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Sample records for shilianhua slh sinocrassula

  1. Dicty_cDB: SLH224 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH224 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16287-1 SLH224F (Link to Original site) SLH2...24F 565 - - - - - - Show SLH224 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH224 (Link to...ycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-A/SLH224Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH22...4F (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH224 (SLH224Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-A/SLH224Q.Seq.d/ AAAAA.../SS/SSF8-A/SSF805Q.Seq.d/ 1033 0.0 SLH288 (SLH288Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-D/SLH288Q.Seq.d/ 1033 0.0 SLH224 (SLH224Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-A/SLH2

  2. Dicty_cDB: SLH287 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH287 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16243-1 SLH287Z (Link... to Original site) - - SLH287Z 614 - - - - Show SLH287 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH287 (Link to...ycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-D/SLH287Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH28...7Z (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH287 (SLH287Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-D/SLH287Q.Seq.d/ XXXXX...6Q) /CSM/SS/SSJ6-B/SSJ636Q.Seq.d/ 1217 0.0 SLH575 (SLH575Q) /CSM/SL/SLH5-D/SLH575Q.Seq.d/ 1217 0.0 SLH287 (SLH287Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2

  3. Dicty_cDB: SLH278 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH278 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16382-1 SLH278Z (Link... to Original site) - - SLH278Z 528 - - - - Show SLH278 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH278 (Link to...ycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-D/SLH278Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH27...8Z (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH278 (SLH278Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-D/SLH278Q.Seq.d/ XXXXX...75 (SLH375Q) /CSM/SL/SLH3-D/SLH375Q.Seq.d/ 1047 0.0 SLH278 (SLH278Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-D/SLH278Q.Seq.d/ 1047 0.0

  4. Dicty_cDB: SLH221 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH221 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16381-1 SLH221Z (Link... to Original site) - - SLH221Z 595 - - - - Show SLH221 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH221 (Link to...ycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-A/SLH221Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH22...1Z (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH221 (SLH221Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-A/SLH221Q.Seq.d/ XXXXX...LH722 (SLH722Q) /CSM/SL/SLH7-A/SLH722Q.Seq.d/ 559 e-158 SLH221 (SLH221Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-A/SLH221Q.Seq.d/ 559 e

  5. Dicty_cDB: SLH284 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH284 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U15748-1 SLH284P (Link to Original site) SLH2...84F 544 SLH284Z 467 SLH284P 1011 - - Show SLH284 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH2...e URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-D/SLH284Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH2...84P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH284 (SLH284Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-D/SLH2...DNA Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value SLH284 (SLH284Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-D/SLH284Q

  6. Dicty_cDB: SLH275 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH275 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16280-1 SLH275Z (Link... to Original site) - - SLH275Z 543 - - - - Show SLH275 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH275 (Link to...ycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-D/SLH275Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH27...5Z (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH275 (SLH275Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-D/SLH275Q.Seq.d/ XXXXX...ignificant alignments: (bits) Value SLH275 (SLH275Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-D/SLH275Q.Seq.d/ 1076 0.0 SLH850 (SLH850Q)

  7. Dicty_cDB: SLH273 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH273 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16280-1 SLH273P (Link to Original site) SLH2...73F 241 SLH273Z 294 SLH273P 535 - - Show SLH273 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH2... URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-D/SLH273Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH2...73P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH273 (SLH273Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-D/SLH2...ducing significant alignments: (bits) Value SLH273 (SLH273Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-D/SLH273Q.Seq.d/ 868 0.0 SSK467 (S

  8. Dicty_cDB: SLH285 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH285 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16287-1 SLH285F (Link to Original site) SLH2...85F 326 - - - - - - Show SLH285 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH285 (Link to...ycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-D/SLH285Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH28...5F (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH285 (SLH285Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-D/SLH285Q.Seq.d/ AAAAA...ue SSF805 (SSF805Q) /CSM/SS/SSF8-A/SSF805Q.Seq.d/ 617 e-176 SLH288 (SLH288Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-D/SLH288Q.Seq.d/ 617 e-176 SLH285 (SLH2

  9. Dicty_cDB: SLH207 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH207 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U11514-1 SLH207P (Link to Original site) SLH2...07F 689 SLH207Z 675 SLH207P 1364 - - Show SLH207 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH2...e URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-A/SLH207Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH2...07P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH207 (SLH207Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-A/SLH2...**yi Homology vs CSM-cDNA Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value SLH207 (SLH207Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-A/SLH2

  10. Dicty_cDB: SLH201 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH201 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U14690-1 SLH201F (Link to Original site) SLH2...01F 395 - - - - - - Show SLH201 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH201 (Link to...ycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-A/SLH201Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH20...1F (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH201 (SLH201Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-A/SLH201Q.Seq.d/ CACCA...M/SL/SLH4-C/SLH463Q.Seq.d/ 718 0.0 SLH201 (SLH201Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-A/SLH201Q.Seq.d/ 718 0.0 SSF514 (SSF514Q) /

  11. Dicty_cDB: SLH220 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH220 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U15409-1 SLH220F (Link to Original site) SLH2...20F 510 - - - - - - Show SLH220 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH220 (Link to...ycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-A/SLH220Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH22...0F (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH220 (SLH220Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-A/SLH220Q.Seq.d/ GAAGA...gnificant alignments: (bits) Value SLH220 (SLH220Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-A/SLH220Q.Seq.d/

  12. Dicty_cDB: SLH242 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH242 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16343-1 SLH242Z (Link... to Original site) - - SLH242Z 476 - - - - Show SLH242 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH242 (Link to...ycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-B/SLH242Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH24...2Z (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH242 (SLH242Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-B/SLH242Q.Seq.d/ XXXXX...d/ 910 0.0 SLI231 (SLI231Q) /CSM/SL/SLI2-B/SLI231Q.Seq.d/ 910 0.0 SLH242 (SLH242Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-B/SLH2

  13. Dicty_cDB: SLH245 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH245 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U01321-1 SLH245F (Link to Original site) SLH2...45F 294 - - - - - - Show SLH245 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH245 (Link to...ycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-B/SLH245Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH24...5F (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH245 (SLH245Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-B/SLH245Q.Seq.d/ CACCA...significant alignments: (bits) Value SLH245 (SLH245Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-B/SLH245Q.Seq.d/ 513 e-145 SLF841 (SLF841

  14. Dicty_cDB: SLH229 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH229 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U15799-1 SLH229Z (Link... to Original site) - - SLH229Z 269 - - - - Show SLH229 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH229 (Link to...ycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-B/SLH229Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH22...9Z (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH229 (SLH229Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-B/SLH229Q.Seq.d/ XXXXX...E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value SLH229 (SLH229Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-B/SLH2

  15. Dicty_cDB: SLH247 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH247 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16280-1 SLH247Z (Link... to Original site) - - SLH247Z 632 - - - - Show SLH247 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH247 (Link to...ycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-B/SLH247Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH24...7Z (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH247 (SLH247Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-B/SLH247Q.Seq.d/ XXXXX...ant alignments: (bits) Value SLH247 (SLH247Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-B/SLH247Q.Seq.d/ 1253 0.0 SLA487 (SLA487Q) /CSM/S

  16. Dicty_cDB: SLH256 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH256 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U12223-1 SLH256F (Link to Original site) SLH2...56F 399 - - - - - - Show SLH256 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH256 (Link to...ycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-C/SLH256Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH25...6F (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH256 (SLH256Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-C/SLH256Q.Seq.d/ CAGAA...SL/SLJ5-A/SLJ523Q.Seq.d/ 444 e-124 SLH256 (SLH256Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-C/SLH256Q.Seq.d/ 444 e-124 SSK705 (SSK705Q)

  17. Dicty_cDB: SLH288 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH288 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16287-1 SLH288P (Link to Original site) SLH2...88F 594 SLH288Z 688 SLH288P 1282 - - Show SLH288 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH2...e URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-D/SLH288Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH2...88P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH288 (SLH288Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-D/SLH2...hsiikikkkkikkkasiinn*kkkkkkk Homology vs CSM-cDNA Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value SLH288 (SLH2

  18. Dicty_cDB: SLH239 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH239 (Link to dictyBase) - G22492 DDB0190970 Contig-U04169-1 SLH2...39F (Link to Original site) SLH239F 460 - - - - - - Show SLH239 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH2...riginal site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-B/SLH239Q.Seq.d/ ...Representative seq. ID SLH239F (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH239 (SLH239Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-B/SLH2...uences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value SLH239 (SLH239Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-B/SLH239Q.Seq.d/ 640 0.0

  19. Dicty_cDB: SLH249 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH249 (Link to dictyBase) - G24226 DDB0215670 Contig-U04170-1 SLH2...49E (Link to Original site) - - - - - - SLH249E 689 Show SLH249 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH2...riginal site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-C/SLH249Q.Seq.d/ ...Representative seq. ID SLH249E (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH249 (SLH249Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-C/SLH2...re E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value SLH249 (SLH249Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-C/SLH2

  20. Dicty_cDB: SLH295 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH295 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U15436-1 SLH295E (Link to Original site) SLH2...95F 644 SLH295Z 632 SLH295P 1276 SLH295E 1045 Show SLH295 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH2...ginal site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-D/SLH295Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH2...95E (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH295 (SLH295Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-D/SLH2...q*wfnpclqiiipinflikiskkkkkkkkkkkkkk Homology vs CSM-cDNA Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value SLH2

  1. Dicty_cDB: SLH218 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH218 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16325-1 SLH218F (Link to Original site) SLH2...18F 419 - - - - - - Show SLH218 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH218 (Link to...ycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-A/SLH218Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH21...8F (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH218 (SLH218Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-A/SLH218Q.Seq.d/ CCATG...) /CSM/SL/SLI3-C/SLI370Q.Seq.d/ 831 0.0 SLI170 (SLI170Q) /CSM/SL/SLI1-C/SLI170Q.Seq.d/ 831 0.0 SLH218 (SLH218Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-A/SLH2

  2. Dicty_cDB: SLH231 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH231 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16382-1 SLH231F (Link to Original site) SLH2...31F 431 - - - - - - Show SLH231 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH231 (Link to...ycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-B/SLH231Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH23...1F (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH231 (SLH231Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-B/SLH231Q.Seq.d/ AAAAA...Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value SLH231 (SLH231Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-B/SLH231Q.Seq

  3. Dicty_cDB: SLH241 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH241 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U15835-1 SLH241E (Link... to Original site) - - - - - - SLH241E 371 Show SLH241 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH241 (Link to...ycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-B/SLH241Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH24...1E (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH241 (SLH241Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-B/SLH241Q.Seq.d/ GAAGT....Seq.d/ 638 0.0 VFE160 (VFE160Q) /CSM/VF/VFE1-C/VFE160Q.Seq.d/ 638 0.0 SLH241 (SLH241Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-B/SLH24

  4. Dicty_cDB: SLH274 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH274 (Link to dictyBase) - G22493 DDB0218769 Contig-U04171-1 SLH2...74F (Link to Original site) SLH274F 340 - - - - - - Show SLH274 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH2...riginal site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-D/SLH274Q.Seq.d/ ...Representative seq. ID SLH274F (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH274 (SLH274Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-D/SLH2...core E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value SLH274 (SLH274Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-D/SLH274Q.Seq.

  5. Dicty_cDB: SLH265 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH265 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U13901-1 SLH265Z (Link... to Original site) - - SLH265Z 631 - - - - Show SLH265 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH265 (Link to...ycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-C/SLH265Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH26...5Z (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH265 (SLH265Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-C/SLH265Q.Seq.d/ XXXXX... alignments: (bits) Value SLH265 (SLH265Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-C/SLH265Q.Seq.d/ 1059 0.0 VFL442 (VFL442Q) /CSM/VF/V

  6. Dicty_cDB: SLH238 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH238 (Link to dictyBase) - G22491 DDB0188118 Contig-U04168-1 SLH2...38F (Link to Original site) SLH238F 383 - - - - - - Show SLH238 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH2...riginal site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-B/SLH238Q.Seq.d/ ...Representative seq. ID SLH238F (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH238 (SLH238Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-B/SLH2...e E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value SLH238 (SLH238Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-B/SLH2

  7. Dicty_cDB: SLH203 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH203 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U10734-1 SLH203Z (Link... to Original site) - - SLH203Z 683 - - - - Show SLH203 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH203 (Link to...ycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-A/SLH203Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH20...3Z (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH203 (SLH203Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-A/SLH203Q.Seq.d/ XXXXX...ing significant alignments: (bits) Value SLH203 (SLH203Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-A/SLH203Q.

  8. SLH Timing Belt Powertrain

    Schneider, Abe

    2014-04-09

    The main goal of this proposal was to develop and test a novel powertrain solution for the SLH hydroEngine, a low-cost, efficient low-head hydropower technology. Nearly two-thirds of U.S. renewable electricity is produced by hydropower (EIA 2010). According to the U.S. Department of Energy; this amount could be increased by 50% with small hydropower plants, often using already-existing dams (Hall 2004). There are more than 80,000 existing dams, and of these, less than 4% generate power (Blankinship 2009). In addition, there are over 800 irrigation districts in the U.S., many with multiple, non-power, low-head drops. These existing, non-power dams and irrigation drops could be retrofitted to produce distributed, baseload, renewable energy with appropriate technology. The problem is that most existing dams are low-head, or less than 30 feet in height (Ragon 2009). Only about 2% of the available low-head hydropower resource in the U.S. has been developed, leaving more than 70 GW of annual mean potential low-head capacity untapped (Hall 2004). Natel Energy, Inc. is developing a low-head hydropower turbine that operates efficiently at heads less than 6 meters and is cost-effective for deployment across multiple low-head structures. Because of the unique racetrack-like path taken by the prime-movers in the SLH, a flexible powertrain is required. Historically, the only viable technological solution was roller chain. Despite the having the ability to easily attach blades, roller chain is characterized by significant drawbacks, including high cost, wear, and vibration from chordal action. Advanced carbon- fiber-reinforced timing belts have been recently developed which, coupled with a novel belt attachment system developed by Natel Energy, result in a large reduction in moving parts, reduced mass and cost, and elimination of chordal action for increased fatigue life. The work done in this project affirmatively addressed each of the following 3 major uncertainties concerning

  9. Dicty_cDB: SLH243 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH243 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U15469-1 SLH243P (Link to Original site) SLH2...43F 436 SLH243Z 369 SLH243P 805 - - Show SLH243 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH2... URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-B/SLH243Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH2...43P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH243 (SLH243Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-B/SLH2...SA605. 785 0.0 1 ( AU062023 ) Dictyostelium discoideum slug cDNA, clone SLH243. 785 0.0 1 ( BJ416791 ) Dicty

  10. Dicty_cDB: SLH222 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH222 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16475-1 SLH222Z (Link... to Original site) - - SLH222Z 433 - - - - Show SLH222 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH222 (Link to...ycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-A/SLH222Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH22...2Z (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH222 (SLH222Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-A/SLH222Q.Seq.d/ XXXXX...603Q.Seq.d/ 728 0.0 SLI537 (SLI537Q) /CSM/SL/SLI5-B/SLI537Q.Seq.d/ 728 0.0 SLH222 (SLH222Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2

  11. Dicty_cDB: SLH208 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH208 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U10711-1 SLH208P (Link to Original site) SLH2...08F 517 SLH208Z 692 SLH208P 1209 - - Show SLH208 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH2...e URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-A/SLH208Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH2...08P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH208 (SLH208Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-A/SLH2...wfr*fpfkimei*llnnstsltlpppplsiihil*lql*ye Homology vs CSM-cDNA Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value SLH2

  12. Dicty_cDB: SLH226 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH226 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16444-1 SLH226Z (Link... to Original site) - - SLH226Z 516 - - - - Show SLH226 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH226 (Link to...ycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-B/SLH226Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH22...6Z (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH226 (SLH226Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-B/SLH226Q.Seq.d/ XXXXX...4.0 %: peroxisomal >> prediction for SLH226 is cyt 5' end seq. ID - 5' end seq. - Length of 5' end seq. - 3' end seq. ID SLH2

  13. Dicty_cDB: SLH292 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH292 (Link to dictyBase) - G01986 DDB0185621 Contig-U15046-1 SLH2...92P (Link to Original site) SLH292F 431 SLH292Z 307 SLH292P 738 - - Show SLH292 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH2...ontig-U15046-1 Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-D/SLH2...92Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH292P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH292 (SLH292Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2...-D/SLH292Q.Seq.d/ ATTTTCTATACAAATAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAATAAAAATAAAAATAAAAATAA AAATTTAA

  14. Dicty_cDB: SLH290 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH290 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16510-1 SLH290Z (Link... to Original site) - - SLH290Z 412 - - - - Show SLH290 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH290 (Link to...ycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-D/SLH290Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH29...0Z (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH290 (SLH290Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-D/SLH290Q.Seq.d/ XXXXX...%: peroxisomal >> prediction for SLH290 is mit 5' end seq. ID - 5' end seq. - Length of 5' end seq. - 3' end seq. ID SLH2

