WorldWideScience

Sample records for shiva spaceflight holography

  1. Holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, H. Arthur

    Holography is a process which numbers among its many applications the creation of holograms--unique three dimensional photographs that show spatial relations and shifts just as they exist in reality. This book recounts the history of holography, tracing its development from Euclid's theory of light rays through Huygens' theory of wave motion to…

  2. Fiber optics in SHIVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severyn, J.; Parker, J.

    1978-01-01

    SHIVA is a twenty arm laser which is controlled with a network of fifty computers, interconnected with digital fiber optic links. Three different fiber optic systems employed on the Shiva laser will be described. Two of the systems are for digital communications, one at 9600 baud and the other at 1 megabaud. The third system uses fiber optics to distribute diagnostic triggers with subnanosecond jitter

  3. Shiva laser system performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaze, J.; Godwin, R.O.; Holzrichter, J.F.

    1978-01-01

    On November 18, 1977, after four years of experimentation, innovation, and construction, the Shiva High Energy Laser facility produced 10.2 kJ of focusable laser energy delivered in a 0.95 ns pulse. The Shiva laser, with its computer control system and delta amplifiers, demonstrated its versatility on May 18, 1978, when the first 20-beam target shot with delta amplifiers focused 26 TW on a target and produced a yield of 7.5 x 10 9 neutrons

  4. SHIVA laser: nearing completion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaze, J.A.; Godwin, R.O.

    1977-01-01

    Construction of the Shiva laser system is nearing completion. This laser will be operating in fall 1977 and will produce over 20 terawatts of focusable power in a subnanosecond pulse. Fusion experiments will begin early in 1978. It is anticipated that thermonuclear energy release equal to one percent that of the incident light energy will be achieved with sub-millimeter deuterium-tritium targets. From other experiments densities in excess of a thousand times that of liquid are also expected

  5. Lord Shiva Statue Unveiled

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    On 18 June, CERN unveiled an unusual new landmark, a 2m tall statue of the Indian deity Lord Shiva. The Director-General and Dr. Kakodkar watch as Mr.Chandrasekhar signs the Guest Book. The statue is a gift from India, celebrating CERN's long association with India which started in the 1960's and continues strongly today. It was unveiled by the Director General, Dr Robert Aymar, His Excellency Mr K. M. Chandrasekhar, Ambassador (WTO-Geneva) and Dr Anil Kakodkar, Chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission and Secretary, Dept of Atomic Energy, India. In the Hindu religion, this form of the dancing Lord Shiva is known as the Nataraj and symbolises Shakti, or life force. As a plaque alongside the statue explains, the belief is that Lord Shiva danced the Universe into existence, motivates it, and will eventually extinguish it. Carl Sagan drew the metaphor between the cosmic dance of the Nataraj and the modern study of the 'cosmic dance' of subatomic particles. The statue was made in India. The original sculpture was...

  6. Shiva target irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manes, K.R.; Ahlstrom, H.G.; Coleman, L.W.; Storm, E.K.; Glaze, J.A.; Hurley, C.A.; Rienecker, F.; O'Neal, W.C.

    1977-01-01

    The first laser/plasma studies performed with the Shiva laser system will be two sided irradiations extending the data obtained by other LLL lasers to higher powers. The twenty approximately 1 TW laser pulses will reach the target simultaneously from above and below in nested pentagonal clusters. The upper and lower clusters of ten beams each are radially polarized so that they strike the target in p-polarization and maximize absorption. This geometry introduces laser system isolation problems which will be briefly discussed. The layout and types of target diagnostics will be described and a brief status report on the facility given

  7. Shiva optical diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rienecker, F.; Kobierecki, M.; Ozarski, R.; Seppala, L.; Manes, K.; Merritt, B.

    1977-01-01

    In the laser fusion program at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, no target experiment is complete unless it is complemented by careful measurements of the laser pulse that irradiates the target. For this purpose, an incident beam diagnostics (IBD) package has been designed for the Shiva laser. The package will furnish data on items such as the total energy and the focusable energy out of the laser chain, and the spatial and temporal energy and power distribution at the target plane. Understanding laser-plasma interactions requires knowledge of the amount of 1.06 μm light energy that is scattered in various directions from the target. The light energy that is scattered toward the beam focusing lens is analyzed by a reflected beam diagnostic (RBD) package containing a calorimeter, a multiple image camera and a TV camera. This paper describes the detailed design and operation of the IBD and RBD packages as tools to align spatial filters and targets, as well as to diagnose the laser beams and target reflectivity

  8. Shiva and Argus target diagnostics vacuum systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaros, S.S.; Mayo, S.E.; Campbell, D.; Holeman, D.

    1978-09-01

    The normal operation of LLL's Argus and Shiva laser irradiation facilities demand a main vacuum system for the target chamber and a separate local vacuum system for each of the larger appendage dianostics. This paper will describe the Argus and Shiva main vacuum systems, their respective auxiliary vacuum systems and the individual diagnostics with their respective special vacuum requirements and subsequent vacuum systems. Our latest approach to automatic computer-controlled vacuum systems will be presented

  9. SHIVA star inductive pulse compression system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinovsky, R.E.; Baker, W.L.; Chen, Y.G.; Holmes, J.; Lopez, E.

    1983-01-01

    The SHIVA star capacitor bank, a 120 kv parallel bank storing 9.5 mj with a short circuit current of almost 90 ma, at the AFWL is the world's highest energy, fast capacitor bank. The approximately 3 microsecond short circuit risetime is shortened by an inductive store/opening switch power conditioning system in which a total inductance of about 10 nh is charged with 35 ma currents. Electrically exploded conductor (fuse) opening switches are employed to interrupt the current in a few hundred nanoseconds to deliver a fast rising current to the load. The system is in operation at the AFWL and is used for a variety of plasma physics experiments. Performance of the bank and pulse compression system are discussed

  10. Polarization holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolova, L.; Ramanujam, P.S.

    Current research into holography is concerned with applications in optically storing, retrieving, and processing information. Polarization holography has many unique properties compared to conventional holography. It gives results in high efficiency, achromaticity, and special polarization...... properties. This books reviews the research carried out in this field over the last 15 years. The authors provide basic concepts in polarization and the propagation of light through anisotropic materials, before presenting a sound theoretical basis for polarization holography. The fabrication...... and characterization of azobenzene based materials, which remain the most efficient for the purpose, is described in detail. This is followed by a description of other materials that are used in polarization holography. An in-depth description of various applications, including display holography and optical storage...

  11. Spaceflight Versus Human Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Stephanie

    2013-09-01

    Spaceflight is challenging. Human spaceflight is far more challenging,.Those familiar with spaceflight recognize that human spaceflight is more than tacking an environmental control system on an existing spacecraft, that there are a number of serious technical challenges involved in sending people out into space and bringing them back home safely.The return trip, bringing the crew back to the surface of the earth safely, is more than just an additional task, it's the new imperative. Differences between manned and unmanned spaceflight are more than technical. The human element forces a change in philosophy, a mindset that will likely touch every aspect of flight from launch through mission and return. Seasoned space professionals used to the paradigms and priorities of unmanned flight need to be cognizant of these differences and some of the implications, perhaps most especially because mission success and human safety priorities are sometimes contradictory.

  12. Focusing lenses for the 20-beam fusion laser, SHIVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neal, W.C.

    1976-01-01

    The focus lens design for the 20-beam SHIVA laser fusion facility involves considerations of uniform and normal pellet illumination. The resulting requirements dictate tailored beam intensity profiles and vacuum-loaded thin lenses

  13. Measurements of laser parameters for the Shiva laser fusion facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozarski, R.G.

    1979-01-01

    Large laser systems require numerous laser diagnostics to provide configuration, performance and maintenance data to permit efficient operation. The following diagnostics for a large laser system named Shiva are discussed: (1) description of Shiva laser system, (2) what measurements are desired and or required and why, (3) what measurement techniques and packages are employed and a brief description of the operating principles of the sensors employed, and (4) the laser diagnostic data acquisition and display system

  14. Neutron holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beynon, T.D.

    1986-01-01

    the paper concerns neutron holography, which allows an image to be constructed of the surfaces, as well as the interiors, of objects. The technique of neutron holography and its applications are described. Present and future use of the method is briefly outlined. (U.K.)

  15. Evolution of shiva laser alignment systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, R.D.

    1980-07-01

    The Shiva oscillator pulse is preamplified and divided into twenty beams. Each beam is then amplified, spatially filtered, directed, and focused onto a target a few hundred micrometers in size producing optical intensities up to 10 16 W/cm 2 . The laser was designed and built with three automatic alignment systems: the oscillator alignment system, which aligns each of the laser's three oscillators to a reference beamline; the chain input pointing system, which points each beam into its respective chain; and the chain output pointing, focusing and centering system which points, centers and focuses the beam onto the target. Recently the alignment of the laser's one hundred twenty spatial filter pinholes was also automated. This system uses digitized video images of back-illuminated pinholes and computer analysis to determine current positions. The offset of each current position from a desired center point is then translated into stepper motor commands and the pinhole is moved the proper distance. While motors for one pinhole are moving, the system can digitize, analyze, and send commands to other motors, allowing the system to efficiently align several pinholes in parallel

  16. Electron holography

    CERN Document Server

    Tonomura, Akira

    1993-01-01

    Holography was devised for breaking through the resolution limit of electron microscopes The advent of a "coherent" field emission electron beam has enabled the use of Electron Holography in various areas of magnetic domain structures observation, fluxon observation in superconductors, and fundamental experiments in physics which have been inaccessible using other techniques After examining the fundamentals of electron holography and its applications to the afore mentioned fields, a detailed discussion of the Aharonov-Bohm effect and the related experiments is presented Many photographs and illustrations are included to elucidate the text

  17. Optical holography

    CERN Document Server

    Collier, Robert J; Lin, Lawrence H

    1971-01-01

    Optical Holography deals with the use of optical holography to solve technical problems, with emphasis on the properties of holograms formed with visible light. Topics covered include the Fourier transform, propagation and diffraction, pulsed-laser holography, and optical systems with spherical lenses. A geometric analysis of point-source holograms is also presented, and holograms and hologram spatial filters formed with spatially modulated reference waves are described. This book is comprised of 20 chapters and begins with an introduction to concepts that are basic to understanding hologr

  18. Diagnostics of Shiva Nova produced high yield thermonuclear events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlstrom, H.G.; Banner, D.L.; Boyle, M.J.; Campbell, E.M.; Coleman, L.W.; Koppel, L.N.; Kornblum, H.N. Jr.; Rienecker, F.; Severyn, J.R.; Slivinsky, V.W.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments with the Shiva Nova laser facility which produce yield levels of scientific breakeven and above will result in neutron, x-ray and particle fluxes which will require specific attention to the survivability of diagnostic instrumentation. These yield levels will also allow the utilization of new diagnotics techniques which can provide detailed information on the state of the imploded fuel and pusher shells

  19. Some comments on the Shiva spaceframe earthquake damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurley, C.A.

    1980-01-01

    On January 24, 1980, at 11:00 a.m., an earthquake, measuring 5.5 on the Richter scale, shook the Livermore Valley. There were three very pronounced shocks, the first at 5.5 followed by two, one at 5.2 and the other at 4.8, on the Richter scale. The Shiva spaceframe was shaken out of alignment. Shiva consists of two frames, a laser frame and a target frame. Components on each frame stayed within alignment with respect to each other, but the target frame moved with respect to the laser frame. Shearing of the seismic anchor bolts on the target frame was responsible for this misalignment. This was the third in a series of earthquakes for Shiva, the first occurring on June 20, 1977 at a magnitude of 4.7 on the Richter scale and an epicenter 2 miles away. The second quake was on August 6, 1979, with a magnitude of 5.9 and the epicenter 60 miles away. There was no damage or misalignment due to these first two earthquakes. The third however, severely tested the Shiva system and will be the subject of this report. Accelerometers were not in operation on the system so we do not know what the acceleration forces were. Our subsequent investigation, however, gives us some indication of these forces

  20. Performance of Shiva as a laser fusion irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speck, D.R.; Bliss, E.S.; Glaze, J.A.; Johnson, B.C.; Manes, K.R.; Ozarski, R.G.; Rupert, P.R.; Simmons, W.W.; Swift, C.D.; Thompson, C.E.

    1979-01-01

    Shiva is a 20 beam Nd:Glass Laser and Target Irradiation Facility at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The laser system and integrated target facility evolved during the last year from a large, untested, experimental laser system to a target irradiation facility which has provided significant laser driven inertial confinement fusion data. The operation of the facility is discussed

  1. Thermodynamic holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Bo-Bo; Jiang, Zhan-Feng; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-01-01

    The holographic principle states that the information about a volume of a system is encoded on the boundary surface of the volume. Holography appears in many branches of physics, such as optics, electromagnetism, many-body physics, quantum gravity, and string theory. Here we show that holography is also an underlying principle in thermodynamics, a most important foundation of physics. The thermodynamics of a system is fully determined by its partition function. We prove that the partition function of a finite but arbitrarily large system is an analytic function on the complex plane of physical parameters, and therefore the partition function in a region on the complex plane is uniquely determined by its values along the boundary. The thermodynamic holography has applications in studying thermodynamics of nano-scale systems (such as molecule engines, nano-generators and macromolecules) and provides a new approach to many-body physics. PMID:26478214

  2. Measurements required to construct the Shiva laser fusion facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rien, H.J.

    1979-01-01

    The construction of a large laser fusion system involves all aspects of metrology. This report covers some of the technical problems encountered and how the science of weights and measures was used to identify and solve them. The techniques used range from very simple and inexpensive handheld equipment to sophisticated scientific apparatus costing thousands of dollars. The success of the 30 trillion watt Shiva laser system would not have been possible without reliable and accurate measurements

  3. Energy storage and power conditioning system for the Shiva laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, G.R.; Gagnon, W.L.; Rupert, P.R.; Trenholme, J.B.

    1975-01-01

    An optimal energy delivery system for the world's largest glass laser system has been designed based on computer modeling and operation of laser hardware. Components of the system have been tested on operating lasers at LLL. The Shiva system is now under construction and will be completed in 1977. The energy supply described here will provide cost-effective, reliable power and facilitate the gathering of data in pursuit of controlled thermonuclear reactions

  4. Dental Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirtoft, Ingegerd

    1983-12-01

    Ten years have passed since the first articles appeared in this new field. The qualities of the laser light together with the need of contactless 3-D measurements for different dental purposes seemed to be extremely promising, but still just a few scientists have used the method and mostly for laboratory studies. For some reason there has been a preponderance for orthodontic measurements. This seems to be a bit peculiar from holographic view compared with measurements for engineering purposes, which usually are made on metals. So naturally holography can become a clinical tool for measurements in the field of fixed bridges, removable partial dentures and implants. One of the problems is that the need for holography in dental research must be fulfilled in collaboration with physicists. Only a two-way communication during an entire experiment can balance both technical and odontological demands and thus give practical and clinical important results. The need for an easy way of handling the evaluation to get all required information is another problem and of course the holographic equipment must be converted to a box easy to handle for everyone. At last the position of dental holography today is going to be carefully examined together with an attempt to look into the hopefully exciting and not to utopic future for this research field.

  5. New techniques in digital holography

    CERN Document Server

    Picart, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    A state of the art presentation of important advances in the field of digital holography, detailing advances related to fundamentals of digital holography, in-line holography applied to fluid mechanics, digital color holography, digital holographic microscopy, infrared holography, special techniques in full field vibrometry and inverse problems in digital holography

  6. Single Beam Holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsuan; Ruterbusch, Paul H.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses how holography can be used as part of undergraduate physics laboratories. The authors propose a single beam technique of holography, which will reduce the recording scheme as well as relax the isolation requirements. (HM)

  7. Holography and tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howells, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    This session includes a collection of outlines of pertinent information, diagrams, graphs, electron micrographs, and color photographs pertaining to historical aspects and recent advances in the development of X-ray Gabor Holography. Many of the photographs feature or pertain to instrumentation used in holography, tomography, and cryo-holography.

  8. Holography and tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howells, M.

    1997-01-01

    This session includes a collection of outlines of pertinent information, diagrams, graphs, electron micrographs, and color photographs pertaining to historical aspects and recent advances in the development of X-ray Gabor Holography. Many of the photographs feature or pertain to instrumentation used in holography, tomography, and cryo-holography

  9. Exploding pusher targets for the SHIVA laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, M.D.; Larsen, J.T.; Nuckolls, J.H.

    1977-01-01

    The first targets for the 20 TW SHIVA laser system were designed. They are simple glass micro-balloons, approximately 300 μm in diameter and 2 μm thick, filled with D-T gas. Using LASNEX, whose model physics was utilized successfully for ARGUS targets, we optimize for both gain and yield. The target behaves as an exploding pusher. Different simple analytic models for the physics of this mode are presented, and are tested by comparing their scaling predictions, at constant absorbed power, with those demonstrated by LASNEX. Emphasis is placed on successful prediction of the basic quantities of peak ion temperature and compression, rather than neutron yield or n tau

  10. Photon correlation holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Dinesh N; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Ezawa, Takahiro; Miyamoto, Yoko; Takeda, Mitsuo

    2011-01-17

    Unconventional holography called photon correlation holography is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. Using photon correlation, i.e. intensity correlation or fourth order correlation of optical field, a 3-D image of the object recorded in a hologram is reconstructed stochastically with illumination through a random phase screen. Two different schemes for realizing photon correlation holography are examined by numerical simulations, and the experiment was performed for one of the reconstruction schemes suitable for the experimental proof of the principle. The technique of photon correlation holography provides a new insight into how the information is embedded in the spatial as well as temporal correlation of photons in the stochastic pseudo thermal light.

  11. X-ray holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faigel, G.; Tegze, M.; Belakhovsky, M.; Marchesini, S.; Bortel, G.

    2003-01-01

    In the last decade holographic methods using hard X-rays were developed. They are able to resolve atomic distances, and can give the 3D arrangement of atoms around a selected element. Therefore, hard X-ray holography has potential applications in chemistry, biology and physics. In this article we give a general description of these methods and discuss the developments in the experimental technique. The capabilities of hard X-ray holography are demonstrated by examples

  12. SHIVA Nd: glass disk-amplifier-assembly facility and special purpose fixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, W.A.; Patton, H.G.; Stowers, I.F.; Wentworth, D.E.

    1977-09-01

    The facility built to assemble and maintain the laser amplifiers in the SHIVA Laser System is described. The facility is a Class-100 clean room which includes a high pressure solvent spray box, optical inspection equipment, and several unique amplifier-assembly fixtures

  13. An Introduction to Educational Holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, R. Scott

    Holograms are capable of taking the two-dimensional ways of envisioning information to another dimension of presentation, representation, and conceptualization. Educational holography is joining display holography, holographic testing of materials, and holographic optical elements as a fourth major field in holography. Holograms are explored as…

  14. Holography out of equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smolic, M.

    2013-01-01

    Using holography it is possible to write down the dissipative hydrodynamic behaviour of a boundary field theory which describes a non-conformal fluid. It is also possible to write down the evolution equations of the two-point correlators for the various field present within the cornerstone field

  15. Holography without Fuss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Steve

    1989-01-01

    Outlines what a hologram is, the main types of holography, and how a simple system producing a white light reflection hologram can be set up in a school physics laboratory. Discusses the basic optics of the hologram and procedures and materials for making holograms in school. (YP)

  16. Deconstruction and Holography

    CERN Document Server

    Jejjala, V; Minic, D; Jejjala, Vishnu; Leigh, Robert G.; Minic, Djordje

    2003-01-01

    It was recently pointed out that the physics of a single discrete gravitational extra dimension exhibits a peculiar UV/IR connection relating the UV scale to the radius of the effective extra dimension. Here we note that this non-locality is a manifestation of holography, encoding the correct scaling of the number of fundamental degrees of freedom of the UV theory. This in turn relates the Wilsonian RG flow in the UV theory to the effective gravitational dynamics in the extra dimension. The relevant holographic c-function is determined by the expression for the holographic bound. Holography in this context is a result of the requirements of unitarity and diffeomorphism invariance. We comment on the relevance of this observation for the cosmological constant problem.

  17. Pre-holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kay, Bernard S.; Larkin, Peter

    2008-01-01

    We construct a symplectic isomorphism h from classical Klein Gordon solutions of mass m on (d+1)-dimensional Lorentzian anti-de Sitter space (equipped with the usual symplectic form) to a certain symplectic space of functions on its conformal boundary (only) for all integer and half-integer Δ (=(d/2)+(1/2)(d 2 +4m 2 ) 1/2 ). h induces a large family of new examples of Rehren's algebraic holography in which the net of local quantum Klein Gordon algebras in AdS is seen to map to a suitably defined net of local algebras for the (generalized free) scalar conformal field with anomalous dimension Δ on d-dimensional Minkowski space (the AdS boundary). Relatedly, we show for these models that Bertola et al.'s boundary-limit holography becomes a quantum duality (only) if the test functions for boundary Wightman distributions are restricted in a particular way

  18. Black holes and holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, Samir D

    2012-01-01

    The idea of holography in gravity arose from the fact that the entropy of black holes is given by their surface area. The holography encountered in gauge/gravity duality has no such relation however; the boundary surface can be placed at an arbitrary location in AdS space and its area does not give the entropy of the bulk. The essential issues are also different between the two cases: in black holes we get Hawking radiation from the 'holographic surface' which leads to the information issue, while in gauge/gravity duality there is no such radiation. To resolve the information paradox we need to show that there are real degrees of freedom at the horizon of the hole; this is achieved by the fuzzball construction. In gauge/gravity duality we have instead a field theory defined on an abstract dual space; there are no gravitational degrees of freedom at the holographic boundary. It is important to understand the relations and differences between these two notions of holography to get a full understanding of the lessons from the information paradox.

  19. Applications and Fundamentals of Holography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Betzios, P.

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis we explore the fascinating topic of Holography for various systems. The intuitive idea of Holography is that one has at hand two dual descriptions of the physical reality at different number of dimensions much like in the usual holograms, where one projects a three dimensional object

  20. Holography in the Junior High.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszkiewicz, Frank

    1988-01-01

    Examines the use of holography in the art technology program of a junior high school. Characterizing holography as a valuable artistic experience and discovery experience and stressing the importance of student interest and involvement, the author discusses the necessary equipment for the project and includes two diagrams of a holographic setup.…

  1. New trend in electron holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanigaki, Toshiaki; Harada, Ken; Murakami, Yasukazu; Niitsu, Kodai; Akashi, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Yoshio; Sugawara, Akira; Shindo, Daisuke

    2016-06-01

    Electron holography using a coherent electron wave is a promising technique for high-resolution visualization of electromagnetic fields in and around objects. The capability of electron holography has been enhanced by the development of new technologies and has thus become an even more powerful tool for exploring scientific frontiers. This review introduces these technologies including split-illumination electron holography and vector-field electron tomography. Split-illumination electron holography, which uses separated coherent waves, overcomes the limits imposed by the lateral coherence requirement for electron waves in electron holography. Areas that are difficult to observe using conventional electron holography are now observable. Exemplified applications include observing a singular magnetic domain wall in electrical steel sheets, local magnetizations at anti-phase boundaries, and electrostatic potentials in metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors. Vector-field electron tomography can be used to visualize magnetic vectors in three dimensions. Two components of the vectors are reconstructed using dual-axis tomography, and the remaining one is calculated using div B   =  0. A high-voltage electron microscope can be used to achieve precise magnetic reconstruction. For example, magnetic vortices have been visualized using a 1 MV holography electron microscope.

  2. New trend in electron holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanigaki, Toshiaki; Akashi, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Yoshio; Sugawara, Akira; Harada, Ken; Niitsu, Kodai; Shindo, Daisuke; Murakami, Yasukazu

    2016-01-01

    Electron holography using a coherent electron wave is a promising technique for high-resolution visualization of electromagnetic fields in and around objects. The capability of electron holography has been enhanced by the development of new technologies and has thus become an even more powerful tool for exploring scientific frontiers. This review introduces these technologies including split-illumination electron holography and vector-field electron tomography. Split-illumination electron holography, which uses separated coherent waves, overcomes the limits imposed by the lateral coherence requirement for electron waves in electron holography. Areas that are difficult to observe using conventional electron holography are now observable. Exemplified applications include observing a singular magnetic domain wall in electrical steel sheets, local magnetizations at anti-phase boundaries, and electrostatic potentials in metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors. Vector-field electron tomography can be used to visualize magnetic vectors in three dimensions. Two components of the vectors are reconstructed using dual-axis tomography, and the remaining one is calculated using div B   =  0. A high-voltage electron microscope can be used to achieve precise magnetic reconstruction. For example, magnetic vortices have been visualized using a 1 MV holography electron microscope. (paper)

  3. Electron holography of biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, P; Lichte, H; Formanek, P; Lehmann, M; Huhle, R; Carrillo-Cabrera, W; Harscher, A; Ehrlich, H

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we summarise the development of off-axis electron holography on biological samples starting in 1986 with the first results on ferritin from the group of Tonomura. In the middle of the 1990s strong interest was evoked, but then stagnation took place because the results obtained at that stage did not reach the contrast and the resolution achieved by conventional electron microscopy. To date, there exist only a few ( approximately 12) publications on electron holography of biological objects, thus this topic is quite small and concise. The reason for this could be that holography is mostly established in materials science by physicists. Therefore, applications for off-axis holography were powerfully pushed forward in the area of imaging, e.g. electric or magnetic micro- and nanofields. Unstained biological systems investigated by means of off-axis electron holography up to now are ferritin, tobacco mosaic virus, a bacterial flagellum, T5 bacteriophage virus, hexagonal packed intermediate layer of bacteria and the Semliki Forest virus. New results of the authors on collagen fibres and surface layer of bacteria, the so-called S-layer 2D crystal lattice are presented in this review. For the sake of completeness, we will shortly discuss in-line holography of biological samples and off-axis holography of materials related to biological systems, such as biomaterial composites or magnetotactic bacteria.

  4. Holography gets smart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Chris; Larbey, Cynthia

    2008-02-01

    At least 6% of world trade, amounting to some 200bn per year, involves counterfeit goods. But this figure would be even higher were it not for the humble hologram. Invented 50 years ago, holograms provide authentication tags to deter copying, and can be found everywhere from credit cards, passports and banknotes to consumer goods, cosmetics and pharmaceuticals. Holography also underpins supermarket scanners and CD players; it can even be used to store optical data in 3D. Now, however, holograms are making their mark as powerful yet cheap diagnostic tools, which could in particular have many applications in biomedicine.

  5. Adaptive Optical Scanning Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, P. W. M.; Poon, Ting-Chung; Liu, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    Optical Scanning Holography (OSH) is a powerful technique that employs a single-pixel sensor and a row-by-row scanning mechanism to capture the hologram of a wide-view, three-dimensional object. However, the time required to acquire a hologram with OSH is rather lengthy. In this paper, we propose an enhanced framework, which is referred to as Adaptive OSH (AOSH), to shorten the holographic recording process. We have demonstrated that the AOSH method is capable of decreasing the acquisition time by up to an order of magnitude, while preserving the content of the hologram favorably. PMID:26916866

  6. DSN Microwave Antenna Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochblatt, D. J.; Seidel, B. L.

    1984-01-01

    The DSN microwave antenna holography project will obtain three-dimensional pictures of the large DSN antenna surfaces. These pictures must be of suffi icient resolution to allow adjustment of the reflector panels to an rms surface of 0.5 mm (0.25 mm, goal). The major parameters and equations needed to define a holographic measurement system are outlined and then the proof of concept demonstration measurement that was made at DSS-43 (Australia) that resulted in contour maps with spatial resolution of 7 m in the aperture plane and resolution orthogonal to the aperture plane of 0.7 mm was discussed.

  7. Shiva and Nova: progress of laser fusion at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlstrom, H.G.

    1979-01-01

    Over the last several years we have made significant progress in the understanding of the laser plasma interaction through the use of new diagnostic instrumentation and techniques. We have also implemented the Shiva system and operated the world's most complex laser system and produced significant target data. In the implosion experiments with the Shiva system, we have archieved densities greater than 100 x liquid density of DT. The significance of this result is that we have had to overcome the questions of achieving a spherically symmetric implosion and obviating the problem of Rayleigh-Taylor instability. We see no major obstacle in the future to attaining the densities appropriate to efficient burn of microfusion pellets for application to fusion reactors. Further, we have identified a laser system which may provide the architecture required for a fusion reactor driver and we have an agressive on going program to investigate this option for a fusion reactor driver. In addition, our Systems Studies Program has identified a reactor configuration which solves many of the important problems associated with laser fusion reactors. This is not to say that a question of the configuration of an inertial confinement fusion reactor has been settled but rather that there is a very attractive possibility and one which can be used to judge other possibilities and grade them with respect to their performance compared to the Hylife reaction chamber. Thus we hold great hope for the possibility of inertial confinement fusion as an eventual energy source to provide energy for the world

  8. Split-illumination electron holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanigaki, Toshiaki; Aizawa, Shinji; Suzuki, Takahiro; Park, Hyun Soon [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Inada, Yoshikatsu [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Matsuda, Tsuyoshi [Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Taniyama, Akira [Corporate Research and Development Laboratories, Sumitomo Metal Industries, Ltd., Amagasaki, Hyogo 660-0891 (Japan); Shindo, Daisuke [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Tonomura, Akira [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, Graduate University, Onna-son, Okinawa 904-0495 (Japan); Central Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., Hatoyama, Saitama 350-0395 (Japan)

    2012-07-23

    We developed a split-illumination electron holography that uses an electron biprism in the illuminating system and two biprisms (applicable to one biprism) in the imaging system, enabling holographic interference micrographs of regions far from the sample edge to be obtained. Using a condenser biprism, we split an electron wave into two coherent electron waves: one wave is to illuminate an observation area far from the sample edge in the sample plane and the other wave to pass through a vacuum space outside the sample. The split-illumination holography has the potential to greatly expand the breadth of applications of electron holography.

  9. Split-illumination electron holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanigaki, Toshiaki; Aizawa, Shinji; Suzuki, Takahiro; Park, Hyun Soon; Inada, Yoshikatsu; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Taniyama, Akira; Shindo, Daisuke; Tonomura, Akira

    2012-01-01

    We developed a split-illumination electron holography that uses an electron biprism in the illuminating system and two biprisms (applicable to one biprism) in the imaging system, enabling holographic interference micrographs of regions far from the sample edge to be obtained. Using a condenser biprism, we split an electron wave into two coherent electron waves: one wave is to illuminate an observation area far from the sample edge in the sample plane and the other wave to pass through a vacuum space outside the sample. The split-illumination holography has the potential to greatly expand the breadth of applications of electron holography.

  10. Quasi-two-dimensional holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutzner, J.; Erhard, A.; Wuestenberg, H.; Zimpfer, J.

    1980-01-01

    The acoustical holography with numerical reconstruction by area scanning is memory- and time-intensive. With the experiences by the linear holography we tried to derive a scanning for the evaluating of the two-dimensional flaw-sizes. In most practical cases it is sufficient to determine the exact depth extension of a flaw, whereas the accuracy of the length extension is less critical. For this reason the applicability of the so-called quasi-two-dimensional holography is appropriate. The used sound field given by special probes is divergent in the inclined plane and light focussed in the perpendicular plane using cylindrical lenses. (orig.) [de

  11. Holography of Little Inflation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett McInnes

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available For several crucial microseconds of its early history, the Universe consisted of a Quark–Gluon Plasma. As it cooled during this era, it traced out a trajectory in the quark matter phase diagram. The form taken by this trajectory is not known with certainty, but is of great importance: it determines, for example, whether the cosmic plasma passed through a first-order phase change during the transition to the hadron era, as has recently been suggested by advocates of the “Little Inflation” model. Just before this transition, the plasma was strongly coupled and therefore can be studied by holographic techniques. We show that holography imposes a strong constraint (taking the form of a bound on the baryonic chemical potential relative to the temperature on the domain through which the cosmic plasma could pass as it cooled, with important consequences for Little Inflation. In fact, we find that holography applied to Little Inflation implies that the cosmic plasma must have passed quite close to the quark matter critical point, and might therefore have been affected by the associated fluctuation phenomena.

  12. Holography for fast reactor inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tozer, B.A.

    1980-01-01

    Holography, an optical process whereby an image of the original subject can be reconstructed in three dimensions, is being developed for use as an optical inspection tool. With a potential information storage density of 10 16 bits/m 2 , the ability to reconstruct in 3 dimensions, a depth of field of up to 8 metres, extremely wide angle of view, and potentially diffraction limited resolution, holography should be invaluable for the optical recording of fast reactors during construction, and the inspection of optically accessible regions during operation, or maintenance down-times. The photographic emulsions used for high resolution holography are fine-grained and fog only very slowly when subjected to γ-radiation, so that inspection of highly radio-active regions and components can be effected satisfactorily. Some of the practical limitations affecting holography are described and ways of overcoming them discussed. Some preliminary results are presented. (author)

  13. Holography Experiments on Optical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonczak, B.; Dabrowski, J.

    1979-01-01

    Describes experiments intended to produce a better understanding of the holographic method of producing images and optical imaging by other optical systems. Application of holography to teaching physics courses is considered. (Author/SA)

  14. Terrestrial Spaceflight Analogs: Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucian, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in immune cell distribution and function, circadian misalignment, stress and latent viral reactivation appear to persist during Antarctic winterover at Concordia Station. Some of these changes are similar to those observed in Astronauts, either during or immediately following spaceflight. Others are unique to the Concordia analog. Based on some initial immune data and environmental conditions, Concordia winterover may be an appropriate analog for some flight-associated immune system changes and mission stress effects. An ongoing smaller control study at Neumayer III will address the influence of the hypoxic variable. Changes were observed in the peripheral blood leukocyte distribution consistent with immune mobilization, and similar to those observed during spaceflight. Alterations in cytokine production profiles were observed during winterover that are distinct from those observed during spaceflight, but potentially consistent with those observed during persistent hypobaric hypoxia. The reactivation of latent herpesviruses was observed during overwinter/isolation, that is consistently associated with dysregulation in immune function.

  15. Microwave antenna holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochblatt, David J.; Seidel, Boris L.

    1992-01-01

    This microwave holography technique utilizes the Fourier transform relation between the complex far field radiation pattern of an antenna and the complex aperture field distribution. Resulting aperture phase and amplitude distribution data can be used to precisely characterize various crucial performance parameters, including panel alignment, panel shaping, subreflector position, antenna aperture illumination, directivity at various frequencies, and gravity deformation effects. The methodology of data processing presented here was successfully applied to the Deep Space Network (DSN) 34-m beam waveguide antennas. The antenna performance was improved at all operating frequencies by reducing the main reflector mechanical surface rms error to 0.43 mm. At Ka-band (32 GHz), the estimated improvement is 4.1 dB, resulting in an aperture efficiency of 52 percent. The performance improvement was verified by efficiency measurements and additional holographic measurements.

  16. Experiments with polymer coated microspheres irradiated by the Shiva laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auerbach, J.M.; Manes, K.R.; Matthews, D.L.

    1979-01-01

    Polymer coated spherical targets have been irradiated by the Shiva laser system in an effort to compress the contained 10 mg/cc DT fuel to super liquid densities. Glass microspheres of 140 μm ID and 5 μm wall thickness with polymer coatings 15 μm to 100 μm thick have been irradiated with laser pulses of 4 kilojoules in 200 psec FWHM. Target performance was diagnosed with neutron yield measurements, radiochemistry, Argon line imaging, and x-ray imaging techniques. Ball in plate targets achieved greater implosion symmetry than free-standing ball targets. With yields of 10 7 to 10 8 neutrons, targets reached DT fuel compressions of several times liquid density

  17. The Spaceflight Revolution Revisted

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, William Sims

    2002-01-01

    There are two models of the future of spaceflight, and there are two theories of how that future might be achieved. The first model of spaceflight assumes that we have already achieved most of what is worth achieving in space, whereas the second imagines it will be possible to build a truly interplanetary civilization in which most human beings live elsewhere than on Earth. The first theory holds that progress comes incrementally from the inexorable working of free markets and political systems, whereas the second believes that revolutionary transformations must sometimes be accomplished by social movements that transcend the ordinary institutions and motivations of mundane existence.

  18. Error analysis by means of acoustic holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutzner, J.; Wuestenberg, H.

    1976-01-01

    The possilbilities to use the acoustical holography in nondestructive testing are discussed. Although compared to optical holography the image quality of acoustical holography is reduced this technique can give important informations about the shape of defects. Especially in nondestructive testing of thick walled components no alternative exists until now. (orig.) [de

  19. Holography in small bubble chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecoq, P.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter reports on an experiment to determine the total charm cross section at different incident momenta using the small, heavy liquid bubble chamber HOBC. Holography in liquid hydrogen is also tested using the holographic lexan bubble chamber HOLEBC with the aim of preparing a future holographic experiment in hydrogen. The high intensity tests show that more than 100 incident tracks per hologram do not cause a dramatic effect on the picture quality. Hydrogen is more favorable than freon as the bubble growth is much slower in hydrogen. An advantage of holography is to have the maximum resolution in the full volume of the bubble chamber, which allows a gain in sensitivity by a factor of 10 compared to classical optics as 100 tracks per hologram look reasonable. Holograms are not more difficult to analyze than classical optics high-resolution pictures. The results show that holography is a very powerful technique which can be used in very high resolution particle physics experiments

  20. Electron holography for polymer microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joy, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    Electron holography provides a radically new approach to the problem of imaging objects such as macromolecules, which exhibit little or no contrast when viewed in the conventional transmission electron microscope (TEM). This is overcome in electron holography by using the macromolecule as a phase object. Computer reconstruction of the hologram then allows the phase to be viewed as an image, and amplified. Holography requires a TEM with a field emission gun, and with an electro-static biprism to produce the interference pattern. The hologram requires a similar radiation dose to conventional microscopy but many different images (e.g. a through focal series) can be extracted from the same hologram. Further developments of the technique promise to combine high contrast imaging of the bulk of the macromolecule together with high spatial resolution imaging of surface detail

  1. Strong Coupling Holography

    CERN Document Server

    Dvali, Gia

    2009-01-01

    We show that whenever a 4-dimensional theory with N particle species emerges as a consistent low energy description of a 3-brane embedded in an asymptotically-flat (4+d)-dimensional space, the holographic scale of high-dimensional gravity sets the strong coupling scale of the 4D theory. This connection persists in the limit in which gravity can be consistently decoupled. We demonstrate this effect for orbifold planes, as well as for the solitonic branes and string theoretic D-branes. In all cases the emergence of a 4D strong coupling scale from bulk holography is a persistent phenomenon. The effect turns out to be insensitive even to such extreme deformations of the brane action that seemingly shield 4D theory from the bulk gravity effects. A well understood example of such deformation is given by large 4D Einstein term in the 3-brane action, which is known to suppress the strength of 5D gravity at short distances and change the 5D Newton's law into the four-dimensional one. Nevertheless, we observe that the ...

  2. Wavefront division digital holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenhui; Cao, Liangcai; Li, Rujia; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Hao; Jiang, Qiang; Jin, Guofan

    2018-05-01

    Digital holography (DH), mostly Mach-Zehnder configuration based, belongs to non-common path amplitude splitting interference imaging whose stability and fringe contrast are environmental sensitive. This paper presents a wavefront division DH configuration with both high stability and high-contrast fringes benefitting from quasi common path wavefront-splitting interference. In our proposal, two spherical waves with similar curvature coming from the same wavefront are used, which makes full use of the physical sampling capacity of the detectors. The interference fringe spacing can be adjusted flexibly for both in-line and off-axis mode due to the independent modulation to these two waves. Only a few optical elements, including the mirror-beam splitter interference component, are used without strict alignments, which makes it robust and easy-to-implement. The proposed wavefront division DH promotes interference imaging physics into the practical and miniaturized a step forward. The feasibility of this method is proved by the imaging of a resolution target and a water flea.

  3. Electron Holography: phases matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichte, Hannes

    2013-06-01

    Essentially, all optics is wave optics, be it with light, X-rays, neutrons or electrons. The information transfer from the object to the image can only be understood in terms of waves given by amplitude and phase. However, phases are difficult to measure: for slowly oscillating waves such as sound or low-frequency electromagnetic waves, phases can be measured directly; for high frequencies this has to be done by heterodyne detection, i.e. superposition with a reference and averaging over time. In optics, this is called interferometry. Because interference is mostly very difficult to achieve, phases have often been considered 'hidden variables' seemingly pulling the strings from backstage, only visible by their action on the image intensity. This was almost the case in conventional Electron Microscopy with the phase differences introduced by an object. However, in the face of the urgent questions from solid state physics and materials science, these phases have to be determined precisely, because they encode the most dominant object properties, such as charge distributions and electromagnetic fields. After more than six decades of very patient advancement, electron interferometry and holography offer unprecedented analytical facilities down to an atomic scale. Akira Tonomura has prominently contributed to the present state.

  4. PHILOSOPHERS BEFORE AND AFTER SPACEFLIGHT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Grigenti

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In my contribution, I will show the ways by which philosophers have treated the topic of space-travel before and after its implementation. I will discuss the following points: a Introduction: the human condition. b Philosophers before spaceflight: the Astolfo Protocol. c Philosophers after spaceflight: the Promethean suspect. In this paper I will emphasize the elements of two different and alternative visions of spaceflight that can be found in the Western tradition of philosophical thought.

  5. Brain structural plasticity with spaceflight

    OpenAIRE

    Koppelmans, Vincent; Bloomberg, Jacob J; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P; Seidler, Rachael D

    2016-01-01

    Humans undergo extensive sensorimotor adaptation during spaceflight due to altered vestibular inputs and body unloading. No studies have yet evaluated the effects of spaceflight on human brain structure despite the fact that recently reported optic nerve structural changes are hypothesized to occur due to increased intracranial pressure occurring with microgravity. This is the first report on human brain structural changes with spaceflight. We evaluated retrospective longitudinal T2-weighted ...

  6. PHILOSOPHERS BEFORE AND AFTER SPACEFLIGHT

    OpenAIRE

    Fabio Grigenti

    2011-01-01

    In my contribution, I will show the ways by which philosophers have treated the topic of space-travel before and after its implementation. I will discuss the following points: a) Introduction: the human condition. b) Philosophers before spaceflight: the Astolfo Protocol. c) Philosophers after spaceflight: the Promethean suspect. In this paper I will emphasize the elements of two different and alternative visions of spaceflight that can be found in the Western tradition of philosophical thought.

  7. Acoustic Holography With Incoherent Sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Druyvesteyn, W.F.; Raangs, R.

    2005-01-01

    In near field acoustic holography the sound field is scanned near the surface of the vibrating object; from these measurements the vibration of the structure can be calculated. In the case of correlated sources one reference signal is sufficient. When incoherent sources are present the separation of

  8. Content metamorphosis in synthetic holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desbiens, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    A synthetic hologram is an optical system made of hundreds of images amalgamated in a structure of holographic cells. Each of these images represents a point of view on a three-dimensional space which makes us consider synthetic holography as a multiple points of view perspective system. In the composition of a computer graphics scene for a synthetic hologram, the field of view of the holographic image can be divided into several viewing zones. We can attribute these divisions to any object or image feature independently and operate different transformations on image content. In computer generated holography, we tend to consider content variations as a continuous animation much like a short movie. However, by composing sequential variations of image features in relation with spatial divisions, we can build new narrative forms distinct from linear cinematographic narration. When observers move freely and change their viewing positions, they travel from one field of view division to another. In synthetic holography, metamorphoses of image content are within the observer's path. In all imaging Medias, the transformation of image features in synchronisation with the observer's position is a rare occurrence. However, this is a predominant characteristic of synthetic holography. This paper describes some of my experimental works in the development of metamorphic holographic images.

  9. Holography applications in recent China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Dahsiung

    2000-10-01

    Reports on recent developments on holography applications in China are given in this paper, including the development of anti-counterfeiting Holograms from 1986-2000, China issued Banknotes in 1999 with holograms and OVIs, the developments in Machine Readable Holograms in China, the developments in Anti-counterfeiting Information Networks in China.

  10. X-ray absorption holography

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopecký, Miloš; Lausi, A.; Bussetto, E.; Kub, Jiří; Savoia, A.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 18 (2002), s. 185503-1 - 185503-3 ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A100 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010921 Keywords : x-ray holography Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 7.323, year: 2002

  11. 25 megajoule energy storage and delivery system for the Shiva laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagnon, W.L.; Rupert, P.R.; Berkbigler, L.; Carder, B.M.; Gritton, D.G.; Holloway, R.W.; Howland, M.M.; Whitham, K.

    1977-01-01

    A 25 megajoule, 20 kV capacitive energy storage and delivery system has been built and tested for Shiva--a 20 arm, 10 kJ, 20 TW neodymium glass fusion research laser. This system supplies over 3.5 megamperes to xenon flashlamps for optical pumping of the laser amplifier. About 15% of the energy is used to establish magnetic fields within Faraday rotator glass. A digital based control and diagnostics scheme is employed through the entire pulse power system. This scheme utilizes a distributed digital data bus that addresses every element through two levels of optical isolation. The interfacing of low level digital circuitry to a pulse power environment is discussed, as well as the design and performance of the total system. Cost and manufacturing details are important in a project of this size. The projected cost goal of 27 cents/joule, installed and operating, has been met. The general approach to the design, transient analysis, manufacture, and activation of this large power conditioning system is also discussed

  12. Radiation yield from SHIVA Star plasma flow switch driven fast liner implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degnan, J.H.; Baker, W.L.; Beason, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    A 2.5 Terawatt 0.5 MJ isotropic equivalent radiation yield was obtained in a SHIVA Star plasma flow switch driven fast liner implosion. The 1313 μF 80 kV discharge delivered 13 MA to a coaxial vacuum inductive store with a plasma armature. Over 9.4 MA current was plasma flow switched to the implosion load (>90% of the gun muzzle current at that time). The load wa a 5 cm radius, 2 cm tall, 200 μg/cm/sup 2/ aluminum plated Formvar cylindrical foil. The radiation pulse was measured with an array of seven X-ray diodes (XRDs). The XRDs all had aluminum photocathodes, a variety of filters and nickel mesh to reduce the incident X-ray photon flux to avoid Child-Langmuir saturation. The filters were chosen so that the authors had seven different diode response functions covering the energy range from 15 eV to about 3 keV. The filters were mounted remote (about 30 cm) from the XRDs. The anode mesh served as part of the mesh array. The distance between meshes was greater than 10 cm. Each XRD had a 5 cm diameter cathode with an aperture limited to a 2 cm diameter. The XRD anode-cathode gap was 1 cm and the bias was 5 kV. The theoretical Child-Langmuir saturation signal was 125 V with 50 Ω termination. The maximum observed signal was 75 V

  13. Enhanced load current delivery from the SHIVA Star vacuum inductive store/plasma flow switch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, D.W.; Baker, W.L.; Beason, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    The experimental results reported here were obtained from passively integrated Rogowski coils mounted in the SHIVA Star device and B located in the load and transfer regions of the device. The integrator time constant was 100 μs. Current measurements accuracy is estimated to be 5% for the Rogowski coils and 10% for B probes. B probes indicated peak currents of 13.5 MA at the breech and 13.0 MA at the muzzle with 650 ns 10-90% rise time. B probes in the implosion region indicated a current greater than 9.4 MA inside 5.5 cm radius; at that time, the muzzle current was 10.3 MA. The 10-90% rise time was 170 ns. The innermost probe indicated 7.3 MA inside 3.2 cm; at that time, the muzzle current was 9.3 MA. The 10-90% rise time at 3.2 cm was 300 ns. Timing anomalies suggested some azimuthal current asymmetry in the implosion region. The data indicate greater than 90% current delivery from the gun muzzle to just outside the initial position implosion foil and 70-80% current delivery from the gun muzzle to the partially imploded foil

  14. A 3-MA compact-toroid-plasma-flow-switched plasma focus demonstration experiment on Shiva Star

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiuttu, G F; Degnan, J H [Phillips Lab., Kirtland AFB, NM (United States). High Energy Sources Div.; Graham, J D [Maxwell Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); and others

    1997-12-31

    A novel dense plasma focus experiment using the Shiva Star capacitor bank is described. The experiment uses a compact toroid (CT) magnetized plasma flow switch (PFS) to initiate the focus implosion. The CT armature stably and reproducibly translates up to 3 MA from the vacuum feed region through coaxial electrodes to the gas puff central load. The inertia of the 1 mg CT and the work that must be done in compressing the internal magnetic fields during the translation provide a delay in current delivery to the pinch of 5 - 10 {mu}s, which matches the bank quarter cycle time relatively well. Effectiveness of the current delivery was monitored primarily by inductive probes in the PFS region, fast photography of the focus, and x-ray and neutron measurements of the pinch. K shell x-ray yields using neon gas were as high as 1 kJ, and 10{sup 8} neutrons were produced in a deuterium gas focus. (author). 4 figs., 10 refs.

  15. A 3-MA compact-toroid-plasma-flow-switched plasma focus demonstration experiment on Shiva Star

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuttu, G.F.; Degnan, J.H.

    1996-01-01

    A novel dense plasma focus experiment using the Shiva Star capacitor bank is described. The experiment uses a compact toroid (CT) magnetized plasma flow switch (PFS) to initiate the focus implosion. The CT armature stably and reproducibly translates up to 3 MA from the vacuum feed region through coaxial electrodes to the gas puff central load. The inertia of the 1 mg CT and the work that must be done in compressing the internal magnetic fields during the translation provide a delay in current delivery to the pinch of 5 - 10 μs, which matches the bank quarter cycle time relatively well. Effectiveness of the current delivery was monitored primarily by inductive probes in the PFS region, fast photography of the focus, and x-ray and neutron measurements of the pinch. K shell x-ray yields using neon gas were as high as 1 kJ, and 10 8 neutrons were produced in a deuterium gas focus. (author). 4 figs., 10 refs

  16. Digital holography for MEMS and microsystem metrology

    CERN Document Server

    Asundi, Anand

    2011-01-01

    Approaching the topic of digital holography from the practical perspective of industrial inspection, Digital Holography for MEMS and Microsystem Metrology describes the process of digital holography and its growing applications for MEMS characterization, residual stress measurement, design and evaluation, and device testing and inspection. Asundi also provides a thorough theoretical grounding that enables the reader to understand basic concepts and thus identify areas where this technique can be adopted. This combination of both practical and theoretical approach will ensure the

  17. Atom-resolving x-ray holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, B.; Hiort, T.; Materlik, G.; Nishino, Y.; Novikov, D. V.

    2000-01-01

    The current state of atomic resolution x-ray holography is discussed on the basis of theory and experimental results. X-ray holography is theoretically described in quantum theory. Presently-used experimental implementations are shown together with the data analysis used. Reconstructions of experimental and simulated holograms are compared for a Cu 3 Au crystal structure. Rigorous experimental realizations of pure direct and reciprocal x-ray holography methods are demonstrated, and future developments and applications of the method are suggested

  18. Virtual integral holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venolia, Dan S.; Williams, Lance

    1990-08-01

    components of a stereo display system with user point-of-view tracking for interactive 3D, and a digital realization of integral composite display which we term virtual integral holography. The primary drawbacks of holographic display - film processing turnaround time, and the difficulties of displaying scenes in full color -are obviated, and motion parallax cues provide easy 3D interpretation even for users who cannot see in stereo.

  19. Radar, sonar, and holography an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Kock, Winston E

    1974-01-01

    Radar, Sonar, and Holography: An Introduction provides an introduction to the technology of radar and sonar. Because the new science of holography is affecting both these fields quite strongly, the book includes an explanation of the fundamental principles underlying this new art (including the subjects of wave coherence, interference, and diffraction) and of the hologram process itself. Finally, numerous examples are discussed which show how holography is providing new horizons to radar and sonar systems. The book thus also provides a simple approach to the new technology of holography. The

  20. Surpassing digital holography limits by lensless object scanning holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micó, Vicente; Ferreira, Carlos; García, Javier

    2012-04-23

    We present lensless object scanning holography (LOSH) as a fully lensless method, capable of improving image quality in reflective digital Fourier holography, by means of an extremely simplified experimental setup. LOSH is based on the recording and digital post-processing of a set of digital lensless holograms and results in a synthetic image with improved resolution, field of view (FOV), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and depth of field (DOF). The superresolution (SR) effect arises from the generation of a synthetic aperture (SA) based on the linear movement of the inspected object. The same scanning principle enlarges the object FOV. SNR enhancement is achieved by speckle suppression and coherent artifacts averaging due to the coherent addition of the multiple partially overlapping bandpass images. And DOF extension is performed by digital refocusing to different object's sections. Experimental results showing an impressive image quality improvement are reported for a one-dimensional reflective resolution test target. © 2012 Optical Society of America

  1. Spaceflight participant visits CERN!

    CERN Multimedia

    Kathryn Coldham

    2016-01-01

    On 15 July, CERN welcomed spaceflight participant Anousheh Ansari.   Anousheh Ansari’s grin stretches from ear to ear, during an intriguing conversation with Nobel laureate Samuel C.C. Ting at AMS POCC. (Image: Maximilien Brice/CERN) Iranian-American Anousheh Ansari was the first-ever female spaceflight participant, spending eight days on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2006. She now has a new addition to her list of extraordinary sights ­– the home of the world’s largest particle accelerator: CERN.   On 15 July, Anousheh Ansari came to CERN and, unsurprisingly, visited the control room of the experiment attached to the ISS: the AMS. At the AMS Payload Operations Control Centre (AMS POCC) on CERN’s Prévessin site, she met the Nobel laureate Samuel Ting, spokesperson of the AMS experiment. Ansari and her accompanying guests were thrilled to expand their knowledge about CERN, its research and its...

  2. Pulse Holography: Review Of Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smigielski, Paul

    1990-04-01

    Pulse Holography includes studies concerning time-varying phase objects as well as time-varying reflective objects involving the use of pulse ruby- and YAG-lasers. The paper is divided in two parts. One part concerns the direct use of 3-1) images reconstructed from holograms, i.e. applications to particle size analysis, 3-I) velocity measurements, 3-I) cinematography ... The second part describes applications using holographic interferometry in laboratory or in an industrial environment, i.e. applications to fluid mechanics, vibration analysis, non-destructive testing ... Recent developments including interferornetric cineholography, fiber optics, measurement of non-interferometric displacements ... , are also described. The future of holography depends to a great extent on data processing and interpretation of informations contained in holograms or holographic intericrograms. Therefore, we give the state of art in this field in Europe illustrated with some industrial applications.

