WorldWideScience

Sample records for shinnecock nation cultural

  1. By Their Very Presence: Rethinking Research and Partnering for Change with Educators and Artists from Long Island's Shinnecock Nation Cultural Center and Museum

    Caracciolo, Diane

    2009-01-01

    This paper recounts the non-Native author's journey toward understanding and enacting Indigenous research paradigms in her home region of Long Island, New York. Unknown to most Long Islanders, their region, which extends over 100 miles eastward from Manhattan, contains two state recognized Native reserves--Shinnecock and Poospatuck. Long Island is…

  2. 75 FR 34760 - Final Determination for Federal Acknowledgment of the Shinnecock Indian Nation

    2010-06-18

    ... interpreted to require tracing ancestry to the earliest history of a group'' (Shinnecock PF, 13), and that..., this notice will be posted on the Department's Indian Affairs Web site at http://www.bia.gov . The May...

  3. Hydrologic assessment of the shallow groundwater flow system beneath the Shinnecock Nation tribal lands, Suffolk County, New York

    Noll, Michael L.; Rivera, Simonette L.; Busciolano, Ronald J.

    2016-12-02

    Defining the distribution and flow of shallow groundwater beneath the Shinnecock Nation tribal lands in Suffolk County, New York, is a crucial first step in identifying sources of potential contamination to the surficial aquifer and coastal ecosystems. The surficial or water table aquifer beneath the tribal lands is the primary source of potable water supply for at least 6 percent of the households on the tribal lands. Oyster fisheries and other marine ecosystems are critical to the livelihood of many residents living on the tribal lands, but are susceptible to contamination from groundwater entering the embayment from the surficial aquifer. Contamination of the surficial aquifer from flooding during intense coastal storms, nutrient loading from fertilizers, and septic effluent have been identified as potential sources of human and ecological health concerns on tribal lands.The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) facilitated the installation of 17 water table wells on and adjacent to the tribal lands during March 2014. These wells were combined with other existing wells to create a 32-well water table monitoring network that was used to assess local hydrologic conditions. Survey-grade, global-navigation-satellite systems provided centimeter-level accuracy for positioning wellhead surveys. Water levels were measured by the USGS during May (spring) and November (fall) 2014 to evaluate seasonal effects on the water table. Water level measurements were made at high and low tide during May 2014 to identify potential effects on the water table caused by changes in tidal stage (tidal flux) in Shinnecock Bay. Water level contour maps indicate that the surficial aquifer is recharged by precipitation and upgradient groundwater flow that moves from the recharge zone located generally beneath Sunrise Highway, to the discharge zone beneath the tribal lands, and eventually discharges into the embayment, tidal creeks, and estuaries that bound the tribal lands to the east, south, and

  4. Shinnecock Inlet, New York, Site Investigation Report 3, Selected Field Data Report for 1997, 1998, 1999 Velocity and Sediment Surveys

    Pratt, Thad

    2001-01-01

    .... This fieldwork included ADCP current measurements and sediment sampling in the inlet channel, the Atlantic Ocean encompassing the ebb shoal, and Shinnecock Bay including the navigation channels and flood shoal...

  5. Algerian National Culture and TQM

    Abdelkrim Yahia-Berrouiguet

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature on total quality management confirmed that the national culture has an effect on total quality management implementation. The aim of this study is to compare the Algerian national culture and the TQM culture. The results indicated that not all the national culture dimensions are appropriate for TQM implementation in the Algerian context: the collectivism dimension is appropriate, the power distance and uncertainty avoidance dimensions are not appropriate.

  6. The Culture of Nationalism

    2013-12-01

    transformation into tools of the extremist nationalist state applies, at least in its broad strokes, to such other art forms as music , theater, or opera. A...monuments were an effective part of the liturgy of public festivals which the Nazis adopted and extended. This development played a key role in the...an area that provided space for festivals and celebrations. A sort of pilgrimage to these sites of national significance was carried out to worship

  7. Culture Analysis: The Interaction of Organizational and National Culture

    Marina Arnoldovna Makarchenko

    2015-01-01

    The article is devoted to the interaction between organizational culture factors. A comparative analysis of the Russian and Argentine companies culture using different methods shows the impact of the national mentality in organizational culture. The thesis is the need to introduce the term "regional culture" in relation to modern Russia.

  8. Cultural policy for national development

    Nsekela, A J

    1977-02-01

    Cultural policy decisions to alleviate poverty in the Third World are viewed as a moral obligation on the part of industrialized nations to promote an equitable income and service distribution. A review of colonialism on the part of the First toward the Third World concludes that the export of primary products has failed to bring an equal return of industrialization because of the inflated prices of manufactured goods and processes. Policies aimed at eliminating the lack of opportunity in the Third World must attack the three areas of poverty, unemployment, and inequality (racial and sexual). Economic integration of these nations requires a better linkage between natural resources, technology, knowledge, and human resources. More attention is needed to the use of national resources for the manufacture of products that will be used domestically and also exported to international markets. Basic to economic development is the raising of the educational, health, and income levels of the people. A philosophical program is outlined for developing policies that will promote human development. (DCK)

  9. National Culture Influence over the Organizational Culture in Romania

    Carataº Maria Alina; Spãtariu Elena Cerasela

    2012-01-01

    The present paper aims highlighting the characteristics of the organisational culture concept in Romania. In the first part of the paper, we have presented the importance of organizational culture theory through a literature review; we described the factors that have an impact on it. In the second part, we developed ideas about the national culture of Romania, the national frame and how this affects the organizational culture, and we presented its peculiarities.

  10. Knowledge Sharing and National Culture

    Michailova, Snejina; Hutchings, Kate

    2004-01-01

    Much of the knowledge management literature tends to assume a rather universalistunderstanding of knowledge sharing. Yet, attitudes to knowledge sharing as well as actualknowledge-sharing behaviour depend on conditions that vary across institutional and culturalenvironments. This paper contributes...... to the knowledge-sharing literature by specificallydiscussing the interplay between knowledge-sharing and national cultural factors in the context oftransition countries. The paper engages in a comparative examination of two major transitionsocieties, China and Russia, and contributes to understanding...... the complexity of differencesbetween transition economies. The paper is written as a set of theoretical arguments andpropositions that is designed to elucidate more nuanced ways of thinking about knowledgesharing in China and Russia. We argue that in the case of China and Russia, verticalindividualism...

  11. Does National Culture Impact Capital Budgeting Systems?

    Peter J. Graham; Milind Sathye

    2017-01-01

    We examine how national culture impacts organisational selection of capital budgeting systems to develop our understanding of what influence a holistic formulation of national culture has on capital budgeting systems. Such an understanding is important as it would not only provide a clearer link between national culture and capital budgeting systems and advance extant literature but would also help multinational firms that have business relationships with Indonesian firms in suita...

  12. Modernism: Representations of National Culture

    Ersoy, Ahmet; Górny, Maciej; Kechriotis, Vangelis; Ady, Endre; Bedirxan, Celadet Alî; Beöthy, Zsolt; Bobrzyński, Michał; Boilǎ, Romul; Caragiale, Ion Luca; Fikret, Tevfik; Fishta, Gjergj; Gombrowicz, Witold; Górski, Artur; Gusti, Dimitrie; Hašek, Jaroslav

    2012-01-01

    This is the second part of the third volume of the four-volume series, a daring project of CEU Press, presenting the most important texts that triggered and shaped the processes of nation-building in the many countries of Central and Southeast Europe. The aim is to confront ‘mainstream’ and seemingly successful national discourses with each other, thus creating a space for analyzing those narratives of identity which became institutionalized as “national canons.” After the volumes focousing ...

  13. The Impact of National Culture on the Organizational Culture

    ALICIA FLORENCIA URTEAGA

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The relationships between national culture and organizational culture were analysed in 16 Argentinean companies. Sample was integrated by 429 employees (292 male, and 184 female, mean age 35 years old. Subjects completed, in their own work places, a socio-demographic questionnaire,a scale of national culture, and a scale of organizational practices. Results indicated that organizations adopt practices that, on average, reflect the cultural values of their country of origin. Multiple regression analysis showedthat Argentinean national companies are characterized by practices closely associated with collectivism, high power distance, and high uncertainty avoidance. In contrast, Argentinean privatized companies adopted practices most linked to individualism, low power distance, low uncertainty avoidance,low paternalism, and low fatalism. The results are discussed in light of its strengths and weaknesses, and a new agenda for future research is suggested.

  14. The Revival of Chinese Cultural Nationalism

    Yingjie Guo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The debate on Chinse cultural nationalism, as on nationalism in general, is often polarised by a number of theoretical positions, value judgements, practical concerns and methodological choices. While there is no consensus that cultural nationalism has developed into a formidable force in China, few would deny that it has been on the rise since June 4, 1989, and that it is a cultural-political movement with no parallel in the People’s Republic, except perhaps for the period following May 4, 1919. Of central concern in this special issue of PORTAL Journal of Multidisciplinary International Studies are the manifestations of cultural nationalism, the causation of its resurgence in post-Tiananmen China, and the ways in which it is likely to impact on China’s future development.

  15. CULTURAL NATIONALISM AND THE IRISH LITERARY REVIVAL

    David Pierce

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The impact of cultural nationalism on the Insh Literary Revival is a topic of continuing interest for the cultural critic and literary historian alike. In recent years, with the Fa11 of the Berlin Wall, political scientists and others, suchas A.D. Smith, Ernest Gellner, and E.J. Hobsbawm, have also focused on the subject of nationalism. The intention here in this article is to revisit a familiar site in the light of these new ideas and to test their validity or appropriateness in the Irish context. The article, part of a larger project to be published in 2003 by Polity Press under the title A Cultural History of Twentieth-Century Irish Literature, is divided into 5 sections: What ish my Nation?; What is a Nation?; Do Nations Have Navels?; 1890s: Winds of Change; English As We Speak It In Ireland. Among Irish authors discussed are Hyde, Shaw. Yeats, Wilde, Lady Gregory, Joyce, and Beckett.

  16. Does National Culture Impact Capital Budgeting Systems?

    Peter J. Graham

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We examine how national culture impacts organisational selection of capital budgeting systems to develop our understanding of what influence a holistic formulation of national culture has on capital budgeting systems. Such an understanding is important as it would not only provide a clearer link between national culture and capital budgeting systems and advance extant literature but would also help multinational firms that have business relationships with Indonesian firms in suitably designing strategies. We conducted semi-structured interviews of selected finance managers of listed firms in Indonesia and Australia. Consistent with the contingency theory, we found that economic, political, legal and social uncertainty impact on the use of capital budgeting systems. The levels of uncertainty were higher in Indonesia than Australia and need to be reckoned in the selection of capital budgeting systems used by firms. We also found that firms are influenced by project size and complexity, when selecting capital budgeting systems.

  17. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Plan

    Julie Braun Williams

    2013-02-01

    As a federal agency, the U.S. Department of Energy has been directed by Congress, the U.S. president, and the American public to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historic, and other cultural resources on the lands it administers. This mandate to preserve cultural resources in a spirit of stewardship for the future is outlined in various federal preservation laws, regulations, and guidelines such as the National Historic Preservation Act, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act. The purpose of this Cultural Resource Management Plan is to describe how the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office will meet these responsibilities at Idaho National Laboratory in southeastern Idaho. The Idaho National Laboratory is home to a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least 13,500 years of human occupation in the southeastern Idaho area. These resources are nonrenewable, bear valuable physical and intangible legacies, and yield important information about the past, present, and perhaps the future. There are special challenges associated with balancing the preservation of these sites with the management and ongoing operation of an active scientific laboratory. The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is committed to a cultural resource management program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting both the spirit and intent of the legislative mandates. This document is designed for multiple uses and is intended to be flexible and responsive to future changes in law or mission. Document flexibility and responsiveness will be assured through regular reviews and as-needed updates. Document content includes summaries of Laboratory cultural resource philosophy and overall Department of Energy policy; brief contextual overviews of Laboratory missions, environment, and cultural history; and an overview of cultural resource management practices. A series of appendices

  18. 78 FR 55743 - Notice of Service Delivery Area Designation for the Shinnecock Indian Nation

    2013-09-11

    ... the availability of funds, the person's relative medical priority, and the actual availability and..., Reservation, Wyoming. Sublette, WY. Aroostook Band of Micmac Indians of Aroostook, ME.\\3\\ Maine. Assiniboine..., Roosevelt, MT, Sheridan, MT, Valley, MT. Bad River Band of the Lake Superior Ashland, WI, Iron, WI. Tribe of...

  19. Nollywood, Popular Culture and Nigerian National Identity

    Charles Effiong

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Film culture in Nigeria has become very popular among Nigerian and transnational audiences especially in Africa to the extent that there is hardly a day people do not look for new films produced by Nollywood. In the same light, there is hardly a street in the country where one cannot find at least a video shop that distributes these films. Young and old people especially those in the rural areas are often found hanging around these shops to catch a glimpse of any of the films advertised by retail outlets. This has therefore proven the popularity of Nollywood productions among the people, who see in these films issues of culture that engage their attention and also try to give them awareness about socio-cultural practices that are common in the society. A major problem of concern is that although these films expose and treat cultural issues that affect the society, their promotion of a true national identity is questionable. In this regard, this paper is an attempt to examine how the films produced by Nollywood have been able to promote national identity vis-à-vis showcasing the cultural values of the people that can be cherished in the Nigerian society and beyond. Arguments on this will be done through qualitative (interview method and supported by Kantian morality theory, which will help in concluding that as popular culture, Nigerian films have created among Nigerians and the world some cultural practices that tend to give the Nigerian people a negative identity.

  20. Weight of Culture in Nation Building

    2007-07-15

    holds that the nation is motivated by its own national interests, foremost among which are autonomy and territorial integrity. 7 Anticipated Problems... collectivist societies in which they are tightly woven into strong groups, be they family or ethnic based. These groups demand loyalty and subordinate... autonomy and individual expression” (Moore and Robinson 2002, 19). It is, therefore, a sensible question to ask whether a culture so focused on group

  1. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Plan

    Lowrey, Diana Lee

    2009-02-01

    As a federal agency, the U.S. Department of Energy has been directed by Congress, the U.S. president, and the American public to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historic, and other cultural resources on the lands it administers. This mandate to preserve cultural resources in a spirit of stewardship for the future is outlined in various federal preservation laws, regulations, and guidelines such as the National Historic Preservation Act, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act. The purpose of this Cultural Resource Management Plan is to describe how the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office will meet these responsibilities at the Idaho National Laboratory. This Laboratory, which is located in southeastern Idaho, is home to a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least 13,500 years of human occupation in the southeastern Idaho area. These resources are nonrenewable; bear valuable physical and intangible legacies; and yield important information about the past, present, and perhaps the future. There are special challenges associated with balancing the preservation of these sites with the management and ongoing operation of an active scientific laboratory. The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is committed to a cultural resource management program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting both the spirit and intent of the legislative mandates. This document is designed for multiple uses and is intended to be flexible and responsive to future changes in law or mission. Document flexibility and responsiveness will be assured through annual reviews and as-needed updates. Document content includes summaries of Laboratory cultural resource philosophy and overall Department of Energy policy; brief contextual overviews of Laboratory missions, environment, and cultural history; and an overview of cultural resource management practices. A series of

  2. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Plan

    Lowrey, Diana Lee

    2011-02-01

    As a federal agency, the U.S. Department of Energy has been directed by Congress, the U.S. president, and the American public to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historic, and other cultural resources on the lands it administers. This mandate to preserve cultural resources in a spirit of stewardship for the future is outlined in various federal preservation laws, regulations, and guidelines such as the National Historic Preservation Act, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act. The purpose of this Cultural Resource Management Plan is to describe how the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office will meet these responsibilities at the Idaho National Laboratory. This Laboratory, which is located in southeastern Idaho, is home to a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least 13,500 years of human occupation in the southeastern Idaho area. These resources are nonrenewable; bear valuable physical and intangible legacies; and yield important information about the past, present, and perhaps the future. There are special challenges associated with balancing the preservation of these sites with the management and ongoing operation of an active scientific laboratory. The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is committed to a cultural resource management program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting both the spirit and intent of the legislative mandates. This document is designed for multiple uses and is intended to be flexible and responsive to future changes in law or mission. Document flexibility and responsiveness will be assured through annual reviews and as-needed updates. Document content includes summaries of Laboratory cultural resource philosophy and overall Department of Energy policy; brief contextual overviews of Laboratory missions, environment, and cultural history; and an overview of cultural resource management practices. A series of

  3. The Cultural Ideological Contestation in National Examination

    Kerta Adhi Made

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to find out the forms and the factors leading to the contestation of cultural ideology in National Examination. This research utilized Qualitative Research method and the approach of Cultural Studies. Based on the analysis, it was found that the forms of ideological contestation, specifically, centralistic, prioritizing on the result of cognitive domain, and imaging. The factors which caused consisted of political of education, state policies, and socio-cultural. The implications of this research were (1 There was shifting of educational values into capitalism, (2 The meaning of learning became limited in which it was just purposed at facing National Examination, (3 Educational services have shifted from humanist public services to commodification of education, with the result that honesty was marginalized. Eventhough the government has developed sophisticated system and very tight supervision, if the character of the subjects are not formed and cultured, accordingly, the National Examination stated honest and achievement oriented will be just a slogan. Therefore, the education system needs to be improved. The education paradigm which is more emphasized on the increasing of intellectual intelligence by multiple choice tests and scores needs to be deconstructed by adjusting with Indonesian cultural values based on “Pancasila” as ideological foundation and developing character education to the children from early age.

  4. Precedent Names of Chinese National Culture

    Валентина Алексеевна Ленинцева

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents an analysis of precedent names as symbols of precedent phenomena in the material and spiritual culture of the Chinese. An evaluation of daily events and the attitude of the Chinese towards the world are reflected in the vocabulary of their language. The symbols of precedent phenomena can be proper names (anthroponomy, names of places, the date, as well as figurative and expressive means of language (idioms, sayings. Precedent names as symbols of precedent phenomena vividly and accurately capture the above-mentioned points, and encompass almost all spheres of life, history and spiritual development. The subject of our study are national precedent phenomena that define the ethno-cultural specificity, reflecting the history and culture of the Chinese people and their national character. Representatives of different cultures have different perceptions of the same precedent phenomena. Inadequate understanding of national invariants of precedent phenomena is often the source of communication failures. The aim of this paper is to highlight precedent names as a symbol of precedent phenomena in the discourse of the Chinese linguocultural community. For this purpose a classification of precedent names in Chinese was carried out. Precedent names which play an important role in shaping the Chinese national consciousness were taken from the Chinese-Russian Dictionary.

  5. Cultivating College Students' National Culture Identity Based on English Education

    Yuan, Yang; Fang, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Our country is a multi-ethnic country with plentiful national culture achievements, and the development of the national culture shows a trend of diversity, so cultural identity construction is particularly important. Article analyzes the concept of national identity, the relation between cultural identity and ethnic identity, the present situation…

  6. Astronomical Heritage in the National Culture

    Harutyunian, H. A.; Mickaelian, A. M.; Parsamian, E. S.

    2014-10-01

    The book contains Proceedings of the Archaeoastronomical Meeting "Astronomical Heritage in the National Culture" Dedicated to Anania Shirakatsi's 1400th Anniversary and XI Annual Meeting of the Armenian Astronomical Society. It consists of 3 main sections: "Astronomical Heritage", "Anania Shirakatsi" and "Modern Astronomy", as well as Literature about Anania Shirakatsi is included. The book may be interesting for astronomers, historians, archaeologists, linguists, students and other readers.

  7. Political culture, national identity and nuclear energy

    Bayer, F.

    2013-01-01

    The paper 'Political culture, national identity and nuclear energy. The austrian controversy on nuclear energy between 1978 and 1986 within the national assembly' identifies the roots of the broad rejection of nuclear technologies in contemporary Austria within the controversy on neclear energy in the late 1970s and early 1980s. The close result of the referendum in November 1978 on the commissioning of the nuclear power plant in Zwentendorf - understood as a moment of severe polarisation - serves as a starting point for the investigation. In recent studies the explosion of the reactor in Chernobyl in April 1986 is considered the turning point of the austrian controversy and therefore marks the end of the examined period. Reviewing the history of nuclear energy in Austria the paper sheds light on events and aspects which turn out to be important for the rejection of nuclear technologies in contemporary Austria. On the one hand the analysis of the nuclear debate within the national assembly focuses on ways in which nuclear technologies were made sense of and ascribed with meaning and describes them as a sociotechnical imaginary. Next to highlighting the construction of national identity within these processes the analysis on the other hand explores the role of consensus and mutual action within the political culture of the Second Republic and its implications for the nuclear controversy. The integration of different perspectives enables to pinpoint several key aspects of the austrian nuclear controversy for the development of a broad rejection of nuclear technologies in the post-chernobyl era: the obligation to reach a consensus between the political parties, a specific set of ideas described as the imaginary of a ‘nuclear free Austria’ and its specific relations to national identity. (author) [de

  8. ECOLOGICAL CULTURE IN THE UKRAINIAN NATIONAL CHARACTER

    SKLADANOVSKAYA M.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The ecological security of our country, the possibility of a balanced sustainable development depends on the level of formation of ecological culture of society. Purpose of the article is to analyze the ethnic origins of ecological culture of modern Ukrainian. Nature of Ukraine is the most important point of the historical development of the national character. The installation, stereotypes, archetypes influence on its formation. The aesthetic human needs are met first in the perception of the beauty of unspoiled nature, its comprehension, reflection on the eternal themes: man's place in the natural world, awareness of human relationships and nature, its impact on the individual, man's relation to the world; an effort to recreate the beauty of the surrounding environment. Development of individual aesthetic needs, a sense of harmony and disharmony is the first step of the creativity development, the creative personality possibilities, creativity abilities, which is urgently needed as a modern social development and personal improvement. This is a necessary component of ecological consciousness, ecological culture of modern man.

  9. Comparative assessment of the impact of national culture dimensions on traits of organization culture

    Štreimikienė, Dalia; Mikalauskienė, Asta

    2012-01-01

    The paper deals with national culture and organizational culture assessment methods and applies the Denison Organization Culture Survey to measure organizational culture in Lithuanian SME in Kaunas region. The paper aims to define the impact of national culture dimensions on organizational culture dimensions by applying comparative analysis for Taiwan, Mexico and Lithuania. The comparative analysis revealed that power distance is positively related to involvement, but negatively related to th...

  10. Comparative assessment of the impact of national culture dimensions on traits of organization culture

    Štreimikienė, Dalia; Mikalauskienė, Asta

    2013-01-01

    The paper deals with national culture and organizational culture assessment methods and applies the Denison Organization Culture Survey to measure organizational culture in Lithuanian SME in Kaunas region. The paper aims to define the impact of national culture dimensions on organizational culture dimensions by applying comparative analysis for Taiwan, Mexico and Lithuania. The comparative analysis revealed that power distance is positively related to involvement, but negatively related to th...

  11. The relationship between job satisfaction and national culture

    Eskildsen, Jacob; Kristensen, Kai; Antvor, Henrik Gjesing

    2010-01-01

    – The managerial consequences are that it is virtually meaningless to compare the results from a cross-national job satisfaction study without considering the impact that national culture has on the results. It would be much better to follow Deming's advice on performance appraisal. According...... to this organizational units from different cultures should be evaluated in relation to their ability to improve job satisfaction instead of being compared without taking national culture into account. Originality/value – The paper gives a theoretical explanation for the influence that national culture has on national...

  12. Impact of National Culture Dimensions on Scrum Implementations

    Zhao, Chengqian

    2015-01-01

    Context. Scrum is one of the most common used Agile method. It is based on empiricism. Scrum only provides a framework but the detailed implementations in practice are very different. and the environment has a big influence on it. National culture is proven to have an impact on Agile methodology. The implementation of Scrum practices should be influenced by national culture as well. Objectives. This paper reveals the relationship between national culture and Scrum implementation. It explores ...

  13. The fit between national culture, organizing and managing

    Søndergaard, Mikael

    2006-01-01

    We hypothesize a fit betwen national cultural environment of the organization and contingency variables subject to managerial discretion. Such a hypothesis implies that national cultures is a contextual variable in contingency thoery and uses emperically derived culture contingency theory to argue...... are negatively correlated with uncertainty avoidance. We derive a number of important implication for organization design theory and practice....... that national culture chracteristics affect management's choices as to how to organize and manage people.  A tightly matched population of 4400 city managers from 14 Western countries constitutes strong material for the analysis as cultural and behavioral variables were directly analyzed. Findings suggest...

  14. Icelandic National Culture compared to National Cultures of 25 OECD member states using VSM94

    Svala Guðmundsdóttir

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Researchers such as Hofstede (2002 and House, Hanges, Javidan, Dorfman and Gupta, (2004 have defined well-known cultural clusters such as, Anglo, Germanic, and Nordic cultural clusters. However, Iceland was not incorporated in these studies and therefore the research question of this paper is: In relation to Hofstede´s five cultural dimensions where does Iceland differ in relation to 25 of the OECD member states using VSM94? A questionnaire was sent to students at the University of Iceland, School of Social Sciences by e-mail in October 2013. The five dimensions of national culture were measured using scales developed by Hofstede called VSM 94. The results indicated that Iceland differs considerably from nations such as Slovakia, Japan, India, Thailand and China, which were found high in PDI and the MAS dimension while Iceland was found to be high in IDV and low in PDI. When considering the 25 OECD countries, Iceland is more similar to the Anglo cluster, C3, Canada, New Zealand, United Kingdon, Australia and United States than the Nordic cluster, C1 i.e. Denmark, Sweden and Norway. Iceland is similar to those countries in relation to high IDV, low PDI but differs in the dimensions MAS and UAI where Iceland scores higher.

  15. Escaping National Tags and Embracing Diversity: Third Culture Kid Songwriters

    Sanfilippo-Schulz Jessica

    2018-01-01

    Nowadays, more and more writers cannot be classified according to one single nation. Whereas in Imagined Communities Anderson describes the development of nations and national belongings, in Third Culture Kid (TCK) discourse a central theme is the concept of not belonging to one specific nation or culture (“NatioNILism”). TCKs are individuals who were raised moving from one country to the next due to their parents’ career choices. Not having had a fixed home while growing up, rather than acce...

  16. The Role of National Cultures in Shaping the Corporate Management Cultures: A Four Countries Theoretical Analysis

    Mohammad Ayub Khan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the impact of national cultures on the management cultures of organizations. In doing so, this paper explores the differences and similarities among the national cultures of USA, Mexico, Pakistan and Russia, and subsequently analyzes the impacts of such differences and similarities on the management cultures of organizations in these countries. The findings of this study suggest that cross-cultural differences greatly influence the management culture in organizations. This finding presents cross-cultural management challenges for organizations in these countries in order to build multinational long-term strategic business partnerships.

  17. National culture and operations management : a structured literature review

    Boscari, Stefania; Bortolotti, Thomas; Netland, Torbjorn; Rich, Nicholas

    2018-01-01

    National culture has received a substantial amount of interest in the operations management literature. We present the first structured review of articles studying national culture in operations management. Our search returned 51 papers published in ten leading journals between 2000 and 2017. We

  18. Managing Transnational Education: Does National Culture Really Matter?

    Eldridge, Kaye; Cranston, Neil

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on an exploratory study that examined the effect of national culture upon the management of Australia's provision of transnational higher education in Thailand. In particular, using Hofstede's national cultural value dimensions as an analytical tool, interviews with managers responsible for Australia's provision of…

  19. Loosen up? Cultural tightness and national entrepreneurial activity

    Harms, Rainer; Groen, Arend J.

    The level of entrepreneurship between countries differs consistently. A source of this variance lies in national culture differences. Recently, the cultural dimension “tightness” has been introduced in the literature. Tightness refers to the degree to which a nation has strong norms and a low

  20. CULTURE, COMMUNICATION AND NATIONAL IMAGE: THE WAY ...

    This definition limits the concept of culture to the bahavioural context only. ... values as the protection of life, property and individual freedoms, as well as drawing .... through speech; a process sociologists call the” oral cultural tradition”. .... Okoro (2009), stated that presently the film industry in Nigeria is not really helping in.

  1. The Resistance of national cultures to global marketing influence

    Pikturnienė, Indrė

    2005-01-01

    Due to Increased regional integration, countries, which were previously closed to the world, became exposed to universal or partly adapted marketing mixes. A discussion whether global marketing campaigns can influence national cultures, and serve as a drive for emergence of global culture is developed in the article. The paper demonstrates that the conclusion, whether global marketing campaigns can generate globalisation of culture, depends on the definition of culture, which can overwhelm ei...

  2. Starting points of national literature and culture

    Rahilya Geybullayeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a report of the international conference on Comparative Literature and Culture, organized by the Azerbaijan Comparative Literature Association and the Azerbaijani Literature Department of the Baku Slavic University.

  3. National security through the preservation and development of cultural sphere

    Malakshinova N.Sh.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available matters of national security in the context of the inextricable interrelationship and interdependence of national security and socio-economic development are presented in the article. The particular attention is paid to the legislative consolidation of security categories, the system of national security elements, and changes in the domestic legislation updates. Therefore, safety, a list of national interests, highlighted by long-term perspective, and questions about the means of implementation of strategic national priorities, including the named culture as a sphere of life are very important. Sphere of culture as a national priority and an important factor in the quality of life growth and harmonization of public relations, collateral dynamic socio-economic development and the preservation of a common cultural space and sovereignty of Russia are studied more detailed.

  4. A cross-national investigation into the individual and national cultural antecedents of consumer innovativeness

    Steenkamp, JBEM; ter Hofstede, F; Wedel, M

    The authors examine antecedents of consumer innovativeness in a cross-national context. They propose a framework that distinguishes individual difference variables and national cultural variables. Two types of individual difference variables are considered: personal values and

  5. Revolutionary Black Culture: The Cultural Arm of Revolutionary Nationalism

    Mkalimoto, Ernie

    1969-01-01

    Emphasizes that armed might is not the only form, nor the only necessary form of struggle in Black revolutionary nationalism; that Black poets, actors, writers, and artists, as well as political and military cadres, must unite with the Black masses in one common effort. (RJ)

  6. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for FY 2009

    Brenda R. Pace; Julie B. Braun

    2009-10-01

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year 2009 (FY 2009). Throughout the year, thirty-eight cultural resource localities were revisited including: two locations with Native American human remains, one of which is a cave, two additional caves, twenty-two prehistoric archaeological sites, six historic homesteads, two historic stage stations, two historic trails, and two nuclear resources, including Experimental Breeder Reactor-I, which is a designated National Historic Landmark. Several INL project areas were also monitored in FY 2009 to assess project compliance with cultural resource recommendations and monitor the effects of ongoing project activities. Although impacts were documented at a few locations and trespassing citations were issued in one instance, no significant adverse effects that would threaten the National Register eligibility of any resources were observed. Monitoring also demonstrated that several INL projects generally remain in compliance with recommendations to protect cultural resources.

  7. Adoption of communication technologies and national culture

    Hofstede, G.J.

    2001-01-01

    This paper investigates the question what attributes of countries influence the differential speed at which they adopt new communication technologies. On the basis of empirical data, it concludes that besides GNP per capita, cultural variables predict the speed of technology adoption. In particular,

  8. Family law and national culture
    Arguing against the cultural constraints argument

    Masha Antokolskaia

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The ‘cultural constraints argument’, submits that family laws are embedded in unique national cultures, that this cultural and historical diversity is unbridgeable and therefore family laws are not spontaneously converging and cannot be deliberately harmonised. This article argues against the core assumption of the cultural constraints argument – the alleged embedment of family laws in unique and unchangeable national cultures. History shows that in the field of family ideology and law one cannot really talk of unique national cultures, but rather of a pan-European culture, which is not homogeneous but an amalgamation of pan-European ‘conservative’ and pan-European ‘progressive’ cultures. The relative influence of these two opposing family ‘cultures’ varies from country to country and from time to time. Examinations of history of family law suggest that there are the differences in the balance of political power between ‘progressive’ and ‘conservative’ forces, rather than national culture that determines the differences in the pertinent national family laws.

  9. The impact of national traditions and cultures on national foresight processes

    Andersen, Per Dannemand; Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the influence of national traditions, styles or culture on the use of foresight in decision-making processes. Inspired by sociologists’ contributions on national culture, the paper demonstrates that two dimensions of national culture, power distance and uncertainty avoidance......, are useful in the characterisation of the context in which national foresight exercises are carried out. The paper is based on two Danish cases: The Danish Government’s Globalisation Strategy, from 2005, and the Danish Research 2015 process, from 2008, which focus on priority settings for strategic research...

  10. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for FY 2010

    INL Cultural Resource Management Office

    2010-10-01

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year 2010 (FY 2010). Throughout the year, thirty-three cultural resource localities were revisited, including somethat were visited more than once, including: two locations with Native American human remains, one of which is a cave, two additional caves, twenty-six prehistoric archaeological sites, two historic stage stations, and Experimental Breeder Reactor-I, which is a designated National Historic Landmark. The resources that were monitored included seventeen that are routinely visited and sixteen that are located in INL project areas. Although impacts were documented at a few locations and one trespassing incident (albeit sans formal charges) was discovered, no significant adverse effects that would threaten the National Register eligibility of any resources were observed. Monitoring also demonstrated that several INL projects generally remain in compliance with recommendations to protect cultural resources.

  11. Dimensions of national culture as predictors of cross-national differences in subjective well-being

    Arrindell, W.A.; Hatzichristou, C; Wensink, J; Rosenberg, E; van Twillert, B; Stedema, J; Meijer, D

    The value of predicting cross-national variations in Subjective Well-Being (SWB) from Hofstede's dimensions of national culture (1980) was examined using data collected in 36 nations; The Hofstede dimensions were: Individualism-Collectivism (IDV), Power Distance (PDI), Masculinity-Femininity (MAS),

  12. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for FY 2008

    Brenda R. Pace

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year 2008 (FY 2008). Throughout the year, 45 cultural resource localities were revisited including: two locations of heightened Shoshone-Bannock tribal sensitivity, four caves, one butte, twenty-eight prehistoric archaeological sites, three historic homesteads, two historic stage stations, one historic canal construction camp, three historic trails, and Experimental Breeder Reactor-I, which is a designated National Historic Landmark. Several INL project areas were also monitored in FY 2008 to assess project compliance with cultural resource recommendations, confirm the locations of previously recorded cultural resources in relation to project activities, to assess the damage caused by fire-fighting efforts, and to watch for cultural materials during ground disturbing activities. Although impacts were documented at a few locations, no significant adverse effects that would threaten the National Register eligibility of any resource were observed. Monitoring also demonstrated that INL projects generally remain in compliance with recommendations to protect cultural resources

  13. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for 2013

    Williams, Julie B. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2013-10-01

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during 2013. Throughout the year, thirty-eight cultural resource localities were revisited including: two locations with Native American human remains, one of which is also a cave; fourteen additional caves; seven prehistoric archaeological sites ; four historic archaeological sites; one historic trail; one nuclear resource (Experimental Breeder Reactor-I, a designated National Historic Landmark); and nine historic structures located at the Central Facilities Area. Of the monitored resources, thirty-three were routinely monitored, and five were monitored to assess project compliance with cultural resource recommendations along with the effects of ongoing project activities. On six occasions, ground disturbing activities within the boundaries of the Power Burst Facility/Critical Infrastructure Test Range Complex (PBF/CITRC) were observed by INL CRM staff prepared to respond to any additional finds of Native American human remains. In addition, two resources were visited more than once as part of the routine monitoring schedule or to monitor for additional damage. Throughout the year, most of the cultural resources monitored had no visual adverse changes resulting in Type 1determinations. However, Type 2 impacts were noted at eight sites, indicating that although impacts were noted or that a project was operating outside of culturally cleared limitations, cultural resources retained integrity and noted impacts did not threaten National Register eligibility. No new Type 3 or any Type 4 impacts that adversely impacted cultural resources and threatened National Register eligibility were observed at cultural resources monitored in 2013.

  14. When national culture is disrupted : Cultural continuity and resistance to Muslim immigrants

    Smeekes, Anouk; Verkuijten, Maykel

    In three studies we examined the importance of cultural continuity for attitudes towards Muslim immigrants. Study 1 showed that perceiving national culture to be temporally enduring predicted opposition to Muslim expressive rights, and this effect was mediated by perceptions of continuity threat.

  15. Nation Branding in Romania After 1989: A Cultural Semiotic Perspective

    Bianca Florentina Cheregi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses four nation branding post-communist campaigns initiated by the Romanian Government, from a cultural semiotic perspective, as developed by the Tartu-Moscow-Semiotic School. In so doing, it focuses on analyzing advertising and national identity discourses inside the semiospheres. Moreover, the paper investigates how elements of neoliberal ideology are addressed in the governmental campaigns, considering the “marketization of public discourse” (Fairclough, 1993. Nation branding in post-communist Romania is a distinctive phenomena, compared to other countries, especially from Western Europe. In transition countries, nation branding is often mentioned because of the constant need to reconfigure national identity by dissociating from the communist past (Kaneva, 2012. In Romania, nation branding is also a public issue discussed in the media, connected to the ways in which the international press portrays the country or to the migrants’ actions. In this context, Romania’s nation brand represents a cultural space and the campaigns mobilize cultural symbols as systems of signs necessary for the existence and functioning of advertising discourses. Using a semiotic analysis linked to the field of cultural semiotics (Lotman, 2005/1984, this article analyzes four nation branding campaigns initiated by the Romanian Government (Romania Simply Surprising – 2004, Romania Land of Choice – 2009, Explore the Carpathian Garden – 2010, and Discover the Place Where You Feel Reborn – 2014, considering elements such as semiotic borders, dual coding and symbols. The results show that the campaigns are part of four different semiospheres, integrating discursive practices both from advertising and public diplomacy when communicating the national image to the internal (citizens or external (international audiences.

  16. To create a gas culture, national purpose

    Anon

    1998-01-01

    In 1986 it began to speak for the first time of the gas like substitute of the energy in the capital, to toast this way a better energetic option. The business of the gas in Colombia has a great expansion potential, judging by the millionaire transactions that have been carried out recently, in which have participated with signal interest investors of all the continents and it is that the future tendency is the substituting the electric devices for gas devices, at least in that that to cooking of foods and heating of water refers, given the economic and environmental benefits that it represents the overcrowding of the consumption of combustible gases (natural gas and liquefied gas of the petroleum). The economic importance of the investment in the plan of overcrowding of the natural gas in Colombia, represents a very important aspect proposed by the government and of all the actors involved inside the gas industry and it is the one of benefiting economically to the whole community, through the social investment, advanced in each region to or release and wide of the whole country. This promissory panorama for the nascent Colombian gas industry, supported by the discoveries of gas carried out in the decade of the 90, in increasing the reserves of natural gas, to build a great gas pipeline and urban nets, to carry out complementary works and of conversion to gas, to supply thermoelectric that will generate near additional 1500 MW of energy, it also seeks to benefit with the domiciliary gas service, in next four years to more than three million homes distributed in for the less 300 municipalities of the national geography

  17. TRADITIONAL ROMANIAN CULTURE — CORNERSTONE FOR (REBUILDING A NATION

    PUIU ANA-MARIA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Traditional culture? As an amateur overview, it represents life in the countryside with its interests accompanied by the aesthetic side dictated by the native common sense of each individual. In fact, traditional culture represents the identity card of each nation regardless of the historic age of its existence. The ethnogenesis of a nation represents the birth moment of this type of emanation of folk, simple yet perfect wisdom from a creative point of view, developing itself along with the historical, chronological evolution of its people.

  18. National Identity as a Factor of Inter-Cultural Communication

    Elizaveta A. Volkova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the definition and origin of the notions «mentality (identity» and «national mentality (identity» focusing on their complex essence. The article names factors that affect the formation of national identity, at the same time pointing out the aspect of human life that the identity itself affects. The notion «national identity» is revealed via its vocabulary definitions. National identity is analyzed as a factor of inter-cultural communication, its role and importance in this communication are also analyzed. One of the objectives of the research is signing out the limits of the concepts «national identity» and «inter-cultural communication» and revealing the conditions of their interaction and mutual dependence. National identity is a complex notion, which complexity lies within the combination of mental and emotional, spiritual elements. This factor adds extra difficulty into understanding, as well as investigating the notion of national identity. Thus it is not rarely ignored in linguistics, international communication, even in teaching languages. However, nowadays, when globalization makes international contacts and communication widely accessible, many people meet unexpected difficulties that derive from ignoring national identity factor. That is why recently it is getting more and more obvious that taking national identity into consideration can be one of the main keys to successful communication at all levels.

  19. Development of a Cultural Connectedness Scale for First Nations youth.

    Snowshoe, Angela; Crooks, Claire V; Tremblay, Paul F; Craig, Wendy M; Hinson, Riley E

    2015-03-01

    Despite a growing recognition of cultural connectedness as an important protective factor for First Nations (FN) peoples' health, there remains a clear need for a conceptual model that organizes, explains, and leads to an understanding of the resiliency mechanisms underlying this concept for FN youth. The current study involved the development of the Cultural Connectedness Scale (CCS) to identify a new scale of cultural connectedness. A sample of 319 FN, Métis, and Inuit youths enrolled in Grades 8-12 from reserve and urban areas in Saskatchewan and Southwestern Ontario, Canada, participated in the current study. A combination of rational expert judgments and empirical data were used to refine the pool of items to a set that is a representative sample of the indicators of the cultural connectedness construct. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was used to examine the latent structure of the cultural connectedness items, and a confirmatory factor analysis was used to test the fit of a more parsimonious version of the final EFA model. The resulting 29-item inventory consisted of 3 dimensions: identity, traditions, and spirituality. Criterion validity was demonstrated with cultural connectedness dimensions correlating well with other youth well-being indicators. The conceptualization and operationalization of the cultural connectedness has a number of potential applications both for research and prevention. This study provides an orienting framework that guides measurement of cultural connectedness that researchers need to further explore the role of culture in enhancing resiliency and well-being among FN youth in Canada. 2015 APA, all rights reserved

  20. Escaping National Tags and Embracing Diversity: Third Culture Kid Songwriters

    Sanfilippo-Schulz Jessica

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, more and more writers cannot be classified according to one single nation. Whereas in Imagined Communities Anderson describes the development of nations and national belongings, in Third Culture Kid (TCK discourse a central theme is the concept of not belonging to one specific nation or culture (“NatioNILism”. TCKs are individuals who were raised moving from one country to the next due to their parents’ career choices. Not having had a fixed home while growing up, rather than accepting classifications according to nations and cultures, many TCKs prefer to embrace diversity. Antje Rauwerda argues that the fiction of adult TCKs comprises typical features that reflect the consequences of a displaced international childhood and accordingly coins the new literary classification Third Culture Literature. Whereas Rauwerda exclusively analyses novels written by TCKs, this article examines whether the effects of hypermobile international childhoods can be detected in the works of TCK songwriters. By analysing not only the song lyrics of contemporary musicians such as Haikaa, Sinkane and Tanita Tikaram but also the artists’ views regarding issues such as belonging, identity and transience, it will be shown that in the scholarly realm the TCK lens can be expanded to song texts too.

  1. Climatic Warmth and National Wealth: Some Culture-Level Determinants of National Character Stereotypes.

    McCrae, Robert R; Terracciano, Antonio; Realo, Anu; Allik, Jüri

    2007-12-01

    National character stereotypes are widely shared, but do not reflect assessed levels of personality traits. In this article we present data illustrating the divergence of stereotypes and assessed personality traits in north and south Italy, test hypotheses about the associations of temperature and national wealth with national character stereotypes in 49 cultures, and explore possible links to national values and beliefs. Results suggest that warmth and wealth are common determinants of national stereotypes, but that there are also idiosyncratic influences on the perceptions of individual nations.

  2. Globalization and support for national cultural protectionism from a cross-national perspective

    Bekhuis, H.; Meuleman, R.; Lubbers, M.

    2013-01-01

    This study answers the question to what extent support for national cultural protectionism differs between countries, and to what extent differences between countries are related to levels of globalization. We propose that globalization processes affect people′s support of cultural protectionism,

  3. Multi-Cultural Considerations for Counselling First Nations Clients

    Nuttgens, Simon A.; Campbell, Allan J.

    2010-01-01

    Despite evidence that First Nations people experience a disproportionate degree of mental health concerns relative to other Canadians, many within this population do not access Western-based mental health services. In this article we extend a socio-political and historical rationale for attending to key cultural differences when working with First…

  4. Differences between tight and loose cultures : A 33-nation study

    Gelfand, M.J.; Raver, R.L.; Nishii, L.; Leslie, L.M.; Lun, J.; Lim, B.C.; Van de Vliert, E.

    2011-01-01

    With data from 33 nations, we illustrate the differences between cultures that are tight (have many strong norms and a low tolerance of deviant behavior) versus loose (have weak social norms and a high tolerance of deviant behavior). Tightness-looseness is part of a complex, loosely integrated

  5. micro-sociological insight to cultural transformation and national ...

    Prof

    the importance of the micro-sociological aspects of national development. ... rural areas and urban centres are privileged spaces for cultural production and ... Guatemala, 80.6% of people in Mexico, 79% of people in Peru and 64.3% of people ...

  6. Determining Work Culture Scores for Fourteen Developed Nations

    Belote, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    As business relationships become increasingly global in nature, a new methodology for understanding the approach to work in various nations is needed. When involved in business dealings with international partners, it is crucial that the modern businessperson understand and empathize with the culture of the company with which he or she is working.…

  7. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Annual Report FY 2006

    Clayton F. Marler; Julie Braun; Hollie Gilbert; Dino Lowrey; Brenda Ringe Pace

    2007-04-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory Site is home to vast numbers and a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least a 13,500-year span of human occupation in the region. As a federal agency, the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office has legal responsibility for the management and protection of those resources and has delegated these responsibilities to its primary contractor, Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA). The INL Cultural Resource Management Office, staffed by BEA professionals, is committed to maintaining a cultural resource management program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting the resources’ importance in local, regional, and national history. This annual report summarizes activities performed by the INL Cultural Resource Management Office staff during Fiscal Year 2006. This work is diverse, far-reaching and though generally confined to INL cultural resource compliance, also includes a myriad of professional and voluntary community activities. This document is intended to be both informative to internal and external stakeholders, and to serve as a planning tool for future cultural resource management work to be conducted on the INL.

  8. Racin and the Significance of a National Culture

    Angelina Banovic-Markovska

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the text RACIN and the Significance of a National Culture I’ll speak further on Racin’s publications, namely, his political reflections, which apart from their notable social dimension also possess an explicitly national and moral dimension. Along those lines, I’ll see to a contextualization of the same, in the span of seventy years, as the world order had undergone momentous changes, not only in terms of political and ideological shifts, but rather through a change in the class-based and race-bound paradigms.This, in turn, allows me to draw a parallel between our Kosta Racin, a progressive people’s thinker, a revolutionary and a socialist, a poet and a journalist stemming from the realm of the old Yugoslavia, on the one hand, and the Franco-based existential humanist, the psychiatrist Frantz Fanon, the progenitor of the anticolonial movement in the countries of the Third World, on the other. Even though the parallel between Racin and Fanon may seem a bit far-fetched, the fact remains that both were involved with socially-centered,nationally-bound and revolutionary-focused questions, thus emphasizing, first and foremost, the significance of a national culture amidst the conditions of political, economic and spiritual enslavement.As proponents of socialist ideas and Marxist ideology, as revolutionaries and fighters for national and human rights who had experienced the turmoil of war, both men exhibited a higher consciousness when it came to matters related to the state of the national culture with the enslaved colonized peoples, with one difference in mind, namely, that in the case of Racin, the emphasis was placed on the class-related national aspect, whereas with Fanon, the emphasis was placed on the race-related national aspect.

  9. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Annual Report FY 2007

    Julie Braun; Hollie Gilbert; Dino Lowrey; Clayton Marler; Brenda Pace

    2008-03-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site is home to vast numbers and a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least a 13,500-year span of human land use in the region. As a federal agency, the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office has legal responsibility for the management and protection of those resources and has delegated these responsibilities to its primary contractor, Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA). The BEA professional staff is committed to maintaining a cultural resource management program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting the resources’ importance in local, regional, and national history. This annual report summarizes activities performed by the INL Cultural Resource Management Office (CRMO) staff during fiscal year 2007. This work is diverse, far-reaching and though generally confined to INL cultural resource compliance, also includes a myriad of professional and voluntary community activities. This document is intended to be both informative to internal and external stakeholders, and to serve as a planning tool for future cultural resource management work to be conducted on the INL.

  10. VLADIMIR AXIONOV — DISTINGUISHED PERSONALITY OF NATIONAL CULTURE

    COMENDANT TATIANA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The present paper is dedicated to the memory of Vladimir Axionov — scientist, university professor, doctor in the study of arts, prime vice rector at the Academy of Musuc, Theatre and Fine Arts. Being a person of comprehensive knowledge, V.Axionov elaborated more than 100 works of great value that contributed to the development of national and universal musical culture. V. Axionov was an outstanding teacher, trainer of scientific researchers, mentor of original talents; he dedicated his vast activity to the professional training of young people involved in the field of artistic education. He was an excellent organizer who ensured a competent and efficient management. V. Axionov was a highly qualified professional who obtained remarkable and valuable results thus becoming a promoter of the scientific truth. He carried out extensive didactic, scientific and educational work; he was and will remain an outstanding personality of national culture.

  11. Transmission ethnic-cultural senses throught national cuisine

    T. I. Burdeyna

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Global society requires acceleration and diversification of ways data’s transmission, erasing the boundaries between people and nations. However, there always will be a certain sign that distinguishes one ethnic group among others. Ethno­cultural specificity is kept and transmitted by various means. Cuisine as one of the most important everyday realities is also transmitting ethnic and cultural meanings. Moreover, each dish is a kind of special semiotic text content. Are there reasons that motivate each of us to choose the dishes? Do our choices genetically depend on our ancestors? Or just have a set of personal culinary preferences? The national dish is one of the cultural and historical features. Every national cuisine established concepts that have appeared in the process of communication. Borsch is such a concept and the ethnic mark for Ukrainians at the same time. Cooking and eating is a synthetic type of communication that produces transmission and perception of information kinesthetic, auditory and visual methods. Except the usual everyday dishes there are festive that are becoming solemn, not average.

  12. Impact of national cultures on automotive after sales services perception

    Jose Albors-Garrigos

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This article clarifies the impact of national culture in the after sales service in the automotive sector. Introduction and objectives: After-sales services have become paramount in the automobile industry. However, they are not sufficiently researched, particularly in emerging markets. Here an academic gap exists because, within the automotive research literature, culture is a widely neglected issue. Thus no explicit knowledge can be applied regarding emerging markets service demand behaviour, which might be a crucial point, as some of these countries culture is different to the western culture. Methods: The research is based in a survey carried out among Chinese premium brand automotive customers. Results: It shows which individual level values are causal and positively contribute to the perception of service quality and loyalty behaviour by customers. Conclusion: The article providing a guideline how the entire process chain of after-sales services could be researched and applies successfully the individual level value theory by Schwartz. Implications and research limitation: Brand loyalty is well explained by perceived service quality significantly leads to after-sales service satisfaction, which itself is a strong predictor of workshop loyalty. Moreover, workshop loyal customers are likewise significantly brand loyal. Finally, the influence of culture is empirically verified with the one exception of after-sales service satisfaction.