  15. Dicty_cDB: SLH211 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH211 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16162-1 SLH211Z (Link... to Original site) - - SLH211Z 427 - - - - Show SLH211 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH211 (Link to...ycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-A/SLH211Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH21...1Z (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH211 (SLH211Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-A/SLH211Q.Seq.d/ XXXXX...equences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value SLI277 (SLI277Q) /CSM/SL/SLI2-D/SLI277Q.Seq.d/ 767 0.0 SLH211 (SLH2

  16. Dicty_cDB: SLH282 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH282 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U10985-1 | Contig-U15908-1 SLH2...82P (Link to Original site) SLH282F 506 SLH282Z 455 SLH282P 961 - - Show SLH282 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH2...85-1 | Contig-U15908-1 Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-D/SLH2...82Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH282P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH282 (SLH2...82Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-D/SLH282Q.Seq.d/ GGTTTTTAAAACTATTGATACTGAAGAGAATGGAATTATATCAATAACACAATTAAGACA

  17. Dicty_cDB: SLH202 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH202 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U07944-1 SLH202F (Link to Original site) SLH2...02F 172 - - - - - - Show SLH202 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH202 (Link to...ycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-A/SLH202Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH20...2F (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH202 (SLH202Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-A/SLH202Q.Seq.d/ CATTC...%: nuclear 12.0 %: mitochondrial 8.0 %: cytoskeletal 4.0 %: peroxisomal >> prediction for SLH202 is cyt 5' end seq. ID SLH2

  18. Dicty_cDB: SLH223 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH223 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16450-1 SLH223Z (Link... to Original site) - - SLH223Z 404 - - - - Show SLH223 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH223 (Link to...ycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-A/SLH223Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH22...3Z (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH223 (SLH223Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-A/SLH223Q.Seq.d/ XXXXX...logy vs CSM-cDNA Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value SLH223 (SLH2

  19. Dicty_cDB: SLH286 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH286 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16366-1 SLH286Z (Link... to Original site) - - SLH286Z 386 - - - - Show SLH286 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH286 (Link to...ycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-D/SLH286Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH28...6Z (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH286 (SLH286Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-D/SLH286Q.Seq.d/ XXXXX...Seq.d/ 646 0.0 SLK513 (SLK513Q) /CSM/SL/SLK5-A/SLK513Q.Seq.d/ 646 0.0 SLI160 (SLI160Q) /CSM/SL/SLI1-C/SLI160Q.Seq.d/ 646 0.0 SLH2

  20. Dicty_cDB: SLH296 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH296 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16382-1 SLH296F (Link to Original site) SLH2...96F 539 - - - - - - Show SLH296 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH296 (Link to...ycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-D/SLH296Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH29...6F (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH296 (SLH296Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-D/SLH296Q.Seq.d/ GGACG...ete cDNA clone:FC-AV1... 1068 0.0 1 ( AU062036 ) Dictyostelium discoideum slug cDNA, clone SLH296. 1068 0.0

  1. Dicty_cDB: SLH234 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH234 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U08154-1 SLH234F (Link to Original site) SLH2...34F 535 - - - - - - Show SLH234 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH234 (Link to...ycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-B/SLH234Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH23...4F (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH234 (SLH234Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-B/SLH234Q.Seq.d/ ACAAA...DCTTV--- Homology vs CSM-cDNA Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value SLH2

  2. Dicty_cDB: SLH204 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH204 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U15479-1 SLH204Z (Link... to Original site) - - SLH204Z 657 - - - - Show SLH204 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH204 (Link to...ycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-A/SLH204Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH20...4Z (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH204 (SLH204Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-A/SLH204Q.Seq.d/ XXXXX...g significant alignments: (bits) Value N ( AU039226 ) Dictyostelium discoideum slug cDNA, clone SLH204. 930

  3. Dicty_cDB: SLH294 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH294 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16466-1 SLH294E (Link... to Original site) - - - - - - SLH294E 393 Show SLH294 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH294 (Link to...ycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-D/SLH294Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH29...4E (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH294 (SLH294Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-D/SLH294Q.Seq.d/ CGATA...stelium discoideum slug cDNA, clone SLH294. 666 0.0 1 ( AU034499 ) Dictyostelium discoideum slug cDNA, clone

  4. Dicty_cDB: SLH214 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH214 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16455-1 SLH214E (Link... to Original site) - - - - - - SLH214E 308 Show SLH214 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH214 (Link to...ycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-A/SLH214Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH21...4E (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH214 (SLH214Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-A/SLH214Q.Seq.d/ GTTGA...a: 0.00 m3b: 0.00 m_ : 1.00 48.0 %: nuclear 28.0 %: mitochondrial 20.0 %: cytoplasmic 4.0 %: peroxisomal >> prediction for SLH2

  5. Dicty_cDB: SLH264 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH264 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16382-1 SLH264Z (Link... to Original site) - - SLH264Z 532 - - - - Show SLH264 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH264 (Link to...ycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-C/SLH264Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH26...4Z (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH264 (SLH264Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-C/SLH264Q.Seq.d/ XXXXX...g significant alignments: (bits) Value N ( AU039244 ) Dictyostelium discoideum slug cDNA, clone SLH2

  6. Dicty_cDB: SLH268 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH268 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - SLH268Z (Link to Original site) - - SLH2...68Z 640 - - - - Show SLH268 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH268 (Link to dictyBase) At...las ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-C/SLH2...68Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH268Z (Link to Original site) R...epresentative DNA sequence >SLH268 (SLH268Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-C/SLH268Q.Seq.d/ XXXXXXXXXXCTGGTGGTTATATTTCTCGTACT

  7. Dicty_cDB: SLH252 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH252 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - SLH252F (Link to Original site) SLH2...52F 158 - - - - - - Show SLH252 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH252 (Link to dictyBase) At...las ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-C/SLH2...52Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH252F (Link to Original site) R...epresentative DNA sequence >SLH252 (SLH252Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-C/SLH252Q.Seq.d/ ACAGAATGGGTAAAGTACATGGTGGTTTGAATC

  8. Dicty_cDB: SLH678 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH678 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U04159-1 SLH678E (Link... to Original site) - - - - - - SLH678E 373 Show SLH678 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH678 (Link to dict...yBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig Contig-U04159-1 Original site URL http://dict... producing significant alignments: (bits) Value N ( AU039970 ) Dictyostelium discoideum slug cDNA, clone SLG...865. 323 e-129 2 ( AU039381 ) Dictyostelium discoideum slug cDNA, clone SLH678. 3

  9. Quick look report for Semiscale Mod-2C experiments S-LH-1 and S-LH-2

    Loomis, G.G.; Streit, J.E.

    1985-05-01

    Results from a preliminary analysis of Semiscale Tests S-LH-1 and S-LH-2 are presented. Both experiments were 5%, cold leg, centerline pipe break, loss-of-coolant accident simulations with only the downcomer to upper head bypass flow different. Test S-LH-1 had a bypass flow of 0.9% of core flow and Test S-LH-2 had a 3% bypass flow. Phenomena of interest included two core liquid level depressions with minor core rod temperature excursions. The first liquid level depression was induced by a manometric balance formed by a liquid seal in the pump suctions of both loops and the second level depletion was due to core liquid boiloff. Pump suction seal clearing mitigated the first core heatup and accumulator flow refilled the core to terminate the second core heatup. Comparisons are made between a pretest RELAP5 calculation and S-LH-1 data. RELAP5 calculated the manometric core level depression but not the core rod heatups

  10. Pretest analysis document for Semiscale Test S-LH-1

    Shaw, R.A.

    1985-03-01

    Results from various pretest calculations which were performed for Test S-LH-1 are included in this report. Test S-LH-1 has been designed to produce primary liquid holdup in the steam generator U-tubes similar to Tests S-UT-8. The analyses included in this report indicate liquid will be held in the tubes, the core liquid level will be appropriately depressed, and a core heater rod temperature excursion should occur. Several sensitivity studies are also included which identify parameters which could affect the response

  11. Bioactive constituents from Chinese natural medicines. XXXII. aminopeptidase N and aldose reductase inhibitors from Sinocrassula indica: structures of sinocrassosides B(4), B(5), C(1), and D(1)-D(3).

    Morikawa, Toshio; Xie, Haihui; Wang, Tao; Matsuda, Hisashi; Yoshikawa, Masayuki

    2008-10-01

    From the methanolic extract of the whole plant of Sinocrassula indica (Crassulaceae), six new flavonol glycosides, sinocrassosides B(4) (1), B(5) (2), C(1) (3), D(1) (4), D(2) (5), and D(3) (6), were isolated together with 30 compounds. The structures of 1-6 were elucidated on the basis of chemical and physicochemical evidence. In addition, several constituents were found to show inhibitory effects on aminopeptidase N and aldose reductase.

  12. The S-layer homology domain-containing protein SlhA from Paenibacillus alvei CCM 2051(T) is important for swarming and biofilm formation.

    Janesch, Bettina; Koerdt, Andrea; Messner, Paul; Schäffer, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Swarming and biofilm formation have been studied for a variety of bacteria. While this is well investigated for Gram-negative bacteria, less is known about Gram-positive bacteria, including Paenibacillus alvei, a secondary invader of diseased honeybee colonies infected with Melissococcus pluton, the causative agent of European foulbrood (EFB). Paenibacillus alvei CCM 2051(T) is a Gram-positive bacterium which was recently shown to employ S-layer homology (SLH) domains as cell wall targeting modules to display proteins on its cell surface. This study deals with the newly identified 1335-amino acid protein SlhA from P. alvei which carries at the C‑terminus three consecutive SLH-motifs containing the predicted binding sequences SRGE, VRQD, and LRGD instead of the common TRAE motif. Based on the proof of cell surface location of SlhA by fluorescence microscopy using a SlhA-GFP chimera, the binding mechanism was investigated in an in vitro assay. To unravel a putative function of the SlhA protein, a knockout mutant was constructed. Experimental data indicated that one SLH domain is sufficient for anchoring of SlhA to the cell surface, and the SLH domains of SlhA recognize both the peptidoglycan and the secondary cell wall polymer in vitro. This is in agreement with previous data from the S-layer protein SpaA, pinpointing a wider utilization of that mechanism for cell surface display of proteins in P. alvei. Compared to the wild-type bacterium ΔslhA revealed changed colony morphology, loss of swarming motility and impaired biofilm formation. The phenotype was similar to that of the flagella knockout Δhag, possibly due to reduced EPS production influencing the functionality of the flagella of ΔslhA. This study demonstrates the involvement of the SLH domain-containing protein SlhA in swarming and biofilm formation of P. alvei CCM 2051(T).

  13. The S-layer homology domain-containing protein SlhA from Paenibacillus alvei CCM 2051(T is important for swarming and biofilm formation.

    Bettina Janesch

    Full Text Available Swarming and biofilm formation have been studied for a variety of bacteria. While this is well investigated for Gram-negative bacteria, less is known about Gram-positive bacteria, including Paenibacillus alvei, a secondary invader of diseased honeybee colonies infected with Melissococcus pluton, the causative agent of European foulbrood (EFB.Paenibacillus alvei CCM 2051(T is a Gram-positive bacterium which was recently shown to employ S-layer homology (SLH domains as cell wall targeting modules to display proteins on its cell surface. This study deals with the newly identified 1335-amino acid protein SlhA from P. alvei which carries at the C‑terminus three consecutive SLH-motifs containing the predicted binding sequences SRGE, VRQD, and LRGD instead of the common TRAE motif. Based on the proof of cell surface location of SlhA by fluorescence microscopy using a SlhA-GFP chimera, the binding mechanism was investigated in an in vitro assay. To unravel a putative function of the SlhA protein, a knockout mutant was constructed. Experimental data indicated that one SLH domain is sufficient for anchoring of SlhA to the cell surface, and the SLH domains of SlhA recognize both the peptidoglycan and the secondary cell wall polymer in vitro. This is in agreement with previous data from the S-layer protein SpaA, pinpointing a wider utilization of that mechanism for cell surface display of proteins in P. alvei. Compared to the wild-type bacterium ΔslhA revealed changed colony morphology, loss of swarming motility and impaired biofilm formation. The phenotype was similar to that of the flagella knockout Δhag, possibly due to reduced EPS production influencing the functionality of the flagella of ΔslhA.This study demonstrates the involvement of the SLH domain-containing protein SlhA in swarming and biofilm formation of P. alvei CCM 2051(T.

  14. Results of Semiscale Mod-2C small-break (5%) loss-of-coolant accident. Experiments S-LH-1 and S-LH-2

    Loomis, G.G.; Streit, J.E.

    1985-11-01

    Two experiments simulating small break (5%) loss-of-coolant accidents (5% SBLOCAs) were performed in the Semiscale Mod-2C facility. These experiments were identical except for downcomer-to-upper-head bypass flow (0.9% in Experiment S-LH-1 and 3.0% in Experiment S-LH-2) and were performed at high pressure and temperature [15.6 MPa (2262 psia) system pressure; 37 K (67 0 F) core differential temperature; 595 K(610 0 F) hot leg fluid temperature]. From the experimental results, the signature response and transient mass distribution are determined for a 5% SBLOCA. The core thermal-hydraulic response is characterized, including core void distribution maps, and the effect of core bypass flow on transient severity is assessed. Comparisons are made between postexperiment RELAP5 calculations and the experimental results, and the capability of RELAP5 to calculate the phenomena is assessed. 115 figs

  15. Lyophilized silica lipid hybrid (SLH) carriers for poorly water-soluble drugs: physicochemical and in vitro pharmaceutical investigations.

    Yasmin, Rokhsana; Tan, Angel; Bremmell, Kristen E; Prestidge, Clive A

    2014-09-01

    Lyophilization was investigated to produce a powdery silica-lipid hybrid (SLH) carrier for oral delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs. The silica to lipid ratio, incorporation of cryoprotectant, and lipid loading level were investigated as performance indicators for lyophilized SLH carriers. Celecoxib, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, was used as the model poorly soluble moiety to attain desirable physicochemical and in vitro drug solubilization properties. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal fluorescence imaging verified a nanoporous, homogenous internal matrix structures of the lyophilized SLH particles, prepared from submicron triglyceride emulsions and stabilized by porous silica nanoparticles (Aerosil 380), similar to spray-dried SLH. 20-50 wt % of silica in the formulation have shown to produce nonoily SLH agglomerates with complete lipid encapsulation. The incorporation of a cryoprotectant prevented irreversible aggregation of the silica-stabilized droplets during lyophilization, thereby readily redispersing in water to form micrometre-sized particles (water-soluble therapeutics is confirmed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  16. The nuclear immune receptor RPS4 is required for RRS1SLH1-dependent constitutive defense activation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Kee Hoon Sohn

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR disease resistance (R proteins recognize specific "avirulent" pathogen effectors and activate immune responses. NB-LRR proteins structurally and functionally resemble mammalian Nod-like receptors (NLRs. How NB-LRR and NLR proteins activate defense is poorly understood. The divergently transcribed Arabidopsis R genes, RPS4 (resistance to Pseudomonas syringae 4 and RRS1 (resistance to Ralstonia solanacearum 1, function together to confer recognition of Pseudomonas AvrRps4 and Ralstonia PopP2. RRS1 is the only known recessive NB-LRR R gene and encodes a WRKY DNA binding domain, prompting suggestions that it acts downstream of RPS4 for transcriptional activation of defense genes. We define here the early RRS1-dependent transcriptional changes upon delivery of PopP2 via Pseudomonas type III secretion. The Arabidopsis slh1 (sensitive to low humidity 1 mutant encodes an RRS1 allele (RRS1SLH1 with a single amino acid (leucine insertion in the WRKY DNA-binding domain. Its poor growth due to constitutive defense activation is rescued at higher temperature. Transcription profiling data indicate that RRS1SLH1-mediated defense activation overlaps substantially with AvrRps4- and PopP2-regulated responses. To better understand the genetic basis of RPS4/RRS1-dependent immunity, we performed a genetic screen to identify suppressor of slh1 immunity (sushi mutants. We show that many sushi mutants carry mutations in RPS4, suggesting that RPS4 acts downstream or in a complex with RRS1. Interestingly, several mutations were identified in a domain C-terminal to the RPS4 LRR domain. Using an Agrobacterium-mediated transient assay system, we demonstrate that the P-loop motif of RPS4 but not of RRS1SLH1 is required for RRS1SLH1 function. We also recapitulate the dominant suppression of RRS1SLH1 defense activation by wild type RRS1 and show this suppression requires an intact RRS1 P-loop. These analyses of RRS1SLH1 shed

  17. GPM SLH: Convective Latent Heating Estimated with GPM Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar Data

    Takayabu, Y. N.; Hamada, A.; Yokoyama, C.; Ikuta, Y.; Shige, S.; Yamaji, M.; Kubota, T.