  3. Diatomic Metasurface for Vectorial Holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zi-Lan; Deng, Junhong; Zhuang, Xin; Wang, Shuai; Li, Kingfai; Wang, Yao; Chi, Yihui; Ye, Xuan; Xu, Jian; Wang, Guo Ping; Zhao, Rongkuo; Wang, Xiaolei; Cao, Yaoyu; Cheng, Xing; Li, Guixin; Li, Xiangping

    2018-05-09

    The emerging metasurfaces with the exceptional capability of manipulating an arbitrary wavefront have revived the holography with unprecedented prospects. However, most of the reported metaholograms suffer from limited polarization controls for a restrained bandwidth in addition to their complicated meta-atom designs with spatially variant dimensions. Here, we demonstrate a new concept of vectorial holography based on diatomic metasurfaces consisting of metamolecules formed by two orthogonal meta-atoms. On the basis of a simply linear relationship between phase and polarization modulations with displacements and orientations of identical meta-atoms, active diffraction of multiple polarization states and reconstruction of holographic images are simultaneously achieved, which is robust against both incident angles and wavelengths. Leveraging this appealing feature, broadband vectorial holographic images with spatially varying polarization states and dual-way polarization switching functionalities have been demonstrated, suggesting a new route to achromatic diffractive elements, polarization optics, and ultrasecure anticounterfeiting.

  4. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, H.D.; Busse, L.J.; Lemon, D.K.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the emission linear pulse holography which produces a chronological linear holographic image of a flaw by utilizing the acoustic energy emitted during crack growth. A thirty two point sampling array is used to construct phase-only linear holograms of simulated acoustic emission sources on large metal plates. The concept behind the AE linear pulse holography is illustrated, and a block diagram of a data acquisition system to implement the concept is given. Array element spacing, synthetic frequency criteria, and lateral depth resolution are specified. A reference timing transducer positioned between the array and the inspection zone and which inititates the time-of-flight measurements is described. The results graphically illustrate the technique using a one-dimensional FFT computer algorithm (ie. linear backward wave) for an AE image reconstruction

  5. X-ray fluorescence holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kouichi; Happo, Naohisa; Hosokawa, Shinya; Hu, Wen; Matsushita, Tomohiro

    2012-03-07

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a method of atomic resolution holography which utilizes fluorescing atoms as a wave source or a monitor of the interference field within a crystal sample. It provides three-dimensional atomic images around a specified element and has a range of up to a few nm in real space. Because of this feature, XFH is expected to be used for medium-range local structural analysis, which cannot be performed by x-ray diffraction or x-ray absorption fine structure analysis. In this article, we explain the theory of XFH including solutions to the twin-image problem, an advanced measuring system, and data processing for the reconstruction of atomic images. Then, we briefly introduce our recent applications of this technique to the analysis of local lattice distortions in mixed crystals and nanometer-size clusters appearing in the low-temperature phase of a shape-memory alloy.

  6. X-ray fluorescence holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Kouichi; Happo, Naohisa; Hosokawa, Shinya; Hu Wen; Matsushita, Tomohiro

    2012-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a method of atomic resolution holography which utilizes fluorescing atoms as a wave source or a monitor of the interference field within a crystal sample. It provides three-dimensional atomic images around a specified element and has a range of up to a few nm in real space. Because of this feature, XFH is expected to be used for medium-range local structural analysis, which cannot be performed by x-ray diffraction or x-ray absorption fine structure analysis. In this article, we explain the theory of XFH including solutions to the twin-image problem, an advanced measuring system, and data processing for the reconstruction of atomic images. Then, we briefly introduce our recent applications of this technique to the analysis of local lattice distortions in mixed crystals and nanometer-size clusters appearing in the low-temperature phase of a shape-memory alloy. (topical review)

  7. Atomic-resolution neutron holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cser, L.; Toeroek, Gy.; Krexner, G.

    2001-01-01

    Atomic-resolution neutron holography can be realised by two different schemes. In the frame of the first approach a point-like source of slow neutrons is produced inside the investigated crystal. Due to the extremely large value of the incoherent-scattering cross-section of the proton, hydrogen atoms imbedded in a metal single-crystal lattice may serve as point-like sources when the sample is irradiated by a monochromatic beam of slow neutrons. The second approach utilizes the registration of the interference between the incident and scattered waves by means of a point-like detector inserted in the lattice of the crystal under investigation. In addition, neutron-induced electron holography is considered. The feasibility of these ideas is discussed. (orig.)

  8. Bioinformatics for Precision Medicine in Oncology: principles and application to the SHIVA clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas eServant

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Precision medicine (PM requires the delivery of individually adapted medical care based on the genetic characteristics of each patient and his/her tumor. The last decade witnessed the development of high-throughput technologies such as microarrays and next-generation sequencing which paved the way to PM in the field of oncology. While the cost of these technologies decreases, we are facing an exponential increase in the amount of data produced. Our ability to use this information in daily practice relies strongly on the availability of an efficient bioinformatics system that assists in the translation of knowledge from the bench towards molecular targeting and diagnosis. Clinical trials and routine diagnoses constitute different approaches, both requiring a strong bioinformatics environment capable of i warranting the integration and the traceability of data, ii ensuring the correct processing and analyses of genomic data and iii applying well-defined and reproducible procedures for workflow management and decision-making. To address the issues, a seamless information system was developed at Institut Curie which facilitates the data integration and tracks in real-time the processing of individual samples. Moreover, computational pipelines were developed to identify reliably genomic alterations and mutations from the molecular profiles of each patient. After a rigorous quality control, a meaningful report is delivered to the clinicians and biologists for the therapeutic decision. The complete bioinformatics environment and the key points of its implementation are presented in the context of the SHIVA clinical trial, a multicentric randomized phase II trial comparing targeted therapy based on tumor molecular profiling versus conventional therapy in patients with refractory cancer. The numerous challenges faced in practice during the setting up and the conduct of this trial are discussed as an illustration of PM application.

  9. X-ray fluorescence holography

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashi, K; Takahashi, Y

    2003-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a new structural analysis method of determining a 3D atomic arrangement around fluorescing atoms. We developed an XFH apparatus using advanced X-ray techniques and succeeded in obtaining high-quality hologram data. Furthermore, we introduced applications to the structural analysis of a thin film and the environment around dopants and, discussed the quantitative analysis of local lattice distortion. (author)

  10. Multicolor Holography With Phase Shifting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikram, Chandra S.

    1996-01-01

    Prototype apparatus constructed to test feasibility of two-color holographic interferometric scheme in which data for reconstructing holographic wavefront obtained with help of phase-shifting technique. Provides two sets of data needed to solve equations for effects of temperature and concentration. Concept extended to holography at three or more wavelengths to measure three or more phenomena associated with significant variations in index of refraction

  11. Holography as a measuring tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tozer, B.A.; Webster, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    Holography has advantages over conventional photography for the recording and direct measurement of physical structures. The three-dimensional reconstruction carries information equivalent to almost a million photographs. Other advantages include the depth of field, resolution, wide angle of view and information storage density. A number of possible applications of holography have been identified within the CEGB and a proposal to apply it during the post-irradiation examination of nuclear fuel elements is now well advanced. Optical inspection of discharged fuel elements from Advanced-Gas-Cooled Reactors, whether undertaken in the irradiated-fuel disposal system at the station or at a post-irradiation-examination centre, can normally be performed remotely. Because of the very high radiation levels near the surfaces of the fuel element, viewing must be carried out through windows about 1.5 metres thick. Conventional photography is possible in the fuel-disposal system, but a specialised camera is required and only relatively low-resolution photographs of the top of the element can be obtained. At the post-irradiation centre, elements are dismantled and a detailed study can then be made, but it is very laborious and consumes expensive radiation- 'cave' time. Holography offers the possibility of recording a three-dimensional image of a complete element, which can then be studied at leisure to provide information on the condition of individual fuel pins. The present state of development of this work at Marchwood Engineering Laboratories is described. (author)

  12. Spaceflight-Induced Intracranial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Alex P; Marshall-Bowman, Karina

    2015-06-01

    Although once a widely speculated about and largely theoretical topic, spaceflight-induced intracranial hypertension has gained acceptance as a distinct clinical phenomenon, yet the underlying physiological mechanisms are still poorly understood. In the past, many terms were used to describe the symptoms of malaise, nausea, vomiting, and vertigo, though longer duration spaceflights have increased the prevalence of overlapping symptoms of headache and visual disturbance. Spaceflight-induced visual pathology is thought to be a manifestation of increased intracranial pressure (ICP) because of its similar presentation to cases of known intracranial hypertension on Earth as well as the documentation of increased ICP by lumbar puncture in symptomatic astronauts upon return to gravity. The most likely mechanisms of spaceflight-induced increased ICP include a cephalad shift of body fluids, venous outflow obstruction, blood-brain barrier breakdown, and disruption to CSF flow. The relative contribution of increased ICP to the symptoms experienced during spaceflight is currently unknown, though other factors recently posited to contribute include local effects on ocular structures, individual differences in metabolism, and the vasodilator effects of carbon dioxide. This review article attempts to consolidate the literature regarding spaceflight-induced intracranial hypertension and distinguish it from other pathologies with similar symptomatology. It discusses the proposed physiological causes and the pathological manifestations of increased ICP in the spaceflight environment and provides considerations for future long-term space travel. In the future, it will be critical to develop countermeasures so that astronauts can participate at their peak potential and return safely to Earth.

  13. Nd:YAG laser for holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bykovsky, Yu.A.; Evtihiev, N.N.; Larkin, A.I.

    1982-01-01

    Different possibilities to use photonics, holography and optical processing for nuclear physics has been investigated in our works. The paper presents the results of the study of time and spatial coherence of Nd:YAG laser and application in holography. (orig./HSI)

  14. Artistic Representation with Pulsed Holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, S

    2013-01-01

    This thesis describes artistic representation through pulsed holography. One of the prevalent practical problems in making holograms is object movement. Any movement of the object or film, including movement caused by acoustic vibration, has the same fatal results. One way of reducing the chance of movement is by ensuring that the exposure is very quick; using a pulsed laser can fulfill this objective. The attractiveness of using pulsed laser is based on the variety of materials or objects that can be recorded (e.g., liquid material or instantaneous scene of a moving object). One of the most interesting points about pulsed holograms is that some reconstructed images present us with completely different views of the real world. For example, the holographic image of liquid material does not appear fluid; it looks like a piece of hard glass that would produce a sharp sound upon tapping. In everyday life, we are unfamiliar with such an instantaneous scene. On the other hand, soft-textured materials such as a feather or wool differ from liquids when observed through holography. Using a pulsed hologram, we can sense the soft touch of the object or material with the help of realistic three-dimensional (3-D) images. The images allow us to realize the sense of touch in a way that resembles touching real objects. I had the opportunity to use a pulsed ruby laser soon after I started to work in the field of holography in 1979. Since then, I have made pulsed holograms of activities, including pouring water, breaking eggs, blowing soap bubbles, and scattering feathers and popcorn. I have also created holographic art with materials and objects, such as silk fiber, fabric, balloons, glass, flowers, and even the human body. Whenever I create art, I like to present the spectator with a new experience in perception. Therefore, I would like to introduce my experimental artwork through those pulsed holograms.

  15. Nearfield acoustic holography. I - Theory of generalized holography and the development of NAH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, J. D.; Williams, E. G.; Lee, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Because its underlying principles are so fundamental, holography has been studied and applied in many areas of science. Recently, a technique has been developed which takes the maximum advantage of the fundamental principles and extracts much more information from a hologram than is customarily associated with such a measurement. In this paper the fundamental principles of holography are reviewed, and a sound radiation measurement system, called nearfield acoustic holography (NAH), which fully exploits the fundamental principles, is described.

  16. Mix-and-match holography

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Yifan

    2017-11-22

    Computational caustics and light steering displays offer a wide range of interesting applications, ranging from art works and architectural installations to energy efficient HDR projection. In this work we expand on this concept by encoding several target images into pairs of front and rear phase-distorting surfaces. Different target holograms can be decoded by mixing and matching different front and rear surfaces under specific geometric alignments. Our approach, which we call mix-and-match holography, is made possible by moving from a refractive caustic image formation process to a diffractive, holographic one. This provides the extra bandwidth that is required to multiplex several images into pairing surfaces.

  17. Seismic Holography of Solar Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Charles

    2000-01-01

    The basic goal of the project was to extend holographic seismic imaging techniques developed under a previous NASA contract, and to incorporate phase diagnostics. Phase-sensitive imaging gives us a powerful probe of local thermal and Doppler perturbations in active region subphotospheres, allowing us to map thermal structure and flows associated with "acoustic moats" and "acoustic glories". These remarkable features were discovered during our work, by applying simple acoustic power holography to active regions. Included in the original project statement was an effort to obtain the first seismic images of active regions on the Sun's far surface.

  18. Holography through optically active windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, A. J.

    1979-01-01

    By using two orthogonally polarized reference beams, holograms can be recorded through stressed windows and the reconstructed virtual image will show no stress pattern. As shown analytically, the stress-pattern-free hologram is recordable for any polarization state of the object illumination. Hence, the more efficient nondepolarizing diffuser can be used in performing holography through stressed windows if two reference beams are used. Results are presented for a pair of machined polysulfone windows intended for use in a holographic flow-visualization setup in a single-stage-compressor test rig.

  19. Experimental verification of transient nonlinear acoustical holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Yun; Cannata, Jonathan; Wang, Tianren

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents an experimental study on nonlinear transient acoustical holography. The validity and effectiveness of a recently proposed nonlinear transient acoustical holography algorithm is evaluated in the presence of noise. The acoustic field measured on a post-focal plane of a high-intensity focused transducer is backward projected to reconstruct the pressure distributions on the focal and a pre-focal plane, which are shown to be in good agreement with the measurement. In contrast, the conventional linear holography produces erroneous results in this case where the nonlinearity involved is strong. Forward acoustic field projection was also carried out to further verify the algorithm.

  20. Holography: Art in an Ephemeral Medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buterbaugh, James G.

    1979-01-01

    The science of holography provides an opportunity to see reality by illusion using laser light, lenses, and mirrors. To develop as holographic artists, students must first gain proficiency in using its techniques, equipment, and materials. (Author/CMV)

  1. General temperature field measurement by digital holography

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doleček, Roman; Psota, Pavel; Lédl, Vít; Vít, Tomáš; Václavík, Jan; Kopecký, V.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 1 (2013), A319-A325 ISSN 1559-128X Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : digital holography * temperature field measurement * tomography Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.649, year: 2013

  2. Holography as a Liberal Arts Physics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jacob Wen-kuang

    1978-01-01

    Describes a liberal arts physics course for all majors interested in holography or to satisfy the general education requirements. An outline of the course and some experience of offering it are given. (Author/GA)

  3. Multicultural factors for international spaceflight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kring, J P

    2001-06-01

    Spaceflight operations, including the International Space Station (ISS) and a mission to Mars, depend on international cooperation. Accordingly, safety, performance, and mission success rely on how well crews and operational personnel with different cultural backgrounds operate together. This paper outlines 10 areas related to spaceflight that are influenced by the national culture and backgrounds of personnel: (a) Communication, (b) Cognition and Decision Making, (c) Technology Interfacing, (d) Interpersonal Interactions, (e) Work, Management, and Leadership Style, (f) Personal Hygiene and Clothing, (g) Food Preparation and Meals, (h) Religion and Holidays, (i) Recreation, and (j) Habitat Aesthetics. Research findings and recommendations are presented, as well as a multicultural training approach to reduce potential challenges for long-duration spaceflight.

  4. Introduction to holography - theory - experimental equipment; Introduction a l'holographie - theorie - dispositifs experimentaux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Consoli, T; Proca, G; Slama, L [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-07-01

    This work presents the theory and the technic in the field of holography. It makes a synthesis of the present knowledge in that field. (authors) [French] Ce travail expose les theories et les techniques dans le domaine de l'holographie. Il fait la synthese des connaissances acquises a ce jour dans ce domaine en evolution rapide. (auteurs)

  5. Introduction to holography - theory - experimental equipment; Introduction a l'holographie - theorie - dispositifs experimentaux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Consoli, T.; Proca, G.; Slama, L. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-07-01

    This work presents the theory and the technic in the field of holography. It makes a synthesis of the present knowledge in that field. (authors) [French] Ce travail expose les theories et les techniques dans le domaine de l'holographie. Il fait la synthese des connaissances acquises a ce jour dans ce domaine en evolution rapide. (auteurs)

  6. Deriving an atmospheric budget of total organic bromine using airborne in-situ measurements from the Western Pacific during SHIVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, S.; Bönisch, H.; Keber, T.; Oram, D. E.; Mills, G.; Engel, A.

    2014-02-01

    During the SHIVA (Stratospheric Ozone: Halogen Impacts in a Varying Atmosphere) project an extensive dataset of all halogen species relevant for the atmospheric budget of total organic bromine has been collected in the West Pacific region using the FALCON aircraft operated by the German Aerospace agency DLR (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt) covering a vertical range from the planetary boundary layer up to the ceiling altitude of the aircraft of 13 km. In total, more than 700 measurements were performed with the newly developed fully-automated in-situ instrument GHOST-MS (Gas cHromatograph for the Observation of Tracers - coupled with a Mass Spectrometer) by the Goethe University of Frankfurt (GUF) and with the onboard whole-air sampler WASP with subsequent ground based state-of-the-art GC/MS analysis by the University of East Anglia (UEA). Both instruments yield good agreement for all major (CHBr3 and CH2Br2) and minor (CHBrCl, CHBrCl2 and CHBr2Cl) VSLS (very short-lived substances), at least at the level of their 2 σ measurement uncertainties. In contrast to the suggestion that the Western Pacific could be a major source region for VSLS (Pyle et al., 2011), we found only slightly enhanced mixing ratios of brominated halogen source gases relative to the levels reported in Montzka et al. (2011) for other tropical regions. A budget for total organic bromine, including all four halons,CH3Br and the VSLS, is derived for the upper troposphere, the input region for the TTL and thus also for the stratosphere, compiled from the SHIVA dataset. With exception of the two minor VSLS CHBrCl2 and CHBr2Cl, excellent agreement with the values reported in Montzka et al. (2011) is found, while being slightly higher than previous studies from our group based on balloon-borne measurements.

  7. Visualizing Breath using Digital Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, P. R.; Reid, I. D.; Wilton, J. B.

    2013-02-01

    Artist Jayne Wilton and physicists Peter Hobson and Ivan Reid of Brunel University are collaborating at Brunel University on a project which aims to use a range of techniques to make visible the normally invisible dynamics of the breath and the verbal and non-verbal communication it facilitates. The breath is a source of a wide range of chemical, auditory and physical exchanges with the direct environment. Digital Holography is being investigated to enable a visually stimulating articulation of the physical trajectory of the breath as it leaves the mouth. Initial findings of this research are presented. Real time digital hologram replay allows the audience to move through holographs of breath-born particles.

  8. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, H.D.; Busse, L.J.; Lemon, D.K.

    1983-10-25

    This device relates to the concept of and means for performing Acoustic Emission Linear Pulse Holography, which combines the advantages of linear holographic imaging and Acoustic Emission into a single non-destructive inspection system. This unique system produces a chronological, linear holographic image of a flaw by utilizing the acoustic energy emitted during crack growth. The innovation is the concept of utilizing the crack-generated acoustic emission energy to generate a chronological series of images of a growing crack by applying linear, pulse holographic processing to the acoustic emission data. The process is implemented by placing on a structure an array of piezoelectric sensors (typically 16 or 32 of them) near the defect location. A reference sensor is placed between the defect and the array.

  9. Brain structural plasticity with spaceflight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppelmans, Vincent; Bloomberg, Jacob J; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P; Seidler, Rachael D

    2016-01-01

    Humans undergo extensive sensorimotor adaptation during spaceflight due to altered vestibular inputs and body unloading. No studies have yet evaluated the effects of spaceflight on human brain structure despite the fact that recently reported optic nerve structural changes are hypothesized to occur due to increased intracranial pressure occurring with microgravity. This is the first report on human brain structural changes with spaceflight. We evaluated retrospective longitudinal T2-weighted MRI scans and balance data from 27 astronauts (thirteen ~2-week shuttle crew members and fourteen ~6-month International Space Station crew members) to determine spaceflight effects on brain structure, and whether any pre to postflight brain changes are associated with balance changes. Data were obtained from the NASA Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health. Brain scans were segmented into gray matter maps and normalized into MNI space using a stepwise approach through subject specific templates. Non-parametric permutation testing was used to analyze pre to postflight volumetric gray matter changes. We found extensive volumetric gray matter decreases, including large areas covering the temporal and frontal poles and around the orbits. This effect was larger in International Space Station versus shuttle crew members in some regions. There were bilateral focal gray matter increases within the medial primary somatosensory and motor cortex; i.e., the cerebral areas where the lower limbs are represented. These intriguing findings are observed in a retrospective data set; future prospective studies should probe the underlying mechanisms and behavioral consequences.

  10. Spaceflight promotes biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wooseong Kim

    Full Text Available Understanding the effects of spaceflight on microbial communities is crucial for the success of long-term, manned space missions. Surface-associated bacterial communities, known as biofilms, were abundant on the Mir space station and continue to be a challenge on the International Space Station. The health and safety hazards linked to the development of biofilms are of particular concern due to the suppression of immune function observed during spaceflight. While planktonic cultures of microbes have indicated that spaceflight can lead to increases in growth and virulence, the effects of spaceflight on biofilm development and physiology remain unclear. To address this issue, Pseudomonas aeruginosa was cultured during two Space Shuttle Atlantis missions: STS-132 and STS-135, and the biofilms formed during spaceflight were characterized. Spaceflight was observed to increase the number of viable cells, biofilm biomass, and thickness relative to normal gravity controls. Moreover, the biofilms formed during spaceflight exhibited a column-and-canopy structure that has not been observed on Earth. The increase in the amount of biofilms and the formation of the novel architecture during spaceflight were observed to be independent of carbon source and phosphate concentrations in the media. However, flagella-driven motility was shown to be essential for the formation of this biofilm architecture during spaceflight. These findings represent the first evidence that spaceflight affects community-level behaviors of bacteria and highlight the importance of understanding how both harmful and beneficial human-microbe interactions may be altered during spaceflight.

  11. Spin and wavelength multiplexed nonlinear metasurface holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Weimin; Zeuner, Franziska; Li, Xin; Reineke, Bernhard; He, Shan; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Liu, Juan; Wang, Yongtian; Zhang, Shuang; Zentgraf, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Metasurfaces, as the ultrathin version of metamaterials, have caught growing attention due to their superior capability in controlling the phase, amplitude and polarization states of light. Among various types of metasurfaces, geometric metasurface that encodes a geometric or Pancharatnam-Berry phase into the orientation angle of the constituent meta-atoms has shown great potential in controlling light in both linear and nonlinear optical regimes. The robust and dispersionless nature of the geometric phase simplifies the wave manipulation tremendously. Benefitting from the continuous phase control, metasurface holography has exhibited advantages over conventional depth controlled holography with discretized phase levels. Here we report on spin and wavelength multiplexed nonlinear metasurface holography, which allows construction of multiple target holographic images carried independently by the fundamental and harmonic generation waves of different spins. The nonlinear holograms provide independent, nondispersive and crosstalk-free post-selective channels for holographic multiplexing and multidimensional optical data storages, anti-counterfeiting, and optical encryption.

  12. Dark field electron holography for strain measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beche, A., E-mail: armand.beche@fei.com [CEA-Grenoble, INAC/SP2M/LEMMA, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Rouviere, J.L. [CEA-Grenoble, INAC/SP2M/LEMMA, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Barnes, J.P.; Cooper, D. [CEA-LETI, Minatec Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France)

    2011-02-15

    Dark field electron holography is a new TEM-based technique for measuring strain with nanometer scale resolution. Here we present the procedure to align a transmission electron microscope and obtain dark field holograms as well as the theoretical background necessary to reconstruct strain maps from holograms. A series of experimental parameters such as biprism voltage, sample thickness, exposure time, tilt angle and choice of diffracted beam are then investigated on a silicon-germanium layer epitaxially embedded in a silicon matrix in order to obtain optimal dark field holograms over a large field of view with good spatial resolution and strain sensitivity. -- Research Highlights: {yields} Step by step explanation of the dark field electron holography technique. {yields} Presentation of the theoretical equations to obtain quantitative strain map. {yields} Description of experimental parameters influencing dark field holography results. {yields} Quantitative strain measurement on a SiGe layer embedded in a silicon matrix.

  13. An easy teaching tool for holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voslion, T; Escarguel, A

    2012-01-01

    In the framework of scientific outreach at the Maison des Sciences of Aix-Marseilles University, we created a teaching kit for holography that can be packed into a small case. It includes all the equipment required to produce holograms almost anywhere and has a simple optical assembly and very good vibration tolerance. The fundamental principles of holography and several applications are illustrated through simple experiments: reflection Denisyuk holograms, angular multiplexing, notch filters, holographic interferometry and diffraction holographic gratings. It is possible to use this tool for several purposes: science outreach, teaching for undergraduate and graduate students and continuing education. In this paper, we explain the basis of holography, how the kit works and indicate some applications and results that can be performed and obtained with it. (paper)

  14. Ten years of x-ray holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faigel, G.; Bortel, G.; Tegze, M.; Fadley, C.S.; Simionovici, A.S.

    2007-01-01

    With the appearance of nano-science the role of local methods has become more and more important. Hard x-ray holography based on the inside reference point concept is a local probe of the atomic order in solids. It gives the 3D real space image of atoms without the phase ambiguity inherent to diffraction methods. In this paper a brief description of the basics of hard x-ray holography is given. The last ten years' experimental and evaluation-related developments are reviewed. We also introduce different variants of the method, such as Bremsstrahlung and gamma ray holography (GRH). The power of the method is illustrated by examples. We outline new directions and future possibilities. (authors)

  15. Electron holography at atomic dimensions -- Present state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, M.; Lichte, H.

    1999-01-01

    An electron microscope is a wave optical instrument where the object information is carried by an electron wave. However, an important information, the phase of the electron wave, is lost, because only intensities can be recorded in a conventional electron micrograph. Off-axis electron holography solves this phase problem by encoding amplitude and phase information in an interference pattern, the so-called hologram. After reconstruction, a rather unrestricted wave optical analysis can be performed on a computer. The possibilities as well as the current limitations of off-axis electron holography at atomic dimensions are discussed, and they are illustrated at two applications of structure characterization of ε-NbN and YBCO-1237. Finally, an electron microscope equipped with a Cs-corrector, a monochromator, and a Moellenstedt biprism is outlined for subangstrom holography

  16. Deriving an atmospheric budget of total organic bromine using airborne in situ measurements from the western Pacific area during SHIVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, S.; Bönisch, H.; Keber, T.; Oram, D. E.; Mills, G.; Engel, A.

    2014-07-01

    During the recent SHIVA (Stratospheric Ozone: Halogen Impacts in a Varying Atmosphere) project an extensive data set of all halogen species relevant for the atmospheric budget of total organic bromine was collected in the western Pacific region using the Falcon aircraft operated by the German Aerospace agency DLR (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt) covering a vertical range from the planetary boundary layer up to the ceiling altitude of the aircraft of 13 km. In total, more than 700 measurements were performed with the newly developed fully automated in situ instrument GHOST-MS (Gas chromatograph for the Observation of Tracers - coupled with a Mass Spectrometer) by the Goethe University of Frankfurt (GUF) and with the onboard whole-air sampler WASP with subsequent ground-based state-of-the-art GC / MS analysis by the University of East Anglia (UEA). Both instruments yield good agreement for all major (CHBr3 and CH2Br2) and minor (CH2BrCl, CHBrCl2 and CHBr2Cl) VSLS (very short-lived substances), at least at the level of their 2σ measurement uncertainties. In contrast to the suggestion that the western Pacific could be a region of strongly increased atmospheric VSLS abundance (Pyle et al., 2011), we found only in the upper troposphere a slightly enhanced amount of total organic bromine from VSLS relative to the levels reported in Montzka and Reimann et al. (2011) for other tropical regions. From the SHIVA observations in the upper troposphere, a budget for total organic bromine, including four halons (H-1301, H-1211, H-1202, H-2402), CH3Br and the VSLS, is derived for the level of zero radiative heating (LZRH), the input region for the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) and thus also for the stratosphere. With the exception of the two minor VSLS CHBrCl2 and CHBr2Cl, excellent agreement with the values reported in Montzka and Reimann et al. (2011) is found, while being slightly higher than previous studies from our group based on balloon-borne measurements.

  17. Holography beyond the Penrose limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callan, Curtis G.; McLoughlin, Tristan; Swanson, Ian

    2004-01-01

    The flat pp-wave background geometry has been realized as a particular Penrose limit of AdS 5 xS 5 . It describes a string that has been infinitely boosted along an equatorial null geodesic in the S 5 subspace. The string worldsheet Hamiltonian in this background is free. Finite boosts lead to curvature corrections that induce interacting perturbations of the string worldsheet Hamiltonian. We develop a systematic light-cone gauge quantization of the interacting worldsheet string theory and use it to obtain the interacting spectrum of the so-called 'two-impurity' states of the string. The quantization is technically rather intricate and we provide a detailed account of the methods we use to extract explicit results. We give a systematic treatment of the fermionic states and are able to show that the spectrum possesses the proper extended supermultiplet structure (a nontrivial fact since half the supersymmetry is nonlinearly realized). We test holography by comparing the string energy spectrum with the scaling dimensions of corresponding gauge theory operators. We confirm earlier results that agreement obtains in low orders of perturbation theory, but breaks down at third order. The methods presented here can be used to explore these issues in a wider context than is specifically dealt with in this paper

  18. Pairing induced superconductivity in holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagrov, Andrey; Meszena, Balazs; Schalm, Koenraad

    2014-09-01

    We study pairing induced superconductivity in large N strongly coupled systems at finite density using holography. In the weakly coupled dual gravitational theory the mechanism is conventional BCS theory. An IR hard wall cut-off is included to ensure that we can controllably address the dynamics of a single confined Fermi surface. We address in detail the interplay between the scalar order parameter field and fermion pairing. Adding an explicitly dynamical scalar operator with the same quantum numbers as the fermion-pair, the theory experiences a BCS/BEC crossover controlled by the relative scaling dimensions. We find the novel result that this BCS/BEC crossover exposes resonances in the canonical expectation value of the scalar operator. This occurs not only when the scaling dimension is degenerate with the Cooper pair, but also with that of higher derivative paired operators. We speculate that a proper definition of the order parameter which takes mixing with these operators into account stays finite nevertheless.

  19. Holography with a Landau pole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faedo, Antón F. [Departament de Física Quántica i Astrofísica and Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (ICC), Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, ES-08028, Barcelona (Spain); Mateos, David [Departament de Física Quántica i Astrofísica and Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (ICC), Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, ES-08028, Barcelona (Spain); Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA), Passeig Lluís Companys 23, ES-08010, Barcelona (Spain); Pantelidou, Christiana [Departament de Física Quántica i Astrofísica and Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (ICC), Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, ES-08028, Barcelona (Spain); Tarrío, Javier [Physique Théorique et Mathématique, Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), and International Solvay Institutes, Campus de la Plaine CP 231, B-1050, Brussels (Belgium)

    2017-02-08

    Holography for UV-incomplete gauge theories is important but poorly understood. A paradigmatic example is d=4, N=4 super Yang-Mills coupled to N{sub f} quark flavors, which possesses a Landau pole at a UV scale Λ{sub LP}. The dual gravity solution exhibits a UV singularity at a finite proper distance along the holographic direction. Despite this, holographic renormalization can be fully implemented via analytic continuation to an AdS solution. The presence of a UV cut-off manifests itself in several interesting ways. At energies E≪Λ{sub LP} no pathologies appear, as expected from effective field theory. In contrast, at scales E≲Λ{sub LP} the gravitational potential becomes repulsive, and at temperatures T≲Λ{sub LP} the specific heat becomes negative. Although we focus on N=4 super Yang-Mills with flavor, our qualitative results apply to a much more general class of theories, since they only depend on the fact that the metric near the UV singularity is a hyper-scaling violating metric with exponent θ>d−1.

  20. Holography with a Landau pole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faedo, Antón F.; Mateos, David; Pantelidou, Christiana; Tarrío, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Holography for UV-incomplete gauge theories is important but poorly understood. A paradigmatic example is d=4, N=4 super Yang-Mills coupled to N f quark flavors, which possesses a Landau pole at a UV scale Λ LP . The dual gravity solution exhibits a UV singularity at a finite proper distance along the holographic direction. Despite this, holographic renormalization can be fully implemented via analytic continuation to an AdS solution. The presence of a UV cut-off manifests itself in several interesting ways. At energies E≪Λ LP no pathologies appear, as expected from effective field theory. In contrast, at scales E≲Λ LP the gravitational potential becomes repulsive, and at temperatures T≲Λ LP the specific heat becomes negative. Although we focus on N=4 super Yang-Mills with flavor, our qualitative results apply to a much more general class of theories, since they only depend on the fact that the metric near the UV singularity is a hyper-scaling violating metric with exponent θ>d−1.

  1. Holography - Application To Art: Curatorial Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinsmore, Sydney

    1987-06-01

    An exploration of the need to define a specific and critical language to describe the art of holography. Within any discussion of art, critical analysis must maintain an objective openess, particularily when the discourse concerns new media. To apply technological invention to art, new media is often without precedent on which to base criticism and bias. For this reason, holography falls prey to comparative rhetoric and established evaluation of other forms of imaging,as photography emulated the compositional romanticism of painting initially. Isolated and often misunderstood within the context of history, new media vascillates between legitimacy and curiosity in an attempt to create specific parameters to identify perceptual transition.

  2. Holography on the Spacelab 3 mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Robert B.; Kroes, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    Spacelab 3's Fluid Experiment System, in which triglycine sulfate crystals were produced by a low temperature solution-growth technique, employs holography as its primary data-gathering system. This use of holography allows optical techniques which would be difficult to apply in orbit to be used after the holographic data is returned to ground laboratories, using an analysis of the reconstructed holographic image. The system used allows both single- and double-exposure holograms to be obtained in two separate orthogonal configurations.

  3. Resolution in in-line digital holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier, C; Denis, L; Fournel, T

    2010-01-01

    Digital in-line holography is a 3D imaging technique which has been widely developed during the last two decades. This technique achieves the 3D reconstruction of volume objects from a 2D image-hologram. It is a metrological tool and therefore the improvement of resolution is one of the current challenges. However the resolution depends on several experimental parameters and the experimenters have to choose the parameters which will lead to the best resolution. This paper presents the study of resolution in in-line digital holography from the asymptotical bounds of the covariance of estimators used in hologram reconstruction.

  4. Fundamentals of Anesthesiology for Spaceflight

    OpenAIRE

    Komorowski, M; Fleming, SF; Kirkpatrick, AK

    2016-01-01

    During future space exploration missions, the risk of medical events requiring surgery is significant, and will likely rely on anesthetic techniques. Available options during spaceflight include local, regional (nerve block) and general anesthesia. No actual invasive anesthesia was ever performed on humans in space or immediately after landing, and the safe delivery of such advanced medical care in this context is challenging. In the first section of this review, Human adaptation to the space...

  5. Is holography ready for yet another life? or make holography great again

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trolinger, James D.

    2016-08-01

    Holographic metrology, unlike most other applications of holography, has always thrived and continues to thrive by continuously incorporating new supporting technologies that make it more powerful and useful. Successes, failures, lives, and deaths are examined and recognized as evolutionary steps that position the field where opportunities are as great and as many as ever. This is a story of that evolution. Comparisons and analogies with other applications of holography such as data storage, archiving, the arts, entertainment, advertising, and security and their evolution are interesting. Critical events, successes, mistakes, and coincidences represent milestones of abandonment or failure to deliver in many holography communities that followed a different evolutionary path. Events and new technical developments continue to emerge in supporting fields that can revive and expand all holography applications. New opportunities are described with encouragement to act on them and take some risks. Don't wait until all of the required technology and hardware are available, because good scientists always act before then. The paper is about "making holography great again" and your opportunity to be a part of the upcoming revolution. Although the discussion focuses on holographic metrology, the same principles should apply to other holography communities.

  6. Spaceflight Modulates Gene Expression in Astronauts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Astronauts are exposed to a unique combination of stressors during spaceflight which leads to alterations in their physiology and potentially increases their...

  7. Holography, Gravity and Condensed Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartnoll, Sean [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2017-12-20

    Over the five years of funding from this grant, I produced 26 publications. These include a book-long monograph on "Holographic Quantum Matter" that is currently in press with MIT press. The remainder were mostly published in Physical Review Letters, the Journal of High Energy Physics, Nature Physics, Classical and Quantum Gravity and Physical Review B. Over this period, the field of holography applied to condensed matter physics developed from a promising theoretical approach to a mature conceptual and practical edifice, whose ideas were realized in experiments. My own work played a central role in this development. In particular, in the final year of this grant, I co-authored two experimental papers in which ideas that I had developed in earlier years were shown to usefully describe transport in strongly correlated materials — these papers were published in Science and in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (obviously my contribution to these papers was theoretical). My theoretical work in this period developed several new directions of research that have proven to be influential. These include (i) The construction of highly inhomogeneous black hole event horizons, realizing disordered fixed points and describing new regimes of classical gravity, (ii) The conjecture of a bound on diffusivities that could underpin transport in strongly interacting media — an idea which may be proven in the near future and has turned out to be intimately connected to studies of quantum chaos in black holes and strongly correlated media, (iii) The characterization of new forms of hydrodynamic transport, e.g. with phase-disordered order parameters. These studies pertain to key open questions in our understanding of how non-quasiparticle, intrinsically strongly interacting systems can behave. In addition to the interface between holography and strongly interacting condensed matter systems, I made several advances on understanding the role of entanglement in quantum

  8. Speckle reduction techniques in digital holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monaghan, David; Kelly, Damien; Hennelly, Bryan [Department of Computer Science, National University of Ireland, Maynooth, Co. Kildare (Ireland); Javidi, Bahram, E-mail: bryanh@cs.nuim.i [University of Connecticut Electrical and Computer Engineering Department 371 Fairfield Road, Unit 2157 Storrs, CT 06269-2157 (United States)

    2010-02-01

    We have studied several speckle reduction techniques, applicable to digital holography. These include the use of optical diffusers, wavelet filtering, simulating temporal incoherence and filtering in the Fourier domain. The Digital Holograms (DHs) used in this study are captured using a Phase Shift Interferometric (PSI) in-line setup and subsequently reconstructed numerically.

  9. Electron Holography Image Simulation of Nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keimpema, K.; Raedt, H. De; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    We discuss a real-space and a Fourier-space technique to compute numerically, the phase images observed by electron holography of nanoscale particles. An assessment of the applicability and accuracy of these techniques is made by calculating numerical results for simple geometries for which

  10. Photopolymer for Optical Holography and Holographic Interferometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Květoň, M.; Lédl, Vít; Havránek, A.; Fiala, P.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 295, č. 1 (2010), s. 107-113 ISSN 1022-1360 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : holographic interferometry * holography * photopolymerization * recording material * refractive index Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/masy.200900093/pdf

  11. Synthetic optical holography for rapid nanoimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, M; Carney, P S; Hillenbrand, R

    2014-03-20

    Holography has paved the way for phase imaging in a variety of wide-field techniques, including electron, X-ray and optical microscopy. In scanning optical microscopy, however, the serial fashion of image acquisition seems to challenge a direct implementation of traditional holography. Here we introduce synthetic optical holography (SOH) for quantitative phase-resolved imaging in scanning optical microscopy. It uniquely combines fast phase imaging, technical simplicity and simultaneous operation at visible and infrared frequencies with a single reference arm. We demonstrate SOH with a scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscope (s-SNOM) where it enables reliable quantitative phase-resolved near-field imaging with unprecedented speed. We apply these capabilities to nanoscale, non-invasive and rapid screening of grain boundaries in CVD-grown graphene, by recording 65 kilopixel near-field images in 26 s and 2.3 megapixel images in 13 min. Beyond s-SNOM, the SOH concept could boost the implementation of holography in other scanning imaging applications such as confocal microscopy.

  12. Simple optical setup implementation for digital Fourier transform holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Oliveira, G N [Pos-graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica, TEM/PGMEC, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Rua Passo da Patria, 156, Niteroi, R.J., Cep.: 24.210-240 (Brazil); Rodrigues, D M C; Dos Santos, P A M, E-mail: pams@if.uff.br [Instituto de Fisica, Laboratorio de Optica Nao-linear e Aplicada, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Gal. Nilton Tavares de Souza, s/n, Gragoata, Niteroi, R.J., Cep.:24.210-346 (Brazil)

    2011-01-01

    In the present work a simple implementation of Digital Fourier Transform Holography (DFTH) setup is discussed. This is obtained making a very simple modification in the classical setup arquiteture of the Fourier Transform holography. It is also demonstrated the easy and practical viability of the setup in an interferometric application for mechanical parameters determination. The work is also proposed as an interesting advanced introductory training for graduated students in digital holography.

  13. Defending spaceflight: The echoes of Apollo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovetto, R. J.

    2016-12-01

    This paper defends, and emphasizes the importance of, spaceflight, broadly construed to include human and unmanned spaceflight, space science, exploration and development. Within this discourse, I provide counter-replies to remarks by physicist Dr. Steven Weinberg against my previous support of human spaceflight. In this defense of peaceful spaceflight I draw upon a variety of sources. Although a focus is human spaceflight, human and unmanned modes must not be treated as an either-or opposition. Rather, each has a critical role to play in moving humanity forward as a spacefaring species. In the course of this communication, I also stress the perennial role of space agencies as science and technology-drivers, and their function to provide a stable and unified platform for space programs.

  14. Holography at x-ray wavelengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solem, T.C.; Baldwin, G.C.; Chapline, G.F.

    1981-01-01

    We discuss alternative holographic techniques for imaging microscopic structures with a short-pulse, high intensity, high-quantum-energy laser. We find that Fresnel transform holography using a photoresist for registration of the hologram is most likely to be within the scope of near term technology. Although it has advantages in time gating, using an in-line electron microscope for hologram registration has an unacceptable tradeoff between quantum efficiency and resolution. Fourier transform holography using a reflector to generate the reference beam might be a reasonable alternative using low resolution film, but is necessarily more complicated. We discuss the dependence of the required laser intensity on the resolution sought and on the elastic and absorption cross sections. We conclude that resonant scattering must be used to obtain holograms at reasonable intensities

  15. Limits of computational white-light holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mader, Sebastian; Kozacki, Tomasz; Tompkin, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Recently, computational holograms are being used in applications, where previously conventional holograms were applied. Compared to conventional holography, computational holography is based on imaging of virtual objects instead of real objects, which renders them somewhat more flexibility. Here, computational holograms are calculated based on the superposition of point sources, which are placed at the mesh vertices of arbitrary 3D models. The computed holograms have full parallax and exhibit a problem in viewing that we have called g hosting , which is linked to the viewing of computational holograms based on 3D models close to the image plane. Experimental white-light reconstruction of these holograms showed significant blurring, which is explained here based on simulations of the lateral as well as the axial resolution of a point image with respect to the source spectrum and image distance. In accordance with these simulations, an upper limit of the distance to the image plane is determined, which ensures high quality imaging.

  16. Immune changes in test animals during spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesnyak, A. T.; Sonnenfeld, G.; Rykova, M. P.; Meshkov, D. O.; Mastro, A.; Konstantinova, I.

    1993-01-01

    Over the past two decades, it has become apparent that changes in immune parameters occur in cosmonauts and astronauts after spaceflight. Therefore, interest has been generated in the use of animal surrogates to better understand the nature and extent of these changes, the mechanism of these changes, and to allow the possible development of countermeasures. Among the changes noted in animals after spaceflight are alterations in lymphocytic blastogenesis, cytokine function, natural killer cell activity, and colony-stimulating factors. The nature and significance of spaceflight-induced changes in immune responses will be the focus of this review.

  17. Software Engineering for Human Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrickson, Steven E.

    2014-01-01

    The Spacecraft Software Engineering Branch of NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) provides world-class products, leadership, and technical expertise in software engineering, processes, technology, and systems management for human spaceflight. The branch contributes to major NASA programs (e.g. ISS, MPCV/Orion) with in-house software development and prime contractor oversight, and maintains the JSC Engineering Directorate CMMI rating for flight software development. Software engineering teams work with hardware developers, mission planners, and system operators to integrate flight vehicles, habitats, robotics, and other spacecraft elements. They seek to infuse automation and autonomy into missions, and apply new technologies to flight processor and computational architectures. This presentation will provide an overview of key software-related projects, software methodologies and tools, and technology pursuits of interest to the JSC Spacecraft Software Engineering Branch.

  18. Radiation protection for human spaceflight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajek, M.

    2009-01-01

    Cosmic radiation exposure is one of the most significant risks associated with human space exploration. Except for the principles of justification and optimization (ALARA), the concepts of terrestrial radiation protection are of limited applicability to human spaceflight, as until now only few experimentally verified data on the biological effectiveness of heavy ions and the dose distribution within the human body exist. Instead of applying the annual dose limits for workers on ground also to astronauts, whose careers are of comparatively short duration, the overall lifetime risk is used as a measure. For long-term missions outside Earth's magnetic field, the acceptable level of risk has not yet been defined, since there is not enough information available to estimate the risk of effects to the central nervous system and of potential non-cancer radiation health hazards. (orig.)

  19. Application of Denisyuk pulsed holography to material testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renesse, R.L. van; Burgmeijer, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    When holography is applied outside the laboratory, some well known problems are experienced: vibrations, rigid body motion, stray daylight. Pulse holography can overcome the difficulties with vibrations, but the other problems are less easily solved. When the object area to be holographically tested

  20. Applications of holography to condensed matter physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Simon F.

    2012-10-01

    Holography is one of the key insights to emerge from string theory. It connects quantum gravity to field theory, and thereby provides a non-perturbative formulation of string theory. This has enabled progress on a range of theoretical issues, from the quantum description of spacetime to the calculation of scattering amplitudes in supersymmetric field theories. There have been important insights into both the field theories and the spacetime picture. More recently, applied holography has been the subject of intense and rapid development. The idea here is to use the spacetime description to address questions about strongly coupled field theory relevant to application areas such as finite-temperature QCD and condensed matter physics; the focus in this special issue is on the latter. This involves the study of field theory at finite temperature and with chemical potentials for appropriate charges, described in spacetime by charged black hole solutions. The use of holography to study these systems requires a significant extrapolation, from the field theories where classical gravitational calculations in the bulk are a useful approximation to the experimentally relevant theories. Nonetheless, the approach has had some striking qualitative successes, including the construction of holographic versions of superconducting or superfluid phase transitions, the identification of Fermi liquids with a variety of thermal behaviours, and the construction of a map between a class of gravity solutions and the hydrodynamic regime in the field theory. The use of holography provides a qualitatively new perspective on these aspects of strong coupling dynamics. In addition to insight into the behaviour of the strongly coupled field theories, this work has led to new insights into the bulk dynamics and a deeper understanding of holography. The purpose of this focus issue is to strengthen the connections between this direction and other gravitational research and to make the gravity

  1. A new state-of-the-art tool to investigate rock friction under extreme slip velocities and accelerations: SHIVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemeijer, André; di Toro, Giulio; Nielsen, Stefan; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Romeo, Gianni; di Stefano, Giuseppe; Smith, Steven; di Felice, Fabio; Mariano, Sofia

    2010-05-01

    Despite considerable effort over the past several decades, the mechanics of earthquakes rupture remain largely unknown. In order to complement fault drilling projects and field and seismological observations, recent friction experiments strive to reproduce as closely as possible in-situ (natural) conditions of slip velocity and acceleration on intact and fault rocks. In this contribution, we present a novel state-of-the-art experimental rotary shear apparatus (SHIVA or Slow to HIgh Velocity Apparatus) capable of shearing samples at sliding velocities up to 10 m/s, accelerations of ~ 40 m/s2 and normal stresses up to 50 MPa. In comparison with existing high speed friction machines, this apparatus extends the range of sliding velocities, normal stresses, sample size and, more importantly, accelerations. The apparatus consists of a pair of brushless electric motors (a low velocity motor, 10-6-10-3 m/s, power 5 kW, and a high velocity motor, 10-3 - 10 m/s, power 270 kW), that are connected by a gear system that allows a switch between motors without loss of velocity and force. The motors drive a rotary shaft which clamps ring-shaped samples (diameter 40- 50 mm). On the other side of the rotary shaft, a stationary shaft holds the other half of the sample assembly. The shaft is held stationary by a pair of stainless steel arms, one of which is attached to the side of the concrete-filled base where torque is measured by a tension cell. Axial force (maximum 37 kN) is applied on this side by a piston-cylinder couple with an arm to increase the force. The entire machine measures by 3.5 by 1.2 meters and weighs 3700 kg. We aim to perform experiments on rock samples of a variety of compositions using slip velocities and accelerations that simulate slip velocity functions that occur during earthquakes. In addition, we plan to develop a pore fluid system and a pressure vessel in order to perform experiments that include the physical-chemical processes that occur during slow

  2. Drosophila melanogaster gene expression changes after spaceflight.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Gene expression levels were determined in 3rd instar and adult Drosophila melanogaster reared during spaceflight to elucidate the genetic and molecular mechanisms...

  3. Distributed System for Spaceflight Biomedical Support

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Our project investigated whether a software platform could integrate as wide a variety of devices and data types as needed for spaceflight biomedical support. The...

  4. Bioavailability of Promethazine during Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Jason L.; Wang, Zuwei; Putcha, Lakshmi

    2009-01-01

    Promethazine (PMZ) is the choice anti-motion sickness medication for treating space motion sickness (SMS) during flight. The side effects associated with PMZ include dizziness, drowsiness, sedation, and impaired psychomotor performance which could impact crew performance and mission operations. Early anecdotal reports from crewmembers indicate that these central nervous system side effects of PMZ are absent or greatly attenuated in microgravity, potentially due to changes in pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics in microgravity. These changes could also affect the therapeutic effectiveness of drugs in general and PMZ, in particular. In this investigation, we examined bioavailability and associated pharmacokinetics of PMZ in astronauts during and after space flight. Methods. Nine astronauts received, per their preference, PMZ (25 or 50 mg as intramuscular injection, oral tablet, or rectal suppository) on flight day one for the treatment of SMS and subsequently collected saliva samples and completed sleepiness scores for 72 h post dose. Thirty days after the astronauts returned to Earth, they repeated the protocol. Bioavailability and PK parameters were calculated and compared between flight and ground. Results. Maximum concentration (Cmax) was lower and time to reach Cmax (tmax) was longer in flight than on the ground. Area under the curve (AUC), a measure of bioavailability, was lower and biological half-life (t1/2) was longer in flight than on the ground. Conclusion. Results indicate that bioavailability of PMZ is reduced during spaceflight. Number of samples, sampling method, and sampling schedule significantly affected PK parameter estimates.

  5. Radiation biodosimetry: Applications for spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, W. F.; Miller, A. C.; Grace, M. B.; McLeland, C. B.; Luo, L.; Muderhwa, J. M.; Miner, V. L.; Prasanna, P. G. S.

    The multiparametric dosimetry system that we are developing for medical radiological defense applications could be adapted for spaceflight environments. The system complements the internationally accepted personnel dosimeters and cytogenetic analysis of chromosome aberrations, considered the best means of documenting radiation doses for health records. Our system consists of a portable hematology analyzer, molecular biodosimetry using nucleic acid and antigen-based diagnostic equipment, and a dose assessment management software application. A dry-capillary tube reagent-based centrifuge blood cell counter (QBC Autoread Plus, Beckon Dickinson Bioscience) measures peripheral blood lymphocytes and monocytes, which could determine radiation dose based on the kinetics of blood cell depletion. Molecular biomarkers for ionizing radiation exposure (gene expression changes, blood proteins) can be measured in real time using such diagnostic detection technologies as miniaturized nucleic acid sequences and antigen-based biosensors, but they require validation of dose-dependent targets and development of optimized protocols and analysis systems. The Biodosimetry Assessment Tool, a software application, calculates radiation dose based on a patient's physical signs and symptoms and blood cell count analysis. It also annotates location of personnel dosimeters, displays a summary of a patient's dosimetric information to healthcare professionals, and archives the data for further use. These radiation assessment diagnostic technologies can have dual-use applications supporting general medical-related care.

  6. Fatigue Management in Spaceflight Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmire, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    Sleep loss and fatigue remain an issue for crewmembers working on the International Space Station, and the ground crews who support them. Schedule shifts on the ISS are required for conducting mission operations. These shifts lead to tasks being performed during the biological night, and sleep scheduled during the biological day, for flight crews and the ground teams who support them. Other stressors have been recognized as hindering sleep in space; these include workload, thinking about upcoming tasks, environmental factors, and inadequate day/night cues. It is unknown if and how other factors such as microgravity, carbon dioxide levels, or increased radiation, may also play a part. Efforts are underway to standardize and provide care for crewmembers, ground controllers and other support personnel. Through collaborations between research and operations, evidenced-based clinical practice guidelines are being developed to equip flight surgeons with the tools and processes needed for treating circadian desynchrony (and subsequent sleep loss) caused by jet lag and shift work. The proper implementation of countermeasures such as schedules, lighting protocols, and cognitive behavioral education can hasten phase shifting, enhance sleep and optimize performance. This panel will focus on Fatigue Management in Spaceflight Operations. Speakers will present on research-based recommendations and technologies aimed at mitigating sleep loss, circadian desynchronization and fatigue on-orbit. Gaps in current mitigations and future recommendations will also be discussed.

  7. Ethereal presences in holography and photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, M.; Byrne, Kay

    2007-02-01

    This paper examines the concept of the 'Presence of Absence' in post-mortem photography and holography, drawing upon both historical and lesser-known images as reference. To create a photographic negative one needs the presence of light to expose the light sensitive surface, be it glass, a polished plate or plastic. A hologram may also be created when a coherent light source, for example from a Laser, travels through a light sensitive material and falls upon the subject to be recorded. A holograph however, retains the optical qualities of both phase and amplitude, the memory of light. Both mediums recall, as it were, 'now absent moments', and confronts us with what is 'not there' as much as 'what is'. This paper examines the exploration of absence and presence in post-mortem photography and holography and it's a richly visceral visual language. A photonic syntax can interpret death as an elegant yet horrific aesthetic, the photograph may be beautify screened and yet obscene in its content. In essence one can be a voyeur, experiencing a mere visual whisper of the true nature of the subject. Our Victorian forefathers explored postmortem photography as an object of mourning, and at the close of the nineteenth century when Jack the Ripper had the inhabitants of White Chapel in a grip of fear, photography made its mark as a documentation of violent crime. Today, within contemporary photography, death is now presented within the confines of the 'Art Gallery', as a sensual, and at times, sensationalised art form. In exploring post-mortem imagery, both in holography and conventional photography, absence presents an aspect of death as startling in its unanimated form and detailed in its finite examination of mortality.

