WorldWideScience

Sample records for shingle scrap including

  1. Shingles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... need to stay away from newborn babies, pregnant women, anyone with a weakened immune system, or anyone who is not vaccinated against chickenpox. So teens who get shingles may need to stay home from school for a while. It all depends ...

  2. Shingles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your health care provider can make the diagnosis by looking at your skin and asking about your medical history. Tests are rarely needed, but may include taking a skin sample to see if the skin is infected ...

  3. Thermal load histories for North American roof assembles using various cladding materials including wood-thermoplastic composite shingles

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. E. Winandy

    2006-01-01

    Since 1991, thermal load histories for various roof cladding types have been monitored in outdoor attic structures that simulate classic North American light-framed construction. In this paper, the 2005 thermal loads for wood-based composite roof sheathing, wood rafters, and attics under wood-plastic composite shingles are compared to common North American roof...

  4. Fire resistant PV shingle assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenox, Carl J.

    2012-10-02

    A fire resistant PV shingle assembly includes a PV assembly, including PV body, a fire shield and a connection member connecting the fire shield below the PV body, and a support and inter-engagement assembly. The support and inter-engagement assembly is mounted to the PV assembly and comprises a vertical support element, supporting the PV assembly above a support surface, an upper interlock element, positioned towards the upper PV edge, and a lower interlock element, positioned towards the lower PV edge. The upper interlock element of one PV shingle assembly is inter-engageable with the lower interlock element of an adjacent PV shingle assembly. In some embodiments the PV shingle assembly may comprise a ventilation path below the PV body. The PV body may be slidably mounted to the connection member to facilitate removal of the PV body.

  5. Process for removing and detoxifying cadmium from scrap metal including mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    Cadmium-bearing scrap from nuclear applications, such as neutron shielding and reactor control and safety rods, must usually be handled as mixed waste since it is radioactive and the cadmium in it is both leachable and highly toxic. Removing the cadmium from this scrap, and converting it to a nonleachable and minimally radioactive form, would greatly simplify disposal or recycling. A process now under development will do this by shredding the scrap; leaching it with reagents which selectively dissolve out the cadmium; reprecipitating the cadmium as its highly insoluble sulfide; then fusing the sulfide into a glassy matrix to bring its leachability below EPA limits before disposal. Alternatively, the cadmium may be recovered for reuse. A particular advantage of the process is that all reagents (except the glass frit) can easily be recovered and reused in a nearly closed cycle, minimizing the risk of radioactive release. The process does not harm common metals such as aluminum, iron and stainless steel, and is also applicable to non-nuclear cadmium-bearing scrap such as nickel-cadmium batteries

  6. Asphalt Roofing Shingles Into Energy Project Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jameson, Rex, PE

    2008-04-28

    Based on a widely cited September, 1999 report by the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources, nearly 11 million tons of asphalt roofing shingle wastes are produced in the United States each year. Recent data suggests that the total is made up of about 9.4 million tons from roofing tear-offs and about 1.6 million tons from manufacturing scrap. Developing beneficial uses for these materials would conserve natural resources, promote protection of the environment and strengthen the economy. This project explored the feasibility of using chipped asphalt shingle materials in cement manufacturing kilns and circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boilers. A method of enhancing the value of chipped shingle materials for use as fuel by removing certain fractions for use as substitute raw materials for the manufacture of new shingles was also explored. Procedures were developed to prevent asbestos containing materials from being processed at the chipping facilities, and the frequency of the occurrence of asbestos in residential roofing tear-off materials was evaluated. The economic feasibility of each potential use was evaluated based on experience gained during the project and on a review of the well established use of shingle materials in hot mix asphalt. This project demonstrated that chipped asphalt shingle materials can be suitable for use as fuel in circulating fluidized boilers and cement kilns. More experience would be necessary to determine the full benefits that could be derived and to discover long term effects, but no technical barriers to full scale commercial use of chipped asphalt shingle materials in these applications were discovered. While the technical feasibility of various options was demonstrated, only the use of asphalt shingle materials in hot mix asphalt applications is currently viable economically.

  7. Shingles: Hope through Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain, or itch, generally in a band-like distribution on one side of the body, i.e., ... section entitled “Can shingles during pregnancy or at birth harm the ... a high rate of side effects. Desipramine and nortriptyline have fewer ...

  8. Herpes zoster (shingles) disseminated (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herpes zoster (shingles) normally occurs in a limited area that follows a dermatome (see the "dermatome" picture). In individuals with damaged immune systems, herpes zoster may be widespread (disseminated), causing serious illness. ...

  9. Immunizations Part II: Shingles Vaccine

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-09-24

    This podcast discusses older adults and shingles, as well as the importance of getting the shingles vaccine. It is primarily targeted to public health and aging services professionals.  Created: 9/24/2008 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP) and National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 9/24/2008.

  10. "My Experience with Shingles." | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in its entirety, visit http://nihseniorhealth.gov/shingles/toc.html . Maryland resident Sue Spicer knows firsthand about ... other shingles information at http://nihseniorhealth.gov/shingles/toc.html Could you first describe your early symptoms? ...

  11. Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome and Shingles ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome and Shingles Associated with a Combined Paralysis of Three Oculomotor Nerves: A Case Report. ... CASE DETAILS: A 40 years old patient was seen for a pain of the right side of the face and a complete immobility of the eyeball. The diagnosis of V1 shingles with a pan uveitis ...

  12. Contaminated nickel scrap processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Hayden, H.W.; Johnson, J.S. Jr.; Wilson, D.F.

    1994-12-01

    The DOE will soon choose between treating contaminated nickel scrap as a legacy waste and developing high-volume nickel decontamination processes. In addition to reducing the volume of legacy wastes, a decontamination process could make 200,000 tons of this strategic metal available for domestic use. Contaminants in DOE nickel scrap include 234 Th, 234 Pa, 137 Cs, 239 Pu (trace), 60 Co, U, 99 Tc, and 237 Np (trace). This report reviews several industrial-scale processes -- electrorefining, electrowinning, vapormetallurgy, and leaching -- used for the purification of nickel. Conventional nickel electrolysis processes are particularly attractive because they use side-stream purification of process solutions to improve the purity of nickel metal. Additionally, nickel purification by electrolysis is effective in a variety of electrolyte systems, including sulfate, chloride, and nitrate. Conventional electrorefining processes typically use a mixed electrolyte which includes sulfate, chloride, and borate. The use of an electrorefining or electrowinning system for scrap nickel recovery could be combined effectively with a variety of processes, including cementation, solvent extraction, ion exchange, complex-formation, and surface sorption, developed for uranium and transuranic purification. Selected processes were reviewed and evaluated for use in nickel side-stream purification. 80 refs

  13. Contaminated nickel scrap processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Hayden, H.W.; Johnson, J.S. Jr.; Wilson, D.F.

    1994-12-01

    The DOE will soon choose between treating contaminated nickel scrap as a legacy waste and developing high-volume nickel decontamination processes. In addition to reducing the volume of legacy wastes, a decontamination process could make 200,000 tons of this strategic metal available for domestic use. Contaminants in DOE nickel scrap include {sup 234}Th, {sup 234}Pa, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 239}Pu (trace), {sup 60}Co, U, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 237}Np (trace). This report reviews several industrial-scale processes -- electrorefining, electrowinning, vapormetallurgy, and leaching -- used for the purification of nickel. Conventional nickel electrolysis processes are particularly attractive because they use side-stream purification of process solutions to improve the purity of nickel metal. Additionally, nickel purification by electrolysis is effective in a variety of electrolyte systems, including sulfate, chloride, and nitrate. Conventional electrorefining processes typically use a mixed electrolyte which includes sulfate, chloride, and borate. The use of an electrorefining or electrowinning system for scrap nickel recovery could be combined effectively with a variety of processes, including cementation, solvent extraction, ion exchange, complex-formation, and surface sorption, developed for uranium and transuranic purification. Selected processes were reviewed and evaluated for use in nickel side-stream purification. 80 refs.

  14. Recombinant zoster (shingles) vaccine, RZV - what you need to know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... year in the United States get shingles. Shingles vaccine (recombinant) Recombinant shingles vaccine was approved by FDA in 2017 for the ... life-threatening allergic reaction after a dose of recombinant shingles vaccine, or has a severe allergy to any component ...

  15. Fernald scrap metal recycling and beneficial reuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motl, G.P.; Burns, D.D.

    1993-10-01

    The Fernald site, formerly the Feed Materials Production Facility, produced uranium metal products to meet defense production requirements for the Department of Energy from 1953 to 1989. In this report is is described how the Fernald scrap metal project has demonstrated that contractor capabilities can be used successfully to recycle large quantities of Department of Energy scrap metal. The project has proven that the open-quotes beneficial reuseclose quotes concept makes excellent economic sense when a market for recycled products can be identified. Topics covered in this report include the scrap metal pile history, the procurement strategy, scrap metal processing, and a discussion of lessons learned

  16. Facts about Chickenpox and Shingles for Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in institutional settings. ♦ Inmates and staff of correctional institutions ♦ Military personnel. ♦ Nonpregnant women of childbearing age. ♦ Teachers ... failure, heart attack, type II diabetes and major depression. Antiviral medications can be used to treat shingles ...

  17. Latent Virus Reactivation in Astronauts and Shingles Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Satish K.; Cohrs, Randall J.; Gilden, Donald H.; Tyring, Stephen K.; Castro, Victoria A.; Ott, C. Mark; Pierson, Duane L.

    2010-01-01

    Spaceflight is a uniquely stressful environment with astronauts experiencing a variety of stressors including: isolation and confinement, psychosocial, noise, sleep deprivation, anxiety, variable gravitational forces, and increased radiation. These stressors are manifested through the HPA and SAM axes resulting in increased stress hormones. Diminished T-lymphocyte functions lead to reactivation of latent herpesviruses in astronauts during spaceflight. Herpes simplex virus reactivated with symptoms during spaceflight whereas Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivate and are shed without symptoms. EBV and VZV are shed in saliva and CMV in the urine. The levels of EBV shed in astronauts increased 10-fold during the flight; CMV and VZV are not typically shed in low stressed individuals, but both were shed in astronauts during spaceflight. All herpes viruses were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. Culturing revealed that VZV shed in saliva was infectious virus. The PCR technology was extended to test saliva of 54 shingles patients. All shingles patients shed VZV in their saliva, and the levels followed the course of the disease. Viremia was also found to be common during shingles. The technology may be used before zoster lesions appear allowing for prevention of disease. The technology may be used for rapid detection of VZV in doctors offices. These studies demonstrated the value of applying technologies designed for astronauts to people on Earth.

  18. Developments in radioactive scrap monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellian, J.G.

    1997-01-01

    Over the past ten years there have been major developments in radiation monitoring systems used for detecting shielded radioactive sources in scrap metal. The extent of the problem and industry's awareness of the problem have both grown significantly during that time. The multimillion dollar expenses associated with decontamination after a source passes into the melt and the potential health hazard to employees and the public have added further impetus to the development of monitoring systems. Early attempts at scrap monitoring could detect some radiation, but testing with real life situations showed them to be virtually incapable of detecting shielded sources of radioactivity in incoming vehicles. More sophisticated detector technology and the development of advanced software made useful by more powerful microprocessors led to successive generations of monitoring systems with order-of-magnitude improvement in detection capability. The next generation includes larger detectors and more complex algorithms offering further improvement in truck and rail car monitoring. Complete solutions require monitoring at additional locations within the site, such as the charge bucket and conveyor lines, and at the scrap processor's site

  19. Installation, care, and maintenance of wood shake and shingle roofs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tony Bonura; Jack Dwyer; Arnie Nebelsick; Brent Stuart; R. Sam Williams; Christopher Hunt

    2011-01-01

    This article gives general guidelines for selection, installation, finishing, and maintenance of wood shake and shingle roofs. The authors have gathered information from a variety of sources: research publications on wood finishing, technical data sheets from paint manufacturers, installation instructions for shake and shingle roofs, and interviews with experts having...

  20. Installation, care, and maintenance of wood shake and shingle siding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack Dwyer; Tony Bonura; Arnie Nebelsick; Sam Williams; Christopher G. Hunt

    2011-01-01

    This article gives general guidelines for selection, installation, finishing, and maintenance of wood shakes and shingles. The authors gathered information from a variety of sources: research publications on wood finishing, technical data sheets from paint manufacturers, installation instructions for shake and shingle siding, and interviews with experts having...

  1. Stopping Shingles (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Shingles, also known as herpes zoster, is a disease characterized by a painful skin rash, with blisters usually occurring on one side of the body. Each year, approximately one million people in the U.S. get the disease. In this podcast, Dr. Mark Pallansch discusses a newly approved vaccine to prevent shingles.

  2. Stopping Shingles (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2018-01-25

    Shingles, also known as herpes zoster, is a disease characterized by a painful skin rash with blisters. This podcast discusses a new vaccine to prevent shingles.  Created: 1/25/2018 by MMWR.   Date Released: 1/25/2018.

  3. Technical Review of the Characteristics of Spent Nuclear Fuel Scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhn, William L.; Abrefah, John; Pitner, Allen L.; Damschen, Dennis W.

    2000-01-01

    Spent Nuclear Fuel scrap generated while washing the SNF in Hanford's K-Basins to prepare it for cold vacuum drying differed significantly from that envisioned during project design. Therefore, a technical review panel evaluated the new information about the physical characteristics of scrap generated during processing by characterizing it based on measured weights and digital photographic images. They examined images of the scrap and from them estimated the volume and hence the masses of inert material and of large fragments of spent fuel. The panel estimated the area of these particles directly from images and by fitting a lognormal distribution to the relative number particles in four size ranges and then obtaining the area-to-volume ratio from the distribution. The estimated area is 0.3 m2 for the mass of scrap that could be loaded into a container for drying, which compares to a value of 4.5 m2 assumed for safe operation of the baseline process. The small quantity of scrap genera ted is encouraging. However, the size and mass of the scrap depend both on processes degrading the fuel while in the basin and on processes catching the scrap during washing, the latter including essentially unintentional filtration as debris accumulates. Therefore, the panel concluded that the estimated surface area meets the criterion for loading scrap into an MCO for drying, but because it did not attempt to evaluate the criterion itself, it is not in a position to actually recommend loading the scrap. Further, this is not a sufficiently strong technical position from which to extrapolate the results from the examined scrap to all future scrap generated by the existing process

  4. The steel scrap age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauliuk, Stefan; Milford, Rachel L; Müller, Daniel B; Allwood, Julian M

    2013-04-02

    Steel production accounts for 25% of industrial carbon emissions. Long-term forecasts of steel demand and scrap supply are needed to develop strategies for how the steel industry could respond to industrialization and urbanization in the developing world while simultaneously reducing its environmental impact, and in particular, its carbon footprint. We developed a dynamic stock model to estimate future final demand for steel and the available scrap for 10 world regions. Based on evidence from developed countries, we assumed that per capita in-use stocks will saturate eventually. We determined the response of the entire steel cycle to stock saturation, in particular the future split between primary and secondary steel production. During the 21st century, steel demand may peak in the developed world, China, the Middle East, Latin America, and India. As China completes its industrialization, global primary steel production may peak between 2020 and 2030 and decline thereafter. We developed a capacity model to show how extensive trade of finished steel could prolong the lifetime of the Chinese steelmaking assets. Secondary steel production will more than double by 2050, and it may surpass primary production between 2050 and 2060: the late 21st century can become the steel scrap age.

  5. Issues in recycling galvanized scrap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koros, P.J. [LTV Steel Co., Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States); Hellickson, D.A. [General Motors Corp., Detroit, MI (United States); Dudek, F.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1995-02-10

    The quality of the steel used for most galvanizing (and tinplate) applications makes scrap derived from their production and use a premier solid charge material for steelmaking. In 1989 the AISI created a Task Force to define the issues and to recommend technologically and economically sound approaches to assure continued, unhindered recyclability of the growing volume of galvanized scrap. The AISI program addressed the treatment of full-sized industrial bales of scrap. The current, on-going MRI (US)--Argonne National Laboratory program is focused on ``loose`` scrap from industrial and post-consumer sources. Results from these programs, issues of scrap management from source to steel melting, the choices for handling zinc in iron and steelmaking and the benefits/costs for removal of zinc (and lead) from scrap prior to melting in BOF and foundry operations are reviewed in this paper.

  6. What Everyone Should Know about Shingles Vaccine (Shingrix)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... containing mercury). Top of Page How Can I Pay For Shingrix? There are several ways shingles vaccine ... Word file Microsoft Excel file Audio/Video file Apple Quicktime file RealPlayer file Text file Zip Archive ...

  7. Stopping Shingles (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2018-01-25

    Shingles, also known as herpes zoster, is a disease characterized by a painful skin rash, with blisters usually occurring on one side of the body. Each year, approximately one million people in the U.S. get the disease. In this podcast, Dr. Mark Pallansch discusses a newly approved vaccine to prevent shingles.  Created: 1/25/2018 by MMWR.   Date Released: 1/25/2018.

  8. Scrap is no crap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wenzel, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Scrap is good business for the environment. When we recycle metal - meaning to collect, sort and melt it down - we emit much less CO2 than when we extract metal from the ground. The environmental benefit applies to all metals and is gained every time we recycle them. That is a positive message in...... in a world where we search for methods to reduce our CO2 emission. And the environmental potential is big: There are no upper limits for how many times we can recycle metals, which makes recycling an important part of the fight against global warming....

  9. ORO scrap metal decontamination program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jugan, M.

    1987-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has approximately 80,000 tons of contaminated scrap metal at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Piketon, Ohio; and the Feed Materials Production Center in Fernald, Ohio. After unsuccessful in-house attempts to eliminate/recycle the contaminated metal, DOE is allowing private enterprise the opportunity to participate in this program. DOE is making this opportunity available under a two-phase approach, which is being supported by two separate and corresponding Request for Proposals. Phase I, which is nearing completion, is a demonstration phase to establish a group of companies that the DOE will consider qualified to eliminate the scrap at one or more sites. In Phase I, the companies decontaminated 25-50 tons of scrap to demonstrate capabilities to DOE and to gain the knowledge required to plan/bid on elimination of the scrap at one or more sites. Phase II will request proposals for elimination of the total scrap at one or more of the above noted sites. Multiple awards for Phase II are also anticipated. Companies participating in Phase II will be required to take title to the contaminated scrap and decontaminate/process the scrap for beneficial reuse. Radioactive wastes and metal that cannot be successfully decontaminated/processed will be returned to DOE

  10. Drive-based recording analyses at >800 Gfc/in2 using shingled recording

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    William Cross, R.; Montemorra, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Since the introduction of perpendicular recording, conventional perpendicular scaling has enabled the hard disk drive industry to deliver products ranging from ∼130 to well over 500 Gb/in 2 in a little over 4 years. The incredible areal density growth spurt enabled by perpendicular recording is now endangered by an inability to effectively balance writeability with erasure effects at the system level. Shingled magnetic recording (SMR) offers an effective means to continue perpendicular areal density growth using conventional heads and tuned media designs. The use of specially designed edge-write head structures (also known as 'corner writers') should further increase the AD gain potential for shingled recording. In this paper, we will demonstrate the drive-based recording performance characteristics of a shingled recording system at areal densities in excess of 800 Gb/in 2 using a conventional head. Using a production drive base, developmental heads/media and a number of sophisticated analytical routines, we have studied the recording performance of a shingled magnetic recording subsystem. Our observations confirm excellent writeability in excess of 400 ktpi and a perpendicular system with acceptable noise balance, especially at extreme ID and OD skews where the benefits of SMR are quite pronounced. We believe that this demonstration illustrates that SMR is not only capable of productization, but is likely the path of least resistance toward production drive areal density closer to 1 Tb/in 2 and beyond. - Research highlights: → Drive-based recording demonstrations at 805 Gf/in 2 has been demonstrated using both 95 and 65 mm drive platforms at roughly 430 ktpi and 1.87 Mfci. → Limiting factors for shingled recording include side reading, which is dominated by the reader crosstrack skirt profile, MT10 being a representative metric. → Media jitter and associated DC media SNR further limit areal density, dominated by crosstrack transition curvature, downtrack

  11. Scrapping of student bursaries confirmed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, Chris

    2016-07-27

    Student bursaries for nurses will be scrapped from next year, the government has confirmed. Undergraduate nursing and midwifery students in England will now face tuition fees and student loans from August 2017.

  12. Developing methods for detecting radioactive scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellian, J.G.; Johnston, J.G.

    1995-01-01

    During the last 10 years, there have been major developments in radiation detection systems used for catching shielded radioactive sources in scrap metal. The original testing required to determine the extent of the problem and the preliminary designs of the first instruments will be discussed. Present systems available today will be described listing their advantages and disadvantages. In conclusion, the newest developments and state of the art equipment will also be included describing the limits and most appropriate locations for the systems

  13. Evaluation of radioactive scrap metal recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieves, L.A.; Chen, S.Y.; Kohout, E.J.; Nabelssi, B.; Tilbrook, R.W.; Wilson, S.E.

    1995-12-01

    This report evaluates the human health risks and environmental and socio-political impacts of options for recycling radioactive scrap metal (RSM) or disposing of and replacing it. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is assisting the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Oak Ridge Programs Division, in assessing the implications of RSM management alternatives. This study is intended to support the DOE contribution to a study of metal recycling being conducted by the Task Group on Recycling and Reuse of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The focus is on evaluating the justification for the practice of recycling RSM, and the case of iron and steel scrap is used as an example in assessing the impacts. To conduct the evaluation, a considerable set of data was compiled and developed. Much of this information is included in this document to provide a source book of information

  14. Evaluation of radioactive scrap metal recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieves, L.A.; Chen, S.Y.; Kohout, E.J.; Nabelssi, B.; Tilbrook, R.W.; Wilson, S.E.

    1995-12-01

    This report evaluates the human health risks and environmental and socio-political impacts of options for recycling radioactive scrap metal (RSM) or disposing of and replacing it. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is assisting the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Oak Ridge Programs Division, in assessing the implications of RSM management alternatives. This study is intended to support the DOE contribution to a study of metal recycling being conducted by the Task Group on Recycling and Reuse of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The focus is on evaluating the justification for the practice of recycling RSM, and the case of iron and steel scrap is used as an example in assessing the impacts. To conduct the evaluation, a considerable set of data was compiled and developed. Much of this information is included in this document to provide a source book of information.

  15. Economic comparison of management modes for contaminated metal scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janberg, K.

    1987-01-01

    This report presents an economic study of the three following management modes for contaminated metal scrap: - decontamination of scrap metal followed by release, - direct melting of scrap metal, followed by release or restricted reuse, - super-compaction followed by disposal as radioactive waste. The present study, which refers to conditions prevailing in Germany, includes reviews of the contaminated scrap arisings, of experience with scrap management and of the licensing conditions for metal recycling. The results obtained during the treatment of more than 140 t of contaminated scrap metal show that: - super-compaction is the best procedure for all mixed metallic wastes of small dimensions and complex geometries, as decontamination is very costly in such a case and the melting would lead to undefined metallurgical products; - decontamination is recommendable for simple geometries and activities higher than the regulatory upper limit for melting in an industrial foundry (74 Bq/g); - direct melting for lower activity levels is gaining in competitiveness and has a good chance to be the best solution, in particular when the free use levels will be reduced below the currently accepted levels in Germany

  16. Production of lumber, lath, and shingles in 1917

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin H. Smith; Albert H. Pierson

    1919-01-01

    In this bulletin, which is one of an annual series covering the period 1904 to 1917, inclusive, with the exception of 1914, are detailed statistics of the 1917 production of lumber, lath, and shingles in the continental United States, with comparative figures from previous annual reports. The collection and compilation of the statistics for the Western States was done...

  17. Asphalt and Wood Shingling. Roofing Workbook and Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Arthur

    This combination workbook and set of tests contains materials on asphalt and wood shingling that have been designed to be used by those studying to enter the roofing and waterproofing trade. It consists of seven instructional units and seven accompanying objective tests. Covered in the individual units are the following topics: shingling…

  18. System for Prevention, Detection and Response to Radioactive Materials in Scrap Metal in Ukraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarovska, O., E-mail: makarovska@hq.snrc.gov.ua [State Nuclear Regulatory Committee of Ukraine, Kiev (Ukraine)

    2011-07-15

    The State control system to prevent, detect and respond to cases of radioactive material in scrap metal is functioning in Ukraine. The system includes regulations for the safe and secure management of metal scrap and administrative and technical measures to prevent, detect and respond to cases of radioactive material in scrap metal. The key elements of prevention are the system of licensing and supervision in the sphere of radioactive material use and the State system for inventory, registration and control of radiation sources. Metal scrap management is licensed by the Ministry of Industrial Policy and one of the licence conditions is radiation control of the scrap metal. State supervision of the operations with metal scrap is provided by Ministry of Health and Ministry of Environmental Protection according to the regulation 'State sanitary-ecological standard for metal scrap management'. Specific standards exist for the export of metal scrap. Export consignments are followed by a certificate that proves the radiological safety of the metal. Ukrainian metallurgical plants provide an input radiation control of metal scrap and an output control of the produced metal. Thus, there exists a five barrier system of metal scrap control: border control; exclusion zone perimeter control; metal scrap dealers control; metallurgical plants (input control and output control of produced metal); and export consignments radiological certification. To regain control over orphan sources (including occasional radioactive material in the scrap metal) the 'procedure for interaction of executive authorities and involved legal entities in case of revealing of radiation sources in no legal use' was approved by a Resolution of the Cabinet of Ministers of Ukraine. The investigation of each case with feedback, information of involved bodies, safe and secure storage of restored radioactive material are provided according to this procedure. (author)

  19. Process options and projected mass flows for the HTGR refabrication scrap recovery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiegs, S.M.

    1979-03-01

    The two major uranium recovery processing options reviewed are (1) internal recovery of the scrap by the refabrication system and (2) transfer to and external recovery of the scrap by the head end of the reprocessing system. Each option was reviewed with respect to equipment requirements, preparatory processing, and material accountability. Because there may be a high cost factor on transfer of scrap fuel material to the reprocessing system for recovery, all of the scrap streams will be recycled internally within the refabrication system, with the exception of reject fuel elements, which will be transferred to the head end of the reprocessing system for uranium recovery. The refabrication facility will be fully remote; thus, simple recovery techniques were selected as the reference processes for scrap recovery. Crushing, burning, and leaching methods will be used to recover uranium from the HTGR refabrication scrap fuel forms, which include particles without silicon carbide coatings, particles with silicon carbide coatings, uncarbonized fuel rods, carbon furnace parts, perchloroethylene distillation bottoms, and analytical sample remnants. Mass flows through the reference scrap recovery system were calculated for the HTGR reference recycle facility operating with the highly enriched uranium fuel cycle. Output per day from the refabrication scrap recovery system is estimated to be 4.02 kg of 2355 U and 10.85 kg of 233 U. Maximum equipment capacities were determined, and future work will be directed toward the development and costing of the scrap recovery system chosen as reference

  20. 7 CFR 29.3526 - Leaf scrap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.3526 Section 29.3526 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 95) § 29.3526 Leaf scrap. A byproduct of unstemmed tobacco Leaf scrap results from handling...

  1. 7 CFR 29.3034 - Leaf scrap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.3034 Section 29.3034 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Leaf scrap. A by-product of unstemmed tobacco. Leaf scrap results from handling unstemmed tobacco and...

  2. 7 CFR 29.6022 - Leaf scrap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.6022 Section 29.6022 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6022 Leaf scrap. A byproduct of unstemmed tobacco Leaf scrap results...

  3. 7 CFR 29.2277 - Leaf scrap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.2277 Section 29.2277 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... scrap. A byproduct of unstemmed tobacco. Leaf scrap results from handling unstemmed tobacco and consists...

  4. Y-12 old salvage yard scrap metal characterization study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, L.M.; Melton, S.G.; Shaw, S.S.

    1993-11-01

    The purpose of the Y-12 Old Salvage Yard scrap metal Characterization Study is to make conservative estimates of the quantities of total uranium and the wt % 235 U contained in scrap metal. The original project scope included estimates of thorium, but due to the insignificant quantities found in the yards, thorium was excluded from further analysis. Metal in three of the four Y-12 scrap metal yards were characterized. The scrap metal yard east of the PIDAS fence is managed by the Environmental Restoration Program and therefore was not included in this study. For all Y-12 Plant scrap metal shipments, Waste Transportation, Storage, and Disposal (WTSD) personnel must complete a Request for Authorization to Ship Nuclear Materials, UCN-16409, which requires the grams of total uranium, the wt % 235 U, and the grams of 235 U contained in the shipment. This information is necessary to ensure compliance with Department of Transportation regulations, as well as to ensure that the receiving facility is adhering to its operating license. This characterization study was designed to provide a technical basis for determining these necessary radioactive quantities

  5. High Value Scrap Tire Recycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauman, B. D.

    2003-02-01

    The objectives of this project were to further develop and scale-up a novel technology for reuse of scrap tire rubber, to identify and develop end uses for the technology (products), and to characterize the technology's energy savings and environmental impact.

  6. Recovery of gold from electronic scrap by hydrometallurgical processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Churl Kyoung; Rhee, Kang-In [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Sohn, Hun Joon [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-09-30

    A series of processes has been developed to recover the gold from electronic scrap containing about 200{approx}600 ppm Au. First, mechanical beneficiation including shredding, crushing and screening was employed. Results showed that 99 percent of gold component leaves in the fraction of under 1 mm of crushed scrap and its concentration was enriched to about 800 ppm without incineration. The crushed scrap was leached in 50% aqua regia solution and gold was completely dissolved at 60 deg. C within 2 hours. Other valuable metals such as silver, copper, nickel and iron were also dissolved. The resulting solution was boiled to remove nitrous compounds in the leachate. Finally, a newly designed electrolyzer was tested to recover the gold metal. More than 99% of gold and silver were recovered within an hour by electrowinning process. (author). 10 refs., 5 tabs., 6 figs.

  7. Release of Radioactive Scrap Metal/Scrap Metal (RSM/SM) at Nevada Test Site (NTS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Reynolds Electrical and Engineering Company, Inc. (REECo) is the prime contractor to the US Department of Energy (DOE) in providing service and support for NTS operations. Mercury Base Camp is the main control point for the many forward areas at NTS, which covers 1,350 square miles. The forward areas are where above-ground and underground nuclear tests have been performed over the last 41 years. No metal (or other material) is returned to Mercury without first being tested for radioactivity. No radioactive metals are allowed to reenter Mercury from the forward areas, other than testing equipment. RAMATROL is the monitor check point. They check material in various ways, including swipe tests, and have a large assortment of equipment for testing. Scrap metal is also checked to address Resource Conservation and Recovery Act concerns. After addressing these issues, the scrap metals are categorized. Federal Property Management Regulations (FPMR) are followed by REECo. The nonradioactive scrap material is sold through the GSA on a scheduled basis. Radioactive scrap metal are presently held in forward areas where they were used. REECo has gained approval of their Nevada Test Site Defense Waste Acceptance Criteria, Certification, and Transfer Requirements, NVO-325 application, which will allow disposal on site, when RSM is declared a waste. The guideline that REECo uses for release limits is DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Works, Attachment 2, Surface Radioactivity Guides, of this order, give release limits for radioactive materials. However, the removal of radioactive materials from NTS require approval by DOE Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) on a case-by-case basis. Requirements to consider before removal are found in DOE Order 5820.2A, Radioactive Waste Management

  8. Experience during the monitoring of inactive scrap for the detection of inadvertent presence of radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Ranjit; Anoj Kumar; Vikas; Singh, Rajvir; Patra, R.P.; Vikas Kumar; Pradeepkumar, K.S.

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes about the experience gained during the radiation monitoring of inactive scrap generated at various nuclear facilities. This type surveillance is carried out to prevent the spread of radioactivity in public domain and also as requirement by regulatory authorities. The inspection and certification of scrap material from nuclear facilities is a regulatory requirement to ensure that no radioactive material reaches public domain. This paper describes the methodology and experience in detection of radioactivity at inactive Scrap monitoring facility. Inactive scraps (metallic and non metallic) generated from various nuclear facilities of BARC, Trombay is dispatched to Trombay Village Store (TVS) for temporary storage before auction to the public. The monitoring at the facility includes visual inspection and radiation measurement before loading the scrap in the truck. An online PC based monitoring system and portable monitoring instruments in the range (nSv/h-µSv/h) are used to carry out radiation monitoring of inactive scrap loaded in a vehicle. Radioactive source of high activity with potential for serious environmental hazard has not been detected, but few cases of presence of radioactive/contaminated material (MS plate/equipments with low level of 137 Cs contamination) have been detected and identified using portable gamma spectrometer. Implementation of strict regulatory measures and radiation monitoring at nuclear facilities can minimize the probability of radioactive material reaching the public domain. The methodology followed for monitoring of inactive scrap is found to be effective even for detection of presence of radioactivity in scrap if any. (author)

  9. 32 CFR 644.522 - Clearance of military scrap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Clearance of military scrap. 644.522 Section 644... Excess Land and Improvements § 644.522 Clearance of military scrap. Military scrap can contain or be... destruction, by using command, of all military scrap and scrap metal from lands suitable for cultivation or...

  10. Characteristics of reverse overwrite process in shingled recording scheme at ultra-high track density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Shaoping, E-mail: shaoping_li_2000@yahoo.com [Western Digital Inc. 1250 Reliance Way, Fremont, CA 94539 (United States); Mendez, Hector; Terrill, Dave; Liu Feng; Bai, Daniel; Mao Sining [Western Digital Inc. 1250 Reliance Way, Fremont, CA 94539 (United States)

    2012-02-15

    A systematic experimental study of the reverse overwrite (ReOVW) process in the shingled recording scheme has been conducted in conjunction with characterization of corresponding recording performances from recording heads with different geometries. It was found that there is no ReOVW reduction as the track density increases in a strict shingled recording fashion. Nonetheless, ReOVW is indeed slightly decreased from 300 to 700 kpi in a so-called one write shingled recording process. Overall our obtained data suggest that conventional magnetic recording technology might be able to extend all the way beyond an areal density of one Tbit/in{sup 2} by using the shingled recording scheme. - Research Highlights: > This paper discusses the most advanced recording scheme, e.g., shingled recording process, for next generation magnetic data storage devices. > The paper shows that the write-ability of magnetic recording is sufficient in the shingled recording scheme even when the areal density is beyond 1.0 Tb/in{sup 2}. > Our results also shows that the writer's edge write-ability is essential for reducing noise during the write process in shingled recording scheme. > The paper also demonstrates that a multiple and sequential write process ensures the normal erasure-ability in shingled recording scheme. > Our results also indicate that the noise nature in the write process still could be attributed to the hard-easy transition and imprint effect.

  11. Characteristics of reverse overwrite process in shingled recording scheme at ultra-high track density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shaoping; Mendez, Hector; Terrill, Dave; Liu Feng; Bai, Daniel; Mao Sining

    2012-01-01

    A systematic experimental study of the reverse overwrite (ReOVW) process in the shingled recording scheme has been conducted in conjunction with characterization of corresponding recording performances from recording heads with different geometries. It was found that there is no ReOVW reduction as the track density increases in a strict shingled recording fashion. Nonetheless, ReOVW is indeed slightly decreased from 300 to 700 kpi in a so-called one write shingled recording process. Overall our obtained data suggest that conventional magnetic recording technology might be able to extend all the way beyond an areal density of one Tbit/in 2 by using the shingled recording scheme. - Research highlights: → This paper discusses the most advanced recording scheme, e.g., shingled recording process, for next generation magnetic data storage devices. → The paper shows that the write-ability of magnetic recording is sufficient in the shingled recording scheme even when the areal density is beyond 1.0 Tb/in 2 . → Our results also shows that the writer's edge write-ability is essential for reducing noise during the write process in shingled recording scheme. → The paper also demonstrates that a multiple and sequential write process ensures the normal erasure-ability in shingled recording scheme. → Our results also indicate that the noise nature in the write process still could be attributed to the hard-easy transition and imprint effect.

  12. Defense Scrap Yard Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-06-01

    Shall consist of brass castings, rolled brass, rod brass, tubing and 26 Honey . miscellaneous yellow brasses, including plated brass. Must be free of...surveillance. (See torns include: dry cough , irritation of throat and OSHA 1910.1025) tightness of chest leading to difficulty in breath- (1) Lead...selected conditions, e.g., styrene- up the cure of a compound when added in minor acrylonitrile copolymer resins blended with butadi- quantity as compared

  13. The Spontaneous Combustion of Railway Ties and Asphalt Shingles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Geoffrey

    Many Low Carbon Fuels (LCFs) present unknown spontaneous combustion risks, which must be quantified before their use as fossil fuel replacements. Wood and coal spontaneous combustion is well understood; however, LCFs weather, and subsequent chemical changes could affect their spontaneous combustion properties. LCF spontaneous combustion could lead to accidental fires with possible loss of life, limb and property. The spontaneous combustion risks of two LCFs, discarded creosote-treated wooden railway ties and roofing asphalt shingles, were investigated with calorimetry and heat transfer experiments. Chemical changes due to weathering were studied with pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (py-GC/MS). Creosote-treated wooden railway tie dust, roofing asphalt shingle particles, poplar wood pellets, and petroleum coke self-heating were studied with isothermal calorimetry. Railway tie dust and asphalt shingle heat transfer were characterized with a guarded hot plate. Petroleum coke self-heating was consistent with coal, while both poplar pellets and railway tie dust were found to be more reactive compared to oven test results of similar materials. The observed increase in reactivity was probably a result of significant moisture contenint in the pellet and railway tie dust. Critical conditions for spontaneous combustion were evaluated with the Frank-Kamenetskii parameter, assuming an ambient temperature of 40°C and constant moisture content. Kamenetskii calculations indicate that a 1.6 m cube of railway tie dust, or a 58 m cube of asphalt particles, would be unstable and combust. LCF chemistry may have been affected by weathering, which would cause chemical changes that affect their spontaneous combustion properties. Therefore, railway tie wood and roofing asphalt shingle chemistry were investigated by identifying products of 250° and 550°C pyrolysis with py-GC/MS. Railway tie wood pyrolyzates did not show signs of weathering; in contrast, asphalt pyrolysis

  14. Transboundary Movement of Radioactively Contaminated Scrap Metal - Lessons Learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nizamska, M., E-mail: m.nimzamska@bnra.bg [Emergency Planning and Preparedness Division, Bulgarian Nuclear Regulatory Agency, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2011-07-15

    Starting in 1989, Bulgaria has undergone a comprehensive transformation of its economy and social conditions. Part of this process is related to the intensive privatization that started in 2001. This privatization included facilities, as well as sites that use radioactive material for different applications - industry, medicine, agriculture, science, etc. The rapid change of property ownership and, in some cases, the resulting bankruptcy, has caused difficulties in tracing and identifying radioactive sources and materials and a deterioration of the system of safety, physical protection, etc. of radioactive material. In some cases, radioactive sources were stolen because of the value of their protective containers and sold for scrap metal. This led to the occurrence of different types of radiation incidents, mainly related to the discovery of radioactive sources in scrap metal. The consequences of these incidents include the risk of radiation exposure of the workers at scrap metal yards or reprocessing facilities and of members of the public and, in addition, radioactive contamination of the environment. The Bulgarian Nuclear Regulatory Agency (BNRA) has been responding to these incidents and has carried out a series of measures to improve the control over materials (e.g. activated or surface contaminated materials) and radioactive sources and to strengthen the preventive, monitoring, emergency preparedness and mitigating measures at facility, national and transboundary levels. This paper presents an analysis of the lessons learned by the BNRA and of the control of the transboundary movement of radioactively contaminated scrap metal through the territory of Bulgaria. (author)

  15. 7 CFR 29.2529 - Leaf scrap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.2529 Section 29.2529 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... tobacco. Leaf scrap results from handling unstemmed tobacco and consists of loose and tangled whole or...

  16. The development of technology for recycling of electronic scrap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Hyo-Shin; Kim, Won-Baek; Sohn, Yong-Uhn [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (KR)] (and others)

    1999-12-01

    Electronic devices, especially computer becomes an essential tools for home and industries entering the information era. The number of computers exceed over 100 million, hence, the amount of end of life(EOL) computer and electronic scrap is increasing. These wastes and scraps include products rejected from manufacturing processes and obstacle computers. Owing to a short life cycle of electronic products and rapid growth of electronic industries, the number of domestic EOL computers goes beyond a million and its disposal causes an environmental problems. Therefore, this recycling is considered to play an important role from the viewpoint of environmental preservation as well as reusable resources. The process development for the recovery of valuable materials and minimization of waste from electronic scrap has been carried out. In the first year of three year project, physical separation such as shredding, crushing, and magnetic separation is established to reclaim valuable materials effectively. Then, hydro- and pyrometallurgical processes are employed to recover valuable metals from electronic scrap. First, metallic and nonmetallic portion are separated from PCBs by a newly designed shredder to prevent hazardous organic materials from further chemical treatment. The optimum conditions for each unit process were found in terms of separation ratio, energy consumption, recovery rate, etc. (author). 92 refs., 24 tabs., 39 figs.

  17. Assessment of recycling or disposal alternatives for radioactive scrap metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphie, W.E.; Lilly, M.J. III; Nieves, L.A.; Chen, S.Y.

    1993-01-01

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Oak Ridge Programs Division, is participating with the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development in providing analytical support for evaluation of management alternatives for radioactive scrap metals. For this purpose, Argonne National Laboratory is assessing environmental and societal implications of recycling and/or disposal process alternatives. This effort includes development of inventory estimates for contaminated metals; investigation of scrap metal market structure, processes, and trends; assessment of radiological and nonradiological effects of recycling; and investigation of social and political factors that are likely to either facilitate or constrain recycling opportunities. In addition, the option of scrap metal disposal is being assessed, especially with regard to the environmental and health impacts of replacing these metals if they are withdrawn from use. This paper focuses on the radiological risk assessment and dose estimate sensitivity analysis. A open-quotes tieredclose quotes concept for release categories, with and without use restrictions, is being developed. Within the tiers, different release limits may be indicated for specific groupings of radionuclides. Depending on the spectrum of radionuclides that are present and the level of residual activity after decontamination and/or smelting, the scrap may be released for unrestricted public use or for specified public uses, or it may be recycled within the nuclear industry. The conservatism of baseline dose estimates is examined, and both more realistic parameter values and protective measures for workers are suggested

  18. Mercury-impacted scrap metal: Source and nature of the mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finster, Molly E; Raymond, Michelle R; Scofield, Marcienne A; Smith, Karen P

    2015-09-15

    The reuse and recycling of industrial solid wastes such as scrap metal is supported and encouraged both internationally and domestically, especially when such wastes can be used as substitutes for raw material. However, scrap metal processing facilities, such as mini-mills, have been identified as a source of mercury (Hg) emissions in the United States. This research aims to better define some of the key issues related to the source and nature of mercury in the scrap metal waste stream. Overall, it is difficult to pinpoint the key mercury sources feeding into scrap metal recycling facilities, quantify their associated mercury concentrations, or determine which chemical forms are most significant. Potential sources of mercury in scrap metal include mercury switches from discarded vehicles, electronic-based scrap from household appliances and related industrial systems, and Hg-impacted scrap metal from the oil and gas industry. The form of mercury associated with scrap metal varies and depends on the source type. The specific amount of mercury that can be adsorbed and retained by steel appears to be a function of both metallurgical and environmental factors. In general, the longer the steel is in contact with a fluid or condensate that contains measurable concentrations of elemental mercury, the greater the potential for mercury accumulation in that steel. Most mercury compounds are thermally unstable at elevated temperatures (i.e., above 350 °C). As such, the mercury associated with impacted scrap is expected to be volatilized out of the metal when it is heated during processing (e.g., shredding or torch cutting) or melted in a furnace. This release of fugitive gas (Hg vapor) and particulates, as well as Hg-impacted bag-house dust and control filters, could potentially pose an occupational exposure risk to workers at a scrap metal processing facility. Thus, identifying and characterizing the key sources of Hg-impacted scrap, and understanding the nature and extent

  19. Bioleaching of metals from electronic scrap by moderately thermophilic acidophilic bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ilyas, Sadia; Anwar, Munir A.; Niazi, Shahida B.; Ghauri, M. Afzal

    The present work was aimed at studying the bioleachability of metals from electronic scrap by the selected moderately thermophilic strains of acidophilic chemolithotrophic and acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria. These included Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans and an unidentified acidophilic

  20. Scrap metals' role in circular economy in Ghana, using Sunyani as a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EJIRO

    quantity and economic value of scrap metals as essential part of resource ... Therefore, proper education, policy and regulatory measures are key recommendations to ... The methodology of this research includes the description of the.

  1. CHANGING THE LANDSCAPE--LOW-TECH SOLUTIONS TO THE PADUCAH SCRAP METAL REMOVAL PROJECT ARE PROVIDING SAFE, COST-EFFECTIVE REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SCRAP YARDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, Dan; Eyman, Jeff

    2003-01-01

    Between 1974 and 1983, contaminated equipment was removed from the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) process buildings as part of an enrichment process upgrade program. The upgrades consisted of the dismantlement, removal, and on-site storage of contaminated equipment, cell components, and scrap material (e.g., metal) from the cascade facilities. Scrap metal including other materials (e.g., drums, obsolete equipment) not related to this upgrade program have thus far accumulated in nine contiguous radiologically-contaminated and non-contaminated scrap yards covering 1.05E5 m2 (26 acres) located in the northwestern portion of the PGDP. This paper presents the sequencing of field operations and methods used to achieve the safe removal and disposition of over 47,000 tonnes (53,000 tons) of metal and miscellaneous items contained in these yards. The methods of accomplishment consist of mobilization, performing nuclear criticality safety evaluations, moving scrap metal to ground level, inspection and segregation, sampling and characterization, scrap metal sizing, packaging and disposal, and finally demobilization. Preventing the intermingling of characteristically hazardous and non-hazardous wastes promotes waste minimization, allowing for the metal and materials to be segregated into 13 separate waste streams. Low-tech solutions such as using heavy equipment to retrieve, size, and package scrap materials in conjunction with thorough planning that integrates safe work practices, commitment to teamwork, and incorporating lessons learned ensures that field operations will be conducted efficiently and safely

  2. Development of an integrated MOX-scrap recycling flow-sheet by dry and wet routes using microwave heating techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallik, G K; Malav, R K; Karande, A P; Bhargava, V K; Kamath, H S [Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Tarapur (India)

    1999-01-01

    A simple, short and efficient scrap, recycling flow-sheet, which is exclusively based on microwave heating techniques and, includes both dry and wet routes, for (U,Pu)O{sub 2} fuel scrap recycling has been developed and evaluated. (author) 6 refs., 1 tab.

  3. Next-Generation Factory-Produced Cool Asphalt Shingles: Phase 1 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levinson, Ronnen M.; Chen, Sharon S.; Ban-Weiss, George A.; Gilbert, Haley E.; Berdahl, Paul H.; Rosado, Pablo J.; Destaillats, Hugo; Sleiman, Mohamad; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.

    2016-11-01

    As the least expensive category of high-slope roofing in the U.S., shingles are found on the roofs of about 80% of U.S. homes, and constitute about 80% (by product area) of this market. Shingles are also among the least reflective high-slope roofing products, with few cool options on the market. The widespread use of cool roofs in the two warmest U.S. climate zones could reduce annual residential cooling energy use in these zones by over 7%. This project targets the development of high-performance cool shingles with initial solar reflectance at least 0.40 and a cost premium not exceeding US$0.50/ft². Phase 1 of the current study explored three approaches to increasing shingle reflectance. Method A replaces dark bare granules by white bare granules to enhance the near-infrared reflectance attained with cool pigments. Method B applies a white basecoat and a cool-color topcoat to a shingle surfaced with dark bare granules. Method C applies a visually clear, NIR-reflecting surface treatment to a conventionally colored shingle. Method A was the most successful, but our investigation of Method B identified roller coating as a promising top-coating technique, and our study of Method C developed a novel approach based on a nanowire mesh. Method A yielded red, green, brown, and black faux shingles with solar reflectance up to 0.39 with volumetric coloration. Since the base material is white, these reflectances can readily be increased by using less pigment. The expected cost premium for Method A shingles is less than our target limit of $0.50/ft², and would represent less than a 10% increase in the installed cost of a shingle roof. Using inexpensive but cool (spectrally selective) iron oxide pigments to volumetrically color white limestone synthesized from sequestered carbon and seawater appears to offer high albedo at low cost. In Phase 2, we plan to refine the cool shingle prototypes, manufacture cool granules, and manufacture and market high-performance cool shingles.

  4. AIR EMISSIONS FROM SCRAP TIRE COMBUSTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report discusses air emissions from two types of scrap tire combustion: uncontrolled and controlled. Uncontrolled sources are open tire fires, which produce many unhealthful products of incomplete combustion and release them directly into the atmosphere. Controlled combustion...

  5. Radiation protection aspects in importing metallic scraps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risica, S.; Di Ciaccio, P.

    1996-09-01

    The meeting deals with radiation protection problems caused by the possibility that radioactive metal scraps or radioactive sources hidden in the scraps, may arrive in a foundry. The importance of this issue and of rational and systematic solutions is showed by several accidents, happened in the past in numerous countries, by many signals in Italy and by some papers published in international scientific journals or reports issued by authorities and institutions in different countries

  6. Management options for recycling radioactive scrap metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehmel, J.C.; MacKinney, J.; Bartlett, J.

    1997-02-01

    The feasibility and advantages of recycling radioactive scrap metals (RSM) have yet to be assessed, given the unique technical, regulatory, safety, and cost-benefit issues that have already been raised by a concerned recycling industry. As is known, this industry has been repeatedly involved with the accidental recycling of radioactive sources and, in some cases, with costly consequences. If recycling were deemed to be a viable option, it might have to be implemented with regulatory monitoring and controls. Its implementation may have to consider various and complex issues and address the requirements and concerns of distinctly different industries. There are three basic options for the recycling of such scraps. They are: (1) recycling through the existing network of metal-scrap dealers and brokers, (2) recycling directly and only with specific steelmills, or (3) recycling through regional processing centers. Under the first option, scrap dealers and brokers would receive material from RSM generators and determine at which steelmills such scraps would be recycled. For the second option, RSM generators would deal directly with selected steelmills under specific agreements. For the third option, generators would ship scraps only to regional centers for processing and shipment to participating steelmills. This paper addresses the potential advantages of each option, identifies the types of arrangements that would need to be secured among all parties, and attempts to assess the receptivity of the recycling industry to each option.

  7. Advanced technologies for decontamination and conversion of scrap metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacNair, V.; Muth, T.; Shasteen, K.; Liby, A.; Hradil, G.; Mishra, B.

    1996-01-01

    In October 1993, Manufacturing Sciences Corporation was awarded DOE contract DE-AC21-93MC30170 to develop and test recycling of radioactive scrap metal (RSM) to high value and intermediate and final product forms. This work was conducted to help solve the problems associated with decontamination and reuse of the diffusion plant barrier nickel and other radioactively contaminated scrap metals present in the diffusion plants. Options available for disposition of the nickel include decontamination and subsequent release or recycled product manufacture for restricted end use. Both of these options are evaluated during the course of this research effort. work during phase I of this project successfully demonstrated the ability to make stainless steel from barrier nickel feed. This paved the way for restricted end use products made from stainless steel. Also, after repeated trials and studies, the inducto-slag nickel decontamination process was eliminated as a suitable alternative. Electro-refining appeared to be a promising technology for decontamination of the diffusion plant barrier material. Goals for phase II included conducting experiments to facilitate the development of an electro-refining process to separate technetium from nickel. In parallel with those activities, phase II efforts were to include the development of the necessary processes to make useful products from radioactive scrap metal. Nickel from the diffusion plants as well as stainless steel and carbon steel could be used as feed material for these products

  8. Investigation of fatigue and mechanical properties of the pipe grade poly(vinyl chloride using recycled scraps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J-M. Lee

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effect of using pre-consumer PVC scraps on static and long-term mechanical properties is studied. The degradation characteristics of mixing virgin PVC with crushed pre-consumer and PVC pipe scraps are analyzed using various tools including Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC, Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA, X-ray fluorescence (XRF and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR spectroscopy. The variation of static mechanical properties as a function of adding pre-consumer PVC pipe scraps is investigated using the degradation analyses of recycled PVC scraps. In addition, fatigue tests are executed to evaluate the long-term durability of blending virgin PVC and recycled PVC scraps, and the fracture surface is investigated in detail to reveal the variation of the fracture mechanisms.

  9. Detection of radioactivity in scrap in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kugeler, E.; Thierfeldt, S.; Sefzig, R.; Weimer, G.

    1999-01-01

    Although Germany's scrap export exceeds the import, the imports of scrap amount to more than one million Mg per year. Radioactivity has been found mainly in imported scrap in Germany. This radioactivity can consist of surface contamination in scrap e.g. from the oil and gas industry, nuclear and other technical applications or of radiation sources, e.g. from medical or technical irradiation devices where the source has not been removed prior to scrapping. Fortunately really large sources have been involved in only very few occasions. More serious incidents have, however, been reported from other countries. Today, measurement facilities have been installed at the entrances to virtually all German foundries and larger scrap yards. These measurement facilities allow the swift measurement of whole lorry or freight car loads. The lower limit of detection is for some devices as low as ca. 5 nSv/h (dose rate increase above background at the detector) which is achieved by very advanced hardware and software. Additionally, simplified dose rate measurements are performed by German customs officials at the eastern borders for scrap loads to be imported into Germany. When activity is detected in a load, several options exist, like e.g.: (i) sending the scrap back to the sender; (ii) allowing the whole load to be melted down; (iii) careful unloading and separating the load with the aim of localizing and removing the contamination. This paper analyses these various options after detection, discusses the role of the competent authorities and evaluates the possible radiological consequences. Realistic dose calculations show that it is possible that a person may receive doses of several mSv or even 10 mSv if precautionary measures are neglected or if a larger source is not detected at all. This paper further addresses which types and amounts of radioactivity may be detected and which conclusions can be drawn from the dose rate at the detector. The continuous increase in the number

  10. Radiation protection aspects of the trafficking radionuclides contaminated metal scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prouza, Z.

    1999-01-01

    This paper covers the legal base of the release in the environment of radionuclides containing materials and the radiation protection aspects of trafficking in radionuclides contaminated materials. Materials, substance and objects containing radionuclides or contaminated by them may be released into the environment, if they do not exceed values authorized by SONS (State Office of Nuclear Safety). Legislative measures should be taken against illicit trafficking of the nuclear material in all the areas. The creation of a sophisticated system for the control and regulation of all important radionuclides released into the environment should be based on the radiation protection limits, constraints, reference and exemption levels which are introduced in the legislative documents; the strong supervision of producers and users of the sealed sources by SONS side, in addition to the requirements of the licensing process of their sources; a complete data-base and information exchange system related to illicit trafficking in contaminated material; in this system all the authorities with jurisdiction should be involved. The responsibilities of the persons involved in metal scrap trafficking should include arrangement of appropriate monitoring, rules for transport of the metal scrap, an adequate measuring system to monitor metal scrap including monitoring to prevent processing or smelting of the radioactive material, control measures, etc. All of the above items of legislation are an important challenge for the Czech Republic. (author)

  11. Characterization of naturally occurring radioactive materials and Cobald-60 contaminated ferrous scraps from steel industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, H.E.; Chiu, H.S.; Hunga, J.Y.; His, H.W.; Chen, Y.B.

    2002-01-01

    Since the occurrence of radioactively contaminated rebar incident in 1992, steel industries in Taiwan were encouraged by Atomic Energy Council (AEC) to install portal monitor to detect the abnormal radiation in shipments of metal scrap feed. From 1994 through 1999, there were 53 discoveries of radioactivity in ferrous scraps by steel companies. These include 15 orphan radioactive sources, 16 cobalt-60 contaminated rebars, 20 Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) contaminated scraps, and two unknowns. Most NORM-contaminated scraps were from abroad. The NORM and cobalt-60 contaminated scraps were taken from the steel mills and analyzed in laboratory. The analytical results of scales and sludge sampled from NORM-contaminated scraps combining with the circumstantial evidences indicate that five possible industrial processes may be involved. They are oil production and treatment, heavy mineral sand benefication and rare earth processing, copper mining and processing, recovery of ammonium chloride by lime adsorption in Ammonium-soda process, and tailing of uranium enrichment process. The cobalt-60 activity and trace elements concentrations of contaminated rebars confirm that all of them were produced domestically in the period from Oct. 1982 to Jan. 1983, when the cobalt-60 sources were lost and entered the electric arc furnace to produce the contaminated rebars. (author)

  12. Economic aspects of recycling U.S. Department of Energy radioactive scrap metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrop, J.; Numark, N.; MacKinney, J.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has substantial quantities of scrap metal contaminated with low-levels of radioactivity. What is more important, current DOE Decommissioning and Dismantlement (D and D) plans will generate even more radioactive scrap metal. Disposition of this radioactive scrap metal could result in substantial costs to the DOE, but if certain options are exercised, could result in an economic gain. This paper outlines five basic options the DOE could follow for disposition of its radioactive scrap metal, and then examines the economic consequences of each option. A cost-benefit analysis was used to evaluate each of the five options. Real costs, derived from DOE studies and private industry, formed the basis for all analysis. These include transportation, packaging, processing (melt-refining) prices charged by industry, and burial fees and scrap metal storage facility operating and surveillance costs faced by the DOE. Other potential costs, such as the avoided costs of mining, and other less-well defined factors are assumed imbedded in the prices charged by industry for processing radioactive scrap metal. The results of this analysis show that burial cost is the most significant factor to consider in deciding which RSM disposition option to pursue. Moderate variations in burial costs can dramatically change the outcome of the cost-benefit analysis. (author)

  13. A Pilot Assessment of Occupational Health Hazards in the US Electronic Scrap Recycling Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceballos, Diana M; Gong, Wei; Page, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) surveyed a randomly selected sample of electronic scrap (e-scrap) recycling facilities nationwide to characterize work processes, exposures, and controls. Despite multiple attempts to contact 278 facilities, only 47 responded (17% response rate). Surveyed facilities reported recycling a wide variety of electronics. The most common recycling processes were manual dismantling and sorting. Other processes included shredding, crushing, and automated separation. Many facilities reported that they had health and safety programs in place. However, some facilities reported the use of compressed air for cleaning, a practice that can lead to increased employee dust exposures, and some facilities allowed food and drinks in the production areas, a practice that can lead to ingestion of contaminants. Although our results may not be generalizable to all US e-scrap recycling facilities, they are informative regarding health and safety programs in the industry. We concluded that e-scrap recycling has the potential for a wide variety of occupational exposures particularly because of the frequent use of manual processes. On-site evaluations of e-scrap recyclers are needed to determine if reported work processes, practices, and controls are effective and meet current standards and guidelines. Educating the e-scrap recycling industry about health and safety best practices, specifically related to safe handling of metal dust, would help protect employees.

  14. The Study for Recycling NORM - Contaminated Steel Scraps from Steel Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, K. F.; Lee, Y. S.; Chao, H. E.