  13. Can dimensions of national culture predict cross-national differences in medical communication?

    Meeuwesen, L.; Brink, A. van den; Hofstede, G.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study investigated at a country level how cross-national differences in medical communication can be understood from the first four of Hofstede's cultural dimensions, i.e. power distance, uncertainty avoidance, individualism/collectivism and masculinity/femininity, together with national wealth. METHODS: A total of 307 general practitioners (GPs) and 5820 patients from Belgium, Estonia, Germany, Great Britain, the Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland par...

  14. Can dimensions of national culture predict cross-national differences in medical communication?

    Meeuwesen, L.; Brink, A. van den; Hofstede, G.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study investigated at a country level how cross-national differences in medical communication can be understood from the first four of Hofstede's cultural dimensions, i.e. power distance, uncertainty avoidance, individualism/collectivism and masculinity/femininity, together with

  15. CULTURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    DAVIS, M.

    2005-04-01

    The Cultural Resource Management Plan (CRMP) for Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) provides an organized guide that describes or references all facets and interrelationships of cultural resources at BNL. This document specifically follows, where applicable, the format of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Guidelines for Development of Cultural Resource Management Plans, DOE G 450.1-3 (9-22-04[m1]). Management strategies included within this CRMP are designed to adequately identify the cultural resources that BNL and DOE consider significant and to acknowledge associated management actions. A principal objective of the CRMP is to reduce the need for additional regulatory documents and to serve as the basis for a formal agreement between the DOE and the New York State Historic Preservation Officer (NYSHPO). The BNL CRMP is designed to be a ''living document.'' Each section includes identified gaps in the management plan, with proposed goals and actions for addressing each gap. The plan will be periodically revised to incorporate new documentation.

  16. DIAGNOSING NATIONAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE DIFFERENCES: A RESEARCH IN HOTEL ENTERPRISES

    AKDENİZ, Defne; AYTEMİZ SEYMEN, Oya

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to test whether national culture and organizational cultures were isomorphic in accommodation establishments, through Hofstede’s cultural dimensions. Based on data from a survey of 142 employees from multinational hotels in Istanbul, the existence and degree of difference between national and organizational culture were tested. The new culture scores were calculated by calculation formulas derived from the mean scores of each culture dimension. The most important result of th...

  17. Tobacco as Cultural Signifier: A Cultural History of Masculinity and Nationality in Habsburg Hungary

    Alexander Maxwell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Since tobacco smoking acquired important patriotic symbolism in nineteenth century, the history of tobacco sheds light on Hungarian nationalism. Hungarian tobacco growers found the Austrian tobacco tariff policy harmful to their interests, particularly when war disrupted the supply of American tobacco in potential export markets. Pushing for a different tariff, Hungarian patriots turned smoking into a marker of Hungarian patriotism. Tobacco symbolism was prominent during Hungary’s 1848 Revolution, not least because tobacco acquired revolutionary symbolism in Italy and Germany as well. The culture of patriotic tobacco corresponded to revolutionary national ideas in that it mostly transcended class barriers but excluded women.

  18. Libraries within the system of the institutions of national memory of Ukraine and national cultural heritage

    Dubrovina L. A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article, libraries, archives and museums are explored as the constituents of social institutes realizing state policy of social, historical and national memory The institutes organize deposition of memory sources, conduct scientific inquiry and identification, study the origins of documents, museum exhibits and collections, the history of documental heritage. Their main functions are preservation and study of historical and cultural sources, sharing unbiased information and scientifically grounded knowledge concerning the documental cultural heritage and the sources’ use in contemporary information analysis, memorial, socio-political, cultural-educational and other events, aimed at the formation and consolidation of national memory. It is believed, that through the abovementioned actions these social institutions contribute to the informational safety of a country, its integration into the world humanitarian space. The institutions activity provides governmental figures, educators, scientists and cultural figures with unbiased information, conduces countermeasures against the tendentious interpretation of historical process and the deformation of memorial senses of the past and modernity, the manipulation of historical facts and socio-cultural factors sense

  19. National Innovation System And Culture A Cross-Country Analysis

    Joseph Gogodze

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study assesses the relationship between Hofstedes cultural dimensions and the constituents of a National Innovation System NIS. We consider an NIS as a special kind of intangible latent asset and identify its two constituents input and output capital. These are extracted through a modern NIS measurement model based on the Global Innovation Index. Using structural equation models we show that power distance and uncertainty avoidance and long-term orientation and indulgence vs. restraint act through the latent constructs PDUA and LTIV respectively. Moreover individualism IDV and NIS constituents are directly and negatively affected by PDUA. IDV and LTIV directly and positively affect the NIS constituents. Further the results show that masculinity vs. femininity significantly and negatively affects the NIS input constituent and significantly affects the NIS output constituent but its impact is negative for high-income countries and positive for non-high income countries.

  20. The Effects of National Cultural Traits on BOP Consumer Behavior

    Tsai Chi Kuo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Scholars who aim to solve problems with poverty and a lack of resources often focus on bottom of pyramid (BOP consumer groups. They propose that the traditional TOP (top of pyramid business strategies are not suitable for BOP populations, and that it is crucial to determine and satisfy BOP consumption demands. The purpose of this study is to find out which factors influence BOP consumption, and to explore BOP integrated products. The concepts of “national cultural traits” and sustainable product design are also used. The findings will help enterprises learn how to make profits in BOP markets (addressing economic goals, while helping the poor get out of poverty (addressing social goals. Two different areas concerning BOP consumers are used to illustrate the results.

  1. Are National and Organizational Cultures Isomorphic? Evidence from a Four Country Comparative Study

    Rune Ellemose Gulev

    2009-01-01

    This pilot study investigates whether organizational practices as observed through differing organizational cultures systematically replicate or reject national values. It is among the first to project delineated, narrow national cultural portrayals of Germany, Austria, Slovenia and Denmark against pattern-specific organizational cultures. Through country cluster analysis and correlation tests, the results achieve significance along all three dimensions. Trust allocations, authority perceptio...

  2. Can dimensions of national culture predict cross-national differences in medical communication?

    Meeuwesen, Ludwien; van den Brink-Muinen, Atie; Hofstede, Geert

    2009-04-01

    This study investigated at a country level how cross-national differences in medical communication can be understood from the first four of Hofstede's cultural dimensions, i.e. power distance, uncertainty avoidance, individualism/collectivism and masculinity/femininity, together with national wealth. A total of 307 general practitioners (GPs) and 5820 patients from Belgium, Estonia, Germany, Great Britain, the Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland participated in the study. Medical communication was videotaped and assessed using Roter's interaction analysis system (RIAS). Additional context information of physicians (gender, job satisfaction, risk-taking and belief of psychological influence on diseases) and patients (gender, health condition, diagnosis and medical encounter expectations) was gathered by using questionnaires. Countries differ considerably form each other in terms of culture dimensions. The larger a nation's power distance, the less room there is for unexpected information exchange and the shorter the consultations are. Roles are clearly described and fixed. The higher the level of uncertainty avoidance, the less attention is given to rapport building, e.g. less eye contact. In 'masculine' countries there is less instrumental communication in the medical interaction, which was contrary to expectations. In wealthy countries, more attention is given to psychosocial communication. The four culture dimensions, together with countries' wealth, contribute importantly to the understanding of differences in European countries' styles of medical communication. Their predictive power reaches much further than explanations along the north/south or east/west division of Europe. The understanding of these cross-national differences is a precondition for the prevention of intercultural miscommunication. Improved understanding may occur at microlevel in the medical encounter, as well as on macrolevel in pursuing more effective cooperation and

  3. To Understand the “Brazilian Way” of School Management: How National Culture Influences the Organizational Culture and School Leadership

    Ana Maria de Albuquerque Moreira

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to identify characteristics of national culture in the culture of Brazilian school management and leadership. Considering the broad literature that deals with the peculiarities of Brazilian culture and its influence on Brazilian management, it is assumed that as an institution belonging to a particular society, the school offers internal dynamics that are organized under influences of historical and cultural determinants of this society. This work is an exploratory study that uses secondary data found in studies on the profiles of principals, leadership, climate, and organizational culture in schools and primary data from research applied in public secondary schools located in the Federal District, Brazil. The results demonstrate that the initial premise—national culture influences the organizational culture and school leadership—has been confirmed and aspects that merit further analysis are identified.

  4. The national spirit reflection in the memory of language and culture

    Romanov A.S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available this research focuses on a dialectic interrelation between language and culture perceived as existential manifestations of the national spirit. Identity of the national linguistic world perception is defined by its social-historic development, geographic and climatic conditions of living and distinctiveness of the national linguo-cultural heritage.

  5. POTTERY IN CULTURE UKRAINIAN NATIONAL HOUSING OF PRIDNEPROVSKYI REGION

    YEVSEEVA G. P.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Formulation of the problem. Housing is a prerequisite for the existence of any rights, so the material culture of each nation it has an important place. In the exterior of ethnic expressed mainly in the way some design elements of housing and street facilities. Most ethnic specificity has interior housing, depending on external conditions: the nature of planning, construction, furniture, decoration items, dishes and more. There is a similarity residential interior throughout the residence Ukrainian. Such similarity is natural, it is in the internal space of the housing specific people represents their understanding feasibility, benefits and beauty. Beauty and the similarity of pottery that used the Ukrainian nation from its inception and up until today, confirms the unity of the aesthetic preferences of the people and the convenience of daily life. Analysis of publications. The study of Ukrainian national dishes, its specific features, artistic design tools dedicated to a number of scientific papers. Information on the national pottery central and southern regions of Ukraine are contained in the writings of scholars of the nineteenth century. and scholars period of independence. Some issues of Ukrainian pottery and its typologies considered in the work of scientists of the Soviet period. The purpose of the article is to analyze the types of pottery that were in use in the Ukrainian national housing of the Prydniprovia. Conclusions. Each peasant house, like today, a hundred years ago, saturating domestic products with dual reality hidden meaning, ancient meanings, is a kind of unique personal world, which is closely intertwined with the general social commonplace, seeing its effects and actively influencing it forms a harmonious world environment, in which modern man lives. It is therefore important to us to know, for example, not the evolution of Ukrainian houses as an insult, but its structure and nature of technology of hut building even a

  6. Impact of national context and culture on curriculum change: A case study

    Jippes, M.; Driessen, E.W.; Majoor, G.D.; Gijselaers, W.H.; Muijtjens, A.M.M.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2013-01-01

    Background: Earlier studies suggested national culture to be a potential barrier to curriculum reform in medical schools. In particular, Hofstede's cultural dimension 'uncertainty avoidance' had a significant negative relationship with the implementation rate of integrated curricula. Aims: However,

  7. National culture and business model change: a framework for successful expansions

    Dalby, J.; Nielsen, L.S.; Lueg, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Dalby, J., Nielsen, Lueg, R., L. S., Pedersen, L., Tomoni, A. C. 2014. National culture and business model change: a framework for successful expansions. Journal of Enterprising Culture, 22(4): 379-498.......Dalby, J., Nielsen, Lueg, R., L. S., Pedersen, L., Tomoni, A. C. 2014. National culture and business model change: a framework for successful expansions. Journal of Enterprising Culture, 22(4): 379-498....

  8. The influence of organizational and national culture on new product performance

    Eisend, Martin; Evanschitzky, Heiner; Gilliland, David I.

    2016-01-01

    The authors conduct a meta-analysis on the combined influence of organizational and national culture on new product performance. For this purpose, they refer to the effectiveness of value congruency and develop a conceptual model describing the fit between organizational culture types as suggested by the competing values framework and national culture, as described by Hofstede's cultural dimensions. The meta-analysis is based on 489 effect sizes taken from 123 manuscripts. The findings show t...

  9. The impact of national culture on the ethical standards of the German restaurant market

    Crocamo, Filomena Clara

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to find out the ethical standards of the restaurant business in Germany. A further objective was to understand the national cultural impact on these ethical standards and how potential distinctions in the ethical decision-making process can be explained by the different national cultural background. The theoretical framework of this thesis was based on the theories of national cultural dimensions by the researcher Hofstede (1980) and the concepts of busi...

  10. The role of national security culture in crisis management : the case of Kardak crisis

    Savaş, Özlem

    2008-01-01

    Ankara : The Department of International Relations, Bilkent University, 2008. Thesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 2008. Includes bibliographical references leaves 94-103. This thesis analyzes the role of national security culture in crisis management. The use and significance of national security culture in the management of a crisis is the main concern discussed throughout this study. It is assumed that national security culture serves as the main guideline of states d...

  11. Culture, Communication and National Image: The Way Forward for ...

    ... of national image which is of utmost interest to any nation craving for national development and global partnership in the 21st century. There is no country without national image at any point in time. And so, at any time, the behaviour and activities of the people of any nation go a long way in defining their national image.

  12. The competitive advantage of European nations : The impact of national culture - a missing element in Porter's analysis?

    F.A.J. van den Bosch (Frans); A.A. van Prooijen

    1992-01-01

    textabstractThis article uses as its starting point Michael Porter's model of the national ‘diamond’ to explain the role of the national environment in the competitive position of industries and firms. The authors believe, however, that the influence of national culture on the competitive advantage

  13. The influence of national culture on organizational change and competitiveness in Serbia

    Ostojić Đorđe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Globalization of business has created a worldwide market where companies from around the world make interactions. National cultures have a significant influence on the way companies do business, as well as on company's market position. National culture influences the way managers interpret their environment, the types of organizational changes and employee motivation. Companies must perform more rigorous selection of workers, so as to employ a worker whose individual cultural values (that are formed under the influence of national culture correspond to organizational culture of a company, improving the competitiveness of companies in the process.

  14. Cultural continuity, traditional Indigenous language, and diabetes in Alberta First Nations: a mixed methods study.

    Oster, Richard T; Grier, Angela; Lightning, Rick; Mayan, Maria J; Toth, Ellen L

    2014-10-19

    We used an exploratory sequential mixed methods approach to study the association between cultural continuity, self-determination, and diabetes prevalence in First Nations in Alberta, Canada. We conducted a qualitative description where we interviewed 10 Cree and Blackfoot leaders (members of Chief and Council) from across the province to understand cultural continuity, self-determination, and their relationship to health and diabetes, in the Alberta First Nations context. Based on the qualitative findings, we then conducted a cross-sectional analysis using provincial administrative data and publically available data for 31 First Nations communities to quantitatively examine any relationship between cultural continuity and diabetes prevalence. Cultural continuity, or "being who we are", is foundational to health in successful First Nations. Self-determination, or "being a self-sufficient Nation", stems from cultural continuity and is seriously compromised in today's Alberta Cree and Blackfoot Nations. Unfortunately, First Nations are in a continuous struggle with government policy. The intergenerational effects of colonization continue to impact the culture, which undermines the sense of self-determination, and contributes to diabetes and ill health. Crude diabetes prevalence varied dramatically among First Nations with values as low as 1.2% and as high as 18.3%. Those First Nations that appeared to have more cultural continuity (measured by traditional Indigenous language knowledge) had significantly lower diabetes prevalence after adjustment for socio-economic factors (p =0.007). First Nations that have been better able to preserve their culture may be relatively protected from diabetes.

  15. The Literature Curriculum in Russia Cultural Nationalism vs. The Cultural Turn

    Karin Sarsenov

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In Western educational systems, the question “Why study literature in school?” has been raised in connection with the theoretical development often summarized as “the cultural turn.” The author strives to contribute to this discussion by examining the development of educational discourse in Russia. During the Soviet period, literature was – together with history – the subject most heavily influenced by the dogmas of Soviet state ideology. As such, literature enjoyed great prestige and was a compulsory and separate subject from the fifth to the eleventh school years. Since 1991, the educational system has undergone radical reform, but the number of hours devoted to literature has not changed significantly. This would suggest that literature still is perceived as an important means of incorporating children into the national and political community. The target of this study is to identify authorities’ specific aims in devoting so much time to literature in school, as well as to elucidate in what way literature is to achieve these aims. Russian guidelines for the development of literature curricula published in the years 1991–2010 are examined to see just how literature is legitimated as a secondary school subject. Based on this material, the author draws conclusions about the rhetorical practices and ideological development of curricular discourse, its relationship to Soviet educational thought and the extent to which the cultural turn has influenced this sphere.

  16. Birthweight distribution in ART singletons resulting from embryo culture in two different culture media compared with the national population

    Lemmen, Josephine Gabriela; Pinborg, Anja; Rasmussen, S

    2014-01-01

    IS KNOWN ALREADY: Studies on human ART singletons have reported a difference in birthweight in singletons following IVF culture in different culture media. However, other studies comparing different culture media have not shown any significant differences in birthweight. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION......: This study was a retrospective comparison of birthweights in IVF/ICSI singletons conceived after fresh embryo transfer following embryo culture in Cook or Medicult medium and in a national cohort of naturally conceived singletons in nulliparous women. The study compares four independent groups consisting...... of singletons in nulliparous women from Cook-d2: 2-day culture in Cook medium at Rigshospitalet (n = 974), Medicult-d2: 2-day culture in Medicult EmbryoAssist medium at Rigshospitalet (n = 147), Medicult-d3: 3-day culture in Medicult EmbryoAssist medium with and without added GM-CSF (n = 204), and DK...

  17. Socio-economic factors, cultural values, national personality and antibiotics use: A cross-cultural study among European countries.

    Gaygısız, Ümmügülsüm; Lajunen, Timo; Gaygısız, Esma

    There are considerable cross-national differences in public attitudes towards antibiotics use, use of prescribed antibiotics, and self-medication with antibiotics even within Europe. This study was aimed at investigating the relationships between socio-economic factors, cultural values, national personality characteristics and the antibiotic use in Europe. Data included scores from 27 European countries (14 countries for personality analysis). Correlations between socio-economic variables (Gross National Income per capita, governance quality, life expectancy, mean years of schooling, number of physicians), Hofstede's cultural value dimensions (power distance, individualism, masculinity, uncertainty avoidance, long-term orientation, indulgence), national personality characteristic (extraversion, neuroticism, social desirability) and antibiotic use were calculated and three regression models were constructed. Governance quality (r=-.51), mean years of schooling (r=-.61), power distance (r=.59), masculinity (r=.53), and neuroticism (r=.73) correlated with antibiotic use. The highest amount of variance in antibiotic use was accounted by the cultural values (65%) followed by socio-economic factors (63%) and personality factors (55%). Results show that socio-economic factors, cultural values and national personality characteristics explain cross-national differences in antibiotic use in Europe. In particular, governance quality, uncertainty avoidance, masculinity and neuroticism were important factors explaining antibiotics use. The findings underline the importance of socio-economic and cultural context in health care and in planning public health interventions. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Is Drop-Out from University Dependent on National Culture and Policy? The Case of Denmark

    Troelsen, Rie; Laursen, Per F.

    2014-01-01

    National cultures are known to influence educational institutions and practices in many ways. It therefore seems reasonable to assume that drop-out from university is also influenced by differences in national cultures. In this article, we compare drop-out from Danish universities with drop-out from European universities. Based on Danish national…

  19. 75 FR 57957 - Call for Comments on the Existing National Standards for the Culturally and Linguistically...

    2010-09-23

    ... first national standards for cultural competence in health care and offer comprehensive guidance on what... health needs and thus suffer a greater loss to their overall health and productivity.'' Findings from the.... Increasingly, national experts are looking to cultural competency training as a means to reduce disparities in...

  20. Managing the workplace in a globalized world: The role of national culture in workplace management

    Plijter, EB; van der Voordt, Theo; Rocco de Campos Pereira, R.C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: to provide a better insight into the role of national cultures on the management and design of workplaces of multinationals in different countries.
    Design/methodology/approach: This explorative study is based on an extensive literature review of dimensions of national culture in

  1. Phraseology from the perspective of national-cultural specificity (based on English language material)

    Осипова Инна Алексеевна; Osipova Inna Alekseevna

    2016-01-01

    within the scope of the current study, linguistic units of English phraseology are perceived from the point of view of the national-cultural identity of English-speaking ethnos. National and stylistic peculiarities have always drawn attention of linguists because of a high cultural potential hidden in nature of phraseological units. This article was created for specialists of philological direction and mainstream audience.

  2. The visual arts at the biennial Burkinabè National Cultural Week | Ky ...

    Every two years the Ministry of Arts, Culture, and Tourism of Burkina Faso organises a National Cultural Week in Bobo Dioulasso. Its main objectives are to develop and promote Burkinabè culture and artists. This event, which includes numerous domains of art, nevertheless remains quite obviously a framework for the ...

  3. Culture as a Resource in Nation-Building. The Case of Macedonia

    Slaveski, Stojan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Together with history, culture represents one of the most basic aspects of the fabric of everyday life. It gives us a sense of identity and tells us who we are, where we come from and where we are going. Cultural policy broadly defines the meaning of social practice, and deals with subjectivity and identity, thereby playing a central role in the building of a sense of self. In the era of globalization, culture transcends borders between countries and can play the role of the connective tissue of the "imagined nation". It is used in the voluntary and organic approach to defining the nation. While the organic approach emphasizes the role of culture in highlighting the specificity of the nation, voluntary discourse focuses on the culture's universal value. This paper will analyze how culture is being used as a resource in the construction of the contemporary Macedonian nation.

  4. National character does not reflect mean personality trait levels in 49 cultures

    Terracciano, A; Abdel-Khalek, A M; Adám, N

    2005-01-01

    ratings of 3989 people from 49 cultures and compared them with the average personality scores of culture members assessed by observer ratings and self-reports. National character ratings were reliable but did not converge with assessed traits. Perceptions of national character thus appear to be unfounded......Most people hold beliefs about personality characteristics typical of members of their own and others' cultures. These perceptions of national character may be generalizations from personal experience, stereotypes with a "kernel of truth," or inaccurate stereotypes. We obtained national character...

  5. Virtual HRD and National Culture: An Information Processing Perspective

    Chung, Chih-Hung; Angnakoon, Putthachat; Li, Jessica; Allen, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to provide researchers with a better understanding of the cultural impact on information processing in virtual learning environment. Design/methodology/approach: This study uses a causal loop diagram to depict the cultural impact on information processing in the virtual human resource development (VHRD)…

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: Careers: Life at Sandia: People and Culture

    ; Culture Work-Life Balance Special Programs Students and Postdocs Benefits and Perks Hiring Process Life at -Life Balance Careers People and Culture Solar cell picture Quality people, quality work Integrity , the incredible work-life balance." View All Jobs Equal opportunity employer/Disability/Vet/GLBT

  7. Cultural Resuscitation and Nation-Building: An Examination of ...

    Mrs Afam

    The natural vegetation of Ughievwen clan and the sub-groups is rainforest with swamp ... twentieth century appeared to have eroded these cultural values even up to the post- colonial ... fire with logs and as soon as the smoke had reduced and the charcoal burnt brightly, ..... Globalization and cultural management: Between.

  8. CULTURAL NATIONALISM IN A COLONIAL CONTEXT: LAOS IN FRENCH INDOCHINA, 1893-1940

    Ivarsson, Søren

    2008-01-01

    In general, studies dealing with the link between French colonialism and nationalism in Laos have focused on the anti-colonial or revolutionary aspects of Lao nationalism. This is true for texts written by Western scholars as well as officially sanctioned books on Lao history published in Laos. T....... This chapter approaches Lao nationalism from a cultural perspective, through a discussion of how a specific idea about Laos and its culture was formed under French colonial rule in the period 1893-1940....

  9. Cultural assimilation, cultural diffusion and the origin of the wealth of nations

    Ashraf, Quamrul; Galor, Oded

    2007-01-01

    This research argues that variations in the interplay between cultural assimilation and cultural diffusion have played a significant role in giving rise to differential patterns of economic development across the globe. Societies that were geographically less vulnerable to cultural diffusion, benefited from enhanced assimilation, lower cultural diversity and, thus, more intense accumulation of society-specific human capital, enabling them to flourish in the technological paradigm that charact...

  10. Development of Quality Assurance System in Culture and Nation Character Education in Primary Education in Indonesia

    Susilana, Rudi; Asra

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of national education is to develop skills and build dignified national character and civilization in educating nation life (Act No. 20, 2003). The paper describes a system of quality assurance in culture and character education in primary education. This study employs the six sigma model which consists of the formula DMAIC (Define,…

  11. Popular Culture Transcending National Borders and Genres in East Asia

    Matsuda, Masako; Higashi, Nozomi

    2006-01-01

    Using highly advanced media technology, Asian cultural exchanges became very active since the latter half of the 1990s. Firstly, Japanese "trendy dramas" were favorably welcomed in Asia because they could show young people's problems in an Asian context against the background of a modernized city. These dramas have projected an image of Japan as an idealistically westernized country. Due to the popularity of Japanese culture such as manga, TV dramas, and movies, there seems to have risen a fe...

  12. Explaining Differences in Subjective Well-Being Across 33 Nations Using Multilevel Models: Universal Personality, Cultural Relativity, and National Income.

    Cheng, Cecilia; Cheung, Mike W-L; Montasem, Alex

    2016-02-01

    This multinational study simultaneously tested three prominent hypotheses--universal disposition, cultural relativity, and livability--that explained differences in subjective well-being across nations. We performed multilevel structural equation modeling to examine the hypothesized relationships at both individual and cultural levels in 33 nations. Participants were 6,753 university students (2,215 men; 4,403 women; 135 did not specify), and the average age of the entire sample was 20.97 years (SD = 2.39). Both individual- and cultural-level analyses supported the universal disposition and cultural relativity hypotheses by revealing significant associations of subjective well-being with Extraversion, Neuroticism, and independent self-construal. In addition, interdependent self-construal was positively related to life satisfaction at the individual level only, whereas aggregated negative affect was positively linked with aggregate levels of Extraversion and interdependent self-construal at the cultural level only. Consistent with the livability hypothesis, gross national income (GNI) was related to aggregate levels of negative affect and life satisfaction. There was also a quadratic relationship between GNI and aggregated positive affect. Our findings reveal that universal disposition, cultural self-construal, and national income can elucidate differences in subjective well-being, but the multilevel analyses advance the literature by yielding new findings that cannot be identified in studies using individual-level analyses alone. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Race, culture, nation and identity politics in Turkey: some comments

    Bruinessen, M.M. van

    1997-01-01

    Nation-building was a major theme in American scholarship dealing with the 'new states' of Asia and Africa in the 1960s. It was generally treated as an inevitable and beneficial process. The first discordant voice was that of Walker Connor, who in an often-quoted article, "Nation-building or

  14. “A Peculiar National Character”: Transatlantic Realignment and the Birth of American Cultural Nationalism after 1815

    Jaap Verheul

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This article argues that the emergence of American cultural nationalism after the War of 1812 developed in self-confident opposition to the Old World, yet was thoroughly influenced by European standards of nationhood. American intellectuals who campaigned for cultural independence from Europe at the same time retained European standards of civilization and esthetics, and were thoroughly influenced by ideas about the relationship between culture and nation that developed in England and Germany. This articles discusses these postcolonial complexities are reflected in debates about American cultural identity in newly founded magazines such as the North American Review that long predated Emerson’s famous “Intellectual Declaration of Independence” of 1837.

  15. Negative Cultural Transfer in Cross-Cultural Communication for Inter-national Business

    夏秋颖

    2015-01-01

    With the depth development of economic globalization,the multi-culture conflict,communication and integration are strengthened.Meanwhile,series of problems about cross-cultural communication for international business have happened.One of the core problem is negative cultural transfer.This paper gives the analysis about its causes and effects.At last,the way to solve it have been found.

  16. Cultural policy and Korean Wave:From national culture to transnational consumerism

    Lee, Hye-Kyung

    2013-01-01

    This chapter reflects on Korean cultural policy’s responses to the Korean Wave from a historical perspective. It finds that the contemporary cultural policy is taking an unprecedentedly transnational and consumerist turn. This accompanies the redefining of Korean culture as universal ‘‘K-culture” and the rise of new public-private interface where an array of Korean Wave projects are planned and carried out, feeding multifaceted governmental and commercial aspirations. The policy goes beyond d...

  17. The Role of National Culture on Entrepreneurship: An Assessment on the Entrepreneurial Culture of Turkey

    Doğan, Ebru

    2016-01-01

    Entrepreneurship constitutes the most important dynamic of economic growth and development. With growing importance all over the world, entrepreneurship is also closely related to the social and cultural structure of a society. As the culture is a remarkable element of entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial environment, a country desiring to promote the development of entrepreneurship and emergence of more entrepreneurs would need a culture supporting entrepreneurship. Entrepreneurship is...

  18. Culture Matters in Successful Curriculum Change: An International Study of the Influence of National and Organizational Culture Tested With Multilevel Structural Equation Modeling

    Jippes, M.; Driessen, E.W.; Broers, N.J.; Majoor, G.D.; Gijselaers, W.H.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: National culture has been shown to play a role in curriculum change in medical schools, and business literature has described a similar influence of organizational culture on change processes in organizations. This study investigated the impact of both national and organizational culture on

  19. Research and Development Knowledge Transfer across National Cultures

    Thiessen, M.; Hendriks, P.H.J.; Essers, C.; Pauleen, David J.

    2007-01-01

    With the increased tendency of multinational corporations (MNCs) to disperse their research and development (R&D) activities over various countries, the integration of the dispersed R&D knowledge via knowledge transfer across cultural borders becomes crucial for understanding and managing MNCs. The

  20. A National Sports Institute as a Learning Culture

    Lee, Jessica; Price, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose: The aim of this study was to describe the learning culture for elite athletes who resided at the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) from the perspective of the athletes themselves. As a government entity, the AIS is highly regulated by policies and strategies concerning allocation of funding, facilities, services, and…

  1. National minorities in Brno. The cultural heritage of Roma in excluded locations

    Pospíšilová, Jana; Poláková, J.; Brožovičová, K.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 5 (2015), s. 18-34 ISSN 0862-8351 Institutional support: RVO:68378076 Keywords : National minorities * Roma * Cultural heritage * exclusion * Brno Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  2. The Path to a Culturally Relevant National Security Strategy

    Frappler, John

    2008-01-01

    .... In an attempt to remain ahead of its enemies in the prosecution of the GWOT, the United States has proceeded with an extensive review of its National Security Strategy and an historic transformation...

  3. Phraseology from the perspective of national-cultural specificity (based on English language material

    Osipova I. A.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available within the scope of the current study, linguistic units of English phraseology are perceived from the point of view of the national-cultural identity of English-speaking ethnos. National and stylistic peculiarities have always drawn attention of linguists because of a high cultural potential hidden in nature of phraseological units. This article was created for specialists of philological direction and mainstream audience.

  4. Determining the Role of Language and Culture in First Nations Schools: A Comparison of the First Nations Education Act with the Policy of the Assembly of First Nations

    Morcom, Lindsay A.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, I explore the incongruence between the federal government's proposed First Nations Education Act and the approach of the Assembly of First Nations (AFN) regarding language and culture education. I also examine research concerning potential outcomes of their approaches to determine what would be most beneficial to learners.…

  5. Towards an innovation culture : what are it's national, corporate, marketing and engineering aspects, some experimental evidence

    Ulijn, J.M.; Weggeman, M.C.D.P.; Cooper, C.L.; Cartwright, S.; Earley, P.C.

    2001-01-01

    This chapter addresses the issue of innovation culture (IC) and proposes and try to answer 5 research questions related to the possible impact of different elements, such as national, corporate and professional (engineering vs marketing) cultures (NC, CC, and PC), their intersection and integration

  6. NATIONAL CULTURAL DIMENSIONS AND WELL-BEING IN SOME COUNTRIES OF THE WORLD, IN 2013

    Liliana DUGULEANĂ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cultural dimensions of Hofstede’s model were developed in different models of cultural influences in business. Erin Meyer, the author of the Culture Map, uses eight scales for defining a national cultural profile. The database of cultural profiles for some states of the World was built in time, by business leaders and it can be dynamically updated by adding the answers of new respondents to the online questionnaire. The performances of economic and social organizations influence the well-being of their nations. The paper uses the estimations of the national cultural profiles from Erin Meyer’s database and some indicators which characterize the well-being, like: human development index (HDI, the corruption perceptions index, the unemployment rate and inequality-adjusted HDI, in order to define how the culture influences the well-being. Using the Analysis of Principal Components in SPSS, there can be found the position of the analyzed countries about well-being in relation with their national cultural profile in businesses, in 2013.

  7. Cultural impact on co-design teamwork in distributed bi- national teams

    Man, J.; Lu, Y.; Brombacher, A.C.; Ying, F.

    2014-01-01

    This paper is designed to study the impact of cultural difference on co-design teamwork. The aim of this study is to explore the impact of supporting and hindering cultural factors on codesign teamwork in distributed bi-national teams from Netherland and China. In order to achieve the research

  8. Social, cultural, and economic aspects of livestock ranching on the Santa Fe and Carson National Forests

    Alice M. McSweeney; Carol Raish

    2012-01-01

    We examined the cultural, social, and economic aspects of livestock operations of ranchers who have Federal grazing permits (called permittees) on the Santa Fe and Carson National Forests of northern New Mexico. This study was an expansion of the 2003 pilot study and was designed to provide much-needed information concerning the culture and economic practices of the...

  9. The National Heritage of Ki Hadjar Dewantara in Tamansiswa about Culture-Based Education and Learning

    Towaf, Siti Malikhah

    2016-01-01

    Global interdependence is a reality; in the security, economics, politics, socio-culture, and especially in the education of a nation;. Relevant to the need for an international dialog on education, this study tries to explore: 1) the concepts of culture-based education and learning of Ki Hadjar Dewantara (KHD) in Tamansiswa, 2) the results of…

  10. National Culture, Creativity, and Productivity: What's the Relationship with Student Achievement?

    Fang, Zheng; Xu, Xianxuan; Grant, Leslie W.; Stronge, James H.; Ward, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Using Hofstede's culture dimensions and World Values Survey (WVS) dimensions, the study uses a series of multiple regressions to explore the relationship among national culture, creativity as measured by patents, economic productivity as measured by gross domestic product per capita, and student achievement as measured by Trends in International…

  11. The Impact of National Culture on Informal Learning in the Workplace

    Kim, Sehoon; McLean, Gary N.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to identify how differing cultural factors affect informal learning in the workplace. We have introduced concepts and reviewed studies on informal learning and national culture based on an extensive literature review on the factors influencing informal learning, particularly based on five Hofstede's dimensions of…

  12. National Culture and Higher Education as Pre-Determining Factors of Student Entrepreneurship

    Roman, Teodora; Maxim, Alexandru

    2017-01-01

    Our purpose is to assess the influence of national culture and higher education on entrepreneurship among students and fresh graduates. The aim was to determine whether the grouping of students based on certain personality traits (most of which are connected to culture) is effective at predicting entrepreneurial intention and whether…

  13. National Cultures, Performance Appraisal Practices, and Organizational Absenteeism and Turnover: A Study across 21 Countries

    Peretz, Hilla; Fried, Yitzhak

    2012-01-01

    Performance appraisal (PA) is a key human resource activity in organizations. However, in this global economy, we know little about how societal cultures affect PA practices. In this study, we address this gap by focusing on 2 complementary issues: (a) the influence of societal (national) cultural practices on PA practices adopted by organizations…

  14. Restoring the Balance: First Nations Women, Community, and Culture

    María del Carmen Rodríguez de France

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available With empowering stories and histories from twelve Aboriginal women who are leaders in different contexts and communities, the book acknowledges and celebrates the contributions of Aboriginal women to diverse fields of work and disciplines such as art, culture, politics, language, law, community, education, and social activism. About the Authors Eric Guimond is an assistant director at the Strategic Research and Analysis Directorate at Indian and Northern Affairs Canada. Gail Guthrie Valaskakis was a Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Concordia University and was a leading authority on Aboriginal Media and Communication. She passed away in 2007. Madeleine Dion Stout is a former nurse and founding director of the Centre of Aboriginal Education, Research, and Culture at Carleton University.

  15. Differences between National Cultures Matter – Case of Slovenian-Korean Working Environment

    Tušar Matej

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Global business today usually requires organizations to be present locally in countries where their customers are. To do this successfully, good cooperation with local people is needed. Therefore, this paper focuses on the integration of cultures in the business world. The insights from this study are expected to benefit Slovenian expatriates to foreign companies in South Korea, as well as national culture researchers. The main goals of this research include a comparison of Hofstede’s IBM survey results with the researched working environment, and identifying the benefits of merging two national cultures for the working environment.

  16. Investigating the Effect of Cultural Values on National Identity; (Case Study of Kerman’s Citizens

    Hamid Nassaj

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available National identity is the most comprehensive and important level of identity in all social systems, which is influential in all domains of culture, society and politics. Considering the significance of national identity as the most component of social order and integrity, the present study investigates the indices of national identity. Accordingly, the effect of cultural values on citizens’ attitudes towards national identity is to be studied. The present study is a survey research and the required data were collected via a researcher-made questionnaire. The population included the youth aged 16 to 40 years old in Kerman City, among whom 270 participants were selected as the sample size. The results of the research indicate that the degree of values of pluralism, patriarchy, power distance and avoidance of uncertainty are at relatively high levels. Furthermore, citizens’ national identity is at the moderate level. In addition, the findings indicate that the effect of variables of pluralism and power distance has significant effects on citizens’ national identity, and the coefficient and direction of the effect of this two variables on national identity is positive. In other words, participants who enjoy pluralist cultural values have more degree of national identity than those who have individualist characteristics and the first group are more likely to be located at higher classes of national identity than the second group. Also, the results indicate that participants who have cultural values with high power distance have more degree of national identity than those who have cultural characteristics with low degree of power distance. The findings indicate that variables of risk-taking and patriarchy have no significant effect on the degree of citizens’ national identity.

  17. Beyond Economy: Impact of National Cultural Values on Nationwide Broadband Internet Diffusion

    Joo, Sung-Hee

    2010-01-01

    This study examines how the non-conventional factors of national cultural values and government involvement affect the diffusion of broadband Internet technologies in various nations around the world. An innovative element of the study was the examination of the influence patterns at different stages of diffusion, which was measured by the number…

  18. Do needs for security and certainty predict cultural and economic conservatism? A cross-national analysis.

    Malka, Ariel; Soto, Christopher J; Inzlicht, Michael; Lelkes, Yphtach

    2014-06-01

    We examine whether individual differences in needs for security and certainty predict conservative (vs. liberal) position on both cultural and economic political issues and whether these effects are conditional on nation-level characteristics and individual-level political engagement. Analyses with cross-national data from 51 nations reveal that valuing conformity, security, and tradition over self-direction and stimulation (a) predicts ideological self-placement on the political right, but only among people high in political engagement and within relatively developed nations, ideologically constrained nations, and non-Eastern European nations, (b) reliably predicts right-wing cultural attitudes and does so more strongly within developed and ideologically constrained nations, and (c) on average predicts left-wing economic attitudes but does so more weakly among people high in political engagement, within ideologically constrained nations, and within non-Eastern European nations. These findings challenge the prevailing view that needs for security and certainty organically yield a broad right-wing ideology and that exposure to political discourse better equips people to select the broad ideology that is most need satisfying. Rather, these findings suggest that needs for security and certainty generally yield culturally conservative but economically left-wing preferences and that exposure to political discourse generally weakens the latter relation. We consider implications for the interactive influence of personality characteristics and social context on political attitudes and discuss the importance of assessing multiple attitude domains, assessing political engagement, and considering national characteristics when studying the psychological origins of political attitudes.

  19. Cultural Integration and National Identity Education for Ethnic Minority College Students

    LI Yongzheng; WANG Lixia

    2014-01-01

    Cultural integration is an objective historical phenomenon , and also exists in present society .No matter if seen from history or from the present world , cultural integration is the key to ethnic relations as well as an approach for cultural development .The concept of “nation” is a fairly new product introduced from western countries in modern times.It is a people ’ s cognition, ap-praisal and feelings towards the country where they live.It is mainly represented in the national politi-cal community , the structural level as well as the i-dentity in the common spiritual level of the Chinese nation. School education is a very strong tool during the formation process of a “nation”.Since the Qin and Han periods (2nd Century B.C.), China has formed a large -unified web of Chinese culture . After the creation of the New China , China also has paid attention to the development of education for the ethnic minorities , and has taken the task of training the new generation of ethnic minorities as an important national policy .“Fair Education” is the “core idea” of China ’ s ethnic minorities ’ education. This includes preferential policy for ethnic minority-students’ education chances , the investment of teaching resources in ethnic minority areas, and respect for and protection of the cul-tures of the ethnic minorities .Through these ac-tions, the government ensures that the ethnic mi-nority-students living in remote and poor areas get the chance for a fair education like the Han -Chi-nese students .The policy further enhances the e-qual development of , and exchanges among the va-rious nationalities in the whole country; promotes the common development of the ethnic economies , the common prosperity of their cultures , political stability;and finally ensures the citizen ’ s strong identity of the nation . Culturale integration is the foundation of and precondition for the national identity education of the ethnic minorities .On the one hand

  20. Birthweight distribution in ART singletons resulting from embryo culture in two different culture media compared with the national population.

    Lemmen, J G; Pinborg, A; Rasmussen, S; Ziebe, S

    2014-10-10

    Is there a difference in birthweight distribution in ART singletons born after IVF culture in two different culture media? There is no effect of culture media on both crude and adjusted birthweight distributions in ART singletons from nulliparous mothers. Studies on human ART singletons have reported a difference in birthweight in singletons following IVF culture in different culture media. However, other studies comparing different culture media have not shown any significant differences in birthweight. This study was a retrospective comparison of birthweights in IVF/ICSI singletons conceived after fresh embryo transfer following embryo culture in Cook or Medicult medium and in a national cohort of naturally conceived singletons in nulliparous women. The study compares four independent groups consisting of singletons in nulliparous women from Cook-d2: 2-day culture in Cook medium at Rigshospitalet (n = 974), Medicult-d2: 2-day culture in Medicult EmbryoAssist medium at Rigshospitalet (n = 147), Medicult-d3: 3-day culture in Medicult EmbryoAssist medium with and without added GM-CSF (n = 204), and DK: pregnancies from the Danish birth registry (n = 106842). The study compares the birthweights of singletons from nulliparous women in the four independent groups mentioned above; Cook-d2: Medicult-d2: Medicult-d3: and DK. In addition, distributions of large and small for gestational age infants were compared between the groups and a multiple linear regression analysis was used to determine which factors determined birthweight. We found no significant difference in the crude birthweight distributions between singletons born after culture in Cook-d2 or Medicult-groups. Singleton girls from the Cook-d2 group weighed 3302 ± 28 g, versus 3252 ± 76 in the Medicult-d2 group (difference 50 g; P = 0.547). Singleton boys from the Cook-d2 group weighed 3430 ± 27 g, versus 3354 ± 56 in the Medicult-d2 group (difference 76 g; P = 0.279). In the background population, mean

  1. Folk national culture as a means of forming norms of communication in childhood

    Chernushevich V. A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The best carriers of playing culture are children, who possess and enjoy it. Destroyed social kids’ structures, territorial kids’ associations (family, yard, village, street communities of children interrupted generally the process of culture transmission, reproduction and passing of communication tradition. And there is a need in social-state “revivification” (recovering folk games list and its’ players, enough for folk games reproduction process. Folk game includes particular properties of relations on the levels of physical and emotional, vocal interaction, imagery-symbolic filling, special features of clothes (all aspects of communication that constitute features of national culture of the nation and make from the nation the community of people very special and different from other communities and nations. Studying of correctional possibilities of folk games within the frames of playing agendas showed that their psychological and emotional resources provide the conditions for adoption by children the norms of communication.

  2. From putative genes to temperament and culture: cultural characteristics of the distribution of dominant affective temperaments in national studies.

    Gonda, Xenia; Vázquez, Gustavo H; Akiskal, Kareen K; Akiskal, Hagop S

    2011-06-01

    Affective temperaments may carry distinct evolutionary advantages both on the individual or a group level, so we can expect that in different cultural and national samples the frequency of dominant affective temperaments will show characteristic differences. The aim of the present study was to investigate the characteristics of distribution of dominant affective temperaments in different national studies of general non-clinical population. In our study we included six studies published in different countries around the world (Argentina, Germany, Hungary, Korea, Portugal, and Lebanon) which investigated a large sample of non-clinical population using TEMPS-A, and reported frequencies for dominant affective temperaments. The frequencies of dominant affective temperaments were compared using chi square tests. We found a significant difference in the frequency of affective temperaments among the different national studies in case of the cyclothymic, hyperthymic and irritable temperaments. We found important parallels between the frequency of affective temperaments and cultural dimensions described by Hofstede (Hofstede and Hofstede, 2005). The characteristics encompassed by the depressive temperament show considerable similarities with Hofstede's individualism-collectivism dimension, while those of the hyperthymic temperament seem to be similar to uncertainty avoidance, and the irritable temperament shows similarities with Hofstede's power distance. Furthermore, the relative frequency of these dominant temperaments in case of the different national samples paralleled the relative scores of these countries on the corresponding cultural scales. Our results indicate an important relationship between affective temperaments and cultural dimensions, which suggests that these phenomena may be the manifestations of the same genetically determined predispositions in different forms. We included a study by Erfurth et al. (2005), in which affective temperaments were evaluated

  3. Hofstede’s Dimensions of National Cultures Revisited: A Case Study of South Korea’s Culture

    Buja Elena

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In about thirty-five years since the first publication of Hofstede’s (1991 study on the dimensions of national cultures, people all over the world have evolved in various directions and to various extents due to the phenomenon known as globalization. The present paper aims to investigate whether within this time span South Korea, a technically and economically developed country, whose way of life is strongly influenced by Confucianism, has complied with or resisted this phenomenon. The data that will be discussed have been collected from a Korean best seller (Shin’s Please Look After Mom, 2012 that approximately covers the period in which Hofstede conducted his investigations on national cultures. Hopefully the findings will indicate that the deeply rooted values have remained almost the same, while the outer layers of culture (such as the symbols or rituals, also known as ‘practices’ have changed due to the influences exerted by the other important economic and cultural powers of the world (such as Japan, the United States or some of the European countries Korea has come in touch with.

  4. Cultural similarity and international trade in a panel of nations

    E-G Hwang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Using a gravity model and the data of a panel of eight nations, we present evidence that supports the views that geographical influence on trade had increased from 1985 to 1997. In both years, linguistic influence on trade is found to exist in export but not in import. The estimated results show a positive relation between religious similarity and international trade for the year 1985 but not for the year 1997. However, there is an indication that, for 1997, the religious dissimilarity tends to discourage international trade with low-income countries and regions and to encourage international trade with high-income countries. We also find that, for low-income trade partners, religious dissimilarity retards imports more than exports; by contrast, for high-income trade partners, it encourages exports more than imports.

  5. National Culture and Business Model Change - A Framework for Successful Expansions

    Stenskov, Lea Houmark; Lueg, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a conceptual framework to analyse how a company’s business model needs to be adjusted if it is expanded into another cultural context. For this, we use the example of changes in the business model of a Danish ITcompany opening a new office in the U.S. Using a single case study......, we integrate the concepts of business models (Osterwalder and Pigneur, 2005) and national culture (Hofstede, 1980). Our findings explain why and how adjustments in the business model are necessary regarding the company’s communication, team composition, and customer involvement in projects....... As to implications, we construct a matrix combining business models and national culture that other multinational companies can use to achieve better understanding of their business model in different national contexts....

  6. Cultural Dimensions of Digital Library Development, Part I: Theory and Methodological Framework for a Comparative Study of the Cultures of Innovation in Five European National Libraries

    Dalbello, Marija

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the influence of culture on digital libraries of the first wave. The local cultures of innovation of five European national libraries (Biblioteca nacional de Portugal, Bibliotheque nationale de France, Die Deutsche Bibliothek, the National Library of Scotland, and the British Library) are reconstructed in case histories from…

  7. Cultural Connectedness and Its Relation to Mental Wellness for First Nations Youth.

    Snowshoe, Angela; Crooks, Claire V; Tremblay, Paul F; Hinson, Riley E

    2017-04-01

    We explored the interrelationships among components of cultural connectedness (i.e., identity, traditions, and spirituality) and First Nations youth mental health using a brief version of the original Cultural Connectedness Scale. Participants included 290 First Nations youth (M age  = 14.4) who were recruited from both urban and rural school settings in Saskatchewan and Southwestern Ontario. We performed a confirmatory factor analysis of the Cultural Connectedness Scale-Short Version (CCS-S) items to investigate the factor stability of the construct in our sample. We examined the relationships between the CCS-S subscales and self-efficacy, sense of self (present and future), school connectedness, and life satisfaction using hierarchical multiple linear regression analyses to establish the validity of the abbreviated measure. The results revealed that cultural connectedness, as measured by the 10-item CCS-S, had strong associations with the mental health indicators assessed and, in some cases, was associated with First Nations youth mental health above and beyond other social determinants of health. Our results extend findings from previous research on cultural connectedness by elucidating the meaning of its components and demonstrate the importance of culture for positive youth development.

  8. National cultural values and the evolution of process and outcome discrepancies in international strategic alliances

    Kumar, Rajesh; Nti, Kofi O

    2004-01-01

    The article assesses the role played by national cultural values in shaping the evolution of international strategic alliances. The authors build on a systems dynamic model of alliance evolution in which the developmental path of an alliance depends on how the partners manage process and outcome...... discrepancies that may emerge during the course of an alliance. They argue that national culture affects alliance evolution by influencing partners sensitivity to discrepancy detection , shaping the nature of attributions they make, and by affecting the partners reactions to discrepancies. They focus...

  9. Effect of national cultural values on safety climate, and safety management system

    Ali, T.H.; Memon, N.A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the critical role played by the national culture in influencing how workers safely or otherwise behave (mainly in risky situations) on construction sites, and how site managers implement safety management processes and practices. The paper presents the findings of an empirical research study based on a questionnaire survey, administered in Pakistan, targeting construction site managers and workers to gauge the effect national culture has on managers preferences for and perceptions of safety management systems (policies and practices) and than linking this effect to predict workers attitudes and intentional behaviors. (author)

  10. National Agendas and Local Realities: Festive Material and Ritual Culture, Nationalism, and Modernity in the Chita Region of Japan

    Sean McPherson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The reworking of religious space in modern Japan encompassed the reinvention of the spatial, material, and ritual culture of matsuri 祭り(festivals. After a period of relative official disfavor, festivals in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries were reinvigorated by changes in ritual process and spatial scope, as well as by shifts in the architecture and sculpture of dashi 山車 (wheeled festival floats. The incorporation of matsuri into broader discourses of national cultural identity was driven by the affective potential of their supposed cultural authenticity. This reinvention of festivity is evident in the Tokoname Matsuri of Tokoname City, Aichi Prefecture, where after the 1905 Russo-Japanese conflict several Edo-period shrine festivals were merged into a shōkonsai 招魂祭 (festival for the war dead. The spatial scope and ritual process, as well as the architecture and sculptural iconography, of the six dashi built for the new Tokoname Matsuri tied this regional city into national discourses of cultural authenticity, racial purity, and martial valor. The ideological resonance in prewar Japan of the Tokoname Matsuri and other festivals with nationalist imagery sprang from their indelibly local origins; matsuri were not controlled entirely from the top down, but rather were mediated at multiple levels.