    2017-12-01

    Three dimensional diabatic heating distribution plays essential roles to determine large-scale circulation, as well as to generate mesoscale circulation associated with tropical convection (e.g. Hartmann et al., 1984; Houze et al. 1982). For mid-latitude systems also, diabatic heating contributes to generate PVs resulting in, for example, explosive intensifications of mid-lattitude storms (Boettcher and Wernli, 2011). Previously, with TRMM PR data, we developed a Spectral Latent Heating algorithm (SLH; Shige et al. 2004, etc.) for 36N-36S region. It was based on the spectral LH tables produced from a simulation utilizing the Goddard Cloud Ensemble Model forced with the TOGA-COARE data. With GPM DPR, the observation region is extended to 65N-65S. Here, we introduce a new version of SLH algorithm which is applicable also to the mid-latitude precipitation. A new global GPM SLH ver.5 product is released as one of NASA/JAXA GPM standard products on July 11, 2017. For GPM SLH mid-latitude algorithm, we employ the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA)'s high resolution (horizontally 2km) Local Forecast Model (LFM) to construct the LUTs. With collaborations of JMA's forecast group, forecast data for 8 extratropical cyclone cases are collected and utilized. For mid-latitude precipitation, we have to deal with large temperature gradients and complex relationship between the freezing level and cloud base levels. LUTs are constructed for LH, Q1-QR, and Q2 (Yanai et al. 1973), for six different precipitation types: Convective and shallow stratiform LUTs are made against precipitation top heights. For deep stratiform and other precipitation, LUTs are made against maximum precipitation to handle the unknown cloud-bases. Finally, three-dimensional convective latent heating is retrieved, utilizing the LUTs and precipitation profile data from GPM 2AKu. We can confirm that retrieved LH looks very similar to simulated LH, for a consistency check. We also confirm a good continuities of

  18. RELAP5/MOD2 code assessment for the Semiscale Mod-2C Test S-LH-1

    Fineman, C.P.

    1986-01-01

    RELAP5/MOD2, Cycle 36.02, was assessed using data from Semiscale Mod-2C experiment S-LH-1. The major phenomena that occurred during the experiment were calculated by RELAP5/MOD2, although the duration and the magnitude of their effect on the transient were not always well calculated. Areas defined where further work was needed to improve the RELAP5 calculation include: (1) the system energy balance, (2) core interfacial drag, and 3) the heat transfer logic rod dryout criterion

  19. Development of a project on North Unit Irrigation District’s Main Canal at the Monroe Drop, using a novel low-head hydropower technology called the SLH100

    Schneider, Abraham [Natel Energy, Inc., Alameda, CA (United States); Schneider, Gia [Natel Energy, Inc., Alameda, CA (United States); McKinstry, Katherine [Natel Energy, Inc., Alameda, CA (United States); Harwood, Meghan [Natel Energy, Inc., Alameda, CA (United States)

    2017-03-14

    Natel Energy is a low­-head, distributed hydropower company based out of Alameda, CA. Natel manufactures and sells proprietary hydroelectric turbines called hydroEngines® that are suitable for low-­head, high-­flow settings, and range from 30kW to 1 MW of capacity per unit. Natel’s hydroEngine is a state­-of­the-­art two stage impulse turbine, using blades mounted symmetrically on two belts perpendicular to the axis of travel, and using linearly­-moving foils, rather than a rotor, to enable efficient conversion of kinetic energy of large volumes of water at low head with no risk of cavitation. In addition, the hydroEngine can be installed at or above tailwater level, reducing the excavation necessary to build the powerhouse and thus reducing total installed cost and project footprint. Thus, the hydroEngine technology enables a new generation of small hydro installations with low cost of project development, fish-­friendly operations, and small project footprint. In September of 2015, Natel Energy formally commissioned its first project installation in Madras, Oregon, installing 1 SLH100 turbine at an existing drop structure on the North Unit Irrigation District (NUID) Main Canal. The water falls between 13.5 feet to 16.5 feet at this structure, depending on flow. The plant has an installed capacity of 250 kW and an expected annual generation of approximately 873 MWh. The plant operates at an annual capacity factor of 40%, and a capacity factor over the irrigation season, or period of available flow, of 80%. Annual capacity factor is calculated as a percentage of plant operating hours relative to a total of 8,760 hours in a year; because the irrigation canal in which the Project is located only runs water from April to October, the available flow capacity factor is higher. Net greenhouse gas reductions from the Monroe Project are estimated to be 602 tCO2/year. The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of the specifications for Natel’s first

  20. Dicty_cDB: SLH341 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available 5 ( AF305060 ) Dictyostelium discoideum Wiscott-Aldrich syndrome... 404 0.0 5 ( B...ts) Value AF305060_1( AF305060 |pid:none) Dictyostelium discoideum Wiscott-A... 83 8e-15 AC117076_18( AC1170

  1. Dicty_cDB: SLH884 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available YGNVVLSGGTTMFPGIADRMNKELTALAPSTLKIKIIAPPERKYSVWIGGSILASLS TFQQMWISKEEYDESGPSIVHRKCF*immkvllxxxiiii*q**ylnv**...IADRMNKELTALAPSTLKIKIIAPPERKYSVWIGGSILASLS TFQQMWISKEEYDESGPSIVHRKCF*immkvllxxxiiii*q**ylnv**nlitfflmvv dlyp

  2. Dicty_cDB: SLH810 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available frhfsdcriwlfwfcfinshtvsfflrisck*CFSFFFWTSGFSIRYLIYCNHLI ILIILCFVIISLFVTFL Translated Amino Acid sequence (Al...rame C: *fncyfrhfsdcriwlfwfcfinshtvsfflrisck*CFSFFFWTSGFSIRYLIYCNHLI ILIILCFVIISLFVTFL Homology vs CSM-cDNA

  3. Psychosocial correlates of physical activity and sedentary leisure habits in young adolescents: the Teens Eating for Energy and Nutrition at School study.

    Schmitz, Kathryn H; Lytle, Leslie A; Phillips, Glenn A; Murray, David M; Birnbaum, Amanda S; Kubik, Martha Y

    2002-02-01

    Low levels of physical activity (PA) and highly sedentary leisure habits (SLH) in youth may establish behavioral patterns that will predispose youth to increased chronic disease risk in adulthood. The purpose of this paper was to examine associations of demographic and psychosocial factors with self-reported PA and SLH in young adolescents. A general linear mixed model predicted self-reported PA and SLH in the spring from demographic and psychosocial variables measured the previous fall in 3798 seventh grade students. PA and SLH differed by race, with Caucasian students reporting among the highest PA and lowest SLH. Perceptions of higher academic rank or expectations predicted higher PA and lower SLH. Depressive symptomatology predicted higher SLH scores but not PA. Higher self-reported value of health, appearance, and achievement predicted higher PA and lower SLH in girls. Girls who reported that their mothers had an authoritative parenting style also reported higher PA and lower SLH. Determinants of PA and SLH appear to differ from each other, particularly in boys. Development of effective programs to increase PA and/or decrease SLH in young adolescents should be based on a clear understanding of the determinants of these behaviors. Copyright 2002 American Health Foundation and Elsevier Science (USA).

  4. Pluronic-Functionalized Silica-Lipid Hybrid Microparticles: Improving the Oral Delivery of Poorly Water-Soluble Weak Bases.

    Rao, Shasha; Richter, Katharina; Nguyen, Tri-Hung; Boyd, Ben J; Porter, Christopher J H; Tan, Angel; Prestidge, Clive A

    2015-12-07

    A Pluronic-functionalized silica-lipid hybrid (Plu-SLH) microparticle system for the oral delivery of poorly water-soluble, weak base drugs is reported for the first time. A highly effective Plu-SLH microparticle system was composed of Labrasol as the lipid phase, Pluronic F127 as the polymeric precipitation inhibitor (PPI), and silica nanoparticles as the solid carrier. For the model drug cinnarizine (CIN), the Plu-SLH delivery system was shown to offer significant biopharmaceutical advantages in comparison with unformulated drug and drug in the silica-lipid hybrid (SLH) system. In vitro two-phase dissolution studies illustrated significantly reduced pH provoked CIN precipitation and an 8- to 14-fold improvement in the extent of dissolution in intestinal conditions. In addition, under simulated intestinal digesting conditions, the Plu-SLH provided approximately three times more drug solubilization than the SLH. Oral administration in rats resulted in superior bioavailability for Plu-SLH microparticles, i.e., 1.6- and 2.1-fold greater than the SLH and the unformulated CIN, respectively. A physical mixture of Pluronic and SLH (Plu&SLH), having the same composition as Plu-SLH, was also evaluated, but showed no significant increase in CIN absorption when compared to unmodified CIN or SLH. This work represents the first study where different methods of incorporating PPI to formulate solid-state lipid-based formulations were compared for the impact on the biopharmaceutical performance. The data suggest that the novel physicochemical properties and structure of the fabricated Plu-SLH microparticle delivery system play an important role in facilitating the synergistic advantage of Labrasol and Pluronic F127 in preventing drug precipitation, and the Plu-SLH provides efficient oral delivery of poorly water-soluble weak bases.

  5. Egg Yolk Lecithin: A Biochemical Laboratory Project

    White, Bernard J.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate laboratory project involving lecithin which integrates two general aspects of lipid methodology: chromatographic techniques and use of enzymes specificity to obtain structural information. (Author/SLH)

  6. Dicty_cDB: AFM869 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available Dictyostelium discoideum slug cDNA, clone SLH341. 404 e-128 3 ( AF305060 ) Dictyostelium discoideum Wiscott-...ucing significant alignments: (bits) Value AF305060_1( AF305060 |pid:none) Dictyostelium discoideum Wiscott-

  7. Dicty_cDB: SLC409 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLC409 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U14931-1 SLC409Z (Link... to Original site) - - SLC409Z 483 - - - - Show SLC409 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLC409 (Link to...ycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLC4-A/SLC409Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLC40...9Z (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLC409 (SLC409Q) /CSM/SL/SLC4-A/SLC409Q.Seq.d/ XXXXX... SLH501 (SLH501Q) /CSM/SL/SLH5-A/SLH501Q.Seq.d/ 858 0.0 SLF191 (SLF191Q) /CSM/SL/SLF1-D/SLF191Q.Seq.d/ 858 0.0 SLC409 (SLC4

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TSYR-01-0989 [SEVENS

    Full Text Available CBRC-TSYR-01-0989 ref|XP_002627763.1| glucose-methanol-choline oxidoreductase [Ajel...lomyces dermatitidis SLH14081] gb|EEQ75403.1| glucose-methanol-choline oxidoreductase [Ajellomyces dermatiti...dis SLH14081] gb|EEQ88001.1| glucose-methanol-choline oxidoreductase [Ajellomyces dermatitidis ER-3] XP_002627763.1 9.8 28% ...

  9. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    ... of scFv and BsFv were approximately 30 kDa and 60 kDa, respectively. Flow cytometry revealed that SLH10 BsFv bound the selected cell lines with greater signal intensity than the parental scFv. The improved antigen binding of SLH10 BsFv may be useful for immunodiagnostics or targeted gene therapy for liver cancer.

  10. Altered lower extremity joint mechanics occur during the star excursion balance test and single leg hop after ACL-reconstruction in a collegiate athlete.

    Samaan, Michael A; Ringleb, Stacie I; Bawab, Sebastian Y; Greska, Eric K; Weinhandl, Joshua T

    2018-03-01

    The effects of ACL-reconstruction on lower extremity joint mechanics during performance of the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) and Single Leg Hop (SLH) are limited. The purpose of this study was to determine if altered lower extremity mechanics occur during the SEBT and SLH after ACL-reconstruction. One female Division I collegiate athlete performed the SEBT and SLH tasks, bilaterally, both before ACL injury and 27 months after ACL-reconstruction. Maximal reach, hop distances, lower extremity joint kinematics and moments were compared between both time points. Musculoskeletal simulations were used to assess muscle force production during the SEBT and SLH at both time points. Compared to the pre-injury time point, SEBT reach distances were similar in both limbs after ACL-reconstruction except for the max anterior reach distance in the ipsilateral limb. The athlete demonstrated similar hop distances, bilaterally, after ACL-reconstruction compared to the pre-injury time point. Despite normal functional performance during the SEBT and SLH, the athlete exhibited altered lower extremity joint mechanics during both of these tasks. These results suggest that measuring the maximal reach and hop distances for these tasks, in combination with an analysis of the lower extremity joint mechanics that occur after ACL-reconstruction, may help clinicians and researchers to better understand the effects of ACL-reconstruction on the neuromuscular system during the SEBT and SLH.

  11. Singing for Lung Health-a systematic review of the literature and consensus statement.

    Lewis, Adam; Cave, Phoene; Stern, Myra; Welch, Lindsay; Taylor, Karen; Russell, Juliet; Doyle, Anne-Marie; Russell, Anne-Marie; McKee, Heather; Clift, Stephen; Bott, Julia; Hopkinson, Nicholas S

    2016-12-01

    There is growing interest in Singing for Lung Health (SLH), an approach where patients with respiratory disease take part in singing groups, intended to improve their condition. A consensus group was convened in early 2016 to address issues including: the specific features that make SLH distinct from other forms of participation in singing; the existing evidence base via a systematic review; gaps in the evidence base including the need to define value-based outcome measures for sustainable commissioning of SLH; defining the measures needed to evaluate both individuals' responses to SLH and the quality of singing programmes. and core training, expertise and competencies required by singing group leaders to deliver high-quality programmes. A systematic review to establish the extent of the evidence base for SLH was undertaken. Electronic databases, including Pubmed, OVID Medline and Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane central register of controlled trials and PEDro, were used. Six studies were included in the final review. Quantitative data suggest that singing has the potential to improve health-related quality of life, particularly related to physical health, and levels of anxiety without causing significant side effects. There is a significant risk of bias in many of the existing studies with small numbers of subjects overall. Little comparison can be made between studies owing to their heterogeneity in design. Qualitative data indicate that singing is an enjoyable experience for patients, who consistently report that it helps them to cope with their condition better. Larger and longer-term trials are needed.

  12. Singing for Lung Health—a systematic review of the literature and consensus statement

    Lewis, Adam; Cave, Phoene; Stern, Myra; Welch, Lindsay; Taylor, Karen; Russell, Juliet; Doyle, Anne-Marie; Russell, Anne-Marie; McKee, Heather; Clift, Stephen; Bott, Julia; Hopkinson, Nicholas S

    2016-01-01

    There is growing interest in Singing for Lung Health (SLH), an approach where patients with respiratory disease take part in singing groups, intended to improve their condition. A consensus group was convened in early 2016 to address issues including: the specific features that make SLH distinct from other forms of participation in singing; the existing evidence base via a systematic review; gaps in the evidence base including the need to define value-based outcome measures for sustainable commissioning of SLH; defining the measures needed to evaluate both individuals' responses to SLH and the quality of singing programmes. and core training, expertise and competencies required by singing group leaders to deliver high-quality programmes. A systematic review to establish the extent of the evidence base for SLH was undertaken. Electronic databases, including Pubmed, OVID Medline and Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane central register of controlled trials and PEDro, were used. Six studies were included in the final review. Quantitative data suggest that singing has the potential to improve health-related quality of life, particularly related to physical health, and levels of anxiety without causing significant side effects. There is a significant risk of bias in many of the existing studies with small numbers of subjects overall. Little comparison can be made between studies owing to their heterogeneity in design. Qualitative data indicate that singing is an enjoyable experience for patients, who consistently report that it helps them to cope with their condition better. Larger and longer-term trials are needed. PMID:27906158

  13. They Just Respect You for Who You Are: Contributors to Educator Positive Youth Development Promotion for Somali, Latino, and Hmong Students.

    Allen, Michele L; Rosas-Lee, Maira; Ortega, Luis; Hang, Mikow; Pergament, Shannon; Pratt, Rebekah

    2016-02-01

    Youth from immigrant communities may experience barriers to connecting with schools and teachers, potentially undermining academic achievement and healthy youth development. This qualitative study aimed to understand how educators serving Somali, Latino, and Hmong (SLH) youth can best promote educator-student connectedness and positive youth development, by exploring the perspectives of teachers, youth workers, and SLH youth, using a community based participatory research approach. We conducted four focus groups with teachers, 18 key informant interviews with adults working with SLH youth, and nine focus groups with SLH middle and high school students. Four themes emerged regarding facilitators to educators promoting positive youth development in schools: (1) an authoritative teaching approach where teachers hold high expectations for student behavior and achievement, (2) building trusting educator-student relationships, (3) conveying respect for students as individuals, and (4) a school infrastructure characterized by a supportive and inclusive environment. Findings suggest a set of skills and educator-student interactions that may promote positive youth development and increase student-educator connectedness for SLH youth in public schools.