  8. Principle and Reconstruction Algorithm for Atomic-Resolution Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Tomohiro; Muro, Takayuki; Matsui, Fumihiko; Happo, Naohisa; Hosokawa, Shinya; Ohoyama, Kenji; Sato-Tomita, Ayana; Sasaki, Yuji C.; Hayashi, Kouichi

    2018-06-01

    Atomic-resolution holography makes it possible to obtain the three-dimensional (3D) structure around a target atomic site. Translational symmetry of the atomic arrangement of the sample is not necessary, and the 3D atomic image can be measured when the local structure of the target atomic site is oriented. Therefore, 3D local atomic structures such as dopants and adsorbates are observable. Here, the atomic-resolution holography comprising photoelectron holography, X-ray fluorescence holography, neutron holography, and their inverse modes are treated. Although the measurement methods are different, they can be handled with a unified theory. The algorithm for reconstructing 3D atomic images from holograms plays an important role. Although Fourier transform-based methods have been proposed, they require the multiple-energy holograms. In addition, they cannot be directly applied to photoelectron holography because of the phase shift problem. We have developed methods based on the fitting method for reconstructing from single-energy and photoelectron holograms. The developed methods are applicable to all types of atomic-resolution holography.

  9. Phase alteration compensation in reflection digital holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rincon, O; Amezquita, R; Monroy, F

    2011-01-01

    The phase maps obtained from digital holographic microscopy techniques carry information about the axial lengths of the object under study. Additionally, these phase maps have information of tilt and curvatures with origin in the off-axis geometry and the magnification lenses system, respectively. Only a complete compensation of these extra phases allows a correct interpretation of the phase information. In this article a numerical strategy to compensate for these alterations is designed, using a phase mask located in different planes. This strategy is applied in the measurement of a phase steps plate using a digital holography setup.

  10. Photoelectron holography with improved image reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushita, Tomohiro, E-mail: matusita@spring8.or.j [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Matsui, Fumihiko; Daimon, Hiroshi [Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST), 8916-5 Takayama, Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan); Hayashi, Kouichi [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2010-05-15

    Electron holography is a type of atomic structural analysis, and it has unique features such as element selectivity and the ability to analyze the structure around an impurity in a crystal. In this paper, we introduce the measurement system, electron holograms, a theory for the recording process of an electron hologram, and a theory for the reconstruction algorithm. We describe photoelectron holograms, Auger electron holograms, and the inverse mode of an electron hologram. The reconstruction algorithm, scattering pattern extraction algorithm (SPEA), the SPEA with maximum entropy method (SPEA-MEM), and SPEA-MEM with translational operation are also described.

  11. Photoelectron holography with improved image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, Tomohiro; Matsui, Fumihiko; Daimon, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Kouichi

    2010-01-01

    Electron holography is a type of atomic structural analysis, and it has unique features such as element selectivity and the ability to analyze the structure around an impurity in a crystal. In this paper, we introduce the measurement system, electron holograms, a theory for the recording process of an electron hologram, and a theory for the reconstruction algorithm. We describe photoelectron holograms, Auger electron holograms, and the inverse mode of an electron hologram. The reconstruction algorithm, scattering pattern extraction algorithm (SPEA), the SPEA with maximum entropy method (SPEA-MEM), and SPEA-MEM with translational operation are also described.

  12. EDITORIAL: Optical tomography and digital holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coupland, Jeremy; Lobera, Julia

    2008-07-01

    The articles in this special feature in Measurement Science and Technology concern exciting new developments in the field of digital holography—the process of electronically recording and numerically reconstructing an optical field [1]. Making use of the enormous advances in digital imaging and computer technology, digital holography is presented in a range of applications from fluid flow measurement and structural analysis to medical imaging. The science of digital holography rests on the foundations of optical holography, on the work of Gabor in the late 1940s, and on the development of laser sources in the 1960s, which made his vision a practical reality [2]. Optical holography, however, uses a photosensitive material, both to record a latent image and subsequently to behave as a diffractive optical element with which to reconstruct the incident field. In this way display holograms, using silver halide materials for example, can produce life-size images that are virtually indistinguishable from the object itself [3]. Digital holography, in contrast, separates the steps of recording and reconstruction, and the final image is most often in the form of a 3D computer model. Of course, television cameras have been used from the beginnings of holography to record interferometric images. However, the huge disparity between the resolution of holographic recording materials (more than 3000 cycles/mm) and television cameras (around 50 cycles/mm) was raised as a major concern by early researchers. TV holography, as it was sometimes called, generally recorded low numerical aperture (NA) holograms producing images with characteristically large speckle and was therefore more often referred to as electronic speckle pattern interferomery (ESPI) [4]. It is possible, however, to record large NA holograms on a sensor with restricted resolution by using an objective lens or a diverging reference wave [5]. This is generally referred to as digital holographic microscopy (DHM) since

  13. DHM (Digital Holography Microscope) for imaging cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emery, Yves; Cuche, Etienne; Colomb, Tristan; Depeursinge, Christian; Rappaz, Benjamin; Marquet, Pierre; Magistretti, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    Light interaction with a sample modifies both intensity and phase of the illuminating wave. Any available supports for image recording are only sensitive to intensity, but Denis Gabor [P. Marquet, B. Rappaz, P. Magistretti, et. al. Digital Holography for quantitative phase-contrast imaging, Optics Letters, 30, 5, pp 291-93 (2005)] invented in 1948 a way to encode the phase as an intensity variation: the h ologram . Digital Holographic Microscopy (DHM) [D. Gabor, A new microscopic principle, Nature, 1948] implements digitally this powerful hologram. Characterization of various pollen grains and of morphology changes of neurones associated with hypotonic shock demonstrates the potential of DHM for imaging cells

  14. Optical voice encryption based on digital holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajput, Sudheesh K; Matoba, Osamu

    2017-11-15

    We propose an optical voice encryption scheme based on digital holography (DH). An off-axis DH is employed to acquire voice information by obtaining phase retardation occurring in the object wave due to sound wave propagation. The acquired hologram, including voice information, is encrypted using optical image encryption. The DH reconstruction and decryption with all the correct parameters can retrieve an original voice. The scheme has the capability to record the human voice in holograms and encrypt it directly. These aspects make the scheme suitable for other security applications and help to use the voice as a potential security tool. We present experimental and some part of simulation results.

  15. Micro-Structure Measurement and Imaging Based on Digital Holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyeong Suk; Jung, Hyun Chul; Chang, Ho Seob; Akhter, Naseem [Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kee, Chang Doo [Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Advancements in the imaging and computing technology have opened the path to digital holography for non-destructive investigations of technical samples, material property measurement, vibration analysis, flow visualization and stress analysis in aerospace industry which has widened the application of digital holography in the above fields. In this paper, we demonstrate the non-destructive investigation and micro-structure measurement application of digital holography to the small particles and a biological sample. This paper gives a brief description of the digital holograms recorded with this system and illustratively demonstrated

  16. Micro-Structure Measurement and Imaging Based on Digital Holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyeong Suk; Jung, Hyun Chul; Chang, Ho Seob; Akhter, Naseem; Kee, Chang Doo

    2010-01-01

    Advancements in the imaging and computing technology have opened the path to digital holography for non-destructive investigations of technical samples, material property measurement, vibration analysis, flow visualization and stress analysis in aerospace industry which has widened the application of digital holography in the above fields. In this paper, we demonstrate the non-destructive investigation and micro-structure measurement application of digital holography to the small particles and a biological sample. This paper gives a brief description of the digital holograms recorded with this system and illustratively demonstrated

  17. Electron holography of Fe-based nanocrystalline magnetic materials (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shindo, Daisuke; Park, Young-Gil; Gao, Youhui; Park, Hyun Soon

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic domain structures of nanocrystalline magnetic materials were extensively investigated by electron holography with a change in temperature or magnetic field applied. In both soft and hard magnetic materials, the distribution of lines of magnetic flux clarified in situ by electron holography was found to correspond well to their magnetic properties. An attempt to produce a strong magnetic field using a sharp needle made of a permanent magnet, whose movement is controlled by piezo drives has been presented. This article demonstrates that the attempt is promising to investigate the magnetization process of hard magnetic materials by electron holography

  18. First law of entanglement rates from holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Bannon, Andy; Probst, Jonas; Rodgers, Ronnie; Uhlemann, Christoph F.

    2017-09-01

    For a perturbation of the state of a conformal field theory (CFT), the response of the entanglement entropy is governed by the so-called "first law" of entanglement entropy, in which the change in entanglement entropy is proportional to the change in energy. Whether such a first law holds for other types of perturbations, such as a change to the CFT Lagrangian, remains an open question. We use holography to study the evolution in time t of entanglement entropy for a CFT driven by a t -linear source for a conserved U (1 ) current or marginal scalar operator. We find that although the usual first law of entanglement entropy may be violated, a first law for the rates of change of entanglement entropy and energy still holds. More generally, we prove that this first law for rates holds in holography for any asymptotically (d +1 )-dimensional anti-de Sitter metric perturbation whose t dependence first appears at order zd in the Fefferman-Graham expansion about the boundary at z =0 .

  19. Data extraction system for underwater particle holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebrensky, J. J.; Craig, Gary; Hobson, Peter R.; Lampitt, R. S.; Nareid, Helge; Pescetto, A.; Trucco, Andrea; Watson, John

    2000-08-01

    Pulsed laser holography in an extremely powerful technique for the study of particle fields as it allows instantaneous, non-invasive high- resolution recording of substantial volumes. By relaying the real image one can obtain the size, shape, position and - if multiple exposures are made - velocity of every object in the recorded field. Manual analysis of large volumes containing thousands of particles is, however, an enormous and time-consuming task, with operator fatigue an unpredictable source of errors. Clearly the value of holographic measurements also depends crucially on the quality of the reconstructed image: not only will poor resolution degrade the size and shape measurements, but aberrations such as coma and astigmatism can change the perceived centroid of a particle, affecting position and velocity measurements. For large-scale applications of particle field holography, specifically the in situ recording of marine plankton with Holocam, we have developed an automated data extraction system that can be readily switched between the in-line and off-axis geometries and provides optimised reconstruction from holograms recorded underwater. As a videocamera is automatically stepped through the 200 by 200 by 1000mm sample volume, image processing and object tracking routines locate and extract particle images for further classification by a separate software module.

  20. NASA Human Spaceflight Conjunction Assessment: Recent Conjunctions of Interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browns, Ansley C.

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation discusses a brief history of NASA Human Spaceflight Conjunction Assessment (CA) activities, an overview of NASA CA process for ISS and Shuttle, and recent examples from Human Spaceflight conjunctions.

  1. Spaceflight induced changes in the human proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kononikhin, Alexey S; Starodubtseva, Natalia L; Pastushkova, Lyudmila Kh; Kashirina, Daria N; Fedorchenko, Kristina Yu; Brhozovsky, Alexander G; Popov, Igor A; Larina, Irina M; Nikolaev, Evgeny N

    2017-01-01

    Spaceflight is one of the most extreme conditions encountered by humans: Individuals are exposed to radiation, microgravity, hypodynamia, and will experience isolation. A better understanding of the molecular processes induced by these factors may allow us to develop personalized countermeasures to minimize risks to astronauts. Areas covered: This review is a summary of literature searches from PubMed, NASA, Roskosmos and the authors' research experiences and opinions. The review covers the available proteomic data on the effects of spaceflight factors on the human body, including both real space missions and ground-based model experiments. Expert commentary: Overall, the authors believe that the present background, methodology and equipment improvements will enhance spaceflight safety and support accumulation of new knowledge on how organisms adapt to extreme conditions.

  2. Improving image quality of parallel phase-shifting digital holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awatsuji, Yasuhiro; Tahara, Tatsuki; Kaneko, Atsushi; Koyama, Takamasa; Nishio, Kenzo; Ura, Shogo; Kubota, Toshihiro; Matoba, Osamu

    2008-01-01

    The authors propose parallel two-step phase-shifting digital holography to improve the image quality of parallel phase-shifting digital holography. The proposed technique can increase the effective number of pixels of hologram twice in comparison to the conventional parallel four-step technique. The increase of the number of pixels makes it possible to improve the image quality of the reconstructed image of the parallel phase-shifting digital holography. Numerical simulation and preliminary experiment of the proposed technique were conducted and the effectiveness of the technique was confirmed. The proposed technique is more practical than the conventional parallel phase-shifting digital holography, because the composition of the digital holographic system based on the proposed technique is simpler.

  3. Off-axis and inline electron holography: Experimental comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Formanek, Petr; Koch, C.T.; Lubk, Axel

    2010-01-01

    Electron holography is a very powerful technique for mapping static electric and magnetic potentials down to atomic resolution. While electron holography is commonly considered synonymous with its off-axis variant in the high energy electron microscopy community, inline electron holography is widely applied in low-energy electron microscopy, where the realization of the off-axis setup is still an experimental challenge. This paper demonstrates that both inline and off-axis holography may be used to recover amplitude and phase shift of the very same object, in our example latex spheres of 90 and 200 nm in diameter, producing very similar results, provided the object does not charge under the electron beam.

  4. Electron holography for fields in solids: Problems and progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichte, Hannes; Börrnert, Felix; Lenk, Andreas; Lubk, Axel; Röder, Falk; Sickmann, Jan; Sturm, Sebastian; Vogel, Karin; Wolf, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Electron holography initially was invented by Dennis Gabor for solving the problems raised by the aberrations of electron lenses in Transmission Electron Microscopy. Nowadays, after hardware correction of aberrations allows true atomic resolution of the structure, for comprehensive understanding of solids, determination of electric and magnetic nanofields is the most challenging task. Since fields are phase objects in the TEM, electron holography is the unrivaled method of choice. After more than 40 years of experimental realization and steady improvement, holography is increasingly contributing to these highly sophisticated and essential questions in materials science, as well to the understanding of electron waves and their interaction with matter. - Highlights: • We review the development of the method of electron holography. • We outline the role of information content as guideline. • We outline the improvements of the method. • We sketch the future instrumental development. • We summarize the still existing problems to solve

  5. Spaceflight Effect on White Matter Structural Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jessica K.; Kopplemans, Vincent; Paternack, Ofer; Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Seidler, Rachael D.

    2017-01-01

    Recent reports of elevated brain white matter hyperintensity (WMH) counts and volume in postflight astronaut MRIs suggest that further examination of spaceflight's impact on the microstructure of brain white matter is warranted. To this end, retrospective longitudinal diffusion-weighted MRI scans obtained from 15 astronauts were evaluated. In light of the recent reports of microgravity-induced cephalad fluid shift and gray matter atrophy seen in astronauts, we applied a technique to estimate diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) metrics corrected for free water contamination. This approach enabled the analysis of white matter tissue-specific alterations that are unrelated to fluid shifts, occurring from before spaceflight to after landing. After spaceflight, decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) values were detected in an area encompassing the superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculi and the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus. Increased radial diffusivity (RD) and decreased axial diffusivity (AD) were also detected within overlapping regions. In addition, FA values in the corticospinal tract decreased and RD measures in the precentral gyrus white matter increased from before to after flight. The results show disrupted structural connectivity of white matter in tracts involved in visuospatial processing, vestibular function, and movement control as a result of spaceflight. The findings may help us understand the structural underpinnings of the extensive spaceflight-induced sensorimotor remodeling. Prospective longitudinal assessment of the white matter integrity in astronauts is needed to characterize the evolution of white matter microstructural changes associated with spaceflight, their behavioral consequences, and the time course of recovery. Supported by a grant from the National Space Biomedical Research Institute, NASA NCC 9-58.

  6. Holography explained in the language of potential scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csonka, P.L.

    1978-04-01

    Holography is explained in the language of potential scattering kinematics (whereas usually the formalism of wave optics is used). This approach is probably more natural for those who were trained as atomic, nuclear, etc., physicists, but are now attracted by the possibility of x-ray holography. Classical optical instruments are hardly mentioned, and the approximations usually connected with them are not used. Many of the results derived in this report are not new. 5 figures

  7. Some Applications of Holography to Study Strongly Correlated Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatnagar Neha

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we study the transport coefficients of strongly coupled condensed matter systems using gauge/gravity duality (holography. We consider examples from the real world and evaluate the conductivities from their gravity duals. Adopting the bottom-up approach of holography, we obtain the frequency response of the conductivity for (1+1-dimensional systems. We also evaluate the DC conductivities for non-relativistic condensed matter systems with hyperscaling violating geometry.

  8. Spaceflight Flow Cytometry: Design Challenges and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Dimitri; Kao, Shih-Hsin; Jeevarajan, Antony S.

    2004-01-01

    Future space exploration missions will require analytical technology capable of providing both autonomous medical care to the crew and investigative capabilities to researchers. While several promising candidate technologies exist for further development, flow cytometry is an attractive technology as it offers both crew health and a wide array of biochemistry and immunology assays. While flow cytometry has been widely used for cellular analysis in both clinical and research settings, the requirements for proper operation in spaceflight impose constraints on any instrument designs. The challenges of designing a spaceflight-ready flow cytometer are discussed, as well as some preliminary results using a prototype system.

  9. 76 FR 24836 - Regulatory Approach for Commercial Orbital Human Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-03

    ... human spaceflight. The FAA will share its current philosophy, but is most interested in the public's... for Commercial Orbital Human Spaceflight AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... information from the public on the regulatory approach to commercial orbital human spaceflight by the FAA...

  10. Electron holography-basics and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichte, Hannes; Lehmann, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Despite the huge progress achieved recently by means of the corrector for aberrations, allowing now a true atomic resolution of 0.1 nm, hence making it an unrivalled tool for nanoscience, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) suffers from a severe drawback: in a conventional electron micrograph only a poor phase contrast can be achieved, i.e. phase structures are virtually invisible. Therefore, conventional TEM is nearly blind for electric and magnetic fields, which are pure phase objects. Since such fields provoked by the atomic structure, e.g. of semiconductors and ferroelectrics, largely determine the solid state properties, hence the importance for high technology applications, substantial object information is missing. Electron holography in TEM offers the solution: by superposition with a coherent reference wave, a hologram is recorded, from which the image wave can be completely reconstructed by amplitude and phase. Now the object is displayed quantitatively in two separate images: one representing the amplitude, the other the phase. From the phase image, electric and magnetic fields can be determined quantitatively in the range from micrometre down to atomic dimensions by all wave optical methods that one can think of, both in real space and in Fourier space. Electron holography is pure wave optics. Therefore, we discuss the basics of coherence and interference, the implementation into a TEM, the path of rays for recording holograms as well as the limits in lateral and signal resolution. We outline the methods of reconstructing the wave by numerical image processing and procedures for extracting the object properties of interest. Furthermore, we present a broad spectrum of applications both at mesoscopic and atomic dimensions. This paper gives an overview of the state of the art pointing at the needs for further development. It is also meant as encouragement for those who refrain from holography, thinking that it can only be performed by specialists in

  11. When holography meets coherent diffraction imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Longchamp, Jean-Nicolas; Fink, Hans-Werner

    2012-12-17

    The phase problem is inherent to crystallographic, astronomical and optical imaging where only the intensity of the scattered signal is detected and the phase information is lost and must somehow be recovered to reconstruct the object's structure. Modern imaging techniques at the molecular scale rely on utilizing novel coherent light sources like X-ray free electron lasers for the ultimate goal of visualizing such objects as individual biomolecules rather than crystals. Here, unlike in the case of crystals where structures can be solved by model building and phase refinement, the phase distribution of the wave scattered by an individual molecule must directly be recovered. There are two well-known solutions to the phase problem: holography and coherent diffraction imaging (CDI). Both techniques have their pros and cons. In holography, the reconstruction of the scattered complex-valued object wave is directly provided by a well-defined reference wave that must cover the entire detector area which often is an experimental challenge. CDI provides the highest possible, only wavelength limited, resolution, but the phase recovery is an iterative process which requires some pre-defined information about the object and whose outcome is not always uniquely-defined. Moreover, the diffraction patterns must be recorded under oversampling conditions, a pre-requisite to be able to solve the phase problem. Here, we report how holography and CDI can be merged into one superior technique: holographic coherent diffraction imaging (HCDI). An inline hologram can be recorded by employing a modified CDI experimental scheme. We demonstrate that the amplitude of the Fourier transform of an inline hologram is related to the complex-valued visibility, thus providing information on both, the amplitude and the phase of the scattered wave in the plane of the diffraction pattern. With the phase information available, the condition of oversampling the diffraction patterns can be relaxed, and the

  12. X-ray interferometric Fourier holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balyan, M.K.

    2016-01-01

    The X-ray interferometric Fourier holography is proposed and theoretically investigated. Fourier The X-ray interferometric Young fringes and object image reconstruction are investigated. It is shown that the interference pattern of two slits formed on the exit surface of the crystal-analyzer (the third plate of the interferometer) is the X-ray interferometric Young fringes. An expression for X-ray interferometric Young fringes period is obtained. The subsequent reconstruction of the slit image as an object is performed by means of Fourier transform of the intensity distribution on the hologram. Three methods of reconstruction of the amplitude transmission complex function of the object are presented: analytical - approximate method, method of iteration and step by step method. As an example the X-ray Fourier interferometric hologram recording and the complex amplitude transmission function reconstruction for a beryllium circular wire are considered

  13. Holography and higher-spin theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petkou, T.

    2005-01-01

    I review recent work on the holographic relation between higher-spin theories in Anti-de Sitter spaces and conformal field theories. I present the main results of studies concerning the higher-spin holographic dual of the three-dimensional O(N) vector model. I discuss the special role played by certain double-trace deformations in Conformal Field Theories that have higher-spin holographic duals. Moreover, I show that duality transformations in a U(1) gauge theory on AdS 4 induce boundary double-trace deformations and argue that a similar effect takes place in the holography of linearized higher-spin theories on AdS 4 . (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  14. Advanced in X-ray fluorescence holography

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashi, K

    2002-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) can resolve 'phase problem' in crystal diffraction and therefore it provides 3D atomic images around specific elements. Since first demonstration of the XFH in 1996, view of atoms has been improved rapidly with the refinement of the hologram data collection method. The present performance of the XFH makes it possible to apply to impurity, thin film and quasicrystal, and opens a way to practical tool for determination of local structure. In this paper, theory including solutions for twin image problem, advanced experimental systems and application to Si sub 0 sub . sub 9 sub 9 sub 9 Ge sub 0 sub . sub 0 sub 0 sub 1 are discussed. (author)

  15. Remote metrology by comparative digital holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumbach, Torsten; Osten, Wolfgang; Kopylow, Christoph von; Jueptner, Werner

    2006-01-01

    A method for the remote comparison of objects with regard to their shape or response to a load is presented. The method allows interferometric sensitivity for comparing objects with different microstructure. In contrast to the well-known incoherent techniques based on inverse fringe projection this new approach uses the coherent optical wave field of the master object as a mask for the illumination of the sample object. The coherent mask is created by digital holography to allow instant access to the complete optical information of the master object at any place desired. The mask is reconstructed by a spatial light modulator (SLM). The optical reconstruction of digital holograms with SLM technology allows modification of reconstructed wavefronts with respect to improvement of image quality, the skilled introduction of additional information about the object (augmented reality), and the alignment of the master and test object

  16. Holography, probe branes and isoperimetric inequalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Ferrari

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In many instances of holographic correspondences between a d-dimensional boundary theory and a (d+1-dimensional bulk, a direct argument in the boundary theory implies that there must exist a simple and precise relation between the Euclidean on-shell action of a (d−1-brane probing the bulk geometry and the Euclidean gravitational bulk action. This relation is crucial for the consistency of holography, yet it is non-trivial from the bulk perspective. In particular, we show that it relies on a nice isoperimetric inequality that must be satisfied in a large class of Poincaré–Einstein spaces. Remarkably, this inequality follows from theorems by Lee and Wang.

  17. Response of carausius morosus to spaceflight environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitz, G.; Bucker, H.; Facius, R.; Horneck, G. (DFVLR-Institute for Aerospace Medicine, 5000 Koeln 90, FRG (DE)); Ruther, W. (University of Marburg, 3550 Marburg, FRG (DE)); Beaujean, R. (University Kiel, 2300 Kiel 1, FRG (DE)); Heinrich, W. (University of Siegen, 5900 Siegen 21, FRG (DE))

    1989-05-15

    Already during the early biosatellite program, a synergistic action of radiation and spaceflight factors---probably microgravity---was observed in disturbances of development of Dropsophila larvae, such as chromosome translocations and body anomalies. Radiation was applied by an onboard source of gamma-radiation. The synergism was supposed to be due to an increase in chromosome breakage followed by a loss or exchange of genetic information.

  18. Response of carausius morosus to spaceflight environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitz, G.; Bucker, H.; Facius, R.; Horneck, G.; Ruther, W.; Beaujean, R.; Heinrich, W.

    1989-01-01

    Already during the early biosatellite program, a synergistic action of radiation and spaceflight factors---probably microgravity---was observed in disturbances of development of Dropsophila larvae, such as chromosome translocations and body anomalies. Radiation was applied by an onboard source of gamma-radiation. The synergism was supposed to be due to an increase in chromosome breakage followed by a loss or exchange of genetic information

  19. Genetic dissection of the Arabidopsis spaceflight transcriptome: Are some responses dispensable for the physiological adaptation of plants to spaceflight?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Lisa Paul

    Full Text Available Experimentation on the International Space Station has reached the stage where repeated and nuanced transcriptome studies are beginning to illuminate the structural and metabolic differences between plants grown in space compared to plants on the Earth. Genes that are important in establishing the spaceflight responses are being identified, their roles in spaceflight physiological adaptation are increasingly understood, and the fact that different genotypes adapt differently is recognized. However, the basic question of whether these spaceflight responses are actually required for survival has yet to be posed, and the fundamental notion that spaceflight responses may be non-adaptive has yet to be explored. Therefore the experiments presented here were designed to ask if portions of the plant spaceflight response can be genetically removed without causing loss of spaceflight survival and without causing increased stress responses. The CARA experiment compared the spaceflight transcriptome responses in the root tips of two Arabidopsis ecotypes, Col-0 and WS, as well as that of a PhyD mutant of Col-0. When grown with the ambient light of the ISS, phyD plants displayed a significantly reduced spaceflight transcriptome response compared to Col-0, suggesting that altering the activity of a single gene can actually improve spaceflight adaptation by reducing the transcriptome cost of physiological adaptation. The WS genotype showed an even simpler spaceflight transcriptome response in the ambient light of the ISS, more broadly indicating that the plant genotype can be manipulated to reduce the cost of spaceflight adaptation, as measured by transcriptional response. These differential genotypic responses suggest that genetic manipulation could further reduce, or perhaps eliminate the metabolic cost of spaceflight adaptation. When plants were germinated and then left in the dark on the ISS, the WS genotype actually mounted a larger transcriptome response

  20. An easy physics outreach and teaching tool for holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voslion, T; Escarguel, A

    2013-01-01

    in the framework of scientific outreach at the 'Maison des Sciences' of the Aix-Marseilles University, we created a teaching kit for holography contained in a small case. It includes all the required equipment to produce holograms almost anywhere with a simple optical assembly with a very good vibration tolerance. The fundamental principles of holography and several applications are illustrated through simple experiments: reflection Denisyuk holograms, angular multiplexing, notch filters, holographic interferometry and diffraction holographic gratings. It is possible to use this tool for several purposes: science outreach, teaching for undergraduate and graduate students and continuing education. In this article, we explain the basis of holography, how the kit works, and give some applications and results that can be done with it.

  1. Digital holography and wavefront sensing principles, techniques and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Schnars, Ulf; Watson, John; Jüptner, Werner

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a self-contained treatment of the principles and major applications of digital hologram recording and numerical reconstruction (Digital Holography). This second edition has been significantly revised and enlarged. The authors have extended the chapter on Digital Holographic Microscopy to incorporate new sections on particle sizing, particle image velocimetry and underwater holography. A new chapter now deals comprehensively and extensively with computational wave field sensing. These techniques represent a fascinating alternative to standard interferometry and Digital Holography. They enable wave field sensing without the requirement of a particular reference wave, thus allowing the use of low brilliance light sources and even liquid-crystal displays (LCD) for interferometric applications.              

  2. X-ray holography. Atoms in three dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tegze, M.

    2005-01-01

    The principles of atomic resolution X-ray holography was elaborated in 1991. X-ray photons scatter thousand times less on atoms than electrons of the same wavelength. As a result, both free path and penetration depth are higher which giver information about the bulk material. X-ray holography is realized by irradiating the single crystal sample with radiation from external X-ray source. The incident radiation is ionizing the atoms of the sample to emit fluorescent radiation. The angle dependence of the fluorescent radiation results an image containing the hologram. The hologram itself is extremely small compared to the background that needs 10 10 capturing photons to recover image. Using Thomas Gog's method and synchrotron radiation the X-ray holography becomes more usable, but the method still needs refining both experimentally and theoretically. (TRA)

  3. Dynamic imaging through turbid media based on digital holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shiping; Zhong, Jingang

    2014-03-01

    Imaging through turbid media using visible or IR light instead of harmful x ray is still a challenging problem, especially in dynamic imaging. A method of dynamic imaging through turbid media using digital holography is presented. In order to match the coherence length between the dynamic object wave and the reference wave, a cw laser is used. To solve the problem of difficult focusing in imaging through turbid media, an autofocus technology is applied. To further enhance the image contrast, a spatial filtering technique is used. A description of digital holography and experiments of imaging the objects hidden in turbid media are presented. The experimental result shows that dynamic images of the objects can be achieved by the use of digital holography.

  4. Electron holography for fields in solids: problems and progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichte, Hannes; Börrnert, Felix; Lenk, Andreas; Lubk, Axel; Röder, Falk; Sickmann, Jan; Sturm, Sebastian; Vogel, Karin; Wolf, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    Electron holography initially was invented by Dennis Gabor for solving the problems raised by the aberrations of electron lenses in Transmission Electron Microscopy. Nowadays, after hardware correction of aberrations allows true atomic resolution of the structure, for comprehensive understanding of solids, determination of electric and magnetic nanofields is the most challenging task. Since fields are phase objects in the TEM, electron holography is the unrivaled method of choice. After more than 40 years of experimental realization and steady improvement, holography is increasingly contributing to these highly sophisticated and essential questions in materials science, as well to the understanding of electron waves and their interaction with matter. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Urolithiasis and Genitourinary Systems Issues for Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jeffrey A.; Sargsyan, Ashot; Pietryzk, Robert; Sams, C.; Stepaniak, Phillip; Whitson, P.

    2008-09-01

    Genitourinary medical events have shown to be an issue for both short duration and long duration spaceflight, and are anticipated to also be a potential issue for future exploration missions as well. This is based on actual historical pre-, in- and post-flight medical events, as well as assessment of what future flight challenges lay ahead. For this study, retrospective record review, as well as prospective studies of ultrasound and contingency management procedure development, and oral urinary stone prophylaxis were conducted. Results showed that the incidence of prior urinary calculi in- and post-flight was a risk driver for development of on-orbit countermeasures, as well as diagnostic and therapeutic methods for a possible in-flight calculus contingency. Oral potassium citrate and bisphosphonate preparations show promise for prophylaxis in spaceflight risk reduction. We conclude that a properly developed approach of selection, monitoring, and preventive medicine with effective countermeasures, along with early imaging diagnosis and minimally-invasive contingency intervention, should prevent issues such as urinary calculi from having a significant mission impact for exploration-class spaceflight.

  6. Black molecular adsorber coatings for spaceflight applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Nithin S.; Hasegawa, Mark M.; Straka, Sharon A.

    2014-09-01

    The molecular adsorber coating is a new technology that was developed to mitigate the risk of on-orbit molecular contamination on spaceflight missions. The application of this coating would be ideal near highly sensitive, interior surfaces and instruments that are negatively impacted by outgassed molecules from materials, such as plastics, adhesives, lubricants, epoxies, and other similar compounds. This current, sprayable paint technology is comprised of inorganic white materials made from highly porous zeolite. In addition to good adhesion performance, thermal stability, and adsorptive capability, the molecular adsorber coating offers favorable thermal control characteristics. However, low reflectivity properties, which are typically offered by black thermal control coatings, are desired for some spaceflight applications. For example, black coatings are used on interior surfaces, in particular, on instrument baffles for optical stray light control. Similarly, they are also used within light paths between optical systems, such as telescopes, to absorb light. Recent efforts have been made to transform the white molecular adsorber coating into a black coating with similar adsorptive properties. This result is achieved by optimizing the current formulation with black pigments, while still maintaining its adsorption capability for outgassing control. Different binder to pigment ratios, coating thicknesses, and spray application techniques were explored to develop a black version of the molecular adsorber coating. During the development process, coating performance and adsorption characteristics were studied. The preliminary work performed on black molecular adsorber coatings thus far is very promising. Continued development and testing is necessary for its use on future contamination sensitive spaceflight missions.

  7. Spaceflight Activates Lipotoxic Pathways in Mouse Liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen R Jonscher

    Full Text Available Spaceflight affects numerous organ systems in the body, leading to metabolic dysfunction that may have long-term consequences. Microgravity-induced alterations in liver metabolism, particularly with respect to lipids, remain largely unexplored. Here we utilize a novel systems biology approach, combining metabolomics and transcriptomics with advanced Raman microscopy, to investigate altered hepatic lipid metabolism in mice following short duration spaceflight. Mice flown aboard Space Transportation System -135, the last Shuttle mission, lose weight but redistribute lipids, particularly to the liver. Intriguingly, spaceflight mice lose retinol from lipid droplets. Both mRNA and metabolite changes suggest the retinol loss is linked to activation of PPARα-mediated pathways and potentially to hepatic stellate cell activation, both of which may be coincident with increased bile acids and early signs of liver injury. Although the 13-day flight duration is too short for frank fibrosis to develop, the retinol loss plus changes in markers of extracellular matrix remodeling raise the concern that longer duration exposure to the space environment may result in progressive liver damage, increasing the risk for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

  8. Spaceflight Activates Lipotoxic Pathways in Mouse Liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonscher, Karen R.; Alfonso-Garcia, Alba; Suhalim, Jeffrey L.; Orlicky, David J.; Potma, Eric O.; Ferguson, Virginia L.; Bouxsein, Mary L.; Bateman, Ted A.; Stodieck, Louis S.; Levi, Moshe; Friedman, Jacob E.; Gridley, Daila S.; Pecaut, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Spaceflight affects numerous organ systems in the body, leading to metabolic dysfunction that may have long-term consequences. Microgravity-induced alterations in liver metabolism, particularly with respect to lipids, remain largely unexplored. Here we utilize a novel systems biology approach, combining metabolomics and transcriptomics with advanced Raman microscopy, to investigate altered hepatic lipid metabolism in mice following short duration spaceflight. Mice flown aboard Space Transportation System -135, the last Shuttle mission, lose weight but redistribute lipids, particularly to the liver. Intriguingly, spaceflight mice lose retinol from lipid droplets. Both mRNA and metabolite changes suggest the retinol loss is linked to activation of PPARα-mediated pathways and potentially to hepatic stellate cell activation, both of which may be coincident with increased bile acids and early signs of liver injury. Although the 13-day flight duration is too short for frank fibrosis to develop, the retinol loss plus changes in markers of extracellular matrix remodeling raise the concern that longer duration exposure to the space environment may result in progressive liver damage, increasing the risk for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:27097220

  9. Digital holography with electron wave: measuring into the nanoworld

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza Santoyo, Fernando; Voelkl, Edgar

    2016-04-01

    Dennis Gabor invented Holography in 1949. His main concern at the time was centered on the spherical aberration correction in the recently created electron microscopes, especially after O. Scherzer had shown mathematically that round electron optical lenses always have a positive spherical aberration coefficient and the mechanical requirements for minimizing the spherical aberration were too high to allow for atomic resolution. At the time the lack of coherent electron sources meant that in-line holography was developed using quasi-coherent light sources. As such Holography did not produce scientific good enough results to be considered a must use tool. In 1956, G. Moellenstedt invented a device called a wire-biprism that allowed the object and reference beams to be combined in an off-axis configuration. The invention of the laser at the end of the 1950s gave a great leap to Holography since this light source was highly coherent and hence led to the invention of Holographic Interferometry during the first lustrum of the 1960s. This new discipline in the Optics field has successfully evolved to become a trusted tool in a wide variety of areas. Coherent electron sources were made available only by the late 1970s, a fact that gave an outstanding impulse to electron holography so that today nanomaterials and structures belonging to a wide variety of subjects can be characterized in regards to their physical and mechanical parameters. This invited paper will present and discuss electron holography's state of the art applications to study the shape of nanoparticles and bacteria, and the qualitative and quantitative study of magnetic and electric fields produced by novel nano-structures.

  10. m-Learning and holography: Compatible techniques?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Maria L.

    2014-07-01

    Since the last decades, cell phones have become increasingly popular and are nowadays ubiquitous. New generations of cell phones are now equipped with text messaging, internet, and camera features. They are now making their way into the classroom. This is creating a new teaching and learning technique, the so called m-Learning (or mobile-Learning). Because of the many benefits that cell phones offer, teachers could easily use them as a teaching and learning tool. However, an additional work from the teachers for introducing their students into the m-Learning in the classroom needs to be defined and developed. As an example, optical techniques, based upon interference and diffraction phenomena, such as holography, appear to be convenient topics for m-Learning. They can be approached with simple examples and experiments within the cell phones performances and classroom accessibility. We will present some results carried out at the Faculty of Physical Sciences in UCM to obtain very simple holographic recordings via cell phones. The activities were carried out inside the course on Optical Coherence and Laser, offered to students in the fourth course of the Grade in Physical Sciences. Some open conclusions and proposals will be presented.

  11. Using DSLR cameras in digital holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hincapié-Zuluaga, Diego; Herrera-Ramírez, Jorge; García-Sucerquia, Jorge

    2017-08-01

    In Digital Holography (DH), the size of the bidimensional image sensor to record the digital hologram, plays a key role on the performance of this imaging technique; the larger the size of the camera sensor, the better the quality of the final reconstructed image. Scientific cameras with large formats are offered in the market, but their cost and availability limit their use as a first option when implementing DH. Nowadays, DSLR cameras provide an easy-access alternative that is worthwhile to be explored. The DSLR cameras are a wide, commercial, and available option that in comparison with traditional scientific cameras, offer a much lower cost per effective pixel over a large sensing area. However, in the DSLR cameras, with their RGB pixel distribution, the sampling of information is different to the sampling in monochrome cameras usually employed in DH. This fact has implications in their performance. In this work, we discuss why DSLR cameras are not extensively used for DH, taking into account the problem reported by different authors of object replication. Simulations of DH using monochromatic and DSLR cameras are presented and a theoretical deduction for the replication problem using the Fourier theory is also shown. Experimental results of DH implementation using a DSLR camera show the replication problem.

  12. Synthetic holography based on scanning microcavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Di Donato

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic optical holography (SOH is an imaging technique, introduced in scanning microscopy to record amplitude and phase of a scattered field from a sample. In this paper, it is described a novel implementation of SOH through a lens-free low-coherence system, based on a scanning optical microcavity. This technique combines the low-coherence properties of the source with the mutual interference of scattered waves and the resonant behavior of a micro-cavity, in order to realize a high sensitive imaging system. Micro-cavity is compact and realized by approaching a cleaved optical fiber to the sample. The scanning system works in an open-loop configuration without the need for a reference wave, usually required in interferometric systems. Measurements were performed over calibration samples and a lateral resolution of about 1 μm is achieved by means of an optical fiber with a Numerical Aperture (NA equal to 0.1 and a Mode Field Diameter (MDF of 5.6 μm.

  13. Preliminary tests of holography in BEBC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pouyat, F.

    1982-01-01

    A collaboration has been set-up between the Institut de Recherche in St. Louis (ISL), the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), and the BEBC Group at CERN to study possibilities for application of holographic techniques in BEBC. Laboratory tests and a first trial in BEBC have shown that holograms can be recorded with a two-beam set-up adapted to the optics system of the chamber. The object beam passing through the fish-eye windows illuminates the chamber; after reflection from the Scotchlite panel at the bottom of BEBC it falls through a large-aperture lens onto the film plane. The reference beam is projected directly onto the holographic film plane without passing through the chamber liquid. First results are presented on the influence of the BEBC magnetic field, vibrations of the BEBC expansion system, and on the limitations on resolution to be expected. An outlook is given of future plans for trying to feed a test program on holography into the physics program of the chamber. (orig.)

  14. Autofocusing in digital holography using deep learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhenbo; Xu, Zhimin; Lam, Edmund Y.

    2018-02-01

    In digital holography, it is critical to know the distance in order to reconstruct the multi-sectional object. This autofocusing is traditionally solved by reconstructing a stack of in-focus and out-of-focus images and using some focus metric, such as entropy or variance, to calculate the sharpness of each reconstructed image. Then the distance corresponding to the sharpest image is determined as the focal position. This method is effective but computationally demanding and time-consuming. To get an accurate estimation, one has to reconstruct many images. Sometimes after a coarse search, a refinement is needed. To overcome this problem in autofocusing, we propose to use deep learning, i.e., a convolutional neural network (CNN), to solve this problem. Autofocusing is viewed as a classification problem, in which the true distance is transferred as a label. To estimate the distance is equated to labeling a hologram correctly. To train such an algorithm, totally 1000 holograms are captured under the same environment, i.e., exposure time, incident angle, object, except the distance. There are 5 labels corresponding to 5 distances. These data are randomly split into three datasets to train, validate and test a CNN network. Experimental results show that the trained network is capable of predicting the distance without reconstructing or knowing any physical parameters about the setup. The prediction time using this method is far less than traditional autofocusing methods.

  15. Holography and the Electroweak Phase Transition

    CERN Document Server

    Creminelli, Paolo; Rattazzi, Riccardo; Creminelli, Paolo; Nicolis, Alberto; Rattazzi, Riccardo

    2002-01-01

    We study through holography the compact Randall-Sundrum (RS) model at finite temperature. In the presence of radius stabilization, the system is described at low enough temperature by the RS solution. At high temperature it is described by the AdS-Schwarzshild solution with an event horizon replacing the TeV brane. We calculate the transition temperature T_c between the two phases and we find it to be somewhat smaller than the TeV scale. Assuming that the Universe starts out at T >> T_c and cools down by expansion, we study the rate of the transition to the RS phase. We find that the transition is too slow and the Universe ends up in an old inflation scenario unless tight bounds are satisfied by the model parameters. In particular we find that the AdS curvature must be comparable to the 5D Planck mass and that the radius stabilization mechanism must lead to a sizeable distortion of the basic RS metric.

  16. Spectrally resolved digital holography using a white light LED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, D.; Pedrini, G.; Buchta, D.; Osten, W.

    2017-06-01

    This paper introduces the concept of spectrally resolved digital holography. The measurement principle and the analysis of the data will be discussed in detail. The usefulness of spectrally resolved digital holography is demonstrated for colour imaging and optical metrology with regards to the recovery of modulus information and phase information, respectively. The phase information will be used to measure the shape of an object via the application of the dual wavelength method. Based on the large degree of data available, multiple speckle de-correlated dual wavelength phase maps can be obtained, which when averaged result in a signal to noise ratio improvement.

  17. X-ray holography with an atomic scatterer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mityureva, A.A.; Smirnov, V.V., E-mail: valery_smirnov@mail.ru

    2016-08-15

    X-ray holography scheme with reference scatterer consisting of heavy atom as reference center and its link to an object consisting of several light atoms and using controlled variation of the alignment is represented. The scheme can reproduce an object in three dimensions with atomic resolution. The distorting factors of reconstruction are considered. - Highlights: • X-ray holography scheme with a reference wave formed by atomic scatterer. • 3D object reconstruction with atomic resolution from the set of holograms. • Simple formula for the distorting factor in reconstruction.

  18. Coaxial waveguide mode reconstruction and analysis with THz digital holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinke; Xiong, Wei; Sun, Wenfeng; Zhang, Yan

    2012-03-26

    Terahertz (THz) digital holography is employed to investigate the properties of waveguides. By using a THz digital holographic imaging system, the propagation modes of a metallic coaxial waveguide are measured and the mode patterns are restored with the inverse Fresnel diffraction algorithm. The experimental results show that the THz propagation mode inside the waveguide is a combination of four modes TE₁₁, TE₁₂, TM₁₁, and TM₁₂, which are in good agreement with the simulation results. In this work, THz digital holography presents its strong potential as a platform for waveguide mode charactering. The experimental findings provide a valuable reference for the design of THz waveguides.

  19. Spaceflight bioreactor studies of cells and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Lisa E; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2002-01-01

    Studies of the fundamental role of gravity in the development and function of biological organisms are a central component of the human exploration of space. Microgravity affects numerous physical phenomena relevant to biological research, including the hydrostatic pressure in fluid filled vesicles, sedimentation of organelles, and buoyancy-driven convection of flow and heat. These physical phenomena can in turn directly and indirectly affect cellular morphology, metabolism, locomotion, secretion of extracellular matrix and soluble signals, and assembly into functional tissues. Studies aimed at distinguishing specific effects of gravity on biological systems require the ability to: (i) control and systematically vary gravity, e.g. by utilizing the microgravity environment of space in conjunction with an in-flight centrifuge; and (ii) maintain constant all other factors in the immediate environment, including in particular concentrations and exchange rates of biochemical species and hydrodynamic shear. The latter criteria imply the need for gravity-independent mechanisms to provide for mass transport between the cells and their environment. Available flight hardware has largely determined the experimental design and scientific objectives of spaceflight cell and tissue culture studies carried out to date. Simple culture vessels have yielded important quantitative data, and helped establish in vitro models of cell locomotion, growth and differentiation in various mammalian cell types including embryonic lung cells [6], lymphocytes [2,8], and renal cells [7,31]. Studies done using bacterial cells established the first correlations between gravity-dependent factors such as cell settling velocity and diffusional distance and the respective cell responses [12]. The development of advanced bioreactors for microgravity cell and tissue culture and for tissue engineering has benefited both research areas and provided relevant in vitro model systems for studies of astronaut

  20. Atomic imaging by x-ray-fluorescence holography and electron-emission holography: A comparative theoretical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Len, P.M.; Thevuthasan, S.; Fadley, C.S.; Kaduwela, A.P.; Van Hove, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    We consider from a theoretical viewpoint the direct imaging of atoms at and near the surfaces of solids by both x-ray-fluorescence holography (XFH) and electron-emission holography (EEH). The more ideal nature of x-ray scattering makes XFH images superior to those in single-energy EEH. The overlap of real and twin features for pairs of atoms at ±a can cause their XFH or EEH atomic images to cancel for certain combinations of wave vector and |a|. The relative merits of XFH and EEH for structure studies are considered

  1. X-ray fluorescence holography and multiple-energy x-ray holography: A critical comparison of atomic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Len, P.M.; Gog, T.; Fadley, C.S.; Materlik, G.

    1997-01-01

    We compare x-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) and multiple-energy x-ray holography (MEXH), two techniques that have recently been used to obtain experimental three-dimensional atomic images. For single-energy holograms, these methods are equivalent by virtue of the optical reciprocity theorem. However, XFH can only record holographic information at the characteristic fluorescence energies of the emitting species, while MEXH can record holographic information at any energy above the fluorescent edge of the emitter, thus enabling the suppression of real-twin overlaps and other aberrations and artifacts in atomic images. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  2. Spaceflight Microbiology: Benefits for Long Duration Spaceflight and Our Understanding of Microorganisms on Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, C. Mark

    2014-01-01

    Spaceflight microbiology is composed of both operational and experimental components that complement each other in our understanding of microbial interactions and their responses in the microgravity of spaceflight. Operationally, efforts to mitigate microbiological risk to the crew and the spacecraft have historically focused on minimizing the number of detectable organisms, relying heavily on preventative measures, including appropriate vehicle design, crew quarantine prior to flight, and stringent microbial monitoring. Preflight monitoring targets have included the astronauts, spaceflight foods, potable water systems, the vehicle air and surfaces, and the cargo carried aboard the spacecraft. This approach has been very successful for earlier missions; however, the construction and long-term habitation of the International Space Station (ISS) has created the need for additional inflight monitoring of the environment and potable water systems using hardware designed for both in-flight microbial enumeration and sample collection and return to Earth. In addition to operational activities, the ISS is providing a research platform to advance our understanding of microbiomes in the built environment. Adding to the research possibilities of this system are multiple reports of unique changes in microbial gene expression and phenotypic responses, including virulence and biofilm formation, in response to spaceflight culture. The tremendous potential of the ISS research platform led the National Research Council to recommend that NASA utilize the ISS as a microbial observatory. Collectively, the findings from operational and research activities on the ISS are expected to both enable future space exploration and translate to basic and applied research on Earth.

  3. Vitamin K status in spaceflight and ground-based models of spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone loss is a well-documented change during and after long-duration spaceflight. Many types of countermeasures to bone loss have been proposed, including vitamin K supplementation. The objective of this series of studies was to measure change in vitamin K status in response to microgravity under a ...

  4. Fermionic phase transition induced by the effective impurity in holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Li-Qing [IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Department of Physics and Astronomy,Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); School of Physics and Electronic Information, Shangrao Normal University,Shangrao 334000 (China); Kuang, Xiao-Mei [Department of Physics, National Technical University of Athens,GR-15780 Athens (Greece); Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso,Casilla 4059, Valparaíso (Chile); Wang, Bin [IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Department of Physics and Astronomy,Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Wu, Jian-Pin [Institute of Gravitation and Cosmology, Department of Physics,School of Mathematics and Physics, Bohai University, Jinzhou 121013 (China); State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics,Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2015-11-20

    We investigate the holographic fermionic phase transition induced by the effective impurity in holography, which is introduced by massless scalar fields in Einstein-Maxwell-massless scalar gravity. We obtain a phase diagram in (α,T) plane separating the Fermi liquid phase and the non-Fermi liquid phase.

  5. Local charge measurement using off-axis electron holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beleggia, Marco; Gontard, L.C.; Dunin-Borkowski, R.0E.

    2016-01-01

    A model-independent approach based on Gauss’ theorem for measuring the local charge in a specimen from an electron-optical phase image recorded using off-axis electron holography was recently proposed. Here, we show that such a charge measurement is reliable when it is applied to determine the to...

  6. How hummingbirds hum: acoustic holography of hummingbirds during maneuvering flight

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hightower, B.; Wijnings, P.W.A.; Ingersoll, R.; Chin, D.; Scholte, R.; Lentink, D.

    2017-01-01

    Hummingbirds make a characteristic humming sound when they flap their wings. The physics and the biological significance of hummingbird aeroacoustics is still poorly understood. We used acoustic holography and high-speed cameras to determine the acoustic field of six hummingbirds while they either

  7. Intellectual property issues in holography and high tech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reingand, Nadya

    2004-06-01

    The author with technical education background (Ph.D. in holography) shares her 3+ years of experience working on intellectual property (IP) issues that includes patents, trademarks, and copyrights. A special attention is paid to the patent issues: the application procedure, the patent requirements, the databases for prior art search, how to make the cost efficient filing.

  8. Near field acoustic holography with microphones on a rigid sphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn; Moreno-Pescador, Guillermo; Fernandez Grande, Efren

    2011-01-01

    Spherical near field acoustic holography (spherical NAH) is a technique that makes it possible to reconstruct the sound field inside and just outside a spherical surface on which the sound pressure is measured with an array of microphones. This is potentially very useful for source identification...

  9. Digital holography using a digital photo-camera

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sekanina, H.; Pospíšil, Jaroslav

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 13 (2002), s. 2083-2092 ISSN 0950-0340 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010921 Keywords : digital holography * photo-camera Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.717, year: 2002

  10. Experiences in using ultrasonic holography with numerical and optical reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitz, V.; Wosnitza, M.

    1978-01-01

    At present, ultrasonic holography can resolve and image faults of 1 mm and more and with distances of one ultrasonic wavelength. The main field of application is for thick-walled structural components. Depending on the expected orientation, test probe arrangements as in standard ultrasonic testing are chosen. (orig./RW) [de

  11. X-ray holography with a position sensitive detector

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lausi, A.; Kopecký, Miloš; Busetto, E.; Savoia, A.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 101, č. 5 (2002), s. 621-628 ISSN 0587-4246 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010921 Keywords : fluorescence holography * resolution atoms Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.345, year: 2002

  12. Jet Tomography versus Holography at RHIC and LHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torrieri G.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We compare pQCD based jet tomography to AdS/CFT based jet holography approach to address the heavy quark jet puzzle and discuss future tests at RHIC and LHC that could help decide which paradigm can provide the most consistent quantitative theory to explain modification of jet observabkles in high energy nuclear collisions.

  13. Molecular Mechanisms of Circadian Regulation During Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanello, S. B.; Boyle, R.