  11. Thumbs up for privacy?: Differences in online self-disclosure behavior across national cultures.

    Reed, Philip J; Spiro, Emma S; Butts, Carter T

    2016-09-01

    This study investigates relationships between national-level culture and online self-disclosure behavior. We operationalize culture through the GLOBE dimensions, a set of nine variables measuring cultural practices and another nine measuring values. Our observations of self-disclosure come from the privacy settings of approximately 200,000 randomly sampled Facebook users who designated a geographical network in 2009. We model privacy awareness as a function of one or more GLOBE variables with demographic covariates, evaluating the relative influence of each factor. In the top-performing models, we find that the majority of the cultural dimensions are significantly related to privacy awareness behavior. We also find that the hypothesized directions of several of these relationships, based largely on cultural attitudes towards threat mitigation, are confirmed. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. INFLUENCE OF NATIONAL CULTURE ON BEHAVIOR OF BUSINESS: COMPARATIVE STUDY OF SLOVAKIA AND UKRAINE

    Nataliia Viktorovna Ostapenko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the influence of national culture on the behavior of enterprises by comparing two countries - Ukraine and Slovakia. The data is based on the original author's own research on the enterprises of Ukraine and Slovakia. The paper is investigated why and how cultural factors (informal institutions may influence the perception of companies of rules of the game, and the formation of appropriate behavior. On the basis of surveys conducted among enterprises of Ukraine and Slovakia main conclusions about current formal rules of the game in these countries, perception by entrepreneurs these rules and the formation of certain behavior by them are done. In work on the basis of comparative analysis conclusions about the impact of national culture on the development of entrepreneurship in the national economy are done. The author of the article examines the following indicators: national culture, personal characteristics of respondents, subordination of norms, opportunism, and coherence of formal and informal institutions at the national level. In particular the most important indicators of the perception of norms are: indicators of perception of entrepreneurs of regulation and public policies in the field of entrepreneurship, business productivity, perceptions of bribery and tax evasion, etc.

  13. Culture Matters in Successful Curriculum Change: An International Study of the Influence of National and Organizational Culture Tested With Multilevel Structural Equation Modeling.

    Jippes, Mariëlle; Driessen, Erik W; Broers, Nick J; Majoor, Gerard D; Gijselaers, Wim H; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    2015-07-01

    National culture has been shown to play a role in curriculum change in medical schools, and business literature has described a similar influence of organizational culture on change processes in organizations. This study investigated the impact of both national and organizational culture on successful curriculum change in medical schools internationally. The authors tested a literature-based conceptual model using multilevel structural equation modeling. For the operationalization of national and organizational culture, the authors used Hofstede's dimensions of culture and Quinn and Spreitzer's competing values framework, respectively. To operationalize successful curriculum change, the authors used two derivates: medical schools' organizational readiness for curriculum change developed by Jippes and colleagues, and change-related behavior developed by Herscovitch and Meyer. The authors administered a questionnaire in 2012 measuring the described operationalizations to medical schools in the process of changing their curriculum. Nine hundred ninety-one of 1,073 invited staff members from 131 of 345 medical schools in 56 of 80 countries completed the questionnaire. An initial poor fit of the model improved to a reasonable fit by two suggested modifications which seemed theoretically plausible. In sum, characteristics of national culture and organizational culture, such as a certain level of risk taking, flexible policies and procedures, and strong leadership, affected successful curriculum change. National and organizational culture influence readiness for change in medical schools. Therefore, medical schools considering curriculum reform should anticipate the potential impact of national and organizational culture.

  14. Performance-based vs socially supportive culture: A cross-national study of descriptive norms and entrepreneurship

    Ute Stephan; Lorraine M Uhlaner

    2010-01-01

    This paper is a cross-national study testing a framework relating cultural descriptive norms to entrepreneurship in a sample of 40 nations. Based on data from the Global Leadership and Organizational Behavior Effectiveness project, we identify two higher-order dimensions of culture – socially supportive culture (SSC) and performance-based culture (PBC) – and relate them to entrepreneurship rates and associated supply-side and demand-side variables available from the Global Entrepreneurship Mo...

  15. The study of Relation between Cultural Components and National Attachment among Citizens of Yazd city.

    M. Farahmand

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available National attachment sense as one of the components of social Property is a key word in national culture. Any definition of society is Occurred by accepting attachment and commitment sense and the society is existed to some extent because people have positive sense about that. National attachment sense is considered as one the important affairs of any society and its proper recognition and full knowledge of authorities and affair operators about the effective social factors on that can be an effective step in recognizing the existent problems in society. The present research reviewed the relation between cultural components and national attachment among the Yazd citizens. The research statistical society was all of the Yazd’s 15 to 65 years old citizens that 384 people were selected as sample by Cochran formula. The tool of data gathering was researcher-made questionnaire that had appropriate validity and reliability. Sampling method has been multi-stage clustered. Results showed that there was a meaningful relationship between secularization, consumerism and virtual social networks with national attachment has been reverse and meaningful, but the relationship between age and values preferences with national attachment has been direct and meaningful. Independent variables in regression equation managed to explain 39 percent of national attachment variable changes. The greatest impact on dependent variable (national attachment has belonged to the variables of secularization, age, values preferences and consumerism.

  16. The Impact of the New Nationalism and Identity Politics on Cultural Policy-Making In Europe and Beyond

    Duelund, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Fuelled by factors such as globalisation, European integration and migration, there is evidence of a resurgence of nationalism in Europe and beyond. This trend is being increasingly revitalised in national and regional cultural policy-making, often linked to a new focus on politics of national...... identity. At worst a future scenario of Europe might be an internationalization of nationalism which tends to colonize art, culture and "the whole way of life". To change this cultural lens requires a new narrative of Europe. It requires scientific cultural research, knowledge and insight, if the ghosts...

  17. Creating National Narrative: The Red Guard Art Exhibitions and the National Exhibitions in the Chinese Cultural Revolution 1966 - 1976

    Winnie Tsang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The artistic development in China experienced drastic changes during the Cultural Revolution from 1966 to 1976. Traditional Chinese art was denounced, whereas propaganda art became predominant in shaping the public’s loyalty towards the Communist Party and the country. Two major groups of art exhibitions emerged during the Revolution—the unofficial Red Guard art exhibitions organized by student activists in collaboration with local communes and art schools between 1966 and 1968, and the state-run national exhibitions from 1972 to 1975. These exhibitions were significant to this period because they were held frequently in the capital city Beijing and occasionally elsewhere, and through art they presented unique revolutionary beliefs to the Chinese people in a public setting. While the Red Guard art exhibitions and the national exhibitions certainly created different national narratives, I argue that the national exhibitions were in fact an attempt to revise the national narrative created by the Red Guard art exhibitions in order to re-establish a more utopian, consistent, and official national narrative. This paper unravels the intricate relationship between the two groups of exhibitions by comparing their exhibition venues, ideological focuses, work selection and quality editing. 

  18. National Contexts Influencing Principals' Time Use and Allocation: Economic Development, Societal Culture, and Educational System

    Lee, Moosung; Hallinger, Philip

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the impact of macro-context factors on the behavior of school principals. More specifically, the article illuminates how a nation's level of economic development, societal culture, and educational system influence the amount of time principals devote to their job role and shape their allocation of time to instructional…

  19. Theory in social simulation: Status-Power theory, national culture and emergence of the glass ceiling

    Hofstede, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    This is a conceptual exploration of the work of some
    eminent social scientists thought to be amenable to agent-based
    modelling of social reality. Kemper’s status-power theory and
    Hofstede’s dimensions of national culture are the central
    theories. The article reviews empirical work on

  20. Management of psychosocial risks in European workplaces: drivers and barriers in a national and cultural context

    Heuvel, S. van den; Bakhuys Roozeboom, M.M.C.; Eekhout, I.; Houtman, I.L.D.

    2017-01-01

    Management of psychosocial risks in European workplaces; drivers and barriers in a national and cultural context. General objective of the project commissioned by the European Agency for Safety and Health at Work (EU-OSHA) is to support policy makers in stimulating successful psychosocial risk (PSR)

  1. Exploratory research on the role of national and professional cultures in a distributed learning project

    Vogel, D.R.; Genuchten, van M.J.I.M.; Lou, D.; Verveen, S.; van Eekhout, M.M.I.M.; Adams, A.

    2001-01-01

    The impact of differing national and professional cultural backgrounds is a salient issue that interacts with technological support of distributed teams. As we prepare for the world of the future it becomes imperative that we give students the experience of working in multicultural distributed

  2. Internationalization of Higher Education in University Institution Rankings: The Influence of National Culture

    Delgado-Márquez, Blanca L.; Hurtado-Torres, Nuria E.; Bondar, Yaroslava

    2012-01-01

    Internationalization constitutes a widespread concept in the management literature and has recently begun to be applied to higher education institutions. While previous research has analyzed the relationship between national culture and corporate profit-oriented behavior, in this study, we focus on university institutions to investigate the…

  3. Understanding national culture effects on user behavior in integrative IS implementations

    Krijnse Locker, Niels; Vos, Janita F.J.; Boonstra, Albert

    2016-01-01

    This study examines how national culture manifests itself in integrative IS implementations and how it influences user behavior. Adopting a case survey approach, a sample of 70 cases encompassing 18 countries/regions, 18 industries and over 25 different integrative IT systems resulted in 481

  4. Do needs for security and certainty predict cultural and economic conservatism? A cross-national analysis

    Malka, A.; Soto, C.J.; Inzlicht, M.; Lelkes, Y.

    2014-01-01

    We examine whether individual differences in needs for security and certainty predict conservative (vs. liberal) position on both cultural and economic political issues and whether these effects are conditional on nation-level characteristics and individual-level political engagement. Analyses with

  5. The response rate in postal epidemiological studies in the context of national cultural behaviour

    Angelova, Radostina A.; Naydenov, Kiril; Hägerhed-Engman, Linda

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the effect of national cultural differences on the response rate, obtained in questionnaire based epidemiological studies on allergy and asthma, performed in Sweden (DBH) and Bulgaria (ALLHOME). The two studies used one and the same methodology, but the ob...

  6. National and Organizational Culture, Performance Evaluation and Trust: Evidence from Multinational Company Subsidiary in Indonesia

    Unggul Purwohedi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of national and organizational culture on the relationship between accounting and trust in a subsidiary of a Western Multi-National Company (MNC in Indonesia. This study use a qualitative field study of one French MNC subsidiary and interview four expatriate directors, nine Indonesian managers and 10 Indonesian employees. Key themes were identified with the assistance of NVivo software. In this study, accounting, through formal performance evaluation, contributes to trust building between supervisors and their subordinates. Formal performance evaluation through transparent and objective evaluation increases trust in the supervisor. On the other hand, informal performance evaluation tends to decrease trustful behaviour due to secrecy in the evaluation process.  It appears that Indonesian national culture does influence organizational culture preference in the local staff. Individuals share national culture as a result of values developed from family, religion, education, and experience.DOI: 10.15408/sjie.v6i2.4733 

  7. Teaching Culture: Imagined Communities and National Fantasies in the O.J. Simpson Case.

    Silberstein, Sandra

    2003-01-01

    Argues for a complex and contradictory presentation of culture in the language classroom. Uses theories of nationalism to examine treatment of the O.J. Simpson case. Coverage from popular news magazines is read through the lens of anthropology and of literary and social theory. (Author/VWL)

  8. Cultural Symbolism behind the Architectural Design of Mounds Park All-Nations Magnet School.

    Pewewardy, Cornell; May, Paul G.

    1992-01-01

    The architectural design of Mounds Park All-Nations Magnet School (St. Paul, Minnesota) incorporates cultural symbols representing the Native American worldview and Medicine Wheel Circle beliefs, as well as design elements from aboriginal housing styles, and colors and sculptured elements that reinforce the relationship of nature to building. (SV)

  9. Do Auditing and Reporting Standards Affect Firms’ Ethical Behaviours? The Moderating Role of National Culture

    Zengin Karaibrahimoglu, Yasemin; Guneri Cangarli, Burcu

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to examine the impact of national cultural values on the relation between auditing and reporting standards and ethical behaviours of firms. Based on a regression analysis using data regarding 54 countries between the years 2007 and 2012, we found that the impact of the perceived

  10. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Office FY 2011 Activity Report

    Julie Braun Williams; Brenda R. Pace; Hollie K. Gilbert; Christina L. Olson

    2012-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site is home to vast numbers and a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least a 13,500 year span of human land use in the region. As a federal agency, the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) has legal responsibility for the management and protection of the resources and has contracted these responsibilities to Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA). The BEA professional staff is committed to maintaining a cultural resource management program that accepts the challenge of preserving INL cultural resources in a manner reflecting their importance in local, regional, and national history. This report is intended as a stand-alone document that summarizes activities performed by the INL Cultural Resource Management Office (CRMO) staff during fiscal year 2011. This work is diverse, far-reaching and though generally confined to INL cultural resource compliance, also includes a myriad of professional and voluntary community activities. This document is intended to be informative to both internal and external stakeholders, serve as a planning tool for future INL cultural resource management work, and meet an agreed upon legal requirement.

  11. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Office FY 2010 Activity Report

    Hollie K. Gilbert; Clayton F. Marler; Christina L. Olson; Brenda R. Pace; Julie Braun Williams

    2011-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site is home to vast numbers and a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least a 13,500 year span of human land use in the region. As a federal agency, the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) has legal responsibility for the management and protection of the resources and has contracted these responsibilities to Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA). The BEA professional staff is committed to maintaining a cultural resource management program that accepts the challenge of preserving INL cultural resources in a manner reflecting their importance in local, regional, and national history. This report summarizes activities performed by the INL Cultural Resource Management Office (CRMO) staff during fiscal year 2010. This work is diverse, far-reaching and though generally confined to INL cultural resource compliance, also includes a myriad of professional and voluntary community activities. This document is intended to be informative to both internal and external stakeholders and to serve as a planning tool for future INL cultural resource management work.

  12. Nation-building Behind the Dike: Dutch Nationalism and the Visual Culture of Hydraulic Engineering

    Ensel, R.

    2017-01-01

    This article charts a crucial chapter in the history of Dutch nationalism, i. e. the topic of ‘water management’, by delving into the debate on the construction of the Afsluitdijk. The closure of the Zuiderzee by the construction of a dike is one of the most significant infrastructural projects of

  13. Cultural Diversity and the National Parks: Working Together for Change. The National Parks Community Partners Program.

    Spears, Alan

    This guidebook was developed to assist in the creation of partnerships. It discusses some of the best practices and lessons learned in the program's first year, and gives novice community-based organizers a sense of how effective partnerships can be formed. The guidebook will help the more experienced organizers of National Park Service employees…

  14. Narratives of success and national culture dimensions: Serbia and the USA

    Drašković Slavka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper starts with underlying the American myth of success basic elements/believes: American democracy allows all citizens to raise above limitations of their birth, hard work brings wealth and comfort, rewarded are who are deserving and with ambition, plus a modicum of good lack (Marsden, 1992. The author than compares the myth of success elements with the dimensions of the US national culture defined by Hofstede. She argues that the American myth of success elements is corresponding to Hofstede’s findings of the US national culture characteristics. The American culture was found to be extremely individualistic, masculine (challenge, earnings, recognition and advancement are important, high risk taking and action oriented, with the low extent of acceptance of unequal distribution of power. Fully in line with that, according to the myth of success, America has been from its beginnings in sixteen century the place where social differences disappear and men have an opportunity for advancement to higher level jobs and social status regardless their starting position. Together with low power distance, individualism and muscularity are the purest US cultural dimensions according to Hofstede (1981, 2000, 2001, but they are also the very core of the American success myth. The myth of success hero is individual, self made man. Those heroes are strong personalities that attain their success through education, hard work, and sheer willpower. While no man is an island, it’s not external help or special relationships that make the crucial difference in the self-made man’s rise, nor is luck the deciding factor. He is the one who raises himself, counting on his own self, his own abilities and hard work. Masculine cultural dimension is associated with the sympathy and identification with strong and successful people. The American myth of success hero is assertive, tough and focused on material success, all the elements of the masculine cultural

  15. Implementation of the national tuberculosis guidelines on culture and drug sensitivity testing in Guatemala, 2013.

    Samayoa-Peláez, Maritza; Ayala, Nancy; Yadon, Zaida E; Heldal, Einar

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess whether the National Tuberculosis Program (NTP) guidelines for culture and drug sensitivity testing (DST) in Guatemala were successfully implemented, particularly in cases of smear-negative pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) or previously treated TB, by documenting notification rates by department (geographic area), disease type and category, and culture and DST results. Methods This was a cross-sectional, operational research study that merged and linked all patients registered by the NTP and the National Reference Laboratory in 2013, eliminating duplicates. The proportions with culture (for new smear negative pulmonary cases) and culture combined with DST (for previously treated patients) were estimated and analyzed by department. Data were analyzed using EpiData Analysis version 2.2. Results There were 3 074 patients registered with TB (all forms), for a case notification rate of 20/100 000 population. Of these, 2 842 had new TB, of which 2 167 (76%) were smear-positive pulmonary TB (PTB), 385 (14%) were smear-negative PTB, and 290 (10%) were extrapulmonary TB. There were 232 (8%) previously treated cases. Case notification rates (all forms) varied by department from 2-68 per 100 000 population, with the highest rates seen in the southwest and northeast part of Guatemala. Of new TB patients, 136 had a culture performed and 55 had DST of which the results were 33 fully sensitive, 9 monoresistant, 3 polyresistant, and 10 multidrug resistant TB (MDR-TB). Only 21 (5%) of new smear-negative PTB patients had cultures. Of 232 previously treated patients, 54 (23%) had a culture and 47 (20%) had DST, of which 29 were fully sensitive, 7 monoresistant, 2 polyresistant, and 9 MDR-TB. Of 22 departments (including the capital), culture and DST was performed in new smear-negative PTB in 7 departments (32%) and in previously treated TB in 13 departments (59%). Conclusions Despite national guidelines, only 5% of smear-negative PTB cases had a culture and only 20% of

  16. Implementation of the national tuberculosis guidelines on culture and drug sensitivity testing in Guatemala, 2013

    Maritza Samayoa-Peláez

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To assess whether the National Tuberculosis Program (NTP guidelines for culture and drug sensitivity testing (DST in Guatemala were successfully implemented, particularly in cases of smear-negative pulmonary tuberculosis (TB or previously treated TB, by documenting notification rates by department (geographic area, disease type and category, and culture and DST results. Methods This was a cross-sectional, operational research study that merged and linked all patients registered by the NTP and the National Reference Laboratory in 2013, eliminating duplicates. The proportions with culture (for new smear negative pulmonary cases and culture combined with DST (for previously treated patients were estimated and analyzed by department. Data were analyzed using EpiData Analysis version 2.2. Results There were 3 074 patients registered with TB (all forms, for a case notification rate of 20/100 000 population. Of these, 2 842 had new TB, of which 2 167 (76% were smear-positive pulmonary TB (PTB, 385 (14% were smear-negative PTB, and 290 (10% were extrapulmonary TB. There were 232 (8% previously treated cases. Case notification rates (all forms varied by department from 2–68 per 100 000 population, with the highest rates seen in the southwest and northeast part of Guatemala. Of new TB patients, 136 had a culture performed and 55 had DST of which the results were 33 fully sensitive, 9 monoresistant, 3 polyresistant, and 10 multidrug resistant TB (MDR-TB. Only 21 (5% of new smear-negative PTB patients had cultures. Of 232 previously treated patients, 54 (23% had a culture and 47 (20% had DST, of which 29 were fully sensitive, 7 monoresistant, 2 polyresistant, and 9 MDR-TB. Of 22 departments (including the capital, culture and DST was performed in new smear-negative PTB in 7 departments (32% and in previously treated TB in 13 departments (59%. Conclusions Despite national guidelines, only 5% of smear-negative PTB cases had a culture and

  17. Effects of national culture on human failures in container shipping: the moderating role of Confucian dynamism.

    Lu, Chin-Shan; Lai, Kee-hung; Lun, Y H Venus; Cheng, T C E

    2012-11-01

    Recent reports on work safety in container shipping operations highlight high frequencies of human failures. In this study, we empirically examine the effects of seafarers' perceptions of national culture on the occurrence of human failures affecting work safety in shipping operations. We develop a model adopting Hofstede's national culture construct, which comprises five dimensions, namely power distance, collectivism/individualism, uncertainty avoidance, masculinity/femininity, and Confucian dynamism. We then formulate research hypotheses from theory and test the hypotheses using survey data collected from 608 seafarers who work on global container carriers. Using a point scale for evaluating seafarers' perception of the five national culture dimensions, we find that Filipino seafarers score highest on collectivism, whereas Chinese and Taiwanese seafarers score highest on Confucian dynamism, followed by collectivism, masculinity, power distance, and uncertainty avoidance. The results also indicate that Taiwanese seafarers have a propensity for uncertainty avoidance and masculinity, whereas Filipino seafarers lean more towards power distance, masculinity, and collectivism, which are consistent with the findings of Hofstede and Bond (1988). The results suggest that there will be fewer human failures in container shipping operations when power distance is low, and collectivism and uncertainty avoidance are high. Specifically, this study finds that Confucian dynamism plays an important moderating role as it affects the strength of associations between some national culture dimensions and human failures. Finally, we discuss our findings' contribution to the development of national culture theory and their managerial implications for reducing the occurrence of human failures in shipping operations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Redressing First Nations historical trauma: theorizing mechanisms for indigenous culture as mental health treatment.

    Gone, Joseph P

    2013-10-01

    Indigenous "First Nations" communities have consistently associated their disproportionate rates of psychiatric distress with historical experiences of European colonization. This emphasis on the socio-psychological legacy of colonization within tribal communities has occasioned increasingly widespread consideration of what has been termed historical trauma within First Nations contexts. In contrast to personal experiences of a traumatic nature, the concept of historical trauma calls attention to the complex, collective, cumulative, and intergenerational psychosocial impacts that resulted from the depredations of past colonial subjugation. One oft-cited exemplar of this subjugation--particularly in Canada--is the Indian residential school. Such schools were overtly designed to "kill the Indian and save the man." This was institutionally achieved by sequestering First Nations children from family and community while forbidding participation in Native cultural practices in order to assimilate them into the lower strata of mainstream society. The case of a residential school "survivor" from an indigenous community treatment program on a Manitoba First Nations reserve is presented to illustrate the significance of participation in traditional cultural practices for therapeutic recovery from historical trauma. An indigenous rationale for the postulated efficacy of "culture as treatment" is explored with attention to plausible therapeutic mechanisms that might account for such recovery. To the degree that a return to indigenous tradition might benefit distressed First Nations clients, redressing the socio-psychological ravages of colonization in this manner seems a promising approach worthy of further research investigation.

  19. The red road to wellness: cultural reclamation in a Native First Nations community treatment center.

    Gone, Joseph P

    2011-03-01

    This article explores how Native American cultural practices were incorporated into the therapeutic activities of a community-controlled substance abuse treatment center on a "First Nations" reserve in the Canadian north. Analysis of open-ended interviews with nineteen staff and clients-as contextualized by participant observation, program records, and existing ethnographic resources-yielded insights concerning local therapeutic practice with outpatients and other community members. Specifically, program staff adopted and promoted a diverse array of both western and Aboriginal approaches that were formally integrated with reference to the Aboriginal symbol of the medicine wheel. Although incorporations of indigenous culture marked Lodge programs as distinctively Aboriginal in character, the subtle but profound influence of western "therapy culture" was centrally evident in healing activities as well. Nuanced explication of these activities illustrated four contributions of cultural analysis for community psychology.

  20. Representation of National Identity in Malaysian State Mosque Built Form as a Socio- cultural Product

    Alice Sabrina Ismail

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation of national identity is the essence for a multi-racial country like Malaysia because it can strengthen national solidarity, create a common aspiration, and sustain the continuity of a historical heritage with multiple ethnicity and background. Nevertheless, the characteristics of this national identity is still not fully dealt with from an architectural aspect. Hence, the purpose of this paper is to critically examine the problem of national architectural identity in Malaysia. This is vital to uncover the resulting design principles with national architectural identity characteristics by referencing to three typologies of local state mosque as case study. The finding outlines that there are six architectural principles that influence the formation of national identity. These are the understanding of built form detail elements, materials usage, local style composition and expression, application of organic theory, designing a regionalistic articulation of space and form as well as an understanding of democratic values form to reflect the characteristics of national identity. These established referential guideline design on national identity is of benefit for future designers, builders, developer and related authority to produce built form that symbolizes nation political values as well as responsive to the existing social culture context.

  1. Transracial adoptees bridging heritage and national cultures: Parental socialisation, ethnic identity and self-esteem.

    Ferrari, Laura; Ranieri, Sonia; Barni, Daniela; Rosnati, Rosa

    2015-12-01

    Transracial adoptees represent a specific group of immigrants who experience unique immigration processes that bring them face-to-face with two cultural backgrounds: that of their heritage culture on one hand and that of their national culture on the other hand. However, there is a scarcity of studies focused on the way these processes unfold within adoptive families. This study was aimed at exploring how transracial adoptees cope with the construction of their ethnic identity. Administering a self-report questionnaire to 127 transracial adoptees and their mothers, for a total of 254 participants, we first investigated the association between mothers' cultural socialisation (enculturation and preparation for bias strategies) and adoptees' ethnic identity (i.e. ethnic identity exploration and ethnic identity affirmation dimensions). We then investigated whether ethnic identity affects self-esteem by testing the hypothesis that national identity moderates the relationship between ethnic identity and self-esteem. Results revealed that mothers' enculturation (but not their preparation for bias) supported adoptees' ethnic identity exploration, which in turn was positively associated with ethnic identity affirmation. Moreover, we confirmed the moderation effect: ethnic identity affirmation enhanced the level of self-esteem, but only for those adoptees who perceived a higher degree of national identity affirmation. © 2015 International Union of Psychological Science.

  2. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for Fiscal Year 2016

    Gilbert, Hollie Kae [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Holmer, Marie Pilkington [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Olson, Christina Liegh [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Pace, Brenda Ringe [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-11-01

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year (FY) 2016. Overall monitoring included surveillance of the following 23 individual cultural resource localities: two locations with human remains, one of which is also a cave; seven additional caves; six prehistoric archaeological sites; four historic archaeological sites; one historic trail; Experimental Breeder Reactor I (EBR-I), a National Historic Landmark; Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion (ANP) objects located at EBR-I; and one Arco Naval Proving Ground (NPG) property, CF-633 and related objects and structures. Several INL work processes and projects were also monitored to confirm compliance with original INL CRM recommendations and assess the effects of ongoing work. On one occasion, ground disturbing activities within the boundaries of the Critical Infrastructure Test Range Complex (CITRC) were observed by INL CRM staff prepared to respond to any additional finds of Native American human remains. Additionally, the CRM office was notified during two Trespass Investigations conducted by INL Security. Most of the cultural resources monitored in FY 2016 exhibited no adverse impacts, resulting in Type 1 impact assessments. However, Type 2 impacts were noted five times. Three previously reported Type 2 impacts were once again documented at the EBR-I National Historic Landmark, including spalling and deterioration of bricks due to inadequate drainage, minimal maintenance, and rodent infestation. The ANP engines and locomotive on display at the EBR-I Visitors Center also exhibited impacts related to long term exposure. Finally, most of the Arco NPG properties monitored at Central Facilities Area exhibited problems with lack of timely and appropriate maintenance as well as inadequate drainage. No new Type 3 or Type 4 impacts that adversely affected significant cultural resources and threatened National

  3. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for Fiscal Year 2016

    Gilbert, Hollie Kae; Holmer, Marie Pilkington; Olson, Christina Liegh; Pace, Brenda Ringe

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory's (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year (FY) 2016. Overall monitoring included surveillance of the following 23 individual cultural resource localities: two locations with human remains, one of which is also a cave; seven additional caves; six prehistoric archaeological sites; four historic archaeological sites; one historic trail; Experimental Breeder Reactor I (EBR-I), a National Historic Landmark; Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion (ANP) objects located at EBR-I; and one Arco Naval Proving Ground (NPG) property, CF-633 and related objects and structures. Several INL work processes and projects were also monitored to confirm compliance with original INL CRM recommendations and assess the effects of ongoing work. On one occasion, ground disturbing activities within the boundaries of the Critical Infrastructure Test Range Complex (CITRC) were observed by INL CRM staff prepared to respond to any additional finds of Native American human remains. Additionally, the CRM office was notified during two Trespass Investigations conducted by INL Security. Most of the cultural resources monitored in FY 2016 exhibited no adverse impacts, resulting in Type 1 impact assessments. However, Type 2 impacts were noted five times. Three previously reported Type 2 impacts were once again documented at the EBR-I National Historic Landmark, including spalling and deterioration of bricks due to inadequate drainage, minimal maintenance, and rodent infestation. The ANP engines and locomotive on display at the EBR-I Visitors Center also exhibited impacts related to long term exposure. Finally, most of the Arco NPG properties monitored at Central Facilities Area exhibited problems with lack of timely and appropriate maintenance as well as inadequate drainage. No new Type 3 or Type 4 impacts that adversely affected significant cultural resources and threatened National

  4. Performance-based vs socially supportive culture : A cross-national study of descriptive norms and entrepreneurship

    Ute, S.; Uhlaner, L.M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper is a cross-national study testing a framework relating cultural descriptive norms to entrepreneurship in a sample of 40 nations. Based on data from the Global Leadership and Organizational Behavior Effectiveness project, we identify two higher-order dimensions of culture – socially

  5. Error Management Practices Interacting with National and Organizational Culture: The Case of Two State University Departments in Turkey

    Göktürk, Söheyda; Bozoglu, Oguzhan; Günçavdi, Gizem

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Elements of national and organizational cultures can contribute much to the success of error management in organizations. Accordingly, this study aims to consider how errors were approached in two state university departments in Turkey in relation to their specific organizational and national cultures. Design/methodology/approach: The…

  6. The Chinese-Indonesian collections in the National Museum of World Cultures, the Netherlands

    Francine Brinkgreve

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Among the more than 130,000 objects from Indonesia in the Dutch National Museum of World Cultures, many once belonged to or were used by the Chinese population of Indonesia. In this article, the authors provide an overview of these collections by presenting their collecting histories from the earliest acquisitions to the most recent collections and by highlighting a number of objects, which in their materials, techniques, motifs, colours or function show a combination of elements from both Chinese and Indonesian cultures. The authors pay particular attention to objects which play a role in the Chinese-Indonesian wedding ceremony.

  7. Preventive culture and oral health condition of patients with HIV / AIDS treated in a national hospital

    Pérez Cahuaya, Lisbeth Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the safety culture and oral health status of patients with HIV / AIDS care in a national hospital in 2012. The type of study was descriptive, cross-sectional and retrospective. The sample consisted of 250 patients of both sexes. The sample selection was convenience. The method used for data collection was questionnaire and clinical observation. The results were: a level of oral health preventive culture low in 67.6%, moderate presence of plaque in 55.6%, ...

  8. Using the Cultural Dimension and Accounting Value Classification Frameworks to Investigate Cultural Diversity in a Multi-National South African-Based Company

    Stefan Stander

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The developing South African economy provides good business opportunities for global companies. Despite the popularity of mergers and acquisitions as a way to expand into a developing economy, many such business transaction fail to create sustainable organisations due to issues pertaining to national and corporate cross-cultural issues. This study investigated the potential impact of national cultural differences pertinent to the acquisition of a South African-based resource company by a French-based international group. It was evident that there were cultural differences in the manner which certain attitudes and actions were expressed within the workplace, which have led to some conflict that hampered the optimum functioning of the accounting-related functions within the company. By using Hofstede’s cultural dimensions andGray’s accounting value classification frameworks within this case study, the organization’s management was provided with insights into how national cultural orientation affects their functioning.

  9. The Importance of Culture in Addressing Domestic Violence for First Nation's Women

    Donna M. Klingspohn

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Indigenous women in Canada face a range of health and social issues including domestic violence. Indigenous women (First Nations, Inuit and Métis are six times more likely to be killed than non-Aboriginal women (Homicide in Canada, 2014; Miladinovic and Mulligan, 2015. Aboriginal women are 2.5 times more likely to be victims of violence than non-Aboriginal women (Robertson, 2010. These and other statistics highlight a significant difference in the level of violence experienced by Indigenous women to that experienced by women in the mainstream population in Canada. The historical impacts of colonization and forced assimilation are viewed as the main social determinant of health for aboriginal people in Canada, as they led to intergenerational trauma, with communities struggling today against discrimination, stigma, poverty and social exclusion. Most disturbing and damaging are the outcomes of domestic violence, mental health and addiction issues (Prussing, 2014. First Nation's women who want to leave a violent situation have limited access to helping services, as most are located in large cities and towns, far from remote reserves where many of the women live. Services were originally designed by and for the mainstream population. First Nation's women who manage to access these programs often find staff with limited cultural competence and program supports that have little cultural safety or relevance for them. Indigenous culture is defined in various levels of legislation as having a set of specific rights based on their historical ties to a particular region, with cultural or historical distinctiveness from the mainstream and other populations (Indigenous Peoples at the UN, 2014. In Canada, indigenous cultural beliefs are closely tied to belief in a creator, ancestors and the natural world, influencing their spirituality and their political perspectives (Waldram et al., 2006. Cultural safety, a concept that emerged in the 1980's in New Zealand

  10. The Importance of Culture in Addressing Domestic Violence for First Nation's Women.

    Klingspohn, Donna M

    2018-01-01

    Indigenous women in Canada face a range of health and social issues including domestic violence. Indigenous women (First Nations, Inuit and Métis) are six times more likely to be killed than non-Aboriginal women (Homicide in Canada, 2014; Miladinovic and Mulligan, 2015). Aboriginal women are 2.5 times more likely to be victims of violence than non-Aboriginal women (Robertson, 2010). These and other statistics highlight a significant difference in the level of violence experienced by Indigenous women to that experienced by women in the mainstream population in Canada. The historical impacts of colonization and forced assimilation are viewed as the main social determinant of health for aboriginal people in Canada, as they led to intergenerational trauma, with communities struggling today against discrimination, stigma, poverty and social exclusion. Most disturbing and damaging are the outcomes of domestic violence, mental health and addiction issues (Prussing, 2014). First Nation's women who want to leave a violent situation have limited access to helping services, as most are located in large cities and towns, far from remote reserves where many of the women live. Services were originally designed by and for the mainstream population. First Nation's women who manage to access these programs often find staff with limited cultural competence and program supports that have little cultural safety or relevance for them. Indigenous culture is defined in various levels of legislation as having a set of specific rights based on their historical ties to a particular region, with cultural or historical distinctiveness from the mainstream and other populations (Indigenous Peoples at the UN, 2014). In Canada, indigenous cultural beliefs are closely tied to belief in a creator, ancestors and the natural world, influencing their spirituality and their political perspectives (Waldram et al., 2006). Cultural safety, a concept that emerged in the 1980's in New Zealand, is viewed as

  11. Verbal Communication Culture and Local Wisdom: The Value Civilization of Indonesia Nation

    Tina Kartika

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia is a nation with cultural diversity and area. This caused a lot of the uniqueness of culture in everyday life. This uniqueness was generally a positive value to maintain the harmony of human beings and nature. The discussion of this article was the verbal communication, the study of the wisdom of the nation speech-language Indonesia, and local wisdom in civilization. The words expressed in the local wisdom among others are fearless (need fear only God Almighty, self-sacrificing or spirit of nationalism (patriotism, orderly, loyal, affectionate, hardworking, consensus, mutual help, and creative. Positive values here needed to be crystallized in people’s lives; it would be the identifier of the Indonesian people. This research was conducted in five districts of Pagaralam, South Sumatra. The method used was qualitative. Data collection techniques included participant observer/observation, observation without participation, in-depth interviews, and documentation. This article finds that if local wisdom actually exists in everyday life, the nation of Indonesia has carved beauty behave in civilization itself. The local wisdom of the nation begins values, the rule in the family, and then developed in the community. A positive value of local wisdom is the identifier of civilized society and the need to preserve Indonesia. 

  12. Are cultural dimensions relevant for explaining cross-national differences in antibiotic use in Europe?

    Kelen Greta

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antibiotics are widely-used medicines for which a more prudent use has been advocated to minimize development of resistance. There are considerable cross-national differences that can only partially be explained by epidemiological difference and variations in health care structure. The aim of this study was to explore whether cross-national differences in use of antibiotics (prescribed and non-prescribed are associated with differences between national cultures as described in Hofstede's model of cultural dimensions (Power Distance, Individualism, Masculinity, Uncertainty Avoidance and Long-Term Orientation. Methods Country-level data of prescribed antibiotic use and self-medication with antibiotics were correlated to country-specific scores of cultural dimensions obtained from Hofstede. Data on use of antibiotics were provided by three European studies, based on different methods and/or countries: Self-medication with Antibiotics and Resistance in Europe (SAR, based on a survey in 2003 on reported use of antibiotics in 19 countries, the European Surveillance on Antimicrobial Consumption, based on distribution and reimbursement of antibiotics in ambulatory care (1997–2002, and the 2002 interview-based Eurobarometer study, asking whether respondents had taken antibiotics in the previous 12 months. These studies provided data on antibiotics use for 27 European countries in total, for which scores of cultural dimensions were also available. The SAR-study differentiated between prescribed antibiotics and self-medication with antibiotics. Results Significant positive correlations were found for Power Distance Index with use of prescribed antibiotics in the three studies (rho between 0.59 and 0.62 and with self-medication (rho = 0.54 in the SAR study. Positive significant correlations were found for the Uncertainty Avoidance Index with the use of antibiotics as reported in two studies (rho between 0.57 and 0.59; for the SAR study

  13. Are cultural dimensions relevant for explaining cross-national differences in antibiotic use in Europe?

    Deschepper, Reginald; Grigoryan, Larissa; Lundborg, Cecilia Stålsby; Hofstede, Geert; Cohen, Joachim; Kelen, Greta Van Der; Deliens, Luc; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M

    2008-06-06

    Antibiotics are widely-used medicines for which a more prudent use has been advocated to minimize development of resistance. There are considerable cross-national differences that can only partially be explained by epidemiological difference and variations in health care structure. The aim of this study was to explore whether cross-national differences in use of antibiotics (prescribed and non-prescribed) are associated with differences between national cultures as described in Hofstede's model of cultural dimensions (Power Distance, Individualism, Masculinity, Uncertainty Avoidance and Long-Term Orientation). Country-level data of prescribed antibiotic use and self-medication with antibiotics were correlated to country-specific scores of cultural dimensions obtained from Hofstede. Data on use of antibiotics were provided by three European studies, based on different methods and/or countries: Self-medication with Antibiotics and Resistance in Europe (SAR), based on a survey in 2003 on reported use of antibiotics in 19 countries, the European Surveillance on Antimicrobial Consumption, based on distribution and reimbursement of antibiotics in ambulatory care (1997-2002), and the 2002 interview-based Eurobarometer study, asking whether respondents had taken antibiotics in the previous 12 months. These studies provided data on antibiotics use for 27 European countries in total, for which scores of cultural dimensions were also available. The SAR-study differentiated between prescribed antibiotics and self-medication with antibiotics. Significant positive correlations were found for Power Distance Index with use of prescribed antibiotics in the three studies (rho between 0.59 and 0.62) and with self-medication (rho = 0.54) in the SAR study. Positive significant correlations were found for the Uncertainty Avoidance Index with the use of antibiotics as reported in two studies (rho between 0.57 and 0.59; for the SAR study the correlations were insignificant). Masculinity

  14. Social capital in Asia: Investigating returns to brokerage in collectivistic national cultures.

    Merluzzi, Jennifer

    2013-05-01

    Evidence on the returns to brokerage networks predominately comes from studies of firms located in the United States. Analyses conducted in other countries have noted differences in how social capital may be valued questioning whether brokerage networks yield economic advantage in less individualistic contexts such as Asia. Using network data on employees involved in a product launch in the Asian region of a large American software firm, evidence of returns to brokerage is found among the top executives located and working in the collectivistic national country offices. This finding provides new insights on how returns to brokerage in a non-US culture may arise by considering the differing influences of firm and national culture as well as an employee's formal position at a firm. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cross-National Applicability of a Parsimonious Measure of Acculturation to Global Consumer Culture.

    Gupta, Nitin

    2016-04-01

    Durvasula and Lysonski's paper presented a shorter version of the Acculturation to Global Consumer Culture Scale (hereafter AGCC), which was developed by Cleveland and Laroche to address scarcity of measurements that determined how individuals acquired and became a part of the emerging global consumer culture. The following critique discusses a few concerns and three major shortcomings of the paper, including skewed sample frame and incorrect choice of countries for assessing cross-national applicability of the scale, not discussing the differences in the means of the seven distinct dimensions of AGCC across the four nations studied by the authors, and absence of any critical review of existing consumer acculturation scales vis-à-vis AGCC. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. The Concept of Fiesta in Spanish National and Cultural Vision of the World

    Elena Vasilievna Astakhova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The author examines the image of Spain through the megaconcept of fiesta, which determines many aspects of the national and cultural mentality. This concept reflects various vectors of quotidian life, religious and popular holidays with their complicated details and special dramaturgy, penetrates to every day communication and behavior. The research determines such Spanish extralinguistic realities as corrida, tertulia, movida, botellon, indignados, analyses the role of the theater, of "coffee culture", of football and other phenomenons in social life and cognitive space of Spaniards. The knowledge of different aspects of fiesta helps to understand the word potential of Spanish language, its metaphors, and stylistic images. The fiesta as a key word of Spanish linguistic culture, it is full of feelings, which considered being merged in verbal, textual, visual and no verbal dimensions for the exit of intercultural communication.

  17. KEEPING THE NATION'S ASSETS THROUGH THE LEGAL PROTECTION OF COPYRIGHT WORKS OF CULTURE

    Zulkifli Makkawaru

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia positioned copyright art and culture based on its strength as a nation or community rights over an Alliance grouping of the society which can give the effect of distortions in its protection. Which institution can be megurus and oversee the interests between countriesCultivate ideas/ideas in the fields of art, literature and science in the context of intellectual property rights (HKI categorized into areas of HKI named Copyright (Copyright. The scope of the rights provided for the protection of copyright in the context of this very broad following elements known in several countries. There is a different understanding about the copyright status of culture from both the substance of the right nor of the appreciation of the case which threatens foreign claims copyright over the culture of Indonesia

  18. Introduction to Special Issue "Gender, Culture and Alcohol Problems: A Multi-national Study

    Bloomfield, Kim; Gmel, Gerhard; Wilsnack, Sharon

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides an introduction to a series of articles reporting results from the EU concerted action "Gender, Culture and Alcohol Problems: A Multi-national Study" which examined differences in drinking among women and men in 13 European and two non-European countries. The gender gap...... analyses the smallest gender differences in drinking behaviour were found in Nordic countries, followed by western and central European countries, with the largest gender differences in countries with developing economies....

  19. Entrepreneurial orientation rhetoric in franchise organizations: The impact of national culture

    Watson , Anna; Dada , O. Lola; Wright , Owen; Perrigot , Rozenn

    2017-01-01

    International audience; This study examines the role of national culture on the entrepreneurial orientation (EO) rhetoric contained within franchisee recruitment promotional materials, where EO rhetoric is defined as the strategic use of words in organizational narratives to convey the risk taking, innovativeness, proactiveness, autonomy and competitive aggressiveness of the firm. The sample comprised 378 franchise organizations, in five different countries (Australia, France, India, South Af...

  20. Strategy of National Cultural Security and Modern Russia «Soft Force»

    G J Filimonov

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Today one of the key factors needed for preservation of the state sovereignty, territorial integrity of the country, consolidation of a society, creation of conditions for the successful decision of internal problems and accordingly occurrence of possibility for conducting by the state of active foreign policy necessity of formation of own strategy of maintenance of national cultural safety and potentials so-called «soft force» appears.

  1. A Feasibility Trial of Mental Health First Aid First Nations: Acceptability, Cultural Adaptation, and Preliminary Outcomes.

    Crooks, Claire V; Lapp, Andrea; Auger, Monique; van der Woerd, Kim; Snowshoe, Angela; Rogers, Billie Jo; Tsuruda, Samantha; Caron, Cassidy

    2018-03-25

    The Mental Health First Aid First Nations course was adapted from Mental Health First Aid Basic to create a community-based, culturally safe and relevant approach to promoting mental health literacy in First Nations contexts. Over 2.5 days, the course aims to build community capacity by teaching individuals to recognize and respond to mental health crises. This feasibility trial utilized mixed methods to evaluate the acceptability, cultural adaptation, and preliminary effectiveness of MHFAFN. Our approach was grounded in community-based participatory research principles, emphasizing relationship-driven procedures to collecting data and choice for how participants shared their voices. Data included participant interviews (n = 89), and surveys (n = 91) from 10 groups in four provinces. Surveys contained open-ended questions, retrospective pre-post ratings, and a scenario. We utilized data from nine facilitator interviews and 24 facilitator implementation surveys. The different lines of evidence converged to highlight strong acceptability, mixed reactions to the cultural adaptation, and gains in participants' knowledge, mental health first aid skill application, awareness, and self-efficacy, and reductions in stigma beliefs. Beyond promoting individual gains, the course served as a community-wide prevention approach by situating mental health in a colonial context and highlighting local resources and cultural strengths for promoting mental well-being. © 2018 The Authors American Journal of Community Psychology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society for Community Research and Action.

  2. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for Fiscal Year 2007

    Brenda R. Pace

    2007-01-01

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory's (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year 2007 (FY 2007). In FY 2007, 40 localities were revisited: two locations of heightened Shoshone-Bannock tribal sensitivity, four caves, three butte/craters, twelve prehistoric archaeological sites, two historic stage stations, nine historic homesteads, a portion of Goodale's Cutoff of the Oregon Trail, a portion of historic trail T-16, one World War II dump, four buildings from the World War II period, and Experimental Breeder Reactor-I, a modern scientific facility and National Historic Landmark. Several INL project areas were also monitored in FY 2007. This included direct observation of ground disturbing activities within the Power Burst Facility (PBF, now designated as the Critical Infrastructure Test Range Complex-CITRC), backfilling operations associated with backhoe trenches along the Big Lost River, and geophysical surveys designed to pinpoint subsurface unexploded ordnance in the vicinity of the Naval Ordnance Disposal Area. Surprise checks were also made to three ongoing INL projects to ensure compliance with INL CRM Office recommendations to avoid impacts to cultural resources. Although some impacts were documented, no significant adverse effects that would threaten the National Register eligibility of any resource were observed at any location

  3. Impact of national context and culture on curriculum change: a case study.

    Jippes, Mariëlle; Driessen, Erik W; Majoor, Gerard D; Gijselaers, Wim H; Muijtjens, Arno M M; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    2013-08-01

    Earlier studies suggested national culture to be a potential barrier to curriculum reform in medical schools. In particular, Hofstede's cultural dimension 'uncertainty avoidance' had a significant negative relationship with the implementation rate of integrated curricula. However, some schools succeeded to adopt curriculum changes despite their country's strong uncertainty avoidance. This raised the question: 'How did those schools overcome the barrier of uncertainty avoidance?' Austria offered the combination of a high uncertainty avoidance score and integrated curricula in all its medical schools. Twenty-seven key change agents in four medical universities were interviewed and transcripts analysed using thematic cross-case analysis. Initially, strict national laws and limited autonomy of schools inhibited innovation and fostered an 'excuse culture': 'It's not our fault. It is the ministry's'. A new law increasing university autonomy stimulated reforms. However, just this law would have been insufficient as many faculty still sought to avoid change. A strong need for change, supportive and continuous leadership, and visionary change agents were also deemed essential. In societies with strong uncertainty avoidance strict legislation may enforce resistance to curriculum change. In those countries opposition by faculty can be overcome if national legislation encourages change, provided additional internal factors support the change process.

  4. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for Fiscal Year 2007

    Brenda R. Pace

    2007-10-01

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year 2007 (FY 2007). In FY 2007, 40 localities were revisited: two locations of heightened Shoshone-Bannock tribal sensitivity, four caves, three butte/craters, twelve prehistoric archaeological sites, two historic stage stations, nine historic homesteads, a portion of Goodale’s Cutoff of the Oregon Trail, a portion of historic trail T-16, one World War II dump, four buildings from the World War II period, and Experimental Breeder Reactor –I, a modern scientific facility and National Historic Landmark. Several INL project areas were also monitored in FY 2007. This included direct observation of ground disturbing activities within the Power Burst Facility (PBF, now designated as the Critical Infrastructure Test Range Complex – CITRC), backfilling operations associated with backhoe trenches along the Big Lost River, and geophysical surveys designed to pinpoint subsurface unexploded ordnance in the vicinity of the Naval Ordnance Disposal Area. Surprise checks were also made to three ongoing INL projects to ensure compliance with INL CRM Office recommendations to avoid impacts to cultural resources. Although some impacts were documented, no significant adverse effects that would threaten the National Register eligibility of any resource were observed at any location.

  5. Incorporating Hofstede’ National Culture in Human Factor Analysis and Classification System (HFACS: Cases of Indonesian Aviation Safety

    Pratama Gradiyan Budi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available National culture plays an important role in the application of ergonomics and safety. This research examined role of national culture in accident analysis of Indonesian aviation using framework of Human Factors Analysis and Classification System (HFACS. 53 Indonesian aviation accidents during year of 2001-2012 were analyzed using the HFACS framework by authors and were validated to 14 air-transport experts in Indonesia. National culture is viewed with Hofstede’ lens of national culture. Result shows that high collectivistic, low uncertainty avoidance, high power distance, and masculinity dimension which are characteristics of Indonesian culture, play an important role in Indonesian aviation accident and should be incorporated within HFACS. Result is discussed in relation with HFACS and Indonesian aviation accident analysis.

  6. Assessment of patient safety culture in clinical laboratories in the Spanish National Health System.

    Giménez-Marín, Angeles; Rivas-Ruiz, Francisco; García-Raja, Ana M; Venta-Obaya, Rafael; Fusté-Ventosa, Margarita; Caballé-Martín, Inmaculada; Benítez-Estevez, Alfonso; Quinteiro-García, Ana I; Bedini, José Luis; León-Justel, Antonio; Torra-Puig, Montserrat

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing awareness of the importance of transforming organisational culture in order to raise safety standards. This paper describes the results obtained from an evaluation of patient safety culture in a sample of clinical laboratories in public hospitals in the Spanish National Health System. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted among health workers employed in the clinical laboratories of 27 public hospitals in 2012. The participants were recruited by the heads of service at each of the participating centers. Stratified analyses were performed to assess the mean score, standardized to a base of 100, of the six survey factors, together with the overall patient safety score. 740 completed questionnaires were received (88% of the 840 issued). The highest standardized scores were obtained in Area 1 (individual, social and cultural) with a mean value of 77 (95%CI: 76-78), and the lowest ones, in Area 3 (equipment and resources), with a mean value of 58 (95%CI: 57-59). In all areas, a greater perception of patient safety was reported by the heads of service than by other staff. We present the first multicentre study to evaluate the culture of clinical safety in public hospital laboratories in Spain. The results obtained evidence a culture in which high regard is paid to safety, probably due to the pattern of continuous quality improvement. Nevertheless, much remains to be done, as reflected by the weaknesses detected, which identify areas and strategies for improvement.

