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Sample records for shewanella putrefaciens cell-bound

  1. Shewanella putrefaciens infective endocarditis

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    Jonathan Constant

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella putrefaciens rarely causes infection in humans. In the last few decades a growing number of cases have been described. The following report outlines the case of a 40-year-old immunocompetent white man with S. putrefaciens infective endocarditis. This is the first known case of infective endocarditis due to an apparently monomicrobial S. putrefaciens infection, and the second known case of S. putrefaciens-related infective endocarditis worldwide.

  2. Shewanella putrefaciens adhesion and biofilm formation on food processing surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, Dorthe; Hjelm, M.; Johansen, C.

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory model systems were developed for studying Shewanella putrefaciens adhesion and biofilm formation under batch and flow conditions. S. putrefaciens plays a major role in food spoilage and may cause microbially induced corrosion on steel surfaces. S. putrefaciens bacteria suspended in buf...... from surfaces, and indirect conductometry and found this combination sufficient to quantify bacteria on surfaces...

  3. [A rare cause of pneumonia: Shewanella putrefaciens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durdu, Bülent; Durdu, Yasemin; Güleç, Nuray; Islim, Filiz; Biçer, Mualla

    2012-01-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens is a gram-negative, non-fermentative, oxidase positive, motile bacillus that produces hydrogen sulphide. It is found widely in the nature especially in marine environments. Although it is accepted as saprophytic, different clinical syndromes, most commonly skin or soft tissue infections, have been associated with S.putrefaciens, mainly in immunocompromised cases and patients with underlying diseases. However, pneumonia cases due to S.putrefaciens are quite limited in the literature. In this report, a case of pneumonia caused by S.putrefaciens was presented. A 43-year-old female patient was admitted to our hospital with the complaints of fever, cough, sputum and weakness. The patient has had brochiectasis since childhood and has used periodical antibiotic therapies due to pneumoniae episodes. She was diagnosed to have pneumonia based on the clinical, radiological and laboratory findings, and empirical antibiotic treatment with ciprofloxacin and ceftazidime combination was initiated. Gram-stained smear of sputum yielded abundant leucocytes and gram-negative bacteria, and the isolate grown in the sputum culture was identified as S.putrefaciens by conventional methods and API 20 NE (BioMerieux, France) system. The isolate was found susceptible to ceftriaxone, ceftazidime, cefepime, ciprofloxacin, piperacillin-tazobactam, cephoperazon-sulbactam, imipenem, amikacin, gentamicin and trimethoprime-sulphametoxazole; whereas resistant to ampicillin, amoxycillin-clavulanate, cefazolin and cefuroxime, by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. According to the antibiogram results, the therapy was changed to ceftriaxone (1 x 2 g, intravenous). The patient was discharged with complete cure after 14 days of therapy. In conclusion, S.putrefaciens should be considered in patients with predisposing factors as an unusual cause of pneumonia and the characteristics such as H2S production and sensitivity to third generation cephalosporins and penicillins should be used

  4. Distribution of Shewanella putrefaciens and Desulfovibrio vulgaris in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Distribution of Shewanella putrefaciens and Desulfovibrio vulgaris in sulphidogenic biofilms of industrial cooling water systems determined by fluorescent in situ hybridisation. Elise S McLeod, Raynard MacDonald, Volker S. Brozel ...

  5. Recovery of Elemental Palladium by Shewanella putrefaciens

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    Akasaka, S.; Xia, X.; Sawada, K.; Enokida, Y.; Yamamoto, I.; Ohnuki, T.

    2006-12-01

    Microbial reduction of metals plays an important role in environmental behavior and provides a technique for the recovery of metals from industrial wastewater. Recently, demand for platinum group metals (PGMs) increases by their catalytic properties. The extreme rarity of PGMs have led to a growing interest in their recovery. Palladium, one of PGMs, has different oxidation states of Pd(II) and Pd(0). The oxidized form of Pd(II) is soluble, while the reduced form of Pd(0) is insoluble. In this study, microbial reduction of palladium by Fe(III)- reducing bacterium, Shewanella putrefaceins was conducted. This bacterium is known to be capable of reducing metals, such as Mn(IV), U(VI), or Tc(VII) with organic C or H2 as an electron donor. In order to investigate the potential of S. putrefaciens to reduce Pd(II) in solution, resting cells or heat-killed cells were suspended under anaerobic conditions with lactate or H2 as an electron donor. The cells of S. putrefaciens (NBRC3908) were grown in aerobic medium, harvested by centrifugation, and then washed with 25 mmol/dm3 HEPES and 100 mmol/dm3 NaCl (HEPES-NaCl) solution (pH 7.0). The heat-killed cells were autoclaved for 20 min at 121 degrees C. The cell suspension (21.5 mg in dry weight) was resuspended in the HEPES-NaCl solution which contained 1.0 mmol/dm3 Na2PdCl4 (Wako Pure chemical Industries, Ltd). The suspensions were bubbled with N2 for 15 min before 10 mmol/dm3 lactate or 4.8 v/v% H2 was added. The suspensions were then incubated at 30 degrees C. Redox potential (Eh) and pH of the solutions were measured in an inert glove box with Ar gas. Concentration of Pd(II) was measured by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometer (ICP-AES). Deposited Pd and cells were analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with Energy-Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). Approximately 86% of Pd(II) of the initial concentration was removed from solution by the resting cells within 24 h when

  6. A Rare Case of Pneumonia Caused by Shewanella putrefaciens

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    Rajshree Patel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella putrefaciens is a gram-negative, nonfermentative, oxidase positive, motile bacillus that produces hydrogen sulphide. It is found widely in the nature especially in marine environments. In some very rare cases Shewanella putrefaciens can be a human pathogen. It can produce a wide variety of clinical syndromes including bacteremia as well as skin and soft tissue infections. However, pneumonia due to S. putrefaciens is rare; there are a total of 4 reported cases in the literature. We present a case of 63-year-old male who was presented to emergency room status after cardiac arrest, fell into sea water face down. On the second day of hospitalization, he was diagnosed to have pneumonia based on the clinical, radiological, and laboratory findings. Empirical antibiotic treatment with vancomycin and piperacillin/tazobactam combination was initiated. Gram-stained smear of endotracheal aspirate yielded gram-negative bacteria, and the isolate grown from endotracheal aspirate culture was identified as S. putrefaciens by Biomerieux API 20 NE technique. On review of the literature and according to culture and sensitivity results, therapy in our patient was changed to cefepime. Patient’s pneumonia improved with treatment with cefepime. We believe that our patient developed pneumonia evidently caused by S. putrefaciens, after near drowning in sea water. The pneumonia resolved after treatment with cefepime.

  7. Shewanella putrefaciens Adhesion and Biofilm Formation on Food Processing Surfaces

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    Bagge, Dorthe; Hjelm, Mette; Johansen, Charlotte; Huber, Ingrid; Gram, Lone

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory model systems were developed for studying Shewanella putrefaciens adhesion and biofilm formation under batch and flow conditions. S. putrefaciens plays a major role in food spoilage and may cause microbially induced corrosion on steel surfaces. S. putrefaciens bacteria suspended in buffer adhered readily to stainless steel surfaces. Maximum numbers of adherent bacteria per square centimeter were reached in 8 h at 25°C and reflected the cell density in suspension. Numbers of adhering bacteria from a suspension containing 108 CFU/ml were much lower in a laminar flow system (modified Robbins device) (reaching 102 CFU/cm2) than in a batch system (reaching 107 CFU/cm2), and maximum numbers were reached after 24 h. When nutrients were supplied, S. putrefaciens grew in biofilms with layers of bacteria. The rate of biofilm formation and the thickness of the film were not dependent on the availability of carbohydrate (lactate or glucose) or on iron starvation. The number of S. putrefaciens bacteria on the surface was partly influenced by the presence of other bacteria (Pseudomonas fluorescens) which reduced the numbers of S. putrefaciens bacteria in the biofilm. Numbers of bacteria on the surface must be quantified to evaluate the influence of environmental factors on adhesion and biofilm formation. We used a combination of fluorescence microscopy (4′,6′-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining and in situ hybridization, for mixed-culture studies), ultrasonic removal of bacteria from surfaces, and indirect conductometry and found this combination sufficient to quantify bacteria on surfaces. PMID:11319118

  8. Physiology and enzymology involved in denitrification by Shewanella putrefaciens

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    Krause, B.; Nealson, K. H.

    1997-01-01

    Nitrate reduction to N2O was investigated in batch cultures of Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1, MR-4, and MR-7. All three strains reduced nitrate to nitrite to N2O, and this reduction was coupled to growth, whereas ammonium accumulation was very low (0 to 1 micromol liter-1). All S. putrefaciens isolates were also capable of reducing nitrate aerobically; under anaerobic conditions, nitrite levels were three- to sixfold higher than those found under oxic conditions. Nitrate reductase activities (31 to 60 micromol of nitrite min-1 mg of protein-1) detected in intact cells of S. putrefaciens were equal to or higher than those seen in Escherichia coli LE 392. Km values for nitrate reduction ranged from 12 mM for MR-1 to 1.3 mM for MR-4 with benzyl viologen as an artifical electron donor. Nitrate and nitrite reductase activities in cell-free preparations were demonstrated in native gels by using reduced benzyl viologen. Detergent treatment of crude and membrane extracts suggested that the nitrate reductases of MR-1 and MR-4 are membrane bound. When the nitrate reductase in MR-1 was partially purified, three subunits (90, 70, and 55 kDa) were detected in denaturing gels. The nitrite reductase of MR-1 is also membrane bound and appeared as a 60-kDa band in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels after partial purification.

  9. A rare case of Shewanella putrefaciens bacteremia in a patient of road traffic accident

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    Ritesh Ranjan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella putrefaciens rarely causes human infection. These are mostly found in environment and food stuffs. Shewanella are often found in mixed culture. It has been implicated in cellulitis, otitis media, and septicemia. It may be found in respiratory tract, urine, feces, and pleural fluid. There is no definite guideline for therapeutic option. In general, these are susceptible to various antimicrobial agents but are often resistant to penicillin and cephalothin. We report a rare case of bacteremia by S. putrefaciens in a patient of head injury with polytrauma after a road traffic accident.

  10. Changes in cell morphology of Listeria monocytogenesnes and Shewanella putrefaciens resulting from the action of protamine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Charlotte; Gill, T.; Gram, Lone

    1996-01-01

    cells. Immunoelectron microscopy of protamine-treated cells of both L. monocytogenes and S. putrefaciens showed great damage to the cell wall and condensation of the cytoplasm. Respiration of the cells was decreased due to treatment with sublethal concentrations of protamine, probably due to leakage...... or loss of cell envelope potential. It was concluded that protamine disrupted the outer surface structure and condensed the cytoplasm of sensitive cells and, in sublethal concentrations, altered membrane structures, thereby eliminating respiration......Protamine, which is an antibacterial basic peptide, was shown to alter the cell morphology of Listeria monocytogenes and Shewanella putrefaciens. Atomic force microscopy revealed that protamine smoothed the surface of cells, formed holes in the cell envelope, and caused fusion of S. putrefaciens...

  11. Polymicrobial bacteremia caused by Escherichia coli, Edwardsiella tarda, and Shewanella putrefaciens.

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    Wang, I-Kuan; Lee, Ming-Hsun; Chen, Yu-Ming; Huang, Chiu-Ching

    2004-09-01

    Edwardsiella tarda, a member of Enterobacteriaceae, is found in freshwater and marine environments and in animals living in these environments. This bacterium is primarily associated with gastrointestinal diseases, and has been isolated from stool specimens obtained from persons with or without clinical infectious diseases. Shewanella putrefaciens, a saprophytic gram-negative rod, is rarely responsible for clinical syndromes in humans. Debilitated status and exposure to aquatic environments are the major predisposing factors for E. tarda or S. putrefaciens infection. A 61-year-old woman was febrile with diarrhea 8 hours after ingesting shark meat, and two sets of blood cultures grew Escherichia coli, E. tarda and S. putrefaciens at the same time. She was successfully treated with antibiotics. We present this rare case of polymicrobial bacteremia caused by E. coli, E. tarda and S. putrefaciens without underlying disease, which is the first found in Taiwan. This rare case of febrile diarrhea with consequent polymicrobial bacteremia emphasizes that attention should always be extended to these unusual pathogens.

  12. Differentiation of Shewanella putrefaciens and Shewanella alga on the basis of whole-cell protein profiles, ribotyping, phenotypic characterization, and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Birte Fonnesbech; Jørgensen, K.; Christensen, H.

    1997-01-01

    Seventy-six presumed Shewanella putrefaciens isolates from fish, oil drillings, and clinical specimens, the type strain of Shewanella putrefaciens (ATCC 8071), the type strain of Shewanella alga (IAM 14159), and the type strain of Shewanella hanedai (ATCC 33224) were compared by several typing...... methods. Numerical analysis of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of whole-cell protein and ribotyping patterns showed that the strains were separated into two distinct clusters with 56% +/- 10% and 40% +/- 14% similarity for whole- cell protein profiling and ribotyping......, respectively. One cluster consisted of 26 isolates with 52 to 55 mol% G + C and included 15 human isolates, mostly clinical specimens, 8 isolates from marine waters, and the type strain of S. alga. This homogeneous cluster of mesophilic, halotolerant strains was by all analyses identical to the recently...

  13. Comparison of adhesion of the food spoilage bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens to stainless steel and silver surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelm, Mette; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Møller, Per

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the number of attached bacteria, Shewanella putrefaciens, on stainless steel with different silver surfaces. Thus evaluating if silver surfaces could contribute to a higher hygienic status in the food industry. Bacterial adhesion to three types of silver surfaces...... (new silver, tarnished silver and sulphide treated silver) was compared to adhesion to stainless steel (AISI 316). Numbers of attached bacteria (cfu cm-2) were estimated using the Malthus indirect conductance method. A lower number of attached bacteria were measured on new silver surfaces compared...... to stainless steel for samples taken after 24 hours. However this was not significant (P > 0.05). The numbers of attached bacteria were consistently lower when tarnished silver surfaces were compared to stainless steel and some, but not all, experiments showed statistically significant. A difference of more...

  14. MOLECULAR CLONING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF NOVEL THERMOSTABLE LIPASE FROM SHEWANELLA PUTREFACIENS AND USING ENZYMATIC BIODIESEL PRODUCTION

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    Fahri Akbas

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A novel thermostable lipase from Shewanella putrefaciens was identified, expressed in Escherichia coli, characterized and used in biodiesel production. Enzyme characterization was carried out by enzyme assay, SDS-PAGE and other biochemical reactions. The recombinant lipase was found to have a molecular mass of 29 kDa and exhibited lipase activity when Tween 80 was used as the substrate. The purified enzyme showed maximum activity at pH 5.0 and at 80°C. The recombinant lipase was used for the transesterification of canola oil and waste oil. The enzyme retains 50% of its activity at 90°C for 30 minutes. It is also able to retain 20% of its activity even at 100 °C for 20 minutes. These properties of the obtained new recombinant thermostable lipase make it promising as a biocatalyst for industrial processes.

  15. Growth of the facultative anaerobe Shewanella putrefaciens by elemental sulfur reduction

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    Moser, D. P.; Nealson, K. H.

    1996-01-01

    The growth of bacteria by dissimilatory elemental sulfur reduction is generally associated with obligate anaerobes and thermophiles in particular. Here we describe the sulfur-dependent growth of the facultatively anaerobic mesophile Shewanella putrefaciens. Six of nine representative S. putrefaciens isolates from a variety of environments proved able to grow by sulfur reduction, and strain MR-1 was chosen for further study. Growth was monitored in a minimal medium (usually with 0.05% Casamino Acids added as a growth stimulant) containing 30 mM lactate and limiting concentrations of elemental sulfur. When mechanisms were provided for the removal of the metabolic end product, H2S, measurable growth was obtained at sulfur concentrations of from 2 to 30 mM. Initial doubling times were ca. 1.5 h and substrate independent over the range of sulfur concentrations tested. In the cultures with the highest sulfur concentrations, cell numbers increased by greater than 400-fold after 48 h, reaching a maximum density of 6.8 x 10(8) cells ml-1. Yields were determined as total cell carbon and ranged from 1.7 to 5.9 g of C mol of S(0) consumed-1 in the presence of the amino acid supplement and from 0.9 to 3.4 g of C mol of S(0-1) in its absence. Several lines of evidence indicate that cell-to-sulfur contact is not required for growth. Approaches for the culture of sulfur-metabolizing bacteria and potential ecological implications of sulfur reduction in Shewanella-like heterotrophs are discussed.

  16. Interference activity of a minimal Type I CRISPR–Cas system from Shewanella putrefaciens

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    Dwarakanath, Srivatsa; Brenzinger, Susanne; Gleditzsch, Daniel; Plagens, André; Klingl, Andreas; Thormann, Kai; Randau, Lennart

    2015-01-01

    Type I CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats)–Cas (CRISPR-associated) systems exist in bacterial and archaeal organisms and provide immunity against foreign DNA. The Cas protein content of the DNA interference complexes (termed Cascade) varies between different CRISPR-Cas subtypes. A minimal variant of the Type I-F system was identified in proteobacterial species including Shewanella putrefaciens CN-32. This variant lacks a large subunit (Csy1), Csy2 and Csy3 and contains two unclassified cas genes. The genome of S. putrefaciens CN-32 contains only five Cas proteins (Cas1, Cas3, Cas6f, Cas1821 and Cas1822) and a single CRISPR array with 81 spacers. RNA-Seq analyses revealed the transcription of this array and the maturation of crRNAs (CRISPR RNAs). Interference assays based on plasmid conjugation demonstrated that this CRISPR-Cas system is active in vivo and that activity is dependent on the recognition of the dinucleotide GG PAM (Protospacer Adjacent Motif) sequence and crRNA abundance. The deletion of cas1821 and cas1822 reduced the cellular crRNA pool. Recombinant Cas1821 was shown to form helical filaments bound to RNA molecules, which suggests its role as the Cascade backbone protein. A Cascade complex was isolated which contained multiple Cas1821 copies, Cas1822, Cas6f and mature crRNAs. PMID:26350210

  17. Interference activity of a minimal Type I CRISPR-Cas system from Shewanella putrefaciens.

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    Dwarakanath, Srivatsa; Brenzinger, Susanne; Gleditzsch, Daniel; Plagens, André; Klingl, Andreas; Thormann, Kai; Randau, Lennart

    2015-10-15

    Type I CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats)-Cas (CRISPR-associated) systems exist in bacterial and archaeal organisms and provide immunity against foreign DNA. The Cas protein content of the DNA interference complexes (termed Cascade) varies between different CRISPR-Cas subtypes. A minimal variant of the Type I-F system was identified in proteobacterial species including Shewanella putrefaciens CN-32. This variant lacks a large subunit (Csy1), Csy2 and Csy3 and contains two unclassified cas genes. The genome of S. putrefaciens CN-32 contains only five Cas proteins (Cas1, Cas3, Cas6f, Cas1821 and Cas1822) and a single CRISPR array with 81 spacers. RNA-Seq analyses revealed the transcription of this array and the maturation of crRNAs (CRISPR RNAs). Interference assays based on plasmid conjugation demonstrated that this CRISPR-Cas system is active in vivo and that activity is dependent on the recognition of the dinucleotide GG PAM (Protospacer Adjacent Motif) sequence and crRNA abundance. The deletion of cas1821 and cas1822 reduced the cellular crRNA pool. Recombinant Cas1821 was shown to form helical filaments bound to RNA molecules, which suggests its role as the Cascade backbone protein. A Cascade complex was isolated which contained multiple Cas1821 copies, Cas1822, Cas6f and mature crRNAs. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. A comparison of molecular biology mechanism of Shewanella putrefaciens between fresh and terrestrial sewage wastewater

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    Jiajie Xu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Municipal and industrial wastewater is often discharged into the environment without appropriate treatment, especially in developing countries. As a result, many rivers and oceans are contaminated. It is urgent to control and administer treatments to these contaminated rivers and oceans. However, most mechanisms of bacterial colonization in contaminated rivers and oceans were unknown, especially in sewage outlets. We found Shewanella putrefaciens to be the primary bacteria in the terrestrial sewage wastewater outlets around Ningbo City, China. Therefore, in this study, we applied a combination of differential proteomics, metabolomics, and real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR techniques to identify bacteria intracellular metabolites. We found S. putrefaciens had 12 different proteins differentially expressed in freshwater culture than when grown in wastewater, referring to the formation of biological membranes (Omp35, OmpW, energy metabolism (SOD, deoxyribose-phosphate pyrophosphokinase, fatty acid metabolism (beta-ketoacyl synthase, secondary metabolism, TCA cycle, lysine degradation (2-oxoglutarate reductase, and propionic acid metabolism (succinyl coenzyme A synthetase. The sequences of these 12 differentially expressed proteins were aligned with sequences downloaded from NCBI. There are also 27 differentially concentrated metabolites detected by NMR, including alcohols (ethanol, isopropanol, amines (dimethylamine, ethanolamine, amino acids (alanine, leucine, amine compounds (bilinerurine, nucleic acid compounds (nucleosides, inosines, organic acids (formate, acetate. Formate and ethanolamine show significant difference between the two environments and are possibly involved in energy metabolism, glycerophospholipid and ether lipids metabolism to provide energy supply and material basis for engraftment in sewage. Because understanding S. putrefaciens’s biological mechanism of colonization (protein, gene express and metabolites in

  19. Immobilization of selenium by biofilm of Shewanella putrefaciens with and without Fe(III)-citrate complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Yoshinori; Sakama, Yosuke; Saiki, Hiroshi; Kitamura, Akira; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Tanaka, Kazuya

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effect of biofilms on selenium migration, we examined selenite reduction by biofilms of an iron-reducing bacterium, Shewanella putrefaciens, under anaerobic conditions. The biofilms were grown under static conditions on culture cover glasses coated with poly-L-lysine. Optical microscopic observation of the biofilms after staining with 0.1% crystal violet solution revealed that the cells were surrounded by filamentous extracellular polymer substances. Exposure of the biofilms to aqueous selenite resulted in the formation of red precipitates, which were assigned to nanoparticulate elemental selenium using X-ray absorption near-edge structure analysis. Micrographic observation showed that the precipitates immobilized at the biofilms. We also examined the selenite reduction in the presence of Fe(III)-citrate complex. In this case, a dark brown precipitate formed at the biofilms. X-ray absorption near-edge structure analysis revealed that the precipitate was a mixed compound with elemental selenium and iron selenide. These findings indicate that biofilms of iron-reducing bacteria in the environment can immobilize selenium by reducing Se(IV) to Se(0), and Fe(III)-citrate complex promotes the reduction of Se(0) to Se(-II). (author)

  20. Exogenous electron shuttle-mediated extracellular electron transfer of Shewanella putrefaciens 200: electrochemical parameters and thermodynamics.

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    Wu, Yundang; Liu, Tongxu; Li, Xiaomin; Li, Fangbai

    2014-08-19

    Despite the importance of exogenous electron shuttles (ESs) in extracellular electron transfer (EET), a lack of understanding of the key properties of ESs is a concern given their different influences on EET processes. Here, the ES-mediated EET capacity of Shewanella putrefaciens 200 (SP200) was evaluated by examining the electricity generated in a microbial fuel cell. The results indicated that all the ESs substantially accelerated the current generation compared to only SP200. The current and polarization parameters were linearly correlated with both the standard redox potential (E(ES)(0)) and the electron accepting capacity (EAC) of the ESs. A thermodynamic analysis of the electron transfer from the electron donor to the electrode suggested that the EET from c-type cytochromes (c-Cyts) to ESs is a crucial step causing the differences in EET capacities among various ESs. Based on the derived equations, both E(ES)(0) and EAC can quantitatively determine potential losses (ΔE) that reflect the potential loss of the ES-mediated EET. In situ spectral kinetic analysis of ES reduction by c-Cyts in a living SP200 suspension was first investigated with the E(ES), E(c-Cyt), and ΔE values being calculated. This study can provide a comprehensive understanding of the role of ESs in EET.

  1. Oil field and freshwater isolates of Shewanella putrefaciens have lipopolysaccharide polyacrylamide gel profiles characteristic of marine bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickard, C.; Foght, J.M.; Pickard, M.A.; Westlake, D.W.S.

    1993-01-01

    The lipopolysaccharide structure of oil field and freshwater isolates of bacteria that reduce ferric iron, recently classified as strains of Shewanella putrefaciens, was analyzed using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and a lipopolysaccharide-specific silver-staining procedure. The results demonstrate that all the oil field and freshwater isolates examined exhibited the more hydrophobic R-type lipopolysaccharide, which has been found to be characteristic of Gram-negative marine bacteria. This hydrophobic lipopolysaccharide would confer an advantage on bacteria involved in hydrocarbon degradation by assisting their association with the surface of oil droplets. 15 refs., 1 fig

  2. Sorption and precipitation of Mn2+ by viable and autoclaved Shewanella putrefaciens: Effect of contact time

    KAUST Repository

    Chubar, Natalia

    2013-01-01

    The sorption of Mn(II) by viable and inactivated cells of Shewanella putrefaciens, a non-pathogenic, facultative anaerobic, gram-negative bacterium characterised as a Mn(IV) and Fe(III) reducer, was studied under aerobic conditions, as a function of pH, bacterial density and metal loading. During a short contact time (3-24h), the adsorptive behaviour of live and dead bacteria toward Mn(II) was sufficiently similar, an observation that was reflected in the studies on adsorption kinetics at various metal loadings, effects of pH, bacteria density, isotherms and drifting of pH during adsorption. Continuing the experiment for an additional 2-30days demonstrated that the Mn(II) sorption by suspensions of viable and autoclaved cells differed significantly from one another. The sorption to dead cells was characterised by a rapid equilibration and was described by an isotherm. In contrast, the sorption (uptake) to live bacteria exhibited a complex time-dependent uptake. This uptake began as adsorption and ion exchange processes followed by bioprecipitation, and it was accompanied by the formation of polymeric sugars (EPS) and the release of dissolved organic substances. FTIR, EXAFS/XANES and XPS demonstrated that manganese(II) phosphate was the main precipitate formed in 125ml batches, which is the first evidence of the ability of microbes to synthesise manganese phosphates. XPS and XANES spectra did not detect Mn(II) oxidation. Although the release of protein-like compounds by the viable bacteria increased in the presence of Mn2+ (and, by contrast, the release of carbohydrates did not change), electrochemical analyses did not indicate any aqueous complexation of Mn(II) by the organic ligands. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Sequence and Genetic Characterization of etrA, an fnr Analog that Regulates Anaerobic Respiration in Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffarini, Daad A.; Nelson, Kenneth H.

    1993-01-01

    An electron transport regulatory gene, etrA, has been isolated and characterized from the obligate respiratory bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens MR-l. The deduced amino acid sequence of etrA (EtrA) shows a high degree of identity to both the Fnr of Escherichia coli (73.6%) and the analogous protein (ANR) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (50.8%). The four active cysteine residues of Fnr are conserved in EtrA, and the amino acid sequence of the DNA-binding domains of the two proteins are identical. Further, S.putrefaciens etrA is able to complement an fnr mutant of E.coli. In contrast to fnr, there is no recognizable Fnr box upstream of the etrA sequence. Gene replacement etr.A mutants of MR-1 were deficient in growth on nitrite, thiosulfate, sulfite, trimethylamine-N-oxide, dimethyl sulfoxide, Fe(III), and fumarate, suggesting that EtrA is involved in the regulation of the corresponding reductase genes. However, the mutants were all positive for reduction of and growth on nitrate and Mn(IV), indicating that EtrA is not involved in the regulation of these two systems. Southern blots of S.putrefaciens DNA with use of etrA as a probe revealed the expected etrA bands and a second set of hybridization signals whose genetic and functional properties remain to be determined.

  4. Associations of Eu(III) with Gram-negative bacteria, Alcaligenes faecalis, Shewanella putrefaciens, and Paracoccus denitrificans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, Takuo; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Kimura, Takaumi; Francis, Arokiasamy J.

    2005-01-01

    We studied the association of Eu(III) with Gram-negative bacteria, Alcaligenes faecalis, Shewanella putrefaciens, and Paracoccus denitrificans by a batch method and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). The kinetics study showed that the Eu(III) adsorption on the bacteria rapidly proceeded. The Eu(III) adsorption on A. faecalis and P. denitrificans at pHs 3, 4, and 5, and that on S.putrefaciens at pHs 4 and 5 reached a maximum within 5 minutes after contact. For P. denitrificans, the percent adsorption of Eu(III) decreased after the maximum percent adsorption was attained, which suggests the existence of exudates with an affinity with Eu(III). TRLFS showed that the coordination of Eu(III) on these bacteria is multidentate through an inner-spherical process. The ligand field of Eu(III) on P. denitrificans was as strong as the ones observed for halophilic microorganisms, while that of A. faecalis and S. putrefaciens was the typical one observed for non-halophilic microorganisms. The coordination environment of Eu(III) on the bacteria differed from each other, though they are categorized as Gram-negative bacteria with the similar cell wall components. (author)

  5. Unsaturated macrocyclic dihydroxamic acid siderophores produced by Shewanella putrefaciens using precursor-directed biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soe, Cho Z; Codd, Rachel

    2014-04-18

    To acquire iron essential for growth, the bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens produces the macrocyclic dihydroxamic acid putrebactin (pbH2; [M + H(+)](+), m/zcalc 373.2) as its native siderophore. The assembly of pbH2 requires endogenous 1,4-diaminobutane (DB), which is produced from the ornithine decarboxylase (ODC)-catalyzed decarboxylation of l-ornithine. In this work, levels of endogenous DB were attenuated in S. putrefaciens cultures by augmenting the medium with the ODC inhibitor 1,4-diamino-2-butanone (DBO). The presence in the medium of DBO together with alternative exogenous non-native diamine substrates, (15)N2-1,4-diaminobutane ((15)N2-DB) or 1,4-diamino-2(E)-butene (E-DBE), resulted in the respective biosynthesis of (15)N-labeled pbH2 ((15)N4-pbH2; [M + H(+)](+), m/zcalc 377.2, m/zobs 377.2) or the unsaturated pbH2 variant, named here: E,E-putrebactene (E,E-pbeH2; [M + H(+)](+), m/zcalc 369.2, m/zobs 369.2). In the latter system, remaining endogenous DB resulted in the parallel biosynthesis of the monounsaturated DB-E-DBE hybrid, E-putrebactene (E-pbxH2; [M + H(+)](+), m/zcalc 371.2, m/zobs 371.2). These are the first identified unsaturated macrocyclic dihydroxamic acid siderophores. LC-MS measurements showed 1:1 complexes formed between Fe(III) and pbH2 ([Fe(pb)](+); [M](+), m/zcalc 426.1, m/zobs 426.2), (15)N4-pbH2 ([Fe((15)N4-pb)](+); [M](+), m/zcalc 430.1, m/zobs 430.1), E,E-pbeH2 ([Fe(E,E-pbe)](+); [M](+), m/zcalc 422.1, m/zobs 422.0), or E-pbxH2 ([Fe(E-pbx)](+); [M](+), m/zcalc 424.1, m/zobs 424.2). The order of the gain in siderophore-mediated Fe(III) solubility, as defined by the difference in retention time between the free ligand and the Fe(III)-loaded complex, was pbH2 (ΔtR = 8.77 min) > E-pbxH2 (ΔtR = 6.95 min) > E,E-pbeH2 (ΔtR = 6.16 min), which suggests one possible reason why nature has selected for saturated rather than unsaturated siderophores as Fe(III) solubilization agents. The potential to conduct multiple types of ex situ chemical

  6. Shewanella putrefaciens mtrB encodes an outer membrane protein required for Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beliaev, A S; Saffarini, D A

    1998-12-01

    Iron and manganese oxides or oxyhydroxides are abundant transition metals, and in aquatic environments they serve as terminal electron acceptors for a large number of bacterial species. The molecular mechanisms of anaerobic metal reduction, however, are not understood. Shewanella putrefaciens is a facultative anaerobe that uses Fe(III) and Mn(IV) as terminal electron acceptors during anaerobic respiration. Transposon mutagenesis was used to generate mutants of S. putrefaciens, and one such mutant, SR-21, was analyzed in detail. Growth and enzyme assays indicated that the mutation in SR-21 resulted in loss of Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction but did not affect its ability to reduce other electron acceptors used by the wild type. This deficiency was due to Tn5 inactivation of an open reading frame (ORF) designated mtrB. mtrB encodes a protein of 679 amino acids and contains a signal sequence characteristic of secreted proteins. Analysis of membrane fractions of the mutant, SR-21, and wild-type cells indicated that MtrB is located on the outer membrane of S. putrefaciens. A 5.2-kb DNA fragment that contains mtrB was isolated and completely sequenced. A second ORF, designated mtrA, was found directly upstream of mtrB. The two ORFs appear to be arranged in an operon. mtrA encodes a putative 10-heme c-type cytochrome of 333 amino acids. The N-terminal sequence of MtrA contains a potential signal sequence for secretion across the cell membrane. The amino acid sequence of MtrA exhibited 34% identity to NrfB from Escherichia coli, which is involved in formate-dependent nitrite reduction. To our knowledge, this is the first report of genes encoding proteins involved in metal reduction.

  7. Isolation of Shewanella putrefaciens in an elderly man with subacute intestinal obstruction & appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Maqsood Ali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella is Gram-negative motile bacillus, non fermentative and facultative anaerobe. Its natural habitat is all forms of water and soil, but has also been isolated from fish, dairy products, oils, and carcasses. Often found with microflora of the marine environment. Bacterial infections with Shewanella spp. are rare. The exposure to the marine environment, sea and diary food are considered as a risk factor for Shewanella spp. infection. Clinical infections seen are otitis, soft tissue infection, bacteremia, ear infection, eye infection, infective arthritis, osteomyelitis, infective endocarditis and peritonitis.

  8. Antimicrobial peptide AMPNT-6 from Bacillus subtilis inhibits biofilm formation by Shewanella putrefaciens and disrupts its preformed biofilms on both abiotic and shrimp shell surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Qi; Pu, Yuehua; Sun, Lijun; Wang, Yaling; Liu, Yang; Wang, Rundong; Liao, Jianmeng; Xu, Defeng; Liu, Ying; Ye, Riying; Fang, Zhijia; Gooneratne, Ravi

    2017-12-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens biofilm formation is of great concern for the shrimp industry because it adheres easily to food and food-contact surfaces and is a source of persistent and unseen contamination that causes shrimp spoilage and economic losses to the shrimp industry. Different concentrations of an antimicrobial lipopeptide, the fermentation product of Bacillus subtilis, AMPNT-6, were tested for the ability to reduce adhesion and disrupt S. putrefaciens preformed biofilms on two different contact surfaces (shrimp shell, stainless steel sheet). AMPNT-6 displayed a marked dose- and time-dependent anti-adhesive effect>biofilm removal. 3MIC AMPNT-6 was able both to remove biofilm and prevent bacteria from forming biofilm in a 96-well polystyrene microplate used as the model surface. 2MIC AMPNT-6 prevented bacteria from adhering to the microplate surface to form biofilm for 3h and removed already existing biofilm within 24h. Secretion of extracellular polymeric substances incubated in LB broth for 24h by S. putrefaciens was minimal at 3× MIC AMPNT-6. Scanning electron microscopy showed that damage to S. putrefaciens bacteria by AMPNT-6 possibly contributed to the non-adherence to the surfaces. Disruption of the mature biofilm structure by AMPNT-6 contributed to biofilm removal. It is concluded that AMPNT-6 can be used effectively to prevent attachment and also detach S. putrefaciens biofilms from shrimp shells, stainless steel sheets and polystyrene surfaces. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparative Genomics Analysis and Phenotypic Characterization of Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1: Anaerobic Respiration, Bacterial Microcompartments, and Lateral Flagella

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, D.; Tu, Q.; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-01-01

    Respiratory versatility and psychrophily are the hallmarks of Shewanella. The ability to utilize a wide range of electron acceptors for respiration is due to the large number of c-type cytochrome genes present in the genome of Shewanella strains. More recently the dissimilatory metal reduction of Shewanella species has been extensively and intensively studied for potential applications in the bioremediation of radioactive wastes of groundwater and subsurface environments. Multiple Shewanella genome sequences are now available in the public databases (Fredrickson et al., 2008). Most of the sequenced Shewanella strains were isolated from marine environments and this genus was believed to be of marine origin (Hau and Gralnick, 2007). However, the well-characterized model strain, S. oneidensis MR-1, was isolated from the freshwater lake sediment of Lake Oneida, New York (Myers and Nealson, 1988) and similar bacteria have also been isolated from other freshwater environments (Venkateswaran et al., 1999). Here we comparatively analyzed the genome sequence and physiological characteristics of S. putrefaciens W3-18-1 and S. oneidensis MR-1, isolated from the marine and freshwater lake sediments, respectively. The anaerobic respirations, carbon source utilization, and cell motility have been experimentally investigated. Large scale horizontal gene transfers have been revealed and the genetic divergence between these two strains was considered to be critical to the bacterial adaptation to specific habitats, freshwater or marine sediments.

  10. Effects of Fab' fragments of specific egg yolk antibody (IgY-Fab') against Shewanella putrefaciens on the preservation of refrigerated turbot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Lin, Hong; Sui, Jianxin; Wang, Jingxue; Cao, Limin

    2015-01-01

    In our previous studies the specific egg yolk antibody (IgY) against Shewanella putrefaciens (one of the specific spoilage organisms for marine products during aerobic chilling storage) demonstrated significant activity to prolong the shelf life of refrigerated fish. The exploitation of the antigen-binding fragment plus the hinge region (IgY-Fab') is now considered a promising method for improving the efficiency of such natural antimicrobial agents. The antimicrobial activity of IgY-Fab' against S. putrefaciens was investigated using refrigerated turbot as samples. By microbial, chemical and sensory tests, it was shown to be able to effectively inhibit bacterial growth and prolong the shelf life of samples, with an efficiency evaluated significantly higher than that of whole IgY with the same molarity. The interaction between IgY agents and S. putrefaciens cells was also investigated, and the IgY-Fab' showed a much greater ability to damage cell membranes than the whole IgY. Compared to whole IgY with the same molarity, IgY-Fab' demonstrated higher and more durable antimicrobial efficiency. Such a result was assumed to be closely related to its structural properties (such as the much lower molecular weight), which may enhance its ability to influence physiological activities of antigen bacteria, especially the property or/and structure of cell membranes. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Simultaneous biosynthesis of putrebactin, avaroferrin and bisucaberin by Shewanella putrefaciens and characterisation of complexes with iron(III), molybdenum(VI) or chromium(V).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soe, Cho Zin; Telfer, Thomas J; Levina, Aviva; Lay, Peter A; Codd, Rachel

    2016-09-01

    Cultures of Shewanella putrefaciens grown in medium containing 10mM 1,4-diamino-2-butanone (DBO) as an inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase and 10mM 1,5-diaminopentane (cadaverine) showed the simultaneous biosynthesis of the macrocyclic dihydroxamic acids: putrebactin (pbH 2 ), avaroferrin (avH 2 ) and bisucaberin (bsH 2 ). The level of DBO did not completely repress the production of endogenous 1,4-diaminobutane (putrescine) as the native diamine substrate of pbH 2 . The relative concentration of pbH 2 :avH 2 :bsH 2 was 1:2:1, which correlated with the substrate selection of putrescine:cadaverine in a ratio of 1:1. The macrocycles were characterised using LC-MS as free ligands and as 1:1 complexes with Fe(III) of the form [Fe(pb)] + , [Fe(av)] + or [Fe(bs)] + , with labile ancillary ligands in six-coordinate complexes displaced during ESI-MS acquisition; or with Mo(VI) of the form [Mo(O) 2 (pb)], [Mo(O) 2 (av)] or [Mo(O) 2 (bs)]. Chromium(V) complexes of the form [CrO(pb)] + were detected from solutions of Cr(VI) and pbH 2 in DMF using X-band EPR spectroscopy. Supplementation of S. putrefaciens medium with DBO and 1,3-diaminopropane, 1,6-diaminohexane or 1,4-diamino-2(Z)-butene (Z-DBE) resulted only in the biosynthesis of pbH 2 . The work has identified a native system for the simultaneous biosynthesis of a suite of three macrocyclic dihydroxamic acid siderophores and highlights both the utility of precursor-directed biosynthesis for expanding the structural diversity of siderophores, and the breadth of their coordination chemistry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. In Situ Spectral Kinetics of Cr(VI) Reduction by c-Type Cytochromes in A Suspension of Living Shewanella putrefaciens 200

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tongxu; Li, Xiaomin; Li, Fangbai; Han, Rui; Wu, Yundang; Yuan, Xiu; Wang, Ying

    2016-07-01

    Although c-type cytochromes (c-Cyts) mediating metal reduction have been mainly investigated with in vitro purified proteins of dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria, the in vivo behavior of c-Cyts is still unclear given the difficulty in measuring the proteins of intact cells. Here, c-Cyts in living Shewanella putrefaciens 200 (SP200) was successfully quantified using diffuse-transmission UV/Vis spectroscopy due to the strong absorbance of hemes, and the in situ spectral kinetics of Cr(VI) reduction by c-Cyts were examined over time. The reduced product Cr(III) observed on the cell surface may play a role in inhibiting the Cr(VI) reduction and reducing the cell numbers with high concentrations (>200 μM) of Cr(VI) evidenced by the 16S rRNA analysis. A brief kinetic model was established with two predominant reactions, redox transformation of c-Cyts and Cr(VI) reduction by reduced c-Cyts, but the fitting curves were not well-matched with c-Cyts data. The Cr(III)-induced inhibitory effect to the cellular function of redox transformation of c-Cyts was then added to the model, resulting in substantially improved the model fitting. This study provides a case of directly examining the reaction properties of outer-membrane enzyme during microbial metal reduction processes under physiological conditions.

  13. Emerging infections: Shewanella - A series of five cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Kanchan Sharma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Shewanella spp. are unusual cause of disease in humans; however, reports of Shewanella infections have been increasing. Shewanella is a ubiquitous organism that has been isolated from many foods, sewage, and both from fresh and salt water. Earlier it was named as Pseudomonas putrefaciens or Shewanella putrefaciens. There are several reports describing this organism causing human infections such as cellulitis, abscesses, bacteremia, wound infection, etc. It is oxidase and catalase-positive non-fermenter gram-negative rod that produces hydrogen sulfide. Aims : The study was conducted to identify Shewanella spp., which was wrongly reported as Pseudomonas spp. Materials and Methods : Clinical samples were cultured as per standard clinical laboratory procedure. We tested the non-lactose-fermenting colonies for oxidase positivity. Oxidase-positive colony was inoculated in triple sugar iron slant (TSI to know the hydrogen sulfide production. Hydrogen sulfide positive colonies were further tested for citrate, urease, indole, and amino acid decarboxylation and acid and gas production from sugars. Results : Five isolates identified as Pseudomonas spp. during preliminary testing were proved to be Shewanella spp. on further testing. Conclusions : It will help in better understanding the epidemiology, pathogenesis and risk factors associated with these and prevention of the rare pathogenic organisms.

  14. Shewanella alga bacteremia in two patients with lower leg ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domínguez, H.; Vogel, Birte Fonnesbech; Gram, Lone

    1996-01-01

    of infection. Both patients survived; however, one of them had extensive myonecrosis, while the other patient had an uncomplicated course. The strains were initially believed to be Shewanella putrefaciens on the basis of key characteristics and results of the API 20NE identification system (bioMerieux, Marcy l......The first Danish cases of Shewanella alga bacteremia in two patients with chronic lower leg ulcers are reported. Both patients were admitted to the hospital during the same month of a very warm summer and had been exposed to the same marine environment, thereby suggesting the same source...

  15. Shewanella strain isolated from black powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutterbach, Marcia T.S.; Contador, Luciana S.; Oliveira, Ana Lucia C.; Galvao, Mariana M. [National Institute of Technology (INT), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Pimenta, Gutemberg S. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Black powder is a term frequently used to refer to residues formed by various types of iron sulfides mixed with contaminants eventually present in the natural gas flow. According to some researchers, the occurrence of black powder in gas pipelines, besides its chemical corrosion origin, can be directly related to the sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) metabolism in this environment. A black powder sample was inoculated in a Post gate E medium modified with the addition of thioglycolate. The resulting positive culture was kept in the laboratory for four years until its use. A dilution technique was then performed aiming to isolate an SRB strain. The bacterial strain isolated and identified through DNA sequencing was not an SRB but rather a Shewanella sp. Compared to the sulfate-reducing bacteria group-traditionally considered the foremost responsible for microbially-influenced corrosion (MIC) - Shewanella is a facultative anaerobe and has a versatile metabolism. Shewanella is able to reduce ferric iron and sulfite, oxidize hydrogen gas, and produce hydrogen sulfide; therefore, these bacteria can be responsible for MIC and pit formation. The isolated Shewanella was used in a corrosion experiment, and the corrosion products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, identifying iron sulfides, iron oxides, and sulfur. Our results indicate that the strain isolated, S. putrefaciens, plays a key role in corrosion problems in gas pipelines. (author)

  16. Redox Sensing within the Genus Shewanella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard W. Harris

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel bacterial behavior called congregation was recently described in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as the accumulation of cells around insoluble electron acceptors (IEA. It is the result of a series of “run-and-reversal” events enabled by modulation of swimming speed and direction. The model proposed that the swimming cells constantly sense their surroundings with specialized outer membrane cytochromes capable of extracellular electron transport (EET. Up to this point, neither the congregation nor attachment behavior have been studied in any other strains. In this study, the wild type of S. oneidensis MR-1 and several deletion mutants as well as eight other Shewanella strains (Shewanella putrefaciens CN32, S. sp. ANA-3, S. sp. W3-18-1, Shewanella amazonensis SB2B, Shewanella loihica PV-4, Shewanella denitrificans OS217, Shewanella baltica OS155, and Shewanella frigidimarina NCIMB400 were screened for the ability to congregate. To monitor congregation and attachment, specialized cell-tracking techniques, as well as a novel cell accumulation after photo-bleaching (CAAP confocal microscopy technique were utilized in this study. We found a strong correlation between the ability of strain MR-1 to accumulate on mineral surface and the presence of key EET genes such as mtrBC/omcA (SO_1778, SO_1776, and SO_1779 and gene coding for methyl-accepting protein (MCPs with Ca+ channel chemotaxis receptor (Cache domain (SO_2240. These EET and taxis genes were previously identified as essential for characteristic run and reversal swimming around IEA surfaces. CN32, ANA-3, and PV-4 congregated around both Fe(OH3 and MnO2. Two other Shewanella spp. showed preferences for one oxide over the other: preferences that correlated with the metal content of the environments from which the strains were isolated: e.g., W3-18-1, which was isolated from an iron-rich habitat congregated and attached preferentially to Fe(OH3, while SB2B, which was isolated from a MnO2-rich

  17. Removal of U(VI) from aqueous solutions using Shewanella sp. RCRI7, isolated from Qurugoel Lake in Iran

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdehvand, Adib Zaheri; Keshtkar, Alireza; Fatemi, Faezeh [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Nuclear Fuel Cycle Research School; Tarhiz, Vahideh; Hejazi, Mohammad Saeid [Tabriz Univ. of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Molecular Medicine Research Center

    2017-04-01

    Isolation, genotypic and phenotypic characterization of an aqueous bacterium, Shewanella sp RCRI7, from Qurugoel Lake in Iran and uranium removal from aqueous solutions using the isolate is described. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and phylogenetic tree, strain RCRI7{sup T} falls into genus Shewanella. Closely related type strains include Shewanella xiamenensis S4{sup T} KJ542801, Shewanella profunda DSM15900{sup T} FR733713, Shewanella putrefaciens LMG 26268{sup T} X81623 and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1{sup T} AE014299. Anaerobic incubation of the bacteria in the presence of U(VI) led to uranium removal from the solution and formation of a black precipitate. Analysis of the precipitate using UV-vis confirmed the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). The effects of pH, temperature, U(VI) concentration and cell density on uranium removal were elucidated. The maximum uranium removal was 97%. As a conclusion, the findings revealed the ability of the local strain RCRI7 for U(VI) bioreduction as an effective bacterium for uranium immobilization.

  18. Removal of U(VI) from aqueous solutions using Shewanella sp. RCRI7, isolated from Qurugoel Lake in Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdehvand, Adib Zaheri; Keshtkar, Alireza; Fatemi, Faezeh; Tarhiz, Vahideh; Hejazi, Mohammad Saeid

    2017-01-01

    Isolation, genotypic and phenotypic characterization of an aqueous bacterium, Shewanella sp RCRI7, from Qurugoel Lake in Iran and uranium removal from aqueous solutions using the isolate is described. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and phylogenetic tree, strain RCRI7 T falls into genus Shewanella. Closely related type strains include Shewanella xiamenensis S4 T KJ542801, Shewanella profunda DSM15900 T FR733713, Shewanella putrefaciens LMG 26268 T X81623 and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 T AE014299. Anaerobic incubation of the bacteria in the presence of U(VI) led to uranium removal from the solution and formation of a black precipitate. Analysis of the precipitate using UV-vis confirmed the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). The effects of pH, temperature, U(VI) concentration and cell density on uranium removal were elucidated. The maximum uranium removal was 97%. As a conclusion, the findings revealed the ability of the local strain RCRI7 for U(VI) bioreduction as an effective bacterium for uranium immobilization.