    2003-01-01

    Since 1994, most of the major steel industries in Taiwan have installed portal monitor to detect the abnormal radiation in metal scrap feed. As a result, the discovery of NORM (Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material) has increased in recent years. In order to save the natural resources and promote radiation protection, an experimental melting process for the NORM contaminated steel scraps was carried out by the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER) Taiwan, ROC. The experimental melting process has a pretreatment step that includes a series of cutting and removal of scales, sludge, as well as combustible and volatile materials on/in the steel scraps. After pretreatment the surface of the steel scraps are relatively clean. Then the scraps are melted by a pilot-type induction furnace. This experiment finally produced seven ingots with a total weight of 2,849 kg and 96.8% recovery. All of the surface dose rates are of the background values. The activity concentrations of these ingots are also below the regulatory criteria. Thus, these NORM-bearing steel scraps are ready for recycling. This study has been granted by the regulatory authority

  15. Testing of wet scrap recovery equipment for mixed oxide scrap reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demiter, J.A.; Klem, M.J.; Owen, T.J.

    1984-08-01

    The Wet Scrap Recovery (WSR) program was initiated at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) by Westinghouse Hanford Company in Richland, Washington to demonstrate fuel fabrication scrap recovery and reconversion to fuel grade oxide powder using the continuous coprecipitation-calcination (COPRECAL) conversion process. Advancements in process control equipment and instrumentation were also developed and demonstrated

  16. Leachability of heavy metals from scrap dirt sampled at two scrap iron and metal recycling facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Dorthe Lærke; Holm, Peter Engelund; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2000-01-01

    Column and batch leaching experiments were performed to quantify leaching of heavy metals (Pb, Cu, Cd and Zn) from scrap dirt representing different activities at two iron scrap and metal recycling facilities. The scrap dirt is often found directly upon the bare unprotected soil at recycling...... battery salvage locations was different, showing lower pH and signi®cant leaching of lead (up to 8000 mg Pb l±1), cadmium (up to 40 mg Cd l±1), and zinc (up to 2000 mg Zn l±1). The column and batch leaching experiments gave comparable results at the order of magnitude level, and both approaches are......, at that level, useful for evaluation of leaching potentials from scrap dirt. The experiments showed that scrap dirt at recycling facilities constitutes only a modest leaching problem, but a long-term soil pollution problem from a land-use perspective. Leaching experiments with compost solution indicated...

  17. The reuse of scrap and decontamination waste water from decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Junxian; Li Xin; Xie Xiaolong

    2010-01-01

    Huge amount of radioactive scrap with low activity will be generated from reactor decommissioning; the decontamination is concentrated in the surface layer of the scrap. The decontaminated substance can be removed by high pressure water jet to appear the base metal and to reuse the metal. Big amount of radioactive waste water will be generated by this decontamination technology; the radioactive of the waste water is mainly caused by the solid particle from decontamination. To remove the solid particle as clean as possible, the waste water can be reused. Different possible technology to remove the solid particle from the water had been investigated, such as the gravity deposit separation, the filtration and the centrifugal separation etc. The centrifugal separation technology is selected; it includes the hydraulic vortex, the centrifugal filtration and the centrifugal deposit. After the cost benefit analysis at last the centrifugal deposit used butterfly type separator is selected. To reuse the waste water the fresh water consumption and the cost for waste water treatment can be reduced. To reuse the radioactive scrap and the waste water from decommissioning will minimize the radioactive waste. (authors)

  18. The new MAW scrap processing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kueppers, L.

    1994-01-01

    The shielded bunker for heat-generating waste attached to the MAW scrap processing cell will be modified and extended to comprise several MAW scrap processing cells of enhanced throughput capacity, and a new building to serve as an airlock and port for acceptance of large shipping casks (shipping cask airlock, TBS). The new facility is to process scrap from decommissioned nuclear installations, and in addition radwaste accrued at operating plants of utilities. This will allow efficient and steady use of the new MAW scrap processing facility. The planning activities for modification and extension are based on close coordination between KfK and the GNS mbH, in order to put structural dimensioning and capacity planning on a realistic basis in line with expected amounts of radwaste from operating nuclear installations of utilities. The paper indicates the currently available waste amount assessments covering solid radwaste (MAW) from the decommissioning of the WAK, MZFR, and KNK II, and existing waste amounts consisting of core internals of German nuclear power plant. The figures show that the MAW scrap processing facility will have to process an overall bulk of about 1100 Mg of solid waste over the next ten years to come. (orig./HP) [de

  19. Catalytic extraction processing of contaminated scrap metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, T.P.; Johnston, J.E.; Payea, B.M. [Molten Metal Technology, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy issued a Planned Research and Development Announcement (PRDA) in 1993, with the objective of identifying unique technologies which could be applied to the most hazardous waste streams at DOE sites. The combination of radioactive contamination with additional contamination by hazardous constituents such as those identified by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) pose an especially challenging problem. Traditional remediation technologies are increasingly becoming less acceptable to stakeholders and regulators because of the risks they pose to public health and safety. Desirable recycling technologies were described by the DOE as: (1) easily installed, operated, and maintained; (2) exhibiting superior environmental performance; (3) protective of worker and public health and safety; (4) readily acceptable to a wide spectrum of evaluators; and (5) economically feasible. Molten Metal Technology, Inc. (MMT) was awarded a contract as a result of the PRDA initiative to demonstrate the applicability of Catalytic Extraction Processing (CEP), MMT`s proprietary elemental recycling technology, to DOE`s inventory of low level mixed waste. This includes DOE`s inventory of radioactively- and RCRA-contaminated scrap metal and other waste forms expected to be generated by the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of DOE sites.

  20. Catalytic extraction processing of contaminated scrap metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, T.P.; Johnston, J.E.; Payea, B.M.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy issued a Planned Research and Development Announcement (PRDA) in 1993, with the objective of identifying unique technologies which could be applied to the most hazardous waste streams at DOE sites. The combination of radioactive contamination with additional contamination by hazardous constituents such as those identified by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) pose an especially challenging problem. Traditional remediation technologies are increasingly becoming less acceptable to stakeholders and regulators because of the risks they pose to public health and safety. Desirable recycling technologies were described by the DOE as: (1) easily installed, operated, and maintained; (2) exhibiting superior environmental performance; (3) protective of worker and public health and safety; (4) readily acceptable to a wide spectrum of evaluators; and (5) economically feasible. Molten Metal Technology, Inc. (MMT) was awarded a contract as a result of the PRDA initiative to demonstrate the applicability of Catalytic Extraction Processing (CEP), MMT's proprietary elemental recycling technology, to DOE's inventory of low level mixed waste. This includes DOE's inventory of radioactively- and RCRA-contaminated scrap metal and other waste forms expected to be generated by the decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) of DOE sites

  1. Microwave-assisted shingled magnetic recording simulations on an exchange-coupled composite medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, T., E-mail: t-tanaka@ed.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Electronics, Graduate School of Information Science and Electrical Engineering, Kyushu University, Motoota 744, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Kashiwagi, S. [Department of Electronics, Graduate School of Information Science and Electrical Engineering, Kyushu University, Motoota 744, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Kanai, Y. [Department of Information and Electronics Engineering, Niigata Institute of Technology, Fujihashi 1719, Kashiwazaki, Niigata 945-1195 (Japan); Matsuyama, K. [Department of Electronics, Graduate School of Information Science and Electrical Engineering, Kyushu University, Motoota 744, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2016-10-15

    The potential of microwave-assisted magnetic recording combined with the shingled recording scheme has been studied by simulating read/write processes on exchange-coupled composite media focusing on recording characteristics in the cross-track direction. Microwave fields enhance writability, especially at the track edge, resulting in lower noise and higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), which enables higher track density in the shingled recording scheme. Read/write simulations of microwave-assisted shingled recording achieve 1.4 Mtracks/in. while retaining high SNR. Further increases in SNR and track density will require either a narrower reader or track edge noise reduction. - Highlights: • Signal recording of shingled magnetic recording using an asymmetric single pole type head combined with a microwave assistance was numerically demonstrated. • Writability is improved by microwave fields with a moderate frequency at the track edge of the shielded side, resulting in higher signal-to-noise ratio. • 1.41 Mtpi of track density is feasible for the recording scheme of shingled magnetic recording with microwave assistance.

  2. Microwave-assisted shingled magnetic recording simulations on an exchange-coupled composite medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, T.; Kashiwagi, S.; Kanai, Y.; Matsuyama, K.

    2016-01-01

    The potential of microwave-assisted magnetic recording combined with the shingled recording scheme has been studied by simulating read/write processes on exchange-coupled composite media focusing on recording characteristics in the cross-track direction. Microwave fields enhance writability, especially at the track edge, resulting in lower noise and higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), which enables higher track density in the shingled recording scheme. Read/write simulations of microwave-assisted shingled recording achieve 1.4 Mtracks/in. while retaining high SNR. Further increases in SNR and track density will require either a narrower reader or track edge noise reduction. - Highlights: • Signal recording of shingled magnetic recording using an asymmetric single pole type head combined with a microwave assistance was numerically demonstrated. • Writability is improved by microwave fields with a moderate frequency at the track edge of the shielded side, resulting in higher signal-to-noise ratio. • 1.41 Mtpi of track density is feasible for the recording scheme of shingled magnetic recording with microwave assistance.

  3. 7 CFR 29.1169 - Scrap (S Group).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Scrap (S Group). 29.1169 Section 29.1169 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Standards Grades § 29.1169 Scrap (S Group). A byproduct of stemmed and unstemmed tobacco. Scrap...

  4. 7 CFR 29.2441 - Scrap (S Group).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Scrap (S Group). 29.2441 Section 29.2441 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Standards Grades § 29.2441 Scrap (S Group). A byproduct of unstemmed and stemmed tobacco. Scrap...

  5. Considerations in recycling contaminated scrap metal and rubble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluk, A.F.; Hocking, E.K.

    1992-01-01

    Management options for the Department of Energy's increasing amounts of contaminated scrap metal and rubble include reuse as is, disposal, and recycling. Recycling, with its promise of resource recovery, virgin materials conservation, and land disposal minimization, emerges as a preferred management technique. Implementing a cost effective recycling program requires resolution of several issues including: establishing release limits for contaminants, controlling use of recycled materials creating effective public communication programs; developing economical, reliable assay technologies; managing secondary waste streams, expanding availability of unrestricted markets; and solving conflicting legal considerations

  6. Vitrification for stability of scrap and residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, C.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-05-01

    A conference breakout discussion was held on the subject of vitrification for stabilization of plutonium scrap and residue. This was one of four such sessions held within the vitrification workshop for participants to discuss specific subjects in further detail. The questions and issues were defined by the participants.

  7. Catalytic extraction processing of contaminated scrap metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, T.P.; Johnston, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    The contract was conceived to establish the commercial capability of Catalytic Extraction Processing (CEP) to treat contaminated scrap metal in the DOE inventory. In so doing, Molten Metal Technology, Inc. (MMT), pursued the following objectives: demonstration of the recycling of ferrous and non-ferrous metals--to establish that radioactively contaminated scrap metal can be converted to high-grade, ferrous and non-ferrous alloys which can be reused by DOE or reintroduced into commerce; immobilize radionuclides--that CEP will concentrate the radionuclides in a dense vitreous phase, minimize secondary waste generation and stabilize and reduce waste volume; destroy hazardous organics--that CEP will convert hazardous organics to valuable industrial gases, which can be used as feed gases for chemical synthesis or as an energy source; recovery volatile heavy metals--that CEP's off-gas treatment system will capture volatile heavy metals, such as mercury and lead; and establish that CEP is economical for processing contaminated scrap metal in the DOE inventory--that CEP is a more cost-effective and, complete treatment and recycling technology than competing technologies for processing contaminated scrap. The process and its performance are described

  8. Feasibility analysis of recycling radioactive scrap steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, F.; Balhiser, B.; Cignetti, N.

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to: (1) establish a conceptual design that integrates commercial steel mill technology with radioactive scrap metal (RSM) processing to produce carbon and stainless steel sheet and plate at a grade suitable for fabricating into radioactive waste containers; (2) determine the economic feasibility of building a micro-mill in the Western US to process 30,000 tons of RSM per year from both DOE and the nuclear utilities; and (3) provide recommendations for implementation. For purposes of defining the project, it is divided into phases: economic feasibility and conceptual design; preliminary design; detail design; construction; and operation. This study comprises the bulk of Phase 1. It is divided into four sections. Section 1 provides the reader with a complete overview extracting pertinent data, recommendations and conclusions from the remainder of the report. Section 2 defines the variables that impact the design requirements. These data form the baseline to create a preliminary conceptual design that is technically sound, economically viable, and capitalizes on economies of scale. Priorities governing the design activities are: (1) minimizing worker exposure to radionuclide hazards, (2) maximizing worker safety, (3) minimizing environmental contamination, (4) minimizing secondary wastes, and (5) establishing engineering controls to insure that the plant will be granted a license in the state selected for operation. Section 3 provides details of the preliminary conceptual design that was selected. The cost of project construction is estimated and the personnel needed to support the steel-making operation and radiological and environmental control are identified. Section 4 identifies the operational costs and supports the economic feasibility analysis. A detailed discussion of the resulting conclusions and recommendations is included in this section

  9. Recycling decontaminated scrap metal from the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordas, F.

    2000-01-01

    The Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) has set up a pilot program for recycling decontaminated scrap metal. In decommissioning its enriched uranium production facilities at Pierrelatte, the CEA has accumulated some 700 metric tons of scrap metal from dismantled uranium hexafluoride transport containers. The containers were decontaminated by SOCATRI at the Tricastin site, then cut up and recycled by a steelmaker. The project was submitted to the Ionizing Radiation Protection Office, the Nuclear Facilities Safety Division and the Regional Directorate for Industry, Research and Environmental Protection for approval. It was also submitted to the Ministry of Industry's Nuclear Information and Safety Council and to the Permanent Secretariat for Industrial Pollution Problems (an informational group chaired by the Prefect of the Provence Alpes-Cote d Azur region and including representatives of local and regional authorities, associations, elected officials and the media). The permit was granted for this program under the terms of a prefectorial decree stipulating additional requirements for the steelmaker, and contingent on the demonstration of full control over the operations, demonstrated traceability and the absence of any significant harmful effects. The key elements of this demonstration include the choice of operators, identification of the objects, itemization of the operations, discrimination of operators, the contractual framework of the operations, the signature of agreements by the CEA with SOCATRI and with the steelmaker, documentary monitoring of the operations, contradictory inspections and measurements, second-level inspection by the CEA/Valrho, audits of the operators and impact assessments. All the procedures of operations related to the scrap metal are described in quality assurance documents. (author)

  10. A recovery of gold from electronic scrap by mechanical separation, acid leaching and electrowinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhee, K.I.; Lee, J.C.; Lee, C.K.; Joo, K.H.; Yoon, J.K.; Kang, H.R.; Kim, Y.S.; Sohn, H.J.

    1995-12-31

    A series of processes to recover the gold from electronic scrap which contains initially about 200--600 ppm Au have been developed. First, mechanical beneficiation including shredding, crushing and screening was employed. Results showed that 99 percent of gold component leaves in the fraction of under 1 mm of crushed scrap and its concentration was enriched to about 800 ppm without incineration. The scrap was leached in 50% aqua regia solution and gold was dissolved completely at 60 C within 2 hours. Other valuable metals such as silver, copper, nickel and iron were also dissolved. This resulting solution was boiled to remove nitrous compounds in the leachate. Finally, a newly designed electrolyzer was tested to recover the gold metal. More than 99% of gold and silver were recovered within an hour in electrowinning process.

  11. A novel technique for the production of cool colored concrete tile and asphalt shingle roofing products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Berdahl, Paul [Heat Island Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Wood, Kurt; Skilton, Wayne; Petersheim, Jerry [Arkema, Inc., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2010-06-15

    The widespread use of solar-reflective roofing materials can save energy, mitigate urban heat islands and slow global warming by cooling the roughly 20% of the urban surface that is roofed. In this study we created prototype solar-reflective nonwhite concrete tile and asphalt shingle roofing materials using a two-layer spray coating process intended to maximize both solar reflectance and factory-line throughput. Each layer is a thin, quick-drying, pigmented latex paint based on either acrylic or a poly(vinylidene fluoride)/acrylic blend. The first layer is a titanium dioxide rutile white basecoat that increases the solar reflectance of a gray-cement concrete tile from 0.18 to 0.79, and that of a shingle surfaced with bare granules from 0.06 to 0.62. The second layer is a ''cool'' color topcoat with weak near-infrared (NIR) absorption and/or strong NIR backscattering. Each layer dries within seconds, potentially allowing a factory line to pass first under the white spray, then under the color spray. We combined a white basecoat with monocolor topcoats in various shades of red, brown, green and blue to prepare 24 cool colored prototype tiles and 24 cool colored prototypes shingles. The solar reflectances of the tiles ranged from 0.26 (dark brown; CIELAB lightness value L{sup *}=29) to 0.57 (light green; L{sup *}=76); those of the shingles ranged from 0.18 (dark brown; L{sup *}=26) to 0.34 (light green; L{sup *}=68). Over half of the tiles had a solar reflectance of at least 0.40, and over half of the shingles had a solar reflectance of at least 0.25. (author)

  12. Slovenian System for Protecting Against Radioactive Material in Scrap Metal Shipments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stritar, A.; Cesarek, J.; Vokal Nemec, B., E-mail: andrej.stritar@gov.si [Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2011-07-15

    The Slovenian experience shows that the majority of detected orphan sources are associated with imports of scrap metal to Slovenia and transits of that material through Slovenia. Such orphan sources originate from past industrial activities and weak regulatory control in the countries of origin. In order to minimise the number of sources outside regulatory control several regulatory and law enforcement measures have been implemented. To prevent illicit trafficking across the border the 'First line of defence' - customs and police - are equipped with radiation detection devices. Since 2002, the Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA) has provided a 24-hour on-duty officer, who gives advice in case of the discovery of an orphan source. The majority of scrap metal collectors and re-cyclers are equipped with portal monitors and/or hand-held radiation detection equipment. Generally, good cooperation has been established between different organizations within Slovenia, with neighbouring countries and with some international organizations. To regulate the scrap metal activities, a new Decree on checking the radioactivity of shipments of metal scrap has been in force since 1 January 2008. This decree requires that every importer has to present a certificate of radiation measurement before any shipment of scrap metal is brought into Slovenia. Such measurements can be performed only by certified organizations. These organizations can obtain certification from the SNSA providing that they have the prescribed measuring devices, adequate training and procedures, and that their capabilities have been checked by a technical support organization. The experience after one year of application of the decree is positive. Awareness, including the adequacy of response, has increased. The paper discusses the general scheme for protection against illicit radioactive material in scrap metal shipments and the Slovenian experience in the last decade. (author)

  13. Import of metal scrap - risks associated with radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elert, M.

    1992-11-01

    There is a growing concern in Sweden for the possibility that imported metal scrap is radioactive. The recent political and economical changes in eastern Europe and the increased cooperation with the CEC has affected Swedens import. In the last years, the import of metal scrap from the former USSR has increased considerably. In view of recent incidents, when radioactive materials have been found, the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute has detected a need for identifying the potential risk sources and evaluating the magnitude of the risk associated with the import of metal scrap. The purpose of this report is to provide some background material concerning import statistics, use of metal scrap in Sweden and to identify potential sources of radioactive metal scrap. In addition, the radionuclides of most concern has been identified and the possibility of detecting them in metal scrap shipments is analyzed

  14. 49 CFR 173.218 - Fish meal or fish scrap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fish meal or fish scrap. 173.218 Section 173.218... Fish meal or fish scrap. (a) Except as provided in Column (7) of the HMT in § 172.101 of this subchapter, fish meal or fish scrap, containing at least 6%, but not more than 12% water, is authorized for...

  15. Assessment of dose level of ionizing radiation in army scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel Hamid, S. M.

    2010-12-01

    Radiation protection is the science of protecting people and the environment from the harmful effects of ionizing radiation, which includes both particle radiation and high energy radiation. Ionizing radiation is widely used in industry and medicine. Any human activity of nuclear technologies should be linked to the foundation of scientific methodology and baseline radiation culture to avoid risk of radiation and should be working with radioactive materials and expertise to understand, control practices in order to avoid risks that could cause harm to human and environment. The study was conducted in warehouses and building of Sudan air force Khartoum basic air force during September 2010. The goal of this study to estimate the radiation dose and measurement of radioactive contamination of aircraft scrap equipment and increase the culture of radiological safety as well as the concept of radiation protection. The results showed that there is no pollution observed in the contents of the aircraft and the spire part stores outside, levels of radiation dose for the all contents of the aircraft and spire part within the excitable level, except temperature sensors estimated radiation dose about 43 μSv/h outside of the shielding and 12 μSv/h inside the shielding that exceeded the internationally recommended dose level. One of the most important of the identification of eighteen (18) radiation sources used in temperature and fuel level sensors. These are separated from the scrap, collected and stored in safe place. (Author)

  16. Plutonium scrap waste processing based on aqueous nitrate and chloride media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navratil, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    A brief review of plutonium scrap aqueous waste processing technology at Rocky Flats is given. Nitric acid unit operations include dissolution and leaching, anion exchange purification and precipitation. Chloride waste processing consists of cation exchange and carbonate precipitation. Ferrite and carrier precipitation waste treatment processes are also described. 3 figs

  17. EPA and GSA Webinar: E Scrap Management, Computers for Learning and the Federal Green Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA and the General Services Administration (GSA) are hosting a webinar on May 2, 2018. Topics will include policies and procedures on E Scrap management, a review of the Computers For Leaning Program, and benefits of joining the Federal Green Challenge.

  18. Remelting of Aluminium by Continuous Submersion of Rolled Scrap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farner, Snorre

    2000-12-01

    When remelting aluminium scrap, metal losses due to dross generation is a common problem. Reduction of these losses will give substantial economic and environmental benefits. Dross is generated when aluminium metal oxidizes and films of oxide envelope molten metal. When a cold metal object is immersed in a melt, the heat of the melt around this is transferred so rapidly into the object that a shell of melt often solidifies to the surface of the object. When scrap with low bulk density is charged to a melt, solidification of melt on the cold scrap prevents melt from entering the cavities in the bulk of the scrap, and the bulk density remains low. Thus the scrap tends to float on the melt surface. Submersion of this scrap is important to avoid oxidation and subsequent dross generation. One solution to this is to roll scrap to a strip and feed it into the melt. This system has been examined by studying feeding of a continuous, thin aluminium plate into molten aluminium. Also, the effect of lacquer was considered, as well as feeding the plate into a launder with melt flowing along the surface of the plate. An analytical, one-dimensional, steady-state model has been developed to describe the melting and the melting mechanisms. It is based on a shell solidifying on the plate surface and a gap introducing a thermal resistance 1/h{sub g} between the shell and the plate. The thermal resistance 1/h{sub l} of the boundary layer of the melt is included. Depending on these resistances, the initial temperature of the plate and the melt temperature, a shell will form, and the plate will penetrate a distance P into the melt before it melts away. An experimental apparatus was designed and constructed to feed aluminium plate from a coil into a melt bath at a specified velocity. The plate could be withdrawn rapidly to ''freeze'' the situation like it was below the melt surface. The penetration depth P of the plate could be measured and shell formation observed

  19. Advanced technologies for decomtamination and conversion of scrap metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valerie MacNair; Steve Sarten; Thomas Muth; Brajendra Mishra

    1999-05-27

    The Department of Energy (DOE) faces the task of decommissioning much of the vast US weapons complex. One challenge of this effort includes the disposition of large amounts of radioactively contaminated scrap metal (RSM) including but not limited to steel, nickel, copper, and aluminum. The decontamination and recycling of RSM has become a key element in the DOE's strategy for cleanup of contaminated sites and facilities. Recycling helps to offset the cost of decommissioning and saves valuable space in the waste disposal facilities. It also reduces the amount of environmental effects associated with mining new metals. Work on this project is geared toward finding decontamination and/or recycling alternatives for the RSM contained in the decommissioned gaseous diffusion plants including approximately 40,000 tons of nickel. The nickel is contaminated with Technetium-99, and is difficult to remove using traditional decontamination technologies. The project, titled ``Advanced Technologies for Decontamination and Conversion of Scrap Metal'' was proposed as a four phase project. Phase 1 and 2 are complete and Phase 3 will complete May 31, 1999. Stainless steel made from contaminated nickel barrier was successfully produced in Phase 1. An economic evaluation was performed and a market study of potential products from the recycled metal was completed. Inducto-slag refining, after extensive testing, was eliminated as an alternative to remove technetium contamination from nickel. Phase 2 included successful lab scale and pilot scale demonstrations of electrorefining to separate technetium from nickel. This effort included a survey of available technologies to detect technetium in volumetrically contaminated metals. A new process to make sanitary drums from RSM was developed and implemented. Phase 3 included a full scale demonstration of electrorefining, an evaluation of electro-refining alternatives including direct dissolution, melting of nickel into anodes, a

  20. Advanced technologies for decontamination and conversion of scrap metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valerie MacNair; Steve Sarten; Thomas Muth; Brajendra Mishra

    1999-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) faces the task of decommissioning much of the vast US weapons complex. One challenge of this effort includes the disposition of large amounts of radioactively contaminated scrap metal (RSM) including but not limited to steel, nickel, copper, and aluminum. The decontamination and recycling of RSM has become a key element in the DOE's strategy for cleanup of contaminated sites and facilities. Recycling helps to offset the cost of decommissioning and saves valuable space in the waste disposal facilities. It also reduces the amount of environmental effects associated with mining new metals. Work on this project is geared toward finding decontamination and/or recycling alternatives for the RSM contained in the decommissioned gaseous diffusion plants including approximately 40,000 tons of nickel. The nickel is contaminated with Technetium-99, and is difficult to remove using traditional decontamination technologies. The project, titled ''Advanced Technologies for Decontamination and Conversion of Scrap Metal'' was proposed as a four phase project. Phase 1 and 2 are complete and Phase 3 will complete May 31, 1999. Stainless steel made from contaminated nickel barrier was successfully produced in Phase 1. An economic evaluation was performed and a market study of potential products from the recycled metal was completed. Inducto-slag refining, after extensive testing, was eliminated as an alternative to remove technetium contamination from nickel. Phase 2 included successful lab scale and pilot scale demonstrations of electrorefining to separate technetium from nickel. This effort included a survey of available technologies to detect technetium in volumetrically contaminated metals. A new process to make sanitary drums from RSM was developed and implemented. Phase 3 included a full scale demonstration of electrorefining, an evaluation of electro-refining alternatives including direct dissolution, melting of nickel into anodes, a laser cutting

  1. Health risk and impact evaluation for recycling of radioactive scrap metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieves, L.A.; Chen, S.Y.; Murphie, W.E.; Lilly, M.J. III

    1994-01-01

    The DoE, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, is participating with the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development in providing analytical support for developing international standards for recycling of radioactive scrap metals. For this purpose, Argonne National Laboratory is assessing health, environmental and societal implications of recycling and/or disposal process alternatives. This effort includes development of international inventory estimates for contaminated metals; investigation of international scrap metal markets; assessment of radiological and non-radiological human health risks; impacts on environmental quality and resources; and investigation of social and political factors. The RSM disposal option is being assessed with regard to the environmental and health impacts of replacing the metals if they are withdrawn from use. Impact estimates are developed for steel as an illustrative example because steel comprises a major portion of the scrap metal inventory. Current and potential sources of RSM include nuclear power plants, fuel cycle and weapons production facilities, industrial and medical facilities and equipment, and petroleum and phosphate rock extraction equipment. Millions of metric tons (t) of scrap iron and steel, stainless steel, and copper, as well as lesser quantities of aluminum, nickel, lead, and zirconium, are likely to become available in the future as these facilities are withdrawn from service

  2. Development and testing of shingle-type solar cell modules. Quarterly report No. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, N.F.

    1978-01-05

    The details of a shingle module design which produces in excess of 97 watts/m/sup 2/ of module area at 1 kW/m/sup 2/ insolation and at 60/sup 0/C are reported. This selected design employs a tempered glass coverplate to provide the primary solar cell structural support. The use of the B.F. Goodrich FLEXSEAL roofing system as the outer skin of the shingle substrate provides a high confidence of achieving the 15 year service life goal. The fabrication and testing of a preproduction module of this design has demonstrated that this selected approach will meet the environmental testing requirements imposed by the contract. Attempts to fabricate a preproduction module of an alternative design, which embeds the solar cell assembly within a methyl methacrylate casting, proved unsuccessful.

  3. Incident involving radioactive material in steel scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drabova, D.; Matzner, J.; Prouza, Z.

    1998-01-01

    In early March of 1996, a wagon with steel scrap heading from the Czech Republic to Italy was returned as a strongly contaminated material. Based on the integral dose (dose rate 650 mGy/h in front of the wagon) and spectrometric measurement and evaluation, it was concluded that an unshielded cobalt-60 source (1.6 TBq) was present. The history of the event (notification, assessment, intervention planning, intervention) is highlighted and the lesson learned from the incident is discussed. (P.A.)

  4. Economic feasibility of radioactive scrap steel recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balhiser, R.; Rosholt, D.; Nichols, F.

    1995-01-01

    The goal of MSE's Radioactive Scrap Steel (RSS) Recycle Program is to develop practical methods for recycling RSS into useful product. This paper provides interim information about ongoing feasibility investigations that are scheduled for completion by September 1995. The project approach, major issues, and cost projections are outlined. Current information indicates that a cost effective RSS Recycling Facility can be designed, built, and in operation by 1999. The RSS team believes that high quality steel plate can be made from RSS at a conversion cost of $1500 per ton or less

  5. Integrating Recycled Glass Cullet in Asphalt Roof Shingles to Mitigate Heat Island Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    The roof covering provides water shedding and ultraviolet protection, and there are six generic classifications roof coverings: asphalt shingles, clay ...M. N. Assimakopou, and G. Mihalakakou. 2011. "Solar cooling with aluminium pillared clays ." Elsevier, Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 95 2363...Fallon, where he completed a deployment onboard the USS BOXER (LHD 4) to Guatemala, El Salvador, and Peru in support of the humanitarian and civic

  6. Scrap of gloveboxes No. 801-W and No. 802-W

    CERN Document Server

    Ohuchi, S; Kurosawa, M; Okane, S; Usui, T

    2002-01-01

    Both gloveboxes No. 801-W for measuring samples of uranium or plutonium and No. 802-W for analyzing the quantity of uranium or plutonium are established at twenty five years ago in the analyzing room No. 108 of Plutonium Fuel Research Facility. It was planned to scrap the gloveboxes and to establish new gloveboxes. This report describes the technical view of the scrapping works.

  7. 46 CFR Sec. 12 - Disposition of removed equipment and scrap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Disposition of removed equipment and scrap. Sec. 12... CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 12 Disposition of removed equipment and scrap. (a) Article 8 of the NSA-LUMPSUMREP Contract provides that any ship equipment, fuel, lube oil, supplies, stores, furniture, fixtures...

  8. Hydrogen isotope storage in zircaloy scrap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, H. S.; Kuk, I. H.; Chung, H.; Paek, S. W.; Kang, H. S

    1999-08-01

    8 MCi of tritium a year will be produced after wolsong TRF is in operation. The metal hydride form is one of useful tritium storage. The metals in use for metal hydride are uranium, titanium, etc., however uranium is limited to use by regulation, and titanium is relatively costly. Both metals are not produced in country but whole amount is imported. On the other hand 2,000kg of zircaloy scrap is produced by CANDU nuclear fuel fabrication process, which is also useful for hydrogen storage. The purpose of this study is to evaluation of hydrogen absorption capacity for zircaloy scrap that is produced as waste by CANDU nuclear fuel fabrication process. The sample evacuated for an hour at 1000 deg C. The strip showed higher capacity : 0.7 at 25 deg C, 2.0 at 200 deg C, 2.0 at 200 deg C, 2.0 at 400 deg C, respectively. The H/M values for commercial zircaloy sponge were 2.0 at 25 deg C and 2.0 at 400 deg C.

  9. Hydrogen isotope storage in zircaloy scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H. S.; Kuk, I. H.; Chung, H.; Paek, S. W.; Kang, H. S.

    1999-08-01

    8 MCi of tritium a year will be produced after wolsong TRF is in operation. The metal hydride form is one of useful tritium storage. The metals in use for metal hydride are uranium, titanium, etc., however uranium is limited to use by regulation, and titanium is relatively costly. Both metals are not produced in country but whole amount is imported. On the other hand 2,000kg of zircaloy scrap is produced by CANDU nuclear fuel fabrication process, which is also useful for hydrogen storage. The purpose of this study is to evaluation of hydrogen absorption capacity for zircaloy scrap that is produced as waste by CANDU nuclear fuel fabrication process. The sample evacuated for an hour at 1000 deg C. The strip showed higher capacity : 0.7 at 25 deg C, 2.0 at 200 deg C, 2.0 at 200 deg C, 2.0 at 400 deg C, respectively. The H/M values for commercial zircaloy sponge were 2.0 at 25 deg C and 2.0 at 400 deg C

  10. Problems with radioactivity scrap in the iron and steel industry of the Czech and Slovak Republics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raab, J.; Toman, V.

    1999-01-01

    During the recent restructuring process, the Czech steel industry has undergone a drastic reduction in the steel production by around 40%. Under such situation, previously exported volumes have been diverted into domestic markets. For the export, the Czech steel industry had to make its efforts in enhancing the quality of products and in improving the technologies in accordance with ISO standards (ISO 9000 and also ISO 14000). Among the various new quality demands in the export market, the radioactive contamination of steel products has received a very high attention. The Czech Iron and Steel Federation has organized a working team specialized in solving the problems arising from radioactive contaminated metallurgical scrap and steel products. The working team is made up of specialists from steel producers and scrap handling firms of the Czech Republic and the Slovak Republic, of experts from the State Office for Nuclear Safety, the Ministry of Industry and Trade and the Metrological Institute. Members of the Inspectorate for Ionizing Radiation and the General Directory for Customs are also included. This working team takes part in the elaboration of the legislative norms in that area. This paper deals with all the detailed functions of the working team. At present, all the major Czech steel producers have installed stationary radiation monitoring systems for detecting the possible radioactivity in all materials entering into factories. Under an agreement arranged between the producers of the Czech Iron and Steel Federation, the tolerable range of radionuclide contents in steel scrap and steel products has been set at the maximum of 100 Bq/kg in ( scrap and steel products. In this respect, the large firms collecting and treating scrap have also installed stationary radiation monitoring systems. In such monitoring systems, the detector will measure and check the values of radioactivity above 10 - 15% higher than the natural background level. In the case that

  11. INEL metal recycle radioactive scrap metal survey report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funk, D.M.

    1994-09-01

    DOE requested that inventory and characterization of radioactive scrap metal (RSM) be conducted across the DOE complex. Past studies have estimated the metal available from unsubstantiated sources. In meetings held in FY-1993, with seven DOE sites represented and several DOE-HQ personnel present, INEL personnel discovered that these numbers were not reliable and that large stockpiles did not exist. INEL proposed doing in-field measurements to ascertain the amount of RSM actually available. This information was necessary to determine the economic viability of recycling and to identify feed stock that could be used to produce containers for radioactive waste. This inventory measured the amount of RSM available at the selected DOE sites. Information gathered included radionuclide content and chemical form, general radiation field, alloy type, and mass of metal

  12. Optimization of fuel recovery through the stepwise co-pyrolysis of palm shell and scrap tire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abnisa, Faisal; Wan Daud, Wan Mohd Ashri

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The co-pyrolysis of palm shell and scrap tire was studied. • The effect of stepwise co-pyrolysis temperature was investigated. • Co-pyrolysis successfully improved the quantity and quality of product yields. • Stepwise co-pyrolysis slightly increased oil and gas, and decreased char. • The co-pyrolysis of 50% biomass and 50% scrap tire is recommended. - Abstract: This study optimized the use of biomass waste to generate fuel through co-pyrolysis. In this paper, the effects of stepwise co-pyrolysis temperature and different ratios between palm shells and scrap tires in feedstock were studied to observe any improvements in the quantity and quality of the liquid yield and its byproduct. The ratio of palm shells and scrap tires varied at 100:0, 75:25, 50:50, 25:75, and 0:100. The experiment was conducted in a fixed-bed reactor. The study was divided into two scenarios. The first scenario was performed at the optimum temperature of 500 °C with a reaction time of 60 min. In the second scenario, the temperature was set at 500 °C for 60 min before the temperature was increased to 800 °C with a high heating rate. After the temperature reached 800 °C, the condition was maintained for approximately 45 min. Results showed that an increase in the liquid and gas yields was achieved when the temperature increased after optimum conditions. Increased yield was also obtained when the proportion of scrap tire was increased in the feedstock. Several other important findings are discussed in this paper, including the phases of pyrolysis oil, features of the liquid product, and characteristics of the byproducts. All products from both scenarios were analyzed by various methods to understand their fuel characteristics

  13. Recycling of rare earth magnet scraps: Carbon and oxygen removal from Nd magnet scraps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saguchi, A.; Asabe, K.; Fukuda, T.; Takahashi, W.; Suzuki, R.O.

    2006-01-01

    The decarburization and deoxidation technique for permanent Nd-Fe-B magnet scrap is investigated. The carbon and oxygen contamination damage the magnetic properties. The carbon content decreased less than 0.001% by heating in air. The two stage deoxidation is applied, iron oxides are reduced by heating in hydrogen thereafter rare earth oxides are removed by Ca-reduction and leaching. The appropriate conditions for deoxidation in the Ca-reduction and suppressing the re-oxidation in the leaching are investigated. The heating pattern in Ca-reduction and the leaching condition for the mixture composed of Ca compounds and Nd-Fe-B alloy powder greatly affects the oxygen content of recycled material. The decarburized and deoxidized Nd-Fe-B magnet scrap can be recycled as alloying elements by melting

  14. Feasibility of re-melting NORM-contaminated scrap metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winters, S. J.; Smith, K. P.

    1999-10-26

    Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) sometimes accumulate inside pieces of equipment associated with oil and gas production and processing activities. Typically, the NORM accumulates when radium that is present in solution in produced water precipitates out in scale and sludge deposits. Scrap equipment containing residual quantities of these NORM-bearing scales and sludges can present a waste management problem if the radium concentrations exceed regulatory limits or activate the alarms on radiation screening devices installed at most scrap metal recycling facilities. Although NORM-contaminated scrap metal currently is not disposed of by re-melting, this form of recycling could present a viable disposition option for this waste stream. Studies indicate that re-melting NORM-contaminated scrap metal is a viable recycling option from a risk-based perspective. However, a myriad of economic, regulatory, and policy issues have caused the recyclers to turn away virtually all radioactive scrap metal. Until these issues can be resolved, re-melting of the petroleum industry's NORM-impacted scrap metal is unlikely to be a widespread practice. This paper summarizes the issues associated with re-melting radioactive scrap so that the petroleum industry and its regulators will understand the obstacles. This paper was prepared as part of a report being prepared by the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission's NORM Subcommittee.

  15. 40 CFR 63.10885 - What are my management practices for metallic scrap and mercury switches?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... minimize the presence of mercury in scrap from end-of-life vehicles. (3) Option for specialty metal scrap... metallic scrap and mercury switches? 63.10885 Section 63.10885 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Affected Sources § 63.10885 What are my management practices for metallic scrap and mercury switches? (a...

  16. Economic feasibility of radioactive scrap steel recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, F.; Balhiser, R.; Rosholt, D.

    1995-01-01

    In the past, government and commercial nuclear operators treated radioactive scrap steel (RSS) as a liability and disposed of it by burial; this was an accepted and economical solution at that time. Today, environmental concerns about burial are changing the waste disposal picture by (a) causing burial costs to soar rapidly, (b) creating pressure to close existing burial sites, and (c) making it difficult and expensive to open and operate burial facilities. To exacerbate the problem, planned dismantling of nuclear facilities will substantially increase volumes of RSS open-quotes wasteclose quotes over the next 30 yr. This report describes a project with the intention of integrating the current commercial mini-mill approach of recycling uncontaminated steel with radiological controls to design a system that can process contaminated metals at prices significantly below the current processors or burial costs

  17. Radioactive scrap metal decontamination technology assessment report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckentin, J.M.; Damkroger, B.K.; Schlienger, M.E.

    1996-04-01

    Within the DOE complex there exists a tremendous quantity of radioactive scrap metal. As an example, it is estimated that within the gaseous diffusion plants there exists in excess of 700,000 tons of contaminated stainless steel. At present, valuable material is being disposed of when it could be converted into a high quality product. Liquid metal processing represents a true recycling opportunity for this material. By applying the primary production processes towards the material's decontamination and re-use, the value of the strategic resource is maintained while drastically reducing the volume of material in need of burial. Potential processes for the liquid metal decontamination of radioactively contaminated metal are discussed and contrasted. Opportunities and technology development issues are identified and discussed. The processes compared are: surface decontamination; size reduction, packaging and burial; melting technologies; electric arc melting; plasma arc centrifugal treatment; air induction melting; vacuum induction melting; and vacuum induction melting and electroslag remelting

  18. Update on Recovering Lead From Scrap Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, E. R.; Lee, A. Y.; Paulson, D. L.

    1985-02-01

    Previous work at the Bureau of Mines Rolla Research Center, U.S. Department of the Interior, resulted in successful development of a bench-scale, combination electrorefining-electrowinning method for recycling lead from scrap batteries by using waste fluosilicic acid (H2SiF6) as electrolyte.1,2 This paper describes larger scale experiments. Prior attempts to electrowin lead failed because large quantities of insoluble lead dioxide were deposited on the anodes at the expense of lead deposition on the cathodes. A major breakthrough was achieved with the discovery that lead dioxide formation at the anodes is prevented by adding a small amount of phosphorus to the electrolyte. The amount of PbO2 formed on the anodes during lead electrowinning was less than 1% of the total lead deposited on the cathodes. This work recently won the prestigious IR·100 award as one of the 100 most significant technological advances of 1984.

  19. Scrap uranium recycling via electron beam melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKoon, R.

    1993-11-01

    A program is underway at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to recycle scrap uranium metal. Currently, much of the material from forging and machining processes is considered radioactive waste and is disposed of by oxidation and encapsulation at significant cost. In the recycling process, uranium and uranium alloys in various forms will be processed by electron beam melting and continuously cast into ingots meeting applicable specifications for virgin material. Existing vacuum processing facilities at LLNL are in compliance with all current federal and state environmental, safety and health regulations for the electron beam melting and vaporization of uranium metal. One of these facilities has been retrofitted with an auxiliary electron beam gun system, water-cooled hearth, crucible and ingot puller to create an electron beam melt furnace. In this furnace, basic process R ampersand D on uranium recycling will be performed with the goal of eventual transfer of this technology to a production facility

  20. Scrap Tyre Management Pathways and Their Use as a Fuel—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Rowhani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a review of different methods for managing waste tyres. Around 1.5 billion scrap tyres make their way into the environmental cycle each year, so there is an extreme demand to manage and mitigate the environmental impact which occurs from landfilling and burning. Numerous approaches are targeted to recycle and reuse the tyre rubber in various applications. Among them, one of the most important methods for sustainable environmental stewardship is converting tyre rubber components into bio-oil. In this study, scrap tyre management techniques including landfill, retreading, recycling, combustion, and conversion to liquid fuels was reviewed (including gasification, hydrothermal liquefaction, and pyrolysis. The effects of parameters such as reactor types, pyrolysis temperature, and catalyst on the oil, gas and solid products in pyrolysis process were investigated.

  1. Contaminated scrap metal management on the Oak Ridge Reservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayden, H.W.; Stephenson, M.J.; Bailey, J.K.; Weir, J.R.; Gilbert, W.C.

    1993-01-01

    Large quantities of scrap metal are accumulating at the various Department of Energy (DOE) installations across the country as a result of ongoing DOE programs and missions in concert with present day waste management practices. DOE Oak Ridge alone is presently storing around 500,000 tons of scrap metal. The local generation rate, currently estimated at 1,400 tons/yr, is expected to increase sharply over the next couple of years as numerous environmental restoration and decommissioning programs gain momentum. Projections show that 775,000 tons of scrap metal could be generated at the K-25 Site over the next ten years. The Y-12 Plant and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have similar potentials. The history of scrap metal management at Oak Ridge and future challenges and opportunities are discussed

  2. Cost-assessment Analysis of Local Vehicle Scrapping Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Lukasz; Gliniak, Maciej; Polek, Daria; Gruca, Maria

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of the paper was to analyse the costs of recycling vehicles at local vehicle scrapping facility. The article contains regulations concerning vehicle decommissioning, describes the types of recovery, vehicles recycling networks, analyses the structure of a disassembly station, as well as the financial and institutional system in charge of dealing with the recycling of vehicles in Poland. The authors present the number of scrapped vehicles at local recycling company and the level of achieved recovery and recycling. The research presented in the article shows financial situation of the vehicle scrapping industry. In addition, it has been observed that the number of subsidies are directly proportional to the number of scrapped vehicles, and achieved levels of recycling and recovery depends on the percentage of incomplete vehicles.

  3. The Scrap Tire Problem: A Preliminary Economic Analysis (1985)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of the study was to conduct a preliminary economic analysis of the social benefits of EPA action to require more appropriate disposal of scrap tires versus the social costs of such an action.

  4. Analysis of disposition alternatives for radioactively contaminated scrap metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieves, L.A.; Chen, S.Y.; Kohout, E.J.; Nabelssi, B.; Tilbrook, R.W.; Wilson, S.E.

    1997-01-01

    Millions of tonnes of slightly radioactive, scrap iron and steel, stainless steel, and copper are likely to become available as nuclear and other facilities and equipment are withdrawn from service. Disposition of this material is an international policy issue under consideration currently. The major alternatives for managing this material are to either develop a regulatory process for decontamination and recycling that will safeguard human health or to dispose of the scrap and replace the metal stocks. To evaluate the alternatives, we estimate quantities of scrap arising from nuclear power plant decommissioning, evaluate potential price impacts of recycling on regional markets, and assess the health and environmental impacts of the management alternatives. We conclude that decontaminating and recycling the scrap is the superior alternative

  5. Radiation survey of aircraft and heavy machinery scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idriss, Hajo; Salih, Isam; Gumaa, Elsadig; Yassin, Abbas; Yousif, E.H.; Abdel Hamid, Saad Eldeen M.; Sam, A.K.

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted primarily to survey aircraft and heavy machinery at 30 locations within Khartoum State using handheld radiation survey meters to detect and identify any radiation sources that might be present and to estimate radiation dose levels. The survey has resulted in detection of 16 sealed sources of 90 Sr and one of 226 Ra in aircraft scrap. Of course, 90 Sr sources are used in military aircraft as temperature sensors while 226 Ra is used for indicating fuel levels. These sources were found intact without spreading radioactivity contamination; however, none was detected in heavy machine scrap. The levels of radiation dose measured at 0.1 m from the source fall within the range of 25.1–40.2 μSv/h with an average value of 33.52±4.06 μSv/h. These orphan sources have been separated from the scrap, tested for possible leakage, conditioned and stored in waste management facility. The result of this study has revealed without doubt that the scrap constitute a serious source of public exposure and highlights the importance of legislation making radiation monitoring of scrap in the country mandatory before it is sold to metal industry for reprocessing. - Highlights: ► Sealed radioactive sources ( 90 Sr and 226 Ra) were detected in aircraft scrap. ► No source was detected in heavy machine scrap. ► Radiation dose measured at 0.1 m from the source can be used to estimate exposure to public. ► Monitoring of scrap was found to be useful for protection (from orphan sources).

  6. Statistical modeling to management and treatment of scrap with low and very low residual activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Bermejo Fernandez, R.; Anaya Lazaro, M.

    2011-01-01

    The experience of recent years on the management of scrap metal containing residual activity have allowed the development of a simple statistical model for the management of these materials. This statistical model includes a breakdown of the various processing operations to which these materials undergo and the effects in the process of radiological controls associated to the control of declassification that defines disposal (recycled by smelting, reclamation, temporary storage the plant or sent to final storage of radioactive waste.

  7. Shingles Immunity and Health Functioning in the Elderly: Tai Chi Chih as a Behavioral Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Irwin

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Both the incidence and severity of herpes zoster (HZ or shingles increase markedly with increasing age in association with a decline in varicella zoster virus (VZV-specific immunity. Considerable evidence shows that behavioral stressors, prevalent in older adults, correlate with impairments of cellular immunity. Moreover, the presence of depressive symptoms in older adults is associated with declines in VZV-responder cell frequency (VZV-RCF, an immunological marker of shingles risk. In this review, we discuss recent findings that administration of a relaxation response-based intervention, tai chi chih (TCC, results in improvements in health functioning and immunity to VZV in older adults as compared with a control group. TCC is a slow moving meditation consisting of 20 separate standardized movements which can be readily used in elderly and medically compromised individuals. TCC offers standardized training and practice schedules, lending an important advantage over prior relaxation response-based therapies. Focus on older adults at increased risk for HZ and assay of VZV-specific immunity have implications for understanding the impact of behavioral factors and a behavioral intervention on a clinically relevant end-point and on the response of the immune system to infectious pathogens.

  8. Handling and disposal of radioactive scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witte, K.

    1975-01-01

    The 9th special course for journalists was in this year on the highly topical subject 'handling and disposal of radioactive scrap'. It was held on the 26th and 27th May 1975 at the Nuclear Research Centre at Karlsruhe. These courses have been held for several years by the Nuclear Research Association (GfK) in the School for Nuclear Engineering and are intended mainly to contribute to journalists of the daily papers, radio and television who are 'not previously technically trained' an introduction into the difficult subject matter of nuclear engineering with its ancillary areas. In view of the many discussions carried on in public the course is further intended to achieve that the problems discussed are treated by means of publicity which is free from emotion. In the journalists' course this year specially selected experts gave technical information prepared for general information as to how radioactive waste can be safely worked up and then finally stored without adverse effects on the environment. Since the interesting collection of questions was put forward in a compressed form and at the same time clearly presented, the author reports on the different separate subjects on which lectures were given. (orig.) [de

  9. Atypical Presentation of a Common Disease: Shingles of the Larynx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Sarah; Zawawi, Faisal; Young, Jonathan

    2015-09-01

    Herpes zoster is a neurocutaneous disease resulting from the reactivation of endogenous varicella-zoster virus (VZV) in dorsal sensory or cranial nerve ganglia. Rarely, this infection manifests without the characteristic dermatomal rash, a condition termed zoster sine herpete. Viral spreading of herpes zoster in the head and neck may manifest as various signs and symptoms because of the multiple possible combinations of cranial neuropathies. With only six cases reported in the English literature up to now, isolated neuropathies of the vagus nerve in the absence of cutaneous lesions tend to be misdiagnosed as idiopathic laryngeal paralysis. We report a case of herpes zoster of the larynx in an 80-year-old man presenting with sore throat, dysphagia, and hoarseness. Endoscopic examination revealed unilateral vocal fold paralysis, pooling of secretions, and mucosal vesicles of the hemilarynx. After the diagnosis of VZV infection with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing, the patient was treated with valacyclovir and corticosteroids, leading to complete recovery after 2 months. Herpes zoster of the larynx is an uncommon condition that should be included in the differential diagnosis of laryngeal paralysis of idiopathic cause. We recommend performing a thorough examination of the pharyngolaryngeal structures and ordering PCR testing as the diagnostic method of choice. Copyright © 2015 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Leaching kinetics of cobalt from the scraps of spent aerospace magnetic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xuejiao; Chen, Yongli; Yin, Jianguo; Xia, Wentang; Yuan, Xiaoli; Xiang, Xiaoyan

    2018-06-01

    Based on physicochemical properties of the scraps of spent aerospace magnetic materials, a roasting - magnetic separation followed by sulfuric acid leaching process was proposed to extract cobalt. Roasting was performed at 500 °C to remove organic impurity. Non-magnetic impurities were reduced by magnetic separation and then the raw material was sieved into desired particle sizes. Acid leaching was carried out to extract cobalt from the scraps and experimental parameters included agitation speed, particle size, initial concentration of sulfuric acid and temperature. Agitation speed higher than 300 r/min had a relatively small impact on the cobalt extraction. As the particle size reduced, the content of cobalt in the raw material decreases and the extraction of cobalt by acid leaching increased at first and decreased afterwards. Raising the initial concentration of sulfuric acid and temperature contributed to improve the cobalt extraction and the influence of temperature was more remarkable. SEM image revealed that the spent aerospace magnetic materials mainly existed in the sliced strip flake with a loose surface and porous structure. Under the experimental condition, the leaching rate of cobalt from the scraps in sulfuric acid solution could be expressed as ln(-ln(1 - α)) = lnk + nlnt. The apparent activation energy was found to be 38.33 kJ/mol and it was mainly controlled by the surface chemical reaction. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Caltrans use of scrap tires in asphalt rubber products: a comprehensive review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiping Zhou

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The California Department of Transportation (Caltrans has been using scrap tire rubber in asphalt pavements since the 1970s in chip seals and the 1980s in rubberized hot mix asphalt(RHMA. Both the wet (field blend and dry processes were used in early trials. Caltrans has also used rubber modified binders containing both crumb rubber modifier and polymer modifier that could be manufactured at a refinery facility, a terminal blend wet process. Since the beginning of this century, Caltrans increased the use of scrap tire rubber in paving projects and invested considerable resources in developing technically sound, cost effective, and environmentally friendly strategies for using scrap tire rubber in roadway applications. By the end of year 2010, approximately 31%of all hot mix asphalt (HMA placed by Caltrans was rubberized HMA, roughly 1.2 million tons. Caltrans efforts in using asphalt rubber products were also demonstrated in its research and technology development. These included the construction of two full-scale field experiments, five warranty projects, and an accelerated pavement study using a heavy vehicle simulator. Additionally, terminal blend asphalt rubber and rubberized warm mix asphalts began to be experimented on trial basis. This paper provides a comprehensive review of Caltrans experience over four decades with asphalt rubber products. Current practices and future outlook are also discussed.

  12. Radiation survey of aircraft and heavy machinery scrap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idriss, Hajo; Salih, Isam; Gumaa, Elsadig; Yassin, Abbas; Yousif, E H; Abdel Hamid, Saad Eldeen M; Sam, A K

    2012-12-01

    This study was conducted primarily to survey aircraft and heavy machinery at 30 locations within Khartoum State using handheld radiation survey meters to detect and identify any radiation sources that might be present and to estimate radiation dose levels. The survey has resulted in detection of 16 sealed sources of (90)Sr and one of (226)Ra in aircraft scrap. Of course, (90)Sr sources are used in military aircraft as temperature sensors while (226)Ra is used for indicating fuel levels. These sources were found intact without spreading radioactivity contamination; however, none was detected in heavy machine scrap. The levels of radiation dose measured at 0.1m from the source fall within the range of 25.1-40.2 μSv/h with an average value of 33.52 ± 4.06 μSv/h. These orphan sources have been separated from the scrap, tested for possible leakage, conditioned and stored in waste management facility. The result of this study has revealed without doubt that the scrap constitute a serious source of public exposure and highlights the importance of legislation making radiation monitoring of scrap in the country mandatory before it is sold to metal industry for reprocessing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. German experience in recycling of contaminated scrap by melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quade, U.

    2003-01-01

    Recycling of radioactively contaminated scrap to products for further application in the nuclear cycle is Germany as an economic alternative. It has been shown that recycling within the nuclear industry reduces the collective dose as well as the number of individuals who receive doses. In the future when decommissioning of NPP will increase, a high amount of slightly radioactive steel scrap has to be managed safely. Recycling will play an important role to keep as much of these materials within the nuclear cycle as economically possible. Siempelkamp supplies a broad range of products made of recycled material from the nuclear industry. Containers made of nodular cast iron for transport and storage of radwaste as well as containers made of concrete with iron granules additive to increase the density up to 4 g/cm 3 , are offered. Interim and final disposal volume, having consequences on costs, can be reduced when recycling is applied for slightly contaminated metallic scrap

  14. Lithium Carbonate Recovery from Cathode Scrap of Spent Lithium-Ion Battery: A Closed-Loop Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wenfang; Zhang, Xihua; Zheng, Xiaohong; Lin, Xiao; Cao, Hongbin; Zhang, Yi; Sun, Zhi

    2017-02-07

    A closed-loop process to recover lithium carbonate from cathode scrap of lithium-ion battery (LIB) is developed. Lithium could be selectively leached into solution using formic acid while aluminum remained as the metallic form, and most of the other metals from the cathode scrap could be precipitated out. This phenomenon clearly demonstrates that formic acid can be used for lithium recovery from cathode scrap, as both leaching and separation reagent. By investigating the effects of different parameters including temperature, formic acid concentration, H 2 O 2 amount, and solid to liquid ratio, the leaching rate of Li can reach 99.93% with minor Al loss into the solution. Subsequently, the leaching kinetics was evaluated and the controlling step as well as the apparent activation energy could be determined. After further separation of the remaining Ni, Co, and Mn from the leachate, Li 2 CO 3 with the purity of 99.90% could be obtained. The final solution after lithium carbonate extraction can be further processed for sodium formate preparation, and Ni, Co, and Mn precipitates are ready for precursor preparation for cathode materials. As a result, the global recovery rates of Al, Li, Ni, Co, and Mn in this process were found to be 95.46%, 98.22%, 99.96%, 99.96%, and 99.95% respectively, achieving effective resources recycling from cathode scrap of spent LIB.

  15. Impact on Sensex of Scrapping Double Taxation of Dividends

    OpenAIRE

    Ragunathan V; Varma, Jayanth R.

    1997-01-01

    The taxation of dividends has generated an active debate in recent months in the media. While the industry representatives have been critical of the double taxation of dividends, the Government seems to be questioning the very premise that dividends are double taxed in India. The argument that scrapping the double taxation of dividends will give the Sensex a much needed boost seems to have tilted the scales. What will be the impact of scrapping of dividend tax on Sensex? One finds that the st...

  16. Advanced technologies for decontamination and conversion of scrap metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muth, T.R.; Shasteen, K.E.; Liby, A.L.

    1995-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) accumulated large quantities of radioactive scrap metal (RSM) through historic maintenance activities. The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) of major sites formerly engaged in production of nuclear materials and manufacture of nuclear weapons will generate additional quantities of RSM, as much as 3 million tons of such metal according to a recent study. The recycling of RSM is quickly becoming appreciated as a key strategy in DOE's cleanup of contaminated sites and facilities. The work described here has focused on recycle of the concentrated and high-value contaminated scrap metal resource that will arise from cleanup of DOE's gaseous diffusion plants

  17. The melting treatment of bulk scrap from decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Junxian; Deng Feng

    2014-01-01

    Large amount of radioactive scrap will come out from reactor decommissioning. The melting treatment can be used for the volume reduction, the recycle and reuse of the radioactive scrap to reduce the mass of the radioactive waste disposal and to reuse most of the metal. The melting treatment has the advantages in volume reduction, conditioning, radionuclide confinement, reduction of radioactivity concentration, easy monitoring of radioactivity; and the effective of decontamination for several radionuclide. Therefore to use the melting technology other decontamination technology should be performed ahead, the decontamination effect of the melting should be predicted, the utility of recycle and reuse should be defined, and the secondary waste should be controlled effectively. (authors)

  18. Advanced technologies for decontamination and conversion of scrap metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muth, T.R.; Shasteen, K.E.; Liby, A.L. [Manufacturing Sciences Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) accumulated large quantities of radioactive scrap metal (RSM) through historic maintenance activities. The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) of major sites formerly engaged in production of nuclear materials and manufacture of nuclear weapons will generate additional quantities of RSM, as much as 3 million tons of such metal according to a recent study. The recycling of RSM is quickly becoming appreciated as a key strategy in DOE`s cleanup of contaminated sites and facilities. The work described here has focused on recycle of the concentrated and high-value contaminated scrap metal resource that will arise from cleanup of DOE`s gaseous diffusion plants.