  14. Z H η vertex in the simplest little Higgs model

    He, Shi-Ping; Mao, Ying-nan; Zhang, Chen; Zhu, Shou-hua

    2018-04-01

    The issue of deriving Z H η vertex in the simplest little Higgs (SLH) model is revisited. Special attention is paid to the treatment of noncanonically-normalized scalar kinetic matrix and vector-scalar two-point transitions. We elucidate a general procedure to diagonalize a general vector-scalar system in gauge theories and apply it to the case of SLH. The resultant Z H η vertex is found to be different from those which have already existed in the literature for a long time. We also present an understanding of this issue from an effective field theory viewpoint.

  15. An oral delivery system for indomethicin engineered from cationic lipid emulsions and silica nanoparticles

    Simovic, Spomenka; Hui, He; Song, Yunmei

    2010-01-01

    We report on a porous silica-lipid hybrid microcapsule (SLH) oral delivery system for indomethacin fabricated from Pickering emulsion templates, where the drug forms an electrostatic complex with cationic lipid present in the oil phase. Dry SLH microcapsules prepared either by spray drying...... (approximately 1-5 microm) or phase coacervation (20-50 microm) exhibit a specific internal porous matrix structure with pore diameters in the range of 20 to 100 nm. Dissolution studies under sink conditions and in the presence of electrolytes revealed a decreased extent of dissolution; this confirms...

  16. Singing for Lung Health: a qualitative assessment of a British Lung Foundation programme for group leaders

    Lewis, Adam; Cave, Phoene; Hopkinson, Nicholas S

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Singing for Lung Health (SLH) groups are an increasingly popular intervention for people with respiratory disease. There are limited data as to how these groups should be developed and run. We aimed to evaluate the experience of singing leaders both to assess the training provided by the British Lung Foundation (BLF) and to provide information to guide future development of programmes. Methods A convenience sample of 15 leaders who had received BLF SLH training participated in the BLF service evaluation. Fifteen singing groups were observed, and singing leader interviews and questionnaires were collected. Inductive themes from the qualitative data were the primary outcome. The content of observed singing groups was also rated against the training leaders had received. Results Singing leaders valued the BLF training but felt that a significant level of expertise is required before joining. Singing leaders often found setting up groups challenging and some found clinician support beneficial. There were important technical aspects of running a lung health group including issues around content, for example, choice of repertoire to suit breathing pattern, and delivery, for example, pace, rhythm and management of group dynamics. Leaders said that group participants reported physical health improvements such as reduced breathlessness on activity. The content and delivery of singing classes observed displayed a good level of fidelity, suggesting that SLH training is effective. Conclusion The experience of the leaders highlights the requirements, support and technical skills needed to run SLH groups, which have features distinct from generic community singing groups. PMID:29071079

  17. A facile and efficient dry transfer technique for two-dimensional Van derWaals heterostructure

    Xie, Li; Du, Luojun; Lu, Xiaobo; Yang, Rong; Shi, Dongxia; Zhang, Guangyu

    2017-08-01

    Not Available Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2013CB934500 and 2013CBA01602), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61325021, 11574361, and 51572289), the Key Research Program of Frontier Sciences, CAS, (Grant No. QYZDB-SSW-SLH004), and the Strategic Priority Research Program (B), CAS (Grant No. XDB07010100).

  18. PRESEASON JUMP AND HOP MEASURES IN MALE COLLEGIATE BASKETBALL PLAYERS: AN EPIDEMIOLOGIC REPORT.

    Brumitt, Jason; Engilis, Amy; Isaak, Dale; Briggs, Amy; Mattocks, Alma

    2016-12-01

    Injuries are inherent in basketball with lower extremity (LE) injury rates reported as high as 11.6 per 1000 athletic exposures (AEs); many of these injuries result in time loss from sport participation. A recent trend in sports medicine research has been the attempt to identify athletes who may be at risk for injury based on measures of preseason fitness. The purpose of this prospective cohort study was to determine if the standing long jump (SLJ) and/or the single-leg hop (SLH) for distance functional performance tests (FPT) are associated with non-contact time loss lower quadrant (LQ, defined as lower extremities or low back) injury in collegiate male basketball players. It was hypothesized that basketball players with shorter SLJ or SLH measures would be at an increased risk for LQ injury. Seventy-one male collegiate basketball players from five teams completed a demographic questionnaire and performed three SLJ and six SLH (three per lower extremity) tests. Team athletic trainers tracked non-contact LQ time loss injuries during the season. Prospective cohort. Mean SLJ distance (normalized to height) was 0.99 (± 0.11) and mean SLH distances for the right and left were 0.85 ± 0.11 and 0.87 ± 0.10, respectively. A total of 29 (18 initial, 11 subsequent) non-contact time loss LQ injuries occurred during the study. At risk athletes (e.g., those with shorter SLJ and/or SLH) were no more likely to experience a non-contact time loss injury than their counterparts [OR associated with each FPT below cut scores = 0.9 (95% CI: 0.2, 4.9)]. The results from this study indicate that preseason performance of the SLJ and the SLH were not associated with future risk of LQ injury in this population. Preseason SLJ and SLH measures were not associated with non-contact time loss injuries in male collegiate basketball players. However, the descriptive data presented in this study can help sports medicine professionals evaluate athletic readiness prior to discharging

  19. Propagation and forcing of high-frequency sea level variability along the west coast of South America

    del Pilar Cornejo-Rodriguez, Maria; Enfield, David B.

    1987-12-01

    Tide and wind data from coastal and island stations from Buenaventura, Colombia (4°N), to Callao, Peru (12°S), have been analyzed for the 1979-1984 time period to determine the propagation and forcing characteristics of coastal sea level variability at periods of days to weeks, as well as how they vary either with season or between the 1982-1983 El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) period and non-ENSO years. During four non-ENSO years, the ensemble averaged cross spectra between coastal sea level height (SLH) and local winds show weak evidence of local forcing during the whole year without significant differences between the austral summer and winter seasons, other than a greater energy in the wind fluctuations at Talara during summer. Cross spectra between SLH series from neighboring stations show evidence of poleward phase propagation during winter seasons at speeds of about 2.0 m s-1 between La Libertad and Talara at periods of a week or more, and about 2.7 m s-1 between Talara and Callao at periods of 5-11 days, but no propagation is found during summers. During the 1982-1983 ENSO there is a large increase in SLH energy at most frequencies at all coastal stations, but especially in the 8-to-11-day band, where energies are enhanced by as much as an order of magnitude above non-ENSO levels. The cross spectra between adjacent SLH stations indicate a nondispersive poleward propagation of events during the 1982-1983 ENSO with phase speeds of 2.2-3.5 m s-1 from La Libertad to Talara (periods of a week or more) and 3.4-3.6 m s-1 from Talara to Callao (3.5 days or more). As with the SLH energy, the coherence and phase propagation were much stronger along the Peru coast in 1982-1983 than during non-ENSO periods, especially in the 8-to-11-day band. The one-third increase in phase speeds during the ENSO over the non-ENSO speeds is found to be consistent with the anomalous depressions of the density structure during El Niño. Comparisons between coastal SLH and the local

  20. Total versus subtotal Laparoscopic Hysterectomy: A comparative study in Arash Hospital

    Samiei H

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1":*{behavior:url(#ieooui } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Over the past 50 years, subtotal or supracervical hysterectomy has come to be viewed as a suboptimal procedure reserved for those rare instances in which when concern over blood loss or anatomic distortion dictates limiting the extent of dissection, the aim of this study was to compare total and subtotal laparoscopic hysterectomy. "n"nMethods: The patients who were candidates for hysterectomy with benign disease, with no contraindication for laparoscopic surgery entered the study in Arash Hospital, from March 2007 to April 2009. By simple randomization 45 patients (25 for TLH and 20 for SLH were selected. Demographic Details and intra and post operative complications, were recorded by the staff and were compared between two groups."n"nResults: The average time for TLH operations look significantly longer than SLH operation (148.6±29.7 minutes; 128.5±25.64 minutes, p=0.03. Although, the hemoglobin (gr/dl drop in TLH was significantly higher than SLH (1.54 Versus 0.9, p<0.05 Blood transfusion were common in SLH (1 case Versus 3 Cases. The total length of hospital stay, was significantly shorter after SLH than TLH (3.6±1.47 day and 2.85±0.59, p=0.04. The drug requirements to

  1. Increase in first morning voided urinary luteinizing hormone levels precedes the physical onset of puberty

    Demir, Ahmet; Voutilainen, R; Juul, A

    1996-01-01

    Determinations of serum gonadotropin concentrations by ultra-sensitive methods have improved the diagnosis of pubertal disorders. The onset of puberty can be estimated by measuring serum gonadotropin pulsation, but as this requires serial nocturnal blood sampling, it is not a routine investigation...... before clinical signs of puberty can be detected. The correlation between FMV urine and S-LH values was good (r = 0.64; P ... for S-LH. A significant increase in FMV U-LH concentration occurs before the first clinical signs of puberty in a sex-independent fashion. Our data indicate that FMV U-LH measurement is a clinically relevant, noninvasive method for the evaluation of pubertal development, and it may be helpful...

  2. Peptidoglycan-associated outer membrane protein Mep45 of rumen anaerobe Selenomonas ruminantium forms a non-specific diffusion pore via its C-terminal transmembrane domain.

    Kojima, Seiji; Hayashi, Kanako; Tochigi, Saeko; Kusano, Tomonobu; Kaneko, Jun; Kamio, Yoshiyuki

    2016-10-01

    The major outer membrane protein Mep45 of Selenomonas ruminantium, an anaerobic Gram-negative bacterium, comprises two distinct domains: the N-terminal S-layer homologous (SLH) domain that protrudes into the periplasm and binds to peptidoglycan, and the remaining C-terminal transmembrane domain, whose function has been unknown. Here, we solubilized and purified Mep45 and characterized its function using proteoliposomes reconstituted with Mep45. We found that Mep45 forms a nonspecific diffusion channel via its C-terminal region. The channel was permeable to solutes smaller than a molecular weight of roughly 600, and the estimated pore radius was 0.58 nm. Truncation of the SLH domain did not affect the channel property. On the basis of the fact that Mep45 is the most abundant outer membrane protein in S. ruminantium, we conclude that Mep45 serves as a main pathway through which small solutes diffuse across the outer membrane of this bacterium.

  3. Une mélanonychie suspecte révélant un syndrome de Laugier ...

    Le syndrome de Laugier Hunziker (SLH) est une affection rare, d'étiologie inconnue, décrite initialement en 1970 par Laugier et Hunziker. Elle touche les adultes de phototype clair avec une prédominance féminine. Ce syndrome est caractérisépar la présence des macules lenticulaires, bien limitées, de couleur variable, ...

  4. Furosemide Loaded Silica-Lipid Hybrid Microparticles: Formulation Development, in vitro and ex vivo Evaluation.

    Sambaraj, Swapna; Ammula, Divya; Nagabandi, Vijaykumar

    2015-09-01

    The main objective of the current research work was to formulate and evaluate furosemide loaded silica lipid hybrid microparticles for improved oral delivery. A novel silica-lipid hybrid microparticulate system is used for enhancing the oral absorption of low solubility and low permeability of (BCS Class IV) drugs. Silica-lipid hybrid microparticles include the drug solubilising effect of dispersed lipids and stabilizing effect of hydrophilic silica particles to increase drug solubilisation, which leads to enhanced oral bioavailability. The slica lipid hybrid (SLH) microparticles were composed of poorly soluble drug (furosemide), dispersion of oil phase (Soya bean oil and miglyol) in lecithin (Phospholipoid 90H), non-ionic surfactant (Polysorbate 80) and adsorbent (Aerosol 380). Saturation solubility studies were performed in different oils and surfactants with increased concentration of drug revealed increased solubility of furosemide. In vitro dissolution studies conducted under simulated gastric medium revealed 2-4 fold increase in dissolution efficiencies for SLH microparticles compared to that of pure drug (furosemide) and marketed formulation Lasix®. Ex vivo studies showed enhanced lipid digestibility, which improved drug permeability. Solid-state characterization of SLH microparticles by X-ray powder diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis confirmed non-crystalline nature and more compatibility of furosemide in silica-lipid hybrid microparticles. It can be concluded that the role of lipids and hydrophilic silica based carrier highlighted in enhancing solubility and permeability, and hence the oral bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs.

  5. Topology of actions and homogeneous spaces

    Kozlov, Konstantin L

    2013-01-01

    Topologization of a group of homeomorphisms and its action provide additional possibilities for studying the topological space, the group of homeomorphisms, and their interconnections. The subject of the paper is the use of the property of d-openness of an action (introduced by Ancel under the name of weak micro-transitivity) in the study of spaces with various forms of homogeneity. It is proved that a d-open action of a Čech-complete group is open. A characterization of Polish SLH spaces using d-openness is given, and it is established that any separable metrizable SLH space has an SLH completion that is a Polish space. Furthermore, the completion is realized in coordination with the completion of the acting group with respect to the two-sided uniformity. A sufficient condition is given for extension of a d-open action to the completion of the space with respect to the maximal equiuniformity with preservation of d-openness. A result of van Mill is generalized, namely, it is proved that any homogeneous CDH metrizable compactum is the only G-compactification of the space of rational numbers for the action of some Polish group. Bibliography: 39 titles.

  6. Lower extremity functional tests and risk of injury in division iii collegiate athletes.

    Brumitt, Jason; Heiderscheit, Bryan C; Manske, Robert C; Niemuth, Paul E; Rauh, Mitchell J

    2013-06-01

    Functional tests have been used primarily to assess an athlete's fitness or readiness to return to sport. The purpose of this prospective cohort study was to determine the ability of the standing long jump (SLJ) test, the single-leg hop (SLH) for distance test, and the lower extremity functional test (LEFT) as preseason screening tools to identify collegiate athletes who may be at increased risk for a time-loss sports-related low back or lower extremity injury. A total of 193 Division III athletes from 15 university teams (110 females, age 19.1 ± 1.1 y; 83 males, age 19.5 ± 1.3 y) were tested prior to their sports seasons. Athletes performed the functional tests in the following sequence: SLJ, SLH, LEFT. The athletes were then prospectively followed during their sports season for occurrence of low back or LE injury. Female athletes who completed the LEFT in $118 s were 6 times more likely (OR=6.4, 95% CI: 1.3, 31.7) to sustain a thigh or knee injury. Male athletes who completed the LEFT in #100 s were more likely to experience a time-loss injury to the low back or LE (OR=3.2, 95% CI: 1.1, 9.5) or a foot or ankle injury (OR=6.7, 95% CI: 1.5, 29.7) than male athletes who completed the LEFT in 101 s or more. Female athletes with a greater than 10% side-to-side asymmetry between SLH distances had a 4-fold increase in foot or ankle injury (cut point: >10%; OR=4.4, 95% CI: 1.2, 15.4). Male athletes with SLH distances (either leg) at least 75% of their height had at least a 3-fold increase (OR=3.6, 95% CI: 1.2, 11.2 for the right LE; OR=3.6, 95% CI: 1.2, 11.2 for left LE) in low back or LE injury. The LEFT and the SLH tests appear useful in identifying Division III athletes at risk for a low back or lower extremity sports injury. Thus, these tests warrant further consideration as preparticipatory screening examination tools for sport injury in this population. The single-leg hop for distance and the lower extremity functional test, when administered to Division III

  7. Surface-Layer (S-Layer) Proteins Sap and EA1 Govern the Binding of the S-Layer-Associated Protein BslO at the Cell Septa of Bacillus anthracis

    Kern, Valerie J.; Kern, Justin W.; Theriot, Julie A.; Schneewind, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    The Gram-positive pathogen Bacillus anthracis contains 24 genes whose products harbor the structurally conserved surface-layer (S-layer) homology (SLH) domain. Proteins endowed with the SLH domain associate with the secondary cell wall polysaccharide (SCWP) following secretion. Two such proteins, Sap and EA1, have the unique ability to self-assemble into a paracrystalline layer on the surface of bacilli and form S layers. Other SLH domain proteins can also be found within the S layer and have been designated Bacillus S-layer-associated protein (BSLs). While both S-layer proteins and BSLs bind the same SCWP, their deposition on the cell surface is not random. For example, BslO is targeted to septal peptidoglycan zones, where it catalyzes the separation of daughter cells. Here we show that an insertional lesion in the sap structural gene results in elongated chains of bacilli, as observed with a bslO mutant. The chain length of the sap mutant can be reduced by the addition of purified BslO in the culture medium. This complementation in trans can be explained by an increased deposition of BslO onto the surface of sap mutant bacilli that extends beyond chain septa. Using fluorescence microscopy, we observed that the Sap S layer does not overlap the EA1 S layer and slowly yields to the EA1 S layer in a growth-phase-dependent manner. Although present all over bacilli, Sap S-layer patches are not observed at septa. Thus, we propose that the dynamic Sap/EA1 S-layer coverage of the envelope restricts the deposition of BslO to the SCWP at septal rings. PMID:22609927

  8. What Is the Role of Manual Preference in Hand-Digit Mapping During Finger Counting? A Study in a Large Sample of Right- and Left-Handers.