  19. Sorption and precipitation of Mn2+ by viable and autoclaved Shewanella putrefaciens: Effect of contact time

    KAUST Repository

    Chubar, Natalia; Visser, Tom; Avramut, Cristina; de Waard, Helen

    2013-01-01

    of pH, bacterial density and metal loading. During a short contact time (3-24h), the adsorptive behaviour of live and dead bacteria toward Mn(II) was sufficiently similar, an observation that was reflected in the studies on adsorption kinetics

  20. Identification of Shewanella baltica as the most important H2S-producing species during iced storage of Danish marine fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonnesbech Vogel, Birte; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Satomi, Masataka; Gram, Lone

    2005-11-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens has been considered the main spoilage bacteria of low-temperature stored marine seafood. However, psychrotropic Shewanella have been reclassified during recent years, and the purpose of the present study was to determine whether any of the new Shewanella species are important in fish spoilage. More than 500 H2S-producing strains were isolated from iced stored marine fish (cod, plaice, and flounder) caught in the Baltic Sea during winter or summer time. All strains were identified as Shewanella species by phenotypic tests. Different Shewanella species were present on newly caught fish. During the warm summer months the mesophilic human pathogenic S. algae dominated the H2S-producing bacterial population. After iced storage, a shift in the Shewanella species was found, and most of the H2S-producing strains were identified as S. baltica. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis confirmed the identification of these two major groups. Several isolates could only be identified to the genus Shewanella level and were separated into two subgroups with low (44%) and high (47%) G+C mol%. The low G+C% group was isolated during winter months, whereas the high G+C% group was isolated on fish caught during summer and only during the first few days of iced storage. Phenotypically, these strains were different from the type strains of S. putrefaciens, S. oneidensis, S. colwelliana, and S. affinis, but the high G+C% group clustered close to S. colwelliana by 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison. The low G+C% group may constitute a new species. S. baltica, and the low G+C% group of Shewanella spp. strains grew well in cod juice at 0 degrees C, but three high G+C Shewanella spp. were unable to grow at 0 degrees C. In conclusion, the spoilage reactions of iced Danish marine fish remain unchanged (i.e., trimethylamine-N-oxide reduction and H2S production); however, the main H2S-producing organism was identified as S. baltica.

  1. Integrated genome-based studies of Shewanella Ecophysiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiedje, James M. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Konstantinidis, Kostas [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Worden, Mark [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2014-01-08

    The aim of the work reported is to study Shewanella population genomics, and to understand the evolution, ecophysiology, and speciation of Shewanella. The tasks supporting this aim are: to study genetic and ecophysiological bases defining the core and diversification of Shewanella species; to determine gene content patterns along redox gradients; and to Investigate the evolutionary processes, patterns and mechanisms of Shewanella.

  2. Shewanella algae in acute gastroenteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Dey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella algae is an emerging bacteria rarely implicated as a human pathogen. Previously reported cases of S. algae have mainly been associated with direct contact with seawater. Here we report the isolation of S. algae as the sole etiological agent from a patient suffering from acute gastroenteritis with bloody diarrhoea. The bacterium was identified by automated identification system and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Our report highlights the importance of looking for the relatively rare aetiological agents in clinical samples that does not yield common pathogens. It also underscores the usefulness of automated systems in identification of rare pathogens.

  3. Cold adaptation of the mononuclear molybdoenzyme periplasmic nitrate reductase from the Antarctic bacterium Shewanella gelidimarina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, Philippa J.L.; Codd, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Cold-adapted phenotype of NapA from the Antarctic bacterium Shewanella gelidimarina. ► Protein homology model of NapA from S. gelidimarina and mesophilic homologue. ► Six amino acid residues identified as lead candidates governing NapA cold adaptation. ► Molecular-level understanding of designing cool-temperature in situ oxyanion sensors. -- Abstract: The reduction of nitrate to nitrite is catalysed in bacteria by periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap) which describes a system of variable protein subunits encoded by the nap operon. Nitrate reduction occurs in the NapA subunit, which contains a bis-molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide (Mo–MGD) cofactor and one [4Fe–4S] iron–sulfur cluster. The activity of periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap) isolated as native protein from the cold-adapted (psychrophilic) Antarctic bacterium Shewanella gelidimarina (Nap Sgel ) and middle-temperature adapted (mesophilic) Shewanella putrefaciens (Nap Sput ) was examined at varied temperature. Irreversible deactivation of Nap Sgel and Nap Sput occurred at 54.5 and 65 °C, respectively. When Nap Sgel was preincubated at 21–70 °C for 30 min, the room-temperature nitrate reductase activity was maximal and invariant between 21 and 54 °C, which suggested that Nap Sgel was poised for optimal catalysis at modest temperatures and, unlike Nap Sput , did not benefit from thermally-induced refolding. At 20 °C, Nap Sgel reduced selenate at 16% of the rate of nitrate reduction. Nap Sput did not reduce selenate. Sequence alignment showed 46 amino acid residue substitutions in Nap Sgel that were conserved in NapA from mesophilic Shewanella, Rhodobacter and Escherichia species and could be associated with the Nap Sgel cold-adapted phenotype. Protein homology modeling of Nap Sgel using a mesophilic template with 66% amino acid identity showed the majority of substitutions occurred at the protein surface distal to the Mo–MGD cofactor. Two mesophilic ↔ psychrophilic

  4. Bioactivity of glycolipopeptide cell-bound biosurfactants against skin pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecino, X; Rodríguez-López, L; Ferreira, D; Cruz, J M; Moldes, A B; Rodrigues, L R

    2018-04-01

    The antimicrobial and anti-adhesive activities of the cell-bound biosurfactants, produced by Lactobacillus pentosus (PEB), characterized as glycolipopeptide macromolecules, were evaluated against several microorganisms present in the skin microflora, envisaging its potential use as a "natural" ingredient in cosmetic and personal care formulations. Their performance was compared with another cell-bound biosurfactants also characterized as glycolipopeptides produced by Lactobacillus paracasei (PAB). At concentrations of 50mg/mL, the PEB showed an important antimicrobial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (85% when extracted with phosphate buffer (PB) and 100% when extracted with phosphate buffer saline (PBS)), Streptococcus agalactiae (100% for both extracts), Staphylococcus aureus (67% when extracted with PBS and 100% when extracted with PB), Escherichia coli (72% when extracted with PB and 89% when extracted with PBS), Streptococcus pyogenes (about 85% for both extracts) and Candida albicans (around 70% for both extracts), comparable with that obtained for the PAB. However, at lower concentrations the PAB exhibited in general higher antimicrobial activities. Biosurfactants produced by both microorganisms also showed significant anti-adhesive properties against all the microorganisms under study, except for E. coli and C. albicans (less than 30%). Overall, these cell-bound biosurfactants could be used as potential antimicrobial and anti-adhesive agents in cosmetic and pharmaceutical formulations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Integrated Genome-Based Studies of Shewanella Ecophysiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jizhong [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); He, Zhili [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    2014-04-08

    As a part of the Shewanella Federation project, we have used integrated genomic, proteomic and computational technologies to study various aspects of energy metabolism of two Shewanella strains from a systems-level perspective.

  6. Resolution of two native monomeric 90 kDa nitrate reductase active proteins from Shewanella gelidimarina and the sequence of two napA genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, Philippa J.L.; McKinzie, Audra A.; Codd, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Two monomeric 90 kDa nitrate reductase active proteins from Shewanella gelidimarina. → Sequence of napA from napEDABC-type operon and napA from NapDAGHB-type operon. → Isolation of NAP as NapA or NapAB correlated with NapA P47E amino acid substitution. -- Abstract: The reduction of nitrate to nitrite in the bacterial periplasm occurs in the 90 kDa NapA subunit of the periplasmic nitrate reductase (NAP) system. Most Shewanella genomes contain two nap operons: napEDABC and napDAGHB, which is an unusual feature of this genus. Two native, monomeric, 90 kDa nitrate reductase active proteins were resolved by hydrophobic interaction chromatography from aerobic cultures of Shewanella gelidimarina replete with reduced nitrogen compounds. The 90 kDa protein obtained in higher yield was characterized as NapA by electronic absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies and was identified by LC/MS/MS and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS as NapA from the napEDABC-type operon. The other 90 kDa protein, which was unstable and produced in low yields, was posited as NapA from the napDAGHB-type operon. Two napA genes have been sequenced from the napEDABC-type and napDAGHB-type operons of S. gelidimarina. Native NAP from S. putrefaciens was resolved as one NapA monomer and one NapAB heterodimer. Two amino acid substitutions in NapA correlated with the isolation of NAP as a NapA monomer or a NapAB heterodimer. The resolution of native, redox-active NapA isoforms in Shewanella provides new insight into the respiratory versatility of this genus, which has implications in bioremediation and the assembly of microbial fuel cells.

  7. Redox sensing within the genus Shewanella

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harris, Howard W.; Sánchez-Andrea, Irene; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Salas, Everett C.; Tran, William; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    2018-01-01

    A novel bacterial behavior called congregation was recently described in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as the accumulation of cells around insoluble electron acceptors (IEA). It is the result of a series of "run-and-reversal" events enabled by modulation of swimming speed and direction. The model

  8. Cold adaptation of the mononuclear molybdoenzyme periplasmic nitrate reductase from the Antarctic bacterium Shewanella gelidimarina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Philippa J.L. [School of Chemistry, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Codd, Rachel, E-mail: rachel.codd@sydney.edu.au [School of Chemistry, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); School of Medical Sciences (Pharmacology) and Bosch Institute, University of New South Wales, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cold-adapted phenotype of NapA from the Antarctic bacterium Shewanella gelidimarina. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protein homology model of NapA from S. gelidimarina and mesophilic homologue. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Six amino acid residues identified as lead candidates governing NapA cold adaptation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molecular-level understanding of designing cool-temperature in situ oxyanion sensors. -- Abstract: The reduction of nitrate to nitrite is catalysed in bacteria by periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap) which describes a system of variable protein subunits encoded by the nap operon. Nitrate reduction occurs in the NapA subunit, which contains a bis-molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide (Mo-MGD) cofactor and one [4Fe-4S] iron-sulfur cluster. The activity of periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap) isolated as native protein from the cold-adapted (psychrophilic) Antarctic bacterium Shewanella gelidimarina (Nap{sub Sgel}) and middle-temperature adapted (mesophilic) Shewanella putrefaciens (Nap{sub Sput}) was examined at varied temperature. Irreversible deactivation of Nap{sub Sgel} and Nap{sub Sput} occurred at 54.5 and 65 Degree-Sign C, respectively. When Nap{sub Sgel} was preincubated at 21-70 Degree-Sign C for 30 min, the room-temperature nitrate reductase activity was maximal and invariant between 21 and 54 Degree-Sign C, which suggested that Nap{sub Sgel} was poised for optimal catalysis at modest temperatures and, unlike Nap{sub Sput}, did not benefit from thermally-induced refolding. At 20 Degree-Sign C, Nap{sub Sgel} reduced selenate at 16% of the rate of nitrate reduction. Nap{sub Sput} did not reduce selenate. Sequence alignment showed 46 amino acid residue substitutions in Nap{sub Sgel} that were conserved in NapA from mesophilic Shewanella, Rhodobacter and Escherichia species and could be associated with the Nap{sub Sgel} cold-adapted phenotype. Protein homology modeling of Nap{sub Sgel} using a

  9. Dissimilatory nitrate reduction to nitrate, nitrous oxide, and ammonium by Pseudomonas putrefaciens.

    OpenAIRE

    Samuelsson, M O

    1985-01-01

    The influence of redox potential on dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium was investigated on a marine bacterium, Pseudomonas putrefaciens. Nitrate was consumed (3.1 mmol liter-1), and ammonium was produced in cultures with glucose and without sodium thioglycolate. When sodium thioglycolate was added, nitrate was consumed at a lower rate (1.1 mmol liter-1), and no significant amounts of nitrite or ammonium were produced. No growth was detected in glucose media either with or without sod...

  10. Genome Sequences of Shewanella baltica and Shewanella morhuae Strains Isolated from the Gastrointestinal Tract of Freshwater Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Daniel; Gram, Lone; Dailey, Frank E

    2018-06-21

    We present here the genome sequences of Shewanella baltica strain CW2 and Shewanella morhuae strain CW7, isolated from the gastrointestinal tract of Salvelinus namaycush (lean lake trout) and Coregonus clupeaformis (whitefish), respectively. These genome sequences provide insights into the niche adaptation of these specific species in freshwater systems. Copyright © 2018 Castillo et al.

  11. Uso del probiótico Shewanella putrefaciens Pdp11 en el cultivo de Solea senegalensis: implicaciones sobre la microbiota intestinal

    OpenAIRE

    Tapia Paniagua, Silvana Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Actualmente, la acuicultura es una industria en expansión. Entre las especies que se están introduciendo destaca el lenguado, Solea senegalensis, cuyo cultivo en cautividad no acaba de ser económicamente rentable debido fundamentalmente a las mortalidades producidas por infecciones bacterianas. Los antibióticos presentan una serie de limitaciones ya conocidas, siendo los probióticos una de las opciones más consideradas. Estudios previos en nuestro laboratorio han mostrado que la cepas S. p...

  12. Shewanella hafniensis sp. nov. and Shewanella morhuae sp. nov., isolated from marine fish of the Baltic Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Satomi, M.; Vogel, Birte Fonnesbech; Gram, Lone

    2006-01-01

    Two novel species belonging to the genus Shewanella are described on the basis of their phenotypic characteristics, phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA and gyrB gene sequences and levels of DNA-DNA hybridization. A total of 47 strains belonging to two novel Gram-negative, psychrotolerant, H2S-produ...... species, Shewanella hafniensis sp. nov. (type strain P010T=ATCC BAA-1207T=NBRC 100975T) and Shewanella morhuae sp. nov. (type strain U1417T=ATCC BAA-1205T=NBRC 100978T), are described....

  13. Dissimilatory nitrate reduction to nitrate, nitrous oxide, and ammonium by Pseudomonas putrefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsson, M O

    1985-10-01

    The influence of redox potential on dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium was investigated on a marine bacterium, Pseudomonas putrefaciens. Nitrate was consumed (3.1 mmol liter-1), and ammonium was produced in cultures with glucose and without sodium thioglycolate. When sodium thioglycolate was added, nitrate was consumed at a lower rate (1.1 mmol liter-1), and no significant amounts of nitrite or ammonium were produced. No growth was detected in glucose media either with or without sodium thioglycolate. When grown on tryptic soy broth, the production of nitrous oxide paralleled growth. In the same medium, but with sodium thioglycolate, nitrous oxide was first produced during growth and then consumed. Acetylene caused the nitrous oxide to accumulate. These results and the mass balance calculations for different nitrogen components indicate that P. putrefaciens has the capacity to dissimilate nitrate to ammonium as well as to dinitrogen gas and nitrous oxide (denitrification). The dissimilatory pathway to ammonium dominates except when sodium thioglycolate is added to the medium.

  14. Effects of cell-bound microcystins on survival and feeding of Daphnia spp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohrlack, T; Dittmann, E; Börner, T

    2001-01-01

    The influence of cell-bound microcystins on the survival time and feeding rates of six Daphnia clones belonging to five common species was studied. To do this, the effects of the microcystin-producing Microcystis strain PCC7806 and its mutant, which has been genetically engineered to knock out mi...

  15. Pro- and non-coagulant forms of non-cell-bound tissue factor in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturk-Maquelin, K. N.; Nieuwland, R.; Romijn, F. P. H. T. M.; Eijsman, L.; Hack, C. E.; Sturk, A.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Concentrations of non-cell-bound (NCB; soluble) tissue factor (TF) are elevated in blood collecting in the pericardial cavity of patients during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Previously, we reported microparticles supporting thrombin generation in such blood samples. In this study we

  16. Bacterial content in the intestine of frozen common carp Cyprinus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aeromonas hydrophila, Aeromonas sp., Bacillus sp., Enterobacter sp., Micrococcus sp., Photobacterium damselae, Serratia liquefaciens, Shewanella putrefaciens, Staphylococcus sp., Streptococcus sp. and Vibrio sp. survived after prolonged freezing. Two bacterial species viz. Shewanella putrefaciens and Aeromonas ...

  17. Integrated Genome-Based Studies of Shewanella Ecophysiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrei L. Osterman, Ph.D.

    2012-12-17

    Integration of bioinformatics and experimental techniques was applied to mapping and characterization of the key components (pathways, enzymes, transporters, regulators) of the core metabolic machinery in Shewanella oneidensis and related species with main focus was on metabolic and regulatory pathways involved in utilization of various carbon and energy sources. Among the main accomplishments reflected in ten joint publications with other participants of Shewanella Federation are: (i) A systems-level reconstruction of carbohydrate utilization pathways in the genus of Shewanella (19 species). This analysis yielded reconstruction of 18 sugar utilization pathways including 10 novel pathway variants and prediction of > 60 novel protein families of enzymes, transporters and regulators involved in these pathways. Selected functional predictions were verified by focused biochemical and genetic experiments. Observed growth phenotypes were consistent with bioinformatic predictions providing strong validation of the technology and (ii) Global genomic reconstruction of transcriptional regulons in 16 Shewanella genomes. The inferred regulatory network includes 82 transcription factors, 8 riboswitches and 6 translational attenuators. Of those, 45 regulons were inferred directly from the genome context analysis, whereas others were propagated from previously characterized regulons in other species. Selected regulatory predictions were experimentally tested. Integration of this analysis with microarray data revealed overall consistency and provided additional layer of interactions between regulons. All the results were captured in the new database RegPrecise, which is a joint development with the LBNL team. A more detailed analysis of the individual subsystems, pathways and regulons in Shewanella spp included bioinfiormatics-based prediction and experimental characterization of: (i) N-Acetylglucosamine catabolic pathway; (ii)Lactate utilization machinery; (iii) Novel Nrt

  18. Functional Analysis of Shewanella, a cross genome comparison.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serres, Margrethe H.

    2009-05-15

    The bacterial genus Shewanella includes a group of highly versatile organisms that have successfully adapted to life in many environments ranging from aquatic (fresh and marine) to sedimentary (lake and marine sediments, subsurface sediments, sea vent). A unique respiratory capability of the Shewanellas, initially observed for Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, is the ability to use metals and metalloids, including radioactive compounds, as electron acceptors. Members of the Shewanella genus have also been shown to degrade environmental pollutants i.e. halogenated compounds, making this group highly applicable for the DOE mission. S. oneidensis MR-1 has in addition been found to utilize a diverse set of nutrients and to have a large set of genes dedicated to regulation and to sensing of the environment. The sequencing of the S. oneidensis MR-1 genome facilitated experimental and bioinformatics analyses by a group of collaborating researchers, the Shewanella Federation. Through the joint effort and with support from Department of Energy S. oneidensis MR-1 has become a model organism of study. Our work has been a functional analysis of S. oneidensis MR-1, both by itself and as part of a comparative study. We have improved the annotation of gene products, assigned metabolic functions, and analyzed protein families present in S. oneidensis MR-1. The data has been applied to analysis of experimental data (i.e. gene expression, proteome) generated for S. oneidensis MR-1. Further, this work has formed the basis for a comparative study of over 20 members of the Shewanella genus. The species and strains selected for genome sequencing represented an evolutionary gradient of DNA relatedness, ranging from close to intermediate, and to distant. The organisms selected have also adapted to a variety of ecological niches. Through our work we have been able to detect and interpret genome similarities and differences between members of the genus. We have in this way contributed to the

  19. Secretion of non-cell-bound phytase by the yeast Pichia kudriavzevii TY13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellström, A; Qvirist, L; Svanberg, U; Veide Vilg, J; Andlid, T

    2015-05-01

    Mineral deficiencies cause several health problems in the world, especially for populations consuming cereal-based diets rich in the anti-nutrient phytate. Our aim was to characterize the phytate-degrading capacity of the yeast Pichia kudriavzevii TY13 and its secretion of phytase. The phytase activity in cell-free supernatants from cultures with 100% intact cells was 35-190 mU ml(-1) depending on the media. The Km was 0.28 mmol l(-1) and the specific phytase activity 0.32 U mg(-1) total protein. The phytase activity and secretion of extracellular non-cell-bound phytase was affected by the medium phosphate concentrations. Further, addition of yeast extract had a clearly inducing effect, resulting in over 60% of the cultures total phytase activity as non-cell-bound. Our study reveals that it is possible to achieve high extracellular phytase activity from the yeast P. kudriavzevii TY13 by proper composition of the growth medium. TY13 could be a promising future starter culture for fermented foods with improved mineral bioavailability. Using strains that secrete phytase to the food matrix may significantly improve the phytate degradation by facilitating the enzyme-to-substrate interaction. The secreted non-cell-bound phytase activities by TY13 could further be advantageous in industrial production of phytase. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. Integrated Genome-Based Studies of Shewanella Echophysiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margrethe H. Serres

    2012-06-29

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a motile, facultative {gamma}-Proteobacterium with remarkable respiratory versatility; it can utilize a range of organic and inorganic compounds as terminal electronacceptors for anaerobic metabolism. The ability to effectively reduce nitrate, S0, polyvalent metals andradionuclides has established MR-1 as an important model dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganism for genome-based investigations of biogeochemical transformation of metals and radionuclides that are of concern to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites nationwide. Metal-reducing bacteria such as Shewanella also have a highly developed capacity for extracellular transfer of respiratory electrons to solid phase Fe and Mn oxides as well as directly to anode surfaces in microbial fuel cells. More broadly, Shewanellae are recognized free-living microorganisms and members of microbial communities involved in the decomposition of organic matter and the cycling of elements in aquatic and sedimentary systems. To function and compete in environments that are subject to spatial and temporal environmental change, Shewanella must be able to sense and respond to such changes and therefore require relatively robust sensing and regulation systems. The overall goal of this project is to apply the tools of genomics, leveraging the availability of genome sequence for 18 additional strains of Shewanella, to better understand the ecophysiology and speciation of respiratory-versatile members of this important genus. To understand these systems we propose to use genome-based approaches to investigate Shewanella as a system of integrated networks; first describing key cellular subsystems - those involved in signal transduction, regulation, and metabolism - then building towards understanding the function of whole cells and, eventually, cells within populations. As a general approach, this project will employ complimentary "top-down" - bioinformatics-based genome functional predictions, high

  1. Characterization of lead nanoparticles formed by Shewanella sp. KR-12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chien-Liang; Yen, Jui-Hung, E-mail: sonny@ntu.edu.tw [National Taiwan University, Department of Agricultural Chemistry (China)

    2016-01-15

    The bacterial strain KR-12 was isolated from river sediment in northeast Taiwan. 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed that it belongs to the genus Shewanella. The strain can accumulate lead (Pb) and form Pb nanoparticles (PbNPs) on exposure to Pb(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} and sodium formate in HEPES buffer. On transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the KR-12-formed PbNPs were spherical in shape and ranged from 3 to 8 nm. The PbNPs formed a line or curved pattern on bacteria. In addition, one or more pilus-like structures elongated from the bacteria. In contrast, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and other bacteria could not form PbNPs pattern or pilus-like structure under the same conditions. High-resolution TEM combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy demonstrated that these PbNPs primarily contained Pb and had an amorphous structure. This is the first report of the biosynthesis of PbNPs by a Shewanella species.

  2. Cell-bound lipases from Burkholderia sp. ZYB002: gene sequence analysis, expression, enzymatic characterization, and 3D structural model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Zhengyu; Lin, Hong; Shi, Shaolei; Mu, Xiangduo; Liu, Yanru; Huang, Jianzhong

    2016-05-03

    The whole-cell lipase from Burkholderia cepacia has been used as a biocatalyst in organic synthesis. However, there is no report in the literature on the component or the gene sequence of the cell-bound lipase from this species. Qualitative analysis of the cell-bound lipase would help to illuminate the regulation mechanism of gene expression and further improve the yield of the cell-bound lipase by gene engineering. Three predictive cell-bound lipases, lipA, lipC21 and lipC24, from Burkholderia sp. ZYB002 were cloned and expressed in E. coli. Both LipA and LipC24 displayed the lipase activity. LipC24 was a novel mesophilic enzyme and displayed preference for medium-chain-length acyl groups (C10-C14). The 3D structural model of LipC24 revealed the open Y-type active site. LipA displayed 96 % amino acid sequence identity with the known extracellular lipase. lipA-inactivation and lipC24-inactivation decreased the total cell-bound lipase activity of Burkholderia sp. ZYB002 by 42 % and 14 %, respectively. The cell-bound lipase activity from Burkholderia sp. ZYB002 originated from a multi-enzyme mixture with LipA as the main component. LipC24 was a novel lipase and displayed different enzymatic characteristics and structural model with LipA. Besides LipA and LipC24, other type of the cell-bound lipases (or esterases) should exist.

  3. INTEGRATED GENOME-BASED STUDIES OF SHEWANELLA ECOPHYSIOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NEALSON, KENNETH H.

    2013-10-15

    This project had as its goals the understanding of the ecophysiology of the genus Shewanella using various genomics approaches. As opposed to other programs involving Shewanella, this one branched out into the various areas in which Shewanella cells are active, and included both basic and applied studies. All of the work was, to some extent, related to the ability of the bacteria to accomplish electron exchange between the cell and solid state electron acceptors and/or electron donors, a process we call Extracellular Electron Transport, or EET. The major accomplishments related to several different areas: Basic Science Studies: 1. Genetics and genomics of nitrate reduction, resulting in elucidation of atypical nitrate reduction systems in Shewanella oneidensis (MR-1)[2]. 2. Influence of bacterial strain and growth conditions on iron reduction, showing that rates of reduction, extents of reduction, and the formation of secondary minerals were different for different strains of Shewanella [3,4,9]. 3. Comparative genomics as a tool for comparing metabolic capacities of different Shewanella strains, and for predicting growth and metabolism [6,10,15]. In these studies, collaboration with ORNL, PNNL, and 4. Basic studies of electron transport in strain MR-1, both to poised electrodes, and via conductive nanowires [12,13]. This included the first accurate measurements of electrical energy generation by a single cell during electrode growth [12], and the demonstration of electrical conductivity along the length of bacterial nanowires [13]. 5. Impact of surface charge and electron flow on cell movement, cell attachment, cell growth, and biofilm formation [7.18]. The demonstration that interaction with solid state electron acceptors resulted in increased motility [7] led to the description of a phenomenon called electrokinesis. The importance of this for biofilm formation and for electron flow was hypothesized by Nealson & Finkel [18], and is now under study in several

  4. Shewanella gelidii sp. nov., isolated from the red algae Gelidium amansii, and emended description of Shewanella waksmanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Chen, Hongli; Liu, Zhenhua; Ming, Hong; Zhou, Chenyan; Zhu, Xinshu; Zhang, Peng; Jing, Changqin; Feng, Huigen

    2016-08-01

    A novel Gram-stain-negative, straight or slightly curved rod-shaped, non-spore-forming, facultatively anaerobic bacterium with a single polar flagellum, designated RZB5-4T, was isolated from a sample of the red algae Gelidium amansii collected from the coastal region of Rizhao, PR China (119.625° E 35.517° N). The organism grew optimally between 24 and 28 °C, at pH 7.0 and in the presence of 2-3 % (w/v) NaCl. The strain required seawater or artificial seawater for growth, and NaCl alone did not support growth. Strain RZB5-4T contained C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c, C16 : 0 and iso-C15 : 0 as the dominant fatty acids. The respiratory quinones detected in strain RZB5-4T were ubiquinone 7, ubiquinone 8, menaquinone 7 and methylmenaquinone 7. The polar lipids of strain RZB5-4T comprised phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylmonomethylethanolamine, one unidentified glycolipid, one unidentified phospholipid and one unknown lipid. The DNA G+C content of strain RZB5-4T was 47 mol %. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA and gyrase B (gyrB) gene sequences showed that strain RZB5-4T belonged to the genus Shewanella, clustering with Shewanella waksmanii ATCC BAA-643T. Strain RZB5-4T exhibited the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity value (96.6 %) and the highest gyrB gene sequence similarity value (80.7 %), respectively, to S. waksmanii ATCC BAA-643T. On the basis of polyphasic analyses, strain RZB5-4T represents a novel species of the genus Shewanella, for which the name Shewanella gelidii sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is RZB5-4T (=JCM 30804T=KCTC 42663T=MCCC 1K00697T).

  5. The genus Shewanella: from the briny depths below to human pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janda, J Michael; Abbott, Sharon L

    2014-11-01

    The genus Shewanella is currently composed of more than 50 species that inhabit a range of marine environs and ecosystems. Several members of this genus, including S. oneidensis, have been identified that could potentially play key roles in environmental processes such as bioremediation of toxic elements and heavy metals and serving as microbial fuel cells. In contrast to this beneficial role, shewanellae are increasingly being implicated as human pathogens in persons exposed through occupational or recreational activities to marine niches containing shewanellae. Documented illnesses linked to Shewanella include skin and soft tissue infections, bacteremia, and otitis media. At present, it is unclear exactly how many Shewanella species are truly bona fide human pathogens. Recent advances in the taxonomy and phylogenetic relatedness of members of this genus, however, support the concept that most human infections are caused by a single species, S. algae. Some phylogenetic data further suggest that some current members of the genus are not true Shewanella species sensu stricto. The current review summarizes our present knowledge of the distribution, epidemiology, disease spectrum, and identification of microbial species focusing on a clinical perspective.

  6. Integrated genome-based studies of Shewanella ecophysiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segre Daniel; Beg Qasim

    2012-02-14

    This project was a component of the Shewanella Federation and, as such, contributed to the overall goal of applying the genomic tools to better understand eco-physiology and speciation of respiratory-versatile members of Shewanella genus. Our role at Boston University was to perform bioreactor and high throughput gene expression microarrays, and combine dynamic flux balance modeling with experimentally obtained transcriptional and gene expression datasets from different growth conditions. In the first part of project, we designed the S. oneidensis microarray probes for Affymetrix Inc. (based in California), then we identified the pathways of carbon utilization in the metal-reducing marine bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, using our newly designed high-density oligonucleotide Affymetrix microarray on Shewanella cells grown with various carbon sources. Next, using a combination of experimental and computational approaches, we built algorithm and methods to integrate the transcriptional and metabolic regulatory networks of S. oneidensis. Specifically, we combined mRNA microarray and metabolite measurements with statistical inference and dynamic flux balance analysis (dFBA) to study the transcriptional response of S. oneidensis MR-1 as it passes through exponential, stationary, and transition phases. By measuring time-dependent mRNA expression levels during batch growth of S. oneidensis MR-1 under two radically different nutrient compositions (minimal lactate and nutritionally rich LB medium), we obtain detailed snapshots of the regulatory strategies used by this bacterium to cope with gradually changing nutrient availability. In addition to traditional clustering, which provides a first indication of major regulatory trends and transcription factors activities, we developed and implemented a new computational approach for Dynamic Detection of Transcriptional Triggers (D2T2). This new method allows us to infer a putative topology of transcriptional dependencies

  7. Reduction of Ferrrihydrite and Akaganeite by Shewanella alga (PAH93)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, M.; Kim, Y.; Lee, Y.; Kwon, K.; Roh, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Shewanella species are capable of oxidizing diverse organic acids coupled to reducing Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides to crystalline Fe(II)-containing phases such as magnetite, siderite, and vivianite. The objective of this study was to examine reduction of ferrihydrite and akaganeite as the electron acceptors using various organic acids as the electron donors by Shewanella alga (PAH93) isolated from Yeosu, South Korea. Microbial reduction of akaganeite (40 mM) and ferrihydrite (40 mM) was examined using acetate (10 mM), glucose (10 mM), and lactate (10 mM) as electron donors at room temperature. Ferrozine method was used to analyze both water soluble and HCl soluble Fe(II) concentrations during the microbial Fe(III) reduction. XRD and TEM-EDX analyses were used to characterize biominerals formed by PAH93. PAH93 was completely reduced ferrihydrite to Fe(II), which transformed as siderite (FeCO3). PAH93 was oxidized acetate, glucose, and lactate coupled to reducing akaganeite to magnetite or green rust. Microbial reduction of ferrihydrite resulted in higher soluble Fe(II) concentration (446 - 498 mg/L) than the reduction of akaganeite (255 - 284 mg/L) within 6 days of incubation. For 21 days of incubation, souble Fe(II) concentration during akaganeite reduction (945 - 1316 mg/L) was higher than ferrihydrite reduction (120 - 738 mg/L). It may be attributed to the differences of crystallinity of the iron minerals used for microbial iron reduction. This study indicates types of the electron acceptors, ferrihydrite and akaganeite, affect Fe(II) reduction rate and types of the biotransformed minerals.

  8. Oxidative stress induces monocyte necrosis with enrichment of cell-bound albumin and overexpression of endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial chaperones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiping Tang

    Full Text Available In the present study, monocytes were treated with 5-azacytidine (azacytidine, gossypol or hydrogen peroxide to induce cell death through oxidative stress. A shift from apoptotic to necrotic cell death occurred when monocytes were treated with 100 µM azacytidine for more than 12 hours. Necrotic monocytes exhibited characteristics, including enrichment of cell-bound albumin and up-regulation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER- and mitochondrial-specific chaperones to protect mitochondrial integrity, which were not observed in other necrotic cells, including HUH-7, A2780, A549 and HOC1a. Our results show that the cell-bound albumin originates in the culture medium rather than from monocyte-derived hepatocytes, and that HSP60 is a potential binding partner of the cell-bound albumin. Proteomic analysis shows that HSP60 and protein disulfide isomerase are the most abundant up-regulated mitochondrial and ER-chaperones, and that both HSP60 and calreticulin are ubiquitinated in necrotic monocytes. In contrast, expression levels of the cytosolic chaperones HSP90 and HSP71 were down-regulated in the azacytidine-treated monocytes, concomitant with an increase in the levels of these chaperones in the cell culture medium. Collectively, our results demonstrates that chaperones from different organelles behave differently in necrotic monocytes, ER- and mitochondrial chaperones being retained and cytosolic and nuclear chaperones being released into the cell culture medium through the ruptured cell membrane. HSP60 may serve as a new target for development of myeloid leukemia treatment.

  9. High Pressure Reduction of Selenite by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, A.; Daniel, I.; Testemale, D.; Letard, I.; Bleuet, P.; Cardon, H.; Oger, P.

    2007-12-01

    High-pressure biotopes comprise cold deep-sea environments, hydrothermal vents, and deep subsurface or deep-sea sediments. The latter are less studied, due to the technical difficulties to sample at great depths without contamination. Nevertheless, microbial sulfate reduction and methanogenesis have been found to be spatially distributed in deep deep-sea sediments (1), and sulfate reduction has been shown to be actually more efficient under high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) in some sediments (2). Sulfate-reducing bacteria obtained from the Japan Sea are characterized by an increased sulfide production under pressure (3,4). Unfortunately, investigations of microbial metabolic activity as a function of pressure are extremely scarce due to the experimental difficulty of such measurements at high hydrostatic pressure. We were able to measure the reduction of selenite Se(IV) by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as a function of pressure, to 150 MPa using two different high-pressure reactors that allow in situ X-ray spectroscopy measurements on a synchrotron source. A first series of measurements was carried out in a low-pressure Diamond Anvil Cell (DAC) of our own design (5) at ID22 beamline at ESRF (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility); a second one was performed in an autoclave (6) at the BM30B beamline at ESRF. Selenite reduction by strain MR-17 was monitored from ambient pressure to 150 MPa over 25 hours at 30 deg C by XANES spectroscopy (X-ray Analysis of Near Edge Structure). Spectra were recorded hourly in order to quantify the evolution of the oxidation state of selenium with time. Stationary-phase bacteria were inoculated at a high concentration into fresh growth medium containing 5 or 10 M of sodium selenite and 20 mM sodium lactate. Kinetic parameters of the Se (IV) reduction by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 could be extracted from the data, as a function of pressure. They show 1) that the rate constant k of the reaction is decreased by a half at high pressure

  10. Metabolic Flux Analysis of Shewanella spp. Reveals Evolutionary Robustness in Central Carbon Metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Martin, Hector Garcia; Dehal, Paramvir S.; Deutschbauer, Adam; Llora, Xavier; Meadows, Adam; Arkin, Adam; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-08-19

    Shewanella spp. are a group of facultative anaerobic bacteria widely distributed in marine and fresh-water environments. In this study, we profiled the central metabolic fluxes of eight recently sequenced Shewanella species grown under the same condition in minimal med-ium with [3-13C] lactate. Although the tested Shewanella species had slightly different growth rates (0.23-0.29 h31) and produced different amounts of acetate and pyruvate during early exponential growth (pseudo-steady state), the relative intracellular metabolic flux distributions were remarkably similar. This result indicates that Shewanella species share similar regulation in regard to central carbon metabolic fluxes under steady growth conditions: the maintenance of metabolic robustness is not only evident in a single species under genetic perturbations (Fischer and Sauer, 2005; Nat Genet 37(6):636-640), but also observed through evolutionary related microbial species. This remarkable conservation of relative flux profiles through phylogenetic differences prompts us to introduce the concept of metabotype as an alternative scheme to classify microbial fluxomics. On the other hand, Shewanella spp. display flexibility in the relative flux profiles when switching their metabolism from consuming lactate to consuming pyruvate and acetate.

  11. Estimates of abundance and diversity of Shewanella genus in natural and engineered aqueous environments with newly designed primers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing-Bing; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Fan, Yang-Yang; Liu, Dong-Feng; Fang, Cai-Yun; Wu, Chao; Li, Wen-Wei; Yang, Zong-Chuang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2018-05-12

    Shewanella species have a diverse respiratory ability and wide distribution in environments and play an important role in bioremediation and the biogeochemical cycles of elements. Primers with more accuracy and broader coverage are required with consideration of the increasing number of Shewanella species and evaluation of their roles in various environments. In this work, a new primer set of 640F/815R was developed to quantify the abundance of Shewanella species in natural and engineered environments. In silico tools for primer evaluation, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and clone library results showed that 640F/815R had a higher specificity and coverage than the previous primers in quantitative analysis of Shewanella. Another newly developed primer pair of 211F/815cR was also adopted to analyze the Shewanella diversity and demonstrated to be the best candidate in terms of specificity and coverage. We detected more Shewanella-related species in freshwater environments and found them to be substantially different from those in marine environments. Abundance and diversity of Shewanella species in wastewater treatment plants were largely affected by the process and operating conditions. Overall, this study suggests that investigations of abundance and diversity of Shewanella in various environments are of great importance to evaluate their ecophysiology and potential ecological roles. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Bio-reduction of plutonyl and neptunyl by Shewanella alga

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, D.T.; Lucchini, J.F; Rittmann, B.E.; Songkasiri, W.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The results of a concurrent experimental and modeling study to investigate the bio-reduction of higher-valent plutonium and neptunium by Shewanella alga strain BrY are presented. S. Alga, as a facultative metal reducer, is representative of bacteria that will be important in defining the mobility of plutonium and neptunium species as they migrate from oxic to anoxic zones. This is also an important consideration in defining the long-term stability of bio-precipitated 'immobilized' plutonium phases under changing redox conditions in biologically active systems and subsequently the effectiveness of remediation/containment approaches used for bio-remediation. Neptunium (VI) is readily reduced in groundwaters by many organics. In biologically active systems, it is unlikely, for this reason, that this oxidation state of neptunium will be important. Under all conditions investigated, neptunium (V) was reduced to neptunium (IV) when anaerobic conditions were established for a wide variety of electron donors. This was evidences by 3-4 orders of magnitude reduction in solution concentration and confirmed by XANES analysis. This led to high bio-association and/or precipitation of the neptunium. Plutonium (VI), as was the case with neptunium (VI) was reduced by the organics typically present in biologically active systems. Analogous bio-reduction experiments with plutonium (V) and plutonium (VI) are in progress and are expected to show that bio-reduction will predominate under anaerobic conditions, as was the case with neptunium. These results for neptunium and plutonium show S. Alga to be an effective microbe for the bio-reduction, and consequently the immobilization, of these important actinide contaminants. (authors)

  13. [Effects of iron on azoreduction by Shewanella decolorationis S12].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xing-Juan; Xu, Mei-Ying; Sun, Guo-Ping

    2010-01-01

    The effects of soluble and insoluble Fe(III) on anaerobic azoreduction by Shewanella decolorationis S12 were examined in a series of experiments. Results showed that the effects of iron on anaerobic azoreduction depended on the solubility and concentration of the compounds. Azoreduction was inhibited by insoluble Fe(III) and 0.05-2 mmol/L Fe2 O3 all decelerated the azoreduction activity of 0.2 mmol/L amaranth, but the increase in the concentrations of Fe2O3 did not cause an increasing inhibition. Soluble Fe(III) of which concentration less than 0.4 mmol/L enhanced azoreduction activity of 0.2 mmol/L amaranth but there was no linear relationship between the concentration of soluble Fe(III) and azoreduction activity. Soluble Fe(III) of which concentration more than 1 mmol/L inhibited azoreduction activity of 0.2 mmol/L amaranth and an increasing concentration resulted in an increased inhibition. The inhibition was strengthened under the conditions of limited electron donor. On the other hand, soluble Fe(III) and Fe(II) could relieve the inhibition of azoreduction by dicumarol which blocked quinone cycle. It suggests that in addition to quinone cycle, there is a Fe(III) Fe(II) cycle shuttling electrons in cytoplasmic and periplasmic environment. That is the reason why low concentration of soluble Fe(III) or Fe (II) can enhance azoreduction of S. decolorationis S12. It also indicates that insoluble Fe(III) and high concentration of soluble Fe(III) do compete with azo dye for electrons once it acts as electron acceptor. Thus, when iron and azo dye coexisted, iron could serve as an electron transfer agent or electron competitive inhibitor for anaerobic azoreduction under different conditions. High efficiency of azoreduction can be achieved through controlling the solubility and concentration of irons.

  14. Current trends of human infections and antibiotic resistance of the genus Shewanella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousfi, K; Bekal, S; Usongo, V; Touati, A

    2017-08-01

    Shewanella spp. are commonly known as environmental bacteria and are most frequently isolated from aquatic areas. Currently, diseases syndromes and multidrug resistance have increasingly been reported in the genus Shewanella. Some species are associated with various infections, such as skin and soft tissue infections, as well as bacteremia. Generally, these bacteria are opportunistic and mostly affect people with an impaired immune system. This genus is also a probable vehicle and progenitor of antibiotic resistance genes. In fact, several resistance genes and mobile genetic elements have been identified in some resistant species isolated from environmental or clinical settings. These genes confer resistance to different antibiotic classes, including those used in therapies such as β-lactams and quinolones, and are generally located on the chromosome. Recently, a multidrug-resistant (MDR) plasmid harboring several drug resistance genes associated with transposons and integrons has been identified in Shewanella xiamenensis. These antibiotic resistance genes can circulate in the environment and contribute to the emergence of antibiotic resistance. This review describes different aspects of Shewanella, focusing on the infections caused by this genus, as well as their role in the propagation of antibiotic resistance via mobile genetic elements.

  15. Microbial metal reduction by members of the genus Shewanella: novel strategies for anaerobic respiration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dichristina, Thomas; Bates, David J.; Burns, Justin L.; Dale, Jason R.; Payne, Amanda N.

    2006-01-01

    Metal-reducing members of the genus Shewanella are important components of the microbial community residing in redox-stratified freshwater and marine environments. Metal-reducing gram-negative bacteria such as Shewanella, however, are presented with a unique physiological challenge: they are required to respire anaerobically on terminal electron acceptors which are either highly insoluble (Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-oxides) and reduced to soluble end-products or highly soluble (U(VI) and Tc(VII)) and reduced to insoluble end-products. To overcome physiological problems associated with metal solubility, metal-respiring Shewanella are postulated to employ a variety of novel respiratory strategies not found in other gram-negative bacteria which respire on soluble electron acceptors such as O2, NO3 and SO4. The following chapter highlights the latest findings on the molecular mechanism of Fe(III), U(VI) and Tc(VII) reduction by Shewanella, with particular emphasis on electron transport chain physiology.

  16. Biological characteristics and pathogenicity of a highly pathogenic Shewanella marisflavi infected sea cucumber (Apostichopus uaponicus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewanella marisflavi isolate AP629 was characterized as a novel pathogen of sea cucumber. The LD50 values (14 days) in sea cucumber and swordtail fish were 3.89 × 106 and 4.85 × 104 CFU g-1 body weight, respectively. Studies on S. marisflavi had been conducted, including morphology, physiological a...

  17. Treatment Failure Due to Emergence of Resistance to Carbapenem during Therapy for Shewanella algae Bacteremia

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Dong-Min; Kang, Cheol-In; Lee, Chang Seop; Kim, Hong-Bin; Kim, Eui-Chong; Kim, Nam Joong; Oh, Myoung-don; Choe, Kang-Won

    2006-01-01

    We describe a case of bacteremia due to imipenem-susceptible Shewanella algae. Despite treatment with imipenem, the patient developed a spinal epidural abscess, from which imipenem-resistant S. algae was isolated. The development of resistance should be monitored when S. algae infection is treated with imipenem, even though the strain is initially susceptible to imipenem.

  18. Comparative genomic reconstruction of transcriptional networks controlling central metabolism in the Shewanella genus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovaleva Galina

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-scale prediction of gene regulation and reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria is one of the critical tasks of modern genomics. The Shewanella genus is comprised of metabolically versatile gamma-proteobacteria, whose lifestyles and natural environments are substantially different from Escherichia coli and other model bacterial species. The comparative genomics approaches and computational identification of regulatory sites are useful for the in silico reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria. Results To explore conservation and variations in the Shewanella transcriptional networks we analyzed the repertoire of transcription factors and performed genomics-based reconstruction and comparative analysis of regulons in 16 Shewanella genomes. The inferred regulatory network includes 82 transcription factors and their DNA binding sites, 8 riboswitches and 6 translational attenuators. Forty five regulons were newly inferred from the genome context analysis, whereas others were propagated from previously characterized regulons in the Enterobacteria and Pseudomonas spp.. Multiple variations in regulatory strategies between the Shewanella spp. and E. coli include regulon contraction and expansion (as in the case of PdhR, HexR, FadR, numerous cases of recruiting non-orthologous regulators to control equivalent pathways (e.g. PsrA for fatty acid degradation and, conversely, orthologous regulators to control distinct pathways (e.g. TyrR, ArgR, Crp. Conclusions We tentatively defined the first reference collection of ~100 transcriptional regulons in 16 Shewanella genomes. The resulting regulatory network contains ~600 regulated genes per genome that are mostly involved in metabolism of carbohydrates, amino acids, fatty acids, vitamins, metals, and stress responses. Several reconstructed regulons including NagR for N-acetylglucosamine catabolism were experimentally validated in S

  19. Shewanella loihica sp. nov., isolated from iron-rich microbial mats in the Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Haichun; Obraztova, Anna; Stewart, Nathan; Popa, Radu; Fredrickson, James K; Tiedje, James M; Nealson, Kenneth H; Zhou, Jizhong

    2006-08-01

    A novel marine bacterial strain, PV-4(T), isolated from a microbial mat located at a hydrothermal vent of Loihi Seamount in the Pacific Ocean, has been characterized. This micro-organism is orangey in colour, Gram-negative, polarly flagellated, facultatively anaerobic and psychrotolerant (temperature range, 0-42 degrees C). No growth was observed with nitrate, nitrite, DMSO or thiosulfate as the electron acceptor and lactate as the electron donor. The major fatty acid detected in strain PV-4(T) was iso-C(15 : 0). Strain PV-4(T) had ubiquinones consisting mainly of Q-7 and Q-8, and possessed menaquinone MK-7. The DNA G+C content of the strain was 53.8 mol% and the genome size was about 4.5 Mbp. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences placed PV-4(T) within the genus Shewanella. PV-4(T) exhibited 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity levels of 99.6 and 97.5 %, respectively, with respect to the type strains of Shewanella aquimarina and Shewanella marisflavi. DNA from strain PV-4(T) showed low mean levels of relatedness to the DNAs of S. aquimarina (50.5 %) and S. marisflavi (8.5 %). On the basis of phylogenetic and phenotypic characteristics, the bacterium was classified in the genus Shewanella within a distinct novel species, for which the name Shewanella loihica sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is PV-4(T) (=ATCC BAA-1088(T)=DSM 17748(T)).