  19. 41 CFR 109-27.5107 - Recovery of silver from used hypo solution and scrap film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... used hypo solution and scrap film. 109-27.5107 Section 109-27.5107 Public Contracts and Property... § 109-27.5107 Recovery of silver from used hypo solution and scrap film. The requirements for the recovery of silver from used hypo solution and scrap film are contained in § 109-45.1003 of this chapter. ...

  20. Detection of contaminated metallurgical scrap at borders: a proposal for an 'investigation level'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duftschmid, K.E.

    1999-01-01

    In 1995 the IAEA started a program to combat illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials which includes the problem of cross-border movement of contaminated metallurgical scrap. A major activity in this program is the elaboration of a Safety Guide on 'Preventing, Detecting and Responding to Illicit Trafficking', co-sponsored by the World Customs Organization (WCO) and INTERPOL. The guide will provide advice to the Member States, in particular on technical and administrative procedures for detection of radioactive materials at borders. Radiation monitoring systems for contaminated scrap metals have been successfully used in steel plants and larger scrap yards since several years and suitable products are on the market today. Using sophisticated software and dynamic scanning techniques such systems allow for detection of an artificial increase in radiation background level as low as by 20%, even if the natural background signal is substantially suppressed by the vehicle itself entering the monitor. However, the measurement conditions at borders are essentially different from those in plants. Large traffic crossing major borders limits the time for detection and response to a few seconds and multiple checks are nearly impractical. Shielded radioactive sources - even of high activity - which are deeply buried in scrap, cannot be detected without unloading the vehicle, a procedure generally ruled out at borders. Highly sensitive monitoring systems necessarily cause frequent false alarms or nuisance alarms due to innocent radioactive materials such as naturally occurring radioactivity e.g. in fertilizers, scale in pipes used in the oil industry or medical radioisotopes. A particular, rather frequent problem is the unnecessary reject of scrap transports on borders due to the inherent low level contamination of steel with 60 Co, even in sheet metal used for lorries or railroad cars. Such contamination can easily be caused by the routine method to control

  1. Quality- and dilution losses in the recycling of ferrous materials from end-of-life passenger cars: input-output analysis under explicit consideration of scrap quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Shinichiro; Kondo, Yasushi; Matsubae, Kazuyo; Nakajima, Kenichi; Tasaki, Tomohiro; Nagasaka, Tetsuya

    2012-09-04

    Metals can in theory be infinitely recycled in a closed-loop without any degradation in quality. In reality, however, open-loop recycling is more typical for metal scrap recovered from end-of-life (EoL) products because mixing of different metal species results in scrap quality that no longer matches the originals. Further losses occur when meeting the quality requirement of the target product requires dilution of the secondary material by adding high purity materials. Standard LCA usually does not address these losses. This paper presents a novel approach to quantifying quality- and dilution losses, by means of hybrid input-output analysis. We focus on the losses associated with the recycling of ferrous materials from end-of-life vehicle (ELV) due to the mixing of copper, a typical contaminant in steel recycling. Given the quality of scrap in terms of copper density, the model determines the ratio by which scrap needs to be diluted in an electric arc furnace (EAF), and the amount of demand for EAF steel including those quantities needed for dilution. Application to a high-resolution Japanese IO table supplemented with data on ferrous materials including different grades of scrap indicates that a nationwide avoidance of these losses could result in a significant reduction of CO(2) emissions.

  2. PRODUCTION OF ELECTROTECHNICAL WIRE OF SCRAP AND COPPER WASTES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. P. Volchok

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical composition, structure and properties of copper upon base steps of wire production technology (melting of anode copper with using of scrap and waste, electrolitical refining, producing of rod by continuous casting, manufacture of electrotechnical wire and fibres is described.

  3. Problems concerned with scrap metal monitoring at borders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duftschmid, K.E.

    1997-01-01

    Since the early 1980's numerous incidents have been reported in which radioactive material or empty labelled containers for radioactive sources have been found in scrap metal. Apart from the potential health hazard to employees and the general public resulting costs for decontamination, shutdown of production and waste of products already amounted to multi-million dollar figures. Since the opening of the ''iron border'' in Europe, incidents of illicit trafficking of radioactive sources across borders and contamination of scrap metal imported from the former ''Eastern Countries'' have considerably increased, as a result of the lack of a suitable radiation protection infrastructure in some of these countries. This initiated monitoring of scrap metal transports at the borders of several European countries, such as Austria, Finland, Germany and Italy. Up to now neither universally accepted clearance levels for scrap contamination, nor an agreed standardised procedure for its control exist, although the IAEA as well as the European Commission have proposed some recommendations. As a pragmatic solution for border monitoring it is suggested to apply, as practical clearance level, a dose rate on the outside of the vehicle in the order of 0,1 μSv/h, which is approximately equivalent to double natural environmental background. This dose rate would correspond to an activity concentration for 60 Co in the order of 1 kBq/kg and therefore be in a tolerable range, even in view of products coming in close contact with the public. (author)

  4. Primary Raw Materials for Steelmakers: Scrap and Pig Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Bumbac

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Most of the daily steel we so much need is obtained now in electric furnaces, for which the main raw material is scrap. The scrap market is a very sensitive one, depending very much on internal collect, exports and imports, the market of steel and freight. Commerce with scrap is one of the most intense among all the countries of the world and covers all the routes and regions. Every ten years or so importers become exporters and vice versa, due to the period of life of the metallic products. For example, China was for the last 10 years one of the biggest importers (after Turkey, which is number one in importers' hierarchy, but prognoses tell that in 2-3 years China might become self-sufficient due to the investments which began some 20 years ago. USA was one of the largest exporters, but some 3 years ago some analysts advanced the idea that it may become a net importer (it didn't happened, though. The scrap market is not only important, it is also very interesting, with twisted evolutions and volatile prices in some periods.

  5. Innovative technologies for recycling contaminated concrete and scrap metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossart, S.J.; Moore, J.

    1993-01-01

    Decontamination and decommissioning of US DOE's surplus facilities will generate enormous quantities of concrete and scrap metal. A solicitation was issued, seeking innovative technologies for recycling and reusing these materials. Eight proposals were selected for award. If successfully developed, these technologies will enable DOE to clean its facilities by 2019

  6. Feasibility study of a portable smelter for scrap metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavendish, J.H.

    1976-06-01

    The use of a portable smelter to process uranium-contaminated scrap metals was studied. Objectives were to convert scrap metal located at many diverse sites into a form which would be suitable for unlicensed sale and reduce the problems associated with storing the scrap. The Foundry Design Company study indicated the portable smelter concept was feasible from an equipment and transportation standpoint. Capital costs for a 5-ton/hour (steel) nominal capacity unit were estimated to be $2,349,000. Technical evaluation indicates that all the common metals considered, i.e., iron, nickel, copper, and aluminum, are amenable to uranium decontamination by smelting except aluminum. An economic evaluation of the processing of the 30,000 tons of steel scrap to be generated by the Cascade Improvement Program by a portable smelter was made based upon information supplied by Foundry Design Company, plus the assumption that the product metal could be sold for $120.00 per ton. This evaluation indicated a net return of $2,424,000 to the government could be realized. The Health and Safety study indicated no major problems of this nature would be encountered in operating a portable smelter. The legal review indicated the proposed operation fell within the authority of existing regulations. Consideration of possible conflicts with regard to competition with the private sector was suggested

  7. Results of chemical decontamination of DOE`s uranium-enrichment scrap metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levesque, R.G.

    1997-02-01

    The CORPEX{reg_sign} Nuclear Decontamination Processes were used to decontaminate representative scrap metal specimens obtained from the existing scrap metal piles located at the Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Piketon, Ohio. In September 1995, under contract to Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, MELE Associates, Inc. performed the on-site decontamination demonstration. The decontamination demonstration proved that significant amounts of the existing DOE scrap metal can be decontaminated to levels where the scrap metal could be economically released by DOE for beneficial reuse. This simple and environmentally friendly process can be used as an alternative, or in addition to, smelting radiologically contaminated scrap metal.

  8. Summary of industrial impacts from recycled radioactive scrap metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehmel, J.-C.; Harrop, J.; MacKinney, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    During operation, decontamination, and dismantlement, nuclear facilities are generating significant quantities of radioactive scrap metal (RSM). Future decommissioning will generate even more RSM. The petroleum industry also generates RSM in the form of equipment contaminated with naturally occurring radioactivity. Finally, the accidental melting of radioactive sources in steel mills has generated smaller amounts of contaminated metals. Steel mills, smelters, and foundries could recycle these materials, which might then appear in finished products or as feedstocks used by other industries. If introduced in this manner, residual radioactivity can adversely affect the performance of certain products. Such products include computers and other devices that rely on integrated circuits. The most important effect of residual radioactivity on integrated circuits is a phenomenon known as 'single event upsets or soft errors.' Radioactivity can also adversely affect the performance of products such as photographic film and components designed to measure the presence of radioactivity. Radioactivity that raises background count-rates to higher levels could affect the performance of radiation monitoring systems and analytical equipment. Higher background count-rates would lead to reduced sensitivity and lower resolution in spectroscopic systems. The computer, photographic, and radiation measurement industries have taken steps to minimize the impact of residual radioactivity on their products. These steps include monitoring manufacturing processes, specifying material acceptance standards, and screening suppliers. As RSM is recycled, these steps may become more important and more costly. This paper characterizes potentially impacted industries and vulnerability and effects due to the presence of residual radioactivity. Finally, the paper describes practices used to limit the impact of residual radioactivity. (J.P.N.)

  9. Evaluation of workability and strength of green concrete using waste steel scrap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neeraja, D.; Arshad, Shaik Mohammed; Nawaz Nadaf, Alisha K.; Reddy, Mani Kumar

    2017-11-01

    This project works on the study of workability and mechanical properties of concrete using waste steel scrap from the lathe industry. Lathe industries produce waste steel scrap from the lathe machines. In this study, an attempt is made to use this waste in concrete, as accumulation of waste steel scrap cause disposal problem. Tests like compressive test, split tensile test, NDT test (UPV test) were conducted to determine the impact of steel scrap in concrete. The percentages of steel scrap considered in the study were 0%, 0.5%, 1%, 1.5%, and 2% respectively by volume of concrete, 7 day, 28 days test were conducted to find out strength of steel scrap concrete. It is observed that split tensile strength of steel scrap concrete is increased slightly. Split tensile strength of Steel scrap concrete is found to be maximum with volume fraction of 2.0% steel scrap. The steel scrap gives good result in split tensile strength of concrete. From the study concluded that steel scrap can be used in concrete to reduce brittleness of concrete to some extent.

  10. Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome and Shingles Associated with a Combined Paralysis of Three Oculomotor Nerves: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atipo-Tsiba, P W; Kombo Bayonne, E S

    2016-05-01

    In countries with high prevalence of HIV/AIDS infection, particularly in black Africa, shingles is one of the main opportunistic infections during immunosuppression due to AIDS in young patients. If immunological weakness is important, usually when the CD4 cell count is less than 100 cells/mm(3), the risk of inflammatory reactions in the first three months after initiating of antiretroviral treatment (ART) is very high. This inflammatory reaction is called immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). This observation reports the first documented case of IRIS with V1 shingles in a young HIV patient at University Hospital of Brazzaville. A 40 years old patient was seen for a pain of the right side of the face and a complete immobility of the eyeball. The diagnosis of V1 shingles with a pan uveitis, and a paralysis of III, IV and VI nerves was made. The patiants HIV status was positive and CD4 cell count was 150 cells/mm(3). After two months of evolution under ART with a CD4 count of 850 cells /mm(3), the symptomatology was quickly complicated by significant inflammation causing a phtisis bulbi. CD4 cells count is an important indicator in the HIV/AIDS therapy. In some major forms of IRIS, momentary pause of anti retroviral treatment is sometimes necessary.

  11. Assessment of DOE radioactive scrap metal disposition options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, C.R.; Kasper, K.M.; Bossart, S.J.

    1997-01-01

    The DOE has amassed a large amount of radioactively-contaminated scrap metal (RSM) as a result of past operations and decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) projects. The volume of RSM will continue to increase as a result of the D ampersand D of more than 6,000 surplus facilities and many of the 14,000 operating facilities in the DOE complex. RSM can be either surface contaminated or volumetrically contaminated, or both, with varying amounts of radioactivity. Several options exist for the disposition of this RSM, including disposal as radioactive waste, recycling by decontamination and free-release for unrestricted use, or recycling for restricted reuse inside a DOE controlled area. The DOE Office of Science and Technology (EM-50) has been actively investing in technology and strategy development in support of restricted-reuse RSM recycling for the past several years. This paper will assess the nature of the RSM recycling issue, review past investment by DOE to develop technologies and strategies to recycle RSM, and then discuss some recommendations concerning future investments in support of RSM management. Available information on the supply of RSM will be presented in Section II. The regulatory and policy framework concerning recycling RSM will be presented in Section III. A review of DOE investment in RSM recycling technology and current programs will be presented in Section IV. The current and projected industrial capacity will be described in Section V. And, finally, a discussion of issues and recommendations regarding DOE technology development interests in RSM recycling will be presented in Section VI and VII, respectively

  12. Assessment of DOE radioactive scrap metal disposition options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, C.R.; Kasper, K.M. [Waste Policy Institute, Morgantown, WV (United States); Bossart, S.J. [Department of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1997-02-01

    The DOE has amassed a large amount of radioactively-contaminated scrap metal (RSM) as a result of past operations and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) projects. The volume of RSM will continue to increase as a result of the D&D of more than 6,000 surplus facilities and many of the 14,000 operating facilities in the DOE complex. RSM can be either surface contaminated or volumetrically contaminated, or both, with varying amounts of radioactivity. Several options exist for the disposition of this RSM, including disposal as radioactive waste, recycling by decontamination and free-release for unrestricted use, or recycling for restricted reuse inside a DOE controlled area. The DOE Office of Science and Technology (EM-50) has been actively investing in technology and strategy development in support of restricted-reuse RSM recycling for the past several years. This paper will assess the nature of the RSM recycling issue, review past investment by DOE to develop technologies and strategies to recycle RSM, and then discuss some recommendations concerning future investments in support of RSM management. Available information on the supply of RSM will be presented in Section II. The regulatory and policy framework concerning recycling RSM will be presented in Section III. A review of DOE investment in RSM recycling technology and current programs will be presented in Section IV. The current and projected industrial capacity will be described in Section V. And, finally, a discussion of issues and recommendations regarding DOE technology development interests in RSM recycling will be presented in Section VI and VII, respectively.

  13. Evaluating awareness and practices pertaining to radioactive waste management among scrap dealers in Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makkar, Nayani; Chandra, Tany; Agrawal, Prachi; Bansal, Harshit; Singh, Simranjeet; Anand, Tanu; Gupta, Mannan Kumar; Kumar, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    With nuclear technology rapidly taking the spotlight in the last 50 years, radiation accidents seem to be a harsh reality of the modern world. The Mayapuri Radiation accident of 2010 was the worst radiation accident India has yet dealt with. Two years thereafter, we designed a study to assess the awareness and practices regarding radioactive waste among scrap dealers aiming to assess deficiencies in radiation disaster preparedness. A community based cross-sectional study. The study population consisted of 209 volunteers (from 108 scrap dealerships) including 108 shop-owners and 101 workers segregated as Group A consisting of 54 dealerships in Mayapuri and Group B of 54 dealerships from the rest of the city. Subjects were then interviewed using a semi-structured questionnaire. Awareness about radioactive waste varied significantly with level of education (p = 0.024), Kuppuswamy's socio-economic scale (p = 0.005), age of the scrap dealer (p = 0.049) and his work experience (p = 0.045). The larger dealerships in Mayapuri were more aware about radioactive waste (p = 0.0004), the accident in 2010 (p = 0.0002), the symbol for radiation hazard (p = 0.016), as well as the emergency guidelines and the agencies to contact in the event of a radiation accident. Our findings seem to signify that while governmental and non-governmental agencies were successful in implementing prompt disaster response and awareness programs, the community continues to be inadequately prepared. These go on to suggest that though concerted awareness and training programs do benefit the affected community, economic and social development is the key to disaster prevention and mitigation.

  14. Pyrolysis of a waste from the grinding of scrap tyres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, A M; Barriocanal, C; Alvarez, R

    2012-02-15

    The fibres that are used to reinforce tyres can be recovered as a waste in the process of grinding of scrap tyres. In this paper beneficiation through pyrolysis is studied since the fibres are made up of polymers with a small amount of rubber because the latter is difficult to separate. The experiments were performed at three temperatures (400, 550 and 900°C) in a horizontal oven. The three products - gas, oil and char - obtained from the pyrolysis were investigated. The composition of the gas was analyzed by means of gas chromatography. The oil was studied by gas chromatography and infrared spectroscopy. The char porous structure was determined by N(2) adsorption. In addition, the topography of the chars was studied by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The products resulting from the pyrolysis of the fibres were compared with those obtained from scrap rubber. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Lead scrap processing in rotary furnaces: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseau, M

    1987-01-01

    Formerly, the lead scrap had been processed mainly in reverberatory and shaft furnaces or, even, in rotary furnaces (R.F.). The direct smelting of battery scrap entrains an expensive pollution control and high operating costs because of slag recirculation, coke consumption, losses in slag and matte. Nowadays, mechanized battery wrecking plants allow selective separation of casings and separators from metallic Pb (grids, poles, solders) as well as lead in non-metallic form (PbSO/sub 4/, PbO, PbO/sub 2/, contaminated with some Sb) frequently called paste. Because of their high performance and flexibility in metallurgical processing (melting, reducing, oxidizing and selective pouring) the R.F. supersedes the reverberatory furnace worldwide.

  16. Challenges in the Management of Potentially Contaminated Scrap Metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meehan, R.W., E-mail: meehanrw@em.doe.gov [US Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Washington, DC (United States)

    2011-07-15

    This paper describes the background and current status of the management of potentially contaminated metals and materials at the US Department of Energy (DOE) sites across the USA. The current DOE policy prohibiting the release of metal scrap for recycling from radiation areas is explained. Finally, a potential path forward to competently assess, characterize and clear material from radiological control is proposed that uses a combination of administrative processes and empirical techniques that are valid irrespective of the standard used for clearance. (author)

  17. CRITICAL ASPECTS IN SCRAPS OF COLD SMOKED SALMON PROCESSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Bernardi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper was to summarize the critical aspects in the processing of smoked salmon scraps as resulted from seven different lots of samples through microbiological and chemical-physical analysis. Results demonstrate that this product has very variable salt content, high microbial counts influencing the shelf-life, rancidity problems depending on the raw material and is heavily contaminated by Listeria monocytogenes.

  18. Wastes from plutonium conversion and scrap recovery operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, D.C.; Bowersox, D.F.; McKerley, B.J.; Nance, R.L.

    1988-03-01

    This report deals with the handling of defense-related wastes associated with plutonium processing. It first defines the different waste categories along with the techniques used to assess waste content. It then discusses the various treatment approaches used in recovering plutonium from scrap. Next, it addresses the various waste management approaches necessary to handle all wastes. Finally, there is a discussion of some future areas for processing with emphasis on waste reduction. 91 refs., 25 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Emergency response during the radiological control of scraps in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos Viltre, Enma O.; Cardenas Herrera, Juan; Dominguez Ley, Orlando; Capote Ferrera, Eduardo; Fernandez Gomez, Isis M.; Caveda Ramos, Celia; Carrazana, Jorge; Barroso Perez, Idelisa

    2008-01-01

    In the last few years, in the international scene, incidents have been reported due to the presence of radioactive materials in the scrap. This reality has motivated the adoption of measures of radiological security, due to the implications that these incidents have for the public and the environment, as well as for the international trade. Among theses actions is the implementation of the radiological control of scrap, with the additional requirement that this control has to be implemented in the framework of a Quality Management Program.Taking into account the international experience, our institution designed and organized in 2002 a national service for the radiological monitoring of scrap, being the clients the main exporting and trading enterprises of this material in the country. During these years, several contaminated materials have been detected, causing incidents that activated the radiological emergency response system. In this sense, since some years ago, our country has been working in the implementation of a national and ministerial system for facing and mitigating the consequences of accidental radiological situations, conjugating efforts and wills from different national institutions with the leadership of the Center of Radiation Protection and Hygiene (CPHR) and the Center of Nuclear Security (CNSN) in correspondence with the social responsibility assigned to the them. These incidents propitiate to have not only a system of capacity and quick response oriented to limit the exposure of people, to control the sources, to mitigate the consequences of the accident and to reestablish the conditions of normality, but also a previous adequate planning that guarantees the speed and effectiveness of it. In these work the experiences reached by the specialists of the CPHR from Cuba during the occurrence of an incident in the execution of the service of radiological monitoring of scraps are exposed. (author)

  20. Wastes from plutonium conversion and scrap recovery operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, D.C.; Bowersox, D.F.; McKerley, B.J.; Nance, R.L.

    1988-03-01

    This report deals with the handling of defense-related wastes associated with plutonium processing. It first defines the different waste categories along with the techniques used to assess waste content. It then discusses the various treatment approaches used in recovering plutonium from scrap. Next, it addresses the various waste management approaches necessary to handle all wastes. Finally, there is a discussion of some future areas for processing with emphasis on waste reduction. 91 refs., 25 figs., 4 tabs

  1. Recovering heavy rare earth metals from magnet scrap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Ryan T.; McCallum, Ralph W.; Jones, Lawrence L.

    2017-08-08

    A method of treating rare earth metal-bearing permanent magnet scrap, waste or other material in a manner to recover the heavy rare earth metal content separately from the light rare earth metal content. The heavy rare earth metal content can be recovered either as a heavy rare earth metal-enriched iron based alloy or as a heavy rare earth metal based alloy.

  2. Advanced technologies for decontamination and conversion of scrap metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muth, T.R.; Shasteen, K.E.; Liby, A.L.

    1995-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) accumulated large quantities of radioactive scrap metal (RSM) through historic maintenance activities. The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) of major sites formerly engaged in production of nuclear materials and manufacture of nuclear weapons will generate additional quantities of RSM, as much as 3 million tons of such metal according to a recent study. The recycling of RSM is quickly becoming appreciated as a key strategy in DOE's cleanup of contaminated sites and facilities

  3. Advanced technologies for decontamination and conversion of scrap metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muth, T.R.; Moore, J.; Olson, D.; Mishra, B.

    1994-01-01

    Recycle of radioactive scrap metals (RSM) from decommissioning of DOE uranium enrichment and nuclear weapons manufacturing facilities is mandatory to recapture the value of these metals and avoid the high cost of disposal by burial. The scrap metals conversion project detailed below focuses on the contaminated nickel associated with the gaseous diffusion plants. Stainless steel can be produced in MSC's vacuum induction melting process (VIM) to the S30400 specification using nickel as an alloy constituent. Further the case alloy can be rolled in MSC's rolling mill to the mechanical property specification for S30400 demonstrating the capability to manufacture the contaminated nickel into valuable end products at a facility licensed to handle radioactive materials. Bulk removal of Technetium from scrap nickel is theoretically possible in a reasonable length of time with the high calcium fluoride flux, however the need for the high temperature creates a practical problem due to flux volatility. Bulk decontamination is possible and perhaps more desirable if nickel is alloyed with copper to lower the melting point of the alloy allowing the use of the high calcium fluoride flux. Slag decontamination processes have been suggested which have been proven technically viable at the Colorado School of Mines

  4. Plutonium scrap processing at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nixon, A.E.; McKerley, B.J.; Christensen, E.L.

    1980-01-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory currently has the newest plutonium handling facility in the nation. Los Alamos has been active in the processing of plutonium almost since the discovery of this man-made element in 1941. One of the functions of the new facility is the processing of plutonium scrap generated at LASL and other sites. The feed for the scrap processing program is extremely varied, and a wide variety of contaminants are often encountered. Depending upon the scrap matrix and contaminants present, the majority of material receives a nitric acid/hydrofluoric acid or nitric acid/calcium fluoride leach. The plutonium nitrate solutions are then loaded onto an anion exchange column charged with DOWEX 1 x 4, 50 to 100 mesh, nitrate form resin. The column is eluted with 0.48 M hydroxyl amine nitrate. The Pu(NO 3 ) 3 is then precipitated as plutonium III oxalate which is calcined at 450 to 500 0 C to yield a purified PuO 2 product

  5. Radioactive materials in scrap metal, the situation in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jossen, H.

    2005-01-01

    About 10 years ago, different happenings in the Swiss and international metal scrap recycling scene created a sensibility to unwanted radioactive substances in scrap metal. Italy, one of the main buyers for scrap metals, started at its borders with systematic checks, arranged by authorities. As a consequence, in Switzerland a concept was elaborated under cooperation of the recycling companies, the Italian authorities, the Federal Office of Public Health (BAG), Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (HSK) and the Swiss National Accident Insurance Fund (Suva) to fulfil the different requirements. Individual radioprotection, protection of environment, protection of work yard and machinery and the quality assurance of the recycled metals and the resulting products requires adapted solutions with the main issues: training, suitable measuring equipment and an intervention-and waste management. Detected radioactive substances are professionally recovered, stored and submitted to the radioactive waste collection. The investigation of the happenings can lead to useful hints on gaps and on chances for improvements in general radioprotection. (orig.)

  6. EFFECTOF ISOLATION WALL USING SCRAP TIRE ON GROUND VIBRATION REDUCTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashimoto, Takahiko; Kashimoto, Yusuke; Hayakawa, Kiyoshi; Matsui, Tamotsu; Fujimoto, Hiroaki

    Some countermeasure methods against the environmental ground vibration caused by some traffic vibrations have been proposed so far. The authors have developed a new type ground vibration isolation wall using scrap tire, and evaluated its effectiveness on the ground vibration reduction by full scale field tests. In this paper, the authors discussed and examined the effectiveness of the developed countermeasure method by two field tests. The one concerns on the effect of scrap tire as soft material of vibration isolation wall, and the other on the effect of the developed countermeasure method practically applied in a residential area close to monorail traffic. As the results, it was elucidated that the ground vibration of 2-3 dB was reduced in case of two times volume of the soft material, the conversion ratio of the vibration energy of the soft material to the kinetic energy was higher than that of the core material of PHC pile, the vibration acceleration of 0.19 - 1.26 gal was reduced by the developed countermeasure method in case of the monorail traffic, and the vibration reduction measured behind the isolation wall agreed well with the proposed theoretical value, together with confirming the effectiveness of the ground vibration isolation wall using scrap tire as the countermeasure method against the environmental ground vibration.

  7. Management of radioactive scrap metal at SCK-CEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noynaert, L.; Klein, M.; Cornelissen, R.; Ponnet, M.

    2000-01-01

    The environmental concern and public perception as well as the steadily increase of the conditioning and disposal costs are pushing the nuclear sector to minimise the amount of radioactive waste. Hence it is a strong incentive to prefer the management option 'recycling and reuse' instead of the option 'disposal and replacement'. The 'recycling and reuse' option requires the availability of decontamination techniques as well as measuring techniques allowing to prove that the release criteria are met. Therefore SCK-CEN has now two decontamination installations for scrap metal on its own site. One installation uses a wet abrasive technique while the other one uses a chemical process based on the Ce 4+ . These two installations, combined with the use of foundries for free release or for radioactive scrap metal recycling are now common practices at SCK-CEN and will allow to reduce the metallic waste to 10% of the metallic scrap production and the costs at least by a factor 2.5. (author)

  8. Influence of vegetation on the infilling of a macrotidal embayment: examples from salt marshes and shingle spit of the Baie de Somme (North France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bot, Sophie; Forey, Estelle; Lafite, Robert; Langlois, Estelle

    2015-04-01

    As many estuaries in the English Channel, the Baie de Somme is currently filling with a mean seabed elevation between 1.3 and 1.8 cm/yr. Embankments and polders, as well as sea level rise, increase this natural accretion process, which leads to important modifications of environment uses. Interactions between vegetation and sediment dynamics constitute a key-point to consider, in order to better understand the infilling processes in estuaries. To estimate the effect of vegetation on these processes, two particular environments have been studied in the bay: (i) the mid salt marsh covered with Halimione portulacoides, associated with a silty sedimentation, and (ii) the shingle spit, that closes the bay from the South, on which the sea kale (Crambe maritime), a protected pioneer species, develops. Salt marshes progress with a rate of 5-10 m/yr (mean value calculated on the 1947-2011 period). Sedimentological analysis have been conducted on 9 cores (50cm long) collected in three Halimione communities of the bay. They are associated with a silty-dominated (38-84 micrometer) sedimentation under the influence of decantation processes. Rhythmicity is observed in the sedimentation, due to the repetition of a two-layer pattern, that includes a dark layer composed of vegetal rests and that would represent annual sedimentation. Annual sedimentation rates (0.7 to 5.8 cm/yr) are consistent with mean values previously recorded. The shingle spit progresses to the North under the influence of the littoral drift at a rate of 7 m/yr (mean value calculated on the 1947-2011 period). Sea kales are observed on parts formed since several years, above the level of the highest astronomical tides. TLS surveys and sedimentation bars have allowed to measure erosion/sedimentation volumes at the scale of the spit and of sea kale individuals, during spring 2013. Individuals of this species facilitate the trapping of sand, transported by winds from the intertidal flats. Sea kale thus contributes

  9. Metal Exposures at three U.S. electronic scrap recycling facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceballos, Diana; Beaucham, Catherine; Page, Elena

    2017-06-01

    Many metals found in electronic scrap are known to cause serious health effects, including but not limited to cancer and respiratory, neurologic, renal, and reproductive damage. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention performed three health hazard evaluations at electronic scrap recycling facilities in the U.S. to characterize employee exposure to metals and recommend control strategies to reduce these exposures. We performed air, surface, and biological monitoring for metals. We found one overexposure to lead and two overexposures to cadmium. We found metals on non-production surfaces, and the skin and clothing of workers before they left work in all of the facilities. We also found some elevated blood lead levels (above 10 micrograms per deciliter), however no employees at any facility had detectable mercury in their urine or exceeded 34% of the OELs for blood or urine cadmium. This article focuses on sampling results for lead, cadmium, mercury, and indium. We provided recommendations for improving local exhaust ventilation, reducing the recirculation of potentially contaminated air, using respirators until exposures are controlled, and reducing the migration of contaminants from production to non-production areas. We also recommended ways for employees to prevent taking home metal dust by using work uniforms laundered on-site, storing personal and work items in separate lockers, and using washing facilities equipped with lead-removing cleaning products.

  10. Evaluation of the costs and benefits of recycling radioactively contaminated scrap metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durman, E.C.; Tsirigotis, P.; MacKinney, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is evaluating the economic and technical issues associated with the potential recycling of radioactive scrap metals (RSM). These metals, usually only slightly contaminated, originate primarily from the decommissioning and decontamination (D and D) of federal facilities, licensees of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and certain unlicensed industries. EPA conducted a study entitled Analysis of the Potential Recycling of Department of Energy Radioactive Scrap Metal, September 6, 1994, for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to provide information and tools to DOE for assessing DOE's problem with RSM from the D and D of their sites. EPA is now initiating an evaluation of RSM recycling to support a recycling regulation. Although the study prepared for DOE will provide a useful start for the regulatory analysis, additional information must be gathered to analyze the impacts of a recycling regulation that will apply to all potential generators of RSM. This paper summarizes cost-benefit issues related to an RSM recycling regulatory analysis, including: the quantity of potentially recyclable contaminated metals; costs of disposal at federal and private waste repositories; all potential environmental, health, and safety, and market impacts; and the potential for adverse effects on radio-sensitive industries. (author)

  11. Influence of writing and reading intertrack interferences in terms of bit aspect ratio in shingled magnetic recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobuhara, Hirofumi; Okamoto, Yoshihiro; Yamashita, Masato; Nakamura, Yasuaki; Osawa, Hisashi; Muraoka, Hiroaki

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate the influence of the writing and reading intertrack interferences (ITIs) in terms of bit aspect ratio (BAR) in shingled magnetic recording by computer simulation using a read/write model which consists of a writing process based on Stoner-Wohlfarth switching asteroid by a one-side shielded isosceles triangular write head and a reading process by an around shielded read head for a discrete Voronoi medium model. The results show that BAR should be 3 to reduce the influence of writing and reading ITIs, media noise, and additive white Gaussian noise in an assumed areal density of 4.61Tbpsi.

  12. Catalytic extraction processing of contaminated scrap metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, T.P.; Johnston, J.E.; Payea, B.M.; Zeitoon, B.M.

    1995-01-01

    Molten Metal Technology was awarded a contract to demonstrate the applicability of the Catalytic Extraction Process, a proprietary process that could be applied to US DOE's inventory of low level mixed waste. This paper is a description of that technology, and included within this document are discussions of: (1) Program objectives, (2) Overall technology review, (3) Organic feed conversion to synthetic gas, (4) Metal, halogen, and transuranic recovery, (5) Demonstrations, (6) Design of the prototype facility, and (7) Results

  13. Solids loading evaluation for HB-line scrap recovery filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowder, M.L.

    2000-01-01

    The HB-Line Scrap Recovery facility uses wire screen filters to remove solids from plutonium-containing solutions transferred from the slab tank dissolvers. At times, the accumulation of solids is large enough to cause blinding (i.e., pluggage) of the filters. If the solids contain undissolved plutonium, significant accumulation of fissile material could impact operations. To address this potential issue, experiments were performed to define the minimum solids required to completely blind a filter. The solids loading experiments were performed by arranging 25- and 10-microm HB-Line filters in series to simulate the equipment in the scrap recovery process. Separate tests were performed using coarse and fine glass frit and cerium oxide powder suspended in 35 wt% sodium nitrate solution using a small turbine mixer. The solution and solids were transferred from a reservoir through the filter housings by vacuum. In each case, the 25-microm filter blinded first and was full of wet cake. After drying and accounting for the sodium nitrate in the filter cake, the following results were obtained. The results of the solids loading tests demonstrated that at least 800 g of solids accumulated in the filter housing before flow stopped. The actual amount of collected material was dependent upon the physical properties of the solids such as density and particle size. The mass of solids collected by the blinded 25-microm filter increased when successively finer solids were used in the experiments. Based on these results, one should anticipate that filters in the HB-Line Scrap Recovery Facility have the potential to collect similar quantities of material before transfer of solution from the dissolvers is severely impacted

  14. USING THE SCRAP TIRES TO PRODUCE A FLEXIBLE COUPLER

    OpenAIRE

    Tahsean A. Hussain

    2018-01-01

    The scrap tires considered a problematic source of waste, the old rubber tires causes a big environmental problem that is need much money and effort to disposes it safely. In Iraq there are more than two million used tires disposed to the environment annually. one of the tire’s recycling methods is the use of tire layers to produce a new rubber parts used in the engineering and industrial purposes as the bridges and machines dampers, this trend of recycling doesn’t take a sufficient care comp...

  15. Enhanced high-solids anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge by the addition of scrap iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaobin; Feng, Yinghong; Yu, Qilin; Xu, Zibin; Quan, Xie

    2014-05-01

    Anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge usually requires pretreatment procedure to improve the bioavailability of sludge, which involves considerable energy and high expenditures. This study proposes a cost-effective method for enhanced anaerobic digestion of sludge without a pretreatment by directly adding iron into the digester. The results showed that addition of Fe(0) powder could enhance 14.46% methane yield, and Fe scrap (clean scrap) could further enhance methane yield (improving rate 21.28%) because the scrap has better mass transfer efficiency with sludge and liquid than Fe(0) powder. The scrap of Fe with rust (rusty scrap) could induce microbial Fe(III) reduction, which resulted in achieving the highest methane yield (improving rate 29.51%), and the reduction rate of volatile suspended solids (VSS) was also highest (48.27%) among Fe powder, clean scrap and rusty scrap. PCR-DGGE proved that the addition of rusty scrap could enhance diversity of acetobacteria and enrich iron-reducing bacteria to enhance degradation of complex substrates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Automobile scrap regulation. Give-away presents. Polluting cars and trade-in for cleaner cars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annema, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    A scrap regulation for old vehicles has been in place in the Netherlands for almost one year now. Has it been an effective instrument? What are the societal costs and benefits? Is it a fair regulation? Was it a good idea to introduce the car scrap regulation? The answer to all these questions is: doubtful. [nl

  17. State of the art of smelting lead-acid battery scrap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melin, A

    1977-02-01

    A discussion is given of the economic importance of lead recovery and of scrap recycling in the battery industry. Various possibiliies of processing battery scrap, either by direct smelting or by smelting after preparaton are discussed, and the BBU, the Stolberger, and the Tonnolli methods are compared

  18. Decontamination and reuse of ORGDP aluminum scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Hayden, H.W.; Wilson, D.F.

    1996-12-01

    The Gaseous Diffusion Plants, or GDPs, have significant amounts of a number of metals, including nickel, aluminum, copper, and steel. Aluminum was used extensively throughout the GDPs because of its excellent strength to weight ratios and good resistance to corrosion by UF 6 . This report is concerned with the recycle of aluminum stator and rotor blades from axial compressors. Most of the stator and rotor blades were made from 214-X aluminum casting alloy. Used compressor blades were contaminated with uranium both as a result of surface contamination and as an accumulation held in surface-connected voids inside of the blades. A variety of GDP studies were performed to evaluate the amounts of uranium retained in the blades; the volume, area, and location of voids in the blades; and connections between surface defects and voids. Based on experimental data on deposition, uranium content of the blades is 0.3%, or roughly 200 times the value expected from blade surface area. However, this value does correlate with estimated internal surface area and with lengthy deposition times. Based on a literature search, it appears that gaseous decontamination or melt refining using fluxes specific for uranium removal have the potential for removing internal contamination from aluminum blades. A melt refining process was used to recycle blades during the 1950s and 1960s. The process removed roughly one-third of the uranium from the blades. Blade cast from recycled aluminum appeared to perform as well as blades from virgin material. New melt refining and gaseous decontamination processes have been shown to provide substantially better decontamination of pure aluminum. If these techniques can be successfully adapted to treat aluminum 214-X alloy, internal and, possibly, external reuse of aluminum alloys may be possible

  19. Complex deformation routes for direct recycling aluminium alloy scrap via industrial hot extrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraskevas, Dimos; Kellens, Karel; Kampen, Carlos; Mohammadi, Amirahmad; Duflou, Joost R.

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents the final results of an industrial project, aiming for direct hot extrusion of wrought aluminium alloy scrap at an industrial scale. Two types of complex deformation/extrusion routes were tested for the production of the same profile, starting from AA6060 scrap in form of machining chips. More specifically scrap-based billets were extruded through: a 2-porthole and a 4-porthole die-set, modified for enhanced scrap consolidation and grain refinement. For comparison reasons, cast billets of the same alloy were extruded through the modified 2-porthole die set. The tensile testing results as well as microstructural investigations show that the 4-porthole extrusion route further improves scrap consolidation compared to the 2-porthole die output. The successful implementation of solid state recycling, directly at industrial level, indicates the technological readiness level of this research.

  20. Properties of concrete containing scrap-tire rubber--an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddique, Rafat; Naik, Tarun R

    2004-01-01

    Solid waste management is one of the major environmental concerns in the United States. Over 5 billion tons of non-hazardous solid waste materials are generated in USA each year. Of these, more than 270 million scrap-tires (approximately 3.6 million tons) are generated each year. In addition to this, about 300 million scrap-tires have been stockpiled. Several studies have been carried out to reuse scrap-tires in a variety of rubber and plastic products, incineration for production of electricity, or as fuel for cement kilns, as well as in asphalt concrete. Studies show that workable rubberized concrete mixtures can be made with scrap-tire rubber. This paper presents an overview of some of the research published regarding the use of scrap-tires in portland cement concrete. The benefits of using magnesium oxychloride cement as a binder for rubberized concrete mixtures are also presented. The paper details the likely uses of rubberized concrete.

  1. High Purity Tungsten Spherical Particle Preparation From WC-Co Spent Hard Scrap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Chulwoong

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten carbide-cobalt hard metal scrap was recycled to obtain high purity spherical tungsten powder by a combined hydrometallurgy and physical metallurgy pathway. Selective leaching of tungsten element from hard metal scrap occurs at solid / liquid interface and therefore enlargement of effective surface area is advantageous. Linear oxidation behavior of Tungsten carbide-cobalt and the oxidized scrap is friable to be pulverized by milling process. In this regard, isothermally oxidized Tungsten carbide-cobalt hard metal scrap was mechanically broken into particles and then tungsten trioxide particle was recovered by hydrometallurgical method. Recovered tungsten trioxide was reduced to tungsten particle in a hydrogen environment. After that, tungsten particle was melted and solidified to make a spherical one by RF (Ratio Frequency thermal plasma process. Well spherical tungsten micro-particle was successfully obtained from spent scrap. In addition to the morphological change, thermal plasma process showed an advantage for the purification of feedstock particle.

  2. Activities and Issues in Monitoring Scrap Metal Against Radioactive Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S.Y., E-mail: sychen@anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Over the past few decades, the global scrap metal industry has grown increasingly vigilant regarding radioactive contamination. Accidental melts of radioactive sources in some smelting facilities, in particular, have caused considerable damage and required recovery efforts costing tens of millions of dollars. In response, the industry has developed and deployed countermeasures. Increasingly expensive and sophisticated radiation monitoring devices have been implemented at key scrap entry points - ports and scrapyards. Recognition of the importance of such endeavors has led to a series of activities aimed at establishing organized and coordinated efforts among the interested parties. Recent concerns over the potential use of radioactive sources for radiological devices in terrorist acts have substantially heightened the need for national and international authorities to further control, intercept, and secure the sources that have escaped the regulatory domain. Enhanced collaboration by the government and industry could substantially improve the effectiveness of efforts at control; the 'Spanish Protocol' as developed by the Spanish metal industry and government regulators is a good example of such collaboration. (author)

  3. Radiation accident at Mayapuri scrap market, Delhi, 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, A. B.; Mohanan, S.; Damodaran, D.; Soneja, M.; Jain, N.; Mohan, A.; Vikram, N. K.; Sood, R.

    2012-01-01

    This article reports the accidental public radiation exposure in a scrap market in Delhi (India)), on March 2010. The source, a gamma unit containing Cobalt-60 pencils, was improperly disposed of by a research institution in violation of national regulations for radiation protection and safety of radioactive sources. The unit was sold off to unsuspecting scrap dealers who dismantled the equipment. This event subsequently caused the most severe radiation accident reported in India to date, resulting in seven radiation injuries and one death. The clinical course of five of the patients treated at the All India Inst. of Medical Sciences hospital, New Delhi, is summarised in this report. All five patients suffered from the haematological form of the acute radiation syndrome and local cutaneous radiation injury as well. While four patients exposed to doses between 0.6 and 2.8 Gy survived with intensive or supportive treatment, the patient with the highest exposure of 3.1 Gy died due to acute respiratory distress syndrome and multi-organ failure on Day 16 after hospitalisation. The incident highlights the current gaps in the knowledge, infrastructure and legislation in handling radioactive materials. Medical institutions need to formulate individualised triage and management guidelines to immediately respond to future public radiological accidents. (authors)

  4. Fernald scrap metal and recycling and beneficial reuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motl, G.P.

    1993-01-01

    The Fernald plant, formerly known as the Feed Materials Production Facility, is located on a 1050-acre site 17 miles northwest of downtown Cincinnati, Ohio. Site construction was initiated in 1951 to fabricate uranium metal to meet defense production requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In October 1990, the DOE transferred management responsibility for the site from its Defense Programs organization to the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. In August 1991, the site was renamed the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) to reflect the site's new cleanup mission. During 40 yr of plant operation, a scrap metal storage area grew to contain 5000 t of scrap metal. Material in the pile, such as structural steel, crushed drums, tanks, and pipes, is contaminated with uranium to levels up to 200,000 disintegrations per minute alpha. In July 1991, cleanup of this pile was designated a CERCLA removal action under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act and a consent agreement executed between the DOE and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

  5. Some functional properties of composite material based on scrap tires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesuma, Renate; Malers, Laimonis

    2013-09-01

    The utilization of scrap tires still obtains a remarkable importance from the aspect of unloading the environment from non-degradable waste [1]. One of the most prospective ways for scrap tires reuse is a production of composite materials [2] This research must be considered as a continuation of previous investigations [3, 4]. It is devoted to the clarification of some functional properties, which are considered important for the view of practical applications, of the composite material. Some functional properties of the material were investigated, for instance, the compressive stress at different extent of deformation of sample (till 67% of initial thickness) (LVS EN 826) [5] and the resistance to UV radiation (modified method based on LVS EN 14836) [6]. Experiments were realized on the purposefully selected samples. The results were evaluated in the correlation with potential changes of Shore C hardness (Shore scale, ISO 7619-1, ISO 868) [7, 8]. The results showed noticeable resistance of the composite material against the mechanical influence and ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The correlation with the composition of the material, activity of binder, definite technological parameters, and the conditions supported during the production, were determined. It was estimated that selected properties and characteristics of the material are strongly dependent from the composition and technological parameters used in production of the composite material, and from the size of rubber crumb. Obtained results show possibility to attain desirable changes in the composite material properties by changing both the composition and technological parameters of examined material.

  6. Assessment of recycling or disposal alternatives for radioactive scrap metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphie, W.E.; Lilly, M.J. III

    1993-01-01

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, is participating with the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) is an evaluation of management alternatives for radioactive scarp metals. For this purpose, Argonne National Laboratory is assessing alternatives for radioactive scrap metals. For this purpose, Argonne National Laboratory is assessing environmental and societal implications of recycling and/or disposal process alternatives (with metal replacement). Findings will be presented in a report from the OECD Task Group. This paper focuses on the radiological risk assessment and dose estimate sensitivity analysis. A ''tiered'' concept for release categories, with and without use restrictions, is being developed. Within the tiers, different release limits may be indicated for specific groupings of radionuclides. Depending on the spectrum of radionuclides that are present and the level of residual activity after decontamination and/or smelting, the scrap may be released for unrestricted public use or for specified public uses, or it may be recycled within the nuclear industry. The conversatism of baseline dose estimates is examined, and both more realistic parameter values and protective measures for workers are suggested

  7. Characteristics of indium-tin-oxide (ITO) nanoparticle ink-coated layers recycled from ITO scraps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Seung-Jae; Hong, Sung-Jei; Lee, Jae Yong

    2015-09-01

    This study investigates the characteristics of an indium-tin-oxide (ITO) ink layer that includes nanoparticles synthesized from ITO target scraps. The particle size of the ITO nanoparticle was less than 15 nm, and the crystal structure was cubic with a (222) preferred orientation. Also, the composition ratio of In to Sn was 92.7 to 7.3 in weight. The ITO nanoparticles were well dispersed in the ink solvent to formulate a 20-wt% ITO nanoparticle ink. Furthermore, the ITO nanoparticle ink was coated onto a glass substrate, followed by heat-treatment at 600 °C. The layer showed good sheet resistances below 400 Ω/□ and optical transmittances higher than 88% at 550 nm. Thus, we can conclude that the characteristics of the layer make it highly applicable to a transparent conductive electrode.

  8. Application of activated carbon derived from scrap tires for adsorption of Rhodamine B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Liu, Shuangxi; Zhu, Tan

    2010-01-01

    Activated carbon derived from solid hazardous waste scrap tires was evaluated as a potential adsorbent for cationic dye removal. The adsorption process with respect to operating parameters was investigated to evaluate the adsorption characteristics of the activated pyrolytic tire char (APTC) for Rhodamine B (RhB). Systematic research including equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamic studies was performed. The results showed that APTC was a potential adsorbent for RhB with a higher adsorption capacity than most adsorbents. Solution pH and temperature exert significant influence while ionic strength showed little effect on the adsorption process. The adsorption equilibrium data obey Langmuir isotherm and the kinetic data were well described by the pseudo second-order kinetic model. The adsorption process followed intra-particle diffusion model with more than one process affecting the adsorption process. Thermodynamic study confirmed that the adsorption was a physisorption process with spontaneous, endothermic and random characteristics.

  9. Bioleaching of electronic scrap by mixed culture of moderately thermophilic microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivǎnuş, D.; ǎnuş, R. C., IV; Cǎlmuc, F.

    2010-06-01

    A process for the metal recovery from electronic scrap using bacterial leaching was investigated. A mixed culture of moderately thermophilic microorganisms was enriched from acid mine drainages (AMDs) samples collected from several sulphide mines in Romania, and the bioleaching of electronic scrap was conducted both in shake flask and bioreactor. The results show that in the shake flask, the mixture can tolerate 50 g/L scrap after being acclimated to gradually increased concentrations of scrap. The copper extraction increases obviously in bioleaching of scrap with moderately thermophilic microorganisms supplemented with 0.4 g/L yeast extract at 180 r/min, 74% copper can be extracted in the pulp of 50 g/L scrap after 20 d. Compared with copper extractions of mesophilic culture, unacclimated culture and acclimated culture without addition of yeast extract, that of accliniated culture with addition of yeast extract is increased by 53%, 44% and 16%, respectively. In a completely stirred tank reactor, the mass fraction of copper and total iron extraction reach up to 81% and 56%, respectively. The results also indicate that it is necessary to add a large amount of acid to the pulp to extract copper from electronic scrap effectively.

  10. Collection and recycling of electronic scrap: A worldwide overview and comparison with the Brazilian situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis de Oliveira, Camila; Moura Bernardes, Andréa; Gerbase, Annelise Engel

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Review of the different e-waste collection systems and recycling processes. ► We present the e-waste collection systems used in Europe and in the US. ► We present e-waste collection systems used in Asia and Latin America. ► E-waste management between developed and developing countries is very different. ► We made a comparison of the world situation to the current Brazilian reality. - Abstract: Recycling and the related issue of sustainable development are increasing in importance around the world. In Brazil, the new National Policy on Solid Wastes has prompted discussion on the future of electronic waste (e-waste). Over the last 10 years, different e-waste collection systems and recycling processes have been applied globally. This paper presents the systems used in different countries and compares the world situation to the current Brazilian reality. To establish a recycling process, it is necessary to organize efficient collection management. The main difficulty associated with the implementation of e-waste recycling processes in Brazil is the collection system, as its efficiency depends not only on the education and cooperation of the people but also on cooperation among industrial waste generators, distributors and the government. Over half a million waste pickers have been reported in Brazil and they are responsible for the success of metal scrap collection in the country. The country also has close to 2400 companies and cooperatives involved in recycling and scrap trading. On the other hand, the collection and recycling of e-waste is still incipient because e-wastes are not seen as valuable in the informal sector. The Brazilian challenge is therefore to organize a system of e-waste management including the informal sector without neglecting environmentally sound management principles.

  11. Experience during the monitoring of inactive scrap for the detection of inadvertent presence of radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Ranjit; Kumar, Anoj; Vikas; Patra, R.P.; Kumar, Vikas; Singh, Rajvir; Pradeepkumar, K.S.

    2012-01-01

    The inspection and certification of scrap material from nuclear facilities is a regulatory requirement to ensure that radioactive material will not reach public domain. Around the world, cases involving radioactive contamination of metallic components have occurred due to radioactive sources/contaminated metal scrap reaching the public domain. Radiological monitoring of inactive scrap material is essential as it may get into various usages in public domain where controls cannot be implemented. The method of detection is measurement of gamma dose rates due to any loose/fixed radioactive contamination in the scrap or presence of any radioactive material/source. In addition prevention of any inadvertent/malicious act leading to radioactive material reaching the public domain through scrap being essential, this monitoring gains further importance. This paper describes the methodology and experience in detection of presence of radioactivity at inactive Scrap monitoring facility. Even though radioactive sources of high strength with potential for serious environmental hazard have not been detected, few cases of contaminated material (MS plate/equipments etc with extremely low level of 137 Cs and Uranium contamination) have been detected and identified using portable gamma spectrometer. If proper monitoring is not carried out the dispersal of radioactivity to the environment can be a matter of concern due to metal scrap reaching recycling industry resulting in huge cost of decontamination and waste disposal. These events may also have negative impact on the export from the country resulting in economic losses. The impact of such events can be ruled out by effective scrap monitoring techniques which ensure that even small quantity of radioactivity escaping into public domain can be prevented. The methodology followed for monitoring of inactive scrap is found to be effective even for detection of presence of very low level of radioactivity

  12. Beneficial reuse of US DOE Radioactive scrap metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motl, G.P.

    1995-01-19

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has more than 2.5 million tons of radioactive scrap metal (RSM) that is either in inventory or expected to be generated over the next 25 years as major facilities within the weapons complex are decommissioned. Since much of this metal cannot be decontaminated easily, past practice has been to either retain this material in inventory or ship it to DOE disposal sites for burial. In an attempt to conserve natural resources and to avoid burial of this material at DOE disposal sites, options are now being explored to ``beneficially reuse`` this material. Under the beneficial reuse concept, RSM that cannot be decontaminated and free released is used in applications where the inherent contamination is not a detriment to its end use. This paper describes initiatives currently in progress in the United States that support the DOE beneficial reuse concept.

  13. Beneficial reuse of US DOE Radioactive scrap metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motl, G.P.

    1995-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has more than 2.5 million tons of radioactive scrap metal (RSM) that is either in inventory or expected to be generated over the next 25 years as major facilities within the weapons complex are decommissioned. Since much of this metal cannot be decontaminated easily, past practice has been to either retain this material in inventory or ship it to DOE disposal sites for burial. In an attempt to conserve natural resources and to avoid burial of this material at DOE disposal sites, options are now being explored to ''beneficially reuse'' this material. Under the beneficial reuse concept, RSM that cannot be decontaminated and free released is used in applications where the inherent contamination is not a detriment to its end use. This paper describes initiatives currently in progress in the United States that support the DOE beneficial reuse concept

  14. Nondestructive assay system development for a plutonium scrap recovery facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsue, S.T.; Baker, M.P.

    1984-01-01

    A plutonium scrap recovery facility is being constructed at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). The safeguards groups of the Los Alamos National Laboratory have been working since the early design stage of the facility with SRP and other national laboratories to develop a state-of-the-art assay system for this new facility. Not only will the most current assay techniques be incorporated into the system, but also the various nondestructive assay (NDA) instruments are to be integrated with an Instrument Control Computer (ICC). This undertaking is both challenging and ambitious; an entire assay system of this type has never been done before in a working facility. This paper will describe, in particular, the effort of the Los Alamos Safeguards Assay Group in this endeavor. Our effort in this project can be roughly divided into three phases: NDA development, system integration, and integral testing. 6 references

  15. Process evaluations for uranium recovery from scrap material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westphal, B.R.; Benedict, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    The integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept being developed by Argonne National Laboratory is based on pyrometallurgical processing of spent nuclear metallic fuel with subsequent fabrication into new reactor fuel by an injection casting sequence. During fabrication, a dilute scrap stream containing uranium alloy fines and broken quartz (Vycor) molds in produced. Waste characterization of this stream, developed by using present operating data and chemical analysis was used to evaluate different uranium recovery methods and possible process variations for the return of the recovered metal. Two methods, comminution with size separation and electrostatic separation, have been tested and can recover over 95% of the metal. Recycling the metal to either the electrochemical process or the injection casting was evaluated for the different economic and process impacts. The physical waste parameters and the important separation process variables are discussed with their effects on the viability of recycling the material. In this paper criteria used to establish the acceptable operating limits is discussed

  16. Leaching of DOC, DN, and inorganic constituents from scrap tires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selbes, Meric; Yilmaz, Ozge; Khan, Abdul A; Karanfil, Tanju

    2015-11-01

    One concern for recycle and reuse of scrap tires is the leaching of tire constituents (organic and inorganic) with time, and their subsequent potential harmful impacts in environment. The main objective of this study was to examine the leaching of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved nitrogen (DN), and selected inorganic constituents from scrap tires. Different sizes of tire chips and crumb rubber were exposed to leaching solutions with pH's ranging from 3.0 to 10.0 for 28days. The leaching of DOC and DN were found to be higher for smaller size tire chips; however, the leaching of inorganic constituents was independent of the size. In general, basic pH conditions increased the leaching of DOC and DN, whereas acidic pH conditions led to elevated concentrations of metals. Leaching was minimal around the neutral pH values for all the monitored parameters. Analysis of the leaching rates showed that components associated with the rubbery portion of the tires (DOC, DN, zinc, calcium, magnesium, etc.) exhibited an initial rapid followed by a slow release. On the other hand, a constant rate of leaching was observed for iron and manganese, which are attributed to the metal wires present inside the tires. Although the total amounts that leached varied, the observed leaching rates were similar for all tire chip sizes and leaching solutions. Operation under neutral pH conditions, use of larger size tire chips, prewashing of tires, and removal of metal wires prior to application will reduce the impact of tire recycle and reuse. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Volatilisation and oxidation of aluminium scraps fed into incineration furnaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biganzoli, Laura; Gorla, Leopoldo; Nessi, Simone; Grosso, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Aluminium packaging partitioning in MSW incineration residues is evaluated. ► The amount of aluminium packaging recoverable from the bottom ashes is evaluated. ► Aluminium packaging oxidation rate in the residues of MSW incineration is evaluated. ► 80% of aluminium cans, 51% of trays and 27% of foils can be recovered from bottom ashes. - Abstract: Ferrous and non-ferrous metal scraps are increasingly recovered from municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash and used in the production of secondary steel and aluminium. However, during the incineration process, metal scraps contained in the waste undergo volatilisation and oxidation processes, which determine a loss of their recoverable mass. The present paper evaluates the behaviour of different types of aluminium packaging materials in a full-scale waste to energy plant during standard operation. Their partitioning and oxidation level in the residues of the incineration process are evaluated, together with the amount of potentially recoverable aluminium. About 80% of post-consumer cans, 51% of trays and 27% of foils can be recovered through an advanced treatment of bottom ash combined with a melting process in the saline furnace for the production of secondary aluminium. The residual amount of aluminium concentrates in the fly ash or in the fine fraction of the bottom ash and its recovery is virtually impossible using the current eddy current separation technology. The average oxidation levels of the aluminium in the residues of the incineration process is equal to 9.2% for cans, 17.4% for trays and 58.8% for foils. The differences between the tested packaging materials are related to their thickness, mechanical strength and to the alloy.