    Zago, Laure; Badets, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to test whether there is a relationship between manual preference and hand-digit mapping in 369 French adults with similar numbers of right- and left-handers. Manual laterality was evaluated with the finger tapping test to evaluate hand motor asymmetry, and the Edinburgh handedness inventory was used to assess manual preference strength (MPS) and direction. Participants were asked to spontaneously "count on their fingers from 1 to 10" without indications concerning the hand(s) to be used. The results indicated that both MPS and hand motor asymmetry affect the hand-starting preference for counting. Left-handers with a strong left-hand preference (sLH) or left-hand motor asymmetry largely started to count with their left hand (left-starter), while right-handers with a strong right-hand preference (sRH) or right-hand motor asymmetry largely started to count with their right hand (right-starter). Notably, individuals with weak MPS did not show a hand-starting preference. These findings demonstrated that manual laterality contributes to finger counting directionality. Lastly, the results showed a higher proportion of sLH left-starter individuals compared with sRH right-starters, indicating an asymmetric bias of MPS on hand-starting preference. We hypothesize that the higher proportion of sLH left-starters could be explained by the congruence between left-to-right hand-digit mapping and left-to-right mental number line representation that has been largely reported in the literature. Taken together, these results indicate that finger-counting habits integrate biological and cultural information. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. The Surface Layer Homology Domain-Containing Proteins of Alkaliphilic Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4 Play an Important Role in Alkaline Adaptation via Peptidoglycan Synthesis.

    Fujinami, Shun; Ito, Masahiro

    2018-01-01

    It is well known that the Na + cycle and the cell wall are essential for alkaline adaptation of Na + -dependent alkaliphilic Bacillus species. In Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4, surface layer protein A (SlpA), the most abundant protein in the surface layer (S-layer) of the cell wall, is involved in alkaline adaptation, especially under low Na + concentrations. The presence of a large number of genes that encode S-layer homology (SLH) domain-containing proteins has been suggested from the genome sequence of B. pseudofirmus OF4. However, other than SlpA, the functions of SLH domain-containing proteins are not well known. Therefore, a deletion mutant of the csaB gene, required for the retention of SLH domain-containing proteins on the cell wall, was constructed to investigate its physiological properties. The csaB mutant strain of B. pseudofirmus OF4 had a chained morphology and alkaline sensitivity even under a 230 mM Na + concentration at which there is no growth difference between the parental strain and the slpA mutant strain. Ultra-thin section transmission electron microscopy showed that a csaB mutant strain lacked an S-layer part, and its peptidoglycan (PG) layer was disturbed. The slpA mutant strain also lacked an S-layer part, although its PG layer was not disturbed. These results suggested that the surface layer homology domain-containing proteins of B. pseudofirmus OF4 play an important role in alkaline adaptation via peptidoglycan synthesis.

  10. A comparative analysis of alpha-decay half-lives for even-even 178Pb to 234U isotopes

    Hosseini, S. S.; Hassanabadi, H.; Zarrinkamar, S.

    2018-02-01

    The feasibility for the alpha decay from the even-even transitions of 178Pb to 234U isotopes has been studied within the Coulomb and proximity potential model (CPPM). The alpha decay half-lives are considered from different theoretical approaches using Semi-empirical formula of Poenaru et al. (SemFIS), the Universal Decay law (UDL) of Qi et al., Akrawy-Dorin formula of Akrawy and Poenaru (ADF), the Scaling law of Brown (SLB) and the Scaling Law of Horoi et al. (SLH). The numerical results obtained by the CPPM and compared with other method as well the experimental data.

  11. The Stratonovich formulation of quantum feedback network rules

    Gough, John E.

    2016-12-01

    We express the rules for forming quantum feedback networks using the Stratonovich form of quantum stochastic calculus rather than the Itō or SLH (J. E. Gough and M. R. James, "Quantum feedback networks: Hamiltonian formulation," Commun. Math. Phys. 287, 1109 (2009), J. E. Gough and M. R. James, "The Series product and its application to quantum feedforward and feedback networks," IEEE Trans. Autom. Control 54, 2530 (2009)) form. Remarkably the feedback reduction rule implies that we obtain the Schur complement of the matrix of Stratonovich coupling operators where we short out the internal input/output coefficients.

  12. Effect of abiotic factors on the infestation of spotted bollworm in advance genotypes of cotton

    Khaliq, A.; Subhani, M.N.; Murtaza, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Studies were conducted on ten advance varieties of cotton Viz., BH-121, NIAB KRISHMA, DNA-137, VH-142, BH-125, MNH-635, SLH-627, FNH-245, CRIS-467 and CRIS-82 to see the effect of different weather conditions on the incidence and development of spotted bollworm infestation at Nuclear Institute for Agriculture and Biology (NIAB), Faisalabad. Temperature and relative humidity were correlated positively and rainfall affected negatively to the infestation of spotted bollworm on squares and green bolls in advance genotype of cotton. (author)

  13. Effect of weather factors on the incidence and development of pink bollworm on flowers of advance cotton genotypes

    Khaliq, A.; Subhani, M.N.; Hassan, S.W.; Afzal, M.

    2008-01-01

    Ten advance genotypes of cotton Viz. BH-121, NIAB KRISHMA, DNH-137, VH-142, VH-142 BH-125, MNH-635, SLH-267, FNH-245, CRIS-467 and CRIS-82 were used to determine the effect of different weather factors on the incidence and development of pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossyiella) infestation at Nuclear institute for Agriculture and Biology (NIAB) Faisalabad. Trials were laid out using Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD) with four replications. Finally data were subjected to statistical analysis and for correlation studies between weather factors and pink bollworm. Temperature and relative humidity and rainfall affected negatively for the infestation of pink bollworm on flowers in advance genotypes of cotton. (author)

  14. Fibre qualities of bolls developed under different day and night temperatures in various Pakistani cotton varieties and mutant strains

    Bandesha, A.A.; Aslam, M.; Ishaque, W.; Haq, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    Four commercial cotton varieties NIAB-78, B-557, SLH-41, MNH-93 and four advanced mutants strains N-82, L-21, L-25 and M-626 were used to study the effect of temperature on fibre quality during boll developing stage. The results showed that varieties differed significantly in all fibre quality parameters. There was significant increase in fibre length under medium temperature range while significant increase in fibre strength and highly significant increase in Micronaire values and maturity index under high temperature conditions. The medium temperature range (24.5 to 30.6 C) seemed to be ideal for cotton fibre development. (author)

  15. Comparative analyses of two thermophilic enzymes exhibiting both beta-1,4 mannosidic and beta-1,4 glucosidic cleavage activities from Caldanaerobius polysaccharolyticus.

    Han, Yejun; Dodd, Dylan; Hespen, Charles W; Ohene-Adjei, Samuel; Schroeder, Charles M; Mackie, Roderick I; Cann, Isaac K O

    2010-08-01

    The hydrolysis of polysaccharides containing mannan requires endo-1,4-beta-mannanase and 1,4-beta-mannosidase activities. In the current report, the biochemical properties of two endo-beta-1,4-mannanases (Man5A and Man5B) from Caldanaerobius polysaccharolyticus were studied. Man5A is composed of an N-terminal signal peptide (SP), a catalytic domain, two carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs), and three surface layer homology (SLH) repeats, whereas Man5B lacks the SP, CBMs, and SLH repeats. To gain insights into how the two glycoside hydrolase family 5 (GH5) enzymes may aid the bacterium in energy acquisition and also the potential application of the two enzymes in the biofuel industry, two derivatives of Man5A (Man5A-TM1 [TM1 stands for truncational mutant 1], which lacks the SP and SLH repeats, and Man5A-TM2, which lacks the SP, CBMs, and SLH repeats) and the wild-type Man5B were biochemically analyzed. The Man5A derivatives displayed endo-1,4-beta-mannanase and endo-1,4-beta-glucanase activities and hydrolyzed oligosaccharides with a degree of polymerization (DP) of 4 or higher. Man5B exhibited endo-1,4-beta-mannanase activity and little endo-1,4-beta-glucanase activity; however, this enzyme also exhibited 1,4-beta-mannosidase and cellodextrinase activities. Man5A-TM1, compared to either Man5A-TM2 or Man5B, had higher catalytic activity with soluble and insoluble polysaccharides, indicating that the CBMs enhance catalysis of Man5A. Furthermore, Man5A-TM1 acted synergistically with Man5B in the hydrolysis of beta-mannan and carboxymethyl cellulose. The versatility of the two enzymes, therefore, makes them a resource for depolymerization of mannan-containing polysaccharides in the biofuel industry. Furthermore, on the basis of the biochemical and genomic data, a molecular mechanism for utilization of mannan-containing nutrients by C. polysaccharolyticus is proposed.

  16. Mississippi River: Study of Alternatives for Rehabilitation of Lock and Dam Number 1. Minneapolis, Minnesota. Volume 3. Appendices B-F.

    1976-04-01

    ADA34 023 MSSISSIPPI RVER: STUDOFALERNATVESOR 1/4 REHABILIATION OF LOCK AND D..U) CORPS OF ENGINEERS ST A SR P UNCLASSIFED PALM STPU DITIT AR7 / 132...AFACIFA4 Slh9qFAC,- 6 I0. "A e 6250 , 3 VW~- 41Mj,4, 4 04X, 4950 , 5 SCp * 295" , 6, 496Vs, .3502 S 00-, 55oolo,, ,e-. o’so b, Swl~.-/~o~ 41 N //Z-V...the concrete specimen. Selected portions wurc examined in immersion oils under the petrographic microscope. CONC LUSIONS River Wall, Drill Hole No. 74

  17. The Setting is the Service: How the Architecture of Sober Living Residences Supports Community Based Recovery.

    Wittman, Fried; Jee, Babette; Polcin, Douglas L; Henderson, Diane

    2014-07-01

    The architecture of residential recovery settings is an important silent partner in the alcohol/drug recovery field. The settings significantly support or hinder recovery experiences of residents, and shape community reactions to the presence of sober living houses (SLH) in ordinary neighborhoods. Grounded in the principles of Alcoholics Anonymous, the SLH provides residents with settings designed to support peer based recovery; further, these settings operate in a community context that insists on sobriety and strongly encourages attendance at 12-step meetings. Little formal research has been conducted to show how architectural features of the recovery setting - building appearance, spatial layouts, furnishings and finishes, policies for use of the facilities, physical care and maintenance of the property, neighborhood features, aspects of location in the city - function to promote (or retard) recovery, and to build (or detract from) community support. This paper uses a case-study approach to analyze the architecture of a community-based residential recovery service that has demonstrated successful recovery outcomes for its residents, is popular in its community, and has achieved state-wide recognition. The Environmental Pattern Language (Alexander, Ishikawa, & Silverstein, 1977) is used to analyze its architecture in a format that can be tested, critiqued, and adapted for use by similar programs in many communities, providing a model for replication and further research.

  18. Effect of pectin, lecithin, and antacid feed supplements (Egusin®) on gastric ulcer scores, gastric fluid pH and blood gas values in horses

    2014-01-01

    Background The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of two commercial feed supplements, Egusin 250® [E-250] and Egusin SLH® [E-SLH], on gastric ulcer scores, gastric fluid pH, and blood gas values in stall-confined horses undergoing feed-deprivation. Methods Nine Thoroughbred horses were used in a three-period crossover study. For the three treatment groups, sweet feed was mixed with E-250, E-SLH, or nothing (control group) and fed twice daily. Horses were treated for 21 days, then an additional 7 days while on an alternating feed-deprivation model to induce or worsen ulcers (period one). In periods two and three, horses (n=6) were treated for an additional 7 days after feed-deprivation. Gastroscopies were performed on day -1 (n=9), day 21 (n=9), day 28 (n=9) and day 35 (n=6). Gastric juice pH was measured and gastric ulcer scores were assigned. Venous blood gas values were also measured. Results Gastric ulcers in control horses significantly decreased after 21 days, but there was no difference in ulcer scores when compared to the Egusin® treated horses. NG gastric ulcer scores significantly increased in E-250 and control horses on day 28 compared to day 21 as a result of intermittent feed-deprivation, but no treatment effect was observed. NG ulcer scores remained high in the control group but significantly decreased in the E-SLH- and E-250-treated horses by day 35. Gastric juice pH values were low and variable and no treatment effect was observed. Mean blood pCO2 values were significantly increased two hours after feeding in treated horses compared to controls, whereas mean blood TCO2 values increased in the 24 hour sample, but did not exceed 38 mmol/l. Conclusions The feed-deprivation model increased NG gastric ulcer severity in the horses. However, by day 35, Egusin® treated horses had less severe NG gastric ulcers compared to untreated control horses. After 35 days, Egusin® products tested here ameliorate the severity of gastric ulcers in

  19. Fractionation of Nitrogen Isotopes by Plants with Different Types of Mycorrhiza in Mountain Tundra Ecosystems

    Buzin, Igor; Makarov, Mikhail; Maslov, Mikhail; Tiunov, Alexei

    2017-04-01

    We studied nitrogen concentration and nitrogen isotope composition in plants from four mountain tundra ecosystems in the Khibiny Mountains. The ecosystems consisted of a toposequence beginning with the shrub-lichen heath (SLH) on the ridge and upper slope, followed by the Betula nana dominated shrub heath (SH) on the middle slope, the cereal meadow (CM) on the lower slope and the sedge meadow (SM) at the bottom of the slope. The inorganic nitrogen concentration of the soils from the studied ecosystems were significantly different; the SLH soil was found to contain the minimum concentration of N-NH4+ and N-NO3- , while in the soils of the meadow ecosystems these concentrations were much higher. The concentration of nitrogen in leaves of the dominant plant species in all of the ecosystems is directly connected with the concentration of inorganic nitrogen in the soils, regardless of the plant's mycorrhizal symbiosis type. However, such a correlation is not apparent in the case of plant roots, especially for plant roots with ectomycorrhiza and ericoid mycorrhiza. The majority of plant species with these types of mycorrhiza in the SH and particularly in the CM were enriched in 15N in comparison with the SLH (such plants were not found within the SM). This could be due to several reasons: 1) the decreasing role of mycorrhiza in nitrogen consumption and therefore in the fractionation of isotopes in the relatively-N-enriched ecosystems; 2) the use of relatively-15N-enriched forms of nitrogen for plant nutrition in meadow ecosystems. This heavier nitrogen isotope composition in plant roots with ectomycorrhiza and ericoid mycorrhiza in ecosystems with available nitrogen enriched soils doesn't correspond to the classical idea of mycorrhiza decreasing participation in nitrogen plant nutrition. The analysis of the isotope composition of separate labile forms of nitrogen makes it possible to explain the phenomenon. Not all arbuscular mycorrhizal species within the sedge meadow

  20. The development of a lower heat concrete mixture for mass concrete placement conditions

    Crowley, Aaron Martin

    The hydration process of portland cement (PC) is exothermic; therefore, the thermal behavior of concrete has to be taken into consideration when placed in a large mass. The research presented involves a Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT) Class S (seal) portland cement concrete (PCC) which is used as a foundation seal during construction of bridge abutments and piers. A Class S PCC mixture meeting the 2006 TDOT specifications has the potential to generate excessive amounts of heat and induce thermal cracking in structural elements. The purpose of the study is to reduce the heat generation of a Class S PCC while maintaining adequate values of other engineering properties. Due to the possibility of underwater placement of a Class S PCC, reduction in the total cementing materials content were not considered in this study. Five candidate mixtures were used to compare against a typical TDOT Class S mixture. The five candidate Class S-LH (lower heat) mixtures were 45, 60, 70% Grade 120 slag substitutions for PC as well as two ternary mixtures containing Grade 120 slag and Class F fly ash. Ten batches of each mixture were produced. All plastic and hardened properties met TDOT 604.03 Class S requirements for analytical comparison. The 70% Grade 120 slag Class S-LH mixture was analytically superior for all hardened properties and at reducing heat generation. Since the 70% Grade 120 slag Class S-LH mixture proved to be superior in laboratory conditions; it was selected for further evaluation in the field testing portion of the research. The 70% Grade 120 slag mixture produced a significantly lower maximum temperature as well as a significantly lower maximum differential temperature than a TDOT Class S mixture with 20% Class C fly ash in side-by-side 18 cubic yard cube field placements. Research results and literature recommend that engineers should decide when mass concrete conditions are appropriate during construction practices. When mass concrete conditions are

  1. Sea level variability at Adriatic coast and its relationship to atmospheric forcing

    Bergant, K. [Centre for Atmospheric Research, Nova Gorica Polytechnic, Nova Gorica (Slovenia); Susnik, M.; Strojan, I. [Dept. of Hydrology, Environmental Agency of the Republic of Slovenia, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Shaw, A.G.P. [James Rennel Div., National Oceanography Centre, Empress Dock, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-01