  20. 2-Nitrophenol reduction promoted by S. putrefaciens 200 and biogenic ferrous iron: The role of different size-fractions of dissolved organic matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Zhenke [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agricultural Environment Pollution Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environmental and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Tao, Liang, E-mail: taoliang@soil.gd.cn [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agricultural Environment Pollution Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environmental and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Li, Fangbai, E-mail: cefbli@soil.gd.cn [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agricultural Environment Pollution Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environmental and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China)

    2014-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Dissolved organic matter (DOM) act as electron shuttle in redox reactions. • Different molecular weight DOM fractions have different electron transfer capacity. • A higher electron transfer capacities value indicates a higher reduction rate. • DOM transfer electron from S. putrefaciens 200 to 2-nitrophenol (2-NP) and Fe(III). • DOM and biogenic Fe(II) synergistically enhanced the 2-NP reductive transformation. - Abstract: The reduction of nitroaromatic compounds (listed as a priority pollutant) in natural subsurface environments typically coexists with dissimilatory reduction of iron oxides effected by dissolved organic matter (DOM). Investigating the impact of the DOM that influences those reduction processes is crucial for understanding and predicting the geochemical fate of these environmental species. This study investigated the impact of different molecular weight DOM fractions (DMWDs) on the 2-nitrophenol (2-NP) reduction by S. putrefaciens 200 (SP200) and α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} with lactate (excluding electron donor interference). Kinetic measurements demonstrated that 2-NP reduction rates were affected by the redox reactivity of active species under DMWDs (denoted as L-DOM, M-DOM, and H-DOM). The enhanced reduction rates are consistent with the negative shifts in peak oxidation potential values, the increases in HA-like/FA-like values, aromaticity index values and electron transfer capacity values. L-DOM acted mainly as ligands to complex Fe(II), whereas the significant role of H-DOM in reductive reactions should be acting as an electron shuttle, transferring electrons from SP200 to Fe(III) and 2-NP and from biogenic Fe(II) to 2-NP, further accelerating the 2-NP reductions. Those observations provide valuable insights into the role of DOM in the biogeochemical redox processes and the remediation of contaminated soil in a natural environment.

  1. Purification and characterization of two new cell-bound bioactive compounds produced by wild Lactococcus lactis strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, Margarete Alice Fontes; Brede, Dag Anders; Nes, Ingolf Figved; Baracat-Pereira, Maria Cristina; de Queiroz, Marisa Vieira; de Moraes, Célia Alencar

    2017-07-03

    Novel compounds and innovative methods are required considering that antibiotic resistance has reached a crisis point. In the study, two cell-bound antimicrobial compounds produced by Lactococcus lactis ID1.5 were isolated and partially characterized. Following purification by cationic exchange and a solid-phase C18 column, antimicrobial activity was recovered after three runs of RPC using 60% (v/v) and 100% (v/v) of 2-propanol for elution, suggesting that more than one antimicrobial compound were produced by L. lactis ID1.5, which were in this study called compounds AI and AII. The mass spectrum of AI and AII showed major intensity ions at m/z 1070.05 and 955.9 Da, respectively. The compound AI showed a spectrum of antimicrobial activity mainly against L. lactis species, while the organisms most sensitive to compound AII were Bacillus subtilis, Listeria innocua, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The antimicrobial activity of both compounds was suppressed by treatment with Tween 80. Nevertheless, both compounds showed high stability to heat and proteases treatments. The isolated compounds, AI and AII, showed distinct properties from other antimicrobial substances already reported as produced by L. lactis, and have a significant inhibitory effect against two clinically important respiratory pathogens. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Molecular characterization and bioactivity profile of the tropical sponge-associated bacterium Shewanella algae VCDB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachanamol, R. S.; Lipton, A. P.; Thankamani, V.; Sarika, A. R.; Selvin, J.

    2014-06-01

    The pigmented, rod-shaped, Gram-negative, motile bacteria isolated from marine sponge Callyspongia diffusa exhibiting bioactivity was characterized as Shewanella algae (GenBank: KC623651). The 16S rRNA gene sequence-based phylogenetic analysis showed its similarity with the member of Shewanella and placed in a separate cluster with the recognized bacteria S. algae (PSB-05 FJ86678) with which it showed 99.0 % sequence similarity. Growth of the strain was optimum at temperature 30 °C, pH 8.0 in the presence of 2.0-4.0 % of NaCl. High antibiotic activity against microbes such as Escherichia coli (MTCC 40), S. typhii (MTCC 98), P. vulgaris (MTCC 426), V. fluvialis, V. anguillarum, E. cloacae, and L. lactis was recorded. The growth of fungal pathogens such as Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus fumigatus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides was effectively controlled.

  3. Influence of riboflavin on the reduction of radionuclides by Shewanella oneidenis MR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkouk, Andrea; Law, Gareth T W; Rizoulis, Athanasios; Law, Katie; Renshaw, Joanna C; Morris, Katherine; Livens, Francis R; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2016-03-28

    Uranium (as UO2(2+)), technetium (as TcO4(-)) and neptunium (as NpO2(+)) are highly mobile radionuclides that can be reduced enzymatically by a range of anaerobic and facultatively anaerobic microorganisms, including Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, to poorly soluble species. The redox chemistry of Pu is more complicated, but the dominant oxidation state in most environments is highly insoluble Pu(IV), which can be reduced to Pu(III) which has a potentially increased solubility which could enhance migration of Pu in the environment. Recently it was shown that flavins (riboflavin and flavin mononucleotide (FMN)) secreted by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can act as electron shuttles, promoting anoxic growth coupled to the accelerated reduction of poorly-crystalline Fe(III) oxides. Here, we studied the role of riboflavin in mediating the reduction of radionuclides in cultures of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Our results demonstrate that the addition of 10 μM riboflavin enhances the reduction rate of Tc(VII) to Tc(IV), Pu(IV) to Pu(III) and to a lesser extent, Np(V) to Np(IV), but has no significant influence on the reduction rate of U(VI) by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Thus riboflavin can act as an extracellular electron shuttle to enhance rates of Tc(VII), Np(V) and Pu(IV) reduction, and may therefore play a role in controlling the oxidation state of key redox active actinides and fission products in natural and engineered environments. These results also suggest that the addition of riboflavin could be used to accelerate the bioremediation of radionuclide-contaminated environments.

  4. Contribution of Extracellular Polymeric Substances from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 Biofilms to U(VI) Immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Bin; Ahmed, B.; Kennedy, David W.; Wang, Zheming; Shi, Liang; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Isern, Nancy G.; Majors, Paul D.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2011-06-05

    The goal of this study was to quantify the contribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in U(VI) immobilization by Shewanella sp. HRCR-1. Through comparison of U(VI) immobilization using cells with bound EPS (bEPS) and cells without EPS, we showed that i) bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms contributed significantly to U(VI) immobilization, especially at low initial U(VI) concentrations, through both sorption and reduction; ii) bEPS could be considered as a functional extension of the cells for U(VI) immobilization and they likely play more important roles at initial U(VI) concentrations; and iii) U(VI) reduction efficiency was found to be dependent upon initial U(VI) concentration and the efficiency decreased at lower concentrations. To quantify relative contribution of sorption and reduction in U(VI) immobilization by EPS fractions, we isolated loosely associated EPS (laEPS) and bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms grown in a hollow fiber membrane biofilm reactor and tested their reactivity with U(V). We found that, when in reduced form, the isolated cell-free EPS fractions could reduce U(VI). Polysaccharides in the EPS likely contributed to U(VI) sorption and dominated reactivity of laEPS while redox active components (e.g., outer membrane c-type cytochromes), especially in bEPS, might facilitate U(VI) reduction.

  5. Molecular underpinnings of nitrite effect on CymA-dependent respiration in Shewanella oneidensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao Jin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella exhibit a remarkable versatility of respiration, with a diverse array of electron acceptors (EAs. In environments where these bacteria thrive, multiple EAs are usually present. However, we know little about strategies by which these EAs and their interaction affect ecophysiology of Shewanella. In this study, we demonstrate in the model strain, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, that nitrite, not through nitric oxide to which it may convert, inhibits respiration of fumarate, and probably many other EAs whose reduction depends on quinol dehydrogenase CymA. This is achieved via the repression of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP production, a second messenger required for activation of cAMP-receptor protein (Crp which plays a primary role in regulation of respiration. If nitrite is not promptly removed, intracellular cAMP levels drop, and this impairs Crp activity. As a result, the production of nitrite reductase NrfA, CymA, and fumarate reductase FccA is substantially reduced. In contrast, nitrite can be simultaneously respired with trimethylamine N-oxide, resulting in enhanced biomass.

  6. Contribution of extracellular polymeric substances from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms to U(VI) immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Bin; Ahmed, Bulbul; Kennedy, David W; Wang, Zheming; Shi, Liang; Marshall, Matthew J; Fredrickson, Jim K; Isern, Nancy G; Majors, Paul D; Beyenal, Haluk

    2011-07-01

    The goal of this study was to quantify the contribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) to U(VI) immobilization by Shewanella sp. HRCR-1. Through comparison of U(VI) immobilization using cells with bound EPS (bEPS) and cells with minimal EPS, we show that (i) bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms contribute significantly to U(VI) immobilization, especially at low initial U(VI) concentrations, through both sorption and reduction; (ii) bEPS can be considered a functional extension of the cells for U(VI) immobilization and they likely play more important roles at lower initial U(VI) concentrations; and (iii) the U(VI) reduction efficiency is dependent upon the initial U(VI) concentration and decreases at lower concentrations. To quantify the relative contributions of sorption and reduction to U(VI) immobilization by EPS fractions, we isolated loosely associated EPS (laEPS) and bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms grown in a hollow fiber membrane biofilm reactor and tested their reactivity with U(VI). We found that, when reduced, the isolated cell-free EPS fractions could reduce U(VI). Polysaccharides in the EPS likely contributed to U(VI) sorption and dominated the reactivity of laEPS, while redox active components (e.g., outer membrane c-type cytochromes), especially in bEPS, possibly facilitated U(VI) reduction.

  7. Whole-genome sequencing reveals that Shewanella haliotis Kim et al. 2007 can be considered a later heterotypic synonym of Shewanella algae Simidu et al. 1990.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeinbaum, Nadia; Kellum, Cailin E; Glass, Jennifer B; Janda, J Michael; DiChristina, Thomas J

    2018-04-01

    Previously, experimental DNA-DNA hybridization (DDH) between Shewanellahaliotis JCM 14758 T and Shewanellaalgae JCM 21037 T had suggested that the two strains could be considered different species, despite minimal phenotypic differences. The recent isolation of Shewanella sp. MN-01, with 99 % 16S rRNA gene identity to S. algae and S. haliotis, revealed a potential taxonomic problem between these two species. In this study, we reassessed the nomenclature of S. haliotis and S. algae using available whole-genome sequences. The whole-genome sequence of S. haliotis JCM 14758 T and ten S. algae strains showed ≥97.7 % average nucleotide identity and >78.9 % digital DDH, clearly above the recommended species thresholds. According to the rules of priority and in view of the results obtained, S. haliotis is to be considered a later heterotypic synonym of S. algae. Because the whole-genome sequence of Shewanella sp. strain MN-01 shares >99 % ANI with S. algae JCM 14758 T , it can be confidently identified as S. algae.

  8. Structures, Compositions, and Activities of Live Shewanella Biofilms Formed on Graphite Electrodes in Electrochemical Flow Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitayama, Miho; Koga, Ryota; Kasai, Takuya; Kouzuma, Atsushi; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2017-09-01

    An electrochemical flow cell equipped with a graphite working electrode (WE) at the bottom was inoculated with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 expressing an anaerobic fluorescent protein, and biofilm formation on the WE was observed over time during current generation at WE potentials of +0.4 and 0 V (versus standard hydrogen electrodes), under electrolyte-flow conditions. Electrochemical analyses suggested the presence of unique electron-transfer mechanisms in the +0.4-V biofilm. Microscopic analyses revealed that, in contrast to aerobic biofilms, current-generating biofilm (at +0.4 V) was thin and flat (∼10 μm in thickness), and cells were evenly and densely distributed in the biofilm. In contrast, cells were unevenly distributed in biofilm formed at 0 V. In situ fluorescence staining and biofilm recovery experiments showed that the amounts of extracellular polysaccharides (EPSs) in the +0.4-V biofilm were much smaller than those in the aerobic and 0-V biofilms, suggesting that Shewanella cells suppress the production of EPSs at +0.4 V under flow conditions. We suggest that Shewanella cells perceive electrode potentials and modulate the structure and composition of biofilms to efficiently transfer electrons to electrodes. IMPORTANCE A promising application of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) is to save energy in wastewater treatment. Since current is generated in these MFCs by biofilm microbes under horizontal flows of wastewater, it is important to understand the mechanisms for biofilm formation and current generation under water-flow conditions. Although massive work has been done to analyze the molecular mechanisms for current generation by model exoelectrogenic bacteria, such as Shewanella oneidensis , limited information is available regarding the formation of current-generating biofilms over time under water-flow conditions. The present study developed electrochemical flow cells and used them to examine the electrochemical and structural features of current

  9. Effects of Cd on reductive transformation of lepidocrocite by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chaolei Yuan; Fangbai Li; Rui Han; Tongxu Liu; Weimin Sun; Weilin Huang

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the reduction of lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in the presence and absence of Cd.The results showed that Cd2+ retarded microbial reduction of γ-FeOOH and avoided formation of magnetite.The inhibitory effect on γ-FeOOH transformation may not result from Cd2+ toxicity to the bacterium;it rather was probably due to competitive adsorption between Cd2+ and Fe2+ on γ-FeOOH as its surface reduction catalyzed by adsorbed Fe2+ was eliminated by adsorption of Cd2+.

  10. Cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of dihydrodipicolinate synthase from the psychrophile Shewanella benthica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wubben, Jacinta M.; Dogovski, Con; Dobson, Renwick C. J.; Codd, Rachel; Gerrard, Juliet A.; Parker, Michael W.; Perugini, Matthew A.

    2010-01-01

    Dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS) is an essential oligomeric enzyme of interest to antibiotic discovery research and studies probing the importance of quaternary structure to protein function, stability and dynamics. The cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of DHDPS from the psychrophilic (cold-dwelling) bacterium Shewanella benthica are described. Dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS) is an oligomeric enzyme that catalyzes the first committed step of the lysine-biosynthesis pathway in plants and bacteria, which yields essential building blocks for cell-wall and protein synthesis. DHDPS is therefore of interest to drug-discovery research as well as to studies that probe the importance of quaternary structure to protein function, stability and dynamics. Accordingly, DHDPS from the psychrophilic (cold-dwelling) organism Shewanella benthica (Sb-DHDPS) was cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized. The best crystals of Sb-DHDPS were grown in 200 mM ammonium sulfate, 100 mM bis-tris pH 5.0–6.0, 23–26%(w/v) PEG 3350, 0.02%(w/v) sodium azide and diffracted to beyond 2.5 Å resolution. Processing of diffraction data to 2.5 Å resolution resulted in a unit cell with space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 and dimensions a = 73.1, b = 84.0, c = 143.7 Å. These studies of the first DHDPS enzyme to be characterized from a bacterial psychrophile will provide insight into the molecular evolution of enzyme structure and dynamics

  11. Electrochemical characteristics of Shewanella loihica on carbon nanotubes-modified graphite surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Epifanio, Monica; Marsili, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • We deposited CNT coatings on graphite electrode by electrophoretic deposition. • CNT coating increased extracellular electron transfer in Shewanella loihica biofilms. • Thick electroactive biofilms hinder the electroactivity of CNT coatings. -- Abstract: High specific surface and electrocatalytic activity of the electrode surface favour extracellular electron transfer from electrochemically active biofilms to polarized electrodes. We coated layer-by-layer carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on graphite electrodes through electrophoretic deposition, thus increasing the electrocatalytic activity. After determining the optimal number of CNT layers through electrochemical methods, we grew Shewanella loihica PV-4 biofilms on the CNT-coated electrodes to quantify the increase in extracellular electron transfer rate compared with unmodified electrodes. Current density on CNT-modified electrodes was 1.7 times higher than that observed on unmodified electrodes after 48 h from inoculation. Rapid microbial cells attachment on CNT-coated electrodes, as determined from scanning electronic microscopy, explained the rapid increase of the current. Also, the CNT reduced the charge transfer resistance of the graphite electrodes, as measured by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy. However, the electrocatalytic activity of the CNT-coated electrode decreased as the biofilm grew thicker and covered the CNT-coating. These result confirmed that surface-modified electrodes improve the electron transfer rate in thin biofilms (<5 μm), but are not feasible for power production in microbial fuel cells, where the biofilm thickness is much higher

  12. Multi-heme Cytochromes in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1: Structures, functions and opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breuer, Marian; Rosso, Kevin M.; Blumberger, Jochen; Butt, Julea N.

    2014-11-05

    Multi-heme cytochromes are employed by a range of microorganisms to transport electrons over distances of up to tens of nanometers. Perhaps the most spectacular utilization of these proteins is in the reduction of extracellular solid substrates, including electrodes and insoluble mineral oxides of Fe(III) and Mn(III/IV), by species of Shewanella and Geobacter. However, multi-heme cytochromes are found in numerous and phylogenetically diverse prokaryotes where they participate in electron transfer and redox catalysis that contributes to biogeochemical cycling of N, S and Fe on the global scale. These properties of multi-heme cytochromes have attracted much interest and contributed to advances in bioenergy applications and bioremediation of contaminated soils. Looking forward there are opportunities to engage multi-heme cytochromes for biological photovoltaic cells, microbial electrosynthesis and developing bespoke molecular devices. As a consequence it is timely to review our present understanding of these proteins and we do this here with a focus on the multitude of functionally diverse multi-heme cytochromes in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. We draw on findings from experimental and computational approaches which ideally complement each other in the study of these systems: computational methods can interpret experimentally determined properties in terms of molecular structure to cast light on the relation between structure and function. We show how this synergy has contributed to our understanding of multi-heme cytochromes and can be expected to continue to do so for greater insight into natural processes and their informed exploitation in biotechnologies.

  13. Shewanella algae infection after surgical treatment of Haglund's heel and rupture of the Achilles tendon.] [Article in Danish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Malene

    2014-01-01

    This is a case report of soft tissue infection with the marine bacterium Shewanella algae that is rare in Denmark. The patient was a 43-year-old male and he was treated surgically for Haglund's heel, a bony protrusion at the calcaneus. After clinical healing the patient suffered a rupture...

  14. Programming the quorum sensing-based AND gate in Shewanella oneidensis for logic gated-microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yidan; Yang, Yun; Katz, Evgeny; Song, Hao

    2015-03-11

    An AND logic gate based on a synthetic quorum-sensing (QS) module was constructed in a Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 mtrA knockout mutant. The presence of two input signals activated the expression of a periplasmic decaheme cytochrome MtrA to regenerate the extracellular electron transfer conduit, enabling the construction of AND-gated microbial fuel cells.

  15. Distribution and Genetic Characteristics of SXT/R391 Integrative Conjugative Elements in Shewanella spp. From China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujie Fang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The genus Shewanella consists of facultatively anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria, which are regarded as potential agents of food contamination and opportunistic human pathogens. Information about the distribution and genetic characteristics of SXT/R391 integrative conjugative elements (ICEs in Shewanella species is limited. Here, 91 Shewanella strains collected from diverse samples in China were studied for the presence of SXT/R391 ICEs. Three positive strains, classified as Shewanella upenei, were obtained from patients and water from a local mill. In light of their close clonal relationships and high sequence similarity, a representative ICE was selected and designated ICESupCHN110003. The BLASTn searches against GenBank showed that ICEVchBan5 was most closely related to ICESupCHN110003, with the coverage of 76% and identity of 99%. The phylogenetic tree of concatenated core genes demonstrated that ICESupCHN110003 formed a distinct branch outside the cluster comprising ICEValA056-1, ICEPmiCHN2410, and ICEPmiChn1. Comparison of the genetic structures revealed that ICESupCHN110003 encoded uncommon genes in hotspots, such as specific type III restriction-modification system, conferring adaptive functions to the host. Based on the low coverage in the sequence analysis, independent clade in the phylogenetic tree, and unique inserted fragments in hotspots, ICESupCHN110003 represented a novel SXT/R391 element, which widened the list of ICEs. Furthermore, the antibiotic resistance genes floR, strA, strB, and sul2 in ICESupCHN110003 and resistance to multiple drugs of the positive isolates were detected. A cross-species transfer capability of the SXT/R391 ICEs was also discovered. In summary, it is necessary to reinforce continuous surveillance of SXT/R391 ICEs in the genus Shewanella.

  16. Identification of Shewanella baltica as the most important H2S-producing species during iced storage of danish marine fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Birte Fonnesbech; Venkateswaran, K.; Satomi, M.

    2005-01-01

    are important in fish spoilage. More than 500 H2S-producing strains were isolated from iced stored marine fish (cod, plaice, and flounder) caught in the Baltic Sea during winter or summer time. All strains were identified as Shewanella species by phenotypic tests. Different Shewanella species were present...... unchanged (i.e., trimethylamine-N-oxide reduction and H2S production); however, the main H2S-producing organism was identified as S. baltica....

  17. Invariability of Central Metabolic Flux Distribution in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Under Environmental or Genetic Perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yinjie; Martin, Hector Garcia; Deutschbauer, Adam; Feng, Xueyang; Huang, Rick; Llora, Xavier; Arkin, Adam; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-04-21

    An environmentally important bacterium with versatile respiration, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, displayed significantly different growth rates under three culture conditions: minimal medium (doubling time {approx} 3 hrs), salt stressed minimal medium (doubling time {approx} 6 hrs), and minimal medium with amino acid supplementation (doubling time {approx}1.5 hrs). {sup 13}C-based metabolic flux analysis indicated that fluxes of central metabolic reactions remained relatively constant under the three growth conditions, which is in stark contrast to the reported significant changes in the transcript and metabolite profiles under various growth conditions. Furthermore, ten transposon mutants of S. oneidensis MR-1 were randomly chosen from a transposon library and their flux distributions through central metabolic pathways were revealed to be identical, even though such mutational processes altered the secondary metabolism, for example, glycine and C1 (5,10-Me-THF) metabolism.

  18. Isolation of Shewanella algae from rectal swabs of patients with bloody diarrhoea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Nath

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella algae is an emerging bacteria rarely implicated as a human pathogen. It was infrequently recovered from clinical specimens probably because of inadequate processing of non-fermenting oxidase-positive gram-negative bacilli. We report here isolation of S. algae in pure culture and mixed with E. coli from two cases of acute gastroenteritis with bloody mucous containing diarrhea occurring at the same time. As this organism is not a normal flora of the gut, the possible source of infection may be fish contaminated with the organism. Whether this bacterium can be considered an enteric pathogen needs to be evaluated. The cases were clinically diagnosed as acute bacillary dysentery. The bacterium was identified by 16S r-RNA gene sequence analysis.

  19. Evolution of Cell Size Homeostasis and Growth Rate Diversity during Initial Surface Colonization of Shewanella oneidensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Calvin K; Kim, Alexander J; Santos, Giancarlo S; Lai, Peter Y; Lee, Stella Y; Qiao, David F; Anda, Jaime De; Young, Thomas D; Chen, Yujie; Rowe, Annette R; Nealson, Kenneth H; Weiss, Paul S; Wong, Gerard C L

    2016-09-06

    Cell size control and homeostasis are fundamental features of bacterial metabolism. Recent work suggests that cells add a constant size between birth and division ("adder" model). However, it is not known how cell size homeostasis is influenced by the existence of heterogeneous microenvironments, such as those during biofilm formation. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can use diverse energy sources on a range of surfaces via extracellular electron transport (EET), which can impact growth, metabolism, and size diversity. Here, we track bacterial surface communities at single-cell resolution to show that not only do bacterial motility appendages influence the transition from two- to three-dimensional biofilm growth and control postdivisional cell fates, they strongly impact cell size homeostasis. For every generation, we find that the average growth rate for cells that stay on the surface and continue to divide (nondetaching population) and that for cells that detach before their next division (detaching population) are roughly constant. However, the growth rate distribution is narrow for the nondetaching population, but broad for the detaching population in each generation. Interestingly, the appendage deletion mutants (ΔpilA, ΔmshA-D, Δflg) have significantly broader growth rate distributions than that of the wild type for both detaching and nondetaching populations, which suggests that Shewanella appendages are important for sensing and integrating environmental inputs that contribute to size homeostasis. Moreover, our results suggest multiplexing of appendages for sensing and motility functions contributes to cell size dysregulation. These results can potentially provide a framework for generating metabolic diversity in S. oneidensis populations to optimize EET in heterogeneous environments.

  20. Reconstruction of Extracellular Respiratory Pathways for Iron(III Reduction in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan eCoursolle

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 is a facultative anaerobic bacterium capable of respiring a multitude of electron acceptors, many of which require the Mtr respiratory pathway. The core Mtr respiratory pathway includes a periplasmic c-type cytochrome (MtrA, an integral outer membrane β-barrel protein (MtrB and an outer membrane-anchored c-type cytochrome (MtrC. Together, these components facilitate transfer of electrons from the c-type cytochrome CymA in the cytoplasmic membrane to electron acceptors at and beyond the outer membrane. The genes encoding these core proteins have paralogs in the S. oneidensis genome (mtrB and mtrA each have four while mtrC has three and some of the paralogs of mtrC and mtrA are able to form functional Mtr complexes. We demonstrate that of the additional three mtrB paralogs found in the S. oneidensis genome, only MtrE can replace MtrB to form a functional respiratory pathway to soluble iron(III citrate. We also evaluate which mtrC / mtrA paralog pairs (a total of 12 combinations are able to form functional complexes with endogenous levels of mtrB paralog expression. Finally, we reconstruct all possible functional Mtr complexes and test them in a S. oneidensis mutant strain where all paralogs have been eliminated from the genome. We find that each combination tested with the exception of MtrA / MtrE / OmcA is able to reduce iron(III citrate at a level significantly above background. The results presented here have implications towards the evolution of anaerobic extracellular respiration in Shewanella and for future studies looking to increase the rates of substrate reduction for water treatment, bioremediation, or electricity production.

  1. Whole genome sequence to decipher the resistome of Shewanella algae, a multidrug-resistant bacterium responsible for pneumonia, Marseille, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimmino, Teresa; Olaitan, Abiola Olumuyiwa; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2016-01-01

    We characterize and decipher the resistome and the virulence factors of Shewanella algae MARS 14, a multidrug-resistant clinical strain using the whole genome sequencing (WGS) strategy. The bacteria were isolated from the bronchoalveolar lavage of a hospitalized patient in the Timone Hospital in Marseille, France who developed pneumonia after plunging into the Mediterranean Sea. The genome size of S. algae MARS 14 was 5,005,710 bp with 52.8% guanine cytosine content. The resistome includes members of class C and D beta-lactamases and numerous multidrug-efflux pumps. We also found the presence of several hemolysins genes, a complete flagellum system gene cluster and genes responsible for biofilm formation. Moreover, we reported for the first time in a clinical strain of Shewanella spp. the presence of a bacteriocin (marinocin). The WGS analysis of this pathogen provides insight into its virulence factors and resistance to antibiotics.

  2. Molecular Phylogenetic Exploration of Bacterial Diversity in a Bakreshwar (India) Hot Spring and Culture of Shewanella-Related Thermophiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Dhritiman; Bal, Bijay; Kashyap, V. K.; Pal, Subrata

    2003-01-01

    The bacterial diversity of a hot spring in Bakreshwar, India, was investigated by a culture-independent approach. 16S ribosomal DNA clones derived from the sediment samples were found to be associated with gamma-Proteobacteria, cyanobacteria, and green nonsulfur and low-GC gram-positive bacteria. The first of the above phylotypes cobranches with Shewanella, a well-known iron reducer. This phylogenetic correlation has been exploited to develop culture conditions for thermophilic iron-reducing microorganisms. PMID:12839826

  3. Iron Triggers λSo Prophage Induction and Release of Extracellular DNA in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Binnenkade, Lucas; Teichmann, Laura; Thormann, Kai M.

    2014-01-01

    Prophages are ubiquitous elements within bacterial chromosomes and affect host physiology and ecology in multiple ways. We have previously demonstrated that phage-induced lysis is required for extracellular DNA (eDNA) release and normal biofilm formation in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Here, we investigated the regulatory mechanisms of prophage λSo spatiotemporal induction in biofilms. To this end, we used a functional fluorescence fusion to monitor λSo activation in various mutant backgrounds...

  4. Homogentisic acid is the product of MelA, which mediates melanogenesis in the marine bacterium Shewanella colwelliana D.

    OpenAIRE

    Coon, S L; Kotob, S; Jarvis, B B; Wang, S; Fuqua, W C; Weiner, R M

    1994-01-01

    Shewanella colwelliana D is a marine procaryote which produces a diffusible brown pigment that correlates with melA gene expression. Previously, melA had been cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli; however, the reaction product of MelA had not been identified. This report identifies that product as homogentisic acid, provides evidence that the pigment is homogentisic acid-melanin (pyomelanin), and suggests that MelA is p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate hydroxylase. This is the first repo...

  5. The marine bacteria Shewanella frigidimarina NCIMB400 upregulates the type VI secretion system during early biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Denis; Jean, Natacha; Van Overtvelt, Perrine; Ouidir, Tassadit; Hardouin, Julie; Blache, Yves; Molmeret, Maëlle

    2016-02-01

    Shewanella sp. are facultative anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria, extensively studied for their electron transfer ability. Shewanella frigidimarina has been detected and isolated from marine environments, and in particular, from biofilms. However, its ability to adhere to surfaces and form a biofilm is poorly understood. In this study, we show that the ability to adhere and to form a biofilm of S. frigidimarina NCIMB400 is significantly higher than that of Shewanella oneidensis in our conditions. We also show that this strain forms a biofilm in artificial seawater, whereas in Luria-Bertani, this capacity is reduced. To identify proteins involved in early biofilm formation, a proteomic analysis of sessile versus planktonic membrane-enriched fractions allowed the identification of several components of the same type VI secretion system gene cluster: putative Hcp1 and ImpB proteins as well as a forkhead-associated domain-containing protein. The upregulation of Hcp1 a marker of active translocation has been confirmed using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Our data demonstrated the presence of a single and complete type VI secretion system in S. frigidimarina NCIMB400 genome, upregulated in sessile compared with planktonic conditions. The fact that three proteins including the secreted protein Hcp1 have been identified may suggest that this type VI secretion system is functional. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Potential for luxS related signalling in marine bacteria and production of autoinducer-2 in the genus Shewanella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner-Döbler Irene

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The autoinducer-2 (AI-2 group of signalling molecules are produced by both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria as the by-product of a metabolic transformation carried out by the LuxS enzyme. They are the only non species-specific quorum sensing compounds presently known in bacteria. The luxS gene coding for the AI-2 synthase enzyme was found in many important pathogens. Here, we surveyed its occurrence in a collection of 165 marine isolates belonging to abundant marine phyla using conserved degenerated PCR primers and sequencing of selected positive bands to determine if the presence of the luxS gene is phylogenetically conserved or dependent on the habitat. Results The luxS gene was not present in any of the Alphaproteobacteria (n = 71 and Bacteroidetes strains (n = 29 tested; by contrast, these bacteria harboured the sahH gene, coding for an alternative enzyme for the detoxification of S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH in the activated methyl cycle. Within the Gammaproteobacteria (n = 76, luxS was found in all Shewanella, Vibrio and Alteromonas isolates and some Pseudoalteromonas and Halomonas species, while sahH was detected in Psychrobacter strains. A number of Gammaproteobacteria (n = 27 appeared to have neither the luxS nor the sahH gene. We then studied the production of AI-2 in the genus Shewanella using the Vibrio harveyi bioassay. All ten species of Shewanella tested produced a pronounced peak of AI-2 towards the end of the exponential growth phase in several media investigated. The maximum of AI-2 activity was different in each Shewanella species, ranging from 4% to 46% of the positive control. Conclusion The data are consistent with those of fully sequenced bacterial genomes and show that the potential for luxS related signalling is dependent on phylogenetic affiliation rather than ecological niche and is largest in certain groups of Gammaproteobacteria in the marine environment. This is the first report on AI-2

  7. Genome-level homology and phylogeny of Shewanella (Gammaproteobacteria: lteromonadales: Shewanellaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dikow Rebecca B

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The explosion in availability of whole genome data provides the opportunity to build phylogenetic hypotheses based on these data as well as the ability to learn more about the genomes themselves. The biological history of genes and genomes can be investigated based on the taxomonic history provided by the phylogeny. A phylogenetic hypothesis based on complete genome data is presented for the genus Shewanella (Gammaproteobacteria: Alteromonadales: Shewanellaceae. Nineteen taxa from Shewanella (16 species and 3 additional strains of one species as well as three outgroup species representing the genera Aeromonas (Gammaproteobacteria: Aeromonadales: Aeromonadaceae, Alteromonas (Gammaproteobacteria: Alteromonadales: Alteromonadaceae and Colwellia (Gammaproteobacteria: Alteromonadales: Colwelliaceae are included for a total of 22 taxa. Results Putatively homologous regions were found across unannotated genomes and tested with a phylogenetic analysis. Two genome-wide data-sets are considered, one including only those genomic regions for which all taxa are represented, which included 3,361,015 aligned nucleotide base-pairs (bp and a second that additionally includes those regions present in only subsets of taxa, which totaled 12,456,624 aligned bp. Alignment columns in these large data-sets were then randomly sampled to create smaller data-sets. After the phylogenetic hypothesis was generated, genome annotations were projected onto the DNA sequence alignment to compare the historical hypothesis generated by the phylogeny with the functional hypothesis posited by annotation. Conclusions Individual phylogenetic analyses of the 243 locally co-linear genome regions all failed to recover the genome topology, but the smaller data-sets that were random samplings of the large concatenated alignments all produced the genome topology. It is shown that there is not a single orthologous copy of 16S rRNA across the taxon sampling included in this

  8. Minimal contribution of cell-bound antibodies to the immunoscintigraphy of inflamed joints with 99mTc-anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinne, R.W.; Palombo-Kinne, E.; Wolski, A.; Wolf, F.; Emmrich, F.; Becker, W.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: The cellular joint infiltrate in rheumatoid arthritis patients is rich in CD4-positive T-helper lymphocytes and macrophages, rendering anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) suitable for specific immunoscintigraphy of human/experimental arthritis. Following intravenous injection, however, mAbs are present both in the free form and bound to CD4-positive, circulating monocytes and T-cells. Thus, the present study aimed at analyzing the relative contribution of the free and the cell-bound component to the imaging of inflamed joints in experimental adjuvant arthritis (AA). Methods: AA rat pertioneal macrophages or lymph node T-cells were incubated in vitro with saturating amounts of 99mTc-anti-CD4 mAb (W3/25) and injected i.v. into rats with AA. Results: In vitro release of 99m Tc-anti-CD4 mAb from the cells was limited (on average 1.57%/h for macrophages and 0.84%/h for T-cells). Following i.v. injection, whole body/joints scans and tissue measurements showed only negligible accumulation of radioactivity in inflamed ankle joints (tissue: 0.22 and 0.34% of the injected activity, respectively), whereas the radioactivity was concentrated in liver (tissue: 79% and 71%, respectively), kidney, and urinary bladder. Unlike macrophages, however, anti-CD4 mAb-coated T-cells significantly accumulated in lymphoid organs, the inflamed synovial membrane of the ankle joints, as well as in elbow and knee joints. Conclusion: While the overall contribution of cell-bound mAbs to the imaging of arthritic joints with anti-CD4 mAbs is minimal, differential accumulation of macrophages and T-cells in lymphoid organs and the inflamed synovial membrane indicates preferential migration patterns of these 2 cell populations in arthritic rats. Although only validated for 99m Tc-anti-CD4 mAbs, extrapolation of the results to other anticellular mAbs with similar affinity for their antigen may be possible. (orig.) [de

  9. Enzymatic reduction of U60 nanoclusters by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Qiang; Fein, Jeremy B. [Notre Dame Univ., IN (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences

    2018-04-01

    In this study, a series of reduction experiments were conducted using a representative uranyl peroxide nanocluster, U60 (K{sub 16}Li{sub 44}[UO{sub 2}(O{sub 2})OH]{sub 60}) and a bacterial species, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, that is capable of enzymatic U(VI) reduction. U60 was reduced by S. oneidensis in the absence of O{sub 2}, but the reduction kinetics for U60 were significantly slower than was observed in this study for aqueous uranyl acetate, and were faster than was reported in previous studies for solid phase U(VI). Our results indicate that U60 aggregates bigger than 0.2 μm formed immediately upon mixing with the bacterial growth medium, and that these aggregates were gradually broken down during the process of reduction. Neither reduction nor dissolution of U60 was observed during 72 h of control experiments open to the atmosphere, indicating that the breakdown and dissolution of U60 aggregates is caused by the reduction of U60, and that S. oneidensis is capable of direct reduction of the U(VI) within the U60 nanoclusters, likely due to the adsorption of U60 aggregates onto bacterial cells. This study is first to show the reduction capacity of bacteria for uranyl peroxide nanoclusters, and the results yield a better understanding of the long term fate of uranium in environmental systems in which uranyl peroxide nanoclusters are present.

  10. Room-temperature synthesis of gold nanoparticles and nanoplates using Shewanella algae cell extract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogi, Takashi; Saitoh, Norizoh; Nomura, Toshiyuki; Konishi, Yasuhiro, E-mail: yasuhiro@chemeng.osakafu-u.ac.j [Osaka Prefecture University, Department of Chemical Engineering (Japan)

    2010-09-15

    Biosynthesis of spherical gold nanoparticles and gold nanoplates was achieved at room temperature and pH 2.8 when cell extract from the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella algae was used as both a reducing and shape-controlling agent. Cell extract, prepared by sonicating a suspension of S. algae cells, was capable of reducing 1 mol/m{sup 3} aqueous AuCl{sub 4}{sup -} ions into elemental gold within 10 min when H{sub 2} gas was provided as an electron donor. The time interval lapsed since the beginning of the bioreductive reaction was found to be an important factor in controlling the morphology of biogenic gold nanoparticles. After 1 h, there was a large population of well-dispersed, spherical gold nanoparticles with a mean size of 9.6 nm. Gold nanoplates with an edge length of 100 nm appeared after 6 h, and 60% of the total nanoparticle population was due to gold nanoplates with an edge length of 100-200 nm after 24 h. The yield of gold nanoplates prepared with S. algae extract was four times higher than that prepared with resting cells of S. algae. The resulting biogenic gold nanoparticle suspensions showed a large variation in color, ranging from pale pink to purple due to changes in nanoparticle morphology.

  11. Comparative systems biology across an evolutionary gradient within the Shewanella genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T; Serres, Margrethe H; Romine, Margaret F; Rodrigues, Jorge L M; Auchtung, Jennifer; McCue, Lee-Ann; Lipton, Mary S; Obraztsova, Anna; Giometti, Carol S; Nealson, Kenneth H; Fredrickson, James K; Tiedje, James M

    2009-09-15

    To what extent genotypic differences translate to phenotypic variation remains a poorly understood issue of paramount importance for several cornerstone concepts of microbiology including the species definition. Here, we take advantage of the completed genomic sequences, expressed proteomic profiles, and physiological studies of 10 closely related Shewanella strains and species to provide quantitative insights into this issue. Our analyses revealed that, despite extensive horizontal gene transfer within these genomes, the genotypic and phenotypic similarities among the organisms were generally predictable from their evolutionary relatedness. The power of the predictions depended on the degree of ecological specialization of the organisms evaluated. Using the gradient of evolutionary relatedness formed by these genomes, we were able to partly isolate the effect of ecology from that of evolutionary divergence and to rank the different cellular functions in terms of their rates of evolution. Our ranking also revealed that whole-cell protein expression differences among these organisms, when the organisms were grown under identical conditions, were relatively larger than differences at the genome level, suggesting that similarity in gene regulation and expression should constitute another important parameter for (new) species description. Collectively, our results provide important new information toward beginning a systems-level understanding of bacterial species and genera.

  12. Room-temperature synthesis of gold nanoparticles and nanoplates using Shewanella algae cell extract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogi, Takashi; Saitoh, Norizoh; Nomura, Toshiyuki; Konishi, Yasuhiro

    2010-01-01

    Biosynthesis of spherical gold nanoparticles and gold nanoplates was achieved at room temperature and pH 2.8 when cell extract from the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella algae was used as both a reducing and shape-controlling agent. Cell extract, prepared by sonicating a suspension of S. algae cells, was capable of reducing 1 mol/m 3 aqueous AuCl 4 - ions into elemental gold within 10 min when H 2 gas was provided as an electron donor. The time interval lapsed since the beginning of the bioreductive reaction was found to be an important factor in controlling the morphology of biogenic gold nanoparticles. After 1 h, there was a large population of well-dispersed, spherical gold nanoparticles with a mean size of 9.6 nm. Gold nanoplates with an edge length of 100 nm appeared after 6 h, and 60% of the total nanoparticle population was due to gold nanoplates with an edge length of 100-200 nm after 24 h. The yield of gold nanoplates prepared with S. algae extract was four times higher than that prepared with resting cells of S. algae. The resulting biogenic gold nanoparticle suspensions showed a large variation in color, ranging from pale pink to purple due to changes in nanoparticle morphology.

  13. Exploring the roles of DNA methylation in the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bendall, Matthew L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Luong, Khai [Pacific Biosciences, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Wetmore, Kelly M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Blow, Matthew [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Korlach, Jonas [Pacific Biosciences, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Deutschbauer, Adam [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Malmstrom, Rex [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-08-30

    We performed whole genome analyses of DNA methylation in Shewanella 17 oneidensis MR-1 to examine its possible role in regulating gene expression and 18 other cellular processes. Single-Molecule Real Time (SMRT) sequencing 19 revealed extensive methylation of adenine (N6mA) throughout the 20 genome. These methylated bases were located in five sequence motifs, 21 including three novel targets for Type I restriction/modification enzymes. The 22 sequence motifs targeted by putative methyltranferases were determined via 23 SMRT sequencing of gene knockout mutants. In addition, we found S. 24 oneidensis MR-1 cultures grown under various culture conditions displayed 25 different DNA methylation patterns. However, the small number of differentially 26 methylated sites could not be directly linked to the much larger number of 27 differentially expressed genes in these conditions, suggesting DNA methylation is 28 not a major regulator of gene expression in S. oneidensis MR-1. The enrichment 29 of methylated GATC motifs in the origin of replication indicate DNA methylation 30 may regulate genome replication in a manner similar to that seen in Escherichia 31 coli. Furthermore, comparative analyses suggest that many 32 Gammaproteobacteria, including all members of the Shewanellaceae family, may 33 also utilize DNA methylation to regulate genome replication.

  14. Microbial deposition of gold nanoparticles by the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Y.; Tsukiyama, T.; Tachimi, T.; Saitoh, N.; Nomura, T.; Nagamine, S.

    2007-01-01

    Microbial reduction and deposition of gold nanoparticles was achieved at 25 deg. C over the pH range 2.0-7.0 using the mesophilic bacterium Shewanella algae in the presence of H 2 as the electron donor. The reductive deposition of gold by the resting cells of S. algae was a fast process: 1 mM AuCl 4 - ions were completely reduced to elemental gold within 30 min. At a solution pH of 7, gold nanoparticles 10-20 nm in size were deposited in the periplasmic space of S. algae cells. At pH 2.8, gold nanoparticles 15-200 nm in size were deposited on the bacterial cells, and the biogenic nanoparticles exhibited a variety of shapes that included nanotriangles: in particular, single crystalline gold nanotriangles 100-200 nm in size were microbially deposited. At a solution pH of 2.0, gold nanoparticles about 20 nm in size were deposited intracellularly, and larger gold particles approximately 350 nm in size were deposited extracellularly. The solution pH was an important factor in controlling the morphology of the biogenic gold particles and the location of gold deposition. Microbial deposition of gold nanoparticles is potentially attractive as an environmentally friendly alternative to conventional methods

  15. Unique organizational and functional features of the cytochrome c maturation system in Shewanella oneidensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao Jin

    Full Text Available Shewanella are renowned for their ability to respire on a wide range of electron acceptors, which has been partially accredited to the presence of a large number of the c-type cytochromes. In the model species S. oneidensis MR-1, at least 41 genes encode c-type cytochromes that are predicted to be intact, thereby likely functional. Previously, in-frame deletion mutants for 36 of these genes were obtained and characterized. In this study, first we completed the construction of an entire set of c-type cytochrome mutants utilizing a newly developed att-based mutagenesis approach, which is more effective and efficient than the approach used previously by circumventing the conventional cloning. Second, we investigated the cytochrome c maturation (Ccm system in S. oneidensis. There are two loci predicted to encode components of the Ccm system, SO0259-SO0269 and SO0476-SO0478. The former is proven essential for cytochrome c maturation whereas the latter is dispensable. Unlike the single operon organization observed in other γ-proteobacteria, genes at the SO0259-SO0269 locus are uniquely organized into four operons, ccmABCDE, scyA, SO0265, and ccmFGH-SO0269. Functional analysis revealed that the SO0265 gene rather than the scyA and SO0269 genes are relevant to cytochrome c maturation.

  16. Metabolic Characteristics of a Glucose-Utilizing Shewanella oneidensis Strain Grown under Electrode-Respiring Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gen Nakagawa

    Full Text Available In bioelectrochemical systems, the electrode potential is an important parameter affecting the electron flow between electrodes and microbes and microbial metabolic activities. Here, we investigated the metabolic characteristics of a glucose-utilizing strain of engineered Shewanella oneidensis under electrode-respiring conditions in electrochemical reactors for gaining insight into how metabolic pathways in electrochemically active bacteria are affected by the electrode potential. When an electrochemical reactor was operated with its working electrode poised at +0.4 V (vs. an Ag/AgCl reference electrode, the engineered S. oneidensis strain, carrying a plasmid encoding a sugar permease and glucose kinase of Escherichia coli, generated current by oxidizing glucose to acetate and produced D-lactate as an intermediate metabolite. However, D-lactate accumulation was not observed when the engineered strain was grown with a working electrode poised at 0 V. We also found that transcription of genes involved in pyruvate and D-lactate metabolisms was upregulated at a high electrode potential compared with their transcription at a low electrode potential. These results suggest that the carbon catabolic pathway of S. oneidensis can be modified by controlling the potential of a working electrode in an electrochemical bioreactor.

  17. Investigating different mechanisms for biogenic selenite transformations: Geobacter sulfurreducens, Shewanella oneidensis and Veillonella atypica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, C.I.; Pattrick, R.A.D.; Law, N.; Charnock, J.M.; Coker, V.S.; Fellowes, J.W.; Oremland, R.S.; Lloyd, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    The metal-reducing bacteria Geobacter sulfurreducens, Shewanella oneidensis and Veillonella atypica, use different mechanisms to transform toxic, bioavailable sodium selenite to less toxic, non-mobile elemental selenium and then to selenide in anaerobic environments, offering the potential for in situ and ex situ bioremediation of contaminated soils, sediments, industrial effluents, and agricultural drainage waters. The products of these reductive transformations depend on both the organism involved and the reduction conditions employed, in terms of electron donor and exogenous extracellular redox mediator. The intermediary phase involves the precipitation of elemental selenium nanospheres and the potential role of proteins in the formation of these structures is discussed. The bionanomineral phases produced during these transformations, including both elemental selenium nanospheres and metal selenide nanoparticles, have catalytic, semiconducting and light-emitting properties, which may have unique applications in the realm of nanophotonics. This research offers the potential to combine remediation of contaminants with the development of environmentally friendly manufacturing pathways for novel bionanominerals. ?? 2009 Taylor & Francis.

  18. Genome-scale metabolic network validation of Shewanella oneidensis using transposon insertion frequency analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Yang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Transposon mutagenesis, in combination with parallel sequencing, is becoming a powerful tool for en-masse mutant analysis. A probability generating function was used to explain observed miniHimar transposon insertion patterns, and gene essentiality calls were made by transposon insertion frequency analysis (TIFA. TIFA incorporated the observed genome and sequence motif bias of the miniHimar transposon. The gene essentiality calls were compared to: 1 previous genome-wide direct gene-essentiality assignments; and, 2 flux balance analysis (FBA predictions from an existing genome-scale metabolic model of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. A three-way comparison between FBA, TIFA, and the direct essentiality calls was made to validate the TIFA approach. The refinement in the interpretation of observed transposon insertions demonstrated that genes without insertions are not necessarily essential, and that genes that contain insertions are not always nonessential. The TIFA calls were in reasonable agreement with direct essentiality calls for S. oneidensis, but agreed more closely with E. coli essentiality calls for orthologs. The TIFA gene essentiality calls were in good agreement with the MR-1 FBA essentiality predictions, and the agreement between TIFA and FBA predictions was substantially better than between the FBA and the direct gene essentiality predictions.

  19. Involvement of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 LuxS in Biofilm Development and Sulfur Metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Learman, Deric R.; Yi, Haakrho; Brown, Steven D.; Martin, Stanton L.; Geesey, Gill G.; Stevens, Ann M.; Hochella, Michael F.

    2009-01-05

    The role of LuxS in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 has been examined by transcriptomic profiling, biochemical, and physiological experiments. The results indicate that a mutation in luxS alters biofilm development, not by altering quorum-sensing abilities but by disrupting the activated methyl cycle (AMC). The S. oneidensis wild type can produce a luminescence response in the AI-2 reporter strain Vibrio harveyi MM32. This luminescence response is abolished upon the deletion of luxS. The deletion of luxS also alters biofilm formations in static and flowthrough conditions. Genetic complementation restores the mutant biofilm defect, but the addition of synthetic AI-2 has no effect. These results suggest that AI-2 is not used as a quorum-sensing signal to regulate biofilm development in S. oneidensis. Growth on various sulfur sources was examined because of the involvement of LuxS in the AMC. A mutation in luxS produced a reduced ability to grow with methionine as the sole sulfur source. Methionine is a key metabolite used in the AMC to produce a methyl source in the cell and to recycle homocysteine. These data suggest that LuxS is important to metabolizing methionine and the AMC in S. oneidensis.