  18. USING THE SCRAP TIRES TO PRODUCE A FLEXIBLE COUPLER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahsean A. Hussain

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The scrap tires considered a problematic source of waste, the old rubber tires causes a big environmental problem that is need much money and effort to disposes it safely. In Iraq there are more than two million used tires disposed to the environment annually. one of the tire’s recycling methods is the use of tire layers to produce a new rubber parts used in the engineering and industrial purposes as the bridges and machines dampers, this trend of recycling doesn’t take a sufficient care comparing with the other uses. There are a lot of studies conducted in these field, these studies suggests many methods to manage the huge number of scrap tires, the current paper aims to use the old rubber tires in engineering purposes (especially as a coupler joins the motor or engines with the other equipment as electric dynamo or pumps, the study focusing on the mechanical properties of a strip from a used tires and comparing with one prepared in the lab., and suggesting a new method to use as an engineering parts (for example the coupler lays between the IC engine and the dynamo of an electric generator. One of the results obtained from the experiments, there is no significant difference between the mechanical properties of the old and the new strip, (in the tensile test, the breaking force of the -Lab. tensile specimen- is 137 N whereas the specimen of old tire have a breaking force 113.27 N, but they are same in the elongation. A computational example is suggested to estimate the dimensions of a flexible coupler use an old tire pieces.

  19. Volatilisation and oxidation of aluminium scraps fed into incineration furnaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biganzoli, Laura, E-mail: laura.biganzoli@mail.polimi.it [Politecnico di Milano, Piazza L. Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Gorla, Leopoldo; Nessi, Simone; Grosso, Mario [Politecnico di Milano, Piazza L. Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aluminium packaging partitioning in MSW incineration residues is evaluated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The amount of aluminium packaging recoverable from the bottom ashes is evaluated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aluminium packaging oxidation rate in the residues of MSW incineration is evaluated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 80% of aluminium cans, 51% of trays and 27% of foils can be recovered from bottom ashes. - Abstract: Ferrous and non-ferrous metal scraps are increasingly recovered from municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash and used in the production of secondary steel and aluminium. However, during the incineration process, metal scraps contained in the waste undergo volatilisation and oxidation processes, which determine a loss of their recoverable mass. The present paper evaluates the behaviour of different types of aluminium packaging materials in a full-scale waste to energy plant during standard operation. Their partitioning and oxidation level in the residues of the incineration process are evaluated, together with the amount of potentially recoverable aluminium. About 80% of post-consumer cans, 51% of trays and 27% of foils can be recovered through an advanced treatment of bottom ash combined with a melting process in the saline furnace for the production of secondary aluminium. The residual amount of aluminium concentrates in the fly ash or in the fine fraction of the bottom ash and its recovery is virtually impossible using the current eddy current separation technology. The average oxidation levels of the aluminium in the residues of the incineration process is equal to 9.2% for cans, 17.4% for trays and 58.8% for foils. The differences between the tested packaging materials are related to their thickness, mechanical strength and to the alloy.

  20. Worker exposures from recycling surface contaminated radioactive scrap metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluk, A.; Phillips, J.W.; Culp, J.

    1996-01-01

    Current DOE policy permits release from DOE control of real property with residual levels of surficial radioactive contamination if the contamination is below approved guidelines. If the material contains contamination that is evenly distributed throughout its volume (referred to as volumetric contamination), then Departmental approval for release must be obtained in advance. Several DOE sites presently recycle surface contaminated metal, although the quantities are small relative to the quantities of metal processed by typical mini-mills, hence the potential radiation exposures to mill workers from processing DOE metals and the public from the processed metal are at present also a very small fraction of their potential value. The exposures calculated in this analysis are based on 100% of the scrap metal being processed at the maximum contamination levels and are therefore assumed to be maximum values and not likely to occur in actual practice. This paper examines the relationship between the surface contamination limits established under DOE Order 5400.5, open-quotes Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment,close quotes and radiation exposures to workers involved in the scrap metal recycling process. The analysis is limited to surficial contamination at or below the guideline levels established in DOE Order 5400.5 at the time of release. Workers involved in the melting and subsequent fabrication of products are not considered radiation workers (no requirements for monitoring) and must be considered members of the public. The majority of the exposures calculated in this analysis range from tenths of a millirem per year (mrem/yr) to less than 5 mrem/yr. The incremental risk of cancer associated with these exposures ranges from 10 -8 cancers per year to 10 -6 cancers per year

  1. Fully automated laboratory for the assay of plutonium in wastes and recoverable scraps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guiberteau, P.; Michaut, F.; Bergey, C.; Debruyne, T.

    1990-01-01

    To determine the plutonium content of wastes and recoverable scraps in intermediate size containers (ten liters) an automated laboratory has been carried out. Two passive methods of measurement are used. Gamma ray spectrometry allows plutonium isotopic analysis, americium determination and plutonium assay in wastes and poor scraps. Calorimetry is used for accurate (± 3%) plutonium determination in rich scraps. A full automation was realized with a barcode management and a supply robot to feed the eight assay set-ups. The laboratory works on a 24 hours per day and 365 days per year basis and has a capacity of 8,000 assays per year

  2. Survey on the scrap iron and steel recycling in Thailand and Indonesia; Hatten tojokoku (Tai Indonesia) ni okeru tetsu scrap saiseiyo ni kansuru chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This report describes the survey results of the scrap iron and steel recycling industries in Thailand and Indonesia. The purpose of this survey is to extract problems obstructing the scrap iron and steel recycling, to recognize the present situation and predict the future situation, and to examine the possibility of international cooperation. As a result of the survey, it was found that the quality of scrap collected in the domestic market is poor as it contains too many impurities for it to be utilized for the manufacture of many higher quality iron and steel products. The actual quantity of domestically collected scrap is too low to support the expected growth in demand in each nation. Current environmental management practices are largely concerned with the construction of wastewater treatment facilities and the extraction of furnace dust. However, the lack of enforcement of environmental regulations does not encourage companies to implement sound environmental practices. Neither government actively promotes and investigates iron and steel recycling in the domestic, commercial or industrial sectors. Collaboration with overseas nations having more advanced iron and steel industries could be helpful to the scrap recycling industry in both nations. 6 figs., 21 tabs.

  3. The Research of Scrapped Automobiles Recycling and Disassembling Industry Development Based on Auto Industry Chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    linhua Pang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of China’s scrapped car is on an explosively growing trend, and the development of scrapped car recycling industry has a golden prospect. The current scrapped car recycling system is not perfect in our country, because related industries driven by market develop slowly, and there are some outstanding problems such as potential safety risks, environmental pollution and resource waste. The paper analyzes and studies the existing problems and countermeasures to investigate the development strategy of scrapped car recycling industry according to the whole automobile industry chain construction, technology and equipment conditions, policy guidance, etc. and at last explore the new industrial development pattern of serving automobile reverse design.

  4. Management of radiation protection aspects in the recycling of metallurgical scrap: the report of UNECE team of specialists on radioactive contaminated scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deckers, B.

    2001-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows: In 1999, the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) has created a Team of Specialists on Radioactive Contaminated Metal Scrap: technically qualified representatives of the steel industry, government representatives and competent international organizations representatives have studied the problem of radioactively contaminated scrap and steel, and have proposed solutions in this context acceptable at the international level in order to harmonize the legislation, the systems of measurement of radioactivity, the levels of detection. This team has established a document which will be published by the United Nations, and where good practices on managing radioactive metal scrap are presented, and which also contains numerous recommendations in order to harmonize legislations. The paper presents the content of the document and the main recommendations of the team. (author)

  5. Characterization of Irradiated and Non-Irradiated Rubber from Automotive Scrap Tires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Clécia Moura; Silva, Leonardo G.

    The aim of this work was to characterize the samples of irradiated and non-irradiated rubber from automotive scrap tires. Rubber samples from scrap tires were irradiated at irradiation doses of 200, 400 and 600kGy in an electron beam accelerator. Subsequently, both the irradiated and non-irradiated samples were characterized by thermogravimetry (TG), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), tensile strength mechanical test, and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrophotometry.

  6. Utilization of metal scrap for the production of waste drums for ultimate disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janberg, K.; Rittscher, D.

    1988-01-01

    The contribution reviews the history of development of the techniques for treatment of decommissioning scrap from the beginning of the 1980's onwards (decommissioning of the Niederaichbach and Gundremmingen nuclear power stations), together with the radiological measuring methods required for regulatory purposes. The advantages of the recycling of the metal scrap by means of melting, and of materials utilization for production of waste containers for ultimate storage are discussed together with product quality assurance criteria. (RB) [de

  7. The effect of material productivity on scrap reduction on aluminum reduction pot process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huda, L. N.

    2018-02-01

    Scrap in the production process is defined as part of production that can not be accepted as the final product due to production failure. The amount of scarp occurring in the reduction pot production process of one of the aluminum smelting furnaces exceeds the acceptance standard of 5 to 10%. This affects the amount of production produced. The purpose of this study is to reduce the amount of scrap produced to increase the productivity of the materials used. The solution is carried-out by making improvements using Lean Six Sigma method. In the initial calculation, material productivity ranged from 0.88. Based on the study, the factors that cause the high amount of scrap produced is the use of Na2O which is inserted into the alumina is different in size and the influence of noise that occurs in pots that are difficult to control. The analysis base on Lean Six Sigma obtained process cycle efficiency (PCE) equal to 86,92% for actual condition. Process improvement is carried-out through define, measure, analyze, improve and control procedure on Na2O feeding process and PCE value decrease 6,05%. This indicates that increased process capability will reduce scrap. A decrease in scrap amount of about 6% will be able to increase material productivity by 0.05%. This indicates that continuous process control is needed to decrease the number of scraps and increase productivity.

  8. Evaluation of segmented gamma scanner measurements on cans of recoverable scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shull, A.H.; Weber, J.H.; MacMurdo, K.W.; Baker, L.B.

    1991-01-01

    Savannah River Site (SRS) has had a long-standing concern about the inability to measure recoverable scrap. A segmented gamma scanner (SGS) was evaluated for use in measuring cans of scrap materials. Four scrap cans were selected and re-packaged into containers that could be measured using calorimetry and gamma spectrometry. These scrap cans were later used as working standards for the SGS. In addition, replicate measurements were made on all cans of scrap currently stored with estimated values. Before accepting the SGS measurements on the cans, data from the replicate measurements of the standards and a limited number of process cans were analyzed to determine if there was a significant bias between the SGS and the calorimeter-gamma spectrometer measurements, if the random replication error would be acceptable for accountability, to set control limits for the workings standards, and to determine acceptable differences between replicate measurements. After completing the measurement of all process scrap cans in the inventory, the the final data were analyzed and estimates based on the two sets of data compared. The methodology used to determine the appropriate measurement error model, to estimate the measurement errors, to set control limits, and to determine the significance of the bias will be described as well as a comparison of the error estimates based on the preliminary versus final data

  9. Reclamation and reuse of LEU silicide fuel from manufacturing scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gale, G.R.; Pace, B.W.; Evans, R.S.

    2004-01-01

    In order to provide an understanding of the organization which is the sole supplier of United States plate type research and test reactor fuel and LEU core conversions, a brief description of the structure and history is presented. Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) is a part of McDermott International, Inc. which is a large diversified corporation employing over 20,000 people primarily in engineering and construction for the off-shore oil and power generation industries throughout the world. B and W provides many energy related products requiring precision machining and high quality systems. This is accomplished by using state-of-the-art equipment, technology and highly skilled people. The RTRFE group within B and W has the ability to produce various complexly shaped fuel elements with a wide variety of fuels and enrichments. B and W RTRFE has fabricated over 200,000 plates since 1981 and gained the diversified experience necessary to satisfy many customer requirements. This accomplishment was possible with the support of McDermott International and all of its resources. B and W has always had a commitment to high quality and integrity. This is apparent by the success and longevity (125 years) of the company. A lower cost to convert cores to LEU provides direct support to RERTR and demonstrates Babcock and Wilcox's commitment to the program. As a supporter of RERTR reactor conversion from HEU to LEU, B and W has contributed a significant amount of R and D money to improve the silicide fuel process which ultimately lowers the LEU core costs. In the most recent R and D project, B and W is constructing a LEU silicide reclamation facility to re-use the unirradiated fuel scrap generated from the production process. Remanufacturing use of this fuel completes the fuel cycle and provides a contribution to LEU cores by reducing scrap inventory and handling costs, lowering initial purchase of fuel due to increasing the process yields, and lowering the replacement costs. This

  10. Control and Management of Radioactive Material Inadvertently Incorporated into Scrap Metal. Proceedings of an International Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Radioactive substances can become associated with scrap metal in various ways and if not discovered they can be incorporated into steel and non-ferrous metals through the melting process. This can cause health hazards as well as environmental concerns and there can be serious commercial implications. Numerous incidents have occurred in recent years involving the discovery of radioactive substances in scrap metal and, in some cases, in metal from the melting process. These incidents have proved to be very costly in relation to the recovery and cleanup operations required but also in terms of the potential loss of confidence of the industry in scrap metal as a resource. This has led the scrap metal industry to seek ways of managing the problem. In most countries, shipments of scrap metal are monitored but at different points in the distribution chain and to different extents and efficiencies. As yet, only limited efforts towards unifying and harmonizing monitoring strategies and methods in the context of scrap metal have been made at the international level. The Conference was organized into five sessions: the global perspective, national policies and strategies, compliance with radiological criteria, management of incidents with contaminated scrap metal, and improving confidence and protecting the interests of stakeholders. The aim of the first session was to present the views and perspectives of the different organizations concerned with radioactive material in scrap metal, scrap metal recycling, steel making, radiation source security and safety and international trade and economics. The second session covered some of the national policies and strategies being used to address the control of radioactive material that has been inadvertently incorporated into scrap metal were presented. In addition to the oral presentations, contributions describing the situation in many countries of the world in the form of posters were displayed. The many posters reporting national

  11. Control and Management of Radioactive Material Inadvertently Incorporated into Scrap Metal. Proceedings of an International Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-15

    Radioactive substances can become associated with scrap metal in various ways and if not discovered they can be incorporated into steel and non-ferrous metals through the melting process. This can cause health hazards as well as environmental concerns and there can be serious commercial implications. Numerous incidents have occurred in recent years involving the discovery of radioactive substances in scrap metal and, in some cases, in metal from the melting process. These incidents have proved to be very costly in relation to the recovery and cleanup operations required but also in terms of the potential loss of confidence of the industry in scrap metal as a resource. This has led the scrap metal industry to seek ways of managing the problem. In most countries, shipments of scrap metal are monitored but at different points in the distribution chain and to different extents and efficiencies. As yet, only limited efforts towards unifying and harmonizing monitoring strategies and methods in the context of scrap metal have been made at the international level. The Conference was organized into five sessions: the global perspective, national policies and strategies, compliance with radiological criteria, management of incidents with contaminated scrap metal, and improving confidence and protecting the interests of stakeholders. The aim of the first session was to present the views and perspectives of the different organizations concerned with radioactive material in scrap metal, scrap metal recycling, steel making, radiation source security and safety and international trade and economics. The second session covered some of the national policies and strategies being used to address the control of radioactive material that has been inadvertently incorporated into scrap metal were presented. In addition to the oral presentations, contributions describing the situation in many countries of the world in the form of posters were displayed. The many posters reporting national

  12. Feasibility of biodegradation of pentachlorophenol in scrap wood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaulieu, G.; Besner, A.; Gilbert, R.; Tetreault, P.; Beaudet, R.; Bisaillon, J. G.; Lepine, F.; Ottou, J. M.; Sansregret, J. L.; Lei, J.

    1998-04-01

    The feasibility of biological treatment of scrap wood impregnated in pentachlorophenol (PCP) was investigated using wood samples impregnated with PCP for biodegradation experiments by the Hydro-Quebec Research Institute (IREQ). IREQ identified the necessity of pre-treating the wood, first by shredding wood poles into wood shavings, followed by mechanical milling of the shavings to obtain wood dust. Biodegradation experiments under anaerobic conditions were performed by the Armand-Frappier Institute by isolating a consortium of bacteria from a mixture of PCP-contaminated soils and a municipal anaerobic sludge that was able to degrade PCP under anaerobic methanogenic conditions at 29 degrees C. A complementary source of carbon was found to be necessary for the bacterial consortium to degrade the PCP. The best PCP degradation results were obtained with an aerobic fixed-film reactor. Aerobic biodegradation tests were performed on liquor extracted from wood dust contaminated with PCP. The anaerobic fixed field reactor was able to completely degrade the PCP extracted from wood dust in less than one day. Aerobic biodegradation was also investigated using microorganisms and fungi. Over a four month experimental period only low concentrations of PCP were found in effluents treated with the aerobic cultures. 117 refs., 38 tabs., 31 figs

  13. Properties of Pervious Concrete Containing Scrap Tyre Tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boon Koh Heng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a huge quantity of waste tyre tubes generated every year due to the increasing of motorcycle user. Therefore, recycling of the waste tyre tubes is become mandatory. The aim of this research was to study the properties of pervious concrete containing scrap tyre tube (STT rubber particles with percentages of 3%, 5% and 7% of the cement content. The properties studied are void content, compressive strength measured at 7, 14 and 28 days, flexural strength and flow rate which were determined at 28 day. The experimental results showed that, there were increased in void content and flow rate of pervious concrete containing STT. Both compressive strength and flexural strength of pervious concrete containing STT showed a lower value compared to the control mix without STT. The reductions of the mechanical strengths are likely due to the increase of void content. Overall, pervious concrete which contains 7% STT has shown an increment of mechanical strengths and flow rate compared to other STT pervious concrete. Nonetheless, the results indicate that there are potentials for use of STT in pervious concrete, especially for use in pervious concrete applications such as pavements, driveways and parking lots.

  14. Radioactive Scrap Metal (RSM) recycling: A doe white paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, S.; Moore, H.H.; Ghoshal, A.

    1992-01-01

    An effective White Paper on recycling radioactive scrap metals has been drafted at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently. The paper has received the praise and commendation of the DOE's Director of Environmental Management. However, obstructionist posturing by the petty bureaucrats in DOE continues to plague the meaningful implementation of RSM recycling. The key findings of the White Paper study and its major recommendations have discussed in this paper. The study indicates that several technologies, such as melt refining and electro refining, are currently available for surface and volume decontamination of metals. The unit cost of decontamination was found to vary from $700 to $400/ton; recycling of most low-contaminated metals can therefore be cost-effective vis-a vis the average cost of low-level radioactive wastes disposal of %400 to $2800/ton. Major recycling demonstration projects with emphasis on restricted RSM reuse options have been recommended. Volume contamination standard for unrestricted release should be established only after adequate studies of health effects and scientific/industrial effects of RSM reuse has been conducted by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Some of the significant technical data developed during this study have also been briefly discussed in this paper. (author)

  15. Sulfur dioxide leaching of spent zinc-carbon-battery scrap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avraamides, J.; Senanayake, G.; Clegg, R. [A.J. Parker Cooperative Research Centre for Hydrometallurgy, Murdoch University, Perth, WA 6150 (Australia)

    2006-09-22

    Zinc-carbon batteries, which contain around 20% zinc, 35% manganese oxides and 10% steel, are currently disposed after use as land fill or reprocessed to recover metals or oxides. Crushed material is subjected to magnetic separation followed by hydrometallurgical treatment of the non-magnetic material to recover zinc metal and manganese oxides. The leaching with 2M sulfuric acid in the presence of hydrogen peroxide recovers 93% Zn and 82% Mn at 25{sup o}C. Alkaline leaching with 6M NaOH recovers 80% zinc. The present study shows that over 90% zinc and manganese can be leached in 20-30min at 30{sup o}C using 0.1-1.0M sulfuric acid in the presence of sulfur dioxide. The iron extraction is sensitive to both acid concentration and sulfur dioxide flow rate. The effect of reagent concentration and particle size on the extraction of zinc, manganese and iron are reported. It is shown that the iron and manganese leaching follow a shrinking core kinetic model due to the formation of insoluble metal salts/oxides on the solid surface. This is supported by (i) the decrease in iron and manganese extraction from synthetic Fe(III)-Mn(IV)-Zn(II) oxide mixtures with increase in acid concentration from 1M to 2M, and (ii) the low iron dissolution and re-precipitation of dissolved manganese and zinc during prolonged leaching of battery scrap with low sulfur dioxide. (author)

  16. Controlling the Outcome of Melting Radioactive Sources in Scrap Metal: from Exclusion, Exemption and Clearance towards a 'Codex Metallarius'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, A.J., E-mail: agonzale@sede.arn.gov.ar [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2011-07-15

    Orphan radiation sources have been inadvertently incorporated into scrap metal and traces of radioactive residues have appeared in finished metal products causing public anxiety, despair in industry and governmental concern. The international principles of exclusion, exemption and clearance can be used to tackle this problem. They are described in detail, as they are becoming universally established for defining the scope of radiation protection regulations. However, notwithstanding the relevance of these principles, the paper suggests a straightforward professional consensus for discontinuing radiological control of commodities with minute traces of radioactive residues. The consensus should unambiguously specify a generic activity concentration in inedible commodities, including metals, below which radiological control may be effectively relinquished. A subsequent legally binding intergovernmental undertaking could resolve the current regulatory ambiguity, facilitate commercial exchange and ensure adequate public protection. For metals, it might take the form of a 'Codex Metallarius' (similar to the existing Codex Alimentarius for edible commodities) establishing a generic level of radiological acceptability for finished metal products. Furthermore, it is proposed that there should be an international convention to prevent radioactive sources becoming orphaned from regulatory control and then inadvertently appearing in trash and scrap. (author)

  17. Radioactive sources and contaminated materials in scrap: monitoring, detection and remedial actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallini, R.; Berna, V.; Bonora, A.; Santini, M.

    1999-01-01

    The scrap recycling in steel and other metal mills represents one of the most relevant activities in the Province of Brescia (Lombardy, Italy). In our Province more than 20 million tonnes of metal scrap are recycled every year by a melting process. Since 1990, many accidents which took place were caused by the unwanted melting of radioactive sources, that were probably hidden in metal scrap. In 1993, the Italian Government stated directives to monitor metal scrap imported from non-EC countries because of the suspicion of the illegal traffic of radioactive materials. In 1996, a law imposed the control of all metal scrap, regardless of their origins. Since 1993, our staff have controlled thousands of railway wagons and trucks. Approximately a hundred steel mills and foundries of aluminium, cooper, brass, etc. have also been controlled and many samples have been collected (flue dust, slag, finished products). During these controls, contaminated areas have been brought to light in two warehouses (Cs 137), in 6 companies (Cs 137 and Am 241), in two landfills of industrial waste (Cs 137) and in a quarry (Cs 137). Up to now the contaminated areas have been cleaned, except for the last one. About 150 radioactive sources on contaminated materials have been found in metal scrap. We found radioactive sources of Co 60, Ra 226, Ir 192, Kr 85, Am 241, while the contamination of metals was mainly due to Ra 226. The situation described above justifies an accurate control of the amount of scrap to reduce the risk of contamination of the workers in the working areas, in the environment and in the general public. (author)

  18. Recycled scrap metal and soils/debris with low radioactive contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carriker, A.W.

    1996-01-01

    Two types of large volume bulk shipments of materials with low radioactivity have characteristics that complicate compliance with normal transport regulations. Scrap metal for recycling sometimes contains radioactive material that was not known or identified by the shipper prior to it being offered for transport to a scrap recycle processor. If the radioactive material is not detected before the scrap is processed, radiological and economic problems may occur. If detected before processing, the scrap metal will often be returned to the shipper. Uranium mill-tailings and contaminated soils and debris have created potential public health problems that required the movement of large volumes of bulk material to isolated safe locations. Similarly, old radium processing sites have created contamination problems needing remediation. The US Department of Transportation has issued exemptions to shippers and carriers for returning rejected scrap metal to original shippers. Other exemptions simplify transport of mill-tailings and debris from sites being remediated. These exemptions provide relief from detailed radioassay of the radioactive content in each conveyance as well as relief from the normal requirements for packaging, shipping documents, marking, labelling, and placarding which would be required for some of the shipments if the exemptions were not issued. (Author)

  19. Radioactivity in the scrap recycling process: Radiation protection aspects and experimental monitoring problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sacco, D.; Ruggeri, F.; Bindi, G.; Bonanni, A.; Casciardi, S.; Delia, R.; Loppa, A.; Rossi, P.; Venturini, L.

    1996-01-01

    The steel scrap recycling by steel mill is increasing moved by profits and by purpose of protection of environmental resources. Besides the use of radioactive sources in several fields (medical, industrial and in scientific researches) on one hand, and the disposal of made radioactive materials from nuclear reactors on the other one, makes the likelihood no more negligible that some radionuclides could be found, accidental y or fraudulently, in steel recycling scrap. Radiation protection problems for surveillance both employees in the production cycle and of people and environment in general arose. First of all, we characterize different type of radioactive materials that can found in scraps, pointing out the potential hazards from exposure of workers and people and from environmental contamination, related to physical and chemical specifications of the involved radionuclides. Some suitable monitoring equipment for scrap recycling facilities are discussed, related to the different step of production cycle (transport, storage, manipulation and melting). At last experimental data, taken in some periods of the monitoring campaign made at the Italian border on imported scraps, are presented. (author)

  20. Scrap supply in Bosnian after war situation - sources, quality, regulation and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pihura, Dervis

    1999-01-01

    Before the war, the Bosnian foundry and steel industry were supplied with scrap partly from domestic sources but mainly from foreign market. The annual steel production before the war recorded 130,000 tonnes of casting and 2,000.000 tonnes of crude steel. Most of the scrap was imported to secure and stabilize the production. During and after the war, despite a significant loss of production, efforts have been made to return to the normal production level in many ways. In the wake of the war, there has been a growing concern over the import of radioactive contaminated metallurgical scrap or low quality raw materials which are uncontrolled or of unidentified sources. In this regard, it is urgently required to establish an effective system to prevent from, to detect and to control the flow of the radioactive contaminated metallurgical scrap. The system should be established in such a way that all sorts of radioactive metallurgical elements should be controlled and prevented from use in all the metallurgical manufacturing processes, ferrous and non-ferrous alike. The coverage of control should start from the border or (air) port checkpoint where the flow of the scrap begins to the final steel product. The control system should take a form of internationally common and acceptable standards and regulations. Equipments and measurement techniques should also be internationally common. (author)

  1. An assessment of the potential radiation exposure from residual radioactivity in scrap metal for recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Yoon; Lee, Kun Jai

    1997-01-01

    With current waste monitoring technology it is reasonable to assume that much of the material designated as low level waste (LLW), generated within nuclear facilities, is in fact uncontaminated. This may include operational wastes, metal and rubble, office waste and discrete items from decommissioning or decontamination operations. Materials that contain only trivial quantities of radionuclides could realistically be exempted or released from regulatory control for recycle or reuse. A criterion for uncontrolled disposal of low-level radioactive contaminated waste is that the radiation exposure of the public and of each individual caused by this disposal is so low that radiation protection measures need not be taken. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) suggests an annual effective doses of 10 μ Sv as a limit for the individual radiation dose. In 1990, new recommendation on radiation protection standards was developed by International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) to take into account new biological information related to the detriment associated with radiation exposure. Adoption of these recommendations necessitated a revision of the Commission's secondary limits contained in Publication 30, Parts 1 ∼ 4. This study summarized the potential radiation exposure from valuable scrap metal considered to uncontrolled recycle by new ICRP recommendations. Potential exposure pathways to people following were analyzed and relevant models developed. Finally, concentrations leading to an individual dose of 10 μ Sv/yr were calculated for 14 key radionuclides. These potential radiation exposures are compared with the results of an IAEA study. 12 refs., 6 tabs., figs

  2. Rapid Separation Methods to Characterize Actinides and Metallic Impurities in Plutonium Scrap Materials at SRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxwell, S.L. III; Jones, V.D.

    1998-07-01

    The Nuclear Materials Stabilization and Storage Division at SRS plans to stabilize selected plutonium scrap residue materials for long term storage by dissolution processing and plans to stabilize other plutonium vault materials via high-temperature furnace processing. To support these nuclear material stabilization activities, the SRS Analytical Laboratories Department (ALD) will provide characterization of materials required prior to the dissolution or the high-firing of these materials. Lab renovations to install new analytical instrumentation are underway to support these activities that include glove boxes with simulated-process dissolution and high- pressure microwave dissolution capability. Inductively-coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), inductively- coupled mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and thermal-ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) will be used to measure actinide isotopics and metallic impurities. New high-speed actinide separation methods have been developed that will be applied to isotopic characterization of nuclear materials by TIMS and ICP-MS to eliminate isobaric interferences between Pu-238 /U- 238 and Pu-241/Am-241. TEVA Resin, UTEVA Resin, and TRU Resin columns will be used with vacuum-assisted flow rates to minimize TIMS and ICP-MS sample turnaround times. For metallic impurity analysis, rapid column removal methods using UTEVA Resin, AGMP-1 anion resin and AG MP-50 cation resin have also been developed to remove plutonium and uranium matrix interferences prior to ICP-AES and ICP- MS measurements

  3. Beneficial reuse `96: The fourth annual conference on the recycle and reuse of radioactive scrap metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    From October 22-24, 1996 the University of Tennessee`s Energy, Environment and Resources Center and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Center for Risk Management cosponsored Beneficial Reuse `96: The Fourth Annual Conference on the Recycle and Reuse of Radioactive Materials. Along with the traditional focus on radioactive scrap metals, this year`s conference included a wide range of topics pertaining to naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM), and contaminated concrete reuse applications. As with previous Beneficial Reuse conferences, the primary goal of this year`s conference was to bring together stakeholder representatives for presentations, panel sessions and workshops on significant waste minimization issues surrounding the recycle and reuse of contaminated metals and other materials. A wide range of industry, government and public stakeholder groups participated in this year`s conference. An international presence from Canada, Germany and Korea helped to make Beneficial Reuse `96 a well-rounded affair. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  4. Soil and groundwater contamination with heavy metals at two scrap iron and metal recycling facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Dorthe Lærke; Holm, P. E.; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2000-01-01

    Field studies were performed at two actual scrap iron and metal recycling facilities in order to evaluate the extent of heavy metal migration into subsoil and groundwater caused by more than 25 years of handling scrap directly on the ground without any measures to prevent leaching. Surface soil...... samples, called `scrap dirt', representing the different activities on the two recycling facilities, all showed very high concentrations of lead (Pb), copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn), high concentrations of cadmium (Cd) , chromium (Cr) and nickel (Ni) and somewhat elevated concentrations of many other metals....... In particular high concentrations were found for Pb at the car-battery salvage locations (13 to 26 g Pb kg±1) and Cu at the cable burning location (22 g Cu kg±1) at one site. The migration of metals below the surface in general (except at the car-battery salvage locations) was very limited even after...

  5. A methodology for estimating potential doses and risks from recycling U.S. Department of Energy radioactive scrap metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKinney, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is considering writing regulations for the controlled use of materials originating from radioactively contaminated zones which may be recyclable. These materials include metals, such as steel (carbon and stainless), nickel, copper, aluminum and lead, from the decommissioning of federal, and non-federal facilities. To develop criteria for the release of such materials, a risk analysis of all potential exposure pathways should be conducted. These pathways include direct exposure to the recycled material by the public and workers, both individual and collective, as well as numerous other potential exposure pathways in the life of the material. EPA has developed a risk assessment methodology for estimating doses and risks associated with recycling radioactive scrap metals. This methodology was applied to metal belonging to the U.S. Department of Energy. This paper will discuss the draft EPA risk assessment methodology as a tool for estimating doses and risks from recycling. (author)

  6. 29 CFR 570.63 - Occupations involved in the operation of paper-products machines, scrap paper balers, and paper...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Occupations involved in the operation of paper-products machines, scrap paper balers, and paper box compactors (Order 12). 570.63 Section 570.63 Labor Regulations... involved in the operation of paper-products machines, scrap paper balers, and paper box compactors (Order...

  7. A model for recovery of scrap monolithic uranium molybdenum fuel by electrorefining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Kleeck, Melissa A.

    The goal of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors program (RERTR) is toreduce enrichment at research and test reactors, thereby decreasing proliferation risk at these facilities. A new fuel to accomplish this goal is being manufactured experimentally at the Y12 National Security Complex. This new fuel will require its own waste management procedure,namely for the recovery of scrap from its manufacture. The new fuel is a monolithic uraniummolybdenum alloy clad in zirconium. Feasibility tests were conducted in the Planar Electrode Electrorefiner using scrap U-8Mo fuel alloy. These tests proved that a uranium product could be recovered free of molybdenum from this scrap fuel by electrorefining. Tests were also conducted using U-10Mo Zr clad fuel, which confirmed that product could be recovered from a clad version of this scrap fuel at an engineering scale, though analytical results are pending for the behavior of Zr in the electrorefiner. A model was constructed for the simulation of electrorefining the scrap material produced in the manufacture of this fuel. The model was implemented on two platforms, Microsoft Excel and MatLab. Correlations, used in the model, were developed experimentally, describing area specific resistance behavior at each electrode. Experiments validating the model were conducted using scrap of U-10Mo Zr clad fuel in the Planar Electrode Electrorefiner. The results of model simulations on both platforms were compared to experimental results for the same fuel, salt and electrorefiner compositions and dimensions for two trials. In general, the model demonstrated behavior similar to experimental data but additional refinements are needed to improve its accuracy. These refinements consist of a function for surface area at anode and cathode based on charge passed. Several approximations were made in the model concerning areas of electrodes which should be replaced by a more accurate function describing these areas.

  8. Thermogravimetric characteristics and kinetics of scrap tyre and Juglans regia shell co-pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzun, B B; Yaman, E

    2014-10-01

    The degradation kinetics of Juglans regia shell, scrap tyre and their blends were investigated using a thermogravimetric analysis method. Experiments were performed under dynamic conditions and a nitrogen atmosphere in the range 293 to 973 K at different heating rates. During pyrolysis of J. regia shell three mass loss zones were specified as removal of water, decomposition of hemicelluloses and cellulose, and decomposition of lignin. The degradation curves of scrap tyre showed merely one stage which was due to decomposition of styrene butadiene rubber. The kinetic parameters were calculated using both Arrhenius and Coats-Redfern methods. By adopting the Arrhenius method, the average value of activation energies of J. regia shell, scrap tyre and their 1 : 1 blends were found to be 69.22, 71.48 and 47.03 kJ mol(-1), respectively. Additionally, by using the Coats-Redfern method, the average value of activation energies of J. regia shell, scrap tyre and their 1 : 1 blend were determined as 99.85, 78.72 and 63.81 kJ mol(-1), respectively. The addition of J. regia shell to scrap tyre caused a reduction in the activation energies. The difference of weight loss was measured to examine interactions between raw materials. The maximum difference between experimental and theoretical mass loss was 5% at about 648 K with a heating rate of 20 K min(-1). These results indicated a significant synergistic effect was available during co-pyrolysis of J. regia shell and scrap tyre in the high temperature region. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. RECYCLING OF SCRAP AND WASTE OF COPPER AND COPPER ALLOYS IN BELARUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Rovin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The construction of a new casting and mechanical shop of unitary enterprise «Tsvetmet» in December 2015 has allowed to solve the complex problem of processing and utilization of scrap and wastes of copper and copper alloys in the Republic of Belarus. The technological processes of fire refinement of copper and manufacturing of copper rod from scrap and production of brass rod by hot pressing (extrusion of the continuously casted round billet have been mastered for the first time in the Republic of Belarus.

  10. Efficient recovery of gold and other noble metals from electronic and other scraps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Hidetoshi

    1987-01-01

    Pure gold is extracted from crude gold by the solvent extraction method in the recovery and refining process for Noble metals recovered from electronic and other scraps. This solvent extraction method is advantageous in that it facilitates rapid processing, thereby reducing the interest burden of gold staying too long in the unit. Therefore, the method is also used in the refining of platinum and palladium. Technological innovation has created more complex and diversified types of scraps, and efforts are being made to accommodate ourselves to such a trend.

  11. Progress toward uranium scrap recycling via electron beam cold hearth refining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKoon, R.H.

    1994-01-01

    A 250 kW electron beam cold hearth refining (EBCHR) melt furnace at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been in operation for over a year producing 5.5 in.-diameter ingots of various uranium alloys. Production of in-specification uranium-6%-niobium (U-6Nb) alloy ingots has been demonstrated using Virgin feedstock. A vibratory scrap feeder has been installed on the system and the ability to recycle chopped U-6Nb scrap has been established. A preliminary comparison of vacuum arc remelted (VAR) and electron beam (EB) melted product is presented

  12. Progress toward uranium scrap recycling via Electron Cold Hearth Refining (EBCHR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKoon, R.H.

    1994-01-01

    A 250 kW electron beam cold hearth refining (EBCHR) melt furnace at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been in operation for over a year producing 5.5 in.-diameter ingots of various uranium alloys. Production of in-specification uranium-6% - niobium (U-6Nb) alloy ingots has been demonstrated using virgin feedstock. A vibratory scrap feeder has been installed on the system and the ability to recycle chopped U-6Nb scrap has been established. A preliminary comparison of vacuum arc remelted (VAR) and electron beam (EB) melted product is presented

  13. The prospect for recycle of radioactive scrap metals to products for restricted and unrestricted use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liby, A.L.

    1995-01-01

    Large quantities of radioactive scrap metals will arise from decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear power plants and DOE facilities. Much of this metal can be easily decontaminated and released to the existing secondary metals industry for recycling. For metal that can not be readily released, recycle into restricted-use end products is an economically attractive alternative to burial as low level radioactive waste. This paper will examine sources and types of scrap metal, technical approaches, potential products, and economics of metals recycle. Construction, licensing, environmental compliance, and possible reuse of existing nuclear facilities for metals recycling will be discussed. (author)

  14. Design of the network for the radiological control in the recycling of metal scrap in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez Ley, Orlando; Caveda Ramos, Celia; Ramos Viltre, Enma O.; Capote Ferrera, Eduardo; Alonso Abad, Dolores; Zerquera, Juan Tomas

    2008-01-01

    Full text: During the last six years, the Centre of Protection and Hygiene of the Radiations (CPHR) has given answer to the problem about the presence of radioactive materials in the scrap which is exported in Cuba. The service of radioactivity measurement in scraps has reduced the risks of the occurrence of this type of events in the main import and export enterprises in Cuba. This has been carried out using few resources, a properly qualified staff and a laboratory credited by the norm ISO 17025:00. There is not the same control in the enterprises that manipulate and process metallic scrap inside the country. With the objective of extending the radiological control of the metallic scrap to the whole country, a monitoring network was designed. The design was based on the experience accumulated during the years of service to the import and export enterprises. First, It was defined the most vulnerable points in the whole recycle chain for each province, prioritizing the scrap melting plants and the longest scrap yards. All possible scenarios were identified, a quality system was also designed and implemented and a course of Radiological Protection oriented to the metallurgist technicians who are linked with the performance of this practice was elaborated. The monitoring has two phases. First, the measurements are carried out in the measurement points in each province and the transmissions of the data related to the monitored scrap loads are sent to the CPHR. The second phase is the confection of the Declaration of Conformity at the CPHR. This declaration certifies that this scrap may be processed. For the operation of this network, two software were developed and are currently used. One of them allows the control of the information in monitoring point and sends the necessary data to CPHR for the confection of the Declaration of Conformity. The other controls all the information received from the monitoring points and generates the Declaration of Conformity

  15. Statistical treatment of hazards result from radioactive material in metal scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salem, E.F.; Rashad, S.M.

    2013-01-01

    Radioactive sources have a wide range of uses in medicine and industry. Radioactive materials entering the public domain in an uncontrolled manner may creating a serious risk of radiation exposure for workers and the public as well as excessive costs for plant decontamination and waste of product to be borne by the metal industry. This paper describes the major accidents that had happened in the last decades due to radioactive material in metal scrap, provides assessment of associated hazards and lessons learned. This will help Regulatory Authority to introduce measures capable to avoid the recurrence of similar events. The study highlights the situation for metal scrap incidents in Egypt.

  16. Structure of the AZ91 alloy pressure castings fabricated of home scrap containing charge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Konopka

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the AZ91 alloy home scrap addition to the metal charge on both the structure and the selected mechanical propertiesof pressure castings was examined in this article. Two heats were made using different components, the first with only pure AZ91 alloyingots in the charge, and the second containing 30 wt % of home scrap. The hot chamber 3 MN machine was used for casting. Thestructures of the castings and their Brinell hardness were examined for both cases. A strong refinement of crystals was observed in castings made with the contribution of the recycled material. Any significant differences in castings hardness were not observed.

  17. Reuse of waste water from high pressure water jet decontamination for reactor decommissioning scrap metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Junxian; Li Xin; Hou Huijuan

    2011-01-01

    For recycle and reuse of reactor decommissioning scrap metal by high pressure water jet decontamination, large quantity of radioactive waste water will be generated. To save the cost of radioactive waste water treatment and to reduce the cost of the scrap decontamination, this part of radioactive waste water should be reused. Most of the radioactivities in the decontamination waste water come from the solid particle in the water. Thus to reuse the waste water, the solid particle in the waster should be removed. Different possible treatment technologies have been investigated. By cost benefit analysis the centrifugal separation technology is selected. (authors)

  18. Radiometric monitoring of contaminated scrap metals imported in Italy. Technical and regulatory features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobici, F.; Piermattei, S.; Susanna, A.

    1996-01-01

    During these last ten years there have been occasional reports of mishaps from trafficking of contaminated scraps or containing radioactive sources. Recently an increase of events indicated that the problem becomes more important as to generate possible consequences, from a radiation protection standpoint, for workers and general public. Following the detection of contaminated metal scraps in some recycling industries and in some consignments entering the Italian borders, the competent Authorities laid down rules to put the matter under control. In this paper technical and regulatory features are discussed. (author)

  19. Recycling of rare earths from Hg-containing fluorescent lamp scraps by solid state chlorination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, Tom; Froehlich, Peter; Bertau, Martin; Golon, Katja

    2015-01-01

    Solid state chlorination with NH 4 Cl comprises a method for rare earth recycling apart from pyro- or hydrometallurgical strategies. The examined partially Hg-containing fluorescent lamp scraps are rich in rare earths like La, Ce, Tb and Gd, but especially in Y and Eu. By mixing with NH 4 Cl and heating up to NH 4 Cl decomposition temperature in a sublimation reactor, Y and Eu could be transferred selectively into their respective metal chlorides with high yields. The yield and selectivity depend on temperature and the ratio of NH 4 Cl to fluorescent lamp scraps, which were varied systematically.

  20. Economic and policy instrument analyses in support of the scrap tire recycling program in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ni-Bin

    2008-02-01

    Understanding the cost-effectiveness and the role of economic and policy instruments, such as the combined product tax-recycling subsidy scheme or a tradable permit, for scrap tire recycling has been of crucial importance in a market-oriented environmental management system. Promoting product (tire) stewardship on one hand and improving incentive-based recycling policy on the other hand requires a comprehensive analysis of the interfaces and interactions in the nexus of economic impacts, environmental management, environmental valuation, and cost-benefit analysis. This paper presents an assessment of the interfaces and interactions between the implementation of policy instruments and its associated economic evaluation for sustaining a scrap tire recycling program in Taiwan during the era of the strong economic growth of the late 1990s. It begins with an introduction of the management of the co-evolution between technology metrics of scrap tire recycling and organizational changes for meeting the managerial goals island-wide during the 1990s. The database collected and used for such analysis covers 17 major tire recycling firms and 10 major tire manufacturers at that time. With estimates of scrap tire generation and possible scale of subsidy with respect to differing tire recycling technologies applied, economic analysis eventually leads to identify the associated levels of product tax with respect to various sizes of new tires. It particularly demonstrates a broad perspective of how an integrated econometric and engineering economic analysis can be conducted to assist in implementing policy instruments for scrap tire management. Research findings indicate that different subsidy settings for collection, processing, and end use of scrap tires should be configured to ameliorate the overall managerial effectiveness. Removing the existing boundaries between designated service districts could strengthen the competitiveness of scrap tires recycling industry, helping to

  1. Recycling and processing of several typical crosslinked polymer scraps with enhanced mechanical properties based on solid-state mechanochemical milling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Canhui; Zhang, Xinxing; Zhang, Wei [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials Engineering, Polymer Research Institute, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China)

    2015-05-22

    The partially devulcanization or de-crosslinking of ground tire rubber (GTR), post-vulcanized fluororubber scraps and crosslinked polyethylene from cable scraps through high-shear mechanochemical milling (HSMM) was conducted by a modified solid-state mechanochemical reactor. The results indicated that the HSMM treated crosslinked polymer scraps can be reprocessed as virgin rubbers or thermoplastics to produce materials with high performance. The foamed composites of low density polyethylene/GTR and the blend of post-vulcanized flurorubber (FKM) with polyacrylate rubber (ACM) with better processability and mechanical properties were obtained. The morphology observation showed that the dispersion and compatibility between de-crosslinked polymer scraps and matrix were enhanced. The results demonstrated that HSMM is a feasible alternative technology for recycling post-vulcanized or crosslinked polymer scraps.

  2. Recycling and processing of several typical crosslinked polymer scraps with enhanced mechanical properties based on solid-state mechanochemical milling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Canhui; Zhang, Xinxing; Zhang, Wei

    2015-05-01

    The partially devulcanization or de-crosslinking of ground tire rubber (GTR), post-vulcanized fluororubber scraps and crosslinked polyethylene from cable scraps through high-shear mechanochemical milling (HSMM) was conducted by a modified solid-state mechanochemical reactor. The results indicated that the HSMM treated crosslinked polymer scraps can be reprocessed as virgin rubbers or thermoplastics to produce materials with high performance. The foamed composites of low density polyethylene/GTR and the blend of post-vulcanized flurorubber (FKM) with polyacrylate rubber (ACM) with better processability and mechanical properties were obtained. The morphology observation showed that the dispersion and compatibility between de-crosslinked polymer scraps and matrix were enhanced. The results demonstrated that HSMM is a feasible alternative technology for recycling post-vulcanized or crosslinked polymer scraps.

  3. Recycling and processing of several typical crosslinked polymer scraps with enhanced mechanical properties based on solid-state mechanochemical milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Canhui; Zhang, Xinxing; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The partially devulcanization or de-crosslinking of ground tire rubber (GTR), post-vulcanized fluororubber scraps and crosslinked polyethylene from cable scraps through high-shear mechanochemical milling (HSMM) was conducted by a modified solid-state mechanochemical reactor. The results indicated that the HSMM treated crosslinked polymer scraps can be reprocessed as virgin rubbers or thermoplastics to produce materials with high performance. The foamed composites of low density polyethylene/GTR and the blend of post-vulcanized flurorubber (FKM) with polyacrylate rubber (ACM) with better processability and mechanical properties were obtained. The morphology observation showed that the dispersion and compatibility between de-crosslinked polymer scraps and matrix were enhanced. The results demonstrated that HSMM is a feasible alternative technology for recycling post-vulcanized or crosslinked polymer scraps

  4. Shingle 2.0: generalising self-consistent and automated domain discretisation for multi-scale geophysical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candy, Adam S.; Pietrzak, Julie D.

    2018-01-01

    The approaches taken to describe and develop spatial discretisations of the domains required for geophysical simulation models are commonly ad hoc, model- or application-specific, and under-documented. This is particularly acute for simulation models that are flexible in their use of multi-scale, anisotropic, fully unstructured meshes where a relatively large number of heterogeneous parameters are required to constrain their full description. As a consequence, it can be difficult to reproduce simulations, to ensure a provenance in model data handling and initialisation, and a challenge to conduct model intercomparisons rigorously. This paper takes a novel approach to spatial discretisation, considering it much like a numerical simulation model problem of its own. It introduces a generalised, extensible, self-documenting approach to carefully describe, and necessarily fully, the constraints over the heterogeneous parameter space that determine how a domain is spatially discretised. This additionally provides a method to accurately record these constraints, using high-level natural language based abstractions that enable full accounts of provenance, sharing, and distribution. Together with this description, a generalised consistent approach to unstructured mesh generation for geophysical models is developed that is automated, robust and repeatable, quick-to-draft, rigorously verified, and consistent with the source data throughout. This interprets the description above to execute a self-consistent spatial discretisation process, which is automatically validated to expected discrete characteristics and metrics. Library code, verification tests, and examples available in the repository at https://github.com/shingleproject/Shingle. Further details of the project presented at http://shingleproject.org.

  5. Melting of contaminated steel scrap from the dismantling of the CO2 systems of gas cooled, graphite moderated nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feaugas, J.; Jeanjacques, M.; Peulve, J.

    1994-01-01

    G2 and G3 are the natural Uranium cooled reactors Graphite/Gas. The two reactors were designed for both plutonium and electricity production (45 MWe). The dismantling of the reactors at stage 2 has produced more than 4 000 tonnes of contaminated scrap. Because of their large mass and low residual contamination level, the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) considered various possibilities for the processing of these metallic products in order to reduce the volume of waste going to be stored. After different studies and tests of several processes and the evaluation of their results, the choice to melt the dismantled pipeworks was taken. It was decided to build the Nuclear Steel Melting Facility known as INFANTE, in cooperation with a steelmaker (AHL). The realization time schedule for the INFANTE lasted 20 months. It included studies, construction and the licensing procedure. (authors). 2 tabs., 3 figs

  6. Study of silver removal from scrap jewellery by way of the flotation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Oleksiak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is a discussion on the proposed solution of using the fl otation process to separate metals from non-metallic components present in the scrap generated while jewellery goods are being ground. For the sake of the studies analysed, a dedicated laboratory station was established.

  7. Liquid metal extraction of Nd from NdFeB magnet scrap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yanchen [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1999-12-10

    This research involves using molten magnesium (Mg) to remove neodymium (Nd) from NdFeB magnet scrap by diffusion. The results show that liquid metal extraction of Nd may be a viable and inexpensive method for recovering the expensive rare earth element Nd for use in Mg castings.

  8. Classification of scrap material from nuclear power plants as acceptable for recirculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, C.

    1983-06-01

    The Swedish National Institute of Radiation Protection has in a principal decision accepted that scrap material from nuclear power plants, that contains or may contain radioactive material, can be recirculated. The document is an English translation of the background material for the Board meeting decision and gives some guide-lines for the authority when dealing with this questions. (author)

  9. Evaluation of copper for divider subassembly in MCO Mark IA and Mark IV scrap fuel baskets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graves, C.E.

    1997-01-01

    The K Basin Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) subprojection eludes the design and fabrication of a canister that will be used to confine, contain, and maintain fuel in a critically safe array to enable its removal from the K Basins, vacuum drying, transport, staging, hot conditioning, and interim storage (Goldinann 1997). Each MCO consists of a shell, shield plug, fuel baskets (Mark IA or Mark IV), and other incidental equipment. The Mark IA intact and scrap fuel baskets are a safety class item for criticality control and components necessary for criticality control will be constructed from 304L stainless steel. It is proposed that a copper divider subassembly be used in both Mark IA and Mark IV scrap baskets to increase the safety basis margin during cold vacuum drying. The use of copper would increase the heat conducted away from hot areas in the baskets out to the wall of the MCO by both radiative and conductive heat transfer means. Thus copper subassembly will likely be a safety significant component of the scrap fuel baskets. This report examines the structural, cost and corrosion consequences associated with using a copper subassembly in the stainless steel MCO scrap fuel baskets

  10. Fuzzy chance constrained linear programming model for scrap charge optimization in steel production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rong, Aiying; Lahdelma, Risto

    2008-01-01

    the uncertainty based on fuzzy set theory and constrain the failure risk based on a possibility measure. Consequently, the scrap charge optimization problem is modeled as a fuzzy chance constrained linear programming problem. Since the constraints of the model mainly address the specification of the product...

  11. Fabrication of metallic alloy powder (Ni{sub 3}Fe) from Fe–77Ni scrap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Inseok [ES Materials Research Center, Research Institute of Industrial Science and Technology, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Shun-Myung [Extractive Metallurgy Department, Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources, Deajeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Sang-An [Department of Environmental Engineering, Silla University, Busan 46958 (Korea, Republic of); Wang, Jei-Pil, E-mail: jpwang@pknu.ac.kr [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Pukyong National University, Busan 608-739 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The oxidation behavior of Fe–77Ni alloy scrap was investigated at an oxygen partial pressure of 0.2 atm and temperatures ranging from 400 °C to 900 °C. The corresponding oxidation rate increased with increasing temperature and obeyed the parabolic rate law, as evidenced by its linear proportionality to the temperature. In addition, surface morphologies, cross-sectional views, compositions, structural properties were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Diffusion through either the spinel structure or the NiO layer, which were both present in the alloy during oxidation at elevated temperatures, was deemed the rate-limiting step of the reaction. The oxide powder less than 10 μm was obtained from Fe–77Ni alloy scrap was obtained using ball-milling and sieving processes. In fact, 15 h of milling yielded a recovery ratio of 97%. Using hydrogen gas, the oxide powder was successfully reduced to an alloy powder of Ni{sub 3}Fe and reduction rates of ∼97% were achieved after 3 h at 1000 °C. - Highlights: • The oxidation behavior of Fe–77Ni alloy scrap was investigated. • The oxide powder less than 10 μm was obtained from Fe–77Ni alloy scrap. • Using hydrogen gas, the oxide powder was successfully reclaimed. • Reduction rates of ∼97% were achieved after 3 h at 1000 °C.

  12. United States copper metal and scrap use and trade patterns, 1995‒2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goonan, Thomas G.

    2016-06-17

    In 1995, China accounted for 10 percent of world copper consumption. By 2014, China accounted for about 49 percent of world copper consumption. This change has affected global copper and copper scrap prices, the sources of copper supply, and U.S. trade of copper-containing materials.

  13. 16 CFR 300.29 - Garments or products composed of or containing miscellaneous cloth scraps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Garments or products composed of or containing miscellaneous cloth scraps. 300.29 Section 300.29 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION... chiefly woolen fibers with the balance of undetermined mixtures of cotton, rayon or other non-woolen...

  14. Noneconomic factors influencing scrap metal disposition decisions at DOE and NRC-licensed nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewen, M.D.; Robinson, L.A.

    1997-02-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is currently developing radiation protection standards for scrap metal, which will establish criteria for the unconditional clearance of scrap from nuclear facilities. In support of this effort, Industrial Economics, Incorporated is assessing the costs and benefits attributable to the rulemaking. The first step in this analysis is to develop an in-depth understanding of the factors influencing scrap disposition decisions, so that one can predict current and future practices under existing requirements and compare them to the potential effects of EPA`s rulemaking. These baseline practices are difficult to predict due to a variety of factors. First, because decommissioning activities are just beginning at many sites, current practices do not necessarily provide an accurate indicator of how these practices may evolve as site managers gain experience with related decisions. Second, a number of different regulations and policies apply to these decisions, and the interactive effects of these requirements can be difficult to predict. Third, factors other than regulatory constraints and costs may have a significant effect on related decisions, such as concerns about public perceptions. In general, research suggests that these factors tend to discourage the unconditional clearance of scrap metal.

  15. US Department of Energy`s weapons complex scrap metal inventory. Research report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duda, J.R.

    1993-07-01

    Two tasks comprise the thrust of this contracted effort. Task 1 is the development of a Source List and is based on determining a list of public documents pertaining to contaminated/uncontaminated scrap metals, equipment, and other materials of value, were they not contaminated or could they be decontaminated. Task 2 is to develop an inventory of such materials from the Task 1 list of public documentation. In more detail, the Task 2 Inventory Report is based upon fulfillment of the following requirement to prepare and submit an Inventory Report based on the information obtained in the Source List. The Inventory Report shall define the type, quantity, and location of used equipment, scrap metal, and other materials existing within DOE`s system. The Inventory Report shall list: the site where the equipment, scrap metal, or other material resides; the type and size of equipment; the type and volume and/or weight of scrap metal or other material; its source; the type and level of contamination; its accessibility; the current annual rate of generation; and the projected annual rate of generation of the material.

  16. Evaluation of Wet Digestion Methods for Quantification of Metal Content in Electronic Scrap Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhabrata Das

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the electronics sector and the short life-span of electronic products have triggered an exponential increase in the generation of electronic waste (E-waste. Effective recycling of E-waste has thus become a serious solid waste management challenge. E-waste management technologies include pyrometallurgy, hydrometallurgy, and bioleaching. Determining the metal content of an E-waste sample is critical in evaluating the efficiency of a metal recovery method in E-waste recycling. However, E-waste is complex and of diverse origins. The lack of a standard digestion method for E-waste has resulted in difficulty in comparing the efficiencies of different metal recovery processes. In this study, several solid digestion protocols including American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM-D6357-11, United States Environment Protection Agency Solid Waste (US EPA SW 846 Method 3050b, ultrasound-assisted, and microwave digestion methods were compared to determine the metal content (Ag, Al, Au, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, Pd, Sn, and Zn of electronic scrap materials (ESM obtained from two different sources. The highest metal recovery (mg/g of ESM was obtained using ASTM D6357-11 for most of the metals, which remained mainly bound to silicate fractions, while a microwave-assisted digestion protocol (MWD-2 was more effective in solubilizing Al, Pb, and Sn. The study highlights the need for a judicious selection of digestion protocol, and proposes steps for selecting an effective acid digestion method for ESM.

  17. Thermolysis of scrap tire and rubber in sub/super-critical water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qinghai; Li, Fuxin; Meng, Aihong; Tan, Zhongchao; Zhang, Yanguo

    2018-01-01

    The rapid growth of waste tires has become a serious environmental issue. Energy and material recovery is regarded as a promising use for waste tires. Thermolysis of scrap tire (ST), natural rubber (NR), and styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) was carried out in subcritical and supercritical water using a temperature-pressure independent adjustable batch tubular reactor. As a result, oil yields increased as temperature and pressure increased, and they reached maximum values as the state of water was near the critical point. However, further increases in water temperature and pressure reduced the oil yields. The maximum oil yield of 21.21% was obtained at 420 °C and 18 MPa with a reaction time of 40 min. The relative molecular weights of the chemicals in the oil products were in the range of 70-140 g/mole. The oil produced from ST, NR, and SBR contained similar chemical compounds, but the oil yield of SR was between those of NR and SBR. The oil yield from thermolysis of subcritical or supercritical water should be further improved. The main gaseous products, including CH 4 , C 2 H 2 , C 2 H 4 , C 2 H 6 , and C 3 H 8 , increased with reaction time, temperature, and pressure, whereas the solid residues, including carbon black and impurities, decreased. These results provide useful information to develop a sub/super-critical water thermolysis process for energy and material regeneration from waste tires. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Influence of Home Scrap on Mechanical Properties of MgAl9Zn1 Alloy Castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konopka Z.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The work presents the results of examinations concerning the influence of various amounts of home scrap additions on the properties of castings made of MgAl9Zn1 alloy. The fraction of home scrap in the metal charge ranged from 0 to 100%. Castings were pressure cast by means of the hot-chamber pressure die casting machine under the industrial conditions in one of the domestic foundries. The examinations consisted in the determination of the following properties: tensile strength Rm, yield strength Rp0.2, and the unit elongation A5, all being measured during the static tensile test. Also, the hardness measurements were taken by the Brinell method. It was found that the mechanical properties (mainly the strength properties are being improved up to the home scrap fraction of 50%. Their values were increased by about 30% over this range. Further rise in the home scrap content, however, brought a definite decrease in these properties. The unit elongation A5 exhibited continual decrease with an increase in the home scrap fraction in the metal charge. A large growth of hardness was noticed for the home scrap fraction increasing up to the value of 50%. Further increasing the home scrap percentage, however, did not result in a significant rise of the hardness value any more.