    Sea level (SLH) variability at the Adriatic coast was investigated for the period 1872-2001 using monthly average values of observations at 13 tide gauge stations. Linear trends and seasonal cycles were investigated first and removed afterwards from the data. Empirical orthogonal functions (EOF) analysis was used further on remaining anomalies (SLA) to extract the regional intermonthly variability of SLH. It was found that the leading EOF and its principal component (PC) explain a major part of SLA variability (92%). The correlation between the reconstructed SLA, based on leading EOF and its PC, and overlapping observed SLA values for selected tide gauge stations is between 0.93 and 0.99. Actual SLH values at tide gauge stations can be reconstructed and some gaps in the data can be filled in on the basis of estimated SLA values if reasonable estimates of long-term trends and seasonal cycles are also available. A strong, seasonally dependent relationship between SLA at the Adriatic coast and atmospheric forcing, represented by sea level pressure (SLP) fields, was also found. Comparing the time series of leading PC and gridded SLP data for the period 1948-2001, the highest correlation coefficients (r) of -0.92 in winter, -0.84 in spring, -0.66 in summer, and -0.91 in autumn were estimated for a SLP grid point located in northern Italy. The SLP variability on this grid point contains information about the isostatic response of the sea level at the Adriatic coast, but can also be treated as a sort of teleconnection index representing the large-scale SLP variability across central and southern Europe. To some extent the large-scale SLP variability that affects the SLA at the Adriatic coast can be related to the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), because significant correlations were found between the NAO index and the first PC of SLA (r{sub winter}=-0.56, r{sub spring}=-0.45, r{sub summer}=-0.48, and r{sub autumn}=-0.43) for the period 1872-2001. The use of partial least

  2. Role of different weather conditions on the incidence and development of american bollworm

    Khaliq, A.; Subhani, M.N.; Hassan, S.W.; Murtaza, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Studies were conducted at Nuclear Institute for Agriculture and biology (NIAB). Faisalabad on ten advance genotypes of cotton Viz,. BH-121, NIAB KRISHMA, DNH-137, VH-142, BH-125. MNH-635, SLH-267, FNH-245, CRIS-467 and CRIS-82, to see the role of different weather condition on the incidence and development of American bollworm (Heliothis armigera) infestation and coefficient of correlation among these factors and American bollworm infestation. Trial were laid out using Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD) with four replications. Finally data were subject to the statistical analysis and for correlation studies between weather factors and percent American boll temperature infestation. Temperature and relative humidity were correlated positively and rainfall effected negatively to the infestation of American bollworm on squares and for green bolls temperature was positively correlated while relative humidity and rainfall negatively with the percent American bollworm infestation in advance -genotypes of cotton under unsprayed condition. (author)

  3. Effect of induced lodging on grain yield and quality of brewing barley

    Eduardo Caierão

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Lodging is one of the main factors of constraint to grain yield stability in barley. The objective of this study wasto evaluate the effects of lodging on agronomic and qualitative traits, when induced at different stages of the crop development.The trial was carried out in Victor Graeff, RS, using a randomized complete block design with four replications and 3 factors:year, lodging date and lodging intensity. The analyzed parameters were grain yield (GY, kernel plumpness (KP, germination(G, and score of lodging at harvest (SLH. No significant interaction was observed for GY and G. The effects of inducedlodging at the booting and physiologic maturity stages were distinct for GY, KP and G. Unlike G, the variables GY and KPwere not significantly affected by lodging intensity. Quantitative and qualitative losses in barley can be predicted based onlodging.

  4. Safety Standard for Hydrogen and Hydrogen Systems: Guidelines for Hydrogen System Design, Materials Selection, Operations, Storage and Transportation. Revision

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Safety Standard, which establishes a uniform process for hydrogen system design, materials selection, operation, storage, and transportation, is presented. The guidelines include suggestions for safely storing, handling, and using hydrogen in gaseous (GH2), liquid (LH2), or slush (SLH2) form whether used as a propellant or non-propellant. The handbook contains 9 chapters detailing properties and hazards, facility design, design of components, materials compatibility, detection, and transportation. Chapter 10 serves as a reference and the appendices contained therein include: assessment examples; scaling laws, explosions, blast effects, and fragmentation; codes, standards, and NASA directives; and relief devices along with a list of tables and figures, abbreviations, a glossary and an index for ease of use. The intent of the handbook is to provide enough information that it can be used alone, but at the same time, reference data sources that can provide much more detail if required.

  5. Ω and ϕ in Au + Au collisions at and 11.5 GeV from a multiphase transport model

    Ye, Y. J.; Chen, J. H.; Ma, Y. G.; Zhang, S.; Zhong, C.

    2017-08-01

    Within the framework of a multiphase transport model, we study the production and properties of Ω and ϕ in Au + Au collisions with a new set of parameters for and with the original set of parameters for . The AMPT model with string melting provides a reasonable description at , while the default AMPT model describes the data well at . This indicates that the system created at top RHIC energy is dominated by partonic interactions, while hadronic interactions become important at lower beam energy, such as . The comparison of N(Ω++Ω-)/[2N(ϕ)] ratio between data and calculations further supports the argument. Our calculations can generally describe the data of nuclear modification factor as well as elliptic flow. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11421505, 11520101004, 11220101005, 11275250, 11322547), Major State Basic Research Development Program in China (2014CB845400, 2015CB856904) and Key Research Program of Frontier Sciences of CAS (QYZDJSSW-SLH002)

  6. Derived Born cross sections of e+e‑ annihilation into open charm mesons from CLEO-c measurements

    Dong, Xiang-Kun; Wang, Liang-Liang; Yuan, Chang-Zheng

    2018-04-01

    The exclusive Born cross sections of the production of D0, D+ and {{{D}}}{{s}}{{+}} mesons in e+e‑ annihilation at 13 energy points between 3.970 and 4.260 GeV are obtained by applying corrections for initial state radiation and vacuum polarization to the observed cross sections measured by the CLEO-c experiment. Both the statistical and the systematic uncertainties for the obtained Born cross sections are estimated. Supported in part by National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) (11235011, 11475187, 11521505, U1632106), the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (2015CB856701), Key Research Program of Frontier Sciences, CAS, (QYZDJ-SSW-SLH011) and the CAS Center for Excellence in Particle Physics (CCEPP)

  7. Dicty_cDB: SLC433 [Dicty_cDB

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLC433 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16397-1 SLC433Z (Link... to Original site) - - SLC433Z 613 - - - - Show SLC433 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLC433 (Link to...ycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLC4-B/SLC433Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLC43...3Z (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLC433 (SLC433Q) /CSM/SL/SLC4-B/SLC433Q.Seq.d/ XXXXX...tyostelium discoideum slug cDNA, clone SLH872. 1134 0.0 1 ( AU034279 ) Dictyostelium discoideum slug cDNA, clone SLC4

  8. Distinction between critical current effects and intrinsic anomalies in the point-contact Andreev reflection spectra of unconventional superconductors

    He, Ge; Wei, Zhong-Xu; Brisbois, Jérémy; Jia, Yan-Li; Huang, Yu-Long; Zhou, Hua-Xue; Ni, Shun-Li; Silhanek, Alejandro V.; Shan, Lei; Zhu, Bei-Yi; Yuan, Jie; Dong, Xiao-Li; Zhou, Fang; Zhao, Zhong-Xian; Jin, Kui

    2018-04-01

    Not Available Project supported by the National Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2015CB921000, 2016YFA0300301, and 2017YFA0302902), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11674374 and 1474338), the Key Research Program of Frontier Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. QYZDB-SSW-SLH008), the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant Nos. XDB07020100 and XDB07030200), the Beijing Municipal Science and Technology Project (Grant No. Z161100002116011), the Fonds de la Recherche Scientifique–FNRS and the ARC Grant 13/18-08 for Concerted Research Actions, financed by the French Community of Belgium (Wallonia-Brussels Federation). Jérémy Brisbois acknowledges the support from F.R.S.–FNRS (Research Fellowship), The work of Alejandro V Silhanek is partially supported by PDR T.0106.16 of the F.R.S.–FNRS..

  9. The effects of surface condition on abdominal muscle activity during single-legged hold exercise.

    Ha, Sung-min; Oh, Jae-seop; Jeon, In-cheol; Kwon, Oh-yun

    2015-02-01

    To treat low-back pain, various spinal stability exercises are commonly used to improve trunk muscle function and strength. Because human movement for normal daily activity occurs in multi-dimensions, the importance of exercise in multi-dimensions or on unstable surfaces has been emphasized. Recently, a motorized rotating platform (MRP) for facilitating multi-dimensions dynamic movement was introduced for clinical use. However, the abdominal muscle activity with this device has not been reported. The purpose of this study was to compare the abdominal muscle activity (rectus abdominis, external and internal oblique muscles) during an active single-leg-hold (SLH) exercise on a floor (stable surface), foam roll, and motorized rotating platform (MRP). Thirteen healthy male subjects participated in this study. Using electromyography, the abdominal muscle activity was measured while the subjects performed SLH exercises on floor (stable surface), foam roll, and MRP. There were significant differences in the abdominal muscle activities among conditions (P.05) (Fig. 2). After the Bonferroni correction, however, no significant differences among conditions remained, except for differences in both side IO muscle activity between the floor and foam roll conditions (padjexercises on a foam roll and MRP is more effective increased activities of both side of RA and IO, and Rt. EO compared to floor condition. However, there were no significant differences in abdominal muscles activity in the multiple comparison between conditions (mean difference were smaller than the standard deviation in the abdominal muscle activities) (padj>0.017), except for differences in both side IO muscle activity between the floor (stable surface) and foam roll (padj<0.017) (effect size: 0.79/0.62 (non-supporting/supporting leg) for foam-roll versus floor). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The association between hemispheric specialization for language production and for spatial attention depends on left-hand preference strength.

    Zago, Laure; Petit, Laurent; Mellet, Emmanuel; Jobard, Gaël; Crivello, Fabrice; Joliot, Marc; Mazoyer, Bernard; Tzourio-Mazoyer, Nathalie

    2016-12-01

    Cerebral lateralization for language production and spatial attention and their relationships with manual preference strength (MPS) were assessed in a sample of 293 healthy volunteers, including 151 left-handers, using fMRI during covert sentence production (PROD) and line bisection judgment (LBJ) tasks, as compared to high- and low-level reference tasks. At the group level, we found the expected complementary hemispheric specialization (HS) with leftward asymmetries for PROD within frontal and temporal regions and rightward asymmetries for LBJ within frontal and posterior occipito-parieto-temporal regions. Individual hemispheric (HLI) and regional (frontal and occipital) lateralization indices (LI) were then calculated on the activation maps for PROD and LBJ. We found a correlation between the degree of rightward cerebral asymmetry and the leftward behavioral attentional bias recorded during LBJ task. This correlation was found when LBJ-LI was computed over the hemispheres, in the frontal lobes, but not in the occipital lobes. We then investigated whether language production and spatial attention cerebral lateralization relate to each other, and whether manual preference was a variable that impacted the complementary HS of these functions. No correlation was found between spatial and language LIs in the majority of our sample of participants, including right-handers with a strong right-hand preference (sRH, n=97) and mixed-handers (MH, n=97), indicating that these functions lateralized independently. By contrast, in the group of left-handers with a strong left-hand preference (sLH, n= 99), a negative correlation was found between language and spatial lateralization. This negative correlation was found when LBJ-LI and PROD-LI were computed over the hemispheres, in the frontal lobes and between the occipital lobes for LBJ and the frontal lobes for PROD. These findings underline the importance to include sLH in the study sample to reveal the underlying mechanisms of

  11. Measurement of the integrated Luminosities of cross-section scan data samples around the {\\rm{\\psi }}(3770) mass region

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ahmed, S.; Albrecht, M.; Alekseev, M.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, Y.; Bakina, O.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Ban, Y.; Begzsuren, K.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Berger, N.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chai, J.; Chang, J. F.; Chang, W. L.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, P. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Cossio, F.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; De Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Dou, Z. L.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, Y.; Farinelli, R.; Fava, L.; Fegan, S.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, X. L.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. G.; Gao, Z.; Garillon, B.; Garzia, I.; Gilman, A.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, L.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, L. M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, R. P.; Guo, Y. P.; Guskov, A.; Haddadi, Z.; Han, S.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, X. Q.; Heinsius, F. H.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Holtmann, T.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, X. Z.; Huang, Z. L.; Hussain, T.; Ikegami Andersson, W.; Irshad, M.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiang, X. Y.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Jin, Y.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Khan, T.; Khoukaz, A.; Kiese, P.; Kliemt, R.; Koch, L.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kuemmel, M.; Kuessner, M.; Kupsc, A.; Kurth, M.; Kühn, W.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Lavezzi, L.; Leiber, S.; Leithoff, H.; Li, C.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, F. Y.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, H. J.; Li, J. C.; Li, J. W.; Li, K. J.; Li, Kang; Li, Ke; Li, Lei; Li, P. L.; Li, P. R.; Li, Q. Y.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Liao, L. Z.; Libby, J.; Lin, C. X.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, D.; Liu, D. Y.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. L.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, Huanhuan; Liu, Huihui; Liu, J. B.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, Ke; Liu, L. D.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqing; Long, Y. F.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, X. L.; Lusso, S.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, M. M.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, Y. M.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mangoni, A.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Meng, Z. X.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Mezzadri, G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales Morales, C.; Morello, G.; Muchnoi, N. Yu; Muramatsu, H.; Mustafa, A.; Nakhoul, S.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pan, Y.; Papenbrock, M.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Pellegrino, J.; Peng, H. P.; Peng, Z. Y.; Peters, K.; Pettersson, J.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Pitka, A.; Poling, R.; Prasad, V.; Qi, H. R.; Qi, M.; Qi, T. Y.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Richter, M.; Ripka, M.; Rolo, M.; Rong, G.; Rosner, Ch.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrié, M.; Schnier, C.; Schoenning, K.; Shan, W.; Shan, X. Y.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shi, X.; Song, J. J.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Sowa, C.; Spataro, S.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, L.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, X. H.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. K.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tan, Y. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, G. Y.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Tiemens, M.; Tsednee, B.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, C. W.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, Dan; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, Meng; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, W. P.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wang, Zongyuan; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, L. J.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L.; Xia, X.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, Y. J.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xie, Y. H.; Xiong, X. A.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, J. J.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, F.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. J.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, S. L.; Yang, Y. H.; Yang, Y. X.; Yang, Yifan; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; You, Z. Y.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zeng, Z.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. F.; Zhang, T. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Yao; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, Q.; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, A. N.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; BESIII Collaboration

    2018-05-01

    To investigate the nature of the {{\\psi }}(3770) resonance and to measure the cross section for {{{e}}}+{{{e}}}-\\to {{D}}\\bar{{{D}}}, a cross-section scan data sample, distributed among 41 center-of-mass energy points from 3.73 to 3.89 GeV, was taken with the BESIII detector operated at the BEPCII collider in the year 2010. By analyzing the large angle Bhabha scattering events, we measure the integrated luminosity of the data sample at each center-of-mass energy point. The total integrated luminosity of the data sample is 76.16+/- 0.04+/- 0.61 {pb}}-1, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. Supported by National Key Basic Research Program of China (2015CB856700), National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) (11235011, 11335008, 11425524, 11625523, 11635010), the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) Large-Scale Scientific Facility Program, the CAS Center for Excellence in Particle Physics (CCEPP), Joint Large-Scale Scientific Facility Funds of the NSFC and CAS (U1332201, U1532257, U1532258), CAS Key Research Program of Frontier Sciences (QYZDJ-SSW-SLH003, QYZDJ-SSW-SLH040), 100 Talents Program of CAS, National 1000 Talents Program of China, INPAC and Shanghai Key Laboratory for Particle Physics and Cosmology, German Research Foundation DFG under Contracts Nos. Collaborative Research Center CRC 1044, FOR 2359, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Italy, Koninklijke Nederlandse Akademie van Wetenschappen (KNAW) (530-4CDP03), Ministry of Development of Turkey (DPT2006K-120470), National Science and Technology fund, The Swedish Research Council, U. S. Department of Energy (DE-FG02-05ER41374, DE-SC-0010118, DE-SC-0010504, DE-SC-0012069), University of Groningen (RuG) and the Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH (GSI), Darmstadt, WCU Program of National Research Foundation of Korea (R32-2008-000-10155-0)

  12. Southeastward increase of the late Quaternary slip-rate of the Xianshuihe fault, eastern Tibet. Geodynamic and seismic hazard implications

    Bai, Mingkun; Chevalier, Marie-Luce; Pan, Jiawei; Replumaz, Anne; Leloup, Philippe Hervé; Métois, Marianne; Li, Haibing