  20. Reduced heme levels underlie the exponential growth defect of the Shewanella oneidensis hfq mutant.

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    Christopher M Brennan

    Full Text Available The RNA chaperone Hfq fulfills important roles in small regulatory RNA (sRNA function in many bacteria. Loss of Hfq in the dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 results in slow exponential phase growth and a reduced terminal cell density at stationary phase. We have found that the exponential phase growth defect of the hfq mutant in LB is the result of reduced heme levels. Both heme levels and exponential phase growth of the hfq mutant can be completely restored by supplementing LB medium with 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA, the first committed intermediate synthesized during heme synthesis. Increasing expression of gtrA, which encodes the enzyme that catalyzes the first step in heme biosynthesis, also restores heme levels and exponential phase growth of the hfq mutant. Taken together, our data indicate that reduced heme levels are responsible for the exponential growth defect of the S. oneidensis hfq mutant in LB medium and suggest that the S. oneidensis hfq mutant is deficient in heme production at the 5-ALA synthesis step.

  1. Hsp90 Is Essential under Heat Stress in the Bacterium Shewanella oneidensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flora Ambre Honoré

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The Hsp90 chaperone is essential in eukaryotes and activates a large array of client proteins. In contrast, its role is still elusive in bacteria, and only a few Hsp90 bacterial clients are known. Here, we found that Hsp90 is essential in the model bacterium Shewanella oneidensis under heat stress. A genetic screen for Hsp90 client proteins identified TilS, an essential protein involved in tRNA maturation. Overexpression of TilS rescued the growth defect of the hsp90 deletion strain under heat stress. In vivo, the activity and the amount of TilS were significantly reduced in the absence of Hsp90 at high temperature. Furthermore, we showed that Hsp90 interacts with TilS, and Hsp90 prevents TilS aggregation in vitro at high temperature. Together, our results indicate that TilS is a client of Hsp90 in S. oneidensis. Therefore, our study links the essentiality of bacterial Hsp90 at high temperature with the identification of a client.

  2. The Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Fluxome under Various OxygenConditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Hwang, Judy S.; Wemmer, David E.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2006-03-17

    The central metabolic fluxes of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1were examined under carbon-limited (aerobic) and oxygen-limited(micro-aerobic) chemostat conditions using 13C labeled lactate as thesole carbon source. The carbon labeling patterns of key amino acids inbiomass were probed using both GC-MS and 13C-NMR. Based on the genomeannotation, a metabolic pathway model was constructed to quantify thecentral metabolic flux distributions. The model showed that thetricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is the major carbon metabolism route underboth conditions. The Entner-Doudoroff and pentose phosphate pathways weremainly utilized for biomass synthesis (flux below 5 percent of thelactate uptake rate). The anapleurotic reactions (pyruvate to malate andoxaloacetate to phosphoenolpyruvate) and the glyoxylate shunt wereactive. Under carbon-limited conditions, a substantial amount of carbonwas oxidized via the highly reversible serine metabolic pathway. Fluxesthrough the TCA cycle were less whereas acetate production was more underoxygen limitation than under carbon limitation. Although fluxdistributions under aerobic, micro-aerobic, and shake-flask cultureconditions were dramatically different, the relative flux ratios of thecentral metabolic reactions did not vary significantly. Hence, S.oneidensis metabolism appears to be quite robust to environmentalchanges. Our study also demonstrates the merit of coupling GC-MS with 13CNMR for metabolic flux analysis to reduce the use of 13C labeledsubstrates and to obtain more accurate flux values.

  3. Time course transcriptome changes in Shewanella algae in response to salt stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuping Fu

    Full Text Available Shewanella algae, which produces tetrodotoxin and exists in various seafoods, can cause human diseases, such as spondylodiscitis and bloody diarrhea. In the present study, we focused on the temporal, dynamic process in salt-stressed S. algae by monitoring the gene transcript levels at different time points after high salt exposure. Transcript changes in amino acid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, energy metabolism, membrane transport, regulatory functions, and cellular signaling were found to be important for the high salt response in S. algae. The most common strategies used by bacteria to survive and grow in high salt environments, such as Na+ efflux, K+ uptake, glutamate transport and biosynthesis, and the accumulation of compatible solutes, were also observed in S. algae. In particular, genes involved in peptidoglycan biosynthesis and DNA repair were highly and steadily up-regulated, accompanied by rapid and instantaneous enhancement of the transcription of large- and small-ribosome subunits, which suggested that the structural changes in the cell wall and some stressful responses occurred in S. algae. Furthermore, the transcription of genes involved in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle and the glycolytic pathway was decreased, whereas the transcription of genes involved in anaerobic respiration was increased. These results, demonstrating the multi-pathway reactions of S. algae in response to salt stress, increase our understanding of the microbial stress response mechanisms.

  4. Multiple approaches towards decolorization and reuse of a textile dye (VB-B) by a marine bacterium Shewanella decolorationis

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SatheeshBabu, S.; Mohandass, C.; VijayRaj, A.S.; Rajasabapathy, R.; Dhale, M.A.

    stream_size 41279 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Water_Air_Soil_Pollut_224_1500a.pdf.txt stream_source_info Water_Air_Soil_Pollut_224_1500a.pdf.txt Content-Encoding UTF-8 Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8...     1    Author version: Water Air Soil Pollut., vol.224(4); 2013; 1500 Multiple approaches towards decolorization and reuse of a textile dye (VB-B) by a marine bacterium Shewanella decolorationis S. Satheesh Babu, C.Mohandass*, A.S.Vijay Raj, R...

  5. Real-Time Gene Expression Profiling of Live Shewanella Oneidensis Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaoliang Sunney Xie

    2009-03-30

    The overall objective of this proposal is to make real-time observations of gene expression in live Shewanella oneidensis cells with high sensitivity and high throughput. Gene expression, a central process to all life, is stochastic because most genes often exist in one or two copies per cell. Although the central dogma of molecular biology has been proven beyond doubt, due to insufficient sensitivity, stochastic protein production has not been visualized in real time in an individual cell at the single-molecule level. We report the first direct observation of single protein molecules as they are generated, one at a time in a single live E. coli cell, yielding quantitative information about gene expression [Science 2006; 311: 1600-1603]. We demonstrated a general strategy for live-cell single-molecule measurements: detection by localization. It is difficult to detect single fluorescence protein molecules inside cytoplasm - their fluorescence is spread by fast diffusion to the entire cell and overwhelmed by the strong autofluorescence. We achieved single-molecule sensitivity by immobilizing the fluorescence protein on the cell membrane, where the diffusion is much slowed. We learned that under the repressed condition protein molecules are produced in bursts, with each burst originating from a stochastically-transcribed single messenger RNA molecule, and that protein copy numbers in the bursts follow a geometric distribution. We also simultaneously published a paper reporting a different method using β-glactosidase as a reporter [Nature 440, 358 (2006)]. Many important proteins are expressed at low levels, inaccessible by previous proteomic techniques. Both papers allowed quantification of protein expression with unprecedented sensitivity and received overwhelming acclaim from the scientific community. The Nature paper has been identified as one of the most-cited papers in the past year [http://esi-topics.com/]. We have also an analytical framework describing the

  6. c-Type cytochrome-dependent formation of U(IV nanoparticles by Shewanella oneidensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Marshall

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Modern approaches for bioremediation of radionuclide contaminated environments are based on the ability of microorganisms to effectively catalyze changes in the oxidation states of metals that in turn influence their solubility. Although microbial metal reduction has been identified as an effective means for immobilizing highly-soluble uranium(VI complexes in situ, the biomolecular mechanisms of U(VI reduction are not well understood. Here, we show that c-type cytochromes of a dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, are essential for the reduction of U(VI and formation of extracellular UO(2 nanoparticles. In particular, the outer membrane (OM decaheme cytochrome MtrC (metal reduction, previously implicated in Mn(IV and Fe(III reduction, directly transferred electrons to U(VI. Additionally, deletions of mtrC and/or omcA significantly affected the in vivo U(VI reduction rate relative to wild-type MR-1. Similar to the wild-type, the mutants accumulated UO(2 nanoparticles extracellularly to high densities in association with an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS. In wild-type cells, this UO(2-EPS matrix exhibited glycocalyx-like properties and contained multiple elements of the OM, polysaccharide, and heme-containing proteins. Using a novel combination of methods including synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy and high-resolution immune-electron microscopy, we demonstrate a close association of the extracellular UO(2 nanoparticles with MtrC and OmcA (outer membrane cytochrome. This is the first study to our knowledge to directly localize the OM-associated cytochromes with EPS, which contains biogenic UO(2 nanoparticles. In the environment, such association of UO(2 nanoparticles with biopolymers may exert a strong influence on subsequent behavior including susceptibility to oxidation by O(2 or transport in soils and sediments.

  7. Photocatalytic properties of zinc sulfide nanocrystals biofabricated by metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Xiang; Ma, Xiao-Bo; Yuan, Hang; Liu, Peng-Cheng; Lei, Yu-Bin; Xu, Hui; Du, Dao-Lin; Sun, Jian-Fan; Feng, Yu-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • S. oneidensis MR-1 biofabricated ZnS nanocrystals using artificial wastewater. • ZnS nanocrystals were 5 nm in diameter and aggregated extracellularly. • ZnS had good catalytic activity in the degradation of RHB under UV irradiation. • Photogenerated holes mainly contributed to the degradation of RhB. - Abstract: Accumulation and utilization of heavy metals from wastewater by biological treatment system has aroused great interest. In the present study, a metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was used to explore the biofabrication of ZnS nanocrystals from the artificial wastewater. The biogenic H 2 S produced via the reduction of thiosulfate precipitated the Zn(II) as sulfide extracellularly. Characterization by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) confirmed the precipitates as ZnS nanocrystals. The biogenic ZnS nanocrystals appeared spherical in shape with an average diameter of 5 nm and mainly aggregated in the medium and cell surface of S. oneidensis MR-1. UV–vis DRS spectra showed ZnS nanoparticles appeared a strong absorption below 360 nm. Thus, the photocatalytic activity of ZnS was evaluated by the photodegradation of rhodamine B (RhB) under UV irradiation. The biogenic ZnS nanocrystals showed a high level of photodegradation efficiency to RhB coupled with a significant blue-shift of maximum adsorption peak. A detailed analysis indicated the photogenerated holes, rather than hydroxyl radicals, contributed to the photocatalytic decolorization of RhB. This approach of coupling biosynthesis of nanoparticles with heavy metal removal may offer a potential avenue for efficient bioremediation of heavy metal wastewater

  8. Photocatalytic properties of zinc sulfide nanocrystals biofabricated by metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Xiang [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Ma, Xiao-Bo [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Yuan, Hang [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Technical Biology & Agriculture Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Liu, Peng-Cheng; Lei, Yu-Bin; Xu, Hui [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Du, Dao-Lin, E-mail: ddl@ujs.edu.cn [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Sun, Jian-Fan [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Feng, Yu-Jie, E-mail: yujief@hit.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • S. oneidensis MR-1 biofabricated ZnS nanocrystals using artificial wastewater. • ZnS nanocrystals were 5 nm in diameter and aggregated extracellularly. • ZnS had good catalytic activity in the degradation of RHB under UV irradiation. • Photogenerated holes mainly contributed to the degradation of RhB. - Abstract: Accumulation and utilization of heavy metals from wastewater by biological treatment system has aroused great interest. In the present study, a metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was used to explore the biofabrication of ZnS nanocrystals from the artificial wastewater. The biogenic H{sub 2}S produced via the reduction of thiosulfate precipitated the Zn(II) as sulfide extracellularly. Characterization by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) confirmed the precipitates as ZnS nanocrystals. The biogenic ZnS nanocrystals appeared spherical in shape with an average diameter of 5 nm and mainly aggregated in the medium and cell surface of S. oneidensis MR-1. UV–vis DRS spectra showed ZnS nanoparticles appeared a strong absorption below 360 nm. Thus, the photocatalytic activity of ZnS was evaluated by the photodegradation of rhodamine B (RhB) under UV irradiation. The biogenic ZnS nanocrystals showed a high level of photodegradation efficiency to RhB coupled with a significant blue-shift of maximum adsorption peak. A detailed analysis indicated the photogenerated holes, rather than hydroxyl radicals, contributed to the photocatalytic decolorization of RhB. This approach of coupling biosynthesis of nanoparticles with heavy metal removal may offer a potential avenue for efficient bioremediation of heavy metal wastewater.

  9. Electrochemical Measurement of Electron Transfer Kinetics by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Daniel; LaBelle, Edward; Coursolle, Dan; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.; Bond, Daniel R.

    2009-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 can respire using carbon electrodes and metal oxyhydroxides as electron acceptors, requiring mechanisms for transferring electrons from the cell interior to surfaces located beyond the cell. Although purified outer membrane cytochromes will reduce both electrodes and metals, S. oneidensis also secretes flavins, which accelerate electron transfer to metals and electrodes. We developed techniques for detecting direct electron transfer by intact cells, using turnover and single turnover voltammetry. Metabolically active cells attached to graphite electrodes produced thin (submonolayer) films that demonstrated both catalytic and reversible electron transfer in the presence and absence of flavins. In the absence of soluble flavins, electron transfer occurred in a broad potential window centered at ∼0 V (versus standard hydrogen electrode), and was altered in single (ΔomcA, ΔmtrC) and double deletion (ΔomcA/ΔmtrC) mutants of outer membrane cytochromes. The addition of soluble flavins at physiological concentrations significantly accelerated electron transfer and allowed catalytic electron transfer to occur at lower applied potentials (−0.2 V). Scan rate analysis indicated that rate constants for direct electron transfer were slower than those reported for pure cytochromes (∼1 s−1). These observations indicated that anodic current in the higher (>0 V) window is due to activation of a direct transfer mechanism, whereas electron transfer at lower potentials is enabled by flavins. The electrochemical dissection of these activities in living cells into two systems with characteristic midpoint potentials and kinetic behaviors explains prior observations and demonstrates the complementary nature of S. oneidensis electron transfer strategies. PMID:19661057

  10. Modeling Substrate Utilization, Metabolite Production, and Uranium Immobilization in Shewanella oneidensis Biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan S. Renslow

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we developed a two-dimensional mathematical model to predict substrate utilization and metabolite production rates in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilm in the presence and absence of uranium (U. In our model, lactate and fumarate are used as the electron donor and the electron acceptor, respectively. The model includes the production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS. The EPS bound to the cell surface and distributed in the biofilm were considered bound EPS (bEPS and loosely associated EPS (laEPS, respectively. COMSOL® Multiphysics finite element analysis software was used to solve the model numerically (model file provided in the Supplementary Material. The input variables of the model were the lactate, fumarate, cell, and EPS concentrations, half saturation constant for fumarate, and diffusion coefficients of the substrates and metabolites. To estimate unknown parameters and calibrate the model, we used a custom designed biofilm reactor placed inside a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR microimaging and spectroscopy system and measured substrate utilization and metabolite production rates. From these data we estimated the yield coefficients, maximum substrate utilization rate, half saturation constant for lactate, stoichiometric ratio of fumarate and acetate to lactate and stoichiometric ratio of succinate to fumarate. These parameters are critical to predicting the activity of biofilms and are not available in the literature. Lastly, the model was used to predict uranium immobilization in S. oneidensis MR-1 biofilms by considering reduction and adsorption processes in the cells and in the EPS. We found that the majority of immobilization was due to cells, and that EPS was less efficient at immobilizing U. Furthermore, most of the immobilization occurred within the top 10 μm of the biofilm. To the best of our knowledge, this research is one of the first biofilm immobilization mathematical models based on experimental

  11. Functional assessment of EnvZ/OmpR two-component system in Shewanella oneidensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Yuan

    Full Text Available EnvZ and OmpR constitute the bacterial two-component signal transduction system known to mediate osmotic stress response in a number of gram-negative bacteria. In an effort to understand the mechanism through which Shewanella oneidensis senses and responds to environmental osmolarity changes, structure of the ompR-envZ operon was determined with Northern blotting assay and roles of the EnvZ/OmpR two-component system in response to various stresses were investigated with mutational analysis, quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR, and phenotype microarrays. Results from the mutational analysis and qRT-PCR suggested that the EnvZ/OmpR system contributed to osmotic stress response of S. oneidensis and very likely engaged a similar strategy employed by E. coli, which involved reciprocal regulation of two major porin coding genes. Additionally, the ompR-envZ system was also found related to cell motility. We further showed that the ompR-envZ dependent regulation of porin genes and motility resided almost completely on ompR and only partially on envZ, indicating additional mechanisms for OmpR phosphorylation. In contrast to E. coli lacking ompR-envZ, however, growth of S. oneidensis did not show a significant dependence on ompR-envZ even under osmotic stress. Further analysis with phenotype microarrays revealed that the S. oneidensis strains lacking a complete ompR-envZ system displayed hypersensitivities to a number of agents, especially in alkaline environment. Taken together, our results suggest that the function of the ompR-envZ system in S. oneidensis, although still connected with osmoregulation, has diverged considerably from that of E. coli. Additional mechanism must exist to support growth of S. oneidensis under osmotic stress.

  12. Transcriptome analysis reveals a stress response of Shewanella oneidensis deprived of background levels of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoping; Schilkey, Faye; Smith, Geoffrey B.

    2018-01-01

    Natural ionizing background radiation has exerted a constant pressure on organisms since the first forms of life appeared on Earth, so that cells have developed molecular mechanisms to avoid or repair damages caused directly by radiation or indirectly by radiation-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the present study, we investigated the transcriptional effect of depriving Shewanella oneidensis cultures of background levels of radiation by growing the cells in a mine 655 m underground, thus reducing the dose rate from 72.1 to 0.9 nGy h-1 from control to treatment, respectively. RNASeq transcriptome analysis showed the differential expression of 4.6 and 7.6% of the S. oneidensis genome during early- and late-exponential phases of growth, respectively. The greatest change observed in the treatment was the downregulation of ribosomal proteins (21% of all annotated ribosomal protein genes during early- and 14% during late-exponential) and tRNA genes (14% of all annotated tRNA genes in early-exponential), indicating a marked decrease in protein translation. Other significant changes were the upregulation of membrane transporters, implying an increase in the traffic of substrates across the cell membrane, as well as the up and downregulation of genes related to respiration, which could be interpreted as a response to insufficient oxidants in the cells. In other reports, there is evidence in multiple species that some ROS not just lead to oxidative stress, but act as signaling molecules to control cellular metabolism at the transcriptional level. Consistent with these reports, several genes involved in the metabolism of carbon and biosynthesis of amino acids were also regulated, lending support to the idea of a wide metabolic response. Our results indicate that S. oneidensis is sensitive to the withdrawal of background levels of ionizing radiation and suggest that a transcriptional response is required to maintain homeostasis and retain normal growth. PMID:29768440

  13. Snapshot of iron response in Shewanella oneidensis by gene network reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yunfeng; Harris, Daniel P.; Luo, Feng; Xiong, Wenlu; Joachimiak, Marcin; Wu, Liyou; Dehal, Paramvir; Jacobsen, Janet; Yang, Zamin; Palumbo, Anthony V.; Arkin, Adam P.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-10-09

    Background: Iron homeostasis of Shewanella oneidensis, a gamma-proteobacterium possessing high iron content, is regulated by a global transcription factor Fur. However, knowledge is incomplete about other biological pathways that respond to changes in iron concentration, as well as details of the responses. In this work, we integrate physiological, transcriptomics and genetic approaches to delineate the iron response of S. oneidensis. Results: We show that the iron response in S. oneidensis is a rapid process. Temporal gene expression profiles were examined for iron depletion and repletion, and a gene co-expression network was reconstructed. Modules of iron acquisition systems, anaerobic energy metabolism and protein degradation were the most noteworthy in the gene network. Bioinformatics analyses suggested that genes in each of the modules might be regulated by DNA-binding proteins Fur, CRP and RpoH, respectively. Closer inspection of these modules revealed a transcriptional regulator (SO2426) involved in iron acquisition and ten transcriptional factors involved in anaerobic energy metabolism. Selected genes in the network were analyzed by genetic studies. Disruption of genes encoding a putative alcaligin biosynthesis protein (SO3032) and a gene previously implicated in protein degradation (SO2017) led to severe growth deficiency under iron depletion conditions. Disruption of a novel transcriptional factor (SO1415) caused deficiency in both anaerobic iron reduction and growth with thiosulfate or TMAO as an electronic acceptor, suggesting that SO1415 is required for specific branches of anaerobic energy metabolism pathways. Conclusions: Using a reconstructed gene network, we identified major biological pathways that were differentially expressed during iron depletion and repletion. Genetic studies not only demonstrated the importance of iron acquisition and protein degradation for iron depletion, but also characterized a novel transcriptional factor (SO1415) with a

  14. In Situ Analysis of a Silver Nanoparticle-Precipitating Shewanella Biofilm by Surface Enhanced Confocal Raman Microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gal Schkolnik

    Full Text Available Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is an electroactive bacterium, capable of reducing extracellular insoluble electron acceptors, making it important for both nutrient cycling in nature and microbial electrochemical technologies, such as microbial fuel cells and microbial electrosynthesis. When allowed to anaerobically colonize an Ag/AgCl solid interface, S. oneidensis has precipitated silver nanoparticles (AgNp, thus providing the means for a surface enhanced confocal Raman microscopy (SECRaM investigation of its biofilm. The result is the in-situ chemical mapping of the biofilm as it developed over time, where the distribution of cytochromes, reduced and oxidized flavins, polysaccharides and phosphate in the undisturbed biofilm is monitored. Utilizing AgNp bio-produced by the bacteria colonizing the Ag/AgCl interface, we could perform SECRaM while avoiding the use of a patterned or roughened support or the introduction of noble metal salts and reducing agents. This new method will allow a spatially and temporally resolved chemical investigation not only of Shewanella biofilms at an insoluble electron acceptor, but also of other noble metal nanoparticle-precipitating bacteria in laboratory cultures or in complex microbial communities in their natural habitats.

  15. THE ROLE OF 4-HYDROXYPHENYLPYRUVATE DIOXYGENASE IN ENHANCEMENT OF SOLID-PHASE ELECTRON TRANSFER BY SHEWANELLA ONEIDENSIS MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turick, C; Amy Ekechukwu, A

    2007-06-01

    While mechanistic details of dissimilatory metal reduction are far from being understood, it is postulated that the electron transfer to solid metal oxides is mediated by outer membrane-associated c-type cytochromes and redox active electron shuttling compounds. This study focuses on the production of homogensitate in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, an intermediate of tyrosine degradation pathway, which is a precursor of a redox cycling metabolite, pyomelanin. In this study, we determined that two enzymes involved in this pathway, 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (4HPPD) and homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase are responsible for homogentisate production and oxidation, respectively. Inhibition of 4-HPPD activity with the specific inhibitor sulcotrione (2-(2-chloro-4-methane sulfonylbenzoyl)-1,3-cyclohexanedione), and deletion of melA, a gene encoding 4-HPPD, resulted in no pyomelanin production by S. oneidensis MR-1. Conversely, deletion of hmgA which encodes the putative homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase, resulted in pyomelanin overproduction. The efficiency and rates, with which MR-1 reduces hydrous ferric oxide, were directly linked to the ability of mutant strains to produce pyomelanin. Electrochemical studies with whole cells demonstrated that pyomelanin substantially increases the formal potential (E{sup o}{prime}) of S. oneidensis MR-1. Based on this work, environmental production of pyomelanin likely contributes to an increased solid-phase metal reduction capacity in Shewanella oneidensis.

  16. Synthesis of Ultra-Small Platinum, Palladium and Gold Nanoparticles by Shewanella loihica PV-4 Electrochemically Active Biofilm and Their Enhanced Catalytic Activities

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Elaf; Kalathil, Shafeer; Shi, Le; Alharbi, Ohoud; Li, Renyuan; Zaouri, Noor A.; Wang, Peng

    2018-01-01

    strain of Shewanella loihica PV-4 and successfully synthesized USNPs of noble metal Au, Pd, and Pt. The synthesized USNPs had a size range between 2 and 7 nm and exhibited excellent catalytic performance in dye decomposition. The results of this work

  17. Phylogenetic Analysis of Shewanella Strains by DNA Relatedness Derived from Whole Genome Microarray DNA-DNA Hybridization and Comparisons with Other Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Liyou; Yi, T.Y.; Van Nostrand, Joy; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses were done for the Shewanella strains isolated from Baltic Sea (38 strains), US DOE Hanford Uranium bioremediation site (Hanford Reach of the Columbia River (HRCR), 11 strains), Pacific Ocean and Hawaiian sediments (8 strains), and strains from other resources (16 strains) with three out group strains, Rhodopseudomonas palustris, Clostridium cellulolyticum, and Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus X514, using DNA relatedness derived from WCGA-based DNA-DNA hybridizations, sequence similarities of 16S rRNA gene and gyrB gene, and sequence similarities of 6 loci of Shewanella genome selected from a shared gene list of the Shewanella strains with whole genome sequenced based on the average nucleotide identity of them (ANI). The phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA and gyrB gene sequences, and DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations of the tested Shewanella strains share exactly the same sub-clusters with very few exceptions, in which the strains were basically grouped by species. However, the phylogenetic analysis based on DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations dramatically increased the differentiation resolution at species and strains level within Shewanella genus. When the tree based on DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations was compared to the tree based on the combined sequences of the selected functional genes (6 loci), we found that the resolutions of both methods are similar, but the clustering of the tree based on DNA relatedness derived from WMGA hybridizations was clearer. These results indicate that WCGA-based DNA-DNA hybridization is an idea alternative of conventional DNA-DNA hybridization methods and it is superior to the phylogenetics methods based on sequence similarities of single genes. Detailed analysis is being performed for the re-classification of the strains examined.

  18. Genome analysis of a clinical isolate of Shewanella sp. uncovered an active hybrid integrative and conjugative element carrying an integron platform inserted in a novel genomic locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmeciano Di Noto, Gisela; Jara, Eugenio; Iriarte, Andrés; Centrón, Daniela; Quiroga, Cecilia

    2016-08-01

    Shewanella spp. are currently considered to be emerging pathogens that can code for a blaOXA carbapenemase in their chromosome. Complete genome analysis of the clinical isolate Shewanella sp. Sh95 revealed that this strain is a novel species, which shares a lineage with marine isolates. Characterization of its resistome showed that it codes for genes drfA15, qacH and blaOXA-48. We propose that Shewanella sp. Sh95 acts as reservoir of blaOXA-48. Moreover, analysis of mobilome showed that it contains a novel integrative and conjugative element (ICE), named ICESh95. Comparative analysis between the close relatives ICESpuPO1 from Shewanella sp. W3-18-1 and ICE SXTMO10 from Vibrio cholerae showed that ICESh95 encompassed two new regions, a type III restriction modification system and a multidrug resistance integron. The integron platform contained a novel arrangement formed by gene cassettes drfA15 and qacH, and a class C-attC group II intron. Furthermore, insertion of ICESh95 occurred at a unique target site, which correlated with the presence of a different xis/int module. Mobility of ICESh95 was assessed and demonstrated its ability to self-transfer with high efficiency to different species of bacteria. Our results show that ICESh95 is a self-transmissible, mobile element, which can contribute to the dissemination of antimicrobial resistance; this is clearly a threat when natural bacteria from water ecosystems, such as Shewanella, act as vectors in its propagation.

  19. Phylogenetic Analysis of Shewanella Strains by DNA Relatedness Derived from Whole Genome Microarray DNA-DNA Hybridization and Comparison with Other Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Liyou; Yi, T. Y.; Van Nostrand, Joy; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    Phylogenetic analyses were done for the Shewanella strains isolated from Baltic Sea (38 strains), US DOE Hanford Uranium bioremediation site [Hanford Reach of the Columbia River (HRCR), 11 strains], Pacific Ocean and Hawaiian sediments (8 strains), and strains from other resources (16 strains) with three out group strains, Rhodopseudomonas palustris, Clostridium cellulolyticum, and Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus X514, using DNA relatedness derived from WCGA-based DNA-DNA hybridizations, sequence similarities of 16S rRNA gene and gyrB gene, and sequence similarities of 6 loci of Shewanella genome selected from a shared gene list of the Shewanella strains with whole genome sequenced based on the average nucleotide identity of them (ANI). The phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA and gyrB gene sequences, and DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations of the tested Shewanella strains share exactly the same sub-clusters with very few exceptions, in which the strains were basically grouped by species. However, the phylogenetic analysis based on DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations dramatically increased the differentiation resolution at species and strains level within Shewanella genus. When the tree based on DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations was compared to the tree based on the combined sequences of the selected functional genes (6 loci), we found that the resolutions of both methods are similar, but the clustering of the tree based on DNA relatedness derived from WMGA hybridizations was clearer. These results indicate that WCGA-based DNA-DNA hybridization is an idea alternative of conventional DNA-DNA hybridization methods and it is superior to the phylogenetics methods based on sequence similarities of single genes. Detailed analysis is being performed for the re-classification of the strains examined.

  20. In Vitro Enzymatic Reduction Kinetics of Mineral Oxides by Membrane Fractions from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruebush, S.; Icopini, G.; Brantley, S.; Tien, M.

    2006-01-01

    This study documents the first example of in vitro solid-phase mineral oxide reduction by enzyme-containing membrane fractions. Previous in vitro studies have only reported the reduction of aqueous ions. Total membrane (TM) fractions from iron-grown cultures of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were isolated and shown to catalyze the reduction of goethite, hematite, birnessite, and ramsdellite/pyrolusite using formate. In contrast, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and succinate cannot function as electron donors. The significant implications of observations related to this cell-free system are: (i) both iron and manganese mineral oxides are reduced by the TM fraction, but aqueous U(VI) is not; (ii) TM fractions from anaerobically grown, but not aerobically grown, cells can reduce the mineral oxides; (iii) electron shuttles and iron chelators are not needed for this in vitro reduction, documenting conclusively that reduction can occur by direct contact with the mineral oxide; (iv) electron shuttles and EDTA stimulate the in vitro Fe(III) reduction, documenting that exogenous molecules can enhance rates of enzymatic mineral reduction; and (v) multiple membrane components are involved in solid-phase oxide reduction. The membrane fractions, consisting of liposomes of cytoplasmic and outer membrane segments, contain at least 100 proteins including the enzyme that oxidizes formate, formate dehydrogenase. Mineral oxide reduction was inhibited by the addition of detergent Triton X-100, which solubilizes membranes and their associated proteins, consistent with the involvement of multiple electron carriers that are disrupted by detergent addition. In contrast, formate dehydrogenase activity was not inhibited by Triton X-100. The addition of anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) and menaquinone-4 was unable to restore activity; however, menadione (MD) restored 33% of the activity. The addition of AQDS and MD to reactions without added detergent increased the rate of goethite

  1. Surface complexation of neptunium (V) onto whole cells and cell componets of Shewanella alga

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Donald Timothy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Deo, Randhir P [ASU; Rittmann, Bruce E [ASU; Songkasiri, Warinthorn [UNAFFILIATED

    2008-01-01

    We systematically quantified surface complexation of neptunium(V) onto whole cells of Shewanella alga strain BrY and onto cell wall and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of S. alga. We first performed acid and base titrations and used the mathematical model FITEQL with constant-capacitance surface-complexation to determine the concentrations and deprotonation constants of specific surface functional groups. Deprotonation constants most likely corresponded to a carboxyl site associated with amino acids (pK{sub a} {approx} 2.4), a carboxyl group not associated with amino acids (pK{sub a} {approx} 5), a phosphoryl site (pK{sub a} {approx} 7.2), and an amine site (pK{sub a} > 10). We then carried out batch sorption experiments with Np(V) and each of the S. alga components at different pHs. Results show that solution pH influenced the speciation of Np(V) and each of the surface functional groups. We used the speciation sub-model of the biogeochemical model CCBATCH to compute the stability constants for Np(V) complexation to each surface functional group. The stability constants were similar for each functional group on S. alga bacterial whole cells, cell walls, and EPS, and they explain the complicated sorption patterns when they are combined with the aqueous-phase speciation of Np(V). For pH < 8, NpO{sub 2}{sup +} was the dominant form of Np(V), and its log K values for the low-pK{sub a} carboxyl, other carboxyl, and phosphoryl groups were 1.75, 1.75, and 2.5 to 3.1, respectively. For pH greater than 8, the key surface ligand was amine >XNH3+, which complexed with NpO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 5-}. The log K for NpO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 5-} complexed onto the amine groups was 3.1 to 3.6. All of the log K values are similar to those of Np(V) complexes with aqueous carboxyl and N-containing carboxyl ligands. These results point towards the important role of surface complexation in defining key actinide-microbiological interactions in the subsurface.

  2. Deletion of Lytic Transglycosylases Increases Beta-Lactam Resistance in Shewanella oneidensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jianhua; Sun, Yiyang; Sun, Yijuan; Yu, Zhiliang; Qiu, Juanping; Gao, Haichun

    2018-01-01

    Production of chromosome-encoded β-lactamases confers resistance to β-lactams in many Gram-negative bacteria. Some inducible β-lactamases, especially the class C β-lactamase AmpC in Enterobacteriaceae, share a common regulatory mechanism, the ampR-ampC paradigm. Induction of ampC is intimately linked to peptidoglycan recycling, and the LysR-type transcriptional regulator AmpR plays a central role in the process. However, our previous studies have demonstrated that the expression of class D β-lactamase gene blaA in Shewanella oneidensis is distinct from the established paradigm since an AmpR homolog is absent and major peptidoglycan recycling enzymes play opposite roles in β-lactamase expression. Given that lytic transglycosylases (LTs), a class of peptidoglycan hydrolases cleaving the β-1,4 glycosidic linkage in glycan strands of peptidoglycan, can disturb peptidoglycan recycling, and thus may affect induction of blaA. In this study, we investigated impacts of such enzymes on susceptibility to β-lactams. Deletion of three LTs (SltY, MltB and MltB2) increased β-lactam resistance, while four other LTs (MltD, MltD2, MltF, and Slt2) seemed dispensable to β-lactam resistance. The double LT mutants ΔmltBΔmltB2 and ΔsltYΔmltB2 had β-lactam resistance stronger than any of the single mutants. Deletion of ampG (encoding permease AmpG) and mrcA (encoding penicillin binding protein 1a, PBP1a) from both double LT mutants further increased the resistance to β-lactams. Notably, all increased β-lactam resistance phenotypes were in accordance with enhanced blaA expression. Although significant, the increase in β-lactamase activity after inactivating LTs is much lower than that produced by PBP1a inactivation. Our data implicate that LTs play important roles in blaA expression in S. oneidensis. PMID:29403465

  3. Molecular Underpinnings of Fe(III Oxide Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang eShi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In the absence of O2 and other electron acceptors, the Gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can use ferric [Fe(III] (oxy(hydroxide minerals as the terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration. At circumneutral pH and in the absence of strong complexing ligands, Fe(III oxides are relatively insoluble and thus are external to the bacterial cells. S. oneidensis MR-1 has evolved the machinery (i.e., metal-reducing or Mtr pathway for transferring electrons across the entire cell envelope to the surface of extracellular Fe(III oxides. The protein components identified to date for the Mtr pathway include CymA, MtrA, MtrB, MtrC and OmcA. CymA is an inner-membrane tetraheme c-type cytochrome (c-Cyt that is proposed to oxidize the quinol in the inner-membrane and transfers the released electrons to redox proteins in the periplasm. Although the periplasmic proteins receiving electrons from CymA during Fe(III oxidation have not been identified, they are believed to relay the electrons to MtrA. A decaheme c-Cyt, MtrA is thought to be embedded in the trans outer-membrane and porin-like protein MtrB. Together, MtrAB deliver the electrons across the outer-membrane to the MtrC and OmcA on the outmost bacterial surface. Functioning as terminal reductases, the outer membrane and decaheme c-Cyts MtrC and OmcA can bind the surface of Fe(III oxides and transfer electrons directly to these minerals. To increase their reaction rates, MtrC and OmcA can use the flavins secreted by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells as diffusible co-factors for reduction of Fe(III oxides. MtrC and OmcA can also serve as the terminal reductases for soluble forms of Fe(III. Although our understanding of the Mtr pathway is still far from complete, it is the best characterized microbial pathway used for extracellular electron exchange. Characterizations of the Mtr pathway have made significant contributions to the molecular understanding of microbial reduction of Fe(III oxides.

  4. Regulation of Gene Expression in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 during Electron Acceptor Limitation and Bacterial Nanowire Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchinger, Sarah E.; Pirbadian, Sahand; Baker, Carol S.; Leung, Kar Man; Burroughs, Nigel J.; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In limiting oxygen as an electron acceptor, the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 rapidly forms nanowires, extensions of its outer membrane containing the cytochromes MtrC and OmcA needed for extracellular electron transfer. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis was employed to determine differential gene expression over time from triplicate chemostat cultures that were limited for oxygen. We identified 465 genes with decreased expression and 677 genes with increased expression. The coordinated increased expression of heme biosynthesis, cytochrome maturation, and transport pathways indicates that S. oneidensis MR-1 increases cytochrome production, including the transcription of genes encoding MtrA, MtrC, and OmcA, and transports these decaheme cytochromes across the cytoplasmic membrane during electron acceptor limitation and nanowire formation. In contrast, the expression of the mtrA and mtrC homologs mtrF and mtrD either remains unaffected or decreases under these conditions. The ompW gene, encoding a small outer membrane porin, has 40-fold higher expression during oxygen limitation, and it is proposed that OmpW plays a role in cation transport to maintain electrical neutrality during electron transfer. The genes encoding the anaerobic respiration regulator cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) and the extracytoplasmic function sigma factor RpoE are among the transcription factor genes with increased expression. RpoE might function by signaling the initial response to oxygen limitation. Our results show that RpoE activates transcription from promoters upstream of mtrC and omcA. The transcriptome and mutant analyses of S. oneidensis MR-1 nanowire production are consistent with independent regulatory mechanisms for extending the outer membrane into tubular structures and for ensuring the electron transfer function of the nanowires. IMPORTANCE Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 has the capacity to transfer electrons to its external surface

  5. Occurrence of Shewanella algae in Danish coastal water and effects of water temperature and culture conditions on its survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Lone; Bundvad, Anemone; Melchiorsen, Jette

    1999-01-01

    increased to 10(5) to 10(7) CFU/ml at room temperature. Most probable number analysis showed this result to be due to regrowth rather than resuscitation. It was hypothesized that S. algae would survive cold exposure better if in the biofilm state; however, culturable counts from S. algae biofilms decreased......The marine bacterium Shewanella algae, which was identified as the cause of human cases of bacteremia and ear infections in Denmark in the summers of 1994 and 1995, was detected in seawater only during the months (July, August, September, and October) when the water temperature was above 13 degrees...... C. The bacterium is a typical mesophilic organism, and model experiments were conducted to elucidate the fate of the organism under cold and nutrient-limited conditions. The culturable count of S. algae decreased rapidly from 10(7) CFU/ml to 10(1) CFU/ml in approximately 1 month when cells grown...

  6. Isolation and Characterization of a Shewanella Phage–Host System from the Gut of the Tunicate, Ciona intestinalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany Leigh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Outnumbering all other biological entities on earth, bacteriophages (phages play critical roles in structuring microbial communities through bacterial infection and subsequent lysis, as well as through horizontal gene transfer. While numerous studies have examined the effects of phages on free-living bacterial cells, much less is known regarding the role of phage infection in host-associated biofilms, which help to stabilize adherent microbial communities. Here we report the cultivation and characterization of a novel strain of Shewanella fidelis from the gut of the marine tunicate Ciona intestinalis, inducible prophages from the S. fidelis genome, and a strain-specific lytic phage recovered from surrounding seawater. In vitro biofilm assays demonstrated that lytic phage infection affects biofilm formation in a process likely influenced by the accumulation and integration of the extracellular DNA released during cell lysis, similar to the mechanism that has been previously shown for prophage induction.

  7. Constraint-based model of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 metabolism: a tool for data analysis and hypothesis generation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigoriy E Pinchuk

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Shewanellae are gram-negative facultatively anaerobic metal-reducing bacteria commonly found in chemically (i.e., redox stratified environments. Occupying such niches requires the ability to rapidly acclimate to changes in electron donor/acceptor type and availability; hence, the ability to compete and thrive in such environments must ultimately be reflected in the organization and utilization of electron transfer networks, as well as central and peripheral carbon metabolism. To understand how Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 utilizes its resources, the metabolic network was reconstructed. The resulting network consists of 774 reactions, 783 genes, and 634 unique metabolites and contains biosynthesis pathways for all cell constituents. Using constraint-based modeling, we investigated aerobic growth of S. oneidensis MR-1 on numerous carbon sources. To achieve this, we (i used experimental data to formulate a biomass equation and estimate cellular ATP requirements, (ii developed an approach to identify cycles (such as futile cycles and circulations, (iii classified how reaction usage affects cellular growth, (iv predicted cellular biomass yields on different carbon sources and compared model predictions to experimental measurements, and (v used experimental results to refine metabolic fluxes for growth on lactate. The results revealed that aerobic lactate-grown cells of S. oneidensis MR-1 used less efficient enzymes to couple electron transport to proton motive force generation, and possibly operated at least one futile cycle involving malic enzymes. Several examples are provided whereby model predictions were validated by experimental data, in particular the role of serine hydroxymethyltransferase and glycine cleavage system in the metabolism of one-carbon units, and growth on different sources of carbon and energy. This work illustrates how integration of computational and experimental efforts facilitates the understanding of microbial metabolism at a

  8. Synthetic Klebsiella pneumoniae-Shewanella oneidensis Consortium Enables Glycerol-Fed High-Performance Microbial Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Yin, Changji; Sun, Liming; Li, Yuanxiu; Guo, Xuewu; Song, Hao

    2018-05-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) is an eco-friendly bio-electrochemical sys-tem that uses microorganism as biocatalyst to convert biomass into electricity. Glycerol, as a waste in the biodiesel refinery processes, is an appealing substrate for MFC. Nevertheless, glycerol cannot be utilized as carbon source by well-known exoelectrogens such as Shewanella oneidensis. Herein, to generate electricity by rapidly harnessing glycerol, the authors rationally constructed a Klebsiella pneumoniae-Shewanella oneidensis microbial consortium to efficiently harvest electricity from glyc-erol, in which K. pneumoniae converted glycerol into lactate, fed to S. oneidensis as carbon source and electron donor. To improve electricity output, the authors systematically engineered the consortium in terms of carbon flux distribution and efficiency of extracellular electron transfer (EET). To direct more carbon flux to lactate biosynthesis in K. pneumoniae, the authors eliminated the ethanol pathway by knocking out the alcohol dehydrogenase gene (adhE), and enhanced lactate biosynthesis by heterologously expressing a lactate dehydrogen-ase gene (ldhD) from Lactobacillus bulgaricus and a lactate transporter gene (lldP) from Escherichia coli. To facilitate EET between S. oneidensis and anode surfaces, a biosynthetic flavins pathway from Bacillus subtilis is introduced into S. oneidensis. The author further optimized the glycerol concentration, thus S. oneidensis could be continuously fed with lactate synthesized from K. pneumoniae at a constant rate. Our glycerol-fed MFC generated a maximum power density of 19.9 mW/m 2 , significantly higher than that of the wild-type consor-tium. This work suggested that engineering microbial consortia is an effi-cient strategy to expand the spectrum of usable carbon sources and promote electricity power production in MFCs. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Ferrihydrite-associated organic matter (OM stimulates reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and a complex microbial consortia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. Cooper

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The formation of Fe(III oxides in natural environments occurs in the presence of natural organic matter (OM, resulting in the formation of OM–mineral complexes that form through adsorption or coprecipitation processes. Thus, microbial Fe(III reduction in natural environments most often occurs in the presence of OM–mineral complexes rather than pure Fe(III minerals. This study investigated to what extent does the content of adsorbed or coprecipitated OM on ferrihydrite influence the rate of Fe(III reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a model Fe(III-reducing microorganism, in comparison to a microbial consortium extracted from the acidic, Fe-rich Schlöppnerbrunnen fen. We found that increased OM content led to increased rates of microbial Fe(III reduction by S. oneidensis MR-1 in contrast to earlier findings with the model organism Geobacter bremensis. Ferrihydrite–OM coprecipitates were reduced slightly faster than ferrihydrites with adsorbed OM. Surprisingly, the complex microbial consortia stimulated by a mixture of electrons donors (lactate, acetate, and glucose mimics S. oneidensis under the same experimental Fe(III-reducing conditions suggesting similar mechanisms of electron transfer whether or not the OM is adsorbed or coprecipitated to the mineral surfaces. We also followed potential shifts of the microbial community during the incubation via 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses to determine variations due to the presence of adsorbed or coprecipitated OM–ferrihydrite complexes in contrast to pure ferrihydrite. Community profile analyses showed no enrichment of typical model Fe(III-reducing bacteria, such as Shewanella or Geobacter sp., but an enrichment of fermenters (e.g., Enterobacteria during pure ferrihydrite incubations which are known to use Fe(III as an electron sink. Instead, OM–mineral complexes favored the enrichment of microbes including Desulfobacteria and Pelosinus sp., both of which can utilize lactate and

  10. Ferrihydrite-associated organic matter (OM) stimulates reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and a complex microbial consortia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Rebecca Elizabeth; Eusterhues, Karin; Wegner, Carl-Eric; Totsche, Kai Uwe; Küsel, Kirsten

    2017-11-01

    The formation of Fe(III) oxides in natural environments occurs in the presence of natural organic matter (OM), resulting in the formation of OM-mineral complexes that form through adsorption or coprecipitation processes. Thus, microbial Fe(III) reduction in natural environments most often occurs in the presence of OM-mineral complexes rather than pure Fe(III) minerals. This study investigated to what extent does the content of adsorbed or coprecipitated OM on ferrihydrite influence the rate of Fe(III) reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a model Fe(III)-reducing microorganism, in comparison to a microbial consortium extracted from the acidic, Fe-rich Schlöppnerbrunnen fen. We found that increased OM content led to increased rates of microbial Fe(III) reduction by S. oneidensis MR-1 in contrast to earlier findings with the model organism Geobacter bremensis. Ferrihydrite-OM coprecipitates were reduced slightly faster than ferrihydrites with adsorbed OM. Surprisingly, the complex microbial consortia stimulated by a mixture of electrons donors (lactate, acetate, and glucose) mimics S. oneidensis under the same experimental Fe(III)-reducing conditions suggesting similar mechanisms of electron transfer whether or not the OM is adsorbed or coprecipitated to the mineral surfaces. We also followed potential shifts of the microbial community during the incubation via 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses to determine variations due to the presence of adsorbed or coprecipitated OM-ferrihydrite complexes in contrast to pure ferrihydrite. Community profile analyses showed no enrichment of typical model Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, such as Shewanella or Geobacter sp., but an enrichment of fermenters (e.g., Enterobacteria) during pure ferrihydrite incubations which are known to use Fe(III) as an electron sink. Instead, OM-mineral complexes favored the enrichment of microbes including Desulfobacteria and Pelosinus sp., both of which can utilize lactate and acetate as an electron

  11. The Shewanella algae strain YM8 produces volatiles with strong inhibition activity against Aspergillus pathogens and aflatoxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andong eGong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxigenic Aspergillus fungi and associated aflatoxins are ubiquitous in the production and storage of food/feed commodities. Controlling these pests is a challenge. In this study, the Shewanella algae strain YM8 was found to produce volatiles that have strong antifungal activity against Aspergillus pathogens. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry profiling revealed 15 volatile organic compounds (VOCs emitted from YM8, of which dimethyl trisulfide was the most abundant. We obtained authentic reference standards for six of the VOCs; these all significantly reduced mycelial growth and conidial germination in Aspergillus; dimethyl trisulfide and 2,4-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl-phenol showed the strongest inhibitory activity. YM8 completely inhibited Aspergillus growth and aflatoxin biosynthesis in maize and peanut samples stored at different water activity levels, and scanning electron microscopy revealed severely damaged conidia and a complete lack of mycelium development and conidiogenesis. YM8 also completely inhibited the growth of eight other agronomically important species of phytopathogenic fungi: A. parasiticus, A. niger, Alternaria alternate, Botrytis cinerea, Fusarium graminearum, Fusarium oxysporum, Monilinia fructicola, and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. This study demonstrates the susceptibility of Aspergillus and other fungi to VOCs from marine bacteria and indicates a new strategy for effectively controlling these pathogens and the associated mycotoxin production in the field and during storage.

  12. Catabolic and regulatory systems in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 involved in electricity generation in microbial fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi eKouzuma

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe that respires using a variety of inorganic and organic compounds. MR-1 is also capable of utilizing extracellular solid materials, including anodes in microbial fuel cells (MFCs, as electron acceptors, thereby enabling electricity generation. As MFCs have the potential to generate electricity from biomass waste and wastewater, MR-1 has been extensively studied to identify the molecular systems that are involved in electricity generation in MFCs. These studies have demonstrated the importance of extracellular electron-transfer pathways that electrically connect the quinone pool in the cytoplasmic membrane to extracellular electron acceptors. Electricity generation is also dependent on intracellular catabolic pathways that oxidize electron donors, such as lactate, and regulatory systems that control the expression of genes encoding the components of catabolic and electron-transfer pathways. In addition, recent findings suggest that cell-surface polymers, e.g., exopolysaccharides, and secreted chemicals, which function as electron shuttles, are also involved in electricity generation. Despite these advances in our knowledge on the extracellular electron-transfer processes in MR-1, further efforts are necessary to fully understand the underlying intra- and extra-cellular molecular systems for electricity generation in MFCs. We suggest that investigating how MR-1 coordinates these systems to efficiently transfer electrons to electrodes and conserve electrochemical energy for cell proliferation is important for establishing the biological bases for MFCs.