  7. Influence of national culture on the adoption of integrated and problem-based curricula in Europe.

    Jippes, Mariëlle; Majoor, Gerard D

    2008-03-01

    There is an evident misbalance in the frequency of medical schools with problem-based learning (PBL) curricula in northern versus southern Europe. This study explores the hypothesis that national culture influences the flexibility of (medical) schools in terms of their propensity to adopt integrated and PBL curricula. National culture was defined by a country's scores on indexes for 4 dimensions of culture as described by Hofstede, defined as: power distance; individualism/collectivism; masculinity/femininity, and uncertainty avoidance. Non-integrated medical curricula were defined as those that included courses in 2 of the 3 basic sciences (anatomy, biochemistry and physiology) in the first 2 years; otherwise, by exclusion, curricula were assumed to be integrated. The medical curricula of 134 of the 263 schools in the 17 European countries included in Hofstede's study were examined. Correlations were calculated between the percentage of integrated medical curricula in a country and that country's scores on indexes for each of the 4 dimensions of culture. Significant negative correlations were found between the percentage of integrated curricula and scores on the power distance index (correlation coefficient [CC]: - 0.692; P = 0.002) and the uncertainty avoidance index (CC: - 0.704; P = 0.002). No significant correlations were found between the percentage of integrated curricula and scores on the indexes for individualism/collectivism and masculinity/femininity. A (medical) school which is considering adopting an integrated or PBL curriculum and which is based in a country with a high score on Hofstede's power distance index and/or uncertainty avoidance index must a priori design strategies to reduce or overcome the obstructive effects of these dimensions of culture on the school's organisation.

  8. Influence of national culture on the adoption of integrated medical curricula.

    Jippes, Mariëlle; Majoor, Gerard D

    2011-03-01

    Integrated curricula have been implemented in medical schools all over the world. However, among countries different relative numbers of schools with integrated curricula are found. This study aims to explore the possible correlation between the percentage of medical schools with integrated curricula in a country and that country's cultural characteristics. Curricula were defined as not integrated if in the first 2 years of the program at least two out of the three monodisciplinary courses Anatomy, Physiology and Biochemistry were identified. Culture was defined using Hofstede's dimensions Power distance, Uncertainty avoidance, Masculinity/Femininity, and Individualism/Collectivism. Consequently, this study had to be restricted to the 63 countries included in Hofstede's studies which harbored 1,195 medical schools. From each country we randomly sampled a maximum of 15 schools yielding 484 schools to be investigated. In total 91% (446) of the curricula were found. Correlation of percent integrated curricula and each dimension of culture was determined by calculating Spearman's Rho. A high score on the Power distance index and a high score on the Uncertainty avoidance index correlated with a low percent integrated curricula; a high score on the Individualism index correlated with a high percent integrated curricula. The percentage integrated curricula in a country did not correlate with its score on the Masculinity index. National culture is associated with the propensity of medical schools to adopt integrated medical curricula. Consequently, medical schools considering introduction of integrated and problem-based medical curricula should take into account dimensions of national culture which may hinder the innovation process.

  9. The effect of national cultural differences of board members on integrated reporting

    Simona Alfiero

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This research, based on stakeholder theory and the national cultural dimensions, aims to test the influence of foreigners on board and its size on Integrated Reporting (IR practices. The analysis is based on a sample of 1,058 European companies from 18 different countries, who adopted or not the IR for the year 2015, and it relies on a Logit. The dependent variable is a dummy (presenting or not the IR and the independent variables are represented by the board characteristics (foreigners and size. The impact of the critical mass on the presence of foreigners and the cultural dimension on the basis of directors’ nationality was tested relying on the masculinity/femininity dimension of Hofstede. Besides, the directors’ country of origin was considered, namely if they belong to the major European countries presenting a wider IR diffusion. The relationship between foreigners on board and IR is found to be negative. This means that companies with at least one foreigner are less inclined to adopt IR. The results show that the boards with more of three foreign administrators have a major propensity to adopt the IR. The membership of the directors in countries with a feminist culture also has a positive effect.

  10. National program for the fostering and development of safety culture in the nuclear activities in Cuba

    Ferro Fernandez, R.; Guillen Campos, A.

    2002-01-01

    Since its appearance, as a result of the investigations of the accident in the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, the term Safety Culture has been considered a key element to achieve a high level of safety in the nuclear installations, becoming a basic safety principle, internationally. The Cuban regulatory authority understood from very early the importance of the promotion and development of attitudes and characteristics in the organizations and personnel involved in the nuclear sector, reflecting a high Safety Culture, in order to propitiate a higher involvement of all employees in safety, contributing this way to the prevention of accidents in the nuclear facilities. Although the Cuban Nuclear Program was significantly reduced in the 90's, the regulatory authority has continued working in this direction and assimilated all the international experience for its application in its strategies for the development of a Safety Culture in the nuclear activities in the country. The present work summarizes the Cuban experience in the establishment of a National Program for the fostering and development of a Safety Culture. (author)

  11. Experiencing the culture of academic medicine: gender matters, a national study.

    Pololi, Linda H; Civian, Janet T; Brennan, Robert T; Dottolo, Andrea L; Krupat, Edward

    2013-02-01

    Energized and productive faculty are critical to academic medicine, yet studies indicate a lack of advancement and senior roles for women. Using measures of key aspects of the culture of academic medicine, this study sought to identify similarity and dissimilarity between perceptions of the culture by male and female faculty. The C - Change Faculty Survey was used to collect data on perceptions of organizational culture. A stratified random sample of 4,578 full-time faculty at 26 nationally representative US medical colleges (response rate 52 %). 1,271 (53 %) of respondents were female. Factor analysis assisted in the creation of scales assessing dimensions of the culture, which served as the key outcomes. Regression analysis identified gender differences while controlling for other demographic characteristics. Compared with men, female faculty reported a lower sense of belonging and relationships within the workplace (T = -3.30, p men to perceive their institution as family-friendly (T = -4.06, p men did not differ significantly on levels of engagement, leadership aspirations, feelings of ethical/moral distress, perception of institutional commitment to faculty advancement, or perception of institutional change efforts to improve support for faculty. Faculty men and women are equally engaged in their work and share similar leadership aspirations. However, medical schools have failed to create and sustain an environment where women feel fully accepted and supported to succeed; how can we ensure that medical schools are fully using the talent pool of a third of its faculty?

  12. The National Commitment Towards Conserving the Heritage (documentation of Historical and Cultural Sites in Gcc Countries)

    AlSulaiti, F.

    2013-07-01

    The five Arab Gulf countries of Kuwait, Bahrain, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates and Oman possess many shared characteristics and historical ties across their common peninsula. The prime factor uniting them is the historical nature of their entwined involvement with peoples and nations beyond the region. That the Gulf has been an important water passageway since ancient times suggests that the inhabitants of its shores met early on with other civilizations. The knowledge of one's roots, history, and traditional arts supports awareness of inherited culture and can help contextualize and illuminate community reflection and identification. The intricacy of the recording and understanding processes of documentation requires skilled professionals, with knowledge and awareness for the associated tasks. Responsible of cultural heritage should provide the adequate documentations, recording and updating of the records. Collaboration of different individuals such as specialist heritage, archaeologists, surveyors, conservators, researchers, architectural historians, and many other expert personnel is the golden key of successful documentation. The purpose of this document is to show the authorities of Gulf Arab countries and their planning measures, management and sharing effect of recording the cultural heritage. This essay identifies key points in the approach to contextualizing and developing cultural identity in a way that respects organic qualities. Through highlighting a number of archeological ruins and outlining management plans, the essay explores frameworks that can be applied to promote and preserve integral identity of important sites and their greater surrounding communities.

  13. THE NATIONAL COMMITMENT TOWARDS CONSERVING THE HERITAGE (DOCUMENTATION OF HISTORICAL AND CULTURAL SITES IN GCC COUNTRIES

    F. AlSulaiti

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The five Arab Gulf countries of Kuwait, Bahrain, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates and Oman possess many shared characteristics and historical ties across their common peninsula. The prime factor uniting them is the historical nature of their entwined involvement with peoples and nations beyond the region. That the Gulf has been an important water passageway since ancient times suggests that the inhabitants of its shores met early on with other civilizations. The knowledge of one’s roots, history, and traditional arts supports awareness of inherited culture and can help contextualize and illuminate community reflection and identification. The intricacy of the recording and understanding processes of documentation requires skilled professionals, with knowledge and awareness for the associated tasks. Responsible of cultural heritage should provide the adequate documentations, recording and updating of the records. Collaboration of different individuals such as specialist heritage, archaeologists, surveyors, conservators, researchers, architectural historians, and many other expert personnel is the golden key of successful documentation. The purpose of this document is to show the authorities of Gulf Arab countries and their planning measures, management and sharing effect of recording the cultural heritage. This essay identifies key points in the approach to contextualizing and developing cultural identity in a way that respects organic qualities. Through highlighting a number of archeological ruins and outlining management plans, the essay explores frameworks that can be applied to promote and preserve integral identity of important sites and their greater surrounding communities.

  14. How National Culture and Parental Style Affect the Process of Adolescents’ Ecological Resocialization

    Elodie Gentina

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The role of adolescents as influencers on their families’ environmental behavior is potentially a catalyst for change towards increasing eco-friendly actions. In this paper, the authors report on a cross-cultural study of ecological resocialization in France and India. Using in-depth dyadic interviews, they investigated parental styles, cultural attributes and extent of adolescents’ influence over parental eco-behavior. The study reveals that ecological resocialization across countries differs substantially, according to a combination of national cultural values, parental style and influence strategy. French teens exhibit a greater impact than Indian teens on their parents’ eco-behavior and use bilateral influence strategies. In India, not all mothers engage in ecological resocialization, but those who do are susceptible to unilateral strategies. The role of environmental knowledge, and the context and effectiveness of each kind of strategy is discussed. The findings have implications for how public policy officials and agencies can encourage adolescents as key resocialization agents to influence their parents’ pro-environmental consumption by using the most adapted influence strategy across cultures.

  15. Cultural Resource Investigations for the Remote Handled Low Level Waste Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Brenda R. Pace; Hollie Gilbert; Julie Braun Williams; Clayton Marler; Dino Lowrey; Cameron Brizzee

    2010-06-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is considering options for construction of a facility for disposal of Idaho National Laboratory (INL) generated remote-handled low-level waste. Initial screening has resulted in the identification of two recommended alternative locations for this new facility: one near the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Complex and one near the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Disposal Facility (ICDF). In April and May of 2010, the INL Cultural Resource Management Office conducted archival searches, intensive archaeological field surveys, and initial coordination with the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes to identify cultural resources that may be adversely affected by new construction within either one of these candidate locations. This investigation showed that construction within the location near the ATR Complex may impact one historic homestead and several historic canals and ditches that are potentially eligible for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places. No resources judged to be of National Register significance were identified in the candidate location near the ICDF. Generalized tribal concerns regarding protection of natural resources were also documented in both locations. This report outlines recommendations for protective measures to help ensure that the impacts of construction on the identified resources are not adverse.

  16. Navigating hybridity: investigating the dance between culture and values within the cuban national education system.

    Erik Byker

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hybridity is the dynamic relationship between local and global factors that push and pull on people and nations. Hybridity is deeply situated in socio-contextual factors, like cultural beliefs, education, and political systems, that aid and hinder a people’s navigation of globalized phenomena. Simply put, hybridity is how people and societies adapt to a changing world. This article examines the case of Cuba in response to hybridity. Specifically, the article’s purpose is to examine ways that the Cuban National Education System impacts how Cubans navigate the global march towards hybridity. The article reports on a focused ethnographic study of a week long education trip to Cuba during February 2013. The ethnography includes over 100 hours of data collection, including semi-structured interviews with 26 Cuban participants. The study uses Freire’s (1970 notion of “humanizing pedagogy” to analyze how the impact of the Cuban National Education System values in the context of Cuba and larger global context. The study found that three values in particular, amor, solidaridad, and conciencia de derechos y response, were deeply embedded in the Cuban National Education System and effect the way that Cubans navigate the complex hybridity that situates their island nation.

  17. Organizational learning for sustainable development: Correlation with the national culture dimensions framework

    Jovanović Violeta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge has become a key resource and the driver of economic progress. The distribution of welfare in the world demonstrates that the richest countries are the ones that have the knowledge, not natural resources. Creating a knowledge-based society is the foundation for sustainable development. Key factors influencing the creation of a knowledge-based economy are investments in education, research and development and application of new technologies. Nevertheless, culture, attitudes and values that affect people’s commitment to continuous improvement and learning, can also play an important role in creating a knowledge society for sustainable development. In this paper authors are making an attempt to identify the basic values of employees in several Serbian companies by means of factor analysis approach, with special emphasis on the national cultural dimensions framework and its utility.

  18. Pride and loathing in history : the national character discourse and the Chinese search for a cultural identity

    Shu, Chunyan

    2013-01-01

    This research examines three intellectual approaches in contemporary China to the question of cultural identity by focusing on the discourse of national character, which has been employed by cultural critics to attribute China's “lack of modernity” to the perseverance of Confucian tradition and the

  19. The Impact of the New Nationalism and Identity Politics on Cultural Policymaking in Europe and Beyond

    Duelund, Peter

    2011-01-01

    ? What steps should i.e.be implemented by the Council of Europe and other pan- European cultural policy bodies? Which are the cultural challenges in implementing "golden" concepts such as multiple identity development, cultural diversity, intercultural dialogue and cultural heritage protection? How...... the concepts of "multiple identities", cultural diversity, intercultural dialogue and dynamic interpretation of the cultural heritage to cultural realities and practices?...

  20. European-enlightenment and national-romanticist sources of cultural memory: Reflections in contemporary debates

    Đerić Gordana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Each society is marked by a selective cultural memory which, beside events and traditions whose importance is emphasized, is also constituted by its parts and contents whose influence is either diminished or forgotten. Our society, too is marked by such kind of memory, with obvious reduction, value opposition and, in sum, general duality within the reception of cultural memory, which is always more complex than it appears in political speeches mother-tongue reading books or history textbooks. For this reason, an examination of construction and reception of cultural memory, with an emphasis on traditions of Enlightenment and Romanticism, stems from a necessity to answer a set of questions regarding the contemporary relation to the past, the way "distance" or "proximity" to the latter is constituted, and especially the way in which contemporary practices mark, change and make use of cultural history. Starting from the assumptions that shaping cultural history, its heritage and "memory" is closely connected to the beginnings of nation-building and that cultural memory is a never-ending political process it is my intention in this research project to examine the rivalry juxtapositions, "interruptions" and new foundations of traditions, focusing on the interdependent relation of Enlightenment and Romanticist strands, and particularly on their unmarked, empty spots. Just as cultural memory is a result of two opposed processes - foregrounding and oblivion - so this research is similarly devoted to a double and apparently paradoxical task. On one hand, the accent is on the resurrection and reinforcement of integrative segments of these traditions which, at the time of their emergence as well as in subsequent interpretations, were mostly neglected. On the other hand there is the need to keep pace with what is required by the current "acceleration of time", which amounts to nothing else but the necessity to forget. Briefly put, the aim is to point to

  1. Towards an understanding of the influence of national culture on organisational viability: An exploratory study

    Awuzie Bankole O.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Viability connotes a system’s ability to become ultra-stable through effective self-regulation of its internal processes and information processing among its subsystems. Applying this to an infrastructure delivery system (IDS context, this study proposes that an IDS can successfully deliver on client requirements only if they attain and maintain viability. Research into the influence of National Culture (NC on an IDS’s viability appears to be lacking; hence this study. Adopting a multi-case study, qualitative research design, this study explores three IDSs involved in the delivery of infrastructure projects in two different NC contexts; Nigeria and the United Kingdom. 25 semi-structured interviews were conducted across the cases to provide for an in-depth understanding of existing interactions between participants in these delivery systems: client/project sponsor; main contractor and sub-contractors and to understand the influence of the prevailing national culture on such interactions, if any. Findings indicate that NC in project delivery environments influence the ability of IDSs to attain viability, especially as it pertains to the sustenance of Team Quality Attributes (TWQ within the system. Based on these findings, it is expected that in modelling IDSs for viability, adequate consideration should be given to the prevailing NC by project managers and planners.

  2. Attitudes towards globalization and cosmopolitanism: cultural diversity, personal consumption and the national economy.

    Woodward, Ian; Skrbis, Zlatko; Bean, Clive

    2008-06-01

    One of the widely accepted consequences of globalization is the development of individual outlooks, behaviours and feelings that transcend local and national boundaries. This has encouraged a re-assessment of important assumptions about the nature of community, personal attachment and belonging in the face of unprecedented opportunities for culture, identities and politics to shape, and be shaped by, global events and processes. Recently, the upsurge of interest in the concept of cosmopolitanism has provided a promising new framework for understanding the nexus between cosmopolitan dispositions and global interconnectedness across cultural, political and economic realms. Using data from a representative social survey of Australians this paper investigates the negotiation of belonging under the conditions of globalization. The data tap into attitudes and behaviours associated with a broad gamut of cosmopolitan traits in the domains of culture, consumption, human rights, citizenship, and international governance. They show how cosmopolitan outlooks are shaped by social structural factors, and how forms of identification with humanity and the globe are fractured by boundaries of self and others, threats and opportunities, and the value of things global and local.

  3. Cross-cultural communication capabilities of U.S. military trainers: host nation perspective.

    Mahmood, Maysaa; Alameri, Ali; Jawad, Shakir; Alani, Yasir; Zuerlein, Scott; Nakano, Gregg; Anderson, Warner; Beadling, Charles

    2013-06-01

    A survey was conducted to assess trainee perception of the cross-cultural communication competency of U.S. military trainers and their satisfaction with the training they received. Findings from the survey show that U.S. military trainers rely significantly on local interpreters. This indicates variability in the ability of the trainers to communicate effectively with host nation partners, the variability being dependent on the capabilities of the individual interpreter. The findings illustrate the importance of providing military health personnel with training on how to work effectively with interpreters. The use of supplementary resources such as electronic translation devises when the interpreter is not capable of conveying health-related training information with the desired level of accuracy is recommended. Expanding the availability of general cultural training, which provides baseline information on local values, traditions, and customs in addition to health-specific cultural orientation, is also recommended to help military health trainers customize their training content and methods to fit the local environment. Reprint & Copyright © 2013 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  4. National cultural values: reflections on the formation process of future leaders in international economic cooperation

    MARIJA NIKOLIC

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The trend towards foreign investments in Serbia has been in rapid progress in recent years. The biggest and most valuable numbers of investments are coming from Italy. The authors’ expectation is that the trend of Italian investments in future will continue; therefore it is of high importance for the representatives of both countries’ business sectors to understand and accept differences and similarities to the other country’s business culture. Research of cultural differences between two nations , which are considered like a frame of business culture, helps avoiding possible misunderstandings and improving business cooperation between two countries. Having in mind students of economics and management, on one hand like future leaders of Italian and Serbian business and on other like representatives of the current education value system in the field of economics and management, this study consists of an application of the 7-D Hofstede Model. The application of the model takes place through the administration of two surveys done by students of Serbian Megatrend University, in Belgrade, and Italian Università degli Studi Gabriele d’Annunzio, in Pescara.

  5. Using Natural Sciences for Cultural Expansion: The National Socialist Agenda for the Balkans

    Maria Zarifi

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This article highlights the political merit natural sciences were awarded under the totalitarian regime of Nazi Germany and their propagandistic role in Hitler's foreign policy agenda for the Balkans, a region which was expected to replace Germany's colonies lost in World War I. It accounts further for the policies and strategies National Socialists used to exert cultural influence on the countries of South-East Europe, namely through a number of institutions with which natural sciences were in one way or another involved in order to promote German culture abroad. The promotion of the German language and, to a certain degree, the Nazi ideology was a precondition for familiarising the Balkan countries with German scientific achievements, which would pave the way for an economic and political infiltration in that region. Therefore, natural sciences, as part of the German intellect, acquired political and economic connotations hidden behind the euphemistic term of cultural policy, designed for this region of geopolitical importance. The article is based almost exclusively on unpublished German records.

  6. 77 FR 25226 - Culturally Significant Object Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “The Wealth of a Nation...

    2012-04-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice 7860] Culturally Significant Object Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``The Wealth of a Nation: British Silver From the Museum's Collection'' SUMMARY: Notice is hereby... object to be included in the exhibition ``The Wealth of a Nation: British Silver from the Museum's...

  7. Issues Surrounding English, the Internationalisation of Higher Education and National Cultural Identity in Asia: A Focus on Japan

    Le Phan, Ha

    2013-01-01

    The English language is significant to the internationalisation of higher education worldwide. Countries in Asia are proactive in appropriating English for their national interests, while paying attention to associated national cultural identity issues. This article examines the ways in which the role of English is interpreted and justified in…

  8. [Geognosy versus Geology: National Modes of Thought and Cultural Practices Concerning Space and Time in Competition].

    Klemun, Marianne

    2015-09-01

    Natural science investigators at the end of the eighteenth century made use of conflicting labels to position their respective preferred fields of activity in the Earth sciences. This mania for labelling marked their break with natural science and the umbrella term 'mineralogy'. In this conflict situation of specialist classifications and explanations, two terms in particular were established: geognosy and geology, which covered the very promising project of research in the areas of the 'origin of the Earth' and the 'formation of the Earth'. These and the associated research goals were subsequently accorded a dazzling career. Proceeding from the conceptual core-meaning in the formation of terms und its semantic spectrum and conceptual shifts in a time of change, my study will look at the identity and heterogeneity functions of geology and geognosy. For whereas in French and English speaking countries the term geology came to be used exclusively (geology, géologie), this was avoided in German, particularly because the term geognosy was preferred. These national differences may be explained with reference to the different cultural and national styles of science: for example the social embedding of geology in the culture of the English gentleman or the French museum culture, and the close connection of 'German' geognosy to mining. A further starting point in the analysis of the double use of both geology and geognosy in German speaking countries until 1840 is provided by the different references to temporalization and spatialization of the two terms. And we should also include the practical implications and the epistemic requirements that were bound up with the defence of geognosy in the German speaking world.

  9. Photometric Assessment of Night Sky Quality over Chaco Culture National Historical Park

    Hung, Li-Wei; Duriscoe, Dan M.; White, Jeremy M.; Meadows, Bob; Anderson, Sharolyn J.

    2018-06-01

    The US National Park Service (NPS) characterizes night sky conditions over Chaco Culture National Historical Park using measurements in the park and satellite data. The park is located near the geographic center of the San Juan Basin of northwestern New Mexico and the adjacent Four Corners state. In the park, we capture a series of night sky images in V-band using our mobile camera system on nine nights from 2001 to 2016 at four sites. We perform absolute photometric calibration and determine the image placement to obtain multiple 45-million-pixel mosaic images of the entire night sky. We also model the regional night sky conditions in and around the park based on 2016 VIIRS satellite data. The average zenith brightness is 21.5 mag/arcsec2, and the whole sky is only ~16% brighter than the natural conditions. The faintest stars visible to naked eyes have magnitude of approximately 7.0, reaching the sensitivity limit of human eyes. The main impacts to Chaco’s night sky quality are the light domes from Albuquerque, Rio Rancho, Farmington, Bloomfield, Gallup, Santa Fe, Grants, and Crown Point. A few of these light domes exceed the natural brightness of the Milky Way. Additionally, glare sources from oil and gas development sites are visible along the north and east horizons. Overall, the night sky quality at Chaco Culture National Historical Park is very good. The park preserves to a large extent the natural illumination cycles, providing a refuge for crepuscular and nocturnal species. During clear and dark nights, visitors have an opportunity to see the Milky Way from nearly horizon to horizon, complete constellations, and faint astronomical objects and natural sources of light such as the Andromeda Galaxy, zodiacal light, and airglow.

  10. The Imposition of the Death Penalty on Mexican Nationals in the United States and the Cultural, Legal and Political Context

    James Michael Olivero

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews death penalty perspectives from the United States, Mexico and international law. The United States practices the death penalty on not only its citizens, but those of other nations who commit capital crimes. Mexico is a death penalty abolitionist state that takes significant issue with the United States over executing Mexican nationals. The paper analyzes the cultural, legal and political conflict between the two countries surrounding the application of the death penalty on Mexican nationals.

  11. Culture.

    Smith, Timothy B; Rodríguez, Melanie Domenech; Bernal, Guillermo

    2011-02-01

    This article summarizes the definitions, means, and research of adapting psychotherapy to clients' cultural backgrounds. We begin by reviewing the prevailing definitions of cultural adaptation and providing a clinical example. We present an original meta-analysis of 65 experimental and quasi-experimental studies involving 8,620 participants. The omnibus effect size of d = .46 indicates that treatments specifically adapted for clients of color were moderately more effective with that clientele than traditional treatments. The most effective treatments tended to be those with greater numbers of cultural adaptations. Mental health services targeted to a specific cultural group were several times more effective than those provided to clients from a variety of cultural backgrounds. We recommend a series of research-supported therapeutic practices that account for clients' culture, with culture-specific treatments being more effective than generally culture-sensitive treatments. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. How Does National Culture Impact on Consumers’ Decision-making Styles? A Cross Cultural Study in Brazil, the United States and Japan

    Chan Yie Leng

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This empirical article investigates the relationship between national culture and consumer decision-making styles in the purchase of cell phones, a product category that appears to be required by consumers independent of their nationalities. To make the research measurable, we used Hofstede’s four cultural dimensions (power distance, uncertainty avoidance, individualism, and masculinity and Sproles and Kendall’s Consumer Style Inventory framework (quality conscious, brand conscious, innovative, recreation, price conscious, impulsive, confused and brand loyal, and tested nine hypotheses through MANOVA in a sample of 108 buyers of the product in Brazil, 104 in the USA, and 107 in Japan, countries ranked in the top ten of the world’s largest cell phone market. Factor Analysis via Principal Component Analysis was conducted to examine the suitability of the eight-factor model in observations from each country. The three nationalities and the eight decision making styles were treated as independent and dependent variables, respectively. Findings showed mixed evidence for the application of Hofstede’s cultural dimensions to decision-making styles. Managerial implications and suggestions for future research are presented to help understand the relationship between national culture and consumer decision-making styles.

  13. A meta-analysis of country differences in the high-performance work system-business performance relationship: the roles of national culture and managerial discretion.

    Rabl, Tanja; Jayasinghe, Mevan; Gerhart, Barry; Kühlmann, Torsten M

    2014-11-01

    Our article develops a conceptual framework based primarily on national culture perspectives but also incorporating the role of managerial discretion (cultural tightness-looseness, institutional flexibility), which is aimed at achieving a better understanding of how the effectiveness of high-performance work systems (HPWSs) may vary across countries. Based on a meta-analysis of 156 HPWS-business performance effect sizes from 35,767 firms and establishments in 29 countries, we found that the mean HPWS-business performance effect size was positive overall (corrected r = .28) and positive in each country, regardless of its national culture or degree of institutional flexibility. In the case of national culture, the HPWS-business performance relationship was, on average, actually more strongly positive in countries where the degree of a priori hypothesized consistency or fit between an HPWS and national culture (according to national culture perspectives) was lower, except in the case of tight national cultures, where greater a priori fit of an HPWS with national culture was associated with a more positive HPWS-business performance effect size. However, in loose cultures (and in cultures that were neither tight nor loose), less a priori hypothesized consistency between an HPWS and national culture was associated with higher HPWS effectiveness. As such, our findings suggest the importance of not only national culture but also managerial discretion in understanding the HPWS-business performance relationship. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Family ties and health cross-nationally: the contextualizing role of familistic culture and public pension spending in Europe.

    Mair, Christine A

    2013-11-01

    Although previous research theorizes that cross-national variation in the relationship between family ties and health is due to nation-level differences in culture and policy/economics, no study has examined this theorization empirically. Using data from the Survey of Health, Ageing, and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) and the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), this study uses multilevel modeling to analyze individual-, nation-, and cross-level effects for 30,291 older adults in 14 nations. Family ties to spouses/partners and parents are associated with better health, but ties to coresident children are associated with poorer health in certain contexts. Familistic culture and public pension spending have a weak but statistically significant moderating effect on the relationship between intergenerational family ties and health. This article underscores the complexity of family and highlights the need for continued theorization and measurement at the nation level to promote older adults' health in diverse contexts.

  15. Introduction to Special Issue "Gender, Culture and Alcohol Problems: A Multi-national Study

    Bloomfield, Kim; Gmel, Gerhard; Wilsnack, Sharon

    2006-01-01

    and global level. Country surveys were independently conducted and then centralized at one institution for further data standardization and processing. Several results indicated that the greater the societal gender equality in a country, the smaller the gender differences in drinking behavior. In most...... analyses the smallest gender differences in drinking behaviour were found in Nordic countries, followed by western and central European countries, with the largest gender differences in countries with developing economies.......This paper provides an introduction to a series of articles reporting results from the EU concerted action "Gender, Culture and Alcohol Problems: A Multi-national Study" which examined differences in drinking among women and men in 13 European and two non-European countries. The gender gap...

  16. [Clinical governance and patient safety culture in clinical laboratories in the Spanish National Health System].

    Giménez-Marín, Á; Rivas-Ruiz, F

    To conduct a situational analysis of patient safety culture in public laboratories in the Spanish National Health System and to determine the clinical governance variables that most strongly influence patient safety. A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out, in which a Survey of Patient Safety in Clinical Laboratories was addressed to workers in 26 participating laboratories. In this survey, which consisted of 45 items grouped into 6 areas, scores were assigned on a scale from 0 to 100 (where 0 is the lowest perception of patient safety). Laboratory managers were asked specific questions about quality management systems and technology. The mean scores for the 26 participating hospitals were evaluated, and the following results observed: in 4of the 6areas, the mean score was higher than 70 points. In the third area (equipment and resources) and the fourth area (working conditions), the scores were lower than 60 points. Every hospital had a digital medical record system. This 100% level of provision was followed by that of an electronic request management system, which was implemented in 82.6% of the hospitals. The results obtained show that the culture of security is homogeneous and of high quality in health service laboratories, probably due to the steady improvement observed. However, in terms of clinical governance, there is still some way to go, as shown by the presence of weaknesses in crucial dimensions of safety culture, together with variable levels of implementation of fail-safe technologies and quality management systems. Copyright © 2017 SECA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Mitigating Product Harm Crises and Making Markets Sustainable: How does National Culture Matter?

    Ganganee C. Samaraweera

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Product harm crisis has become a serious issue in the business world today irrespective of the crisis mitigating strategies adopted to remedy the harm. The purpose of the study is to determine whether national culture shapes consumer reactions to crisis response strategies as a result of variation of consumers’ perceptions the affected firm’s moral responsibility. The study considers a comparison of 303 marketing-based Chinese and Sri Lankan students. Findings of independent sample t tests and Analysis of variance (ANOVA suggested that consumers’ moral perceptions vary significantly between China and Sri Lanka in response to crisis response strategies revealing a new insight in the crisis mitigating literature. A wounded company has to launch a super effort response in Sri Lanka whereas the voluntary recall response in China is sufficient in a crisis in order to maintain moral reputation. Moreover, the study reveals that implementation of an inappropriate strategy leads to significant financial and moral reputational loss to a company. Therefore, the study recommends companies choosing culture-specific response strategies in order to protect moral reputational status and to make the market sustainable.

  18. Cultural, economic, and psychological predictors of colonoscopy in a national sample.

    Halbert, Chanita Hughes; Barg, Frances K; Guerra, Carmen E; Shea, Judy A; Armstrong, Katrina; Ferguson, Monica; Weathers, Benita; Coyne, James; Troxel, Andrea B

    2011-11-01

    Although colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer death among adults in the US and colonoscopy is efficacious in reducing morbidity and mortality from CRC, screening rates are sub-optimal. Understanding the socioeconomic, cultural, and health care context within which decisions about colonoscopy are made allows physicians to address patients' most salient beliefs and values and other constraints when making screening recommendations. To evaluate the direct and interactive effects of socioeconomics, health care variables, psychological characteristics, and cultural values on colonoscopy use. National survey completed between January-August 2009 in a random sample of African American, white, and Hispanic adults ages 50-75 without cancer (n = 582). Self-reported colonoscopy use. Only 59% of respondents reported having a colonoscopy. The likelihood of colonoscopy increased with having health insurance (OR = 2.82, 95% CI = 1.24, 6.43, p = 0.004), and increasing age (OR = 1.40, 95% CI = 1.11, 1.77, p = 0.001). In addition, respondents with greater self-efficacy were more likely to have a colonoscopy (OR = 2.41, 95% CI = 1.35, 4.29, p = 0.003). Programs that help patients to overcome access and psychological barriers to screening are needed.

  19. Innovation in Sustainable Products: Cross-Cultural Analysis Of Bi-National Teams

    Cleber José Cunha Dutra

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Innovation has been required as a vital asset for organizational survival in many areas, especially in the sustainability organizational field of concerns. Changes in Brazilian consumers’ consumption are perceived from the growing demand for environmentally-friendly products and services which are pressuring companies to achieve environmental efficiency. Tools like Cleaner Production, Sustainable Supply-Chain Management, and Ecodesign are essential to help firms achieve this goal. However, these tools require integration between different functions in a company, demanding that members with different expertise work together as a team. Based on a long tradition of collaboration, Germany is a potential partner for Brazil, combining expertise in the development of innovations aimed at more sustainable products. In today’s global environment, transnational teams should become the most effective teams in an organization but, because of the potential for miscommunication and conflict, the management of these teams needs special attention. Cultural differences between German and Brazilian members of work teams represent risks/advantages for the management of process of innovative products development. The paper draws on previously reviewed studies to ground an analysis of cultural dimensions and national characters, within Brazilian-German teams. In essence, this study is an essay with the main aim to open perspectives for further research and to support organizations in their sustainable management practices.

  20. The Impact of Seafarers’ Perceptions of National Culture and Leadership on Safety Attitude and Safety Behavior in Dry Bulk Shipping

    Chin-Shan Lu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to examine the effects of national culture and leadership style on safety performance in bulk shipping companies. Survey data collected from 322 respondents working in dry bulk carriers was used, a multiple regression analysis was conducted to analyze the influence of national culture and leadership styles (i.e. transformational, passive management, and contingent reward on safety attitude and safety behavior. The results indicate that national culture dimensions such as power distance, uncertainty avoidance, collectivism, and long-term orientation had a positive influence on safety behaviour. Long-term orientation had a positive influence on safety attitude, whereas masculinity had a negative influence on safety attitude of seafarers. Specifically, this research found that transformational leadership had a positive influence on safety attitude and safety behaviour of seafarers. Moreover, practical implication from the research findings to improve ship safety in dry bulk shipping were discussed.

  1. Individualism: a valid and important dimension of cultural differences between nations.

    Schimmack, Ulrich; Oishi, Shigehiro; Diener, Ed

    2005-01-01

    Oyserman, Coon, and Kemmelmeier's (2002) meta-analysis suggested problems in the measurement of individualism and collectivism. Studies using Hofstede's individualism scores show little convergent validity with more recent measures of individualism and collectivism. We propose that the lack of convergent validity is due to national differences in response styles. Whereas Hofstede statistically controlled for response styles, Oyserman et al.'s meta-analysis relied on uncorrected ratings. Data from an international student survey demonstrated convergent validity between Hofstede's individualism dimension and horizontal individualism when response styles were statistically controlled, whereas uncorrected scores correlated highly with the individualism scores in Oyserman et al.'s meta-analysis. Uncorrected horizontal individualism scores and meta-analytic individualism scores did not correlate significantly with nations' development, whereas corrected horizontal individualism scores and Hofstede's individualism dimension were significantly correlated with development. This pattern of results suggests that individualism is a valid construct for cross-cultural comparisons, but that the measurement of this construct needs improvement.

  2. The Impact of Tourism on the Socio-Cultural Environment in the Gorce National Park and its Vicinity

    Luberda, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents the problems of tourism in terms of its relationship with the social as well as cultural environment. The purpose of the article was to examine how tourism affects the socio-cultural environment in the Gorce National Park and its vicinity. I examined whether tourist traffic in the Park brings about more benefits or problems, and whether changes taking place in communities visited by tourists are positive or negative? The impact of tourism on the socio-cult...

  3. Preliminary findings of an investigation into the relationship between national culture and EQ-5D value sets.

    Bailey, Henry; Kind, Paul

    2010-10-01

    Despite the growing importance of the EQ-5D descriptive system as a basis for the valuation of QALYs in cost-utility analysis, for most countries, there are no EQ-5D value sets. Researchers and policy makers wishing to use the EQ-5D descriptive system in a country for which there is no value set are advised to use one from a nearby or 'similar' population. Factors other than geographic proximity can affect the relative values of EQ-5D states. This study explores the links between national culture and EQ-5D value sets. Rank correlation analysis is used to explore relationships between the relative values of a set of EQ-5D states and dimensions of national culture. The latter are taken from Hofstede's framework which operationalizes national culture in five dimensions. For the data currently available (countries for which EQ-5D value sets and scores on dimensions of culture both exist), moderate and strong correlations were found between the culture dimension of power distance and individualism and the EQ-5D dimensions of pain/discomfort and anxiety/depression. Moderate correlations were also observed between the cultural dimension of masculinity and the EQ-5D dimensions of self care, usual activities and pain/discomfort. Uncertainty avoidance correlates with the EQ-5D dimension of anxiety/depression. The correlation patterns observed are generally consistent with a priori expectations based on the nature of the dimensions of culture and the EQ-5D model. This analysis demonstrates the potential of national culture in providing insight into the drivers of the relative values of EQ-5D dimensions for different countries and in informing decisions about which EQ-5D value sets to use in situations where one does not exist.

  4. Comparison of metamotivational dominance and cultural identity between Japanese National Team and Māori All Blacks rugby players

    Yusuke Kuroda

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This pilot study used a reversal theory framework to examine metamotivational dominance of rugby players on the Māori All Blacks (MABs squad of New Zealand and the Japanese National Team (JNT. Since the two groups have different cultural team demographics, cultural identity was also examined. Twenty six players from the MABs and 31 from the JNT completed questionnaires on metamotivational dominance and cultural identity. In terms of metamotivational dominance, the findings indicated that the MABs were more playful minded and spontaneous oriented than the JNT. Regarding cultural identity, the JNT showed a greater knowledge of their own culture and higher comfort level in their cultural context, while the MABs felt more positive and willing to sustain their own culture. The motivational personality differences between the teams may reflect the style of play that is valued within each team culture that is, flair, spontaneity and high-risk play within Māori rugby, and structure, team unity and conformity within the JNT. This suggests that metamotivational dominance of teams and players is influenced by the cultural identity of both the individuals and the group, which may have a further impact on team cohesion and performance. Keywords: Sociology, Psychology

  5. Comparison of metamotivational dominance and cultural identity between Japanese National Team and Māori All Blacks rugby players.

    Kuroda, Yusuke; Palmer, Farah; Nakazawa, Makoto

    2017-11-01

    This pilot study used a reversal theory framework to examine metamotivational dominance of rugby players on the Māori All Blacks (MABs) squad of New Zealand and the Japanese National Team (JNT). Since the two groups have different cultural team demographics, cultural identity was also examined. Twenty six players from the MABs and 31 from the JNT completed questionnaires on metamotivational dominance and cultural identity. In terms of metamotivational dominance, the findings indicated that the MABs were more playful minded and spontaneous oriented than the JNT. Regarding cultural identity, the JNT showed a greater knowledge of their own culture and higher comfort level in their cultural context, while the MABs felt more positive and willing to sustain their own culture. The motivational personality differences between the teams may reflect the style of play that is valued within each team culture that is, flair, spontaneity and high-risk play within Māori rugby, and structure, team unity and conformity within the JNT. This suggests that metamotivational dominance of teams and players is influenced by the cultural identity of both the individuals and the group, which may have a further impact on team cohesion and performance.

  6. The universal zulu nation in colombia, social impact of hip hop culture in the Valley of Aburrá

    Camilo Arias

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The effervescence of organizational movements around the cultural practices of Hip Hop in the Valley of Aburrá, alternatives are thought of together and to propose structural changes to their environments, from social interventions with communities’ ways. That is why we consider it necessary to make a tour of the historical and social factors that have shaped what we now know as Hip Hop Culture, to generate with this a picture of their impact on the cultural scene at local and national level.

  7. The role of education in the culture of four pillar poverty to establish the nationalism of young generation

    Sarmini; Warsono

    2018-01-01

    Globalization as an international integration process brings several positive and negative impacts due to the exchange of world views, products, thoughts, and other cultural aspects that can diminish the values of national identity. Four pillars of nationality are needed as a foundation to counteract the negative effects of globalization, therefore a culturally, educative, legal and structural approach is needed so that the younger generation can truly understand and safeguard the four pillars of our nationality. So far the government has also played little role in building the four pillars into an education. This research intends to see how the role of education can build young generation of nationalism by using research design in the form of content analysis. The population in this study is the Education Office of Sidoarjo Regency, which is the level of Junior High School Education Unit. However, given the scope and breadth of the district of Sidoarjo, a representative sample is determined using FGD (Focus Group Discussion) data collection techniques and questionnaires that will be analyzed using written policy descriptions or unwritten policies. Through a series of research stages, it can be concluded that there are still many principals who have not integrated the culture of the four pillars of nationalism into a written and unwritten document covering intracurricular, extracurricular, school culture and through community participation.

  8. Cultural Dimensions of Digital Library Development, Part II: The Cultures of Innovation in Five European National Libraries (Narratives of Development)

    Dalbello, Marija

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the narrative accounts of the beginnings of digital library programs in five European national libraries: Biblioteca nacional de Portugal, Bibliotheque nationale de France, Die Deutsche Bibliothek, the National Library of Scotland, and the British Library. Based on interviews with policy makers and developers of digital…

  9. The party of the people versus the cultural elite: Populism and nationalism in Flemish radical right rhetoric about artists

    de Cleen, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the interplay between nationalism and populism in the Flemish \\ud (North-Belgian), Vlaams Bloc/Vlaams Belang’s (VB), populist radical right rhetoric about \\ud expressive culture. Building on a discourse theoretical analysis of three extensive case \\ud studies (concerts against the VB, the opposition between the VB and the Flemish theatres, \\ud and the VB’s criticism of the Flemish National Songfest), and a number of other \\ud controversial moments the article shows that...

  10. Testing a theory of organizational culture, climate and youth outcomes in child welfare systems: a United States national study.

    Williams, Nathaniel J; Glisson, Charles

    2014-04-01

    Theories of organizational culture and climate (OCC) applied to child welfare systems hypothesize that strategic dimensions of organizational culture influence organizational climate and that OCC explains system variance in youth outcomes. This study provides the first structural test of the direct and indirect effects of culture and climate on youth outcomes in a national sample of child welfare systems and isolates specific culture and climate dimensions most associated with youth outcomes. The study applies multilevel path analysis (ML-PA) to a U.S. nationwide sample of 2,380 youth in 73 child welfare systems participating in the second National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-being. Youths were selected in a national, two-stage, stratified random sample design. Youths' psychosocial functioning was assessed by caregivers' responses to the Child Behavior Checklist at intake and at 18-month follow-up. OCC was assessed by front-line caseworkers' (N=1,740) aggregated responses to the Organizational Social Context measure. Comparison of the a priori and subsequent trimmed models confirmed a reduced model that excluded rigid organizational culture and explained 70% of the system variance in youth outcomes. Controlling for youth- and system-level covariates, systems with more proficient and less resistant organizational cultures exhibited more functional, more engaged, and less stressful climates. Systems with more proficient cultures and more engaged, more functional, and more stressful climates exhibited superior youth outcomes. Findings suggest child welfare administrators can support service effectiveness with interventions that improve specific dimensions of culture and climate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Culture of National Philosophical Communities: the Project Dedicated to the Research of Modern Ukrainian Philosophical Traditions

    Lidiya Bogataya

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The article introduces a new Ukrainian research project related to the preparation of a collective monograph. This monograph will highlight the activities of modern Ukrainian philosophical communities. Such communities in their totality constitute a modern national philosophical culture and its study belongs to the category of macro-humanitarian research. The basis for a holistic observation of a culture is, on the one hand, digital technologies that enable technically to take into account practically all the studies that are carried out in a particular field in a certain period of time. On the other hand, new methodological developments are emerging that allow us to quickly process large text arrays. An example of such methodological innovations can be considered the study of American-Italian literary critic Franco Moretti. Moretti examines the opportunities that arise when using “distant reading.” The article emphasizes that the main advantage of “distant reading” is the possibility of taking into account the whole body of texts, and not only its canonical kernel. Introduces the idea of «compression reading» as a special kind of “rapid reading”, which allows you to get the most general idea of the text based on the analysis of the title of the text and its annotation. The development of compression reading technologies along with distant reading technologies will allow efficient and efficient processing of large array of texts. The expediency of actualization of the whole textual array formed in this or that humanitarian field of research is associated with the development of a new ethic. This ethic is the ethic of collective labor. A new understanding of the collective is considered, which is possible only with careful consideration of any manifestation of the individual

  12. Jewish national cultural-and-religious public motion in Ukraine in 1920th

    V. O. Dotsenko

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The article is based on the archived documents, periodic press and monographic literature analysis and deals with the problem of cultural-and-religious development of Jewish society’ public initiative in Ukraine in 1920th. The special features of activity of religiously-elucidative public associations are determined, their relationships with Communist Party organs. Anti-religious work of Communist Party organs is illuminated. At the beginning of 1920th Ukrainian Jewishness actively supported and heard the confession Judaism that remained next to languages Yiddish and Hebrew like instrument for maintenance of jewries national identity in the new soviet state. At the beginning of 1920th the cells of many public associations of religiously-cultural and educational aspiration functioned in Ukraine. Religious organizations developed in Jewish cult buildings. Separately maintenance of national identity of jewries was assisted by educational establishments that were actively helped by religious communities and societies. From the first years the Communist Party organs began active attacks on Jewish religious public motion. Active politics of division of jewries on atheists and believers was conducted. The last was constantly pursued and yielded to the repressions. Active voice in an anti-religious campaign was accepted by Jewish-section at the Central Committee of CP(bU. For their assistance local authorities closed synagogues, converted them into working clubs, khati-chital’ni (reading homes. Headers and eshibotes were closed, the retinues of Thora, prayer books and other religious literature were destroyed. During the Jewish holytides and on Saturdays, various atheistic actions, trials of rabbis and Judaism. got organized among the Jewish young people, workers and intelligentsia. With rolling down of New Economic Policy and beginning of mass population sovietization at the end of 1920th pressure on religious Jewish public motion from the side of

  13. Sociosexuality from Argentina to Zimbabwe: a 48-nation study of sex, culture, and strategies of human mating.

    Schmitt, David P

    2005-04-01

    The Sociosexual Orientation Inventory (SOI; Simpson & Gangestad 1991) is a self-report measure of individual differences in human mating strategies. Low SOI scores signify that a person is sociosexually restricted, or follows a more monogamous mating strategy. High SOI scores indicate that an individual is unrestricted, or has a more promiscuous mating strategy. As part of the International Sexuality Description Project (ISDP), the SOI was translated from English into 25 additional languages and administered to a total sample of 14,059 people across 48 nations. Responses to the SOI were used to address four main issues. First, the psychometric properties of the SOI were examined in cross-cultural perspective. The SOI possessed adequate reliability and validity both within and across a diverse range of modem cultures. Second, theories concerning the systematic distribution of sociosexuality across cultures were evaluated. Both operational sex ratios and reproductively demanding environments related in evolutionary-predicted ways to national levels of sociosexuality. Third, sex differences in sociosexuality were generally large and demonstrated cross-cultural universality across the 48 nations of the ISDP, confirming several evolutionary theories of human mating. Fourth, sex differences in sociosexuality were significantly larger when reproductive environments were demanding but were reduced to more moderate levels in cultures with more political and economic gender equality. Implications for evolutionary and social role theories of human sexuality are discussed.

  14. Engaging First Nation and Inuit communities in asthma management and control: assessing cultural appropriateness of educational resources.

    Latycheva, O; Chera, R; Hampson, C; Masuda, J R; Stewart, M; Elliott, S J; Fenton, N E

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a growing concern in First Nations and Inuit communities. As with many health indicators and outcomes, Aboriginal peoples living in remote areas experience greater disparities in respiratory health compared with non-Aboriginal Canadians. Therefore, it is critically important to take into account their unique needs when developing asthma educational materials and resources. The purpose of this study is to assess the cultural relevance of existing asthma education materials for First Nations and Inuit peoples. Five First Nations and Inuit communities from across Canada participated in the project. A combination of quantitative evaluations (eg surveys) and qualitative approaches (eg open discussion, live chats) were used to assess printed and web-based asthma education materials. Participants represented First Nations and Inuit communities from across Canada and were selected on the basis of age and role: 6 to 12 years old (children), 12 and over (youth), parents and grandparents, community leaders and teachers, and community advisory group members. In general, the results showed that although participants of all age categories liked the selection of asthma educational materials and resources, they identified pictures and images related to First Nations and Inuit people living and coping with asthma as ways of improving cultural relevance. This reinforces findings that tailoring materials to include Aboriginal languages, ceremonies and traditions would enhance their uptake. Our findings also demonstrate that visually based content in both printed and virtual form were the preferred style of learning of all participants, except young children who preferred to learn through play and interactive activities. Asthma is a growing concern in First Nations and Inuit communities. Given this concern, it is essential to understand cultural needs and preferences when developing asthma education materials and resources. The findings from this research emphasize the need

  15. The "Culture" of Migrant Pupils: A Nation- and Welfare-State Historical Perspective on the European Refugee Crisis

    Buchardt, Mette

    2018-01-01

    Culture seems to function as a central explanation when refugees and other migrants are framed as a risk and a challenge in European and national politics across the member states, including educational politics. Based on the case of Denmark during the 1970s, the article unfolds how education historically has been an arena for the internal…

  16. The Ideological Struggle of Multicultural Nationalism: Cultural Identity in the 2014 Malaysian Top-Grossing Movie The Journey

    Changsong Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study attempts to discover how multiculturalism interacts with sub-state nationalism as portrayed in the Malaysian top-grossing film of 2014 – The Journey directed by Chiu Keng Guan. The nature of Malaysian society and its colonial history might suggest that cultural interaction among its three major races (Malays, Chinese, and Indians is a norm, but this study argues that the culture of these three major races as portrayed in the fictional film is made up of “systems of representations”; such systems of representations do not reflect the intentions of the subjects, but rather, actively construct meanings as conditions and instruments, signifying practice in reality. The application of in-depth interviews (e.g., the film director and the screenplay writer discovered cultural identity depicted in the film as always having a specific ‘positionality’ within their representation, and the ideological struggle of multicultural nationalism embedded in the film is considered ‘nonsubjective’. The authors believe that every culture is local, but no culture is autochthonous, and cultural identity illustrated in the film can be regarded as ‘uniqueness of the soil’.

  17. Cultural Resource Assessment of the Test Area North Demolition Landfill at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    Brenda R. Pace

    2003-01-01

    The proposed new demolition landfill at Test Area North on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) will support ongoing demolition and decontamination within the facilities on the north end of the INEEL. In June of 2003, the INEEL Cultural Resource Management Office conducted archival searches, field surveys, and coordination with the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes to identify all cultural resources that might be adversely affected by the project and to provide recommendations to protect those listed or eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. These investigations showed that landfill construction and operation would affect two significant cultural resources. This report outlines protective measures to ensure that these effects are not adverse

  18. Cultural Resource Assessment of the Test Area North Demolition Landfill at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    Brenda R. Pace

    2003-07-01

    The proposed new demolition landfill at Test Area North on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) will support ongoing demolition and decontamination within the facilities on the north end of the INEEL. In June of 2003, the INEEL Cultural Resource Management Office conducted archival searches, field surveys, and coordination with the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes to identify all cultural resources that might be adversely affected by the project and to provide recommendations to protect those listed or eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. These investigations showed that landfill construction and operation would affect two significant cultural resources. This report outlines protective measures to ensure that these effects are not adverse.