    2012-01-01

    The physiology of both vertebrates and invertebrates follows internal rhythms coordinated in phase with the 24-hour daily light cycle. This circadian clock is governed by a central pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the brain. However, peripheral circadian clocks or oscillators have been identified in most tissues. How the central and peripheral oscillators are synchronized is still being elucidated. Light is the main environmental cue that entrains the circadian clock. Under the absence of a light stimulus, the clock continues its oscillation in a free-running condition. In general, three functional compartments of the circadian clock are defined. The vertebrate retina contains endogenous clocks that control many aspects of retinal physiology, including retinal sensitivity to light, neurohormone synthesis (melatonin and dopamine), rod disk shedding, signalling pathways and gene expression. Neurons with putative local circadian rhythm generation are found among all the major neuron populations in the mammalian retina. In the mouse, clock genes and function are more localized to the inner retinal and ganglion cell layers. The photoreceptor, however, secrete melatonin which may still serve a an important circadian signal. The reception and transmission of the non-visual photic stimulus resides in a small subpopulation (1-3%) or retinal ganglion cells (RGC) that express the pigment melanopsin (Opn4) and are called intrisically photoreceptive RGC (ipRGC). Melanopsin peak absorption is at 420 nm and all the axons of the ipRGC reach the SCN. A common countermeasure for circadian re-entrainment utilizes blue-green light to entrain the circadian clock and mitigate the risk of fatigue and health and performance decrement due to circadian rhythm disruption. However, an effective countermeasure targeting the photoreceptor system requires that the basic circadian molecular machinery remains intact during spaceflight. We hypothesize that spaceflight may affect ip

  14. Plant growth strategies are remodeled by spaceflight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Anna-Lisa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arabidopsis plants were grown on the International Space Station within specialized hardware that combined a plant growth habitat with a camera system that can capture images at regular intervals of growth. The Imaging hardware delivers telemetric data from the ISS, specifically images received in real-time from experiments on orbit, providing science without sample return. Comparable Ground Controls were grown in a sister unit that is maintained in the Orbital Environment Simulator at Kennedy Space Center. One of many types of biological data that can be analyzed in this fashion is root morphology. Arabidopsis seeds were geminated on orbit on nutrient gel Petri plates in a configuration that encouraged growth along the surface of the gel. Photos were taken every six hours for the 15 days of the experiment. Results In the absence of gravity, but the presence of directional light, spaceflight roots remained strongly negatively phototropic and grew in the opposite direction of the shoot growth; however, cultivars WS and Col-0 displayed two distinct, marked differences in their growth patterns. First, cultivar WS skewed strongly to the right on orbit, while cultivar Col-0 grew with little deviation away from the light source. Second, the Spaceflight environment also impacted the rate of growth in Arabidopsis. The size of the Flight plants (as measured by primary root and hypocotyl length was uniformly smaller than comparably aged Ground Control plants in both cultivars. Conclusions Skewing and waving, thought to be gravity dependent phenomena, occur in spaceflight plants. In the presence of an orienting light source, phenotypic trends in skewing are gravity independent, and the general patterns of directional root growth typified by a given genotype in unit gravity are recapitulated on orbit, although overall growth patterns on orbit are less uniform. Skewing appears independent of axial orientation on the ISS – suggesting

  15. The Effects of Spaceflight and a Spaceflight Analog on Neurocognitive Perfonnance: Extent, Longevity, and Neural Bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidler, R. D.; Mulavara, A. P.; Koppelmans, V.; Erdeniz, B.; Kofman, I. S.; DeDios, Y. E.; Szecsy, D. L.; Riascos-Castaneda, R. F.; Wood, S. J.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    We are conducting ongoing experiments in which we are performing structural and functional magnetic resonance brain imaging to identify the relationships between changes in neurocognitive function and neural structural alterations following a six month International Space Station mission and following 70 days exposure to a spaceflight analog, head down tilt bedrest. Our central hypothesis is that measures of brain structure, function, and network integrity will change from pre to post intervention (spaceflight, bedrest). Moreover, we predict that these changes will correlate with indices of cognitive, sensory, and motor function in a neuroanatomically selective fashion. Our interdisciplinary approach utilizes cutting edge neuroimaging techniques and a broad ranging battery of sensory, motor, and cognitive assessments that will be conducted pre flight, during flight, and post flight to investigate potential neuroplastic and maladaptive brain changes in crewmembers following long-duration spaceflight. Success in this endeavor would 1) result in identification of the underlying neural mechanisms and operational risks of spaceflight-induced changes in behavior, and 2) identify whether a return to normative behavioral function following re-adaptation to Earth's gravitational environment is associated with a restitution of brain structure and function or instead is supported by substitution with compensatory brain processes. With the bedrest study, we will be able to determine the neural and neurocognitive effects of extended duration unloading, reduced sensory inputs, and increased cephalic fluid distribution. This will enable us to parse out the multiple mechanisms contributing to any spaceflight-induced neural structural and behavioral changes that we observe in the flight study. In this presentation I will discuss preliminary results from six participants who have undergone the bed rest protocol. These individuals show decrements in balance and functional mobility

  16. Sleep-Wake Actigraphy and Light Exposure During Spaceflight - Short

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czeisler, Charles A.; Wright, Kenneth P., Jr.; Ronda, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Sleep-Wake Actigraphy and Light Exposure During Spaceflight - Short (Sleep-Short) will examine the effects of spaceflight on the sleep of the astronauts during space shuttle missions. Advancing state-of-the-art technology for monitoring, diagnosing and assessing treatment of sleep patterns is vital to treating insomnia on Earth and in space.

  17. Ghost Images in Helioseismic Holography? Toy Models in a Uniform Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dan

    2018-02-01

    Helioseismic holography is a powerful technique used to probe the solar interior based on estimations of the 3D wavefield. The Porter-Bojarski holography, which is a well-established method used in acoustics to recover sources and scatterers in 3D, is also an estimation of the wavefield, and hence it has the potential of being applied to helioseismology. Here we present a proof-of-concept study, where we compare helioseismic holography and Porter-Bojarski holography under the assumption that the waves propagate in a homogeneous medium. We consider the problem of locating a point source of wave excitation inside a sphere. Under these assumptions, we find that the two imaging methods have the same capability of locating the source, with the exception that helioseismic holography suffers from "ghost images" ( i.e. artificial peaks away from the source location). We conclude that Porter-Bojarski holography may improve the method currently used in helioseismology.

  18. Anesthesia during and Immediately after Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seubert, Christoph N.; Price, Catherine; Janelle, Gregory M.

    2006-01-01

    The increasing presence of humans in space and long-duration manned missions to the Moon or Mars pose novel challenges to the delivery of medical care. Even now, cumulative person-days in space exceed 80 years and preparations for a return to the Moon are actively underway. Medical care after an emergent de-orbit or an accident during a non-nominal landing must not only address the specific disease or injuries but also the challenges posed by physiologic adaptations to microgravity. In the highly autonomous situation of a long-term space mission the situation is even more complex, because personnel, equipment, specific training, and clinical experience are by definition limited. To summarize our current knowledge specifically for anesthetic care during and immediately after spaceflight, we will review physiologic adaptations to microgravity with particular emphasis on the resulting anesthetic risks, discuss veterinary experiences with anesthesia in weightlessness or in animals adapted to microgravity, describe current research that pertains to anesthesia and spaceflight and point out unresolved questions for future investigation.

  19. The Next Spaceflight Solar Irradiance Sensor: TSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Greg; Pilewskie, Peter; Richard, Erik

    2016-05-01

    The Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) will continue measurements of the solar irradiance with improved accuracies and stabilities over extant spaceflight instruments. The two TSIS solar-observing instruments include the Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) and the Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) for measuring total- and spectral- solar-irradiance, respectively. The former provides the net energy powering the Earth’s climate system while the latter helps attribute where that energy is absorbed by the Earth’s atmosphere and surface. Both spaceflight instruments are assembled and being prepared for integration on the International Space Station. With operations commencing in late 2017, the TSIS is intended to overlap with NASA’s ongoing SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) mission, which launched in 2003 and contains the first versions of both the TIM and SIM instruments, as well as with the TSI Calibration Transfer Experiment (TCTE), which began total solar irradiance measurements in 2013. We summarize the TSIS’s instrument improvements and intended solar-irradiance measurements.

  20. Skeletal changes during and after spaceflight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vico, Laurence; Hargens, Alan

    2018-03-21

    Space sojourns are challenging for life. The ability of the human body to adapt to these extreme conditions has been noted since the beginning of human space travel. Skeletal alterations that occur during spaceflight are now better understood owing to tools such as dual-energy X-ray densitometry and high-resolution peripheral quantitative CT, and murine models help researchers to understand cellular and matrix changes that occur in bone and that are difficult to measure in humans. However, questions remain with regard to bone adaptation and osteocyte fate, as well as to interactions of the skeleton with fluid shifts towards the head and with the vascular system. Further investigations into the relationships between the musculoskeletal system, energy metabolism and sensory motor acclimatisation are needed. In this regard, an integrated intervention is required that will address multiple systems simultaneously. Importantly, radiation and isolation-related stresses are gaining increased attention as the prospect of human exploration into deep space draws nearer. Although space is a unique environment, clear parallels exist between the effects of spaceflight, periods of immobilization and ageing, with possibly irreversible features. Space travel offers an opportunity to establish integrated deconditioning and ageing interventions that combine nutritional, physical and pharmaceutical strategies.

  1. Physical Training for Long-Duration Spaceflight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loehr, James A; Guilliams, Mark E; Petersen, Nora; Hirsch, Natalie; Kawashima, Shino; Ohshima, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    Physical training has been conducted on the International Space Station (ISS) for the past 10 yr as a countermeasure to physiological deconditioning during spaceflight. Each member space agency has developed its own approach to creating and implementing physical training protocols for their astronauts. We have divided physical training into three distinct phases (preflight, in-flight, and postflight) and provided a description of each phase with its constraints and limitations. We also discuss how each member agency (NASA, ESA, CSA, and JAXA) prescribed physical training for their crewmembers during the first 10 yr of ISS operations. It is important to understand the operational environment, the agency responsible for the physical training program, and the constraints and limitations associated with spaceflight to accurately design and implement exercise training or interpret the exercise data collected on ISS. As exploration missions move forward, resolving agency differences in physical training programs will become important to maximizing the effectiveness of exercise as a countermeasure and minimizing any mission impacts.

  2. Intracranial Fluid Redistribution During a Spaceflight Analog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppelmans, Vincent; Pasternak, Ofer; Bloomberg, Jacob J.; De Dios, Yiri E.; Wood, Scott J.; Riascos, Roy; Reuter-Lorenz, Patrica A.; Kofman, Igor S.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Seidler, Rachael D.

    2017-01-01

    The neural correlates of spaceflight-induced sensorimotor impairments are unknown. Head down-tilt bed rest (HDBR) serves as a microgravity analog because it mimics the headward fluid shift and limb unloading of spaceflight. We investigated focal brain white matter (WM) changes and fluid shifts during 70 days of 6 deg HDBR in 16 subjects who were assessed pre (2x), during (3x), and post-HDBR (2x). Changes over time were compared to those in control subjects (n=12) assessed four times over 90 days. Diffusion MRI was used to assess WM microstructure and fluid shifts. Free-Water Imaging, derived from diffusion MRI, was used to quantify the distribution of intracranial extracellular free water (FW). Additionally, we tested whether WM and FW changes correlated with changes in functional mobility and balance measures. HDBR resulted in FW increases in fronto-temporal regions and decreases in posterior-parietal regions that largely recovered by two weeks post-HDBR. WM microstructure was unaffected by HDBR. FW decreased in the post-central gyrus and precuneus. We previously reported that gray matter increases in these regions were associated with less HDBR-induced balance impairment, suggesting adaptive structural neuroplasticity. Future studies are warranted to determine causality and underlying mechanisms.

  3. Manned spaceflight log II—2006–2012

    CERN Document Server

    Shayler, David J

    2013-01-01

    April 12, 1961 "Attention! This is Radio Moscow speaking...The world's first satellite spaceship, Vostock, with a man aboard, was put into orbit round the Earth." Soviet Union cosmonaut Yuri A. Gagarin becomes the first person to fly in space, completing one orbit in 108 minutes. April 5, 2001 As NASA prepares to fly the final Shuttle missions to the International Space Station, Russia launches Soyuz TMA 21 (code-named 'Yuri Gagarin') with the 28th ISS Expedition crew aboard, celebrating 50 years of manned spaceflight. Meanwhile, in China, preparations continue for launching the nation's first Space Station (called Tiangong 1 - or Heavenly Palace 1) later in the year. The sixth decade of manned spaceflight orbital operations has truly began. At this point in the history of human space exploration, it is timely to review the first five decades of adventure and look forward to the next decade and what it might bring. Several notable anniversaries celebrated in 2011 make it the right time to reflect and pay homa...

  4. Preliminary investigation of ultrasonic shear wave holography with a view to the inspection of pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldridge, E.E.; Clare, A.B.; Shepherd, D.A.

    1975-01-01

    The manner in which holography would fit into the general scheme of pressure vessel inspection is discussed. Compared to conventional A, B and C presentations holography requires a different processing of the ultrasonic signal and a mechanical scan which may be more demanding than that normally provided for a C display. Preliminary results are presented of the examination of artificial defects in steel plate using shear wave holography. (author)

  5. QCD and Light-Front Holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC /Southern Denmark U., CP3-Origins; de Teramond, Guy F.; /Costa Rica U.

    2010-10-27

    The soft-wall AdS/QCD model, modified by a positive-sign dilaton metric, leads to a remarkable one-parameter description of nonperturbative hadron dynamics. The model predicts a zero-mass pion for zero-mass quarks and a Regge spectrum of linear trajectories with the same slope in the leading orbital angular momentum L of hadrons and the radial quantum number N. Light-Front Holography maps the amplitudes which are functions of the fifth dimension variable z of anti-de Sitter space to a corresponding hadron theory quantized on the light front. The resulting Lorentz-invariant relativistic light-front wave equations are functions of an invariant impact variable {zeta} which measures the separation of the quark and gluonic constituents within the hadron at equal light-front time. The result is to a semi-classical frame-independent first approximation to the spectra and light-front wavefunctions of meson and baryon light-quark bound states, which in turn predict the behavior of the pion and nucleon form factors. The theory implements chiral symmetry in a novel way: the effects of chiral symmetry breaking increase as one goes toward large interquark separation, consistent with spectroscopic data, and the the hadron eigenstates generally have components with different orbital angular momentum; e.g., the proton eigenstate in AdS/QCD with massless quarks has L = 0 and L = 1 light-front Fock components with equal probability. The soft-wall model also predicts the form of the non-perturbative effective coupling {alpha}{sub s}{sup AdS} (Q) and its {beta}-function which agrees with the effective coupling {alpha}{sub g1} extracted from the Bjorken sum rule. The AdS/QCD model can be systematically improved by using its complete orthonormal solutions to diagonalize the full QCD light-front Hamiltonian or by applying the Lippmann-Schwinger method in order to systematically include the QCD interaction terms. A new perspective on quark and gluon condensates is also reviewed.

  6. Asymptotic symmetries, holography and topological hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Rashmish K.; Sundrum, Raman

    2018-01-01

    from AdS4 provide hints for better understanding Minkowski asymptotic symmetries, the 3D structure of its soft limits, and Minkowski holography.

  7. Ultra-realistic imaging advanced techniques in analogue and digital colour holography

    CERN Document Server

    Bjelkhagen, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Ultra-high resolution holograms are now finding commercial and industrial applications in such areas as holographic maps, 3D medical imaging, and consumer devices. Ultra-Realistic Imaging: Advanced Techniques in Analogue and Digital Colour Holography brings together a comprehensive discussion of key methods that enable holography to be used as a technique of ultra-realistic imaging.After a historical review of progress in holography, the book: Discusses CW recording lasers, pulsed holography lasers, and reviews optical designs for many of the principal laser types with emphasis on attaining th

  8. Spatially and Temporally Resolved Diagnostics of Dense Sprays Using Gated, Femtosecond, Digital Holography, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is a proposal to develop a unique, gated, picosecond, digital holography system for characterizing dense particle fields in high pressure combustion...

  9. Spaceflight Affects Postnatal Development of the Aortic Wall in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-ichiro Katsuda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated effect of microgravity environment during spaceflight on postnatal development of the rheological properties of the aorta in rats. The neonate rats were randomly divided at 7 days of age into the spaceflight, asynchronous ground control, and vivarium control groups (8 pups for one dam. The spaceflight group rats at 9 days of age were exposed to microgravity environment for 16 days. A longitudinal wall strip of the proximal descending thoracic aorta was subjected to stress-strain and stress-relaxation tests. Wall tensile force was significantly smaller in the spaceflight group than in the two control groups, whereas there were no significant differences in wall stress or incremental elastic modulus at each strain among the three groups. Wall thickness and number of smooth muscle fibers were significantly smaller in the spaceflight group than in the two control groups, but there were no significant differences in amounts of either the elastin or collagen fibers among the three groups. The decreased thickness was mainly caused by the decreased number of smooth muscle cells. Plastic deformation was observed only in the spaceflight group in the stress-strain test. A microgravity environment during spaceflight could affect postnatal development of the morphological and rheological properties of the aorta.

  10. Cardiac atrophy after bed rest and spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perhonen, M. A.; Franco, F.; Lane, L. D.; Buckey, J. C.; Blomqvist, C. G.; Zerwekh, J. E.; Peshock, R. M.; Weatherall, P. T.; Levine, B. D.

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac muscle adapts well to changes in loading conditions. For example, left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy may be induced physiologically (via exercise training) or pathologically (via hypertension or valvular heart disease). If hypertension is treated, LV hypertrophy regresses, suggesting a sensitivity to LV work. However, whether physical inactivity in nonathletic populations causes adaptive changes in LV mass or even frank atrophy is not clear. We exposed previously sedentary men to 6 (n = 5) and 12 (n = 3) wk of horizontal bed rest. LV and right ventricular (RV) mass and end-diastolic volume were measured using cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 2, 6, and 12 wk of bed rest; five healthy men were also studied before and after at least 6 wk of routine daily activities as controls. In addition, four astronauts were exposed to the complete elimination of hydrostatic gradients during a spaceflight of 10 days. During bed rest, LV mass decreased by 8.0 +/- 2.2% (P = 0.005) after 6 wk with an additional atrophy of 7.6 +/- 2.3% in the subjects who remained in bed for 12 wk; there was no change in LV mass for the control subjects (153.0 +/- 12.2 vs. 153.4 +/- 12.1 g, P = 0.81). Mean wall thickness decreased (4 +/- 2.5%, P = 0.01) after 6 wk of bed rest associated with the decrease in LV mass, suggesting a physiological remodeling with respect to altered load. LV end-diastolic volume decreased by 14 +/- 1.7% (P = 0.002) after 2 wk of bed rest and changed minimally thereafter. After 6 wk of bed rest, RV free wall mass decreased by 10 +/- 2.7% (P = 0.06) and RV end-diastolic volume by 16 +/- 7.9% (P = 0.06). After spaceflight, LV mass decreased by 12 +/- 6.9% (P = 0.07). In conclusion, cardiac atrophy occurs during prolonged (6 wk) horizontal bed rest and may also occur after short-term spaceflight. We suggest that cardiac atrophy is due to a physiological adaptation to reduced myocardial load and work in real or simulated microgravity and demonstrates the plasticity

  11. Virtual reality: Avatars in human spaceflight training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterlund, Jeffrey; Lawrence, Brad

    2012-02-01

    With the advancements in high spatial and temporal resolution graphics, along with advancements in 3D display capabilities to model, simulate, and analyze human-to-machine interfaces and interactions, the world of virtual environments is being used to develop everything from gaming, movie special affects and animations to the design of automobiles. The use of multiple object motion capture technology and digital human tools in aerospace has demonstrated to be a more cost effective alternative to the cost of physical prototypes, provides a more efficient, flexible and responsive environment to changes in the design and training, and provides early human factors considerations concerning the operation of a complex launch vehicle or spacecraft. United Space Alliance (USA) has deployed this technique and tool under Research and Development (R&D) activities on both spacecraft assembly and ground processing operations design and training on the Orion Crew Module. USA utilizes specialized products that were chosen based on functionality, including software and fixed based hardware (e.g., infrared and visible red cameras), along with cyber gloves to ensure fine motor dexterity of the hands. The key findings of the R&D were: mock-ups should be built to not obstruct cameras from markers being tracked; a mock-up toolkit be assembled to facilitate dynamic design changes; markers should be placed in accurate positions on humans and flight hardware to help with tracking; 3D models used in the virtual environment be striped of non-essential data; high computational capable workstations are required to handle the large model data sets; and Technology Interchange Meetings with vendors and other industries also utilizing virtual reality applications need to occur on a continual basis enabling USA to maintain its leading edge within this technology. Parameters of interest and benefit in human spaceflight simulation training that utilizes virtual reality technologies are to

  12. Altered Venous Function during Long-Duration Spaceflights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques-Olivier Fortrat

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Venous adaptation to microgravity, associated with cardiovascular deconditioning, may contribute to orthostatic intolerance following spaceflight. The aim of this study was to analyze the main parameters of venous hemodynamics with long-duration spaceflight.Methods: Venous plethysmography was performed on 24 cosmonauts before, during, and after spaceflights aboard the International Space Station. Venous plethysmography assessed venous filling and emptying functions as well as microvascular filtration, in response to different levels of venous occlusion pressure. Calf volume was assessed using calf circumference measurements.Results: Calf volume decreased during spaceflight from 2.3 ± 0.3 to 1.7 ± 0.2 L (p < 0.001, and recovered after it (2.3 ± 0.3 L. Venous compliance, determined as the relationship between occlusion pressure and the change in venous volume, increased during spaceflight from 0.090 ± 0.005 to 0.120 ± 0.007 (p < 0.01 and recovered 8 days after landing (0.071 ± 0.005, arbitrary units. The index of venous emptying rate decreased during spaceflight from −0.004 ± 0.022 to −0.212 ± 0.033 (p < 0.001, arbitrary units. The index of vascular microfiltration increased during spaceflight from 6.1 ± 1.8 to 10.6 ± 7.9 (p < 0.05, arbitrary units.Conclusion: This study demonstrated that overall venous function is changed during spaceflight. In future, venous function should be considered when developing countermeasures to prevent cardiovascular deconditioning and orthostatic intolerance with long-duration spaceflight.

  13. On Representative Spaceflight Instrument and Associated Instrument Sensor Web Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizhner, Semion; Patel, Umeshkumar; Vootukuru, Meg

    2007-01-01

    Sensor Web-based adaptation and sharing of space flight mission resources, including those of the Space-Ground and Control-User communication segment, could greatly benefit from utilization of heritage Internet Protocols and devices applied for Spaceflight (SpaceIP). This had been successfully demonstrated by a few recent spaceflight experiments. However, while terrestrial applications of Internet protocols are well developed and understood (mostly due to billions of dollars in investments by the military and industry), the spaceflight application of Internet protocols is still in its infancy. Progress in the developments of SpaceIP-enabled instrument components will largely determine the SpaceIP utilization of those investments and acceptance in years to come. Likewise SpaceIP, the development of commercial real-time and instrument colocated computational resources, data compression and storage, can be enabled on-board a spacecraft and, in turn, support a powerful application to Sensor Web-based design of a spaceflight instrument. Sensor Web-enabled reconfiguration and adaptation of structures for hardware resources and information systems will commence application of Field Programmable Arrays (FPGA) and other aerospace programmable logic devices for what this technology was intended. These are a few obvious potential benefits of Sensor Web technologies for spaceflight applications. However, they are still waiting to be explored. This is because there is a need for a new approach to spaceflight instrumentation in order to make these mature sensor web technologies applicable for spaceflight. In this paper we present an approach in developing related and enabling spaceflight instrument-level technologies based on the new concept of a representative spaceflight Instrument Sensor Web (ISW).

  14. Spaceflight enhances cell aggregation and random budding in Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie Crabbé

    Full Text Available This study presents the first global transcriptional profiling and phenotypic characterization of the major human opportunistic fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, grown in spaceflight conditions. Microarray analysis revealed that C. albicans subjected to short-term spaceflight culture differentially regulated 452 genes compared to synchronous ground controls, which represented 8.3% of the analyzed ORFs. Spaceflight-cultured C. albicans-induced genes involved in cell aggregation (similar to flocculation, which was validated by microscopic and flow cytometry analysis. We also observed enhanced random budding of spaceflight-cultured cells as opposed to bipolar budding patterns for ground samples, in accordance with the gene expression data. Furthermore, genes involved in antifungal agent and stress resistance were differentially regulated in spaceflight, including induction of ABC transporters and members of the major facilitator family, downregulation of ergosterol-encoding genes, and upregulation of genes involved in oxidative stress resistance. Finally, downregulation of genes involved in actin cytoskeleton was observed. Interestingly, the transcriptional regulator Cap1 and over 30% of the Cap1 regulon was differentially expressed in spaceflight-cultured C. albicans. A potential role for Cap1 in the spaceflight response of C. albicans is suggested, as this regulator is involved in random budding, cell aggregation, and oxidative stress resistance; all related to observed spaceflight-associated changes of C. albicans. While culture of C. albicans in microgravity potentiates a global change in gene expression that could induce a virulence-related phenotype, no increased virulence in a murine intraperitoneal (i.p. infection model was observed under the conditions of this study. Collectively, our data represent an important basis for the assessment of the risk that commensal flora could play during human spaceflight missions. Furthermore, since the

  15. Effects of spaceflight on murine skeletal muscle gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, David L.; Bandstra, Eric R.; Harrison, Brooke C.; Thorng, Seiha; Stodieck, Louis S.; Kostenuik, Paul J.; Morony, Sean; Lacey, David L.; Hammond, Timothy G.; Leinwand, Leslie L.; Argraves, W. Scott; Bateman, Ted A.; Barth, Jeremy L.

    2009-01-01

    Spaceflight results in a number of adaptations to skeletal muscle, including atrophy and shifts toward faster muscle fiber types. To identify changes in gene expression that may underlie these adaptations, we used both microarray expression analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction to quantify shifts in mRNA levels in the gastrocnemius from mice flown on the 11-day, 19-h STS-108 shuttle flight and from normal gravity controls. Spaceflight data also were compared with the ground-based unloading model of hindlimb suspension, with one group of pure suspension and one of suspension followed by 3.5 h of reloading to mimic the time between landing and euthanization of the spaceflight mice. Analysis of microarray data revealed that 272 mRNAs were significantly altered by spaceflight, the majority of which displayed similar responses to hindlimb suspension, whereas reloading tended to counteract these responses. Several mRNAs altered by spaceflight were associated with muscle growth, including the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase regulatory subunit p85α, insulin response substrate-1, the forkhead box O1 transcription factor, and MAFbx/atrogin1. Moreover, myostatin mRNA expression tended to increase, whereas mRNA levels of the myostatin inhibitor FSTL3 tended to decrease, in response to spaceflight. In addition, mRNA levels of the slow oxidative fiber-associated transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-associated receptor (PPAR)-γ coactivator-1α and the transcription factor PPAR-α were significantly decreased in spaceflight gastrocnemius. Finally, spaceflight resulted in a significant decrease in levels of the microRNA miR-206. Together these data demonstrate that spaceflight induces significant changes in mRNA expression of genes associated with muscle growth and fiber type. PMID:19074574

  16. Physiological and Functional Alterations after Spaceflight and Bed Rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar P; Peters, Brian T; Miller, Chris A; Kofman, Igor S; Reschke, Millard F; Taylor, Laura C; Lawrence, Emily L; Wood, Scott J; Laurie, Steven S; Lee, Stuart M C; Buxton, Roxanne E; May-Phillips, Tiffany R; Stenger, Michael B; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L; Ryder, Jeffrey W; Feiveson, Alan H; Bloomberg, Jacob J

    2018-04-03

    Exposure to microgravity causes alterations in multiple physiological systems, potentially impacting the ability of astronauts to perform critical mission tasks. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of spaceflight on functional task performance and to identify the key physiological factors contributing to their deficits. A test battery comprised of 7 functional tests and 15 physiological measures was used to investigate the sensorimotor, cardiovascular and neuromuscular adaptations to spaceflight. Astronauts were tested before and after 6-month spaceflights. Subjects were also tested before and after 70 days of 6° head-down bed rest, a spaceflight analog, to examine the role of axial body unloading on the spaceflight results. These subjects included Control and Exercise groups to examine the effects of exercise during bed rest. Spaceflight subjects showed the greatest decrement in performance during functional tasks that required the greatest demand for dynamic control of postural equilibrium which was paralleled by similar decrements in sensorimotor tests that assessed postural and dynamic gait control. Other changes included reduced lower limb muscle performance and increased heart rate to maintain blood pressure. Exercise performed during bed rest prevented detrimental change in neuromuscular and cardiovascular function, however, both bed rest groups experienced functional and balance deficits similar to spaceflight subjects. Bed rest data indicates that body support unloading experienced during spaceflight contributes to postflight postural control dysfunction. Further, the bed rest results in the Exercise group of subjects confirm that resistance and aerobic exercises performed during spaceflight can play an integral role in maintaining neuromuscular and cardiovascular function, which can help in reducing decrements in functional performance. These results indicate that a countermeasure to mitigate postflight postural control dysfunction is

  17. Technology assessment of human spaceflight - Combining philosophical and technical issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromm, J.; Hoevelmann, G. H.

    1992-08-01

    A transutilitarian rationale is proposed for assessing human spaceflight that is based on objectives for these endeavors and ethical norms of conduct. Specific attention is given to: presupposed/tacit reasons for including man in spaceflight and the restricted notion of rational/justifiable activity. It is shown that economic rationale is insufficient and unsuitable as a means for assessing manned spaceflight, and transutilitarian objectives are compiled that contribute to the motivation for manned flight. The transutilitarian motivations include: pioneering uncharted territory, enhancing national prestige, establishing space-related autonomy, promoting international cooperation, and enhancing science and the quality of human life.

  18. Safety Criteria for the Private Spaceflight Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Andy; Maropoulos, Paul

    2010-09-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration(FAA) Office of Commercial Space Transportation(AST) has set specific rules and generic guidelines to cover experimental and operational flights by industry forerunners such as Virgin Galactic and XCOR. One such guideline Advisory Circular(AC) 437.55-1[1] contains exemplar hazard analyses for spacecraft designers and operators to follow under an experimental permit. The FAA’s rules and guidelines have also been ratified in a report to the United States Congress, Analysis of Human Space Flight Safety[2] which cites that the industry is too immature and has ‘insufficient data’ to be proscriptive and that ‘defining a minimum set of criteria for human spaceflight service providers is potentially problematic’ in order not to ‘stifle the emerging industry’. The authors of this paper acknowledge the immaturity of the industry and discuss the problematic issues that Design Organisations and Operators now face.

  19. Calysto: Risk Management for Commercial Manned Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillaman, Gary

    2012-01-01

    The Calysto: Risk Management for Commercial Manned Spaceflight study analyzes risk management in large enterprises and how to effectively communicate risks across organizations. The Calysto Risk Management tool developed by NASA's Kennedy Space Center's SharePoint team is used and referenced throughout the study. Calysto is a web-base tool built on Microsoft's SharePoint platform. The risk management process at NASA is examined and incorporated in the study. Using risk management standards from industry and specific organizations at the Kennedy Space Center, three methods of communicating and elevating risk are examined. Each method describes details of the effectiveness and plausibility of using the method in the Calysto Risk Management Tool. At the end of the study suggestions are made for future renditions of Calysto.

  20. Art-science, beauty-reason and holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, T H

    2013-01-01

    Display holography holds a distinction that makes it appealing to a wide audience. It can be appreciated at a deep level by people of all ages and in all fields of endeavor. It provides a unique opportunity for us to gather in an intimate location to learn, enjoy, and enlighten one another. This paper offers demonstrations to explore the relationships between art and science, esthetics and mathematics, and the dualities that exist in nature. On the practical level, a visual model for deep understanding of holography and a proposal for 'making holograms that sell' will be presented. In writing this article, the author acknowledges the fact that for this symposium, a Proceeding will be published as well as a set of audio-visual recordings. With that in mind, this article represents largely the printable contents, leaving the audio-visual part as 'performance' to be electronically recorded.

  1. X-ray holography with a customizable reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Andrew V; D'Alfonso, Adrian J; Wang, Fenglin; Bean, Richard; Capotondi, Flavio; Kirian, Richard A; Pedersoli, Emanuele; Pedersoli, Emmanuele; Raimondi, Lorenzo; Stellato, Francesco; Yoon, Chun Hong; Chapman, Henry N

    2014-08-22

    In X-ray Fourier-transform holography, images are formed by exploiting the interference pattern between the X-rays scattered from the sample and a known reference wave. To date, this technique has only been possible with a limited set of special reference waves. We demonstrate X-ray Fourier-transform holography with an almost unrestricted choice for the reference wave, permitting experimental geometries to be designed according to the needs of each experiment and opening up new avenues to optimize signal-to-noise and resolution. The optimization of holographic references can aid the development of holographic techniques to meet the demands of resolution and fidelity required for single-shot imaging applications with X-ray lasers.

  2. Color evaluation of computer-generated color rainbow holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Yile; Wang, Hui; Wu, Qiong

    2013-01-01

    A color evaluation approach for computer-generated color rainbow holography (CGCRH) is presented. Firstly, the relationship between color quantities of a computer display and a color computer-generated holography (CCGH) colorimetric system is discussed based on color matching theory. An isochromatic transfer relationship of color quantity and amplitude of object light field is proposed. Secondly, the color reproduction mechanism and factors leading to the color difference between the color object and the holographic image that is reconstructed by CGCRH are analyzed in detail. A quantitative color calculation method for the holographic image reconstructed by CGCRH is given. Finally, general color samples are selected as numerical calculation test targets and the color differences between holographic images and test targets are calculated based on our proposed method. (paper)

  3. High-resolution observation by double-biprism electron holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Ken; Tonomura, Akira; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Akashi, Tetsuya; Togawa, Yoshihiko

    2004-01-01

    High-resolution electron holography has been achieved by using a double-biprism interferometer implemented on a 1 MV field emission electron microscope. The interferometer was installed behind the first magnifying lens to narrow carrier fringes and thus enabled complete separation of sideband Fourier spectrum from center band in reconstruction process. Holograms of Au fine particles and single-crystalline thin films with the finest fringe spacing of 4.2 pm were recorded and reconstructed. The overall holography system including the reconstruction process performed well for holograms in which carrier fringes had a spacing of around 10 pm. High-resolution lattice images of the amplitude and phase were clearly reconstructed without mixing of the center band and sideband information. Additionally, entire holograms were recorded without Fresnel fringes normally generated by the filament electrode of the biprism, and the holograms were thus reconstructed without the artifacts caused by Fresnel fringes

  4. Measurements of the Characteristics of Transparent Material Using Digital Holography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Yu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Digital holography is applied to measure the characteristics of transparent material. A digital hologram recording system to measure the surface of transparent material was established, and the digital holograms of transparent object were obtained in high quality. For postprocessing of hologram, the least-squares phase unwrapping algorithm was used in phase unwrapping, and the phase reconstruction image of transparent object was obtained. The information of material surfaces was measured and the characteristic was presented in 3D visualization. The validation experiment was conducted by NanoMap 500LS system; the results of validation experiment are well satisfied with the measurement by digital holography, which proved the feasibility of digital holographic technology as a good measurement tool for transparent material.

  5. Application of Super-Resolution Image Reconstruction to Digital Holography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Shuqun

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a new application of super-resolution image reconstruction to digital holography which is a technique for three-dimensional information recording and reconstruction. Digital holography has suffered from the low resolution of CCD sensors, which significantly limits the size of objects that can be recorded. The existing solution to this problem is to use optics to bandlimit the object to be recorded, which can cause the loss of details. Here super-resolution image reconstruction is proposed to be applied in enhancing the spatial resolution of digital holograms. By introducing a global camera translation before sampling, a high-resolution hologram can be reconstructed from a set of undersampled hologram images. This permits the recording of larger objects and reduces the distance between the object and the hologram. Practical results from real and simulated holograms are presented to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed technique.

  6. Advanced split-illumination electron holography without Fresnel fringes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanigaki, Toshiaki, E-mail: tanigaki-toshiaki@riken.jp [Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), RIKEN, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Aizawa, Shinji; Park, Hyun Soon [Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), RIKEN, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Matsuda, Tsuyoshi [Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Harada, Ken [Central Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., Hatoyama, Saitama 350-0395 (Japan); Shindo, Daisuke [Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), RIKEN, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2014-02-01

    Advanced split-illumination electron holography was developed by employing two biprisms in the illuminating system to split an electron wave into two coherent waves and two biprisms in the imaging system to overlap them. A focused image of an upper condenser-biprism filament was formed on the sample plane, and all other filaments were placed in its shadow. This developed system makes it possible to obtain precise reconstructed object waves without modulations due to Fresnel fringes, in addition to holograms of distant objects from reference waves. - Highlights: • Advanced split-illumination electron holography without Fresnel fringes is developed. • Two biprisms are installed in illuminating system of microscope. • High-precision holographic observations of an area locating far from the sample edge become possible.

  7. Linear programming phase unwrapping for dual-wavelength digital holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaomin; Jiao, Jiannan; Qu, Weijuan; Yang, Fang; Li, Hongru; Tian, Ailing; Asundi, Anand

    2017-01-20

    A linear programming phase unwrapping method in dual-wavelength digital holography is proposed and verified experimentally. The proposed method uses the square of height difference as a convergence standard and theoretically gives the boundary condition in a searching process. A simulation was performed by unwrapping step structures at different levels of Gaussian noise. As a result, our method is capable of recovering the discontinuities accurately. It is robust and straightforward. In the experiment, a microelectromechanical systems sample and a cylindrical lens were measured separately. The testing results were in good agreement with true values. Moreover, the proposed method is applicable not only in digital holography but also in other dual-wavelength interferometric techniques.

  8. Advanced split-illumination electron holography without Fresnel fringes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanigaki, Toshiaki; Aizawa, Shinji; Park, Hyun Soon; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Harada, Ken; Shindo, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    Advanced split-illumination electron holography was developed by employing two biprisms in the illuminating system to split an electron wave into two coherent waves and two biprisms in the imaging system to overlap them. A focused image of an upper condenser-biprism filament was formed on the sample plane, and all other filaments were placed in its shadow. This developed system makes it possible to obtain precise reconstructed object waves without modulations due to Fresnel fringes, in addition to holograms of distant objects from reference waves. - Highlights: • Advanced split-illumination electron holography without Fresnel fringes is developed. • Two biprisms are installed in illuminating system of microscope. • High-precision holographic observations of an area locating far from the sample edge become possible

  9. Positron emission zone plate holography for particle tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gundogdu, O. [University of Birmingham, School of Physics and Astronomy, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: o.gundogdu@surrey.ac.uk

    2006-01-15

    Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT) is a powerful non-invasive technique that has been used extensively for tracking a single particle. In this paper, we present a study of zone plate holography method in order to track multiple particles, mainly two particles. The main aim is to use as small number of events as possible in the order to make it possible to track particles in fast moving industrial systems. A zone plate with 100% focal efficiency is simulated and applied to the Positron Emission Tomography (PET) data for multiple particle tracking. A simple trajectory code was employed to explore the effects of the nature of the experimental trajectories. A computer holographic reconstruction code that simulates optical reconstruction was developed. The different aspects of the particle location, particle activity ratios for enabling tagging of particles and zone plate and hologram locations are investigated. The effect of the shot noise is investigated and the limitations of the zone plate holography are reported.

  10. Positron emission zone plate holography for particle tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gundogdu, O.

    2006-01-01

    Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT) is a powerful non-invasive technique that has been used extensively for tracking a single particle. In this paper, we present a study of zone plate holography method in order to track multiple particles, mainly two particles. The main aim is to use as small number of events as possible in the order to make it possible to track particles in fast moving industrial systems. A zone plate with 100% focal efficiency is simulated and applied to the Positron Emission Tomography (PET) data for multiple particle tracking. A simple trajectory code was employed to explore the effects of the nature of the experimental trajectories. A computer holographic reconstruction code that simulates optical reconstruction was developed. The different aspects of the particle location, particle activity ratios for enabling tagging of particles and zone plate and hologram locations are investigated. The effect of the shot noise is investigated and the limitations of the zone plate holography are reported

  11. Local magnetic structure determination using polarized neutron holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szakál, Alex; Markó, Márton; Cser, László

    2015-01-01

    A unique and important property of the neutron is that it possesses magnetic moment. This property is widely used for determination of magnetic structure of crystalline samples observing the magnetic components of the diffraction peaks. Investigations of diffraction patterns give information only about the averaged structure of a crystal but for discovering of local spin arrangement around a specific (e.g., impurity) nucleus remains still a challenging problem. Neutron holography is a useful tool to investigate the local structure around a specific nucleus embedded in a crystal lattice. The method has been successfully applied experimentally in several cases using non-magnetic short range interaction of the neutron and the nucleus. A mathematical model of the hologram using interaction between magnetic moment of the atom and the neutron spin for polarized neutron holography is provided. Validity of a polarized neutron holographic experiment is demonstrated by applying the proposed method on model systems

  12. Importance of ultrasonic holography as imaging technique of material faults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitz, V.

    1978-01-01

    In ultra-sound testing of thick-wall components the reconstruction of shape and position of material faults stands in the foreground. Ultra-sound holography allows imaging of this kind. The principle of this technique is to completely measure the amount and phase of a sound field arising from the fault location on the surface of the material-piece. The quantity is measured as a complex quantity. To accomplish this, ultra-sound holography works with monochromatic burst-signals. The recording of phase and amplitude formation can be made optically by means of a film carrier as well as numerically in a computer. Corresponding to this fact the reconstruction takes place by means of a laser beam or by means of mathematical formalisms in the computer. Both the methods are realized today and are applied in destruction-free testing. (orig./DG) [de

  13. Electron holography study on the microstructure of magnetic tunnelling junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Q.Y.; Wang, Y.G.; You, B.; Du, J.; Hu, A.; Zhang, Z.

    2004-01-01

    Electron holography was applied to study the microstructure evolution of magnetic tunnelling junctions (MTJs) CoFe/AlO x /Co annealed at different temperatures. A mean inner potential barrier was observed in the as-deposited MTJ sample, while it was changed to a potential well after a 200 deg. C or a 400 deg. C annealing. It is suggested that the oxygen atoms were redistributed during the annealing, which left metallic atoms acting as acceptors to confine the electrons, leading to the decrease of the potential of the AlO x barrier layer. The results suggest that the electron holography may be a useful tool for the study of the microstructure of amorphous materials

  14. Holography in Goedel-type spacetimes and their generalizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klepac, P [Inst. Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2006-03-01

    In the contribution we review some facts concerning holography in the Godel-type universes, adopting the approach presented in the paper Boyda at all. Then the analysis is extended to an inhomogeneous cylindrically symmetric solution, found in framework of Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton gravity, which violates the causality. In particular, the question is raised, whether holographic screens shield the closed timelike curves from an observer, thus providing a chronology protection mechanism.

  15. Studying atomic-resolution by X-ray fluorescence holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Hongyi; Chen Jianwen; Xie Honglan; Zhu Huafeng; Li Ruxin; Xu Zhizhan

    2005-01-01

    In this work, the results of numerical simulations of X-ray fluorescence holograms and the reconstructed atomic images for Fe single crystal are given. The influences of the recording angles ranges and the polarization effect on the reconstruction of the atomic images are discussed. The process for removing twin images by multiple energy fluorescence holography and expanding the energy range of the incident X-rays to improve the resolution of the reconstructed images is presented

  16. Development of positron diffraction and holography at LLNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamza, A.; Asoka-Kumar, P.; Stoeffl, W.; Howell, R.; Miller, D.; Denison, A.

    2003-01-01

    A low-energy positron diffraction and holography spectrometer is currently being constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to study surfaces and adsorbed structures. This instrument will operate in conjunction with the LLNL intense positron beam produced by the 100 MeV LINAC allowing data to be acquired in minutes rather than days. Positron diffraction possesses certain advantages over electron diffraction which are discussed. Details of the instrument based on that of low-energy electron diffraction are described

  17. Magnetic imaging by dichroic x-ray holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisebitt, S.; Loergen, M.; Eberhardt, W.; Luening, M.; Schlotter, W.F.; Stoehr, J.; Hellwig, O.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: While holography has evolved to a powerful technique in the visible spectral range, it is difficult to apply at shorter wavelength as no intrinsically coherent (soft) x-ray laser is available as a light source. The progression from visible light towards shorter wavelength is motivated by the increase in spatial resolution that can be achieved. Of equal importance is the possibility to exploit special contrast mechanisms provided by scattering in resonance with transitions between electronic core and valence levels. These contrast mechanisms can be utilized in x-ray holography to form a spectroscopic image of the sample, in analogy to spectromicroscopy. So far, successful x-ray spectroholography has not been reported due to the experimental difficulties associated with the short wavelength and the limited coherent photon flux available. We present images of magnetic domain patterns forming in thin film Co-Pt multilayers, obtained by spectroholography at a wavelength of 1.59 nm. At this wavelength, we exploit x ray magnetic dichroism at the Co 2p 3/2 level in a Fourier transform holography experiment. Holography at this wavelength was made possible by combining nanostructured masks with coherence l tered synchrotron radiation from an undulator source in the experimental setup. The magnetic multilayers have perpendicular anisotropy and are probed using circular polarized x-rays. Dichroic holograms are recorded by combining measurements with positive and negative helicities. The spectroholograms can be numerically inverted to show the pure magnetic sample structure, such as labyrinth or stripe domains. Currently, we achieve a spatial resolution of 100 nm in the magnetic image. The advantages and limitations of this technique will be compared to other lensless imaging techniques such as over sampling phasing. The future prospects of imaging techniques based on coherent scattering are discussed in the context of the current development of free electron x

  18. X-ray diffuse scattering holography of a centrosymmetric sample

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopecký, Miloš; Fábry, Jan; Kub, Jiří; Bussetto, E.; Lausi, A.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 23 (2005), 231914/1-231914/3 ISSN 0003-6951 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100100529 Grant - others:EU(XE) HPRI-CT-1999-00033 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : x-ray holography * diffuse scattering Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.127, year: 2005

  19. Deriving an atmospheric budget of total organic bromine using airborne in-situ measurements of brominated hydrocarbons in the Western Pacific during SHIVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Stephan; Bönisch, Harald; Keber, Timo; Oram, Dave; Mills, Graham; Engel, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Halogenated hydrocarbons play a major role as precursors for stratospheric ozone depletion. Released from the surface in the troposphere, the halocarbons reach the stratosphere via transport through the tropical tropopause layer. The contribution of the so called very short lived species (VSLS), having atmospheric lifetimes of less than half a year as sources gases for stratospheric bromine is significant. Source gas observations of long-lived bromine compounds and VSLS have so far not been able to explain the amount of bromine derived in the stratosphere from observations of BrO and modeling of the ratio of BrO to total bromine. Due to the short lifetimes and the high atmospheric variability, the representativeness of the available observations of VSLS source gases remains unclear, as these may vary with region and display seasonal variability. During the SHIVA (Stratospheric Ozone: Halogen Impacts in a Varying Atmosphere) project an extensive dataset with over 700 samples of ambient air of all halogen species relevant for the atmospheric budget of total organic bromine (long lived halocarbons: H-1301, H-1211, H-1202, H-2402 and CH3Br, very short lived substances: CHBr3, CH2Br2, CHBr2Cl, CHBrCl2 and CHBrCl) have been collected from onboard the FALCON aircraft in the West Pacific region. Measurements were performed with the newly developed fully-automated in-situ instrument GHOST-MS (Gas chromatograph for the Observation of Tracers - coupled with a Mass Spectrometer) by the Goethe University of Frankfurt and with the onboard whole-air sampler WASP with subsequent ground based state-of-the-art GC/MS analysis by the University of East Anglia. We will present the datasets, compare these to other observation, derive a bromine budget for the West Pacific and derive an estimate of the amount of bromine from VSLS reaching the stratosphere. Using the mean mixing ratios in the upper troposphere of the halocarbons mentioned above, the calculated budget of the total organic

  20. Ultra-realistic 3-D imaging based on colour holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjelkhagen, H I

    2013-01-01

    A review of recent progress in colour holography is provided with new applications. Colour holography recording techniques in silver-halide emulsions are discussed. Both analogue, mainly Denisyuk colour holograms, and digitally-printed colour holograms are described and their recent improvements. An alternative to silver-halide materials are the panchromatic photopolymer materials such as the DuPont and Bayer photopolymers which are covered. The light sources used to illuminate the recorded holograms are very important to obtain ultra-realistic 3-D images. In particular the new light sources based on RGB LEDs are described. They show improved image quality over today's commonly used halogen lights. Recent work in colour holography by holographers and companies in different countries around the world are included. To record and display ultra-realistic 3-D images with perfect colour rendering are highly dependent on the correct recording technique using the optimal recording laser wavelengths, the availability of improved panchromatic recording materials and combined with new display light sources.

  1. Ultra-realistic imaging: a new beginning for display holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjelkhagen, Hans I.; Brotherton-Ratcliffe, David

    2014-02-01

    Recent improvements in key foundation technologies are set to potentially transform the field of Display Holography. In particular new recording systems, based on recent DPSS and semiconductor lasers combined with novel recording materials and processing, have now demonstrated full-color analogue holograms of both lower noise and higher spectral accuracy. Progress in illumination technology is leading to a further major reduction in display noise and to a significant increase of the clear image depth and brightness of such holograms. So too, recent progress in 1-step Direct-Write Digital Holography (DWDH) now opens the way to the creation of High Virtual Volume Displays (HVV) - large format full-parallax DWDH reflection holograms having fundamentally larger clear image depths. In a certain fashion HVV displays can be thought of as providing a high quality full-color digital equivalent to the large-format laser-illuminated transmission holograms of the sixties and seventies. Back then, the advent of such holograms led to much optimism for display holography in the market. However, problems with laser illumination, their monochromatic analogue nature and image noise are well cited as being responsible for their failure in reality. Is there reason for believing that the latest technology improvements will make the mark this time around? This paper argues that indeed there is.

  2. Digital holography of particles: benefits of the 'inverse problem' approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gire, J; Denis, L; Fournier, C; Soulez, F; Ducottet, C; Thiébaut, E

    2008-01-01

    The potential of in-line digital holography to locate and measure the size of particles distributed throughout a volume (in one shot) has been established. These measurements are fundamental for the study of particle trajectories in fluid flow. The most important issues in digital holography today are poor depth positioning accuracy, transverse field-of-view limitations, border artifacts and computational burdens. We recently suggested an 'inverse problem' approach to address some of these issues for the processing of particle digital holograms. The described algorithm improves axial positioning accuracy, gives particle diameters with sub-micrometer accuracy, eliminates border effects and increases the size of the studied volume. This approach for processing particle holograms pushes back some classical constraints. For example, the Nyquist criterion is no longer a restriction for the recording step and the studied volume is no longer confined to the field of view delimited by the sensor borders. In this paper we present a review of the limitations commonly found in digital holography. We then discuss the benefits of the 'inverse problem' approach and the influence of some experimental parameters in this framework

  3. Computer generated holography with intensity-graded patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossella Conti

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Computer Generated Holography achieves patterned illumination at the sample plane through phase modulation of the laser beam at the objective back aperture. This is obtained by using liquid crystal-based spatial light modulators (LC-SLMs, which modulate the spatial phase of the incident laser beam. A variety of algorithms are employed to calculate the phase modulation masks addressed to the LC-SLM. These algorithms range from simple gratings-and-lenses to generate multiple diffraction-limited spots, to iterative Fourier-transform algorithms capable of generating arbitrary illumination shapes perfectly tailored on the base of the target contour. Applications for holographic light patterning include multi-trap optical tweezers, patterned voltage imaging and optical control of neuronal excitation using uncaging or optogenetics. These past implementations of computer generated holography used binary input profile to generate binary light distribution at the sample plane. Here we demonstrate that using graded input sources, enables generating intensity graded light patterns and extend the range of application of holographic light illumination. At first, we use intensity-graded holograms to compensate for LC-SLM position dependent diffraction efficiency or sample fluorescence inhomogeneity. Finally we show that intensity-graded holography can be used to equalize photo evoked currents from cells expressing different level of chanelrhodopsin2 (ChR2, one of the most commonly used optogenetics light gated channels, taking into account the non-linear dependence of channel opening on incident light.

  4. Towards Holography via Quantum Source-Channel Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastawski, Fernando; Eisert, Jens; Wilming, Henrik

    2017-07-01

    While originally motivated by quantum computation, quantum error correction (QEC) is currently providing valuable insights into many-body quantum physics, such as topological phases of matter. Furthermore, mounting evidence originating from holography research (AdS/CFT) indicates that QEC should also be pertinent for conformal field theories. With this motivation in mind, we introduce quantum source-channel codes, which combine features of lossy compression and approximate quantum error correction, both of which are predicted in holography. Through a recent construction for approximate recovery maps, we derive guarantees on its erasure decoding performance from calculations of an entropic quantity called conditional mutual information. As an example, we consider Gibbs states of the transverse field Ising model at criticality and provide evidence that they exhibit nontrivial protection from local erasure. This gives rise to the first concrete interpretation of a bona fide conformal field theory as a quantum error correcting code. We argue that quantum source-channel codes are of independent interest beyond holography.

  5. Femtosecond X-ray Fourier holography imaging of freeflying nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorkhover, Tais; Ulmer, Anatoli; Ferguson, Ken R.; Bucher, Max; Maia, Filipe R.N.C.; Bielecki, Johan; Ekeberg, Tomas; Hantke, Max F.; Daurer, Benedikt J.; Bostedt, Christoph

    2018-02-26

    Ultrafast X-ray imaging on individual fragile specimens such as aerosols1, metastable particles2, superfluid quantum systems3 and live biospecimen4 provides high resolution information, which is inaccessible with conventional imaging techniques. Coherent X-ray diffractive imag- 2 ing, however, suffers from intrinsic loss of phase, and therefore structure recovery is often complicated and not always uniquely-defined4, 5. Here, we introduce the method of in-flight holography, where we use nanoclusters as reference X-ray scatterers in order to encode relative phase information into diffraction patterns of a virus. The resulting hologram contains an unambiguous three-dimensional map of a virus and two nanoclusters with the highest lateral resolution so far achieved via single shot X-ray holography. Our approach unlocks the benefits of holography for ultrafast X-ray imaging of nanoscale, non-periodic systems and paves the way to direct observation of complex electron dynamics down to the attosecond time scale.

  6. X-ray holography: atoms in 3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tegze, M.; Faigel, G.; Bortel, G.; Marchesini, S.; Belakhovsky, M.; Simionovici, A.

    2004-01-01

    X-ray holography is a novel method for the investigation of local atomic arrangements in solids. In conventional diffraction experiments only the intensity of the scattered radiation is measured, its phase is lost. This loss of information makes difficult to reconstruct the atomic arrangements. In holography both the intensity and the phase information is recorded. Using one of the atoms of the solid as source or detector of the x-radiation, atomic resolution can be reached. A three-dimensional picture of the atoms surrounding the source/detector atom can be easily reconstructed from the measured hologram. While in principle the measurement is very simple, in practice the weak signal-to-background ratio (∼ 10-3) makes it difficult. Using high intensity synchrotron radiation the measurement time can be reduced and high quality holograms can be recorded. In this talk we review the principles and experimental techniques of atomic resolution x-ray holography and present a few examples of its application. (author)

  7. Feasibility study for PTV measurement using x-ray holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uemura, Tomomasa; Yamamoto, Yasufumi; Murata, Shigeru; Nishio, Shigeru; Iguchi, Manabu; Uesugi, Kentaro

    2005-01-01

    Some X-ray imaging techniques are examined for a feasibility study for micro-PIV in this study. There are three X-ray imaging method, the absorption contrast method, the refraction contrast method, and the phase contrast method. The first one is a common method but its spatial resolution is rather poor. The 2nd method corresponds to the Schlieren method that utilizes refraction of parallel light. The characteristics of the method, edge enhancement, can be effective in extracting tracer images. The third method is a kind of holography methods, and this method can record fine tracer particles. Among the three methods, the second and the third method are seemed to be applicable to PIV imaging, and those methods need a parallel X-ray. The SPring-8, the synchrotron radiation facility in Harima, is utilized. There are some methods to realize phase contrast image, most of them requires ultra-high precision in optical alignment. In the present study, though a coherent source is indispensable, the simplest and robust holography method, the inline holography, is used to take phase contrast pictures. (author)

  8. Quantum electrodynamics of the internal source x-ray holographies: Bremsstrahlung, fluorescence, and multiple-energy x-ray holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, G.A.; Sorensen, L.B.