  13. Transcriptome and metabolome responses of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to methyl orange under microaerophilic and aerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xinhua; Qi, Yueling; Xu, Chen; Yang, Yuyi; Wang, Jun

    2017-04-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 degrades various azo dyes under microaerophilic and anaerobic conditions, but this process is inhibited under aerobic conditions. The mechanisms underlying azo dye biodegradation and inhibition remain unknown. Therefore, we investigated metabolic and transcriptional changes in strain MR-1, which was cultured under different conditions, to elucidate these mechanisms. At the transcriptional level, genes involved in certain metabolic processes, particularly the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, amino acid biodegradation, and the electron transfer system, were significantly altered (M ≧ 2, p > 0.8 ) in the presence of methyl orange (MO). Moreover, a high concentration of dissolved oxygen heavily impacted the expression levels of genes involved in fatty acid biodegradation. Metabolome analysis revealed significant alteration (p < 0.05) in the concentrations of nine metabolites when strain MR-1 was cultured under aerobic conditions; the majority of these metabolites were closely associated with amino acid metabolism and DNA replication. Accordingly, we propose a possible pathway for MO biodegradation and discuss the most likely causes of biodegradation inhibition due to dissolved oxygen.

  14. Towards structural studies of the old yellow enzyme homologue SYE4 from Shewanella oneidensis and its complexes at atomic resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elegheert, Jonathan; Hemel, Debbie van den; Dix, Ina; Stout, Jan; Van Beeumen, Jozef; Brigé, Ann; Savvides, Savvas N.

    2009-01-01

    Of the four old yellow enzyme homologues found in S. oneidensis, SYE4 is the homologue most implicated in resistance to oxidative stress. SYE4 was recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Shewanella oneidensis is an environmentally versatile Gram-negative γ-proteobacterium that is endowed with an unusually large proteome of redox proteins. Of the four old yellow enzyme (OYE) homologues found in S. oneidensis, SYE4 is the homologue most implicated in resistance to oxidative stress. SYE4 was recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 and were moderately pseudo-merohedrally twinned, emulating a P422 metric symmetry. The native crystals of SYE4 were of exceptional diffraction quality and provided complete data to 1.10 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation, while crystals of the reduced enzyme and of the enzyme in complex with a wide range of ligands typically led to high-quality complete data sets to 1.30–1.60 Å resolution, thus providing a rare opportunity to dissect the structure–function relationships of a good-sized enzyme (40 kDa) at true atomic resolution. Here, the attainment of a number of experimental milestones in the crystallographic studies of SYE4 and its complexes are reported, including isolation of the elusive hydride–Meisenheimer complex

  15. Physiological and transcriptional approaches reveal connection between nitrogen and manganese cycles in Shewanella algae C6G3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aigle, Axel; Bonin, Patricia; Iobbi-Nivol, Chantal; Méjean, Vincent; Michotey, Valérie

    2017-03-01

    To explain anaerobic nitrite/nitrate production at the expense of ammonium mediated by manganese oxide (Mn(IV)) in sediment, nitrate and manganese respirations were investigated in a strain (Shewanella algae C6G3) presenting these features. In contrast to S. oneidensis MR-1, a biotic transitory nitrite accumulation at the expense of ammonium was observed in S. algae during anaerobic growth with Mn(IV) under condition of limiting electron acceptor, concomitantly, with a higher electron donor stoichiometry than expected. This low and reproducible transitory accumulation is the result of production and consumption since the strain is able to dissimilative reduce nitrate into ammonium. Nitrite production in Mn(IV) condition is strengthened by comparative expression of the nitrate/nitrite reductase genes (napA, nrfA, nrfA-2), and rates of the nitrate/nitrite reductase activities under Mn(IV), nitrate or fumarate conditions. Compared with S. oneidensis MR-1, S. algae contains additional genes that encode nitrate and nitrite reductases (napA-α and nrfA-2) and an Outer Membrane Cytochrome (OMC)(mtrH). Different patterns of expression of the OMC genes (omcA, mtrF, mtrH and mtrC) were observed depending on the electron acceptor and growth phase. Only gene mtrF-2 (SO1659 homolog) was specifically expressed under the Mn(IV) condition. Nitrate and Mn(IV) respirations seem connected at the physiological and transcriptional levels.

  16. Tracking Electron Uptake from a Cathode into Shewanella Cells: Implications for Energy Acquisition from Solid-Substrate Electron Donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette R. Rowe

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available While typically investigated as a microorganism capable of extracellular electron transfer to minerals or anodes, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can also facilitate electron flow from a cathode to terminal electron acceptors, such as fumarate or oxygen, thereby providing a model system for a process that has significant environmental and technological implications. This work demonstrates that cathodic electrons enter the electron transport chain of S. oneidensis when oxygen is used as the terminal electron acceptor. The effect of electron transport chain inhibitors suggested that a proton gradient is generated during cathode oxidation, consistent with the higher cellular ATP levels measured in cathode-respiring cells than in controls. Cathode oxidation also correlated with an increase in the cellular redox (NADH/FMNH2 pool determined with a bioluminescence assay, a proton uncoupler, and a mutant of proton-pumping NADH oxidase complex I. This work suggested that the generation of NADH/FMNH2 under cathodic conditions was linked to reverse electron flow mediated by complex I. A decrease in cathodic electron uptake was observed in various mutant strains, including those lacking the extracellular electron transfer components necessary for anodic-current generation. While no cell growth was observed under these conditions, here we show that cathode oxidation is linked to cellular energy acquisition, resulting in a quantifiable reduction in the cellular decay rate. This work highlights a potential mechanism for cell survival and/or persistence on cathodes, which might extend to environments where growth and division are severely limited.

  17. Tracking Electron Uptake from a Cathode into Shewanella Cells: Implications for Energy Acquisition from Solid-Substrate Electron Donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeev, Pournami; Jain, Abhiney; Pirbadian, Sahand; Okamoto, Akihiro; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT While typically investigated as a microorganism capable of extracellular electron transfer to minerals or anodes, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can also facilitate electron flow from a cathode to terminal electron acceptors, such as fumarate or oxygen, thereby providing a model system for a process that has significant environmental and technological implications. This work demonstrates that cathodic electrons enter the electron transport chain of S. oneidensis when oxygen is used as the terminal electron acceptor. The effect of electron transport chain inhibitors suggested that a proton gradient is generated during cathode oxidation, consistent with the higher cellular ATP levels measured in cathode-respiring cells than in controls. Cathode oxidation also correlated with an increase in the cellular redox (NADH/FMNH2) pool determined with a bioluminescence assay, a proton uncoupler, and a mutant of proton-pumping NADH oxidase complex I. This work suggested that the generation of NADH/FMNH2 under cathodic conditions was linked to reverse electron flow mediated by complex I. A decrease in cathodic electron uptake was observed in various mutant strains, including those lacking the extracellular electron transfer components necessary for anodic-current generation. While no cell growth was observed under these conditions, here we show that cathode oxidation is linked to cellular energy acquisition, resulting in a quantifiable reduction in the cellular decay rate. This work highlights a potential mechanism for cell survival and/or persistence on cathodes, which might extend to environments where growth and division are severely limited. PMID:29487241

  18. Cu-doped TiO2 nanoparticles enhance survival of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under Ultraviolet Light (UV) exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Bing; Zhuang, Wei-Qin; Sahu, Manoranjan; Biswas, Pratim; Tang, Yinjie J.

    2011-01-01

    It has been shown that photocatalytic TiO 2 nanoparticles (NPs) can be used as an efficient anti-microbial agent under UV light due to generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), while Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a metal-reducing bacterium highly susceptible to UV radiation. Interestingly, we found that the presence of Cu-doped TiO 2 NPs in the cultural medium dramatically increased the survival rates (based on colony-forming unit) of strain MR-1 by over 10,000-fold (incubation without shaking) and ∼ 200 fold (incubation with shaking) after a 2-h exposure to UV light. Gene expression results (via qPCR measurement) indicated that the DNA repair gene recA in MR-1 was significantly induced by UV exposure (indicating cellular damage under UV stress), but the influence of NPs on recA expression was not statistically evident. Plausible explanations to NP attenuation of UV stresses are: 1. TiO 2 based NPs are capable of scattering and absorbing UV light and thus create a shading effect to protect MR-1 from UV radiation; 2. more importantly, Cu-doped TiO 2 NPs can co-agglomerate with MR-1 to form large flocs that improves cells' survival against the environmental stresses. This study improves our understanding of NP ecological impacts under natural solar radiation and provides useful insights to application of photocatalytic-NPs for bacterial disinfection.

  19. Use of an Electrochemical Split Cell Technique to Evaluate the Influence of Shewanella oneidensis Activities on Corrosion of Carbon Steel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Bertram Miller

    Full Text Available Microbially induced corrosion (MIC is a complex problem that affects various industries. Several techniques have been developed to monitor corrosion and elucidate corrosion mechanisms, including microbiological processes that induce metal deterioration. We used zero resistance ammetry (ZRA in a split chamber configuration to evaluate the effects of the facultatively anaerobic Fe(III reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 on the corrosion of UNS G10180 carbon steel. We show that activities of S. oneidensis inhibit corrosion of steel with which that organism has direct contact. However, when a carbon steel coupon in contact with S. oneidensis was electrically connected to a second coupon that was free of biofilm (in separate chambers of the split chamber assembly, ZRA-based measurements indicated that current moved from the S. oneidensis-containing chamber to the cell-free chamber. This electron transfer enhanced the O2 reduction reaction on the coupon deployed in the cell free chamber, and consequently, enhanced oxidation and corrosion of that electrode. Our results illustrate a novel mechanism for MIC in cases where metal surfaces are heterogeneously covered by biofilms.

  20. Understanding the role of multiheme cytochromes in iron(III) reduction and arsenic mobilization by Shewanella sp. ANA-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, C.; Duenas, R.; Saltikov, C.

    2006-12-01

    The reduction of Fe (III) to Fe (II) and of arsenate (As (V)) to arsenite (As (III)) by Fe (III) reducing and As (V) respiring prokaryotes such as the bacterium Shewanella sp. ANA-3 may contribute to arsenic mobilization in aquifers contaminated with arsenic, specifically in places such as Bangladesh. Under oxic conditions As (V) predominates and is often adsorbed onto mineral surfaces such as amorphous ferrihydrite. However, under anoxic conditions As (III) predominates, sorbs to fewer minerals, and has a greater hydrologic mobility compared to As (V). The genetic mechanism underlying arsenic release from subsurface material most likely involves a combination of respiratory gene clusters (e.g. mtr/omc and arr). In this study, we are investigating the genetic pathways underlying arsenic mobilization. We have generated various mutations in the mtr/omc gene cluster, which encodes several outermembrane decaheme c-type cytochromes. Deletions in one mtr/omc gene did not eliminate iron reduction. However, strains carrying multiple gene deletions were greatly impaired in iron reduction abilities. Work is currently underway to generate combinations of iron reduction and arsenate reduction single and double mutants that will be used to investigate microbial mobilization of arsenic in flow-through columns containing As (V)-HFO coated sand. This work will address the importance of arsenate reduction and iron reduction in the mobilization of arsenic.

  1. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 nanowires are outer membrane and periplasmic extensions of the extracellular electron transport components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirbadian, Sahand; Barchinger, Sarah E; Leung, Kar Man; Byun, Hye Suk; Jangir, Yamini; Bouhenni, Rachida A; Reed, Samantha B; Romine, Margaret F; Saffarini, Daad A; Shi, Liang; Gorby, Yuri A; Golbeck, John H; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y

    2014-09-02

    Bacterial nanowires offer an extracellular electron transport (EET) pathway for linking the respiratory chain of bacteria to external surfaces, including oxidized metals in the environment and engineered electrodes in renewable energy devices. Despite the global, environmental, and technological consequences of this biotic-abiotic interaction, the composition, physiological relevance, and electron transport mechanisms of bacterial nanowires remain unclear. We report, to our knowledge, the first in vivo observations of the formation and respiratory impact of nanowires in the model metal-reducing microbe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Live fluorescence measurements, immunolabeling, and quantitative gene expression analysis point to S. oneidensis MR-1 nanowires as extensions of the outer membrane and periplasm that include the multiheme cytochromes responsible for EET, rather than pilin-based structures as previously thought. These membrane extensions are associated with outer membrane vesicles, structures ubiquitous in Gram-negative bacteria, and are consistent with bacterial nanowires that mediate long-range EET by the previously proposed multistep redox hopping mechanism. Redox-functionalized membrane and vesicular extensions may represent a general microbial strategy for electron transport and energy distribution.

  2. Effects of atmospheric air plasma treatment of graphite and carbon felt electrodes on the anodic current from Shewanella attached cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epifanio, Monica; Inguva, Saikumar; Kitching, Michael; Mosnier, Jean-Paul; Marsili, Enrico

    2015-12-01

    The attachment of electrochemically active microorganisms (EAM) on an electrode is determined by both the chemistry and topography of the electrode surface. Pre-treatment of the electrode surface by atmospheric air plasma introduces hydrophilic functional groups, thereby increasing cell attachment and electroactivity in short-term experiments. In this study, we use graphite and carbon felt electrodes to grow the model EAM Shewanella loihica PV-4 at oxidative potential (0.2 V vs. Ag/AgCl). Cell attachment and electroactivity are measured through electrodynamic methods. Atmospheric air plasma pre-treatment increases cell attachment and current output at graphite electrodes by 25%, while it improves the electroactivity of the carbon felt electrodes by 450%. Air plasma pre-treatment decreased the coulombic efficiency on both carbon felt and graphite electrodes by 60% and 80%, respectively. Microbially produced flavins adsorb preferentially at the graphite electrode, and air plasma pre-treatment results in lower flavin adsorption at both graphite and carbon felt electrodes. Results show that air plasma pre-treatment is a feasible option to increase current output in bioelectrochemical systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. WO3 nanorods-modified carbon electrode for sustained electron uptake from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 with suppressed biofilm formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Feng; Yuan, Shi-Jie; Li, Wen-Wei; Chen, Jie-Jie; Ko, Chi-Chiu; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • WO 3 nanorods-modified carbon paper was used as the anode of MFC. • WO 3 nanorods suppressed biofilm growth on the electrode surface. • Sustained electron transfer from cells to electrode via riboflavin was achieved. • C–WO 3 nanorods enable stable and efficient EET process in long-time operation. - Abstract: Carbon materials are widely used as electrodes for bioelectrochemical systems (BES). However, a thick biofilm tends to grow on the electrode surface during continuous operation, resulting in constrained transport of electrons and nutrients at the cell-electrode interface. In this work, we tackled this problem by adopting a WO 3 -nanorods modified carbon electrode (C–WO 3 nanorods), which completely suppressed the biofilm growth of Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1. Moreover, the C–WO 3 nanorods exhibited high electric conductivity and strong response to riboflavin. These two factors together make it possible for the C–WO 3 nanorods to maintain a sustained, efficient process of electron transfer from the MR-1 planktonic cells. As a consequence, the microbial fuel cells with C–WO 3 nanorods anode showed more stable performance than the pure carbon paper and WO 3 -nanoparticles systems in prolonged operation. This work suggests that WO 3 nanorods have the potential to be used as a robust and biofouling-resistant electrode material for practical bioelectrochemical applications

  4. Flavin as an Indicator of the Rate-Limiting Factor for Microbial Current Production in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Junki; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Okamoto, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    Microbial electrode catalysis such as microbial fuel cells or electrosynthesis involves electron exchange with the electrodes located at the cell exterior; i.e., extracellular electron transport (EET). Despite the vast amount of research on the kinetics of EET to optimize the catalysis rate, the relevance of other factors, including upstream metabolic reactions, has scarcely been investigated. Herein, we report an in vivo electrochemical assay to confirm whether EET limits anodic current production (j) for the lactate oxidation of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Addition of riboflavin, which specifically enhances the EET rate, increased j only in the early phase before j saturation. In contrast, when we removed a trace metal ion necessary for upstream reactions from the electrolyte, a significant decrease in j and the lactate consumption rate was observed only after j saturation. These data suggest that the limiting factor for j shifted from EET to upstream reactions, highlighting the general importance of enhancing, for example, microbial metabolism, especially for long-standing practical applications. Our concept to specifically control the rate of EET could be applicable to other bioelectrode catalysis systems as a strategy to monitor their rate-limiting factors.

  5. Enhanced eicosapentaenoic acid production by a new deep-sea marine bacterium Shewanella electrodiphila MAR441T.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinwei Zhang

    Full Text Available Omega-3 fatty acids are products of secondary metabolism, essential for growth and important for human health. Although there are numerous reports of bacterial production of omega-3 fatty acids, less information is available on the biotechnological production of these compounds from bacteria. The production of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5ω3 by a new species of marine bacteria Shewanella electrodiphila MAR441T was investigated under different fermentation conditions. This strain produced a high percentage (up to 26% of total fatty acids and high yields (mg / g of biomass of EPA at or below the optimal growth temperature. At higher growth temperatures these values decreased greatly. The amount of EPA produced was affected by the carbon source, which also influenced fatty acid composition. This strain required Na+ for growth and EPA synthesis and cells harvested at late exponential or early stationary phase had a higher EPA content. Both the highest amounts (20 mg g-1 and highest percent EPA content (18% occurred with growth on L-proline and (NH42SO4. The addition of cerulenin further enhanced EPA production to 30 mg g-1. Chemical mutagenesis using NTG allowed the isolation of mutants with improved levels of EPA content (from 9.7 to 15.8 mg g-1 when grown at 15°C. Thus, the yields of EPA could be substantially enhanced without the need for recombinant DNA technology, often a commercial requirement for food supplement manufacture.

  6. Synthesis of Ultra-Small Platinum, Palladium and Gold Nanoparticles by Shewanella loihica PV-4 Electrochemically Active Biofilm and Their Enhanced Catalytic Activities

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Elaf

    2018-02-21

    Ultra-small nanoparticles (USNPs) of noble metals have a great potential in a variety of applications due to their high surface areas and high reactivity. This works employed electrochemically active biofilms (EABs) composed of a single bacterium strain of Shewanella loihica PV-4 and successfully synthesized USNPs of noble metal Au, Pd, and Pt. The synthesized USNPs had a size range between 2 and 7 nm and exhibited excellent catalytic performance in dye decomposition. The results of this work shine lights on the use of EABs in nanoparticle synthesis.

  7. Stress induction in the bacteria Shewanella oneidensis and Deinococcus radiodurans in response to below-background ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Hugo; Schoderbek, Donald; Dulal, Santosh; Escobar, Gabriela; Wood, Jeffrey; Nelson, Roger; Smith, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    The 'Linear no-threshold' (LNT) model predicts that any amount of radiation increases the risk of organisms to accumulate negative effects. Several studies at below background radiation levels (4.5-11.4 nGy h(-1)) show decreased growth rates and an increased susceptibility to oxidative stress. The purpose of our study is to obtain molecular evidence of a stress response in Shewanella oneidensis and Deinococcus radiodurans grown at a gamma dose rate of 0.16 nGy h(-1), about 400 times less than normal background radiation. Bacteria cultures were grown at a dose rate of 0.16 or 71.3 nGy h(-1) gamma irradiation. Total RNA was extracted from samples at early-exponential and stationary phases for the rt-PCR relative quantification (radiation-deprived treatment/background radiation control) of the stress-related genes katB (catalase), recA (recombinase), oxyR (oxidative stress transcriptional regulator), lexA (SOS regulon transcriptional repressor), dnaK (heat shock protein 70) and SOA0154 (putative heavy metal efflux pump). Deprivation of normal levels of radiation caused a reduction in growth of both bacterial species, accompanied by the upregulation of katB, recA, SOA0154 genes in S. oneidensis and the upregulation of dnaK in D. radiodurans. When cells were returned to background radiation levels, growth rates recovered and the stress response dissipated. Our results indicate that below-background levels of radiation inhibited growth and elicited a stress response in two species of bacteria, contrary to the LNT model prediction.

  8. Effect of anode polarization on biofilm formation and electron transfer in Shewanella oneidensis/graphite felt microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, David; Coradin, Thibaud; Laberty-Robert, Christel

    2018-04-01

    In microbial fuel cells, electricity generation is assumed by bacterial degradation of low-grade organics generating electrons that are transferred to an electrode. The nature and efficiency of the electron transfer from the bacteria to the electrodes are determined by several chemical, physical and biological parameters. Specifically, the application of a specific potential at the bioanode has been shown to stimulate the formation of an electro-active biofilm, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In this study, we have investigated the effect of an applied potential on the formation and electroactivity of biofilms established by Shewanella oneidensis bacteria on graphite felt electrodes in single- and double-chamber reactor configurations in oxic conditions. Using amperometry, cyclic voltammetry, and OCP/Power/Polarization curves techniques, we showed that a potential ranging between -0.3V and +0.5V (vs. Ag/AgCl/KCl sat.) and its converse application to a couple of electrodes leads to different electrochemical behaviors, anodic currents and biofilm architectures. For example, when the bacteria were confined in the anodic compartment of a double-chamber cell, a negative applied potential (-0.3V) at the bioanode favors a mediated electron transfer correlated with the progressive formation of a biofilm that fills the felt porosity and bridges the graphite fibers. In contrast, a positive applied potential (+0.3V) at the bioanode stimulates a direct electron transfer resulting in the fast-bacterial colonization of the fibers only. These results provide significant insight for the understanding of the complex bacteria-electrode interactions in microbial fuel cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Facilitated extracellular electron transfer of Shewanella loihica PV-4 by antimony-doped tin oxide nanoparticles as active microelectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaojian; Liu, Huan; Wang, Jinrong; Ren, Guangyuan; Xie, Beizhen; Liu, Hong; Zhu, Ying; Jiang, Lei

    2015-11-28

    Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria are capable of extracellular electron transfer (EET) to insoluble metal oxides as external electron acceptors for their anaerobic respiration, which is recognized as an important energy-conversion process in natural and engineered environments, such as in mineral cycling, bioremediation, and microbial fuel/electrolysis cells. However, the low EET efficiency remains one of the major bottlenecks for its practical application. We report firstly that the microbial current generated by Shewanella loihica PV-4 (S. loihica PV-4) could be greatly improved that is up to ca. 115 fold, by adding antimony-doped tin oxide (ATO) nanoparticles in the electrochemical reactor. The results demonstrate that the biocompatible, electrically conductive ATO nanoparticles acted as active microelectrodes could facilitate the formation of a cells/ATO composite biofilm and the reduction of the outer membrane c-type cytochromes (OM c-Cyts) that are beneficial for the electron transfer from cells to electrode. Meanwhile, a synergistic effect between the participation of OM c-Cyts and the accelerated EET mediated by cell-secreted flavins may play an important role for the enhanced current generation in the presence of ATO nanoparticles. Moreover, it is worth noting that the TCA cycle in S. loihica PV-4 cells is activated by adding ATO nanoparticles, even if the potential is poised at +0.2 V, thereby also improving the EET process. The results presented here may provide a simple and effective strategy to boost the EET of S. loihica PV-4 cells, which is conducive to providing potential applications in bioelectrochemical systems.

  10. Shewanella oneidensis: a new and efficient System for Expression and Maturation of heterologous [Fe-Fe] Hydrogenase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sybirna Kateryna

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The eukaryotic green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, produces H2 under anaerobic conditions, in a reaction catalysed by a [Fe-Fe] hydrogenase HydA1. For further biochemical and biophysical studies a suitable expression system of this enzyme should be found to overcome its weak expression in the host organism. Two heterologous expression systems used up to now have several advantages. However they are not free from some drawbacks. In this work we use bacterium Shewanella oneidensis as a new and efficient system for expression and maturation of HydA1 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Results Based on codon usage bias and hydrogenase maturation ability, the bacterium S. oneidensis, which possesses putative [Fe-Fe] and [Ni-Fe] hydrogenase operons, was selected as the best potential host for C. reinhardtii [Fe-Fe] hydrogenase expression. Hydrogen formation by S. oneidensis strain AS52 (ΔhydAΔhyaB transformed with a plasmid bearing CrHydA1 and grown in the presence of six different substrates for anaerobic respiration was determined. A significant increase in hydrogen evolution was observed for cells grown in the presence of trimethylamine oxide, dimethylsulfoxide and disodium thiosulfate, showing that the system of S. oneidensis is efficient for heterologous expression of algal [Fe-Fe] hydrogenase. Conclusion In the present work a new efficient system for heterologous expression and maturation of C. reinhardtii hydrogenase has been developed. HydA1 of C. reinhardtii was purified and shown to contain 6 Fe atoms/molecule of protein, as expected. Using DMSO, TMAO or thiosulfate as substrates for anaerobic respiration during the cell growth, 0.4 – 0.5 mg l-1(OD600 = 1 of catalytically active HydA1 was obtained with hydrogen evolution rate of ~700 μmol H2 mg-1 min-1.

  11. Iron triggers λSo prophage induction and release of extracellular DNA in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binnenkade, Lucas; Teichmann, Laura; Thormann, Kai M

    2014-09-01

    Prophages are ubiquitous elements within bacterial chromosomes and affect host physiology and ecology in multiple ways. We have previously demonstrated that phage-induced lysis is required for extracellular DNA (eDNA) release and normal biofilm formation in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Here, we investigated the regulatory mechanisms of prophage λSo spatiotemporal induction in biofilms. To this end, we used a functional fluorescence fusion to monitor λSo activation in various mutant backgrounds and in response to different physiological conditions. λSo induction occurred mainly in a subpopulation of filamentous cells in a strictly RecA-dependent manner, implicating oxidative stress-induced DNA damage as the major trigger. Accordingly, mutants affected in the oxidative stress response (ΔoxyR) or iron homeostasis (Δfur) displayed drastically increased levels of phage induction and abnormal biofilm formation, while planktonic cells were not or only marginally affected. To further investigate the role of oxidative stress, we performed a mutant screen and identified two independent amino acid substitutions in OxyR (T104N and L197P) that suppress induction of λSo by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). However, λSo induction was not suppressed in biofilms formed by both mutants, suggesting a minor role of intracellular H2O2 in this process. In contrast, addition of iron to biofilms strongly enhanced λSo induction and eDNA release, while both processes were significantly suppressed at low iron levels, strongly indicating that iron is the limiting factor. We conclude that uptake of iron during biofilm formation triggers λSo-mediated lysis of a subpopulation of cells, likely by an increase in iron-mediated DNA damage sensed by RecA. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Characterization of the periplasmic redox network that sustains the versatile anaerobic metabolism of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica N. Alves

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The versatile anaerobic metabolism of the Gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (SOMR-1 relies on a multitude of redox proteins found in its periplasm. Most are multiheme cytochromes that carry electrons to terminal reductases of insoluble electron acceptors located at the cell surface, or bona fide terminal reductases of soluble electron acceptors. In this study, the interaction network of several multiheme cytochromes was explored by a combination of NMR spectroscopy, activity assays followed by UV-visible spectroscopy and comparison of surface electrostatic potentials. From these data the small tetraheme cytochrome (STC emerges as the main periplasmic redox shuttle in SOMR-1. It accepts electrons from CymA and distributes them to a number of terminal oxidoreductases involved in the respiration of various compounds. STC is also involved in the electron transfer pathway to reduce nitrite by interaction with the octaheme tetrathionate reductase (OTR, but not with cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR. In the main pathway leading the metal respiration STC pairs with flavocytochrome c (FccA, the other major periplasmic cytochrome, which provides redundancy in this important pathway. The data reveals that the two proteins compete for the binding site at the surface of MtrA, the decaheme cytochrome inserted on the periplasmic side of the MtrCAB-OmcA outer-membrane complex. However, this is not observed for the MtrA homologues. Indeed, neither STC nor FccA interact with MtrD, the best replacement for MtrA, and only STC is able to interact with the decaheme cytochrome DmsE of the outer-membrane complex DmsEFABGH. Overall, these results shown that STC plays a central role in the anaerobic respiratory metabolism of SOMR-1. Nonetheless, the trans-periplasmic electron transfer chain is functionally resilient as a consequence of redundancies that arise from the presence of alternative pathways that bypass/compete with STC.

  13. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 chemotaxis proteins and electron-transport chain components essential for congregation near insoluble electron acceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, H Wayne; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y; Nealson, Kenneth H

    2012-12-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells utilize a behaviour response called electrokinesis to increase their speed in the vicinity of IEAs (insoluble electron acceptors), including manganese oxides, iron oxides and poised electrodes [Harris, El-Naggar, Bretschger, Ward, Romine, Obraztsova and Nealson (2010) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 107, 326-331]. However, it is not currently understood how bacteria remain in the vicinity of the IEA and accumulate both on the surface and in the surrounding medium. In the present paper, we provide results indicating that cells that have contacted the IEAs swim faster than those that have not recently made contact. In addition, fast-swimming cells exhibit an enhancement of swimming reversals leading to rapid non-random accumulation of cells on, and adjacent to, mineral particles. We call the observed accumulation near IEAs 'congregation'. Congregation is eliminated by the loss of a critical gene involved with EET (extracellular electron transport) (cymA, SO_4591) and is altered or eliminated in several deletion mutants of homologues of genes that are involved with chemotaxis or energy taxis in Escherichia coli. These genes include chemotactic signal transduction protein (cheA-3, SO_3207), methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins with the Cache domain (mcp_cache, SO_2240) or the PAS (Per/Arnt/Sim) domain (mcp_pas, SO_1385). In the present paper, we report studies of S. oneidensis MR-1 that lend some insight into how microbes in this group can 'sense' the presence of a solid substrate such as a mineral surface, and maintain themselves in the vicinity of the mineral (i.e. via congregation), which may ultimately lead to attachment and biofilm formation.

  14. Biofabrication of morphology improved cadmium sulfide nanoparticles using Shewanella oneidensis bacterial cells and ionic liquid: For toxicity against brain cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Chen, Siyuan; Ding, Yiming; Zhu, Qiang; Zhang, Nijia; Yu, Shuqing

    2018-01-01

    The present work determines the anticancer activity of bio-mediated synthesized cadmium sulfide nanoparticles using the ionic liquid and bacterial cells (Shewanella oneidensis). Bacterial cells have been exposed to be important resources that hold huge potential as ecofriendly, cost-effective, evading toxic of dangerous chemicals and the alternative of conventional physiochemical synthesis. The Shewanella oneidensis is an important kind of metal reducing bacterium, known as its special anaerobic respiratory and sulfate reducing capacity. The crystalline nature, phase purity and surface morphology of biosynthesized cadmium sulfide nanoparticles were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Field emission scanning electron microscopy, Energy dispersive spectroscopy and Transmission electron microscopy. The use of imidazolium based ionic liquids as soft templating agent for controlling self-assembly and crystal growth direction of metal sulfide nanoparticles has also advanced as an important method. The microscopic techniques showed that the nanoparticles are designed on the nano form and have an excellent spherical morphology, due to the self-assembled mechanism of ionic liquid assistance. The antitumor efficiency of the cadmium sulfide nanoparticles was investigated against brain cancer cell lines using rat glioma cell lines. The effectively improved nano-crystalline and morphological structure of CdS nanoparticles in the presence of IL exhibit excellent cytotoxicity and dispersion ability on the cell shape is completely spread out showing a nice toxic environment against cancer cells. The cytotoxicity effect of cadmium sulfide nanoparticles was discussed with a diagrammatic representation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Crystallization of uridine phosphorylase from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in the laboratory and under microgravity and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safonova, Tatyana N.; Mordkovich, Nadezhda N.; Polyakov, Konstantin M.; Manuvera, Valentin A.; Veiko, Vladimir P.; Popov, Vladimir O.

    2012-01-01

    High-quality crystals of uridine phosphorylase from Shewanella oneidensis were grown under microgravity conditions. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 0.95 Å. Uridine phosphorylase (UDP, EC 2.4.2.3), a key enzyme in the pyrimidine salvage pathway, catalyses the reversible phosphorolysis of uridine to uracil and ribose 1-phosphate. The gene expression of UDP from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was performed in the recipient strain Escherichia coli. The UDP protein was crystallized on earth (in the free form and in complex with uridine as the substrate) by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 296 K and under microgravity conditions (in the free form) aboard the Russian Segment of the International Space Station by the capillary counter-diffusion method. The data sets were collected to a resolution of 1.9 Å from crystals of the free form grown on earth, 1.6 Å from crystals of the complex with uridine and 0.95 Å from crystals of the free form grown under microgravity. All crystals belong to the space group P2 1 and have similar unit-cell parameters. The crystal of uridine phosphorylase grown under microgravity diffracted to ultra-high resolution and gave high-quality X-ray diffraction data

  16. The acid-tolerant L-arabinose isomerase from the mesophilic Shewanella sp. ANA-3 is highly active at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background L-arabinose isomerases catalyse the isomerization of L-arabinose into L-ribulose at insight biological systems. At industrial scale of this enzyme is used for the bioconversion of D-galactose into D-tagatose which has many applications in pharmaceutical and agro-food industries. The isomerization reaction is thermodynamically equilibrated, and therefore the bioconversion rates is shifted towards tagatose when the temperature is increased. Moreover, to prevent secondary reactions it will be of interest to operate at low pH. The profitability of this D-tagatose production process is mainly related to the use of lactose as cheaper raw material. In many dairy products it will be interesting to produce D-tagatose during storage. This requires an efficient L-arabinose isomerase acting at low temperature and pH values. Results The gene encoding the L-arabinose isomerase from Shewanella sp. ANA-3 was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The purified protein has a tetrameric arrangement composed by four identical 55 kDa subunits. The biochemical characterization of this enzyme showed that it was distinguishable by its maximal activity at low temperatures comprised between 15-35°C. Interestingly, this biocatalyst preserves more than 85% of its activity in a broad range of temperatures from 4.0 to 45°C. Shewanella sp. ANA-3 L-arabinose isomerase was also optimally active at pH 5.5-6.5 and maintained over 80% of its activity at large pH values from 4.0 to 8.5. Furthermore, this enzyme exhibited a weak requirement for metallic ions for its activity evaluated at 0.6 mM Mn2+. Stability studies showed that this protein is highly stable mainly at low temperature and pH values. Remarkably, T268K mutation clearly enhances the enzyme stability at low pH values. Use of this L-arabinose isomerase for D-tagatose production allows the achievement of attractive bioconversion rates of 16% at 4°C and 34% at 35°C. Conclusions Here we reported the purification and the

  17. The acid-tolerant L-arabinose isomerase from the mesophilic Shewanella sp. ANA-3 is highly active at low temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhimi Moez

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background L-arabinose isomerases catalyse the isomerization of L-arabinose into L-ribulose at insight biological systems. At industrial scale of this enzyme is used for the bioconversion of D-galactose into D-tagatose which has many applications in pharmaceutical and agro-food industries. The isomerization reaction is thermodynamically equilibrated, and therefore the bioconversion rates is shifted towards tagatose when the temperature is increased. Moreover, to prevent secondary reactions it will be of interest to operate at low pH. The profitability of this D-tagatose production process is mainly related to the use of lactose as cheaper raw material. In many dairy products it will be interesting to produce D-tagatose during storage. This requires an efficient L-arabinose isomerase acting at low temperature and pH values. Results The gene encoding the L-arabinose isomerase from Shewanella sp. ANA-3 was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The purified protein has a tetrameric arrangement composed by four identical 55 kDa subunits. The biochemical characterization of this enzyme showed that it was distinguishable by its maximal activity at low temperatures comprised between 15-35°C. Interestingly, this biocatalyst preserves more than 85% of its activity in a broad range of temperatures from 4.0 to 45°C. Shewanella sp. ANA-3 L-arabinose isomerase was also optimally active at pH 5.5-6.5 and maintained over 80% of its activity at large pH values from 4.0 to 8.5. Furthermore, this enzyme exhibited a weak requirement for metallic ions for its activity evaluated at 0.6 mM Mn2+. Stability studies showed that this protein is highly stable mainly at low temperature and pH values. Remarkably, T268K mutation clearly enhances the enzyme stability at low pH values. Use of this L-arabinose isomerase for D-tagatose production allows the achievement of attractive bioconversion rates of 16% at 4°C and 34% at 35°C. Conclusions Here we

  18. In-vivo identification of direct electron transfer from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to electrodes via outer-membrane OmcA-MtrCAB protein complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, Akihiro [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Nakamura, Ryuhei, E-mail: nakamura@light.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Hashimoto, Kazuhito, E-mail: hashimoto@light.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); ERATO/JST, HASHIMOTO Light Energy Conversion Project (Japan)

    2011-06-30

    Graphical abstract: . Display Omitted Highlights: > Monolayer biofilm of Shewanella cells was prepared on an ITO electrode. > Extracellular electron transfer (EET) process was examined with series of mutants. > Direct ET was confirmed with outer-membrane-bound OmcA-MtrCAB complex. > The EET process was not prominently influenced by capsular polysaccharide. - Abstract: The direct electron-transfer (DET) property of Shewanella bacteria has not been resolved in detail due to the complexity of in vivo electrochemistry in whole-cell systems. Here, we report the in vivo assignment of the redox signal indicative of the DET property in biofilms of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 by cyclic voltammetry (CV) with a series of mutants and a chemical marking technique. The CV measurements of monolayer biofilms formed by deletion mutants of c-type cytochromes ({Delta}mtrA, {Delta}mtrB, {Delta}mtrC/{Delta}omcA, and {Delta}cymA), and pilin ({Delta}pilD), capsular polysaccharide ({Delta}SO3177) and menaquinone ({Delta}menD) biosynthetic proteins demonstrated that the electrochemical redox signal with a midpoint potential at 50 mV (vs. SHE) was due to an outer-membrane-bound OmcA-MtrCAB protein complex of decaheme cytochromes, and did not involve either inner-membrane-bound CymA protein or secreted menaquinone. Using the specific binding affinity of nitric monoxide for the heme groups of c-type cytochromes, we further confirmed this conclusion. The heterogeneous standard rate constant for the DET process was estimated to be 300 {+-} 10 s{sup -1}, which was two orders of magnitude higher than that previously reported for the electron shuttling process via riboflavin. Experiments using a mutant unable to produce capsular polysaccharide ({Delta}SO3177) revealed that the DET property of the OmcA-MtrCAB complex was not influenced by insulating and hydrophilic extracellular polysaccharide. Accordingly, under physiological conditions, S. oneidensis MR-1 utilizes a high density of outer

  19. Water SA - Vol 28, No 2 (2002)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Distribution of Shewanella putrefaciens and Desulfovibrio vulgaris in sulphidogenic biofilms of industrial cooling water systems determined by fluorescent in situ hybridisation · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Elise S McLeod, Raynard MacDonald, ...

  20. Elucidating the Molecular Basis and Regulation of Chromium(VI) Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Resistance to Metal Toxicity Using Integrated Biochemical, Genomic and Proteomic Approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorothea K. Thompson; Robert Hettich

    2007-02-06

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a model environmental organism that possesses diverse respiratory capacities, including the ability to reduce soluble Cr(VI) to sparingly soluble, less toxic Cr(III). Chromate is a serious anthropogenic pollutant found in subsurface sediment and groundwater environments due to its widespread use in defense and industrial applications. Effective bioremediation of chromate-contaminated sites requires knowledge of the molecular mechanisms and regulation of heavy metal resistance and biotransformation by dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria. Towards this goal, our ERSP-funded work was focused on the identification and functional analysis of genes/proteins comprising the response pathways for chromate detoxification and/or reduction. Our work utilized temporal transcriptomic profiling and whole-cell proteomic analyses to characterize the dynamic molecular response of MR-1 to an acute chromate shock (up to 90 min) as well as to a 24-h, low-dose exposure. In addition, we have examined the transcriptome of MR-1 cells actively engaged in chromate reduction. These studies implicated the involvement of a functionally undefined DNA-binding response regulator (SO2426) and a putative azoreductase (SO3585) in the chromate stress response of MR-1.

  1. Elucidating the Molecular Basis and Regulation of Chromium (VI) Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Using Biochemical, Genomic, and Proteomic Approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hettich, Robert L.

    2006-10-30

    Although microbial metal reduction has been investigated intensively from physiological and biochemical perspectives, little is known about the genetic basis and regulatory mechanisms underlying the ability of certain bacteria to transform, detoxify, or immobilize a wide array of heavy metals contaminating DOE-relevant environments. The major goal of this work is to elucidate the molecular components comprising the chromium(VI) response pathway, with an emphasis on components involved in Cr(VI) detoxification and the enzyme complex catalyzing the terminal step in Cr(VI) reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. We have identified and characterized (in the case of DNA-binding response regulator [SO2426] and a putative azoreductase [SO3585]) the genes and gene products involved in the molecular response of MR-1 to chromium(VI) stress using whole-genome sequence information for MR-1 and recently developed proteomic technology, in particular liquid chromatographymass spectrometry (LC-MS), in conjunction with conventional protein purification and characterization techniques. The proteome datasets were integrated with information from whole-genome expression arrays for S. oneidensis MR-1 (as illustrated in Figure 1). The genes and their encoded products identified in this study are of value in understanding metal reduction and bacterial resistance to metal toxicity and in developing effective metal immobilization strategies.

  2. Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR) does not disproportionate hydroxylamine to ammonia and nitrite, despite a strongly favorable driving force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngblut, Matthew; Pauly, Daniel J; Stein, Natalia; Walters, Daniel; Conrad, John A; Moran, Graham R; Bennett, Brian; Pacheco, A Andrew

    2014-04-08

    Cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR) from Shewanella oneidensis, which catalyzes the six-electron reduction of nitrite to ammonia in vivo, was shown to oxidize hydroxylamine in the presence of large quantities of this substrate, yielding nitrite as the sole free nitrogenous product. UV-visible stopped-flow and rapid-freeze-quench electron paramagnetic resonance data, along with product analysis, showed that the equilibrium between hydroxylamine and nitrite is fairly rapidly established in the presence of high initial concentrations of hydroxylamine, despite said equilibrium lying far to the left. By contrast, reduction of hydroxylamine to ammonia did not occur, even though disproportionation of hydroxylamine to yield both nitrite and ammonia is strongly thermodynamically favored. This suggests a kinetic barrier to the ccNiR-catalyzed reduction of hydroxylamine to ammonia. A mechanism for hydroxylamine reduction is proposed in which the hydroxide group is first protonated and released as water, leaving what is formally an NH2(+) moiety bound at the heme active site. This species could be a metastable intermediate or a transition state but in either case would exist only if it were stabilized by the donation of electrons from the ccNiR heme pool into the empty nitrogen p orbital. In this scenario, ccNiR does not catalyze disproportionation because the electron-donating hydroxylamine does not poise the enzyme at a sufficiently low potential to stabilize the putative dehydrated hydroxylamine; presumably, a stronger reductant is required for this.

  3. Oxygen tension and riboflavin gradients cooperatively regulate the migration of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 revealed by a hydrogel-based microfluidic device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beum Jun Kim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella oneidensis (S. oneidensis is a model bacterial strain for studies of bioelectrochemical systems (BESs. It has two extracellular electron transfer pathways: 1 shuttling electrons via an excreted mediator riboflavin; and 2 direct contact between the c-type cytochromes at the cell membrane and the electrode. Despite the extensive use of S. oneidensis in bioelectrochemical systems such as microbial fuel cells and biosensors, many basic microbiology questions about S. oneidensis in the context of BES remain unanswered. Here, we present studies of motility and chemotaxis of S. oneidensis under well controlled concentration gradients of two electron acceptors, oxygen and oxidized form of riboflavin (flavin+ using a newly developed microfluidic platform. Experimental results demonstrate that either oxygen or flavin+ is a chemoattractant to S. oneidensis. The chemotactic tendency of S. oneidensis in a flavin+ concentration gradient is significantly enhanced in an anaerobic in contrast to an aerobic condition. Furthermore, either a low oxygen tension or a high flavin+ concentration considerably enhances the speed of S. oneidensis. This work presents a robust microfluidic platform for generating oxygen and/or flavin+ gradients in an aqueous environment, and demonstrates that two important electron acceptors, oxygen and oxidized riboflavin, cooperatively regulate S. oneidensis migration patterns. The microfluidic tools presented as well as the knowledge gained in this work can be used to guide the future design of BESs for efficient electron production.

  4. Enhanced biofilm formation and melanin synthesis by the oyster settlement-promoting Shewanella colwelliana is related to hydrophobic surface and simulated intertidal environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Sayani; Gachhui, Ratan; Mukherjee, Joydeep

    2015-01-01

    A direct relationship between biofilm formation and melanogenesis in Shewanella colwelliana with increased oyster recruitment is already established. Previously, S. colwelliana was grown in a newly patented biofilm-cultivation device, the conico-cylindrical flask (CCF), offering interchangeable hydrophobic/hydrophilic surfaces. Melanization was enhanced when S. colwelliana was cultivated in a hydrophobic vessel compared with a hydrophilic vessel. In the present study, melanogenesis in the CCF was positively correlated with increased architectural parameters of the biofilm (mean thickness and biovolume obtained by confocal laser scanning microscopy) and melanin gene (melA) expression observed by densitometry. Niche intertidal conditions were mimicked in a process operated in an ultra-low-speed rotating disk bioreactor, which demonstrated enhanced biofilm formation, melanogenesis, exopolysaccharide synthesis and melA gene expression compared with a process where 12-h periodic immersion and emersion was prevented. The wettability properties of the settling plane as well as intermittent wetting and drying, which influenced biofilm formation and melA expression, may affect oyster settlement in nature.

  5. The role of riboflavin in decolourisation of Congo red and bioelectricity production using Shewanella oneidensis-MR1 under MFC and non-MFC conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomaa, Ola M; Fapetu, Segun; Kyazze, Godfrey; Keshavarz, Tajalli

    2017-03-01

    Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria can exchange electrons extracellularly and hold great promise for their use in simultaneous wastewater treatment and electricity production. This study investigated the role of riboflavin, an electron carrier, in the decolourisation of Congo red in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) using Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as a model organism. The contribution of the membrane-bound protein MtrC to the decolourisation process was also investigated. Within the range of riboflavin concentrations tested, 20 µM was found to be the best with >95% of the dye (initial concentration 200 mg/L) decolourised in MFCs within 50 h compared to 90% in the case where no riboflavin was added. The corresponding maximum power density was 45 mW/m 2 . There was no significant difference in the overall decolourisation efficiencies of Shewanela oneidensis MR-1 ΔMtrC mutants compared to the wild type. However, in terms of power production the mutant produced more power (P max 76 mW/m 2 ) compared to the wild type (P max 46 mW/m 2 ) which was attributed to higher levels of riboflavin secreted in solution. Decolourisation efficiencies in non-MFC systems (anaerobic bottles) were similar to those under MFC systems indicating that electricity generation in MFCs does not impair dye decolourisation efficiencies. The results suggest that riboflavin enhances both decolourisation of dyes and simultaneous electricity production in MFCs.

  6. Mapping the Subcellular Proteome of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 using Sarkosyl-based fractionation and LC-MS/MS protein identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Roslyn N.; Romine, Margaret F.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2010-07-19

    A simple and effective subcellular proteomic method for fractionation and analysis of gram-negative bacterial cytoplasm, periplasm, inner, and outer membranes was applied to Shewanella oneidensis to gain insight into its subcellular architecture. A combination of differential centrifugation, Sarkosyl solubilization, and osmotic lysis was used to prepare subcellular fractions. Global differences in protein fractions were observed by SDS PAGE and heme staining, and tryptic peptides were analyzed using high-resolution LC-MS/MS. Compared to crude cell lysates, the fractionation method achieved a significant enrichment (average ~2-fold) in proteins predicted to be localized to each subcellular fraction. Compared to other detergent, organic solvent, and density-based methods previously reported, Sarkosyl most effectively facilitated separation of the inner and outer membranes and was amenable to mass spectrometry, making this procedure ideal for probing the subcellular proteome of gram-negative bacteria via LC-MS/MS. With 40% of the observable proteome represented, this study has provided extensive information on both subcellular architecture and relative abundance of proteins in S. oneidensis and provides a foundation for future work on subcellular organization and protein-membrane interactions in other gram-negative bacteria.

  7. A putative siderophore-interacting protein from the marine bacterium Shewanella frigidimarina NCIMB 400: cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trindade, Inês B.; Fonseca, Bruno M. [Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Avenida da República (EAN), 2780-157 Oeiras (Portugal); Matias, Pedro M. [Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Avenida da República (EAN), 2780-157 Oeiras (Portugal); Instituto de Biologia Experimental e Tecnológica (iBET), Apartado 12, 2780-901 Oeiras (Portugal); Louro, Ricardo O.; Moe, Elin, E-mail: elinmoe@itqb.unl.pt [Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Avenida da República (EAN), 2780-157 Oeiras (Portugal)

    2016-08-09

    The gene encoding a putative siderophore-interacting protein from the marine bacterium S. frigidimarina was successfully cloned, followed by expression and purification of the gene product. Optimized crystals diffracted to 1.35 Å resolution and preliminary crystallographic analysis is promising with respect to structure determination and increased insight into the poorly understood molecular mechanisms underlying iron acquisition. Siderophore-binding proteins (SIPs) perform a key role in iron acquisition in multiple organisms. In the genome of the marine bacterium Shewanella frigidimarina NCIMB 400, the gene tagged as SFRI-RS12295 encodes a protein from this family. Here, the cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of this protein are reported, together with its preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis to 1.35 Å resolution. The SIP crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 48.04, b = 78.31, c = 67.71 Å, α = 90, β = 99.94, γ = 90°, and are predicted to contain two molecules per asymmetric unit. Structure determination by molecular replacement and the use of previously determined ∼2 Å resolution SIP structures with ∼30% sequence identity as templates are ongoing.