  19. Example of establishing the recycling of scrap metal as a waste management option within German regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodenstein, Matthias; Delfs, Johannes; Karschnick, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    The German Atomic Energy Act (Atomgesetz, AtG) specifies the German nuclear licensing and supervising regulations. On that basis the German federal states are responsible for licensing and supervising of nuclear power plants (NPPs) located in that state. The Ministry of Energy, Agriculture, the Environment and Rural Areas (MELUR) is the authority responsible for the state Schleswig-Holstein, in which the NPPs Brokdorf, Brunsbuettel, Kruemmel and the research reactor HZG are located. In the licensing and supervisory procedures the authority may consult authorized experts. In addition to the AtG, the German Radiation Protection Ordinance (Strahlenschutzverordnung, StrlSchV) specifies regulations for clearance according to the 10 μSv-concept. The clearance of metal by recycling / melting is one option within the regulations of the StrlSchV. For a clearance an additional license given by the MELUR is necessary. In that license and the application documents as well as in the supervisory procedures very specific regulations are implemented. This includes regulations for clearance at third parties in foreign countries. In this talk a short introduction to the German regulations focussed on clearance according to the 10 μSv-concept will be given. The specific regulations in the license of clearance will be presented and also the application documents for NPPs in Schleswig-Holstein will be discussed. Furthermore it will be illustrated on what terms the MELUR decided to agree upon the recycling of scrap metal with the aim of clearance according to Radiation Protection 89 in foreign countries along with the German regulatory framework. (authors)

  20. Field Testing Unvented Roofs with Asphalt Shingles in Cold and Hot-Humid Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, Kohta [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States); Lstiburek, Joseph W. [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Test houses with unvented roof assemblies were built to measure long-term moisture performance, in the Chicago area (5A) and the Houston area (2A). The Chicago-area test bed had seven experimental rafter bays, including a control vented compact roof, and six unvented roof variants with cellulose or fiberglass insulation. The interior was run at 50% RH. The Houston-area roof was an unvented attic insulated with spray-applied fiberglass. Most ridges and hips were built with a diffusion vent detail, capped with vapor permeable roof membrane. In contrast, the diffusion vent roofs had drier conditions at the roof peak in wintertime, but during the summer, RHs and MCs were higher than the unvented roof (albeit in the safe range).

  1. Field Testing Unvented Roofs with Asphalt Shingles in Cold and Hot-Humid Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, Kohta [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lstiburek, Joseph W. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Insulating roofs with dense-pack cellulose (instead of spray foam) has moisture risks, but is a lower cost approach. If moisture risks could be addressed, buildings could benefit from retrofit options, and the ability to bring HVAC systems within the conditioned space. Test houses with unvented roof assemblies were built to measure long-term moisture performance, in the Chicago area (5A) and the Houston area (2A). The Chicago-area test bed had seven experimental rafter bays, including a control vented compact roof, and six unvented roof variants with cellulose or fiberglass insulation. The interior was run at 50% RH. All roofs except the vented cathedral assembly experienced wood moisture contents and RH levels high enough to constitute failure. Disassembly at the end of the experiment showed that the unvented fiberglass roofs had wet sheathing and mold growth. In contrast, the cellulose roofs only had slight issues, such as rusted fasteners and sheathing grain raise. The Houston-area roof was an unvented attic insulated with spray-applied fiberglass. Most ridges and hips were built with a diffusion vent detail, capped with vapor permeable roof membrane. Some ridge sections were built as a conventional unvented roof, as a control. In the control unvented roofs, roof peak RHs reached high levels in the first winter; as exterior conditions warmed, RHs quickly fell. In contrast, the diffusion vent roofs had drier conditions at the roof peak in wintertime, but during the summer, RHs and MCs were higher than the unvented roof (albeit in the safe range).

  2. Influence of bone porcelain scraps on the physical characteristics and phase composition of a hard porcelain body

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nodeh, A.A.

    2017-07-01

    Hard porcelain is constituted in the alkali oxides-alumina-silica ternary system, and produced by a mixture of clay-feldspar and silica. The most important properties of this porcelain are high mechanical strength, translucency and whiteness. These properties depend on quality of raw material, firing temperature and soaking time. In bone porcelain bone ash was added to body composition up to 50wt.%. Generally hard porcelain and bone porcelain scrap cannot be reused in body composition. Whereas using these scrap could help natural resources. In this research using bon porcelain scraps in hard porcelain body have been investigated. Results show, this substitution decrease firing temperature, linear expansion and increase glass, probability of deformation and total shrinkage. Using 6wt.% bone porcelain scraps to hard porcelain body composition besides improving some properties, increases 1340°C firing mechanical strength two times and helps natural resources. (Author)

  3. The Effectof Underwater Explosion on the Kinetics of Alkaline Leaching of Roasted Tungsten Carbide Scraps for Recycling

    OpenAIRE

    BAIK, Seung Woo; SHIBAYAMA, Atsushi; MURATA, Kenji; FUJITA, Toyohisa

    2004-01-01

    Wasted tungsten scraps are important resources for recycling, however, the mechanical recycle process of tungsten has a difficulty for recycling due to its mechanical strength. Underwater explosion fracturing technique was designed for solving this problem. The kinetics for alkaline leaching of roasted tungsten alloy scraps with different size distribution prepared by two ways of crushing technique has been investigated to evaluate the effect of the underwater explosion-crushing. The merit of...

  4. Radiation protection aspects in importing metallic scraps; Problemi di radioprotezione connessi con l`importazione di rottami metallici

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Risica, S.; Di Ciacco, P. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita`, Rome (Italy). Laboratorio di Fisica

    1996-09-01

    The meeting deals with radiation protection problems caused by the possibility that radioactive metal scraps or radioactive sources hidden in the scraps, may arrive in a foundry. The importance of this issue and of rational and systematic solutions is showed by several accidents, happened in the past in numerous countries, by many signals in Italy and by some papers published in international scientific journals or reports issued by authorities and institutions in different countries.

  5. Exclusion, Exemption and Clearance in the Frame of the Control and Management of Inadvertent Radioactive Material in Scrap Metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Abel J.

    2011-01-01

    Radioactive substances are incorporated into materials, goods, merchandises, products and in scrap and, as scrap would recycle into new produce, the process of introduction of radioactive susbtanaces into commodities will continue. The situation is unstoppable and requires straightforward solutions. The problem is global and therefore the solution(s) should be global. A clear intergovernmental agreement is needed establishing to what extent commodities should be regulated

  6. Mathematical Modeling and Algebraic Technique for Resolving a Single-Producer Multi-Retailer Integrated Inventory System with Scrap

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan-Shyi Peter Chiu; Chien-Hua Lee; Nong Pan; Singa Wang Chiu

    2013-01-01

    This study uses mathematical modeling along with an algebraic technique to resolve the production-distribution policy for a single-producer multi-retailer integrated inventory system with scrap in production. We assume that a product is manufactured through an imperfect production process where all nonconforming items will be picked up and scrapped in each production cycle. After the entire lot is quality assured, multiple shipments will be delivered synchronously to m different retailers in ...

  7. Statistical modeling to management and treatment of scrap with low and very low residual activity; Hacia la modelizacion estadistica de la gestion y tratamiento de chatarras con baja y muy bajo actividad residual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Bermejo Fernandez, R.; Anaya Lazaro, M.

    2011-07-01

    The experience of recent years on the management of scrap metal containing residual activity have allowed the development of a simple statistical model for the management of these materials. This statistical model includes a breakdown of the various processing operations to which these materials undergo and the effects in the process of radiological controls associated to the control of declassification that defines disposal (recycled by smelting, reclamation, temporary storage the plant or sent to final storage of radioactive waste).

  8. Study of scrap recovery for mixed oxide pellet by means of UO2+5wt.%CeO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joung, Chang Young; Kim, Si Hyung; Kim, Han Soo; Lee, Yong Woo

    2000-01-01

    The recovery method of scrap powder was established using UO 2 -5wt.%CeO 2 powder in the way of of technology development of scrap recovery and recycle in the mixed oxide pellet fabrication process. And pellet density and microstructure, which depend on quantity of scrap, powder treatment method, and sintering condition, was analyzed. As a result of oxidation of sintered pellet in the air the powdering at below 400 degrees C occurred smoothly, and at above 400 degrees C powdering process was not proceeding well as temperature increased and powder particle size grew bigger. M 3 O 8 scrap powder which was powdered through oxidation method was added to UO 2 -5wt.%CeO 2 mixed powder. The results after the powder was treated by means of mixing, crushing, attrition milling, pelletizing, and sintering showed that its density and grain size in the case of reductive sintering decreased as scrap addition increased, but the result in the case of crushing showed increase in grain size. In attrition milling case both density and grain size showed the tendency of increase, particularly grain size grew up to 12 μm. In the oxidative sintering with scrap added mixed powder sintering was accelerated under the oxygen environment and the effect of powder treatment showed the tendency of relatively decreasing. (Hong, J. S.)

  9. Current status of scrap metal recycling and reuse in USA and European countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Akira

    1997-01-01

    Recycling and reuse of natural resources has become a global issue to be pursued, but less effective without voluntary efforts from the every industries and of the individuals. In Japan, recycling and reuse of the scrap metal from dismantling of the nuclear facilities are currently noticed as a promising option and the responsible government organizations just started activities to develope the system for enabling and encouraging the nuclear facility owners to recycle their waste. Coincidently, there have been many reports published recently, which inform successful results of the method and the activities of the international organizations for the same intention. Taking this opportunity, current trends of scrap metal recycling and reuse in the experienced countries are reviewed and the proposals from IAEA, EC and OECD/NEA on the relating issues are summarized and compared in this paper. (author)

  10. Assignment of Responsibilities in the Management of Scrap Metal in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, E.L., E-mail: evaldo@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2011-07-15

    This paper gives an overview of the activities of the National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN), as the Brazilian regulatory authority responsible for licensing, inspecting, controlling and regulating all practices involving sources of ionizing radiation. The activities of the main departments of CNEN responsible for taking care of the practices and sources are described, especially those related to orphan sources and radioactive material in scrap metal. Finally, although Brazil does not yet have the necessary infrastructure to take care of the scrap metal issue, through the joint action of the relevant departments of CNEN it is hoped that the appropriate steps can be taken to build a national protocol, following the examples of other countries, especially Spain. (author)

  11. Kinetics of the Thermal Degradation of Granulated Scrap Tyres: a Model-free Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Félix A. LÓPEZ

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolysis is a technology with a promising future in the recycling of scrap tyres. This paper determines the thermal decomposition behaviour and kinetics of granulated scrap tyres (GST by examining the thermogravimetric/derivative thermogravimetric (TGA/DTG data obtained during their pyrolysis in an inert atmosphere at different heating rates. The model-free methods of Friedman, Flynn-Wall-Ozawa and Coats-Redfern were used to determine the reaction kinetics from the DTG data. The apparent activation energy and pre-exponential factor for the degradation of GST were calculated. A comparison with the results obtained by other authors was made.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.4.2947

  12. Efficient One-Step Electrolytic Recycling of Low-Grade and Post-Consumer Magnesium Scrap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam C. Powell, IV

    2012-07-19

    Metal Oxygen Separation Technologies, Inc. (abbreviated MOxST, pronounced most) and Boston University (BU) have developed a new low-cost process for recycling post-consumer co-mingled and heavily-oxidized magnesium scrap, and discovered a new chemical mechanism for magnesium separations in the process. The new process, designated MagReGenTM, is very effective in laboratory experiments, and on scale-up promises to be the lowest-cost lowest-energy lowest-impact method for separating magnesium metal from aluminum while recovering oxidized magnesium. MagReGenTM uses as little as one-eighth as much energy as today's methods for recycling magnesium metal from comingled scrap. As such, this technology could play a vital role in recycling automotive non-ferrous metals, particularly as motor vehicle magnesium/aluminum ratios increase in order to reduce vehicle weight and increase efficiency.

  13. Detecting the presence of abnormal radioactivity in scrap using the statistical method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baillet, G.

    1999-01-01

    The radiological protection criteria recommended for recycling of metals (as in the paper 'Radiation protection 89') cannot be used when scrap is checked on arrival at steel plants. In the event of an incident, neither the nature of the radioelements that may be present in the scrap, nor their level of activity, nor their physical form, are known. In practice abnormal radioactivity in scrap is detected by comparison with ambient radioactivity. However, ambient radioactivity cannot be regarded as a threshold of acceptability which applies to all products . Its level varies substantially from one place to another. All products display natural radioactivity: its level varies greatly, but in some cases it significantly supplements ambient radioactivity, though this does not mean that the products must be considered dangerous (the classic example is that of some granites and some refractory materials). In our arrival checks on scrap-carrying vehicles (lorries and wagons) using gantries, we focus on changes in the measured ambient radioactivity, expressed in impulses per second, which arise from the presence of the vehicle between the sensor and the ambient radioactivity. For each vehicle, this shielding effect is expressed in terms of the ratio between the level measured in the presence of the vehicle and the level measured immediately before its arrival. The result is therefore a dimensionless number. We carried out a statistical analysis of the results of lorry checks at three sites where the checking equipment is identical, but the natural ambient radioactivity levels very different. We observed that the distributions of the values of this ratio were identical for all the sites, and relate very well to a Gaussian distribution with a mean value of 0.71 and a standard deviation of 0.06. Hence these values are characteristic of the dispersion of the shielding effect of the population of 'scrap-carrying lorries checked with a specific type of checking equipment

  14. Recycling of contaminated scrap by melting 10 years of experience in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamm, M.; Kreh, R.; Quade, U.

    2000-01-01

    Recycling of slightly radioactively contaminated steel scrap from nuclear installations has been developed in Germany since the early 80's. 14,000 t of steel scrap were melted in the single purpose melting plant CARLA at Siempelkamp, Krefeld, up to now. As much material as possible is used for recycling to cast iron containers, shieldings or to replace iron ore in heavy concrete shieldings by iron granules. By this well developed recycling technique within the nuclear cycle radiation exposure of the general public could be avoided. Due to the max. achievable volume reduction, 80 % of final disposal volume have been saved so far. To manage the upcoming metallic waste from decommissioning of nuclear power plants, this recycling path will play an important role in the future. (authors)

  15. Lead scrap use and trade patterns in the United States, 1995-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilburn, David R.

    2015-09-22

    Since 1995, domestic production of lead has increasingly shifted from primary mining and smelting to the recovery of lead-bearing scrap by the secondary lead industry, which accounted for 91 percent of U.S. lead production in 2012. Increasingly stringent environmental regulations for lead emissions in the United States have contributed to the closure of primary lead refineries and the consolidation of the secondary lead industry. Domestic production of lead from the primary and secondary sectors in 2012 is essentially unchanged from the amount produced in 1995. The U.S. secondary industry produced an estimated 145,000 metric tons more refined lead in 2012 than it did in 1995, primarily by recovering lead from battery scrap, allowing the U.S. to maintain production at a level sufficient to supply much of the domestic demand for lead.

  16. Effect of Acid Dissolution Conditions on Recovery of Valuable Metals from Used Plasma Display Panel Scrap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Chan-Mi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this particular study was to recover valuable metals from waste plasma display panels using high energy ball milling with subsequent acid dissolution. Dissolution of milled (PDP powder was studied in HCl, HNO3, and H2SO4 acidic solutions. The effects of dissolution acid, temperature, time, and PDP scrap powder to acid ratio on the leaching process were investigated and the most favorable conditions were found: (1 valuable metals (In, Ag, Mg were recovered from PDP powder in a mixture of concentrated hydrochloric acid (HCl:H2O = 50:50; (2 the optimal dissolution temperature and time for the valuable metals were found to be 60°C and 30 min, respectively; (3 the ideal PDP scrap powder to acid solution ratio was found to be 1:10. The proposed method was applied to the recovery of magnesium, silver, and indium with satisfactory results.

  17. The detection and assessment of radioactive parts in scrap - a technical and legal challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieck, W.

    1999-01-01

    According to the requirements of the European steel industry, delivery of radioactive contaminated metallurgical scrap in excess of natural level has to be excluded. Therefore, in Germany alone, more than 100 high-sensitive gate monitors were installed during the last few years at steel mills and scrap handling facilities. This has resulted in not only tighter protection from an erroneous melting of radioactive sources but also in a great increase in number of reported findings than before. Aside from a small number of sealed sources, the majority of detections concern natural radioactive scale and contamination, mostly from fission and activation products as well as traces of nuclear fuel. Practical and legal problems regarding the application of the regulations on radioactivity protection are demonstrated and discussed. (author)

  18. Direct regeneration of recycled cathode material mixture from scrapped LiFePO4 batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuelei; Zhang, Jin; Song, Dawei; Song, Jishun; Zhang, Lianqi

    2017-03-01

    A new green recycling process (named as direct regeneration process) of cathode material mixture from scrapped LiFePO4 batteries is designed for the first time. Through this direct regeneration process, high purity cathode material mixture (LiFePO4 + acetylene black), anode material mixture (graphite + acetylene black) and other by-products (shell, Al foil, Cu foil and electrolyte solvent, etc.) are recycled from scrapped LiFePO4 batteries with high yield. Subsequently, recycled cathode material mixture without acid leaching is further directly regenerated with Li2CO3. Direct regeneration procedure of recycled cathode material mixture from 600 to 800 °C is investigated in detail. Cathode material mixture regenerated at 650 °C display excellent physical, chemical and electrochemical performances, which meet the reuse requirement for middle-end Li-ion batteries. The results indicate the green direct regeneration process with low-cost and high added-value is feasible.

  19. Shingles (Herpes Zoster)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... woman’s unborn baby. Babies less than 1 month old and people who have a weak immune system ... Publications Connect With Us Contact Us Media contacts Advertising contacts AAD logo Advertising, marketing and sponsorships Legal ...

  20. Chickenpox and Shingles Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Wu, A. (© 2006). Tietz Clinical Guide to Laboratory Tests , Fourth Edition: Saunders Elsevier, St. Louis, MO. Pp 1623. Forbes, B. et. al. (© 2007). Bailey & Scott's Diagnostic Microbiology , Twelfth Edition: Mosby Elsevier Press, St. Louis, MO. ...

  1. Investment, replacement and scrapping in a vintage capital model with embodied technological change

    OpenAIRE

    Bitros, George C.; Hritonenko, Natali; Yatsenko, Yuri

    2007-01-01

    This paper analyzes and compares two alternative policies of determining the service life and replacement demand for vintage equipment under embodied technological change. The policies are the infinite-horizon replacement and the transitory replacement ending with scrapping. The corresponding vintage capital models are formulated in the dynamic optimization framework. These two approaches lead to different estimates of the duration of replacements and the impact of technological change on the...

  2. Correlation between Composition and Properties of Composite Material Based on Scrap Tires

    OpenAIRE

    Mālers, L; Plēsuma, R; Ločmele, L; Kalniņš, M

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of present work is to investigate mechanical and insulation properties of the composite material based on scrap tires and polyurethane-type binder in correlation with composition of composite material. The studies of material’s hardness must be considered as an express-method for estimation of the selected mechanical properties (E and ccompressive stress) of the composite material without direct experimental testing of given parameters. It was shown that composite material must be r...

  3. Method of handling of scrap lead from lead-acid batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sytschev, A P; Kim, G V; Larin, V F; Sidorova, G D; Vicharev, I G; Kuur, V P; Achmetov, R S; Moiseev, G L; Maslov, V I; Kabatschek, V G

    1979-12-13

    Scrap lead and the casings of accumulators are mined and molten together in oxidixing atmosphere at a temperature of 1300 to 1500/sup 0/C. The lead oxide contained in the melt is then reduced to blue lead. Due to the combustion of the accumulator casings consisting of organic substances the fuel consumption in the melting process is reduced in accordance. The oxidizing atmosphere in the melting process is produced by use of air or oxygen.

  4. Isothermal model investigation of fume extraction systems for the scrap burner at Appleby Frodingham

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, D.

    1976-08-01

    Model tests have been made on three suggested schemes for improving the efficiency of fume collection on the scrap burning installation in the Anchor BOS plant at Appleby Frodingham. In particular the usefulness of air curtains as a means of containing the fume has been examined. CO/sub 2/ tracer measurements, and photographs using smoke for visualization have allowed the assessment of the collection efficiencies of the three schemes, and some alterative solutions have been investigated using similar methods. (GRA)

  5. Ferrous and common nonferrous metals industries and associated scrap metals: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mautz, E.W.

    1975-11-01

    Literature on the common metals industries, scrap metal relationships, and transportation aspects has been reviewed as background information in a study to determine the feasibility of a portable melting facility for radioactively contaminated metals. This report draws substantially on government-sponsored studies. Aluminum, copper, iron and steel, and nickel metal industries are discussed from the viewpoints of the general industry characteristics, primary metal production processes, and secondary metal processing aspects. 46 references, 10 tables

  6. Optimal Lot Sizing with Scrap and Random Breakdown Occurring in Backorder Replenishing Period

    OpenAIRE

    Ting, Chia-Kuan; Chiu, Yuan-Shyi; Chan, Chu-Chai

    2011-01-01

    This paper is concerned with determination of optimal lot size for an economic production quantity model with scrap and random breakdown occurring in backorder replenishing period. In most real-life manufacturing systems, generation of defective items and random breakdown of production equipment are inevitable. To deal with the stochastic machine failures, production planners practically calculate the mean time between failures (MTBF) and establish the robust plan accordingly, in terms of opt...

  7. REMOVING ZINC FROM GALVANIZED STEEL SCRAP TO FEASIBLE THE BOF SLUDGE RECYCLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Marques Caetano de Lima

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Galvanized steel scraps generated at Usiminas Ipatinga are recycled in BOF converters. Although they are noble products, they contain a significant quantity of zinc that escapes from the bath due to its high vapor pressure and is captured by the gas control system, appearing in BOF sludge. As BOF sludge contains high iron content, it could be recycled to the process, but due to its zinc content, it is disposed in landfills. For this reason, this study aimed to treat these scraps to remove zinc layer using a thermal treatment process. The samples were fed to a rotative furnace in an inert ambient. It was tested the hot dip galvanized and eletrogalvanized scraps, varying the zinc coating weight between 20g/m2 and 150g/m2, temperature between 700°C and 900°C and time between 3 minutes and 10 minutes. Considering these conditions, it is verified that more than 70% of the zinc layer is removed at 700°C, in 10 minutes. Dust captured is about 60% of metallic zinc and 40% as zinc oxide. Based on these results, the recycling of BOF sludge can be feasible to the ironmaking process.

  8. Use of Portal Monitors for Detection of Technogenic Radioactive Sources in Scrap Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovev, D. B.; Merkusheva, A. E.

    2017-11-01

    The article considers the features of organization of scrap-metal primary radiation control on the specialized enterprises engaging in its deep processing and storage at using by primary technical equipment - radiation portal monitors. The issue of this direction relevance, validity of radiation control implementation with the use of radiation portal monitors, physical and organizational bases of radiation control are considered in detail. The emphasis is put on the considerable increase in the number of technogenic radioactive sources detected in scrap-metal that results in the entering into exploitation of radioactive metallic structures as different building wares. One of reasons of such increase of the number of technogenic radioactive sources getting for processing with scrap-metal is the absence of any recommendations on the radiation portal monitors exploitation. The practical division of the article offers to recommendation on tuning of the modes of work of radiation portal monitors depending on influence the weather factor thus allowing to considerably increase the percent of technogenic radioactive sources detection.

  9. Measures to detect and control radioactive contaminated metallurgical scrap at border checkpoints in Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smagala, G.

    1999-01-01

    The issue of radioactive contaminated metallurgical scrap has never received a high priority in Poland and in the international community. Since the dissolution of the former Soviet Union a higher attention has been given to the problem. Poland which is located between the West and East Europe has the obligation to develop and implement an effective prevention and detection system. The reasons to increase national control and detection system at the border checkpoints in Poland are to avoid the following risks: post Chernobyl contamination transports of commodities; transport of contaminated metal scrap; transfer of radioactive waste for their disposal or utilization; high risk of becoming a transit country of illicit trafficking of nuclear materials and radioactive sources. In order to avoid the above-mentioned risks, Poland initiated in 1990, a deployment of the portable radiation devices at the border checkpoints and, as of 1998, the number of installed instruments exceeded a hundred. This paper presents Poland's activities to detect contaminated scrap at its border checkpoints. (author)

  10. Process for using lead battery scrap. Verfahren zum Verarbeiten von Bleiakkumulatorenschrott

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sycev, A P; Kim, G V; Larin, V F; Sidorova, G D; Vicharev, I G; Kuur, V P; Achmetov, R S; Moiseev, G L; Maslov, V I; Kabacek, V G

    1986-06-26

    The process for using lead battery scrap is such that it leads to an increase of lead metal without the use of fluxes for forming the melt. According to the invention, the battery scrap is broken up, dangerous parts (organic substances containing chlorine) are removed and large pieces of lead (pole bridges, grids, contact pins) are sorted out. The remainder is chopped up into pieces less than 10 mm in size. The small pieces are melted by the suspension melting process at a temperature of 1300 to 1500/sup 0/C in an oxidising atmosphere (air or oxygen) without using any fuel. As the small pieces contain parts of the battery case (= organic substances free of chlorine), they burn in air generating heat, which is then used to melt the sulphate oxide lead compounds. The previously sorted large lead parts are then added to the lead oxide melt. Finally, the lead oxide is reduced to lead metal with coke in a furnace. After the reduction of lead oxide to lead, less than 0.2% of the initial lead content in the battery scrap being processed is lost in the dumped slag.

  11. Effective regeneration of anode material recycled from scrapped Li-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Li, Xuelei; Song, Dawei; Miao, Yanli; Song, Jishun; Zhang, Lianqi

    2018-06-01

    Recycling high-valuable metal elements (such as Li, Ni, Co, Al and Cu elements) from scrapped lithium ion batteries can bring significant economic benefits. However, recycling and reusing anode material has not yet attracted wide attention up to now, due to the lower added-value than the above valuable metal materials and the difficulties in regenerating process. In this paper, a novel regeneration process with significant green advance is proposed to regenerate anode material recycled from scrapped Li-ion batteries for the first time. After regenerated, most acetylene black (AB) and all the styrene butadiene rubber (SBR), carboxymethylcellulose sodium (CMC) in recycled anode material are removed, and the surface of anode material is coated with pyrolytic carbon from phenolic resin again. Finally, the regenerated anode material (graphite with coating layer, residual AB and a little CMC pyrolysis product) is obtained. As expected, all the technical indexs of regenerated anode material exceed that of a midrange graphite with the same type, and partial technical indexs are even closed to that of the unused graphite. The results indicate the effective regeneration of anode material recycled from scrapped Li-ion batteries is really achieved.

  12. An assessment on the recycling opportunities of wastes emanating from scrap metal processing in Mauritius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauthoor, Sumayya, E-mail: sumayya.mauthoor@umail.uom.ac.mu [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Mauritius, Réduit (Mauritius); Mohee, Romeela [Professor of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, National Research Chair in Solid Waste Management, Mauritius Research Council (Mauritius); Kowlesser, Prakash [Solid Waste/Beach Management Unit, Ministry of Local Government and Outer Islands (Mauritius)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Scrap metal processing wastes. • Areas of applications for slag, electric arc furnace dust, mill scale and wastewater sludge. • Waste generation factor of 349.3 kg per ton of steel produced. • Waste management model. - Abstract: This paper presents an assessment on the wastes namely slag, dust, mill scale and sludge resulting from scrap metal processing. The aim of this study is to demonstrate that there are various ways via which scrap metal processing wastes can be reused or recycled in other applications instead of simply diverting them to the landfill. These wastes are briefly described and an overview on the different areas of applications is presented. Based on the results obtained, the waste generation factor developed was 349.3 kg per ton of steel produced and it was reported that slag represents 72% of the total wastes emanating from the iron and steel industry in Mauritius. Finally the suitability of the different treatment and valorisation options in the context of Mauritius is examined.

  13. A study of liberation and separation process of metals from printed circuit boards (PCBs) scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noorliyana, H.A.; Zaheruddin, K.; Mohd Fazlul Bari; M. Sri Asliza; Nurhidayah, A.Z.; Kamarudin, H.

    2009-01-01

    Since the metallic elements are covered with or encapsulated by various plastic or ceramic materials on printed circuit boards, a mechanical pre-treatment process allowing their liberation and separation is first needed in order to facilitate their efficient extraction with hydrometallurgy route. Even though many studies have been performed on the mechanical pre-treatment processing for the liberation and separation of the metallic components of printed circuit boards scrap, further studies are required to pave the way for efficient recycling of waste printed circuit boards through a combination of mechanical pre-treatment and hydrometallurgical technology. In this work, a fundamental study has been carried out on the mechanical pre-treatment that is necessary to recover metallic concentrates from printed circuit boards scraps. The most important problem is to separate or release particles from the associated gangue minerals at the possible liberation particle size. The distribution of metallic elements has been also investigated in relation to the particle size of the milled printed circuit boards. The samples of printed circuit boards were separated into the magnetic and non-magnetic fractions by Rare-earth Roll Magnetic separator. Thereafter, the magnetic and non-magnetic fractions were separated to heavy fraction (metallic elements) and light fraction (plastic) by Mozley Laboratory Table Separator. The recovery ratios and the evaluation of the metallic concentrates recovered by each separation process were also investigated. This study is expected to provide useful data for the efficient mechanical separation of metallic components from printed circuit boards scraps. (author)

  14. The radiological monitoring protocol for metallic products and cleared scrap management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil Lopez, E.

    2003-01-01

    Event though the use of nuclear and radiological techniques is subject to strict controls in most countries, the presence of radioactive material in batches of metallic scrap has been detected with relative frequency in the last few years. This circumstance has motivated the implementation of a series of national and international initiatives aimed at detecting and preventing this type of events, whether they be intentional or involuntary. The Spanish iron and steel industry is one of the country's most important industrial sectors, and to a great extent it depends on the importation of a very significant amount of metallic scrap that it uses as raw material. Experience has shown that countries that import large amounts of scrap, apart from supporting the mentioned international initiatives, should complement them with other national initiatives to reduce the risks resulting from the presence of radioactive material in scrap. In this context, the Spanish authorities, together with trade unions and entrepreneurial associations in the metal reclamations and smelting sectors and ENRESA, have signed a voluntary Protocol that defines and implements a national radiological monitoring and control system for scrap materials and their byproducts. The Protocol defines the obligations and rights of the signatories, and it describes the monitoring and control system and its legal bases, the operation of both specific and other general-purpose radiological monitoring equipment that existed prior to this initiative, the development of radiological training and dissemination plans for professionals in the metal reclamation and smelting sectors, the establishment of effective systems for the safe management of any radioactive materials detected, and the general improvement of the national response system in the event of radiological emergencies. Since the Protocol took effect in November 1999, more than 100 enterprises from the metallurgical (steel, copper, lead and aluminum

  15. Geophysical survey work plan for White Wing Scrap Yard (Waste Area Grouping 11) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    The White Wing Scrap Yard, located on the U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation, served as an aboveground storage and disposal area for contaminated debris and scrap from the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, and the Oak Ridge National laboratory. The site is believed to have been active from the early 1950s until the mid-1960s. A variety of materials were disposed of at the site, including contaminated steel tanks and vehicles. As an interim corrective action, a surface debris removal effort was initiated in November 1993 to reduce the potential threat to human health and the environment from the radionuclide-contaminated debris. Following this removal effort, a geophysical survey will be conducted across the site to locate and determine the lateral extent of buried nonindigenous materials. This survey will provide the data necessary to prepare a map showing areas of conductivity and magnetic intensity that vary from measured background values. These anomalies represent potential buried materials and therefore can be targeted for further evaluation. This work plan outlines the activities necessary to conduct the geophysical survey

  16. About the gasification of untreated scrap and waste wood in fluidized bed reactor for use in decentralized gas engine-cogeneration plants; Zur Vergasung von Rest- und Abfallholz in Wirbelschichtreaktoren fuer dezentrale Energieversorgungsanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tepper, H.

    2005-10-20

    This dissertation examines the thermochemical conversion (gasification) of untreated scrap and waste wood in combustible gases for use in decentralized gas engine-cogeneration plants of low output (1 to 10 MW fuel power). A general section goes into the basics of the energetic utilization of solid biomass, the subprocesses of thermochemical conversion being described in more detail. Special attention is given to the processes and state of the art of biomass gasification in decentralized plants. A theoretical section analyzes the gasification models for solid biomass presented in the literature. Based on this analysis, a simplified kinetic model is derived for the gasification of untreated scrap and waste wood with air in bubbling fluidized bed reactors. It includes a fluid mechanic analysis of the fluidized bed based on HILLIGARDT, an empirical pyrolysis model and a global kinetic approach to the main chemical reaction taken from the literature. An experimental section describes the tests of the gasification of forest scrap wood in a semi-industrial fluidized bed gasification test plant with 150 kW fuel power and presents the significant test results. The gasification model derived is applied to check the test plant's standard settings and compare them with measured values. Furthermore, the model is employed to explain basic reaction paths and zones and to perform concluding parameter simulations. (orig.)

  17. The Influence of Home Scrap on Porosity of MgAl9Zn1 Alloy Pressure Castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konopka Z.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The work presents the results of examinations concerning the influence of various amounts of home scrap additions on the porosity of castings made of MgAl9Zn1 alloy. The fraction of home scrap in the metal charge ranged from 0 to 100%. Castings were pressure cast by means of the hot-chamber pressure die casting machine under the industrial conditions in one of the domestic foundries. Additionally, for the purpose of comparison, the porosity of specimens cut out directly of the MgAl9Zn1 ingot alloy was also determined. The examinations consisted in the qualitative assessment of porosity by means of the optical microscopy and its quantitative determination by the method of weighting specimens in air and in water. It was found during the examination that the porosity of castings decreases with an increase in the home scrap fraction in the metal charge. The qualitative examinations confirmed the beneficial influence of the increased home scrap fraction on the porosity of castings. It was concluded that the reusing of home scrap in a foundry can be a good way of reduction of costs related to the production of pressure castings.

  18. The Spanish system for the radiological surveillance and control of scrap and the products resulting from its processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, E.

    2001-01-01

    Despite the fact that the use of radiation technologies has always been subjected to strict controls in most countries, the presence of radioactive materials in scrap has been detected relatively often in recent years. This has led to the implementation of a series of international initiatives aimed at detecting and preventing illicit international trafficking with radioactive material, intentional or otherwise. The Spanish iron and steel industry is one of the most important industrial sectors in the country, and depends to a large extent on the importing of a significant proportion of the scrap its uses as raw material. Experience has shown that that countries that import large quantities of scrap should complement the aforementioned international initiatives with others of national scope, in order to reduce the risks arising from the presence of radioactive material in scrap. In this context, the Spanish radiological protection authorities, along with the business associations involved in the metal recovery and smelting industry, have established a national system for the radiological surveillance and control of scrap and of the products resulting from its processing. The system consists of a set of legal bases, the installation of specific radiological surveillance equipment and the enhancement of other general purpose equipment that existed prior to these initiatives, the development of radiological training and information plans for the professionals involved in the metal recovery and smelting sectors and improvement to the national radiological emergency response system. (author)

  19. Morphological and mechanical analyses of laminates manufactured from randomly positioned carbon fibre/epoxy resin prepreg scraps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Christiane S. R.; Cândido, Geraldo M.; Alves, Wellington; Marlet, José Maria F.; Rezende, Mirabel C.

    2017-10-01

    This study aims to contribute to sustainability by proposing the reuse of composite prepreg scrap as an added value from discards. The research evaluates the microstructure and mechanical properties of laminates processed by the reuse of uncured carbon fibre/F155-epoxy resin prepreg scraps, waste from the ply cutting area of an aeronautical industry. The composite scraps were used as collected and were randomly positioned to produce laminates to be cured at an autoclave. The mechanical characterization shows a decrease of 39% for the compression property due to the discontinuous fibres in the laminate and an increase of 34% for the interlaminar shear strength, when compared to continuous fibre laminates. This increase is attributed to the higher crosslink density of the epoxy resin, as a result of the cure temperature used in autoclave (60 °C higher than suggested by supplier) and also to the randomly positioned scraps. Microscopic analyses confirm the consolidation of laminates, although show resin rich areas with different sizes and shapes attributed to the overlapping of the scraps with different sizes and shapes. These resin rich areas may contribute to decrease the mechanical properties of laminates. The correlation between mechanical and morphological results shows potential to be used on non-critical structural application, as composite jigs, contributing to sustainability.

  20. Workshop on radioactive contaminated metallurgical scrap. Vol. 1, 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    Volume 1 of the Proceedings contains 28 full contributions, Volume contains 2 full contributions plus abstracts of all contributions. Eight abstracts have no full-text counterpart in the Proceedings. All 38 contributions (including those available in the abstract form only) were input to INIS. (P.A.)

  1. Workshop on radioactive contaminated metallurgical scrap. Vol. 1, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Volume 1 of the Proceedings contains 28 full contributions, Volume contains 2 full contributions plus abstracts of all contributions. Eight abstracts have no full-text counterpart in the Proceedings. All 38 contributions (including those available in the abstract form only) were input to INIS. (P.A.)

  2. Machine Vision Tests for Spent Fuel Scrap Characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BERGER, W.W.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to perform a feasibility test of a Machine Vision system for potential use at the Hanford K basins during spent nuclear fuel (SNF) operations. This report documents the testing performed to establish functionality of the system including quantitative assessment of results. Fauske and Associates, Inc., which has been intimately involved in development of the SNF safety basis, has teamed with Agris-Schoen Vision Systems, experts in robotics, tele-robotics, and Machine Vision, for this work

  3. Treatment of Ni-EDTA containing wastewater by electrocoagulation using iron scraps packed-bed anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xiaokun; Zhang, Junya; Zhang, Yan; Lv, Yuancai; Dou, Rongni; Wen, Shulong; Li, Lianghao; Chen, Yuancai; Hu, YongYou

    2016-12-01

    The unique electrocoagulator proposed in this study is highly efficient at removing Ni-EDTA, providing a potential remediation option for wastewater containing lower concentrations of Ni-EDTA (Ni ≤ 10 mg L -1 ). In the electrocoagulation (EC) system, cylindrical graphite was used as a cathode, and a packed-bed formed from iron scraps was used as an anode. The results showed that the removal of Ni-EDTA increased with the application of current and favoured acidic conditions. We also found that the iron scrap packed-bed anode was superior in its treatment ability and specific energy consumption (SECS) compared with the iron rod anode. In addition, the packed density and temperature had a large influence on the energy consumption (ECS). Over 94.3% of Ni and 95.8% of TOC were removed when conducting the EC treatment at an applied current of 0.5 A, initial pH of 3, air-purged rate 0.2 L min -1 , anode packed density of 400 kg m -3 temperature of 313 K and time of 30 min. SEM analysis of the iron scraps indicated that the specific area of the anode increased after the EC. The XRD analysis of flocs produced during EC revealed that hematite (α-Fe 2 O 3 ) and magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) were the main by-products under aerobic and anoxic conditions, respectively. A kinetic study demonstrated that the removal of Ni-EDTA followed a first-order model with the current parameters. Moreover, the removal efficiency of real wastewater was essentially consistent with that of synthetic wastewater. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. OFFGAS GENERATION FROM THE DISPOSITION OF SCRAP PLUTONIUM BY VITRIFICATION SIMULANT TESTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamecnik, J; Patricia Toole, P; David Best, D; Timothy Jones, T; Donald02 Miller, D; Whitney Thomas, W; Vickie Williams, V

    2008-01-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management is supporting R and D for the conceptual design of the Plutonium Disposition Project at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, SC to reduce the attractiveness of plutonium scrap by fabricating a durable plutonium oxide glass form and immobilizing this form within the high-level waste glass prepared in the Defense Waste Processing Facility. A glass formulation was developed that is capable of incorporating large amounts of actinides as well as accommodating many impurities that may be associated with impure Pu feed streams. The basis for the glass formulation was derived from commercial glasses that had high lanthanide loadings. A development effort led to a Lanthanide BoroSilicate (LaBS) glass that accommodated significant quantities of actinides, tolerated impurities associated with the actinide feed streams and could be processed using established melter technologies. A Cylindrical Induction Melter (CIM) was used for vitrification of the Pu LaBS glass. Induction melting for the immobilization of americium and curium (Am/Cm) in a glass matrix was first demonstrated in 1997. The induction melting system was developed to vitrify a non-radioactive Am/Cm simulant combined with a glass frit. Most of the development of the melter itself was completed as part of that work. This same melter system used for Am/Cm was used for the current work. The CIM system used consisted of a 5 inch (12.7 cm) diameter inductively heated platinum-rhodium (Pt-Rh) containment vessel with a control system and offgas characterization. Scrap plutonium can contain numerous impurities including significant amounts of chlorides, fluorides, sodium, potassium, lead, gallium, chromium, and nickel. Smaller amounts of additional elements can also be present. The amount of chlorides present is unusually high for a melter feed. In commercial applications there is no reason to have chloride at such high concentrations. Because the melter operates at

  5. Radioactive ground-water contamination from an enriched-uranium cold scrap recovery operation, Wood River Junction, Rhode Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, B.J.; Kipp, K.L. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Liquid wastes from a uranium-bearing cold scrap recovery plant at an industrial site in Wood River Junction, Rhode Island were discharged to the environment through evaporation ponds from 1966 to 1980. Leakage from the polyethylene- and polyvinylchloride-lined ponds resulted in a plume of contaminated ground water that extends from the ponds northwestward to the Pawcatuck River through a highly permeable sand and gravel aquifer of glacial origin. Contaminants include: strontium 90, technetium 99, boron, nitrate and potassium. Water quality data from more than 100 observation wells indicate that the plume of contamination is approximately 700 meters long, 100 meters wide, and is confined to the upper 25 meters of saturated thickness where sediments consist of medium to coarse sand and gravel. No contamination has been detected in fine sands and silts underlying the coarser materials. Piezometric-head and water-quality data from wells screened at multiple depths on both sides of the river indicate that contaminants discharge both to the river and to a swampy area at the west edge of the river. Dilution precludes detection of contaminants once they have entered the river, which has an average flow of 5 cubic meters per second

  6. Monitoring of scrap loads at Gorzia border checkpoints: A thirty months experience and some suggestions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabretto, M.

    1999-01-01

    The following topics are highlighted: personnel training, assistance from foreign scrap suppliers, and computerized database. It is suggested that when selecting personnel for this job, major attention should be paid to their attitudes; the personnel should be given very good training, teaching them also how to make controls manually; expert physicist' support should be available within a very short time; each monitoring checkpoint should have its local electronic database; periodical exchange and updating of information should be practised on the standardization of methods of detection, of levels of attention and alarm, of statistics among the people in charge of EU and non-EU countries. (P.A.)

  7. Evaluation of the electrorefining technique for the processing of radioactive scrap metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessinger, G.F.

    1993-10-01

    This report presents the results of a literature study performed to identify applications of the electrorefining technique to the decontamination of radioactively-contaminated scrap metal (RSM). Upon the completion of the literature search and the review of numerous references, it was concluded that there were applications of this technique that were appropriate for the decontamination of some types of RSM, especially when the desired product is a pure elemental metal of high purity. It was also concluded that this technique was not well-suited for the decontamination of RSM stainless steels and other alloys, when it was desired that the metallurgical characteristics of the alloy be present in the decontaminated product.

  8. Study of carbon black obtained by pyrolysis of waste scrap tyres

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikulová, Z.; Šeděnková, Ivana; Matějová, Lenka; Večeř, M.; Dombek, V.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 111, č. 2 (2013), s. 1475-1481 ISSN 1388-6150. [Central and Eastern European Conference on Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry /1./ - CEEC-TAC1. Craiova, 07.09.2011-10.09.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/09/0972 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505; CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : scrap tyres * carbon black * thermogravimetry Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.206, year: 2013

  9. Evaluation of the electrorefining technique for the processing of radioactive scrap metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessinger, G.F.

    1993-10-01

    This report presents the results of a literature study performed to identify applications of the electrorefining technique to the decontamination of radioactively-contaminated scrap metal (RSM). Upon the completion of the literature search and the review of numerous references, it was concluded that there were applications of this technique that were appropriate for the decontamination of some types of RSM, especially when the desired product is a pure elemental metal of high purity. It was also concluded that this technique was not well-suited for the decontamination of RSM stainless steels and other alloys, when it was desired that the metallurgical characteristics of the alloy be present in the decontaminated product

  10. Development of a recovery process of scraps resulting from the manufacture of metallic uranium fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camilo, Ruth L.; Kuada, Terezinha A.; Forbicini, Christina A.L.G.O.; Cohen, Victor H.; Araujo, Bertha F.; Lobao, Afonso S.T.

    1996-01-01

    The study of the dissolution of natural metallic uranium fuel samples with aluminium cladding is presented, in order to obtain optimized conditions for the system. The aluminium cladding was dissolved in an alkaline solution of Na OH/Na NO 3 and the metallic uranium with HNO 3 . A fumeless dissolution with total recovery of nitrous gases was achieved. The main purpose of this project was the recovery of uranium from scraps resulting from the manufacture of the metallic uranium fuel or other non specified fuels. (author)

  11. Pretreatment and preheating of scrap. Tarkastelu koskien romun esikaesittely- ja esikuumennusmenetelmiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooli, P.; Hanni, J. (Outokumpu Oy Tornion Tehtaat, Tornio (Finland))

    1990-01-01

    As a background for this study has been those demands for scrap treatments and transportation, which are coming with increasing production of melting shop of Outokumpu Oy's Tornio works and also problems caused by snow among productionrate. Different pretreatment-, transport-, and preheatingmethods and some alternatives has been studied to arrange those as a functioning complete. Also very exact plannings for some pretreatmentmethods has been made. From preheatingmethods some methods, which are concerned to be effective and possible in the future has been studied. In addition those parameters, which are involved to the effectivity of preheating process in melting shop of Outokumpu Oy's Tornio works has been examined.

  12. Pretreatment and preheating of scrap; Tarkastelu koskien romun esikaesittely- ja esikuumennusmenetelmiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooli, P.; Hanni, J. [Outokumpu Oy Tornion Tehtaat, Tornio (Finland)

    1990-12-31

    As a background for this study has been those demands for scrap treatments and transportation, which are coming with increasing production of melting shop of Outokumpu Oy`s Tornio works and also problems caused by snow among productionrate. Different pretreatment-, transport-, and preheatingmethods and some alternatives has been studied to arrange those as a functioning complete. Also very exact plannings for some pretreatmentmethods has been made. From preheatingmethods some methods, which are concerned to be effective and possible in the future has been studied. In addition those parameters, which are involved to the effectivity of preheating process in melting shop of Outokumpu Oy`s Tornio works has been examined.

  13. Preliminary hazards analysis of thermal scrap stabilization system. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, W.S.

    1994-01-01

    This preliminary analysis examined the HA-21I glovebox and its supporting systems for potential process hazards. Upon further analysis, the thermal stabilization system has been installed in gloveboxes HC-21A and HC-21C. The use of HC-21C and HC-21A simplified the initial safety analysis. In addition, these gloveboxes were cleaner and required less modification for operation than glovebox HA-21I. While this document refers to glovebox HA-21I for the hazards analysis performed, glovebox HC-21C is sufficiently similar that the following analysis is also valid for HC-21C. This hazards analysis document is being re-released as revision 1 to include the updated flowsheet document (Appendix C) and the updated design basis (Appendix D). The revised Process Flow Schematic has also been included (Appendix E). This Current revision incorporates the recommendations provided from the original hazards analysis as well. The System Design Description (SDD) has also been appended (Appendix H) to document the bases for Safety Classification of thermal stabilization equipment

  14. Application of the UNECE Recommendations on Monitoring and Response Procedures for Radioactive Scrap Metal: From Theory to Practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magold, M.; Mansourian-Stephenson, S., E-mail: stephanie.mansourian-stephenson@unece.org [United Nations Economic Council for Europe, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2011-07-15

    The work of the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) in addressing the issue of radioactive material appearing inadvertently in scrap metal is summarized. After hosting several meetings of national and international representatives of the scrap metal industry and radiation protection experts, the UNECE issued recommendations in 2006 on Monitoring and Response Procedures for Radioactive Scrap Metal. Since then, the UNECE has been exploring, with its Member States, the extent to which the Recommendations have been utilized - by means of a questionnaire. In this paper the results of the questionnaire are presented and, on the basis of the results of the questionnaire, conclusions are drawn and recommendations made for international action in this field for the future. (author)

  15. Demonstration test on manufacturing 200 l drum inner shielding material for recycling of reactor operating metal scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umemura, A.; Kimura, K.; Ueno, H.

    1993-01-01

    Low-level reactor wastes should be safely recycled considering those resource values, the reduction of waste disposal volume and environmental effects. The reasonable recycling system of reactor operating metal scrap has been studied and it was concluded that the 200 liter drum inner shielding material is a very promising product for recycling within the nuclear industry. The drum inner shielding material does not require high quality and so it is expected to be easily manufactured by melting and casting from roughly sorted scrap metals. This means that the economical scrap metal recycling system can be achieved by introducing it. Furthermore its use will ensure safety because of being contained in a drum. In order to realize this recycling system with the drum inner shielding material, the demonstration test program is being conducted. The construction of the test facility, which consists of a melting and refining furnace, a casting apparatus, a machining apparatus etc., was finishing in September, 1992

  16. Application and feasibility of coal fly ash and scrap tire fiber as wood wall insulation supplements in residential buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van de Lindt, J.W.; Carraro, J.A.H.; Heyliger, P.R.; Choi, C. [Colorado State University, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    2008-08-15

    Each year, nearly 55% of the fly ash (FA) produced by coal burning power plants in the United States is disposed of in landfills and ash ponds, while the amount of recycled fiber from scrap tires that is beneficially used in end-user markets is virtually negligible. This paper presents the results of a study carried out to investigate whether it might be possible to increase the thermal efficiency of a light-frame residential structure through addition of a fly ash-scrap tire fiber composite to traditional fiberglass insulation in light-frame wood residential construction. This type of construction represents more than 80% of the building stock in North America. The results of this study suggest that the fly ash-scrap tire fiber composite provides a sustainable supplement to traditional insulation that not only increases the efficiency of traditional insulation but can also help significantly reduce the environmental issues associated with disposal of these waste products. (author)

  17. Application and feasibility of coal fly ash and scrap tire fiber as wood wall insulation supplements in residential buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van de Lindt, J.W.; Carraro, J.A.H.; Heyliger, P.R.; Choi, C.

    2008-01-01

    Each year, nearly 55% of the fly ash (FA) produced by coal burning power plants in the United States is disposed of in landfills and ash ponds, while the amount of recycled fiber from scrap tires that is beneficially used in end-user markets is virtually negligible. This paper presents the results of a study carried out to investigate whether it might be possible to increase the thermal efficiency of a light-frame residential structure through addition of a fly ash-scrap tire fiber composite to traditional fiberglass insulation in light-frame wood residential construction. This type of construction represents more than 80% of the building stock in North America. The results of this study suggest that the fly ash-scrap tire fiber composite provides a sustainable supplement to traditional insulation that not only increases the efficiency of traditional insulation but can also help significantly reduce the environmental issues associated with disposal of these waste products. (author)

  18. Recycling of aluminium scrap for secondary Al-Si alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Eulogio; Nino, Jose

    2011-07-01

    An increasing amount of recycled aluminium is going into the production of aluminium alloy used for automotive applications. In these applications, it is necessary to control and remove alloy impurities and inclusions. Cleaning and fluxing processes are widely used during processing of the alloys for removal of inclusions, hydrogen and excess of magnesium. These processes use salt fluxes based in the system NaCl-KCl, injection of chlorine or mixture of chlorine with an inert gas. The new systems include a graphite wand and a circulation device to force convection in the melt and permit the bubbling and dispersion of reactive and cleaning agents. This paper discusses the recycling of aluminium alloys in rotary and reverberatory industrial furnaces. It focuses on the removal of magnesium during the melting process. In rotary furnaces, the magnesium lost is mainly due to the oxidation process at high temperatures. The magnesium removal is carried out by the reaction between chlorine and magnesium, with its efficiency associated to kinetic factors such as concentration of magnesium, mixing, and temperature. These factors are also related to emissions generated during the demagging process. Improvements in the metallic yield can be reached in rotary furnaces if the process starts with a proper salt, with limits of addition, and avoiding long holding times. To improve throughput in reverberatories, start the charging with high magnesium content material and inject chlorine gas if the molten metal is at the right temperature. Removal of magnesium through modern technologies can be efficiently performed to prevent environmental problems.

  19. The design and implementation of vehicle scrapping programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahu, R.; Baxter, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    A number of metropolitan air basins in the US are currently faced with increased difficulty in attaining national and regional clean air standards. Significant controls on stationary sources over the years have allowed mobile sources to become the primary source of air emission in many areas. Programs allowing the use of mobile source offsets for stationary source emission by removal of older, higher emitting vehicles through scrappage programs are, therefore, conceptually attractive and are starting to be implemented. However, achieving success in such scrappage programs is a challenge given the associated technical, economic and social issues. This paper presents a discussion of the important issues that must be considered if vehicle scrappage programs are to be successful, including recent guidance and views of the EPA and state governments on the credits associated with the programs. Although the main focus of such programs is the reduction of criteria pollutants (CO, ROG, NO x , and PM 10 ), the impact on air toxics also has to be considered. The paper will then focus on the technical design of vehicle scrappage programs such that the resulting credits are real, verifiable, enforceable, and cost-effective. Information available under existing vehicle I/M programs along with economic, vehicle maintenance, and geographic data will be used with statistical techniques in order to meet predetermined program goals regarding emissions reduction and cost-effectiveness. A later case-study paper will discuss the actual implementation of such as program in an ozone non-attainment area

  20. Obtaining of barium sulfate from solution formed after desulfation of the active mass of scrap lead-acid batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Kalko

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Analyses of literature data about processes for solution utilization formed after desulfation of the active mass of scrap lead-acid batteries is performed. Optimal conditions for obtaining of barium sulfate sediment from ammonium sulfate solute and chemically pure Ba(OH2×8H2O и BaCl2×2H2O were found experimentally. In laboratory the commercial barium sulfate from sulfate solutions, that are waste of recycling process of battery scrap, with application of chloride and barium hydroxide was production. The possibility of using this product were discussed.

  1. Health physics challenges during decontamination for safe disposal of low level liquid effluent tank as inactive scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akila, R.; Sultan, Bajeer; Sarangapani, R.; Jose, M.T.

    2018-01-01

    The Low-level Liquid waste (LLW) generated during the regeneration of mixed bed column of KAMINI reactor is collected in the SS Delay Tanks located on the western side of RML building. It was proposed to dismantle and dispose the tank as solid waste. The tank weighs about 2 ton. An attempt was made to decontaminate the tank to levels below the exempt quantity so as to qualify it as scrap of unrestricted release. This is first time in IGCAR wherein a material used in a radioactive facility for storing LLW is being released as scrap of unrestricted release and this paper discusses about the same

  2. The regulatory action in the problem of radioactive sources processed as scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truppa, Walter Adrian; Cateriano, Miguel Angel

    2005-01-01

    The loss of control of a radioactive source can result in a radiological emergency, especially if that source is treated as scrap. This paper presents a case registered in Argentina about discovery of a radioactive source of Kr-85, 9.25 GBq, used in a computer for industrial measurement of thickness. The radioactive source, without registration or identification, was registered by a portal for detection of radioactive material in the middle of the scrap that entered daily in the oven of a important steel company. From there, the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (RNA) conducted an investigation to determine the origin of the radioactive source, and in parallel made, in the laboratories of measurement, identification of radioactive material inside the source. This led to a company in financial and judicial bankruptcy, which had not notified the RNA about this situation, and also possessed, according to records, other eleven sources with similar characteristics. Finally the actions and regulatory effort allowed the localization of all the radioactive sources of this company, and its storage and deposit in an authorised repository

  3. Heavy metal partitioning from electronic scrap during thermal End-of-Life treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharnhorst, Wolfram; Ludwig, Christian; Wochele, Joerg; Jolliet, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    Samples of identical Printed Wiring Board Assemblies (PWBA) have been thermally treated in a Quartz Tube Reactor (QTR) in order to detect the volatility of selected heavy metals contained in electronic scrap being of environmental concern. In preparation, evaporation experiments were performed using a Thermo Gravimeter (TG) in connection with an Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emissions Spectrometer (ICP-OES). The QTR experiments were performed under reducing and under oxidising conditions at 550 and at 880 deg. C. The volatilisation has been determined for As, Cd, Ni, Ga, Pb, and Sb using ICP-OES analysis of the ash residues. The results were evaluated by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations, the TG-ICP measurements and in comparison with similar studies. In coincidence with the preparative TG-ICP measurements as well as with thermodynamic equilibrium calculations neither As nor Cd could be detected in the residuals of the thermally treated PWBA samples, suggesting a high volatility of these metals. Ga does not show a distinct volatilisation mechanism and seems to be incorporated in the siliceous fraction. Ni remains as stable compound in the bottom ash. Sb shows a high volatility nearly independent of temperature and oxygen supply. The results imply that, if electronic scrap is thermally processed, attention has to be paid in particular to Sb, As, and Ga. These metals are increasingly used in new electronic equipment such as mobile phone network equipment of the third generation

  4. Submerged Glow-Discharge Plasma: An Economical Approach to Convert Construction Scrap Metal into Nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yek Peter Nai Yuh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Submerged glow-discharge plasma (SGDP is relatively new among the various methods available for nanomaterials synthesis (NMs techniques. This method allows great control over the production cost of nanomaterials synthesis. A lab-scale batch type SDGP technology has been constructed to produce nanomaterials and investigate the inter-relationship between plasma excitation voltages, electrodes submerged areas and electrolyte concentration. Metal oxide nanospheres has been synthesised from different electrolyte concentrations (1M-0.001M and characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS. As the major results showed that the nanospheres are uniformly spherical with diameter size distribution are between 100 nm - 2μm. EDS analysis shown the nano-Iron Oxide have been formed. Scrap metal initially showed around 6.45% and 93.55% of Carbon and Iron composition respectively. After SGDP process to the scrap metal, Carbon content has increased to 34-35% and Iron content has reduced to around 15-40%. EDS results also shown the higher percentage of Iron amount has remained with lower electrolyte concentration and Current is proportionally related to submersion area of cathode.

  5. Conversion of plutonium scrap and residue to boroilicate glass using the GMODS process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.; Rudolph, J.; Elam, K.R.; Ferrada, J.J.