    1997-01-01

    Quantum electrodynamics (QED) is used to derive the differential cross sections measured in the three new experimental internal source ensemble x-ray holographies: bremsstrahlung (BXH), fluorescence (XFH), and multiple-energy (MEXH) x-ray holography. The polarization dependence of the BXH cross section is also obtained. For BXH, we study analytically and numerically the possible effects of the virtual photons and electrons which enter QED calculations in summing over the intermediate states. For the low photon and electron energies used in the current experiments, we show that the virtual intermediate states produce only very small effects. This is because the uncertainty principle limits the distance that the virtual particles can propagate to be much shorter than the separation between the regions of high electron density in the adjacent atoms. We also find that using the asymptotic form of the scattering wave function causes about a 5 10% error for near forward scattering. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  9. Spaceflight 2 um Tm Fiber MOPA Amplifier, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Fibertek proposes to design, develop, and test a spaceflight prototype 2051 nm thulium (Tm)-doped fiber amplifier (TDFA) optical master oscillator power amplifier...

  10. Parallel Detection of Multiple Biomarkers During Spaceflight, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Maintaining the health of astronauts during extended spaceflight is critical to the success of the mission. Radiation Monitoring Devices, Inc. (RMD) proposes an...

  11. Complete de-Dopplerization and acoustic holography for external noise of a high-speed train.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Diange; Wen, Junjie; Miao, Feng; Wang, Ziteng; Gu, Xiaoan; Lian, Xiaomin

    2016-09-01

    Identification and measurement of moving sound sources are the bases for vehicle noise control. Acoustic holography has been applied in successfully identifying the moving sound source since the 1990s. However, due to the high demand for the accuracy of holographic data, currently the maximum velocity achieved by acoustic holography is just above 100 km/h. The objective of this study was to establish a method based on the complete Morse acoustic model to restore the measured signal in high-speed situations, and to propose a far-field acoustic holography method applicable for high-speed moving sound sources. Simulated comparisons of the proposed far-field acoustic holography with complete Morse model, the acoustic holography with simplified Morse model and traditional delay-and-sum beamforming were conducted. Experiments with a high-speed train running at the speed of 278 km/h validated the proposed far-field acoustic holography. This study extended the applications of acoustic holography to high-speed situations and established the basis for quantitative measurements of far-field acoustic holography.

  12. Computer holography: 3D digital art based on high-definition CGH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushima, K; Arima, Y; Nishi, H; Yamashita, H; Yoshizaki, Y; Ogawa, K; Nakahara, S

    2013-01-01

    Our recent works of high-definition computer-generated holograms (CGH) and the techniques used for the creation, such as the polygon-based method, silhouette method and digitized holography, are summarized and reviewed in this paper. The concept of computer holography is proposed in terms of integrating and crystalizing the techniques into novel digital art.

  13. Mapping the electrostatic potential of Au nanoparticles using hybrid electron holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozsoy-Keskinbora, Cigdem; Boothroyd, Chris B; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E; van Aken, Peter A; Koch, Christoph T

    2016-06-01

    Electron holography is a powerful technique for characterizing electrostatic potentials, charge distributions, electric and magnetic fields, strain distributions and semiconductor dopant distributions with sub-nm spatial resolution. Mapping internal electrostatic and magnetic fields within nanoparticles and other low-dimensional materials by TEM requires both high spatial resolution and high phase sensitivity. Carrying out such an analysis fully quantitatively is even more challenging, since artefacts such as dynamical electron scattering may strongly affect the measurement. In-line electron holography, one of the variants of electron holography, features high phase sensitivity at high spatial frequencies, but suffers from inefficient phase recovery at low spatial frequencies. Off-axis electron holography, in contrast, can recover low spatial frequency phase information much more reliably, but is less effective in retrieving phase information at high spatial frequencies when compared to in-line holography. We investigate gold nanoparticles using hybrid electron holography at both atomic-resolution and intermediate magnification. Hybrid electron holography is a novel technique that synergistically combines off-axis and in-line electron holography, allowing the measurement of the complex wave function describing the scattered electrons with excellent signal-to-noise properties at both high and low spatial frequencies. The effect of dynamical electron scattering is minimized by beam tilt averaging. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The next phase of life-sciences spaceflight research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etheridge, Timothy; Nemoto, Kanako; Hashizume, Toko; Mori, Chihiro; Sugimoto, Tomoko; Suzuki, Hiromi; Fukui, Keiji; Yamazaki, Takashi; Higashibata, Akira; Higashitani, Atsushi

    2011-01-01

    Recently we demonstrated that the effectiveness of RNAi interference (RNAi) for inhibiting gene expression is maintained during spaceflight in the worm Caenorhabditis elegans and argued for the biomedical importance of this finding. We also successfully utilized green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged proteins to monitor changes in GPF localization during flight. Here we discuss potential applications of RNAi and GFP in spaceflight studies and the ramifications of these experiments for the future of space life-sciences research. PMID:22446523

  15. Dark-field electron holography for the measurement of geometric phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hytch, M.J.; Houdellier, F.; Huee, F.; Snoeck, E.

    2011-01-01

    The genesis, theoretical basis and practical application of the new electron holographic dark-field technique for mapping strain in nanostructures are presented. The development places geometric phase within a unified theoretical framework for phase measurements by electron holography. The total phase of the transmitted and diffracted beams is described as a sum of four contributions: crystalline, electrostatic, magnetic and geometric. Each contribution is outlined briefly and leads to the proposal to measure geometric phase by dark-field electron holography (DFEH). The experimental conditions, phase reconstruction and analysis are detailed for off-axis electron holography using examples from the field of semiconductors. A method for correcting for thickness variations will be proposed and demonstrated using the phase from the corresponding bright-field electron hologram. -- Highlights: → Unified description of phase measurements in electron holography. → Detailed description of dark-field electron holography for geometric phase measurements. → Correction procedure for systematic errors due to thickness variations.

  16. Preflight screening techniques for centrifuge-simulated suborbital spaceflight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattarini, James M; Blue, Rebecca S; Castleberry, Tarah L; Vanderploeg, James M

    2014-12-01

    Historically, space has been the venue of the healthy individual. With the advent of commercial spaceflight, we face the novel prospect of routinely exposing spaceflight participants (SPFs) with multiple comorbidities to the space environment. Preflight screening procedures must be developed to identify those individuals at increased risk during flight. We examined the responses of volunteers to centrifuge accelerations mimicking commercial suborbital spaceflight profiles to evaluate how potential SFPs might tolerate such forces. We evaluated our screening process for medical approval of subjects for centrifuge participation for applicability to commercial spaceflight operations. All registered subjects completed a medical questionnaire, physical examination, and electrocardiogram. Subjects with identified concerns including cardiopulmonary disease, hypertension, and diabetes were required to provide documentation of their conditions. There were 335 subjects who registered for the study, 124 who completed all prescreening, and 86 subjects who participated in centrifuge trials. Due to prior medical history, five subjects were disqualified, most commonly for psychiatric reasons or uncontrolled medical conditions. Of the subjects approved, four individuals experienced abnormal physiological responses to centrifuge profiles, including one back strain and three with anxiety reactions. The screening methods used were judged to be sufficient to identify individuals physically capable of tolerating simulated suborbital flight. Improved methods will be needed to identify susceptibility to anxiety reactions. While severe or uncontrolled disease was excluded, many subjects successfully participated in centrifuge trials despite medical histories of disease that are disqualifying under historical spaceflight screening regimes. Such screening techniques are applicable for use in future commercial spaceflight operations.

  17. Mapping the electrostatic potential of Au nanoparticles using hybrid electron holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozsoy-Keskinbora, Cigdem, E-mail: c.ozsoy@fkf.mpg.de [Stuttgart Center for Electron Microscopy, Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Boothroyd, Chris B.; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Aken, Peter A. van [Stuttgart Center for Electron Microscopy, Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Koch, Christoph T. [Structure Research & Electron Microscopy group, Department of Physics, Humboldt University of Berlin, Newtonstraße 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Electron holography is a powerful technique for characterizing electrostatic potentials, charge distributions, electric and magnetic fields, strain distributions and semiconductor dopant distributions with sub-nm spatial resolution. Mapping internal electrostatic and magnetic fields within nanoparticles and other low-dimensional materials by TEM requires both high spatial resolution and high phase sensitivity. Carrying out such an analysis fully quantitatively is even more challenging, since artefacts such as dynamical electron scattering may strongly affect the measurement. In-line electron holography, one of the variants of electron holography, features high phase sensitivity at high spatial frequencies, but suffers from inefficient phase recovery at low spatial frequencies. Off-axis electron holography, in contrast, can recover low spatial frequency phase information much more reliably, but is less effective in retrieving phase information at high spatial frequencies when compared to in-line holography. We investigate gold nanoparticles using hybrid electron holography at both atomic-resolution and intermediate magnification. Hybrid electron holography is a novel technique that synergistically combines off-axis and in-line electron holography, allowing the measurement of the complex wave function describing the scattered electrons with excellent signal-to-noise properties at both high and low spatial frequencies. The effect of dynamical electron scattering is minimized by beam tilt averaging. - Highlights: • Hybrid electron holography approach applied to Au nanoparticles. • Proof of principle of atomic resolution hybrid electron holography experiment demonstrated. • Dynamical scattering artifacts decrease by varying the illumination direction. • The effect of the number of iterations and noise on the low spatial frequencies in the phase are discussed.

  18. Mapping the electrostatic potential of Au nanoparticles using hybrid electron holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozsoy-Keskinbora, Cigdem; Boothroyd, Chris B.; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Aken, Peter A. van; Koch, Christoph T.

    2016-01-01

    Electron holography is a powerful technique for characterizing electrostatic potentials, charge distributions, electric and magnetic fields, strain distributions and semiconductor dopant distributions with sub-nm spatial resolution. Mapping internal electrostatic and magnetic fields within nanoparticles and other low-dimensional materials by TEM requires both high spatial resolution and high phase sensitivity. Carrying out such an analysis fully quantitatively is even more challenging, since artefacts such as dynamical electron scattering may strongly affect the measurement. In-line electron holography, one of the variants of electron holography, features high phase sensitivity at high spatial frequencies, but suffers from inefficient phase recovery at low spatial frequencies. Off-axis electron holography, in contrast, can recover low spatial frequency phase information much more reliably, but is less effective in retrieving phase information at high spatial frequencies when compared to in-line holography. We investigate gold nanoparticles using hybrid electron holography at both atomic-resolution and intermediate magnification. Hybrid electron holography is a novel technique that synergistically combines off-axis and in-line electron holography, allowing the measurement of the complex wave function describing the scattered electrons with excellent signal-to-noise properties at both high and low spatial frequencies. The effect of dynamical electron scattering is minimized by beam tilt averaging. - Highlights: • Hybrid electron holography approach applied to Au nanoparticles. • Proof of principle of atomic resolution hybrid electron holography experiment demonstrated. • Dynamical scattering artifacts decrease by varying the illumination direction. • The effect of the number of iterations and noise on the low spatial frequencies in the phase are discussed.

  19. Fault Management Techniques in Human Spaceflight Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hagan, Brian; Crocker, Alan

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses human spaceflight fault management operations. Fault detection and response capabilities available in current US human spaceflight programs Space Shuttle and International Space Station are described while emphasizing system design impacts on operational techniques and constraints. Preflight and inflight processes along with products used to anticipate, mitigate and respond to failures are introduced. Examples of operational products used to support failure responses are presented. Possible improvements in the state of the art, as well as prioritization and success criteria for their implementation are proposed. This paper describes how the architecture of a command and control system impacts operations in areas such as the required fault response times, automated vs. manual fault responses, use of workarounds, etc. The architecture includes the use of redundancy at the system and software function level, software capabilities, use of intelligent or autonomous systems, number and severity of software defects, etc. This in turn drives which Caution and Warning (C&W) events should be annunciated, C&W event classification, operator display designs, crew training, flight control team training, and procedure development. Other factors impacting operations are the complexity of a system, skills needed to understand and operate a system, and the use of commonality vs. optimized solutions for software and responses. Fault detection, annunciation, safing responses, and recovery capabilities are explored using real examples to uncover underlying philosophies and constraints. These factors directly impact operations in that the crew and flight control team need to understand what happened, why it happened, what the system is doing, and what, if any, corrective actions they need to perform. If a fault results in multiple C&W events, or if several faults occur simultaneously, the root cause(s) of the fault(s), as well as their vehicle-wide impacts, must be

  20. Efficacy of Antimicrobials on Bacteria Cultured in a Spaceflight Analogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, CA; Wotring, Virginia; Barrila, Jennifer; Crabbe, Aurelie; Castro, Sarah; Davis, Richard; Rideout, April; McCarthy, Breanne; Ott, C. Mark

    2014-01-01

    As humans travel in space, they will interact with microbial flora from themselves, other crewmembers, their food, and the environment. While evaluations of microbial ecology aboard the Mir and ISS suggest a predominance of common environmental flora, the presence of (and potential for) infectious agents has been well documented. Likewise, pathogens have been detected during preflight monitoring of spaceflight food, resulting in the disqualification of that production lot from flight. These environmental and food organisms range from the obligate pathogen, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium), which has been responsible for disqualification and removal of food destined for ISS and has previously been reported from Shuttle crew refuse, to the opportunistic pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, isolated numerous times from ISS habitable compartments and the crew. Infectious disease events have affected spaceflight missions, including an upper respiratory infection that delayed the launch of STS-36 and an incapacitating Pseudomonas aeruginosa urinary tract infection of a crewmember during Apollo 13. These observations indicate that the crew has the potential to be exposed to obligate and opportunistic pathogens. This risk of exposure is expected to increase with longer mission durations and increased use of regenerative life support systems. As antibiotics are the primary countermeasure after infection, determining if their efficacy during spaceflight missions is comparable to terrestrial application is of critical importance. The NASA Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) culture system has been successfully used as a spaceflight culture analogue to identify potential alterations in several key microbial characteristics, such as virulence and gene regulation, in response to spaceflight culture. We hypothesized that bacteria cultured in the low fluid shear RWV environment would demonstrate changes in efficacy of antibiotics compared to higher fluid shear controls

  1. How Spacecraft Fly Spaceflight Without Formulae

    CERN Document Server

    Swinerd, Graham

    2009-01-01

    About half a century ago a small satellite, Sputnik 1, was launched. The satellite did very little other than to transmit a radio signal to announce its presence in orbit. However, this humble beginning heralded the dawn of the Space Age. Today literally thousands of robotic spacecraft have been launched, many of which have flown to far-flung regions of the Solar System carrying with them the human spirit of scientific discovery and exploration. Numerous other satellites have been launched in orbit around the Earth providing services that support our technological society on the ground. How Spacecraft Fly: Spaceflight Without Formulae by Graham Swinerd focuses on how these spacecraft work. The book opens with a historical perspective of how we have come to understand our Solar System and the Universe. It then progresses through orbital flight, rocket science, the hostile environment within which spacecraft operate, and how they are designed. The concluding chapters give a glimpse of what the 21st century may ...

  2. Network Analysis of Rodent Transcriptomes in Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Maya; Fogle, Homer; Costes, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    Network analysis methods leverage prior knowledge of cellular systems and the statistical and conceptual relationships between analyte measurements to determine gene connectivity. Correlation and conditional metrics are used to infer a network topology and provide a systems-level context for cellular responses. Integration across multiple experimental conditions and omics domains can reveal the regulatory mechanisms that underlie gene expression. GeneLab has assembled rich multi-omic (transcriptomics, proteomics, epigenomics, and epitranscriptomics) datasets for multiple murine tissues from the Rodent Research 1 (RR-1) experiment. RR-1 assesses the impact of 37 days of spaceflight on gene expression across a variety of tissue types, such as adrenal glands, quadriceps, gastrocnemius, tibalius anterior, extensor digitorum longus, soleus, eye, and kidney. Network analysis is particularly useful for RR-1 -omics datasets because it reinforces subtle relationships that may be overlooked in isolated analyses and subdues confounding factors. Our objective is to use network analysis to determine potential target nodes for therapeutic intervention and identify similarities with existing disease models. Multiple network algorithms are used for a higher confidence consensus.

  3. Spaceflight-Induced Intracranial Hypertension: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traver, William J.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation is an overview of the some of the known results of spaceflight induced intracranial hypertension. Historical information from Gemini 5, Apollo, and the space shuttle programs indicated that some vision impairment was reported and a comparison between these historical missions and present missions is included. Optic Disc Edema, Globe Flattening, Choroidal Folds, Hyperopic Shifts and Raised Intracranial Pressure has occurred in Astronauts During and After Long Duration Space Flight. Views illustrate the occurrence of Optic Disc Edema, Globe Flattening, and Choroidal Folds. There are views of the Arachnoid Granulations and Venous return, and the question of spinal or venous compliance issues is discussed. The question of increased blood flow and its relation to increased Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is raised. Most observed on-orbit papilledema does not progress, and this might be a function of plateau homeostasis for the higher level of intracranial pressure. There are seven cases of astronauts experiencing in flight and post flight symptoms, which are summarized and follow-up is reviewed along with a comparison of the treatment options. The question is "is there other involvement besides vision," and other Clinical implications are raised,

  4. Developing Personalized Sensorimotor Adaptability Countermeasures for Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulavara, A. P.; Seidler, R. D.; Peters, B.; Cohen, H. S.; Wood, S.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Astronauts experience sensorimotor disturbances during their initial exposure to microgravity and during the re-adaptation phase following a return to an Earth-gravitational environment. Interestingly, astronauts who return from spaceflight show substantial differences in their abilities to readapt to a gravitational environment. The ability to predict the manner and degree to which individual astronauts would be affected would improve the effectiveness of countermeasure training programs designed to enhance sensorimotor adaptability. In this paper we will be presenting results from our ground-based study that show how behavioral, brain imaging and genomic data may be used to predict individual differences in sensorimotor adaptability to novel sensorimotor environments. This approach will allow us to better design and implement sensorimotor adaptability training countermeasures against decrements in post-mission adaptive capability that are customized for each crewmember's sensory biases, adaptive capacity, brain structure, functional capacities, and genetic predispositions. The ability to customize adaptability training will allow more efficient use of crew time during training and will optimize training prescriptions for astronauts to ensure expected outcomes.

  5. Application of comparative digital holography for distant shape control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumbach, Torsten; Osten, Wolfgang; von Kopylow, Christoph; Juptner, Werner P. O.

    2004-09-01

    The comparison of two objects is of great importance in the industrial production process. Especially comparing the shape is of particular interest for maintaining calibration tools or controlling the tolerance in the deviation between a sample and a master. Outsourcing and globalization of production places can result in large distances between co-operating partners and might cause problems for maintaining quality standards. Consequently new challenges arise for optical measurement techniques especially in the field of industrial shape control. In this paper we describe the progress of implementing a novel technique for comparing directly two objects with different microstructure. The technique is based on the combination of comparative holography and digital holography. Comparing the objects can be done in two ways. One is the digital comparison in the computer and the other way is by using the analogue reconstruction of a master hologram with a spatial light modulator (SLM) as coherent mask for illuminating the test object. Since this mask is stored digitally it can be transmitted via telecommunication networks and this enables the access to the full optical information of the master object at any place wanted. Beside the basic principle of comparative digital holography (CDH), we will show in this paper the set-up for doing the analogue comparison of two objects with increased sensitivity in comparison to former measurements and the calibration of the SLM that is used for the experiments. We will give examples for the digital and the analogue comparison of objects including a verification of our results by another optical measurement technique.

  6. Advanced Electron Holography Applied to Electromagnetic Field Study in Materials Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shindo, Daisuke; Tanigaki, Toshiaki; Park, Hyun Soon

    2017-07-01

    Advances and applications of electron holography to the study of electromagnetic fields in various functional materials are presented. In particular, the development of split-illumination electron holography, which introduces a biprism in the illumination system of a holography electron microscope, enables highly accurate observations of electromagnetic fields and the expansion of the observable area. First, the charge distributions on insulating materials were studied by using split-illumination electron holography and including a mask in the illumination system. Second, the three-dimensional spin configurations of skyrmion lattices in a helimagnet were visualized by using a high-voltage holography electron microscope. Third, the pinning of the magnetic flux lines in a high-temperature superconductor YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-y was analyzed by combining electron holography and scanning ion microscopy. Finally, the dynamic accumulation and collective motions of electrons around insulating biomaterial surfaces were observed by utilizing the amplitude reconstruction processes of electron holography. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. 3D flat holography: entropy and logarithmic corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagchi, Arjun; Basu, Rudranil

    2014-01-01

    We compute the leading corrections to the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy of the Flat Space Cosmological (FSC) solutions in 3D flat spacetimes, which are the flat analogues of the BTZ black holes in AdS 3 . The analysis is done by a computation of density of states in the dual 2D Galilean Conformal Field Theory and the answer obtained by this matches with the limiting value of the expected result for the BTZ inner horizon entropy as well as what is expected for a generic thermodynamic system. Along the way, we also develop other aspects of holography of 3D flat spacetimes

  8. Schrödinger holography for z < 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Tomás; Peach, Alex; Ross, Simon F; Keeler, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    We investigate holography for asymptotically Schrödinger spacetimes, using a frame formalism. Our dictionary is based on the anisotropic scaling symmetry. We consider z < 2, where the holographic dictionary is cleaner; we make some comments on z = 2. We propose a definition of asymptotically locally Schrödinger spacetime where the leading components of the frame fields provide suitable geometric boundary data. We show that an asymptotic expansion exists for generic boundary data satisfying our boundary conditions for z < 2. (paper)

  9. Patch near field acoustic holography based on particle velocity measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yong-Bin; Jacobsen, Finn; Bi, Chuan-Xing

    2009-01-01

    Patch near field acoustic holography (PNAH) based on sound pressure measurements makes it possible to reconstruct the source field near a source by measuring the sound pressure at positions on a surface. that is comparable in size to the source region of concern. Particle velocity is an alternative...... examines the use of particle velocity as the input of PNAH. Because the particle velocity decays faster toward the edges of the measurement aperture than the pressure does and because the wave number ratio that enters into the inverse propagator from pressure to velocity amplifies high spatial frequencies...

  10. High resolution holography - applications at Marchwood Engineering Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webster, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    With a potential information storage density of 10 16 bits/m 2 , the ability to reconstruct in three dimensions, wide angle of view and potentially diffraction limited resolution, holography should be invaluable for optical recording and inspection of complex shape objects. That it has failed to make any significant impact in this field is due to a variety of practical reasons which have limited resolution, quality and reliability of holograms made with pulsed lasers. Some of these limitations are discussed together with possible methods of overcoming them. In line (Gabor) and side-band systems are discussed. The application to CEGB nuclear power stations is described and preliminary results presented. (author)

  11. Interior near-field acoustical holography in flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, E G; Houston, B H; Herdic, P C; Raveendra, S T; Gardner, B

    2000-10-01

    In this paper boundary element methods (BEM) are mated with near-field acoustical holography (NAH) in order to determine the normal velocity over a large area of a fuselage of a turboprop airplane from a measurement of the pressure (hologram) on a concentric surface in the interior of the aircraft. This work represents the first time NAH has been applied in situ, in-flight. The normal fuselage velocity was successfully reconstructed at the blade passage frequency (BPF) of the propeller and its first two harmonics. This reconstructed velocity reveals structure-borne and airborne sound-transmission paths from the engine to the interior space.

  12. New fiber optics illumination system for application to electronics holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciammarella, Cesar A.

    1995-08-01

    The practical application of electronic holography requires the use of fiber optics. The need of employing coherent fiber optics imposes restrictions in the efficient use of laser light. This paper proposes a new solution to this problem. The proposed method increases the efficiency in the use of the laser light and simplifies the interface between the laser source and the fiber optics. This paper will present the theory behind the proposed method. A discussion of the effect of the different parameters that influence the formation of interference fringes is presented. Limitations and results that can be achieved are given. An example of application is presented.

  13. Fast modal decomposition for optical fibers using digital holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Meng; Lin, Zhiquan; Li, Guowei; Situ, Guohai

    2017-07-26

    Eigenmode decomposition of the light field at the output end of optical fibers can provide fundamental insights into the nature of electromagnetic-wave propagation through the fibers. Here we present a fast and complete modal decomposition technique for step-index optical fibers. The proposed technique employs digital holography to measure the light field at the output end of the multimode optical fiber, and utilizes the modal orthonormal property of the basis modes to calculate the modal coefficients of each mode. Optical experiments were carried out to demonstrate the proposed decomposition technique, showing that this approach is fast, accurate and cost-effective.

  14. Near-Field Resonance Microwave Tomography and Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaikovich, K. P.; Smirnov, A. I.; Yanin, D. V.

    2018-02-01

    We develop the methods of electromagnetic computer near-field microwave tomography of distributed subsurface inhomogeneities of complex dielectric permittivity and of holography (shape retrieval) of internally homogeneous subsurface objects. The methods are based on the solution of the near-field inverse scattering problem from measurements of the resonance-parameter variations of microwave probes above the medium surface. The capabilities of the proposed diagnostic technique are demonstrated in the numerical simulation for sensors with a cylindrical capacitor as a probe element, the edge capacitance of which is sensitive to subsurface inhomogeneities.

  15. Adaptive Holography in Liquid Crystal Light-Valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Huignard

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available By performing two-wave mixing experiments in a liquid crystal light-valve, optical beam amplification is obtained as a strongly resonant process to which a narrow frequency bandwidth is associated. This property is exploited to realize adaptive holographic interferometric systems able to efficiently detect displacements as small as fraction of picometers. Pressure radiation induced deformations of a reflecting membrane are measured with the same type of system. Then, when used with complex wavefronts, like speckle fields, the LCLV-based interferometer allows to detect extremely small phase modulations. The examples shown demonstrate the potentialities of the light-valve for dynamic holography applications.

  16. X-ray Fluorescence Holography: Principles, Apparatus, and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kouichi; Korecki, Pawel

    2018-06-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is an atomic structure determination technique that combines the capabilities of X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. It provides a unique means of gaining fully three-dimensional information about the local atomic structure and lattice site positions of selected elements inside compound samples. In this work, we discuss experimental and theoretical aspects that are essential for the efficient recording and analysis of X-ray fluorescence holograms and review the most recent advances in XFH. We describe experiments performed with brilliant synchrotron radiation as well as with tabletop setups that employ conventional X-ray tubes.

  17. Spaceflight modulates gene expression in the whole blood of astronauts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrila, Jennifer; Ott, C Mark; LeBlanc, Carly; Mehta, Satish K; Crabbé, Aurélie; Stafford, Phillip; Pierson, Duane L; Nickerson, Cheryl A

    2016-01-01

    Astronauts are exposed to a unique combination of stressors during spaceflight, which leads to alterations in their physiology and potentially increases their susceptibility to disease, including infectious diseases. To evaluate the potential impact of the spaceflight environment on the regulation of molecular pathways mediating cellular stress responses, we performed a first-of-its-kind pilot study to assess spaceflight-related gene-expression changes in the whole blood of astronauts. Using an array comprised of 234 well-characterized stress-response genes, we profiled transcriptomic changes in six astronauts (four men and two women) from blood preserved before and immediately following the spaceflight. Differentially regulated transcripts included those important for DNA repair, oxidative stress, and protein folding/degradation, including HSP90AB1 , HSP27 , GPX1 , XRCC1 , BAG-1 , HHR23A , FAP48 , and C-FOS . No gender-specific differences or relationship to number of missions flown was observed. This study provides a first assessment of transcriptomic changes occurring in the whole blood of astronauts in response to spaceflight.

  18. Spaceflight and Neurosurgery: A Comprehensive Review of the Relevant Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinney, Christian C; Allison, Zain

    2018-01-01

    Spaceflight and the associated gravitational fluctuations may impact various components of the central nervous system. These include changes in intracranial pressure, the spine, and neurocognitive performance. The implications of altered astronaut performance on critical spaceflight missions are potentially significant. The current body of research on this important topic is extremely limited, and a comprehensive review has not been published. Herein, the authors address this notable gap, as well as the role of the neurosurgeon in optimizing potential diagnostic and therapeutic modalities. A literature search was conducted using the PubMed, EMBASE, and Google Scholar databases, with no time constraints. Significant manuscripts on physiologic changes associated with spaceflight and microgravity were identified and reviewed. Manifestations were separated into 1 of 3 general categories, including changes in intracranial pressure, the spine, and neurocognitive performance. A comprehensive literature review yielded 27 studies with direct relevance to the impact of microgravity and spaceflight on nervous system physiology. This included 7 studies related to intracranial pressure fluctuations, 17 related to changes in the spinal column, and 3 related to neurocognitive change. The microgravity environment encountered during spaceflight impacts intracranial physiology. This includes changes in intracranial pressure, the spinal column, and neurocognitive performance. Herein, we present a systematic review of the published literature on this issue. Neurosurgeons should have a key role in the continued study of this important topic, contributing to both diagnostic and therapeutic understanding. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Frequent premature ventricular contractions in an orbital spaceflight participant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Richard T; Stepanek, Jan P; Scott, Luis R; Voronkov, Yury I

    2010-06-01

    Commercial spaceflight participants on orbital flights typically are older than career astronauts and they often have medical conditions that have not been studied at high g or in microgravity. This is a case report of a 56-yr-old orbital spaceflight participant with essential tremor and frequent premature ventricular contractions that occurred at rates up to 7000 per day. Before training and spaceflight, he was required to complete extensive clinical investigations to demonstrate normal cardiac structures and the absence of cardiac pathology. The evaluation included signal averaged ECG, transthoracic stress echocardiography, exercise tolerance tests, electrophysiological studies, cardiac MRI, electron beam CT, Holter monitoring, and overnight oximetry. While no cardiac pathology was demonstrated, the Russian medical team required that the PVCs be treated prior to training and spaceflight. For the initial flight, a selective beta-1 receptor beta blocker was used and for the second a calcium channel blocker was used in combination with a nonselective beta blocker for tremor control. Analogue environment testing assured that this combination of medications was compatible. The spaceflight participant's PVCs were incompletely suppressed with a low-dose selective beta-1 blocker, but were well suppressed by a calcium channel blocker. He tolerated in-flight periodic use of a nonselective beta blocker in combination with a calcium channel blocker. In-flight ECG and blood pressure monitoring results were normal, and an ECG obtained midmission and on landing day showed successful PVC suppression. He did not have any cardiac difficulty with launch, on-orbit operations, entry, or recovery

  20. Modification of unilateral otolith responses following spaceflight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Andrew H; Schönfeld, Uwe

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the study was to resolve the issue of spaceflight-induced, adaptive modification of the otolith system by measuring unilateral otolith responses in a pre- versus post-flight design. The study represents the first comprehensive approach to examining unilateral otolith function following space flight. Ten astronauts participated in unilateral otolith function tests three times preflight and up to four times after Shuttle flights from landing day through the subsequent 10 days. During unilateral centrifugation, utricular function was examined by the perceptual changes reflected by the subjective visual vertical (SVV) and the otolith-mediated ocular counter-roll, designated as utriculo-ocular response (UOR). Unilateral saccular reflexes were recorded by measurement of collic vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMP). The findings demonstrate a general increase in interlabyrinth asymmetry of otolith responses on landing day relative to preflight baseline, with subsequent reversal in asymmetry within 2-3 days. Recovery to baseline levels was achieved within 10 days. This fluctuation in asymmetry was consistent for the utricle tests (SVV and UOR) while apparently stronger for SVV. A similar asymmetry was observed during cVEMP testing. In addition, the results provide initial evidence of a dominant labyrinth. The findings require reconsideration of the otolith asymmetry hypothesis; in general, on landing day, the response from one labyrinth was equivalent to preflight values, while the other showed considerable discrepancy. The finding that one otolith response can return to one-g level within hours after re-entry while the other takes considerably longer demonstrates the importance of considering the otolith response as a result of both peripheral and associated central neural processing.

  1. Dynamics of valence-shell electrons and nuclei probed by strong-field holography and rescattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walt, Samuel G.; Bhargava Ram, Niraghatam; Atala, Marcos; Shvetsov-Shilovski, Nikolay I; von Conta, Aaron; Baykusheva, Denitsa; Lein, Manfred; Wörner, Hans Jakob

    2017-01-01

    Strong-field photoelectron holography and laser-induced electron diffraction (LIED) are two powerful emerging methods for probing the ultrafast dynamics of molecules. However, both of them have remained restricted to static systems and to nuclear dynamics induced by strong-field ionization. Here we extend these promising methods to image purely electronic valence-shell dynamics in molecules using photoelectron holography. In the same experiment, we use LIED and photoelectron holography simultaneously, to observe coupled electronic-rotational dynamics taking place on similar timescales. These results offer perspectives for imaging ultrafast dynamics of molecules on femtosecond to attosecond timescales. PMID:28643771

  2. Two-energy twin image removal in atomic-resolution x-ray holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Y.; Ishikawa, T.; Hayashi, K.; Takahashi, Y.; Matsubara, E.

    2002-01-01

    We propose a two-energy twin image removal algorithm for atomic-resolution x-ray holography. The validity of the algorithm is shown in a theoretical simulation and in an experiment of internal detector x-ray holography using a ZnSe single crystal. The algorithm, compared to the widely used multiple-energy algorithm, allows efficient measurement of holograms, and is especially important when the available x-ray energies are fixed. It enables twin image free holography using characteristic x rays from laboratory generators and x-ray pulses of free-electron lasers

  3. Evidence Report: Risk of Bone Fracture due to Spaceflight-Induced Changes to Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibonga, Jean D.; Evans, Harlan J.; Smith, Scott A.; Spector, Elisabeth R.; Yardley, Greg; Myer, Jerry

    2017-01-01

    Given that spaceflight may induce adverse changes in bone ultimate strength with respect to mechanical loads during and post-mission, there is a possibility a fracture may occur for activities otherwise unlikely to induce fracture prior to initiating spaceflight.

  4. Spaceflight 1.94 Micron Tm Fiber Laser Transmitter, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Fibertek will develop a spaceflight prototype 1940 nm, 100 W thulium (Tm) laser suitable for NASA spaceflight and long-duration unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV)...

  5. Spaceflight 1.94 micron Tm Fiber Laser Transmitter, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Fibertek proposes to develop a spaceflight prototype 1940 nm, 100 W thulium (Tm) laser suitable for NASA spaceflight and long-duration unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV)...

  6. Synthetic Biology and Human Health: Potential Applications for Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karouia, Fathi; Carr, Christopher; Cai, Yizhi; Chen, Y.; Grenon, Marlene; Larios-Sanz, Maia; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Santos, Orlando

    2011-01-01

    Human space travelers experience a unique environment that affects homeostasis and physiologic adaptation. Spaceflight-related changes have been reported in the musculo-skeletal, cardiovascular, neurovestibular, endocrine, and immune systems. The spacecraft environment further subjects the traveler to noise and gravitational forces, as well as airborne chemical, microbiological contaminants, and radiation exposure. As humans prepare for longer duration missions effective countermeasures must be developed, verified, and implemented to ensure mission success. Over the past ten years, synthetic biology has opened new avenues for research and development in areas such as biological control, biomaterials, sustainable energy production, bioremediation, and biomedical therapies. The latter in particular is of great interest to the implementation of long-duration human spaceflight capabilities. This article discusses the effects of spaceflight on humans, and reviews current capabilities and potential needs associated with the health of the astronauts where synthetic biology could play an important role in the pursuit of space exploration.

  7. Muscle sarcomere lesions and thrombosis after spaceflight and suspension unloading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, D.A.; Ellis, S.; Giometti, C.S.; Hoh, J.F.Y.; Ilyina-Kakueva, E.I.; Oganov, V.S.; Slocum, G.R.; Bain, J.L.W.; Sedlak, F.R. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

    1992-08-01

    Extended exposure of humans to spaceflight produces a progressive loss of skeletal muscle strength. This process must be understood to design effective countermeasures. The present investigation examined hindlimb muscles from flight rats killed as close to landing as possible. Spaceflight and tail suspension-hindlimb unloading (unloaded) produced significant decreases in fiber cross-sectional areas of the adductor longus (AL), a slow-twitch antigravity muscle. However, the mean wet weight of the flight AL muscles was near normal, whereas that of the suspension unloaded AL muscles was significantly reduced. Interstitial edema within the flight AL, but not in the unloaded AL, appeared to account for this apparent disagreement.In both conditions, the slow-twitch oxidative fibers atrophied more than the fast-twitch oxidative-glycolytic fibers. Microcirculation was also compromised by spaceflight, such that there was increased formation of thrombi in the postcapillary venules and capillaries.

  8. Changes in the immune system during and after spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G. R.; Konstantinova, I.; Sonnenfeld, G.; Jennings, R.

    1997-01-01

    The results of immunological analyses before, during and after spaceflight, have established the fact that spaceflight can result in a blunting of the immune mechanisms of human crew members and animal test species. There is some evidence that the immune function changes in short-term flights resemble those occurring after acute stress, while the changes during long-term flights resemble those caused by chronic stress. In addition, this blunting of the immune function occurs concomitant with a relative increase in potentially infectious microorganisms in the space cabin environment. This combination of events results in an increased probability of inflight infectious events. The realization of this probability has been shown to be partially negated by the judicious use of a preflight health stabilization program and other operational countermeasures. The continuation of these countermeasures, as well as microbial and immunological monitoring, are recommended for continued spaceflight safety.

  9. Alterations in adaptive immunity persist during long-duration spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucian, Brian; Stowe, Raymond P; Mehta, Satish; Quiriarte, Heather; Pierson, Duane; Sams, Clarence

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is currently unknown whether immune system alterations persist during long-duration spaceflight. In this study various adaptive immune parameters were assessed in astronauts at three intervals during 6-month spaceflight on board the International Space Station (ISS). AIMS: To assess phenotypic and functional immune system alterations in astronauts participating in 6-month orbital spaceflight. Methods: Blood was collected before, during, and after flight from 23 astronauts participating in 6-month ISS expeditions. In-flight samples were returned to Earth within 48 h of collection for immediate analysis. Assays included peripheral leukocyte distribution, T-cell function, virus-specific immunity, and mitogen-stimulated cytokine production profiles. Results: Redistribution of leukocyte subsets occurred during flight, including an elevated white blood cell (WBC) count and alterations in CD8+ T-cell maturation. A reduction in general T-cell function (both CD4+ and CD8+) persisted for the duration of the 6-month spaceflights, with differential responses between mitogens suggesting an activation threshold shift. The percentage of CD4+ T cells capable of producing IL-2 was depressed after landing. Significant reductions in mitogen-stimulated production of IFNγ, IL-10, IL-5, TNFα, and IL-6 persisted during spaceflight. Following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation, production of IL-10 was reduced, whereas IL-8 production was increased during flight. Conclusions: The data indicated that immune alterations persist during long-duration spaceflight. This phenomenon, in the absence of appropriate countermeasures, has the potential to increase specific clinical risks for crewmembers during exploration-class deep space missions. PMID:28725716

  10. Particle field diagnose using angular multiplexing volume holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yu; Li, Zeren; Luo, Zhenxiong; Jun, Li; Zhong, Jie; Ye, Yan; Li, Shengfu; Zhu, Jianhua

    2017-08-01

    The problem of particle field diagnosing using holography can be met in many areas. But single frame hologram can only catch one moment of the fast event, which can't reveal the change process of an unrepeatable fast event. For events in different time-scale, different solution should be used. We did this work to record a laser induced particle field in the time-scale of tens of micron seconds. A laser of pulse sequence mode is applied to provide 10 pulses, the energy and time interval of whom is 150mJ and 1μs. Four pockels cells are employed to pick up the last four pulses for holographic recording, the other pulses are controlled to pre-expose the photopolymer based recording material, which can enhance photosensitivity of the photopolymer during the moment of holographic recording. The angular multiplexing technique and volume holography is accepted to avoid shifting the photopolymer between each shot. Another Q-switch YAG laser (pulse energy 100mJ, pulse width 10ns) is applied to produce the fast event. As a result, we successfully caught the motion process of the laser induced particle field. The time interval of each frame is 1μs, the angular range of the four references is 14°, and the diffraction efficiency of each hologram is less than 2%. After a basic analysis, this optical system could catch more holograms through a compact design.

  11. Non-relativistic holography and singular black hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Fengli; Wu Shangyu

    2009-01-01

    We provide a framework for non-relativistic holography so that a covariant action principle ensuring the Galilean symmetry for dual conformal field theory is given. This framework is based on the Bargmann lift of the Newton-Cartan gravity to the one-dimensional higher Einstein gravity, or reversely, the null-like Kaluza-Klein reduction. We reproduce the previous zero temperature results, and our framework provides a natural explanation about why the holography is co-dimension 2. We then construct the black hole solution dual to the thermal CFT, and find the horizon is curvature singular. However, we are able to derive the sensible thermodynamics for the dual non-relativistic CFT with correct thermodynamical relations. Besides, our construction admits a null Killing vector in the bulk such that the Galilean symmetry is preserved under the holographic RG flow. Finally, we evaluate the viscosity and find it zero if we neglect the back reaction of the singular horizon, otherwise, it could be non-zero.

  12. Digital Holography and Three-Dimensional Display Principles and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Poon, Ting-Chung

    2006-01-01

    About the Book Digital (or electronic) holography and its application to 3-D display is one of the formidable problems of evolving areas of high technology that has been receiving great attention in recent years. The realization of life-size interactive 3-D displays has been a seemingly unobtainable goal. Technology is not quite at that level yet, but advances in 3-D display now allow us to take important steps toward the achievement of this objective. The reader is presented with the state-of-the-art developments in both digital holography and 3-D display techniques. The book contains a large amount of research material as well as reviews, new ideas and insights that will be useful for graduate students, scientists, and engineers working in the field. About the Editor Ting-Chung Poon is a professor at Virgina Tech in the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, where he is also Director of the Optical Image Processing Laboratory. His research interests include acousto-optics, hybrid (optica...

  13. Advanced double-biprism holography with atomic resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genz, Florian, E-mail: florian.genz@physik.tu-berlin.de [Technische Universität Berlin, Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Straße des 17. Juni, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Niermann, Tore [Technische Universität Berlin, Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Straße des 17. Juni, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Buijsse, Bart; Freitag, Bert [FEI Company, Achtseweg Noord 5, 5651 GG Eindhoven (Netherlands); Lehmann, Michael [Technische Universität Berlin, Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Straße des 17. Juni, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    The optimum biprism position as suggested by Lichte (Ultramicroscopy 64 (1996) 79 [10]) was implemented into a state-of-the-art transmission electron microscope. For a setup optimized for atomic resolution holograms with a width of 30 nm and a fringe spacing of 30 pm, we investigated the practical improvements on hologram quality. The setup is additionally supplemented by a second biprism as suggested by Harada et al. (Applied Physics Letters 84 (2004) 3229 [12]). In order to estimate the possibilities and limitations of the double biprism setup, geometric optics arguments lead to calculation of the exploitable shadow width, necessary for strong reduction of biprism-induced artefacts. Additionally, we used the double biprism setup to estimate the biprism vibration, yielding the most stable imaging conditions with lowest overall fringe contrast damping. Electron holograms of GaN demonstrate the good match between experiment and simulation, also as a consequence of the improved stability. - Highlights: • Investigation of optimum biprism position implementation into state-of-the-art TEM. • Reduction of artefacts, especially vignetting in double-biprism electron holography. • Biprism vibration and most stable imaging conditions in double-biprism holography. • Demonstration of the optimized double-biprism setup using a thin GaN-foil.

  14. Probing Dense Sprays with Gated, Picosecond, Digital Particle Field Holography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Trolinger

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes work that demonstrated the feasibility of producing a gated digital holography system that is capable of producing high-resolution images of three-dimensional particle and structure details deep within dense particle fields of a spray. We developed a gated picosecond digital holocamera, using optical Kerr cell gating, to demonstrate features of gated digital holography that make it an exceptional candidate for this application. The Kerr cell gate shuttered the camera after the initial burst of ballistic and snake photons had been recorded, suppressing longer path, multiple scattered illumination. By starting with a CW laser without gating and then incorporating a picosecond laser and an optical Kerr gate, we were able to assess the imaging quality of the gated holograms, and determine improvement gained by gating. We produced high quality images of 50–200 μm diameter particles, hairs and USAF resolution charts from digital holograms recorded through turbid media where more than 98% of the light was scattered from the field. The system can gate pulses as short as 3 mm in pathlength (10 ps, enabling image-improving features of the system. The experiments lead us to the conclusion that this method has an excellent capability as a diagnostics tool in dense spray combustion research.

  15. Poor man’s holography: how far can it go?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Yu; Wu Xiaoning; Zhang Hongbao

    2013-01-01

    Almost a century ago, Einstein, after Newton, shed new light on gravity by claiming that gravity is geometry. There has been no deeper insight beyond that later on except the recent suspicion that gravity may also be holographic, dual to some sort of quantum field theory living on the boundary with one less dimension. Such a suspicion has been supported mainly by a variety of specific examples from string theory. This paper is intended to purport the holographic gravity from a different perspective. Namely, we shall show that such a holography can actually be observed by working merely within the context of Einstein’s gravity through promoting Brown–York’s formalism, where neither is the spacetime required to be asymptotically AdS nor the boundary to be located at conformal infinity, which also conforms to the spirit inherited from Wilson’s effective field theory. In particular, we show that our holography works remarkably well at least at the level of thermodynamics and hydrodynamics, where a perfect matching between the bulk gravity and boundary fluid is found for entropy and its production by the conserved current method. (paper)

  16. Holography and thermalization in optical pump-probe spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagrov, A.; Craps, B.; Galli, F.; Keränen, V.; Keski-Vakkuri, E.; Zaanen, J.

    2018-04-01

    Using holography, we model experiments in which a 2 +1 D strange metal is pumped by a laser pulse into a highly excited state, after which the time evolution of the optical conductivity is probed. We consider a finite-density state with mildly broken translation invariance and excite it by oscillating electric field pulses. At zero density, the optical conductivity would assume its thermalized value immediately after the pumping has ended. At finite density, pulses with significant dc components give rise to slow exponential relaxation, governed by a vector quasinormal mode. In contrast, for high-frequency pulses the amplitude of the quasinormal mode is strongly suppressed, so that the optical conductivity assumes its thermalized value effectively instantaneously. This surprising prediction may provide a stimulus for taking up the challenge to realize these experiments in the laboratory. Such experiments would test a crucial open question faced by applied holography: are its predictions artifacts of the large N limit or do they enjoy sufficient UV independence to hold at least qualitatively in real-world systems?

  17. A study on the dimensioning of flaws by acoustical holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Michio; Ando, Tomozumi; Enami, Koji; Yajima, Minoru; Fukui, Shigetaka.

    1978-01-01

    As a means of evaluating the safety of flawed pressure vessels and other structures against fracture, fracture mechanics has come to be applied. For the application of fracture mechanics it is necessary to get information concerning the sizes and shapes of flaws. The ultrasonic flaw detection method that is widely used as a nondestructive inspection method cannot measure the sizes and shapes of flaws accurately. Considering that acoustical holography is an useful means for the dimensioning of flaws, we performed basic tests on this method and obtained the following results: (1) The measured values of artificial flaws (flat bottom drilled holes: 5 - 36 mm) made on a steel plate of 150 mm thick showed a good linear relation with their actual sizes and scatter in the measured values was +-3 - 6 mm. (2) The measured values of fatigue cracks (length: 5 - 57 mm) introduced into a steel plate of 150 mm thick also showed a good linear relation with their actual sizes and scatter in the measured values was +-3 mm. (3) It was found that acoustical holography can also be applied to heavy section cast steels. (4) The method of correcting distortion caused by curved surface was investigated by computer-aided simulation and it was considered that such distortion can be corrected by radial scanning of a transducer. (author)

  18. Structural Design Requirements and Factors of Safety for Spaceflight Hardware: For Human Spaceflight. Revision A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Karen S.; Kujala, Rod; Fogt, Vince; Romine, Paul

    2011-01-01

    This document establishes the structural requirements for human-rated spaceflight hardware including launch vehicles, spacecraft and payloads. These requirements are applicable to Government Furnished Equipment activities as well as all related contractor, subcontractor and commercial efforts. These requirements are not imposed on systems other than human-rated spacecraft, such as ground test articles, but may be tailored for use in specific cases where it is prudent to do so such as for personnel safety or when assets are at risk. The requirements in this document are focused on design rather than verification. Implementation of the requirements is expected to be described in a Structural Verification Plan (SVP), which should describe the verification of each structural item for the applicable requirements. The SVP may also document unique verifications that meet or exceed these requirements with NASA Technical Authority approval.

  19. Evaluating Failures and near Misses in Human Spaceflight History for Lessons for Future Human Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    Studies done in the past have drawn on lessons learned with regard to human loss-of-life events. However, an examination of near-fatal accidents can be equally useful, not only in detecting causes, both proximate and systemic, but also for determining what factors averted disaster, what design decisions and/or operator actions prevented catastrophe. Binary pass/fail launch history is often used for risk, but this also has limitations. A program with a number of near misses can look more reliable than a consistently healthy program with a single out-of-family failure. Augmenting reliability evaluations with this near miss data can provide insight and expand on the limitations of a strictly pass/fail evaluation. This paper intends to show how near-miss lessons learned can provide crucial data for any new human spaceflight programs that are interested in sending man into space

  20. Personal growth following long-duration spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suedfeld, Peter; Brcic, Jelena; Johnson, Phyllis J.; Gushin, Vadim

    2012-10-01

    IntroductionSalutogenesis and posttraumatic growth represent personal growth and improved functioning as a result of experiencing major challenging events. These developments are not simply resilience (a return to a baseline level of well-being), but positive change in such characteristics as self-understanding, relations with others, personal values, and life goals. Space agencies and space psychologists, primarily concerned with deleterious effects and their countermeasures, have not paid much attention to such beneficial long-term aftereffects of spaceflight. PurposeTo document what changes veterans of the Soviet/Russian space program report as a consequence of their experiences. MethodTwenty retired male cosmonauts Mir and/or ISS cosmonauts filled out relevant self-report questionnaires. Results: Although there was little change in the relative rankings of a list of values, the scale showed an overall increase in the rated importance of all personal values, although only the increase in Self-Direction reached statistical significance. Responses to one of two post-space growth questionnaires based on the Post-Traumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI) were compared to the means of two comparison groups: 152 first-time mothers, and 926 respondents who had experienced various forms of trauma. The cosmonauts reported higher scores on the dimension of New Possibilities when compared to the new mothers and the traumatized group, and higher scores on Personal Strength and Overall PTG compared to the latter. Respondents who had spent more than a year in space, and those who flew on both Mir and ISS, were the most likely to report positive change in the domain Appreciation of Life. The other post-space career questionnaire reflected major changes in Perceptions of the Earth and of Space, and increases on a number of other dimensions, including New Possibilities and Changes in Daily Life, with positive scores that significantly exceeded the original report. DiscussionIt appears

  1. Launch Pad Escape System Design (Human Spaceflight)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Kelli

    2011-01-01

    A launch pad escape system for human spaceflight is one of those things that everyone hopes they will never need but is critical for every manned space program. Since men were first put into space in the early 1960s, the need for such an Emergency Escape System (EES) has become apparent. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has made use of various types of these EESs over the past 50 years. Early programs, like Mercury and Gemini, did not have an official launch pad escape system. Rather, they relied on a Launch Escape System (LES) of a separate solid rocket motor attached to the manned capsule that could pull the astronauts to safety in the event of an emergency. This could only occur after hatch closure at the launch pad or during the first stage of flight. A version of a LES, now called a Launch Abort System (LAS) is still used today for all manned capsule type launch vehicles. However, this system is very limited in that it can only be used after hatch closure and it is for flight crew only. In addition, the forces necessary for the LES/LAS to get the capsule away from a rocket during the first stage of flight are quite high and can cause injury to the crew. These shortcomings led to the development of a ground based EES for the flight crew and ground support personnel as well. This way, a much less dangerous mode of egress is available for any flight or ground personnel up to a few seconds before launch. The early EESs were fairly simple, gravity-powered systems to use when thing's go bad. And things can go bad very quickly and catastrophically when dealing with a flight vehicle fueled with millions of pounds of hazardous propellant. With this in mind, early EES designers saw such a passive/unpowered system as a must for last minute escapes. This and other design requirements had to be derived for an EES, and this section will take a look at the safety design requirements had to be derived for an EES, and this section will take a look at

  2. Issues And Concerns In The Presentation And Conception Of Commercial And Fine Art Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossette, Marie A.

    1987-06-01

    This paper will address the issues raised by the "commercialization" of holography that has taken place since the mid-1980's. The paper examines the range of these issues as they apply to the practise of fine-art holography, the author's area of expertise. The effect of mass-produced and readily available holograms on the public's perception of holographic art will be discussed in light of the presence of holographic images on credit cards and national magazine covers. A major portion of the paper will examine the specific issues raised by the commercialization and mass production of holographic art. These issues will centre on the professional, ethical and artistic implications of commercialized holography as they apply to the practice of fine art holography.

  3. Photoelectron and x-ray holography by contrast: enhancing image quality and dimensionality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fadley, C.S.; Zhao, L. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA (United States); Hove, M.A. van [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA (United States); Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Kaduwela, A.; Marchesini, S. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Omori, S. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Sony Corporation Semiconductor Network Company, Asahi-cho, Atsugi, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2001-11-26

    Three forms of electron or x-ray holography 'by contrast' are discussed: they all exploit small changes in diffraction conditions to improve image quality and/or extract additional information. Spin-polarized photoelectron holography subtracts spin-down from spin-up holograms so as to image the relative orientations of atomic magnetic moments around an emitter atom. Differential photoelectron holography subtracts holograms taken at slightly different energies so as to overcome the forward-scattering problem that normally degrades the three-dimensional imaging of atoms, particularly for emitter atoms that are part of a bulk substrate environment. Resonant x-ray fluorescence holography also subtracts holograms at slightly different energies, these being chosen above and below an absorption edge of a constituent atom, thus allowing the selective imaging of that type of atom, or what has been referred to as imaging 'in true colour'. (author)

  4. Feed particle size evaluation: conventional approach versus digital holography based image analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio Dell’Orto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the application of image analysis approach based on digital holography in defining particle size in comparison with the sieve shaker method (sieving method as reference method. For this purpose ground corn meal was analyzed by a sieve shaker Retsch VS 1000 and by image analysis approach based on digital holography. Particle size from digital holography were compared with results obtained by screen (sieving analysis for each of size classes by a cumulative distribution plot. Comparison between particle size values obtained by sieving method and image analysis indicated that values were comparable in term of particle size information, introducing a potential application for digital holography and image analysis in feed industry.

  5. Holography: Use in Training and Testing Drivers on the Road in Accident Avoidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Allan H.; Frey, Donnalyn

    1979-01-01

    Defines holography, identifies visual factors in driving and the techniques used in on-road visual presentations, and presents the design and testing of a holographic system for driver training. (RAO)

  6. A comparison of SONAH and IBEM for near-field acoustic holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Peter Møller

    2008-01-01

    Among the popular techniques for acoustic source identification in complex environments are the Statistically Optimal Near Acoustic Holography (SONAH) and the Inverse Boundary Element Method (IBEM). These two methods are quite different regarding the underlying assumptions and the practical...