  8. Combined effect of loss of the caa3 oxidase and Crp regulation drives Shewanella to thrive in redox-stratified environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guangqi; Yin, Jianhua; Chen, Haijiang; Hua, Yijie; Sun, Linlin; Gao, Haichun

    2013-09-01

    Shewanella species are a group of facultative Gram-negative microorganisms with remarkable respiration abilities that allow the use of a diverse array of terminal electron acceptors (EA). Like most bacteria, S. oneidensis possesses multiple terminal oxidases, including two heme-copper oxidases (caa3- and cbb3-type) and a bd-type quinol oxidase. As aerobic respiration is energetically favored, mechanisms underlying the fact that these microorganisms thrive in redox-stratified environments remain vastly unexplored. In this work, we discovered that the cbb3-type oxidase is the predominant system for respiration of oxygen (O2), especially when O2 is abundant. Under microaerobic conditions, the bd-type quinol oxidase has a significant role in addition to the cbb3-type oxidase. In contrast, multiple lines of evidence suggest that under test conditions the caa3-type oxidase, an analog to the mitochondrial enzyme, has no physiological significance, likely because of its extremely low expression. In addition, expression of both cbb3- and bd-type oxidases is under direct control of Crp (cAMP receptor protein) but not the well-established redox regulator Fnr (fumarate nitrate regulator) of canonical systems typified in Escherichia coli. These data, collectively, suggest that adaptation of S. oneidensis to redox-stratified environments is likely due to functional loss of the caa3-type oxidase and switch of the regulatory system for respiration.

  9. Increases of heat shock proteins and their mRNAs at high hydrostatic pressure in a deep-sea piezophilic bacterium, Shewanella violacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hiroshi; Nakasone, Kaoru; Yoshida, Takao; Kato, Chiaki; Maruyama, Tadashi

    2015-07-01

    When non-extremophiles encounter extreme environmental conditions, which are natural for the extremophiles, stress reactions, e.g., expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs), are thought to be induced for survival. To understand how the extremophiles live in such extreme environments, we studied the effects of high hydrostatic pressure on cellular contents of HSPs and their mRNAs during growth in a piezophilic bacterium, Shewanella violacea. HSPs increased at high hydrostatic pressures even when optimal for growth. The mRNAs and proteins of these HSPs significantly increased at higher hydrostatic pressure in S. violacea. In the non-piezophilic Escherichia coli, however, their mRNAs decreased, while their proteins did not change. Several transcriptional start sites (TSSs) for HSP genes were determined by the primer extension method and some of them showed hydrostatic pressure-dependent increase of the mRNAs. A major refolding target of one of the HSPs, chaperonin, at high hydrostatic pressure was shown to be RplB, a subunit of the 50S ribosome. These results suggested that in S. violacea, HSPs play essential roles, e.g., maintaining protein complex machinery including ribosomes, in the growth and viability at high hydrostatic pressure, and that, in their expression, the transcription is under the control of σ(32).

  10. An ice-binding and tandem beta-sandwich domain-containing protein in Shewanella frigidimarina is a potential new type of ice adhesin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, Tyler D R; Graham, Laurie A; Davies, Peter L

    2018-04-01

    Out of the dozen different ice-binding protein (IBP) structures known, the DUF3494 domain is the most widespread, having been passed many times between prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms by horizontal gene transfer. This ~25-kDa β-solenoid domain with an adjacent parallel α-helix is most commonly associated with an N-terminal secretory signal peptide. However, examples of the DUF3494 domain preceded by tandem Bacterial Immunoglobulin-like (BIg) domains are sometimes found, though uncharacterized. Here, we present one such protein (SfIBP_1) from the Antarctic bacterium Shewanella frigidimarina. We have confirmed and characterized the ice-binding activity of its ice-binding domain using thermal hysteresis measurements, fluorescent ice plane affinity analysis, and ice recrystallization inhibition assays. X-ray crystallography was used to solve the structure of the SfIBP_1 ice-binding domain, to further characterize its ice-binding surface and unique method of stabilizing or 'capping' the ends of the solenoid structure. The latter is formed from the interaction of two loops mediated by a combination of tandem prolines and electrostatic interactions. Furthermore, given their domain architecture and membrane association, we propose that these BIg-containing DUF3494 IBPs serve as ice-binding adhesion proteins that are capable of adsorbing their host bacterium onto ice. Submitted new structure to the Protein Data Bank (PDB: 6BG8). © 2018 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  11. Gaseous ligand selectivity of the H-NOX sensor protein from Shewanella oneidensis and comparison to those of other bacterial H-NOXs and soluble guanylyl cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gang; Liu, Wen; Berka, Vladimir; Tsai, Ah-Lim

    2017-09-01

    To delineate the commonalities and differences in gaseous ligand discrimination among the heme-based sensors with Heme Nitric oxide/OXygen binding protein (H-NOX) scaffold, the binding kinetic parameters for gaseous ligands NO, CO, and O 2 , including K D , k on , and k off , of Shewanella oneidensis H-NOX (So H-NOX) were characterized in detail in this study and compared to those of previously characterized H-NOXs from Clostridium botulinum (Cb H-NOX), Nostoc sp. (Ns H-NOX), Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis (Tt H-NOX), Vibrio cholera (Vc H-NOX), and human soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), an H-NOX analogue. The K D (NO) and K D (CO) of each bacterial H-NOX or sGC follow the "sliding scale rule"; the affinities of the bacterial H-NOXs for NO and CO vary in a small range but stronger than those of sGC by at least two orders of magnitude. On the other hand, each bacterial H-NOX exhibits different characters in the stability of its 6c NO complex, reactivity with secondary NO, stability of oxyferrous heme and autoxidation to ferric heme. A facile access channel for gaseous ligands is also identified, implying that ligand access has only minimal effect on gaseous ligand selectivity of H-NOXs or sGC. This comparative study of the binding parameters of the bacterial H-NOXs and sGC provides a basis to guide future new structural and functional studies of each specific heme sensor with the H-NOX protein fold. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  12. Starch-fueled microbial fuel cells by two-step and parallel fermentation using Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Streptococcus bovis 148.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Megumi; Phansroy, Nichanan; Aso, Yuji; Ohara, Hitomi

    2017-08-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 generates electricity from lactic acid, but cannot utilize starch. On the other hand, Streptococcus bovis 148 metabolizes starch and produces lactic acid. Therefore, two methods were trialed for starch-fueled microbial fuel cell (MFC) in this study. In electric generation by two-step fermentation (EGT) method, starch was first converted to lactic acid by S. bovis 148. The S. bovis 148 were then removed by centrifugation, and the fermented broth was preserved for electricity generation by S. oneidensis MR-1. Another method was electric generation by parallel fermentation (EGP) method. In this method, the cultivation and subsequent fermentation processes of S. bovis 148 and S. oneidensis MR-1 were performed simultaneously. After 1, 2, and 3 terms (5-day intervals) of S. oneidensis MR-1 in the EGT fermented broth of S. bovis 148, the maximum currents at each term were 1.8, 2.4, and 2.8 mA, and the maximum current densities at each term were 41.0, 43.6, and 49.9 mW/m 2 , respectively. In the EGP method, starch was also converted into lactic acid with electricity generation. The maximum current density was 140-200 mA/m 2 , and the maximum power density of this method was 12.1 mW/m 2 . Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Characterization of a new M13 metallopeptidase from deep-sea Shewanella sp. E525-6 and mechanistic insight into its catalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Yu eYang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial extracellular peptidases are important for bacterial nutrition and organic nitrogen degradation in the ocean. While many peptidases of the M13 family from terrestrial animals and bacteria are studied, there has been no report on M13 peptidases from marine bacteria. Here, we characterized an M13 peptidase, PepS, from the deep-sea sedimentary strain Shewanella sp. E525-6, and investigated its substrate specificity and catalytic mechanism. The gene pepS cloned from strain E525-6 contains 2085 bp and encodes an M13 metallopeptidase. PepS was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Among the characterized M13 peptidases, PepS shares the highest sequence identity (47% with Zmp1 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, indicating that PepS is a new member of the M13 family. PepS had the highest activity at 30°C and pH 8.0. It retained 15% activity at 0°C. Its half life at 40°C was only 4 min. These properties indicate that PepS is a cold-adapted enzyme. The smallest substrate for PepS is pentapeptide, and it is probably unable to cleave peptides of more than 30 residues. PepS prefers to hydrolyze peptide bonds with P1’ hydrophobic residues. Structural and mutational analyses suggested that His531, His535 and Glu592 coordinate the catalytic zinc ion in PepS, Glu532 acts as a nucleophile, and His654 is probably involved in the transition state stabilization. Asp538 and Asp596 can stablize the orientations of His531 and His535, and Arg660 can stablize the orientation of Asp596. These results help in understanding marine bacterial peptidases and organic nitrogen degradation.

  14. The outer membrane protein Omp35 affects the reduction of Fe(III, nitrate, and fumarate by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myers Charles R

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uses several electron acceptors to support anaerobic respiration including insoluble species such as iron(III and manganese(IV oxides, and soluble species such as nitrate, fumarate, dimethylsulfoxide and many others. MR-1 has complex branched electron transport chains that include components in the cytoplasmic membrane, periplasm, and outer membrane (OM. Previous studies have implicated a role for anaerobically upregulated OM electron transport components in the use of insoluble electron acceptors, and have suggested that other OM components may also contribute to insoluble electron acceptor use. In this study, the role for an anaerobically upregulated 35-kDa OM protein (Omp35 in the use of anaerobic electron acceptors was explored. Results Omp35 was purified from the OM of anaerobically grown cells, the gene encoding Omp35 was identified, and an omp35 null mutant (OMP35-1 was isolated and characterized. Although OMP35-1 grew on all electron acceptors tested, a significant lag was seen when grown on fumarate, nitrate, and Fe(III. Complementation studies confirmed that the phenotype of OMP35-1 was due to the loss of Omp35. Despite its requirement for wild-type rates of electron acceptor use, analysis of Omp35 protein and predicted sequence did not identify any electron transport moieties or predicted motifs. OMP35-1 had normal levels and distribution of known electron transport components including quinones, cytochromes, and fumarate reductase. Omp35 is related to putative porins from MR-1 and S. frigidimarina as well as to the PorA porin from Neisseria meningitidis. Subcellular fraction analysis confirmed that Omp35 is an OM protein. The seven-fold anaerobic upregulation of Omp35 is mediated post-transcriptionally. Conclusion Omp35 is a putative porin in the OM of MR-1 that is markedly upregulated anaerobically by a post-transcriptional mechanism. Omp35 is required for normal rates of growth on Fe

  15. Removal of methylmercury and tributyltin (TBT) using marine microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong Eon; Chung, Jin Wook; Won, Ho Shik; Lee, Dong Sup; Lee, Yong-Woo

    2012-02-01

    Two marine species of bacteria were isolated that are capable of degrading organometallic contaminants: Pseudomonas balearica, which decomposes methylmercury; and Shewanella putrefaciens, which decomposes tributyltin. P. balearica decomposed 97% of methylmercury (20.0 μg/L) into inorganic mercury after 3 h, while S. putrefaciens decomposed 88% of tributyltin (55.3 μg Sn/L) in real wastewater after 36 h. These data indicate that the two bacteria efficiently decomposed the targeted substances and may be applied to real wastewater.

  16. pH Control Enables Simultaneous Enhancement of Nitrogen Retention and N2O Reduction in Shewanella loihica Strain PV-4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayeon Kim

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available pH has been recognized as one of the key environmental parameters with significant impacts on the nitrogen cycle in the environment. In this study, the effects of pH on NO3–/NO2– fate and N2O emission were examined with Shewanella loihica strain PV-4, an organism with complete denitrification and respiratory ammonification pathways. Strain PV-4 was incubated at varying pH with lactate as the electron donor and NO3–/NO2– and N2O as the electron acceptors. When incubated with NO3– and N2O at pH 6.0, transient accumulation of N2O was observed and no significant NH4+ production was observed. At pH 7.0 and 8.0, strain PV-4 served as a N2O sink, as N2O concentration decreased consistently without accumulation. Respiratory ammonification was upregulated in the experiments performed at these higher pH values. When NO2– was used in place of NO3–, neither growth nor NO2– reduction was observed at pH 6.0. NH4+ was the exclusive product from NO2– reduction at both pH 7.0 and 8.0 and neither production nor consumption of N2O was observed, suggesting that NO2– regulation superseded pH effects on the nitrogen-oxide dissimilation reactions. When NO3– was the electron acceptor, nirK transcription was significantly upregulated upon cultivation at pH 6.0, while nrfA transcription was significantly upregulated at pH 8.0. The highest level of nosZ transcription was observed at pH 6.0 and the lowest at pH 8.0. With NO2– as the electron acceptor, transcription profiles of nirK, nrfA, and nosZ were statistically indistinguishable between pH 7.0 and 8.0. The transcriptions of nirK and nosZ were severely downregulated regardless of pH. These observations suggested that the kinetic imbalance between N2O production and consumption, but neither decrease in expression nor activity of NosZ, was the major cause of N2O accumulation at pH 6.0. The findings also suggest that simultaneous enhancement of nitrogen retention and N2O emission reduction may be

  17. Electrochemistry study of the influence of local hydrogen generation in carbon steel bio-corrosion mechanisms in presence of iron reducing bacteria (Shewanella oneidensis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, R.; Libert, M.; Tribollet, B.; Vivier, V.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The safe disposal of nuclear waste is a major concern for the nuclear energy industry. The high-level long-lived waste (HLNW) should be maintained for millions of years in clay formations at 500 metres depth in order to prevent the migration of radionuclides. Thence, different kinds of materials such as, carbon steel, stainless steel, concrete, clay, etc., are chosen aiming to last as long as possible and to preserve the radioactivity properties. In contrast, the anoxic corrosion of the different metallic envelopes is an expected phenomenon due to the changes on the environmental conditions (such as re-saturation) within HLNW repositories. In this context, corrosion products like iron oxides (i.e. magnetite, Fe 3 O 4 ), and hydrogen will be also expected. On the one hand, hydrogen poses a significant threat to the nuclear waste repository when it is accumulated for a long time in the surrounding clay - such hydrogen production may damage the barrier properties of the geological formation, affecting the safety of the repository. On the other hand, hydrogen production represents a new energy source for bacterial growth, especially in such environments with low content of biodegradable organic matter. Moreover, some hydrogeno-trophic bacteria can also use Fe 3+ as an electron acceptor for their development. Therefore, the biological activity and biofilm formation could interfere in the metal corrosion behaviour. This phenomenon is widely known by MIC (Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion), which can represent a huge problem when promoting local corrosion. The objective of this study is to better understand the influence of local hydrogen formation in the carbon steel bio-corrosion process in the presence of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a model of Iron Reducing Bacteria (IRB), in order to evaluate the impact of the bacterial activity in terms of long term behaviour of geological disposal materials. In this study

  18. Curvularia haloperoxidase: Antimicrobial activity and potential application as a surface disinfectant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, E.H.; Albertsen, Line; Johansen, Charlotte

    2003-01-01

    , to antimicrobial compounds. The Curvularia haloperoxidase system caused several-log-unit reductions in counts of bacteria (Pseudomonas spp., Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, Aeromonas salmonicida, Shewanella putrefaciens, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Listeria monocytogenes), yeasts (Candida sp....... and Rhodotorula sp.), and filamentous fungi (Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus tubigensis, Aspergillus versicolor, Fusarium oxysporum, Penicillium chrysogenum, and Penicillium paxilli) cultured in suspension. Also, bacteria adhering to the surfaces of contact lenses were killed. The numbers of S. marcescens and S...

  19. Kinetics of biofilm formation and desiccation survival of Listeria monocytogenes in single and dual species biofilms with Pseudomonas fluorescens, Serratia proteamaculans or Shewanella baltica on food-grade stainless steel surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshvar Alavi, Hessam Edin; Truelstrup Hansen, Lisbeth

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the dynamics of static biofilm formation (100% RH, 15 °C, 48-72 h) and desiccation survival (43% RH, 15 °C, 21 days) of Listeria monocytogenes, in dual species biofilms with the common spoilage bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Serratia proteamaculans and Shewanella baltica, on the surface of food grade stainless steel. The Gram-negative bacteria reduced the maximum biofilm population of L. monocytogenes in dual species biofilms and increased its inactivation during desiccation. However, due to the higher desiccation resistance of Listeria relative to P. fluorescens and S. baltica, the pathogen survived in greater final numbers. In contrast, S. proteamaculans outcompeted the pathogen during the biofilm formation and exhibited similar desiccation survival, causing the N21 days of Serratia to be ca 3 Log10(CFU cm(-2)) greater than that of Listeria in the dual species biofilm. Microscopy revealed biofilm morphologies with variable amounts of exopolymeric substance and the presence of separate microcolonies. Under these simulated food plant conditions, the fate of L. monocytogenes during formation of mixed biofilms and desiccation depended on the implicit characteristics of the co-cultured bacterium.

  20. Mechanisms of bacterially catalyzed reductive dehalogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picardal, Flynn William [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Nine bacteria were tested for the ability to dehalogenate tetrachloromethane (CT), tetrachloroethene (PCE), and 1, 1, 1-trichloroethane (TCA) under anaerobic conditions. Three bacteria were able to reductively dehalogenate CT. Dehalogenation ability was not readily linked to a common metabolism or changes in culture redox potential. None of the bacteria tested were able to dehalogenate PCE or TCA. One of the bacteria capable of dehalogenating CT, Shewanella putrefaciens, was chosen as a model organism to study mechanisms of bacterially catalyzed reductive dehalogenation. The effect of a variety of alternate electron acceptors on CT dehalogenation ability by S. putrefaciens was determined. oxygen and nitrogen oxides were inhibitory but Fe (III), trimethylamine oxide, and fumarate were not. A model of the electron transport chain of S. putrefaciens was developed to explain inhibition patterns. A period of microaerobic growth prior to CT exposure increased the ability of S. putrefaciens to dehalogenate CT. A microaerobic growth period also increased cytochrome concentrations. A relationship between cytochrome content and dehalogenation ability was developed from studies in which cytochrome concentrations in S. putrefaciens were manipulated by changing growth conditions. Stoichiometry studies using 14C-CT suggested that CT was first reduced to form a trichloromethyl radical. Reduction of the radical to produce chloroform and reaction of the radical with cellular biochemicals explained observed product distributions. Carbon dioxide or other fully dehalogenated products were not found.

  1. Monitoring structural transformation of hydroxy-sulphate green rust in the presence of sulphate reducing bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelmoula, M.; Zegeye, A.; Jorand, F.; Carteret, C.

    2006-01-01

    The activities of bacterial consortia enable organisms to maximize their metabolic capabilities. This article assesses the synergetic relationship between iron reducing bacteria (IRB), Shewanella putrefaciens and sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) Desulfovibrio alaskensis. Thus, the aim of this study was first to form a biogenic hydroxy-sulpahte green rust GR2(SO 4 -2 ) through the bioreduction of lepidocrocite by S. putrefaciens and secondly to investigate if sulfate anions intercalated in the biogenic GR2(SO 4 -2 ) could serve as final electron acceptor for a sulfate reducing bacterium, D. alaskensis. The results indicate that the IRB lead to the formation of GR2(SO 4 -2 ) and this mineral serve as an electron acceptor for SRB. GR2(SO 4 -2 ) precipitation and its transformation was demonstrated by using X-ray diffraction (DRX), Moessbauer spectroscopy (TMS) and transmission electron spectroscopy (TEM). These observations point out the possible acceleration of steel corrosion in marine environment in presence of IRB/SRB consortia.

  2. Physiological and Growth Characteristics of Shewanella Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    with B vitamins in the MMB. After the addition of riboflavin, DPV scans revealed a peak at -0.419 ± 0.005 V; n = 3. DPV scans performed on CF 31 h...0.008. The DM was supplemented with Wolfe’s mineral and vitamin solutions [20]. Peptone and yeast extract were omitted and replaced with high-purity...containing MB, cell elongation was observed when cultures entered stationary phase. Under DM conditions, agarose was in excess throughout the

  3. Integrated genome based studies of Shewanella ecophysiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saffarini, Daad A

    2013-03-07

    Progress is reported in these areas: Regulation of anaerobic respiration by cAMP receptor protein and role of adenylate cyclases; Identification of an octaheme c cytochrome as the terminal sulfite reductase in S. oneidensis MR-1; Identification and analysis of components of the electron transport chains that lead to reduction of thiosulfate, tetrathionate, and elemental sulfur in MR-1; Involvement of pili and flagella in metal reduction by S. oneidensis MR-1; and work suggesting that HemN1 is the major enzyme that is involved in heme biosynthesis under anaerobic conditions.

  4. Preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of YqjH from Escherichia coli: a putative cytoplasmic ferri-siderophore reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamford, Vicki A; Armour, Maria; Mitchell, Sue A; Cartron, Michaël; Andrews, Simon C; Watson, Kimberly A

    2008-09-01

    YqjH is a cytoplasmic FAD-containing protein from Escherichia coli; based on homology to ViuB of Vibrio cholerae, it potentially acts as a ferri-siderophore reductase. This work describes its overexpression, purification, crystallization and structure solution at 3.0 A resolution. YqjH shares high sequence similarity with a number of known siderophore-interacting proteins and its structure was solved by molecular replacement using the siderophore-interacting protein from Shewanella putrefaciens as the search model. The YqjH structure resembles those of other members of the NAD(P)H:flavin oxidoreductase superfamily.

  5. Culturable Aerobic and Facultative Anaerobic Intestinal Bacterial Flora of Black Cobra (Naja naja karachiensis) in Southern Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Junaid; Sagheer, Mehwish; Tabassum, Nazneen; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Using morphological analysis and biochemical testing, here for the first time, we determined the culturable gut bacterial flora (aerobes and facultative anaerobes) in the venomous Black Cobra (Naja naja karachiensis) from South Asia. The findings revealed that these snakes inhabit potentially pathogenic bacteria including Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shewanella putrefaciens, Aeromonas hydrophila, Salmonella sp., Moraxella sp., Bacillus sp., Ochrobactrum anthropi, and Providencia rettgeri. These findings are of concern, as injury from snake bite can result in wound infections and tissue necrosis leading to sepsis/necrotizing fasciitis and/or expose consumers of snake meat/medicine in the community to infections. PMID:25002979

  6. The interactive biotic and abiotic processes of DDT transformation under dissimilatory iron-reducing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xin; Wang, Fang; Gu, Chenggang; Yang, Xinglun; Kengara, Fredrick O; Bian, Yongrong; Song, Yang; Jiang, Xin

    2015-11-01

    The objective of the study was to elucidate the biotic and abiotic processes under dissimilatory iron reducing conditions involved in reductive dechlorination and iron reduction. DDT transformation was investigated in cultures of Shewanella putrefaciens 200 with/without α-FeOOH. A modified first-order kinetics model was developed and described DDT transformation well. Both the α-FeOOH reduction rate and the dechlorination rate of DDT were positively correlated to the biomass. Addition of α-FeOOH enhanced reductive dechlorination of DDT by favoring the cell survival and generating Fe(II) which was absorbed on the surface of bacteria and iron oxide. 92% of the absorbed Fe(II) was Na-acetate (1M) extractable. However, α-FeOOH also played a negative role of competing for electrons as reflected by the dechlorination rate of DDT was inhibited when increasing the α-FeOOH from 1 g L(-1) to 5 g L(-1). DDT was measured to be toxic to S. putrefaciens 200. The metabolites DDD, DDE and DDMU were recalcitrant to S. putrefaciens 200. The results suggested that iron oxide was not the key factor to promote the dissipation of DDX (DDT and the metabolites), whereas the one-electron reduction potential (E1) of certain organochlorines is the main factor and that the E1 higher than the threshold of the reductive driving forces of DIRB probably ensures the occur of reductive dechlorination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Isolation and identification of ferric reducing bacteria and evaluation of their roles in iron availability in two calcareous soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbanzadeh, N.; Lakzian, A.; Haghnia, G. H.; Karimi, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    Iron is an essential element for all organisms which plays a crucial role in important biochemical processes such as respiration and photosynthesis. Iron deficiency seems to be an important problem in many calcareous soils. Biological dissimilatory Fe(III) reduction increases iron availability through reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II). The aim of this study was to isolate, identify and evaluate some bacterial isolates for their abilities to reduce Fe(III) in two calcareous soils. Three bacterial isolates were selected and identified from paddy soils by using 16S rRNA amplification and then inoculated to sterilized and non-sterilized calcareous soils in the presence and absence of glucose. The results showed that all isolates belonged to Bacillus genus and were capable of reducing Fe(III) to Fe(II) in vitro condition. The amount of Fe(III) reduction in sterilized calcareous soils was significantly higher when inoculated with PS23 isolate and Shewanella putrefaciens ( S. putrefaciens) (as positive control) compared to PS16 and PS11 isolates. No significant difference was observed between PS11 and PS16 isolates in the presence of indigenous microbial community. The results also revealed that glucose had a significant effect on Fe(III) reduction in the examined calcareous soil samples. The amount of Fe(III) reduction increased two-fold when soil samples were treated with glucose and inoculated by S. putrefaciens and PS23 in non-sterilized soils.

  8. Antibacterial Activity of Zataria multiflora Boiss Essential Oil against Some Fish Spoilage Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hashemi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to investigate antimicrobial effect of Zataria multiflora Boiss essential oil (EO against six fish spoilage bacteria for evaluation of its potential utilization in the preservation of minimally processed fish products. Methods: Firstly, GC-MS analysis of the EO was performed to determine its chemical composition. Then, antibacterial effect of the EO in a range of 0.031 to 4 mg/ml was tested against different fish spoilage bacteria such as Aeromonas hydrophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Shewanella putrefaciens, Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis by broth microdilution method to determine minimum inhibitory (MIC and minimum bactericidal (MBC concentrations. Results: GC-MS results showed that phenolic components such as carvacrol (51.55% and thymol (25.49% were predominant constituents of the EO. Zataria multiflora Boiss EO exhibited strong antimicrobial activity against all tested bacteria. Shewanella Putrefaciens was the most sensitive bacteria with MBC value of 0. 5 mg/ml. Conclusion: According to the results, this EO could be used as an important natural alternative to prevent bacterial growth in food specially seafood products to preserve them against bacterial spoilage.

  9. News and views on tumor markers: The use of radioactive antibodies against cell-bound antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleist, S. von

    1984-01-01

    It was doubtless due to the phenomenal progress in the field of tumor immunology that took place during the last 20 years, that today we dispose not only of highly sensitive immunological tests like the RIA or EIA, but also of most specific reagents like monospecific polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies. In this context the discovery in human carcinomas of tumor-associated antigens was of prime importance, especially since some of them were found to have clinical relevance as so-called tumor markers. It has been shown that there is a direct correlation between the absolute tumor burden and the blood concentration of these substances. Based on animal models a new technology for tumor and metastases detection was developed in recent years, that used polyvalent or monoclonal antibodies prepared against tumor-associated antigens. This technique called radioimmuno-detection (RAID), especially in the hands of experts, may be superior in many instances to conventional radiology, radionuclide scanning or ultra-sonographic techniques. (orig.) [de

  10. Geotrichum candidum 4013: Extracellular lipase versus cell-bound lipase from the single strain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlavsová, Klára; Zarevúcka, Marie; Wimmer, Zdeněk; Macková, M.; Sovová, Helena

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 61, 3/4 (2009), s. 188-193 ISSN 1381-1177 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50380511; CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : supercritical carbon dioxide * blackcurrant oil hydrolysis * enantioselectivity * transesterification Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.400, year: 2009

  11. Microfabricated microbial fuel cell arrays reveal electrochemically active microbes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijie Hou

    Full Text Available Microbial fuel cells (MFCs are remarkable "green energy" devices that exploit microbes to generate electricity from organic compounds. MFC devices currently being used and studied do not generate sufficient power to support widespread and cost-effective applications. Hence, research has focused on strategies to enhance the power output of the MFC devices, including exploring more electrochemically active microbes to expand the few already known electricigen families. However, most of the MFC devices are not compatible with high throughput screening for finding microbes with higher electricity generation capabilities. Here, we describe the development of a microfabricated MFC array, a compact and user-friendly platform for the identification and characterization of electrochemically active microbes. The MFC array consists of 24 integrated anode and cathode chambers, which function as 24 independent miniature MFCs and support direct and parallel comparisons of microbial electrochemical activities. The electricity generation profiles of spatially distinct MFC chambers on the array loaded with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 differed by less than 8%. A screen of environmental microbes using the array identified an isolate that was related to Shewanella putrefaciens IR-1 and Shewanella sp. MR-7, and displayed 2.3-fold higher power output than the S. oneidensis MR-1 reference strain. Therefore, the utility of the MFC array was demonstrated.

  12. Application Of Bacterial Iron Reduction For The Removal Of Iron Impurities From Industrial Silica Sand And Kaolin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegeye, A.; Yahaya, S.; Fialips, C. I.; White, M.; Manning, D. A.; Gray, N.

    2008-12-01

    Biogeochemical evidence exists to support the potential importance of crystalline or amorphous Fe minerals as electron acceptor for Fe reducing bacteria in soils and subsurface sediments. This microbial metabolic activity can be exploited as alternative method in different industrial applications. For instance, the removal of ferric iron impurities from minerals for the glass and paper industries currently rely on physical and chemical treatments having substantial economical and environmental disadvantages. The ability to remove iron by other means, such as bacterial iron reduction, may reduce costs, allow lower grade material to be mined, and improve the efficiency of mineral processing. Kaolin clay and silica sand are used in a wide range of industrial applications, particularly in paper, ceramics and glass manufacturing. Depending on the geological conditions of deposition, they are often associated with iron (hydr)oxides that are either adsorbed to the mineral surfaces or admixed as separate iron bearing minerals. In this study, we have examined the Fe(III) removal efficiency from kaolin and silica sand by a series of iron- reducing bacteria from the Shewanella species (S. alga BrY, S. oneidensis MR-1, S. putrefaciens CN32 and S. putrefaciens ATCC 8071) in the presence of anthraquinone 2,6 disulfonate (AQDS). We have also investigated the effectiveness of a natural organic matter, extracted with the silica sand, as a substitute to AQDS for enhancing Fe(III) reduction kinetics. The microbial reduction of Fe(III) was achieved using batch cultures under non-growth conditions. The rate and the extent of Fe(III) reduction was monitored as a function of the initial Fe(III) content, Shewanella species and temperature. The bacterially- treated minerals were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) to observe any textural and mineralogical transformation. The whiteness and ISO brightness of the kaolin was also measured by

  13. Homogeneity of Danish environmental and clinical isolates of Shewanella algae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Birte Fonnesbech; Holt, H.M.; Gerner-Smidt, P.

    2000-01-01

    amplified polymorphic DNA analysis, no clonal relationship between infective strains was found. From several patients, clonally identical strains of S. algae were reisolated up to 8 months after the primary isolation, indicating that the same strain may be able to maintain the infection....

  14. Antibacterial effect of protamine assayed by impedimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Charlotte; Gill, T.; Gram, Lone

    1995-01-01

    estimating the cell number after protamine treatment, rather than colony counts. Protamine from salmon killed growing Gram- positive bacteria and significantly inhibited growth of Gram- negative bacteria in Tryptone Soy Broth (TSB) at 25 degrees C. In general Gram-positive bacteria were more sensitive...... to protamine than Gram-negative bacteria; the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIG) determined for Gram-positive strains varied from 20 to 1000 mu g ml(-1) and for Gram-negative strains from 500 mu g ml(-1) to more than 4000 mu g ml(-1). The effect of protamine on non-growing Listeria monocytogenes Scott...... A suspended in buffer was not lethal as was the effect on growing cells; however, protamine (50-500 mu g ml(-1)) killed the Gram-negative fish spoilage bacteria Shewanella putrefaciens when the live cells were suspended in buffer....

  15. Microbial pathways for the mobilization of mercury as Hg(O) in anoxic subsurface environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkay, Tamar

    2005-06-01

    The goal of our project which was initiated in June 2005 is focused on the presence of merA in microbial communities of anoxic environments and the effect of anaerobic respiratory pathways on MR expression and activities. The following progress has been made to date: PCR primers were designed to span the known phylogenetic range of merA genes of Gram-negative bacteria. In control experiments, these primers successfully amplified a 288 bp region at the 3? end of previously characterized merA genes from Shewanella putrefaciens pMERPH, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Pseudomonas stutzeri pPB, Tn5041, Pseudomonas sp. K-62, and Serratia marcescens pDU1358.

  16. Dietary administration of the probiotic SpPdp11: Effects on the intestinal microbiota and immune-related gene expression of farmed Solea senegalensis treated with oxytetracycline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia-Paniagua, S T; Vidal, S; Lobo, C; García de la Banda, I; Esteban, M A; Balebona, M C; Moriñigo, M A

    2015-10-01

    Few antimicrobials are currently authorised in the aquaculture industry to treat infectious diseases. Among them, oxytetracycline (OTC) is one of the first-choice drugs for nearly all bacterial diseases. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the dietary administration of OTC both alone and jointly with the probiotic Shewanella putrefaciens Pdp11 (SpPdp11) on the intestinal microbiota and hepatic expression of genes related to immunity in Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) juveniles. The results demonstrated that the richness and diversity of the intestinal microbiota of fish treated with OTC decreased compared with those of the control group but that these effects were lessened by the simultaneous administration of SpPdp11. In addition, specimens that received OTC and SpPdp11 jointly showed a decreased intensity of the Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) bands related to Vibrio genus and the presence of DGGE bands related to Lactobacillus and Shewanella genera. The relationship among the intestinal microbiota of fish fed with control and OTC diets and the expression of the NADPH oxidase and CASPASE-6 genes was demonstrated by a Principal Components Analysis (PCA) carried out in this study. In contrast, a close relationship between the transcription of genes, such as NKEF, IGF-β, HSP70 and GP96, and the DGGE bands of fish treated jointly with OTC and SpPdp11 was observed in the PCA study. In summary, the results obtained in this study demonstrate that the administration of OTC results in the up-regulation of genes related to apoptosis but that the joint administration of OTC and S. putrefaciens Pdp11 increases the transcription of genes related to antiapoptotic effects and oxidative stress regulation. Further, a clear relationship between these changes and those detected in the intestinal microbiota is established. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Impact of natural organic matter coatings on the microbial reduction of iron oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggenburg, Christine; Mikutta, Robert; Schippers, Axel; Dohrmann, Reiner; Guggenberger, Georg

    2018-03-01

    Iron (Fe) oxyhydroxides are important constituents of the soil mineral phase known to stabilize organic matter (OM) under oxic conditions. In an anoxic milieu, however, these Fe-organic associations are exposed to microbial reduction, releasing OM into soil solution. At present, only few studies have addressed the influence of adsorbed natural OM (NOM) on the reductive dissolution of Fe oxyhydroxides. This study therefore examined the impact of both the composition and concentration of adsorbed NOM on microbial Fe reduction with regard to (i) electron shuttling, (ii) complexation of Fe(II,III), (iii) surface site coverage and/or pore blockage, and (iv) aggregation. Adsorption complexes with varying carbon loadings were synthesized using different Fe oxyhydroxides (ferrihydrite, lepidocrocite, goethite, hematite, magnetite) and NOM of different origin (extracellular polymeric substances from Bacillus subtilis, OM extracted from soil Oi and Oa horizons). The adsorption complexes were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), N2 gas adsorption, electrophoretic mobility and particle size measurements, and OM desorption. Incubation experiments under anaerobic conditions were conducted for 16 days comparing two different strains of dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (Shewanella putrefaciens, Geobacter metallireducens). Mineral transformation during reduction was assessed via XRD and FTIR. Microbial reduction of the pure Fe oxyhydroxides was controlled by the specific surface area (SSA) and solubility of the minerals. For Shewanella putrefaciens, the Fe reduction of adsorption complexes strongly correlated with the concentration of potentially usable electron-shuttling molecules for NOM concentrations <2 mg C L-1, whereas for Geobacter metallireducens, Fe reduction depended on the particle size and thus aggregation of the adsorption complexes. These diverging results suggest that

  18. Effects of iron-reducing bacteria and nitrate-reducing bacteria on the transformations of iron corrosion products, magnetite and siderite, formed at the surface of non-alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etique, Marjorie

    2014-01-01

    Radioactive waste is one of the major problems facing the nuclear industry. To circumvent this issue France plans to store vitrified high-level nuclear waste in a stainless steel container, placed into a non-alloy steel overpack, at a depth of 500 m in an argillaceous formation. The main iron corrosion products formed at the surface of the non-alloy steel are siderite (Fe II CO 3 ) and magnetite (Fe II Fe III 2 O 4 ). These compounds are formed in the anoxic conditions present in the nuclear waste repository and play a protective role against corrosion as a passive layer. This work aims to investigate the activity of nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB, Klebsiella mobilis) and iron-reducing bacteria (IRB, Shewanella putrefaciens) during the transformation of siderite and magnetite, especially those involved in anoxic iron biogeochemical cycle. Klebsiella mobilis and Shewanella putrefaciens were first incubated with siderite or magnetite suspensions (high surface specific area) in order to exacerbate the microbial iron transformation, subsequently incubated with a magnetite/siderite film synthesized by anodic polarization at applied current density. The transformation of siderite and magnetite by direct or indirect microbial processes led to the formation of carbonated green rust (Fe II 4 Fe III 2 (OH) 12 CO 3 ). As a transient phase shared by several bacterial reactions involving Fe II and Fe III , this compound is the cornerstone of the anoxic iron biogeochemical cycle. The novelty of this thesis is the consideration of bacterial metabolisms of NRB and IRB often overlooked in bio-corrosion processes. (author) [fr

  19. Microbial iron reduction related to metal speciation in mine waste at the former uranium mine in Ranstad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nejad, F.T.

    1998-02-01

    Mining activities in Ranstad uranium mine started in 1965 and ended in 1969. In 1988 the final restoration was discussed, and it was proposed to water-fill the open pit and cover the waste disposal area using the 'dry method'. Today the open pit has become a lake. Also some alum shale was placed on the land surface where it has been weathered by oxygen and water during 30 years. In 1994 it was observed that the color of the lake turned over to brown-red. Further studies showed increasing iron concentration in the lake and around the tailings area. For estimation of microbial iron reduction in the lake, three iron reducing bacteria were isolated from the water-filled open pit. For the enrichment process, water samples were inoculated in an anoxic enrichment medium. The isolates were able to reduce Fe(III) oxyhydroxide by oxidation of lactate as energy source. Growth of these strains was determined by production of a black precipitation of iron sulfide and was confirmed by estimation of total number of cells. Fe(III) reduction was monitored by measuring the accumulation of Fe(II) over time. Comparison of the 16S rRNA gene sequences of strains Tran-l, Tran-2, and Tran-3 with the EMBL data base showed 98.6% identity with Shewanella putrefaciens, 98.7% identity with Shewanella alga and 98.2% identity with Aeromonas salmonicida, respectively. S. putrefaciens strains have been isolated from many different environments, many of which are suboxic or anoxic. In addition to growing aerobically, S. putrefaciens can use Fe(III) as terminal electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions. To distinguish if the Fe(III) and/or organic compounds presence in weathered alum shale can be utilized by iron reducing bacteria isolated from the lake, reduction of Fe(III) coupled to the oxidation of organic compounds in sterile and non-sterile weathered alum shale was studied. The reduction of Fe(III) coupled to growth of bacteria on sterile and non-sterile shale was observed. Furthermore

  20. Microbial iron reduction related to metal speciation in mine waste at the former uranium mine in Ranstad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nejad, F.T. [Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of General and Marine Microbiology

    1998-02-01

    Mining activities in Ranstad uranium mine started in 1965 and ended in 1969. In 1988 the final restoration was discussed, and it was proposed to water-fill the open pit and cover the waste disposal area using the `dry method`. Today the open pit has become a lake. Also some alum shale was placed on the land surface where it has been weathered by oxygen and water during 30 years. In 1994 it was observed that the color of the lake turned over to brown-red. Further studies showed increasing iron concentration in the lake and around the tailings area. For estimation of microbial iron reduction in the lake, three iron reducing bacteria were isolated from the water-filled open pit. For the enrichment process, water samples were inoculated in an anoxic enrichment medium. The isolates were able to reduce Fe(III) oxyhydroxide by oxidation of lactate as energy source. Growth of these strains was determined by production of a black precipitation of iron sulfide and was confirmed by estimation of total number of cells. Fe(III) reduction was monitored by measuring the accumulation of Fe(II) over time. Comparison of the 16S rRNA gene sequences of strains Tran-l, Tran-2, and Tran-3 with the EMBL data base showed 98.6% identity with Shewanella putrefaciens, 98.7% identity with Shewanella alga and 98.2% identity with Aeromonas salmonicida, respectively. S. putrefaciens strains have been isolated from many different environments, many of which are suboxic or anoxic. In addition to growing aerobically, S. putrefaciens can use Fe(III) as terminal electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions. To distinguish if the Fe(III) and/or organic compounds presence in weathered alum shale can be utilized by iron reducing bacteria isolated from the lake, reduction of Fe(III) coupled to the oxidation of organic compounds in sterile and non-sterile weathered alum shale was studied. The reduction of Fe(III) coupled to growth of bacteria on sterile and non-sterile shale was observed. Furthermore

  1. Radionuclides can be mobilized by bacteria from the subsurface grown under aerobic as well as anaerobic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnsson, A.; Arlinger, J.; Pedersen, K.; Albinsson, Y.; Andlid, T.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Microbes can influence radionuclide mobility in many ways. They can change the pH or redox of their surroundings, act as nucleation sites for precipitation, transport metals sorbed to the cell surface and excrete organic compounds that form mobile radionuclide complexes. The processes behind bio-mobilization of radionuclides are important to study as they may have implications on e g radioactive waste disposal. Three bacterial species; Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas stutzeri and Shewanella putrefaciens were selected for this study. All bacteria were grown under aerobic conditions and P. stutzeri and S. putrefaciens were also grown under anaerobic conditions. Aerobic and anaerobic cultures were centrifuged after having reached stationary phase. The supernatants, containing the exudates of the bacteria, were collected. 59 Fe(III), 147 Pm(III), 234 Th(IV) and 241 Am(III) were added to the supernatants and SiO 2 was added to the supernatant radionuclide mix. The amount of radionuclide in the liquid phase was analyzed using liquid scintillation counting and Na-I gamma spectrometry. Supernatants of all three species of aerobically grown bacteria mobilize more than 60% of all four radionuclides. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis detected four Fe-complexing substances in the supernatant of P. fluorescens and two peaks and one peak, respectively, in the supernatants of P. stutzeri and S. putrefaciens. All substances eluted from the column varied in retention times, indicating that the microbes produced several metabolites that have different complexing abilities. Comparing HPLC data with mobilization data show that P. fluorescens mobilizes the largest percentage of radionuclide and S. putrefaciens mobilizes the least amount of radionuclides in all cases. Like aerobic supernatants the supernatants of anaerobically grown bacteria test positive for siderophores. Despite this 59 Fe(III) shows no net mobilization

  2. Anodic biofilms in microbial fuel cells harbor low numbers of higher-power-producing bacteria than abundant genera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiely, Patrick D.; Call, Douglas F.; Yates, Matthew D.; Regan, John M.; Logan, Bruce E. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2010-09-15

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) anode communities often reveal just a few genera, but it is not known to what extent less abundant bacteria could be important for improving performance. We examined the microbial community in an MFC fed with formic acid for more than 1 year and determined using 16S rRNA gene cloning and fluorescent in situ hybridization that members of the Paracoccus genus comprised most ({proportional_to}30%) of the anode community. A Paracoccus isolate obtained from this biofilm (Paracoccus denitrificans strain PS-1) produced only 5.6 mW/m{sup 2}, whereas the original mixed culture produced up to 10 mW/m{sup 2}. Despite the absence of any Shewanella species in the clone library, we isolated a strain of Shewanella putrefaciens (strain PS-2) from the same biofilm capable of producing a higher-power density (17.4 mW/m{sup 2}) than the mixed culture, although voltage generation was variable. Our results suggest that the numerical abundance of microorganisms in biofilms cannot be assumed a priori to correlate to capacities of these predominant species for high-power production. Detailed screening of bacterial biofilms may therefore be needed to identify important strains capable of high-power generation for specific substrates. (orig.)

  3. Anodic biofilms in microbial fuel cells harbor low numbers of higher-power-producing bacteria than abundant genera

    KAUST Repository

    Kiely, Patrick D.; Call, Douglas F.; Yates, Matthew D.; Regan, John M.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2010-01-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) anode communities often reveal just a few genera, but it is not known to what extent less abundant bacteria could be important for improving performance. We examined the microbial community in an MFC fed with formic acid for more than 1 year and determined using 16S rRNA gene cloning and fluorescent in situ hybridization that members of the Paracoccus genus comprised most (~30%) of the anode community. A Paracoccus isolate obtained from this biofilm (Paracoccus denitrificans strain PS-1) produced only 5.6 mW/m 2, whereas the original mixed culture produced up to 10 mW/m 2. Despite the absence of any Shewanella species in the clone library, we isolated a strain of Shewanella putrefaciens (strain PS-2) from the same biofilm capable of producing a higher-power density (17.4 mW/m2) than the mixed culture, although voltage generation was variable. Our results suggest that the numerical abundance of microorganisms in biofilms cannot be assumed a priori to correlate to capacities of these predominant species for high-power production. Detailed screening of bacterial biofilms may therefore be needed to identify important strains capable of high-power generation for specific substrates. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  4. Anodic biofilms in microbial fuel cells harbor low numbers of higher-power-producing bacteria than abundant genera

    KAUST Repository

    Kiely, Patrick D.

    2010-07-15

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) anode communities often reveal just a few genera, but it is not known to what extent less abundant bacteria could be important for improving performance. We examined the microbial community in an MFC fed with formic acid for more than 1 year and determined using 16S rRNA gene cloning and fluorescent in situ hybridization that members of the Paracoccus genus comprised most (~30%) of the anode community. A Paracoccus isolate obtained from this biofilm (Paracoccus denitrificans strain PS-1) produced only 5.6 mW/m 2, whereas the original mixed culture produced up to 10 mW/m 2. Despite the absence of any Shewanella species in the clone library, we isolated a strain of Shewanella putrefaciens (strain PS-2) from the same biofilm capable of producing a higher-power density (17.4 mW/m2) than the mixed culture, although voltage generation was variable. Our results suggest that the numerical abundance of microorganisms in biofilms cannot be assumed a priori to correlate to capacities of these predominant species for high-power production. Detailed screening of bacterial biofilms may therefore be needed to identify important strains capable of high-power generation for specific substrates. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  5. Inference of Interactions in Cyanobacterial-Heterotrophic Co-Cultures via Transcriptome Sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beliaev, Alex S.; Romine, Margaret F.; Serres, Margaret; Bernstein, Hans C.; Linggi, Bryan E.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Isern, Nancy G.; Chrisler, William B.; Kucek, Leo A.; Hill, Eric A.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy; Bryant, Donald A.; Wiley, H. S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Konopka, Allan

    2014-04-29

    We employed deep sequencing technology to identify transcriptional adaptation of the euryhaline unicellular cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 and the marine facultative aerobe Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1 to growth in a co-culture and infer the effect of carbon flux distributions on photoautotroph-heterotroph interactions. The overall transcriptome response of both organisms to co-cultivation was shaped by their respective physiologies and growth constraints. Carbon limitation resulted in the expansion of metabolic capacities which was manifested through the transcriptional upregulation of transport and catabolic pathways. While growth coupling occurred via lactate oxidation or secretion of photosynthetically fixed carbon, there was evidence of specific metabolic interactions between the two organisms. On one hand, the production and excretion of specific amino acids (methionine and alanine) by the cyanobacterium correlated with the putative downregulation of the corresponding biosynthetic machinery of Shewanella W3-18-1. On the other hand, the broad and consistent decrease of mRNA levels for many Fe-regulated Synechococcus 7002 genes during co-cultivation suggested increased Fe availability as well as more facile and energy-efficient mechanisms for Fe acquisition by the cyanobacterium. Furthermore, evidence pointed at potentially novel interactions between oxygenic photoautotrophs and heterotrophs related to the oxidative stress response as transcriptional patterns suggested that Synechococcus 7002 rather than Shewanella W3-18-1 provided scavenging functions for reactive oxygen species under co-culture conditions. This study provides an initial insight into the complexity of photoautotrophic-heterotrophic interactions and brings new perspectives of their role in the robustness and stability of the association.