  19. Introduction to special issue 'Gender, Culture and Alcohol Problems: a Multi-national Study'.

    Bloomfield, Kim; Gmel, Gerhard; Wilsnack, Sharon

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides an introduction to a series of articles reporting results from the EU concerted action "Gender, Culture and Alcohol Problems: A Multi-national Study" which examined differences in drinking among women and men in 13 European and two non-European countries. The gender gap in alcohol drinking is one of the few universal gender differences in human social behavior. However, the size of these differences varies greatly from one society to another. The papers in this issue examine, across countries, (1) men's and women's drinking patterns, (2) the prevalence of men's and women's experience of alcohol-related problems, (3) gender differences in social inequalities in alcohol use and abuse, (4) gender differences in the influence of combinations of social roles on heavy alcohol use, and (5) how societal-level factors predict women's and men's alcohol use and problems on a regional and global level. Country surveys were independently conducted and then centralized at one institution for further data standardization and processing. Several results indicated that the greater the societal gender equality in a country, the smaller the gender differences in drinking behavior. In most analyses the smallest gender differences in drinking behaviour were found in Nordic countries, followed by western and central European countries, with the largest gender differences in countries with developing economies.

  20. Wastewater treatment by artificial wetlands in the Museum of Popular Culture of the National University

    Carolina Alfaro

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The fulfillment of the Millennium Development Goals in terms of sustainable access to sanitation requires increasing the development of research programs that promote simple and low cost technological options, appropriate to the social, economic, and environmental conditions of each population. These processes must be accompanied by actions of environmental and sanitation education, which allow appropriation of these systems by the communities. In this sense, there are two projects in the National University converging on this subject. The Museum of Popular Culture together with the Public Service Company of Heredia develop an environmental education project that promotes the protection of water, from an historical perspective of its management, which has an artificial wetland as the main teaching unit. On the other hand, the Waste Management Laboratory at the School of Chemistry evaluates the performance of this artificial wetland as part of a research project that promotes this type of alternative sanitation. This paper presents results of the monitoring of this artificial wetland, showing average removal percentages of 93% BOD5,20 , 95% COD, 73% P-PO4, and 95% for SS.

  1. Bessarabia National Cultural Code in the Works of Ukrainian Writer M. Kotsiubinsky

    Kovpik S.I.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The mentality as a special type of folk thinking has always been in the focus of the following sciences, such as: ethnic psychology, sociology, ethnogenesis, literature and other. Works of literature give an opportunity to explore causes and conditions of folk thinking formation. It is well known, that the uniqueness of national thinking is greatly affected by geographical position, nation genomes development and its formation. Ukrainian writer M. Kotsiubinsky during the period from 1892 to 1896 worked in the Bessarabia villages of Tavria province as a member of Odessa phylloxera control commission fighting against pests of vineyards in the territory of Novorossiysk general governor. Working in the Bessarabia villages allowed M. Kotsiubinsky to learn Bessarabians outlook and create a series of stories describing life style, culture and traditions of this nation. This article investigates M. Kotsiubinsky’s works from Bessarabian cycle as “Pe-kopter” and “The Witch”. The Ukrainian writer was able to learn features of life, traditions and morals in Bessarabian community. Thus, in these stories M. Kotsiubinsky showed that disapproval and community morals were above the family feelings and parental honor for the residents of Bessarabia at the end of the nineteenth century. In those days Bessarabian family did not live isolated from the society, and in every possible way they tried to obey its cruel laws. The way of matazans (villagers lining in Bessarabia was totally controlled by the community, and any violation of its standards consequently led to severe punishment. Sometimes primitive fear of Bessarania inhabitants eclipsed common sense so much that they were losing their humanity. As a result, traditional livelihood in Bessarabian society developed certain rules in order to regulate strictly individual behavior in everyday life and during the holiday time. Rural community was a special social and domestic mechanism establishing and

  2. Professional culture of Kazakhstan’s youth as the basis of national development

    Tanabayeva, A.

    2015-01-01

    Culture Youth of Kazakhstan, namely professional competence and culture are one of the important tasks of youth policy. The article described what purpose has this policy and what the priorities for the development of a society and the state.

  3. Cultural Diversity, Geographical Isolation, and the Origin of the Wealth of Nations

    Quamrul Ashraf; Oded Galor

    2011-01-01

    This research argues that variations in the interplay between cultural assimilation and cultural diffusion have played a significant role in giving rise to differential patterns of economic development across the globe. Societies that were geographically less vulnerable to cultural diffusion benefited from enhanced assimilation, lower cultural diversity, and more intense accumulation of society-specific human capital. Thus, they operated more efficiently with respect to their production-possi...

  4. Problem Based Learning as a Cultural Tool for Health and Safety Learning in a Multi-national Company

    Adam, Henrik; Petersson, Eva

    2013-01-01

    The general background of this study is an interest in how cultural tools contribute to structuring learning activities. The specific interest is to explore how such tools co-determine employees’ problem solving actions in health, safety and environment (HSE) training activities in a multi...... learn to organise HSE actions in the context of using Problem Based Learning (PBL) applied as a cultural tool. More specifically, our interest is in how PBL promotes adult learning by drawing on learners’ experience and involving them in reflective and social processes in the given context......-national company context. Theoretically, the research takes its point of departure in a socio-cultural perspective on the role of cultural tools in learning, and in a complementary interest in the role of communicative framing of learning activities. In the research reported here, the focus is on how employees...

  5. Cultural Resource Investigation for the Materials and Fuels Complex Wastewater System Upgrade at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Brenda R. Pace; Julie B raun Williams; Hollie Gilbert; Dino Lowrey; Julie Brizzee

    2010-05-01

    The Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) located in Bingham County at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in southeastern Idaho is considering several alternatives to upgrade wastewater systems to meet future needs at the facility. In April and May of 2010, the INL Cultural Resource Management Office conducted archival searches, archaeological field surveys, and coordination with the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes to identify cultural resources that may be adversely affected by the proposed construction and to provide recommendations to protect any resources listed or eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. These investigations showed that one National Register-eligible archaeological site is located on the boundary of the area of potential effects for the wastewater upgrade. This report outlines protective measures to help ensure that this resource is not adversely affected by construction.

  6. The Treatment of Culture in the Foreign Language Curriculum: An Analysis of National Curriculum Documents

    Lavrenteva, Evgenia; Orland-Barak, Lily

    2015-01-01

    Teaching culture in the foreign language classroom has been widely debated ever since its importance was recognized. Current research suggests that centralized "top down" curricular policies can become potential constraints to teaching culture and points to the need for adapting curricula for culture-integrated language learning. This…

  7. CH Stands for Cheese, Right? A Swiss Culture Class and the National Standards

    Seidlitz, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Culture has always been a part of foreign language learning. However, in recent years, more and more language professors advocate placing culture at the center of our classes. The question of just how to teach culture remains a topic of debate. This paper describes the reworking of a traditional German grammar and reading course into a class that…

  8. Intercultural Sensitivity, Gender, and Nationality of Third Culture Kids Attending an International High School

    Morales, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Due to the globalization and interconnectedness of people from different cultures, intercultural competence is a prerequisite to communicating effectively across different cultures. The Intercultural Sensitivity Inventory (ICSI) measures a person's ability to modify behavior in culturally appropriate ways when coming into contact with diverse…

  9. Mass communication and cultural identity: the unresolved issue of national sovereignty and cultural autonomy in the wake of new communication technologies.

    Uche, L U

    1988-01-01

    The trend in modern mass communication appears to be toward the imposition of the cultural, economic, and political values of the societies with the most advanced communication and information technologies and media sources. The consequence of this reality is that the cultural values, national aspirations, economic needs, and political independence of developing countries are not taken into consideration. Thus, the national interests of African states make it imperative for them to carefully evaluate, assess, and examine the development of their present media structures and ownership patterns. If the mass media is privatized, their owners serve as mouthpieces for multinational corporations. This phenomenon can severely undermine African goals of self-sufficiency in food production and industrialization, political stability that guarantees territorial integrity, and preservation of the African culture. It is imperative that African governments do not allow big multinationals to take over the molding and control of public opinion. Although modern systems of communication are exceedingly expensive and sophisticated, ways must be found to make the media public utilities.

  10. Cultured Construction: Global Evidence of the Impact of National Values on Piped-to-Premises Water Infrastructure Development.

    Kaminsky, Jessica A

    2016-07-19

    In 2016, the global community undertook the Sustainable Development Goals. One of these goals seeks to achieve universal and equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water for all people by the year 2030. In support of this undertaking, this paper seeks to discover the cultural work done by piped water infrastructure across 33 nations with developed and developing economies that have experienced change in the percentage of population served by piped-to-premises water infrastructure at the national level of analysis. To do so, I regressed the 1990-2012 change in piped-to-premises water infrastructure coverage against Hofstede's cultural dimensions, controlling for per capita GDP, the 1990 baseline level of coverage, percent urban population, overall 1990-2012 change in improved sanitation (all technologies), and per capita freshwater resources. Separate analyses were carried out for the urban, rural, and aggregate national contexts. Hofstede's dimensions provide a measure of cross-cultural difference; high or low scores are not in any way intended to represent better or worse but rather serve as a quantitative way to compare aggregate preferences for ways of being and doing. High scores in the cultural dimensions of Power Distance, Individualism-Collectivism, and Uncertainty Avoidance explain increased access to piped-to-premises water infrastructure in the rural context. Higher Power Distance and Uncertainty Avoidance scores are also statistically significant for increased coverage in the urban and national aggregate contexts. These results indicate that, as presently conceived, piped-to-premises water infrastructure fits best with spatial contexts that prefer hierarchy and centralized control. Furthermore, water infrastructure is understood to reduce uncertainty regarding the provision of individually valued benefits. The results of this analysis identify global trends that enable engineers and policy makers to design and manage more culturally appropriate

  11. The impact of national cultural distance on the number of foreign web site visits by U.S. households

    Beugelsdijk, S.; Slangen, A.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate how national cultural distance, defined as the extent to which the shared values and norms in one country differ from those in another, affect the number of Web site visits. Based on a sample of 2,654 U.S. households visiting Web sites in 38 countries over 25 different Web site categories, we find that cultural distance has a negative and significant effect on the number of taste-related foreign Web site visits. In the case of Web sites containing sexually explicit material, we...

  12. A study on the development of national guide for implementing nuclear security culture in ROK

    Koh, Moonsung; Lee, Youngwook; Yoo, Hosik

    2014-01-01

    Among the extended concepts, a remarkable thing is that nuclear security began to be focused on the human factor as well as technical factors (hardware and software system) because most security lapses at nuclear power facilities result from human failings such as low motivation, miscalculation, or malice. Nuclear Security Culture (NSC) is designed to improve the performance of the human factor and to make its interface with security technology and regulations more effective and smooth. There is a need to develop a variety of more efficient tools for achieving sustainable nuclear security culture. We studied for the implementing guide to establish and enhance the nuclear security culture. We have developed the Nuclear Security Culture Implementing Guidelines for licensees in order to enhance nuclear security culture. Licensees have separately established a separate code of conduct on nuclear security culture for their daily business based on such Implementing Guidelines. The Nuclear Security Culture Implementing Guidelines were developed with sufficient consideration of both the IAEA Security Series on nuclear security culture and the Korean circumstances. In all, the Korean government and licensees have timely established and applied the Implementing Guidelines and code of conduct and consequently paved the way for further improvements of the Korean nuclear security regime. The nuclear security culture will facilitate and optimize the human aspects in our nuclear security programs

  13. Evidence for cultural dialects in vocal emotion expression: acoustic classification within and across five nations.

    Laukka, Petri; Neiberg, Daniel; Elfenbein, Hillary Anger

    2014-06-01

    The possibility of cultural differences in the fundamental acoustic patterns used to express emotion through the voice is an unanswered question central to the larger debate about the universality versus cultural specificity of emotion. This study used emotionally inflected standard-content speech segments expressing 11 emotions produced by 100 professional actors from 5 English-speaking cultures. Machine learning simulations were employed to classify expressions based on their acoustic features, using conditions where training and testing were conducted on stimuli coming from either the same or different cultures. A wide range of emotions were classified with above-chance accuracy in cross-cultural conditions, suggesting vocal expressions share important characteristics across cultures. However, classification showed an in-group advantage with higher accuracy in within- versus cross-cultural conditions. This finding demonstrates cultural differences in expressive vocal style, and supports the dialect theory of emotions according to which greater recognition of expressions from in-group members results from greater familiarity with culturally specific expressive styles.

  14. A study on the development of national guide for implementing nuclear security culture in ROK

    Koh, Moonsung; Lee, Youngwook; Yoo, Hosik [Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Among the extended concepts, a remarkable thing is that nuclear security began to be focused on the human factor as well as technical factors (hardware and software system) because most security lapses at nuclear power facilities result from human failings such as low motivation, miscalculation, or malice. Nuclear Security Culture (NSC) is designed to improve the performance of the human factor and to make its interface with security technology and regulations more effective and smooth. There is a need to develop a variety of more efficient tools for achieving sustainable nuclear security culture. We studied for the implementing guide to establish and enhance the nuclear security culture. We have developed the Nuclear Security Culture Implementing Guidelines for licensees in order to enhance nuclear security culture. Licensees have separately established a separate code of conduct on nuclear security culture for their daily business based on such Implementing Guidelines. The Nuclear Security Culture Implementing Guidelines were developed with sufficient consideration of both the IAEA Security Series on nuclear security culture and the Korean circumstances. In all, the Korean government and licensees have timely established and applied the Implementing Guidelines and code of conduct and consequently paved the way for further improvements of the Korean nuclear security regime. The nuclear security culture will facilitate and optimize the human aspects in our nuclear security programs.

  15. cultural

    Irene Kreutz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Es un estudio cualitativo que adoptó como referencial teorico-motodológico la antropología y la etnografía. Presenta las experiencias vivenciadas por mujeres de una comunidad en el proceso salud-enfermedad, con el objetivo de comprender los determinantes sócio-culturales e históricos de las prácticas de prevención y tratamiento adoptados por el grupo cultural por medio de la entrevista semi-estructurada. Los temas que emergieron fueron: la relación entre la alimentación y lo proceso salud-enfermedad, las relaciones con el sistema de salud oficial y el proceso salud-enfermedad y lo sobrenatural. Los dados revelaron que los moradores de la comunidad investigada tienen un modo particular de explicar sus procedimientos terapéuticos. Consideramos que es papel de los profesionales de la salud en sus prácticas, la adopción de abordajes o enfoques que consideren al individuo en su dimensión sócio-cultural e histórica, considerando la enorme diversidad cultural en nuestro país.

  16. Family Ties and Health Cross-Nationally: The Contextualizing Role of Familistic Culture and Public Pension Spending in Europe

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Although previous research theorizes that cross-national variation in the relationship between family ties and health is due to nation-level differences in culture and policy/economics, no study has examined this theorization empirically. Method. Using data from the Survey of Health, Ageing, and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) and the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), this study uses multilevel modeling to analyze individual-, nation-, and cross-level effects for 30,291 older adults in 14 nations. Results. Family ties to spouses/partners and parents are associated with better health, but ties to coresident children are associated with poorer health in certain contexts. Familistic culture and public pension spending have a weak but statistically significant moderating effect on the relationship between intergenerational family ties and health. Discussion. This article underscores the complexity of family and highlights the need for continued theorization and measurement at the nation level to promote older adults’ health in diverse contexts. PMID:24043356

  17. Validation of a Culturally Appropriate Social Capital Framework to Explore Health Conditions in Canadian First Nations Communities

    Brenda Elias

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available An earlier study of our research group formulated a conceptual framework of social capital for First Nation communities and developed a culturally appropriate instrument for its measurement. We tested this instrument further with the Manitoba (Canada First Nations Regional Health Survey, 2003. Using data from this survey, we investigated the bonding dimension of the social capital conceptual framework, with a total sample of 2,765 First Nations individuals living in 24 Manitoba First Nations communities. Twenty seven Likert-scale survey questions measured aspects of bonding social capital, socially-invested resources, ethos,and networks. Validation analyses included an evaluation of internal consistency, factor analyses to explore how well the items clustered together into the components of the social capital framework, and the ability of the items to discriminate across the communities represented in the sample. Cronbach’s Alpha was computed on the 27 scale items, producing an Alpha of 0.84 indicating high internal consistency. The factor analyses produced five distinct factors with a total explained variance of 54.3%. Lastly, a one-way analysis of variancerun by community produced highly significant F-ratios between the groups on all twenty-seven bonding items. The culturally-sensitive items included in the social capital framework were found to be an appropriate tool to measure bonding aspects among Manitoba First Nations communities. Research and policy implications are discussed.

  18. The Rhetoric of Culture as an Act of Closure in a Cross-National Software Development Department

    Jensen, Rasmus Eskild; Nardi, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    Global software teams work on interdependent tasks across geographies, time zones, and cultures. Studies of cross-national software teams report that the main challenges are sharing knowledge, creating trust, and establishing common ground. In this study we examine another challenge—the use...... of the word “culture” as an exclusionary act of closure. As theorized by Metiu, who builds on Weber, closure occurs when one group seeks to preserve the advantages of their situation relative to another group. We conducted an ethnographic study of a cross-national software department with members in Denmark...... and the Philippines. We found that “culture” was invoked by employees in the Danish office to explain failed collaborations, but not by employees in the Philippines. Filipino employees formulated other explanations for problems, and actively resisted cultural explanations. We argue that employees in the Danish office...

  19. Health Information National Trends Survey in American Sign Language (HINTS-ASL): Protocol for the Cultural Adaptation and Linguistic Validation of a National Survey.

    Kushalnagar, Poorna; Harris, Raychelle; Paludneviciene, Raylene; Hoglind, TraciAnn

    2017-09-13

    The Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) collects nationally representative data about the American's public use of health-related information. This survey is available in English and Spanish, but not in American Sign Language (ASL). Thus, the exclusion of ASL users from these national health information survey studies has led to a significant gap in knowledge of Internet usage for health information access in this underserved and understudied population. The objectives of this study are (1) to culturally adapt and linguistically translate the HINTS items to ASL (HINTS-ASL); and (2) to gather information about deaf people's health information seeking behaviors across technology-mediated platforms. We modified the standard procedures developed at the US National Center for Health Statistics Cognitive Survey Laboratory to culturally adapt and translate HINTS items to ASL. Cognitive interviews were conducted to assess clarity and delivery of these HINTS-ASL items. Final ASL video items were uploaded to a protected online survey website. The HINTS-ASL online survey has been administered to over 1350 deaf adults (ages 18 to 90 and up) who use ASL. Data collection is ongoing and includes deaf adult signers across the United States. Some items from HINTS item bank required cultural adaptation for use with deaf people who use accessible services or technology. A separate item bank for deaf-related experiences was created, reflecting deaf-specific technology such as sharing health-related ASL videos through social network sites and using video remote interpreting services in health settings. After data collection is complete, we will conduct a series of analyses on deaf people's health information seeking behaviors across technology-mediated platforms. HINTS-ASL is an accessible health information national trends survey, which includes a culturally appropriate set of items that are relevant to the experiences of deaf people who use ASL. The final HINTS

  20. Implementing CRM System in a Global Organization National vs. Organizational Culture

    Frygell, Linda; Hedman, Jonas; Carlsson, Sven

    2017-01-01

    global subsidiaries, and has planned the implementation well, the implementation was not a complete success. The study has identified that the cultural factor are important, but not stressed enough in the current CRM literature. Understanding the difference between the organizational culture in which...

  1. The popularity of domestic cultural products: cross-national differences and the relation to globalization

    Bekhuis, H.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation addressed the popularity of domestic cultural consumption. It aimed at describing and explaining the extent to which the popularity of domestic cultural consumption differs between countries and over time. We studied the popularity of domestic versus foreign film productions, the

  2. Assessing organisational culture for quality and safety improvement: a national survey of tools and tool use.

    Mannion, R; Konteh, F H; Davies, H T O

    2009-04-01

    There is growing international interest in managing organisational culture as a lever for healthcare improvement. This has prompted a practical need to understand what instruments and tools exist for assessing cultures in healthcare contexts. The present study was undertaken to determine the culture assessment tools being used in the English NHS and assess their fitness for purpose. Postal questionnaire survey of clinical governance leads in 275 English NHS organisations, with a response rate of 77%. A third of the organisations were currently using a culture assessment instrument to support their clinical governance activity. Although we found a high degree of satisfaction with existing instruments, in terms of ease of use and relevance, there is an immediate practical need to develop new and better bespoke culture assessment tools to bridge the gap between the cultural domains covered by extant instruments and the broader range of concerns of clinical governance managers. There is growing interest in understanding and shaping local cultures in healthcare, which is not yet matched by widespread use of available instruments. Even though extant tools cover many of the most important cultural attributes identified by clinical governance managers, the over-riding focus of tools in use is on safety rather than a holistic assessment of the dimensions of healthcare quality and performance.

  3. The Influence of National Culture on Educational Videos: The Case of MOOCs

    Bayeck, Rebecca Yvonne; Choi, Jinhee

    2018-01-01

    This paper discusses the influence of cultural dimensions on Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) introductory videos. The study examined the introductory videos produced by three universities on Coursera platforms using communication theory and Hofstede's cultural dimensions. The results show that introductory videos in MOOCs are influenced by the…

  4. Cultural Resource Investigations for the Resumption of Transient Testing of Nuclear Fuels and Material at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Pace, Brenda R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Williams, Julie B. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2013-11-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a need to test nuclear fuels under conditions that subject them to short bursts of intense, high-power radiation called ‘transient testing’ in order to gain important information necessary for licensing new nuclear fuels for use in U.S. nuclear power plants, for developing information to help improve current nuclear power plant performance and sustainability, for improving the affordability of new generation reactors, for developing recyclable nuclear fuels, and for developing fuels that inhibit any repurposing into nuclear weapons. To meet this mission need, DOE is considering alternatives for re-use and modification of existing nuclear reactor facilities to support a renewed transient testing program. One alternative under consideration involves restarting the Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) reactor located at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) on the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) site in southeastern Idaho. This report summarizes cultural resource investigations conducted by the INL Cultural Resource Management Office in 2013 to support environmental review of activities associated with restarting the TREAT reactor at the INL. These investigations were completed in order to identify and assess the significance of cultural resources within areas of potential effect associated with the proposed action and determine if the TREAT alternative would affect significant cultural resources or historic properties that are eligible for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places. No archaeological resources were identified in the direct area of potential effects for the project, but four of the buildings proposed for modifications are evaluated as historic properties, potentially eligible for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places. This includes the TREAT reactor (building #), control building (building #), guardhouse (building #), and warehouse (building #). The proposed re-use of these historic

  5. Elements of European Political Culture in the Central Asian National Outskirts of the Russian Empire: Perception Specifics of Foreign Cultural Innovations (late 19th – early 20th

    Yuliya A. Lysenko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the main results of political modernization in the Central Asian national outskirts of the Russian Empire taken place in the late 19th – early 20th centuries. The concept “Central Asian national outskirts” includes Stepnoy and Turkistan Governorate Generals, the two administrative-territorial entities founded in the 1860s as a result of a complete joining of the Kazakh camping grounds of the Junior, Middle and Elder zhuzhes; after the Kokand and Khivinsk khanates inhabited by nomads ( the Kirghiz, the Kara-Kalpaks as well as the settled population (the Uzbeks were conquered. The analysis of the sources and materials conducted by the authors asserts that the political modernization of the Central Asian national outskirts proposed by the Russian Empire was carried out in line with the fundamental characteristics of West European civilization and the basis of its political culture. Thus the system of local government was established and the democratic electoral system was introduced by means of expanding the voter’s base, with the region’s population participating in social and political life. The principles of bourgeois ideology based on such concepts as “equality”, “freedom”, “self-determination” were also formed. However, the political modernization of the Central Asian national outskirts should not be considered as complete. Up to 1917 the political sphere of the region’s population was characterized by the predominance of traditional mores, values and laws, whereas clan ideology, tribalism and Muslim ethno-consciousness were characteristic of the social sphere. All these factors affected the process of adapting to western political culture. The institutionalization of the new structures did not go along with the de-institutionalization of the traditional ones, and so resulted in the combination and coexistence of the traditional and modern structures.

  6. CULTURAL EXPLORATION AS ALTER/NATIVE1 ROUTE TO NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: INSIGHTS FROM YORUBA VERBAL ARTS

    OLUWOLE COKER

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper interrogates Yoruba verbal arts and situates culture as a catalyst for development. It is suggested that the intricate resources of oral art, exemplified by Yoruba textual references, are viable ingredients for socio-cultural empowerment. To fully comprehend the dynamics of a society in constant change due to external and internal realities, one must reconsider culture in order to reposition the society. The multidimensional and multidisciplinary significance of Yoruba verbal art demonstrate that culture has a vital role to play in any meaningful socio-political advancement in the Nigerian body polity. The ideas conveyed in proverbial expressions, representing key cultural realities of the Yoruba people, offer insights and ideas for development and social good. The paper submits that a deeper exploration of the intricate resources of verbal art is a viable route to development.

  7. 76 FR 28121 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “National Geographic...

    2011-05-13

    ... Determinations: ``National Geographic Treasures of the Earth'' SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given of the following... objects to be included in the exhibition ``National Geographic Treasures of the Earth'' imported from... exceed six years from June 11, 2011), is in the national interest. The Museum understands that...

  8. The effect of survivalism--self-expressionism culture on black male suicide acceptability: a cross-national analysis.

    Stack, Steven; Kposowa, Augustine J

    2011-04-01

    Cultural explanations of black suicide have focused on the US and stressed religiosity as a protective factor. This paper adds to this literature by (1) expanding the analysis of the impact of religiosity on black suicide to 10 nations, and (2) assessing the extent to which a broader cultural construct (self expressionism) affects black suicide acceptability. Data are from Wave 4 of the World Values Surveys 1991-2001 and refer to 3580 black males nested in ten countries. A hierarchical linear regression model determined that religiosity predicted black suicide acceptability across ten nations. Self expressionism was positively associated with individual level suicide acceptability. Further, a cross-level interaction was found wherein individual level and societal level self expressionism combined to affect suicide acceptability. The variability in suicide acceptability among black males is predicted, in part, by both individual and group levels of adherence to values contained in a major cultural axis of nations: self expressionism. These new found associations compliment the impact of a standard predictor, religiosity, on suicide acceptability. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Identity and cultural plurality in spanish textbooks produced in Brazil and selected by PNLD - National Programme of Textbook

    Jeferson Mundim de Souza

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to promote, given the current reality, in which it sets up a scenario marked by breaking cultural boundaries and understand the world as a more unified universe, reflect on existing conceptions of culture in this context. The world increasingly marked by multicultural societies, the weakening of old cultural references and the multiplication of identity statements. The teaching of foreign languages is an opportunity to place the student in planetary universe of an apparent online culture, but which increasingly reinforces different identities. In this sense, the article presented here, and promote space for a discussion of these very contemporary issues, presents the analysis of a survey of two of the four textbooks in Spanish, selected to join the National Book Program for Education East, delimiting the choice of the characteristics of space and time for analysis and construction of this writing: El arte de leer Spanish and Síntesis: course española language. Not the total analysis of the books will be presented, opting to make a cut, taking as a criterion some teaching units and activities more targeted to the theme proposed, in addition to meet the rules and brevity of this article. Such research revolved around the following questions: How do the textbooks for the teaching and learning of Spanish produced in Brazil include: a the cultural diversity of the Hispanic world? ; b the claim - with respect to their community in training and socializing (s of identity (s American latina- (s? ; and c interaction - proposal from learning strategies, with the identity formation of the Brazilian student? Therefore, we adopted the methodology of qualitative analysis and content analysis technique, taking as indicators the following categories: geographical areas and cultural areas explored in the texts; the identities of anonymous characters and famous circulating in the books; and educational activities related to cultural issues

  10. The Effect of National and International Culture on Logo Design of Iran’s Graphic Art

    Monirifar, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Art is an intellectual accumulation, which is unique to the society where it exists, and it is shaped by that land’s culture. In the other words, art is not an element, which can be taken from other cultures directly and applied to a society. On the other hand, communication instruments play a significant role in transferring the cultural and artistic heritage, which are the basis of a country. Furthermore, graphic design is a language which conveys a message, it is an identification of the c...

  11. The Construction of National Memory Through Popular Culture. The Case of the Argentinian TV Show,

    Elizondo Oviedo, María Verónica

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the borders of the complex television sign through the analysis of the Argentinian TV show "Peter Capusotto y sus videos". In it we find that humor is used as a mechanism to dismantle binary hierarchic political and social oppositions. The program is presented as a musical and comedy TV show where concepts such as popular culture and mass culture are questioned through different false musicians. We focus our attention in the character of Bombita Rodríguez, el Palito Ortega montonero due to the controversy generated in the cultural scene by the fact of bringing up recent aspects of Argentinian history.

  12. Popular Music, National Culture and the First Chervona Ruta Festival of 1989

    Bohdan Klid

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the origins, organization and goals of the first Chervona ruta music festival against the background of the perestroika period, which was characterized by a deepening anxiety over the plight of Ukrainian culture. In 1988 Ivan Dziuba gave voice to these issues in an essay that, among other things, pointed to the shortcomings of Ukrainian pop culture. The present paper shows how, in its own way, the festival became a response to such concerns, and how the problems and limitation of the festival itself reflected the serious cultural situation in Ukraine.

  13. Hospital cultural competency as a systematic organizational intervention: Key findings from the national center for healthcare leadership diversity demonstration project.

    Weech-Maldonado, Robert; Dreachslin, Janice L; Epané, Josué Patien; Gail, Judith; Gupta, Shivani; Wainio, Joyce Anne

    Cultural competency or the ongoing capacity of health care systems to provide for high-quality care to diverse patient populations (National Quality Forum, 2008) has been proposed as an organizational strategy to address disparities in quality of care, patient experience, and workforce representation. But far too many health care organizations still do not treat cultural competency as a business imperative and driver of strategy. The aim of the study was to examine the impact of a systematic, multifaceted, and organizational level cultural competency initiative on hospital performance metrics at the organizational and individual levels. This demonstration project employs a pre-post control group design. Two hospital systems participated in the study. Within each system, two hospitals were selected to serve as the intervention and control hospitals. Executive leadership (C-suite) and all staff at one general medical/surgical nursing unit at the intervention hospitals experienced a systematic, planned cultural competency intervention. Assessments and interventions focused on three organizational level competencies of cultural competency (diversity leadership, strategic human resource management, and patient cultural competency) and three individual level competencies (diversity attitudes, implicit bias, and racial/ethnic identity status). In addition, we evaluated the impact of the intervention on diversity climate and workforce diversity. Overall performance improvement was greater in each of the two intervention hospitals than in the control hospital within the same health care system. Both intervention hospitals experienced improvements in the organizational level competencies of diversity leadership and strategic human resource management. Similarly, improvements were observed in the individual level competencies for diversity attitudes and implicit bias for Blacks among the intervention hospitals. Furthermore, intervention hospitals outperformed their respective

  14. National Nuclear Safety Department Experience of Supervision over Safety Culture of BNPP-1

    Sepanloo, K.; Ardeshir, A.T.

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of the past major NPPs accidents, TMI, Chernobyl and Fukushima Daiichi shows that causes of these accidents can be explained by a complex combination of human, technological and organizational factors. One of the findings of accident investigations and risk assessments is the growing recognition of the impact of cultural context of work practices on safety. The assumed link between culture and safety, epitomized through the concept of safety culture, has been the subject of extensive research in recent years. The term “safety culture” was first introduced into the nuclear industry by the IAEA in INSAG-1 to underline the role and importance of the organizational factors. The objective of this paper is to conduct an assessment of some safety culture indicators of Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant (BNPP-1).

  15. Empires of Disease : Criminal Encounters, Contagious Nations, and Archives of U.S. Culture and Literature

    Perreira, Christopher Michael

    2015-01-01

    Empires of Disease explores the figure of the "prisoner- patient" in literature, culture, and archives of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, specifically within the contexts of incarceration and medicine in Hawai'i, Louisiana, and California. I focus on representations of prisoner-patients in order to interrogate dominant perceptions of medicine as a humanitarian enterprise, examining the historical convergence of race, colonialism, culture, and medicine in archives and artifacts. When a...

  16. Development of a decision aid for energy resource management for the Navajo Nation incorporating environmental cultural values

    Necefer, Len Edward

    Decision-making surrounding pathways of future energy resource management are complexity and requires balancing tradeoffs of multiple environmental, social, economic, and technical outcomes. Technical decision aid can provide a framework for informed decision making, allowing individuals to better understand the tradeoff between resources, technology, energy services, and prices. While technical decision aid have made significant advances in evaluating these quantitative aspects of energy planning and performance, they have not been designed to incorporate human factors, such as preferences and behavior that are informed by cultural values. Incorporating cultural values into decision tools can provide not only an improved decision framework for the Navajo Nation, but also generate new insights on how these perspective can improve decision making on energy resources. Ensuring these aids are a cultural fit for each context has the potential to increase trust and promote understanding of the tradeoffs involved in energy resource management. In this dissertation I present the development of a technical tool that explicitly addresses cultural and spiritual values and experimentally assesses their influence on the preferences and decision making of Navajo citizens. Chapter 2 describes the results of a public elicitation effort to gather information about stakeholder views and concerns related to energy development in the Navajo Nation in order to develop a larger sample survey and a decision-support tool that links techno-economic energy models with sociocultural attributes. Chapter 3 details the methods of developing the energy decision aid and its underlying assumptions for alternative energy projects and their impacts. This tool also provides an alternative to economic valuation of cultural impacts based upon an ordinal index tied to environmental impacts. Chapter 4 details the the influence of various cultural, environmental, and economic outcome information provided

  17. Managing nationality diversity : The interactive effect of leaders' cultural intelligence and task interdependence

    Rosenauer, D.; Homan, A.C.; Horstmeier, C.A.L.; Voelpel, S.C.

    2016-01-01

    In light of the workforce's increasing nationality diversity, our study explores the antecedents for the successful management of nationality diversity as visualized in a favourable diversity climate and enhanced team performance. We propose a double-contingency model in which we argue that the

  18. Cultural and Technical Evaluation of Heating Alternatives to Improve Indoor Air Quality on the Navajo Nation

    In the Navajo Nation it is estimated that 62% of households use wood as their primary means of heating1. A 2010 study by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Diné College found that in Shiprock, NM, the largest town in the Navajo Nation (pop. = 8,300)2, heating is often w...

  19. Shared Places, Separate Spaces: Constructing Cultural Spaces through Two National Languages in Finland

    From, Tuuli; Sahlström, Fritjof

    2017-01-01

    Finland is a bilingual country with 2 national languages, Finnish and Swedish. The Swedish-speaking school institution aims to protect the minority language by maintaining a monolingual school space. In this article, the construction of linguistic and ethnic difference in educational discourse and practice related to the national languages in…

  20. Shared Cultural History as a Predictor of Political and Economic Changes among Nation States.

    Luke J Matthews

    Full Text Available Political and economic risks arise from social phenomena that spread within and across countries. Regime changes, protest movements, and stock market and default shocks can have ramifications across the globe. Quantitative models have made great strides at predicting these events in recent decades but incorporate few explicitly measured cultural variables. However, in recent years cultural evolutionary theory has emerged as a major paradigm to understand the inheritance and diffusion of human cultural variation. Here, we combine these two strands of research by proposing that measures of socio-linguistic affiliation derived from language phylogenies track variation in cultural norms that influence how political and economic changes diffuse across the globe. First, we show that changes over time in a country's democratic or autocratic character correlate with simultaneous changes among their socio-linguistic affiliations more than with changes of spatially proximate countries. Second, we find that models of changes in sovereign default status favor including socio-linguistic affiliations in addition to spatial data. These findings suggest that better measurement of cultural networks could be profoundly useful to policy makers who wish to diversify commercial, social, and other forms of investment across political and economic risks on an international scale.

  1. Shared Cultural History as a Predictor of Political and Economic Changes among Nation States.

    Matthews, Luke J; Passmore, Sam; Richard, Paul M; Gray, Russell D; Atkinson, Quentin D

    2016-01-01

    Political and economic risks arise from social phenomena that spread within and across countries. Regime changes, protest movements, and stock market and default shocks can have ramifications across the globe. Quantitative models have made great strides at predicting these events in recent decades but incorporate few explicitly measured cultural variables. However, in recent years cultural evolutionary theory has emerged as a major paradigm to understand the inheritance and diffusion of human cultural variation. Here, we combine these two strands of research by proposing that measures of socio-linguistic affiliation derived from language phylogenies track variation in cultural norms that influence how political and economic changes diffuse across the globe. First, we show that changes over time in a country's democratic or autocratic character correlate with simultaneous changes among their socio-linguistic affiliations more than with changes of spatially proximate countries. Second, we find that models of changes in sovereign default status favor including socio-linguistic affiliations in addition to spatial data. These findings suggest that better measurement of cultural networks could be profoundly useful to policy makers who wish to diversify commercial, social, and other forms of investment across political and economic risks on an international scale.

  2. “Lines of Mourning”: On the Issue of National and Cultural Self-Determination of L.S. Vygotsky

    Sobkin V.S.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the full text of a work by L.S. Vygotsky “Lines of Mourning” (1916 along with detailed commentaries. This article was the first of the three published in the Jewish periodical Noviy Put’ that can be considered a triptych dedicated to the issues of national, cultural and religious traditions and their relation with modern times. The text and commentaries provide an insight into personal meanings and attitudes of young Vygotsky in the situation of political and value/normative uncertainty. This enables us to reconstruct the features of social, political, national and ethic self-definition of the scientist and to reveal the grounds and values underlying the cultural-historical approach. Special attention is brought to the dialogic nature of the Jewish and Russian culture. In the commentaries we also focus on the specifics of artistic and reflective position of Vygotsky in relation to pre-revolutionary events that took place at that time: understanding this allows us to comprehend a whole set of social, political, moral, ethic and truly psychological problems that would later on be reflected in his scientific works. Another section of our commentaries is centered on the analysis of the article’s style and composition and its multi-layered structure.

  3. Simultaneous administration of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale in 53 nations: exploring the universal and culture-specific features of global self-esteem.

    Schmitt, David P; Allik, Jüri

    2005-10-01

    The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) was translated into 28 languages and administered to 16,998 participants across 53 nations. The RSES factor structure was largely invariant across nations. RSES scores correlated with neuroticism, extraversion, and romantic attachment styles within nearly all nations, providing additional support for cross-cultural equivalence of the RSES. All nations scored above the theoretical midpoint of the RSES, indicating generally positive self-evaluation may be culturally universal. Individual differences in self-esteem were variable across cultures, with a neutral response bias prevalent in more collectivist cultures. Self-competence and self-liking subscales of the RSES varied with cultural individualism. Although positively and negatively worded items of the RSES were correlated within cultures and were uniformly related to external personality variables, differences between aggregates of positive and negative items were smaller in developed nations. Because negatively worded items were interpreted differently across nations, direct cross-cultural comparisons using the RSES may have limited value.

  4. City Cemeteries as Cultural Attractions: Towards an Understanding of Foreign Visitors’ Attitude at the National Graveyard in Budapest

    Brigitta Pécsek

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to reposition urban cemeteries within the tourism supply and to showcase their values as cultural tourism products that can enrich visitors’ experiences. Although urban cemeteries as ritual meeting points of life and death have become an integral part of city tourism, contemporary tourism literature mostly embeds them in dark tourism or thanatourism, neglecting the experience-rich potentials of cemeteries as cultural products. This paper rectifies this by arguing that cemetery tourism makes a fascinating cultural display for tourists, offering both nature-based and cultural activities, therefore, it can be rightfully placed in heritage and cultural tourism. The paper investigates foreign visitors’ attitude at the National Graveyard in Budapest. During the empirical research 52 questionnaires were correctly filled in, followed by the same number of mini-interviews. The research findings confirmed the initial hypotheses: 1. Visitors regarded cemeteries as complex attractions representing both natural and cultural values, which added to the positive experiences of a Budapest city break. 2. There was no reference to the so called “dark aspects” of cemeteries in the answers. 3. Although the satisfaction rate was high, the lack of visitors is a clear indication that the cemetery in Budapest has been so far undervalued as an urban attraction. On the negative side, respondents criticized the lack of information sources available prior to visit, the inefficient marketing and the undesirable neighbourhood. The paper ultimately aims to provide stakeholders solid, preliminary data that might serve as a launching pad for further larger-scale research.

  5. Across Cultural and National Borders: Diasporic Chinese Family in Pushing Hands

    Qijun Han

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Being embedded in the interdisciplinary area of media and culture studies, this articlel explores the family melodrama in transnational Chinese cinema drawing upon theoretical discussions with regard to the historical emergence of melodrama in correspondence to, as Th. Elsaesser says, “periods of intense social and ideological crisis”. While serving as a reflection on the tension between tradition and modernity displayed in the domestic domain, Ang Lee’s Chinese-characterized family melodrama also illustrates the differences between Chinese and Hollywood family melodrama. Linked to the ongoing debate about “melodrama as a cross-cultural form”, in the process of analyzing the film text, our perceptions of generic dislocation or displacement, transcultural entanglements and globalization in light of contemporary cultural practices will be furthermore complicated.  

  6. National programs for the development and development of the culture of Security in the nuclear activities in Cuba

    Ferro Fernandez, R.; Guillen Campos, A.; Arnau Fernandez, A.

    2003-01-01

    From their appearance, as a result of the investigations of the accident in the Nuclear Power station of Chernobyl, the term Culture of Security has been considered a key element to achieve a elevated level of security in the nuclear facilities, becoming a basic principle of security, grateful internationally. The Organ Cuban Regulator understood from very early the importance of to promote and to develop attitudes and characteristic in the organizations and the personnel linked to the nuclear sector that you/they reflected a high culture of security, for to propitiate a bigger involvement of all in the topics of security and in that way to contribute significantly to the prevention of accidents in the nuclear facilities. Although the Program Nuclear Cuban suffered serious reductions in the decade of the years 90, the Organ Regulator has continuous working in this address, assimilating all the international experience for its application in their strategies of development of the culture of security in the nuclear activities that today they are executed in the country. The present work picks up the Cuban experience in the conformation of a National Program for the development and development of the Culture of Security

  7. How Cultural Assumptions May Affect Teaching, Learning, and Communication in the Nation's Prisons.

    Franklin, Godfrey; Platt, John S.

    1994-01-01

    A Multicultural Communications model includes factors that influence human interactions and communications among correctional staff and inmates. To be competent cross-cultural, intercultural, or multicultural communicators, educators must be aware of their knowledge of out-group members. (Author/JOW)

  8. Customer evaluations of after-sales service contact modes : an empirical analysis of national culture's consequences

    Birgelen, van M.; Ruyter, de J.C.; Jong, de A.; Wetzels, M.G.M.

    2001-01-01

    Technological advances extend the after-sales services portfolio from traditional service encounters to voice- and bit-based services. Technology enables service organizations to transcend geographical as well as cultural boundaries. It might even result in geographical convergence, often treated

  9. Job level and national culture as joint roots of job satisfaction

    Huang, X; Van de Vliert, E.

    To examine cross-cultural and cross-occupational variations in job satisfaction, data from a multinational company survey with 129,087 respondents from 39 countries was analysed. Multilevel analyses showed that job level is positively related to job satisfaction in individualistic countries but not

  10. The development of dance art within the nation's pop culture: a study ...

    This emerging dance trends have come to stay and have also contributed immensely to the development of dance in Nigeria. This paper will examine the growth and development of dance art within Nigeria's Pop Culture using participant observation method and will also draw from extant literature such as books, journals, ...

  11. Relational vs. group self-construal: Untangling the role of national culture in HRI

    Evers, V.; Maldonado, H.; Brodecki, T.; Hinds, P.; Fong, T.; Dautenhahn, K.

    2008-01-01

    As robots (and other technologies) increasingly make decisions on behalf of people, it is important to understand how people from diverse cultures respond to this capability. Thus far, much design of autonomous systems takes a Western view valuing individual preferences and choice. We challenge the

  12. Post-Materialism as a Cultural Factor Influencing Entrepreneurial Activity across Nations

    L.M. Uhlaner (Lorraine); A.R. Thurik (Roy); J. Hutjes

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe study of the determinants of entrepreneurship at the country level has been dominated by economic influences. The relative stability of differences in levels of entrepreneurship across coun-tries suggests that other forces such as certain institutional and/or cultural factors are

  13. The Nigeria-Biafra war, popular culture and agitation for sovereignty of a Biafran nation

    Julius-Adeoye, R.J.

    2017-01-01

    The date 6 July 2017 marks the 50th anniversary of the war considered as one of the worst in recent human history, the Nigeria-Biafra war. My paper focuses on the representation of this war in popular culture – with an emphasis on film, fictional and non-fictional literature. It interrogates the

  14. Cultural Demands of the Host-Nation: International Student Experience and the Public Diplomacy Consequences

    Triana, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Traditional approaches for hosting international students tend to focus on classroom achievement rather than on intercultural exchange and cultural immersion. Such approaches lessen the possibility of successful educational experiences which also hinders public diplomacy. Two case studies are presented that reveal how structural changes at a…

  15. Local Organisation and Cultural Identity in Greenland in a National Perspective

    Dybbroe, Susanne

    1991-01-01

    Important contributions have been made to understand the function of locality in the construction of cultural identity. Focus has variously been directed at the role of place and the role of aspects of social organisation in creating a symbolic bond between members of local communities. The article...

  16. National Language Policy and Its Impacts on Second Language Reading Culture

    Azmi, Mohd Nazri Latiff

    2013-01-01

    This research concentrates on Malaysian language policy and its impacts on the development of English language (regarded as a second language in Malaysia) specifically on reading culture. The main objectives of this research are to investigate the weaknesses and strengths of the policy and also to come out with recommendations to improve the…

  17. Comparing Social Behaviour across Culture and Nations: The "What" and "Why" Questions

    Akande, Adebowale

    2009-01-01

    How is the cultural construct of individualism-collectivism related to self-esteem? This is a complex and challenging proposition. Self-esteem (i.e., a person's global, evaluative view of his/her self), has resisted unequivocal definition or clear operationalization. There is a substantial literature on self-esteem hypothesis which may be stated…

  18. The influence of national culture on cooperative attitudes in high-technology start-ups

    Ulijn, J.M.; Frankort, J.T.W.; Uhlaner, L.M.; Ulijn, J.M.; Drillon, D; Lasch, F

    2007-01-01

    The main focus of this chapter is the concept of cooperation by hightechnology start-ups or HTSUs and in particular, the influence that culture may have upon attitudes that may predict cooperative behaviour. HTSUs are defined in this chapter as young companies whose aim is to produce technologically

  19. Cross-national differences in happiness: cultural bias or societal quality?

    R. Veenhoven (Ruut); P. Ouweneel (Piet)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractThere are sizeable differences in happiness between countries. These differences are consistent across indicators and quite stable through time. There is a little support for the view that these differences are due to "cultural bias". In test performed here do not suggest that a great

  20. Giving Voice to Our First Nations: Creating a Framework for Indigenous Interpretation at Cultural Heritage Sites

    Runnels, Chay; Abbott, Judy; Laird, Shelby Gull; Causin, Gina; Stephens-Williams, Pat; Coble, Theresa; Ross, Sara

    2018-01-01

    The Indigenous voice may be muted or lost at complex and controversial cultural heritage sites, but barriers to interpreting these sites can be bridged through collaboration and co-creation. This process necessitates a long-term investment by both the sites and stakeholders. Lessons learned from this experience can serve as a framework for…

  1. Development of Education Programs in Mountainous Regions to Enhance the Culture and Knowledge of Minority Nationalities.

    Wei, Shiyuan; Zhou, Guangda

    1989-01-01

    Describes the historical development of educational programs which could enhance the culture and knowledge of minorities in the mountainous regions of China. Identifies current major problems in minority education and lists statistical information for the school population. Provides guidelines for developing a minority education program. (KO)

  2. 78 FR 58539 - National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services (CLAS) in Health and...

    2013-09-24

    ... to quality care and individual factors such as limited resources. Lack of health equity has a... are substantial increases in provider knowledge and skill acquisition and improvements in provider... Prohibition Against National Origin Discrimination Affecting Limited [[Page 58543

  3. Culture and National Well-Being: Should Societies Emphasize Freedom or Constraint?

    Harrington, Jesse R; Boski, Pawel; Gelfand, Michele J

    2015-01-01

    Throughout history and within numerous disciplines, there exists a perennial debate about how societies should best be organized. Should they emphasize individual freedom and autonomy or security and constraint? Contrary to proponents who tout the benefits of one over the other, we demonstrate across 32 nations that both freedom and constraint exhibit a curvilinear relationship with many indicators of societal well-being. Relative to moderate nations, very permissive and very constrained nations exhibit worse psychosocial outcomes (lower happiness, greater dysthymia, higher suicide rates), worse health outcomes (lower life expectancy, greater mortality rates from cardiovascular disease and diabetes) and poorer economic and political outcomes (lower gross domestic product per capita, greater risk for political instability). This supports the notion that a balance between freedom and constraint results in the best national outcomes. Accordingly, it is time to shift the debate away from either constraint or freedom and focus on both in moderation.

  4. Culture and National Well-Being: Should Societies Emphasize Freedom or Constraint?

    Jesse R Harrington

    Full Text Available Throughout history and within numerous disciplines, there exists a perennial debate about how societies should best be organized. Should they emphasize individual freedom and autonomy or security and constraint? Contrary to proponents who tout the benefits of one over the other, we demonstrate across 32 nations that both freedom and constraint exhibit a curvilinear relationship with many indicators of societal well-being. Relative to moderate nations, very permissive and very constrained nations exhibit worse psychosocial outcomes (lower happiness, greater dysthymia, higher suicide rates, worse health outcomes (lower life expectancy, greater mortality rates from cardiovascular disease and diabetes and poorer economic and political outcomes (lower gross domestic product per capita, greater risk for political instability. This supports the notion that a balance between freedom and constraint results in the best national outcomes. Accordingly, it is time to shift the debate away from either constraint or freedom and focus on both in moderation.

  5. Assessing the Impact of the National Cultural Framework on Responsible Corporate Behaviour towards Consumers: an Application of Geert Hofstede`s Cultural Model

    Cristina Gănescu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to define and measure responsible corporate behaviour towards consumers in EU countries by defining an index of responsible corporate behaviour towards consumers and to establish the impact of Geert Hofstede's cultural dimensions on the responsible behaviour of organisations towards consumers. The index uses a specific measurement methodology based on three major components of responsible corporate behaviour towards customers and on content analysis of the Eurostat databases, the RAPEX 2012 Annual Report, the 2012-2013 Global Competitiveness Report and the Global Reporting Initiative database. We used the multifactorial regression and the Wald significance test to demonstrate that organisations operating in countries characterised by low power distance, individualism, femininity, tolerance of unknown and long-term orientation pay more attention to responsible corporate behaviour towards customers. The study highlights theoretical considerations that support the influence of the national cultural framework on responsible corporate behaviour towards consumers. The methodology for calculating the index of responsible corporate behaviour towards consumers can become a basis of analysis of responsible corporate behaviour towards local consumers or other stakeholders.