    2018-03-01

    The left-lateral strike-slip Xianshuihe fault system located in the eastern Tibetan Plateau is considered as one of the most tectonically active intra-continental fault system in China, along which more than 20 M > 6.5 and more than 10 M > 7 earthquakes occurred since 1700. Therefore, studying its activity, especially its slip rate at different time scales, is essential to evaluate the regional earthquake hazard. Here, we focus on the central segment of the Xianshuihe fault system, where the Xianshuihe fault near Kangding city splays into three branches: the Selaha, Yalahe and Zheduotang faults. In this paper we use precise dating together with precise field measurements of offsets to re-estimate the slip rate of the fault that was suggested without precise age constraints. We studied three sites where the active Selaha fault cuts and left-laterally offsets moraine crests and levees. We measured horizontal offsets of 96 ± 20 m at Tagong levees (TG), 240 ± 15 m at Selaha moraine (SLH) and 80 ± 5 m at Yangjiagou moraine (YJG). Using 10Be cosmogenic dating, we determined abandonment ages at Tagong, Selaha and Yangjiagou of 12.5 (+ 2.5 / - 2.2) ka, 22 ± 2 ka, and 18 ± 2 ka, respectively. By matching the emplacement age of the moraines or levees with their offsets, we obtain late Quaternary horizontal average slip-rates of 7.6 (+ 2.3 / - 1.9) mm/yr at TG and 10.7 (+ 1.3 / - 1.1) mm/yr at SLH, i.e., 5.7-12 mm/yr or between 9.6 and 9.9 mm/yr assuming that the slip rate should be constant between the nearby TG and SLH sites. At YJG, we obtain a lower slip rate of 4.4 ± 0.5 mm/yr, most likely because the parallel Zheduotang fault shares the slip rate at this longitude, therefore suggesting a ∼5 mm/yr slip rate along the Zheduotang fault. The ∼10 mm/yr late Quaternary rate along the Xianshuihe fault is higher than that along the Ganzi fault to the NW (6-8 mm/yr). This appears to be linked to the existence of the Longriba fault system that separates the Longmenshan

  13. Impacts of the Anomalous Mississippi River Discharge and Diversions on Phytoplankton Blooming in the Northeastern Gulf of Mexico in August 2010

    O'Connor, Brendan Sean

    derived from freshwater diversions and storm activity contributed to the development of FLH anomaly in August 2010. Chapter two examines the spectral characteristics of water and oil collected by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). Several peaks in the spectral features of the total radiance of surface oil between 1907nm and 2400nm appear to be absent for water. An algorithm (Spectral Line Height) was created to measure the height of the peak at 2142nm relative to a baseline between 2013nm and 2390nm. A normalized difference technique developed by the USGS was used as a validation tool. Preliminary results of the SLH technique appear to compare favorably with the results derived using the USGS technique. The SLH technique worked in areas that did not show sunglint or shallow bottom features. Sunglint areas would require additional correction to remove the effect of specular reflection. The SLH technique shows promise but will require validation to develop into an operational remote sensing method.

  14. Heterotic studies and inbreeding depression in f/sub 2/populations of upland cotton

    Panni, M.K.

    2012-01-01

    To study the genetic potential, heterotic effects and inbreeding depression, 8 X 8 F/sub 2/diallel populations with parental lines of upland cotton were grown during crop season 2010 in a randomized complete block design at Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Agricultural University Peshawar, Pakistan. Highly significant ( p = 0.01 ) variations were noticed among parental lines and F/sub 2/ populations for all the traits. According to genotypes mean performance for various traits, plant height varied from 101.60 to 126.30 cm and 98.60 to 140.60 cm, bolls plant/sup -1/ (12.87 to 19.53; 12.13 to 22.60), boll weight (3.80 to 5.01 g; 3.04 to 5.38 g) and seed cotton yield plant/sup -1/ varied from 55.74 to 85.47 g and 45.57 to 96.05 g in parental cultivars and their F/sub 2/ populations, respectively. However, 12 and 7 F/sub 2/ populations manifested significant heterosis over mid and better parents for plant height, 7 and 3 for bolls plant/sup -1/, 13 and 9 for boll weight and 13 and 5 F/sub 2/ populations for seed cotton yield plant/sup -1/, respectively. F/sub 2/ populations i.e. CIM-554 X CIM-473, CIM-554 X CIM-499, CIM-496 X SLH-284, CIM-473 X CIM-446 and CIM-554 X SLH-284 with low mean values for plant height performed better and manifested highly significant heterotic values over mid and better parents for bolls per plant, boll weight and seed cotton yield. By comparing F/sub 2/ mean values with F/sub 1/s, inbreeding depression was observed for plant height (0.66 to 23. 99%), bolls per plant (5.00 to 63.16%), boll weight (0.20 to 23.24%) and seed cotton yield (0.44 to 75.52%). However, 62% of F/sub 2/ populations revealed negative values for inbreeding depression, 14% for bolls per plant, 77% for boll weight and 21% for yield, revealed that these F/sub 2/ populations were more stable and performed better than F/sub 1/s even after segregation. Although, F/sub 2/ populations may display less heterosis as compared to F/sub 1/, but still better than high parents and can be used as

  15. Interannual hydroclimatic variability and the 2009-2011 extreme ENSO phases in Colombia: from Andean glaciers to Caribbean lowlands

    Bedoya-Soto, Juan Mauricio; Poveda, Germán; Trenberth, Kevin E.; Vélez-Upegui, Jorge Julián

    2018-03-01

    During 2009-2011, Colombia experienced extreme hydroclimatic events associated with the extreme phases of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Here, we study the dynamics of diverse land-atmosphere phenomena involved in such anomalous events at continental, regional, and local scales. Standardized anomalies of precipitation, 2-m temperature, total column water (TCW), volumetric soil water (VSW), temperature at 925 hPa, surface sensible heat (SSH), latent heat (SLH), evaporation (EVP), and liquid water equivalent thickness (LWET) are analyzed to assess atmosphere-land controls and relationships over tropical South America (TropSA) during 1986-2013 (long term) and 2009-2011 (ENSO extreme phases). An assessment of the interannual covariability between precipitation and 2-m temperature is performed using singular value decomposition (SVD) to identify the dominant spatiotemporal modes of hydroclimatic variability over the region's largest river basins (Amazon, Orinoco, Tocantins, Magdalena-Cauca, and Essequibo). ENSO, its evolution in time, and strong and consistent spatial structures emerge as the dominant mode of variability. In situ anomalies during both extreme phases of ENSO 2009-2011 over the Magdalena-Cauca River basins are linked at the continental scale. The ENSO-driven hydroclimatic effects extend from the diurnal cycle to interannual timescales, as reflected in temperature data from tropical glaciers and the rain-snow boundary in the highest peaks of the Central Andes of Colombia to river levels along the Caribbean lowlands of the Magdalena-Cauca River basin.

  16. CP asymmetries in Strange Baryon Decays

    Bigi, I. I.; Kang, Xian-Wei; Li, Hai-Bo

    2018-01-01

    While indirect and direct CP violation (CPV) has been established in the decays of strange and beauty mesons, no CPV has yet been found for baryons. There are different paths to finding CP asymmetry in the decays of strange baryons; they are all highly non-trivial. The HyperCP Collaboration has probed CPV in the decays of single Ξ and Λ [1]. We discuss future lessons from {{{e}}}+{{{e}}}- collisions at BESIII/BEPCII: probing decays of pairs of strange baryons, namely Λ, Σ and Ξ. Realistic goals are to learn about non-perturbative QCD. One can hope to find CPV in the decays of strange baryons; one can also dream of finding the impact of New Dynamics. We point out that an important new era will start with the BESIII/BEPCII data accumulated by the end of 2018. This also supports new ideas to trigger {{J}}/{{\\psi }}\\to \\bar{{{Λ }}}{{Λ }} at the LHCb collaboration. Supported by National Science Foundation (PHY-1520966), National Natural Science Foundation of China (11335009, 11125525), Joint Large-Scale Scientific Facility Funds of the NSFC and CAS (U1532257), the National Key Basic Research Program of China (2015CB856700), Key Research Program of Frontier Sciences, CAS, (QYZDJ-SSW-SLH003), XWK’s work is also supported by MOST (Taiwan) (104-2112-M-001-022)

  17. Low energy range dielectronic recombination of Fluorine-like Fe17+ at the CSRm

    Khan, Nadir; Huang, Zhong-Kui; Wen, Wei-Qiang; Mahmood, Sultan; Dou, Li-Jun; Wang, Shu-Xing; Xu, Xin; Wang, Han-Bing; Chen, Chong-Yang; Chuai, Xiao-Ya; Zhu, Xiao-Long; Zhao, Dong-Mei; Mao, Li-Jun; Li, Jie; Yin, Da-Yu; Yang, Jian-Cheng; Yuan, You-Jin; Zhu, Lin-Fan; Ma, Xin-Wen

    2018-05-01

    The accuracy of dielectronic recombination (DR) data for astrophysics related ions plays a key role in astrophysical plasma modeling. The absolute DR rate coefficient of Fe17+ ions was measured at the main cooler storage ring at the Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou, China. The experimental electron-ion collision energy range covers the first Rydberg series up to n = 24 for the DR resonances associated with the {}2P1/2\\to {}2P3/2{{Δ }}n=0 core excitations. A theoretical calculation was performed by using FAC code and compared with the measured DR rate coefficient. Overall reasonable agreement was found between the experimental results and calculations. Moreover, the plasma rate coefficient was deduced from the experimental DR rate coefficient and compared with the available results from the literature. At the low energy range, significant discrepancies were found, and the measured resonances challenge state-of-the-art theory at low collision energies. Supported by the National Key R&D Program of China (2017YFA0402300), the National Natural Science Foundation of China through (11320101003, U1732133, 11611530684) and Key Research Program of Frontier Sciences, CAS (QYZDY-SSW-SLH006)

  18. Constraining Alternative Theories of Gravity Using Pulsar Timing Arrays

    Cornish, Neil J.; O'Beirne, Logan; Taylor, Stephen R.; Yunes, Nicolás

    2018-05-01

    The opening of the gravitational wave window by ground-based laser interferometers has made possible many new tests of gravity, including the first constraints on polarization. It is hoped that, within the next decade, pulsar timing will extend the window by making the first detections in the nanohertz frequency regime. Pulsar timing offers several advantages over ground-based interferometers for constraining the polarization of gravitational waves due to the many projections of the polarization pattern provided by the different lines of sight to the pulsars, and the enhanced response to longitudinal polarizations. Here, we show that existing results from pulsar timing arrays can be used to place stringent limits on the energy density of longitudinal stochastic gravitational waves. However, unambiguously distinguishing these modes from noise will be very difficult due to the large variances in the pulsar-pulsar correlation patterns. Existing upper limits on the power spectrum of pulsar timing residuals imply that the amplitude of vector longitudinal (VL) and scalar longitudinal (SL) modes at frequencies of 1/year are constrained, AVL<4 ×10-16 and ASL<4 ×10-17, while the bounds on the energy density for a scale invariant cosmological background are ΩVLh2<4 ×10-11 and ΩSLh2<3 ×10-13.

  19. Assembly and Function of the Bacillus anthracis S-Layer.

    Missiakas, Dominique; Schneewind, Olaf

    2017-09-08

    Bacillus anthracis, the anthrax agent, is a member of the Bacillus cereus sensu lato group, which includes invasive pathogens of mammals or insects as well as nonpathogenic environmental strains. The genes for anthrax pathogenesis are located on two large virulence plasmids. Similar virulence plasmids have been acquired by other B. cereus strains and enable the pathogenesis of anthrax-like diseases. Among the virulence factors of B. anthracis is the S-layer-associated protein BslA, which endows bacilli with invasive attributes for mammalian hosts. BslA surface display and function are dependent on the bacterial S-layer, whose constituents assemble by binding to the secondary cell wall polysaccharide (SCWP) via S-layer homology (SLH) domains. B. anthracis and other pathogenic B. cereus isolates harbor genes for the secretion of S-layer proteins, for S-layer assembly, and for synthesis of the SCWP. We review here recent insights into the assembly and function of the S-layer and the SCWP.

  20. Montmorillonite-lipid hybrid carriers for ionizable and neutral poorly water-soluble drugs: Formulation, characterization and in vitro lipolysis studies.

    Dening, Tahnee J; Rao, Shasha; Thomas, Nicky; Prestidge, Clive A

    2017-06-30

    Lipid-based formulations (LBFs) are a popular strategy for enhancing the gastrointestinal solubilization and absorption of poorly water-soluble drugs. In light of this, montmorillonite-lipid hybrid (MLH) particles, composed of medium-chain triglycerides, lecithin and montmorillonite clay platelets, have been developed as a novel solid-state LBF. Owing to the unique charge properties of montmorillonite, whereby the clay platelet surfaces carry a permanent negative charge and the platelet edges carry a pH-dependent charge, three model poorly water-soluble drugs with different charge properties; blonanserin (weak base, pKa 7.7), ibuprofen (weak acid, pKa 4.5) and fenofibrate (neutral), were formulated as MLH particles and their performance during biorelevant in vitro lipolysis at pH 7.5 was investigated. For blonanserin, drug solubilization during in vitro lipolysis was significantly reduced 3.4-fold and 3.2-fold for MLH particles in comparison to a control lipid solution and silica-lipid hybrid (SLH) particles, respectively. It was hypothesized that strong electrostatic interactions between the anionic montmorillonite platelet surfaces and cationic blonanserin molecules were responsible for the inferior performance of MLH particles. In contrast, no significant influence on drug solubilization was observed for ibuprofen- and fenofibrate-loaded MLH particles. The results of the current study indicate that whilst MLH particles are a promising novel formulation strategy for poorly water-soluble drugs, drug ionization tendency and the potential for drug-clay interactions must be taken into consideration to ensure an appropriate performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Investigation on the transient enthalpy of coal combustion

    Fu, Pei-fang; Wang, Na; Yu, Bo; Zhang, Bin; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Huai-chun [Huazhong Univ. of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China). State Key Lab. of Coal Combustion

    2013-07-01

    The transient enthalpy ({Delta}h) of coal/char combustion of the three different coals (including anthracite, bituminous, and lignite) during the process of combustion is determined as a function of burn-off degree by using thermo-gravimetric-differential scanning calorimeter (TG-DSC) simultaneous thermal analyzer, and The error of determining calorific values of coals/chars is less 5% compared the results of TG-DSC with that of an automatic isoperibol calorimeter. It is found that In the initial stage, all the {Delta}h of coals are greater than that of the char pyrolysized from parent coal for many of volatiles contained more a great deal of heat per unit mass oxidized at low temperature, it also imply that coal is more easily ignited than char corresponded; And in the middle stage, all the {Delta}h of coals is lower than that of the char pyrolysized, so the pyrolysized char oxidation can supply much more of thermo-energy per unit mass. {Delta}h are almost a constant when the burn-off degree is equal to between 0.35/0.15 and 0.95/0.85 for ZCY bituminous coal/char and JWY anthracite/char, between 0.35/0.35 and 0.75/0.9 for SLH lignite/char; In the later stage, the {Delta}h of the coal/char decreased with the burn-off degree, it imply that the activity of the coal/char decreases. Therefore, coal pyrolysis changes not only the structure of char, but also the property of release heat; the transient enthalpy of coal/char combustion has been in change with the burn-out degree.

  2. Investigation on the ignition, thermal acceleration and characteristic temperatures of coal char combustion

    Zhang, Bin; Fu, Peifang; Liu, Yang; Yue, Fang; Chen, Jing; Zhou, Huaichun; Zheng, Chuguang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A new thermal model and measuring method for the ignition temperature are proposed. • Ignition occurs in a region but not a point with ambient conditions changing. • Ignition region is measured from the minimum to maximum ignition temperature. • T_i_g_,_m_a_x of coal char in TG-DSC is in line with the ignition temperature of EFR. - Abstract: Through using a new thermal analysis model and a method of coal/char combustion, the minimum ignition temperature and minimum ignition heat of three different ranks of pulverized coal char were measured by simultaneous Thermogravimetry and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (TG-DSC) experiments. The results show that the ignition of coal char occurs in the range between the minimum ignition temperature and the inflection-point temperature. The thermal acceleration and its gradient G_T increase with increasing heating rate and decrease with increasing coal char rank. The higher the G_T of the coal char, the more easily the ignition occurs and more rapidly the burning and burnout occur. The data show that the G_T of coal char of SLH lignite is 1.6 times more than that of coal char of ZCY bituminous and JWY anthracite in ignition zone, and 3.4 times in burning zone. The characteristic temperatures increase with increasing temperature of prepared char, heating rate and char rank. Moreover, the T_i_g_,_m_a_x calculated in DSC experiment is approximately in line with the ignition temperature obtained in the entrained flow reactor, which demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed theory.