  6. Formation and Reactivity of Biogenic Iron Minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferris, F. Grant

    2002-01-01

    Dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria (DIRB) play an important role in regulating the aqueous geochemistry of iron and other metals in anaerobic, non-sulfidogenic groundwater environments; however, little work has directly assessed the cell surface electrochemistry of DIRB, or the nature of the interfacial environment around individual cells. The electrochemical properties of particulate solids are often inferred from titrations in which net surface charge is determined, assuming electroneutrality, as the difference between known added amounts of acid and base and measured proton concentration. The resultant titration curve can then be fit to a speciation model for the system to determine pKa values and site densities of reactive surface sites. Moreover, with the development of non-contact electrostatic force microscopy (EFM), it is now possible to directly inspect and quantify charge development on surfaces. A combination of acid-base titrations and EFM are being used to assess the electrochemical surface properties of the groundwater DIRB, Shewanella putrefaciens. The pKa spectra and EFM data show together that a high degree of electrochemical heterogeneity exists within the cell wall and at the cell surface of S. putrefaciens. Recognition of variations in the nature and spatial distribution of reactive sites that contribute to charge development on these bacteria implies further that the cell surface of these Fe(III)-reducing bacteria functions as a highly differentiated interfacial system capable of supporting multiple intermolecular interactions with both solutes and solids. These include surface complexation reactions involving dissolved metals, as well as adherence to mineral substrates such as hydrous ferric oxide through longer-range electrostatic interactions, and surface precipitation of secondary reduced-iron minerals

  7. Bacterial and iron oxide aggregates mediate secondary iron mineral formation: green rust versus magnetite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegeye, A; Mustin, C; Jorand, F

    2010-06-01

    In the presence of methanoate as electron donor, Shewanella putrefaciens, a Gram-negative, facultative anaerobe, is able to transform lepidocrocite (gamma-FeOOH) to secondary Fe (II-III) minerals such as carbonated green rust (GR1) and magnetite. When bacterial cells were added to a gamma-FeOOH suspension, aggregates were produced consisting of both bacteria and gamma-FeOOH particles. Recently, we showed that the production of secondary minerals (GR1 vs. magnetite) was dependent on bacterial cell density and not only on iron reduction rates. Thus, gamma-FeOOH and S. putrefaciens aggregation pattern was suggested as the main mechanism driving mineralization. In this study, lepidocrocite bioreduction experiments, in the presence of anthraquinone disulfonate, were conducted by varying the [cell]/[lepidocrocite] ratio in order to determine whether different types of aggregate are formed, which may facilitate precipitation of GR1 as opposed to magnetite. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to analyze the relative cell surface area and lepidocrocite concentration within the aggregates and captured images were characterized by statistical methods for spatial data (i.e. variograms). These results suggest that the [cell]/[lepidocrocite] ratio influenced both the aggregate structure and the nature of the secondary iron mineral formed. Subsequently, a [cell]/[lepidocrocite] ratio above 1 x 10(7) cells mmol(-1) leads to densely packed aggregates and to the formation of GR1. Below this ratio, looser aggregates are formed and magnetite was systematically produced. The data presented in this study bring us closer to a more comprehensive understanding of the parameters governing the formation of minerals in dense bacterial suspensions and suggest that screening mineral-bacteria aggregate structure is critical to understanding (bio)mineralization pathways.

  8. Acid base activity of live bacteria: Implications for quantifying cell wall charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claessens, Jacqueline; van Lith, Yvonne; Laverman, Anniet M.; Van Cappellen, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    To distinguish the buffering capacity associated with functional groups in the cell wall from that resulting from metabolic processes, base or acid consumption by live and dead cells of the Gram-negative bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens was measured in a pH stat system. Live cells exhibited fast consumption of acid (pH 4) or base (pH 7, 8, 9, and 10) during the first few minutes of the experiments. At pH 5.5, no acid or base was required to maintain the initial pH constant. The initial amounts of acid or base consumed by the live cells at pH 4, 8, and 10 were of comparable magnitudes as those neutralized at the same pHs by intact cells killed by exposure to gamma radiation or ethanol. Cells disrupted in a French press required higher amounts of acid or base, due to additional buffering by intracellular constituents. At pH 4, acid neutralization by suspensions of live cells stopped after 50 min, because of loss of viability. In contrast, under neutral and alkaline conditions, base consumption continued for the entire duration of the experiments (5 h). This long-term base neutralization was, at least partly, due to active respiration by the cells, as indicated by the build-up of succinate in solution. Qualitatively, the acid-base activity of live cells of the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis resembled that of S. putrefaciens. The pH-dependent charging of ionizable functional groups in the cell walls of the live bacteria was estimated from the initial amounts of acid or base consumed in the pH stat experiments. From pH 4 to 10, the cell wall charge increased from near-zero values to about -4 × 10 -16 mol cell -1 and -6.5 × 10 -16 mol cell -1 for S. putrefaciens and B. subtilis, respectively. The similar cell wall charging of the two bacterial strains is consistent with the inferred low contribution of lipopolysaccharides to the buffering capacity of the Gram-negative cell wall (of the order of 10%).

  9. Heat Production by the Denitrifying Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens and the Dissimilatory Ammonium-Producing Bacterium Pseudomonas putrefaciens during Anaerobic Growth with Nitrate as the Electron Acceptor

    OpenAIRE

    Samuelsson, M.-O.; Cadez, P.; Gustafsson, L.

    1988-01-01

    The heat production rate and the simultaneous nitrate consumption and production and consumption of nitrite and nitrous oxide were monitored during the anaerobic growth of two types of dissimilatory nitrate reducers. Pseudomonas fluorescens, a denitrifier, consumed nitrate and accumulated small amounts of nitrite or nitrous oxide. The heat production rate increased steadily during the course of nitrate consumption and decreased rapidly concomitant with the depletion of the electron acceptors....

  10. Characterization of a new cell-bound alpha-amylase in Bacillus subtilis 168 Marburg that is only immunologically related to the exocellular alpha-amylase.

    OpenAIRE

    Haddaoui, E; Petit-Glatron, M F; Chambert, R

    1995-01-01

    Immunoblot analysis of Bacillus subtilis cell extracts with polyclonal antibodies, raised against purified exocellular alpha-amylase, revealed one protein species of 82,000 Da. This protein was found even in cells in which the amyE gene, encoding exocellular alpha-amylase, was disrupted. Isolated from the membrane fraction, the 82,000-M(r) protein displayed an alpha-amylase activity in vitro.

  11. Analysis of Fatty Acid and Growth Profiles in Ten Shewanella spp. to Associate Phylogenetic Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-25

    microorganisms from the same genus using physiological responses. To understand these changes, a shift in fatty acid length distributions and growth of...phylogenetically dissimilar microorganisms from the same genus using physiological responses. To understand these changes, a shift in fatty acid length...region contaminated with metals: relation with ecological characteristics and soil respiration. J. Biorem. Biodegrad . 6, 1000274/1000271-1000274

  12. Adenosine Monophosphate Binding Stabilizes the KTN Domain of the Shewanella denitrificans Kef Potassium Efflux System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliotas, Christos; Grayer, Samuel C; Ekkerman, Silvia; Chan, Anthony K N; Healy, Jess; Marius, Phedra; Bartlett, Wendy; Khan, Amjad; Cortopassi, Wilian A; Chandler, Shane A; Rasmussen, Tim; Benesch, Justin L P; Paton, Robert S; Claridge, Timothy D W; Miller, Samantha; Booth, Ian R; Naismith, James H; Conway, Stuart J

    2017-08-15

    Ligand binding is one of the most fundamental properties of proteins. Ligand functions fall into three basic types: substrates, regulatory molecules, and cofactors essential to protein stability, reactivity, or enzyme-substrate complex formation. The regulation of potassium ion movement in bacteria is predominantly under the control of regulatory ligands that gate the relevant channels and transporters, which possess subunits or domains that contain Rossmann folds (RFs). Here we demonstrate that adenosine monophosphate (AMP) is bound to both RFs of the dimeric bacterial Kef potassium efflux system (Kef), where it plays a structural role. We conclude that AMP binds with high affinity, ensuring that the site is fully occupied at all times in the cell. Loss of the ability to bind AMP, we demonstrate, causes protein, and likely dimer, instability and consequent loss of function. Kef system function is regulated via the reversible binding of comparatively low-affinity glutathione-based ligands at the interface between the dimer subunits. We propose this interfacial binding site is itself stabilized, at least in part, by AMP binding.

  13. Using Systems Biology Approaches to Elucidate the Mechanisms of Arsenic Reduction in Shewanella Sp. ANA-3

    OpenAIRE

    Watson, Ruth Pamela Tilus

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic is a naturally occurring ubiquitous metalloid that is usually associated with Iron, sulfur and other compounds in the earth’s crust. In some places around the world the bio-geochemical conditions can cause the mineral bound form of arsenic (arsenate) to be reduced to a more water-soluble form (arsenite). In its reduced state, arsenic can seep from the soil down into ground water aquifers and contaminate drinking water supplies. The effects of drinking arsenic tainted water are devasta...

  14. Selective electrocatalysis of biofuel molecular oxidation using palladium nanoparticles generated on Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Ranran; Tian, Xiaochun; Xiao, Yong

    2018-01-01

    of formate with 200 mV less over-potential. Notably they show unique selective activity toward electrochemical oxidation of formate, whereas no electrochemical catalysis was found for oxidation of ethanol, methanol and acetate. This work demonstrates a sustainable and low-cost method for producing efficient......Production of molecular scale palladium (Pd) nanoparticles (NPs) is important due to their catalytic function in electrochemical oxidation of a number of core fuel molecules in fuel cells. Biogenic methods offer an economic and environmentally friendly synthesis route. In this work...... membrane surface. Mapping by conductive atomic force microscopy shows that the presence of these PdNPs promotes electron transfer and enhances the electric conductivity of the cells. Compared to electrodeposited PdNPs, PdNPs generated by S. oneidensis MR-1 catalyze electrochemically the oxidation...

  15. Mechanism(s) of Electricity Production by Shewanella and other Microbes: Understanding and Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-23

    on to fruitful research careers because of the experience. Collaborations with other Institutions: 1. University of New Mexico – Atanassov’s MURI...Y., A. Obraztsova, G. Rosen, J. Leather , K.G. Scheckel, K.H. Nealson, and Y.M. Arias-Thode. 2011. Marine microbial community response to inorganic

  16. PYOMELANIN IS PRODUCED BY SHEWANELLA ALGAE BRY AND EFFECTED BY EXOGENOUS IRON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turick, C; Frank Caccavo, F; Jr., J; Louis S. Tisa, L

    2006-11-29

    Melanin production by S. algae BrY occurred during late/post-exponential growth in lactate-basal-salts liquid medium supplemented with tyrosine or phenylalanine. The antioxidant ascorbate inhibited melanin production, but not production of the melanin precursor, homogentisic acid. In the absence of ascorbate, melanin production was inhibited by the 4-hydroxyplenylpyruvate dioxygenase inhibitor, sulcotrione and Fe(II) (>0.2mM). These data support the hypothesis that pigment production by S. algae BrY was a result the conversion of tyrosine or phenylalanine to homogentisic acid which was excreted, auto-oxidized and self-polymerized to form pyomelanin. The inverse relationship between Fe(II) concentration and pyomelanin production has implications that pyomelanin may play a role in iron assimilation under Fe(II) limiting conditions.

  17. Observation of dielectric universalities in albumin, cytochrome C and Shewanella oneidensis MR–1 extracellular matrix

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Motovilov, K.A.; Savinov, Maxim; Zhukova, E.S.; Pronin, A.A.; Gagkaeva, Z.V.; Grinenko, V.; Sidoruk, K.V.; Voeikova, T.A.; Barzilovich, P.Y.; Grebenko, A.K.; Lisovskii, S.V.; Torgashev, V. I.; Bednyakov, Petr; Pokorný, Jan; Dressel, M.; Gorshunov, B. P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 1 (2017), s. 1-11, č. článku 15731. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-12757S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : bovine serum-albumin * microbial fuel -cells * acterial nanowires * electron-transport * secondary structure * disordered solids * outer-membrane * ac conduction * boson peak * protein Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  18. Iron and manganese in anaerobic respiration: environmental significance, physiology, and regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nealson, K. H.; Saffarini, D.

    1994-01-01

    Dissimilatory iron and/or manganese reduction is known to occur in several organisms, including anaerobic sulfur-reducing organisms such as Geobacter metallireducens or Desulfuromonas acetoxidans, and facultative aerobes such as Shewanella putrefaciens. These bacteria couple both carbon oxidation and growth to the reduction of these metals, and inhibitor and competition experiments suggest that Mn(IV) and Fe(III) are efficient electron acceptors similar to nitrate in redox abilities and capable of out-competing electron acceptors of lower potential, such as sulfate (sulfate reduction) or CO2 (methanogenesis). Field studies of iron and/or manganese reduction suggest that organisms with such metabolic abilities play important roles in coupling the oxidation of organic carbon to metal reduction under anaerobic conditions. Because both iron and manganese oxides are solids or colloids, they tend to settle downward in aquatic environments, providing a physical mechanism for the movement of oxidizing potential into anoxic zones. The resulting biogeochemical metal cycles have a strong impact on many other elements including carbon, sulfur, phosphorous, and trace metals.

  19. Magnetic comparison of abiogenic and biogenic alteration products of lepidocrocite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, J. L.; Guyodo, Y.; Lagroix, F.; Ona-Nguema, G.; Brest, J.

    2014-06-01

    Lepidocrocite is a potentially important Fe-bearing precursor phase for the production of nanoscale Fe-oxide particles in the environment. We present a detailed magnetic characterization of various alteration products of lepidocrocite resulting from thermal dehydroxylation reactions and bacterially induced bioreduction and remineralization, accompanied by characterization with x-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy. Dehydroxylation during annealing at moderate temperatures produces a topotactic transformation from lepidocrocite to maghemite when heated in an oxidizing atmosphere, or to magnetite when heated in a reducing atmosphere. The abiotic Fe-oxide products form an oriented framework of strongly interacting superparamagnetic crystallites and are characterized by a distinctive porous nanostructure observed by electron microscopy. Lepidocrocite bioreduction by the iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens ATCC 8071 produces nanoscale particles of a strongly magnetic phase. This Fe(II)-bearing mineral produced by bioreduction is highly crystalline and euhedral in shape, with a broad grain size distribution and is indicated by magnetic and XRD measurements to be a cation-excess magnetite. We highlight the distinguishing microscopic characteristics of magnetite from both abiotic and bacterially induced mineralization that should allow them to be identified in natural settings. Moreover, both mechanisms of alteration represent potential pathways for the direct formation of strongly magnetic fine-grained Fe-oxide particles in sedimentary environments.

  20. Biodegradable gelatin-chitosan films incorporated with essential oils as antimicrobial agents for fish preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Estaca, J; López de Lacey, A; López-Caballero, M E; Gómez-Guillén, M C; Montero, P

    2010-10-01

    Essential oils of clove (Syzygium aromaticum L.), fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Miller), cypress (Cupressus sempervirens L.), lavender (Lavandula angustifolia), thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.), herb-of-the-cross (Verbena officinalis L.), pine (Pinus sylvestris) and rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) were tested for their antimicrobial activity on 18 genera of bacteria, which included some important food pathogen and spoilage bacteria. Clove essential oil showed the highest inhibitory effect, followed by rosemary and lavender. In an attempt to evaluate the usefulness of these essential oils as food preservatives, they were also tested on an extract made of fish, where clove and thyme essential oils were the most effective. Then, gelatin-chitosan-based edible films incorporated with clove essential oil were elaborated and their antimicrobial activity tested against six selected microorganisms: Pseudomonas fluorescens, Shewanella putrefaciens, Photobacterium phosphoreum, Listeria innocua, Escherichia coli and Lactobacillus acidophilus. The clove-containing films inhibited all these microorganisms irrespectively of the film matrix or type of microorganism. In a further experiment, when the complex gelatin-chitosan film incorporating clove essential oil was applied to fish during chilled storage, the growth of microorganisms was drastically reduced in gram-negative bacteria, especially enterobacteria, while lactic acid bacteria remained practically constant for much of the storage period. The effect on the microorganisms during this period was in accordance with biochemical indexes of quality, indicating the viability of these films for fish preservation. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Enabling fast electron transfer through both bacterial outer-membrane redox centers and endogenous electron mediators by polyaniline hybridized large-mesoporous carbon anode for high-performance microbial fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, Long; Qiao, Yan; Zhong, Canyu; Li, Chang Ming

    2017-01-01

    Both physical structure and chemical property of an electrode play critical roles in extracellular electron transfer from microbes to electrodes in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Herein a novel polyaniline hybridized large mesoporous carbon (PANI-LMC) anode is fabricated from natural biomass by nanostructured CaCO 3 template-assisted carbonization followed by in situ chemical polymerizing PANI to enable fast extracellular electron transfer, in which the LMC with rich disorder-interconnected large mesopores (∼20−50 nm) and large surface area facilitates a fast mediated electron transfer through electron mediators, while the decorated PANI on LMC surface enables the direct electron transfer via bacterial outer-membrane redox centers. Owing to the unique synergistic effect from both excellent electron transfer paths, the PANI-LMC hybrid anode harvests high power electricity with a maximum output power density of 1280 mW m −2 in Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 MFCs, 10-fold higher than that of conventional carbon cloth. The findings from this work suggest a new insight on design of high-efficient anode according to the multiple and flexible electrochemical process for practical MFC applications.

  2. Impact of Bioreduction on Remobilization of Adsorbed Cadmium on Iron Minerals in Anoxic Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbanzadeh, Nasrin; Lakzian, Amir; Halajnia, Akram; Choi, Ui-Kyu; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Kim, Jong-Oh; Kurade, Mayur; Jeon, Byong-Hun

    2017-06-01

      The impact of bioreduction on the remobilization of adsorbed cadmium Cd(II) on minerals, including hematite, goethite, and two iron(III)-rich clay minerals nontronites (NAU-1 and NAU-2) under anoxic conditions was investigated. Langmuir isotherm equation better described the sorption of Cd(II) onto the all minerals. The maximum adsorption capacity was 6.2, 18.1, 3.6, and 4 mg g-1 for hematite, goethite, NAU-1 and NAU-2, respectively. The desorption of Cd(II) was due to the production of Fe(II) as a result of bioreduction of structural Fe(III) in the minerals by Shewanella putrefaciens. The bioreduction of Cd(II)-loaded Fe(III) minerals was negligible during the initial 5 days followed by a rapid increase up to 20 days. The amount of Cd(II) in solution phase at the end of 30 days increased up to 0.07 mmol L-1 for hematite, NAU-1, and NAU-2 and 0.02 mmol L-1 for goethite. The X-ray diffraction study showed negligible changes in bioreduced minerals phases.

  3. The formation of illite from nontronite by mesophilic and thermophilic bacterial reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaisi, Deb P.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Dong, Hailiang; Kim, Jinwook

    2011-01-01

    The formation of illite through the smectite-to-illite (S-I) reaction is considered to be one of the most important mineral reactions occurring during diagenesis. In biologically catalyzed systems, however, this transformation has been suggested to be rapid and to bypass the high temperature and long time requirements. To understand the factors that promote the S-I reaction, the present study focused on the effects of pH, temperature, solution chemistry, and aging on the S-I reaction in microbially mediated systems. Fe(III)-reduction experiments were performed in both growth and non-growth media with two types of bacteria: mesophilic (Shewanella putrefaciens CN32) and thermophilic (Thermus scotoductus SA-01). Reductive dissolution of NAu-2 was observed and the formation of illite in treatment with thermophilic SA-01 was indicated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). A basic pH (8.4) and high temperature (65°C) were the most favorable conditions for the formation of illite. A long incubation time was also found to enhance the formation of illite. K-nontronite (non-permanent fixation of K) was also detected and differentiated from the discrete illite in the XRD profiles. These results collectively suggested that the formation of illite associated with the biologically catalyzed smectite-to-illite reaction pathway may bypass the prolonged time and high temperature required for the S-I reaction in the absence of microbial activity.

  4. Effect of long-term fertilization on humic redox mediators in multiple microbial redox reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Peng; Zhang, Chunfang; Wang, Yi; Yu, Xinwei; Zhang, Zhichao; Zhang, Dongdong

    2018-03-01

    This study investigated the effects of different long-term fertilizations on humic substances (HSs), humic acids (HAs) and humins, functioning as redox mediators for various microbial redox biotransformations, including 2,2',4,4',5,5'- hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 153 ) dechlorination, dissimilatory iron reduction, and nitrate reduction, and their electron-mediating natures. The redox activity of HSs for various microbial redox metabolisms was substantially enhanced by long-term application of organic fertilizer (pig manure). As a redox mediator, only humin extracted from soils with organic fertilizer amendment (OF-HM) maintained microbial PCB 153 dechlorination activity (1.03 μM PCB 153 removal), and corresponding HA (OF-HA) most effectively enhanced iron reduction and nitrate reduction by Shewanella putrefaciens. Electrochemical analysis confirmed the enhancement of their electron transfer capacity and redox properties. Fourier transform infrared analysis showed that C=C and C=O bonds, and carboxylic or phenolic groups in HSs might be the redox functional groups affected by fertilization. This research enhances our understanding of the influence of anthropogenic fertility on the biogeochemical cycling of elements and in situ remediation ability in agroecosystems through microorganisms' metabolisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Study on the synergic effect of natural compounds on the microbial quality decay of packed fish hamburger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbo, M R; Speranza, B; Filippone, A; Granatiero, S; Conte, A; Sinigaglia, M; Del Nobile, M A

    2008-10-31

    The effectiveness of natural compounds in slowing down the microbial quality decay of refrigerated fish hamburger is addressed in this study. In particular, the control of the microbiological spoilage by combined use of three antimicrobials, and the determination of their optimal composition to extend the fish hamburger Microbiological Stability Limit (MAL) are the main objectives of this work. Thymol, grapefruit seed extract (GFSE) and lemon extract were tested for monitoring the cell growth of the main fish spoilage microorganisms (Pseudomonas fluorescens, Photobacterium phosphoreum and Shewanella putrefaciens), inoculated in fish hamburgers, and the growth of mesophilic and psychrotrophic bacteria. A Central Composite Design (CCD) was developed to highlight a possible synergic effect of the above natural compounds. Results showed an increase in the MAL value for hamburgers mixed with the antimicrobial compounds, compared to the control sample. The optimal antimicrobial compound composition, which corresponds to the maximal MAL value determined in this study, is: 110 mgL(-1) of thymol, 100 mgL(-1) of GFSE and 120 mgL(-1) of lemon extract. The presence of the natural compounds delay the sensorial quality decay without compromising the flavor of the fish hamburgers.

  6. Enrichment of gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.) diet with palm fruit extracts and probiotics: Effects on skin mucosal immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerezuela, Rebeca; Guardiola, Francisco A; Cuesta, Alberto; Esteban, M Ángeles

    2016-02-01

    Fish skin mucus contains numerous immune substances still poorly studied. To date, there are no studies regarding the possible influence of dietary supplements on such important substances. In the present work, a commercial diet used as control diet was enriched with: 1) probiotic Shewanella putrefaciens (Pdp11 diet, 10(9) cfu g(-1)); 2) probiotic Bacillus sp. (Bacillus diet, 10(9) ufc g(-1)); 3) aqueous date palm fruits extracts (DPE diet, 4%), and 4) a combination of Pdp11 + Bacillus sp + aqueous DPE (Mix diet). After 2 and 4 weeks of the feeding trial, enzymatic activities (proteases, antiproteases and peroxidases), IgM levels and terminal carbohydrates abundance were determined in skin mucus. In addition, the expression of certain immune related genes was evaluated in the skin. Our results demonstrated the significant alteration of the terminal carbohydrate abundance in skin mucus. Carbohydrates more affected by experimental diets were N-acetyl-galactosamine, N-acetyl-glucosamine, galactose, mannose, glucose and fucose. IgM, peroxidase activity and protease were also significantly higher in fish fed enriched diets. For last, an important up-regulation on the immune related gene studied on the skin was also detected. Present findings provide robust evidence that fish skin mucosal immunity can be improved by the diet. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Bacteria exploit a polymorphic instability of the flagellar filament to escape from traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, Marco J; Schmidt, Felix K; Eckhardt, Bruno; Thormann, Kai M

    2017-06-13

    Many bacterial species swim by rotating single polar helical flagella. Depending on the direction of rotation, they can swim forward or backward and change directions to move along chemical gradients but also to navigate their obstructed natural environment in soils, sediments, or mucus. When they get stuck, they naturally try to back out, but they can also resort to a radically different flagellar mode, which we discovered here. Using high-speed microscopy, we monitored the swimming behavior of the monopolarly flagellated species Shewanella putrefaciens with fluorescently labeled flagellar filaments at an agarose-glass interface. We show that, when a cell gets stuck, the polar flagellar filament executes a polymorphic change into a spiral-like form that wraps around the cell body in a spiral-like fashion and enables the cell to escape by a screw-like backward motion. Microscopy and modeling suggest that this propagation mode is triggered by an instability of the flagellum under reversal of the rotation and the applied torque. The switch is reversible and bacteria that have escaped the trap can return to their normal swimming mode by another reversal of motor direction. The screw-type flagellar arrangement enables a unique mode of propagation and, given the large number of polarly flagellated bacteria, we expect it to be a common and widespread escape or motility mode in complex and structured environments.

  8. Effect of edible chitosan/clove oil films and high-pressure processing on the microbiological shelf life of trout fillets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertos, Irene; Rico, Daniel; Diez, Ana María; González-Arnáiz, Lucía; García-Casas, María Jesús; Jaime, Isabel

    2015-11-01

    The inhibitory effect of chitosan films with clove oil (0-50 g kg(-1) ) was evaluated on a range of ten representative food spoilage and pathogenic bacteria. The most sensitive bacteria to the films was Shewanella putrefaciens and the most resistant was Aeromonas hydrophila (inhibition was apparent only at 50 g kg(-1) clove essential oil (CEO)). Films with 20 g kg(-1) CEO inhibited nine of ten of the bacteria tested. Chitosan films with 20 g kg(-1) CEO were combined with high-pressure (HPP) processing as treatments for trout fillets, and changes in physicochemical parameters and microbial load were evaluated at 4 °C over 22 days of storage. The films reduced weight loss and water activity compared to fresh and treated samples (HPP and cooking). Results showed that microbial load (total aerobic mesophilic, lactic acid bacteria and total coliform) of the trout fillets covered with chitosan films was lower than that for HPP-treated samples, and similar to cooked samples, except for coliform counts. The use of 20 g kg(-1) CEO-chitosan films showed a further improvement in the shelf-life of trout fillets when compared to that obtained with HPP and cooking treatment. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Electron transfer pathways in microbial oxygen biocathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freguia, Stefano, E-mail: stefano@kais.kyoto-u.ac.j [Bio-analytical and Physical Chemistry Laboratory, Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8205 (Japan); Tsujimura, Seiya, E-mail: seiya@kais.kyoto-u.ac.j [Bio-analytical and Physical Chemistry Laboratory, Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8205 (Japan); Kano, Kenji, E-mail: kkano@kais.kyoto-u.ac.j [Bio-analytical and Physical Chemistry Laboratory, Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8205 (Japan)

    2010-01-01

    The ability of some bacteria to enhance the rate of cathodic oxygen reduction to water has been recently discovered, opening the way to an entirely renewable and environmentally friendly concept of biocathode. In this study we reveal that several mechanisms may induce catalytic effects by bacteria. These comprise mechanisms that are putatively beneficial to the bacteria as well as mechanisms which are merely side effects, including quinone autoxidation and direct O{sub 2} reduction by heme compounds. Here we showed that 1 muM of ACNQ is able to generate a significant catalytic wave for oxygen reduction, with onset at approximately 0 V vs. SHE. Similarly, adsorption of hemin on a carbon surface catalyses O{sub 2} reduction to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with an onset of +0.2 V vs. SHE. To evaluate the catalytic pathways of live cells on cathodic oxygen reduction, two species of electrochemically active bacteria were selected as pure cultures, namely Acinetobacter calcoaceticus and Shewanella putrefaciens. The former appears to exploit a self-excreted redox compound with redox characteristics matching those of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) for extracellular electron transfer. The latter appears to utilise outer membrane-bound redox compounds. Interaction of quinones and cytochromes with the membrane-bound electron transfer chain is yet to be proven.

  10. Influence of the diet on the microbial diversity of faecal and gastrointestinal contents in gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) and intestinal contents in goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Flávia Cristina de Paula; Nicoli, Jacques Robert; Zambonino-Infante, José Luiz; Kaushik, Sadasivam; Gatesoupe, François-Joël

    2011-11-01

    Fish intestinal microbiota changes with the diet and this effect is of particular interest considering the increasing substitution of fish meal by plant protein sources. The objective of this work was to study the effects of partial substitution of fish meal with lupin and rapeseed meals on gut microbiota of the gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) and in goldfish (Carassius auratus). Faecal, gastrointestinal and intestinal contents were characterized using culture-based and molecular methods. Vibrionaceae was high in faeces and in the intestine of sea bream, while a more diverse microbiota was retrieved from the stomach, where Bacillales and Flavobacteriaceae appeared to be influenced by the diet. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiles revealed a high diversity of the microbiota transiting in the sea bream digestive tract, with a shift between gastric and intestinal communities, especially in the group fed with lupin meal. The goldfish was different, with a predominance of Aeromonas spp., Shewanella putrefaciens and Staphylococcus spp. among the aerotolerant-cultivable bacteria. The culture-independent methods revealed the presence of anaerobes like Cetobacterium somerae, and that of Vibrio spp., likely in a viable, but noncultivable state. There was a trend towards decreasing diversity in goldfish microbiota with the partial substitution by lupin, which seemed to inhibit some taxa. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Microbiological analysis of drinking water quality of Ananthanar channel of Kanyakumari district, Tamil Nadu, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raju Mary Antony

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriological analyses were carried out on Ananthanar channel water of Kanyakumari district, Tamil Nadu, India. The Ananthanar channel was selected in this study because this channel runs about nearly 28 km and supplies water for many villages for drinking and bathing purposes. Fecal and total coliform counts were performed using the standard membrane filtration technique and multiple tube technique. The results obtained were compared with reports of All India Institute of Medical Sciences Standards for Drinking and Recreational Water. Faecal coliform counts varied from 12 to 180 MPN/100 ml while Escherichia coli counts ranged from 6 to 161 MPN/100 ml for all the sampled sites. Among the total coliform Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shewanella putrefaciens, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Citrobacter freundii and Proteus mirabilis are reported. The Faecal coliform and the E. coli counts exceeding acceptable limits are indicative of pollution from domestic wastes from several informal settlements located along the riverbank. Water uses in the area were determined and were found to be mainly domestic and recreational. The gross pollution of the river exposes the local people who depend on it for their primary water source to serious health risk.

  12. Effect of microbial action on the corrosion potential of austenitic alloy containers for high-level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angell, P.; Dunn, D.S.; Cragnolino, G.A.

    1996-01-01

    The safe disposal of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) entails the ability to ensure the integrity of waste containers for prolonged time periods. It is generally accepted that under certain conditions, microbial action may change local benign environments to those in which localized corrosion can be actively promoted. The use of repassivation potential (E rp ) in relation to the value of the corrosion potential (E corr ) has been proposed as a means of assessing the propensity of a metallic material to localized corrosion. Microbial activity is known to influence E corr however, the precise mechanism is unresolved. Shewanella putrefaciens, a bacteria with many of the characteristics of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), are being grown under controlled conditions on 316L stainless steel (SS) surfaces to understand the relationship between E corr and metabolic activity. It has been observed that the growth of the bacteria under aerobic conditions, without the production of metabolic sulfide, leads to only minor variation in E corr . These changes possibly correlate to the periods of active bacterial growth

  13. Microbiological spoilage of fish and fish products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gram, L; Huss, H H

    1996-11-01

    Spoilage of fresh and lightly preserved fish products is caused by microbial action. This paper reviews the current knowledge in terms of the microbiology of fish and fish products with particular emphasis on identification of specific spoilage bacteria and the qualitative and quantitative biochemical indicators of spoilage. Shewanella putrefaciens and Pseudomonas spp. are the specific spoilage bacteria of iced fresh fish regardless of the origin of the fish. Modified atmosphere stored marine fish from temperate waters are spoiled by the CO2 resistant Photobacterium phosphoreum whereas Gram-positive bacteria are likely spoilers of CO2 packed fish from fresh or tropical waters. Fish products with high salt contents may spoil due to growth of halophilic bacteria (salted fish) or growth of anaerobic bacteria and yeasts (barrel salted fish). Whilst the spoilage of fresh and highly salted fish is well understood, much less is known about spoilage of lightly preserved fish products. It is concluded that the spoilage is probably caused by lactic acid bacteria, certain psychotrophic Enterobacteriaceae and/or Photobacterium phosphoreum. However, more work is needed in this area.

  14. Effect of three Electron Shuttles on Bioreduction of Ferric Iron in two Acidic and Calcareous soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setareh Sharifi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Iron cycle is one of the most important biogeochemical processes which affect the availability of iron in soils. Ferric iron oxides are the most abundant forms of iron in soils and sediments. Ferric iron is highly insoluble at circumneutral pH. Present investigations have shown that the structural ferric iron bound in clay minerals is reduced by some microorganisms. Anaerobic bacteria reduce ferric iron which bound to soil clay minerals under anaerobic conditions. They have the ability to use ferric iron as a terminal electron acceptor. Many studies presented that dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria (DIRB mediate the transfer of electrons from small organic molecules like acetate and glucose to various humic materials (electron shuttles which then pass electrons abiotically to ferric iron oxyhydroxide and phyllosilicate minerals. Electron shuttles like AQDS, a tricyclic quinone, increase the rate of iron reduction by iron reducing bacteria on sites of iron oxides and oxyhydroxides. By increasing the rate of bioreduction of ferric iron, the solubility and availability of iron enhanced meaningfully. Royer et al. (2002 showed that bioreduction of hematite (common iron mineral in soils increased more than three times in the presence of AQDS and Shewanella putrefaciens comparedto control treatments. Previous works have mostly used synthetic minerals as electron acceptor in bioreduction process. Furthermore, the effect of quinones as electron acceptor for microorganisms were studied with poorly crystalline ferric iron oxides . The main objective of this study was to study the effect of AQS, humic acid and fulvic acid (as electron shuttle and Shewanella sp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, on bioreduction of native ferric iron in two acidic and calcareous soils. Materials and Methods: An experiment was conducted in a completely randomized design with factorial arrangement and three replications in vitro condition. The soil samples collected

  15. Bioligand-mediated partitioning of radionuclides to the aqueous phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnsson, A.; Pedersen, K.; Oedegaard-Jensen, A.; Jakobsson, A.M.; Ekberg, C.

    2008-01-01

    The aqueous-phase partitioning of 59 Fe, 147 Pm, 234 Th and 241 Am by complexing compounds from subsurface bacteria has previously been studied in the presence of quartz sand. In this study the aqueous-phase partitioning of pico- to submicromolar amounts of 59 Fe, 147 Pm, 234 Th and 241 Am was analyzed in the presence of TiO 2 and exudates from three species of subsurface bacteria: Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas stutzeri, and Shewanella putrefaciens. All were grown under aerobic conditions and P. stutzeri and S. putrefaciens were grown under anaerobic conditions as well. The supernatants of the aerobic and anaerobic cultures were collected and radionuclide was added. TiO 2 , with BET surface area of 49.9 m 2 x g -1 , was added to the supernatant radionuclide mix, and the pH was adjusted to approximately 8. After incubation, the amount of radionuclide in the liquid phase of the samples and controls was analyzed using scintillation method. Two types of values were calculated: solution% = the activity maintained in solution relative to the total activity, and Q-values = the quotient between the activity in samples and the activity in controls. Aerobic supernatants had solution% values between 89% and 100% for 59 Fe and between 18 and 43% for 234 Th. The solution% values for 241 Am and 147 Pm were less than 2% overall, but the Q-values were between 34 and 115 times more 241 Am in bacterial supernatants than in controls. The corresponding values for 147 Pm ranged from 6 to 20 times more than in the control. The solution% values for all elements in the presence of anaerobic supernatants were below 2%, but the Q-values clustered around 7 for 59 Fe and ranging from 2 to 29 for 234 Th, indicated that anaerobic supernatants partitioned these elements to the aqueous phase. Both aerobic and anaerobic supernatants tested positive for complexing compounds when analyzed, using the Chrome Azurol S assay. Complexation with excreted organic ligands is most likely the reason

  16. Regulation of biofilm formation in Shewanella oneidensis by BpfA, BpfG, and BpfD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangqi eZhou

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria switch between two distinct life styles -- planktonic (free living and biofilm forming -- in keeping with their ever-changing environment. Such switch involves sophisticated signaling and tight regulation, which provides a fascinating portal for studying gene function and orchestrated protein interactions. In this work, we investigated the molecular mechanism underlying biofilm formation in S. oneidensis MR-1, an environmentally important model bacterium renowned for respiratory diversities, and uncovered a gene cluster coding for seven proteins involved in this process. The three key proteins, BpfA, BpfG, and BpfD, were studied in detail for the first time. BpfA directly participates in biofilm formation as extracellular glue; BpfG is not only indispensable for BpfA export during biofilm forming but also functions to turn BpfA into active form for biofilm dispersing. BpfD regulates biofilm development by interacting with both BpfA and BpfG, likely in response to signal molecule c-di-GMP. In addition, we found that 1:1 stoichiometry between BpfD and BpfG is critical for biofilm formation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that a biofilm over-producing phenotype can be induced by C116S mutation but not loss of BpfG.

  17. Connection between nitrogen and manganese cycles revealed by transcriptomic analysis in Shewanella algae C6G3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michotey, V.; Aigle, A.; Armougom, F.; Mejean, V.; Guasco, S.; Bonin, P.

    2016-02-01

    In sedimentary systems, the repartition of terminal electron-accepting molecules is often stratified on a permanent or seasonal basis. Just below to oxic zone, the suboxic one is characterized by high concentrations of oxidized inorganic compounds such as nitrate, manganese oxides (MnIII/IV) and iron oxides that are in close vicinity. Several studies have reported unexpected anaerobic nitrite/nitrate production at the expense of ammonium mediated by MnIII/IV, however this transient processes is difficult to discern and poorly understood. In the frame of this study, genes organization of nitrate and MnIII/IV respiration was investigated in S.algae. Additional genes were identified in S. algae compare to S. oneidensis: genes coding for nitrate and nitrite reductase (napA-a and nrfA-2) and an OMC protein (mtrH). In contrast to S. oneidensis, an anaerobic transitory nitrite accumulation at the expense of ammonium was observed in S. algae during growth with MnIII/IV, concomitantly with expression of nitrate/nitrite reductase genes (napA, nrfA, nrfA-2). Among the hypothesis explaining this data, the potential putative expression of unidentified gene able to perform ammonium oxidation was not observed on the global transcriptional level, however several signs of oxidative stress were detected and the existence of a secondary reaction generated by a putative oxidative s could not be excluded. Another option could be the action of reverse reaction by an enzyme such as NrfA or NrfA-2 due to the electron flow equilibrium. Whatever the electron acceptor (Nitrate/ MnIII/IV), the unexpected expression level of of omcA, mtrF, mtrH, mtrC was observed and peaked at the end of the exponential phase. Different expression patterns of the omc genes were observed depending on electron acceptor and growth phase. Only mtrF-2 gene was specifically expressed in Mn(III/IV) condition. Nitrate and Mn(III/IV) respirations seem connected at physiological as well as at transcriptional level

  18. Integrated Analysis of Protein Complexes and Regulatory Networks Involved in Anaerobic Energy Metabolism of Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiedje, James M.

    2005-06-01

    Anaerobic Nitrate Reduction. Nitrate is an extensive co-contaminant at some DOE sites making metal and radionuclide reduction problematic. Hence, we sought to better understand the nitrate reduction pathway and its control in S. oneidensis MR-1. It is not known whether the nitrate reduction is by denitrification or dissimilatory nitrate reduction into ammonium (DNRA). By both physiological and genetic evidence, we proved that DNRA is the nitrate reduction pathway in this organism. Using the complete genome sequence of S. oneidensis MR-1, we identified a gene encoding a periplasmic nitrate reductase based on its 72% sequence identity with the napA gene in E. coli. Anaerobic growth of MR-1 on nitrate was abolished in a site directed napA mutant, indicating that NapA is the only nitrate reductase present. The anaerobic expression of napA and nrfA, a homolog of the cytochrome b552 nitrite reductase in E. coli, increased with increasing nitrate concentration until a plateau was reached at 3 mM KNO3. This indicates that these genes are not repressed by increasing concentrations of nitrate. The reduction of nitrate can generate intermediates that can be toxic to the microorganism. To determine the genetic response of MR-1 to high concentrations of nitrate, DNA microarrays were used to obtain a complete gene expression profile of MR-1 at low (1 mM) versus high (40 mM) nitrate concentrations. Genes encoding transporters and efflux pumps were up-regulated, perhaps as a mechanism to export toxic compounds. In addition, the gene expression profile of MR-1, grown anaerobically with nitrate as the only electron acceptor, suggested that this dissimilatory pathway contributes to N assimilation. Hence the nitrate reduction pathway could serve a dual purpose. The role of EtrA, a homolog of Fnr (global anaerobic regulator in E. coli) was examined using an etrA deletion mutant we constructed, S. oneidensis EtrA7-1.

  19. Global Molecular and Morphological Effects of 24-Hour Chromium(VI)Exposure on Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chourey, Karuna [ORNL; Thompson, Melissa R [ORNL; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L [ORNL; Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Zhou, Jizhong [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Thompson, Dorothea K [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    The biological impact of 24-h ("chronic") chromium(VI) [Cr(VI) or chromate] exposure on ShewanellaoneidensisMR-1 was assessed by analyzing cellular morphology as well as genome-wide differential gene and protein expression profiles. Cells challenged aerobically with an initial chromate concentration of 0.3 mM in complex growth medium were compared to untreated control cells grown in the absence of chromate. At the 24-h time point at which cells were harvested for transcriptome and proteome analyses, no residual Cr(VI) was detected in the culture supernatant, thus suggesting the complete uptake and/or reduction of this metal by cells. In contrast to the untreated control cells, Cr(VI)-exposed cells formed apparently aseptate, nonmotile filaments that tended to aggregate. Transcriptome profiling and mass spectrometry-based proteomic charac terization revealed that the principal molecular response to 24-h Cr(VI) exposure was the induction of prophage-related genes and their encoded products as well as a number of functionally undefined hypothetical genes that were located within the integrated phage regions of the MR-1 genome. In addition, genes with annotated functions in DNA metabolism, cell division, biosynthesis and degradation of the murein (pepti doglycan) sacculus, membrane response, and general environmental stress protection were upregulated, while genes encoding chemotaxis, motility, and transport/binding proteins were largely repressed under conditions of 24-h chromate treatment.

  20. Bound Flavin-Cytochrome Model of Extracellular Electron Transfer in Shewanella oneidensis: Analysis by Free Energy Molecular (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-06

    cathodic conditions, oxidized and reduced heme states were assumed, respectively. The calculated results are summarized in Table 2. The solvation free...reports favor a flavin-bound model, proposing two one- electron reductions of flavin, namely, oxidized (Ox) to semiquinone (Sq) and semiquinone to...hydroquinone (Hq), at anodic and cathodic conditions, respectively. In this work, to provide a mechanistic understanding of riboflavin (RF) binding at

  1. Extracellular electron transfer mechanism in Shewanella loihica PV-4 biofilms formed at indium tin oxide and graphite electrodes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jain, A.; Connolly, J.O.; Woolley, R.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Marsili, E.

    /electrode interface [21]. After 24 h from inoculation, the sigmoidal wave disappeared and cyclic voltammetry detected reversible peaks with Em value -0.3 V, most likely due to the production of redox mediator(s) in the cell suspension under anaerobic conditions... reported earlier from the whole cell voltammetry of S. loihica PV- 4 (-0.054 V vs. Ag/AgCl) [18] as well as of S. oneidensis MR-1 (-0.07 V vs. Ag/AgCl) [29]. The Em value obtained for RC (I) was shifted to a more positive potential from those reported...

  2. Rapid Precipitation of Amorphous Silica in Experimental Systems with Nontronite (NAu-1) and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Furukawa, Yoko; O'Reilly, S. E

    2007-01-01

    ...) silica globule formation was confirmed in the immediate vicinity of bacterial cells and extracellular polymeric substances in all experimental systems that contained bacteria, whether the bacteria...

  3. Actividad "in vitro" de diferentes antibacterianos sobre bacilos gram-negativos no fermentadores, excluidos Pseudomonas aeruginosa y Acinetobacter spp ‘In vitro' activity of different antimicrobial agents on gram-negative nonfermentative bacilli, excluding Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.A. Vay

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Los bacilos gram-negativos no fermentadores se encuentran ampliamente distribuidos en el medio ambiente. Además de causar dificultades en la identificación, a menudo presentan una marcada multirresistencia a los antimicrobianos incluyendo aquellos activos frente a Pseudomonas aeruginosa. El objetivo de este trabajo fue evaluar la actividad "in vitro" de diferentes antimicrobianos sobre 177 aislamientos de bacilos gram-negativos no fermentadores (excluidos Pseudomonas aeruginosa y Acinetobacter spp. provenientes de especimenes clínicos. Las concentraciones inhibitorias mínimas (CIM se determinaron por el método de dilución en agar Mueller Hinton frente a los siguientes antibacterianos: ampicilina, piperacilina, piperacilina-tazobactama, sulbactama, cefoperazona, cefoperazona-sulbactama, ceftazidima, cefepima, aztreonam, imipenem, meropenem, colistina, gentamicina, amicacina, trimetoprima-sulfametoxazol (TMS, cloranfenicol, eritromicina, rifampicina, norfloxacina, ciprofloxacina y minociclina. Sobre siete aislamientos: Sphingobacterium multivorum (2, Sphingobacterium spiritivorum (1, Empedobacter brevis (1, Weeksella virosa (1, Bergeyella zoohelcum (1 y Oligella urethralis (1 se ensayó la sensibilidad a amoxicilina-ácido clavulánico y ampicilina-sulbactama y no se determinó la actividad de cefoperazona ni de sulbactama. La multirresistencia fue comúnmente observada en los aislamientos de Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Burkholderia cepacia, Chryseobacterium spp., Myroides spp., Achromobacter xylosoxidans y Ochrobactrum anthropi. En cambio, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Shewanella putrefaciens-algae, Sphingomonas paucimobilis, Pseudomonas oryzihabitans, Bergeyella zoohelcum, Weeksella virosa y Oligella urethralis, fueron ampliamente sensibles a los antibacterianos ensayados. Debido a la gran variabilidad observada en la sensibilidad a los antimicrobianos en las distintas especies, se hace imprescindible realizar la prueba de sensibilidad a los

  4. Non-enzymatic U(VI) interactions with biogenic mackinawite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeramani, H.; Qafoku, N. P.; Kukkadapu, R. K.; Murayama, M.; Hochella, M. F.

    2011-12-01

    Reductive immobilization of hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] by stimulation of dissimilatory metal and/or sulfate reducing bacteria (DMRB or DSRB) has been extensively researched as a remediation strategy for subsurface U(VI) contamination. These bacteria derive energy by reducing oxidized metals as terminal electron acceptors, often utilizing organic substrates as electron donors. Thus, when evaluating the potential for in-situ uranium remediation in heterogeneous subsurface media, it is important to understand how the presence of alternative electron acceptors such as Fe(III) and sulfate affect U(VI) remediation and the long term behavior and reactivity of reduced uranium. Iron, an abundant subsurface element, represents a substantial sink for electrons from DMRB, and the reduction of Fe(III) leads to the formation of dissolved Fe(II) or to reactive biogenic Fe(II)- and mixed Fe(II)/Fe(III)- mineral phases. Consequently, abiotic U(VI) reduction by reactive forms of biogenic Fe(II) minerals could be a potentially important process for uranium immobilization. In our study, the DMRB Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 was used to synthesize a biogenic Fe(II)-bearing sulfide mineral: mackinawite, that has been characterized by XRD, SEM, HRTEM and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Batch experiments involving treated biogenic mackinawite and uranium (50:1 molar ratio) were carried out at room temperature under strict anoxic conditions. Following complete removal of uranium from solution, the biogenic mackinawite was analyzed by a suite of analytical techniques including XAS, HRTEM and Mössbauer spectroscopy to determine the speciation of uranium and investigate concomitant Fe(II)-phase transformation. Determining the speciation of uranium is critical to success of a remediation strategy. The present work elucidates non-enzymatic/abiotic molecular scale redox interactions between biogenic mackinawite and uranium.

  5. Humic substances-mediated microbial reductive dehalogenation of triclosan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.; Xu, S.; Yang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The role of natural organic matter in regulating the redox reactions as an electron shuttle has received lots of attention, because it can significantly affect the environmental degradation of contaminants and biogeochemical cycles of major elements. However, up to date, limited studies examined the role of natural organic matter in affecting the microbial dehalogenation of emergent organohalides, a critical detoxification process. In this study, we investigated the humic substance (HS)-mediated microbial dehalogenation of triclosan, a widely used antimicrobial agent. We found that the presence of HS stimulated the microbial degradation of triclosan by Shewanella putrefaciens CN-32. In the absence of HS, the triclosan was degraded gradually, achieving 8.6% residual at 8 days. With HS, the residual triclosan was below 2% after 4 days. Cl- was confirmed by ion chromatography analysis, but the dehalogenation processes and other byproducts warrant further investigations. The impact of HS on the degradation of triclosan was highly dependent on the concentration of HS. When the HS was below 15 mg/L, the degradation rate constant for triclosan increased with the organic carbon concentration. Beyond that point, the increased organic carbon concentration decreased the degradation of triclosan. Microbially pre-reduced HS abiotically reduced triclosan, testifying the electron shuttling processes. These results indicate that dissolved organic matter plays a dual role in regulating the degradation of triclosan: it mediates electron transport and inhibits the bioavailability through complexation. Such novel organic matter-mediated reactions for organohalides are important for evaluating the natural attenuation of emergent contaminants and designing cost-effective engineering treatment.