    1995-01-01

    Plutonium scrap and residue represent major national and international concerns because (1) significant environmental, safety, and health (ES ampersand H) problems have been identified with their storage; (2) all plutonium recovered from the black market in Europe has been from this category; (3) storage costs are high; and (4) safeguards are difficult. It is proposed to address these problems by conversion of plutonium scrap and residue to a CRACHIP (CRiticality, Aerosol, and CHemically Inert Plutonium) glass using the Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS). CRACHIP refers to a set of requirements for plutonium storage forms that minimize ES ampersand H concerns. The concept is several decades old. Conversion of plutonium from complex chemical mixtures and variable geometries into a certified, qualified, homogeneous CRACHIP glass creates a stable chemical form that minimizes ES ampersand H risks, simplifies safeguards and security, provides an easy-to-store form, decreases storage costs, and allows for future disposition options. GMODS is a new process to directly convert metals, ceramics, and amorphous solids to glass; oxidize organics with the residue converted to glass; and convert chlorides to borosilicate glass and a secondary sodium chloride stream. Laboratory work has demonstrated the conversion of cerium (a plutonium surrogate), uranium (a plutonium surrogate), Zircaloy, stainless steel, and other materials to glass. GMODS is an enabling technology that creates new options. Conventional glassmaking processes require conversion of feeds to oxide-like forms before final conversion to glass. Such chemical conversion and separation processes are often complex and expensive

  6. Recycled tetrahedron-like CuCl from waste Cu scraps for lithium ion battery anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Hongying; Yao, Yuan; Liu, Song; Duan, Jixiang; Liao, Qishu; Yu, Chengyi; Li, Dongdong; Dai, Zhipeng

    2017-07-01

    The wide applications of metal Cu inevitably resulted in a large quantity of waste Cu materials. In order to recover the useful Cu under the mild conditions and reduce the environmental emission, waste Cu scraps were recycled in the form of CuCl powders with high economic value added (EVA) via the facile hydrothermal route. The recycled CuCl powders were characterized in terms of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results suggested that the recycled CuCl powders consisted of many regular tetrahedron-like micro-particles. Furthermore, in order to reduce the cost of lithium ion battery (LIB) anode and build the connection of waste Cu scraps and LIB, the recycled CuCl powders were evaluated as the anode active material of LIB. As expected, the reversible discharge capacity was about 171.8mAh/g at 2.0C even after 50 cycles, implying the satisfactory cycle stability. Clearly, the satisfactory results may open a new avenue to develop the circular economy and the sustainable energy industry, which would be very important in terms of both the resource recovery and the environmental protection. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Scrap automotive electronics: A mini-review of current management practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucchiella, Federica; D'Adamo, Idiano; Rosa, Paolo; Terzi, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    End-of-life vehicles, together with waste from electric and electronic equipment, are known as an important source of secondary raw materials. For many years, their recovery has allowed the restoring of great amounts of metals for new cars production. This article provides a comprehensive mini-review on the end-of-life vehicles recycling topic between 2000 and 2014, with a particular focus on automotive electronics recycling. In fact, in the last years, experts focused their attention on a better exploitation of automotive shredder residue fraction, but not sufficiently on eventual electronic scraps embedded in it. Hence, studies assessing the value embedded in these scraps are rarely available in literature, causing an important gap in both recycling policies and research. The fact that, at present, the management of electronic control units (the most valuable component among automotive electronic equipment) is, as yet, off the radar in both end-of-life vehicles and waste from electric and electronic equipment Directives demonstrates the theory. Of course, their recycling would not contribute in a relevant way to reach the weighted-based recycling and recovery targets characterising current regulations, but would be very important under a critical raw materials recovery view. Results coming from the literature analysis confirm these assumptions. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Energy Recovery from Scrap Tires: A Sustainable Option for Small Islands like Puerto Rico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eddie N. Laboy-Nieves

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Puerto Rico generates and disposes nearly five million/year scrap tires (ST, of which 4.2% is recycled and 80% is exported. The Island has one of the world highest electrical service tariff ($0.28 kWh, because of its dependency on fossil fuels for power generation. The Government has not considered ST for electricity production, despite more than 13,000 ST are generated daily, and paradoxically exported for that purpose. Theoretically, if ST recycling increases to 10% and assuming that the caloric value of ST be 33 MJ/kg, it was estimated that scrap tires processed with pyrolysis can supply annually about 379 MWh, a potential value that shall not be unnoticed. This paper is a literature review to describe the legal, technical, and economic framework for the viability of ST for power generation in Puerto Rico using pyrolysis, the most recommended process for ST energy recovery. Data of ST from Puerto Rico was used to model the potential of ST for pyrolytic energy conversion. The herein article is intended to invite other insular countries and territories, to join efforts with the academic and scientific community, and with the energy generation sector, to validate ST as a sustainable option for energy generation.

  9. Selective Extraction of Rare Earth Elements from Permanent Magnet Scraps with Membrane Solvent Extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daejin; Powell, Lawrence E; Delmau, Lætitia H; Peterson, Eric S; Herchenroeder, Jim; Bhave, Ramesh R

    2015-08-18

    The rare earth elements (REEs) such as neodymium, praseodymium, and dysprosium were successfully recovered from commercial NdFeB magnets and industrial scrap magnets via membrane assisted solvent extraction (MSX). A hollow fiber membrane system was evaluated to extract REEs in a single step with the feed and strip solutions circulating continuously through the MSX system. The effects of several experimental variables on REE extraction such as flow rate, concentration of REEs in the feed solution, membrane configuration, and composition of acids were investigated with the MSX system. A multimembrane module configuration with REEs dissolved in aqueous nitric acid solutions showed high selectivity for REE extraction with no coextraction of non-REEs, whereas the use of aqueous hydrochloric acid solution resulted in coextraction of non-REEs due to the formation of chloroanions of non-REEs. The REE oxides were recovered from the strip solution through precipitation, drying, and annealing steps. The resulting REE oxides were characterized with XRD, SEM-EDX, and ICP-OES, demonstrating that the membrane assisted solvent extraction is capable of selectively recovering pure REEs from the industrial scrap magnets.

  10. Submerged Glow-Discharge Plasma: An Economical Approach to Convert Construction Scrap Metal into Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yek, Peter Nai Yuh; Rafiq Mirza Julaihi, Muhammad; Shahril Osman, Mohammad; Tiong, Tung Chuan; Lee, Wak Ha; Leing Lee, Chern

    2018-03-01

    Submerged glow-discharge plasma (SGDP) is relatively new among the various methods available for nanomaterials synthesis (NMs) techniques. This method allows great control over the production cost of nanomaterials synthesis. A lab-scale batch type SDGP technology has been constructed to produce nanomaterials and investigate the inter-relationship between plasma excitation voltages, electrodes submerged areas and electrolyte concentration. Metal oxide nanospheres has been synthesised from different electrolyte concentrations (1M-0.001M) and characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). As the major results showed that the nanospheres are uniformly spherical with diameter size distribution are between 100 nm - 2μm. EDS analysis shown the nano-Iron Oxide have been formed. Scrap metal initially showed around 6.45% and 93.55% of Carbon and Iron composition respectively. After SGDP process to the scrap metal, Carbon content has increased to 34-35% and Iron content has reduced to around 15-40%. EDS results also shown the higher percentage of Iron amount has remained with lower electrolyte concentration and Current is proportionally related to submersion area of cathode.

  11. Phase equilibrium of the system Ag-Fe-Nd, and Nd extraction from magnet scraps using molten silver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, O.; Okabe, T.H.; Umetsu, Y.

    2004-01-01

    To develop a new recycling process, we examined the direct extraction of neodymium (Nd) metal from Nd-Fe-B magnet scraps using molten silver (Ag) as an extraction medium. Prior to the extraction experiment, the phase equilibrium of the system Ag-Fe-Nd was investigated to estimate the theoretical extraction limit. It was observed that the Fe/Nd 2 Fe 17 mixture equilibrates with the molten Ag-Nd alloy containing 50-52 mol% Nd (57-59 mass% Nd) at 1363 K. The experimental results were in good agreement with the thermodynamic calculation based on literature values. By reacting Nd-Fe-B magnet scraps with molten silver at 1273 K, more than 90% of the neodymium in the scrap was extracted, and an Ag-Nd alloy containing 40-50 mass% Nd was obtained. The neodymium in the Ag-Nd alloy was separated from silver as Nd 2 O 3 by oxidizing the obtained alloy in air. Although the wettability of Nd 2 O 3 with molten silver caused some difficulties in the separation of neodymium from silver, molten silver is shown to be an effective medium for neodymium extraction from magnet scrap

  12. Modeling the energy content of combustible ship-scrapping waste at Alang-Sosiya, India, using multiple regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, M Srinivasa; Basha, Shaik; Joshi, H V; Sravan Kumar, V G; Jha, B; Ghosh, P K

    2005-01-01

    Alang-Sosiya is the largest ship-scrapping yard in the world, established in 1982. Every year an average of 171 ships having a mean weight of 2.10 x 10(6)(+/-7.82 x 10(5)) of light dead weight tonnage (LDT) being scrapped. Apart from scrapped metals, this yard generates a massive amount of combustible solid waste in the form of waste wood, plastic, insulation material, paper, glass wool, thermocol pieces (polyurethane foam material), sponge, oiled rope, cotton waste, rubber, etc. In this study multiple regression analysis was used to develop predictive models for energy content of combustible ship-scrapping solid wastes. The scope of work comprised qualitative and quantitative estimation of solid waste samples and performing a sequential selection procedure for isolating variables. Three regression models were developed to correlate the energy content (net calorific values (LHV)) with variables derived from material composition, proximate and ultimate analyses. The performance of these models for this particular waste complies well with the equations developed by other researchers (Dulong, Steuer, Scheurer-Kestner and Bento's) for estimating energy content of municipal solid waste.

  13. Leaching behaviour of different scrap materials at recovery and recycling companies: full-, pilot- and lab-scale investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondeel, E; Chys, M; Depuydt, V; Folens, K; Du Laing, G; Verliefde, A; Van Hulle, S W H

    2014-12-01

    Scrap material recovery and recycling companies are confronted with waste water that has a highly fluctuating flow rate and composition. Common pollutants, such as COD, nutrients and suspended solids, potentially toxic metals, polyaromatic hydrocarbons and poly chlorinated biphenyls can exceed the discharge limits. An analysis of the leaching behaviour of different scrap materials and scrap yard sweepings was performed at full-scale, pilot-scale and lab-scale in order to find possible preventive solutions for this waste water problem. The results of these leaching tests (with concentrations that frequently exceeded the Flemish discharge limits) showed the importance of regular sweeping campaigns at the company, leak proof or covered storage of specific scrap materials and oil/water separation on particular leachates. The particulate versus dissolved fraction was also studied for the pollutants. For example, up to 98% of the polyaromatic hydrocarbons, poly chlorinated biphenyls and some metals were in the particulate form. This confirms the (potential) applicability of sedimentation and filtration techniques for the treatment of the majority of the leachates, and as such the rainwater run-off as a whole. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Recycling radioactive scrap metal by producing concrete shielding with steel granules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sappok, M.

    1996-01-01

    Siempelkamp foundry at Krefeld, Germany, developed a method for recycling radioactively contaminated steel from nuclear installations. The material is melted and used for producing shielding plates, containers, etc., on a cast-iron basis. Because the percentage of stainless steel has recently increased significantly, problems in the production of high-quality cast iron components have also grown. The metallurgy, the contents of nickel and chromium especially, does not allow for the recycling of stainless steel in a percentage to make this process economical. In Germany, the state of the art is to use shielded concrete containers for the transport of low active waste; this concrete is produced by using hematite as an additive for increasing shielding efficiency. The plan was to produce steel granules from radioactive scrap metal as a substitute for hematite in shielding concrete

  15. Decontamination of the Scrap Removal Room at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridenbaker, W.A.; Clemons, L.

    1987-02-01

    This report describes the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the Scrap Removal Room (SRR) at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). The SRR is an area in the former reprocessing plant that is required for use in support of D and D for other plant areas. The SRR contained a 6.8 Mg (7.5-ton) crane for loading waste material into a shielded truck cask. It became radioactively contaminated during fuel reprocessing from 1966 to 1972. This report describes the work performed to accomplish the D and D objectives of removing existing piping and equipment and of reducing radiation and contamination levels, to As-Low-As-Reasonably-Achievable (ALARA) levels for the installation of new equipment. Also reported are pre- and post-radiological conditions, personnel exposure, radioactive waste volume collected, cost and schedule data, and lessons learned

  16. Investigation of impurities present in recycling and reusing of scrap lead for accumulator industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooq, A.; Irfan, N.; Chaudhry, M.M.; Nawab, S.

    2012-01-01

    Recycling and reusing are the basic strategies of reducing solid waste generated from industries. Millions of batteries containing toxic metals and poisonous wastes are discarded every year in Pakistan. Battery waste deposited in landfills increases the concentration of toxic metals in leachates obtained from landfill base. For this reason, recycling of locally available scrap lead has been focused. During reduction and refining stages, samples were obtained at various stages from a five ton lead smelting pot of an accumulator industry. Various impurities present were determined and removed in order to reuse in accumulators. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) techniques were used to analyze the samples obtained at various stages of recycling. This work has been carried out to reduce these impurities and the refining process has thus been optimized. The lead thus obtained is 99.98 % pure. (author)

  17. Gold and palladium adsorption from leached electronic scrap using ordered mesoporous carbon nanoscaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDowell, Rocklan; Dutech, Guy

    2014-09-01

    Ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) nanoscaffolds are engineered agglomerates of carbon nanotubes held together by small carbon nanofibers with uniform pore sizes, high pore volume, and high channel permeability. These materials exhibit very high affinity for the adsorption of gold from aqueous acidic mixtures. The efficiency of gold recovery is comparable to those typically accomplished using biopolymer-based adsorbents. The adsorption efficiency for other precious metals such as palladium and platinum is lower. Studies on the precious metal (Au, Pd) adsorption on OMC materials from actual liquors of leached electronics will be presented. Adsorption properties will be compared for several different sorbents used for the recovery of precious metals. The leach liquor compositions for three different types of electronic scrap materials (personal computer board, cell phone and tv input/output board) will be presented. The sorption efficiencies for Au, Pd, together with a spectrum of competing and non-competing metals, from such leach mixtures will be compared.

  18. Advanced methods for incineration of solid, burnable LLW and melting for recycling of scrap metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, G.; Lorenzen, J.; Lindberg, M.; Olsson, L.; Wirendal, B.

    2003-01-01

    Radioactive contaminated waste is a great cost factor for nuclear power plants and other nuclear industry. On the deregulated electricity market the price on produced kWh is an important competition tool. Therefore the waste minimisation and volume reduction has given highest priority by many power producers in the process to achieve savings and hence low production cost. Studsvik RadWaste AB in Nykoeping, Sweden, is a company specialised in volume reduction of LLW, as solid combustible waste and as scrap metal for melting and recycling. The treatment facility in Sweden offers this kind of services - together with segmentation and decontamination when necessary - for several customers from Europe, Japan and USA. In addition to these treatment services a whole spectrum of services like transportation, measurement and safeguard, site assistance, industrial cleaning and decontamination in connection with demolition at site is offered from the Studsvik company. (orig.)

  19. Immobilisation of Cu, Pb and Zn in Scrap Metal Yard Soil Using Selected Waste Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamari, A; Putra, W P; Yusoff, S N M; Ishak, C F; Hashim, N; Mohamed, A; Isa, I M; Bakar, S A

    2015-12-01

    Immobilisation of heavy metals in a 30-year old active scrap metal yard soil using three waste materials, namely coconut tree sawdust (CTS), sugarcane bagasse (SB) and eggshell (ES) was investigated. The contaminated soil was amended with amendments at application rates of 0 %, 1 % and 3 % (w/w). The effects of amendments on metal accumulation in water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica) and soil metal bioavailability were studied in a pot experiment. All amendments increased biomass yield and reduced metal accumulation in the plant shoots. The bioconcentration factor and translocation factor values of the metals were in the order of Zn > Cu > Pb. The addition of ES, an alternative source of calcium carbonate (CaCO3), has significantly increased soil pH and resulted in marked reduction in soil metal bioavailability. Therefore, CTS, SB and ES are promising low-cost immobilising agents to restore metal contaminated land.

  20. Demonstration test on manufacturing steel bars for concrete reinforcement for recycling of reactor decommissioning metal scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, D.; Anabuki, Y.

    1993-01-01

    To prove the possibility of recycling the steel scrap resulting from decommissioning of a nuclear power plant, this salvaged steel would be formed into steel bars for concrete reinforcement, as the restricted use and limited use at nuclear plants. The shifting behavior of radioactive isotopes (RI) in the melting process was confirmed through the laboratory hot test using the RI. Then, the demonstration cold test for steel bars for reinforcement using the nonradioactive isotope was conducted in on-line production facilities. In this test the quality of steel bars and uniform distribution of RI were proven and material balance and operational data were obtained. These data show the recycling to steel bars for concrete reinforcement is applicable from economical and safety aspects

  1. Preparation of High-purity Indium Oxalate Salt from Indium Scrap by Organic Acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Su-Jin; Ju, Chang-Sik

    2013-01-01

    Effect of organic acid on the preparation of indium-oxalate salt from indium scraps generated from ITO glass manufacturing process was studied. Effects of parameters, such as type and concentration of organic acids, pH of reactant, temperature, reaction time on indium-oxalate salt preparation were examined. The impurity removal efficiency was similar for both oxalic acid and citric acid, but citric acid did not make organic acid salt with indium. The optimum conditions were 1.5 M oxalic acid, pH 7, 80 .deg. C, and 6 hours. On the other hand, the recoveries increased with pH, but the purity decreased. The indium-oxalate salt purity prepared by two cycles was 99.995% (4N5). The indium-oxalate salt could be converted to indium oxide and indium metal by substitution reaction and calcination

  2. Gold and palladium adsorption from leached electronic scrap using ordered mesoporous carbon nanoscaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDowell, Rocklan; Dutech, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) nanoscaffolds are engineered agglomerates of carbon nanotubes held together by small carbon nanofibers with uniform pore sizes, high pore volume, and high channel permeability. These materials exhibit very high affinity for the adsorption of gold from aqueous acidic mixtures. The efficiency of gold recovery is comparable to those typically accomplished using biopolymer-based adsorbents. The adsorption efficiency for other precious metals such as palladium and platinum is lower. Studies on the precious metal (Au, Pd) adsorption on OMC materials from actual liquors of leached electronics will be presented. Adsorption properties will be compared for several different sorbents used for the recovery of precious metals. The leach liquor compositions for three different types of electronic scrap materials (personal computer board, cell phone and tv input/output board) will be presented. The sorption efficiencies for Au, Pd, together with a spectrum of competing and non-competing metals, from such leach mixtures will be compared.

  3. Thermochemical recycling of mixture of scrap tyres and waste lubricating oil into high caloric value products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdul-Raouf, Manar E.; Maysour, Nermine E.; Abdul-Azim, Abdul-Azim A. [Egyptian Petroleum Research Institute, Nasr City, Cairo (Egypt); Amin, Mahasen S. [Faculty of Science, Benha University, Benha (Egypt)

    2010-06-15

    Scrap tyres and used lubricating oils represent together growing environmental problem because they are not biodegradable and their components cannot readily be recovered. In the present investigation, the thermochemical recycling of mixture of old tyres with waste lubricating oil by pyrolysis and the value of the products obtained have been studied. First, thermobalance experiments were carried out, studying the influence of the following variables: temperature, type of catalyst and catalyst concentration on the pyrolysis reaction of a mixture of 1/1 wt./wt. oil/tyre ratio. These thermobalance results were thoroughly investigated to study the effect of the main process variables on yields of derived products: oils, gases and solid residue. (author)

  4. Application of repair and maintenance management for SACIA L550-E scrap machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ign Dewanto; Tony R, Bambang L

    2013-01-01

    Scrap machines is one of the mechanical machines that serve to reduce the dimensions of the work piece or can also be used in manufacture of various surface which forms a straight, some square and some kind of groove. This machine is one of the means to provide service and repair facilities manufacture of nuclear component plant. Given the importance of this machine in the mechanical workshop equipment must be kept in prime condition. To support this it is necessary for the maintenance and repair maintenance of the machine is always ready to use and if there is damage, it must be repaired immediately so that the machine has long service life, efficient and effective manner. It required good maintenance management. (author)

  5. Thermochemical recycling of mixture of scrap tyres and waste lubricating oil into high caloric value products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul-Raouf, Manar E.; Maysour, Nermine E.; Abdul-Azim, Abdul-Azim A.; Amin, Mahasen S.

    2010-01-01

    Scrap tyres and used lubricating oils represent together growing environmental problem because they are not biodegradable and their components cannot readily be recovered. In the present investigation, the thermochemical recycling of mixture of old tyres with waste lubricating oil by pyrolysis and the value of the products obtained have been studied. First, thermobalance experiments were carried out, studying the influence of the following variables: temperature, type of catalyst and catalyst concentration on the pyrolysis reaction of a mixture of 1/1 wt./wt. oil/tyre ratio. These thermobalance results were thoroughly investigated to study the effect of the main process variables on yields of derived products: oils, gases and solid residue.

  6. Recycle of contaminated scrap metal, Volume 2. Semi-annual report, September 1993--January 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    Catalytic Extraction Processing (CEP) has been demonstrated to be a robust, one-step process that is relatively insensitive to wide variations in waste composition and is applicable to a broad spectrum of DOE wastes. Catalytic Processing Unit (CPU) design models have been validated through experimentation to provide a high degree of confidence in our ability to design a bulk solids CPU for processing DOE wastes. Two commercial CEP facilities have been placed in commission and are currently processing mixed low level wastes. These facilities provide a compelling indication of the maturity, regulatory acceptance, and commercial viability of CEP. In concert with the DOE, Nolten Metal Technology designed a program which would challenge preconceptions of the limitations of waste processing technologies: demonstrate the recycling of ferrous and non-ferrous metals--to establish that radioactively contaminated scrap metal could be converted to high-grade, ferrous and non-ferrous alloys which can be reused by DOE or reintroduced into commerce; immobilize radionuclides--that CEP would concentrate the radionuclides in a durable vitreous phase, minimize secondary waste generation and stabilize and reduce waste volume; destroy hazardous organics--that CEP would convert hazardous organics to valuable industrial gases, which could be used as an energy source; recover volatile heavy metals--that CEP`s off-gas treatment system would capture volatile heavy metals, such as mercury and lead; and establish that CEP is economical for processing contaminated scrap metal in the DOE inventory. The execution of this program resulted in all objectives being met. Volume II contains: Task 1.4, optimization of the vitreous phase for stabilization of radioactive species; Task 1.5, experimental testing of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) wastes; and Task 1.6, conceptual design of a CEP facility.

  7. Recycle of contaminated scrap metal, Volume 1. Semi-annual report, September 1993--January 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-07-01

    Catalytic Extraction Processing (CEP) has been demonstrated to be a robust, one-step process that is relatively insensitive to wide variations in waste composition and is applicable to a broad spectrum of DOE wastes. Catalytic Processing Unit (CPU) design models have been validated through experimentation to provide a high degree of confidence in our ability to design a bulk solids CPU for processing DOE wastes. Two commercial CEP facilities have been placed in commission and are currently processing mixed low level wastes. These facilities provide a compelling indication of the maturity, regulatory acceptance, and commercial viability of CEP. In concert with the DOE, Nolten Metal Technology designed a program which would challenge preconceptions of the limitations of waste processing technologies: demonstrate the recycling of ferrous and non-ferrous metals--to establish that radioactively contaminated scrap metal could be converted to high-grade, ferrous and non-ferrous alloys which can be reused by DOE or reintroduced into commerce; immobilize radionuclides--that CEP would concentrate the radionuclides in a durable vitreous phase, minimize secondary waste generation and stabilize and reduce waste volume; destroy hazardous organics--that CEP would convert hazardous organics to valuable industrial gases, which could be used as an energy source; recover volatile heavy metals--that CEP's off-gas treatment system would capture volatile heavy metals, such as mercury and lead; establish that CEP is economical for processing contaminated scrap metal in the DOE inventory. The execution of this program resulted in all objectives being met. Volume I covers: executive summary; task 1.1 design CEP system; Task 1.2 experimental test plan; Task 1.3 experimental testing

  8. Recycle of contaminated scrap metal, Volume 1. Semi-annual report, September 1993--January 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    Catalytic Extraction Processing (CEP) has been demonstrated to be a robust, one-step process that is relatively insensitive to wide variations in waste composition and is applicable to a broad spectrum of DOE wastes. Catalytic Processing Unit (CPU) design models have been validated through experimentation to provide a high degree of confidence in our ability to design a bulk solids CPU for processing DOE wastes. Two commercial CEP facilities have been placed in commission and are currently processing mixed low level wastes. These facilities provide a compelling indication of the maturity, regulatory acceptance, and commercial viability of CEP. In concert with the DOE, Nolten Metal Technology designed a program which would challenge preconceptions of the limitations of waste processing technologies: demonstrate the recycling of ferrous and non-ferrous metals--to establish that radioactively contaminated scrap metal could be converted to high-grade, ferrous and non-ferrous alloys which can be reused by DOE or reintroduced into commerce; immobilize radionuclides--that CEP would concentrate the radionuclides in a durable vitreous phase, minimize secondary waste generation and stabilize and reduce waste volume; destroy hazardous organics--that CEP would convert hazardous organics to valuable industrial gases, which could be used as an energy source; recover volatile heavy metals--that CEP`s off-gas treatment system would capture volatile heavy metals, such as mercury and lead; establish that CEP is economical for processing contaminated scrap metal in the DOE inventory. The execution of this program resulted in all objectives being met. Volume I covers: executive summary; task 1.1 design CEP system; Task 1.2 experimental test plan; Task 1.3 experimental testing.

  9. Recycle of contaminated scrap metal, Volume 2. Semi-annual report, September 1993--January 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-07-01

    Catalytic Extraction Processing (CEP) has been demonstrated to be a robust, one-step process that is relatively insensitive to wide variations in waste composition and is applicable to a broad spectrum of DOE wastes. Catalytic Processing Unit (CPU) design models have been validated through experimentation to provide a high degree of confidence in our ability to design a bulk solids CPU for processing DOE wastes. Two commercial CEP facilities have been placed in commission and are currently processing mixed low level wastes. These facilities provide a compelling indication of the maturity, regulatory acceptance, and commercial viability of CEP. In concert with the DOE, Nolten Metal Technology designed a program which would challenge preconceptions of the limitations of waste processing technologies: demonstrate the recycling of ferrous and non-ferrous metals--to establish that radioactively contaminated scrap metal could be converted to high-grade, ferrous and non-ferrous alloys which can be reused by DOE or reintroduced into commerce; immobilize radionuclides--that CEP would concentrate the radionuclides in a durable vitreous phase, minimize secondary waste generation and stabilize and reduce waste volume; destroy hazardous organics--that CEP would convert hazardous organics to valuable industrial gases, which could be used as an energy source; recover volatile heavy metals--that CEP's off-gas treatment system would capture volatile heavy metals, such as mercury and lead; and establish that CEP is economical for processing contaminated scrap metal in the DOE inventory. The execution of this program resulted in all objectives being met. Volume II contains: Task 1.4, optimization of the vitreous phase for stabilization of radioactive species; Task 1.5, experimental testing of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) wastes; and Task 1.6, conceptual design of a CEP facility

  10. X-ray Fluorescence in Member States: Ghana. The Use of XRF for Contaminated Site Assessment in Ghana. 2. Estimation of Heavy Metals Contamination at Agbogbloshie E-scrap Yard Using EDXRF Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atiemo, S.M.; Ofosu, F.G.; Aboh, I.J. Kwame

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of the digital age has underscored the important role that electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) plays in a nation's socioeconomic development, including education, health delivery and communications, as well as global connectivity. In 2003 Ghana formulated its policy on information and communications technology (ICT) for accelerated development, with the understanding for instance, that Ghana's accelerated development would not be possible without an ICT-driven development agenda. The demand for EEE in Ghana grows by the day with a corresponding high rate of waste electrical and electronic (WEEE) generation. The WEEE industry in Ghana is a very vibrant one, growing at an amazing rate year after year. Ghana currently imports about 215 000 tonnes of electrical and electronic equipment per annum out of which an estimated 70% are second hand products. About 60-70% of the second hand products arrive in good working condition, 20-30% can be repaired or refurbished to get them functioning and 10-20% are junk and sent directly for the informal recycling. The Agbogbloshie scrap market in Accra came into the limelight following the publication of the report entitled 'Poisoning the Poor' by Greenpeace International. The report gave a damning revelation about the activities of scrap dealers and recyclers at the market. It was noted from the report that surface dust samples contained high concentrations of both heavy metals and persistent organic pollutants due to the unsafe and crude means of retrieving metals and components from the WEEE. This project was therefore designed to determine the heavy metal concentration of surface dust using the EDXRF and estimate the degree of contamination of the dust samples. Surface dust samples were collected from various vicinities within the scrap yard using the methods described above.

  11. Gained experiences concerning the treatment of radioactive metal scrap from German NPP'S in Studsvik - Gained experience concerning the treatment of radioactive metal scrap from German nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westerwinter, Boris; Buckanie, Niemma

    2014-01-01

    The company Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear-Service mbH, Essen/Germany (GNS), operates on behalf of the utilities E.ON, RWE, EnBW and VENE since the nineteen-nineties - amongst its other duties - on the waste management of metal scrap which originates from German nuclear power plants. The main objective within this responsibility is to maximize the value of recyclable fractions for re-use while minimizing the resulting radioactive waste. To achieve the aforementioned objective, melting of metallic scrap proved to be an outstanding choice. The use of this technique combined with all accompanying processes and regulations is accepted by the competent authorities and independent experts as a qualified treatment method over the entire time period. The motivation of this paper is to reflect on the experiences gained concerning the planning, implementation and results, acquired by GNS by using the Studsvik service. The focus will be on characteristics within processing of such campaigns. (authors)

  12. The Scrap Collection per Industry Sector and the Circulation Times of Steel in the U.S. between 1900 and 2016, Calculated Based on the Volume Correlation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Gauffin

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the Volume Correlation Model (VCM as well as data on steel consumption and scrap collection per industry sector (construction, automotive, industrial goods, and consumer goods, it was possible to estimate service lifetimes of steel in the United States between 1900 and 2016. Input data on scrap collection per industry sector was based on a scrap survey conducted by the World Steel Association for a static year in 2014 in the United States. The lifetimes of steel calculated with the VCM method were within the range of previously reported measured lifetimes of products and applications for all industry sectors. Scrapped (and apparent lifetimes of steel compared with measured lifetimes were calculated to be as follows: a scrapped lifetime of 29 years for the construction sector (apparent lifetime: 52 years compared with 44 years measured in 2014. Industrial goods: 16 (27 years compared with 19 years measured in 2010. Consumer goods: 12 (14 years compared with 13 years measured in 2014. Automotive sector: 14 (19 years compared with 17 years measured in 2011. Results show that the VCM can estimate reasonable values of scrap collection and availability per industry sector over time.

  13. Distribution, enrichment and accumulation of heavy metals in coastal sediments of Alang-Sosiya ship scrapping yard, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, M Srinivasa; Basha, Shaik; Sravan Kumar, V G; Joshi, H V; Ramachandraiah, G

    2004-06-01

    Since its inception in 1982, the Alang-Sosiya yard has become the largest ship scrapping works in the world. Several hundreds of ships arrive every year. The degree of heavy metal contamination has been studied in bulk and fine sediments from the intertidal zone of this ship scrapping yard, two stations, one on either side at 5 km distance and one reference station 60 km distance near Mahuva, towards the south. The samples have been subjected to a total digestion technique and analysed for elements: Cd, Co, Cu, Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn and Al, and %TOC. The absolute metal concentrations reflected variations in BF and FF sediment samples with organic matter content. Enrichment factors (EF) and geoaccumulation indices (Igeo) have been calculated and the relative contamination levels are assessed at these sites. At Alang-Sosiya, the enrichment of heavy metals has been observed to be relatively high.

  14. Refusion of zircaloy scraps by VAR (vacuum arc remelting): preliminary results; Fusao de cavacos de zircaloy por VAR: resultados preliminares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, L.A.T.; Mucsi, C.S.; Sato, I.M.; Rossi, J.L.; Martinez, L.G., E-mail: lgallego@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Correa, H.P.S. [Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso do Sul (UFMS), Campo Grande, MS (Brazil); Orlando, M.T.D. [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (UFES), Vitoria, ES (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Fuel elements and structural components of the core of PWR nuclear reactors are made in zirconium alloys known as Zircaloy. Machining chips and shavings resulting from the manufacturing of these components can not be discarded as scrap, once these alloys are strategic materials for the nuclear area, have high costs and are not produced in Brazil on an industrial bases and, consequently, are imported for the manufacture of nuclear fuel. The reuse of Zircaloy chips has economic, strategic and environmental aspects. In this work is proposed a process for recycling Zircaloy scraps using a VAR (vacuum arc remelting) furnace in order to obtain ingots suitable for the manufacture of components of the reactors. The ingots obtained are being studied in order to verify the influence of processing on composition and microstructure of the remelted material. In this work are presented preliminary results of the composition of obtained ingots compared to start material and the resulting microstructure. (author)

  15. Recovery of uranium from (U,Gd)O{sub 2} nuclear fuel scrap using dissolution and precipitation in carbonate media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kwang-Wook, E-mail: nkwkim@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeok daero, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); KEPCO NF 1047 Daedeok daero, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Hyun, Jun-Taek; Lee, Eil-Hee; Park, Geun-Il; Lee, Kune-Woo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeok daero, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Myung-June [KEPCO NF 1047 Daedeok daero, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Kee-Chan; Moon, Jei-Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeok daero, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: > A treatment of (U,Gd)O{sub 2} scrap with a dissolution in carbonate solution with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. > Partial dissolution of Gd together with uranium in carbonate solution. > Solubilities of Gd in solutions with and without carbonate at several pHs. > Purification of Gd-contaminated UO{sub 4} by dissolution and precipitation of UO{sub 4}. - Abstract: This work studied a process to recover uranium from contaminated (U,Gd)O{sub 2} scraps generated from nuclear fuel fabrication processes by using the dissolution of (U,Gd)O{sub 2} scraps in a carbonate with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and the precipitation of the dissolved uranium as UO{sub 4}. The dissolution characteristics of uranium, Gd, and impurity metal oxides were tested, and the behaviors of UO{sub 4} precipitation and Gd solubility were evaluated with changes of the pH of the solution. A little Gd was entrained in the UO{sub 4} precipitate to contaminate the uranium precipitate. Below a pH of 3, the uranium dissolved in the form of uranyl peroxo-carbonato complex ions in the carbonate solution was precipitated as UO{sub 4} with a high precipitation yield, and the Gd had a very high solubility. Using these characteristics, the Gd-contaminated UO{sub 4} could be purified using dissolution in a 1-M HNO{sub 3} solution with heating and re-precipitation upon addition of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to the solution. Finally, an environmentally friendly and economical process to recover pure uranium from contaminated (U,Gd)O{sub 2} scraps was suggested.

  16. Design concept for maximized use of recycled scrap in the production of storage packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bounin, D.; Kleinkroeger, W.; Schreiber, D.

    2004-01-01

    In the decommissioning of nuclear plants large quantities of radioactively contaminated waste metal have to be disposed of. An economic alternative to final storage is the recycling of the scrap metal in the production of transport and storage containers for low and medium active waste made of nodular graphite ductile cast iron. In the particular case of the CARLA plant operated by Siempelkamp, scrap metal with an activity of up to 200 Bq/g is accepted for processing. This covers the vast majority of the metals of a plant to be decommissioned. The composition of the waste metals varies greatly, depending on the different origins like structural or stainless steels After solidification of the high-carbon, high-silicon cast iron melt, the carbon has formed nodular graphite particles embedded in the metal matrix. Nodular cast iron has high strength and elongation. A further advantage of this material are its good radiation shielding properties. Fracture toughness is an important material property in the design of containers for final storage. In the particular case of containers that have to meet the specifications for final storage these must withstand accident loadings from a height of up 5 m at temperatures of -20 C without crack initiation. Containers for final storage do not have the benefit of impact limiters. The fracture toughness of cast iron depends primarily on the microstructure of the metal matrix. A ferritic microstructure has a higher fracture toughness than a pearlitic microstructure. Carbides in the matrix lead to further embrittlement. The metals to be recycled in the decommissioning of a nuclear installation have marked contents of elements like manganese (Mn) in structural steels, chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni) and molybdenum (Mo) in stainless steels and copper (Cu) in special steels. These elements lead to a pearlitic microstructure and to carbides, even at low contents in the melt. With a rising content of pearlite and carbides, the tensile and yield

  17. Characteristics of Indium Tin Oxide (ITO Nanoparticles Recovered by Lift-off Method from TFT-LCD Panel Scraps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongchul Choi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, indium-tin-oxide (ITO nanoparticles were simply recovered from the thin film transistor-liquid crystal display (TFT-LCD panel scraps by means of lift-off method. This can be done by dissolving color filter (CF layer which is located between ITO layer and glass substrate. In this way the ITO layer was easily lifted off the glass substrate of the panel scrap without panel crushing. Over 90% of the ITO on the TFT-LCD panel was recovered by using this method. After separating, the ITO was obtained as particle form and their characteristics were investigated. The recovered product appeared as aggregates of particles less than 100 nm in size. The weight ratio of In/Sn is very close to 91/9. XRD analysis showed that the ITO nanoparticles have well crystallized structures with (222 preferred orientation even after recovery. The method described in this paper could be applied to the industrial recovery business for large size LCD scraps from TV easily without crushing the glass substrate.

  18. Spark Plasma Sintering As a Solid-State Recycling Technique: The Case of Aluminum Alloy Scrap Consolidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimos Paraskevas

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, “meltless” recycling techniques have been presented for the light metals category, targeting both energy and material savings by bypassing the final recycling step of remelting. In this context, the use of spark plasma sintering (SPS is proposed in this paper as a novel solid-state recycling technique. The objective is two-fold: (I to prove the technical feasibility of this approach; and (II to characterize the recycled samples. Aluminum (Al alloy scrap was selected to demonstrate the SPS effectiveness in producing fully-dense samples. For this purpose, Al alloy scrap in the form of machining chips was cold pre-compacted and sintered bellow the solidus temperature at 490 °C, under elevated pressure of 200 MPa. The dynamic scrap compaction, combined with electric current-based joule heating, achieved partial fracture of the stable surface oxides, desorption of the entrapped gases and activated the metallic surfaces, resulting in efficient solid-state chip welding eliminating residual porosity. The microhardness, the texture, the mechanical properties, the microstructure and the density of the recycled specimens have been investigated. An X-ray computed tomography (CT analysis confirmed the density measurements, revealing a void-less bulk material with homogeneously distributed intermetallic compounds and oxides. The oxide content of the chips incorporated within the recycled material slightly increases its elastic properties. Finally, a thermal distribution simulation of the process in different segments illustrates the improved energy efficiency of this approach.

  19. Synthesis of high purity tungsten nanoparticles from tungsten heavy alloy scrap by selective precipitation and reduction route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamal, S.S. Kalyan; Sahoo, P.K.; Vimala, J.; Shanker, B.; Ghosal, P.; Durai, L.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we report synthesis of tungsten nanoparticles of high purity >99.7 wt% from heavy alloy scrap using a novel chemical route of selective precipitation and reduction. The effect of Poly(vinylpyrrolidone) polymer on controlling the particle size is established through FTIR spectra and corroborated with TEM images, wherein the average size decreased form 210 to 45 nm with increasing PVP content from zero to 2 g under different experimental conditions. This process is economical as raw material is a scrap and the efficiency of the reaction is >95%. - Highlights: • Tungsten nanoparticles were synthesized from tungsten heavy alloy scrap. • A novel chemical route of precipitation and reduction with Poly(vinylpyrrolidone) polymer as stabilizer is reported. • The average size decreased form 210 to 45 nm with increasing PVP content from zero to 2 g. • High pure tungsten nanoparticles of >99.7% purity could be synthesized using this route. • Efficiency of the reaction is >95%.

  20. Development of DOE complexwide authorized release protocols for radioactive scrap metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S. Y.

    1998-01-01

    Within the next few decades, several hundred thousand tons of metal are expected to be removed from nuclear facilities across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex as a result of decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) activities. These materials, together with large quantities of tools, equipment, and other items that are commonly recovered from site cleanup or D and D activities, constitute non-real properties that warrant consideration for reuse or recycle, as permitted and practiced under the current DOE policy. The provisions for supporting this policy are contained in the Draft Handbook for Controlling Release for Reuse or Recycle of Property Containing Residual Radioactive Material published by DOE in 1997 and distributed to DOE field offices for interim use and implementation. The authorized release of such property is intended to permit its beneficial use across the entire DOE complex. The objective of this study is to develop readily usable computer-based release protocols to facilitate implementation of the Handbook in evaluating the scrap metals for reuse and recycle. The protocols provide DOE with an effective oversight tool for managing release activities

  1. Recycle and reuse of radioactive scrap metals within the department of energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, V.; Murphie, W.; Gresalfi, M.

    2000-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) National Center of Excellence for Metals Recycle (NMR) is pursuing recycle and reuse alternatives to burial of radioactive scrap metal. This approach is being implemented in a safe and environmentally sound manner, while significantly lowering dis-positioning cost and accelerating cleanup activities. This paper will define the NMR's success to date in promoting safe and cost effective recycle and reuse strategies for DOE's excess metals, through the use of case studies. The paper will also present actual volumes of metal moved by DOE into restricted and unrestricted uses since 1997. In addition, this paper will discuss the principle underlying the Three Building Decommissioning and Decontamination (D and D) Project in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In January 2000, the Secretary of Energy placed a moratorium on the unrestricted release of volumetrically contaminated metals from the DOE sites. Pursuant to that moratorium, the Secretary also established a ''Re-Use and Recycling Task Force'' to conduct a review of DOE policies regarding the management and release of all materials for recycle and reuse from DOE facilities. This task force was charged to develop a set of recommendations to ensure the protection of public health and the environment, openness and public trust, and fiscal responsibility. This paper will present an overview of the DOE's present range of recycle and reuse alternatives to disposal, as practiced by the NMR, and discuss the policy and issues associated with the task force mission. (authors)

  2. Radioactive scrap metal (RSM) inventory ampersand tracking system and prototype RSM field survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, T.R.

    1994-09-01

    Based on very preliminary information, it has been estimated that the radioactive scrap metal (RSM) inventories at DOE facilities amount to about 1.5 million tons and a much larger amount will be generated from decontamination and decommissioning of surplus DOE facilities. To implement a national DOE program for beneficial reuse of RSM, it will be necessary to known the location and characteristics of RSM inventories that are available and will be generated to match them with product demands. It is the intent of this task to provide a standardized methodology via a RSM database for recording, tracking, and reporting data on RSM inventories. A multiple relational database in dBASE IV was designed and a PC-based code was written in Clipper 5.0 syntax to expedite entry, editing, querying, and reporting of RSM survey data. The PC based-code, the multiple relational database files, and other external files used by the code to generate reports and queries constitute a customized software application called the RSM Inventory ampersand Tracking System (RSM I ampersand TS). A prototype RSM field survey was conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) to demonstrate the field use of the RSM I ampersand TS and logistics of conducting the survey. During the demonstration, about 50 tons of RSM were sized, characterized, sorted, and packaged in transport containers

  3. Melting of Grey Cast Iron Based on Steel Scrap Using Silicon Carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojczew A.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the issue of synthetic cast iron production in the electric induction furnace exclusively on the steel scrap base. Silicon carbide and synthetic graphite were used as carburizers. The carburizers were introduced with solid charge or added on the liquid metal surface. The chemical analysis of the produced cast iron, the carburization efficiency and microstructure features were presented in the paper. It was stated that ferrosilicon can be replaced by silicon carbide during the synthetic cast iron melting process. However, due to its chemical composition (30% C and 70% Si which causes significant silicon content in iron increase, the carbon deficit can be partly compensated by the carburizer introduction. Moreover it was shown that the best carbon and silicon assimilation rate is obtained where the silicon carbide is being introduced together with solid charge. When it is thrown onto liquid alloy surface the efficiency of the process is almost two times less and the melting process lasts dozen minutes long. The microstructure of the cast iron produced with the silicon carbide shows more bulky graphite flakes than inside the microstructure of cast iron produced on the pig iron base.

  4. Design and development of indoor device for recycling of domestic vegetable scrap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harshitha, Jampala; Krupanidhi, Sreerama; Kumar, Sunil; Wong, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Since the municipal waste management and community garbage-treating systems are in vogue, there is a growing need for the waste minimization to keep our vicinity clean and green. Therefore, a feasible indoor device is designed for recycling domestic vegetable scrap by adopting the principle of soil ecosystem. To arrive at the composting process control parameters in the proposed device, the soil from landfill and quarry along with supplements namely sawdust, cow dung/yeast and the resident thermophilic bacteria are analysed. The soil parameters namely pH, electrical conductivity, Organic carbon, P, K, Fe, moisture content and the presence of thermophilic bacteria varied significantly between negative control sample (NCS) and positive control sample (PCS) and post-treatment positive control group with dried cow dung (PPC-C)-derived compost is soft-textured and homogenous. Furthermore, the double-compartment-based device would be more feasible and appealing as a recycling bin rather than as a refuse storage bin primarily due to the inclusion of dish-plantation. The standardization of composting control parameters is discussed in this article.

  5. Radioactive metal scrap recycling by melting process at the Chernobyl site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinwarz, W.

    1995-01-01

    Within its TACIS programme the European Union ordered a feasibility study on the cleaning-up of the Chernobyl area from radioactively contaminated metallic material. The study was performed by a Ukrainian German Working Group under the leadership of Siempelkamp and finalized at the end of March 1994. The on-site evaluation for the 30 km exclusion zone showed an overall mass of metal scrap of min. 100,000 Mg with a maximum specific activity of 400 Bq/g based on 48 open depositories within the restricted area. Dominant radionuclides were Cs-137 and Sr-90 accompanied by a very low proportion of α-activity. The study report showed the technical feasibility of a melting plant designed with a throughput of 10'000 Mg per year and its suitability for the overall concept to handle the Chernobyl waste. The main task for the near future can be identified as the establishing of a sound financial concept. (author) 5 figs., 3 tabs., 2 refs

  6. Balanced score card for cluster of building materials scrap recycling in Voronezh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potekhi Igor

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article is described an effort to develop a new system of management and economy of building materials scrap recycling cluster. For this task is used conception “Management by Objective” by American legend Peter Drucker. Thus cluster participants have divergent purposes, but have common purpose, the present conception match the most for develop business strategy of uniting companies in this cluster. As result, it was developed a “Balanced Scorecard” for the cluster. This “Balanced Scorecard” take into account technological features of companies in cluster and developed common purpose system. In base of system structure of indicators there is exist model of cluster. This model can show capacity, output flows and throughput capacity of participants. During develop a system of cluster’s purposes it were learned priorities balance of economy efficiency and natural resource management. There are shown calculation of costs of reuse building recycled materials, located on solid waste landfill. Developed strategic system of purpose of cluster activity allows to get economical benefit all participants and for citizens to save environment from nature disaster.

  7. Description of x-ray-fluorescence (XRF) system for the Wet Scrap Development Laboratory (WSDL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jedlovec, D.R.

    1981-06-01

    In support of the process control and accountability needs of the Wet Scrap Design Laboratory (WSDL), a technique utilizing X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) to determine actinide concentrations was developed and tested in FY 80, FY 81 at the General Electric Vallecitos Nuclear Center (GE-VNC). XRF analysis of uranium and plutonium solutions representative of those expected from the wet chemical processes of the WSDL was performed. This contract was to develop, test, and demonstrate control system concepts to provide a basis for an Integrated Control System (ICS) for a COPRECAL Conversion Plant. Financial support to the ICS was withdrawn before any x-ray fluorescence plutonium testing and development work could be accomplished. The following XRF testing and operation were performed at GE-VNC in FY 80, FY 81: uranium, plutonium, U/Pu testing completed September 1980; in-line testing completed October 1980; high concentration testing completed October 1980; shipment of XRF system components to W-HEDL accomplished January 1981

  8. Fertility Evaluation of Limed Brazilian Soil Polluted with Scrap Metal Residue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Almeida Gabos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to characterize the main inorganic contaminants and evaluate the effect of lime addition, combined with soil dilution with uncontaminated soil, as a strategy for mitigation of these contaminants present in a soil polluted with auto scrap. The experiment was performed in a greenhouse at Campinas (São Paulo State, Brazil in plastic pots (3 dm−3. Five soil mixtures, obtained by mixing an uncontaminated soil sample with contaminated soil (0, 25, 50, 75, and 100% contaminated soil, were evaluated for soil fertility, availability of inorganic contaminants, and corn development. In addition to the expected changes in soil chemistry due to the addition of lime, only the availability of Fe and Mn in the soil mixtures was affected, while the available contents of Cu, Zn, Cd, Cr, Ni, and Pb increased to some extent in the soil mixtures with higher proportion of contaminated soil. Liming of 10 t ha−1 followed by soil dilution at any proportion studied was not successful for mitigation of the inorganic contaminants to a desired level of soil fertility, as demonstrated by the available amounts extracted by the DTPA method (Zn, Pb, Cu, Ni, Cr, Cd and hot water (B still present in the soil. This fact was also proved by the phytotoxicity observed and caused by high amounts of B and Zn accumulating in the plant tissue.

  9. ELECTRODIALYSIS IN THE CONVERSION STEP OF THE CONCENTRATED SALT SOLUTIONS IN THE PROCESS OF BATTERY SCRAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. I. Niftaliev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. The concentrated sodium sulfate solution is formed during the processing of waste battery scrap. A promising way to further treatment of the concentrated salt solution could be the conversion of these salts into acid and bases by electrodialysis, that can be reused in the same technical process cycle. For carrying out the process of conversion of salts into the corresponding acid and base several cells schemes with different combinations of cation, anion and bipolar membranes are used. At this article a comparative analysis of these cells is carried out. In the cells there were used the membranes МC-40, МА-41 and МB-2I. Acid and base solutions with higher concentration may be obtained during the process of electrodialysis in the circulation mode, when a predetermined amount of salt in the closed loop is run through a set of membranes to obtain the desired concentration of the product. The disadvantages of this method are the high cost of buffer tanks and the need to work with small volumes of treated solutions. In industrial applications it is advisable to use continuous electrodialysis with bipolar membranes, since this configuration allows to increase the number of repeating sections, which is necessary to reduce the energy costs. The increase of the removal rate of salts can be achieved by increasing the process steps, and to produce a more concentrated products after the conversion step can be applied electrodialysis-concentrator or evaporator.

  10. Production of Magnesium and Aluminum-Magnesium Alloys from Recycled Secondary Aluminum Scrap Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesing, Adam J.; Das, Subodh K.; Loutfy, Raouf O.

    2016-02-01

    An experimental proof of concept was demonstrated for a patent-pending and trademark-pending RE12™ process for extracting a desired amount of Mg from recycled scrap secondary Al melts. Mg was extracted by electrorefining, producing a Mg product suitable as a Mg alloying hardener additive to primary-grade Al alloys. This efficient electrorefining process operates at high current efficiency, high Mg recovery and low energy consumption. The Mg electrorefining product can meet all the impurity specifications with subsequent melt treatment for removing alkali contaminants. All technical results obtained in the RE12™ project indicate that the electrorefining process for extraction of Mg from Al melt is technically feasible. A techno-economic analysis indicates high potential profitability for applications in Al foundry alloys as well as beverage—can and automotive—sheet alloys. The combination of technical feasibility and potential market profitability completes a successful proof of concept. This economical, environmentally-friendly and chlorine-free RE12™ process could be disruptive and transformational for the Mg production industry by enabling the recycling of 30,000 tonnes of primary-quality Mg annually.

  11. Standard test method for nondestructive assay of special nuclear material in low density scrap and waste by segmented passive gamma-Ray scanning

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the transmission-corrected nondestructive assay (NDA) of gamma-ray emitting special nuclear materials (SNMs), most commonly 235U, 239Pu, and 241Am, in low-density scrap or waste, packaged in cylindrical containers. The method can also be applied to NDA of other gamma-emitting nuclides including fission products. High-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy is used to detect and measure the nuclides of interest and to measure and correct for gamma-ray attenuation in a series of horizontal segments (collimated gamma detector views) of the container. Corrections are also made for counting losses occasioned by signal processing limitations (1-3). 1.2 There are currently several systems in use or under development for determining the attenuation corrections for NDA of radioisotopic materials (4-8). A related technique, tomographic gamma-ray scanning (TGS), is not included in this test method (9, 10, 11). 1.2.1 This test method will cover two implementations of the Segmented Gamma Scanning ...

  12. The position of the Bureau of International Recycling on unwanted radioactivity and scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neenan, P.; Bartley, R.

    1999-01-01

    facilitating impracticable additional restraints to facilitating proper disposal. A more reasoned approach would be to draw up a binding code of practice to avoid disincentives to detection and subsequent appropriate action. Free of charge disposal routes would recognise that the recycling industry should not have to bear the costs resulting from lack of government/institutional controls. As the mainstream recycling industry never intends to purchase or sell radioactive contaminated metallurgical scrap, provisions to prohibit purchase and sales would not be constructive, and could lead to court actions, furthering disincentives to co-operation. International understanding of the basic scientific issues needs improvement. A clear distinction must be made between the very specialised decontamination industry and the normal recycling industry that does not want to process radioactive contaminated material There is a need to determine and harmonise the standards and measurement techniques of radiation. If a standard for 'below regulatory concern' could be internationally accepted, materials certified as such would be regarded as formal commercial materials. As detection systems become more effective and sensitive, this is the most important criteria to resolve. The misunderstanding and misuse of information related to radioactive contaminated metallurgical scrap is of great concern because the recycling industry could suffer from adverse and unfair publicity which would damage co-operation and damage markets for recyclables. BIR members' efforts are directed at environmentally sound materials recycling and the detection of this unwanted material is providing a service and safeguard to customers and to society as a whole. (author)

  13. Adsorbed natural gas storage with activated carbons made from Illinois coals and scrap tires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jielun; Brady, T.A.; Rood, M.J.; Lehmann, C.M.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Lizzio, A.A.

    1997-01-01

    Activated carbons for natural gas storage were produced from Illinois bituminous coals (IBC-102 and IBC-106) and scrap tires by physical activation with steam or CO2 and by chemical activation with KOH, H3PO4, or ZnCl2. The products were characterized for N2-BET area, micropore volume, bulk density, pore size distribution, and volumetric methane storage capacity (Vm/Vs). Vm/Vs values for Illinois coal-derived carbons ranged from 54 to 83 cm3/cm3, which are 35-55% of a target value of 150 cm3/cm3. Both granular and pelletized carbons made with preoxidized Illinois coal gave higher micropore volumes and larger Vm/Vs values than those made without preoxidation. This confirmed that preoxidation is a desirable step in the production of carbons from caking materials. Pelletization of preoxidized IBC-106 coal, followed by steam activation, resulted in the highest Vm/Vs value. With roughly the same micropore volume, pelletization alone increased Vm/Vs of coal carbon by 10%. Tire-derived carbons had Vm/Vs values ranging from 44 to 53 cm3/cm3, lower than those of coal carbons due to their lower bulk densities. Pelletization of the tire carbons increased bulk density up to 160%. However, this increase was offset by a decrease in micropore volume of the pelletized materials, presumably due to the pellet binder. As a result, Vm/Vs values were about the same for granular and pelletized tire carbons. Compared with coal carbons, tire carbons had a higher percentage of mesopores and macropores.

  14. Recycling of radioactively contaminated scrap from the nuclear cycle and spin-off for other application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quade, U.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available In the 1980ies, Siempelkamp foundry in Krefeld, Germany, developed a process to melt medium and slightly radioactive metals from decommissioning and maintenance works in nuclear power plants. Since 1989, in the CARLA melting plant which is licensed according to the German radiation protection ordinance (StrlSchV, metals are being molten which, for the largest part, can be reused. Since 1998, in a second plant, the GERTA melting plant, metals with a content of mercury up to 1 weight %, natural radioactivity up to 500 Bq/g and other chemical contaminations are being molten and completely decontaminated, so that these metals can be reused in the steel cycle. The following text is describing the melting process, acceptance criteria for contaminated scrap and recycling paths for the produced ingots and slags.

    La fundición Siempelkamp en Krefeld, Alemania, desarrolló, en los años 80, un proceso para fundir metales mediana y levemente radioactivos, procedentes de reparaciones o desmantelamiento de plantas nucleares. En la planta de fundición CARLA, que cumple los requisitos del decreto de protección contra radiaciones de la República Federal de Alemania, se funden metales desde 1989, de los cuales la mayor parte puede ser utilizada nuevamente. Desde 1998, en una segunda planta, fundición GERTA, se funden y descontaminan totalmente, metales de hasta un 1 % de peso de mercurio, con una radioactividad natural de hasta 500 Bq/g y con otros contaminantes químicos. De este modo los metales pueden ser nuevamente utilizados en el ciclo metálico. El texto adjunto describe el método para el fundido, los criterios para aceptar chatarra contaminada y las vías de utilización para los bloques de metal y escorias generadas en el proceso.

  15. Potential of scrap tire rubber as lightweight aggregate in flowable fill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, C E; Blackwell, M C

    2003-01-01

    Flowable fill is a self-leveling and self-compacting material that is rapidly gaining acceptance and application in construction, particularly in transportation and utility earthworks. When mixed with concrete sand, standard flowable fill produces a mass density ranging from 1.8 to 2.3 g/cm(3) (115-145 pcf). Scrap tires can be granulated to produce crumb rubber, which has a granular texture and ranges in size from very fine powder to coarse sand-sized particles. Due to its low specific gravity, crumb rubber can be considered a lightweight aggregate. This paper describes an experimental study on replacing sand with crumb rubber in flowable fill to produce a lightweight material. To assess the technical feasibility of using crumb rubber, the fluid- and hardened-state properties of nine flowable fill mixtures were measured. Mixture proportions were varied to investigate the effects of water-to-cement ratio and crumb rubber content on fill properties. Experimental results indicate that crumb rubber can be successfully used to produce a lightweight flowable fill (1.2-1.6 g/cm(3) [73-98 pcf]) with excavatable 28-day compressive strengths ranging from 269 to 1194 kPa (39-173 psi). Using a lightweight fill reduces the applied stress on underlying soils, thereby reducing the potential for bearing capacity failure and minimizing soil settlement. Based on these results, a crumb rubber-based flowable fill can be used in a substantial number of construction applications, such as bridge abutment fills, trench fills, and foundation support fills.