  7. Numerical simulation study for atomic-resolution x-ray fluorescence holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Honglan; Gao Hongyi; Chen Jianwen; Xiong Shisheng; Xu Zhizhan; Wang Junyue; Zhu Peiping; Xian Dingchang

    2003-01-01

    Based on the principle of x-ray fluorescence holography, an iron single crystal model of a body-centred cubic lattice is numerically simulated. From the fluorescence hologram produced numerically, the Fe atomic images were reconstructed. The atomic images of the (001), (100), (010) crystallographic planes were consistent with the corresponding atomic positions of the model. The result indicates that one can obtain internal structure images of single crystals at atomic-resolution by using x-ray fluorescence holography

  8. Hydrothermal synthesis, off-axis electron holography and magnetic properties of Fe3O4 nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almeida, Trevor P.; Muxworthy, Adrian R.; Williams, Wyn

    2014-01-01

    The hydrothermal synthesis of Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) (<50 nm) from mixed FeCl3 / FeCl2 precursor solution at pH ~ 12 has been confirmed using complementary characterisation techniques of transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry. Off-axis electron holography allowed for visuali......The hydrothermal synthesis of Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) (holography allowed...

  9. Tomographical evaluation of multifrequency-holography data in the ultrasonic testing of cylindrical components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutzner, K.

    1986-01-01

    The data of multifrequency-holography on circle which were published in a previous paper were evaluated in a tomographical manner. For that the theoretical model which is the foundation of this measuring technique is converted into a Radon transform which can be inverted by standard methods. The results of this technique are compared with the results of the multifrequency-holography on circle. (orig./HP) [de

  10. The application of digital image plane holography technology to identify Chinese herbal medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huaying; Guo, Zhongjia; Liao, Wei; Zhang, Zhihui

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, the imaging technology of digital image plane holography to identify the Chinese herbal medicine is studied. The optical experiment system of digital image plane holography which is the special case of pre-magnification digital holography was built. In the record system, one is an object light by using plane waves which illuminates the object, and the other one is recording hologram by using spherical light wave as reference light. There is a Micro objective lens behind the object. The second phase factor which caus ed by the Micro objective lens can be eliminated by choosing the proper position of the reference point source when digital image plane holography is recorded by spherical light. In this experiment, we use the Lygodium cells and Onion cells as the object. The experiment results with Lygodium cells and Onion cells show that digital image plane holography avoid the process of finding recording distance by using auto-focusing approach, and the phase information of the object can be reconstructed more accurately. The digital image plane holography is applied to the microscopic imaging of cells more effectively, and it is suit to apply for the identify of Chinese Herbal Medicine. And it promotes the application of digital holographic in practice.

  11. Camera aboard 'Friendship 7' photographs John Glenn during spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    1962-01-01

    A camera aboard the 'Friendship 7' Mercury spacecraft photographs Astronaut John H. Glenn Jr. during the Mercury-Atlas 6 spaceflight (00302-3); Photographs Glenn as he uses a photometer to view the sun during sunsent on the MA-6 space flight (00304).

  12. Psychosocial and Psychophysiological Strain in Extended Spaceflight Simulation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šolcová, Iva

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 3 (2004), s. 179-186 ISSN 0039-3320 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA406/03/1168 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z7025918 Keywords : spaceflight simulation * enforced confinement * psychosocial burden Subject RIV: AN - Psychology Impact factor: 0.274, year: 2004

  13. Human Spaceflight: Activities for the Intermediate and Junior High Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartsfield, John W.; Hartsfield, Kendra J.

    Since its beginning, space science has created high interest and continues to prod the imagination of students. This activity packet, which has been designed to enhance the curriculum and challenge gifted students, contains background information on spaceflight as well as 24 interdisciplinary classroom activities, 3 crossword puzzles, and 3 word…

  14. Building a Shared Definitional Model of Long Duration Human Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, M.; Whitmire, A.; Sandoval, L.; Leveton, L.; Arias, D.

    2011-01-01

    In 1956, on the eve of human space travel Strughold first proposed a simple classification of the present and future stages of manned flight that identified key factors, risks and developmental stages for the evolutionary journey ahead. As we look to optimize the potential of the ISS as a gateway to new destinations, we need a current shared working definitional model of long duration human space flight to help guide our path. Initial search of formal and grey literature augmented by liaison with subject matter experts. Search strategy focused on both the use of term long duration mission and long duration spaceflight, and also broader related current and historical definitions and classification models of spaceflight. The related sea and air travel literature was also subsequently explored with a view to identifying analogous models or classification systems. There are multiple different definitions and classification systems for spaceflight including phase and type of mission, craft and payload and related risk management models. However the frequently used concepts of long duration mission and long duration spaceflight are infrequently operationally defined by authors, and no commonly referenced classical or gold standard definition or model of these terms emerged from the search. The categorization (Cat) system for sailing was found to be of potential analogous utility, with its focus on understanding the need for crew and craft autonomy at various levels of potential adversity and inability to gain outside support or return to a safe location, due to factors of time, distance and location.

  15. Machine Learning Approaches to Increasing Value of Spaceflight Omics Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, Diana

    2017-01-01

    The number of spaceflight bioscience mission opportunities is too small to allow all relevant biological and environmental parameters to be experimentally identified. Simulated spaceflight experiments in ground-based facilities (GBFs), such as clinostats, are each suitable only for particular investigations -- a rotating-wall vessel may be 'simulated microgravity' for cell differentiation (hours), but not DNA repair (seconds) -- and introduce confounding stimuli, such as motor vibration and fluid shear effects. This uncertainty over which biological mechanisms respond to a given form of simulated space radiation or gravity, as well as its side effects, limits our ability to baseline spaceflight data and validate mission science. Machine learning techniques autonomously identify relevant and interdependent factors in a data set given the set of desired metrics to be evaluated: to automatically identify related studies, compare data from related studies, or determine linkages between types of data in the same study. System-of-systems (SoS) machine learning models have the ability to deal with both sparse and heterogeneous data, such as that provided by the small and diverse number of space biosciences flight missions; however, they require appropriate user-defined metrics for any given data set. Although machine learning in bioinformatics is rapidly expanding, the need to combine spaceflight/GBF mission parameters with omics data is unique. This work characterizes the basic requirements for implementing the SoS approach through the System Map (SM) technique, a composite of a dynamic Bayesian network and Gaussian mixture model, in real-world repositories such as the GeneLab Data System and Life Sciences Data Archive. The three primary steps are metadata management for experimental description using open-source ontologies, defining similarity and consistency metrics, and generating testing and validation data sets. Such approaches to spaceflight and GBF omics data may

  16. Spaceflight and ageing: reflecting on Caenorhabditis elegans in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Yoko; Honda, Shuji; Narici, Marco; Szewczyk, Nathaniel J

    2014-01-01

    The prospect of space travel continues to capture the imagination. Several competing companies are now promising flights for the general population. Previously, it was recognized that many of the physiological changes that occur with spaceflight are similar to those seen with normal ageing. This led to the notion that spaceflight can be used as a model of accelerated ageing and raised concerns about the safety of individuals engaging in space travel. Paradoxically, however, space travel has been recently shown to be beneficial to some aspects of muscle health in the tiny worm Caenorhabditis elegans. C. elegans is a commonly used laboratory animal for studying ageing. C. elegans displays age-related decline of some biological processes observed in ageing humans, and about 35% of C. elegans' genes have human homologs. Space flown worms were found to have decreased expression of a number of genes that increase lifespan when expressed at lower levels. These changes were accompanied by decreased accumulation of toxic protein aggregates in ageing worms' muscles. Thus, in addition to spaceflight producing physiological changes that are similar to accelerated ageing, it also appears to produce some changes similar to delayed ageing. Here, we put forward the hypothesis that in addition to the previously well-appreciated mechanotransduction changes, neural and endocrine signals are altered in response to spaceflight and that these may have both negative (e.g. less muscle protein) and some positive consequences (e.g. healthier muscles), at least for invertebrates, with respect to health in space. Given that changes in circulating hormones are well documented with age and in astronauts, our view is that further research into the relationship between metabolic control, ageing, and adaptation to the environment should be productive in advancing our understanding of the physiology of both spaceflight and ageing.

  17. Clinical Herpes Zoster in Antarctica as a Model for Spaceflight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, David P; Brinley, Alaina A; Blue, Rebecca S; Gruschkus, Stephen K; Allen, Andrew T; Parazynski, Scott E

    2017-08-01

    Antarctica is a useful analog for spaceflight, as both environments are remote, isolated, and with limited resources. While previous studies have demonstrated increased asymptomatic viral shedding in both the Antarctic and spaceflight environments, clinical manifestations of reactivated viral disease have been less frequently identified. We sought to identify the incidence of clinical herpes zoster from viral reactivation in the Antarctic winter-over population. Medical records from the 2014 winter season were reviewed for the incidence of zoster in U.S. Antarctic personnel and then compared to the age-matched U.S. Five cases of clinical herpes zoster occurred in the Antarctic Station population of 204 persons, for an incidence of 33.3 per 1000 person-years vs. 3.2 per 1000 person-years in the general population. Four cases were in persons under age 40, yielding an incidence of 106.7 per 1000 person-years in persons ages 30-39 compared to an incidence of 2.0 per 1000 person-years in the same U.S. age group. Immune suppression due to the stressful Antarctic environment may have contributed to the increased incidence of herpes zoster in U.S. Antarctic personnel during the winter of 2014. Working and living in isolated, confined, and extreme environments can cause immune suppression, reactivating latent viruses and increasing viral shedding and symptomatic disease. Such changes have been observed in other austere environments, including spaceflight, suggesting that clinical manifestations of viral reactivation may be seen in future spaceflight.Reyes DP, Brinley AA, Blue RS, Gruschkus SK, Allen AT, Parazynski SE. Clinical herpes zoster in Antarctica as a model for spaceflight. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(8):784-788.

  18. Effects and Responses to Spaceflight in the Mouse Retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanello, Susana B.; Theriot, Corey; Westby, Christian; Boyle, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Several stress environmental factors are combined in a unique fashion during spaceflight, affecting living beings widely across their physiological systems. Recently, attention has been placed on vision changes in astronauts returning from long duration missions. Alterations include hyperoptic shift, globe flattening, choroidal folds and optic disc edema, which are probably associated with increased intracranial pressure. These observations justify a better characterization of the ocular health risks associated with spaceflight. This study investigates the impact of spaceflight on the biology of the mouse retina. Within a successful tissue sharing effort, eyes from albino Balb/cJ mice aboard STS-133 were collected for histological analysis and gene expression profiling of the retina at 1 and 7 days after landing. Both vivarium and AEM (Animal Enclosure Module) mice were used as ground controls. Oxidative stress-induced DNA damage was higher in the flight samples compared to controls on R+1, and decreased on R+7. A trend toward higher oxidative and cellular stress response gene expression was also observed on R+1 compared to AEM controls, and these levels decreased on R+7. Several genes coding for key antioxidant enzymes, namely, heme-oxygenase-1, peroxiredoxin, and catalase, were among those upregulated after flight. Likewise, NF B and TGFbeta1, were upregulated in one flight specimen that overall showed the most elevated oxidative stress markers on R+1. In addition, retinas from vivarium control mice evidenced higher oxidative stress markers, NF B and TGFbeta1, likely due to the more intense illumination in vivarium cages versus the AEM. These preliminary data suggest that spaceflight represents a source of environmental stress that translates into oxidative and cellular stress in the retina, which is partially reversible upon return to Earth. Further work is needed to dissect the contribution of the various spaceflight factors (microgravity, radiation) and to

  19. Spectroscopic imaging, diffraction, and holography with x-ray photoemission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-02-01

    X-ray probes are capable of determining the spatial structure of an atom in a specific chemical state, over length scales from about a micron all the way down to atomic resolution. Examples of these probes include photoemission microscopy, energy-dependent photoemission diffraction, photoelectron holography, and X-ray absorption microspectroscopy. Although the method of image formation, chemical-state sensitivity, and length scales can be very different, these X-ray techniques share a common goal of combining a capability for structure determination with chemical-state specificity. This workshop will address recent advances in holographic, diffraction, and direct imaging techniques using X-ray photoemission on both theoretical and experimental fronts. A particular emphasis will be on novel structure determinations with atomic resolution using photoelectrons

  20. Possibilities of NDT of fiber reinforced plastics with holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuetze, R.

    1978-01-01

    Holography offers several possibilities of non-destructive testing. The interference band pattern is always a measure of the deformation of a component. Apart from a merely qualitative location of defects, quantitative measurements of component deformation can help to find excess stresses or strains of defects. However, experimental stress analyses of this kind are futile unless the measured values are available in a very short time. For this reason, quantitative evaluation must be automatic. The first objective here is automatic counting of interference bands with the aid of photodiodes or a similar device. It would be desirable to arrive at a method where the automatically recorded measured values are processed by a computer which then draws a stress pattern of the component. (orig./RW) [de

  1. A survey of lasers at the birth of holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    The 50th anniversary of the first hologram made with laser light is an appropriate time to shine some light on the lasers that made it possible. Dubbed a solution looking for a problem , the laser emerged from industrial research labs as a new kind of light source for any application requiring coherence. Immediately commercialized by both start-up and well-established corporations, lasers sold in their first year of production left much to be desired but made a good first impression. Their second year of production saw technical improvements that met the requirements for practical holography, and by the end of 1963 were good enough to make holograms of three dimensional, deep and diffuse imagery. Mostly obsolete by the end of the 1960s, very few of the Kennedy era lasers have survived. This survey is intended to identify and celebrate them, so more may be preserved as they are found, to be admired in the future.

  2. Spectroscopic imaging, diffraction, and holography with x-ray photoemission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-02-01

    X-ray probes are capable of determining the spatial structure of an atom in a specific chemical state, over length scales from about a micron all the way down to atomic resolution. Examples of these probes include photoemission microscopy, energy-dependent photoemission diffraction, photoelectron holography, and X-ray absorption microspectroscopy. Although the method of image formation, chemical-state sensitivity, and length scales can be very different, these X-ray techniques share a common goal of combining a capability for structure determination with chemical-state specificity. This workshop will address recent advances in holographic, diffraction, and direct imaging techniques using X-ray photoemission on both theoretical and experimental fronts. A particular emphasis will be on novel structure determinations with atomic resolution using photoelectrons.

  3. Holography demonstrations and workshops for science and engineering outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Weston; Kruse, Kevin; Middlebrook, Christopher

    2012-10-01

    The SPIE/OSA Student Chapter at Michigan Technological University have developed demonstrations and workshops for science and engineering outreach. The practical approach to holography promotes the study of photonic related sciences in high school and college-aged students. An introduction to laser safety, optical laboratory practices, and basic laser coherence theory is given in order to first introduce the participants to the science behind the holograms. The students are then able to create a hologram of an item of their choice, personalizing the experience. By engaging directly, the students are able to see how the theory is applied and also enforces a higher level of attention from them so no mistakes are made in their hologram. Throughout the course participants gain an appreciation for photonics by learning how holograms operate and are constructed through hands on creation of their own holograms. This paper reviews the procedures and methods used in the demonstrations and workshop while examining the overall student experience.

  4. Quasi-three-dimensional particle imaging with digital holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemppinen, Osku; Heinson, Yuli; Berg, Matthew

    2017-05-01

    In this work, approximate three-dimensional structures of microparticles are generated with digital holography using an automated focus method. This is done by stacking a collection of silhouette-like images of a particle reconstructed from a single in-line hologram. The method enables estimation of the particle size in the longitudinal and transverse dimensions. Using the discrete dipole approximation, the method is tested computationally by simulating holograms for a variety of particles and attempting to reconstruct the known three-dimensional structure. It is found that poor longitudinal resolution strongly perturbs the reconstructed structure, yet the method does provide an approximate sense for the structure's longitudinal dimension. The method is then applied to laboratory measurements of holograms of single microparticles and their scattering patterns.

  5. Low photon count based digital holography for quadratic phase cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniraj, Inbarasan; Guo, Changliang; Malallah, Ra'ed; Ryle, James P; Healy, John J; Lee, Byung-Geun; Sheridan, John T

    2017-07-15

    Recently, the vulnerability of the linear canonical transform-based double random phase encryption system to attack has been demonstrated. To alleviate this, we present for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, a method for securing a two-dimensional scene using a quadratic phase encoding system operating in the photon-counted imaging (PCI) regime. Position-phase-shifting digital holography is applied to record the photon-limited encrypted complex samples. The reconstruction of the complex wavefront involves four sparse (undersampled) dataset intensity measurements (interferograms) at two different positions. Computer simulations validate that the photon-limited sparse-encrypted data has adequate information to authenticate the original data set. Finally, security analysis, employing iterative phase retrieval attacks, has been performed.

  6. Inelastic electron holography: First results with surface plasmons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falk, Roeder; Hannes, Lichte [Triebenberg Labor, Institute for Structure Physics, TU Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Inelastic interaction and wave optics seem to be incompatible in that inelastic processes destroy coherence, which is the fundamental requirement for holography. In special experiments it is shown that energy transfer larger than some undoubtedly destroys coherence of the inelastic electron with the elastic remainder. Consequently, the usual inelastic processes, such as phonon-, plasmon- or inner shell-excitations with energy transfer of several out to several, certainly produce incoherence with the elastic ones. However, it turned out that within the inelastic wave, *newborn* by the inelastic process, there is a sufficiently wide area of coherence for generating *inelastic holograms*. This is exploited to create holograms with electrons scattered at surface-plasmons, which opens up quantum mechanical investigation of these inelastic processes.

  7. Digital holography microscopy in 3D biologic samples analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricardo, J O; Palacios, F; Palacios, G F; Sanchez, A [Department of Physics, University of Oriente (Cuba); Muramatsu, M [Department of General Physics, University of Sao Paulo - Sao Paulo (Brazil); Gesualdi, M [Engineering center, Models and Applied Social Science, UFABC - Sao Paulo (Brazil); Font, O [Department of Bio-ingeniering, University of Oriente - Santiago de Cuba (Cuba); Valin, J L [Mechanics Department, ISPJAE, Habana (Cuba); Escobedo, M; Herold, S [Department of Computation, University of Oriente (Cuba); Palacios, D F, E-mail: frpalaciosf@gmail.com [Department of Nuclear physics, University of Simon BolIva (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2011-01-01

    In this work it is used a setup for Digital Holography Microscopy (MHD) for 3D biologic samples reconstruction. The phase contrast image reconstruction is done by using the Double propagation Method. The system was calibrated and tested by using a micrometric scale and pure phase object respectively. It was simulated the human red blood cell (erythrocyte) and beginning from the simulated hologram the digital 3D phase image for erythrocytes it was calculated. Also there was obtained experimental holograms of human erythrocytes and its corresponding 3D phase images, being evident the correspondence qualitative and quantitative between these characteristics in the simulated erythrocyte and in the experimentally calculated by DHM in both cases.

  8. Projecting non-diffracting waves with intermediate-plane holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Argha; Yevick, Aaron; Blackburn, Lauren C; Kanellakopoulos, Nikitas; Grier, David G

    2018-02-19

    We introduce intermediate-plane holography, which substantially improves the ability of holographic trapping systems to project propagation-invariant modes of light using phase-only diffractive optical elements. Translating the mode-forming hologram to an intermediate plane in the optical train can reduce the need to encode amplitude variations in the field, and therefore complements well-established techniques for encoding complex-valued transfer functions into phase-only holograms. Compared to standard holographic trapping implementations, intermediate-plane holograms greatly improve diffraction efficiency and mode purity of propagation-invariant modes, and so increase their useful non-diffracting range. We demonstrate this technique through experimental realizations of accelerating modes and long-range tractor beams.

  9. Shedding light on diatom photonics by means of digital holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Caprio, Giuseppe; Coppola, Giuseppe; De Stefano, Luca; De Stefano, Mario; Antonucci, Alessandra; Congestri, Roberta; De Tommasi, Edoardo

    2014-05-01

    Diatoms are among the dominant phytoplankters in the world's oceans, and their external silica investments, resembling artificial photonic crystals, are expected to play an active role in light manipulation. Digital holography allowed studying the interaction with light of Coscinodiscus wailesii cell wall reconstructing the light confinement inside the cell cytoplasm, condition that is hardly accessible via standard microscopy. The full characterization of the propagated beam, in terms of quantitative phase and intensity, removed a long-standing ambiguity about the origin of the light confinement. The data were discussed in the light of living cell behavior in response to their environment. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. High resolution integral holography using Fourier ptychographic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaohui; Zhang, Jianqi; Wang, Xiaorui; Liu, Delian

    2014-12-29

    An innovative approach is proposed for calculating high resolution computer generated integral holograms by using the Fourier Ptychographic (FP) algorithm. The approach initializes a high resolution complex hologram with a random guess, and then stitches together low resolution multi-view images, synthesized from the elemental images captured by integral imaging (II), to recover the high resolution hologram through an iterative retrieval with FP constrains. This paper begins with an analysis of the principle of hologram synthesis from multi-projections, followed by an accurate determination of the constrains required in the Fourier ptychographic integral-holography (FPIH). Next, the procedure of the approach is described in detail. Finally, optical reconstructions are performed and the results are demonstrated. Theoretical analysis and experiments show that our proposed approach can reconstruct 3D scenes with high resolution.

  11. Molecular photoelectron holography with circularly polarized laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weifeng; Sheng, Zhihao; Feng, Xingpan; Wu, Miaoli; Chen, Zhangjin; Song, Xiaohong

    2014-02-10

    We investigate the photoelectron momentum distribution of molecular-ion H2+driven by ultrashort intense circularly polarized laser pulses. Both numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) and a quasiclassical model indicate that the photoelectron holography (PH) with circularly polarized pulses can occur in molecule. It is demonstrated that the interference between the direct electron wave and rescattered electron wave from one core to its neighboring core induces the PH. Moreover, the results of the TDSE predict that there is a tilt angle between the interference pattern of the PH and the direction perpendicular to the molecular axis. Furthermore, the tilt angle is sensitively dependent on the wavelength of the driven circularly polarized pulse, which is confirmed by the quasiclassical calculations. The PH induced by circularly polarized laser pulses provides a tool to resolve the electron dynamics and explore the spatial information of molecular structures.

  12. On-Line Metrology with Conoscopic Holography: Beyond Triangulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Álvarez

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available On-line non-contact surface inspection with high precision is still an open problem. Laser triangulation techniques are the most common solution for this kind of systems, but there exist fundamental limitations to their applicability when high precisions, long standoffs or large apertures are needed, and when there are difficult operating conditions. Other methods are, in general, not applicable in hostile environments or inadequate for on-line measurement. In this paper we review the latest research in Conoscopic Holography, an interferometric technique that has been applied successfully in this kind of applications, ranging from submicrometric roughness measurements, to long standoff sensors for surface defect detection in steel at high temperatures.

  13. Direct phase retrieval in double blind Fourier holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz, Oren; Leshem, Ben; Miao, Jianwei; Nadler, Boaz; Oron, Dan; Dudovich, Nirit

    2014-10-20

    Phase measurement is a long-standing challenge in a wide range of applications, from X-ray imaging to astrophysics and spectroscopy. While in some scenarios the phase is resolved by an interferometric measurement, in others it is reconstructed via numerical optimization, based on some a-priori knowledge about the signal. The latter commonly use iterative algorithms, and thus have to deal with their convergence, stagnation, and robustness to noise. Here we combine these two approaches and present a new scheme, termed double blind Fourier holography, providing an efficient solution to the phase problem in two dimensions, by solving a system of linear equations. We present and experimentally demonstrate our approach for the case of lens-less imaging.

  14. Determination of localized visibility in off-axis electron holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLeod, Robert A.; Kupsta, Martin; Malac, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Off-axis electron holography is a wavefront-split interference method for the transmission electron microscope that allows the phase shift and amplitude of the electron wavefront to be separated and quantitatively measured. An additional, third component of the holographic signal is the coherence of the electron wavefront. Historically, wavefront coherence has been evaluated by measurement of the holographic fringe visibility (or contrast) based on the minimum and maximum intensity values. We present a method based on statistical moments is presented that allows allow the visibility to be measured in a deterministic and reproducible fashion suitable for quantitative analysis. We also present an algorithm, based on the Fourier-ratio method, which allows the visibility to be resolved in two-dimensions, which we term the local visibility. The local visibility may be used to evaluate the loss of coherence due to electron scattering within a specimen, or as an aid in image analysis and segmentation. The relationship between amplitude and visibility may be used to evaluate the composition and mass thickness of a specimen by means of a 2-D histogram. Results for a selection of elements (C, Al, Si, Ti, Cr, Cu, Ge, and Au) are provided. All presented visibility metrics are biased at low-dose conditions by the presence of shot-noise, for which we provide methods for empirical normalization to achieve linear response. - Highlights: • Report on a new statistical metric to determine holographic fringe visibility. • Adds new signal to electron holography: measure of electron coherence loss in 2-D. • Provide algorithm to calculate 2-D local visibility map. • Show that amplitude and visibility may be used for compositional analysis and segmentation. • Corrected for data bias such as shot noise

  15. Effects of Spaceflight on Cells of Bone Marrow Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engin Özçivici

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Once only a subject for science fiction novels, plans for establishing habitation on space stations, the Moon, and distant planets now appear among the short-term goals of space agencies. This article reviews studies that present biomedical issues that appear to challenge humankind for long-term spaceflights. With particularly focus on cells of bone marrow origin, studies involving changes in bone, immune, and red blood cell populations and their functions due to extended weightlessness were reviewed. Furthermore, effects of mechanical disuse on primitive stem cells that reside in the bone marrow were also included in this review. Novel biomedical solutions using space biotechnology will be required in order to achieve the goal of space exploration without compromising the functions of bone marrow, as spaceflight appears to disrupt homeostasis for all given cell types.

  16. The effect of spaceflight and microgravity on the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ombergen, Angelique; Demertzi, Athena; Tomilovskaya, Elena; Jeurissen, Ben; Sijbers, Jan; Kozlovskaya, Inessa B; Parizel, Paul M; Van de Heyning, Paul H; Sunaert, Stefan; Laureys, Steven; Wuyts, Floris L

    2017-10-01

    Microgravity, confinement, isolation, and immobilization are just some of the features astronauts have to cope with during space missions. Consequently, long-duration space travel can have detrimental effects on human physiology. Although research has focused on the cardiovascular and musculoskeletal system in particular, the exact impact of spaceflight on the human central nervous system remains to be determined. Previous studies have reported psychological problems, cephalic fluid shifts, neurovestibular problems, and cognitive alterations, but there is paucity in the knowledge of the underlying neural substrates. Previous space analogue studies and preliminary spaceflight studies have shown an involvement of the cerebellum, cortical sensorimotor, and somatosensory areas and the vestibular pathways. Extending this knowledge is crucial, especially in view of long-duration interplanetary missions (e.g., Mars missions) and space tourism. In addition, the acquired insight could be relevant for vestibular patients, patients with neurodegenerative disorders, as well as the elderly population, coping with multisensory deficit syndromes, immobilization, and inactivity.

  17. Pleurodeles Waltl Humoral Immune Response under Spaceflight Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bascove, Matthieu; Touche, Nadege; Frippiat, Jean-Pol

    2008-06-01

    The immune system is an important regulatory mechanism affected by spaceflights. In a previous work, we performed a first study of the humoral immune response induced by the immunization of Pleurodeles waltl during a 5 months stay onboard the Mir space station. This analysis indicated that heavy-chain variable domains of specific IgM are encoded by genes of the VHII and VHVI families. However, the contributions of these two families to IgM heavy-chains are different in flown animals [1]. To better understand this immune response modification, we have now determined how individual VH genes have been used to build specific IgM binding sites in animals immunized on earth or in space. This new study revealed quantitative and qualitative modifications in VH genes expression. These data confirm that a spaceflight might affect the humoral response.

  18. The elements of a commercial human spaceflight safety reporting system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Ian

    2017-10-01

    In its report on the SpaceShipTwo accident the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) included in its recommendations that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) ;in collaboration with the commercial spaceflight industry, continue work to implement a database of lessons learned from commercial space mishap investigations and encourage commercial space industry members to voluntarily submit lessons learned.; In its official response to the NTSB the FAA supported this recommendation and indicated it has initiated an iterative process to put into place a framework for a cooperative safety data sharing process including the sharing of lessons learned, and trends analysis. Such a framework is an important element of an overall commercial human spaceflight safety system.

  19. Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 in Long-Duration Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokhari, R.; Zwart, S. R.; Fields, E.; Heer, M.; Sibonga, J.; Smith, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Many nutritional factors influence bone, from the basics of calcium and vitamin D, to factors which influence bone through acid/base balance, including protein, sodium, and more. Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a recently identified factor, secreted from osteocytes, which is involved in classic (albeit complex) feedback loops controlling phosphorus homeostasis through both vitamin D and parathyroid hormone (PTH) (1, 2). As osteocytes are gravity sensing cells, it is important to determine if there are changes in FGF23 during spaceflight. In extreme cases, such as chronic kidney disease, FGF23 levels are highly elevated. FGF23 imbalances, secondary to dietary influences, may contribute to skeletal demineralization and kidney stone risk during spaceflight.

  20. Numerical twin image suppression by nonlinear segmentation mask in digital holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, ChoongSang; Choi, ByeongHo; Kang, HoonJong; Lee, SangKeun

    2012-09-24

    The in-line holography has obvious advantages especially in wider spatial bandwidth over the off-axis holography. However, a direct current(DC)-noise and an unwanted twin image should be separated or eliminated in the in-line holography for a high quality reconstruction. An approach for suppressing the twin image is proposed by separating the real and twin image regions in the digital holography. Specifically, the initial region of real and twin images is obtained by a blind separation matrix, and the segmentation mask to suppress the twin image is calculated by nonlinear quantization from the segmented image. For the performance evaluation, the proposed method is compared with the existing approaches including the overlapping block variance and manual-based schemes. Experimental results showed that the proposed method has a better performance at the overlapped region of the real and twin images. Additionally, the proposed method causes less loss of real image than the overlapping block variance-based scheme. Therefore, we believe that the proposed scheme can be a useful tool for high quality reconstruction in the in-line holography.

  1. Bone Loss During Spaceflight: Available Models and Counter-Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Jonathan; Bach, David; Geller, David

    2015-01-01

    There is ongoing concern for human health during spaceflights. Of particular interest is the uncoupling of bone remodeling and its resultant effect on calcium metabolism and bone loss. The calculated average loss of bone mineral density (BMD) is approximately 1-1.5% per month of spaceflight. The effect of decreased BMD on associated fractures in astronauts is not known. Currently on the International Space Station (ISS), bone loss is managed through dietary supplements and modifications and resistance exercise regimen. As the duration of space flights increases, a review of the current methods available for the prevention of bone loss is warranted. The goal of this project is to review and summarize recent studies that have focused on maintaining BMD during exposure to microgravity. Interventions were divided into physical (Table 1), nutritional (Table 2), or pharmacologic (Table 3) categories. Physical modalities included resistance exercise, low level vibration, and low intensity pulsed ultrasound. Nutritional interventions included altering protein, salt, and fat intake; and vitamin D supplementation. Pharmacologic interventions included the use of bisphosphonates and beta blockers. Studies reported outcomes based on bone density determined by DXA bone scan, micro-architecture of histology and microCT, and serum and urine markers of bone turnover. The ground analog models utilized to approximate osseous physiology in microgravity included human patients previously paralyzed or subjects confined to bedrest. Ground analog animal models include paralysis, immobilization and ovariectomies. As a result of the extensive research performed there is a multi-modality approach available for the management of BMD during spaceflight that includes resistance training, nutrition and dietary supplements. However, there is a paucity of literature describing a formalized tiered protocol to guide investigators through the progression from animal models to human patient ground

  2. Dysrhythmias in Laypersons During Centrifuge-Simulated Suborbital Spaceflight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Rahul; Blue, Rebecca S; Mathers, Charles H; Castleberry, Tarah L; Vanderploeg, James M

    2017-11-01

    There are limited data on cardiac dysrhythmias in laypersons during hypergravity exposure. We report layperson electrocardiograph (ECG) findings and tolerance of dysrhythmias during centrifuge-simulated suborbital spaceflight. Volunteers participated in varied-length centrifuge training programs of 2-7 centrifuge runs over 0.5-2 d, culminating in two simulated suborbital spaceflights of combined +Gz and +Gx (peak +4.0 Gz, +6.0 Gx, duration 5 s). Monitors recorded pre- and post-run mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), 6-s average heart rate (HR) collected at prespecified points during exposures, documented dysrhythmias observed on continuous 3-lead ECG, self-reported symptoms, and objective signs of intolerance on real-time video monitoring. Participating in the study were 148 subjects (43 women). Documented dysrhythmias included sinus pause (N = 5), couplet premature ventricular contractions (N = 4), bigeminy (N = 3), accelerated idioventricular rhythm (N = 1), and relative bradycardia (RB, defined as a transient HR drop of >20 bpm; N = 63). None were associated with subjective symptoms or objective signs of acceleration intolerance. Episodes of RB occurred only during +Gx exposures. Subjects had a higher post-run vs. pre-run MAP after all exposures, but demonstrated no difference in pre- and post-run HR. RB was more common in men, younger individuals, and subjects experiencing more centrifuge runs. Dysrhythmias in laypersons undergoing simulated suborbital spaceflight were well tolerated, though RB was frequently noted during short-duration +Gx exposure. No subjects demonstrated associated symptoms or objective hemodynamic sequelae from these events. Even so, heightened caution remains warranted when monitoring dysrhythmias in laypersons with significant cardiopulmonary disease or taking medications that modulate cardiac conduction.Suresh R, Blue RS, Mathers CH, Castleberry TL, Vanderploeg JM. Dysrhythmias in laypersons during centrifuge-stimulated suborbital

  3. Tolerance of centrifuge-simulated suborbital spaceflight by medical condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Rebecca S; Pattarini, James M; Reyes, David P; Mulcahy, Robert A; Garbino, Alejandro; Mathers, Charles H; Vardiman, Johnené L; Castleberry, Tarah L; Vanderploeg, James M

    2014-07-01

    We examined responses of volunteers with known medical disease to G forces in a centrifuge to evaluate how potential commercial spaceflight participants (SFPs) might tolerate the forces of spaceflight despite significant medical history. Volunteers were recruited based upon suitability for each of five disease categories (hypertension, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, lung disease, back or neck problems) or a control group. Subjects underwent seven centrifuge runs over 2 d. Day 1 consisted of two +G(z) runs (peak = +3.5 G(z), Run 2) and two +G(x), runs (peak = +6.0 G(x), Run 4). Day 2 consisted of three runs approximating suborbital spaceflight profiles (combined +G(x) and +G(z), peak = +6.0 G(x)/+4.0 G(z)). Data collected included blood pressure, electrocardiogram, pulse oximetry, neurovestibular exams, and post-run questionnaires regarding motion sickness, disorientation, grayout, and other symptoms. A total of 335 subjects registered for participation, of which 86 (63 men, 23 women, age 20-78 yr) participated in centrifuge trials. The most common causes for disqualification were weight and severe and uncontrolled medical or psychiatric disease. Five subjects voluntarily withdrew from the second day of testing: three for anxiety reasons, one for back strain, and one for time constraints. Maximum hemodynamic values recorded included HR of 192 bpm, systolic BP of 217 mmHg, and diastolic BP of 144 mmHg. Common subjective complaints included grayout (69%), nausea (20%), and chest discomfort (6%). Despite their medical history, no subject experienced significant adverse physiological responses to centrifuge profiles. These results suggest that most individuals with well-controlled medical conditions can withstand acceleration forces of launch and re-entry profiles of current commercial spaceflight vehicles.

  4. The Challenges and Achievements in 50 Years of Human Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Steven A.

    2012-01-01

    On April 12, 1961 the era of human spaceflight began with the orbital flight of Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin. On May 5, 1961 The United States responded with the launch of Alan Shepard aboard Freedom 7 on the first flight of Project Mercury. The focus of the first 20 years of human spaceflight was developing the fundamental operational capabilities and technologies required for a human mission to the Moon. The Mercury and Gemini Projects demonstrated launch and entry guidance, on-orbit navigation, rendezvous, extravehicular activity, and flight durations equivalent to a round-trip to the Moon. Heroes of this epoch included flight directors Chris Kraft, Gene Kranz, and Glynn Lunney along with astronauts like John Young, Jim Lovell, Tom Stafford, and Neil Armstrong. The "Race to the Moon” was eventually won by the United States with the landing of Apollo 11 on July 20, 1969. The Apollo program was truncated at 11 missions and a new system, the Space Shuttle, was developed which became the focus of the subsequent 30 years. Although never able to meet the flight rate or cost promises made in the 1970s, the Shuttle nevertheless left a remarkable legacy of accomplishment. The Shuttle made possible the launch and servicing of the Hubble Space Telescope and diverse activities such as life science research and classified national security missions. The Shuttle launched more than half the mass ever put into orbit and its heavy-lift capability and large payload bay enabled the on-orbit construction of the International Space Station. The Shuttle also made possible spaceflight careers for scientists who were not military test pilots - people like me. In this talk I will review the early years of spaceflight and share my experiences, including two missions with HST, from the perspective of a five-time flown astronaut and a senior flight operations manager.

  5. The catecholamine response to spaceflight: role of diet and gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, T. P.; Wade, C. E.

    2001-01-01

    Compared with men, women appear to have a decreased sympathetic nervous system (SNS) response to stress. The two manifestations where the sexual dimorphism has been the most pronounced involve the response of the SNS to fluid shifts and fuel metabolism during exercise. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether a similar sexual dimorphism was found in the response to spaceflight. To do so, we compared catecholamine excretion by male and female astronauts from two similar shuttle missions, Spacelab Life Sciences 1 (SLS1, 1991) and 2 (SLS2, 1993) for evidence of sexual dimorphism. To evaluate the variability of the catecholamine response in men, we compared catecholamine excretion from the two SLS missions against the 1996 Life and Microgravity Sciences Mission (LMS) and the 1973 Skylab missions. RESULTS: No gender- or mission-dependent changes were found with epinephrine. Separating out the SLS1/2 data by gender shows that norepinephrine excretion was essentially unchanged with spaceflight in women (98 +/- 10%; n = 3) and substantially decreased with the men (41 +/- 9%; n = 4, P gender-specific effects. We conclude that norepinephrine excretion during spaceflight is both mission and gender dependent. Men show the greater response, with at least three factors being involved, a response to microgravity, energy balance, and the ratio of carbohydrate to fat in the diet.

  6. Spaceflight Effects on Cytochrome P450 Content in Mouse Liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Moskaleva

    Full Text Available Hard conditions of long-term manned spaceflight can affect functions of many biological systems including a system of drug metabolism. The cytochrome P450 (CYP superfamily plays a key role in the drug metabolism. In this study we examined the hepatic content of some P450 isoforms in mice exposed to 30 days of space flight and microgravity. The CYP content was established by the mass-spectrometric method of selected reaction monitoring (SRM. Significant changes in the CYP2C29, CYP2E1 and CYP1A2 contents were detected in mice of the flight group compared to the ground control group. Within seven days after landing and corresponding recovery period changes in the content of CYP2C29 and CYP1A2 returned to the control level, while the CYP2E1 level remained elevated. The induction of enzyme observed in the mice in the conditions of the spaceflight could lead to an accelerated biotransformation and change in efficiency of pharmacological agents, metabolizing by corresponding CYP isoforms. Such possibility of an individual pharmacological response to medication during long-term spaceflights and early period of postflight adaptation should be taken into account in space medicine.

  7. Measurement of rabbit eardrum vibration through stroboscopic digital holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Greef, Daniël; Dirckx, Joris J. J. [University of Antwerp, Laboratory of BioMedical Physics, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2014-05-27

    In this work, we present a setup for high-power single shot stroboscopic digital holography and demonstrate it in an application on rabbit eardrum vibration measurement. The setup is able to make full-field time-resolved measurements of vibrating surfaces with a precision in the nanometer range in a broad frequency range. The height displacement of the measured object is visualized over the entire surface as a function of time. Vibration magnitude and phase maps can be extracted from these data, the latter proving to be very useful to reveal phase delays across the surface. Such deviations from modal motion indicate energy losses due to internal damping, in contrast to purely elastic mechanics. This is of great interest in middle ear mechanics and finite element modelling. In our setup, short laser pulses are fired at selected instants within the surface vibration period and are recorded by a CCD camera. The timing of the pulses and the exposure of the camera are synchronized to the vibration phase by a microprocessor. The high-power frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser produces pulses containing up to 5 mJ of energy, which is amply sufficient to record single-shot holograms. As the laser pulse length is 8 ns and the smallest time step of the trigger electronics is 1 μs, vibration measurements of frequencies up to 250 kHz are achievable through this method, provided that the maximum vibration amplitude exceeds a few nanometers. In our application, middle ear mechanics, measuring frequencies extend from 5 Hz to 20 kHz. The experimental setup will be presented, as well as results of measurements on a stretched circular rubber membrane and a rabbit's eardrum. Two of the challenges when measuring biological tissues, such as the eardrum, are low reflectivity and fast dehydration. To increase reflectivity, a coating is applied and to counteract the undesirable effects of tissue dehydration, the measurement setup and software have been optimized for speed without

  8. ARG1 Functions in the Physiological Adaptation of Undifferentiated Plant Cells to Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupanska, Agata K.; Schultz, Eric R.; Yao, JiQiang; Sng, Natasha J.; Zhou, Mingqi; Callaham, Jordan B.; Ferl, Robert J.; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2017-11-01

    Scientific access to spaceflight and especially the International Space Station has revealed that physiological adaptation to spaceflight is accompanied or enabled by changes in gene expression that significantly alter the transcriptome of cells in spaceflight. A wide range of experiments have shown that plant physiological adaptation to spaceflight involves gene expression changes that alter cell wall and other metabolisms. However, while transcriptome profiling aptly illuminates changes in gene expression that accompany spaceflight adaptation, mutation analysis is required to illuminate key elements required for that adaptation. Here we report how transcriptome profiling was used to gain insight into the spaceflight adaptation role of Altered response to gravity 1 (Arg1), a gene known to affect gravity responses in plants on Earth. The study compared expression profiles of cultured lines of Arabidopsis thaliana derived from wild-type (WT) cultivar Col-0 to profiles from a knock-out line deficient in the gene encoding ARG1 (ARG1 KO), both on the ground and in space. The cell lines were launched on SpaceX CRS-2 as part of the Cellular Expression Logic (CEL) experiment of the BRIC-17 spaceflight mission. The cultured cell lines were grown within 60 mm Petri plates in Petri Dish Fixation Units (PDFUs) that were housed within the Biological Research In Canisters (BRIC) hardware. Spaceflight samples were fixed on orbit. Differentially expressed genes were identified between the two environments (spaceflight and comparable ground controls) and the two genotypes (WT and ARG1 KO). Each genotype engaged unique genes during physiological adaptation to the spaceflight environment, with little overlap. Most of the genes altered in expression in spaceflight in WT cells were found to be Arg1-dependent, suggesting a major role for that gene in the physiological adaptation of undifferentiated cells to spaceflight.

  9. Application of acoustical holography for construction shadow images in ultrasonic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutzner, J.; Zimpfer, J.

    1977-01-01

    The full-scale, three-dimensional presentation of material defects by means of acoustical holography is limited on the one hand by an insufficient resolving power in depth of the procedure and, on the other hand, by the fact that the defects of the material to be examined often reflect mirror-like. Examined is the possible range of reducing these limitations by means of constructing shadow images of defects in ultrasonic testing without - as it is usually done - reconstructing the sonic field reflected by the flow but reconstructing the sonic field diffracted at the flow by means of acoustical holography. It has been shown that acoustical holography, during which the amplitude information is always analyzed as well as - on principle - the phase information, improves the efficiency of ultrasonic testing to a large extent. (orig.) [de

  10. Observation of atomic arrangement by using photoelectron holography and atomic stereo-photograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, Tomohiro; Guo, Fang Zhun; Agui, Akane; Matsui, Fumihiko; Daimon, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    Both a photoelectron holography and atomic stereo-photograph are the atomic structure analysis methods on the basis of photoelectron diffraction. They have six special features such as 1) direct determination of atomic structure, 2) measurement of three dimensional atomic arrangements surrounding of specific element in the sample, 3) determination of position of atom in spite of electron cloud, 4) unnecessary of perfect periodic structure, 5) good sensitivity of structure in the neighborhood of surface and 6) information of electron structure. Photoelectron diffraction, the principle and measurement system of photoelectron holography and atomic stereo-photograph is explained. As application examples of atomic stereo-photograph, the single crystal of cupper and graphite are indicated. For examples of photoelectron holography, Si(001)2p and Ge(001)3s are explained. (S.Y.)

  11. In-line digital holography with phase-shifting Greek-ladder sieves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jing; Zhang, Junyong; Zhang, Yanli; Zhou, Shenlei; Zhu, Jianqiang

    2018-04-01

    Phase shifting is the key technique in in-line digital holography, but traditional phase shifters have their own limitations in short wavelength regions. Here, phase-shifting Greek-ladder sieves with amplitude-only modulation are introduced into in-line digital holography, which are essentially a kind of diffraction lens with three-dimensional array diffraction-limited foci. In the in-line digital holographic experiment, we design two kinds of sieves by lithography and verify the validity of their phase-shifting function by measuring a 1951 U.S. Air Force resolution test target and three-dimensional array foci. With advantages of high resolving power, low cost, and no limitations at shorter wavelengths, phase-shifting Greek-ladder sieves have great potential in X-ray holography or biochemical microscopy for the next generation of synchrotron light sources.

  12. Cave Holography – Out of the lab and under the ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klayer, J

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the combination of my hobbies, caving and holography. Most traditional holography involves bringing the objects to a lab with all the necessary holography equipment mounted on a stable table. I instead bring all the equipment assembled as a portable unit to the natural formations in a cave with the cave itself being the stable table. The first successes were Denisyuks made with a HeNe or laser diode and spatial filter mounted on a tripod. For greater depth, transmission holograms were made with a DPSS laser in several configurations sometimes using fiber optics to route the reference beam and sometimes a spatial filter and mirrors. The cave environment presents unique obstacles that have been overcome as evidenced by the beautiful holograms made.

  13. Photorefractive and computational holography in the experimental generation of Airy beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Rafael A. B.; Vieira, Tarcio A.; Yepes, Indira S. V.; Gesualdi, Marcos R. R.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we present the experimental generation of Airy beams via computational and photorefractive holography. Experimental generation of Airy beams using conventional optical components presents several difficulties and a practically infeasible. Thus, the optical generation of Airy beams has been made from the optical reconstruction of a computer generated hologram implemented by a spatial light modulator. In the photorefractive holography technique, being used for the first time to our knowledge, the hologram of an Airy beam is constructed (recorded) and reconstructed (read) optically in a nonlinear photorefractive medium. The Airy beam experimental realization was made by a setup of computational and photorefractive holography using a photorefractive Bi12 TiO20 crystal as holographic recording medium. Airy beams and Airy beam arrays were obtained experimentally in accordance with the predicted theory; with excellent prospects for applications in optical trapping and optical communications systems.

  14. Imaging live humans through smoke and flames using far-infrared digital holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, M; Pugliese, E; Paturzo, M; Bianco, V; Finizio, A; Pelagotti, A; Poggi, P; Miccio, L; Meucci, R; Ferraro, P

    2013-03-11

    The ability to see behind flames is a key challenge for the industrial field and particularly for the safety field. Development of new technologies to detect live people through smoke and flames in fire scenes is an extremely desirable goal since it can save human lives. The latest technologies, including equipment adopted by fire departments, use infrared bolometers for infrared digital cameras that allow users to see through smoke. However, such detectors are blinded by flame-emitted radiation. Here we show a completely different approach that makes use of lensless digital holography technology in the infrared range for successful imaging through smoke and flames. Notably, we demonstrate that digital holography with a cw laser allows the recording of dynamic human-size targets. In this work, easy detection of live, moving people is achieved through both smoke and flames, thus demonstrating the capability of digital holography at 10.6 μm.

  15. Partition calculation for zero-order and conjugate image removal in digital in-line holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lihong; Wang, Hui; Li, Yong; Jin, Hongzhen

    2012-01-16

    Conventional digital in-line holography requires at least two phase-shifting holograms to reconstruct an original object without zero-order and conjugate image noise. We present a novel approach in which only one in-line hologram and two intensity values (namely the object wave intensity and the reference wave intensity) are required. First, by subtracting the two intensity values the zero-order diffraction can be completely eliminated. Then, an algorithm, called partition calculation, is proposed to numerically remove the conjugate image. A preliminary experimental result is given to confirm the proposed method. The method can simplify the procedure of phase-shifting digital holography and improve the practical feasibility for digital in-line holography.

  16. Investigations of the efficiency of acoustical holography especially in comparison to focussed beams in NDT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the project, the basic knowledge for the practicable application of the linear acoustical holography has been developed. For the application and construction of focusing probes the most important parameters have been determined. The activities for the holography with numerical construction have been concentrated on the reconstruction procedure, the probes, the manipulation and the external controle of time gates. The optimal parameters for holographic scannings have been determined. Practical experiences are showing an acceptable agreement between reconstruction and real flaw sizes, depending on the kind and position of the flaws. The acoustical holography seems to be especially suited for the determination of flaw extensions in depth whereas focusing probes can be applied with more advantage for the extensions in length. (orig.) [de

  17. Effect of Spaceflight on the Circadian Rhythm, Lifespan and Gene Expression of Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kanyan

    2015-01-01

    Space travelers are reported to experience circadian rhythm disruption during spaceflight. However, how the space environment affects circadian rhythm is yet to be determined. The major focus of this study was to investigate the effect of spaceflight on the Drosophila circadian clock at both the behavioral and molecular level. We used China’s Shenzhou-9 spaceship to carry Drosophila. After 13 days of spaceflight, behavior tests showed that the flies maintained normal locomotor activity rhythm and sleep pattern. The expression level and rhythm of major clock genes were also unaffected. However, expression profiling showed differentially regulated output genes of the circadian clock system between space flown and control flies, suggesting that spaceflight affected the circadian output pathway. We also investigated other physiological effects of spaceflight such as lipid metabolism and lifespan, and searched genes significantly affected by spaceflight using microarray analysis. These results provide new information on the effects of spaceflight on circadian rhythm, lipid metabolism and lifespan. Furthermore, we showed that studying the effect of spaceflight on gene expression using samples collected at different Zeitgeber time could obtain different results, suggesting the importance of appropriate sampling procedures in studies on the effects of spaceflight. PMID:25798821

  18. Effect of spaceflight on the circadian rhythm, lifespan and gene expression of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingling Ma

    Full Text Available Space travelers are reported to experience circadian rhythm disruption during spaceflight. However, how the space environment affects circadian rhythm is yet to be determined. The major focus of this study was to investigate the effect of spaceflight on the Drosophila circadian clock at both the behavioral and molecular level. We used China's Shenzhou-9 spaceship to carry Drosophila. After 13 days of spaceflight, behavior tests showed that the flies maintained normal locomotor activity rhythm and sleep pattern. The expression level and rhythm of major clock genes were also unaffected. However, expression profiling showed differentially regulated output genes of the circadian clock system between space flown and control flies, suggesting that spaceflight affected the circadian output pathway. We also investigated other physiological effects of spaceflight such as lipid metabolism and lifespan, and searched genes significantly affected by spaceflight using microarray analysis. These results provide new information on the effects of spaceflight on circadian rhythm, lipid metabolism and lifespan. Furthermore, we showed that studying the effect of spaceflight on gene expression using samples collected at different Zeitgeber time could obtain different results, suggesting the importance of appropriate sampling procedures in studies on the effects of spaceflight.

  19. Gravity in mammalian organ development: differentiation of cultured lung and pancreas rudiments during spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooner, B. S.; Hardman, P.; Paulsen, A.

    1994-01-01

    Organ culture of embryonic mouse lung and pancreas rudiments has been used to investigate development and differentiation, and to assess the effects of microgravity on culture differentiation, during orbital spaceflight of the shuttle Endeavour (mission STS-54). Lung rudiments continue to grow and branch during spaceflight, an initial result that should allow future detailed study of lung morphogenesis in microgravity. Cultured embryonic pancreas undergoes characteristic exocrine acinar tissue and endocrine islet tissue differentiation during spaceflight, and in ground controls. The rudiments developing in the microgravity environment of spaceflight appear to grow larger than their ground counterparts, and they may have differentiated more rapidly than controls, as judged by exocrine zymogen granule presence.

  20. Effects of spaceflight on the immunoglobulin repertoire of unimmunized C57BL/6 mice

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spaceflight has been shown to suppress the adaptive immune response altering the distribution and function of lymphocyte populations. B lymphocytes express highly...

  1. Comparison of the spaceflight transcriptome of four commonly used Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This experiment compared the spaceflight transcriptomes of four commonly used natural variants (ecotypes) of Arabidopsis thaliana using RNAseq. In nature Arabidopsis...

  2. ELECTRON HOLOGRAPHY OF ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS - RECENT THEORETICAL ADVANCES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BELEGGIA,M.; POZZI, G.; TONOMURA, A.

    2007-01-01

    It has been shown in this work that the Fourier space approach can be fruitfully applied to the calculation of the fields and the associated electron optical phase shift of several magnetic and electrostatic structures, like superconducting vortices in conventional and high-T{sub c} superconductors, reverse biased p-n junctions, magnetic domains and nanoparticles. In all these cases, this novel approach has led to unexpected but extremely interesting results, very often expressed in analytical form, which allow the quantitative and reliable interpretation of the experimental data collected by means of electron holography or of more conventional Lorentz microscopy techniques. Moreover, it is worth recalling that whenever long-range electromagnetic fields are involved, a physical model of the object under investigation is necessary in order to take into account correctly the perturbation of the reference wave induced by the tail of the field protruding into the vacuum. For these reasons, we believe that the Fourier space approach for phase computations we have introduced and discussed in this chapter will represent an invaluable tool for the investigation of electromagnetic fields at the meso- and nano-scale.

  3. Light-Front Holography and AdS/QCD Correspondence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.

    2008-04-23

    Light-Front Holography is a remarkable consequence of the correspondence between string theory in AdS space and conformal field theories in physical-space time. It allows string modes {Phi}(z) in the AdS fifth dimension to be precisely mapped to the light-front wavefunctions of hadrons in terms of a specific light-front impact variable {zeta} which measures the separation of the quark and gluonic constituents within the hadron. This mapping was originally obtained by matching the exact expression for electromagnetic current matrix elements in AdS space with the corresponding exact expression for the current matrix element using light-front theory in physical space-time. More recently we have shown that one obtains the identical holographic mapping using matrix elements of the energy-momentum tensor, thus providing an important consistency test and verification of holographic mapping from AdS to physical observables defined on the light-front. The resulting light-front Schrodinger equations predicted from AdS/QCD give a good representation of the observed meson and baryon spectra and give excellent phenomenological predictions for amplitudes such as electromagnetic form factors and decay constants.