  3. A High Molecular-Mass Anoxybacillus sp. SK3-4 Amylopullulanase: Characterization and Its Relationship in Carbohydrate Utilization

    Kian Mau Goh

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available An amylopullulanase of the thermophilic Anoxybacillus sp. SK3-4 (ApuASK was purified to homogeneity and characterized. Though amylopullulanases larger than 200 kDa are rare, the molecular mass of purified ApuASK appears to be approximately 225 kDa, on both SDS-PAGE analyses and native-PAGE analyses. ApuASK was stable between pH 6.0 and pH 8.0 and exhibited optimal activity at pH 7.5. The optimal temperature for ApuASK enzyme activity was 60 °C, and it retained 54% of its total activity for 240 min at 65 °C. ApuASK reacts with pullulan, starch, glycogen, and dextrin, yielding glucose, maltose, and maltotriose. Interestingly, most of the previously described amylopullulanases are unable to produce glucose and maltose from these substrates. Thus, ApuASK is a novel, high molecular-mass amylopullulanase able to produce glucose, maltose, and maltotriose from pullulan and starch. Based on whole genome sequencing data, ApuASK appeared to be the largest protein present in Anoxybacillus sp. SK3-4. The α-amylase catalytic domain present in all of the amylase superfamily members is present in ApuASK, located between the cyclodextrin (CD-pullulan-degrading N-terminus and the α-amylase catalytic C-terminus (amyC domains. In addition, the existence of a S-layer homology (SLH domain indicates that ApuASK might function as a cell-anchoring enzyme and be important for carbohydrate utilization in a streaming hot spring.

  4. The Dynamic Genome and Transcriptome of the Human Fungal Pathogen Blastomyces and Close Relative Emmonsia.

    José F Muñoz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Three closely related thermally dimorphic pathogens are causal agents of major fungal diseases affecting humans in the Americas: blastomycosis, histoplasmosis and paracoccidioidomycosis. Here we report the genome sequence and analysis of four strains of the etiological agent of blastomycosis, Blastomyces, and two species of the related genus Emmonsia, typically pathogens of small mammals. Compared to related species, Blastomyces genomes are highly expanded, with long, often sharply demarcated tracts of low GC-content sequence. These GC-poor isochore-like regions are enriched for gypsy elements, are variable in total size between isolates, and are least expanded in the avirulent B. dermatitidis strain ER-3 as compared with the virulent B. gilchristii strain SLH14081. The lack of similar regions in related species suggests these isochore-like regions originated recently in the ancestor of the Blastomyces lineage. While gene content is highly conserved between Blastomyces and related fungi, we identified changes in copy number of genes potentially involved in host interaction, including proteases and characterized antigens. In addition, we studied gene expression changes of B. dermatitidis during the interaction of the infectious yeast form with macrophages and in a mouse model. Both experiments highlight a strong antioxidant defense response in Blastomyces, and upregulation of dioxygenases in vivo suggests that dioxide produced by antioxidants may be further utilized for amino acid metabolism. We identify a number of functional categories upregulated exclusively in vivo, such as secreted proteins, zinc acquisition proteins, and cysteine and tryptophan metabolism, which may include critical virulence factors missed before in in vitro studies. Across the dimorphic fungi, loss of certain zinc acquisition genes and differences in amino acid metabolism suggest unique adaptations of Blastomyces to its host environment. These results reveal the dynamics

  5. The Dynamic Genome and Transcriptome of the Human Fungal Pathogen Blastomyces and Close Relative Emmonsia.

    Muñoz, José F; Gauthier, Gregory M; Desjardins, Christopher A; Gallo, Juan E; Holder, Jason; Sullivan, Thomas D; Marty, Amber J; Carmen, John C; Chen, Zehua; Ding, Li; Gujja, Sharvari; Magrini, Vincent; Misas, Elizabeth; Mitreva, Makedonka; Priest, Margaret; Saif, Sakina; Whiston, Emily A; Young, Sarah; Zeng, Qiandong; Goldman, William E; Mardis, Elaine R; Taylor, John W; McEwen, Juan G; Clay, Oliver K; Klein, Bruce S; Cuomo, Christina A

    2015-10-01

    Three closely related thermally dimorphic pathogens are causal agents of major fungal diseases affecting humans in the Americas: blastomycosis, histoplasmosis and paracoccidioidomycosis. Here we report the genome sequence and analysis of four strains of the etiological agent of blastomycosis, Blastomyces, and two species of the related genus Emmonsia, typically pathogens of small mammals. Compared to related species, Blastomyces genomes are highly expanded, with long, often sharply demarcated tracts of low GC-content sequence. These GC-poor isochore-like regions are enriched for gypsy elements, are variable in total size between isolates, and are least expanded in the avirulent B. dermatitidis strain ER-3 as compared with the virulent B. gilchristii strain SLH14081. The lack of similar regions in related species suggests these isochore-like regions originated recently in the ancestor of the Blastomyces lineage. While gene content is highly conserved between Blastomyces and related fungi, we identified changes in copy number of genes potentially involved in host interaction, including proteases and characterized antigens. In addition, we studied gene expression changes of B. dermatitidis during the interaction of the infectious yeast form with macrophages and in a mouse model. Both experiments highlight a strong antioxidant defense response in Blastomyces, and upregulation of dioxygenases in vivo suggests that dioxide produced by antioxidants may be further utilized for amino acid metabolism. We identify a number of functional categories upregulated exclusively in vivo, such as secreted proteins, zinc acquisition proteins, and cysteine and tryptophan metabolism, which may include critical virulence factors missed before in in vitro studies. Across the dimorphic fungi, loss of certain zinc acquisition genes and differences in amino acid metabolism suggest unique adaptations of Blastomyces to its host environment. These results reveal the dynamics of genome evolution

  6. Characterization of Three Different Unusual S-Layer Proteins from Viridibacillus arvi JG-B58 That Exhibits Two Super-Imposed S-Layer Proteins

    Günther, Tobias J.; Raff, Johannes; Pollmann, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    Genomic analyses of Viridibacillus arvi JG-B58 that was previously isolated from heavy metal contaminated environment identified three different putative surface layer (S-layer) protein genes namely slp1, slp2, and slp3. All three genes are expressed during cultivation. At least two of the V. arvi JG-B58 S-layer proteins were visualized on the surface of living cells via atomic force microscopy (AFM). These S-layer proteins form a double layer with p4 symmetry. The S-layer proteins were isolated from the cells using two different methods. Purified S-layer proteins were recrystallized on SiO2 substrates in order to study the structure of the arrays and self-assembling properties. The primary structure of all examined S-layer proteins lack some features that are typical for Bacillus or Lysinibacillus S-layers. For example, they possess no SLH domains that are usually responsible for the anchoring of the proteins to the cell wall. Further, the pI values are relatively high ranging from 7.84 to 9.25 for the matured proteins. Such features are typical for S-layer proteins of Lactobacillus species although sequence comparisons indicate a close relationship to S-layer proteins of Lysinibacillus and Bacillus strains. In comparison to the numerous descriptions of S-layers, there are only a few studies reporting the concomitant existence of two different S-layer proteins on cell surfaces. Together with the genomic data, this is the first description of a novel type of S-layer proteins showing features of Lactobacillus as well as of Bacillus-type S-layer proteins and the first study of the cell envelope of Viridibacillus arvi. PMID:27285458

  7. Comparison of steam-generator liquid holdup and core uncovery in two facilities of differing scale

    Motley, F.; Schultz, R.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports on Run SB-CL-05, a test similar to Semiscale Run S-UT-8. The test results show that the core was uncovered briefly during the accident and that the rods overheated at certain core locations. Liquid holdup on the upflow side of the steam-generator tubes was observed. After the loop seal cleared, the core refilled and the rods cooled. These behaviors were similar to those observed in the Semiscale run. The Large-Scale Test Facility (LSTF) Run SB-CL-06 is a counterpart test to Semiscale Run S-LH-01. The comparison of the results of both tests shows similar phenomena. The similarity of phenomena in these two facilities build confidence that these results can be expected to occur in a PWR. Similar holdup has now been observed in the 6 tubes of Semiscale and in the 141 tubes of LSTF. It is now more believable that holdup may occur in a full-scale steam generator with 3000 or more tubes. These results confirm the scaling of these phenomena from Semiscale (1/1705) to LSTF (1/48). The TRAC results for SB-CL-05 are in reasonable agreement with the test data. TRAC predicted the core uncovery and resulting rod heatup. The liquid holdup on the upflow side of the steam-generator tubes was also correctly predicted. The clearing of the loop seal allowed core recovery and cooled the overheated rods just as it had in the data. The TRAC analysis results of Run SB-CL-05 are similar to those from Semiscale Run S-UT-8. The ability of the TRAC code to calculate the phenomena equally well in the two experiments of different scales confirms the scalability of the many models in the code that are important in calculating this small break

  8. Genetic variation and heritability for cotton seed, fiber and oil traits in gossypium hirsutum

    Khan, N.U.; Farhatullah; Batool, S.; Makhdoom, K.; Marwat, K.B.; Hassan, G.; Ahmad, W.; Khan, H.U.

    2010-01-01

    The research work pertaining to the study of genetic variability, heritability, genetic gain and correlation for cottonseed, fiber and cottonseed oil % in Gossypium hirsutum cultivars was conducted during 2005 at NWFP Agricultural University Peshawar, Pakistan. Analysis of variance manifested highly significant differences among the genotypes for all the traits except seeds per locule. Genetic potential range of eight cotton cultivars for different parameters was recorded i.e. seeds locule-1 (6.33 to 6.60), seeds boll-1 (26.10 to 28.47), seed index (8.61 to 9.69 g), lint index (5.35 to 6.05 g), lint % (35.17 to 38.13 %), seed cotton yield (1200 to 2450 kg ha/sup -1/) and cottonseed oil % (27.52 to 30.15%). Genetic variances were found almost greater than the environmental variances for all the traits except seeds locule-1 and seed index. High broad sense heritability and selection response were also formulated for seeds boll-1 (0.67, 0.84), seed index (0.77, 0.47 g), lint index (0.96, 0.33 g), lint % (0.96, 1.66 %), seed cotton yield (0.98, 643.16 kg) and cottonseed oil % (0.87, 1.28 %), respectively. Correlation of yield with other traits was found positive for majority of traits except seeds locule-1 and cotton seed oil %. Seed cotton yield is our ultimate goal in growing cotton besides lint %. Highest seed cotton yield was recorded in CIM-499 followed by CIM-473, CIM-496 and CIM-506 and were also found as the second and third top scoring genotypes for seeds per boll, seed index, lint % and cottonseed oil %. Cultivar SLH-279 performed better for lint index, lint % and oil %. This type of correlation is rarely found and ultra desirable by the cotton breeders and a little genetic gain in seed and lint traits, and oil content is a great accomplishment. (author)

  9. Shallow and Deep Latent Heating Modes Over Tropical Oceans Observed with TRMM PR Spectral Latent Heating Data

    Takayabu, Yukari N.; Shige, Shoichi; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Hirota, Nagio

    2010-01-01

    The global hydrological cycle is central to the Earth's climate system, with rainfall and the physics of its formation acting as the key links in the cycle. Two-thirds of global rainfall occurs in the Tropics. Associated with this rainfall is a vast amount of heat, which is known as latent heat. It arises mainly due to the phase change of water vapor condensing into liquid droplets; three-fourths of the total heat energy available to the Earth's atmosphere comes from tropical rainfall. In addition, fresh water provided by tropical rainfall and its variability exerts a large impact upon the structure and motions of the upper ocean layer. Three-dimensional distributions of latent heating estimated from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Precipitation Radar (TRMM PR)utilizing the Spectral Latent Heating (SLH) algorithm are analyzed. Mass-weighted and vertically integrated latent heating averaged over the tropical oceans is estimated as approx.72.6 J/s (approx.2.51 mm/day), and that over tropical land is approx.73.7 J/s (approx.2.55 mm/day), for 30degN-30degS. It is shown that non-drizzle precipitation over tropical and subtropical oceans consists of two dominant modes of rainfall systems, deep systems and congestus. A rough estimate of shallow mode contribution against the total heating is about 46.7 % for the average tropical oceans, which is substantially larger than 23.7 % over tropical land. While cumulus congestus heating linearly correlates with the SST, deep mode is dynamically bounded by large-scale subsidence. It is notable that substantial amount of rain, as large as 2.38 mm day-1 in average, is brought from congestus clouds under the large-scale subsiding circulation. It is also notable that even in the region with SST warmer than 28 oC, large-scale subsidence effectively suppresses the deep convection, remaining the heating by congestus clouds. Our results support that the entrainment of mid-to-lower-tropospheric dry air, which accompanies the large

  10. Bilişsel - Duyuşsal Odaklı Bir Programın ilköğretim Öğrencilerinin Fiziksel Engelli Yaşıtlarına Yönelik Sosyal Kabul Düzeylerine Etkisinin İncelenmesi

    Canan Aktaş

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Bu araştırmanın amacı bilişsel ve duyuşsal odaklı etkinlikleri içeren bir programın ilköğretim öğrencilerinin fiziksel engelli yaşıtlarına yönelik sosyal kabul düzeyleri üzerindeki etkisini incelemektir. Araştırmaya deney ve kontrol gruplarında 20'şer öğrenci olmak üzere toplam 40 öğrenci (6., 7'., ve 8. sınıf katılmıştır. Deney grubunu II kız 9 erkek, kontrol grubunu ise 9 kız, 11 erkek öğrenci oluşturmuştur. Öğrencilerin fiziksel engelli yaşıtlarına yönelik sosyal kabul düzeyleri program öncesi ve sonrasında Sosyal Kabul Ölçeği ile değerlendirilmiştir. Deney grubundaki öğrencilere haftada iki gün 90 dakika süreli 7 oturumdan oluşan bir program uygulanmıştır. Programda, öğrencilere fiziksel engelli bireyler hakkında bilgi verme, film gösterme, grup tartışması, görme engelli bir bireyle doğrudan etkileşimde bulunma ve engel durumunu canlandırma etkinliklerine yer verilmiştir. Analiz sonuçları, uygulanan programın deney grubundaki öğrencilerin fiziksel engelli yaşıtlarına yönelik sosyal kabul düzeylerini geliştirmede etkili olduğunu göstermiştir. Araştırmada elde edilen bu bulgu, engelli Öğrencilerin normal okul ortamlarında başarılı bir biçimde kaynaştırılmaları açısından benzer programların gerekliliğine işaret etmektedir. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of an intervention program, incorporated cognitive and affective activities on social acceptance level of physically disabled children by their nonhandicapped peers, at 6"' to Slh grade. A total of 40 students. 20 for experimental (II female and 9 male and 20 for control group (9 female and 11 male participated in the study. The Social Acceptance Scale was administered to both groups before and after the program. The program, applied lo the experimental group, was held two times a week for ninety minutes per day for seven weeks. Provision of information about

  11. Molecular basis of human Usher syndrome: deciphering the meshes of the Usher protein network provides insights into the pathomechanisms of the Usher disease.

    Reiners, Jan; Nagel-Wolfrum, Kerstin; Jürgens, Karin; Märker, Tina; Wolfrum, Uwe

    2006-07-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is the most frequent cause of combined deaf-blindness in man. It is clinically and genetically heterogeneous and at least 12 chromosomal loci are assigned to three clinical USH types, namely USH1A-G, USH2A-C, USH3A (Davenport, S.L.H., Omenn, G.S., 1977. The heterogeneity of Usher syndrome. Vth Int. Conf. Birth Defects, Montreal; Petit, C., 2001. Usher syndrome: from genetics to pathogenesis. Annu. Rev. Genomics Hum. Genet. 2, 271-297). Mutations in USH type 1 genes cause the most severe form of USH. In USH1 patients, congenital deafness is combined with a pre-pubertal onset of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and severe vestibular dysfunctions. Those with USH2 have moderate to severe congenital hearing loss, non-vestibular dysfunction and a later onset of RP. USH3 is characterized by variable RP and vestibular dysfunction combined with progressive hearing loss. The gene products of eight identified USH genes belong to different protein classes and families. There are five known USH1 molecules: the molecular motor myosin VIIa (USH1B); the two cell-cell adhesion cadherin proteins, cadherin 23 (USH1D) and protocadherin 15, (USH1F) and the scaffold proteins, harmonin (USH1C) and SANS (USH1G). In addition, two USH2 genes and one USH3A gene have been identified. The two USH2 genes code for the transmembrane protein USH2A, also termed USH2A ("usherin") and the G-protein-coupled 7-transmembrane receptor VLGR1b (USH2C), respectively, whereas the USH3A gene encodes clarin-1, a member of the clarin family which exhibits 4-transmembrane domains. Molecular analysis of USH1 protein function revealed that all five USH1 proteins are integrated into a protein network via binding to PDZ domains in the USH1C protein harmonin. Furthermore, this scaffold function of harmonin is supported by the USH1G protein SANS. Recently, we have shown that the USH2 proteins USH2A and VLGR1b as well as the candidate for USH2B, the sodium bicarbonate co-transporter NBC3, are also