  16. Design of an automated solar concentrator for the pyrolysis of scrap rubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeaiter, Joseph; Ahmad, Mohammad N.; Rooney, David; Samneh, Bechara; Shammas, Elie

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Design of a solar concentrator with high focal-point temperatures. • Development of an automated continuous solar tracking system. • Catalytic pyrolysis to convert waste rubber tire to gas and liquid products. • The liquid components had high yields of C 10 –C 29 hydrocarbons. • The gaseous components were mainly propene and cyclobutene. - Abstract: An automated solar reactor system was designed and built to carry out catalytic pyrolysis of scrap rubber tires at 550 °C. To maximize solar energy concentration, a two degrees-of-freedom automated sun tracking system was developed and implemented. Both the azimuth and zenith angles were controlled via feedback from six photo-resistors positioned on a Fresnel lens. The pyrolysis of rubber tires was tested with the presence of two types of acidic catalysts, H-beta and H-USY. Additionally, a photoactive TiO 2 catalyst was used and the products were compared in terms of gas yields and composition. The catalysts were characterized by BET analysis and the pyrolysis gases and liquids were analyzed using GC–MS. The oil and gas yields were relatively high with the highest gas yield reaching 32.8% with H-beta catalyst while TiO 2 gave the same results as thermal pyrolysis without any catalyst. In the presence of zeolites, the dominant gasoline-like components in the gas were propene and cyclobutene. The TiO 2 and non-catalytic experiments produced a gas containing gasoline-like products of mainly isoprene (76.4% and 88.4% respectively). As for the liquids they were composed of numerous components spread over a wide distribution of C 10 to C 29 hydrocarbons of naphthalene and cyclohexane/ene derivatives

  17. Standard test method for nondestructive assay of nuclear material in scrap and waste by passive-Active neutron counting using 252Cf shuffler

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the nondestructive assay of scrap and waste items for U, Pu, or both, using a 252Cf shuffler. Shuffler measurements have been applied to a variety of matrix materials in containers of up to several 100 L. Corrections are made for the effects of matrix material. Applications of this test method include measurements for safeguards, accountability, TRU, and U waste segregation, disposal, and process control purposes (1, 2, 3). 1.1.1 This test method uses passive neutron coincidence counting (4) to measure the 240Pu-effective mass. It has been used to assay items with total Pu contents between 0.03 g and 1000 g. It could be used to measure other spontaneously fissioning isotopes such as Cm and Cf. It specifically describes the approach used with shift register electronics; however, it can be adapted to other electronics. 1.1.2 This test method uses neutron irradiation with a moveable Cf source and counting of the delayed neutrons from the induced fissions to measure the 235U equiva...

  18. A strategy for the unrestricted release of metallic scrap from decommissioned nuclear facilities, integrating quality planning with the effective use of non-destructive assay instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunn, R.; Troughten, N.; Warran, C.

    2000-01-01

    The key component of any release operation is its quality plan. This plan is a step by step procedure which describes all the actions which are required during the entire process and also the information required at every stage of the process. Once drafted the quality plan will enable operators to determine at what stages it is necessary to measure the parameters required to allow the process to progress. The objective of the radiometric system is to provide the auditable proof that material has been surveyed, the record of the survey and the evidence that the system was operating within its design parameters during the survey. Typical radiometric instruments which have been deployed to provide the information requirements of the quality plan are described in this paper. These include the IonSens TM Conveyor, conveyorized survey monitor used to provide high throughout clearance surveys of removed metallic scrap. The IonSens TM Pipe, cut pipe monitor is used to survey interiors and exteriors of long lengths of removed pipe-work. The IonSens TM 208 large Item monitor is used to survey removed pieces of vessels and ductwork which may have convoluted shapes and finally the DrumScan TM system is used to survey 200 litre drums containing cut up pieces of metal. (author)

  19. ITO nanoparticles reused from ITO scraps and their applications to sputtering target for transparent conductive electrode layer

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Sung-Jei; Song, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Byeong Jun; Lee, Jae-Yong; Kim, Young-Sung

    2017-01-01

    In this study, ITO nanoparticles (ITO-NPs) were reused from ITO target scraps to synthesize low cost ITO-NPs and to apply to make sputtering target for transparent conductive electrodes (TCEs). By controlling heat-treatment temperature as 980??C, we achieved reused ITO-NPs having Brunauer, Emmett and Teller specific surface area (BET SSA) and average particle size 8.05?m2/g and 103.8?nm, respectively. The BET SSA decreases along with increasing heat-treatment temperature. The ITO-NPs were gro...

  20. Legislative and Regulatory Control for the Safety of Radioactively Contaminated Scrap Metals Generated from Mining and Mineral Processing Facilities in South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohajane, E. P.; Shale, K., E-mail: PEMohajane@nnr.co.za [National Nuclear Regulator, Centurion, Gauteng (South Africa)

    2011-07-15

    In South Africa, enhanced levels of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) are associated with many mining and industrial processes. Significant amounts of waste materials are involved which can result in radiation exposure of the workers and the public particularly through the diversion of materials into the public domain. The following operations have been regulated in South Africa for the past twenty years: operating metallurgical plants utilizing NORM, underground mining operations, scrap recyclers and smelters, and rehabilitation and remediation activities involving the above sites. The radioactively contaminated scrap metal generated from the above mentioned facilities is available for recycling in amounts of thousands of tons. The South African government has, to a certain extent, responded to the above-mentioned challenges by introducing regulatory controls to the affected industries. The existing regulatory controls have, however, not provided absolute answers to all issues associated with the management of scrap. (author)

  1. What’s in a Dog’s Breakfast? Considering the Social, Veterinary and Environmental Implications of Feeding Food Scraps to Pets Using Three Australian Surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirrilly Thompson

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Diverting food waste away from landfills is one way to minimise its serious environmental impact. Given that over a third of Australian households have at least one pet, the feeding of food waste to dogs constitutes one potentially significant waste diversion path. However, the proportion of dog owners that feed food waste to their pets is unknown. Moreover, there has been no investigation into any relationship between practices of feeding scraps to pets and the animals’ body condition, living arrangements (inside or outside and exercise regime. To provide some insight, this paper presents findings from three surveys across two Australian studies. The first reports both pet and dog-specific findings from two surveys within a wider food waste research project (n = 1017, establishing that 28% of respondents fed leftovers to pets as a main food waste minimization strategy, yet in only 5% of households did this constitute more than half of the household’s food scraps. This modest diversion of food scraps from landfill to feeding pets was reflected in the finding that there was no significant difference seen in the claimed level of food discards to the waste stream for households feeding food scraps to dogs and those that did not. The second—a dog owner specific study (n = 355—found that almost half (44% of respondents reported feeding table scraps to dogs. They were more likely to be females, owners of medium sized dogs, and in larger households. There was no significant difference in self-rated dogs’ body condition scores between respondents who fed table scraps to their dog and those who did not. Further multidisciplinary research is recommended to reconcile the social, veterinary and environmental risks and benefits of feeding food waste to animals.

  2. An Evaluation of the Resilient Modulus and Permanent Deformation of Unbound Mixtures of Granular Materials and Rubber Particles from Scrap Tyres to be Used in Subballast Layers

    OpenAIRE

    Signes, Carlos Hidalgo; Fernández, Pablo Martínez; Garzón-Roca, Julio; de la Torre, María Elvira Garrido; Franco, Ricardo Insa

    2016-01-01

    [EN] Over the last years rubber from scrap tyres has been reused in different civil works such as road embankments and railway platforms due to its resilient properties, low degradation and vibration attenuation. Unfortunately, this issue is still scarce. For instance, in Spain about 175.000 tonnes of scrap tyres were collected in 2014, of which only 0.6% were reused in civil works. Aiming to contribute to the reutilisation of large quantities of this waste material, this paper focuses on the...

  3. An Evaluation of the Resilient Modulus and Permanent Deformation of Unbound Mixtures of Granular Materials and Rubber Particles from Scrap Tyres to Be Used in Subballast Layers

    OpenAIRE

    Hidalgo Sgnes, Carlos; Martínez Fernández, Pablo; Garzón Roca, Julio; Garrido De La Torre, Mª Elvira; Insa Franco, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    [EN] Over the last years rubber from scrap tyres has been reused in different civil works such as road embankments and railway platforms due to its resilient properties, low degradation and vibration attenuation. Unfortunately, this issue is still scarce. For instance, in Spain about 175.000 tonnes of scrap tyres were collected in 2014, of which only 0.6% were reused in civil works. Aiming to contribute to the reutilisation of large quantities of this waste material, this paper focuses on the...

  4. Recycling of rare earths from Hg-containing fluorescent lamp scraps by solid state chlorination; Rueckgewinnung Seltener Erden aus quecksilberbelasteten Leuchtstoffen mittels Feststoffchlorierung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Tom; Froehlich, Peter; Bertau, Martin [TU Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany); Golon, Katja [FNE Entsorgungsdienste GmbH, Freiberg (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Solid state chlorination with NH{sub 4}Cl comprises a method for rare earth recycling apart from pyro- or hydrometallurgical strategies. The examined partially Hg-containing fluorescent lamp scraps are rich in rare earths like La, Ce, Tb and Gd, but especially in Y and Eu. By mixing with NH{sub 4}Cl and heating up to NH{sub 4}Cl decomposition temperature in a sublimation reactor, Y and Eu could be transferred selectively into their respective metal chlorides with high yields. The yield and selectivity depend on temperature and the ratio of NH{sub 4}Cl to fluorescent lamp scraps, which were varied systematically.

  5. Combined removal of a BTEX, TCE, and cis-DCE mixture using Pseudomonas sp. immobilized on scrap tyres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qihong; de Toledo, Renata Alves; Xie, Fei; Li, Junhui; Shim, Hojae

    2015-09-01

    The simultaneous aerobic removal of a mixture of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and o,m,p-xylene (BTEX); cis-dichloroethylene (cis-DCE); and trichloroethylene (TCE) from the artificially contaminated water using an indigenous bacterial isolate identified as Pseudomonas plecoglossicida immobilized on waste scrap tyres was investigated. Suspended and immobilized conditions were compared for the removal of these volatile organic compounds. For the immobilized system, toluene, benzene, and ethylbenzene were completely removed, while the highest removal efficiencies of 99.0 ± 0.1, 96.8 ± 0.3, 73.6 ± 2.5, and 61.6 ± 0.9% were obtained for o-xylene, m,p-xylene, TCE, and cis-DCE, respectively. The sorption kinetics of contaminants towards tyre surface was also evaluated, and the sorption capacity generally followed the order of toluene > benzene > m,p-xylene > o-xylene > ethylbenzene > TCE > cis-DCE. Scrap tyres showed a good capability for the simultaneous sorption and bioremoval of BTEX/cis-DCE/TCE mixture, implying a promising waste material for the removal of contaminant mixture from industrial wastewater or contaminated groundwater.

  6. Research into the melting/refining of contaminated steel scrap arising in the dismantling of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, D.S.

    1990-01-01

    The main part of this report is concerned with the steel-making behaviour of various radioisotopes encountered in steel from decommissioning of nuclear installations (e.g. cobalt 60, caesium 134 and europium 154). Under a wide range of conditions cobalt is largely absorbed by the steel, europium is absorbed by the slag, whereas caesium may be largely volatized, or largely absorbed by the slag. Radiation exposures which might occur during a large-scale recycling operation, during routine operations and accidents would not be significant according to published criteria in the UK. The second part of the report concerns the detection of radioactive materials which may be accidentally delivered to steelworks in scrap steel and used in steel-making. Detectors have been developed which would indicate the presence of radioactivity in scrap. A survey of the steelworks revealed areas where detection might be performed. Experiments have shown that a gamma ray detector of large volume could provide useful sensitivity of detection

  7. Approach and issues toward development of risk-based release standards for radioactive scrap metal recycle and reuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.Y.; Nieves, L.A.; Nabelssi, B.K.; LePoire, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    The decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities is expected to generate large amounts of slightly radioactive scrap metal (RSM). It is likely that some of these materials will be suitable for recycling and reuse. The amount of scrap steel from DOE facilities, for instance, is estimated to be more than one million tons (Hertzler 1993). However, under current practice and without the establishment of acceptable recycling standards, the RSM would be disposed of primarily as radioactive low-level waste (LLW). In the United States, no specific standards have been developed for the unrestricted release of bulk contaminated materials. Although standards for unrestricted release of radioactive surface contamination (NRC 1974) have existed for about 20 years, the release of materials is not commonly practiced because of the lack of risk-based justifications. Recent guidance from international bodies (IAEA 1988) has established a basis for deriving risk-based release limits for radioactive materials. It is important, therefore, to evaluate the feasibility of recycling and associated issues necessary for the establishment of risk-based release limits for the radioactive metals

  8. Fiscal 1999 research report. Basic research for promotion of joint implementation programs (Scrap and build for Central Heat-Power Station No. 2, St. Petersburg City, and others); 1999 nendo St. Petersburg shi netsuden heikyusho No.2 hoka Scrap and Build chosa hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Japan intends to resort to various means, including joint implementations with advanced countries, to fulfill its greenhouse gas reduction target in compliance with the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Exerting one of Japan's efforts, Mitsui and Co., Ltd., has signed a protocol with LENENEGRO on a survey of the Central Heat-Power Station, St. Petersburg City. The heat-power station started its operation in the 1910s and is now quite superannuated. Its efficiency and operating rate have extremely lowered, and its early modernization is earnestly wished for. The aim of the survey is to have the existing old facilities scrapped for the installation of gas combined cycle cogeneration facilities which are high in efficiency and low in greenhouse gas emissions. The new facilities will consist of three 67MW-class gas turbines, three exhaust heat recovery boilers, and one backpressure turbine, capable of 200MW power generation and 200Gcal/hour heat supply. A total of 140-million dollars will have to be invested and the construction work will require 36 months to complete. A reduction of 1,481,979.0 tons/year in CO2 emissions and an energy saving effect of 546,301 tons/year are expected. (NEDO)

  9. Energy conservation in reheating furnaces by reducing scrap and scale formation; Kuumamuokkauksen energiasaeaestoet romun maeaeraeae ja hilseilyae vaehentaemaellae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kivivuori, S; Savolainen, P; Fredriksson, J; Paavola, J [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Lab. of Materials Processing and Powder Metallurgy

    1997-12-31

    The main objective of the project `Energy Savings in Reheating Furnaces by Reducing Scrap and Scale Formation` is to reduce energy consumption and environmental harms in reheating and rolling of steel. This was done by analysing the different atmospheres in reheating furnaces of the steel companies participating in this project. These atmospheres were then simulated in a laboratory furnace. Scale formation tests with different steel grades were then carried out in these atmospheres. Scale removal tests were done to some steel grades too. The results showed that lower oxygen content - as expected - decreases oxidation despite the even higher carbondioxide content in the atmosphere. Lower oxygen content may cause difficulties in scale removal. This however is highly dependent on the steel grade. Heat treatment tests showed the effect of increased temperature and furnace time on decarburization. Some energy savings was obtained in fuel consumption by optimising the operation parameters and the atmosphere steadier in different reheating furnaces. (orig.)

  10. Palladium and gold removal and recovery from precious metal solutions and electronic scrap leachates by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creamer, Neil J; Baxter-Plant, Victoria S; Henderson, John; Potter, M; Macaskie, Lynne E

    2006-09-01

    Biomass of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans was used to recover Au(III) as Au(0) from test solutions and from waste electronic scrap leachate. Au(0) was precipitated extracellularly by a different mechanism from the biodeposition of Pd(0). The presence of Cu(2+) ( approximately 2000 mg/l) in the leachate inhibited the hydrogenase-mediated removal of Pd(II) but pre-palladisation of the cells in the absence of added Cu(2+) facilitated removal of Pd(II) from the leachate and more than 95% of the Pd(II) was removed autocatalytically from a test solution supplemented with Cu(II) and Pd(II). Metal recovery was demonstrated in a gas-lift electrobioreactor with electrochemically generated hydrogen, followed by precipitation of recovered metal under gravity. A 3-stage bioseparation process for the recovery of Au(III), Pd(II) and Cu(II) is proposed.

  11. Energy conservation in reheating furnaces by reducing scrap and scale formation; Kuumamuokkauksen energiasaeaestoet romun maeaeraeae ja hilseilyae vaehentaemaellae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kivivuori, S.; Savolainen, P.; Fredriksson, J.; Paavola, J. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Lab. of Materials Processing and Powder Metallurgy

    1996-12-31

    The main objective of the project `Energy Savings in Reheating Furnaces by Reducing Scrap and Scale Formation` is to reduce energy consumption and environmental harms in reheating and rolling of steel. This was done by analysing the different atmospheres in reheating furnaces of the steel companies participating in this project. These atmospheres were then simulated in a laboratory furnace. Scale formation tests with different steel grades were then carried out in these atmospheres. Scale removal tests were done to some steel grades too. The results showed that lower oxygen content - as expected - decreases oxidation despite the even higher carbondioxide content in the atmosphere. Lower oxygen content may cause difficulties in scale removal. This however is highly dependent on the steel grade. Heat treatment tests showed the effect of increased temperature and furnace time on decarburization. Some energy savings was obtained in fuel consumption by optimising the operation parameters and the atmosphere steadier in different reheating furnaces. (orig.)

  12. Scrap tyre recycling process with molten zinc as direct heat transfer and solids separation fluid: A new reactor concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedewald, Frank; Goode, Kieran; Sexton, Aidan; Sousa-Gallagher, Maria J

    2016-01-01

    Every year about 1.5 billion tyres are discarded worldwide representing a large amount of solid waste, but also a largely untapped source of raw materials. The objective of the method was to prove the concept of a novel scrap tyre recycling process which uses molten zinc as the direct heat transfer fluid and, simultaneously, uses this media to separate the solids products (i.e. steel and rCB) in a sink-float separation at an operating temperature of 450-470 °C. This methodology involved: •construction of the laboratory scale batch reactor,•separation of floating rCB from the zinc,•recovery of the steel from the bottom of the reactor following pyrolysis.

  13. Organic Matter and Barium Absorption by Plant Species Grown in an Area Polluted with Scrap Metal Residue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleide Aparecida Abreu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of organic matter addition on Ba availability to Helianthus annuus L., Raphanus sativus L., and Ricinus communis L. grown on a Neossolo Litólico Chernossólico fragmentário (pH 7.5, contaminated with scrap residue was evaluated. Four rates (0, 20, 40, and 80 Mg ha−1, organic carbon basis of peat or sugar cane filter, with three replicates, were tested. Plant species were grown until the flowering stage. No effect of organic matter addition to soil on dry matter yield of oilseed radish shoots was observed, but there was an increase in sunflower and castor oil plant shoots when sugar cane filter cake was used. The average Ba transferred from roots to shoots was more than 89% for oilseed radish, 71% for castor oil plants, and 59% for sunflowers. Organic matter treatments were not efficient in reducing Ba availability due to soil liming.

  14. MAGNETIC SEPARATORS AND THEIR PLACE IN MODEM FOUNDRY. REFINEMENT OF WASTE (ALUMINIUM SCRAP WITH THE PURPOSE O F FURTHER USING IN OWN PRODUCTION ON BASIS OF PRUP “MINSK MOTOR PLANT”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Ovchinnikov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The types of magnetic separators used in casting are given. The technology of preparation of aluminium chip scrap for further using in domestic manufacture is developed and implemented at Minsk Motor Works.

  15. Safety analysis, 200 Area, Savannah River Plant: Separations area operations. Building 221-H, B-Line, Scrap Recovery Facility (Supplement 2A): Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1991-07-01

    The now HB-Line is located an top of the 221-H Building on the fifth and sixth levels and is designed to replace the aging existing HB-Line production facility. The new HB-Line consists of three separate facilities: the Scrap Recovery Facility, Neptunium Facility, and Plutonium Oxide Facility. The Scrap Recovery Facility is designed to routinely generate nitrate solutions of {sup 235}U{sup 239}Pu and Pu-238 fromscrap for purification by anion exchange or by solvent extraction in the canyon. The now facility incorporates improvements in: (1) engineered controls for nuclear criticality, (2) cabinet integrity and engineered barriers to contain contamination and minimize personnel exposure to airborne contamination, (3) shielding and remote operations to decrease radiation exposure, and (4) equipment and ventilation design to provide flexibility and improved process performance.

  16. A bezel of an automotive headlamp: scrap/virgin ratio effects on its physicochemical properties due to the use of recycled polycarbonate

    OpenAIRE

    Vega, Etzail; González-Calderón, J. A.; Villegas, Antonio; Montiel, Raúl; Pérez, Elías; Vallejo-Montesinos, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Automotive bezels of polycarbonate (PC) were prepared in this work by varying the amount of recycled polymer in order to estimate an acceptable scrap/virgin ratio that maintains the material properties. Conducted tests allow us to define the limit to don't compromise the performance of recycled pieces. The studied properties were their chemical structure, molecular weight distribution, mechanical and surface properties of the samples. Results showed no change in the chemical structu...

  17. Note on ‘Combining an Improved Multi-delivery Policy into a Single-producer Multi-retailer Integrated Inventory System with Scrap in Production’

    OpenAIRE

    Chung-li Chou; Wen Kuei Wu; Singa W. Chiu

    2014-01-01

    In a recent study, Chiu et al. (2014) employed a mathematical modeling and conventional optimization technique to determine the optimal production-shipment policy for a single-producer multi-retailer integrated inventory system with scrap and an improved product distribution policy. This study replaces their optimization process of using differential calculus with an algebraic derivation. Such a simplified approach enables practitioners, who may have insufficient knowledge of calculus, to man...

  18. Optimization of a heterogeneous catalytic hydrodynamic cavitation reactor performance in decolorization of Rhodamine B: application of scrap iron sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basiri Parsa, Jalal; Ebrahimzadeh Zonouzian, Seyyed Alireza

    2013-11-01

    A low pressure pilot scale hydrodynamic cavitation (HC) reactor with 30 L volume, using fixed scrap iron sheets, as the heterogeneous catalyst, with no external source of H2O2 was devised to investigate the effects of operating parameters of the HC reactor performance. In situ generation of Fenton reagents suggested an induced advanced Fenton process (IAFP) to explain the enhancing effect of the used catalyst in the HC process. The reactor optimization was done based upon the extent of decolorization (ED) of aqueous solution of Rhodamine B (RhB). To have a perfect study on the pertinent parameters of the heterogeneous catalyzed HC reactor, the following cases as, the effects of scrap iron sheets, inlet pressure (2.4-5.8 bar), the distance between orifice plates and catalyst sheets (submerged and inline located orifice plates), back-pressure (2-6 bar), orifice plates type (4 various orifice plates), pH (2-10) and initial RhB concentration (2-14 mg L(-1)) have been investigated. The results showed that the highest cavitational yield can be obtained at pH 3 and initial dye concentration of 10 mg L(-1). Also, an increase in the inlet pressure would lead to an increase in the ED. In addition, it was found that using the deeper holes (thicker orifice plates) would lead to lower ED, and holes with larger diameter would lead to the higher ED in the same cross-sectional area, but in the same holes' diameters, higher cross-sectional area leads to the lower ED. The submerged operation mode showed a greater cavitational effects rather than the inline mode. Also, for the inline mode, the optimum value of 3 bar was obtained for the back-pressure condition in the system. Moreover, according to the analysis of changes in the UV-Vis spectra of RhB, both degradation of RhB chromophore structure and N-deethylation were occurred during the catalyzed HC process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Optimal Recycling of Steel Scrap and Alloying Elements: Input-Output based Linear Programming Method with Its Application to End-of-Life Vehicles in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Hajime; Matsubae, Kazuyo; Nakajima, Kenichi; Kondo, Yasushi; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Fukushima, Yasuhiro; Nagasaka, Tetsuya

    2017-11-21

    Importance of end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) as an urban mine is expected to grow, as more people in developing countries are experiencing increased standards of living, while the automobiles are increasingly made using high-quality materials to meet stricter environmental and safety requirements. While most materials in ELVs, particularly steel, have been recycled at high rates, quality issues have not been adequately addressed due to the complex use of automobile materials, leading to considerable losses of valuable alloying elements. This study highlights the maximal potential of quality-oriented recycling of ELV steel, by exploring the utilization methods of scrap, sorted by parts, to produce electric-arc-furnace-based crude alloy steel with minimal losses of alloying elements. Using linear programming on the case of Japanese economy in 2005, we found that adoption of parts-based scrap sorting could result in the recovery of around 94-98% of the alloying elements occurring in parts scrap (manganese, chromium, nickel, and molybdenum), which may replace 10% of the virgin sources in electric arc furnace-based crude alloy steel production.

  20. New seismograph includes filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-11-02

    The new Nimbus ES-1210 multichannel signal enhancement seismograph from EG and G geometrics has recently been redesigned to include multimode signal fillers on each amplifier. The ES-1210F is a shallow exploration seismograph for near subsurface exploration such as in depth-to-bedrock, geological hazard location, mineral exploration, and landslide investigations.

  1. Analytic device including nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.; Fratalocchi, Andrea; Totero Gongora, Juan Sebastian; Coluccio, Maria Laura; Candeloro, Patrizio; Cuda, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    A device for detecting an analyte in a sample comprising: an array including a plurality of pixels, each pixel including a nanochain comprising: a first nanostructure, a second nanostructure, and a third nanostructure, wherein size of the first nanostructure is larger than that of the second nanostructure, and size of the second nanostructure is larger than that of the third nanostructure, and wherein the first nanostructure, the second nanostructure, and the third nanostructure are positioned on a substrate such that when the nanochain is excited by an energy, an optical field between the second nanostructure and the third nanostructure is stronger than an optical field between the first nanostructure and the second nanostructure, wherein the array is configured to receive a sample; and a detector arranged to collect spectral data from a plurality of pixels of the array.

  2. Saskatchewan resources. [including uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-09-01

    The production of chemicals and minerals for the chemical industry in Saskatchewan are featured, with some discussion of resource taxation. The commodities mentioned include potash, fatty amines, uranium, heavy oil, sodium sulfate, chlorine, sodium hydroxide, sodium chlorate and bentonite. Following the successful outcome of the Cluff Lake inquiry, the uranium industry is booming. Some developments and production figures for Gulf Minerals, Amok, Cenex and Eldorado are mentioned.

  3. ITO nanoparticles reused from ITO scraps and their applications to sputtering target for transparent conductive electrode layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung-Jei; Song, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Byeong Jun; Lee, Jae-Yong; Kim, Young-Sung

    2017-01-01

    In this study, ITO nanoparticles (ITO-NPs) were reused from ITO target scraps to synthesize low cost ITO-NPs and to apply to make sputtering target for transparent conductive electrodes (TCEs). By controlling heat-treatment temperature as 980 °C, we achieved reused ITO-NPs having Brunauer, Emmett and Teller specific surface area (BET SSA) and average particle size 8.05 m 2 /g and 103.8 nm, respectively. The BET SSA decreases along with increasing heat-treatment temperature. The ITO-NPs were grown as round mound shape, and highly crystallized to (222) preferred orientations. Also, applying the reused ITO-NPs, we achieved an ITO target of which density was 99.6%. Using the ITO target, we achieved high quality TCE layer of which sheet resistance and optical transmittance at 550 nm were 29.5 Ω/sq. and 82.3%. Thus, it was confirmed that the reused ITO-NPs was feasible to sputtering target for TCEs layer.

  4. ITO nanoparticles reused from ITO scraps and their applications to sputtering target for transparent conductive electrode layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung-Jei; Song, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Byeong Jun; Lee, Jae-Yong; Kim, Young-Sung

    2017-09-01

    In this study, ITO nanoparticles (ITO-NPs) were reused from ITO target scraps to synthesize low cost ITO-NPs and to apply to make sputtering target for transparent conductive electrodes (TCEs). By controlling heat-treatment temperature as 980 °C, we achieved reused ITO-NPs having Brunauer, Emmett and Teller specific surface area (BET SSA) and average particle size 8.05 m2/g and 103.8 nm, respectively. The BET SSA decreases along with increasing heat-treatment temperature. The ITO-NPs were grown as round mound shape, and highly crystallized to (222) preferred orientations. Also, applying the reused ITO-NPs, we achieved an ITO target of which density was 99.6%. Using the ITO target, we achieved high quality TCE layer of which sheet resistance and optical transmittance at 550 nm were 29.5 Ω/sq. and 82.3%. Thus, it was confirmed that the reused ITO-NPs was feasible to sputtering target for TCEs layer.

  5. Fabrication of Al-20 wt%Si powder using scrap Si by ultra high-energy milling process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Won-Kyung [Division of Advanced Materials Engineering and Institute for Rare Metals, Kongju National University, 275, Budae-dong, Cheonan, Chungnam 330-717 (Korea, Republic of); Y Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I lmaz, Fikret [Department of Physics, Faculty of Art and Science, Gaziosmanpasa University, Tasliciftlik Campus, 60240 Tokat (Turkey); Kim, Hyo-Seob; Koo, Jar-Myung [Division of Advanced Materials Engineering and Institute for Rare Metals, Kongju National University, 275, Budae-dong, Cheonan, Chungnam 330-717 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Soon-Jik, E-mail: hongsj@kongju.ac.kr [Division of Advanced Materials Engineering and Institute for Rare Metals, Kongju National University, 275, Budae-dong, Cheonan, Chungnam 330-717 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High energy ball milling process has been successfully employed to produce Al-20Si alloy using scrap Si powders. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fully finer and homogenous structure could be achieved after 60 min of milling time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Si particles were not dissolved but uniformly dispersed in the Al matrix in a milled state. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hardness of as-milled Al-20Si powder increased steadily with the increase of milling time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Grain size and dispersion strengthening are two mechanisms being responsible for hardness increment. - Abstract: In this study, microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of Al-20 wt%Si and pure Al powders fabricated by ultra high-energy ball milling technique were investigated as a function of milling time. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the as-milled powders were examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and Vickers hardness tester. SEM observation showed that the particle size increased at an early stage of milling, and then decreased drastically with further milling. XRD and cross-sectional EDS-mapping analyses revealed that Si particles were not dissolved but uniformly dispersed in the Al matrix in a milled state. Vickers hardness of both pure Al and Al-Si powder increases with milling time, which attributes to the grain size strengthening and dispersion strengthening.

  6. Solvent Extraction of Co, Ni and Mn from NCM Sulfate Leaching Solution of Li(NCMO2 Secondary Battery Scraps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Hyun Seon

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available As a part of the study on recycling Li(NCMO2 lithium-ion battery scraps, solvent extraction experiments were performed using different extraction agents such as PC88A, Cyanex272 and D2EHPA to separate Co, Ni and Mn from the leaching solution. When the ratio of Mn to Ni was about 0.4 in the leaching solution, the separation factor for Co and Mn was found to be less than 10 so that the separation of Co and Ni was insufficient. When solvent extraction was done using the solution with the lower Mn/Ni ratio of 0.05 where Mn was removed by potassium permanganate and chlorine dioxide, more than 99% of Mn could be extracted through five courses of extraction using 30vol% D2EHPA while the extraction rates of Co and Ni were around 17% and 11%, respectively. In the case that Mn was removed from the solution, the extraction rate of Co was higher than 99% whereas less than 7% Ni was extracted using Cyanex272 suggesting that Co and Ni elements were effectively separated.

  7. Evaluation of sorption capacity of scrap tyre in the removal of copper (II) ion from aqua system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oladoja, N.A.; Ofomaja, A.; Ebare, E.; Ebare, E.

    2006-01-01

    The use of scrap-tyre (ST), which was both a waste and pollutant was investigated as a low-cost sorbent to sorbed Cu (II) from aqueous solution. The influence of pH, sorbent dosage, contact time, and initial sorbate concentration on the uptake of Cu (II) by ST were studied. Optimum sorption of Cu (II) by ST was achieved at pH 6. The amount Of sorbate sorbed per gram of sorbent decreased with increase in sorbent dosage. Maximum uptake of the Cu (II) was achieved within the first thirty minutes of contact between the ST and the Cu (II). The equilibrium relationship between the concentration of the Cu (II) in the fluid phase and the concentration in the ST particles at a given temperature showed that the sorption mechanism was like adsorption rather than distribution into any phase. Analysis of the result using Langmuir and Freundlich models showed that it conformed to Langmuir equation based on the formation of a monomolecular layer. The adsorption capacity due to monolayer coverage was 12.95 mg/g, while the energy of adsorption was 3.95 dm/mg. (author)

  8. “When a breach arises”: Good burocratic action and informal scrap metal collection in Northern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Tauber

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses affirmative bureaucratic intervention into the informal commercial practices of scrap metal collection among the Sinti in a North-Italian province. To contextualize these events it is vital to examine institutional logics, and how they resonate with public officials’ sense of self as well as political loyalties. In everyday bureaucracy Gypsies are considered to be perplexing subjects, provoking contrasting images of poverty and excess. These cultural representations are the opposite of the idea of a decent social-work client. Hence, bureaucratic intervention on behalf of the Sinti put the former in a deontological and moral limbo, one which stimulates them to navigate the political and organisational structures of their organisations in a creative way. This paper aims to bring a positive example of where the social and institutional discrimination against Roma and Sinti in Italy and Europe can be broken. Even if it is not possible to reverse this discrimination, it at least introduces affirmative bureaucratic action as an enlightening direction for anthropological study.

  9. Recycling of pneumatic scrap tyre into nano-crumb rubber by pulsed laser ablation in different pH media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezaan Khamsan, Nur; Bidin, Noriah; Islam, Shumaila; Daud, Suzairi; Krishnan, Ganesan; Bakar, Mohamad Aizat A.; Naqiuddin Razali, Muhamad; Khamis, Jamil

    2018-05-01

    Nano crumb rubber from scrap tyre is synthesized via 1064 nm pulsed Nd:YAG laser ablation in three different pH media i.e. DI-water (pH∼6.45), D-limonene (pH∼3.47) and NaOH solution (pH∼13.41). Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) results show spherical morphology of crumb rubber with high degree of aggregation in DI-water and in D-limonene. However, dispersion of crumb rubbers is observed in NaOH solution. The smallest particles size is obtained in NaOH solution within the range of 10.9 nm – 74.3 nm. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and FTIR analysis confirmed the elements distribution and chemical bonding of rubber with DI-water, D-limonene and NaOH solution. The experimental findings shows that pulsed Nd:YAG laser ablation has potential for fabricating nano-crumb rubber in liquid media.

  10. Feasibility study on the St. Petersburg City heat and electric cogeneration plant No.2, etc. scrap and build project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    For the purpose of reducing greenhouse effect gas emissions in line with the Joint Implementation, a survey was made of the scrap and build project for the superannuated Central Heat Power Station in St. Petersburg City. The survey team visited the relevant sites twice during 1999. The team drafted an improvement plan afterwards and presented it to the Russian counterpart, LENENEGRO. Based on the discussions with LENENEGRO, it was determined that the proposed combined cycle cogeneration plant would contain three 67MW-class gas turbines, three heat recovery steam generators and one back pressure turbine to achieve the generation capacity of approximately 200MW and heat supply capacity of 200G cal/hr. The total investment required for this project is about 140 million dollars. The term of the construction work is estimated at 36 months. It is estimated that the implementation of the project will reduce 1,481,979 tons of CO2 per year, or a total of 40,013,434 tons in 27 years after the commencement of operation. In addition, the terminal power generation efficiency will be improved from the current 18.68% to 41%, which leads to an annual fuel saving of 546,301 tons of crude oil or its equivalent. (NEDO)

  11. Being Included and Excluded

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korzenevica, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Following the civil war of 1996–2006, there was a dramatic increase in the labor mobility of young men and the inclusion of young women in formal education, which led to the transformation of the political landscape of rural Nepal. Mobility and schooling represent a level of prestige that rural...... politics. It analyzes how formal education and mobility either challenge or reinforce traditional gendered norms which dictate a lowly position for young married women in the household and their absence from community politics. The article concludes that women are simultaneously excluded and included from...... community politics. On the one hand, their mobility and decision-making powers decrease with the increase in the labor mobility of men and their newly gained education is politically devalued when compared to the informal education that men gain through mobility, but on the other hand, schooling strengthens...

  12. Refining technology for the recycling of stainless steel radioactive scrap metals, FY 94 bi-annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizia, R.E.; Atteridge, D.G.; Buckentin, J.; Carter, J.; Davis, H.L.; Devletian, J.H.; Scholl, M.R.; Turpin, R.B.; Webster, S.L.

    1994-08-01

    The research addressed under this project is the recycling of metallic nuclear-related by-product materials under the direction of Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company (WINCO). The program addresses the recycling of radioactive scrap metals (RSM) for beneficial re-use within the DOE complex; in particular, this program addresses the recycling of stainless steel RSM. It is anticipated that various stainless steel components under WINCO control at the Idaho Falls Engineering Laboratory (INEL), such as fuel pool criticality barriers and fuel storage racks will begin to be recycled in FY94-95. The end product of this recycling effort is expected to be waste and overpack canisters for densified high level waste for the Idaho Waste Immobilization Facility and/or the Universal Canister System for dry (interim) storage of spent fuel. The specific components of this problem area that are presently being, or have been, addressed by CAAMSEC are: (1) the melting/remelting of stainless steel RSM into billet form; (2) the melting/remelting initial research focus will be on the use of radioactive surrogates to study; (3) the cost effectiveness of RSM processing oriented towards privatization of RSM reuse and/or resale. Other components of this problem that may be addressed under program extension are: (4) the melting/remelting of carbon steel; (5) the processing of billet material into product form which shall meet all applicable ASTM requirements; and, (6) the fabrication of an actual prototypical product; the present concept of an end product is a low carbon Type 304/316 stainless steel cylindrical container for densified and/or vitrified high level radioactive waste and/or the Universal Canister System for dry (interim) storage of spent fuel. The specific work reported herein covers the melting/remelting of stainless steel open-quotes scrapclose quotes metal into billet form and the study of surrogate material removal effectiveness by various remelting techniques

  13. Experiments in anodic film effects during electrorefining of scrap U-10Mo fuels in support of modeling efforts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Kleeck, M. [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Willit, J.; Williamson, M.A. [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Fentiman, A.W. [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    A monolithic uranium molybdenum alloy clad in zirconium has been proposed as a low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel option for research and test reactors, as part of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors program. Scrap from the fuel's manufacture will contain a significant portion of recoverable LEU. Pyroprocessing has been identified as an option to perform this recovery. A model of a pyroprocessing recovery procedure has been developed to assist in refining the LEU recovery process and designing the facility. Corrosion theory and a two mechanism transport model were implemented on a Mat-Lab platform to perform the modeling. In developing this model, improved anodic behavior prediction became necessary since a dense uranium-rich salt film was observed at the anode surface during electrorefining experiments. Experiments were conducted on uranium metal to determine the film's character and the conditions under which it forms. The electro-refiner salt used in all the experiments was eutectic LiCl/KCl containing UCl{sub 3}. The anodic film material was analyzed with ICP-OES to determine its composition. Both cyclic voltammetry and potentiodynamic scans were conducted at operating temperatures between 475 and 575 C. degrees to interrogate the electrochemical behavior of the uranium. The results show that an anodic film was produced on the uranium electrode. The film initially passivated the surface of the uranium on the working electrode. At high over potentials after a trans-passive region, the current observed was nearly equal to the current observed at the initial active level. Analytical results support the presence of K{sub 2}UCl{sub 6} at the uranium surface, within the error of the analytical method.

  14. Spent lithium-ion battery recycling - Reductive ammonia leaching of metals from cathode scrap by sodium sulphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaohong; Gao, Wenfang; Zhang, Xihua; He, Mingming; Lin, Xiao; Cao, Hongbin; Zhang, Yi; Sun, Zhi

    2017-02-01

    Recycling of spent lithium-ion batteries has attracted wide attention because of their high content of valuable and hazardous metals. One of the difficulties for effective metal recovery is the separation of different metals from the solution after leaching. In this research, a full hydrometallurgical process is developed to selectively recover valuable metals (Ni, Co and Li) from cathode scrap of spent lithium ion batteries. By introducing ammonia-ammonium sulphate as the leaching solution and sodium sulphite as the reductant, the total selectivity of Ni, Co and Li in the first-step leaching solution is more than 98.6% while it for Mn is only 1.36%. In detail understanding of the selective leaching process is carried out by investigating the effects of parameters such as leaching reagent composition, leaching time (0-480min), agitation speed (200-700rpm), pulp density (10-50g/L) and temperature (323-353K). It was found that Mn is primarily reduced from Mn 4+ into Mn 2+ into the solution as [Formula: see text] while it subsequently precipitates out into the residue in the form of (NH 4 ) 2 Mn(SO 3 ) 2 ·H 2 O. Ni, Co and Li are leached and remain in the solution either as metallic ion or amine complexes. The optimised leaching conditions can be further obtained and the leaching kinetics is found to be chemical reaction control under current leaching conditions. As a result, this research is potentially beneficial for further optimisation of the spent lithium ion battery recycling process after incorporating with metal extraction from the leaching solution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Geotechnical Investigation of the Potential Use of Shredded Scrap Tires in Soil Stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    Silt-tire and clay-tire mixtures, containing 0% to 100% shredded tire material by weight, with tire chips ranging in size from 7mm-13mm, 13mm-25mm, and 25mm-38mm, were tested for a series of engineering properties including compaction characteristics...

  16. Recovery of plutonium from insulation, scrap glass, and sand-slag residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, D.L.; Garnett, J.E.; Fraser, J.K.

    1979-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed to evaluate methods for removing plutonium from insulation, glass leach heel, and sand and slag heel. The methods evaluated included hydrochloric acid leaching, nitric acid leaching, and a treatment consisting of a fusion step followed by acid leaching. Results indicate that a nitric acid leach is effective in lowering the plutonium concentration of these solid wastes to the desired limit, if multiple contacts are used. A hydrochloric acid leach was found to be superior to a nitric acid leach for removing plutonium from the residues

  17. Plasma melting and recycling technology for decommissioning material. Removal of zinc and lead of ferrous scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Koichi; Amakawa, Tadashi; Yasui, Shinji

    2001-01-01

    A great amount of nonradioactive waste such as concrete, metal and the like, will be generated intensively in a short period when dismantling nuclear power plants. Thus, it is very important for smooth dismantling to promote their recycling. Melting operates conditions to recycle metal easily, but degrades the quality by contamination of tramp elements. So it was performed to melt carbon steel coated with anti-corrosive paint including lead, zinc, etc. and to analyze the steel grade for study of obtaining the desired grade. On some test conditions, concentration of lead and zinc just after melting all samples lowered less than target concentration which was permissible for cast iron. About the unsatisfactory conditions when a lot of slag generated, concentration of zinc was simulated changing the sequence of plasma melting. The result showed that an efficient sequence controlled input energy to maintain molten bath after melting all samples as quickly as possible. (author)

  18. Recycle of radioactive scrap metal from the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (K-25 Site)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meehan, R.W. [DOE-Oak Ridge Operations Office, TN (United States)

    1997-02-01

    The scale of the metal available for reuse at the plant includes 22 million pounds of Ni, 17 million pounds of Al, 47 million pounds of copper, and 835 million pounds of steels. In addition there is a wide range of industrial equipment and other items of value. The author describes small bench scale and pilot plant scale efforts made at treating metal for decontamination and fabrication into cast stock or specialized containers for reuse within the DOE complex or release. These projects show that much of the material can be cleaned or chemically decontaminated to a level where it can be free released to various markets. Of the remaining metals, much of it can be cast into products which can be absorbed within the DOE complex.

  19. Monitoring system with integrated measuring sensors for radioactively contaminated iron and non-iron scrap metal (MerEN). Final report; Ueberwachungssystem mit integrierter Messsensorik fuer radioaktiv belastete Eisen- und Nichteisenschrotte (MerEN). Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celebic, Enis; Gentes, Sascha [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. fuer Technologie und Management im Baubetrieb; Rutschmann, Michael; Goerisch, Uwe [Prof. Dr.-Ing. Uwe Goerisch GmbH Ingenieurbuero fuer Abfallwirtschaft, Karlsruhe (Germany); Wetzel, Ramona [Schrott Wetzel GmbH, Mannheim (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    Radioactive sources are used in the industry, in nuclear medicine, the military, as well as in research. Accidents and losses rarely occur, a proper and responsible handling of those sources provided. Radioactive sources represent a risk when divulged, moved, passed on without authorization or lost. Time and again, radioactive sources are found at scrap yards and metal processing facilities. The supervision of these radioactive materials is gaining importance in the light of the worldwide import and export of ferrous and non-ferrous scrap. The aim of the project was to develop a space monitoring system for radioactively contaminated ferrous and non-ferrous scrap, so it can be removed from the operating range and to protect staff. The monitoring system combines technical and application-specific requirements. As part of the research project, the system was designed based on the operational framework conditions, technical and economic possibilities, and the findings from the experimental phase. The prototype mainly consists of a mainframe computer, stationary and mobile detection units, and the data transfer technology. This has successfully been tested at a scrap yard. The effects of vibrations that occur on scrapyards were investigated. This was necessary to obtain functionality of the hardware. The experimental phase was carried out based on a pre-defined set-up. The aim was to test the individual scenarios, processing and logging of the date as well to interpret the test results. In the event of radioactive sources being found in discarded metal, a standard sequence of actions was designed to protect the yard's processes and its personnel against further radioactive damage. For the first time, active radiation monitoring was performed on scrap-processing machines and in the working range of mobile devices. With this, scrap yard operators will have the opportunity to detect radioactively contaminated material at an early stage and before radiation sources are

  20. Direct conversion of plutonium metal, scrap, residue, and transuranic waste to glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.; Malling, J.F.; Rudolph, J.

    1995-01-01

    A method for the direct conversion of metals, ceramics, organics, and amorphous solids to borosilicate glass has been invented. The process is called the Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS). Traditional glass-making processes can convert only oxide materials to glass. However, many wastes contain complex mixtures of metals, ceramics, organics, and amorphous solids. Conversion of such mixtures to oxides followed by their conversion to glass is often impractical. GMODS may create a practical method to convert such mixtures to glass. Plutonium-containing materials (PCMS) exist in many forms, including metals, ceramics, organics, amorphous solids, and mixtures thereof. These PCMs vary from plutonium metal to filters made of metal, organic binders, and glass fibers. For storage and/or disposal of PCMS, it is desirable to convert PCMs to borosilicate glass. Borosilicate glass is the preferred repository waste form for high-level waste (HLW) because of its properties. PCMs converted to a transuranic borosilicate homogeneous glass would easily pass all waste acceptance and storage criteria. Conversion of PCMs to a glass would also simplify safeguards by conversion of heterogeneous PCMs to homogeneous glass. Thermodynamic calculations and proof-of-principle experiments on the GMODS process with cerium (plutonium surrogate), uranium, stainless steel, aluminum, Zircaloy-2, and carbon were successfully conducted. Initial analysis has identified potential flowsheets and equipment. Major unknowns remain, but the preliminary data suggests that GMODS may be a major new treatment option for PCMs

  1. An Evaluation of the Resilient Modulus and Permanent Deformation of Unbound Mixtures of Granular Materials and Rubber Particles from Scrap Tyres to Be Used in Subballast Layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidalgo Sgnes, C.

    2016-07-01

    Over the last years rubber from scrap tyres has been reused in different civil works such as road embankments and railway platforms due to its resilient properties, low degradation and vibration attenuation. Unfortunately, this issue is still scarce. For instance, in Spain about 175.000 tonnes of scrap tyres were collected in 2014, of which only 0.6% were reused in civil works. Aiming to contribute to the reutilisation of large quantities of this waste material, this paper focuses on the analysis of unbound mixtures of granular materials with different percentages of rubber particles to be used as subballast layers. Mixtures are tested under cyclic triaxial tests so as to obtain their resilient modulus and evaluate their permanent deformations. It is found that as the rubber content increases, the resilient modulus decreases and the permanent deformation increases. Taking into account the usual loads transmitted to the subballast layer, the optimum rubber content that does not compromise the behaviour of the mixture is set in a range between 2.5% and 5% in terms of weight. (Author)

  2. Influencing factors and kinetics analysis on the leaching of iron from boron carbide waste-scrap with ultrasound-assisted method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Xing, Pengfei; Du, Xinghong; Gao, Shuaibo; Chen, Chen

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, the ultrasound-assisted leaching of iron from boron carbide waste-scrap was investigated and the optimization of different influencing factors had also been performed. The factors investigated were acid concentration, liquid-solid ratio, leaching temperature, ultrasonic power and frequency. The leaching of iron with conventional method at various temperatures was also performed. The results show the maximum iron leaching ratios are 87.4%, 94.5% for 80min-leaching with conventional method and 50min-leaching with ultrasound assistance, respectively. The leaching of waste-scrap with conventional method fits the chemical reaction-controlled model. The leaching with ultrasound assistance fits chemical reaction-controlled model, diffusion-controlled model for the first stage and second stage, respectively. The assistance of ultrasound can greatly improve the iron leaching ratio, accelerate the leaching rate, shorten leaching time and lower the residual iron, comparing with conventional method. The advantages of ultrasound-assisted leaching were also confirmed by the SEM-EDS analysis and elemental analysis of the raw material and leached solid samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Use of scrap in recycling alloys for structural applications in automotive engineering; Einsatz von Schrotten in Recyclinglegierungen fuer Strukturanwendungen im Automobilbau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fragner, Werner [AMAG casting GmbH, Ranshofen (Austria). Prozessoptimierung; Hummel, Marc [AUDI AG, N/EK-111, Neckarsulm (Germany). Technologie-/Eigenschaftsentwicklung Metalle; Boesch, Dominik [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Allgemeine Werkstoffeigenschaften

    2013-01-15

    While the CO{sub 2} emissions of vehicles are further reduced by automotive companies, additionally the reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions during manufacturing of a car following a holistic approach is pursued by OEMs. As one of the first of them, Audi AG examines together with AMAG Casting GmbH the production of structural parts, which are made so far out of primary alloys. Components of this momentarily strong growing segment demand high mechanical properties, especially high elongation values in order to absorb as much energy as possible in a crash situation. In addition to iron, recycling alloys usually have further tramp elements, which occur inevitably by processing scrap. Besides of Cu and Zn, elements such as Cr, Pb, Bi, Sn etc. have to be considered, since they can negatively influence the alloy properties. The results of this article show that skilled scrap input and handling during alloy manufacturing can greatly reduce these negative effects in order to be negligible. It can be shown that a standardized, time saving gravity casting test can give a good measure to the behavior of an alloy in pressure die casting conditions and therefore account for an efficient alloy development. (orig.)

  4. Recycling of electronic scrap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legarth, Jens Brøbech

    This Ph.D. thesis deals with the growingly important field of electronics recycling with special attention to the problem of printed circuit board recycling. A literature survey of contemporary electronics recycling and printed circuit board recycling is presented.Further, an analysis of the role...

  5. Food Scrap Generators

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Here you will find Vermont businesses and institutions (such as restaurants, grocery stores, markets, hospitals, schools, food manufacturers, assisted living...

  6. Recycling of scrap tyres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jana, G.K.; Das, C.K.

    2005-01-01

    De-vulcanization of rubber waste posses a challenging economical, environmental and social problem. In the present study, we propose a new de vulcanization process to reuse the rubber waste called mechan-chemical process (MCP), where the waste were de-vulcanized through the application of mechanical shearing, heat (110 degree C) and de-vulcanizing agent (Di-benzyl disulfide). A new look into the de-vulcanization mechanism and the influence of de-vulcanizing agent on mechanical properties of re-vulcanized rubber was presented. One of the most interesting observations is that the retention of tensile strength of re-vulcanized rubber with respect to original tyre is 35.1% and 75.6%, when de-vulcanized in absence and in presence of disulfide respectively. The formation of extra cross-link bond in re-vulcanized rubber containing disulfide was confirmed from cross-link density data and TGA result. DMA analysis revealed that the storage modulus increased for re vulcanized rubber containing disulfide. The SEM was considered in order to study the failure mechanism and homogeneity as affected by the de vulcanization process

  7. 'Scrap yard challenge'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollick, A.

    2000-01-01

    'Plutonium'. The word evokes deep reactions outside of the nuclear industry. Although the majority of Plutonium currently in existence is man-made and therefore perceived as being unnatural, plutonium has been found as a product of the Oklo natural reactor in Gabon. This paper seeks to challenge two concepts, that of the Nuclear Control Institute that Plutonium is unnatural, 'fiendishly toxic' and one of the 'substances most hazardous to man' and the second image that a high security Plutonium store is merely a 'scrapyard' containing a material which has little use. The nuclear industry has often been accused of treating Plutonium and its accumulation casually in proportion to the risks perceived by those outside the industry. As a result this paper seeks to demonstrate that the industry is aware of the concerns of the public and is actively seeking viable solutions. The paper looks at Plutonium itself and explores the issues surrounding military and civil Plutonium in adding to the current stockpiles. It also suggests three possible alternatives for dealing with these Plutonium stockpiles and arrives at a conclusion as to which solutions currently appear most viable. (authors)

  8. Aluminum: Aluminum Scrap Decoater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blazek, Steve

    1999-01-01

    NICE3 and the Philip Services Corporation are cost-sharing a demonstration project to decoat metal using indirect-fired controlled-atmosphere (IDEX) kilns, which can both process solid organics such as rubber and plastics, and minimize dust formation and emission of volatile organic compounds. The publication explains how this cost-effective, two-step system operates

  9. European Legislation to Prevent Loss of Control of Sources and to Recover Orphan Sources, and Other Requirements Relevant to the Scrap Metal Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssens, A.; Tanner, V.; Mundigl, S., E-mail: augustin.janssens@ec.europa.eu [European Commission (Luxembourg)

    2011-07-15

    European legislation (Council Directive 2003/122/EURATOM) has been adopted with regard to the control of high-activity sealed radioactive sources (HASS). This Directive is now part of an overall recast of current radiation protection legislation. At the same time the main Directive, 96/29/EURATOM, laying down Basic Safety Standards (BSS) for the health protection of the general public and workers against the dangers of ionizing radiation, is being revised in the light of the new recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The provisions for exemption and clearance are a further relevant feature of the new BSS. The current issues emerging from the revision and recast of the BSS are discussed, in the framework of the need to protect the scrap metal industry from orphan sources and to manage contaminated metal products. (author)

  10. Scrap tire pyrolysis using a new type two-stage pyrolyzer: Effects of dolomite and olivine on producing a low-sulfur pyrolysis oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Gyung-Goo; Oh, Seung-Jin; Kim, Joo-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Scrap tire pyrolysis was performed using a two-stage pyrolyzer consisting of an auger reactor and a fluidized bed reactor to produce a low-sulfur pyrolysis oil. In the experiments, the effect of the residence time of the feed material in the auger reactor was investigated at ∼300 (auger reactor) and 500 °C (fluidized bed reactor). In addition, natural dolomite and olivine and calcined dolomite and olivine were used as the fluidized bed materials to examine their effects on reducing the sulfur content of pyrolysis oil. In the experiments, the yields of the oil from the auger reactor were 1.4–3.7 wt%, and it was enriched with DL-limonene whose content in the oil was 40–50 wt%. The yields of the oil from the fluidized bed reactor were 42–46 wt%. The optimum residence time of the feed material in the auger reactor turned out to be 3.5 min. Calcined dolomite and olivine significantly decreased the sulfur content of pyrolysis oil. Metal oxides of the additives appeared to react with H_2S to form metal sulfides. The sulfur content of pyrolysis oil obtained with calcined olivine was 0.45 wt%. - Highlights: • Scrap tires were successfully pyrolyzed in a new type two-stage pyrolyzer. • The two-stage pyrolyzer is composed of an auger and fluidized bed reactors. • Calcination of olivine and dolomite led to a strong decrease in sulfur. • The lowest sulfur content of pyrolysis oil was 0.45 wt%. • Pyrolysis oil yields from the fluidized bed reactor were 43–46 wt%.

  11. (including travel dates) Proposed itinerary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashok

    31 July to 22 August 2012 (including travel dates). Proposed itinerary: Arrival in Bangalore on 1 August. 1-5 August: Bangalore, Karnataka. Suggested institutions: Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore. St Johns Medical College & Hospital, Bangalore. Jawaharlal Nehru Centre, Bangalore. 6-8 August: Chennai, TN.

  12. A new concept for an old instrument: flexible corneal scrapping spatula Um novo conceito para um antigo instrumento: espátula corneana flexível

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acacio Lima Filho

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe a new methods to produce an instrument to scrap the cornea. It is made from either a fine needle or a cannula. The material is flattened by means of a laminator or a hammer and a flat metal surface. A sandpaper is used to rough the front end and round it. The tip is slightly bent and the device is submitted to ethylene oxide for sterilization. A handle may be used to hold the instrument, which may be reusable, after washing and sterilization using local heat at the tip, or gas.Os autores descrevem um novo método para produzir um instrumento para colheita de material de córnea. Tal instrumento pode ser manufaturado com uma cânula ou agulha fina. O material é moldado de forma plana com o auxílio de um laminador, ou de um martelo e placa de metal. Lixa fina é utilizada para arredondar as bordas e a ponta é ligeiramente dobrada. Um cabo pode ser adicionado de modo a facilitar a manipulação do instrumento, que pode ser reutilizado após lavagem e esterilização local na ponta do metal, ou por óxido de etileno.

  13. The effect of ship scrapping industry and its associated wastes on the biomass production and biodiversity of biota in in situ condition at Alang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, A; Joshi, H V; Trivedi, R H; Sravankumar, V G; Raghunathan, C; Khambhaty, Y; Kotiwar, O S; Mandal, S K

    2001-06-01

    The main pollutants for the ship scrapping industry and its associated wastes at Alang are heavy metals, petroleum hydrocarbon and bacterial contaminations. The concentration of iron, manganese, cobalt, copper, zinc, lead, cadmium, nickel and mercury were 25 to 15,500% more at nearshore station of Alang as compared to control site at Piram. The concentration of heavy metals in the nearshore station of Alang was always higher than its concentration at 10 km away. The concentration of petroleum hydrocarbon was 16,973 and 53,900% more at the nearshore and 10 km away respectively at Alang as compared to controls. The concentration of chlorophyll-a and phaeophytin were in non-detectable range (Alang as compared to controls. The total viable count, total coliform, Escherichia coli, Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus and other Vibrio, Streptococcus faecalis, Shigella, Salmonella, Proteus, and Klebsiella were always higher (17%-605%) at the nearshore station of Alang as compared to control. Similar trend was observed at 10 km away from Alang. Bacteria in sediment also showed the same pattern of variation. Phytoplankton counts at the nearshore station and 10 km away from Alang were only slightly raised. In contrast to phytoplankton, the zooplankton showed considerable reduction of growth (-10 to -66%) at Alang.

  14. Control of Transboundary Movement of Radioactive Material Inadvertently Incorporated into Scrap Metal and Semi-finished Products of the Metal Recycling Industries. Results of the Meetings Conducted to Develop a Draft Code of Conduct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-02-01

    In 2010, the IAEA initiated the development of a code of conduct on the transboundary movement of radioactive material inadvertently incorporated into scrap metal and semi- finished products of the metal recycling industries (Metal Recycling Code of Conduct). The Metal Recycling Code of Conduct was intended to harmonize the approaches of Member States in relation to the discovery of radioactive material that may inadvertently be present in scrap metals and semi-finished products subject to transboundary movement, and their safe handling and management to facilitate regulatory control. The Metal Recycling Code of Conduct was envisaged as being complementary to the Safety Guide on Control of Orphan Sources and Other Radioactive Material in the Metal Recycling and Production Industries (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SSG-17), which provides recommendations, principally within a national context, on the protection of workers, members of the public and the environment in relation to the control of radioactive material inadvertently incorporated in scrap metal. In February 2013, the third open-ended meeting of technical and legal experts to develop the Metal Recycling Code of Conduct was organized. The objective of this meeting was to address the comments received from Member States and to finalize the text of the draft Metal Recycling Code of Conduct. Representatives from 55 Member States, one non-Member State and the EU, together with seven observers from the metal recycling industry, reviewed the comments and revised the draft accordingly. In September 2013, in Resolution GC(57)/RES/9, the IAEA General Conference recorded that it 'Appreciates the intensive efforts undertaken by the Secretariat to develop a code of conduct on the transboundary movement of scrap metal, or materials produced from scrap metal, that may inadvertently contain radioactive material, and encourages the Secretariat to make the results of the discussion conducted on this issue available to

  15. Theory including future not excluded

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagao, K.; Nielsen, H.B.