  4. Digital reflection holography based systems development for MEMS testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vijay Raj; Liansheng, Sui; Asundi, Anand

    2010-05-01

    MEMS are tiny mechanical devices that are built onto semiconductor chips and are measured in micrometers and nanometers. Testing of MEMS device is an important part in carrying out their functional assessment and reliability analysis. Development of systems based on digital holography (DH) for MEMS inspection and characterization is presented in this paper. Two DH reflection systems, table-top and handheld types, are developed depending on the MEMS measurement requirements and their capabilities are presented. The methodologies for the systems are developed for 3D profile inspection and static & dynamic measurements, which is further integrated with in-house developed software that provides the measurement results in near real time. The applications of the developed systems are demonstrated for different MEMS devices for 3D profile inspection, static deformation/deflection measurements and vibration analysis. The developed systems are well suitable for the testing of MEMS and Microsystems samples, with full-field, static & dynamic inspection as well as to monitor micro-fabrication process.

  5. Photoelectron diffraction and holography: Present status and future prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fadley, C.S. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Thevuthasan, S. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Kaduwela, A.P. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1993-07-01

    Photoelectron diffraction and photoelectron holography, a newly developed variant of it, can provide a rich range of information concerning surface structure. These methods are sensitive to atomic type, chemical state, and spin state. The theoretical prediction of diffraction patterns is also well developed at both the single scattering and multiple scattering levels, and quantitative fits of experiment to theory can lead to structures with accuracies in the {plus_minus}0.03 {Angstrom} range. Direct structural information can also be derived from forward scattering in scanned-angle measurements at higher energies, path length differences contained in scanned-energy data at lower energies, and holographic inversions of data sets spanning some region in angle and energy space. Diffraction can also affect average photoelectron emission depths. Circular dichroism in core-level emission can be fruitfully interpreted in terms of photoelectron diffraction theory, as can measurements with spin-resolved core-spectra, and studies of surface magnetic structures and phase transitions should be possible with these methods. Synchrotron radiation is a key element of fully utilizing these techniques.

  6. How hummingbirds hum: Acoustic holography of hummingbirds during maneuvering flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hightower, Ben; Wijnings, Patrick; Ingersoll, Rivers; Chin, Diana; Scholte, Rick; Lentink, David

    2017-11-01

    Hummingbirds make a characteristic humming sound when they flap their wings. The physics and the biological significance of hummingbird aeroacoustics is still poorly understood. We used acoustic holography and high-speed cameras to determine the acoustic field of six hummingbirds while they either hovered stationary in front of a flower or maneuvered to track flower motion. We used a robotic flower that oscillated either laterally or longitudinally with a linear combination of 20 different frequencies between 0.2 and 20 Hz, a range that encompasses natural flower vibration frequencies in wind. We used high-speed marker tracking to dissect the transfer function between the moving flower, the head, and body of the bird. We also positioned four acoustic arrays equipped with 2176 microphones total above, below, and in front of the hummingbird. Acoustic data from the microphones were back-propagated to planes adjacent to the hummingbird to create the first real-time holograms of the pressure field a hummingbird generates in vivo. Integration of all this data offers insight into how hummingbirds modulate the acoustic field during hovering and maneuvering flight.

  7. Inspection using high resolution holography of large volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tozer, B.A.; Webster, J.M.

    With a potential information storage density of 10 16 bits/m 2 , the ability to reconstruct in 3 dimensions, extremely wide angle of view, and potentially diffraction limited resolution, holography should be invaluable for the optical inspection and recording of normally inaccessible regions of nuclear power stations. This paper describes some possible applications and reviews a variety of practical problems which must be overcome if the potential is to be realised. Microscopic analysis of reconstructed real images of whole structures, recorded on a single photographic plate can be carried out at leisure to reveal cracks not visible to the naked eye on the original subject. Holograms of AGR fuel elements show a depth of field greater than the length of the element, with a resolution of about 10 μm at the nearest point and better than 300 μm on the rear grid being obtainable from one hologram. Factors limiting resolution, quality and reliability of holograms are discussed and some results presented which indicate the present boundaries of practical achievement in this promising field. (author)

  8. Resurgence and hydrodynamic attractors in Gauss-Bonnet holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge; Gushterov, Nikola I.; Meiring, Ben

    2018-04-01

    We study the convergence of the hydrodynamic series in the gravity dual of Gauss-Bonnet gravity in five dimensions with negative cosmological constant via holography. By imposing boost invariance symmetry, we find a solution to the Gauss-Bonnet equation of motion in inverse powers of the proper time, from which we can extract high order corrections to Bjorken flow for different values of the Gauss-Bonnet parameter λGB. As in all other known examples the gradient expansion is, at most, an asymptotic series which can be understood through applying the techniques of Borel-Padé summation. As expected from the behaviour of the quasi-normal modes in the theory, we observe that the singularities in the Borel plane of this series show qualitative features that interpolate between the infinitely strong coupling limit of N=4 Super Yang Mills theory and the expectation from kinetic theory. We further perform the Borel resummation to constrain the behaviour of hydrodynamic attractors beyond leading order in the hydrodynamic expansion. We find that for all values of λGB considered, the convergence of different initial conditions to the resummation and its hydrodynamization occur at large and comparable values of the pressure anisotropy.

  9. Holography and quantum states in elliptic de Sitter space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halpern, Illan F. [Department of Physics, University of California,Berkeley, CA, 94720 (United States); Neiman, Yasha [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics,31 Caroline Street N, Waterloo, ON, N2L 2Y5 (Canada)

    2015-12-10

    We outline a program for interpreting the higher-spin dS/CFT model in terms of physics in the causal patch of a dS observer. The proposal is formulated in “elliptic” de Sitter space dS{sub 4}/ℤ{sub 2}, obtained by identifying antipodal points in dS{sub 4}. We discuss recent evidence that the higher-spin model is especially well-suited for this, since the antipodal symmetry of bulk solutions has a simple encoding on the boundary. For context, we test some other (free and interacting) theories for the same property. Next, we analyze the notion of quantum field states in the non-time-orientable dS{sub 4}/ℤ{sub 2}. We compare the physics seen by different observers, with the outcome depending on whether they share an arrow of time. Finally, we implement the marriage between higher-spin holography and observers in dS{sub 4}/ℤ{sub 2}, in the limit of free bulk fields. We succeed in deriving an observer’s operator algebra and Hamiltonian from the CFT, but not her S-matrix. We speculate on the extension of this to interacting higher-spin theory.

  10. Refocusing criterion via sparsity measurements in digital holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memmolo, Pasquale; Paturzo, Melania; Javidi, Bahram; Netti, Paolo A; Ferraro, Pietro

    2014-08-15

    Several automatic approaches have been proposed in the past to compute the refocus distance in digital holography (DH). However most of them are based on a maximization or minimization of a suitable amplitude image contrast measure, regarded as a function of the reconstruction distance parameter. Here we show that, by using the sparsity measure coefficient regarded as a refocusing criterion in the holographic reconstruction, it is possible to recover the focus plane and, at the same time, establish the degree of sparsity of digital holograms, when samples of the diffraction Fresnel propagation integral are used as a sparse signal representation. We employ a sparsity measurement coefficient known as Gini's index thus showing for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, its application in DH, as an effective refocusing criterion. Demonstration is provided for different holographic configurations (i.e., lens and lensless apparatus) and for completely different objects (i.e., a thin pure phase microscopic object as an in vitro cell, and macroscopic puppets) preparation.

  11. Digital Holography, a metrological tool for quantitative analysis: Trends and future applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paturzo, Melania; Pagliarulo, Vito; Bianco, Vittorio; Memmolo, Pasquale; Miccio, Lisa; Merola, Francesco; Ferraro, Pietro

    2018-05-01

    A review on the last achievements of Digital Holography is reported in this paper, showing that this powerful method can be a key metrological tool for the quantitative analysis and non-invasive inspection of a variety of materials, devices and processes. Nowadays, its range of applications has been greatly extended, including the study of live biological matter and biomedical applications. This paper overviews the main progresses and future perspectives of digital holography, showing new optical configurations and investigating the numerical issues to be tackled for the processing and display of quantitative data.

  12. Supersonic acoustic intensity with statistically optimized near-field acoustic holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Grande, Efren; Jacobsen, Finn

    2011-01-01

    The concept of supersonic acoustic intensity was introduced some years ago for estimating the fraction of the flow of energy radiated by a source that propagates to the far field. It differs from the usual (active) intensity by excluding the near-field energy resulting from evanescent waves...... to the information provided by the near-field acoustic holography technique. This study proposes a version of the supersonic acoustic intensity applied to statistically optimized near-field acoustic holography (SONAH). The theory, numerical results and an experimental study are presented. The possibility of using...

  13. Atomic resolution electrostatic potential mapping of graphene sheets by off-axis electron holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, David, E-mail: david.cooper@cea.fr [University Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054, Grenoble (France); Pan, Cheng-Ta; Haigh, Sarah [School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-21

    Off-axis electron holography has been performed at atomic resolution with the microscope operated at 80 kV to provide electrostatic potential maps from single, double, and triple layer graphene. These electron holograms have been reconstructed in order to obtain information about atomically resolved and mean inner potentials. We propose that off-axis electron holography can now be used to measure the electrical properties in a range of two-dimensional semiconductor materials and three dimensional devices comprising stacked layers of films to provide important information about their electrical properties.

  14. Electron holography studies of the charge on dislocations in GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherns, D.; Jiao, C.G.; Mokhtari, H. [H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Cai, J.; Ponce, F.A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ85287 (United States)

    2002-12-01

    The measurement of charge on dislocations in GaN by electron holography is described. Recent results are presented showing that edge dislocations in n-doped GaN are highly negatively charged, whereas those in p-doped GaN are positively charged. It is shown that the results are consistent with a model which assumes Fermi level pinning at dislocation states about 2.5 V below the conduction band edge. The application of electron holography to screw dislocations, and the dependence of the observations on the dislocation core structure, are also discussed. (Abstract Copyright [2002], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  15. Split-illumination electron holography for improved evaluation of electrostatic potential associated with electrophotography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanigaki, Toshiaki, E-mail: tanigaki-toshiaki@riken.jp; Aizawa, Shinji; Soon Park, Hyun [Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), RIKEN, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Sato, Kuniaki; Akase, Zentaro [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Matsuda, Tsuyoshi [Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Murakami, Yasukazu; Shindo, Daisuke [Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), RIKEN, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Kawase, Hiromitsu [Product Environment Technology Development Department, Environment and Energy Technology Development Center R and D Group, RICOH Co., Ltd., Shinei-cho, Tsuzuki-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 224-0035 (Japan)

    2014-03-31

    Precise evaluation of the electrostatic potential distributions of and around samples with multiple charges using electron holography has long been a problem due to unknown perturbation of the reference wave. Here, we report the first practical application of split-illumination electron holography (SIEH) to tackle this problem. This method enables the use of a non-perturbed reference wave distant from the sample. SIEH revealed the electrostatic potential distributions at interfaces of the charged particles used for development in electrophotography and should lead to dramatic improvements in electrophotography.

  16. Subcycle interference dynamics of time-resolved photoelectron holography with midinfrared laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bian Xuebin; Yuan, Kai-Jun; Bandrauk, Andre D.; Huismans, Y.; Smirnova, O.; Vrakking, M. J. J.

    2011-01-01

    Time-resolved photoelectron holography from atoms using midinfrared laser pulses is investigated by solving the corresponding time-dependent Schroedinger equation (TDSE) and a classical model, respectively. The numerical simulation of the photoelectron angular distribution of Xe irradiated with a low-frequency free-electron laser source agrees well with the experimental results. Different types of subcycle interferometric structures are predicted by the classical model. Furthermore with the TDSE model it is demonstrated that the holographic pattern is sensitive to the shape of the atomic orbitals. This is a step toward imaging by means of photoelectron holography.

  17. Single-shot femtosecond-pulsed phase-shifting digital holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakue, Takashi; Itoh, Seiya; Xia, Peng; Tahara, Tatsuki; Awatsuji, Yasuhiro; Nishio, Kenzo; Ura, Shogo; Kubota, Toshihiro; Matoba, Osamu

    2012-08-27

    Parallel phase-shifting digital holography is capable of three-dimensional measurement of a dynamically moving object with a single-shot recording. In this letter, we demonstrated a parallel phase-shifting digital holography using a single femtosecond light pulse whose central wavelength and temporal duration were 800 nm and 96 fs, respectively. As an object, we set spark discharge in atmospheric pressure air induced by applying a high voltage to between two electrodes. The instantaneous change in phase caused by the spark discharge was clearly reconstructed. The reconstructed phase image shows the change of refractive index of air was -3.7 × 10(-4).

  18. Atomic resolution electrostatic potential mapping of graphene sheets by off-axis electron holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, David; Pan, Cheng-Ta; Haigh, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Off-axis electron holography has been performed at atomic resolution with the microscope operated at 80 kV to provide electrostatic potential maps from single, double, and triple layer graphene. These electron holograms have been reconstructed in order to obtain information about atomically resolved and mean inner potentials. We propose that off-axis electron holography can now be used to measure the electrical properties in a range of two-dimensional semiconductor materials and three dimensional devices comprising stacked layers of films to provide important information about their electrical properties.

  19. Highly efficient and broadband wide-angle holography using patch-dipole nanoantenna reflectarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yifat, Yuval; Eitan, Michal; Iluz, Zeev; Hanein, Yael; Boag, Amir; Scheuer, Jacob

    2014-05-14

    We demonstrate wide-angle, broadband, and efficient reflection holography by utilizing coupled dipole-patch nanoantenna cells to impose an arbitrary phase profile on the reflected light. High-fidelity images were projected at angles of 45 and 20° with respect to the impinging light with efficiencies ranging between 40-50% over an optical bandwidth exceeding 180 nm. Excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions was found at a wide spectral range. The demonstration of such reflectarrays opens new avenues toward expanding the limits of large-angle holography.

  20. X-ray fluorescence holography: A different approach to data collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busetto, E.; Kopecky, M.; Lausi, A.; Menk, R.H.; Miculin, M.; Savoia, A.

    2000-01-01

    The images of nearest neighbors of gallium atoms in a GaAs crystal were obtained by the x-ray fluorescence holography technique. The fluorescence from gallium atoms was selected by means of a thin zinc foil filter that made possible the use of an x-ray silicon photodiode detector without energy resolution. This method makes possible the detection of a much higher signal with respect to all previous experiments, thus reducing drastically measuring times, that is a basic and essential step from contemporary demonstration experiments to possible practical applications of x-ray holography in structure analysis

  1. Microscopy imaging and quantitative phase contrast mapping in turbid microfluidic channels by digital holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paturzo, Melania; Finizio, Andrea; Memmolo, Pasquale; Puglisi, Roberto; Balduzzi, Donatella; Galli, Andrea; Ferraro, Pietro

    2012-09-07

    We show that sharp imaging and quantitative phase-contrast microcopy is possible in microfluidics in flowing turbid media by digital holography. In fact, in flowing liquids with suspended colloidal particles, clear vision is hindered and cannot be recovered by any other microscopic imaging technique. On the contrary, using digital holography, clear imaging is possible thanks to the Doppler frequency shift experienced by the photons scattered by the flowing colloidal particles, which do not contribute to the interference process, i.e. the recorded hologram. The method is illustrated and imaging results are demonstrated for pure phase objects, i.e. biological cells in microfluidic channels.

  2. Split-illumination electron holography for improved evaluation of electrostatic potential associated with electrophotography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanigaki, Toshiaki; Aizawa, Shinji; Soon Park, Hyun; Sato, Kuniaki; Akase, Zentaro; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Murakami, Yasukazu; Shindo, Daisuke; Kawase, Hiromitsu

    2014-01-01

    Precise evaluation of the electrostatic potential distributions of and around samples with multiple charges using electron holography has long been a problem due to unknown perturbation of the reference wave. Here, we report the first practical application of split-illumination electron holography (SIEH) to tackle this problem. This method enables the use of a non-perturbed reference wave distant from the sample. SIEH revealed the electrostatic potential distributions at interfaces of the charged particles used for development in electrophotography and should lead to dramatic improvements in electrophotography

  3. Development and Validation of the Cognition Test Battery for Spaceflight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basner, Mathias; Savitt, Adam; Moore, Tyler M; Port, Allison M; McGuire, Sarah; Ecker, Adrian J; Nasrini, Jad; Mollicone, Daniel J; Mott, Christopher M; McCann, Thom; Dinges, David F; Gur, Ruben C

    2015-11-01

    Sustained high-level cognitive performance is of paramount importance for the success of space missions, which involve environmental, physiological, and psychological stressors that may affect brain functions. Despite subjective symptom reports of cognitive fluctuations in spaceflight, the nature of neurobehavioral functioning in space has not been clarified. We developed a computerized cognitive test battery (Cognition) that has sensitivity to multiple cognitive domains and was specifically designed for the high-performing astronaut population. Cognition consists of 15 unique forms of 10 neuropsychological tests that cover a range of cognitive domains, including emotion processing, spatial orientation, and risk decision making. Cognition is based on tests known to engage specific brain regions as evidenced by functional neuroimaging. Here we describe the first normative and acute total sleep deprivation data on the Cognition test battery as well as several efforts underway to establish the validity, sensitivity, feasibility, and acceptability of Cognition. Practice effects and test-retest variability differed substantially between the 10 Cognition tests, illustrating the importance of normative data that both reflect practice effects and differences in stimulus set difficulty in the population of interest. After one night without sleep, medium to large effect sizes were observed for 3 of the 10 tests addressing vigilant attention (Cohen's d = 1.00), cognitive throughput (d = 0.68), and abstract reasoning (d = 0.65). In addition to providing neuroimaging-based novel information on the effects of spaceflight on a range of cognitive functions, Cognition will facilitate comparing the effects of ground-based analogues to spaceflight, increase consistency across projects, and thus enable meta-analyses.

  4. Innate Immune Responses of Drosophila melanogaster Are Altered by Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcu, Oana; Lera, Matthew P.; Sanchez, Max E.; Levic, Edina; Higgins, Laura A.; Shmygelska, Alena; Fahlen, Thomas F.; Nichol, Helen; Bhattacharya, Sharmila

    2011-01-01

    Alterations and impairment of immune responses in humans present a health risk for space exploration missions. The molecular mechanisms underpinning innate immune defense can be confounded by the complexity of the acquired immune system of humans. Drosophila (fruit fly) innate immunity is simpler, and shares many similarities with human innate immunity at the level of molecular and genetic pathways. The goals of this study were to elucidate fundamental immune processes in Drosophila affected by spaceflight and to measure host-pathogen responses post-flight. Five containers, each containing ten female and five male fruit flies, were housed and bred on the space shuttle (average orbit altitude of 330.35 km) for 12 days and 18.5 hours. A new generation of flies was reared in microgravity. In larvae, the immune system was examined by analyzing plasmatocyte number and activity in culture. In adults, the induced immune responses were analyzed by bacterial clearance and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) of selected genes following infection with E. coli. The RNA levels of relevant immune pathway genes were determined in both larvae and adults by microarray analysis. The ability of larval plasmatocytes to phagocytose E. coli in culture was attenuated following spaceflight, and in parallel, the expression of genes involved in cell maturation was downregulated. In addition, the level of constitutive expression of pattern recognition receptors and opsonins that specifically recognize bacteria, and of lysozymes, antimicrobial peptide (AMP) pathway and immune stress genes, hallmarks of humoral immunity, were also reduced in larvae. In adults, the efficiency of bacterial clearance measured in vivo following a systemic infection with E. coli post-flight, remained robust. We show that spaceflight altered both cellular and humoral immune responses in Drosophila and that the disruption occurs at multiple interacting pathways. PMID:21264297

  5. Development and Validation of the Cognition Test Battery for Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basner, Mathias; Savitt, Adam; Moore, Tyler M.; Port, Allison M.; McGuire, Sarah; Ecker, Adrian J.; Nasrini, Jad; Mollicone, Daniel J.; Mott, Christopher M.; McCann, Thom; Dinges, David F.; Gur, Ruben C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Sustained high-level cognitive performance is of paramount importance for the success of space missions, which involve environmental, physiological and psychological stressors that may affect brain functions. Despite subjective symptom reports of cognitive fluctuations in spaceflight, the nature of neurobehavioral functioning in space has not been clarified. Methods We developed a computerized cognitive test battery (Cognition) that has sensitivity to multiple cognitive domains and was specifically designed for the high-performing astronaut population. Cognition consists of 15 unique forms of 10 neuropsychological tests that cover a range of cognitive domains including emotion processing, spatial orientation, and risk decision making. Cognition is based on tests known to engage specific brain regions as evidenced by functional neuroimaging. Here we describe the first normative and acute total sleep deprivation data on the Cognition test battery as well as several efforts underway to establish the validity, sensitivity, feasibility, and acceptability of Cognition. Results Practice effects and test-retest variability differed substantially between the 10 Cognition tests, illustrating the importance of normative data that both reflect practice effects and differences in stimulus set difficulty in the population of interest. After one night without sleep, medium to large effect sizes were observed for 3 of the 10 tests addressing vigilant attention (Cohen’s d=1.00), cognitive throughput (d=0.68), and abstract reasoning (d=0.65). Conclusions In addition to providing neuroimaging-based novel information on the effects of spaceflight on a range of cognitive functions, Cognition will facilitate comparing the effects of ground-based analogs to spaceflight, increase consistency across projects, and thus enable meta-analyses. PMID:26564759

  6. Space Life Sciences at NASA: Spaceflight Health Policy and Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.; House, Nancy G.

    2006-01-01

    In January 2005, the President proposed a new initiative, the Vision for Space Exploration. To accomplish the goals within the vision for space exploration, physicians and researchers at Johnson Space Center are establishing spaceflight health standards. These standards include fitness for duty criteria (FFD), permissible exposure limits (PELs), and permissible outcome limits (POLs). POLs delineate an acceptable maximum decrement or change in a physiological or behavioral parameter, as the result of exposure to the space environment. For example cardiovascular fitness for duty standards might be a measurable clinical parameter minimum that allows successful performance of all required duties. An example of a permissible exposure limit for radiation might be the quantifiable limit of exposure over a given length of time (e.g. life time radiation exposure). An example of a permissible outcome limit might be the length of microgravity exposure that would minimize bone loss. The purpose of spaceflight health standards is to promote operational and vehicle design requirements, aid in medical decision making during space missions, and guide the development of countermeasures. Standards will be based on scientific and clinical evidence including research findings, lessons learned from previous space missions, studies conducted in space analog environments, current standards of medical practices, risk management data, and expert recommendations. To focus the research community on the needs for exploration missions, NASA has developed the Bioastronautics Roadmap. The Bioastronautics Roadmap, NASA's approach to identification of risks to human space flight, revised baseline was released in February 2005. This document was reviewed by the Institute of Medicine in November 2004 and the final report was received in October 2005. The roadmap defines the most important research and operational needs that will be used to set policy, standards (define acceptable risk), and

  7. Innate immune responses of Drosophila melanogaster are altered by spaceflight.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana Marcu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Alterations and impairment of immune responses in humans present a health risk for space exploration missions. The molecular mechanisms underpinning innate immune defense can be confounded by the complexity of the acquired immune system of humans. Drosophila (fruit fly innate immunity is simpler, and shares many similarities with human innate immunity at the level of molecular and genetic pathways. The goals of this study were to elucidate fundamental immune processes in Drosophila affected by spaceflight and to measure host-pathogen responses post-flight. Five containers, each containing ten female and five male fruit flies, were housed and bred on the space shuttle (average orbit altitude of 330.35 km for 12 days and 18.5 hours. A new generation of flies was reared in microgravity. In larvae, the immune system was examined by analyzing plasmatocyte number and activity in culture. In adults, the induced immune responses were analyzed by bacterial clearance and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR of selected genes following infection with E. coli. The RNA levels of relevant immune pathway genes were determined in both larvae and adults by microarray analysis. The ability of larval plasmatocytes to phagocytose E. coli in culture was attenuated following spaceflight, and in parallel, the expression of genes involved in cell maturation was downregulated. In addition, the level of constitutive expression of pattern recognition receptors and opsonins that specifically recognize bacteria, and of lysozymes, antimicrobial peptide (AMP pathway and immune stress genes, hallmarks of humoral immunity, were also reduced in larvae. In adults, the efficiency of bacterial clearance measured in vivo following a systemic infection with E. coli post-flight, remained robust. We show that spaceflight altered both cellular and humoral immune responses in Drosophila and that the disruption occurs at multiple interacting pathways.

  8. Changes of the eye during long-term spaceflight. Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Makarov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The review includes the publications of the scientific literature on the eye change during long-term spaceflight. The any eye changes such as visual impairment, hyperopic shift in refraction, changes in the intraocular pressure, increased the intracranial pressure, globe flattening, choroidal folding, optic disc edema, and optic nerve kinking and other changes were reported. The main cause of eye disorders, in all probability, is the increase of the intracranial pressure during long-term spaceflight. The reasons of the increased intracranial pressure are a collection of various factors of adaptation mechanisms in the body to weightless conditions. The leading role in the development of intracranial hypertension takes a redistribution of the body fluids (blood and lymph in the direction of the head, but the opportunities and the effect of other factors are present. Also the displacement and increase of the internal organs volume of the chest can cause external compression of the jugular veins, increasing the pressure of the blood in them, and as the result to lead to the increase of the intracranial pressure. The role of trigger such mechanisms in the development of the intracranial hypertension in the microgravity environment as anatomical predisposition of the body, race, metabolic changes under the influence of high carbon dioxide content in the different compartments of the station, high sodium intake, the enzyme dysfunction, weight exercises of the astronauts was discussed. However, the pathogenic mechanisms is currently still under investigation. An important role in the study of the adaptation mechanisms is given to research not only before and after the flight, but also during the space flight. The accumulated knowledge and experience about the changes in organs and systems in the conditions of human adaptation to microgravity will help answer many questions related to the implementation of the long spaceflights.

  9. A Psychiatric Formulary for Long-Duration Spaceflight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Eric; Bui, Brian

    2017-11-01

    Behavioral health is essential for the safety, well-being, and performance of crewmembers in both human spaceflight and Antarctic exploration. Over the past five decades, psychiatric issues have been documented in orbital spaceflight. In Antarctica, literature suggests up to 5% of wintering crewmembers could meet criteria for a psychiatric illness, including mood disorders, stressor-related disorders, sleep-wake disorders, and substance-related disorders. Experience from these settings indicates that psychiatric disorders on deep space missions must be anticipated. An important part of planning for the psychological health of crewmembers is the onboard provision of psychotropic drugs. These medications have been available on orbital missions. A greater variety and supply of these drugs exist at Antarctic facilities. The size and diversity of a deep space psychiatric formulary will be greater than that provided on orbital missions. Drugs to be provisioned include anxiolytics, antidepressants, mood stabilizers, antipsychotics, and hypnotics. Each drug category should include different medications, providing diverse pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and side effect profiles. The formulary itself should be rigorously controlled, given the abuse potential of some medications. In-flight treatment strategies could include psychological monitoring of well-being and early intervention for significant symptoms. Psychiatric emergencies would be treated aggressively with behavioral and pharmacological interventions to de-escalate potentially hazardous situations. On long-duration space missions, a robust psychiatric formulary could provide crewmembers autonomy and flexibility in treating a range of behavioral issues from depression to acute psychosis. This will contribute to the safety, health, and performance of crewmembers, and to mission success.Friedman E, Bui B. A psychiatric formulary for long-duration spaceflight. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(11):1024-1033.

  10. Technology assessment for Spaceship Two, space tourism, and private spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Randy

    A seven-step technology assessment was conducted to address questions regarding the significance and likely consequences associated with the introduction of Spaceship Two, space tourism, and private spaceflight. Impacts were assessed across four categories: the Role and Functions of Government, Private Industry Factors, Cultural and Societal Impacts, and the Time Frame in which these impacts were anticipated to occur. The technology assessment findings were compared to the results of expert interviews that addressed the sane four categories. The researcher noted that, while there was overwhelming agreement between the technology assessment's primary impacts and the expert interview responses, there were several differences. The technology assessment and interviewees agreed that the federal government would likely be both a regulator and user of private spaceflight. Both agreed that business partnerships would be key in pursuing private spaceflight. There was also consensus that, as market forces come to bear, ticket prices would drop and a larger market and broader passenger demographic would emerge. The technology assessment and experts agreed that an accident, especially one early in the industry's evolution, could be disastrous. Both agreed that private spaceflight can serve as a inspiration to students and be a positive influence in society, and both agreed that the start of passenger flights should take place in the 2010 - 2012 timeframe. Due to the potentially disastrous consequences of an accident, there was agreement between the technology assessment and experts on the value of flight and ground crew training, driven by insurance carriers and federal mandate. Most differences between the technology assessment's findings and the expert interview responses were due to omission, rather than direct disagreement. However, this was not the case in every instance. The most significant difference between the technology assessment and the experts involved the

  11. Development of Bone Remodeling Model for Spaceflight Bone Physiology Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennline, James A.; Werner, Christopher R.; Lewandowski, Beth; Thompson, Bill; Sibonga, Jean; Mulugeta, Lealem

    2015-01-01

    Current spaceflight exercise countermeasures do not eliminate bone loss. Astronauts lose bone mass at a rate of 1-2% a month (Lang et al. 2004, Buckey 2006, LeBlanc et al. 2007). This may lead to early onset osteoporosis and place the astronauts at greater risk of fracture later in their lives. NASA seeks to improve understanding of the mechanisms of bone remodeling and demineralization in 1g in order to appropriately quantify long term risks to astronauts and improve countermeasures. NASA's Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) is working with NASA's bone discipline to develop a validated computational model to augment research efforts aimed at achieving this goal.

  12. A primary report on honeybee space-flight breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Jun; Shi Wei; Ding Guiling; Lv Liping; Liu Zhiguang

    2009-01-01

    The semen of honeybees (Apis mellifera ligustica and Apis mellifera carnica) was carried by the recoverable satellite for a spaceflight and was inseminated instrumentally to the virgin queens after returning to the earth. The preliminary results showed that both the vitality of the sperm and the survival rate of SP 1 queen were lower than those of the control. Obvious variations in morphology appeared on the progeny workers of queens in SP 2 and in SP 3 generations, but most of variation were unfavorable. Mutants with desirable characters were not found after the space fight. (authors)

  13. Feasibility study of complex wavefield retrieval in off-axis acoustic holography employing an acousto-optic sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Guillermo López; Weber, Joshua; Sandhu, Jaswinder Singh; Anastasio, Mark A

    2011-12-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a new method for complex-valued wavefield retrieval in off-axis acoustic holography. The method involves use of an intensity-sensitive acousto-optic (AO) sensor, optimized for use at 3.3 MHz, to record the acoustic hologram and a computational method for reconstruction of the object wavefield. The proposed method may circumvent limitations of conventional implementations of acoustic holography and may facilitate the development of acoustic-holography-based biomedical imaging methods. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Numerical suppression of the twin image in in-line holography of a volume of micro-objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denis, L; Fournier, C; Fournel, T; Ducottet, C

    2008-01-01

    We address the twin-image problem that arises in holography due to the lack of phase information in intensity measurements. This problem is of great importance in in-line holography where spatial elimination of the twin image cannot be carried out as in off-axis holography. A unifying description of existing digital suppression methods is given in the light of deconvolution techniques. Holograms of objects spread in 3D cannot be processed through available approaches. We suggest an iterative algorithm and demonstrate its efficacy on both simulated and real data. This method is suitable to enhance the reconstructed images from a digital hologram of small objects

  15. Sleep-Wake Actigraphy and Light Exposure During Spaceflight-Long

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czeisler, Charles A.; Barger, Laura K.; Wright, Kenneth P., Jr.; Ronda, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Sleep-Wake Actigraphy and Light Exposure During Spaceflight-Long (Sleep-Long) will examine the effects of spaceflight and ambient light exposure on the sleep-wake cycles of the crew members during long-duration stays on the space station.

  16. Studies of Fundamental Particle Dynamics in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Roger; Trolinger, James D.; Coimbra, Carlos F. M.; Witherow, William; Rogers, Jan; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This work summarizes theoretical and experimental concepts used to design the flight experiment mission for SHIVA - Spaceflight Holography Investigation in a Virtual Apparatus. SHIVA is a NASA project that exploits a unique, holography-based, diagnostics tool to understand the behavior of small particles subjected to transient accelerations. The flight experiments are designed for testing model equations, measuring g, g-jitter, and other microgravity phenomena. Data collection will also include experiments lying outside of the realm of existing theory. The regime under scrutiny is the low Reynolds number, Stokes regime or creeping flow, which covers particles and bubbles moving at very low velocity. The equations describing this important regime have been under development and investigation for over 100 years and yet a complete analytical solution of the general equation had remained elusive yielding only approximations and numerical solutions. In the course of the ongoing NASA NRA, the first analytical solution of the general equation was produced by members of the investigator team using the mathematics of fractional derivatives. This opened the way to an even more insightful and important investigation of the phenomena in microgravity. Recent results include interacting particles, particle-wall interactions, bubbles, and Reynolds numbers larger than unity. The Space Station provides an ideal environment for SHIVA. Limited ground experiments have already confirmed some aspects of the theory. In general the space environment is required for the overall experiment, especially for cases containing very heavy particles, very light particles, bubbles, collections of particles and for characterization of the space environment and its effect on particle experiments. Lightweight particles and bubbles typically rise too fast in a gravitational field and heavy particles sink too fast. In a microgravity environment, heavy and light particles can be studied side-by-side for

  17. Indian gift unveiled at CERN: the statue of the Indian deity Shiva was unveiled by His Excellency K M Chandrasekhar, ambassador (WTO Geneva), shown above signing the visitors' book, Anil Kakodkar, chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission and secretary of the Indian Department of Energy, and CERN's director-general, Robert Aymar.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    On 18 June CERN unveiled an unusual new landmark - a statue of the Indian deity Shiva. The statue is a gift from CERN's Indian collaborators to celebrate CERN's long association with India, which began in the 1960s. The statue was made in India in the traditional style. The original sculpture was a wax model, around which a soil mould was made. Melting the wax left a hollow into which liquid metal was poured, and once cooled the mould was split and the statue polished and given its antique finish.

  18. Mass-deformed ABJM theory and LLM geometries: exact holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Dongmin; Kim, Yoonbai; Kwon, O-Kab [Department of Physics, BK21 Physics Research Division,Institute of Basic Science, Sungkyunkwan University,Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Tolla, D.D. [Department of Physics, BK21 Physics Research Division,Institute of Basic Science, Sungkyunkwan University,Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); University College, Sungkyunkwan University,Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-19

    We present a detailed account and extension of our claim in https://arxiv.org/abs/1610.01490. We test the gauge/gravity duality between the N=6 mass-deformed ABJM theory with U{sub k}(N)×U{sub −k}(N) gauge symmetry and the 11-dimensional supergravity on LLM geometries with SO(4)/ℤ{sub k}×SO(4)/ℤ{sub k} isometry, in the large N limit. Our analysis is based on the evaluation of vacuum expectation values of chiral primary operators from the supersymmetric vacua of mass-deformed ABJM theory and from the implementation of Kaluza-Klein holography to the LLM geometries. We focus on the chiral primary operator with conformal dimension Δ=1. We show that 〈O{sup (Δ=1)}〉=N{sup (3/2)} f{sub (Δ=1)} for all supersymmetric vacuum solutions and LLM geometries with k=1, where the factor f{sub (Δ)} is independent of N. We also confirm that the vacuum expectation value of the energy momentum tensor is vanishing as expected by the supersymmetry. We extend our results to the case of k≠1 for LLM geometries represented by rectangular-shaped Young-diagrams. In analogy with the Coulomb branch of the N=4 super Yang-Mills theory, we argue that the discrete Higgs vacua of the mABJM theory as well as the corresponding LLM geometries are parametrized by the vevs of the chiral primary operators.

  19. Remote interferometry by digital holography for shape control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumbach, Torsten; Osten, Wolfgang; Falldorf, Claas; Jueptner, Werner P. O.

    2002-06-01

    Modern production requires more and more effective methods for the inspection and quality control at the production place. Outsourcing and globalization result in possible large distances between co-operating partners. This may cause serious problems with respect to the just-in-time exchange of information and the response to possible violations of quality standards. Consequently new challenges arise for optical measurement techniques especially in the field of industrial shape control. A possible solution for these problems can be delivered by a technique that stores optically the full 3D information of the objects to be compared and where the data can be transported over large distances. In this paper we describe the progress in implementing a new technique for the direct comparison of the shape and deformation of two objects with different microstructure where it is not necessary that both samples are located at the same place. This is done by creating a coherent mask for the illumination of the sample object. The coherent mask is created by Digital Holography to enable the instant access to the complete optical information of the master object at any wanted place. The transmission of the digital master holograms to this place can be done via digital telecommunication networks. The comparison can be done in a digital or analogue way. Both methods result in a disappearance of the object shape and the appearance of the shape or deformation difference between the two objects only. The analogue reconstruction of the holograms with a liquid crystal spatial light modulator can be done by using the light modulator as an intensity modulator or as an phase modulator. The reconstruction technique and the space bandwidth of the light modulator will influence the quality of the result. Therefore the paper describes the progress in applying modern spatial light modulators and digital cameras for the effective storage and optical reconstruction of coherent masks.

  20. Enhancing the beamforming map of spherical arrays at low frequencies using acoustic holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiana Roig, Elisabet; Torras Rosell, Antoni; Fernandez Grande, Efren

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the localization of acoustic sources based on circular arrays can be improved at low frequencies by combining beamforming with acoustic holography. This paper extends this technique to the three dimensional case by making use of spherical arrays. The pressure captur...

  1. Near field acoustic holography based on the equivalent source method and pressure-velocity transducers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Y.-B.; Chen, X.-Z.; Jacobsen, Finn

    2009-01-01

    The advantage of using the normal component of the particle velocity rather than the sound pressure in the hologram plane as the input of conventional spatial Fourier transform based near field acoustic holography (NAH) and also as the input of the statistically optimized variant of NAH has recen...... generated by sources on the two sides of the hologram plane is also examined....

  2. Joint Applied Optics and Chinese Optics Letters feature introduction: digital holography and three-dimensional imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Poon, Ting-Chung

    2011-01-01

    This feature issue serves as a pilot issue promoting the joint issue of Applied Optics and Chinese Optics Letters. It focuses upon topics of current relevance to the community working in the area of digital holography and 3-D imaging. (C) 2011 Optical Society of America

  3. Joint Applied Optics and Chinese Optics Letters feature introduction: digital holography and three-dimensional imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Ting-Chung

    2011-12-01

    This feature issue serves as a pilot issue promoting the joint issue of Applied Optics and Chinese Optics Letters. It focuses upon topics of current relevance to the community working in the area of digital holography and 3-D imaging. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  4. Holography microscopy as an artifact-free alternative to phase-contrast

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pastorek, Lukáš; Venit, Tomáš; Hozák, Pavel

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 149, č. 2 (2018), s. 179-186 ISSN 0948-6143 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015062 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Holography microscopy * Phase-contrast * Halo effect Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Cell biology Impact factor: 2.553, year: 2016

  5. Optical sectioning using a digital Fresnel incoherent-holography-based confocal imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelner, Roy; Katz, Barak; Rosen, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new type of confocal microscope using Fresnel incoherent correlation holography (FINCH). Presented here is a confocal configuration of FINCH using a phase pinhole and point illumination that is able to suppress out-of-focus information from the recorded hologram and hence combine the super-resolution capabilities of FINCH with the sectioning capabilities of confocal microscopy. PMID:26413560

  6. Optical sectioning using a digital Fresnel incoherent-holography-based confocal imaging system

    OpenAIRE

    Kelner, Roy; Katz, Barak; Rosen, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new type of confocal microscope using Fresnel incoherent correlation holography (FINCH). Presented here is a confocal configuration of FINCH using a phase pinhole and point illumination that is able to suppress out-of-focus information from the recorded hologram and hence combine the super-resolution capabilities of FINCH with the sectioning capabilities of confocal microscopy.

  7. Digital in-line holography assessment for general phase and opaque particle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coëtmellec, S.; Wichitwong, W.; Gréhan, G.; Lebrun, D.; Brunel, M.; Janssen, A.J.E.M.

    2014-01-01

    We propose using the circle polynomials to describe a particle’s transmission function in a digital holography setup. This allows both opaque and phase particles to be determined. By means of this description, we demonstrate that it is possible to estimate the digital in-line hologram produced by a

  8. Spatially and temporally resolved diagnostics of dense sprays using gated, femtosecond, digital holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trolinger, James D.; Dioumaev, Andrei K.; Ziaee, Ali; Minniti, Marco; Dunn-Rankin, Derek

    2017-08-01

    This paper describes research that demonstrated gated, femtosecond, digital holography, enabling 3D microscopic viewing inside dense, almost opaque sprays, and providing a new and powerful diagnostics capability for viewing fuel atomization processes never seen before. The method works by exploiting the extremely short coherence and pulse length (approximately 30 micrometers in this implementation) provided by a femtosecond laser combined with digital holography to eliminate multiple and wide angle scattered light from particles surrounding the injection region, which normally obscures the image of interest. Photons that follow a path that differs in length by more than 30 micrometers from a straight path through the field to the sensor do not contribute to the holographic recording of photons that travel in a near straight path (ballistic and "snake" photons). To further enhance the method, off-axis digital holography was incorporated to enhance signal to noise ratio and image processing capability in reconstructed images by separating the conjugate images, which overlap and interfere in conventional in-line holography. This also enables digital holographic interferometry. Fundamental relationships and limitations were also examined. The project is a continuing collaboration between MetroLaser and the University of California, Irvine.

  9. A Study Guide on Holography (Draft). Test Edition. AAAS Study Guides on Contemporary Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Tung H.

    This is one of several study guides on contemporary problems produced by the American Association for the Advancement of Science with support of the National Science Foundation. The primary purpose of this guide is to provide a student with sufficient practical and technical information to begin independently practicing holography, with occasional…

  10. AdS/QCD and Applications of Light-Front Holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodsky, S. J.; Cao, F. G.; de Teramond, G. F.

    2012-01-01

    Light-front holography leads to a rigorous connection between hadronic amplitudes in a higher dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS) space and frame-independent light-front wavefunctions of hadrons in (3+1)-dimensional physical space-time, thus providing a compelling physical interpretation of the Ad...

  11. Near-Curie magnetic anomaly at the Ni/C interface observed by Electron Holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrari, Loris; Matteucci, Giorgio; Schofield, Marvin A

    2010-01-01

    We analyze with electron holography carried out in a transmission electron microscope the near-Curie behavior of magnetism at the edge of a Nickel thin film coated with Carbon. In-situ experiments with finely controlled variations of the sample temperature reveal an anomaly in the ferromagnetic...

  12. Anomalous scattering and isomorphous replacement in X-ray diffuse scattering holography

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopecký, Miloš; Kub, Jiří; Busetto, E.; Lausi, A.; Fábry, Jan; Šourek, Zbyněk

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 204, č. 8 (2007), s. 2572-2577 ISSN 1862-6300 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100100529; GA MŠk LA 287 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523; CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : x-ray difuse scattering * x-ray holography Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  13. Physical Principles of the Method for Determination of Geometrical Characteristics and Particle Recognition in Digital Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyomin, V. V.; Polovtsev, I. G.; Davydova, A. Yu.

    2018-03-01

    The physical principles of a method for determination of geometrical characteristics of particles and particle recognition based on the concepts of digital holography, followed by processing of the particle images reconstructed from the digital hologram, using the morphological parameter are reported. An example of application of this method for fast plankton particle recognition is given.

  14. Media ion composition controls regulatory and virulence response of Salmonella in spaceflight.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James W Wilson

    Full Text Available The spaceflight environment is relevant to conditions encountered by pathogens during the course of infection and induces novel changes in microbial pathogenesis not observed using conventional methods. It is unclear how microbial cells sense spaceflight-associated changes to their growth environment and orchestrate corresponding changes in molecular and physiological phenotypes relevant to the infection process. Here we report that spaceflight-induced increases in Salmonella virulence are regulated by media ion composition, and that phosphate ion is sufficient to alter related pathogenesis responses in a spaceflight analogue model. Using whole genome microarray and proteomic analyses from two independent Space Shuttle missions, we identified evolutionarily conserved molecular pathways in Salmonella that respond to spaceflight under all media compositions tested. Identification of conserved regulatory paradigms opens new avenues to control microbial responses during the infection process and holds promise to provide an improved understanding of human health and disease on Earth.

  15. Urine Pretreatment History and Perspective in NASA Human Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Molly; Adam, Niklas; Chambers, Antja; Broyan, James

    2015-01-01

    Urine pretreatment is a technology that may seem to have small mass impacts in future spaceflight missions, but can have significant impacts on reliability, life, and performance of the rest of the wastewater management and recovery systems. NASA has experience with several different urine pretreatment systems, including those flow on the space shuttle, evaluated for NASA waste collection systems or used in Russian commodes on ISS, or developed by NASA or industry as alternatives. Each has had unique requirements for shelf life, operational life, and the life or conditions of the stored, treated urine. Each was evaluated under different test conditions depending on mission, and depending on testing experience developed over NASA's history. Those that were flown led to further lessons learned about hardware compatibility and control. As NASA looks forward to human spaceflight missions beyond low Earth orbit, these techniques need to be evaluated in new light. Based on published design reference missions, candidate requirements can be derived for future systems. Initial comparisons between these requirements and previous performance or test results can be performed. In many cases these comparisons reveal data gaps. Successful previous performance is not enough to address current needs.

  16. Lessons learned about spaceflight and cell biology experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes-Fulford, Millie

    2004-01-01

    Conducting cell biology experiments in microgravity can be among the most technically challenging events in a biologist's life. Conflicting events of spaceflight include waiting to get manifested, delays in manifest schedules, training astronauts to not shake your cultures and to add reagents slowly, as shaking or quick injection can activate signaling cascades and give you erroneous results. It is important to select good hardware that is reliable. Possible conflicting environments in flight include g-force and vibration of launch, exposure of cells to microgravity for extended periods until hardware is turned on, changes in cabin gases and cosmic radiation. One should have an on-board 1-g control centrifuge in order to eliminate environmental differences. Other obstacles include getting your funding in a timely manner (it is not uncommon for two to three years to pass between notification of grant approval for funding and actually getting funded). That said, it is important to note that microgravity research is worthwhile since all terrestrial life evolved in a gravity field and secrets of biological function may only be answered by removing the constant of gravity. Finally, spaceflight experiments are rewarding and worth your effort and patience.

  17. Invited review: gender issues related to spaceflight: a NASA perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harm, D. L.; Jennings, R. T.; Meck, J. V.; Powell, M. R.; Putcha, L.; Sams, C. P.; Schneider, S. M.; Shackelford, L. C.; Smith, S. M.; Whitson, P. A.

    2001-01-01

    This minireview provides an overview of known and potential gender differences in physiological responses to spaceflight. The paper covers cardiovascular and exercise physiology, barophysiology and decompression sickness, renal stone risk, immunology, neurovestibular and sensorimotor function, nutrition, pharmacotherapeutics, and reproduction. Potential health and functional impacts associated with the various physiological changes during spaceflight are discussed, and areas needing additional research are highlighted. Historically, studies of physiological responses to microgravity have not been aimed at examining gender-specific differences in the astronaut population. Insufficient data exist in most of the discipline areas at this time to draw valid conclusions about gender-specific differences in astronauts, in part due to the small ratio of women to men. The only astronaut health issue for which a large enough data set exists to allow valid conclusions to be drawn about gender differences is orthostatic intolerance following shuttle missions, in which women have a significantly higher incidence of presyncope during stand tests than do men. The most common observation across disciplines is that individual differences in physiological responses within genders are usually as large as, or larger than, differences between genders. Individual characteristics usually outweigh gender differences per se.

  18. Spaceflight Activates Autophagy Programs and the Proteasome in Mouse Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaber, Elizabeth A; Pecaut, Michael J; Jonscher, Karen R

    2017-09-27

    Increased oxidative stress is an unavoidable consequence of exposure to the space environment. Our previous studies showed that mice exposed to space for 13.5 days had decreased glutathione levels, suggesting impairments in oxidative defense. Here we performed unbiased, unsupervised and integrated multi-'omic analyses of metabolomic and transcriptomic datasets from mice flown aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis. Enrichment analyses of metabolite and gene sets showed significant changes in osmolyte concentrations and pathways related to glycerophospholipid and sphingolipid metabolism, likely consequences of relative dehydration of the spaceflight mice. However, we also found increased enrichment of aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis and purine metabolic pathways, concomitant with enrichment of genes associated with autophagy and the ubiquitin-proteasome. When taken together with a downregulation in nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2-mediated signaling, our analyses suggest that decreased hepatic oxidative defense may lead to aberrant tRNA post-translational processing, induction of degradation programs and senescence-associated mitochondrial dysfunction in response to the spaceflight environment.

  19. Intraocular Lens Use in an Astronaut During Long Duration Spaceflight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mader, Thomas H; Gibson, C Robert; Schmid, Josef F; Lipsky, William; Sargsyan, Ashot E; Garcia, Kathleen; Williams, Jeffrey N

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the first use of an intraocular lens (IOL) in an astronaut during long duration spaceflight (LDSF). An astronaut developed a unilateral cataract and underwent phacoemulsification with insertion of an acrylic IOL. Approximately 15 mo later he flew on a Soyuz spacecraft to the International Space Station (ISS), where he successfully completed a 6-mo mission. Ocular examination, including ultrasound (US), was performed before, during, and after his mission and he was questioned regarding visual changes during each portion of his flight. We documented no change in IOL position during his space mission. This astronaut reported excellent and stable vision during liftoff, entry into microgravity (MG), 6 mo on the ISS, descent, and landing. Our results suggest that modern IOLs are stable, effective, and well tolerated during LDSF.Mader TH, Gibson CR, Schmid JF, Lipsky W, Sargsyan AE, Garcia K, Williams JN. Intraocular lens use in an astronaut during long duration spaceflight. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2018; 89(1):63-65.

  20. Human spaceflight and an asteroid redirect mission: Why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchell, M. J.

    2014-08-01

    The planning of human spaceflight programmes is an exercise in careful rationing of a scarce and expensive resource. Current NASA plans are to develop the new capability for human-rated launch into space to replace the Space Transportation System (STS), more commonly known as the Space Shuttle, combined with a heavy lift capability, and followed by an eventual Mars mission. As an intermediate step towards Mars, NASA proposes to venture beyond Low Earth Orbit to cis-lunar space to visit a small asteroid which will be captured and moved to lunar orbit by a separate robotic mission. The rationale for this and how to garner support from the scientific community for such an asteroid mission are discussed. Key points that emerge are that a programme usually has greater legitimacy when it emerges from public debate, mostly via a Presidential Commission, a report by the National Research Council or a Decadal Review of science goals etc. Also, human spaceflight missions need to have support from a wide range of interested communities. Accordingly, an outline scientific case for a human visit to an asteroid is made. Further, it is argued here that the scientific interest in an asteroid mission needs to be included early in the planning stages, so that the appropriate capabilities (here the need for drilling cores and carrying equipment to, and returning samples from, the asteroid) can be included.

  1. Effects of spaceflight on the muscles of the murine shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hua; Lim, Chanteak; Schwartz, Andrea G; Andreev-Andrievskiy, Alexander; Deymier, Alix C; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2017-12-01

    Mechanical loading is necessary for the development and maintenance of the musculoskeletal system. Removal of loading via microgravity, paralysis, or bed rest leads to rapid loss of muscle mass and function; however, the molecular mechanisms that lead to these changes are largely unknown, particularly for the spaceflight (SF) microgravity environment. Furthermore, few studies have explored these effects on the shoulder, a dynamically stabilized joint with a large range of motion; therefore, we examined the effects of microgravity on mouse shoulder muscles for the 15-d Space Transportation System (STS)-131, 13-d STS-135, and 30-d Bion-M1 missions. Mice from STS missions were euthanized within 4 h after landing, whereas mice from the Bion-M1 mission were euthanized within 14 h after landing. The motion-generating deltoid muscle was more sensitive to microgravity than the joint-stabilizing rotator cuff muscles. Mice from the STS-131 mission exhibited reduced myogenic ( Myf5 and -6 ) and adipogenic ( Pparg , Cebpa , and Lep ) gene expression, whereas either no change or an increased expression of these genes was observed in mice from the Bion-M1 mission. In summary, muscle responses to microgravity were muscle-type specific, short-duration SF caused dramatic molecular changes to shoulder muscles and responses to reloading upon landing were rapid.-Shen, H., Lim, C., Schwartz, A. G., Andreev-Andrievskiy, A., Deymier, A. C., Thomopoulos, S. Effects of spaceflight on the muscles of the murine shoulder. © FASEB.

  2. Spaceflight Activates Autophagy Programs and the Proteasome in Mouse Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A. Blaber

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Increased oxidative stress is an unavoidable consequence of exposure to the space environment. Our previous studies showed that mice exposed to space for 13.5 days had decreased glutathione levels, suggesting impairments in oxidative defense. Here we performed unbiased, unsupervised and integrated multi-‘omic analyses of metabolomic and transcriptomic datasets from mice flown aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis. Enrichment analyses of metabolite and gene sets showed significant changes in osmolyte concentrations and pathways related to glycerophospholipid and sphingolipid metabolism, likely consequences of relative dehydration of the spaceflight mice. However, we also found increased enrichment of aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis and purine metabolic pathways, concomitant with enrichment of genes associated with autophagy and the ubiquitin-proteasome. When taken together with a downregulation in nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2-like 2-mediated signaling, our analyses suggest that decreased hepatic oxidative defense may lead to aberrant tRNA post-translational processing, induction of degradation programs and senescence-associated mitochondrial dysfunction in response to the spaceflight environment.

  3. Human Spaceflight and American Society: The Record So Far

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Charles

    2002-01-01

    These remarks give me an excuse to revisit a world that Catherine Cox and I had a chance to live in vicariously from 1986 to 1989 when we were researching and writing about Project Apollo. As I thought about it, I realized that actually very few people in this audience have had a chance to live in that world, either vicariously or for real. For most people today, NASA's human spaceflight program is the Shuttle. The NASA you know is an extremely large bureaucracy. The Apollo you know is a historical event. So to kick off today's presentations, I want to be the "Voice of Christmas Past." If we want to think about what is possible for human spaceflight as part of America's future, it is essential to understand how NASA people understood "possible" during the Apollo era. It is also important to understand that the way NASA functioned during the Apollo Program was wildly different from the way NASA functions now. In fact-and I say this with all due respect to the current NASA team members who are doing fine work-the race to the Moon was not really a race against the Russians; it was a race to see if we could get to the Moon before NASA became a bureaucracy, and we won. But the lessons of that experience should be ones that we still have at the front of our minds.