  6. A Change in Team Culture Towards an Autonomy Supportive Working Environment - A Case Study of the Finnish Women’s National Ice Hockey Team

    Andler, Martin

    2017-01-01

    This study presents how the change in team culture has impacted the Finnish Women’s National Ice Hockey Team. The structure of the study is based on the self-determination theory, autonomy supportive coaching and change in team culture. The sub chapters’ focus on motivation, the coaches' and athletes' role within the autonomy supportive team working environment, autonomous goal setting and transformational leadership. The subchapter for cultural change is focused on the complex on-going proce...

  7. A Case Study of Culturally Relevant School-Based Programming for First Nations Youth: Improved Relationships, Confidence and Leadership, and School Success

    Crooks, Claire V.; Burleigh, Dawn; Snowshoe, Angela; Lapp, Andrea; Hughes, Ray; Sisco, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Schools are expected to promote social and emotional learning skills among youth; however, there is a lack of culturally-relevant programming available. The Fourth R: Uniting Our Nations programs for Aboriginal youth include strengths-based programs designed to promote healthy relationships and cultural connectedness, and improve school success…

  8. National Register of Historic Places multiple property documentation form -- Historic, archaeological, and traditional cultural properties of the Hanford Site, Washington

    Nickens, P.R.

    1997-08-01

    The US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site encompasses an area of 560 square miles on the Columbia River in southeastern Washington. Since 1943, the Hanford Site has existed as a protected area for activities primarily related to the production of radioactive materials for national defense uses. For cultural resources on the Hanford Site, establishment of the nuclear reservation as a high security area, with public access restricted, has resulted in a well-protected status, although no deliberate resource protection measures were in effect to mitigate effects of facilities construction and associated activities. Thus, the Hanford Site contains an extensive record of aboriginal archaeological sites and Native American cultural properties, along with pre-Hanford Euro-American sites (primarily archaeological in nature with the removal of most pre-1943 structures), and a considerable number of Manhattan Project/Cold War era buildings and structures. The recent mission change from production to clean up and disposal of DOE lands created a critical need for development and implementation of new and different cultural resource management strategies. DOE-RL has undertaken a preservation planning effort for the Hanford Site. The intent of this Plan is to enable DOE-RL to organize data and develop goals, objectives, and priorities for the identification, evaluation, registration, protection, preservation, and enhancement of the Site`s historical and cultural properties. Decisions made about the identification, evaluation, registration and treatment of historic properties are most aptly made when relationships between individual properties and other similar properties are considered. The historic context and the multiple property documentation (NTD) process provides DOE-RL the organizational framework for these decisions. Once significant patterns are identified, contexts developed, and expected properties are defined, the NTD process provides the foundation for future

  9. Culture and Well-Being: A New Inquiry Into the Psychological Wealth of Nations.

    Oishi, Shigehiro; Schimmack, Ulrich

    2010-07-01

    What is a good society? Philosophers from Plato to Bentham have argued that a good society is a happy society-namely, a society in which most citizens are happy and free from fear. Since the publication of The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith in 1776, most economists have implicitly assumed that a happy society is a materially wealthy society. Thus, gross national product and related indices became the most popular indicators of the well-being of nations from the 1950s to date. Recently, however, prominent economists as well as political scientists, sociologists, and psychologists have shown that a happy society is not only a materially wealthy society but also a society in which citizens can trust one another, have a sense of freedom, and have close social relationships. The inquiry into the psychological wealth of nations, or the subjective well-being of nations, helps answer a fundamental question in philosophy and social sciences for millennia: "What is a good society?" © The Author(s) 2010.

  10. Cultural Differences, Behavior and Assimilation: Player Nationality and Penalties in Football

    Schokkaert, Jeroen; De Luca, Giacomo; Swinnen, Jo

    2011-01-01

    We examine the impact of a different cultural background on individual behavior, focusing on the aggressiveness level of southern and nothern European football players in the English Premier League. We find that southern European football players collect on average more yellow and red cards as compared to their nothern European colleagues. We also find that the initially more aggressive football violent behavior displayed by southern European players coverges towards the local average, the lo...

  11. Cultural Differences, Assimilation and Behavior: Player Nationality and Penalties in Football

    De Luca, Giacomo; Schokkaert, Jeroen; Swinnen, Johan F. M.

    2011-01-01

    We examine the impact of a different cultural background on individual behavior, focusing on violence on the football field of southern European and nothern European football players in the English Premier League. We find that southern European football players collect on average more football penalties than their nothern European colleagues. We also find that the initially higher number of football penalties incurred by southern European players converges towards the local average, the longe...

  12. Post-Materialism as a Cultural Factor Influencing Entrepreneurial Activity across Nations

    Uhlaner, L.M.; Thurik, A.R.; Hutjes, J.

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe study of the determinants of entrepreneurship at the country level has been dominated by economic influences. The relative stability of differences in levels of entrepreneurship across coun-tries suggests that other forces such as certain institutional and/or cultural factors are at play. The objective of this paper is to explore how post-materialism explains differences in entrepreneurial activity across countries. Entrepreneurial activity is defined as the percent of a count...

  13. Cultural Memory Inscribed in the Skin: Symbols of Nation as Tattoo Art in New Zealand

    Claudia Bell

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In New Zealand there is a strand of cultural memory popularly known as 'kiwiana'. The term embraces everyday popular cultural practices - beach activities in summer, food rituals  - as well as an array of vintage artefacts.  The latter are locally manufactured items originating mainly in the 1940s-50s, when import restrictions limited the availability of household goods.  Local makers created products for the domestic market, for instance grocery items (and their logo-bearing containers, household crockery and toys. Those items, intrinsically representations of white (pakeha culture, are fondly recalled by the baby boomers, and have become popular collectibles.  Images of the same items have now become prevalent as decorative motifs on home wares and clothing.Recently a further celebratory strand of kiwiana has now appeared: the inscription of its motifs as extensive permanent skin tattoos. While Maori have always practiced meaningful skin tattoo, and whilst body tattoos in general have joined the realm of fashion, this is something new.  Here we see a recasting of the kiwiana images of popular cultural memory, now drawn onto the body.  One wearer of such a tattoo, a 26 year old plumber, said 'I love New Zealand. I am very proud of who we are and I wouldn't change being a kiwi for the world'. His design, a map of New Zealand on his back in filled with kiwiana items, shows his personal subscription to the populist representations that are utilised as apolitical definition of kiwi­ ness.  Kiwiana tattoo as a growing everyday practice is the focus of this paper.

  14. Safeguards Culture

    Frazar, Sarah L.; Mladineo, Stephen V.

    2012-07-01

    The concepts of nuclear safety and security culture are well established; however, a common understanding of safeguards culture is not internationally recognized. Supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration, the authors prepared this report, an analysis of the concept of safeguards culture, and gauged its value to the safeguards community. The authors explored distinctions between safeguards culture, safeguards compliance, and safeguards performance, and evaluated synergies and differences between safeguards culture and safety/security culture. The report concludes with suggested next steps.

  15. National character does not reflect mean persoanlity trait level in 49 cultures

    Abdel Khalek, A. M.; Adamovová, L.; Alansari, B. M.; Alcalay, L.; Allik, J.; Angleitner, A.; Avia, M. D.; Ayearst, L. E.; Barbaranelli, C.; Beer, A.; Bratko, D.; Brunner-Sciarra, M.; Budzinski, L.; Camart, N.; Dahourou, D.; De Fruyt, F.; Diener, E.; Falzon, R.; Fernardo Rodríguez, A.; Ficková, E.; Fischer, R.; Flores-Mendoza, C.; Ghayur, M. A.; Gülgöz, S.; Halim, M. S.; Hřebíčková, Martina; Humrichouse, J.; Jensen, H. H.; Jónsson, F. H.; Khoury, B.; Klinkosz, W.; Kneževič, G.; Lauri, M. A.; Leibovich, N. B.; Martin, T. A.; Marušić, I.; Mastor, K. A.; Matsumoto, D.; McRorie, M.; Mortensen, E. L.; Munyae, M.; Nagy, J.; Nakazato, K.; Nansubuga, F.; Oishi, S.; Ojedokun, A. O.; Ostendorf, F.; Petot, J.-M.; Porrata, J.; Pramila, V.S.; Prentice, G.; Realo, A.; Reátegui, N.; Rolland, J. P.; Rossier, J.; Ruch, W.; Rus, V. S.; Sánches-Bernardos, M. L.; Sekowski, A.; Shakespeare-Finch, J.; Shimonaka, Y.; Simonetti, F.; Sineshaw, T.; Trobst, K. K.; Yik, M.; Zupancic, A.; McCrae, R. R.; Borg Cunen, M. A.; Wang, L.; Siuta, J.; Smith, P.B.; Terracciano, A.; Trapnell, P.D.; Ádám, N.; Ahn, C.; De Lima, M.P.; Scicluna Calleja, S.; Del Pilar, G.E.H.; Podobnik, M.; Pelevin, S.; Hagberg, B.; Paulhus, D.L.; Meshcheriakov, B.; Jocic, D.D.; Halberstadt, J.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 310, č. 5745 (2005), s. 96-100 ISSN 0036-8075 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA406/01/1507 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70250504 Keywords : national character * personality * stereotypes Subject RIV: AN - Psychology Impact factor: 30.927, year: 2005

  16. Are national levels of employee harassment cultural covariations of climato-economic conditions?

    Van de Vliert, Evert; Einarsen, Stale; Nielsen, Morten Birkeland

    2013-01-01

    Conflict in a workgroup turns into harassment if a group member is persistently confronted with negative acts with few possibilities to retaliate. Cross-national differences in such intragroup harassment are considerable but wait to be understood. In this study, survey data from 44,836 employees in

  17. Family migration in a cross-national perspective: The importance of institutional and cultural context

    Sergi Vidal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Migration rates of dual-earner couples are lower than those of male-breadwinner couples. We revisit this issue using a cross-national comparative perspective and examine heterogeneity in the role of female employment in couple relocations. We propose a theoretical framework in which national levels of support for female employment and normative expectations about gender roles act as moderators of the relationship between couple type (i.e., dual-earner and male-breadwinner and family migration. Methods: We deploy discrete-time event history analyses of harmonised longitudinal data from four large-scale datasets from Australia, Britain, Germany, and Sweden, covering the 1992-2011 period. Results: Consistent with prior research, we find that male-breadwinner couples migrate more often than dual-earner couples in all countries, suggesting that traditional gender structures affecting family migration operate across very different contexts. We also find cross-country differences in the estimated effects of different sorts of absolute and relative partner resources on family migration. Conclusions: We take our results as preliminary evidence that national contexts can serve as moderators of the relationship between within-couple employment arrangements and family migration decisions. Contribution: Our study contributes to family migration literature by illustrating how cross-national comparisons are a valuable methodological approach to put prevailing micro-level explanations of the relationship between female employment and family migration in context.

  18. Resisting "National Breast Cancer Awareness Month": The Rhetoric of Counterpublics and Their Cultural Performances

    Pezzullo, Phaedra C.

    2003-01-01

    Since 1984, October has been recognized in the U.S. as National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. In 1997, the Toxic Links Coalition of the Bay Area, California, began organizing annual "Stop Cancer Where It Starts" tours to counter attempts to obscure the environmentally-linked causes of cancer. By drawing on research including participant…

  19. The Participation of Our Schools in the Defense and Diffusion of National Culture

    Cassanova, Manuel Gonzales

    1977-01-01

    Recounts a paper presented to the 18th Congress of the Centre International De Liaison Des Ecoles De Cinema et Television (CILECT) in 1976. Contends that American interests are infiltrating countries which are unable to defend against such threats to their national identity and analyzes "Sesame Street" to illustrate this contention. (MH)

  20. The impact of national, corporate and professional cultures on innovation : German and Dutch firms compared

    Ulijn, J.M.; Nagel, A.P.; Liang, T.W.

    2001-01-01

    Innovation literature advocates the transition from a technological orientation to market orientation on the part of innovator and entrepreneur. However, the transition requires a change in mindset on the part of these innovation agents, who may be affected by their national contexts. This paper

  1. Building a World-Class Safety Culture: The National Ignition Facility and the Control of Human and Organizational Error

    Bennett, C T; Stalnaker, G

    2002-01-01

    Accidents in complex systems send us signals. They may be harbingers of a catastrophe. Some even argue that a ''normal'' consequence of operations in a complex organization may not only be the goods it produces, but also accidents and--inevitably--catastrophes. We would like to tell you the story of a large, complex organization, whose history questions the argument ''that accidents just happen.'' Starting from a less than enviable safety record, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has accumulated over 2.5 million safe hours. The story of NIF is still unfolding. The facility is still being constructed and commissioned. But the steps NIF has taken in achieving its safety record provide a principled blueprint that may be of value to others. Describing that principled blueprint is the purpose of this paper. The first part of this paper is a case study of NIF and its effort to achieve a world-class safety record. This case study will include a description of (1) NIF's complex systems, (2) NIF's early safety history, (3) factors that may have initiated its safety culture change, and (4) the evolution of its safety blueprint. In the last part of the paper, we will compare NIF's safety culture to what safety industry experts, psychologists, and sociologists say about how to shape a culture and control organizational error

  2. Mentoring Faculty: A US National Survey of Its Adequacy and Linkage to Culture in Academic Health Centers.

    Pololi, Linda H; Evans, Arthur T; Civian, Janet T; Vasiliou, Vasilia; Coplit, Lisa D; Gillum, Linda H; Gibbs, Brian K; Brennan, Robert T

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to (1) describe the quantity and quality of mentoring faculty in US academic health centers (AHCs), (2) measure associations between mentoring and 12 dimensions that reflect the culture of AHCs, and (3) assess whether mentoring predicts seriously contemplating leaving one's institution. During 2007-2009, our National Initiative on Gender, Culture and Leadership in Medicine (C - Change) conducted a cross-sectional study of faculty from 26 representative AHCs in the United States using the 74-item C - Change Faculty Survey to assess relationships of faculty characteristics and various aspects of the institutional culture (52% response rate). Among the 2178 eligible respondents (assistant, associate, and full professors), we classified their mentoring experience as either inadequate, neutral, or positive. In this national sample, 43% of the 2178 respondents had inadequate mentoring; only 30% had a positive assessment of mentoring. There was no statistical difference by sex, minority status, or rank. Inadequate mentoring was most strongly associated with less institutional support, lower self-efficacy in career advancement, and lower scores on the trust/relationship/inclusion scale. The percent of faculty who had seriously considered leaving their institution was highest among those who had inadequate mentoring (58%), compared to those who were neutral (28%) or had positive mentoring (14%) (all paired comparisons, p mentoring was frequently inadequate and this was associated with faculty contemplating leaving their institutions. Positive mentoring, although less prevalent, was associated with many other positive dimensions of AHCs. © 2015 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on Continuing Medical Education, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  3. Neoliberalism and indigenous knowledge: Māori health research and the cultural politics of New Zealand's "National Science Challenges".

    Prussing, Erica; Newbury, Elizabeth

    2016-02-01

    In 2012-13 the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) in New Zealand rapidly implemented a major restructuring of national scientific research funding. The "National Science Challenges" (NSC) initiative aims to promote greater commercial applications of scientific knowledge, reflecting ongoing neoliberal reforms in New Zealand. Using the example of health research, we examine the NSC as a key moment in ongoing indigenous Māori advocacy against neoliberalization. NSC rhetoric and practice through 2013 moved to marginalize participation by Māori researchers, in part through constructing "Māori" and "science" as essentially separate arenas-yet at the same time appeared to recognize and value culturally distinctive forms of Māori knowledge. To contest this "neoliberal multiculturalism," Māori health researchers reasserted the validity of culturally distinctive knowledge, strategically appropriated NSC rhetoric, and marshalled political resources to protect Māori research infrastructure. By foregrounding scientific knowledge production as an arena of contestation over neoliberal values and priorities, and attending closely to how neoliberalizing tactics can include moves to acknowledge cultural diversity, this analysis poses new questions for social scientific study of global trends toward reconfiguring the production of knowledge about health. Study findings are drawn from textual analysis of MBIE documents about the NSC from 2012 to 2014, materials circulated by Māori researchers in the blogosphere in 2014, and ethnographic interviews conducted in 2013 with 17 Māori health researchers working at 7 sites that included university-based research centers, government agencies, and independent consultancies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Do you see what I see? Effects of national culture on employees' safety-related perceptions and behavior.

    Casey, Tristan W; Riseborough, Karli M; Krauss, Autumn D

    2015-05-01

    Growing international trade and globalization are increasing the cultural diversity of the modern workforce, which often results in migrants working under the management of foreign leadership. This change in work arrangements has important implications for occupational health and safety, as migrant workers have been found to be at an increased risk of injuries compared to their domestic counterparts. While some explanations for this discrepancy have been proposed (e.g., job differences, safety knowledge, and communication difficulties), differences in injury involvement have been found to persist even when these contextual factors are controlled for. We argue that employees' national culture may explain further variance in their safety-related perceptions and safety compliance, and investigate this through comparing the survey responses of 562 Anglo and Southern Asian workers at a multinational oil and gas company. Using structural equation modeling, we firstly established partial measurement invariance of our measures across cultural groups. Estimation of the combined sample structural model revealed that supervisor production pressure was negatively related to willingness to report errors and supervisor support, but did not predict safety compliance behavior. Supervisor safety support was positively related to both willingness to report errors and safety compliance. Next, we uncovered evidence of cultural differences in the relationships between supervisor production pressure, supervisor safety support, and willingness to report errors; of note, among Southern Asian employees the negative relationship between supervisor production pressure and willingness to report errors was stronger, and for supervisor safety support, weaker as compared to the model estimated with Anglo employees. Implications of these findings for safety management in multicultural teams within the oil and gas industry are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. How to create national foresight culture and capacity: case study South Africa

    Hietanen, O

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available much dependent on technical access but rather on what one can do with the technology. (Ibid.) In the initial phase of information society development, the Finnish national economy made money through technology (mobile phones, electronic machines... by the specialists. During the last stage of sieving, the analysed value discussion (futures information) is transformed into action, in other words making the future (Fig. 3). (Hietanen & Kaivo-oja 2005) Figure 3. PROACTIVE WORK OR THE STAKEHOLDER4 Value...

  6. Does culture matter?: a cross-national investigation of women's responses to cancer prevention campaigns.

    Han, Kyoo-Hoon; Jo, Samsup

    2012-01-01

    We examined how culture influences the persuasive effects of health campaigns that promote early screening for cancers that occur in women. Two message dimensions were included: individualistic vs. collectivistic appeal and gain vs. loss frame. A total of 955 females from three countries-the United States, South Korea, and Japan-participated in the experiment. From the results, we found that message framing alone did not significantly influence the effectiveness of public campaigns for women's cancer prevention; and this tendency was similar across the three countries. Gain-framed messages are likely to be more persuasive when combined with a collectivistic appeal, however, whereas loss-framed messages tend to be more effective when combined with an individualistic appeal in both the United States and South Korea; but this result was not the case for Japan. Based on the findings, we suggested theoretical and managerial implications as well as several directions for future research.

  7. Cultural Resource Investigations for a Multipurpose Haul Road on the Idaho National Laboratory

    Brenda R. Pace; Cameron Brizzee; Hollie Gilbert; Clayton Marler; Julie Braun Williams

    2010-08-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is considering options for construction of a multipurpose haul road to transport materials and wastes between the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) and other Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site facilities. The proposed road will be closed to the public and designed for limited year-round use. Two primary options are under consideration: a new route south of the existing T-25 power line road and an upgrade to road T-24. In the Spring of 2010, archaeological field surveys and initial coordination and field reconnaissance with representatives from the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes were completed to identify any resources that may be adversely affected by the proposed road construction and to develop recommendations to protect any listed or eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. The investigations showed that 24 archaeological resources and one historic marker are located in the area of potential effects for road construction and operation south of the T-25 powerline road and 27archaeological resources are located in the area of potential effects for road construction and operation along road T-24. Generalized tribal concerns regarding protection of natural resources were also documented in both road corridors. This report outlines recommendations for additional investigations and protective measures that can be implemented to minimize adverse impacts to the identified resources.

  8. Nation

    Østergaard, Uffe

    2014-01-01

    Nation er et gammelt begreb, som kommer af det latinske ord for fødsel, natio. Nationalisme bygger på forestillingen om, at mennesker har én og kun én national identitet og har ret til deres egen nationalstat. Ordet og forestillingen er kun godt 200 år gammel, og i 1900-tallet har ideologien bredt...

  9. JOURNALISTIC COMPETENCE AS A CONDITION OF FORMATION EROTIC CULTURE IN NATIONAL JOURNALISM

    Andrey Evgenevich Petropavlovsky

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the article:- analysis of the professional competence of  Russian journalists in the erotic industry;- a comparison of the factors affecting the development of professionalism in the erotic themes in Russian journalism;- formulation of the criteria to be met by a modern journalist while covering an erotic theme.The novelty of this work lies in the fact that the value of erotic themes in modern journalism is a problem little studied by science.In the article the following conclusions.The importance of competence journalist on erotic themes in coverage erotic sphere is a scientific problem.The question of raising the level of training of journalists in educational institutions in view of specialization is very relevant in Russia.Covering and analysis erotic culture of modern Russia should only highly competent media professionals.In modern Russia journalism often refers to the erotic category just for economic gain. Professional and competent journalist can find a compromise between the financial side and the quality coverage of the problem.

  10. The National and University Library in Ljubljana - the intersection of Time and Cultures

    Marko Mušič

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available As any important architectural work, the libraries from the distant past are vivid organisms that bear in themselves the biological, historical and humanistic experience. Those who live with, and use, such architecture feel its spiritual energy and its vital palpitation. The space accepts them and through symbols and rituals it passes on their idea; it passes on the situation today, however, this is performed from its yesterday's and tomorrow's position. Therefore, good library architecture does not follow changes in trends and fashion, but lives its own time in the continuum of historical consciousness, revealing the spirit and importance of its existence. In the architectural Renaissance taking place during the last years libraries became exactly the same as the important buildings throughout history used to be. They are prestigious architectural achievements that became the visual and symbolic signs of national pride, the cathedrals of our days.

  11. WE-G-BRA-03: Developing a Culture of Patient Safety Utilizing the National Radiation Oncology Incident Learning System (ROILS)

    Hasson, B; Workie, D; Geraghty, C [Anne Arundel Medical Center, Annapolis, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To transition from an in-house incident reporting system to a ROILS standards system with the intent to develop a safety focused culture in the Department and enroll in ROILS. Methods: Since the AAPM Safety Summit (2010) several safety and reporting systems have been implemented within the Department. Specific checklists and SBAR reporting systems were introduced. However, the active learning component was lost due to reporting being viewed with distrust and possible retribution.To Facilitate introducing ROILS each leader in the Department received a copy of the ROILS participation guide. Four specific tasks were assigned to each leader: develop a reporting tree, begin the ROILS based system, facilitate adopting ROILS Terminology, and educate the staff on expectations of safety culture. Next, the ROILS questions were broken down into area specific questions (10–15) per departmental area. Excel spreadsheets were developed for each area and setup for error reporting entries. The Role of the Process Improvement Committee (PI) has been modified to review and make recommendations based on the ROILS entries. Results: The ROILS based Reporting has been in place for 4 months. To date 64 reports have been entered. Since the adoption of ROILS the reporting of incidents has increased from 2/month to 18/month on average. Three reports had a dosimetric effect on the patient (<5%) dose variance. The large majority of entries have been Characterized as Processes not followed or not sure how to Characterize, and Human Behavior. Conclusion: The majority of errors are typo’s that create confusion. The introduction of the ROILS standards has provided a platform for making changes to policies that increase patient safety. The goal is to develop a culture that sees reporting at a national level as a safe and effective way to improve our safety, and to dynamically learn from other institutions reporting.

  12. WE-G-BRA-03: Developing a Culture of Patient Safety Utilizing the National Radiation Oncology Incident Learning System (ROILS)

    Hasson, B; Workie, D; Geraghty, C

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To transition from an in-house incident reporting system to a ROILS standards system with the intent to develop a safety focused culture in the Department and enroll in ROILS. Methods: Since the AAPM Safety Summit (2010) several safety and reporting systems have been implemented within the Department. Specific checklists and SBAR reporting systems were introduced. However, the active learning component was lost due to reporting being viewed with distrust and possible retribution.To Facilitate introducing ROILS each leader in the Department received a copy of the ROILS participation guide. Four specific tasks were assigned to each leader: develop a reporting tree, begin the ROILS based system, facilitate adopting ROILS Terminology, and educate the staff on expectations of safety culture. Next, the ROILS questions were broken down into area specific questions (10–15) per departmental area. Excel spreadsheets were developed for each area and setup for error reporting entries. The Role of the Process Improvement Committee (PI) has been modified to review and make recommendations based on the ROILS entries. Results: The ROILS based Reporting has been in place for 4 months. To date 64 reports have been entered. Since the adoption of ROILS the reporting of incidents has increased from 2/month to 18/month on average. Three reports had a dosimetric effect on the patient (<5%) dose variance. The large majority of entries have been Characterized as Processes not followed or not sure how to Characterize, and Human Behavior. Conclusion: The majority of errors are typo’s that create confusion. The introduction of the ROILS standards has provided a platform for making changes to policies that increase patient safety. The goal is to develop a culture that sees reporting at a national level as a safe and effective way to improve our safety, and to dynamically learn from other institutions reporting

  13. Work life and patient safety culture in Canadian healthcare: connecting the quality dots using national accreditation results.

    Mitchell, Jonathan I

    2012-01-01

    Fostering quality work life is paramount to building a strong patient safety culture in healthcare organizations. Data from two patient safety culture and work-life questionnaires used for Accreditation Canada's national program were analyzed. Strong team leadership was reported in that units were doing a good job of identifying, assessing and managing risks to patients. Seventy-one percent of respondents gave their unit a positive overall grade on patient safety, and 79% of respondents felt that they could often do their best-quality work in their job. However, healthcare workers felt that they did not have enough time to do their jobs adequately and indicated that co-workers were cutting corners in patient care in order to save time. This article discusses engaging both senior leadership and the entire organization in the change process, ensuring supervisory support, and using performance measures to focus organizational efforts on key priorities all as improvement strategies relevant to these findings. These strategies can be used by organizations across sectors and jurisdictions and by healthcare leaders to positively affect work life and patient safety.

  14. The Qatar National Historic Environment Record: a Platform for the Development of a Fully-Integrated Cultural Heritage Management Application

    Cuttler, R. T. H.; Tonner, T. W. W.; Al-Naimi, F. A.; Dingwall, L. M.; Al-Hemaidi, N.

    2013-07-01

    The development of the Qatar National Historic Environment Record (QNHER) by the Qatar Museums Authority and the University of Birmingham in 2008 was based on a customised, bilingual Access database and ArcGIS. While both platforms are stable and well supported, neither was designed for the documentation and retrieval of cultural heritage data. As a result it was decided to develop a custom application using Open Source code. The core module of this application is now completed and is orientated towards the storage and retrieval of geospatial heritage data for the curation of heritage assets. Based on MIDAS Heritage data standards and regionally relevant thesauri, it is a truly bilingual system. Significant attention has been paid to the user interface, which is userfriendly and intuitive. Based on a suite of web services and accessed through a web browser, the system makes full use of internet resources such as Google Maps and Bing Maps. The application avoids long term vendor ''tie-ins'' and as a fully integrated data management system, is now an important tool for both cultural resource managers and heritage researchers in Qatar.

  15. Cross-cultural adaptation of the "Australian National University Alzheimer's Disease Risk Index" for the Brazilian population.

    Borges, Marcus Kiiti; Jacinto, Alessandro Ferrari; Citero, Vanessa de Albuquerque

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) represents a major public health problem and it is therefore crucial that modifiable risk factors be known prior to onset of dementia in late-life. The "Australian National University - Alzheimer's Disease Risk Index" (ANU-ADRI) is one of the potential tools for primary prevention of the disease. The aim of this study was to devise an adapted version of the ANU-ADRI for use in Brazil. The instrument was translated from its original language of English into Portuguese and then back-translated into English by bilingual translators. It was subsequently reviewed and evaluated as to the degree of translation issues and equivalence. In this study, the ANU-ADRI was applied using individual (face-to-face) interviews in a public hospital, unlike the original version which is applied online by self-report. The final version (pretest) was evaluated in a sample of 10 participants with a mean age of 60 years (±11.46) and mean education of 11 years (±6.32). The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) (inter-rater) was 0.954 (P<0.001 for a confidence interval (CI) of 95%=[0.932; 0.969]). Cultural equivalence was performed without the need for a second instrument application step. After cross-cultural adaptation, the language of the resultant questionnaire was deemed easily understandable by the Brazilian population.

  16. Cross-cultural adaptation of the "Australian National University Alzheimer's Disease Risk Index" for the Brazilian population

    Marcus Kiiti Borges

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Alzheimer's disease (AD represents a major public health problem and it is therefore crucial that modifiable risk factors be known prior to onset of dementia in late-life. The "Australian National University - Alzheimer's Disease Risk Index" (ANU-ADRI is one of the potential tools for primary prevention of the disease. Objective: The aim of this study was to devise an adapted version of the ANU-ADRI for use in Brazil. Methods: The instrument was translated from its original language of English into Portuguese and then back-translated into English by bilingual translators. It was subsequently reviewed and evaluated as to the degree of translation issues and equivalence. In this study, the ANU-ADRI was applied using individual (face-to-face interviews in a public hospital, unlike the original version which is applied online by self-report. The final version (pretest was evaluated in a sample of 10 participants with a mean age of 60 years (±11.46 and mean education of 11 years (±6.32. Results: The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC (inter-rater was 0.954 (P<0.001 for a confidence interval (CI of 95%=[0.932; 0.969]. Cultural equivalence was performed without the need for a second instrument application step. Conclusion: After cross-cultural adaptation, the language of the resultant questionnaire was deemed easily understandable by the Brazilian population.

  17. Inculcating the ergonomic culture in developing countries: national healthy schoolbag initiative in Sri Lanka.

    Jayaratne, Kapila

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this article is to describe a survey on ergonomic factors of classroom environments of school children, their influence on health, and use of research outcomes to launch a healthy schoolbag initiative. Ergonomics have not yet well penetrated relevant fields in industrially developing countries, such as Sri Lanka. One of the crucial parameters of the school environment is ergonomics. Available evidence suggests ergonomic mismatches in classroom settings. Good practice examples in child ergonomic interventions are few in resource-poor contexts. A school-based cross-sectional study was conducted in a district in Sri Lanka with a sample of 1,607 children in Grades 6 to 8 with the use of a stratified multistage cluster sampling method. Many children did experience discomfort related to substandard seating arrangements in the classroom. A significant proportion had to turn their necks to see the blackboard. For many children, seating locations were not changed. There were widespread incompatibilities of classroom furniture with anthropometric dimensions of children. A majority of children perceived discomfort contributed by mismatched classroom furniture. Carriage of school materials was not healthy. Deficiencies were noted in weight, model, ergonomic features, and carrying behavior of bags. Children experienced several negative effects, in part attributable to mismatched ergonomic factors. The schoolbag was considered a priority issue. Findings were disseminated to stakeholders and to media. Solutions were contemplated on bag weight reduction, healthy schoolbag introduction, and behavior change in a collaborative initiative with the Education Ministry. Political, administrative, and business stakeholders were successfully engaged to inculcate an ergonomic culture in an industrially developing country.

  18. NATIONAL CULTURE AND ENTREPRENEURIAL INTENT: CASE STUDY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF TÉBESSA (ALGERIA AND THE UNIVERSITY OF CRAIOVA (ROMANIA

    Soufyane BADRAOUI

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to understand and investigate the relationship between entrepreneurial intent and national culture in a post-socialist context. Currently, in Post-Socialist societies that have experienced a wave of economic reforms and a process of transition to the liberal economy, such as Algeria and Romania. The importance of entrepreneurship is in their vitality in the dynamics of development, and that is the significance of testing and understanding the entrepreneurial intentions of the students in connection with the local and/or national culture in Algeria and Romania.

  19. National education ideology as the orientation of the school culture development policy at SMA N 1 and SMA N 3 Yogyakarta

    Lusila Andriani Purwastuti

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at describing the national education ideology as the orientation of the school culture development policy at SMA N 1 and SMAN 3 Yogyakarta. This research employed the qualitative approach through ethnography method. The subjects of the research were the school community. The object was the implementation of Pancasila on the development of the school culture. The data were collected through interviews, observations, and documentation. The data were analyzed using ethnography analysis as suggested by Spradley and they were validated by data triangulation and member checks. The results show that the national education ideology as the orientation of the school culture development is understood: (1 as an open ideology; (2 implemented on the basis value; instrumental values; the value of practices in the school culture; (3 The school culture in SMA N 1 and SMA N 3 is the implementation and contextualization of the values of Pancasila, along with the uniqueness of SMA N 1 with its “Teladan” icon which represents the religious morality and intellectual, as well as at SMA N 3 with its “Padmanaba” icon representing noble behavior. (4  Both schools have developed the school culture, namely: religious morality, social-culture, intellectual, and environment/management/leadership.

  20. Culture as an explanation for substance-related problems: a cross-national study among French and Dutch adolescents.

    Knibbe, Ronald Arnold; Joosten, Jan; Choquet, Marie; Derickx, Mieke; Morin, Delphine; Monshouwer, Karin

    2007-02-01

    Our main goal was to establish whether French and Dutch adolescents differ in rates of substance-related adverse events (e.g. fights, robbery), problems with peers or socializing agents even when controlling for pattern of substance use. For problems with peers and socializing agents due to alcohol we hypothesized that, because of stronger informal control of drinking in France, French adolescents are more likely to report problems with peers and socializing agents. For adverse events due to alcohol no difference was expected after controlling for consumption patterns. For drug-related problems, the hypothesis was that, due to the more restrictive drug policy in France, French adolescents are more likely to report problems with peers, socializing agents and adverse events. Comparable surveys based on samples of adolescent schoolchildren in France (n=9646) and the Netherlands (n=4291) were used. Data were analysed using multilevel logistic regression in which school, age and gender, indicators of substance use and country were used as predictors of substance-related problems. The outcomes show that French adolescents are more likely to report problems with peers and socializing agents due to alcohol even when consumption pattern is controlled for. For adverse events due to alcohol no difference was found between French and Dutch adolescents. For drug-related problems the expected differences were found; i.e. French adolescents are more likely to report problems with peers, socializing agents and adverse events even when controlling for pattern of drug use. It is concluded that there are culturally embedded differences in the rates of some types of problems due to alcohol or drug use. With respect to alcohol use, these differences are most likely due to culturally embedded differences in the informal social control of alcohol use. The differences in rates of drug-related problems are interpreted in the context of national differences in drug policy.

  1. Linking well-being with cultural revitalization for greater cognitive justice in conservation: lessons from Venezuela in Canaima National Park

    Iokiñe Rodriguez

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Across the globe, conservation policies have often suppressed nonscientific forms of knowledge and ways of knowing nature, along with the social practices of the groups that are informed by such knowledge. Reversing this process of epistemic supremacy is crucial both for achieving greater cognitive justice in conservation areas and ensuring that conservation aims are achieved. Doing so, however, is not an easy task. In situations of cultural violence, hidden environmental knowledge is not easily made visible unless adequate conditions for it to emerge are created. I show that one way forward is by conservation engaging with the well-being agendas of indigenous people, in particular, with the construction of their life plans. This discussion is illustrated through a case study in Canaima National Park, Venezuela, where over the last 20 years, social-ecological research has been studying existing conflicts over the use of fire while supporting the development of Pemon (the indigenous peoples in this area Life Plans. Assisting in the development of life plans through participatory historical reconstructions, territorial self-demarcation processes, and facilitation of community reflexivity about its social-ecological changes and desired future has been decisive for the Pemon, and has revealed fire management knowledge that challenges conventional explanations of landscape change that simplistically place the blame for such changes on the local use of fire. This local knowledge, combined with results from studies of Pemon fire regimes, fire behavior ecology, and paleoecological research, now informs a counter narrative of landscape change that is influencing a shift in environmental discourse and policy-making toward an intercultural fire management approach. By documenting how social-ecological research has engaged with the Pemon Life Plan processes, I show the important role that cultural revitalization plays in making hidden and silenced local

  2. Cultural variation in seasonal depression: cross-national differences in winter versus summer patterns of seasonal affective disorder.

    Kasof, Joseph

    2009-05-01

    Research suggests that two dimensions of national culture, individualism-collectivism and power distance, predict affective responses to the seasonally varying levels of ambient sunlight that may underlie regular cycles of mood and behavior in Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). Specifically, negative affect is predicted by the diminished sunlight of fall-winter in countries higher in individualism and lower in power distance, and by the increased sunlight of spring-summer in countries lower in individualism and higher in power distance. This study tests whether individualism correlates positively, and power distance negatively, with the frequency of winter-SAD relative to that of summer-SAD. A search for studies reporting frequencies of both winter-SAD and summer-SAD identified 55 samples encompassing 18 countries and 38,408 participants, including 1931 with SAD. The frequency of winter-SAD, relative to that of summer-SAD, correlated positively with individualism (r=.67, p=.001) and negatively with power distance (r=-.72, p=.0001). Countries in which winter-SAD was more common than summer-SAD were significantly more individualistic and less power-distant than countries in which summer-SAD was more common than winter-SAD. Results survived various tests of threats to validity. The study is limited by the quantity, quality, diversity, and representativeness of the research under review and by its correlational design. Individualism and power distance are strongly related to the relative prevalence of winter-SAD and summer-SAD. Culture may play an important but previously overlooked role in the etiology of SAD.

  3. ‘The Union shall respect cultural diversity and national identities’ Lisbon’s concessions to Euroscepticism – true promises or a booby-trap?

    Aronstein, Irene

    2010-01-01

    Taking Euroscepticism that mainly concentrates on the tension between European integration and the preservation of cultural diversity and national identity as a point of departure, this contribution serves as a normative observation of the Lisbon Treaties' competences and procedures in relation to

  4. EnviroAtlas’s National Assessment of Cultural Ecosystem Services: Leveraging Social Media to Understand America’s Most Valued Landscapes

    While the United States is home to many special places that deliver numerous cultural ecosystem services (CES), there has yet to be a national assessment of these benefits. Identifying and characterizing locations that are appreciated for their beauty, opportunities for outdoor a...

  5. The impact of national culture in MNC's home country on the strategy making process in their overseas subsidiaries: a comparison between Dutch and Japanese companies in Thailand

    Meekanon, K.

    2002-01-01

    The main purpose of this dissertation is to understand that the national cultures of MNCs' home countries play an important role in determining the SMPs in their overseas subsidiaries. To attain this purpose, a comparison between Dutch and

  6. Espanola/Canjilon Pilot Study: Economic, social, and cultural aspects of public land grazing on the Santa Fe and Carson National Forests

    Carol Raish

    1999-01-01

    Many of the livestock grazing permittees on the Carson and Santa Fe National Forests in northern New Mexico are descendants of Hispanic settlers who have farmed and ranched in the region for 400 years. Much of the permitted land was formerly owned or used by local communities under Spanish and Mexican land grants. Cultural differences and historical issues of...

  7. Breaking ground in cross-cultural research on the fear of being laughted at (gelotophobia): A multi-national study involving 73 countries

    Proyer, R.T.; Ruch, W.; Ali, N.S.; Al-Olimat, H. S.; Amemiya, T.; Adal, T.A.; Ansari, S. A.; Arhar, Š.; Asem, G.; Baudin, N.; Bawab, S.; Bergen, D.; Brdar, I.; Brites, R.; Brunner-Sciarra, M.; Carrell, A.; Dios, H.C.; Celik, M.; Ceschi, G.; Chang, K.; Cheryomukhin, A.; Chik, M.P.Y.; Chlopicki, W.; Cranney, J.; Dahourou, D.; Doosje, S.; Dore, M.; El-Arousy, N.; Ficková, E.; Führ, M.; Gallivan, J.; Geling, H.; Germikova, L.; Goh, A.; Gonzáles, R.D.; Ho, S.K.; Hřebíčková, Martina; Jaime, B.; Hertzberg Kaare, B.; Kamble, S.; Kazarian, S.; Kerkkänen, P.; Klementová, M.; Kobozeva, I.M.; Kovjanic, S.; Kumaraswamy, N.; Lampert, M.; Liao, Ch.; Levesque, M.; Loizou, L.; Loving, R.D.; Lyttle, J.; Machline, V.C.; McGoldrick, S.; McRorie, M.; Min, L.; Mottus, R.; Munyae, M.; Navia, C.E.; Nkhalamba, M.; Pedrini, P.P.; Petkova, M.; Platt, T.; Popa, D-E.; Radomska, A.; Rashid, T.; Rawlings, D.; Rubio, V.J.; Samson, A.C.; Sarid, O.; Shams, S.; Sisokohm, S.; Smári, J.; Sneddon, I.; Snikhovska, I.; Stephanenko, E.A.; Stokenberga, L.; Stuer, B.; Tanoto, Y.S.R.; Tapia, L.; Taylor, J.; Thibault, P.; Thompson, A.; Thőrn, H.; Toyota, H.; Ujlaky, J.; Vanno, V.; van der Westhuizen, B.; Wijayathilake, D.; Wong, P.S.O.; Wycoff, E.B.; Yeun, E.J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 22, 1/2 (2009), s. 253-279 ISSN 0933-1719 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA406/07/1561 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70250504 Keywords : cross -cultural comparisons * gelotophobia * humor * multi-national study Subject RIV: AN - Psychology Impact factor: 0.771, year: 2009

  8. The National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics and Cultural Competence: What Does Anne Fadiman's The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down Teach Us Today?

    Hebenstreit, Haylee

    2017-05-01

    This article discusses limitations in the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Code of Ethics conceptualization of "cultural competence." It uses the case example presented in Anne Fadiman's classic (2012) work, The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down: A Hmong Child, Her American Doctors, and the Collision of Two Cultures, to explore the conventional markers of cultural competence, as taught in contemporary graduate-level social work education curricula, and their implications for socially just practice. Furthermore, it proposes that an expanded commitment to antiracist practice is necessary to deliver care and craft policies that, in the spirit of the NASW Code of Ethics, truly respect the "dignity and worth" of the individual. © 2017 National Association of Social Workers.

  9. "Second class loss": political culture as a recovery barrier--the families of terrorist casualties' struggle for national honors, recognition, and belonging.

    Lebel, Udi

    2014-01-01

    Israeli families of terrorist victims have undertaken initiatives to include their dearest in the national pantheon. The objections opposed the penetration of "second-class loss" into the symbolic closure of heroic national bereavement. The "hierarchy of bereavement" is examined through the lens of political culture organized around the veneration held for the army fallen and their families, which has symbolic as well as rehabilitative outcomes. Families of civilian terror victims claims for similar status and treatment had to frame their loss as national in the eyes of the social policy. The article claimed linkage between collective memory and rehabilitation.

  10. An investigation of sulfur concentrations in soils and pine needles in Chaco Culture National Historical Park, New Mexico

    Gladney, E.S.; Ferenbaugh, R.W.; Jones, E.A.; Bell, M.G.; Morgan, J.D.; Nelson, L.A.; Bowker, R.G.

    1993-03-01

    Sulfur measurements in different age groups of pinon pine needles and adjacent soil samples from ten sampling sites at Chaco Culture National Historical Park were determined using combustion elemental analysis and chromatographic techniques. The primary goal was to establish base-line levels for elemental sulfur in the Park. Sulfur levels in foliage and soils were evaluated using analysis of variance techniques. No significant differences were found in foliage sulfur concentrations among the 10 sampling sites; however, trees within sites were significantly different. Needles of different ages did not differ significantly in sulfur content. Average soil concentrations were low, approximately 30% of the average needle concentrations. Soil sulfur concentrations did not differ significantly among the 10 sampling sites; however, different depths in the soil had statistically different concentrations of sulfur. No statistical differences were evident in soils sampled at the four compass points (N,S,E,W) around each tree. These differences imply that large numbers of samples are needed to identify small effects from anthropogenic inputs of sulfur into the system or that the effects must be large relative to the differences among sampling sites and individual trees in order to be detected

  11. International Education Opportunities during the IHY: Bridging the Geographic, Cultural and Linguistic Divide between Participating IHY Nations

    Thompson, B.J.; Morrow, C.A.; Rabello-Soares, M.C.; Smith, R.W.

    2006-01-01

    Currently there are over 70 U.N. Member States participating in the International Heliophysical Year (IHY 2007- 8), and most of these nations do not use English as their primary language. The IHY contains four main program elements: Science, Observatory Development, Outreach, and History. For these elements to be successful, each requires successful communication within and adaptation for the individual member states. The IHY Outreach program contains many educational activities targeting a wide range of languages and contexts. The other three program elements, however, offer a means to extend the impact of the educational programs and reinforce educational activities. IHY's scientific activities involve partnerships with institutions and observatories, many of which have outreach activities in their local communities. Scientists and participation programs from around the world have begun translating materials into their local languages and adapting educational tools for use in their communities. IHY's Observatory Development program, which began deploying instrumentation worldwide in 2004, encourages a strong educational component to each new observatory site as a means of ensuring long-lasting viability of the research program. The history program gathers important information and educates the public about the development of space science. This presentation will discuss efforts occurring within the IHY program that support cross-cultural communication and education and present opportunities to reach new audiences.

  12. Compliance with National Ethics Requirements for Human-Subject Research in Non-biomedical Sciences in Brazil: A Changing Culture?

    de Albuquerque Rocha, Karina; Vasconcelos, Sonia M R

    2018-02-06

    Ethics regulation for human-subject research (HSR) has been established for about 20 years in Brazil. However, compliance with this regulation is controversial for non-biomedical sciences, particularly for human and social sciences (HSS), the source of a recent debate at the National Commission for Research Ethics. We hypothesized that for these fields, formal requirements for compliance with HSR regulation in graduate programs, responsible for the greatest share of Brazilian science, would be small in number. We analyzed institutional documents (collected from June 2014 to May 2015) from 171 graduate programs at six prestigious Brazilian universities in São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro, the states that fund most of the science conducted in Brazil. Among these programs, 149 were in HSS. The results suggest that non-compliance with standard regulation seems to be the rule in most of these programs. The data may reflect not only a resistance from scientists in these fields to comply with standard regulations for ethics in HSR but also a disciplinary tradition that seems prevalent when it comes to research ethics in HSR. However, recent encounters between Brazilian biomedical and non-biomedical scientists for debates over ethics in HSR point to a changing culture in the approach to research ethics in the country.

  13. International Education Opportunities During the IHY: Bridging the Geographic, Cultural and Linguistic Divide Between Participating IHY Nations

    Thompson, B. J.; Morrow, C. A.; Rabello-Soares, M. C.; Smith, R. W.

    2006-12-01

    Currently there are over 70 U.N. Member States participating in the International Heliophysical Year (IHY 2007- 8), and most of these nations do not use English as their primary language. The IHY contains four main program elements: Science, Observatory Development, Outreach, and History. For these elements to be successful, each requires successful communication within and adaptation for the individual member states. The IHY Outreach program contains many educational activities targetting a wide range of languages and contexts. The other three program elements, however, offer a means to extend the impact of the educational programs and reinforce educational activities. IHY's scientific activities involve partnerships with institutions and observatories, many of which have outreach activities in their local communities. Scientists and participation programs from around the world have begun translating materials into their local languages and adapting educational tools for use in their communities. IHY's Observatory Development program, which began deploying instrumentation worldwide in 2004, encourages a strong educational component to each new observatory site as a means of ensuring long-lasting viability of the research program. The history program gathers important information and educates the public about the development of space science. This presentation will discuss efforts occurring within the IHY program that support cross-cultural communication and education and present opportunities to reach new audiences.

  14. DoD Regional and Cultural Capabilities: The Way Ahead. The Regional and Cultural Expertise Summit: Building a Framework to Meet National Defense Challenges

    2007-01-01

    .... The Summit provided a forum for an enterprise-wide dialogue on the need to raise the bar on the Department's ability to better understand different cultures and societies and work more effectively...

  15. Cooperation without culture? The null effect of generalized trust on intentional homicide: a cross-national panel analysis, 1995-2009.

    Robbins, Blaine

    2013-01-01

    Sociologists, political scientists, and economists all suggest that culture plays a pivotal role in the development of large-scale cooperation. In this study, I used generalized trust as a measure of culture to explore if and how culture impacts intentional homicide, my operationalization of cooperation. I compiled multiple cross-national data sets and used pooled time-series linear regression, single-equation instrumental-variables linear regression, and fixed- and random-effects estimation techniques on an unbalanced panel of 118 countries and 232 observations spread over a 15-year time period. Results suggest that culture and large-scale cooperation form a tenuous relationship, while economic factors such as development, inequality, and geopolitics appear to drive large-scale cooperation.

  16. 78 FR 22282 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park...

    2013-04-15

    ... Hawaiian organizations, has determined that the cultural item listed in this notice meets [[Page 22283... Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim the cultural item should submit a... tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural...

  17. 78 FR 45964 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park...

    2013-07-30

    ... Hawaiian organizations, has determined that the cultural item listed in this notice meets the definition of... control of the cultural item to the lineal descendants, Indian tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations... Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim the cultural item should...

  18. ‘The Union shall respect cultural diversity and national identities’
    Lisbon’s concessions to Euroscepticism – true promises or a booby-trap?

    Irene Aronstein

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Taking Euroscepticism that mainly concentrates on the tension between European integration and the preservation of cultural diversity and national identity as a point of departure, this contribution serves as a normative observation of the Lisbon Treaties' competences and procedures in relation to the statement that the EU will respect cultural diversity and national identity. The question is whether the Lisbon Treaties are giving in to Euroscepticism by respecting and protecting diversity or whether the statements are only a window-dressing formality which, in reality, is not effectuated by the Union. When one looks at some Union developments and initiatives over the last few years, the EU's eventual ideal of becoming a more centralised political entity becomes clear. If, when looking at the new provisions in the Lisbon Treaties, this ideal is taken into account, the Treaties seem to reflect this progressive approach. Overall, it seems that 'Lisbon' has indeed considered the Eurosceptic arguments concerning a lack of democratic control and the tension concerning diversity and national identity. Nonetheless, the general signal expressed by the innovations seems to be that progressive integration by increased effectiveness is more important than the satisfaction of the Member States' wishes with regard to respect for cultural diversity and national identity. It may well be that this effectiveness results in a counter-effect: an intensification of Euroscepticism that may negatively reflect on the Union's progressive integration.

  19. The national experience of using the concept of the safety culture and its possible adaptation in the environmental field

    Barbashev, S.V.; Skalets'kij, Yu.M.; Voronenko, V.V.

    2011-01-01

    Based on interdisciplinary research a successful attempt of conceptual combination of ecological culture and ecological security is made. Because of the concept of the safety culture, an attempt to eliminate further restrictions on enhance NPP safety related to a person is made. The main feature of the safety culture is in the fact that the level of duties should be higher and better than usual good practice.