    2013-01-01

    We study a complex action theory (CAT) whose path runs over not only past but also future. We show that, if we regard a matrix element defined in terms of the future state at time T and the past state at time TA as an expectation value in the CAT, then we are allowed to have the Heisenberg equation......, Ehrenfest's theorem, and the conserved probability current density. In addition,we showthat the expectation value at the present time t of a future-included theory for large T - t and large t - T corresponds to that of a future-not-included theory with a proper inner product for large t - T. Hence, the CAT...

  16. Device including a contact detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    arms (12) may extend from the supporting body in co-planar relationship with the first surface. The plurality of cantilever arms (12) may extend substantially parallel to each other and each of the plurality of cantilever arms (12) may include an electrical conductive tip for contacting the area......The present invention relates to a probe for determining an electrical property of an area of a surface of a test sample, the probe is intended to be in a specific orientation relative to the test sample. The probe may comprise a supporting body defining a first surface. A plurality of cantilever...... of the test sample by movement of the probe relative to the surface of the test sample into the specific orientation.; The probe may further comprise a contact detector (14) extending from the supporting body arranged so as to contact the surface of the test sample prior to any one of the plurality...

  17. Neoclassical transport including collisional nonlinearity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candy, J; Belli, E A

    2011-06-10

    In the standard δf theory of neoclassical transport, the zeroth-order (Maxwellian) solution is obtained analytically via the solution of a nonlinear equation. The first-order correction δf is subsequently computed as the solution of a linear, inhomogeneous equation that includes the linearized Fokker-Planck collision operator. This equation admits analytic solutions only in extreme asymptotic limits (banana, plateau, Pfirsch-Schlüter), and so must be solved numerically for realistic plasma parameters. Recently, numerical codes have appeared which attempt to compute the total distribution f more accurately than in the standard ordering by retaining some nonlinear terms related to finite-orbit width, while simultaneously reusing some form of the linearized collision operator. In this work we show that higher-order corrections to the distribution function may be unphysical if collisional nonlinearities are ignored.

  18. The Influence of Micro-Oxygen Addition on Desulfurization Performance and Microbial Communities during Waste-Activated Sludge Digestion in a Rusty Scrap Iron-Loaded Anaerobic Digester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renjun Ruan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, micro-oxygen was integrated into a rusty scrap iron (RSI-loaded anaerobic digester. Under an optimal RSI dosage of 20 g/L, increasing O2 levels were added stepwise in seven stages in a semi-continuous experiment. Results showed the average methane yield was 306 mL/g COD (chemical oxygen demand, and the hydrogen sulphide (H2S concentration was 1933 ppmv with RSI addition. O2 addition induced the microbial oxidation of sulphide by stimulating sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and chemical corrosion of iron, which promoted the generation of FeS and Fe2S3. In the 6th phase of the semi-continuous test, deep desulfurization was achieved without negatively impacting system performance. Average methane yield was 301.1 mL/g COD, and H2S concentration was 75 ppmv. Sulfur mass balance was described, with 84.0%, 11.90% and 0.21% of sulfur present in solid, liquid and gaseous phases, respectively. The Polymerase Chain Reaction-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE analysis revealed that RSI addition could enrich the diversity of hydrogenotrophic methanogens and iron-reducing bacteria to benefit methanogenesis and organic mineralization, and impoverish the methanotroph (Methylocella silvestris to reduce the consumption of methane. Micro-oxygen supplementation could enhance the diversity of iron-oxidizing bacteria arising from the improvement of Fe(II release rate and enrich the sulphur-oxidising bacteria to achieved desulfurization. These results demonstrated that RSI addition in combination with micro-oxygenation represents a promising method for simultaneously controlling biogas H2S concentration and improving digestion performance.

  19. The Effect of Grinding and Roasting Conditions on the Selective Leaching of Nd and Dy from NdFeB Magnet Scraps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Sung Yoon

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The pretreatment processes consisting of grinding followed by roasting were investigated to improve the selective leaching of Nd and Dy from neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB magnet scraps. The peaks of Nd(OH3 and Fe were observed in XRD results after grinding with NaOH as the amount of water addition increased to 5 cm3. These results indicate that the components of Nd and Fe in NdFeB magnet could be changed successfully into Nd(OH3 and Fe, respectively. In the roasting tests using the ground product, with increasing roasting temperature to 500 °C, the peaks of Nd(OH3 and Fe disappeared while those of Nd2O3 and Fe2O3 were shown. The peaks of NdFeO3 in the sample roasted at 600 °C were observed in the XRD pattern. Consequently, 94.2%, 93.1%, 1.0% of Nd, Dy, Fe were leached at 400 rpm and 90 °C in 1 kmol·m−3 acetic acid solution with 1% pulp density using a sample prepared under the following conditions: 15 in stoichiometric molar ratio of NaOH:Nd, 550 rpm in rotational grinding speed, 5 cm3 in water addition, 30 min in grinding time, 400 °C and 2 h in roasting temperature and time. The results indicate that the selective leaching of Nd and Dy from NdFeB magnet could be achieved successfully by grinding and then roasting treatments.

  20. Can a pile of scrap unmask a new high technology? The A4/V-2 No V89 Bäckebo-torpeden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingemar Skoog, A.

    2013-04-01

    Three months before the first V-2 rocket attack on London a test vehicle crashed in southern Sweden on June 13, 1944. At this time the Allied only had limited knowledge about the rocket (A4/V-2) from agent reports and information from the Polish resistance investigating some remains from a crashed test vehicle in Poland. London was confronted with a new weapon supposedly able to carry an explosive warhead of several tons some 250 km. The A4/V-2 rocket test vehicle number V89 broke apart shortly before impacting ground. In a short time 2 t of metal parts and electrical equipment was collected and transported to Stockholm for investigations. A first Swedish report was ready by July 21, 1944 and the rocket parts were then transported to England for further investigations. By August 18, 1944 the Royal Aircraft Establishment (RAE) had its preliminary report ready. But how close to reality can a complex vehicle be reconstructed and the performance calculated from a pile of scrap by investigators dealing with a technology not seen before? In the early 1940s the state of art of liquid propellant rocket technology outside Germany was limited and the size of a liquid rocket engine for the likely performance hardly imaginable. The Swedish and British reports, at that time classified as top secret, have since been released and permit a very detailed analysis of the task to reconstruct the rocket vehicle, the engine itself and its performance. An assessment of the occurrence at Peenemünde and how the rocket became astray and fell in southern Sweden, together with the analyses by Swedish and British military investigators give a unique insight into the true nature of the V89. It shows the real capabilities of early aeronautical accident investigation methods in combination with solid engineering knowledge to unmask a new high technology.

  1. Is it time to scrap Scadding and adopt computed tomography for initial evaluation of sarcoidosis? [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Levy

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we argue for the use of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT over chest X-ray in the initial evaluation of patients with sarcoidosis. Chest X-ray, which has long been used to classify disease severity and offer prognostication in sarcoidosis, has clear limitations compared with HRCT, including wider interobserver variability, a looser association with lung function, and poorer sensitivity to detect important lung manifestations of sarcoidosis. In addition, HRCT offers a diagnostic advantage, as it better depicts targets for biopsy, such as mediastinal/hilar lymphadenopathy and focal parenchymal disease. Newer data suggest that specific HRCT findings may be associated with important prognostic outcomes, such as increased mortality. As we elaborate in this update, we strongly recommend the use of HRCT in the initial evaluation of the patient with sarcoidosis.

  2. Research report for fiscal 1998. Basic research for promoting joint implementation of energy use rationalization in Chinese steel industry (examination of introduction of scrap preheating system for electric furnaces); 1998 nendo chosa hokokusho. Chugoku tekkogyo ni okeru energy no shiyo gorika (denkiro scrap yonetsu system donyu kento)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Investigations are conducted on a project of introducing a scrap preheating system based on the central insertion movable shaft design into China's electric furnaces for the sake of energy saving and global warming gas reduction. Of the electric furnaces numbering approximately 3400 now in operation in China, most are small and antiquated, and are extremely low in energy efficiency when in operation. The percentage of electricity supplied by coal-fired facilities is high, and this causes the CO2 reduction problem. Investigations are conducted into four steel mills operating electric furnaces, and examinations are made on the applicability of a preheating system, which is the ultimate batch system developed by Nippon Steel Corporation. Studies are conducted for Wuyang Iron and Steel Co., Ltd., Tianjin Steel Pipe Co., Ltd., Budong Iron and Steel Co., Ltd., and Shanghai Five Steel Co., Ltd., and it is found that greenhouse gas will be reduced by 31,000 tons, 21,000 tons, 13,000 tons, and 11,000-tons at the said mills, respectively. It is learned that the cost to be invested will be retrieved in approximately 2.5 years, 2.8 years, 7.7 years, and 8.0 years, respectively. It is concluded that Shanghai Budong Iron and Steel (Group) Co., Ltd., is the best candidate to be equipped with the above-said system. (NEDO)

  3. Radio Frequency Enhanced Plasma Potential and Flows in the Scrap-Off Layer of an Active Antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michael John

    Ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) systems are critical components of current and future tokamak experiments aimed at producing nuclear fusion energy. During ICRH a host of deleterious effects occur, including increased heat flux to plasma facing components and modification of launched wave power. A suspected root cause of these effects is the radio frequency (RF) rectification of the plasma potential. Interest in the antenna scrape-off layer (SOL) region has drawn increasing interest, as it is recognized that mitigating these effects is necessary to achieving fusion power. This dissertation investigates the RF rectification of the plasma potential and the resulting cross-field flows that form due to an active RF antenna. The experiment is performed in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) utilizing a fast wave antenna and RF amplifier system developed for these studies. The RF system is capable of 150 kW output power for a 1 ms pulse that is repeated at the 1 Hz repetition rate of the LAPD plasma discharge. Upon application of the RF pulse to the antenna, the DC plasma potential, measured with an emissive probe, dramatically increases in certain spatial locations by a factor greater than 10 Te. The largest plasma potentials are observed at locations magnetically connected to the top and bottom of the antenna, and they exist only in the private SOL created between the antenna and a limiter placed 3.6 m away along the LAPD axis. The DC rectified potentials scale linearly with the antenna current over a factor of 12x in the applied current. These DC potentials increase plasma materials interactions (PMI), resulting in the sputtering of antenna materials whose presence is detected in the bulk plasma by the coatings that develop on probe diagnostics. The DC rectified potentials persist in the plasma long after the RF current in the antenna has rung down on the same time scales as the change in the density. At the top and bottom of the antenna are circular flows, often

  4. Synthesis of high-surface-area γ-Al2O3 from aluminum scrap and its use for the adsorption of metals: Pb(II), Cd(II) and Zn(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asencios, Yvan J.O.; Sun-Kou, María R.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Aluminum hydroxide obtained from aluminum scrap led to the formation of gamma alumina. ► Acidic pH of precipitation favored the formation of small particles of high surface areas. ► Higher aging temperature favored the formation of large structures of large pore sizes. ► Higher aging temperature generated symmetrical solids of regular hexagonal prism forms. ► Aluminas of large pores adsorbed metals as following: Pb (1.75 Å) > Cd (1.54 Å) > Zn (1.38 Å). - Abstract: Several types of alumina were synthesized from sodium aluminate (NaAlO 2 ) by precipitation with sulfuric acid (H 2 SO 4 ) and subsequently calcination at 500 °C to obtain γ-Al 2 O 3 . The precursor aluminate was derived from aluminum scrap. The various γ-Al 2 O 3 synthesized were characterized by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), adsorption–desorption of N 2 (S BET ) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). XRD revealed that distinct phases of Al 2 O 3 were formed during thermal treatment. Moreover, it was observed that conditions of synthesis (pH, aging time and temperature) strongly affect the physicochemical properties of the alumina. A high-surface-area alumina (371 m 2 g −1 ) was synthesized under mild conditions, from inexpensive raw materials. These aluminas were tested for the adsorption of Cd(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) from aqueous solution at toxic metal concentrations, and isotherms were determined.

  5. Fiscal 1996 project on the modeling for effective energy consumption in developing countries under a consignment from NEDO. Recent on the results of the demonstrative study on scrap preheater of electric furnace in the iron making process (for public); 1996 nendo hatten tojokoku energy shohi koritsuka model jigyo Shin Energy Sangyo Gijutsu Sogo Kaihatsu Kiko itaku. Seitetsu katei ni okeru denkiro no genryo yonetsu sochi ni kakawaru jissho kenkyu seika hokokusho (kokaiyo)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    Indonesia is the biggest iron steel producing country in the ASEAN countries. Most of the production is produced by the electric furnace method in which iron steel scrap is used as a material. However, an energy saving measure in this method, the electric furnace scrap preheater using flue gas, has not yet been spread on a full scale. This R and D is aimed at developing jointly with Indonesia an electric furnace scrap preheater for medium/small size electric furnaces which are adoptable to the present iron making situation in Indonesia and installing it to the electric furnace of the iron making plant in Indonesia for a demonstrative study on energy saving, etc. Spread/expansion of the electric furnace scrap preheater which is an excellent energy saving system targeted expansion of energy saving technology not only of Indonesia, but of ASEAN countries and Japan. In this fiscal year, remodeling of part of the system was made by change of flue gas flow for increasing the energy saving effect, and at the same time, a research study was made of a scrap reheater effective as a total system. Moreover, the paper investigated technical data/information in Japan and overseas. 3 figs., 9 tabs.

  6. Energy recovery of combustible fraction from fragmentation of metal scrap - Phase 2; Energiaatervinning av braennbar fraktion fraan fragmentering av metallhaltigt avfall - Steg 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyllenhammar, Marianne (Stena Metall AB (Sweden)); Davidsson, Kent (SP Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, Boraas (Sweden)); Jonsson, Torbjoern; Pettersson, Jesper (HTC, Chalmers Tekniska Hoegskola, Goeteborg (Sweden)); Victoren, Anders; Andersson, Hans (Metso Power AB (Sweden)); Widen, Christoffer (Lidkoepings Vaermeverk AB (Sweden))

    2010-03-15

    More recovered fuels have been put on the fuel market since the landfill ban of organic wastes was implemented. SLF (shredder light fraction = fluff) which is a waste from recovery of metal scrap has mostly been put on landfill until now. Due to high chlorine and metal content in this fuel there is a risk of increased deposit and corrosion problems in incineration plants. This project investigated if co-combustion with sewage sludge could reduce these problems. The purpose of the project was also to document the influence of SLF when it comes to deposits and corrosion in an incineration plant. In this project SLF has been co-combusted with normal waste with and without sewage sludge in the 20 MW bubbling fluidized bed boiler in Lidkoeping. Three combustion tests have been performed: - Ref - Reference test (normal fuel mix = 50% household waste/50% industrial waste). - F1 - Test 1 (75% normal fuel mix , 21% SLF and 4% sewage sludge) - F2 - Test 2 (77% normal fuel mix and 23% SLF) The fuel mix is specified as percentage of energy content. The tests lasted 3 days and during the last 24 hours corrosion and deposit probes were exposed inside the boiler. The surface temperatures of the corrosion probes were 280, 350 and 420 deg C in each test. At the same time as the probes were exposed the boiler operation was followed and samples of fuel, ash and flue gas were taken. The results clearly show that sewage sludge initially decreases the deposit and corrosion problems at SLF combustion. Lower amounts of deposits were measured and the deposits were less corrosive when 4% of sewage sludge was added to the fuel mix with normal waste and SLF (F1). Co-combustion of more than 20% SLF and wastes (F2) increase initially the amount of the deposits and the deposits were also initially more corrosive. Long-term consequences are not investigated in this project. The project has not shown a distinct explanation why sewage sludge gives these good effects. Several possible causes, as

  7. Propriedades reométricas e mecânicas e morfologia de compósitos desenvolvidos com resíduos elastoméricos vulcanizados Cure characteristics, mechanical properties and morphology of composites developed with addition of elastomeric vulcanized ground scraps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Zanchet

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Uma alternativa para as empresas geradoras de resíduos elastoméricos é a incorporação dos mesmos em suas formulações. Esse trabalho tem como objetivo preparar compósitos a partir da incorporação de resíduos industriais de SBR (copolímero de butadieno-estireno e de EPDM (terpolímero de etileno-propileno-dieno, em formulação ASTM específica para cada tipo de elastômero. Foram avaliadas as propriedades reométricas, mecânicas e morfológicas dos compósitos desenvolvidos. A incorporação do resíduo permitiu a obtenção de produtos que vulcanizam em menores tempos quando comparados a composições sem resíduo. A quantidade de resíduo, para o melhor resultado de resistência à tração foi de 37 e de 196 phr para os compósitos com SBR e EPDM, respectivamente. As micrografias de MEV corroboraram os resultados mecânicos dessas composições, indicando melhor homogeneidade do resíduo na respectiva matriz elastomérica.One alternative for elastomeric scraps generation is its incorporation in conventional formulations in the industry itself. In this work, compositions with incorporation of SBR (styrene butadiene rubber and EPDM (ethylene propylene diene rubber industrial scraps, in specific ASTM formulation for each elastomer, were prepared. Rheometric characteristics, mechanical properties and the morphology of the compounds developed were evaluated. With the ground scraps incorporation the vulcanization time decreases, comparing with compounds without ground scraps. The amount of scraps for the best tensile strength properties was 37 and 196 phr for SBR and EPDM compositions, respectively. Micrographs corroborated the mechanical results, indicating the best homogeneity of the scraps in the elastomeric matrix for these compositions.

  8. 42 CFR 410.100 - Included services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... service; however, maintenance therapy itself is not covered as part of these services. (c) Occupational... increase respiratory function, such as graded activity services; these services include physiologic... rehabilitation plan of treatment, including physical therapy services, occupational therapy services, speech...

  9. Static, Lightweight Includes Resolution for PHP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Hills (Mark); P. Klint (Paul); J.J. Vinju (Jurgen)

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractDynamic languages include a number of features that are challenging to model properly in static analysis tools. In PHP, one of these features is the include expression, where an arbitrary expression provides the path of the file to include at runtime. In this paper we present two

  10. Article Including Environmental Barrier Coating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An enhanced environmental barrier coating for a silicon containing substrate. The enhanced barrier coating may include a bond coat doped with at least one of an alkali metal oxide and an alkali earth metal oxide. The enhanced barrier coating may include a composite mullite bond coat including BSAS and another distinct second phase oxide applied over said surface.

  11. Rare thoracic cancers, including peritoneum mesothelioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siesling, Sabine; van der Zwan, Jan Maarten; Izarzugaza, Isabel; Jaal, Jana; Treasure, Tom; Foschi, Roberto; Ricardi, Umberto; Groen, Harry; Tavilla, Andrea; Ardanaz, Eva

    Rare thoracic cancers include those of the trachea, thymus and mesothelioma (including peritoneum mesothelioma). The aim of this study was to describe the incidence, prevalence and survival of rare thoracic tumours using a large database, which includes cancer patients diagnosed from 1978 to 2002,

  12. Rare thoracic cancers, including peritoneum mesothelioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siesling, Sabine; Zwan, J.M.V.D.; Izarzugaza, I.; Jaal, J.; Treasure, T.; Foschi, R.; Ricardi, U.; Groen, H.; Tavilla, A.; Ardanaz, E.

    2012-01-01

    Rare thoracic cancers include those of the trachea, thymus and mesothelioma (including peritoneum mesothelioma). The aim of this study was to describe the incidence, prevalence and survival of rare thoracic tumours using a large database, which includes cancer patients diagnosed from 1978 to 2002,

  13. Sucata como elemento de comunicação na enfermagem "Desperdicios" como elemento de comunicación en la enfermería "Scrap" as an element of communication in nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Esperidião

    1996-04-01

    interacción individuo - "desperdicios", durante la realización del trabajo y averiguar si el objeto escogido asume una representación diferente de los que es. Encontramos que existen especificidades en la representación de cada auto retrato del Ser enfermero. En cuanto a la interacción individuo - "desperdicios" huvo una cierta secuencia de los objetos, selección de "desperdicios" y concretización de la tarea realizada en relación a los objetos escogidos percibimos nítida preferencia a los relacionados con la profesión, aunque otros también lo fueran. Finalizando, sugerimos que otros estudios utilizando "desperdicios" como elemento de comunicación sean realizados.Based on the understanding that students and nursing professionals demonstrate difficulties in being a “person” in the profession, we developed a descriptive and exploratory study with a qualitative approach. Then, we offered during the "Lind" II Nursing Congress in the city of Goiânia a work-shop called “LEARNING ABOUT NURSE'S ENTITY”. Among various processes of work-groups: the "Scrap" was used as a kind of communication. It was a resource utilized in certain dynamics, being the object of our study that has the following goals: to identify the representation of nurse's "entity" to verify the interaction process "man-scrap" during the realization of the work and to verify if the object is represented as it really, is. We have seen that there are particularities in the representation of nurse's entity. Regarding "man-scrap" interaction it had the followed sequence: finding strange the material and the proposal of work, manipulating and identifying objects, "scrap" selection and concretion of the job. With respect to the objects, we perceived a clear preference to the ones related to the profession. Finally, we suggest that other studies about the "scrap" communication element, must be developed.

  14. A novel process for recycling and resynthesizing LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 from the cathode scraps intended for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xihua; Xie, Yongbing; Cao, Hongbin; Nawaz, Faheem; Zhang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A simple process to recycle cathode scraps intended for lithium-ion batteries. • Complete separation of the cathode material from the aluminum foil is achieved. • The recovered aluminum foil is highly pure. • LiNi 1/3 Co 1/3 Mn 1/3 O 2 is directly resynthesized from the separated cathode material. - Abstract: To solve the recycling challenge for aqueous binder based lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), a novel process for recycling and resynthesizing LiNi 1/3 Co 1/3 Mn 1/3 O 2 from the cathode scraps generated during manufacturing process is proposed in this study. Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) is employed to separate the cathode material from the aluminum foil. The effects of TFA concentration, liquid/solid (L/S) ratio, reaction temperature and time on the separation efficiencies of the cathode material and aluminum foil are investigated systematically. The cathode material can be separated completely under the optimal experimental condition of 15 vol.% TFA solution, L/S ratio of 8.0 mL g −1 , reacting at 40 °C for 180 min along with appropriate agitation. LiNi 1/3 Co 1/3 Mn 1/3 O 2 is successfully resynthesized from the separated cathode material by solid state reaction method. Several kinds of characterizations are performed to verify the typical properties of the resynthesized LiNi 1/3 Co 1/3 Mn 1/3 O 2 powder. Electrochemical tests show that the initial charge and discharge capacities of the resynthesized LiNi 1/3 Co 1/3 Mn 1/3 O 2 are 201 mAh g −1 and 155.4 mAh g −1 (2.8–4.5 V, 0.1 C), respectively. The discharge capacity remains at 129 mAh g −1 even after 30 cycles with a capacity retention ratio of 83.01%

  15. Births and deaths including fetal deaths

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Access to a variety of United States birth and death files including fetal deaths: Birth Files, 1968-2009; 1995-2005; Fetal death file, 1982-2005; Mortality files,...

  16. Including Indigenous Minorities in Decision-Making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pristed Nielsen, Helene

    Based on theories of public sphere participation and deliberative democracy, this book presents empirical results from a study of experiences with including Aboriginal and Maori groups in political decision-making in respectively Western Australia and New Zealand......Based on theories of public sphere participation and deliberative democracy, this book presents empirical results from a study of experiences with including Aboriginal and Maori groups in political decision-making in respectively Western Australia and New Zealand...

  17. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  18. Electric Power Monthly, August 1990. [Glossary included

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-11-29

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly summaries of electric utility statistics at the national, Census division, and State level. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data includes generation by energy source (coal, oil, gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear); generation by region; consumption of fossil fuels for power generation; sales of electric power, cost data; and unusual occurrences. A glossary is included.

  19. Electrochemical cell structure including an ionomeric barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Timothy N.; Hibbs, Michael

    2017-06-20

    An apparatus includes an electrochemical half-cell comprising: an electrolyte, an anode; and an ionomeric barrier positioned between the electrolyte and the anode. The anode may comprise a multi-electron vanadium phosphorous alloy, such as VP.sub.x, wherein x is 1-5. The electrochemical half-cell is configured to oxidize the vanadium and phosphorous alloy to release electrons. A method of mitigating corrosion in an electrochemical cell includes disposing an ionomeric barrier in a path of electrolyte or ion flow to an anode and mitigating anion accumulation on the surface of the anode.

  20. Isolators Including Main Spring Linear Guide Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goold, Ryan (Inventor); Buchele, Paul (Inventor); Hindle, Timothy (Inventor); Ruebsamen, Dale Thomas (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Embodiments of isolators, such as three parameter isolators, including a main spring linear guide system are provided. In one embodiment, the isolator includes first and second opposing end portions, a main spring mechanically coupled between the first and second end portions, and a linear guide system extending from the first end portion, across the main spring, and toward the second end portion. The linear guide system expands and contracts in conjunction with deflection of the main spring along the working axis, while restricting displacement and rotation of the main spring along first and second axes orthogonal to the working axis.

  1. Study on incinerating method of leather scraps and recovery of chromium f om incinerated residues. Kakusetsu no nensho hoho no kento narabi ni nensho nokoribun kara no chromium no kaishu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamura, H. (Showa Women' s Univ., Tokyo (Japan) Tokyo Toritsu Hikaku Gijutsu Center, Tokyo (Japan)); Imai, T. (Tokyo Toritsu Hikaku Gijutsu Center, Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-11-05

    In Japan, it is the present situation that most of chromium contained side refuse generated in the leather manufacturing process are treated by means of using them for landfilling or incineration, etc. Even confining to the grownup oxhides and cowhides imported from North America, its total amount is 125,000t in terms of anhydride equivalent, hence it is estimated that about 1.14t of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} is discharged in the way mentioned above as a chromium tanning agent. Since Japan imports almost all chromium material from overseas, it is desirable to recover chromium from the above incinerated residues. In this article, based on the study results in the past concerning the recovery of chromium from incineration of leather scraps, an experimental furnace of the retorting two stage incineration system was experimentally built and a wet alkali scrubber and a hot water boiler utilizing combustion exhaust gas heat were installed. And by using them, the fuel condition to reduce the harmful gas component and the removal effect to be made with the scrubber, the chemical composition of the incinerated residues and its utilization, etc. were examined. As a result, by the above system, it was found that chromium could be recovered and reutilized. 9 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. Experimental Investigation and Thermodynamic Modeling of the B2O3-FeO-Fe2O3-Nd2O3 System for Recycling of NdFeB Magnet Scrap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsson, Lars Klemet; Tranell, Gabriella; Jung, In-Ho

    2017-02-01

    NdFeB magnet scrap is an alternative source of neodymium that could have a significantly lower impact on the environment than current mining and extraction processes. Neodymium can be readily oxidized in the presence of oxygen, which makes it easy to recover neodymium in oxide form. Thermochemical data and phase diagrams for neodymium oxide containing systems is, however, very limited. Thermodynamic modeling of the B2O3-FeO-Fe2O3-Nd2O3 system was hence performed to obtain accurate phase diagrams and thermochemical properties of the system. Key phase diagram experiments were also carried out for the FeO-Nd2O3 system in saturation with iron to improve the accuracy of the present modeling. The modified quasichemical model was used to describe the Gibbs energy of the liquid oxide phase. The Gibbs energy functions of the liquid phase and the solids were optimized to reproduce all available and reliable phase diagram data, and thermochemical properties of the system. Finally the optimized database was applied to calculate conditions for selective oxidation of neodymium from NdFeB magnet waste.

  3. 28 CFR 20.32 - Includable offenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.32 Includable offenses. (a) Criminal history record... vehicular manslaughter, driving under the influence of drugs or liquor, and hit and run), when unaccompanied by a § 20.32(a) offense. These exclusions may not be applicable to criminal history records...

  4. Including Students with Visual Impairments: Softball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian, Ali; Haegele, Justin A.

    2014-01-01

    Research has shown that while students with visual impairments are likely to be included in general physical education programs, they may not be as active as their typically developing peers. This article provides ideas for equipment modifications and game-like progressions for one popular physical education unit, softball. The purpose of these…

  5. Extending flood damage assessment methodology to include ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Optimal and sustainable flood plain management, including flood control, can only be achieved when the impacts of flood control measures are considered for both the man-made and natural environments, and the sociological aspects are fully considered. Until now, methods/models developed to determine the influences ...

  6. BIOLOGIC AND ECONOMIC EFFECTS OF INCLUDING DIFFERENT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The biologic and economic effects of including three agro-industrial by-products as ingredients in turkey poult diets were investigated using 48 turkey poults in a completely randomised design experiment. Diets were formulated to contain the three by-products – wheat offal, rice husk and palm kernel meal, each at 20% level ...

  7. Including Children Dependent on Ventilators in School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Jack M.

    1996-01-01

    Guidelines for including ventilator-dependent children in school are offered, based on experience with six such students at a New York State school. Guidelines stress adherence to the medical management plan, the school-family partnership, roles of the social worker and psychologist, orientation, transportation, classroom issues, and steps toward…

  8. Photoactive devices including porphyrinoids with coordinating additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Stephen R; Zimmerman, Jeramy; Yu, Eric K; Thompson, Mark E; Trinh, Cong; Whited, Matthew; Diev, Vlacheslav

    2015-05-12

    Coordinating additives are included in porphyrinoid-based materials to promote intermolecular organization and improve one or more photoelectric characteristics of the materials. The coordinating additives are selected from fullerene compounds and organic compounds having free electron pairs. Combinations of different coordinating additives can be used to tailor the characteristic properties of such porphyrinoid-based materials, including porphyrin oligomers. Bidentate ligands are one type of coordinating additive that can form coordination bonds with a central metal ion of two different porphyrinoid compounds to promote porphyrinoid alignment and/or pi-stacking. The coordinating additives can shift the absorption spectrum of a photoactive material toward higher wavelengths, increase the external quantum efficiency of the material, or both.

  9. Electric power monthly, September 1990. [Glossary included

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-17

    The purpose of this report is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues. The power plants considered include coal, petroleum, natural gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear power plants. Data are presented for power generation, fuel consumption, fuel receipts and cost, sales of electricity, and unusual occurrences at power plants. Data are compared at the national, Census division, and state levels. 4 figs., 52 tabs. (CK)

  10. Nuclear reactor shield including magnesium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouse, C.A.; Simnad, M.T.

    1981-01-01

    An improvement is described for nuclear reactor shielding of a type used in reactor applications involving significant amounts of fast neutron flux. The reactor shielding includes means providing structural support, neutron moderator material, neutron absorber material and other components, wherein at least a portion of the neutron moderator material is magnesium in the form of magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron

  11. Model for safety reports including descriptive examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    Several safety reports will be produced in the process of planning and constructing the system for disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Sweden. The present report gives a model, with detailed examples, of how these reports should be organized and what steps they should include. In the near future safety reports will deal with the encapsulation plant and the repository. Later reports will treat operation of the handling systems and the repository

  12. Jet-calculus approach including coherence effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, L.M.; Migneron, R.; Narayanan, K.S.S.

    1987-01-01

    We show how integrodifferential equations typical of jet calculus can be combined with an averaging procedure to obtain jet-calculus-based results including the Mueller interference graphs. Results in longitudinal-momentum fraction x for physical quantities are higher at intermediate x and lower at large x than with the conventional ''incoherent'' jet calculus. These results resemble those of Marchesini and Webber, who used a Monte Carlo approach based on the same dynamics

  13. [Renal patient's diet: Can fish be included?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro González, M I; Maafs Rodríguez, A G; Galindo Gómez, C

    2012-01-01

    Medical and nutritional treatment for renal disease, now a major public health issue, is highly complicated. Nutritional therapy must seek to retard renal dysfunction, maintain an optimal nutritional status and prevent the development of underlying pathologies. To analyze ten fish species to identify those that, because of their low phosphorus content, high biological value protein and elevated n-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA, could be included in renal patient's diet. The following fish species (Litte tunny, Red drum, Spotted eagleray, Escolar, Swordfish, Big-scale pomfret, Cortez flounder, Largemouth blackbass, Periche mojarra, Florida Pompano) were analyzed according to the AOAC and Keller techniques to determine their protein, phosphorus, sodium, potassium, cholesterol, vitamins D(3) and E, and n-3 EPA+DHA content. These results were used to calculate relations between nutrients. The protein in the analyzed species ranged from 16.5 g/100 g of fillet (Largemouth black bass) to 27.2 g/100 g (Red drum); the lowest phosphorus value was 28.6 mg/100 g (Periche mojarra) and the highest 216.3 mg/100 g (Spotted eagle ray). 80% of the fish presented > 100 mg EPA + DHA in 100 g of fillet. By its Phosphorus/gProtein ratio, Escolar and Swordfish could not be included in the renal diet; Little tunny, Escolar, Big-scale pomfret, Largemouth black-bass, Periche mojarra and Florida Pompano presented a lower Phosphorus/EPA + DHA ratio. Florida pompano is the most recommended specie for renal patients, due to its optimal nutrient relations. However, all analyzed species, except Escolar and Swordfish, could be included in renal diets.

  14. MOS modeling hierarchy including radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, D.R.; Turfler, R.M.

    1975-01-01

    A hierarchy of modeling procedures has been developed for MOS transistors, circuit blocks, and integrated circuits which include the effects of total dose radiation and photocurrent response. The models were developed for use with the SCEPTRE circuit analysis program, but the techniques are suitable for other modern computer aided analysis programs. The modeling hierarchy permits the designer or analyst to select the level of modeling complexity consistent with circuit size, parametric information, and accuracy requirements. Improvements have been made in the implementation of important second order effects in the transistor MOS model, in the definition of MOS building block models, and in the development of composite terminal models for MOS integrated circuits

  15. Drug delivery device including electrolytic pump

    KAUST Repository

    Foulds, Ian G.; Buttner, Ulrich; Yi, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Systems and methods are provided for a drug delivery device and use of the device for drug delivery. In various aspects, the drug delivery device combines a “solid drug in reservoir” (SDR) system with an electrolytic pump. In various aspects an improved electrolytic pump is provided including, in particular, an improved electrolytic pump for use with a drug delivery device, for example an implantable drug delivery device. A catalytic reformer can be incorporated in a periodically pulsed electrolytic pump to provide stable pumping performance and reduced actuation cycle.

  16. Drug delivery device including electrolytic pump

    KAUST Repository

    Foulds, Ian G.

    2016-03-31

    Systems and methods are provided for a drug delivery device and use of the device for drug delivery. In various aspects, the drug delivery device combines a “solid drug in reservoir” (SDR) system with an electrolytic pump. In various aspects an improved electrolytic pump is provided including, in particular, an improved electrolytic pump for use with a drug delivery device, for example an implantable drug delivery device. A catalytic reformer can be incorporated in a periodically pulsed electrolytic pump to provide stable pumping performance and reduced actuation cycle.

  17. Energy principle with included boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, B.

    1994-01-01

    Earlier comments by the author on the limitations of the classical form of the extended energy principle are supported by a complementary analysis on the potential energy change arising from free-boundary displacements of a magnetically confined plasma. In the final formulation of the extended principle, restricted displacements, satisfying pressure continuity by means of plasma volume currents in a thin boundary layer, are replaced by unrestricted (arbitrary) displacements which can give rise to induced surface currents. It is found that these currents contribute to the change in potential energy, and that their contribution is not taken into account by such a formulation. A general expression is further given for surface currents induced by arbitrary displacements. The expression is used to reformulate the energy principle for the class of displacements which satisfy all necessary boundary conditions, including that of the pressure balance. This makes a minimization procedure of the potential energy possible, for the class of all physically relevant test functions which include the constraints imposed by the boundary conditions. Such a procedure is also consistent with a corresponding variational calculus. (Author)

  18. Aerosol simulation including chemical and nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marwil, E.S.; Lemmon, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    The numerical simulation of aerosol transport, including the effects of chemical and nuclear reactions presents a challenging dynamic accounting problem. Particles of different sizes agglomerate and settle out due to various mechanisms, such as diffusion, diffusiophoresis, thermophoresis, gravitational settling, turbulent acceleration, and centrifugal acceleration. Particles also change size, due to the condensation and evaporation of materials on the particle. Heterogeneous chemical reactions occur at the interface between a particle and the suspending medium, or a surface and the gas in the aerosol. Homogeneous chemical reactions occur within the aersol suspending medium, within a particle, and on a surface. These reactions may include a phase change. Nuclear reactions occur in all locations. These spontaneous transmutations from one element form to another occur at greatly varying rates and may result in phase or chemical changes which complicate the accounting process. This paper presents an approach for inclusion of these effects on the transport of aerosols. The accounting system is very complex and results in a large set of stiff ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The techniques for numerical solution of these ODEs require special attention to achieve their solution in an efficient and affordable manner. 4 refs

  19. Addressing Stillbirth in India Must Include Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lisa; Montgomery, Susanne; Ganesh, Gayatri; Kaur, Harinder Pal; Singh, Ratan

    2017-07-01

    Millennium Development Goal 4, to reduce child mortality, can only be achieved by reducing stillbirths globally. A confluence of medical and sociocultural factors contribute to the high stillbirth rates in India. The psychosocial aftermath of stillbirth is a well-documented public health problem, though less is known of the experience for men, particularly outside of the Western context. Therefore, men's perceptions and knowledge regarding reproductive health, as well as maternal-child health are important. Key informant interviews (n = 5) were analyzed and 28 structured interviews were conducted using a survey based on qualitative themes. Qualitative themes included men's dual burden and right to medical and reproductive decision making power. Wives were discouraged from expressing grief and pushed to conceive again. If not successful, particularly if a son was not conceived, a second wife was considered a solution. Quantitative data revealed that men with a history of stillbirths had greater anxiety and depression, perceived less social support, but had more egalitarian views towards women than men without stillbirth experience. At the same time fathers of stillbirths were more likely to be emotionally or physically abusive. Predictors of mental health, attitudes towards women, and perceived support are discussed. Patriarchal societal values, son preference, deficient women's autonomy, and sex-selective abortion perpetuate the risk for future poor infant outcomes, including stillbirth, and compounds the already higher risk of stillbirth for males. Grief interventions should explore and take into account men's perceptions, attitudes, and behaviors towards reproductive decision making.

  20. Including gauge corrections to thermal leptogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huetig, Janine

    2013-05-17

    This thesis provides the first approach of a systematic inclusion of gauge corrections to leading order to the ansatz of thermal leptogenesis. We have derived a complete expression for the integrated lepton number matrix including all resummations needed. For this purpose, a new class of diagram has been invented, namely the cylindrical diagram, which allows diverse investigations into the topic of leptogenesis such as the case of resonant leptogenesis. After a brief introduction of the topic of the baryon asymmetry in the universe and a discussion of its most promising solutions as well as their advantages and disadvantages, we have presented our framework of thermal leptogenesis. An effective model was described as well as the associated Feynman rules. The basis for using nonequilibrium quantum field theory has been built in chapter 3. At first, the main definitions have been presented for equilibrium thermal field theory, afterwards we have discussed the Kadanoff-Baym equations for systems out of equilibrium using the example of the Majorana neutrino. The equations have also been solved in the context of leptogenesis in chapter 4. Since gauge corrections play a crucial role throughout this thesis, we have also repeated the naive ansatz by replacing the free equilibrium propagator by propagators including thermal damping rates due to the Standard Model damping widths for lepton and Higgs fields. It is shown that this leads to a comparable result to the solutions of the Boltzmann equations for thermal leptogenesis. Thus it becomes obvious that Standard Model corrections are not negligible for thermal leptogenesis and therefore need to be included systematically from first principles. In order to achieve this we have started discussing the calculation of ladder rung diagrams for Majorana neutrinos using the HTL and the CTL approach in chapter 5. All gauge corrections are included in this framework and thus it has become the basis for the following considerations

  1. Including gauge corrections to thermal leptogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huetig, Janine

    2013-01-01

    This thesis provides the first approach of a systematic inclusion of gauge corrections to leading order to the ansatz of thermal leptogenesis. We have derived a complete expression for the integrated lepton number matrix including all resummations needed. For this purpose, a new class of diagram has been invented, namely the cylindrical diagram, which allows diverse investigations into the topic of leptogenesis such as the case of resonant leptogenesis. After a brief introduction of the topic of the baryon asymmetry in the universe and a discussion of its most promising solutions as well as their advantages and disadvantages, we have presented our framework of thermal leptogenesis. An effective model was described as well as the associated Feynman rules. The basis for using nonequilibrium quantum field theory has been built in chapter 3. At first, the main definitions have been presented for equilibrium thermal field theory, afterwards we have discussed the Kadanoff-Baym equations for systems out of equilibrium using the example of the Majorana neutrino. The equations have also been solved in the context of leptogenesis in chapter 4. Since gauge corrections play a crucial role throughout this thesis, we have also repeated the naive ansatz by replacing the free equilibrium propagator by propagators including thermal damping rates due to the Standard Model damping widths for lepton and Higgs fields. It is shown that this leads to a comparable result to the solutions of the Boltzmann equations for thermal leptogenesis. Thus it becomes obvious that Standard Model corrections are not negligible for thermal leptogenesis and therefore need to be included systematically from first principles. In order to achieve this we have started discussing the calculation of ladder rung diagrams for Majorana neutrinos using the HTL and the CTL approach in chapter 5. All gauge corrections are included in this framework and thus it has become the basis for the following considerations

  2. The surgery of peripheral nerves (including tumors)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugleholm, Kåre

    2013-01-01

    Surgical pathology of the peripheral nervous system includes traumatic injury, entrapment syndromes, and tumors. The recent significant advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology and cellular biology of peripheral nerve degeneration and regeneration has yet to be translated into improved...... surgical techniques and better outcome after peripheral nerve injury. Decision making in peripheral nerve surgery continues to be a complex challenge, where the mechanism of injury, repeated clinical evaluation, neuroradiological and neurophysiological examination, and detailed knowledge of the peripheral...... nervous system response to injury are prerequisite to obtain the best possible outcome. Surgery continues to be the primary treatment modality for peripheral nerve tumors and advances in adjuvant oncological treatment has improved outcome after malignant peripheral nerve tumors. The present chapter...

  3. AMS at the ANU including biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fifield, L K; Allan, G L; Cresswell, R G; Ophel, T R [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia); King, S J; Day, J P [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry

    1994-12-31

    An extensive accelerator mass spectrometry program has been conducted on the 14UD accelerator at the Australian National University since 1986. In the two years since the previous conference, the research program has expanded significantly to include biomedical applications of {sup 26}Al and studies of landform evolution using isotopes produced in situ in surface rocks by cosmic ray bombardment. The system is now used for the measurement of {sup 10}Be, {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 59}Ni and {sup 129}I, and research is being undertaken in hydrology, environmental geochemistry, archaeology and biomedicine. On the technical side, a new test system has permitted the successful off-line development of a high-intensity ion source. A new injection line to the 14UD has been established and the new source is now in position and providing beams to the accelerator. 4 refs.

  4. AMS at the ANU including biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fifield, L.K.; Allan, G.L.; Cresswell, R.G.; Ophel, T.R. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia); King, S.J.; Day, J.P. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry

    1993-12-31

    An extensive accelerator mass spectrometry program has been conducted on the 14UD accelerator at the Australian National University since 1986. In the two years since the previous conference, the research program has expanded significantly to include biomedical applications of {sup 26}Al and studies of landform evolution using isotopes produced in situ in surface rocks by cosmic ray bombardment. The system is now used for the measurement of {sup 10}Be, {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 59}Ni and {sup 129}I, and research is being undertaken in hydrology, environmental geochemistry, archaeology and biomedicine. On the technical side, a new test system has permitted the successful off-line development of a high-intensity ion source. A new injection line to the 14UD has been established and the new source is now in position and providing beams to the accelerator. 4 refs.

  5. CERN Technical Training: LABVIEW courses include RADE

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The contents of the "LabView Basic I" and "LabView Intermediate II" courses have recently been changed to include, respectively, an introduction to and expert training in the Rapid Application Development Environment (RADE). RADE is a LabView-based application developed at CERN to integrate LabView in the accelerator and experiment control infrastructure. It is a suitable solution to developing expert tools, machine development analysis and independent test facilities. The course names have also been changed to "LabVIEW Basics I with RADE Introduction" and "LabVIEW Intermediate II with Advanced RADE Application". " LabVIEW Basics I with RADE Introduction" is designed for: Users preparing to develop applications using LabVIEW, or NI Developer Suite; users and technical managers evaluating LabVIEW or NI Developer Suite in purchasing decisions; users pursuing the Certified LabVIEW Developer certification. The course pr...

  6. CERN Technical Training: LABVIEW courses include RADE

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The contents of the "LabView Basic I" and "LabView Intermediate II" courses have recently been changed to include, respectively, an introduction to and expert training in the Rapid Application Development Environment (RADE). RADE is a LabView-based application developed at CERN to integrate LabView in the accelerator and experiment control infrastructure. It is a suitable solution to developing expert tools, machine development analysis and independent test facilities. The course names have also been changed to "LabVIEW Basics I with RADE Introduction" and "LabVIEW Intermediate II with Advanced RADE Application". " LabVIEW Basics I with RADE Introduction" is designed for: Users preparing to develop applications using LabVIEW, or NI Developer Suite; users and technical managers evaluating LabVIEW or NI Developer Suite in purchasing decisions; users pursuing the Certified LabVIEW Developer certification. The course prepares participants to develop test and measurement, da...

  7. CERN Technical Training: LABVIEW courses include RADE

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The contents of "LabView Basic I" and "LabView Intermediate II" trainings have been recently changed to include, respectively, an introduction and an expert training on the Rapid Application Development Environment (RADE). RADE is a LabView-based application developed at CERN to integrate LabView in the accelerator and experiment control infrastructure. It is a suitable solution to develop expert tools, machine development analysis and independent test facilities. The course names have also been changed to "LabVIEW Basics I with RADE Introduction" and "LabVIEW Intermediate II with Advanced RADE Application". " LabVIEW Basics I with RADE Introduction" is designed for: Users preparing to develop applications using LabVIEW, or NI Developer Suite; users and technical managers evaluating LabVIEW or NI Developer Suite in purchasing decisions; users pursuing the Certified LabVIEW Developer certification. The course prepare...

  8. Critical point anomalies include expansion shock waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nannan, N. R., E-mail: ryan.nannan@uvs.edu [Mechanical Engineering Discipline, Anton de Kom University of Suriname, Leysweg 86, PO Box 9212, Paramaribo, Suriname and Process and Energy Department, Delft University of Technology, Leeghwaterstraat 44, 2628 CA Delft (Netherlands); Guardone, A., E-mail: alberto.guardone@polimi.it [Department of Aerospace Science and Technology, Politecnico di Milano, Via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy); Colonna, P., E-mail: p.colonna@tudelft.nl [Propulsion and Power, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-02-15

    From first-principle fluid dynamics, complemented by a rigorous state equation accounting for critical anomalies, we discovered that expansion shock waves may occur in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor critical point in the two-phase region. Due to universality of near-critical thermodynamics, the result is valid for any common pure fluid in which molecular interactions are only short-range, namely, for so-called 3-dimensional Ising-like systems, and under the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium. In addition to rarefaction shock waves, diverse non-classical effects are admissible, including composite compressive shock-fan-shock waves, due to the change of sign of the fundamental derivative of gasdynamics.

  9. CLIC expands to include the Southern Hemisphere

    CERN Multimedia

    Roberto Cantoni

    2010-01-01

    Australia has recently joined the CLIC collaboration: the enlargement will bring new expertise and resources to the project, and is especially welcome in the wake of CERN budget redistributions following the recent adoption of the Medium Term Plan.   The countries involved in CLIC collaboration With the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding on 26 August 2010, the ACAS network (Australian Collaboration for Accelerator Science) became the 40th member of in the multilateral CLIC collaboration making Australia the 22nd country to join the collaboration. “The new MoU was signed by the ACAS network, which includes the Australian Synchrotron and the University of Melbourne”, explains Jean-Pierre Delahaye, CLIC Study Leader. “Thanks to their expertise, the Australian institutes will contribute greatly to the CLIC damping rings and the two-beam test modules." Institutes from any country wishing to join the CLIC collaboration are invited to assume responsibility o...

  10. Should Broca's area include Brodmann area 47?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardila, Alfredo; Bernal, Byron; Rosselli, Monica

    2017-02-01

    Understanding brain organization of speech production has been a principal goal of neuroscience. Historically, brain speech production has been associated with so-called Broca’s area (Brodmann area –BA- 44 and 45), however, modern neuroimaging developments suggest speech production is associated with networks rather than with areas. The purpose of this paper was to analyze the connectivity of BA47 ( pars orbitalis) in relation to language . A meta-analysis was conducted to assess the language network in which BA47 is involved. The Brainmap database was used. Twenty papers corresponding to 29 experimental conditions with a total of 373 subjects were included. Our results suggest that BA47 participates in a “frontal language production system” (or extended Broca’s system). The BA47  connectivity found is also concordant with a minor role in language semantics. BA47 plays a central role in the language production system.

  11. Musculoskeletal ultrasound including definitions for ultrasonographic pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wakefield, RJ; Balint, PV; Szkudlarek, Marcin

    2005-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) has great potential as an outcome in rheumatoid arthritis trials for detecting bone erosions, synovitis, tendon disease, and enthesopathy. It has a number of distinct advantages over magnetic resonance imaging, including good patient tolerability and ability to scan multiple joints...... in a short period of time. However, there are scarce data regarding its validity, reproducibility, and responsiveness to change, making interpretation and comparison of studies difficult. In particular, there are limited data describing standardized scanning methodology and standardized definitions of US...... pathologies. This article presents the first report from the OMERACT ultrasound special interest group, which has compared US against the criteria of the OMERACT filter. Also proposed for the first time are consensus US definitions for common pathological lesions seen in patients with inflammatory arthritis....

  12. Grand unified models including extra Z bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Tiezhong

    1989-01-01

    The grand unified theories (GUT) of the simple Lie groups including extra Z bosons are discussed. Under authors's hypothesis there are only SU 5+m SO 6+4n and E 6 groups. The general discussion of SU 5+m is given, then the SU 6 and SU 7 are considered. In SU 6 the 15+6 * +6 * fermion representations are used, which are not same as others in fermion content, Yukawa coupling and broken scales. A conception of clans of particles, which are not families, is suggested. These clans consist of extra Z bosons and the corresponding fermions of the scale. The all of fermions in the clans are down quarks except for the standard model which consists of Z bosons and 15 fermions, therefore, the spectrum of the hadrons which are composed of these down quarks are different from hadrons at present

  13. Including climate change in energy investment decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ybema, J.R.; Boonekamp, P.G.M.; Smit, J.T.J.

    1995-08-01

    To properly take climate change into account in the analysis of energy investment decisions, it is required to apply decision analysis methods that are capable of considering the specific characteristics of climate change (large uncertainties, long term horizon). Such decision analysis methods do exist. They can explicitly include evolving uncertainties, multi-stage decisions, cumulative effects and risk averse attitudes. Various methods are considered in this report and two of these methods have been selected: hedging calculations and sensitivity analysis. These methods are applied to illustrative examples, and its limitations are discussed. The examples are (1a) space heating and hot water for new houses from a private investor perspective and (1b) as example (1a) but from a government perspective, (2) electricity production with an integrated coal gasification combined cycle (ICGCC) with or without CO 2 removal, and (3) national energy strategy to hedge for climate change. 9 figs., 21 tabs., 42 refs., 1 appendix

  14. Education Program on Fossil Resources Including Coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usami, Masahiro

    Fossil fuels including coal play a key role as crucial energies in contributing to economic development in Asia. On the other hand, its limited quantity and the environmental problems causing from its usage have become a serious global issue and a countermeasure to solve such problems is very much demanded. Along with the pursuit of sustainable development, environmentally-friendly use of highly efficient fossil resources should be therefore, accompanied. Kyushu-university‧s sophisticated research through long years of accumulated experience on the fossil resources and environmental sectors together with the advanced large-scale commercial and empirical equipments will enable us to foster cooperative research and provide internship program for the future researchers. Then, this program is executed as a consignment business from the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry from 2007 fiscal year to 2009 fiscal year. The lecture that uses the textbooks developed by this program is scheduled to be started a course in fiscal year 2010.

  15. Analysis of Smart Composite Structures Including Debonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Seeley, Charles E.

    1997-01-01

    Smart composite structures with distributed sensors and actuators have the capability to actively respond to a changing environment while offering significant weight savings and additional passive controllability through ply tailoring. Piezoelectric sensing and actuation of composite laminates is the most promising concept due to the static and dynamic control capabilities. Essential to the implementation of these smart composites are the development of accurate and efficient modeling techniques and experimental validation. This research addresses each of these important topics. A refined higher order theory is developed to model composite structures with surface bonded or embedded piezoelectric transducers. These transducers are used as both sensors and actuators for closed loop control. The theory accurately captures the transverse shear deformation through the thickness of the smart composite laminate while satisfying stress free boundary conditions on the free surfaces. The theory is extended to include the effect of debonding at the actuator-laminate interface. The developed analytical model is implemented using the finite element method utilizing an induced strain approach for computational efficiency. This allows general laminate geometries and boundary conditions to be analyzed. The state space control equations are developed to allow flexibility in the design of the control system. Circuit concepts are also discussed. Static and dynamic results of smart composite structures, obtained using the higher order theory, are correlated with available analytical data. Comparisons, including debonded laminates, are also made with a general purpose finite element code and available experimental data. Overall, very good agreement is observed. Convergence of the finite element implementation of the higher order theory is shown with exact solutions. Additional results demonstrate the utility of the developed theory to study piezoelectric actuation of composite

  16. Zγ production at NNLO including anomalous couplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, John M.; Neumann, Tobias; Williams, Ciaran

    2017-11-01

    In this paper we present a next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) QCD calculation of the processes pp → l + l -γ and pp\\to ν \\overline{ν}γ that we have implemented in MCFM. Our calculation includes QCD corrections at NNLO both for the Standard Model (SM) and additionally in the presence of Zγγ and ZZγ anomalous couplings. We compare our implementation, obtained using the jettiness slicing approach, with a previous SM calculation and find broad agreement. Focusing on the sensitivity of our results to the slicing parameter, we show that using our setup we are able to compute NNLO cross sections with numerical uncertainties of about 0.1%, which is small compared to residual scale uncertainties of a few percent. We study potential improvements using two different jettiness definitions and the inclusion of power corrections. At √{s}=13 TeV we present phenomenological results and consider Zγ as a background to H → Zγ production. We find that, with typical cuts, the inclusion of NNLO corrections represents a small effect and loosens the extraction of limits on anomalous couplings by about 10%.

  17. Alternating phase focussing including space charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, W.H.; Gluckstern, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    Longitudinal stability can be obtained in a non-relativistic drift tube accelerator by traversing each gap as the rf accelerating field rises. However, the rising accelerating field leads to a transverse defocusing force which is usually overcome by magnetic focussing inside the drift tubes. The radio frequency quadrupole is one way of providing simultaneous longitudinal and transverse focusing without the use of magnets. One can also avoid the use of magnets by traversing alternate gaps between drift tubes as the field is rising and falling, thus providing an alternation of focussing and defocusing forces in both the longitudinal and transverse directions. The stable longitudinal phase space area is quite small, but recent efforts suggest that alternating phase focussing (APF) may permit low velocity acceleration of currents in the 100-300 ma range. This paper presents a study of the parameter space and a test of crude analytic predictions by adapting the code PARMILA, which includes space charge, to APF. 6 refs., 3 figs

  18. Probabilistic production simulation including CHP plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, H.V.; Palsson, H.; Ravn, H.F.

    1997-04-01

    A probabilistic production simulation method is presented for an energy system containing combined heat and power plants. The method permits incorporation of stochastic failures (forced outages) of the plants and is well suited for analysis of the dimensioning of the system, that is, for finding the appropriate types and capacities of production plants in relation to expansion planning. The method is in the tradition of similar approaches for the analysis of power systems, based on the load duration curve. The present method extends on this by considering a two-dimensional load duration curve where the two dimensions represent heat and power. The method permits the analysis of a combined heat and power system which includes all the basic relevant types of plants, viz., condensing plants, back pressure plants, extraction plants and heat plants. The focus of the method is on the situation where the heat side has priority. This implies that on the power side there may be imbalances between demand and production. The method permits quantification of the expected power overflow, the expected unserviced power demand, and the expected unserviced heat demand. It is shown that a discretization method as well as double Fourier series may be applied in algorithms based on the method. (au) 1 tab., 28 ills., 21 refs.

  19. Langevin simulations of QCD, including fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kronfeld, A.S.

    1986-02-01

    We encounter critical slow down in updating when xi/a -> infinite and in matrix inversion (needed to include fermions) when msub(q)a -> 0. A simulation that purports to solve QCD numerically will encounter these limits, so to face the challenge in the title of this workshop, we must cure the disease of critical slow down. Physically, this critical slow down is due to the reluctance of changes at short distances to propagate to large distances. Numerically, the stability of an algorithm at short wavelengths requires a (moderately) small step size; critical slow down occurs when the effective long wavelength step size becomes tiny. The remedy for this disease is an algorithm that propagates signals quickly throughout the system; i.e. one whose effective step size is not reduced for the long wavelength conponents of the fields. (Here the effective ''step size'' is essentially an inverse decorrelation time.) To do so one must resolve various wavelengths of the system and modify the dynamics (in CPU time) of the simulation so that all modes evolve at roughly the same rate. This can be achieved by introducing Fourier transforms. I show how to implement Fourier acceleration for Langevin updating and for conjugate gradient matrix inversion. The crucial feature of these algorithms that lends them to Fourier acceleration is that they update the lattice globally; hence the Fourier transforms are computed once per sweep rather than once per hit. (orig./HSI)

  20. SEEPAGE MODEL FOR PA INCLUDING DRIFT COLLAPSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C. Tsang

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the predictions and analyses performed using the seepage model for performance assessment (SMPA) for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal (Tptpmn) and lower lithophysal (Tptpll) lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Look-up tables of seepage flow rates into a drift (and their uncertainty) are generated by performing numerical simulations with the seepage model for many combinations of the three most important seepage-relevant parameters: the fracture permeability, the capillary-strength parameter 1/a, and the percolation flux. The percolation flux values chosen take into account flow focusing effects, which are evaluated based on a flow-focusing model. Moreover, multiple realizations of the underlying stochastic permeability field are conducted. Selected sensitivity studies are performed, including the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift from an independent drift-degradation analysis (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166107]). The intended purpose of the seepage model is to provide results of drift-scale seepage rates under a series of parameters and scenarios in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). The SMPA is intended for the evaluation of drift-scale seepage rates under the full range of parameter values for three parameters found to be key (fracture permeability, the van Genuchten 1/a parameter, and percolation flux) and drift degradation shape scenarios in support of the TSPA-LA during the period of compliance for postclosure performance [Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone (BSC 2002 [DIRS 160819], Section I-4-2-1)]. The flow-focusing model in the Topopah Spring welded (TSw) unit is intended to provide an estimate of flow focusing factors (FFFs) that (1) bridge the gap between the mountain-scale and drift-scale models, and (2) account for variability in local percolation flux due to