  4. Spaceplane Hermes Europe's dream of independent manned spaceflight

    CERN Document Server

    van den Abeelen, Luc

    2017-01-01

    This is the first comprehensive book on the European Hermes program. It tells the fascinating story of how Europe aimed for an independent manned spaceflight capability which was to complement US and Soviet/Russian space activities.In 1975, France decided to expand its plans for automated satellites for materials processing to include the development of a small 10 ton spaceplane to be launched on top of a future heavy-lifting Ariane rocket. This Hermes spaceplane would give Europe its own human spaceflight capability for shuttling crews between Earth and space stations. The European Space Agency backed the proposal. Unfortunately, after detailed studies, the project was cancelled in 1993. If Hermes had been introduced into service, it could have become the preferred "space taxi" for ferrying crews to and from the International Space Station. But that opportunity was lost. This book provides the first look of the complete story of and reasons for the demise of this ambitious program. It also gives an account w...

  5. Variable magnification dual lens electron holography for semiconductor junction profiling and strain mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.Y., E-mail: wangyy@us.ibm.com [IBM Micro-electronics Division, Zip 40E, Hudson Valley Research Park, 2070 Route 52, Hopewell Junction, NY 12533 (United States); Li, J.; Domenicucci, A. [IBM Micro-electronics Division, Zip 40E, Hudson Valley Research Park, 2070 Route 52, Hopewell Junction, NY 12533 (United States); Bruley, J. [IBM TJ Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, Route 134 Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Dual lens operation for electron holography, which was developed previously (Wang et al., Ultramicroscopy 101 (2004) 63-72; US patent: 7,015,469 B2 (2006)), is re-investigated for bright field (junction profiling) and dark field (strain mapping) electron holography using FEI instrumentation (i.e. F20 and Titan). It is found that dual lens operation provides a wide operational range for electron holography. In addition, the dark field image tilt increases at high objective lens current to include Si Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket 0 0 4 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket diffraction spot. Under the condition of high spatial resolution (1 nm fringe spacing), a large field of view (450 nm), and high fringe contrast (26%) with dual lens operation, a junction map is obtained and strain maps of Si device on Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket 2 2 0 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket and Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket 0 0 4 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket diffraction are acquired. In this paper, a fringe quality number, N Prime , which is number of fringe times fringe contrast, is proposed to estimate the quality of an electron hologram and mathematical reasoning for the N Prime number is provided. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dual lens electron holography is implemented on FEI instruments (Titan and F20). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wide range of field of view (0.1-0.9 {mu}m) and fringe spacing (0.5-6 nm) is achieved. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fringe quality number is proposed to quantify the quality of an electron hologram. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Junction map at high spatial resolution is provided. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Strain maps along Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket 2 2 0 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket and Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket 0 0 4 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket direction of Si by dark field electron holography are reported.

  6. Variable magnification dual lens electron holography for semiconductor junction profiling and strain mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.Y.; Li, J.; Domenicucci, A.; Bruley, J.

    2013-01-01

    Dual lens operation for electron holography, which was developed previously (Wang et al., Ultramicroscopy 101 (2004) 63–72; US patent: 7,015,469 B2 (2006)), is re-investigated for bright field (junction profiling) and dark field (strain mapping) electron holography using FEI instrumentation (i.e. F20 and Titan). It is found that dual lens operation provides a wide operational range for electron holography. In addition, the dark field image tilt increases at high objective lens current to include Si 〈0 0 4〉 diffraction spot. Under the condition of high spatial resolution (1 nm fringe spacing), a large field of view (450 nm), and high fringe contrast (26%) with dual lens operation, a junction map is obtained and strain maps of Si device on 〈2 2 0〉 and 〈0 0 4〉 diffraction are acquired. In this paper, a fringe quality number, N′, which is number of fringe times fringe contrast, is proposed to estimate the quality of an electron hologram and mathematical reasoning for the N′ number is provided. -- Highlights: ► Dual lens electron holography is implemented on FEI instruments (Titan and F20). ► Wide range of field of view (0.1–0.9 μm) and fringe spacing (0.5–6 nm) is achieved. ► Fringe quality number is proposed to quantify the quality of an electron hologram. ► Junction map at high spatial resolution is provided. ► Strain maps along 〈2 2 0〉 and 〈0 0 4〉 direction of Si by dark field electron holography are reported.

  7. Holography microscopy as an artifact-free alternative to phase-contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastorek, Lukáš; Venit, Tomáš; Hozák, Pavel

    2018-02-01

    Artifact-free microscopic images represent a key requirement of multi-parametric image analysis in modern biomedical research. Holography microscopy (HM) is one of the quantitative phase imaging techniques, which has been finding new applications in life science, especially in morphological screening, cell migration, and cancer research. Rather than the classical imaging of absorbing (typically stained) specimens by bright-field microscopy, the information about the light-wave's phase shifts induced by the biological sample is employed for final image reconstruction. In this comparative study, we investigated the usability and the reported advantage of the holography imaging. The claimed halo-free imaging was analyzed compared to the widely used Zernike phase-contrast microscopy. The intensity and phase cross-membrane profiles at the periphery of the cell were quantified. The intensity profile for cells in the phase-contrast images suffers from the significant increase in intensity values around the cell border. On the contrary, no distorted profile is present outside the cell membrane in holography images. The gradual increase in phase shift values is present in the internal part of the cell body projection in holography image. This increase may be related to the increase in the cell internal material according to the dry mass theory. Our experimental data proved the halo-free nature of the holography imaging, which is an important prerequisite of the correct thresholding and cell segmentation, nowadays frequently required in high-content screening and other image-based analysis. Consequently, HM is a method of choice whenever the image analysis relies on the accurate data on cell boundaries.

  8. Adaptation of the Skeletal System during Long-duration Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibonga, Jean D.; Cavanagh, Peter R.; Lang, Thomas F.; LeBlanc, Adrian D.; Schneider, Victor S.; Shackelford, Linda C.; Smith, Scott M.; Vico, Laurence

    2008-01-01

    This review will highlight evidence from crew members flown on space missions greater than 90 days to suggest that the adaptations of the skeletal system to mechanical unloading may predispose crew members to an accelerated onset of osteoporosis after return to Earth. By definition, osteoporosis is a skeletal disorder - characterized by low bone mineral density and structural deterioration - that reduces the ability of bones to resist fracture under the loading of normal daily activities. Involutional or agerelated osteoporosis is readily recognized as a syndrome afflicting the elderly population because of the insipid and asymptomatic nature of bone loss that does not typically manifest as fractures until after age approximately 60. It is not the thesis of this review to suggest that spaceflight-induced bone loss is similar to bone loss induced by metabolic bone disease; rather this review draws parallels between the rapid and earlier loss in females that occurs with menopause and the rapid bone loss in middle-aged crew members that occurs with spaceflight unloading and how the cumulative effects of spaceflight and ageing could be detrimental, particularly if skeletal effects are totally or partially irreversible. In brief, this report will provide detailed evidence that long-duration crew members, exposed to the weightlessness of space for the typical long-duration (4-6 months) mission on Mir or the International Space Station -- 1. Display bone resorption that is aggressive, that targets normally weight-bearing skeletal sites, that is uncoupled to bone formation and that results in areal BMD deficits that can range between 6-20% of preflight BMD; 2. Display compartment-specific declines in volumetric BMD in the proximal femur (a skeletal site of clinical interest) that significantly reduces its compressive and bending strength and which may account for the loss in hip bone strength (i.e., force to failure); 3. Recover BMD over a post-flight time period that

  9. Simultaneous measurement of refractive index and thickness distributions using low-coherence digital holography and vertical scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Kaho; Ohshima, Masashi; Nomura, Takanori

    2014-01-01

    The simultaneous measurement method of a refractive index distribution and a thickness distribution using low-coherence digital holography with a vertical scanning is proposed. The proposed method consists of a combination of digital holography and low-coherence interferometry. The introduction of a datum plane enables the measurement of both a refractive index distribution and a thickness distribution. By the optical experiment, the potential of the proposed method is confirmed. (paper)

  10. High-intensity x-ray holography: an approach to high-resolution snapshot imaging of biological specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solem, J.C.

    1982-08-01

    The crucial physical and technological issues pertaining to the holographic imaging of biological structures with a short-pulse, high-intensity, high-quantum-energy laser were examined. The limitations of x-ray optics are discussed. Alternative holographic techniques were considered, and it was concluded that far-field Fresnel transform holography (Fraunhofer holography) using a photoresist recording surface is most tractable with near term technology. The hydrodynamic expansion of inhomogeneities within the specimen is discussed. It is shown that expansion is the major source of image blurring. Analytic expressions were derived for the explosion of protein concentrations in an x-ray transparent cytoplasm, compared with numerical calculations, and corrections derived to account for the competitive transport processes by which these inhomogeneities lose energy. It is concluded that for the near term Fresnel transform holography, particularly, far-field or Fraunhofer holography, is more practical than Fourier transform holography. Of the alternative fine grain recording media for use with Fresnel transform holography, a photo-resist is most attractive. For best resolution, exposure times must be limited to a few picoseconds, and this calls for investigation of mechanisms to shutter the laser or gate the recording surface. The best contrast ratio between the nitrogen-bearing polymers (protein and the nucleic acids) and water is between the K-edges of oxygen and nitrogen

  11. High-intensity x-ray holography: an approach to high-resolution snapshot imaging of biological specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solem, J.C.

    1982-08-01

    The crucial physical and technological issues pertaining to the holographic imaging of biological structures with a short-pulse, high-intensity, high-quantum-energy laser were examined. The limitations of x-ray optics are discussed. Alternative holographic techniques were considered, and it was concluded that far-field Fresnel transform holography (Fraunhofer holography) using a photoresist recording surface is most tractable with near term technology. The hydrodynamic expansion of inhomogeneities within the specimen is discussed. It is shown that expansion is the major source of image blurring. Analytic expressions were derived for the explosion of protein concentrations in an x-ray transparent cytoplasm, compared with numerical calculations, and corrections derived to account for the competitive transport processes by which these inhomogeneities lose energy. It is concluded that for the near term Fresnel transform holography, particularly, far-field or Fraunhofer holography, is more practical than Fourier transform holography. Of the alternative fine grain recording media for use with Fresnel transform holography, a photo-resist is most attractive. For best resolution, exposure times must be limited to a few picoseconds, and this calls for investigation of mechanisms to shutter the laser or gate the recording surface. The best contrast ratio between the nitrogen-bearing polymers (protein and the nucleic acids) and water is between the K-edges of oxygen and nitrogen.

  12. Human Spaceflight Technology Needs - A Foundation for JSC's Technology Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecklein, Jonette M.

    2013-01-01

    Human space exploration has always been heavily influenced by goals to achieve a specific mission on a specific schedule. This approach drove rapid technology development, the rapidity of which adds risks as well as provides a major driver for costs and cost uncertainty. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is now approaching the extension of human presence throughout the solar system by balancing a proactive yet less schedule-driven development of technology with opportunistic scheduling of missions as the needed technologies are realized. This approach should provide cost effective, low risk technology development that will enable efficient and effective manned spaceflight missions. As a first step, the NASA Human Spaceflight Architecture Team (HAT) has identified a suite of critical technologies needed to support future manned missions across a range of destinations, including in cis-lunar space, near earth asteroid visits, lunar exploration, Mars moons, and Mars exploration. The challenge now is to develop a strategy and plan for technology development that efficiently enables these missions over a reasonable time period, without increasing technology development costs unnecessarily due to schedule pressure, and subsequently mitigating development and mission risks. NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC), as the nation s primary center for human exploration, is addressing this challenge through an innovative approach in allocating Internal Research and Development funding to projects. The HAT Technology Needs (TechNeeds) Database has been developed to correlate across critical technologies and the NASA Office of Chief Technologist Technology Area Breakdown Structure (TABS). The TechNeeds Database illuminates that many critical technologies may support a single technical capability gap, that many HAT technology needs may map to a single TABS technology discipline, and that a single HAT technology need may map to multiple TABS technology

  13. Modelling of the Nutrient Medium for Plants Cultivation in Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechitailo, Galina S.

    2016-07-01

    MODELLING OF THE NUTRIENT MEDIUM FOR PLANTS CULTIVATION IN SPACEFLIGHT Nechitajlo G.S.*, Rakhmetova A.A.**, Bogoslovskaja O.A.**, Ol'hovskay I.P.**, Glushchenko N.N.** *Emanuel Institute of Biochemical Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences (IBCP RAS) mail: spacemal@mail.ru **V.L. Talrose Institute for Energy Problems of Chemical Physics of Russian Academy of Science (INEPCP RAS) mail: nnglu@ mail.ru The valuable life and fruitful activity of cosmonauts and researchers in conditions of spaceflights and prolonged work at space stations are only possible with creating life area providing fresh air, natural food, comfortable psychological conditions, etc. The solution of that problem under space conditions seems impossible without use of high nano- and biotechnologies for plants growth. A priority should be given not only to choose species of growth plants in space, but also to improve conditions for their growth which includes optimal nourishing components for plants, preparation of nutrient mediums, illumination and temperature. We are deeply convinced that just manipulations with growing conditions for cultivated plants, but not genes changes, is a guarantee of success in the decision of this problem. For improving the method of plants growing on the artificial nutrient medium with balanced content of components, being necessary for growth and development of plants, we added essential metal elements: Fe, Zn, Cu - in an electroneutral state in the form of nanoparticles instead of sulfates or other easily dissolving salts. Nanoparticulated metals are known to have a number of advantages in comparison with salts: metals in an electroneutral form are characterized with the prolonged and multifunctional action, low toxicity per se and appearing to be much below the toxicity of the same metals in the ionic forms, accumulation as a reserve being used in biotic dozes, active distribution in bodies and organs of plants and stimulation of vital processes. A high reactivity

  14. Incidence of clinical symptoms during long-duration orbital spaceflight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crucian B

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Brian Crucian,1 Adriana Babiak-Vazquez,2 Smith Johnston,1 Duane L Pierson,1 C Mark Ott,1 Clarence Sams1 1Biomedical Research and Environmental Sciences Division, NASA-Johnson Space Center, 2Epidemiology/Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health, KBR-Wyle, Houston, TX, USA Background: The environment of spaceflight may elevate an astronaut’s clinical risk for specific diseases. The purpose of this study was to derive, as accurately as currently possible, an assessment of in-flight clinical “incidence” data, based on observed clinical symptoms in astronauts on board the International Space Station (ISS.Methods: Electronic medical records were examined from 46 long-duration ISS crew members, each serving approximately a 6-month mission on board the ISS, constituting 20.57 total flight years. Incidence for immunological-related adverse health events or relevant clinical symptoms was tabulated in a non-identifiable fashion. Event categories included infectious diseases, allergies, and rashes/hypersensitivities. A subsequent re-evaluation of more notable events, either of prolonged duration or unresponsive to treatment, was performed.Results: For the disease/symptom categories used in this evaluation, the ISS incidence rate was 3.40 events per flight year. Skin rashes were the most reported event (1.12/flight year followed by upper respiratory symptoms (0.97/flight year and various other (non-respiratory infectious processes. During flight, 46% of crew members reported an event deemed “notable”. Among the notable events, 40% were classified as rashes/hypersensitivities. Characterization of on-orbit rashes manifested as redness with irritation, and could present on a variety of body locations.Conclusion: Based on reported symptoms, astronauts experience adverse medical events of varying severity during long-duration spaceflights. The data suggests caution, from both a vehicle design and biomedical countermeasures perspective, as space

  15. The Stability of Bioactive Compounds in Spaceflight Foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, M. R.; Douglas, G. L.

    2017-01-01

    The status and stability of bioactive compounds in the processed and shelf-stable spaceflight food system have not previously been investigated though the presence of such compounds in aged space foods could have health significance for crews on long duration exploration missions. Over forty foods - either existing International Space Station (ISS) food provisioning items, newly developed foods for spaceflight, or commercially-available ready-to-eat foods - that were predicted to have a relatively high concentrations of one or more bioactive compounds (lycopene, lutein, omega-3 fatty acids, phenolics, sterols, and/or flavonoids) were selected for the study. Food samples were sent overnight to the Food Composition Laboratory of the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University (Corvallis, OR) for bioactive compound analysis. Three packages of each product were blended together for the analysis to reduce package-to-package variability. All ISS food items and commercial foods were analyzed initially and after 12 and 24 months of 21degC storage. Food development occurred in a staggered fashion, so data collection for the newly developed foods continues. Lastly, sensory evaluation and additional temperature storage data (4degC, 35degC) for select foods were collected to establish additional stability parameters. Efficacious concentrations of lycopene, lutein, and omega-3 fatty acids were measured in limited spaceflight foods; two grams of sterols a day may be difficult to achieve with the current space diet. Total polyphenol delivery appears stable and adequate, but individual phenolic compounds vary in stability and were not specifically evaluated in this study. The data suggests that some bioactive compounds, like lycopene and lutein, degrade and then plateau at some equilibrium concentration. The anthocyanin stability appears to be related to storage temperature and food matrix, and lutein stability in leafy vegetables may be impacted by storage temperature

  16. Redox Signaling and Its Impact on Skeletal and Vascular Responses to Spaceflight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candice G. T. Tahimic

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Spaceflight entails exposure to numerous environmental challenges with the potential to contribute to both musculoskeletal and vascular dysfunction. The purpose of this review is to describe current understanding of microgravity and radiation impacts on the mammalian skeleton and associated vasculature at the level of the whole organism. Recent experiments from spaceflight and ground-based models have provided fresh insights into how these environmental stresses influence mechanisms that are related to redox signaling, oxidative stress, and tissue dysfunction. Emerging mechanistic knowledge on cellular defenses to radiation and other environmental stressors, including microgravity, are useful for both screening and developing interventions against spaceflight-induced deficits in bone and vascular function.

  17. Redox Signaling and Its Impact on Skeletal and Vascular Responses to Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahimic, Candice; Globus, Ruth K.

    2018-01-01

    Spaceflight entails exposure to numerous environmental challenges with the potential to contribute to both musculoskeletal and vascular dysfunction. The purpose of this review is to describe current understanding of microgravity and radiation impacts on the mammalian skeleton and associated vasculature at the level of the whole organism. Recent experiments from spaceflight and groundbased models have provided fresh insights into how these environmental stresses influence mechanisms that are related to redox signaling, oxidative stress, and tissue dysfunction. Emerging mechanistic knowledge on cellular defenses to radiation and other environmental stressors, including microgravity, are useful for both screening and developing interventions against spaceflight-induced deficits in bone and vascular function.

  18. Nutrition and muscle loss in humans during spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, T. P.

    1999-01-01

    The protein loss in humans during spaceflight is partly due to a normal adaptive response to a decreased work load on the muscles involved in weight bearing. The process is mediated by changes in prostaglandin release, secondary to the decrease in tension on the affected muscles. On missions, where there is a high level of physical demands on the astronauts, there tends to be an energy deficit, which adds to the muscle protein loss and depletes the body fat reserves. While the adaptive response is a normal part of homeostasis, the additional protein loss from an energy deficit can, in the long run, have a negative effect on health and capability of humans to live and work in space and afterward return to Earth.

  19. On Orbit and Beyond Psychological Perspectives on Human Spaceflight

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    As we stand poised on the verge of a new era of spaceflight, we must rethink every element, including the human dimension. This book explores some of the contributions of psychology to yesterday’s great space race, today’s orbiter and International Space Station missions, and tomorrow’s journeys beyond Earth’s orbit. Early missions into space were typically brief, and crews were small, often drawn from a single nation. As international cooperation in space exploration has increased over the decades, the challenges of communicating across cultural boundaries and dealing with interpersonal conflicts have become all the more important, requiring different coping skills and sensibilities than “the right stuff” expected of early astronauts. As astronauts travel to asteroids or establish a permanent colony on the Moon, with the eventual goal of reaching Mars, the duration of expeditions will increase markedly, as will the psychosocial stresses. Away from their home planet for extended times, future spac...

  20. Radiation protection for human spaceflight; Strahlenschutz in der bemannten Weltraumfahrt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajek, M. [Atominstitut, Technische Univ. Wien (Austria)

    2009-07-01

    Cosmic radiation exposure is one of the most significant risks associated with human space exploration. Except for the principles of justification and optimization (ALARA), the concepts of terrestrial radiation protection are of limited applicability to human spaceflight, as until now only few experimentally verified data on the biological effectiveness of heavy ions and the dose distribution within the human body exist. Instead of applying the annual dose limits for workers on ground also to astronauts, whose careers are of comparatively short duration, the overall lifetime risk is used as a measure. For long-term missions outside Earth's magnetic field, the acceptable level of risk has not yet been defined, since there is not enough information available to estimate the risk of effects to the central nervous system and of potential non-cancer radiation health hazards. (orig.)

  1. Research issues for radiation protection for man during prolonged spaceflight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conklin, J.J.; Hagan, M.P.

    1987-01-01

    Stassinopoulos has shown that for a 5-year period during solar maximum, the solar flare predictive model (SOLPRO) predicts four anomalously large solar flares with 89% confidence. When the solar flare hazard is added to the other radiation hazards in space, radiation poses a formidable challenge to providing a safe permanent presence in space. From this it is clear that there are many unknown questions about space radiation, particularly involving HZE particles and the interaction of other space stressors with radiation. Despite the challenge, the authors are optimistic that the problems can be solved. NASA has achieved an extraordinary record of radiation safety during the first 25 years of spaceflight. During the next 25 years in space, the radiobiological challenge will be significantly greater, but so will the rewards. There are many tools that can be applied with current and future technologies. It is their opinion that the problems will be solved, and they require only the commitment to solve them

  2. Standards-Based Wireless Sensor Networking Protocols for Spaceflight Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Raymond S.

    2010-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) have the capacity to revolutionize data gathering in both spaceflight and terrestrial applications. WSNs provide a huge advantage over traditional, wired instrumentation since they do not require wiring trunks to connect sensors to a central hub. This allows for easy sensor installation in hard to reach locations, easy expansion of the number of sensors or sensing modalities, and reduction in both system cost and weight. While this technology offers unprecedented flexibility and adaptability, implementing it in practice is not without its difficulties. Recent advances in standards-based WSN protocols for industrial control applications have come a long way to solving many of the challenges facing practical WSN deployments. In this paper, we will overview two of the more promising candidates - WirelessHART from the HART Communication Foundation and ISA100.11a from the International Society of Automation - and present the architecture for a new standards-based sensor node for networking and applications research.

  3. Fibroblast Growth Factor-23 in Bed Rest and Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokhari, R.; Zwart, S. R; Fields, E.; Heer, M.; Sibonga, J.; Smith, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Many nutritional factors influence bone, from the basics of calcium and vitamin D, to factors which influence bone through acid/base balance, including protein, sodium, and more. Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a recently identified factor, secreted from osteocytes, which is involved in classic (albeit complex) feedback loops controlling phosphorus homeostasis through both vitamin D and parathyroid hormone (PTH) (1, 2). As osteocytes are gravity sensing cells, it is important to determine if there are changes in FGF23 during spaceflight. In extreme cases, such as chronic kidney disease, FGF23 levels are highly elevated. FGF23 imbalances, secondary to dietary influences, may contribute to skeletal demineralization and kidney stone risk during spaceflight. Presented with an imbalanced dietary phosphorus to calcium ratio, increased secretion of FGF23 will inhibit renal phosphorus reabsorption, resulting in increased excretion and reduced circulating phosphorus. Increased intake and excretion of phosphorus is associated with increased kidney stone risk in both the terrestrial and microgravity environments. Highly processed foods and carbonated beverages are associated with higher phosphorus content. Ideally, the dietary calcium to phosphorus ratio should be at minimum 1:1. Nutritional requirements for spaceflight suggest that this ratio not be less than 0.67 (3), while the International Space Station (ISS) menu provides 1020 mg Ca and 1856 mg P, for a ratio of 0.55 (3). Subjects in NASA's bed rest studies, by design, have consumed intake ratios much closer to 1.0 (4). FGF23 also has an inhibitory influence on PTH secretion and 1(alpha)-hydroxylase, both of which are required for activating vitamin D with the conversion of 25-hydroxyvitamin D to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D. Decreased 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D will result in decreased intestinal phosphorus absorption, and increased urinary phosphorus excretion (via decreased renal reabsorption). Should a decrease in 1

  4. Spaceflight effects on T lymphocyte distribution, function and gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gridley, Daila S.; Slater, James M.; Luo-Owen, Xian; Rizvi, Asma; Chapes, Stephen K.; Stodieck, Louis S.; Ferguson, Virginia L.; Pecaut, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    The immune system is highly sensitive to stressors present during spaceflight. The major emphasis of this study was on the T lymphocytes in C57BL/6NTac mice after return from a 13-day space shuttle mission (STS-118). Spleens and thymuses from flight animals (FLT) and ground controls similarly housed in animal enclosure modules (AEM) were evaluated within 3–6 h after landing. Phytohemagglutinin-induced splenocyte DNA synthesis was significantly reduced in FLT mice when based on both counts per minute and stimulation indexes (P < 0.05). Flow cytometry showed that CD3+ T and CD19+ B cell counts were low in spleens from the FLT group, whereas the number of NK1.1+ natural killer (NK) cells was increased (P < 0.01 for all three populations vs. AEM). The numerical changes resulted in a low percentage of T cells and high percentage of NK cells in FLT animals (P < 0.05). After activation of spleen cells with anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody, interleukin-2 (IL-2) was decreased, but IL-10, interferon-γ, and macrophage inflammatory protein-1α were increased in FLT mice (P < 0.05). Analysis of cancer-related genes in the thymus showed that the expression of 30 of 84 genes was significantly affected by flight (P < 0.05). Genes that differed from AEM controls by at least 1.5-fold were Birc5, Figf, Grb2, and Tert (upregulated) and Fos, Ifnb1, Itgb3, Mmp9, Myc, Pdgfb, S100a4, Thbs, and Tnf (downregulated). Collectively, the data show that T cell distribution, function, and gene expression are significantly modified shortly after return from the spaceflight environment. PMID:18988762

  5. Incidence of clinical symptoms during long-duration orbital spaceflight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucian, Brian; Babiak-Vazquez, Adriana; Johnston, Smith; Pierson, Duane L; Ott, C Mark; Sams, Clarence

    2016-01-01

    The environment of spaceflight may elevate an astronaut's clinical risk for specific diseases. The purpose of this study was to derive, as accurately as currently possible, an assessment of in-flight clinical "incidence" data, based on observed clinical symptoms in astronauts on board the International Space Station (ISS). Electronic medical records were examined from 46 long-duration ISS crew members, each serving approximately a 6-month mission on board the ISS, constituting 20.57 total flight years. Incidence for immunological-related adverse health events or relevant clinical symptoms was tabulated in a non-identifiable fashion. Event categories included infectious diseases, allergies, and rashes/hypersensitivities. A subsequent re-evaluation of more notable events, either of prolonged duration or unresponsive to treatment, was performed. For the disease/symptom categories used in this evaluation, the ISS incidence rate was 3.40 events per flight year. Skin rashes were the most reported event (1.12/flight year) followed by upper respiratory symptoms (0.97/flight year) and various other (non-respiratory) infectious processes. During flight, 46% of crew members reported an event deemed "notable". Among the notable events, 40% were classified as rashes/hypersensitivities. Characterization of on-orbit rashes manifested as redness with irritation, and could present on a variety of body locations. Based on reported symptoms, astronauts experience adverse medical events of varying severity during long-duration spaceflights. The data suggests caution, from both a vehicle design and biomedical countermeasures perspective, as space agencies plan for prolonged deep space exploration missions.

  6. Symmetric and asymmetric hybrid cryptosystem based on compressive sensing and computer generated holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lihong; Jin, Weimin

    2018-01-01

    A novel symmetric and asymmetric hybrid optical cryptosystem is proposed based on compressive sensing combined with computer generated holography. In this method there are six encryption keys, among which two decryption phase masks are different from the two random phase masks used in the encryption process. Therefore, the encryption system has the feature of both symmetric and asymmetric cryptography. On the other hand, because computer generated holography can flexibly digitalize the encrypted information and compressive sensing can significantly reduce data volume, what is more, the final encryption image is real function by phase truncation, the method favors the storage and transmission of the encryption data. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed encryption scheme boosts the security and has high robustness against noise and occlusion attacks.

  7. High-resolution magnetic-domain imaging by Fourier transform holography at 21 nm wavelength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaffert, Stefan; Pfau, Bastian; Günther, Christian M; Schneider, Michael; Korff Schmising, Clemens von; Eisebitt, Stefan; Geilhufe, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Exploiting x-ray magnetic circular dichroism at the L-edges of 3d transition metals, Fourier transform holography has become a standard technique to investigate magnetic samples with sub-100 nm spatial resolution. Here, magnetic imaging in the 21 nm wavelength regime using M-edge circular dichroism is demonstrated. Ultrafast pulses in this wavelength regime are increasingly available from both laser- and accelerator-driven soft x-ray sources. We explain the adaptations concerning sample preparation and data evaluation compared to conventional holography in the 1 nm wavelength range. We find the correction of the Fourier transform hologram to in-plane Fourier components to be critical for high-quality reconstruction and demonstrate 70 nm spatial resolution in magnetization imaging with this approach. (paper)

  8. Patch near-field acoustic holography: The influence of acoustic contributions from outside the source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Grande, Efren; Jacobsen, Finn; Zhang, Yong-Bin

    2009-01-01

    It is a requirement of conventional Near-field Acoustic Holography that the measurement area covers the entire surface of the source. In the case of Patch Near-field Acoustic Holography (patch NAH), the measurement area can be reduced to cover only a specific area of the source which...... is of particular interest (known as the “patch” or “source patch”). The area of the source beyond this patch is not of interest in the analysis. However, its acoustic output may nevertheless contribute to the total sound field in the measurement plane, and influence the reconstruction of the field close...... to the patch. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the acoustic radiation from outside the patch area influences the reconstruction of the sound field close to the source. The reconstruction is based on simulated measurements of sound pressure and particle velocity. The methods used in this paper...

  9. The Current Status of the Development of Light-Sensitive Media for Holography (a Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barachevsky, V. A.

    2018-03-01

    The results of studies that have been performed over the last decade in the field of development of silver halide and nonsilver holographic recording media of organic and inorganic origin are analyzed. It is shown that previously developed materials mainly allow the development of holographic investigations. Among irreversible materials, considerable progress has been made in improving the characteristics of photopolymerizable recording media, which has allowed their use in color image holography and 3D optical archive-type memory, as well as for fabricating holographic optical elements. In the field of improving the properties of reversible holographic recording media, practically significant results have been obtained for the creation of photoanisotropic materials based on azo dyes experiencing cis-trans photoisomerization, which allow the recording of polarization holograms. The needs of dynamic holography have been satisfied by lightsensitive doped inorganic crystals and polymer layers that have been created with nonlinear optical properties.

  10. Applications Of A Fibre Optic TV Holography System To The Study Of Large Automotive Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Jeremy C.; Buckberry, Clive H.

    1990-04-01

    Mono-mode fibre optic components, including directional couplers and piezo-electric phase control elements, have been used to construct a TV holography system. The instrument has advantages of simplicity and ruggedness of construction and, with a 40m fibre optic link to a 600m argon ion laser, has proved to be an ideal tool for studying the structural behaviour of automotive assemblies. The TV holography system is described and two examples presented of its use: analysis of the deformation of a petrol engine cylinder bore due to head bolt forces, and the vibration study of a vehicle bodyshell subjected to wheel induced inputs. Limitations in the application of the technique are identified and future work to address these shortcomings outlined.

  11. Trajectory and velocity measurement of a particle in spray by digital holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lue Qieni; Chen Yiliang; Yuan Rui; Ge Baozhen; Gao Yan; Zhang Yimo

    2009-12-20

    We present a method for the trajectory and the velocity measurement of a particle in spray by digital holography. Based on multiple exposure digital in-line holography, a sequence of digital holograms of a dynamic spray particle field at different times are recorded with a CW laser and a high-speed CCD. The time evolution of the serial positions of particles, i.e., the motion trajectories of the particles, is obtained by numerically reconstructing the synthetic hologram of a sequence of digital holograms. The center coordinate (x,y) of each particle image can be extracted using a Hough transform and subpixel precision computing, and the velocity of an individual particle can also be obtained, which is then applied to measuring the velocity of diesel spray and alcohol spray. The research shows that the method presented in this paper for measuring spray field is feasible.

  12. Improvement of the accuracy of phase observation by modification of phase-shifting electron holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Takahiro; Aizawa, Shinji; Tanigaki, Toshiaki [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ota, Keishin, E-mail: ota@microphase.co.jp [Microphase Co., Ltd., Onigakubo 1147-9, Tsukuba, Ibaragi 300-2651 (Japan); Matsuda, Tsuyoshi [Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi-shi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Tonomura, Akira [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, Graduate University, Kunigami, Okinawa 904-0495 (Japan); Central Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., Hatoyama, Saitama 350-0395 (Japan)

    2012-07-15

    We found that the accuracy of the phase observation in phase-shifting electron holography is strongly restricted by time variations of mean intensity and contrast of the holograms. A modified method was developed for correcting these variations. Experimental results demonstrated that the modification enabled us to acquire a large number of holograms, and as a result, the accuracy of the phase observation has been improved by a factor of 5. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A modified phase-shifting electron holography was proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The time variation of mean intensity and contrast of holograms were corrected. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These corrections lead to a great improvement of the resultant phase accuracy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A phase accuracy of about 1/4000 rad was achieved from experimental results.

  13. Direct Observation of Individual Charges and Their Dynamics on Graphene by Low-Energy Electron Holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Wicki, Flavio; Longchamp, Jean-Nicolas; Escher, Conrad; Fink, Hans-Werner

    2016-09-14

    Visualizing individual charges confined to molecules and observing their dynamics with high spatial resolution is a challenge for advancing various fields in science, ranging from mesoscopic physics to electron transfer events in biological molecules. We show here that the high sensitivity of low-energy electrons to local electric fields can be employed to directly visualize individual charged adsorbates and to study their behavior in a quantitative way. This makes electron holography a unique probing tool for directly visualizing charge distributions with a sensitivity of a fraction of an elementary charge. Moreover, spatial resolution in the nanometer range and fast data acquisition inherent to lens-less low-energy electron holography allows for direct visual inspection of charge transfer processes.

  14. Investigating the use of the acousto-optic effect for acoustic holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torras Rosell, Antoni; Fernandez Grande, Efren; Jacobsen, Finn

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the acousto-optic effect, that is, the interaction between sound and light, can be used as a means to visualize acoustic fields in the audible frequency range. The changes of density caused by sound waves propagating in air induce phase shifts to a laser beam...... that travels through the acoustic field. This phenomenon can in practice be captured with a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV), and the pressure distribution of the acoustic field can be reconstructed using tomography. The present work investigates the potential of the acousto-optic effect in acoustic holography....... Two different holographic methods are examined for this purpose. One method first reconstructs the hologram plane using acousto-optic tomography and then propagates it using conventional near-field acoustic holography (NAH). The other method exploits the so-called Fourier Slice Theorem and bases all...

  15. Tabletop single-shot extreme ultraviolet Fourier transform holography of an extended object.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malm, Erik B; Monserud, Nils C; Brown, Christopher G; Wachulak, Przemyslaw W; Xu, Huiwen; Balakrishnan, Ganesh; Chao, Weilun; Anderson, Erik; Marconi, Mario C

    2013-04-22

    We demonstrate single and multi-shot Fourier transform holography with the use of a tabletop extreme ultraviolet laser. The reference wave was produced by a Fresnel zone plate with a central opening that allowed the incident beam to illuminate the sample directly. The high reference wave intensity allows for larger objects to be imaged compared to mask-based lensless Fourier transform holography techniques. We obtain a spatial resolution of 169 nm from a single laser pulse and a resolution of 128 nm from an accumulation of 20 laser pulses for an object ~11x11μm(2) in size. This experiment utilized a tabletop extreme ultraviolet laser that produces a highly coherent ~1.2 ns laser pulse at 46.9 nm wavelength.

  16. Digital twin image elimination in soft x-ray in-line holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koren, G.; Joyeux, D.

    1993-01-01

    In-line holography is attractive for X-ray microscopy due to its recording simplicity. A drawback of this method is the superposition of the virtual and real images, in which structures and details can be modified or lost. This superposition effectively limits the application of in-line holography to X-ray microscopy. The authors present an iterative constrained algorithm for twin image elimination from Gabor holograms of finite support objects. It is based in the different spatial extent of both images, together with a finite support constraint. The conditions under which the algorithm is applicable will be presented, together with an alternative Monte Carlo method for holograms of complex objects recorded in the shadow region

  17. Shifted knife-edge aperture digital in-line holography for fluid velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palero, Virginia; Lobera, Julia; Andrés, Nieves; Arroyo, M Pilar

    2014-06-01

    We describe a digital holography technique that, with the simplicity of an in-line configuration, produces holograms where the real and virtual images are completely separated, as in an off-axis configuration. An in-line setup, in which the object is imaged near the sensor, is modified by placing a shifted knife-edge aperture that blocks half the frequency spectrum at the focal plane of the imaging lens. This simple modification of the in-line holographic configuration allows discriminating the virtual and real images. As a fluid velocimetry technique, the use of this aperture removes the minimum defocusing distance requisite and reduces the out-of-plane velocity measurement errors of classical in-line holography. Results with different test objects are shown.

  18. Penrose limit, spontaneous symmetry breaking, and holography in a pp-wave background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Sumit R.; Gomez, Cesar; Rey, Soo-Jong

    2002-01-01

    We argue that the gauge theory dual to the type IIB string theory in a ten-dimensional pp-wave background resides on a Euclidean subspace spanning four of the eight transverse coordinates. We then show that the evolution of the string along one of the light cone directions in the bulk is identifiable as the RG flow of the gauge theory, a relation facilitating the 'holography' of the pp-wave background. The 'holography' reorganizes the dual gauge theory into theories defined over Hilbert subspaces of fixed R charge. The reorganization breaks the SO(4,2)xSO(6) symmetry to a maximal subgroup SO(4)xSO(4) spontaneously. We argue that the low-energy string modes may be regarded as Goldstone modes resulting from such a symmetry breaking pattern

  19. X-ray holography: X-ray interactions and their effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    London, R.A.; Trebes, J.E.; Rosen, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    The authors summarize a theoretical study of the interactions of x-rays with a biological sample during the creation of a hologram. The choice of an optimal wavelength for x-ray holography is discussed, based on a description of scattering by objects within an aqueous environment. The problem of the motion resulting from the absorption of x-rays during a short exposure is described. The possibility of using very short exposures in order to capture the image before motion can compromise the resolution is explored. The impact of these calculation on the question of the feasibility of using an x-ray laser for holography of biological structures is discussed. 12 refs., 2 figs

  20. Off-axis electron holography for the measurement of active dopants in silicon semiconductor devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, David

    2016-01-01

    There is a need in the semiconductor industry for a dopant profiling technique with nm-scale resolution. Here we demonstrate that off-axis electron holography can be used to provide maps of the electrostatic potential in semiconductor devices with nm-scale resolution. In this paper we will discuss issues regarding the spatial resolution and precision of the technique. Then we will discuss problems with specimen preparation and how this affects the accuracy of the measurements of the potentials. Finally we show results from experimental off-axis electron holography applied to nMOS and pMOS CMOS devices grown on bulk silicon and silicon- on-insulator type devices and present solutions to common problems that are encountered when examining these types of devices. (paper)

  1. Improvement of the accuracy of phase observation by modification of phase-shifting electron holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Takahiro; Aizawa, Shinji; Tanigaki, Toshiaki; Ota, Keishin; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Tonomura, Akira

    2012-01-01

    We found that the accuracy of the phase observation in phase-shifting electron holography is strongly restricted by time variations of mean intensity and contrast of the holograms. A modified method was developed for correcting these variations. Experimental results demonstrated that the modification enabled us to acquire a large number of holograms, and as a result, the accuracy of the phase observation has been improved by a factor of 5. -- Highlights: ► A modified phase-shifting electron holography was proposed. ► The time variation of mean intensity and contrast of holograms were corrected. ► These corrections lead to a great improvement of the resultant phase accuracy. ► A phase accuracy of about 1/4000 rad was achieved from experimental results.

  2. Near-field ptychography: phase retrieval for inline holography using a structured illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockmar, Marco; Cloetens, Peter; Zanette, Irene; Enders, Bjoern; Dierolf, Martin; Pfeiffer, Franz; Thibault, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Inline holography is a common phase-contrast imaging method which uses free-space propagation to encode the phase signal into measured intensities. However, quantitative retrieval of the sample's image remains challenging, imposing constraints on the nature of the sample or on the propagation distance. Here, we present a way of simultaneously retrieving the sample's complex-valued transmission function and the incident illumination function from near-field diffraction patterns. The procedure relies on the measurement diversity created by lateral translations of the sample with respect to a structured illumination. The reconstruction approach, in essence identical to that employed in ptychography, is applied to hard X-ray synchrotron measurements and to simulations. Compared to other inline holography techniques, we expect near-field ptychography to reduce reconstruction artefacts by factoring out wavefront imperfections and relaxing constraints on the sample's scattering properties, thus ultimately improving the robustness of propagation-based X-ray phase tomography.

  3. Digital holography for coherent fiber beam combining with a co-propagative scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antier, Marie; Larat, Christian; Lallier, Eric; Bourderionnet, Jérôme; Primot, Jérôme; Brignon, Arnaud

    2014-09-22

    We present a technique for passive coherent fiber beam combining based on digital holography. In this method, the phase errors between the fibers are compensated by the diffracted phase-conjugated -1 order of a digital hologram. Unlike previous digital holography technique, the probe beams measuring the phase errors between the fibers are co-propagating with the phase-locked signal beams. This architecture is compatible with the use of multi-stage isolated amplifying fibers. It does not require any phase calculation algorithm and its correction is collective. This concept is experimentally demonstrated with three fibers at 1.55 μm. A residual phase error of λ/20 is measured.

  4. Arg1 functions in the physiological adaptation of undifferentiated plant cells to spaceflight

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this study transcriptome profiling was used to gain insight into the spaceflight adaptation role of Altered response to gravity-1 (Arg1) a gene known to affect...

  5. Spaceflight adaptation requires organ specific alterations in the proteomes of Arabidopsis

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Life in spaceflight demonstrates remarkable adaptive processes within the specialized environments of space vehicles which are subject to the myriad of attending and...

  6. Exploration of Habitability Factors Influencing Short Duration Spaceflight: Structured Postflight Interviews of Shuttle Crewmembers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, James; Leveton, Lauren; Keeton, Kathryn; Whitmire, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    Astronauts report significant difficulties with sleep during Space missions. Psychological, physiological, and habitability factors are all thought to play a role in spaceflight insomnia. Crewmembers gain experience with the spaceflight sleep environment as their missions progress, but this knowledge is not formally collected and communicated to subsequent crews. This lack of information transfer prevents crews from optimizing their capability to sleep during mission, which leads to fatigue and its potentially deleterious effects. The goal of this project is astronauts with recent spaceflight experience to gather their knowledge of and insights into sleep in Space. Structured interviews consisting of standardized closed and open-ended questionnaires are administered to astronauts who have flown on the Space Shuttle since the Columbia disaster. It is hoped that review and analysis of the pooled responses to the interview questions will lead to greater understanding of the sleep environment during short duration spaceflight, with attention placed on problem aspects and their potential solutions.

  7. Incidence of Epstein-Barr Virus in Astronaut Saliva During Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Deborah A.; Mehta, Satish K.; Tyring, Stephen K.; Stowe, Raymond P.; Pierson, Duane L.

    1998-01-01

    Astronauts experience psychological and physical stresses that may result in re-activation of latent viruses during spaceflight, potentially increasing the risk of disease among crew members. The shedding of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the saliva of astronauts will increase during spaceflight. A total of 534 saliva specimens were collected from 11 EBV-seropositive astronauts before, during, and after four space shuttle missions. The presence of EBV DNA in saliva, assessed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), was used to determine shedding patterns before, during, and after spaceflight. EBV DNA was detected more frequently before flight than during (p less than 0.001) or after (p less than 0.01) flight. No significant difference between the in-flight and postflight periods was detected in the frequency of occurrence of EBV DNA. The increased frequency of shedding of EBV before flight suggests that stress levels may be greater before launch than during or after spaceflight.

  8. Evidence Report: Risk of Spaceflight Associated Neuro-ocular Syndrome (SANS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenger, Michael B.; Tarver, William J.; Brunstetter, Tyson; Gibson, Charles Robert; Laurie, Steven S.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Macias, Brandon R.; Mader, Thomas H.; Otto, Christian; Smith, Scott M.; hide

    2017-01-01

    A subset of astronauts develop neuro-ocular structural and functional changes during prolonged periods of spaceflight that may lead to additional neurologic and ocular consequences upon return to Earth.

  9. Spaceflight Alters Bacterial Gene Expression and Virulence and Reveals Role for Global Regulator Hfq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; Ott, C. M.; zuBentrup, K. Honer; Ramamurthy R.; Quick, L.; Porwollik, S.; Cheng, P.; McClellan, M.; Tsaprailis, G.; Radabaugh, T.; hide

    2007-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis of both the molecular genetic and phenotypic responses of any organism to the spaceflight environment has never been accomplished due to significant technological and logistical hurdles. Moreover, the effects of spaceflight on microbial pathogenicity and associated infectious disease risks have not been studied. The bacterial pathogen Salmonella typhimurium was grown aboard Space Shuttle mission STS-115 and compared to identical ground control cultures. Global microarray and proteomic analyses revealed 167 transcripts and 73 proteins changed expression with the conserved RNA-binding protein Hfq identified as a likely global regulator involved in the response to this environment. Hfq involvement was confirmed with a ground based microgravity culture model. Spaceflight samples exhibited enhanced virulence in a murine infection model and extracellular matrix accumulation consistent with a biofilm. Strategies to target Hfq and related regulators could potentially decrease infectious disease risks during spaceflight missions and provide novel therapeutic options on Earth.

  10. Deep Space Spaceflight Hazards Effects on Cognition, Behavioral Health, and Behavioral Biomarkers in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, T. J.; Norsk, P.; Zwart, S.; Crucian, B.; Simonsen, L. C.; Antonsen, E.

    2018-02-01

    Deep Space Gateway missions provide testing grounds to identify the risk of both behavioral performance and cognitive perturbations caused by stressors of spaceflight such as radiation, fluid shifts, sleep deprivation, chronic stress, and others.

  11. 3D velocity measurements in fluid flows using multiple exposure holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanislas, M.; Rodriguez, O.; Dadi, M.; Beluche, F.

    1987-01-01

    An account is given of multiple exposure holography's application to the measurement of velocity in fluid flows. The method is nonintrusive, and yields access to the three components of the instantaneous velocity in three-dimensional domains. These characteristics render such holographic data complementary to classical LDV. Attention is given to solutions proposed for such limitations inherent in the method as the rather lengthy acquisition time; this difficulty is presently addressed by means of an automated evaluation methodology. 12 references

  12. Optical sectioning for optical scanning holography using phase-space filtering with Wigner distribution functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hwi; Min, Sung-Wook; Lee, Byoungho; Poon, Ting-Chung

    2008-07-01

    We propose a novel optical sectioning method for optical scanning holography, which is performed in phase space by using Wigner distribution functions together with the fractional Fourier transform. The principle of phase-space optical sectioning for one-dimensional signals, such as slit objects, and two-dimensional signals, such as rectangular objects, is first discussed. Computer simulation results are then presented to substantiate the proposed idea.

  13. Experimental demonstration of high resolution three-dimensional x-ray holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNulty, I.; Trebes, J.E.; Brase, J.M.; Yorkey, T.J.; Levesque, R.; Szoke, H.; Anderson, E.H.; Jacobsen, C.

    1992-01-01

    Tomographic x-ray holography may make possible the imaging of biological objects at high resolution in three dimensions. We performed a demonstration experiment with soft x-rays to explore the feasibility of this technique. Coherent 3.2-nm undulator radiation was used to record Fourier transform holograms of a microfabricated test object from various illumination angles. The holograms were numerically reconstructed according to the principles of diffraction tomography, yielding images of the object that are well resolved in three dimensions

  14. A low error reconstruction method for confocal holography to determine 3-dimensional properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquemin, P.B., E-mail: pbjacque@nps.edu [Mechanical Engineering, University of Victoria, EOW 548,800 Finnerty Road, Victoria, BC (Canada); Herring, R.A. [Mechanical Engineering, University of Victoria, EOW 548,800 Finnerty Road, Victoria, BC (Canada)

    2012-06-15

    A confocal holography microscope developed at the University of Victoria uniquely combines holography with a scanning confocal microscope to non-intrusively measure fluid temperatures in three-dimensions (Herring, 1997), (Abe and Iwasaki, 1999), (Jacquemin et al., 2005). The Confocal Scanning Laser Holography (CSLH) microscope was built and tested to verify the concept of 3D temperature reconstruction from scanned holograms. The CSLH microscope used a focused laser to non-intrusively probe a heated fluid specimen. The focused beam probed the specimen instead of a collimated beam in order to obtain different phase-shift data for each scan position. A collimated beam produced the same information for scanning along the optical propagation z-axis. No rotational scanning mechanisms were used in the CSLH microscope which restricted the scan angle to the cone angle of the probe beam. Limited viewing angle scanning from a single view point window produced a challenge for tomographic 3D reconstruction. The reconstruction matrices were either singular or ill-conditioned making reconstruction with significant error or impossible. Establishing boundary conditions with a particular scanning geometry resulted in a method of reconstruction with low error referred to as 'wily'. The wily reconstruction method can be applied to microscopy situations requiring 3D imaging where there is a single viewpoint window, a probe beam with high numerical aperture, and specified boundary conditions for the specimen. The issues and progress of the wily algorithm for the CSLH microscope are reported herein. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Evaluation of an optical confocal holography device to measure 3D temperature of a heated fluid. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Processing of multiple holograms containing the cumulative refractive index through the fluid. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reconstruction issues due to restricting angular scanning to the numerical aperture of the

  15. Defect modes in silver-doped photonic crystals made by holography using dichromated gelatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Rui; Chen, Shujing; Ren, Zhi; Wang, Zhaona; Liu, Dahe

    2012-10-01

    The defect mode in silver-doped photonic crystals is investigated. 1D and 3D photonic crystals were made by holography using dichromated gelatin mixed with silver nitrate. By controlling the concentration of the silver nitrate, the defect mode was observed in the bandgaps of the holographic photonic crystals. The numerical simulations were made, and the results showed the consistency with the experimental observations.

  16. Towards quantitative electrostatic potential mapping of working semiconductor devices using off-axis electron holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdi, Sadegh; Kasama, Takeshi; Beleggia, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Pronounced improvements in the understanding of semiconductor device performance are expected if electrostatic potential distributions can be measured quantitatively and reliably under working conditions with sufficient sensitivity and spatial resolution. Here, we employ off-axis electron...... holography to characterize an electrically-biased Si p-. n junction by measuring its electrostatic potential, electric field and charge density distributions under working conditions. A comparison between experimental electron holographic phase images and images obtained using three-dimensional electrostatic...

  17. Measurement of the traction force of biological cells by digital holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao; Cross, Michael; Liu, Changgeng; Clark, David C.; Haynie, Donald T.; Kim, Myung K.

    2011-01-01

    The traction force produced by biological cells has been visualized as distortions in flexible substrata. We have utilized quantitative phase microscopy by digital holography (DH-QPM) to study the wrinkling of a silicone rubber film by motile fibroblasts. Surface deformation and the cellular traction force have been measured from phase profiles in a direct and straightforward manner. DH-QPM is shown to provide highly efficient and versatile means for quantitatively analyzing cellular motility. PMID:22254175

  18. Electron holography study of the charging effect in microfibrils of sciatic nerve tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Hyun; Akase, Zentaro; Shindo, Daisuke; Ohno, Nobuhiko; Fujii, Yasuhisa; Terada, Nobuo; Ohno, Shinichi

    2013-08-01

    The charging effects of microfibrils of sciatic nerve tissues due to electron irradiation are investigated using electron holography. The phenomenon that the charging effects are enhanced with an increase of electron intensity is visualized through direct observations of the electric potential distribution around the specimen. The electric potential at the surface of the specimen could be quantitatively evaluated by simulation, which takes into account the reference wave modulation due to the long-range electric field.

  19. A study of the electrode/solution interface during electrochemical reactions by digital holography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHENHAO CHEN

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Digital holography was used to study in situ the dynamic changes of the electrode/solution interface and the solution near the electrode during the anodic process of iron in a sulfuric acid solution. The effects of chloride, bromide and iodine ions on this process were also investigated. The magnetic field also has effects on the process. The effects are discussed in combination with SEM results.

  20. A low error reconstruction method for confocal holography to determine 3-dimensional properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquemin, P.B.; Herring, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    A confocal holography microscope developed at the University of Victoria uniquely combines holography with a scanning confocal microscope to non-intrusively measure fluid temperatures in three-dimensions (Herring, 1997), (Abe and Iwasaki, 1999), (Jacquemin et al., 2005). The Confocal Scanning Laser Holography (CSLH) microscope was built and tested to verify the concept of 3D temperature reconstruction from scanned holograms. The CSLH microscope used a focused laser to non-intrusively probe a heated fluid specimen. The focused beam probed the specimen instead of a collimated beam in order to obtain different phase-shift data for each scan position. A collimated beam produced the same information for scanning along the optical propagation z-axis. No rotational scanning mechanisms were used in the CSLH microscope which restricted the scan angle to the cone angle of the probe beam. Limited viewing angle scanning from a single view point window produced a challenge for tomographic 3D reconstruction. The reconstruction matrices were either singular or ill-conditioned making reconstruction with significant error or impossible. Establishing boundary conditions with a particular scanning geometry resulted in a method of reconstruction with low error referred to as “wily”. The wily reconstruction method can be applied to microscopy situations requiring 3D imaging where there is a single viewpoint window, a probe beam with high numerical aperture, and specified boundary conditions for the specimen. The issues and progress of the wily algorithm for the CSLH microscope are reported herein. -- Highlights: ► Evaluation of an optical confocal holography device to measure 3D temperature of a heated fluid. ► Processing of multiple holograms containing the cumulative refractive index through the fluid. ► Reconstruction issues due to restricting angular scanning to the numerical aperture of the beam. ► Minimizing tomographic reconstruction error by defining boundary