  20. The Canadian minimum dataset for chronic low back pain research: a cross-cultural adaptation of the National Institutes of Health Task Force Research Standards.

    Lacasse, Anaïs; Roy, Jean-Sébastien; Parent, Alexandre J; Noushi, Nioushah; Odenigbo, Chúk; Pagé, Gabrielle; Beaudet, Nicolas; Choinière, Manon; Stone, Laura S; Ware, Mark A

    2017-01-01

    To better standardize clinical and epidemiological studies about the prevalence, risk factors, prognosis, impact and treatment of chronic low back pain, a minimum data set was developed by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Task Force on Research Standards for Chronic Low Back Pain. The aim of the present study was to develop a culturally adapted questionnaire that could be used for chronic low back pain research among French-speaking populations in Canada. The adaptation of the French Canadian version of the minimum data set was achieved according to guidelines for the cross-cultural adaptation of self-reported measures (double forward-backward translation, expert committee, pretest among 35 patients with pain in the low back region). Minor cultural adaptations were also incorporated into the English version by the expert committee (e.g., items about race/ethnicity, education level). This cross-cultural adaptation provides an equivalent French-Canadian version of the minimal data set questionnaire and a culturally adapted English-Canadian version. Modifications made to the original NIH minimum data set were minimized to facilitate comparison between the Canadian and American versions. The present study is a first step toward the use of a culturally adapted instrument for phenotyping French- and English-speaking low back pain patients in Canada. Clinicians and researchers will recognize the importance of this standardized tool and are encouraged to incorporate it into future research studies on chronic low back pain.

  1. Nordic cultural policies

    Duelund, Peter

    2008-01-01

    A critical view on Nordic Cultural Policy 1961-2008 - Aims, measures, forms of organisation, state og national identity......A critical view on Nordic Cultural Policy 1961-2008 - Aims, measures, forms of organisation, state og national identity...

  2. Cross-cultural perception and power dynamics across changing organizational and national contexts : Curaçao and the Netherlands

    Heijes, Cornelis

    In this article we study the role of power and power differences in cross-cultural perception. We do so by way of exploratory case studies in the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and the police in the Netherlands and Curacao. We demonstrate how cross-cultural perception between two specific ethnic

  3. Trends in Cultural Journalism : The development of film coverage in cross-national perspective, 1955-2005

    A. Kersten (Annemarie); M.S.S.E. Janssen (Susanne)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractVarious studies report that cultural journalism increasingly focuses on service and entertainment instead of serious arts coverage. The press prioritizes popular culture over traditional high arts to growing extent. However, this shift in journalistic attention doesn’t necessarily

  4. Report on the AATF National Survey of Graduate Studies in French/Francophone Culture and Civilization (FFCC).

    Durand, Alain-Philippe

    2003-01-01

    Presents the results of a survey of the teaching of French/Francophone Culture and Civilization (FFCC) in French graduate programs in the United States. The survey was commissioned by the American Association of Teachers of French Commission on Cultural Competence. (Author/VWL)

  5. The Text of the Agency's Agreement with the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization Concerning the Joint Operation of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste

    NONE

    1969-10-20

    The text of the agreement between the Agency and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) concerning the joint operation of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste, which was signed by the Director General of the Agency on 3 July and by the Director General of UNESCO on 15 July 1969, is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency. The agreement will enter into force on 1 January 1970.

  6. The Text of the Agency's Agreement with the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization Concerning the Joint Operation of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste

    1969-01-01

    The text of the agreement between the Agency and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) concerning the joint operation of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste, which was signed by the Director General of the Agency on 3 July and by the Director General of UNESCO on 15 July 1969, is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency. The agreement will enter into force on 1 January 1970.

  7. Microalgal Culture Collection Transfers

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Milford Microalgal culture Collection holds over 200 live cultures representing 13 classes of of algae. The cultures are maintained in three different growing...

  8. Blueprint for Sustainable Change in Diversity Management and Cultural Competence: Lessons From the National Center for Healthcare Leadership Diversity Demonstration Project.

    Dreachslin, Janice L; Weech-Maldonado, Robert; Gail, Judith; Epané, Josué Patien; Wainio, Joyce Anne

    How can healthcare leaders build a sustainable infrastructure to leverage workforce diversity and deliver culturally and linguistically appropriate care to patients? To answer that question, two health systems participated in the National Center for Healthcare Leadership's diversity leadership demonstration project, November 2008 to December 2013. Each system provided one intervention hospital and one control hospital.The control hospital in each system participated in pre- and postassessments but received no preassessment feedback and no intervention support. Each intervention hospital's C-suite leadership and demonstration project manager worked with a diversity coach provided by the National Center for Healthcare Leadership to design and implement an action plan to improve diversity and cultural competence practices and build a sustainable infrastructure. Plans explored areas of strength and areas for improvement that were identified through preintervention assessments. The assessments focused on five competencies of strategic diversity management and culturally and linguistically appropriate care: diversity leadership, strategic human resource management, organizational climate, diversity climate, and patient cultural competence.This article describes each intervention hospital's success in action plan implementation and reports results of postintervention interviews with leadership to provide a blueprint for sustainable change.

  9. Boosting Culture

    2011-01-01

    Culture makes up an indispensable part of our lives, just like material comfort. It is thought of as an important source of a nation’s vitality and creativity, and constitutes a key factor uniting the nation,while making it distinctive from other countries. It is also said culture is a productiv

  10. 敖鲁古雅使鹿鄂温克民族传统体育文化特点%Aoluguyashiluewenke 's traditional national sports culture characteristics

    姜莹; 崔兰英

    2014-01-01

    Aoluguyashiluewenke nation living in Daxinganling north of the forest, hunting, use and raising reindeer minority groups, China is so far the only raising reindeer and save"reindeer culture"of the nation. In this paper the deer's Aoluguya people in sports as the main object of study, from the perspective of culture Aoluguya make physical characteristics in the deer's, provides the reference for the research of national traditional sports in the Shiluewenke nation.%敖鲁古雅使鹿鄂温克族是生活在大兴安岭西北麓密林深处,以狩猎、使用和饲养驯鹿为生的少数民族群体,也是我国迄今唯一饲养驯鹿和保存“驯鹿文化”的民族。本文以敖鲁古雅使鹿鄂温克人的体育为主要的研究对象,从文化的角度分析敖鲁古雅使鹿鄂温克人的体育特点,为使鹿鄂温克的民族传统体育研究提供参考。

  11. Culture and drug sensitivity testing among patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in Mexico: national data for 2009-2013.

    Orejel, Ivonne; Castellanos, Martin; Marín, Diana; Mendoza, Alberto; Harries, Anthony D

    2016-01-01

    This study documented the number and results of mycobacterial culture and drug sensitivity testing (CDST) in Mexico from 2009-2013 and assessed whether states with a higher risk of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) performed more CDST and had more cultures showing MDR-TB. Data for this longitudinal, descriptive, operational research study came from the electronic records of 31 state public health laboratories in Mexico. The total number of CDSTs was 6 470, increasing from 2 143 in the first 2 years to 4 327 in the latter 3 years. There was a significant increase in the proportion of cultures showing sensitivity to all drugs, from 53.1% to 60.9% in 2011-2013 (P tuberculosis were Mexico, particularly in high-risk MDR-TB states where a higher proportion of cultures showed MDR-TB. Scale up and wider coverage of CDST should continue.

  12. 78 FR 22283 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park...

    2013-04-15

    ... were repatriated after the 30 day waiting period expired. The two cultural items were mentioned in the... one carbide lamp and one incomplete boat lantern. Archeological and ethnographic information indicates...

  13. On the Need to Include National Culture as a Central Issue in E-Commerce Trust Beliefs

    David Gefen; Tsipi Heart Heart

    2006-01-01

    Trust and trust beliefs (trustworthiness) are key to e-commerce success but depend, to a large extent, on culture. With e-commerce being an international phenomenon, understanding the cross-cultural aspects of trust creation is therefore arguably required although mostly ignored by current research which deals almost exclusively with the U.S. This exploratory study examines whether definitions of trust beliefs as conceptualized and verified in the U.S. apply in Israel which differs markedly i...

  14. Max Barry’s Jennifer Government and NationStates: neo-liberalism and the cultural public sphere = Jennifer Government, de Max Barry, e Estados-Nações: Neoliberalismo e a esfera pública da cultural

    Purnima Bose

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the United States, many people point to the corporatization of the media and the impoverishment of the public sphere as symptomatic of a crisis in democracy. While the mainstream media has not given much attention to popular anger against corporate globalization,literary works have started to explore this terrain, suggesting that the cultural public sphere is a parapolitical site for debates about economic neo-liberalism and its effects on people. This essayanalyzes the representation of neo-liberalism, corporate power, and resistance in Max Barry’s novel Jennifer Government and computer simulation game NationStates in the context of debates over globalization and the cultural public sphere.Muitas pessoas nos Estados Unidos alegam que a corporativismo dos meios de comunicação e o empobrecimento da esfera pública sãosintomas da crise na democracia. Enquanto os meios de comunicação principais não deram tanta importância à ira popular contra a globalização corporativa, muitos autores de obras literárias já começaram de analisar esse assunto. Sugerem que a esfera publica cultural é um lugar para-político para debates sobre o neoliberalismo econômico e suas conseqüências na população. Esse ensaio analisa a representação do neoliberalismo, poder corporativista e resistência no romance Jennifer Government, de Max Barry, e o jogo de computadorNationStates no contexto de debates sobre a globalização e a esfera pública cultural.

  15. A Culture of (In)Equality?: A Cross-National Study of Gender Parity and Gender Segregation in National School Systems

    Wiseman, Alexander W.

    2008-01-01

    Recent international education reports have highlighted some of the progress (as well as remaining disparity) in gendered education enrollment rates. But, the problem of gender segregation is still a very real issue even in some nations where girls are enrolled at levels on par with boys. Separate classes, curricula, and in many countries separate…

  16. 两种文化民族主义——评“文化民族主义论纲”及“甲申文化宣言” (Two Types of Cultural Nationalism

    Sylvia Chan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses the social and political background of the rise of cultural nationalism in China since the end of the last century. It discusses two schools of cultural nationalism that are most influential today. It argues that the school promoting Confucianism as a state religion has an explicit political agenda of rallying the nation around the goal of building a rich and powerful China to ensure its national security in a competitive and hostile international environment. The article doubts that Confucianism can be easily reconstructed into a popular religion, and suggests that it is not an appropriate cultural symbol to advance the political goal these people pursue. The other school advocates the promotion of Chinese national culture in general, believing that its ‘oriental characteristics’, such as its emphasis on morality, altruism, and quietude, are powerful antidotes to the social and moral ills of modernity and post-modernity. Although it also aims at countering what it perceives to be the hegemony of Western culture, its main concern seems to be the spiritual health of the nation and its emphasis is on the cultivation of civic virtue among the people. The article concludes that the latter kind of cultural nationalism is not incompatible with the democratisation of China, nor is it necessarily anti-West.

  17. Binding Nations through Art Quilts and a Visit to the U.S. Embassy in Paris as a Cultural Envoy

    Riché Richardson

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In the spring of 2008 when Géraldine Chouard, who was helping to coordinate the landmark exhibition in France entitled “Un Patchwork de Cultures,” mentioned the U.S. Embassy in Paris’s interest in inviting me to the city to share some of my quilts as a part of this exhibition and to be a “Cultural Envoy,” I was honored and excited by the possibility. The opportunity to return to Paris under the auspices of the U.S. Embassy, which officially materialized through a grant from the U.S. Departmen...

  18. Building the genomic nation: ‘Homo Brasilis’ and the ‘Genoma Mexicano’ in comparative cultural perspective

    Kent, Michael; García-Deister, Vivette; López-Beltrán, Carlos; Santos, Ricardo Ventura; Schwartz-Marín, Ernesto; Wade, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the relationship between genetic research, nationalism and the construction of collective social identities in Latin America. It makes a comparative analysis of two research projects – the ‘Genoma Mexicano’ and the ‘Homo Brasilis’ – both of which sought to establish national and genetic profiles. Both have reproduced and strengthened the idea of their respective nations of focus, incorporating biological elements into debates on social identities. Also, both have placed the unifying figure of the mestizo/mestiço at the heart of national identity constructions, and in so doing have displaced alternative identity categories, such as those based on race. However, having been developed in different national contexts, these projects have had distinct scientific and social trajectories: in Mexico, the genomic mestizo is mobilized mainly in relation to health, while in Brazil the key arena is that of race. We show the importance of the nation as a frame for mobilizing genetic data in public policy debates, and demonstrate how race comes in and out of focus in different Latin American national contexts of genomic research, while never completely disappearing. PMID:27479999

  19. Oxytocin increases liking for a country’s people and national flag but not for other cultural symbols or consumer products.

    Xiaole eMa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The neuropeptide oxytocin enhances in-group favoritism and ethnocentrism in males. However, whether such effects also occur in women and extend to national symbols and companies/consumer products is unclear. In a between-subject, double-blind placebo controlled experiment we have investigated the effect of intranasal oxytocin on likeability and arousal ratings given by 51 adult Chinese males and females for pictures depicting people or national symbols/consumer products from both strong and weak in-groups (China and Taiwan and corresponding out-groups (Japan and South Korea. To assess duration of treatment effects subjects were also re-tested after one week. Results showed that although oxytocin selectively increased the bias for overall liking for Chinese social stimuli and the national flag, it had no effect on the similar bias towards other Chinese cultural symbols, companies and consumer products. This enhanced bias was maintained one week after treatment. No overall oxytocin effects were found for Taiwanese, Japanese or South Korean pictures. Our findings show for the first time that oxytocin increases liking for a nation’s society and flag in both men and women, but not that for other cultural symbols or companies/consumer products.

  20. Aging in a cultural context: cross-national differences in disability and the moderating role of personal control among older adults in the United States and England.

    Clarke, Philippa; Smith, Jacqui

    2011-07-01

    We investigate cross-national differences in late-life health outcomes and focus on an intriguing difference in beliefs about personal control found between older adult populations in the U.K. and United States. We examine the moderating role of control beliefs in the relationship between physical function and self-reported difficulty with daily activities. Using national data from the United States (Health and Retirement Study) and England (English Longitudinal Study on Ageing), we examine the prevalence in disability across the two countries and show how it varies according to the sense of control. Poisson regression was used to examine the relationship between objective measures of physical function (gait speed) and disability and the modifying effects of control. Older Americans have a higher sense of personal control than the British, which operates as a psychological resource to reduce disability among older Americans. However, the benefits of control are attenuated as physical impairments become more severe. These results emphasize the importance of carefully considering cross-national differences in the disablement process as a result of cultural variation in underlying psychosocial resources. This paper highlights the role of culture in shaping health across adults aging in different sociopolitical contexts.

  1. Transaction cost economics and the role of national culture : a test of hypotheses based on Inglehart and Hofstede

    Steenkamp, J.E.B.M.; Geyskens, I.

    2012-01-01

    Transaction cost economics (TCE) is probably the most widely accepted theory on how firms can gain competitive advantage through efficient organization of their economic transactions. However, by focusing on the competitive environment in which companies operate, it abstracts from the cultural

  2. 77 FR 48533 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park...

    2012-08-14

    ... Indian tribes, has determined that the cultural items meet the definition of sacred objects and..., Crow Agency, MT, that meet the definition of sacred objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is... Priest and leading headman in the Northern Cheyenne Crazy Dog Society. Alex Brady, who was involved in...

  3. Cross-Cultural Validity of the Self-Stigma of Seeking Help (SSOSH) Scale: Examination across Six Nations

    Vogel, David L.; Armstrong, Patrick Ian; Tsai, Pei-Chun; Wade, Nathaniel G.; Hammer, Joseph H.; Efstathiou, Georgios; Holtham, Elizabeth; Kouvaraki, Elli; Liao, Hsin-Ya; Shechtman, Zipora; Topkaya, Nursel

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have found that the stigma associated with seeking therapy--particularly self-stigma--can inhibit the use of psychological services. Yet, most of the research on self-stigma has been conducted in the United States. This is a considerable limitation, as the role of self-stigma in the help-seeking process may vary across cultural groups.…

  4. A NATIONAL DEMONSTRATION PROJECT UTILIZING TELEVISED MATERIALS FOR THE FORMAL EDUCATION OF CULTURALLY DISADVANTAGED PRESCHOOL CHILDREN. FINAL REPORT.

    MUKERJI, ROSE; AND OTHERS

    TO SUPPLY DISADVANTAGED PRESCHOOL CHILDREN WITH CULTURALLY STIMULATING EXPERIENCES, A TV SERIES, "ROUNDABOUT," WAS DESIGNED TO BE USED IN WASHINGTON, D.C. INNER-CITY PRESCHOOL AND DAY CARE CENTERS. THE 15-MINUTE PROGRAMS WERE TO INTRODUCE NEW EXPERIENCES AND SUPPLEMENT REGULAR ACTIVITIES. IT WAS HOPED THAT THE CHILDREN WOULD IDENTIFY…

  5. Mr Huidong LI Deputy Chairman and Secretary-General, Rev. Committee of Chinese Nationalist Party Vice President, Sun Yat-Sen Culture Interchange Association of China Member, Committee for Internal and Judicial Affairs of the National People's Congress of China

    Bennett, Sophia Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Mr Huidong LI Deputy Chairman and Secretary-General, Rev. Committee of Chinese Nationalist Party Vice President, Sun Yat-Sen Culture Interchange Association of China Member, Committee for Internal and Judicial Affairs of the National People's Congress of China

  6. Creating a "culture of research" in a community hospital: Strategies and tools from the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program.

    Dimond, Eileen P; St Germain, Diane; Nacpil, Lianne M; Zaren, Howard A; Swanson, Sandra M; Minnick, Christopher; Carrigan, Angela; Denicoff, Andrea M; Igo, Kathleen E; Acoba, Jared D; Gonzalez, Maria M; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta

    2015-06-01

    The value of community-based cancer research has long been recognized. In addition to the National Cancer Institute's Community Clinical and Minority-Based Oncology Programs established in 1983, and 1991 respectively, the National Cancer Institute established the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program in 2007 with an aim of enhancing access to high-quality cancer care and clinical research in the community setting where most cancer patients receive their treatment. This article discusses strategies utilized by the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program to build research capacity and create a more entrenched culture of research at the community hospitals participating in the program over a 7-year period. To facilitate development of a research culture at the community hospitals, the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program required leadership or chief executive officer engagement; utilized a collaborative learning structure where best practices, successes, and challenges could be shared; promoted site-to-site mentoring to foster faster learning within and between sites; required research program assessments that spanned clinical trial portfolio, accrual barriers, and outreach; increased identification and use of metrics; and, finally, encouraged research team engagement across hospital departments (navigation, multidisciplinary care, pathology, and disparities) to replace the traditionally siloed approach to clinical trials. The health-care environment is rapidly changing while complexity in research increases. Successful research efforts are impacted by numerous factors (e.g. institutional review board reviews, physician interest, and trial availability). The National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program sites, as program participants, had access to the required resources and support to develop and implement the strategies described. Metrics are an important component yet often challenging to

  7. Dancing in the Diaspora: Cultural Long-Distance Nationalism and the Staging of Chineseness by San Francisco’s Chinese Folk Dance Association

    Sau-ling C. Wong

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available

    This essay analyzes the history of a San Francisco Bay Area cultural institution over a period of more than four decades, and, applying to it the concept of "cultural long-distance nationalism," it attempts to tease apart the complexity of cultural practice in diaspora. The organization in question is the Chinese Folk Dance Association (CFDA, founded in 1959, a pro-People’s Republic of China (PRC troupe of amateur dancers and musicians playing Chinese instruments. As someone who was peripherally involved with the group in the mid-1970s and early 1980s and was a friend or acquaintance of a few members of the group, I became curious about the changes in its activities, its performance programs, its roles in the Bay Area community, and its self-perceived relationship to the homeland over time. I have examined the CFDA’s performance programs, photographs, and press coverage since the 1970s (earlier archival material was not available to me, as well as interviewed three of its key figures and spoken on several occasions with one of the three, the long-time executive director of the group and a friend from graduate school. What I have found is that the changes undergone by the group reveal the multiplicity of factors that go into the staging of Chineseness in diaspora and the challenges inherent in such a process. The challenges are especially acute given how rapidly the nation-state to which a specific cultural presentation is tied—the People’s Republic of China (PRC—has itself been undergoing rapid and radical transformations.

  8. Dancing in the Diaspora: Cultural Long-Distance Nationalism and the Staging of Chineseness by San Francisco’s Chinese Folk Dance Association

    Sau-ling C. Wong

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This essay analyzes the history of a San Francisco Bay Area cultural institution over a period of more than four decades, and, applying to it the concept of "cultural long-distance nationalism," it attempts to tease apart the complexity of cultural practice in diaspora. The organization in question is the Chinese Folk Dance Association (CFDA, founded in 1959, a pro-People’s Republic of China (PRC troupe of amateur dancers and musicians playing Chinese instruments. As someone who was peripherally involved with the group in the mid-1970s and early 1980s and was a friend or acquaintance of a few members of the group, I became curious about the changes in its activities, its performance programs, its roles in the Bay Area community, and its self-perceived relationship to the homeland over time. I have examined the CFDA’s performance programs, photographs, and press coverage since the 1970s (earlier archival material was not available to me, as well as interviewed three of its key figures and spoken on several occasions with one of the three, the long-time executive director of the group and a friend from graduate school. What I have found is that the changes undergone by the group reveal the multiplicity of factors that go into the staging of Chineseness in diaspora and the challenges inherent in such a process. The challenges are especially acute given how rapidly the nation-state to which a specific cultural presentation is tied—the People’s Republic of China (PRC—has itself been undergoing rapid and radical transformations.

  9. Approche de Modernisation de l’Enseignement des Langues et Cultures Nationales du Cameroun à l’aide des TIC / Approach of modernization of Cameroon national cultures and languages teaching through ICT

    Marcellin Nkenlifack

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Cet article décrit concrètement l’apport des TIC pour la modernisation de l’enseignement des langues et cultures nationales afin de promouvoir la diversité culturelle et la diffusion des connaissances scientifiques dans les langues locales et de renforcer les capacités de la population. Ce projet qui servira de fibre de développement des savoirs scientifiques et savoir-faire présente plusieurs avantages aux plans psychologique, pédagogique, scientifique et social, avec en prime la sensibilisation aux langues, le déploiement de la plateforme réalisée dans des établissements, la formation des enseignants sur l’utilisation des TIC pour l’enseignement des langues, la distribution des supports d’auto-apprentissage, le développement d’un site d’analyse et diffusion des données culturelles, d’archivage numérique et de préservation du patrimoine, la valorisation des acquis et des prédispositions locales à l’émergence et au développement technologique. Ce projet contribuera à concrétiser l’introduction de l’enseignement des langues et cultures locales dans les programmes officiels de formation au Cameroun. This paper describes the role ICT has played in modernizing the teaching of Cameroun’s national languages and cultures in order to promote cultural diversity and the dissemination of scientific knowledge in local languages as well as reinforce the population’s capacities. The project presented is an educational multimedia platform (in French TICELaCuN, or TIC pour l’enseignement des langues et cultures nationales used to teach Cameroun’s languages. The project will be used to further scientific knowledge and know-how. It offers several psychological, educational, scientific, and social advantages: language awareness, platform deployment in educational institutions, teacher training on ICT use to teach languages, distribution of self-learning supports, development of a site for the analysis and

  10. Culture and drug sensitivity testing among patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in Mexico: national data for 2009–2013

    Ivonne Orejel

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study documented the number and results of mycobacterial culture and drug sensitivity testing (CDST in Mexico from 2009–2013 and assessed whether states with a higher risk of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB performed more CDST and had more cultures showing MDR-TB. Data for this longitudinal, descriptive, operational research study came from the electronic records of 31 state public health laboratories in Mexico. The total number of CDSTs was 6 470, increasing from 2 143 in the first 2 years to 4 327 in the latter 3 years. There was a significant increase in the proportion of cultures showing sensitivity to all drugs, from 53.1% to 60.9% in 2011–2013 (P < 0.001 and a significant decrease in the proportion showing MDR-TB, from 28.2% in 2009 to 19.8% in 2013 (P < 0.001. Cases of extensively drug resistant tuberculosis were < 1% per year. In the 12 states with higher risk for MDR-TB, significantly more CDSTs (2 382 test were done in 2011–2013 than in the other 19 states (1 945 tests. Also, for each year the proportion of cultures showing MDR-TB was significantly higher in high risk MDR-TB states than in lower risk ones (P < 0.001. During the 5-year study period, CDST was scaled up in Mexico, particularly in high-risk MDR-TB states where a higher proportion of cultures showed MDR-TB. Scale up and wider coverage of CDST should continue.

  11. A Cultural Resources Inventory and Historical Evaluation of the Smoky Atmospheric Nuclear Test, Areas 8, 9, and 10, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada

    Jones, Robert C. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Reno, NV (United States); King, Maureen L. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Reno, NV (United States); Beck, Colleen M. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Reno, NV (United States); Falvey, Lauren W. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Reno, NV (United States); Menocal, Tatianna M. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Reno, NV (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This report presents the results of a National Historic Preservation Act Section 106 cultural resources inventory and historical evaluation of the 1957 Smoky atmospheric test location on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The Desert Research Institute (DRI) was tasked to conduct a cultural resources study of the Smoky test area as a result of a proposed undertaking by the Department of Energy Environmental Management. This undertaking involves investigating Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 550 for potential contaminants of concern as delineated in a Corrective Action Investigation Plan. CAU 550 is an area that spatially overlaps portions of the Smoky test location. Smoky, T-2c, was a 44 kt atmospheric nuclear test detonated at 5:30 am on August 31, 1957, on top of a 213.4 m (700 ft) 200 ton tower (T-2c) in Area 8 of the NNSS. Smoky was a weapons related test of the Plumbbob series (number 19) and part of the Department of Defense Exercise Desert Rock VII and VIII. The cultural resources effort involved the development of a historic context based on archival documents and engineering records, the inventory of the cultural resources in the Smoky test area and an associated military trench location in Areas 9 and 10, and an evaluation of the National Register eligibility of the cultural resources. The inventory of the Smoky test area resulted in the identification of structures, features, and artifacts related to the physical development of the test location and the post-test remains. The Smoky test area was designated historic district D104 and coincides with a historic archaeological site recorded as 26NY14794 and the military trenches designed for troop observation, site 26NY14795. Sites 26NY14794 and 26NY14795 are spatially discrete with the trenches located 4.3 km (2.7 mi) southeast of the Smoky ground zero. As a result, historic district D104 is discontiguous and in total it covers 151.4 hectares (374 acres). The Smoky test location, recorded as historic

  12. Civilization, National Culture And Ethical Work Climates: A Comparative Study Of CPA Firms In China And Taiwan

    Gerald Venezia; Chiulien C. Venezia; Yan Bao

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of China as an economic power has prompted the question, what impact if any has globalization and market liberalization had on the ethical climate of organizations within China and its neighbor Taiwan? Cross-strait tensions have eased over the past few years due to closer economic integration. Although both countries differ in political, as well as organizational design, they share core cultural values embedded within civilization; Confucianism. This study attempts to understand...

  13. COMMUNICATING THE STEREOTYPE OF “OTHERNESS” IN EUROPEAN ADVERTISING: CULTURAL AND NATIONAL “FAKE MULTICULTURALISM”

    Ioana Mudure-Iacob

    2014-01-01

    In its quest for the destination of an ‘all-encompassing’ communication, European advertising builds an image of complexity and oppositions. Constructed as a mingling of cultural values, intensive consumerism and creative touches, the story of advertising is a never-ending analysis of nowadays globalized societies. Moreover, its ramifying story of acceptance, assimilation, rejection and stereotypy brought advertising at a position in which the debate over intercultural representation and cons...

  14. 75 FR 14460 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park...

    2010-03-25

    ... National Park, WY, that meet the definition of ``sacred objects'' under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is... clearly identifiable as part of the Seneca ``False Face Society.'' Medicine masks, also called ``false faces'', are sacred objects which belong to a society which still functions at the Newtown Longhouse on...

  15. Perception, Cultural, and Technical Assessment of Heating Alternatives to Improve Indoor Air Quality on the Navajo Nation

    It is estimated that 62 percent of households in the Navajo Nation use wood as their primary heating source, while 25 percent use gaseous fuels, 11 percent use electricity, and the remaining 2 percent use coal, kerosene, other fossil fuels, or solar energy. A 2010 study by the U....

  16. National Narratives and the Invention of Ethnic Identities: Revisiting Cultural Memory and the Decolonized State in Morocco

    Karrouche, N.F.F.

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter, Karrouche focuses on the construction of a national narrative and identity in Morocco from independence onwards until the present day by investigating history textbooks. She explores, in particular, the tension between regional and local identities of Berber populations on the one

  17. Effectively Engaging in Tribal Consultation to protect Traditional Cultural Properties while navigating the 1872 Mining Law - Tonto National Forest, Western Apache Tribes, & Resolution Copper Mine

    Nez, N.

    2017-12-01

    By effectively engaging in government-to-government consultation the Tonto National Forest is able to consider oral histories and tribal cultural knowledge in decision making. These conversations often have the potential to lead to the protection and preservation of public lands. Discussed here is one example of successful tribal consultation and how it let to the protection of Traditional Cultural Properties (TCPs). One hour east of Phoenix, Arizona on the Tonto National Forest, Resolution Copper Mine, is working to access a rich copper vein more than 7,000 feet deep. As part of the mining plan of operation they are investigating viable locations to store the earth removed from the mine site. One proposed storage location required hydrologic and geotechnical studies to determine viability. This constituted a significant amount of ground disturbance in an area that is of known importance to local Indian tribes. To ensure proper consideration of tribal concerns, the Forest engaged nine local tribes in government-government consultation. Consultation resulted in the identification of five springs in the project area considered (TCPs) by the Western Apache tribes. Due to the presence of identified TCPs, the Forest asked tribes to assist in the development of mitigation measures to minimize effects of this project on the TCPs identified. The goal of this partnership was to find a way for the Mine to still be able to gather data, while protecting TCPs. During field visits and consultations, a wide range of concerns were shared which were recorded and considered by Tonto National Forest. The Forest developed a proposed mitigation approach to protect springs, which would prevent (not permit) the installation of water monitoring wells, geotechnical borings or trench excavations within 1,200 feet of perennial springs in the project area. As an added mitigation measure, a cultural resources specialist would be on-site during all ground-disturbing activities. Diligent work on

  18. [Health promotion and wellness programs in private corporate organizations. Problems of trans-national and trans-cultural transferability].

    Fidler, A H; Calkins, D R; Fuentes, E G

    1992-09-01

    Health promotion and wellness programmes in corporate organisations are subjects of considerable interest to both the providers (companies) and the consumers (employees). Economic considerations constitute a significant factor in businesses' interest in adopting health promotion programmes and in the wellness communities attempts to sell such programming to business. Substantial elements of both the business and wellness communities believe that health promotion programmes are financially profitable in addition to, and as a result of, improving employee's health. A fact which has not yet attracted significant research activities is a comparative analysis of corporate health promotion and wellness programmes in different societies with different cultural backgrounds, corporate cultures and external environments. Especially the emerging of a "New Europe" after the full realisation of the Common Market (EC) after 1992 and the tremendous economic possibilities after substantial political changes in the political structure of the eastern part of Europe (on its way to capitalism) might make it worth to look into corporate wellness programs of European organisations and to discuss pros and cons after comparing them with the ones of their American counterparts. Most important facts in which US organisations differ from most European corporations are not only the internal corporate culture but also the external environment, such as direct government interventions and political pressure from the consumer interest groups (strong unions). In many European countries the government imposes a very tight regulatory and legal framework and dictates the way corporate organisations have to share the burden of health related costs and have to provide occupational, wellness or preventive programmes for their employees.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Culture, Liberty and Happiness

    Ura, Karma

    2007-01-01

    The author's intention here is to explore mainly the relationship between culture and globalization, and also to a limited extent the ties and differences, if any, between cultural liberty and happiness. This paper attempts to relate the concept of cultural liberty to the idea of Gross National Happiness. The author underlines strongly that the culture discussed is not about the particular culture of Bhutan; it is about culture in general and in abstract. Likewise happiness referred to here i...

  20. Regional and national differences in stressful life events: The role of cultural factors, economic development, and gender.

    Vázquez, José Juan; Panadero, Sonia; Martín, Rosa M

    2015-07-01

    The study analyzed differences in the risk of experiencing stressful life events (SLE) according to cultural factors, the level of economic development of the region inhabited, and gender. Information was gathered on the number and nature of SLE experienced by a sample of 604 undergraduates from 3 regions with very different levels of economic development: Madrid (Spain), León (Nicaragua), and Bilwi (Nicaragua). The results indicated a greater risk of experiencing SLE among undergraduates from Nicaragua, but few differences attributed to the undergraduates' gender or the level of economic development in the region they inhabit within the same country. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. In Search of an Alternative Feminist Cinema: Gender, Crisis, and the Cultural Discourse of Nation Building in Chinese Independent Films

    Jinhua Li

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Chinese feminist cinema in the postsocialist era is shaped by the grand narrative of nation building that glamorizes urban professional career women and their contributions to economic marketization and globalization. Such cinematic overemphasis on urban women proves inadequate as it creates a disturbing silence about the diasporic existence of non-urban women. This uneven condition demands the creation of an alternative cinematic feminism that visualizes the diversity of Chinese women and represents the heterogeneity of feminist cinematic expressions and female experiences. Using Li Yu’s 'Lost in Beijing' (2007, 'Pingguo' 苹果 and Li Yang’s 'Blind Mountain' (2007, 'Mang shan' 盲山 as case studies, this essay investigates how Chinese independent films re-negotiate female gender identity and crisis through commercialized visual realism and social intervention while in reality the postsocialist grand narrative of nation building redefines the living conditions of female migrant workers and women of limited resources.

  2. Wilderness - between the promise of hell and paradise: A cultural-historical exploration of a Dutch National Park

    Koen Arts; Anke Fischer; Rene van der Wal

    2011-01-01

    ‘Wilderness' is often seen as an ideal state in contemporary debates on ecological restoration. This paper asks what is left of ‘wilderness' in present-day Western Europe and explores this question by drawing on a case study of the Hoge Veluwe National Park in the Netherlands. An overview of intellectual histories of wilderness ideas is used as a backdrop to...

  3. A cross-national comparison of violence among young men in China and the UK: psychiatric and cultural explanations.

    Coid, Jeremy; Hu, Junmei; Kallis, Constantinos; Ping, Yuan; Zhang, Juying; Hu, Yueying; Bui, Laura; Ullrich, Simone; Bebbington, Paul

    2017-10-01

    Public health psychiatry has a key role in violence prevention. Cross-national comparisons of violence and associated psychiatric morbidity can indicate targets for preventive interventions. Data on young adult men in households, 18-34 years, were drawn from the Second Men's Modern Lifestyles survey in Great Britain (n = 2046) and from a corresponding survey in Chengdu, China (n = 4132), using a translated questionnaire. Binary logistic regression models were carried out to estimate the cross-national differences for different types of violence and to identify explanatory variables. Chinese men were less likely to report violence in the past 5 years (AOR 0.59, 95% CI 0.48-0.72, P violence were lower among Chinese men except intimate partner violence (AOR 2.43, 95% CI 1.65-3.59, P violence persisting into adulthood, confidence in fighting ability, perception that violence is acceptable behaviour, and experience of violent victimization. More British men screened positive for antisocial personality disorder and substance misuse. Attitudes which condone violence and a serious problem of alcohol-related, male-on-male violence are key targets for preventive interventions among British men. The higher prevalence of life course-persistent antisocial behaviour among British men is of concern and requires further investigation. Higher prevalence of intimate partner violence among Chinese men reflects patriarchal approaches to conflict resolution and confirms an important public health problem in China which requires further cross-national investigation.

  4. COMMUNICATING THE STEREOTYPE OF “OTHERNESS” IN EUROPEAN ADVERTISING: CULTURAL AND NATIONAL “FAKE MULTICULTURALISM”

    Ioana Mudure-Iacob

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In its quest for the destination of an ‘all-encompassing’ communication, European advertising builds an image of complexity and oppositions. Constructed as a mingling of cultural values, intensive consumerism and creative touches, the story of advertising is a never-ending analysis of nowadays globalized societies. Moreover, its ramifying story of acceptance, assimilation, rejection and stereotypy brought advertising at a position in which the debate over intercultural representation and consumer behavior is crucial. Consequently, the main question that arises is: in the realm of the thirsty and goods-addict consumers, what type of discourse should advertising in Europe use, so as to emphasize pluralism and still maintain culturally personalized approaches. It is, therefore, the purpose of this paper to explore and analyze the congruencies and disparities between advertising and its social, cultural and economic repositories, on the background of Europe’s image. In this respect, some questions can be formulated: How does advertising pertain to organizing its communication with the overly globalized consumer markets? Is the stereotypical label hereby inserted in such a communicational direction with consumers, and if so, what are the features of an “addressing otherness” discourse with respect to ad typology? Another aim of the current paper is to evoke the level at which European advertising fails to stick to the intercultural framework of reference, through a presentation of the stereotypes of “otherness” and the implied “fake multiculturalism.” The idea behind this assumption is that, while representing ethnic groups differently or by use of a derogatory mechanism, the message cannot be that of Europeanness. Moreover, the focus on linguistic choice of advertising vocabulary is linked to the issue of “linguistic fetishism” and, more importantly, it shows that the variety of linguistic panel in Europe sometimes prevents

  5. Public memory and national recreation. Politics of memory and cultural practices in republican Barcelona (1931-1936

    Fernando Sánchez-Costa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to analyse speeches and commemorative practices in Barcelona during the Second Republic (1931-1936. For this purpose, it uses a wide range of contemporary newspaper and administrative sources as well as national and international bibliography. The author understands that the «public memory» forms part of the «public sphere» in the Habermassian sense, that is to say of the area in which the community discovers and defines itself. With this aim in mind, the author dissects commemorative narratives and praxis so as to identify the ideologically implicit concepts that underlie or are made explicit within them. The concept of «public memory» is defined as a category of sociohistorical analysis. The text analyses the dominant speeches of memory and their links with the prevailing liberal-working class nationalism. It studies the coincidences and differences between these verbal and visual accounts and renaixentista Catalan historiography. At the same time, it is argued that the fundamental tenets of the Catalan historical mind-set, as well as the wish to «redeem the past», enable us to interpret the political behaviour of leaders in this period. The article also makes reference to the importance of citizen-led initiatives for the symbolic configuration of the new tapestry of urban memory.

  6. ON THE CONCEPT OF CULTURE AND FOOD CULTURE FOR GRAIN & OIL JOURNALS More discussions on the cultural mission of grain & oil journals in protecting national food security and implementing national food strategy%论粮油期刊文化与粮食文化观——兼论粮油期刊在保障国家粮食安全实施国家粮食战略中的文化使命

    吴成福

    2012-01-01

    The paper puts forward the outlook of food culture based on China' s outstanding traditional culture and advanced contemporary culture, i.e. "the masses regard food as their prime want", which is the concept of food political culture ; " agriculture is the base of all industries while food is the base of agriculture", which is the concept of food economic culture; "make a profit for the tillers of the soil, bring benefit to dieters", which is the concept of food administrative culture; "I would rather stream thousands of drops of sweat, not destroy one grain", which is the outlook of food business culture; "sci-tech innovation escorts for food", which is the outlook of food sci-tech culture; "each grain in your dish is a fruit of hard labor", which is the outlook of food consumption culture; "food safety is regarded as the top priority", which is the concept of food security culture ; "saving food is glorious while wasting food is shameful", which is the concept of food ethical culture ; "color, aromafood aesthetic taste, meaning, form, nutrition", which is the concept of food aesthetic culture; " one does not feel alarmed with food in the hands", which is the concept of food philosophy culture. The paper discusses the relationship between grain & oil journals and food culture as well as the cultural mis- sion of grain & oil journals in protecting national food security and implementing national food strategy.%提出了基于我国优秀传统文化和当代先进文化的粮食文化观,即:“民以食为天”之粮食政治文化观;“农业乃百业之基,粮食乃农业之基”之粮食经济文化观;“为耕者谋利,为食者造福”之粮食行政文化观;“宁流千滴汗,不坏一粒粮”之粮食企业文化观;“技术创新为粮食保驾护航”之粮食科技文化观;“谁知盘中餐,粒粒皆辛苦”之粮食消费文化观;“食以安为先”之粮食安全文

  7. The Absence of Culture?

    Norberg, Magnus; Jomer, Mikael

    2007-01-01

    This thesis attempts to investigate if national culture still is a factor to consider for large multinational organizations when choosing a supplier, or if the global business environment due to globalization has become so standardized and homogenous that the influence of national culture differences has diminished. Existing academic literature is divided regarding this matter; some studies indicate that the influence of national culture on business relations is subtle while other argues that...

  8. Impact of Nano Particles on Cultural Properties in the Atmosphere of Gyeongju National Park Area Using a Proton Beam

    Kim, K. W.; Do, J. Y.; Park, S. Y.; Kim, T. K.; Ha, J. K. [Gyeongju University, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    The objective of this research is to investigate the physical and chemical characteristics of atmospheric nanoparticles observed at the National Park area of Gyeongju. The elemental compositions of the submicron aerosols were analyzed using a PIXE (proton induced X-ray emission) method with a 3 MV Tandetron accelerator. In addition, submicron aerosols were prepared for a determination of ions using ion chromatography. Aerosol monitoring was conducted for airborne particles less than 1.0 and 2.5 micron. They were collected on nuclepore filters using PM1.0 and PM2.5 cyclone samplers. The impact of air-mass pathway on the characteristics of particulate matter was analyzed at an end point of Gyeongju with backward trajectory results obtained from the HYSPLIT model. The ratio of submicron aerosol to fine particles in the mass concentration was 40 - 50% in the urban area of Seoul and the national park area of Gyeongju. During the monitoring period, Asian Dust storm events occurred at each monitoring site. The contributions of elements to the submicron aerosols were 8% lower in the urban area than in the national park area. However, the contributions of aged ions to submicron aerosols were relatively higher by 42% in the urban area of Seoul. The elementals of the submicron aerosols were categorized as soil-related, anthropogenic-related, and aerosol-acidity-related species based on an enrichment factor analysis. The average mass fraction of soil-related elements was approximately 20% for Seoul and 75% for Gyeongju. That of the aerosol-acidity-related specie was higher in Seoul and showed a big difference among Asian Dust storm events, non-Asian Dust storm events, and clear atmospheric conditions due to precipitation. Anthropogenic-related elements accounted for 11.7% in Seoul and 5.7% in Gyeongju. S, SO42- and the anthropogenic related elements like Cr, Cd, Pb, which can not be derived from stone materials themselves, were detected both on the stone surface and in

  9. Impact of Nano Particles on Cultural Properties in the Atmosphere of Gyeongju National Park Area Using a Proton Beam

    Kim, K. W.; Do, J. Y.; Park, S. Y.; Kim, T. K.; Ha, J. K.

    2008-04-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate the physical and chemical characteristics of atmospheric nanoparticles observed at the National Park area of Gyeongju. The elemental compositions of the submicron aerosols were analyzed using a PIXE (proton induced X-ray emission) method with a 3 MV Tandetron accelerator. In addition, submicron aerosols were prepared for a determination of ions using ion chromatography. Aerosol monitoring was conducted for airborne particles less than 1.0 and 2.5 micron. They were collected on nuclepore filters using PM1.0 and PM2.5 cyclone samplers. The impact of air-mass pathway on the characteristics of particulate matter was analyzed at an end point of Gyeongju with backward trajectory results obtained from the HYSPLIT model. The ratio of submicron aerosol to fine particles in the mass concentration was 40 - 50% in the urban area of Seoul and the national park area of Gyeongju. During the monitoring period, Asian Dust storm events occurred at each monitoring site. The contributions of elements to the submicron aerosols were 8% lower in the urban area than in the national park area. However, the contributions of aged ions to submicron aerosols were relatively higher by 42% in the urban area of Seoul. The elementals of the submicron aerosols were categorized as soil-related, anthropogenic-related, and aerosol-acidity-related species based on an enrichment factor analysis. The average mass fraction of soil-related elements was approximately 20% for Seoul and 75% for Gyeongju. That of the aerosol-acidity-related specie was higher in Seoul and showed a big difference among Asian Dust storm events, non-Asian Dust storm events, and clear atmospheric conditions due to precipitation. Anthropogenic-related elements accounted for 11.7% in Seoul and 5.7% in Gyeongju. S, SO42- and the anthropogenic related elements like Cr, Cd, Pb, which can not be derived from stone materials themselves, were detected both on the stone surface and in

  10. Personal Wounds, National Scars. Reflections on Individual and Cultural Trauma in Anne Enright’s The Gathering"

    Ilaria Oddenino

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In her 2007 novel, Enright presents her readers with a complex network of disturbing, ambiguous narratives, woven together – however tentatively – by the grief-stricken voice of Veronica Hegarty. What emerges is a painful chapter of the moral history of contemporary Ireland, one in which  ‘family’ and ‘religion’, the country’s traditional cornerstones, seem to have equally fallen from grace. Indeed, Veronica’s late recollection of the sexual violence that her suicidal brother Liam underwent as a child in a ‘protected’ domestic environment, is mirrored, on a larger scale, by the progressive awakening of her society to a shocking reality of child abuse, not only in people’s homes, but also in the bosom of the Irish Catholic church. Veronica’s personal wounds become thus metonymical of the cultural trauma that has torn her country’s social fabric, and it is precisely the public exposure of those facts that triggers her memories of what went on in her own childhood. Therefore, if the gathering of the title certainly is the coming together of the Hegarthy family for Liam’s wake, it is also and most importantly Veronica’s gathering of distant images of her family’s life, in an attempt to rediscover the long-lost tassels of the puzzle, break the spell of paralysis and, perhaps, let the healing process begin.

  11. Cross-national comparison of Middle Eastern university students: help-seeking behaviors, attitudes toward helping professionals, and cultural beliefs about mental health problems.

    Al-Krenawi, Alean; Graham, John R; Al-Bedah, Eman A; Kadri, Hafni Mahmud; Sehwail, Mahmud A

    2009-02-01

    This study is the first to use identical data collection processes and instruments in Egypt, Kuwait, Palestine, and Israeli Arab communities regarding help-seeking behaviors and attitudes towards perceived cultural beliefs about mental health problems. Data is based on a survey sample of 716, undergraduate students in the 4 countries, 61% female and 39% male. Results indicate that respondents within the various countries, based on nationality, gender and level of education, vary in terms of recognition of personal need, beliefs about mental health problems (i.e. stigmatization), and the use of traditional healing methods versus modern approaches to psychiatric therapy. The conclusion discusses differences between our respondents' expectations and prevailing mental health service provision and delivery.

  12. National institute for Food and Agriculture: novel and changing funding strategies and mechanisms in response to changes in budgets, legislative authorities and scientific culture

    Cavallaro, N.; Melnick, R.

    2017-12-01

    Farm Bill legislation establishes different funding mechanisms managed by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA), which have changed over the years through reauthorization. Other legislation and executive initiatives, as well as recognition by both funders, funding recipients, private organizations, and non-government organizations have stressed the need for multi-, inter-, and trans-disciplinary research and outreach. This presentation will discuss how changes to NIFA legislative authority as well as changing needs and culture in the government and the scientific research community have led to new mechanisms and strategies for types of funded projects, eligibility for NIFA funding, interagency funding, and iterative changes in direction in research solicitations. For example, limited funding for important topics has prompted a need for interagency collaborations in research funding solicitations and jointly funded projects. New legislative authorities and requirements have led to new modes of collaboration with private industry, NGOs and commodity boards along with international alliances. Unlike most funding agencies, NIFA funds education and extension or outreach projects in addition to research projects. New authorities together with increased recognition of scientific research needed to inform societal challenges has led to new thinking and greater flexibility in funding for long-term research projects and larger regional, multi-institutional and multi-national projects. This, in addition to a shifting culture among researchers and research institutions, has aided in new policies, requirements and initiatives among research institutions and government agencies involving information, data sharing and public access. Examples of new mechanisms and programs and their successes along with their drawbacks will be presented.

  13. Does The Consumption Behavior of Tourists Differ by Culture/Nationality? A Study into German and Russian Tourists

    Ahmet Tayfun

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In the era where the fierce competitive settings are ever increasing, the success of establishments is heavily dependent upon the internal Dynamics of the firm along with environmental settings as well as market conditions. Parallel to the technological development in the 20th century, the growth of transportation and communications facilitate the access of goods and services to the consumer markets and the abundance of the goods and services offered in the market paved the way for a complicated consumer market. This study dwells on the consumer behavior observed in tourism sector and research was conducted over German and Russian tourists in Alanya district. The statistical data gathered indicate that individual factors are in the first place in shaping the consumption behavior, in the second place comes marketing components and socio-economic ones are in the last place. The result of t-test suggests that there is a significant difference at 0.05 significance level in terms of the nationality and the level of effect of the three dimensions used in the study.

  14. Cultural Nationalism, Orientalism, Imperial Ambivalence: The Colored American Magazine and Pauline Elizabeth Hopkins

    Yu-Fang Cho

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available

    This essay examines African American novelist Pauline Hopkins’s deployment of the trope of respectable domesticity to contest black disenfranchisement in the context of African Americans’ ambivalent relationship to late-nineteenth-century US imperial expansion in the Asia Pacific. This essay analyzes Contending Forces (1900 in relation to two crucial yet underexplored contexts: first, Hopkins’s commentaries on international race relations; second, African American intellectuals’ commentaries on US imperial ventures in the Asia Pacific and on Chinese immigration in the Colored American Magazine, where Hopkins’s fictional works were serialized. Situated within these contexts of comparative racialization, Hopkins’s works offer critical responses to the masculine nationalist representations of black–Asian relations, illuminating the divisive effects of nationalist identification on differentially racialized subjects, the uneven effects of marriage on the black community, and this institution’s structural ties to imperialism and to the color-based class hierarchy within the imagined black community—all of which call for radical reimagining of race relations beyond the nation form.

  15. KEEPING CULTURAL GENES ALIVE

    Bai Shi

    2012-01-01

    China's contemporary culture and the protection of its diverse cultural heritage have become some of the most talked about issues today.Cultural prosperity was put forward as an important objective of the Central Government's national development strategy last year.However,the industrialization and commercialization of China's culture have been both criticized and celebrated.Many scholars believe industrialization and enormous government investment may not be the best means to protect intangible cultural heritage (ICH).

  16. Partnering with the Pinoleville Pomo Nation: Co-Design Methodology Case Study for Creating Sustainable, Culturally Inspired Renewable Energy Systems and Infrastructure

    Alice Agogino

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the co-design methodology created by the authors to partner with communities that have historical trauma associated with working with outsiders on projects that involved substantial use of engineering and science—renewable energy technologies, for example—that have not integrated their value system or has been historically denied to them. As a case study, we present the lessons learned from a partnership with the Pinoleville Pomo Nation (PPN of Ukiah, CA and UC Berkeley’s Community Assessment of Renewable Energy and Sustainability (CARES team to develop sustainable housing that utilizes sustainability best practices and renewable energy technology as well as reflect the long-standing culture and traditions of the PPN. We also present the Pomo-inspired housing design created by this partnership and illustrate how Native American nations can partner with universities and other academic organizations to utilize engineering expertise to co-design solutions that address the needs of the tribes.

