the combination of high solar irradiances with often very high and rapidly evolving anthropogenic emissions of NOx and VOCs associated to oil/gas exploitation and fast urbanisation. In addition, high biogenic VOC emissions are expected in non-desert areas, in particular during summer due to scorching temperatures and high solar irradiances. Both anthropogenic and biogenic VOC emissions are poorly known, however, due to near-absence of experimental constraints on emission factors for local vegetation and industrial and extraction processes. Furthermore, the dependence of emissions on environmental conditions (e.g. soil moisture in the case of biogenic isoprene emissions) is only very crudely parameterized in emission models. Here we use spaceborne (OMI) observations of formaldehyde, a known product of anthropogenic and biogenic VOC oxidation, as constraint in an inversion framework built on a regional model, MAGRITTE (Model of Atmospheric composition at Global and Regional scales using Inversion Techniques for Trace Gas Emissions). MAGRITTE is run at 0.5x0.5 degree resolution, with lateral boundary conditions provided by the global CTM IMAGESv2 (Bauwens et al., 2016). The global and regional models share essentially the same chemistry and physical parameterizations. Emission inversion with MAGRITTE is performed using an adjoint-based iterative procedure, similar to previous inversions using IMAGES. Biogenic VOC emissions are calculated using MEGAN (Muller et al., 2008; Stavrakou et al., 2015), whereas the HTAPv2 emission dataset is used for anthropogenic emissions, with several adjustments for oil/gas exploitation and traffic emissions. The OMI data are regridded onto the model resolution and averaged seasonally in order to reduce noise. Preliminary results indicate that biogenic isoprene emissions are a

  13. Shock structure in massless gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Majorana

    1991-05-01

    Full Text Available The shock structure problem is investigated in the framework of the Eckart theory of irreversible thermodynamics in the ultra relativistic limit. It is considered a neutrino gas and a gas in the approximation of hard sphere model.

  14. Modeled and observed ozone sensitivity to mobile-source emissions in Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zavala

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The emission characteristics of mobile sources in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA have changed significantly over the past few decades in response to emission control policies, advancements in vehicle technologies and improvements in fuel quality, among others. Along with these changes, concurrent non-linear changes in photochemical levels and criteria pollutants have been observed, providing a unique opportunity to understand the effects of perturbations of mobile emission levels on the photochemistry in the region using observational and modeling approaches. The observed historical trends of ozone (O3, carbon monoxide (CO and nitrogen oxides (NOx suggest that ozone production in the MCMA has changed from a low to a high VOC-sensitive regime over a period of 20 years. Comparison of the historical emission trends of CO, NOx and hydrocarbons derived from mobile-source emission studies in the MCMA from 1991 to 2006 with the trends of the concentrations of CO, NOx, and the CO/NOx ratio during peak traffic hours also indicates that fuel-based fleet average emission factors have significantly decreased for CO and VOCs during this period whereas NOx emission factors do not show any strong trend, effectively reducing the ambient VOC/NOx ratio.

    This study presents the results of model analyses on the sensitivity of the observed ozone levels to the estimated historical changes in its precursors. The model sensitivity analyses used a well-validated base case simulation of a high pollution episode in the MCMA with the mathematical Decoupled Direct Method (DDM and the standard Brute Force Method (BFM in the 3-D CAMx chemical transport model. The model reproduces adequately the observed historical trends and current photochemical levels. Comparison of the BFM and the DDM sensitivity techniques indicates that the model yields ozone values that increase linearly with

  15. Radiation thermo-chemical models of protoplanetary discs IV. Modelling CO ro-vibrational emission from Herbig Ae discs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thi, W. F.; Kamp, I.; Woitke, P.; van der Plas, G.; Bertelsen, R.; Wiesenfeld, L.

    Context. The carbon monoxide (CO) ro-vibrational emission from discs around Herbig Ae stars and T Tauri stars with strong ultraviolet emissions suggests that fluorescence pumping from the ground X-1 Sigma(+) to the electronic A(1)Pi state of CO should be taken into account in disc models. Aims. We

  16. SN 2009ip and SN 2010mc as dual-shock Quark-Novae

    OpenAIRE

    Ouyed, Rachid; Koning, Nico; Leahy, Denis

    2013-01-01

    In recent years a number of double-humped supernovae have been discovered. This is a feature predicted by the dual-shock Quark-Nova model where a SN explosion is followed (a few days to a few weeks later) by a Quark-Nova explosion. SN 2009ip and SN 2010mc are the best observed examples of double-humped SNe. Here, we show that the dual-shock Quark-Nova model naturally explains their lightcurves including the late time emission, which we attribute to the interaction between the mixed SN and QN ...

  17. Hydrodynamical and radio evolution of young supernova remnant G1.9+0.3 based on the model of diffusive shock acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlović, M. Z.

    2017-06-01

    The radio evolution of, so far the youngest known, Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G1.9+0.3 is investigated by using three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic modelling and non-linear kinetic theory of cosmic ray (CR) acceleration in SNRs. We include consistent numerical treatment of magnetic field amplification (MFA) due to resonant streaming instability. Under the assumption that SNR G1.9+0.3 is the result of a Type Ia supernova explosion located near the Galactic Centre, using widely accepted values for explosion energy 1051 erg and ejecta mass 1.4 M⊙, the non-thermal continuum radio emission is calculated. The main purpose of this paper is to explain radio flux brightening measured over recent decades and also predict its future temporal evolution. We estimate that the SNR is now ˜120 yr old, expanding in an ambient density of 0.02 cm-3, and explain its steep radio spectral index only by means of efficient non-linear diffusive shock acceleration (NLDSA). We also make comparison between simulations and observations of this young SNR, in order to test the models and assumptions suggested. Our model prediction of a radio flux density increase of ˜1.8 per cent yr-1 during the past two decades agrees well with the measured values. We synthesize the synchrotron spectrum from radio to X-ray and it fits well the Very Large Array, Molonglo Observatory Synthesis Telescope, Effelsberg, Chandra and NuSTAR measurements. We also propose a simplified evolutionary model of the SNR in gamma rays and suggest it may be a promising target for gamma-ray observations at TeV energies with the future generation of instruments like Cherenkov Telescope Array. SNR G1.9+0.3 is the only known Galactic SNR with the increasing flux density and we present here the prediction that the flux density will start to decrease approximately 500 yr from now. We conclude that this is a general property of SNRs in the free expansion phase.

  18. Modeling methodology of the conducted emission of a DC-DC converter board

    OpenAIRE

    Boyer, Alexandre; Gonzalez Sentis, Manuel; Ghfiri, Chaimae; Durier, André

    2017-01-01

    International audience; This paper proposes a methodology to model an electronic board according to a bottom-up approach. This method is applied to build the model of a synchronous buck DC-DC converter board for conducted emission prediction purpose. The different steps to select the model terminals and the construction of the component and PCB interconnect models are described.

  19. Effect of different emission inventories on modeled ozone and carbon monoxide in Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amnuaylojaroen, T.; Barth, M. C.; Emmons, L. K.; Carmichael, G. R.; Kreasuwun, J.; Prasitwattanaseree, S.; Chantara, S.

    2014-12-01

    In order to improve our understanding of air quality in Southeast Asia, the anthropogenic emissions inventory must be well represented. In this work, we apply different anthropogenic emission inventories in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) version 3.3