  17. Cultural vs. Economic: Re-Visiting the Determinants of Fertility at a Sub-National Level in the U.S, 1990 - 2000

    Jeremy R. Porter

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that through the past century, and especially since 1950, the world population has grown at an accelerating pace landing the current world's population at about 6.5 billion and, according to UN projections, it is expected to reach 9.1 billion by 2050 (Bongaarts 2005. However, this growth is not uniform and tends to vary both regionally and intra-regionally around the world (Bongaarts 1998. There are competing theories as to the true determinants of fertility levels and these identified patterns (Caldwell 2001. The bulk of these theories pit economic determinants versus socio-cultural determinants as the primary indicators concerning the onset of fertility decline. However, most of this work has had an international focus with very few examining sub-national trends in fertility patterns. This paper draws on the work of one study which examined sub-national trends in the U.S. in hopes of better understanding current trends in determining fertility in the U.S. (Cutright 1983. An OLS regression approach is employed allowing for the examination of the two competing theories. Findings suggest that, while both are certainly significant, the role of economic determinants.

  18. Socio-economic and cultural factors associated with smoking prevalence among workers in the National Health System in Belo Horizonte

    Luiz Fábio Machado Barbosa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify factors related to smoking among health workers of the National Health System in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil.METHODS: A cross-sectional study based on a survey conducted between September 2008 and January 2009 with a stratified sample. Data on sociodemographic, health, employment, and work characteristics were analyzed. Poisson regression models with robust variance and estimation of unadjusted and adjusted prevalence ratios were used to establish associations at a 5% significance level for inclusion in the final model.RESULTS: In 1,759 questionnaires analyzed, in which the question related to smoking was answered, the overall prevalence of smoking was 15.7%. Reasonable relationship between requirements and available resources remained negatively correlated to smoking in the final model (PR = 0.75; 95%CI 0.58 - 0.96. The variables that remained positively associated with smoking were being male (PR = 1.75; 95%CI 1.36 - 2.25 and the following positions: community health workers (PR = 2.98; 95%CI 1.76 - 5.05, professionals involved in monitoring (PR = 3.86; 95%CI 1.63 - 5.01, administrative and other general services workers (PR = 2.47; 95%CI 1.51 - 4.05; technical mid-level workers (PR = 2.23; 95%CI 1.31 - 3.78, including nurses and practical nurses (PR = 2.07; 95%CI 1.18 - 3.64.CONCLUSION: Specific occupational subgroups were identified and should be prioritized in smoking cessation and prevention programs.

  19. Cultural change and environmentalism: a cross-national approach of mass publics and decision makers Mudança cultural e ambientalismo: uma abordagem transnacional sobre opinião pública e agentes decisórios

    Peter Ester

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The main focus of this study - the Global Environmental Survey (GOES - is the impact of cultural influences on environmental attitudes. GOES examines the cultural impact from a basic cross-national perspective, investigating the impact of cultural change and value shifts on environmental concern, attitudes, and behavior in both Western and non-Western societies. This study provides cross-national insights in how mass publics and decision makers in both developed and developing countries frame environmental problems and solutions. In addition, the project has shown how leading environmental decision makers and opinion leaders assess the environmental beliefs and attitudes of the public. Apparently, citizens are not yet ready to translate pro-environmental concerns into acceptance of far-reaching environmental policy measures. Citizens in both developed and developing countries seem to prefer voluntary lifestyle changes. Moving from environmental concern via policy support to actual (reported environmental behavior, we can conclude that persistent pro-environmental behavior does not describe citizens' environmental involvement and commitment. Our data indicate that environmentally relevant behaviors (e.g., transportation, energy use, recycling, household purchases, political activism do not form a consistent and coherent pattern. Practice of one type of ecologically conscious behavior does not predict engagement in another. It is not that people reserve a distinctive spot in their mental software for judging the environmental impact of habitual behaviors. Their mental mapping probably consists of manifold decisional heuristics, including comfort, health, safety, price, efficiency, effectiveness, and social responsibility, which are likely to be hierarchically ordered and in competition with environmental heuristics. A focus on specific behaviors, though, reveals that citizens may be deeply involved in "green" behavior. This is related in part to

  20. Türk Millî Arşiv Belgelerinde Millî Kültür Ve Türkler National Culture And Turks In The Documents Of Turkish National Archives

    Hüseyin DOĞRAMACIOĞLU

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available There are some documents about the Turkish national culture and literature in archives. These documents stored in archives and there has not been a comprehensive study on it. These documents are written in the Ottoman language and aren’t translated into modern languages, including Turkish language so far. This archive documents about culture and literature were published in the newspaper of Hâkimiyet-i Milliye (National Sovereignty. Turkish history was researched in different articles and the people were informed about Turkish culture when war years also by some researchers. All these studies have resulted in success. And Turkish people who filled with national spirit had won victories constantly. However, there has not been much research on this newspaper so far because of it was published with the Ottoman language. In this work, I want to give introductory information on these documents and would like to draw attention to this archive documentation.Documents related to the Turkish culture and literature of the Ottoman archives are also available. These documents are regularly published in the newspaper of Hakimiyet-i Milliye. Several pictures, stories and literary articles are those documents. Copies of the newspaper of the Turkish culture and literature are important aspects of research. In this article, the paper analyzed some of the literary and cultural articles. Türk millî kültür ve edebiyatı hakkında devlet arşivlerinde bazıbelgeler vardır. Bu belgeler üzerinde bugüne kadar kapsamlı bir çalışmaolmamıştır. Bu belgeler Osmanlı harfleriyle yazılmış ancak günümüzekadar Latin harfli Türkçe de dâhil olmak üzere hiçbir dileaktarılmamıştır. Türk kültürü ve edebiyatı ile ilgili olan bu arşivbelgeleri Hâkimiyet-i Milliye adlı gazetede yayınlanmıştır. Gazetede MillîMücadele yıllarında savaş haberlerinin yanında Türk tarihi ile ilgiliaraştırmalar bazı yazarlar tarafından farklı makalelerde

  1. Cultural Policy in Iceland

    Gudmundsson, Gestur

    2003-01-01

    on the continuing emphasis on central cultural institution and the Icelandic language. Since the 1970s Cold War conflicts have been replaced by a consensus on growing support to artists and an armth's length policy, and furthermore the 1990s have seen a strong move towards NPM and international participation.......The article examines the history of cultural policy in Iceland from a Nordic comparative perspective. National cultural policy takes form in the 19th and early 20th century as a part of the nation-building, emphasising the Icelandic language as the core of national identity, building cultural...

  2. Cultural participation in Europe

    Stevenson, David; Kann-Rasmussen, Nanna; Balling, Gitte

    2015-01-01

    Europe has a ‘problem’; it is becoming a ‘less cultural continent’ as fewer Europeans are ‘engaging in cultural activities’. This conclusion has been reached due to the findings of the latest cross national cultural participation survey. This paper questions the existence of this ‘problem...

  3. Culture and Negotiation

    Bülow, Anne Marie; Kumar, Rajesh

    2011-01-01

    The literature on cross-cultural negotiation has expanded considerably over the past few decades, but the findings are often ambiguous and sometimes even contradictory. This introduction highlights the critical areas where objections are commonly raised about the relevance of national culture......, the applicability of typologies that treat cultures as static, and the problem of ambiguous terminology. It may not be surprising that studies contradict each other given the ambiguity of the national cultural construct and variations in the context of the negotiating situations that are studied. The articles...... in this issue contribute to deepening our understanding about cross-cultural negotiation processes....

  4. Leadership and Organizational Culture

    宋丽娜

    2015-01-01

    This essay attempts to explore the relationship between leaders, organizational culture, and national culture. Leaders cre⁃ate“climate of the organization”with six mechanisms. Furthermore, leaders style of management is considerably influenced by their national culture based on Hofstede’s organizational culture theory. Varieties of examples and cases are analyzed to illustrate that leadership beliefs and practices have direct relationship with organizational culture and shape their individualistic communica⁃tion styles and goals that influence to a significant degree in establishing shared values, beliefs and practices among employees within an organization.

  5. Japanese nuclear power cooperation enhancing nuclear safety culture for Asian regions, the former Soviet Union and other Eastern-Block Nations

    Yamazaki, Tadamasa; Abe, Hiroshi; Moriya, Fukashi

    1996-01-01

    Japanese electric power industry has versatile programs of international cooperation in the field of nuclear power generation. Japan Electric Power Information Center (JEPIC) has been playing an essential role in executing these programs. The core of such activities is the 'International Invitation Program for Safety Management at Nuclear Power Plant' (IPSNP). IPSNP is sponsored by Japanese Government and aims to enhance the nuclear safety culture for the Former Soviet Union and other Eastern-Block Nations, inclusive of China. The program is started since 1992, and every year we invite some 100 nuclear specialists, so as to let them familiarize with the Japanese nuclear safety management practice. We have already welcomed more than 360 nuclear specialists, and when this program lasts for 10 years, total number of participants will be reached to 1,000 in all. Another feature of our cooperative programs is the JICA's 'Training Course for Nuclear Power Generation.' Since 1985, we have already invited some 60 training participants from the regions in Asia and the Pacific rim. This course is to deliver lectures in English under a broader curriculum on the nuclear power production in general. Furthermore, we have been dispatching the experienced nuclear experts to the Asian nations, such as China, Indonesia, etc. since 1984. This is to expedite to propagate the importance of safety in developing the nuclear power generation. Some 190 experienced experts have already been dispatched and successfully have executed the lectures and seminars on: water chemistry, regular inspection scheduling, plant performance evaluation, preoperation during commissioning stage, etc... (author)

  6. The Agency's Agreement with the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization concerning the Joint Operation of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste. Extension of the Agreement

    1983-02-01

    By an exchange of letters between the Directors General of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and the Agency, the duration of the agreement between the two organizations concerning the joint operation of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste has been extended until 31 December 1986.

  7. The Agency's Agreement with the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization concerning the Joint Operation of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste. Extension of the Agreement

    NONE

    1983-02-15

    By an exchange of letters between the Directors General of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and the Agency, the duration of the agreement between the two organizations concerning the joint operation of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste has been extended until 31 December 1986.

  8. Economic, social, and cultural aspects of livestock ranching on the Española and Canjilon Ranger Districts of the Santa Fe and Carson National Forests: a pilot study

    Carol Raish; Alice M. McSweeney

    2003-01-01

    The ranches of northern New Mexico, composed of land and livestock, are integral components of family and community life. This pilot study examines current economic, social, and cultural aspects of livestock operations owned by ranchers with Federal grazing permits (permittees) on the Canjilon and Española Ranger Districts of the Santa Fe and Carson National...

  9. Cultural Resurrection

    2007-01-01

    "Who are we?Where are we from?"Humans have been pondering these questions since the day they first came into being.One of the ways we preserve memories of the past is through our cul- tural heritage that has been passed on from generation to genera- tion.Intangible cultural heritage,as well as tangible cultural her- itage,is essential to the continuity of human civilization. Since the United Nations Educational,Scientific and Cultural Organization(UNESCO)unveiled the Masterpieces of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity in 2001,China has had Kunqu opera,Guqin and its music,the art of Uygur Muqam of Xinjiang and the traditional Mongolian folk song Long Song added to UNESCO’s protection list.It is now one of the coun-

  10. Adopting Basic Principles of the United Nations Academic Impact Initiative (UNAI: Can Cultural Differences Be Predicted from Value Orientations and Globalization?

    Andrea Nechtelberger

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The United Nations Academic Impact (UNAI Initiative has set forth 10 Basic Principles for higher education. In the present study, a 10 item self-report questionnaire measuring personal endorsement of these principles has been tested by self-report questionnaires with university and post-graduate students from Austria, China, Cyprus, India, Nigeria, and Slovakia (total N = 976, N = 627 female, mean age 24.7 years, s = 5.7. Starting from the assumptions of Moral Foundations Theory (MFT, we expected that personal attitudes toward the UNAI Basic Principles would be predicted by endorsement of various moral foundations as suggested by MFT and by the individual's degree of globalization. Whereas for the Austrian, Cypriot, and Nigerian sub- samples this assumption was largely confirmed, for the Chinese, Indian, and Slovak sub- samples only small amounts of the variance could be explained by regression models. All six sub-samples differed substantially with regard to their overall questionnaire responses: by five discriminant functions 83.6% of participants were classified correctly. We conclude that implementation of UNAI principles should adhere closely to the cultural requirements of the respective society and, where necessary should be accompanied by thorough informational campaigns about UN educational goals.

  11. Innovation in the strategies of Internationalization of Brazilian Multinationals: Evaluation of the Cultural National Dimensions: A Study Case of the Meat Processing Sector

    Riccardo Rovai

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article sketches the evolution of Brazilian multinational companies, from the perspective of the development of Latin-American multinational companies, with respect to the process of globalization. With this article, we looked to characterize the typical profile of these enterprises in agreement with the Dunning Model to confirm if this typology is adequate for the characterization of internationalization strategies. We also explored the Theory of the Cultural Dimensions of Hofstede. While doing this, we analyzed which model measures the strategic alignment and is more orientated in terms of: (i exploration of natural resources and advantages of costs of labor not qualified (resource seeking, advantages; (ii location and synergies of market (market seeking, investments; (iii search of strategic assets of the type efficiency seeking (for what they look to rationalize the production and to explore savings of specialization and location, investments; and (iv type of strategic asset seeking (turned to the acquisition of resources and competences with the objective to develop competitiveness through of the innovation and growth of strategic capacities. We also summarize the referential system that makes possible the development of future inquiries for the delineation of the principal strategies, of the public politics of the National States, and also the financial strategies of these enterprises. Keywords: Strategic innovation; Brazilian multinationals; foreign investment; globalization; Latin American multinationals and multinationals from emerging countries

  12. Adopting Basic Principles of the United Nations Academic Impact Initiative (UNAI): Can Cultural Differences Be Predicted from Value Orientations and Globalization?

    Nechtelberger, Andrea; Renner, Walter; Nechtelberger, Martin; Supeková, Soňa Chovanová; Hadjimarkou, Maria; Offurum, Chino; Ramalingam, Panchalan; Senft, Birgit; Redfern, Kylie

    2017-01-01

    The United Nations Academic Impact (UNAI) Initiative has set forth 10 Basic Principles for higher education. In the present study, a 10 item self-report questionnaire measuring personal endorsement of these principles has been tested by self-report questionnaires with university and post-graduate students from Austria, China, Cyprus, India, Nigeria, and Slovakia (total N = 976, N = 627 female, mean age 24.7 years, s = 5.7). Starting from the assumptions of Moral Foundations Theory (MFT), we expected that personal attitudes toward the UNAI Basic Principles would be predicted by endorsement of various moral foundations as suggested by MFT and by the individual's degree of globalization. Whereas for the Austrian, Cypriot, and Nigerian sub- samples this assumption was largely confirmed, for the Chinese, Indian, and Slovak sub- samples only small amounts of the variance could be explained by regression models. All six sub-samples differed substantially with regard to their overall questionnaire responses: by five discriminant functions 83.6% of participants were classified correctly. We conclude that implementation of UNAI principles should adhere closely to the cultural requirements of the respective society and, where necessary should be accompanied by thorough informational campaigns about UN educational goals.

  13. Adopting Basic Principles of the United Nations Academic Impact Initiative (UNAI): Can Cultural Differences Be Predicted from Value Orientations and Globalization?

    Nechtelberger, Andrea; Renner, Walter; Nechtelberger, Martin; Supeková, Soňa Chovanová; Hadjimarkou, Maria; Offurum, Chino; Ramalingam, Panchalan; Senft, Birgit; Redfern, Kylie

    2017-01-01

    The United Nations Academic Impact (UNAI) Initiative has set forth 10 Basic Principles for higher education. In the present study, a 10 item self-report questionnaire measuring personal endorsement of these principles has been tested by self-report questionnaires with university and post-graduate students from Austria, China, Cyprus, India, Nigeria, and Slovakia (total N = 976, N = 627 female, mean age 24.7 years, s = 5.7). Starting from the assumptions of Moral Foundations Theory (MFT), we expected that personal attitudes toward the UNAI Basic Principles would be predicted by endorsement of various moral foundations as suggested by MFT and by the individual's degree of globalization. Whereas for the Austrian, Cypriot, and Nigerian sub- samples this assumption was largely confirmed, for the Chinese, Indian, and Slovak sub- samples only small amounts of the variance could be explained by regression models. All six sub-samples differed substantially with regard to their overall questionnaire responses: by five discriminant functions 83.6% of participants were classified correctly. We conclude that implementation of UNAI principles should adhere closely to the cultural requirements of the respective society and, where necessary should be accompanied by thorough informational campaigns about UN educational goals. PMID:29180977

  14. Self-reported health as a cultural health determinant in Arab and Jewish Israelis MABAT--National Health and Nutrition Survey 1999-2001.

    Baron-Epel, Orna; Kaplan, Giora; Haviv-Messika, Amalia; Tarabeia, Jalal; Green, Manfred S; Kaluski, Dorit Nitzan

    2005-09-01

    Subjective health (SH) status serves as a measure of health in many studies of health-related issues as it is a good predictor of mortality, morbidity, and use of health services. The measure is used in many population groups. However, the degree to which it measures the same condition in different ethnic groups is not clear. Within Israel's first National Health and Nutrition Survey (MABAT) conducted during 1999-2001, face-to-face interviews were held with 3222 Israeli interviewees, 2379 Jews and 843 Arabs, aged between 25-64 years. Respondents reported their SH, co-morbidity, and other socioeconomic characteristics. Arabs reported higher levels of SH than Jews. In logistic regression analysis, co-morbidity was a much stronger correlate of poorer SH in the Arab than in the Jewish population. The association between socioeconomic variables depended on ethnic group and sex. The findings indicate that SH in Jews and Arabs does not necessarily have the same meaning in relation to objective measures of health, and caution should be exercised in the use of this measure in different population groups with different cultures. Arabs tend to evaluate health better than Jews even though life expectancy is lower and morbidity and mortality are higher in the former population group. Yet diagnosis of a disease increases the frequency of reporting lower SH, more in Arabs than in Jews.

  15. Family culture in mental health help-seeking and utilization in a nationally representative sample of Latinos in the United States: The NLAAS.

    Villatoro, Alice P; Morales, Eduardo S; Mays, Vickie M

    2014-07-01

    Considering the central role of familismo in Latino culture, it is important to assess the extent to which familismo affects mental health help-seeking. This study examined the role of behavioral familismo, the level of perceived family support, in the use of mental health services of Latinos in the United States. Data come from the National Latino and Asian American Study (NLAAS), a representative household survey examining the prevalence of mental disorders and services utilization among Latinos and Asian Americans. Analyses were limited to Latino adults with a clinical need for mental health services, indexed by meeting DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for any mood, anxiety, or substance use disorder during the past 12 months (N = 527). One-third of Latinos with a clinical need used any type of service in the past year, including specialty mental health, general medical, and informal or religious services. High behavioral familismo was significantly associated with increased odds of using informal or religious services, but not specialty or medical services. Self-perceived need and social perceptions of need for care within close networks (i.e., told by family/friends to seek professional help) also were significant predictors of service use. These results carry important implications toward expansions of the mental health workforce in the informal and religious services settings.

  16. Impact of National Culture in Foreign Military Sales Programs: A Case Study of the Swiss and Finnish F/A-18 Foreign Military Sales

    Shaw, Carol

    1996-01-01

    .... The issues brought forth in this study will demonstrate the necessity for those employees who interact with people from foreign cultures to ensure that they posses adequate training in cross-cultural communications...

  17. National identity and global culture

    Michele Marsonet

    2010-04-01

    The paper delves into the recent events and attacks either undertaken or influenced by Al-Shabaab, including a snap shot of its threat to humanitarian aid personnel as well as the Africa Union troops who are desperately trying to lower the intensity of conflict along the Somalia Kenya border area and Al-Shabaab’s actions to secure financial resources.

  18. The Second National Research Conference “History, Economics and Culture of the Medieval Turko-Tatar States of Western Siberia” (Kurgan, 17–18 April 2014

    D.N. Maslyuzhenko

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The article summarizes the results of the Second National Research Conference “History, Economics and Culture of the Medieval Turko-Tatar States of Western Siberia”, which was held in Kurgan on 17th–18th April 2014. 38 researchers from Russia, Kazakhstan, and Ukraine participated at the Conference. The Conference was focused on several topics. On the first day, the Conference started with the issues of the Shiban’s ulus history and a role of the Shibanids in the history of the Golden Horde, including the issue of the borders of these lands, the ulus of Jochi’s place in its administrative structure, the participation of representatives of the dynasty in the events of the Great Zamyatnya (i.e, the Great Distemper and strives of the 1420’s. There were also discussed the ethnic and political processes in the Tyumen and Siberian Yurt. Considerable attention was paid to the Turkization of the Western Siberian population and formation of various groups of the Siberian Tatars. Researchers have noted the limitations of the source base of the late-medieval history of the region and the need for a comprehensive approach to the research involving experts in the fields of history, archaeology, ethnography, anthropology, linguistics. A separate debate was held on the role of the Nogai and Bukhara factor in the history of the Kuchum Siberian khanate. On the second day, there were discussed various aspects of the Turkic-Tatar peoples’ occurrence from the Ural-Irtysh interfluve to the Russian State. There were presented reports both on the policy and destiny of the Kuchum descendants and legal and military aspects of the Tatar yurtes’ subordination. There was held a discussion about two versions of the Ichkinski Tatar ethnogenesis as a special group of the Tatar population of the region. Thereupon, the conference participants called for a cautious stance on the use of ethnic reconstructions in Turkic history and their use in the construction of

  19. Music, culture and identity

    Ilir Ramadani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available At the time of globalization it is difficult to pretend avoiding music culture and identity from political, cultural and social developments. Thus, it is impossible for the music to be unshakable and to represent national identity by not taking and giving nothing to culture. The dynamics of life and the rapid development of technology make it impossible for the culture to remain unaffected in terms of sharing experiences social experiences. Culture represents our current course, both in terms of politics, also in the social and human aspects. Through the technology it is possible for our children to be equal with children of all other countries, to exchange information and to connect directly with all countries of the world. Musical education is one of the main factors of cultural development and preservation of national identity. Identity consists of everything we posses and reflect. We are those who distinguish from each other and have a common denominator compared to other nations.

  20. DIAGNOSIS OF CULTURAL ORGANIZATIONS

    ALBU MĂDĂLINA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cultural institution management is to direct the organization to a specific cultural profile purpose, namely production values esthetic sense, artistic, moral, spiritual, distribution, promotion of these values, protection and circulation of cultural heritage. In this regard, an analysis in the diagnosis cultural organizations aims to determine the main strengths and weaknesses, assess the potential and making recommendations focused on the root causes of failures and positive aspects. This paper presents considerations diligence activity Culture House "IL Caragiale "in Ploiesti. The mission of this organization is to contribute to the cultural development of the community by initiating projects and cultural programs, offer development programs and services to meet cultural needs, increase public access to diverse cultural life, providing a constant presence institution circuit local, national, European and international level. Conclusions drawn from the analysis shows that in a world of economic globalization, information and culture in a company in constant change, in a competitive market where there is information readily available means and leisure, but not cultural consistency in a social environment where interest in culture of people is declining, the situation of the population is impaired, the remuneration of staff working in the field of cultural education is demotivating, the funds allocated to culture have grown lately effectively lead a cultural institution is a challenge.

  1. Absence of National Culture in Foreign Language Teaching and Intercultural Communication Competence Training of College Students in China Frontier Minority Areas

    Jia, Jinan

    2015-01-01

    The absence of Chinese culture in foreign language teaching has a strong impact on the exchange between different cultures, and is also an obstacle to intercultural communication competence training. In general, English teaching level in China frontier minority areas is far behind that in developed areas, and shows its own teaching and cultural…

  2. Text of the agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization concerning the joint operation of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste

    1996-02-01

    The text of the Agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization concerning the Joint Operation of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Agreement was approved by the Agency's Board of Governors on 25 February 1993 and by the UNESCO General Conference on 16 November 1993

  3. Text of the agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization and the Government of the Republic of Italy concerning the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The text of the Agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization and the Government of the Republic of Italy concerning the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Agreement was approved by the Agency`s Board of Governors on 25 February 1993, by the UNESCO General Conference on 16 November 1993, and ratified by the Italian Parliament on 2 January 1995.

  4. Text of the agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization and the Government of the Republic of Italy concerning the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste

    1996-02-01

    The text of the Agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization and the Government of the Republic of Italy concerning the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Agreement was approved by the Agency's Board of Governors on 25 February 1993, by the UNESCO General Conference on 16 November 1993, and ratified by the Italian Parliament on 2 January 1995

  5. The impact of nurse working hours on patient safety culture: a cross-national survey including Japan, the United States and Chinese Taiwan using the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture

    Wu, Yinghui; Fujita, Shigeru; Seto, Kanako; Ito, Shinya; Matsumoto, Kunichika; Huang, Chiu-Chin; Hasegawa, Tomonori

    2013-01-01

    Background A positive patient safety culture (PSC) is one of the most critical components to improve healthcare quality and safety. The Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS), developed by the US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, has been used to assess PSC in 31 countries. However, little is known about the impact of nurse working hours on PSC. We hypothesized that long nurse working hours would deteriorate PSC, and that the deterioration patterns would vary between coun...

  6. Armenian Cultural Astronomy

    Farmanyan, S. V.; Mickaelian, A. M.

    2015-07-01

    Cultural Astronomy is the reflection of sky events in various fields of nations' culture. In foreign literature this field is also called "Astronomy in Culture" or "Astronomy and Culture". Cultural astronomy is the set of interdisciplinary fields studying the astronomical systems of current or ancient societies and cultures. It is manifested in Religion, Mythology, Folklore, Poetry, Art, Linguistics and other fields. In recent years, considerable attention has been paid to this sphere, particularly international organizations were established, conferences are held and journals are published. Armenia is also rich in cultural astronomy. The present paper focuses on Armenian archaeoastronomy and cultural astronomy, including many creations related to astronomical knowledge; calendars, rock art, mythology, etc. On the other hand, this subject is rather poorly developed in Armenia; there are only individual studies on various related issues (especially many studies related to Anania Shirakatsi) but not coordinated actions to manage this important field of investigation.

  7. Formation of National Identity through Sport

    Jørgensen, Per

    The area of Danish national consciousness, national feelings or nationalism which was culturally expressed and formed through sport journalism is examined in the period 1908-1960.......The area of Danish national consciousness, national feelings or nationalism which was culturally expressed and formed through sport journalism is examined in the period 1908-1960....

  8. Cultural Competence Revisited

    Garran, Ann Marie; Werkmeister Rozas, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    In 2001, the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) adopted 10 discrete standards of culturally competent practice which undergird our commitment to diversity and social justice. The concept of intersectionality is newly emerging in social work, though, causing us to reflect on our current conceptualizations of cultural competence.…

  9. Measuring Cultural Diversity

    Patsiurko, Natalka; Campbell, John L.; Hall, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Many claim that national economic success depends upon cultural homogeneity. We collect new time-series data and develop new measures of ethnic, linguistic and religious fractionalization for the OECD countries. We show that cultural diversity may vary by type across countries and over short peri...

  10. Experiencing Global Culture in Vatel

    Kampf, Constance Elizabeth; Broillet, Alexandra; John, Claudette

    2015-01-01

    To explore the meaning of “global culture” in a professional communication context, this paper explores the “unsettled” global culture of Vatel, a private business school educating students from nearly 50 different countries for the hospitality industry. This paper explores the role of knowledge...... management in understanding global culture, arguing that the notion of “unsettled” cultures demonstrates how ideologies function in global settings and draw on national “settled” cultural resources. In unpacking different aspects of Vatel's culture this paper questions assumptions built into cultural frames...... of reference by offering a global culture frame, drawing on cultural resources from country based “settled” cultural contexts, and reflects on how global cultural contexts can benefit from a knowledge management approach to this dynamic between “settled” cultural contexts and “unsettled” cultural ideologies...

  11. Index of Cultural Significance as a Potential Tool for Conservation of Plants Diversity by Communities in The Kerinci Seblat National Park

    Asvic Helida

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Kerinci community is an Indonesian indigenous people who live in Kerinci Regency, Jambi Province. They have local knowledge of the surrounding vegetation that has become a cultural unifying factor within the community. The study reported here aimed to analyze the importance of plants of particular cultural significance and to review efforts to conserve these plants based on Kerinci cultural values. The study was conducted for eight months from October 2013 to May 2014 at three locations chosen purposively, they were Lempur Baru Village, Lama Tamiai Village and Ulu Jernih Village. The data was obtained using a participatory observation approach, based on key informant interviews, while the assessment of plant distribution was based on a whole-of-community viewpoint. The research data consisted of data on the botany of the plants, on the utilization of the plants and on assessment of plant distribution. Analysis of data for 234 plant species used a formula for index of cultural significance (ICS adopted from Turner (1988. The study showed that rice (Oryza sativa L. and cinnamon (Cinnamomum burmanni (Nees & T.Nees Blume are important plant species with values for the Cultural Index of 59 and 57 respectively, while the species known as 'inggu' (Ruta angustifolia (L. Pers had the lowest ICS, of 3. The 'Tri-Stimulus Amar' conservation analysis developed by Zuhud (2007 is seen as a useful model for considering the cultural values that motivate the Kerinci community's plant conservation actions.

  12. On viewing culture as situation

    Kampf, Constance

    cultural contexts. Bazerman, Charles. (1988): Shaping Written Knowledge: The Genre & Activity of the Experimental Article in Science. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press.   Hall, Edward T. (1976). Beyond Culture. Garden City, N.Y.: Anchor Press. Hofstede, Geert. Culture's Consequences: International...... Differences in Work-Related Values. Abr. ed. Newbury Park: Sage Publications, 1984. ---. Culture's Consequences: Comparing Values, Behaviors, Institutions, and Organizations Across Nations. Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications, 2001. ---. Cultures and Organizations: Software of the Mind. New York: Mc...

  13. Cultural Journalism and Cultural Critique in a changing Media Landscape

    Nørgaard Kristensen, Nete; From, Unni

    2015-01-01

    This special issue addresses a topic of journalism studies that has previously been somewhat neglected but which has gained increasing scholarly attention since the mid-2000s: the coverage and evaluation of art and culture, or what we term “cultural journalism and cultural critique.......” In this introduction, we highlight three issues that serve to frame the study of cultural journalism and cultural critique more generally and the eight articles of this special issue more specifically: (1) the constant challenge of demarcating cultural journalism and cultural critique, including the interrelations...... of “journalism” and “critique”; (2) the dialectic of globalisation’s cultural homogenisation, on the one hand, and the specificity of local/national cultures, on the other; and (3) the digital media landscape seen in terms of the need to rethink, perhaps even redefine cultural journalism and cultural critique...

  14. Cultural Diversity or Cultural Imperialism: Liberal Education in Egypt.

    Blanks, David R.

    1998-01-01

    A faculty member's experience at the American University in Cairo (Egypt) reveals that pluralism and tolerance are western concepts, even within the college curriculum. National identity affords cultural stability: where the American melting-pot experience is reinforced by the notion of cultural diversity, the national identity of Egypt is…

  15. Korean Screen Cultures

    Screen Cultures sets out to redress this imbalance with a broad selection of essays spanning both North and South as well as different methodological approaches, from ethnographic and audience studies to cultural materialist readings. The first section of the book, «The South», highlights popular media...... new approaches to Korean popular culture beyond national borders and includes work on K-pop and Korean television drama. This book is a vital addition to existing scholarship on Korean popular culture, offering a unique view by providing an imaginary unification of the two Koreas negotiated through...

  16. Conserving and Sustaining Culture through Traditional Dress ...

    The government of Botswana through its National Policy on Culture (2001) and the National Ecotourism Strategy (2002) is committed to preserving national culture and historical heritage. The policy stipulates that valuable heritage must be preserved and developed in order to foster a sense of national identity, pride and ...

  17. Scientific but people-oriented education and multi-cultural adaptations of international heliophysical year education resources: A perspective from a developing nation

    Faiyetole, Ayodele Adekunle

    2008-12-01

    The world is made up of people of varied cultures who speak different languages. In Africa and, to be more specific, in Nigeria, there is a wide diversity of languages and customs. Nigeria has about 250 ethnic social units, to the extent that just a few of the populace have an effective understanding of English, the nation’s official language. Hence, most communications are carried out in the local languages. To efficiently communicate the heliophysical and other scientific and technological phenomena to the general public, quite a lot would have to be done in the cultural and language context. There is a need to adequately involve social scientists in the education and public outreach programs relating to space science and technology. This paper looks at various ways in which languages and diversity in cultures could be harnessed more effectively to communicate science. The paper also discusses how the various International Heliophysical Year education resources could be adapted to a multi-cultural society, therefore, able to reach more people in the world.

  18. Trans-national identities, modes of networking and integration in a multi-cultural society: A study of migrant Bangladeshis in Peninsular Malaysia

    Sultana, Nayeem

    2007-01-01

    Nation is defined as an 'imagined community' (Benedict Anderson 1991) of the inhabitants of a country that shares a common sense of identity. Among the migrant Bangladeshis in Malaysia, consisting of very diverse groups of people, a common national identity as Bangladeshi citizens or Malaysians is not a reality. Rather, the nurturing of class interests and exploitation as well as regionalism and affiliation with local power brokers are very common. Along with this the formation of hybrid tran...

  19. An Examination of It Occupational Culture: Interpretation, Measurement, and Impact

    Jacks, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Past IS studies on culture have primarily focused on two levels of analysis: national culture and organizational culture. The gap in our knowledge of culture is in the area of occupational culture of IT professionals. Occupational culture, unlike organizational culture, is not bounded by a single organization, but rather forms itself around…

  20. Culture and rural health.

    Farmer, Jane; Bourke, Lisa; Taylor, Judy; Marley, Julia V; Reid, John; Bracksley, Stacey; Johnson, Nicole

    2012-10-01

    This paper considers the role of culture in rural health, suggesting that the concept and its impacts are insufficiently understood and studied. It reviews some of the ways that culture has been considered in (rural) health, and states that culture is either used ambiguously and broadly - for example, suggesting that there is a rural culture, or narrowly - indeed perhaps interchangeably with ethnicity, for example Aboriginal culture as a unity. The paper notes that, although culture is a dynamic social concept, it has been adopted into a biomedical research paradigm as though it is fixed. Culture is often treated as though it is something that can be addressed simplistically, for example, through cultural sensitivity education. Authors suggest that culture is an unaddressed 'elephant in the room' in rural health, and that exploring cultural differences and beliefs and facing up to cultural differences are vital in understanding and addressing rural health and health system challenges. © 2012 The Authors. Australian Journal of Rural Health © National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  1. Culture at the Country Level

    Maseland, R.K.J.; Hoorn, A.A.J. van; Herk, H. van; Torelli, C.J.

    2017-01-01

    This chapter introduces and critically discusses the idea of measuring the culture of countries and cross-national differences therein. We start by elaborating the theoretical foundations for studying culture at the country level. We highlight the use of countries or nations as a unit of analysis and pay special attention to the way in which a group-level construct such as culture has implications at lower levels of analysis, affecting the values and beliefs of individuals. After briefly trac...

  2. Cultural Connotation of the Decorative Art in the Benzhu Temple of Bai Nationality%白族本主庙装饰艺术的文化内涵

    饶峻姝; 饶峻妮

    2012-01-01

    本主庙是白族宗教文化最典型的物质形态,内容丰富、雕饰精美,集中体现了白族建筑中高度成熟的建筑、雕刻、彩绘、书画艺术技巧,也反映了少数民族文化与原始宗教文化、汉文化、周边少数民族地域文化在建筑中的交融与叠合。本主庙借助建筑外观形式、装饰、色彩等要素,用独特的语言形式表达丰富而深邃的文化信息,主要表现在敬神礼人,以人为本;求吉祈福,乐天安命;文化整合,雅俗共赏三个方面。%Benzhu temple is the most typical physical form of religious culture for Bai nationality, inside which the cultural content is rich and the sculpture is exquisite. Benzhu temple is the concentrated reflection of Bai people's highly matured skills in building, carving, colored drawing, handwriting and painting. It also reflects the cultural blending of the ethnic minorities primitive religions, Han people, and the neighboring minority regions in architecture. Through the appearance, decoration and colour of the building and with unique language form, Benzhu temple conveys rich and profound cultural messages, which emphasize three aspects: god and man, praying and fate, and cultural integration.

  3. Icelandic National Culture in Relation to Hofstede´s Five Dimensions Íslensk þjóðmenning í ljósi menningarvídda Hofstede

    Gylfi Dalmann Aðalsteinsson

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available According to the cultural literature, societies are composed from many different culturally dissimilar countries (Hofstede, 2001; House et al., 2004. Geert Hofstede is one of many researchers who had developed a method to measure national culture. His research on national culture has had a great impact on how we understand and measure different culture differences. The purpose of this research is to investigate the characteristics of Icelandic national culture and compare with Bearden et.al. (2006 findings, where data was used from university students from four countries, Argentina, Austria, Japan and USA. In this study undergraduate students from the school of Social Science at the University of Iceland were asked to answer a questionnaire (VSM 94 and a total of 427 responses were usable with the response rate of 15%. According to the results, Icelandic national culture can be characterized by low power distance (PDI, high individualism (IDV, low masculinity (MAS, high uncertainty-avoidance (UAI and average long-term orientation (LTO.Rannsóknir Geert Hofstede á þjóðmenningu og framsetning hans á stjórnun innan ólíkra menningarheima hefur haft mikil áhrif á skilning manna á mismunandi menningu skipulagsheilda í ólíkum löndum. Þannig hafa menn öðlast meiri skilning á menningarlegum mismun skipulagsheilda sem hefur haft mikil áhrif á stjórnunarfræðin. Í þessari rannsókn er leitast við að svara því hver séu einkenni þjóðmenningar á Íslandi út frá víddum Hofstede og hver þessi einkenni eru samanborin við sambærilegt úrtak í fjórum löndum. Ástæðan fyrir vali á úrtaki eru tvíþættar. Annars vegar er lögð áhersla á að úrtakið sé eins einsleitt og hægt er (Hofstede, 1994 og því lágmarks breytileiki hvað varðar aldur, menntun, tekjur og aðrar bakgrunnsbreytur og hins vegar er leitast við að velja úrtak til að gera rannsóknina samanburðarhæfa við rannsókn Bearden, Money og

  4. National Tribal Building Codes Summit

    National Tribal Building Codes summit statement developed to support tribes interested in adopting green and culturally-appropriate building systems to ensure safe, sustainable, affordable, and culturally-appropriate buildings on tribal lands.

  5. Nuclear Safeguards Culture

    Findlay, T.

    2015-01-01

    The paper will consider safeguards culture both at the IAEA and among member states. It will do so through the lens of organizational culture theory and taking into account developments in safeguards since the Iraq case of the early 1990s. The study will seek to identify the current characteristics of safeguards culture and how it has evolved since the 93+2 programme was initiated, as well as considering the roles of the most important purveyors of such culture, including member states and their national safeguards authorities, the General Conference and Board of Governors, the Director General, the Secretariat as a whole, the Safeguards Department and the inspectorate. The question of what might be an optimal safeguards culture at the Agency and among member states will be investigated, along with the issue of how such a culture might be engendered or encouraged. (author)

  6. Beyond cultural values? Cultural leadership ideals and entrepreneurship

    Stephan, Ute; Pathak, Saurav

    2016-01-01

    This paper offers a fresh perspective on national culture and entrepreneurship research. It explores the role of Culturally-endorsed implicit Leadership Theories (CLTs) – i.e., the cultural expectations about outstanding, ideal leadership – on individual entrepreneurship. Developing arguments based on culture-entrepreneurship fit, we predict that charismatic and self-protective CLTs positively affect entrepreneurship. They provide a context that enables entrepreneurs to be co-operative in ord...

  7. Culture collections.

    Smith, David

    2012-01-01

    Culture collections no matter their size, form, or institutional objectives play a role in underpinning microbiology, supplying the resources for study, innovation, and discovery. Their basic roles include providing a mechanism for ex situ conservation of organisms; they are repositories for strains subject to publication, taking in safe, confidential, and patent deposits from researchers. They supply strains for use; therefore, the microorganisms provided must be authentic and preserved well, and any associated information must be valid and sufficient to facilitate the confirmation of their identity and to facilitate their use. The organisms must be collected in compliance with international conventions, international and national legislation and distributed to users indicating clearly the terms and conditions under which they are received and can be used. Collections are harmonizing approaches and characterizing strains to meet user needs. No one single collection can carry out this task alone, and therefore, it is important that output and strategy are coordinated to ensure culture collections deliver the basic resources and services microbiological innovation requires. This chapter describes the types of collection and how they can implement quality management systems and operate to deliver their basic functions. The links to information sources given not only provide support for the practitioners within collections but also provide guidance to users on accessing the huge resource available and how they can help ensure microbiology has the resources and a solid platform for future development. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Right to Education in the International Regulations on Protection of Human Rights and its regulation in the National Legal System : Preliminary Analysis from the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights

    Maria Creusa de Araújo Borges

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We examine, in this article, the question of the right to education, from the Univer- sal Declaration of Human Rights (1948 and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (1966. In the Brazilian national law, they are analyzed the Federal Constitution of 1988 and the Law of Guidelines and Bases of National Educa- tion, 1996, regarding the regulation of education matter, in coordination with the inter- national instruments in question. It is noteworthy that the regulation of the matter at the national level, is influenced by the recognition of this right in international norms, but advances in the recognition of the right to higher education of marginalized social groups, expanding the mandatory gratuity and beyond elementary school because in the Brazilian case, basic education is compulsory and the principle of free governs the entire education system in official establishments. Set up in this way, the existence of an essential core regarding the right to education, which is fully chargeable.

  9. Urine culture

    Culture and sensitivity - urine ... when urinating. You also may have a urine culture after you have been treated for an infection. ... when bacteria or yeast are found in the culture. This likely means that you have a urinary ...

  10. Women's rights are human rights : The practice of the United Nations Human Rights Committee and the Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights

    van Leeuwen, F.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/265778646

    2009-01-01

    ‘Women’s rights are human rights!’ This notion may seem self evident, as the international system for the promotion and the protection of human rights that was installed under the auspice of the United Nations (UN) builds on the idea of equality in dignity and rights of men and women. Yet, as was

  11. Celebrating the Immigrant: An Administrative History of the Statue of Liberty National Monument, 1952-1982. Cultural Resource Management Study 10.

    Blumberg, Barbara

    This book focuses on the history of the Statue of Liberty National Monument from 1952 through 1982. It describes how the monument has come to symbolize an expanding set of ideals, how the symbolism has produced responses in various groups of people ranging from celebrations to physical attacks upon the Statue, and the manner in which the monument…

  12. Organizational culture

    Schein, Edgar H.

    1988-01-01

    Cultural orientations of an organization can be its greatest strength, providing the basis for problem solving, cooperation, and communication. Culture, however, can also inhibit needed changes. Cultural changes typically happen slowly – but without cultural change, many other organizational changes are doomed to fail. The dominant culture of an organization is a major contributor to its success. But, of course, no organizational culture is purely one type or another. And the existence of sec...

  13. The impact of nurse working hours on patient safety culture: a cross-national survey including Japan, the United States and Chinese Taiwan using the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture.

    Wu, Yinghui; Fujita, Shigeru; Seto, Kanako; Ito, Shinya; Matsumoto, Kunichika; Huang, Chiu-Chin; Hasegawa, Tomonori

    2013-10-07

    A positive patient safety culture (PSC) is one of the most critical components to improve healthcare quality and safety. The Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS), developed by the US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, has been used to assess PSC in 31 countries. However, little is known about the impact of nurse working hours on PSC. We hypothesized that long nurse working hours would deteriorate PSC, and that the deterioration patterns would vary between countries. Moreover, the common trends observed in Japan, the US and Chinese Taiwan may be useful to improve PSC in other countries. The purpose of this study was to clarify the impact of long nurse working hours on PSC in Japan, the US, and Chinese Taiwan using HSOPS. The HSOPS questionnaire measures 12 sub-dimensions of PSC, with higher scores indicating a more positive PSC. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated using a generalized linear mixed model to evaluate the impact of working hours on PSC outcome measures (patient safety grade and number of events reported). Tukey's test and Cohen's d values were used to verify the relationships between nurse working hours and the 12 sub-dimensions of PSC. Nurses working ≥60 h/week in Japan and the US had a significantly lower OR for patient safety grade than those working working ≥40 h/week had a significantly higher OR for the number of events reported. The mean score on 'staffing' was significantly lower in the ≥60-h group than in the Japan and Chinese Taiwan. Patient safety grade deteriorated and the number of events reported increased with long working hours. Among the 12 sub-dimensions of PSC, long working hours had an impact on 'staffing' and 'teamwork within units' in Japan, the US and Chinese Taiwan.

  14. Diverse cultures at work: ensuring safety and health through leadership and participation

    Starren, A.; Luijters, K.; Drupsteen, L.; Vilkevicius, G.; Stulginskis, A.; Eeckelaert, L.; Elsler, D.

    2013-01-01

    The differences between cultures are helpful in understanding discrepancies when several nationalities are working together. Cross-cultural studies describe characteristics of cultures and differences between different cultures. Therefore, the cross-cultural literature is very helpful in describing

  15. Sovereignty, wealth, culture and technology: Mainland China and Taiwan grapple with the parameters of 'nation state' in the 21st century

    Emanuel Pastreich

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Este texto introduce los antecedentes históricos de las actuales confrontaciones y negociaciones entre Taiwán, llamada Formosa (" la isla hermosa" en portugués y el continente, es decir las relaciones con Portugal y Holanda,  con los sobrevivientes de la dinastía de Ming y de la dinastía de Qing (1644-1911, con Japón, y Estados Unidos. Los intereses extranjeros han complicado el controlo sobre Taiwán. Se incluye también una consideración de la relación de la Republica Nacionalista China y de la República Popular Comunista China. El debate sobre cultura, la economía y el control político entre estas dos entidades políticas es una preocupación por la actual legitimidad de ambas entidades. Por otra parte, los desafíos de la globalización complican el cuadro en que la convergencia impar de la convergencia económica y cultural con tensiones políticas puede ser representante de los conflictos que encontraremos en este siglo. El artículo considera los lazos económicos, culturales, y tecnológicos que continúan atando Taiwán y el continente a pesar de diferencias serias y se cierra con una pequeña consideración de las posibilidades de una solución pacífica de largo plazo.______________ABSTRACT:This paper introduces the historical background of the present confrontations and negotiations between Taiwan and the mainland in terms of Formosa’s ("the beautiful island" in Portuguese convoluted relations with the Portugal and Holland, survivors of the Ming dynasty, the Qing dynasty (1644-1911, Japan, and the United States. The foreign interests who have had control of Taiwan make its sovereignty more complex. A consideration of the relationship of the Nationalist Republic of China and the Communist People’s Republic of China is also included. The debate on culture, economics and political control between their two political entities is informed past events, and a concern for the present legitimacy of both entities. Moreover, the

  16. Cross-cultural Adaptation of the EORTC QLQ CR-29 Questionnaire for Use in Colorectal Cancer Patients at the National Cancer Institute of Colombia

    Calvo, Oscar; Oliveros, Ricardo; Sanchez, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To validate a cross-cultural version of the EORTC QLQ CR-29 questionnaire version 2.0 (neutral Spanish) for use in Colombian patients. Methods: The EORTC quality of life group algorithm was applied including translation, translation comparison, reverse translation, and pilot application of the questionnaire. Results: The terms used to define the answers across items were modified. In four items the instrument was also modified using different words. The pilot verified a better understanding after the changes. Conclusions: An adapted version of the EORTC QLQ CR-29 is available for Colombia. Thus, validation of psychometric properties through its application in colorectal cancer patients is currently suitable.

  17. Cultura popular e nacionalismo musical: uma discussão das ideias folcloristas sobre a música popular no Brasil * Popular culture and musical nationalism: a discussion of folklorists ideas about popular music in Brazil

    ISMAEL DE OLIVEIRA GEROLAMO

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: Neste trabalho discutimos como a noção de cultura popular torna-se elemento central para os debates em torno do nacionalismo nas esferas cultural e artística. Exploraremos, mais especificamente, as ideias de Mário de Andrade sobre o nacionalismo musical, tendo em vista a importância dessas ideias e suas possíveis ressonâncias nas discussões acerca da música popular no Brasil durante o século XX. A busca por uma “essência do povo” que constituiria a base de uma nação é ponto de referência para esse debate. Essas ideias, surgidas na Europa, ainda no século XIX, ligadas ao movimento romântico e a atuação dos folcloristas, ganham força no Brasil principalmente a partir do século XX e irão permear inúmeros debates em momentos distintos da história republicana do país.Palavras-chave: Nacionalismo Musical – Mário de Andrade – Música Popular. Abstract: In this paper, we discuss how the idea of popular culture becomes central to debates about nationalism in culture and art. We will explore more specifically the ideas of Mário de Andrade on musical nationalism, regarding the importance of these ideas and their possible resonances in discussions of popular music in Brazil during the twentieth century. The search for a "people's essence" that form the basis of a nation is in the core of this debate. These ideas emerged in Europe in the nineteenth century and are connected to the Romantic movement and actions of folklorists and will bulk in Brazil mostly from the twentieth century, when they will be part of numerous debates in distinguished moments in the country’s history.Keywords: Musical Nationalism – Mário de Andrade – Popular Music.

  18. Cultural similarity, cultural competence, and nurse workforce diversity.

    McGinnis, Sandra L; Brush, Barbara L; Moore, Jean

    2010-11-01

    Proponents of health workforce diversity argue that increasing the number of minority health care providers will enhance cultural similarity between patients and providers as well as the health system's capacity to provide culturally competent care. Measuring cultural similarity has been difficult, however, given that current benchmarks of workforce diversity categorize health workers by major racial/ethnic classifications rather than by cultural measures. This study examined the use of national racial/ethnic categories in both patient and registered nurse (RN) populations and found them to be a poor indicator of cultural similarity. Rather, we found that cultural similarity between RN and patient populations needs to be established at the level of local labor markets and broadened to include other cultural parameters such as country of origin, primary language, and self-identified ancestry. Only then can the relationship between cultural similarity and cultural competence be accurately determined and its outcomes measured.

  19. Culture and International Management: A Review.

    Miroshnik, Victoria

    2002-01-01

    A literature review explored the effectiveness of cross-cultural managements of multinational companies. The effect of national culture on organizational culture was analyzed and ways in which multinational companies can adopt the national differences were suggested. (Contains 42 references.) (JOW)

  20. National culture, work-life balance and employee well-being in European tourism firms: the moderating effect of uncertainty avoidance values

    Lucia-Casademunt, Ana M.; García-Cabrera, Antonia M.; Cuéllar-Molina, Deybbi G.

    2015-01-01

    The competitive advantage of companies rests upon work attitudes and the behavior of their employees. Work-life balance initiatives are considered to be an important antecedent of employees’ well-being, and thus a factor that highly conditions employees’ work attitudes and behavior. This study explores these relationships in the tourism industry, where hotels and restaurants offer day and night services that could harm work-life balance. Also, in the tourism industry, the national diversity o...