  6. Shelf-life of chilled fresh Mediterranean swordfish (Xiphias gladius) stored under various packaging conditions: microbiological, biochemical and sensory attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantazi, D; Papavergou, A; Pournis, N; Kontominas, M G; Savvaidis, I N

    2008-02-01

    The present work evaluated the effect of air, vacuum and modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) on the shelf-life of chilled Mediterranean swordfish (Xiphias gladius). Fresh swordfish slices were stored in air, under vacuum and MAP (40%/30%/30%, CO(2)/N(2)/O(2)) under refrigeration (4 degrees C) for a period of 16 days. Of the three treatments used (vacuum, MAP and air), both MAP and vacuum packaging (VP) were the most effective for inhibiting growth of aerobic microflora in swordfish samples until days 9-10 of refrigerated storage. Of the microbial species determined, both Pseudomonas spp. and H(2)S-producing bacteria (including Shewanella putrefaciens) were dominant in swordfish samples stored in air, whereas growth of these species was partly inhibited under VP and MAP conditions. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and Enterobacteriaceae were also found to be members of the final swordfish microbial flora, irrespective of packaging conditions throughout the entire storage period. Of the chemical freshness indices determined, thiobarbituric acid (TBA) values were variable in swordfish samples, indicative of no specific oxidative rancidity trend. Trimethylamine nitrogen (TMA-N) values of swordfish samples stored in air, under VP and MAP exceeded the limit value of 5mgN/100g fish muscle after days 7, 8-9 and 11 days of storage, respectively. In a similar trend, total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N) for swordfish samples stored in air, under VP and MAP exceeded the limit value of 25mgN/100g fish muscle after 7-8, 10 and 12 days of storage, respectively. Sensory analyses (odor and taste attributes) indicated a shelf-life of ca. 7 days for air, 9 days for VP and 11-12 days for the MA-packaged swordfish samples.

  7. Curvularia Haloperoxidase: Antimicrobial Activity and Potential Application as a Surface Disinfectant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Eva H.; Albertsen, Line; Schäfer, Thomas; Johansen, Charlotte; Frisvad, Jens C.; Molin, Søren; Gram, Lone

    2003-01-01

    A presumed antimicrobial enzyme system, the Curvularia haloperoxidase system, was examined with the aim of evaluating its potential as a sanitizing agent. In the presence of hydrogen peroxide, Curvularia haloperoxidase facilitates the oxidation of halides, such as chloride, bromide, and iodide, to antimicrobial compounds. The Curvularia haloperoxidase system caused several-log-unit reductions in counts of bacteria (Pseudomonas spp., Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, Aeromonas salmonicida, Shewanella putrefaciens, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Listeria monocytogenes), yeasts (Candida sp. and Rhodotorula sp.), and filamentous fungi (Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus tubigensis, Aspergillus versicolor, Fusarium oxysporum, Penicillium chrysogenum, and Penicillium paxilli) cultured in suspension. Also, bacteria adhering to the surfaces of contact lenses were killed. The numbers of S. marcescens and S. epidermidis cells adhering to contact lenses were reduced from 4.0 and 4.9 log CFU to 1.2 and 2.7 log CFU, respectively, after treatment with the Curvularia haloperoxidase system. The killing effect of the Curvularia haloperoxidase system was rapid, and 106 CFU of E. coli cells/ml were eliminated within 10 min of treatment. Furthermore, the antimicrobial effect was short lived, causing no antibacterial effect against E. coli 10 min after the system was mixed. Bovine serum albumin (1%) and alginate (1%) inhibited the antimicrobial activity of the Curvularia haloperoxidase system, whereas glucose and Tween 20 did not affect its activity. In conclusion, the Curvularia haloperoxidase system is an effective sanitizing system and has the potential for a vast range of applications, for instance, for disinfection of contact lenses or medical devices. PMID:12902249

  8. Mevalonosomes: specific vacuoles containing the mevalonate pathway in Plocamium brasiliense cortical cells (Rhodophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradas, Wladimir Costa; Crespo, Thalita Mendes; Salgado, Leonardo Tavares; de Andrade, Leonardo Rodrigues; Soares, Angélica Ribeiro; Hellio, Claire; Paranhos, Ricardo Rogers; Hill, Lilian Jorge; de Souza, Geysa Marinho; Kelecom, Alphonse Germaine Albert Charles; Da Gama, Bernardo Antônio Perez; Pereira, Renato Crespo; Amado-Filho, Gilberto Menezes

    2015-04-01

    This paper has identified, for the first time in a member of the Rhodophyta, a vacuolar organelle containing enzymes that are involved in the mevalonate pathway-an important step in red algal isoprenoid biosynthesis. These organelles were named mevalonosomes (Mev) and were found in the cortical cells (CC) of Plocamium brasiliense, a marine macroalgae that synthesizes several halogenated monoterpenes. P. brasiliense specimens were submitted to a cytochemical analysis of the activity of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase (HMGS). Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we confirmed the presence of HMGS activity within the Mev. Because HMGS is necessary for the biosynthesis of halogenated monoterpenes, we isolated a hexanic fraction (HF) rich in halogenated monoterpenes from P. brasiliense that contained a pentachlorinated monoterpene as a major metabolite. Because terpenes are often related to chemical defense, the antifouling (AF) activity of pentachlorinated monoterpene was tested. We found that the settlement of the mussel Perna perna was reduced by HF treatment (2.25 times less than control; 40% and 90% of fouled surface, respectively; P = 0.001; F9,9 = 1.13). The HF (at 10 μg · mL(-1) ) also inhibited three species of fouling microalgae (Chlorarachnion reptans, Cylindrotheca cloisterium, and Exanthemachrysis gayraliae), while at a higher concentration (50 μg · mL(-1) ), it inhibited the bacteria Halomonas marina, Polaribacter irgensii, Pseudoalteromonas elyakovii, Shewanella putrefaciens, and Vibrio aestuarianus. The AF activity of P. brasiliense halogenated monoterpenes and the localization of HMGS activity inside Mev suggest that this cellular structure found in CC may play a role in thallus protection against biofouling. © 2015 Phycological Society of America.

  9. Inhibition of bacterial U(VI) reduction by calcium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, Scott C.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Carroll, S. L.; Kennedy, David W.; Zachara, John M.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Kelly, S. D.; Kemner, K. M.; Fendorf, S.

    2003-01-01

    The rapid kinetics of bacterial U(VI) reduction and low solubility of uraninite (UO2,cr) make this process an attractive option for removing uranium from groundwater. Nevertheless, conditions that may promote or inhibit U(VI) reduction are not well-defined. Recent descriptions of Ca-UO2-CO3 complexes indicate that these species may dominate the aqueous speciation of U(VI) in many environments. We monitored the bacterial reduction of U(VI) in bicarbonate-buffered solution in the presence and absence of Ca. XAFS measurements confirmed the presence of a Ca-U(VI)-CO3 complex in the initial solutions containing calcium. Calcium, at millimolar concentrations (0.45-5 mM), caused a significant decrease in the rate and extent of bacterial U(VI) reduction. Both facultative (Shewanella putrefaciens strain CN32) and obligate (Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, Geobacter sulfurreducens) anaerobic bacteria were affected by the presence of calcium. Reduction of U(VI) ceased when the calculated system Eh re ached -0.046+/- 0.001 V, based on the Ca2UO2(CO3)(3) -- > UO2,cr couple. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that U is a less energetically favorable electron acceptor when the Ca-UO2-CO3 complexes are present. The results do not support Ca inhibition caused by direct interactions with the cells or with the electron donor as the reduction of fumarate or Tc(VII)O-4(-) under identical conditions was unaffected by the presence of Ca

  10. Hydration of swelling clay and bacteria interaction. An experimental in situ reaction study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, J.

    2008-01-01

    This study reports on the physical-chemical behaviour of swelling di-octahedral clays (smectites) and their interaction with aqueous solutions and bacteria (Shewanella putrefaciens). Experimental results are presented for compacted clays, hydrated under confined volume conditions, using a new type of reaction-cell (the 'wet-cell' of Warr and Hoffman, 2004) that was designed for in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement. For comparison, dispersed clay systems were studied using standard batch solutions subjected to varying degrees of agitation. The combination of time-dependent in situ XRD measurements with gravimetric measurements and calculated diffraction patterns using the CALCMIX software (Plancon and Drits, 1999) allowed to successful quantification of the dynamics of water uptake and storage. This analytical procedure combined with published water vapour adsorption data enabled determination of the abundance of structured water layers, developed in the interlayer space, and the amount of water contained in different storage sites (interlayers, surfaces and pore spaces). Qualitative information on surface area and textural organization was also estimated based on calculated changes in the average particle thickness and the organization of water layer structures (ordering). Abiotic smectite hydration experiments, using a range of natural and industrial bentonites (SWy-2, IBECO, MX80, TIXOTON), focused on defining the role of the interlayer cation, variable clay packing densities and the ionic strength of the infiltrating solution. The rate of smectite hydration, as expected, was seen to be highly dependent on the type of interlayer cation (enhanced for Ca as opposed to Na) and the ionic strength of solution (enhanced uptake rates with saline solutions, particularly as they infiltrate Na-smectite). A range of dynamic changes in micro textural state occurred as a function of packing density. These changes explain the differences in hydration behaviour observed

  11. Hydration of swelling clay and bacteria interaction. An experimental in situ reaction study; Hydratation des argiles gonflantes et influence des bacteries. Etude experimentale de reaction in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, J

    2008-01-15

    This study reports on the physical-chemical behaviour of swelling di-octahedral clays (smectites) and their interaction with aqueous solutions and bacteria (Shewanella putrefaciens). Experimental results are presented for compacted clays, hydrated under confined volume conditions, using a new type of reaction-cell (the 'wet-cell' of Warr and Hoffman, 2004) that was designed for in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement. For comparison, dispersed clay systems were studied using standard batch solutions subjected to varying degrees of agitation. The combination of time-dependent in situ XRD measurements with gravimetric measurements and calculated diffraction patterns using the CALCMIX software (Plancon and Drits, 1999) allowed to successful quantification of the dynamics of water uptake and storage. This analytical procedure combined with published water vapour adsorption data enabled determination of the abundance of structured water layers, developed in the interlayer space, and the amount of water contained in different storage sites (interlayers, surfaces and pore spaces). Qualitative information on surface area and textural organization was also estimated based on calculated changes in the average particle thickness and the organization of water layer structures (ordering). Abiotic smectite hydration experiments, using a range of natural and industrial bentonites (SWy-2, IBECO, MX80, TIXOTON), focused on defining the role of the interlayer cation, variable clay packing densities and the ionic strength of the infiltrating solution. The rate of smectite hydration, as expected, was seen to be highly dependent on the type of interlayer cation (enhanced for Ca as opposed to Na) and the ionic strength of solution (enhanced uptake rates with saline solutions, particularly as they infiltrate Na-smectite). A range of dynamic changes in micro textural state occurred as a function of packing density. These changes explain the differences in hydration behaviour

  12. Aggregation Kinetics of Hematite Particles in the Presence of Outer Membrane Cytochrome OmcA of Shewanella oneidenesis MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Anxu [Peking Univ., Beijing (China). College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering; Liu, Feng [Peking Univ., Beijing (China). College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering; Shi, Liang [China Univ. of Geoscience in Wuhan, Hubei (China). Dept. of Biological Sciences and Technology; Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Liu, Juan [Peking Univ., Beijing (China). College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering

    2016-09-20

    The aggregation behavior of 9, 36, and 112 nm hematite particles was studied in the presence of OmcA, a bacterial extracellular protein, in aqueous dispersions at pH 5.7 through time-resolved dynamic light scattering, electrophoretic mobility, and circular dichroism spectra, respectively. At low salt concentration, the attachment efficiencies of hematite particles in all sizes first increased, then decreased, and finally remained stable with the increase of OmcA concentration, indicating the dominant interparticle interaction changed along with the increase in the protein-to-particle ratio. Nevertheless, at high salt concentration, the attachment efficiencies of all hematite samples gradually decreased with increasing OmcA concentration, which can be attributed to increasing steric force. Additionally, the aggregation behavior of OmcA-hematite conjugates was more correlated to total particle-surface area than primary particle size. It was further established that OmcA could stabilize hematite nanoparticles more efficiently than bovine serum albumin (BSA), a model plasma protein, due to the higher affinity of OmcA to hematite surface. This study highlighted the effects of particle properties, solution conditions, and protein properties on the complicated aggregation behavior of protein-nanoparticle conjugates in aqueous environments.

  13. Electrocatalytic oxidation of K4[Fe(CN)6] by metal-reducing bacteriumShewanella oneidensis MR-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Zhiyong; Xiao, Yong; Wu, Ranran

    2017-01-01

    of an inorganic redox compound K4[Fe(CN)6]. A pair of symmetric peak in the cyclic voltammetry (CV) of K4[Fe(CN)6] were found on bare glassy carbon electrode (GCE). Surprisingly, when the GCE is coated MR-1, the anodic peak almost sustained at the same level; while the cathodic peak apparently shrunk. We...

  14. Investigation of the substrate specificity of the proton coupled peptide transporter PepTSo from Shewanella oneidensis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prabhala, Bala Krishna; Aduri, Nanda Gowtham; Hald, Helle

    2015-01-01

    a strikingly high sequence identity, can be used to rationalize its mechanism and substrate preference. However, very little is known about the substrate specificity of PepTSo. To elaborate on this, the natural peptide specificity of PepTSo was investigated. Di and tri-peptides were found to be substrates...... for PepTSo in contrast to mono- and tetrapeptides as was indicated by previous competition studies. Interestingly, a negatively charged side chain was better accommodated on the dipeptide N- than the C-terminus position. Inversely, a positive charged side chain appeared to be tolerated better...

  15. Shewanella oneidensis in a lactate-fed pure-culture and a glucose-fed co-culture with Lactococcus lactis with an electrode as electron acceptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) employing mixed microbial communities as biocatalysts are gaining importance as potential renewable energy, bioremediation, or biosensing devices. While we are beginning to understand how individual microbial species interact with an electrode as electron donor, li...

  16. Oxidative dissolution potential of biogenic and abiogenic TcO2 in subsurface sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredrickson, J.K.; Zachara, J.M.; Plymale, A.E.; Heald, S.M.; McKinley, J.P.; Kennedy, D.W.; Liu, C.; Nachimuthu, P.

    2009-01-01

    Technetium-99 (Tc) is an important fission product contaminant associated with sites of nuclear fuels reprocessing and geologic nuclear waste disposal. Tc is highly mobile in its most oxidized state (Tc(VII)O 4 - ) and less mobile in the reduced form (Tc(IV)O 2 · nH 2 O). Here we investigate the potential for oxidation of Tc(IV) that was heterogeneously reduced by reaction with biogenic Fe(II) in two sediments differing in mineralogy and aggregation state; unconsolidated Pliocene-age fluvial sediment from the upper Ringold (RG) Formation at the Hanford Site and a clay-rich saprolite from the Field Research Center (FRC) background site on the Oak Ridge Site. Both sediments contained Fe(III) and Mn(III/IV) as redox active phases, but FRC also contained mass-dominant Fe-phyllosilicates of different types. Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 reduced Mn(III/IV) oxides and generated Fe(II) that was reactive with Tc(VII) in heat-killed, bioreduced sediment. After bioreduction and heat-killing, biogenic Fe(II) in the FRC exceeded that in RG by a factor of two. More rapid reduction rates were observed in the RG that had lower biogenic Fe(II), and less particle aggregation. EXAFS measurements indicated that the primary reduction product was a TcO 2 -like phase in both sediments. The biogenic redox product Tc(IV) oxidized rapidly and completely in RG when contacted with air. Oxidation, in contrast, was slow and incomplete in the FRC, in spite of similar molecular scale speciation of Tc compared to RG. X-ray microprobe, electron microprobe, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and micro X-ray diffraction were applied to the whole sediment and isolated Tc-containing particles. These analyses revealed that non-oxidizable Tc(IV) in the FRC existed as complexes with octahedral Fe(III) within intra-grain domains of 50-100 (micro)m-sized, Fe-containing micas presumptively identified as celadonite. The markedly slower oxidation rates in FRC as compared to RG were attributed to mass

  17. Oxidative dissolution potential of biogenic and abiogenic TcO 2 in subsurface sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrickson, James K.; Zachara, John M.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Heald, Steve M.; McKinley, James P.; Kennedy, David W.; Liu, Chongxuan; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy

    2009-04-01

    Technetium-99 (Tc) is an important fission product contaminant associated with sites of nuclear fuels reprocessing and geologic nuclear waste disposal. Tc is highly mobile in its most oxidized state [Tc(VII)O4-] and less mobile in the reduced form [Tc(IV)O 2· nH 2O]. Here we investigate the potential for oxidation of Tc(IV) that was heterogeneously reduced by reaction with biogenic Fe(II) in two sediments differing in mineralogy and aggregation state; unconsolidated Pliocene-age fluvial sediment from the upper Ringold (RG) Formation at the Hanford Site and a clay-rich saprolite from the Field Research Center (FRC) background site on the Oak Ridge Site. Both sediments contained Fe(III) and Mn(III/IV) as redox active phases, but FRC also contained mass-dominant Fe-phyllosilicates of different types. Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 reduced Mn(III/IV) oxides and generated Fe(II) that was reactive with Tc(VII) in heat-killed, bioreduced sediment. After bioreduction and heat-killing, biogenic Fe(II) in the FRC exceeded that in RG by a factor of two. More rapid reduction rates were observed in the RG that had lower biogenic Fe(II), and less particle aggregation. EXAFS measurements indicated that the primary reduction product was a TcO 2-like phase in both sediments. The biogenic redox product Tc(IV) oxidized rapidly and completely in RG when contacted with air. Oxidation, in contrast, was slow and incomplete in the FRC, in spite of similar molecular scale speciation of Tc compared to RG. X-ray microprobe, electron microprobe, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and micro X-ray diffraction were applied to the whole sediment and isolated Tc-containing particles. These analyses revealed that non-oxidizable Tc(IV) in the FRC existed as complexes with octahedral Fe(III) within intra-grain domains of 50-100 μm-sized, Fe-containing micas presumptively identified as celadonite. The markedly slower oxidation rates in FRC as compared to RG were attributed to mass

  18. Biogeochemistry of Fe and Tc Reduction and Oxidation in FRC Sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John M, Zachara; James K, Fredrickson; Ravi K, Kukkadapu; Steven C, Smith; David W, Kennedy

    2004-01-01

    The objectives are: (1) To rigorously characterize the distribution of Fe(II) and Fe(III) in FRC sediment. (2) To identify changes to Fe(II)/Fe(III) distribution and concentration resulting from DIRB activity. (3) To determine the dependence of Tc(VII) reduction rate on biogenic Fe(II) and it's forms. (4) To establish tendency of Tc(IV) and biogenic Fe(II) to oxidize and their effects on Tc immobilization. The mineralogic and chemical properties of the pristine, bioreduced, and chemically extracted FRC sediments were characterized by X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray microscopy (XRM, at the PNC-CAT beamline at APS), Moessbauer spectroscopy, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy with lattice fringe imaging. Chemical extraction included dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate (DCB), acid ammonium oxalate (AAO), and hydroxylamine hydrochloride (HAH). The FRC sediment was incubated under anoxic conditions with the facultative dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens, strain CN32 in defined aqueous solutions/media with bicarbonate and PIPES buffers for time periods exceeding 75 d. Lactate was used as the electron donor. Aqueous and sorbed Fe(II) (ferrozine assay and 0.5 N HCl extraction) and Mn(II) (ICP-MS and 10 mM CuSO 4 extraction), and pH were monitored to define the reduction progress and extent. The bioreduced materials were characterized using the abovementioned techniques. Bioreduced (pasteurized) sediment or chemically extracted/reduced sediment spiked with Fe(II) was washed with a PIPES buffer/electrolyte solution, and spiked with NaTc(VII)O 4 to yield a concentration of 20 (micro)M. The Tc(VII)-spiked samples were agitated and equilibrated at 25 C and sampled over time to assess the Tc(VII) reduction rate. Selected sediment samples containing 20 (micro)M of reduced Tc [Tc(IV)] were subjected to oxidation by: (1) successive headspace replacements of air, and (2) open system equilibration with air. Removed aqueous

  19. Preliminary characterization and biological reduction of putative biogenic iron oxides (BIOS) from the Tonga-Kermadec Arc, southwest Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, S; Igric, P; Takahashi, Y; Sakai, Y; Fortin, D; Hannington, M D; Schwarz-Schampera, U

    2009-01-01

    Sediment samples were obtained from areas of diffuse hydrothermal venting along the seabed in the Tonga sector of the Tonga-Kermadec Arc, southwest Pacific Ocean. Sediments from Volcano 1 and Volcano 19 were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and found to be composed primarily of the iron oxyhydroxide mineral, two-line ferrihydrite. XRD also suggested the possible presence of minor amounts of more ordered iron (hydr)oxides (including six-line ferrihydrite, goethite/lepidocrocite and magnetite) in the biogenic iron oxides (BIOS) from Volcano 1; however, Mössbauer spectroscopy failed to detect any mineral phases more crystalline than two-line ferrihydrite. The minerals were precipitated on the surfaces of abundant filamentous microbial structures. Morphologically, some of these structures were similar in appearance to the known iron-oxidizing genus Mariprofundus spp., suggesting that the sediments are composed of biogenic iron oxides. At Volcano 19, an areally extensive, active vent field, the microbial cells appeared to be responsible for the formation of cohesive chimney-like structures of iron oxyhydroxide, 2-3 m in height, whereas at Volcano 1, an older vent field, no chimney-like structures were apparent. Iron reduction of the sediment material (i.e. BIOS) by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 was measured, in vitro, as the ratio of [total Fe(II)]:[total Fe]. From this parameter, reduction rates were calculated for Volcano 1 BIOS (0.0521 day(-1)), Volcano 19 BIOS (0.0473 day(-1)), and hydrous ferric oxide, a synthetic two-line ferrihydrite (0.0224 day(-1)). Sediments from both BIOS sites were more easily reduced than synthetic ferrihydrite, which suggests that the decrease in effective surface area of the minerals within the sediments (due to the presence of the organic component) does not inhibit subsequent microbial reduction. These results indicate that natural, marine BIOS are easily reduced in the presence of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria, and that the

  20. Controls on Fe reduction and mineral formation by a subsurface bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasauer, Susan; Weidler, Peter G.; Langley, Sean; Beveridge, Terry J.

    2003-04-01

    The reductive dissolution of FeIII (hydr)oxides by dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria (DIRB) could have a large impact on sediment genesis and Fe transport. If DIRB are able to reduce FeIII in minerals of high structural order to carry out anaerobic respiration, their range could encompass virtually every O 2-free environment containing FeIII and adequate conditions for cell growth. Previous studies have established that Shewanella putrefaciens CN32, a known DIRB, will reduce crystalline Fe oxides when initially grown at high densities in a nutrient-rich broth, conditions that poorly model the environments where CN32 is found. By contrast, we grew CN32 by batch culture solely in a minimal growth medium. The stringent conditions imposed by the growth method better represent the conditions that cells are likely to encounter in their natural habitat. Furthermore, the expression of reductases necessary to carry out dissimilatory Fe reduction depends on the method of growth. It was found that under anaerobic conditions CN32 reduced hydrous ferric oxide (HFO), a poorly crystalline FeIII mineral, and did not reduce suspensions containing 4 mM FeIII in the form of poorly ordered nanometer-sized goethite (α-FeOOH), well-ordered micron-sized goethite, or nanometer-sized hematite (α-Fe 2O 3) crystallites. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that all minerals but the micron-sized goethite attached extensively to the bacteria and appeared to penetrate the outer cellular membrane. In the treatment with HFO, new FeII and FeIII minerals formed during reduction of HFO-Fe in culture medium containing 4.0 mmol/L P i (soluble inorganic P), as observed by TEM with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, selected area electron diffraction, and X-ray diffraction. The minerals included magnetite (Fe 3O 4), goethite, green rust, and vivianite [Fe 3(PO 4) 2 · 8H 2O]. Vivianite appeared to be the stable end product and the mean coherence length was influenced by the rate of Fe

  1. Influence of Reactive Transport on the Reduction of U(VI) in the Presence of Fe(III) and Nitrate: Implications for U(VI) Immobilization by Bioremediation/Biobarriers - Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    B.D. Wood

    2007-01-01

    Subsurface contamination by metals and radionuclides represent some of the most challenging remediation problems confronting the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. In situ remediation of these contaminants by dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB) has been proposed as a potential cost effective remediation strategy. The primary focus of this research is to determine the mechanisms by which the fluxes of electron acceptors, electron donors, and other species can be controlled to maximize the transfer of reductive equivalents to the aqueous and solid phases. The proposed research is unique in the NABIR portfolio in that it focuses on (i) the role of flow and transport in the initiation of biostimulation and the successful sequestration of metals and radionuclides [specifically U(VI)], (ii) the subsequent reductive capacity and stability of the reduced sediments produced by the biostimulation process, and (iii) the potential for altering the growth of biomass in the subsurface by the addition of specific metabolic uncoupling compounds. A scientifically-based understanding of these phenomena are critical to the ability to design successful bioremediation schemes. The laboratory research will employ Shewanella putrefaciens (CN32), a facultative DMRB that can use Fe(III) oxides as a terminal electron acceptor. Sediment-packed columns will be inoculated with this organism, and the reduction of U(VI) by the DMRB will be stimulated by the addition of a carbon and energy source in the presence of Fe(III). Separate column experiments will be conducted to independently examine: (1) the importance of the abiotic reduction of U(VI) by biogenic Fe(II); (2) the influence of the transport process on Fe(III) reduction and U(VI) immobilization, with emphasis on methods for controlling the fluxes of aqueous species to maximize uranium reduction; (3) the reductive capacity of biologically-reduced sediments (with respect to re-oxidation by convective fluxes of O2 and NO3-) and

  2. Mixed infection zones may be important in the epidemiology of contagious agalactia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafarizadeh Amirreza

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The current study was designed to detect Mycoplasma agalactiae (Ma, Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri (Mmc, Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum (Mcc and Mycoplasma putrefaciens (Mp in sheep and goats with clinical signs consistent with contagious agalactia.

  3. Biodegradation of hydrocarbon compounds in Agbabu natural bitumen

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infrared spectral changes and gravimetric analysis from the preliminary biodegradability study carried out on Agbabu Natural Bitumen showed the vulnerability of the bitumen to some bacteria: Pseudomonas putrefaciens, Pseudomonas nigrificans, Bacillus licheniformis, Pseudomonas fragi and Achromobacter aerogenes.

  4. ORF Alignment: NC_004347 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available in ... [Shewanella oneidensis MR-1] ... Length = 108 ... Query: 5 ... LMFNGVDIERDHQGYLKNIADWHPDMAPLLAQEENIELTS...AHWEVINFVRDFYLEYKTSP 64 ... LMFNGVDIERDHQGYLKNIADWHPDMAPLLAQEENIELTS...AHWEVINFVRDFYLEYKTSP Sbjct: 1 ... LMFNGVDIERDHQGYLKNIADWHPDMAPLLAQEENIELTSAHWEVINFVRDFYLEYKTSP 60 ...

  5. ORF Alignment: NC_004347 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... [Shewanella oneidensis MR-1] ... Length = 151 ... Query: 1 ... MKITLDDLKGPEIAALLQEHLDDMRATSPPESVHALDLNG...LRQPNIRFWTLWDDRNLAGC 60 ... MKITLDDLKGPEIAALLQEHLDDMRATSPPESVHALDLNGLRQPNI...RFWTLWDDRNLAGC Sbjct: 1 ... MKITLDDLKGPEIAALLQEHLDDMRATSPPESVHALDLNGLRQPNIRFWTLWDDRNLAGC 60 ... Query: 121 RSLYAK

  6. ORF Alignment: NC_004347 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rotein ... CinA [Shewanella oneidensis MR-1] ... Length = 160 ... Query: 1 ... MKLEMICTGEEVLSGQIVDTNAAWFASTM...MEHGIEIQRRVTVGDRLEDLIAVFQERSLHA 60 ... MKLEMICTGEEVLSGQIVDTNAAWFASTM...MEHGIEIQRRVTVGDRLEDLIAVFQERSLHA Sbjct: 1 ... MKLEMICTGEEVLSGQIVDTNAAWFASTMMEHGIEIQRRVTVGDRLEDLIAVFQERSLHA 6

  7. (Bio)degradation of RDX and HMX in Marine/Estuarine Water and Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    four fungal strains Rhodotorula sp . HAW-OCF1, Bullera sp . HAW-OCF2, Acremonium sp . HAW-OCF3 and Penicillium sp . HAW-OCF5, were isolated as RDX...represent four novel species of Shewanella described as follows: Shewanella sediminis sp . nov.: Strain HAW-EB3T contains lysine decarboxylase that is...We proposed Shewanella sediminis sp . nov. with HAW-EB3T (= NCIMB 14036T = DSM 17055T) as the type strain (Zhao et al. 2005). Shewanella halifaxensis

  8. ORF Alignment: NC_004347 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... [Shewanella oneidensis MR-1] ... Length = 145 ... Query: 292 QEASREPGQINKLIQDIAQAEANRDGEIELALADCPEA...LFQGLAIKRVLSNLVENAFRYG 351 ... QEASREPGQINKLIQDIAQAEANRDGEIELALADCPEALFQGL...AIKRVLSNLVENAFRYG Sbjct: 1 ... QEASREPGQINKLIQDIAQAEANRDGEIELALADCPEALFQGLAIKRVLSNLVENAFRYG 60 ... Query: 412 IDR

  9. Hexavalent chromium removal by chitosan modified-bioreduced nontronite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajesh; Dong, Hailiang; Zeng, Qiang; Zhang, Li; Rengasamy, Karthikeyan

    2017-08-01

    Recent efforts have focused on structural Fe(II) in chemically or biologically reduced clay minerals to immobilize Cr(VI) from aqueous solution, but the coulombic repulsion between the negatively charged clay surface and the polyanionic form of Cr(VI), e.g., dichromate, can hinder the effectiveness of this process. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficiency and mechanism of Cr(VI) removal by a charge-reversed nontronite (NAu-2), an Fe-rich smectite. Chitosan, a linear polysaccharide derived from chitin found in soil and groundwater, was used to reverse the charge of NAu-2. Intercalation of chitosan into NAu-2 interlayer increased the basal d-spacing of NAu-2 from 1.23 nm to 1.83 nm and zeta potential from -27.17 to +34.13 mV, with the amount of increase depending on chitosan/NAu-2 ratio. Structural Fe(III) in chitosan-exchanged NAu-2 was then biologically reduced by an iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 in bicarbonate buffer with lactate as the sole electron donor, with and without electron shuttle, AQDS. Without AQDS, the extent of Fe(III) reduction increased from the lowest (∼9%) for the chitosan-free NAu-2 to the highest (∼12%) for the highest chitosan loaded NAu-2 (3:1 ratio). This enhancement of Fe(III) reduction was likely due to the attachment of negatively charged bacterial cells to charge-reversed (e.g., positively charged) NAu-2 surfaces, facilitating the electron transfer between cells and structural Fe(III). With AQDS, Fe(III) reduction extent doubled relative to those without AQDS, but the enhancement effect was similar across all chitosan loadings, suggesting that AQDS was more important than chitosan in enhancing Fe(III) bioreduction. Chitosan-exchanged, biologically reduced NAu-2 was then utilized for removing Cr(VI) in batch experiments with three consecutive spikes of 50 μM Cr. With the first Cr spike, the rate of Cr(VI) removal by charged-reversed NAu-2 that was bioreduced without and with AQDS was ∼1

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DSIM-01-0044 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DSIM-01-0044 ref|YP_001501043.1| RNA methyltransferase, TrmA family [Shewanella pealean...a ATCC 700345] gb|ABV86508.1| RNA methyltransferase, TrmA family [Shewanella pealeana ATCC 700345] YP_001501043.1 1.6 42% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DYAK-02-0025 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DYAK-02-0025 ref|YP_001502923.1| protein-export membrane protein SecD [Shewanella pealean...a ATCC 700345] gb|ABV88388.1| protein-export membrane protein SecD [Shewanella pealeana ATCC 700345] YP_001502923.1 2.2 26% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DSIM-02-0077 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DSIM-02-0077 ref|YP_001501317.1| ABC transporter related [Shewanella pealeana ...ATCC 700345] gb|ABV86782.1| ABC transporter related [Shewanella pealeana ATCC 700345] YP_001501317.1 0.35 37% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CJAC-01-1594 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CJAC-01-1594 ref|YP_929179.1| multidrug resistance protein D [Shewanella amazon...ensis SB2B] gb|ABM01510.1| multidrug resistance protein D [Shewanella amazonensis SB2B] YP_929179.1 4.7 38% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DDIS-01-0039 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DDIS-01-0039 ref|YP_928285.1| proton/peptide symporter family protein [Shewanella amazon...ensis SB2B] gb|ABM00616.1| proton/peptide symporter family protein [Shewanella amazonensis SB2B] YP_928285.1 2e-29 28% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-2770 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-2770 ref|YP_925972.1| hypothetical protein Sama_0090 [Shewanella amazon...ensis SB2B] gb|ABL98302.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Shewanella amazonensis SB2B] YP_925972.1 1.8 34% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TTRU-01-0712 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TTRU-01-0712 ref|YP_928130.1| hypothetical protein Sama_2255 [Shewanella amazon...ensis SB2B] gb|ABM00461.1| hypothetical protein Sama_2255 [Shewanella amazonensis SB2B] YP_928130.1 0.33 23% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-3594 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-3594 ref|YP_927377.1| conserved hypothetical formate transporter 1 [Shewanella amazon...ensis SB2B] gb|ABL99707.1| conserved hypothetical formate transporter 1 [Shewanella amazonensis SB2B] YP_927377.1 0.29 29% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DSIM-08-0052 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DSIM-08-0052 ref|YP_926427.1| sensor histidine kinase [Shewanella amazonensis ...SB2B] gb|ABL98757.1| sensor histidine kinase [Shewanella amazonensis SB2B] YP_926427.1 1.6 32% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PABE-24-0030 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PABE-24-0030 ref|YP_927793.1| uracil-xanthine permease [Shewanella amazonensis... SB2B] gb|ABM00124.1| uracil-xanthine permease [Shewanella amazonensis SB2B] YP_927793.1 3.4 27% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CREM-01-1371 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CREM-01-1371 ref|YP_926913.1| Phosphopyruvate hydratase [Shewanella amazonensi...s SB2B] gb|ABL99243.1| Phosphopyruvate hydratase [Shewanella amazonensis SB2B] YP_926913.1 6e-90 71% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-FCAT-01-0707 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-FCAT-01-0707 ref|YP_929042.1| Aspartate kinase., Homoserine dehydrogenase [Shewanella amazon...ensis SB2B] gb|ABM01373.1| Aspartate kinase., Homoserine dehydrogenase [Shewanella amazonensis SB2B] YP_929042.1 0.94 27% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-0840 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-0840 ref|YP_929162.1| acyltransferase family protein [Shewanella amazon...ensis SB2B] gb|ABM01493.1| acyltransferase family protein [Shewanella amazonensis SB2B] YP_929162.1 7.4 24% ...

  3. Dicty_cDB: VHH355 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available |pid:none) Rickettsia massiliae MTU5, compl... 97 9e-19 CP000446_3340( CP000446 |pid:none) Shewanella sp. MR...3e-19 CP000503_703( CP000503 |pid:none) Shewanella sp. W3-18-1, complete... 97 7e-19 CP000683_198( CP000683

  4. AcEST: DK950886 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1|B8CNU1_9GAMM PAS domain protein OS=Shewanella piezotol... 35 3.0 tr|Q20684|Q206...ATI-LSRRIAVEYSDSEDDSEFDEVE 555 >tr|B8CNU1|B8CNU1_9GAMM PAS domain protein OS=Shewanella piezotolerans WP3 GN

  5. AcEST: BP920733 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available TrEMBL tr_hit_id B8CKP7 Definition tr|B8CKP7|B8CKP7_9GAMM Putative uncharacterized protein OS=Shewanella piezo...B8CKP7|B8CKP7_9GAMM Putative uncharacterized protein OS=Shewanella piezotolerans

  6. AcEST: BP918418 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 9GAMM GGDEF domain protein OS=Shewanella piezot... 33 8.1 >tr|Q5CY37|Q5CY37_CRYPV Putative uncharacterized p...KTLAKLLPVEAKVAKNKKK 296 >tr|B8CPU2|B8CPU2_9GAMM GGDEF domain protein OS=Shewanella piezotolerans WP3 GN=swp_

  7. AcEST: BP918791 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available |B8CRP1_9GAMM Amino acid-binding ACT OS=Shewanella piezotolerans WP3 Align length...cted RNA polymerase (Fragment) OS... 33 9.2 >tr|B8CRP1|B8CRP1_9GAMM Amino acid-binding ACT OS=Shewanella piezo

  8. Bacteriological quality of some fishes and crab from rivers within Imo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aeromonas hydrophila and Vibrio sp. were isolated from healthy fishes. Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Pseudomonas putrefaciens were isolated from crabs. This study revealed that heavy contamination of water bodies within Imo River basin affects the health of fishes and aquatic ...

  9. Methods of producing protoporphyrin IX and bacterial mutants therefor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jizhong; Qiu, Dongru; He, Zhili; Xie, Ming

    2016-03-01

    The presently disclosed inventive concepts are directed in certain embodiments to a method of producing protoporphyrin IX by (1) cultivating a strain of Shewanella bacteria in a culture medium under conditions suitable for growth thereof, and (2) recovering the protoporphyrin IX from the culture medium. The strain of Shewanella bacteria comprises at least one mutant hemH gene which is incapable of normal expression, thereby causing an accumulation of protoporphyrin IX. In certain embodiments of the method, the strain of Shewanella bacteria is a strain of S. loihica, and more specifically may be S. loihica PV-4. In certain embodiments, the mutant hemH gene of the strain of Shewanella bacteria may be a mutant of shew_2229 and/or of shew_1140. In other embodiments, the presently disclosed inventive concepts are directed to mutant strains of Shewanella bacteria having at least one mutant hemH gene which is incapable of normal expression, thereby causing an accumulation of protoporphyrin IX during cultivation of the bacteria. In certain embodiments the strain of Shewanella bacteria is a strain of S. loihica, and more specifically may be S. loihica PV-4. In certain embodiments, the mutant hemH gene of the strain of Shewanella bacteria may be a mutant of shew_2229 and/or shew_1140.

  10. Sources of psychrophilic and psychrotolerant clostridia causing spoilage of vacuum-packed chilled meats, as determined by PCR amplification procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broda, D M; Boerema, J A; Brightwell, G

    2009-07-01

    To determine possible preslaughter and processing sources of psychrophilic and psychrotolerant clostridia causing spoilage of vacuum-packed chilled meats. Molecular methods based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of specific 16S rDNA fragments were used to detect the presence of Clostridium gasigenes, Clostridium estertheticum, Clostridium algidicarnis and Clostridium putrefaciens in a total of 357 samples collected from ten slaughter stock supply farms, slaughter stock, two lamb-processing plants, their environments, dressed carcasses and final vacuum-packed meat stored at -0.5 degrees C for 5(1/2) weeks. Clostridium gasigenes, C. estertheticum and C. algidicarnis/C. putrefaciens were commonly detected in farm, faeces, fleece and processing environmental samples collected at the slaughter floor operations prior to fleece removal, but all these micro-organisms were detected in only 4 out of 26 cooling floor and chiller environmental samples. One out of 42 boning room environmental samples tested positive for the presence of C. gasigenes and C. estertheticum, but 25 out of 42 of these samples were positive for C. algidicarnis/C. putrefaciens. Nearly all of the 31 faecal samples tested positive for the presence of C. gasigenes and C. estertheticum; however, only two of these samples were positive for C. algidicarnis and/or C. putrefaciens. Clostridial species that were subject to this investigation were frequently detected on chilled dressed carcasses. The major qualitative and quantitative differences between the results of PCR detection obtained with the primers specific for 'blown pack' -causing clostridia (C. gasigenes and C. estertheticum) and those obtained with primers specific for C. algidicarnis and C. putrefaciens suggest that the control of meat spoilage caused by different groups of meat clostridia is best approached individually for each group. This paper provides information significant for controlling meat spoilage-causing clostridia

  11. AcEST: BP915442 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available to BlastX Result : TrEMBL tr_hit_id B8CPU2 Definition tr|B8CPU2|B8CPU2_9GAMM GGDEF domain protein OS=Shewanella piezo...ore E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value tr|B8CPU2|B8CPU2_9GAMM GGDEF domain protein OS=Shewanella piezo...t... 33 5.5 >tr|B8CPU2|B8CPU2_9GAMM GGDEF domain protein OS=Shewanella piezotolerans WP3 G

  12. Effect of growth media modifications on cell biomass and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are chemically present as esters, ethers, glycerides glycolipids, phospholipids, phosphonolipids, glycosphingolipids, sulpholipids and lipoproteins in storage oils and membranes lipids. Marine microorganisms such as Shewanella frigidimarina are important sources of polyunsaturated ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-2053 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-2053 ref|YP_001474562.1| DNA internalization-related competence protei...n ComEC/Rec2 [Shewanella sediminis HAW-EB3] gb|ABV37434.1| DNA internalization-related competence protein ComEC/Rec2 [Shewanella sediminis HAW-EB3] YP_001474562.1 0.18 25% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1488 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1488 ref|YP_001474562.1| DNA internalization-related competence protei...n ComEC/Rec2 [Shewanella sediminis HAW-EB3] gb|ABV37434.1| DNA internalization-related competence protein ComEC/Rec2 [Shewanella sediminis HAW-EB3] YP_001474562.1 1.7 33% ...

  15. AcEST: BP917400 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available inition tr|B8CHS5|B8CHS5_9GAMM Outer membrane protein RomA OS=Shewanella piezotolerans WP3 Align length 38 S...rized protein Pc12g037... 33 9.4 >tr|B8CHS5|B8CHS5_9GAMM Outer membrane protein RomA OS=Shewanella piezo

  16. AcEST: DK945560 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available lastX Result : TrEMBL tr_hit_id B8CPG2 Definition tr|B8CPG2|B8CPG2_9GAMM Exporter of the RND superfamily OS=Shewanella piezo...acterized protein OS=Trich... 34 4.2 >tr|B8CPG2|B8CPG2_9GAMM Exporter of the RND superfamily OS=Shewanella piezo

  17. Zgorzel pędow borówki wysokiej wywołana przez grzyb Godronia cassandrae f. vaccinii (Peck. Groves [The canker of highbush blueberry caused by Godronia cassandrae f. vaccinii (Peck. Groves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Borecki

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Fusicoccum canker of highbush blueberry was first detected in 1973 in Poland. The diseases appeared on the shoots of variety Jersey in the collection of the Department of Pomology, Agricultural University, Warsaw-Ursyn6w. The disease was caused by the fungus Godronia cassandrae f. vaccinii {Peck. Groves. The conidial stage is known as Topospora myrtilli (Felfch. Boermema syn. Fusicoccum putrefaciens Shear.

  18. Growth of non-Campylobacter, oxidase-positive bacteria on selective Campylobacter agar.

    OpenAIRE

    Moskowitz, L B; Chester, B

    1982-01-01

    A total of 67 oxidase-positive, gram-negative bacteria were tested for growth on selective Campylobacter agar (Blaser formulation, BBL Microbiology Systems, Cockeysville, Md.) at 42 degrees C under microaerophilic conditions. Although the growth of most of these bacteria was prevented, all strains of Achromobacter xylosoxidans, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas putrefaciens, Pseudomonas alcaligenes, and Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes grew as well as Campylobacter fetus subsp. jejuni.

  19. Microbial population analysis of the midgut of Melophagus ovinus via high-throughput sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, De-Yong; Liu, Guo-Hua; Cheng, Tian-Yin; Wang, Ya-Qin

    2017-08-09

    Melophagus ovinus, one of the most common haematophagous ectoparasites of sheep, can cause anaemia and reductions in weight gain, wool growth and hide value. However, no information is available about the microfloral structure of the midgut of this ectoparasite. In the present study, we investigated the microbial community structure of the midgut contents of fully engorged female and male M. ovinus using Illumina HiSeq. The phylum showing the highest abundance was Proteobacteria (99.9%). The dominant bacterial genera in females and males were Bartonella, Arsenophonus and Wolbachia. Some less abundant bacterial genera were also detected, including Enterobacter, Acinetobacter, Halomonas, Shewanella, Bacillus and Staphylococcus. Bartonella, Arsenophonus and Wolbachia were the dominant bacterial genera in the midgut of female and male M. ovinus. Although detected, Enterobacter, Acinetobacter, Halomonas, Shewanella, Bacillus and Staphylococcus showed low abundances. Importantly, this is the first report of the presence of Arsenophonus, Wolbachia, Enterobacter, Halomonas, Shewanella, Bacillus and Staphylococcus in the midgut of M. ovinus.

  20. Alternatives for biosurfactants and bacteriocins extraction from Lactococcus lactis cultures produced under different pH conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, N; Salgado, J M; Cortés, S; Domínguez, J M

    2010-08-01

    Study of the potential of Lactococcus lactis CECT-4434 as a biosurfactants and nisin (the only bacteriocin allowed to be used in the food industry) producer for industrial applications, exploiting the possibility of recovering separately both metabolites, taking into account that L. lactis is an interesting micro-organism with several applications in the food industry because it is recognized as GRAS. The results showed the ability of this strain to produce cell-bound biosurfactants, under controlled pH, and cell-bound biosurfactants and bacteriocins, when pH was not controlled. Three extraction procedures were designed to separately recover these substances. The strain L. lactis CECT-4434 showed to be a cell-bound biosurfactants and bacterocins producer when fermentations were carried out under uncontrolled pH. Both products can be recovered separately. Development of a convenient tool for the extraction of cell-bound biosurfactants and bacteriocins from the fermentation broth.

  1. Microassay for measurement of binding of radiolabelled ligands to cell surface molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woof, J.M.; Burton, D.R.

    1988-01-01

    An improved technique for measuring the binding of radiolabelled ligands to cell surface molecules has been developed by modification of a procedure using centrifugation through a water-immiscible oil to separate free and cell-bound ligand. It maximises the percentage of ligand bound since cell-bound and free ligand can be separated easily and reproducibly even when very small reaction volumes are used. This permits low levels of ligand radiolabelling and relatively low numbers of cells to be used

  2. Phylogenetic analysis and in situ identification of the intestinal microbial community of rainbow trout ( Oncorhynchus mykiss , Walbaum)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huber, I.; Spanggaard, Bettina; Appel, K.F.

    2004-01-01

    of Proteobacteria (mainly Aeromonas and Enterobacteriaceae) dominated the bacterial population structure. Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, Shewanella, Plesiomonas and Proteus were also identified together with isolates belonging to the beta subclass of Proteobacteria and Gram-positive bacteria with high and low DNA G...

  3. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15071-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 753_861( CP000753 |pid:none) Shewanella baltica OS185, comple... 42 0.057 EU682994_1( EU682994 |pid:none) Francisella noatun...g... 42 0.057 FJ217169_1( FJ217169 |pid:none) Francisella noatunensis subsp. ori... 42 0.057 BA000012_917( B

  4. Bioremediation of nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Frank Fanqing; Keasling, Jay D; Tang, Yinjie J

    2013-05-14

    The present invention provides a method comprising the use of microorganisms for nanotoxicity study and bioremediation. In some embodiment, the microorganisms are bacterial organisms such as Gram negative bacteria, which are used as model organisms to study the nanotoxicity of the fullerene compounds: E. coli W3110, a human related enterobacterium and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, an environmentally important bacterium with versatile metabolism.

  5. Dicty_cDB: VHL532 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available P000447 |pid:none) Shewanella frigidimarina NCIMB ... 35 2.4 EU636930_1( EU636930 |pid:none) Simian rotavi...rus A strain RRV segm... 35 2.4 EU719193_1( EU719193 |pid:none) Aspergillus niger s

  6. Volatile components associated with bacterial spoilage of tropical prawns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chinivasagam, H.N.; Bremner, Allan; Wood, A.F.

    1998-01-01

    Analysis of headspace volatiles by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry from king (Penaeus plebejus), banana (P. merguiensis), tiger (P. esculentus/semisulcatus) and greasy (Metapenaeus bennettae) prawns stored in ice or ice slurry, which is effectively an environment of low oxygen tension...... inoculated with a total of 15 cultures of Ps. fragi and S. putrefaciens and incubated for two weeks at 5°C, showed the presence of 17 major compounds in the headspace volatiles analysed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). These were mainly amines, sulphides, ketones and esters. Principal...

  7. Microbial treatment of aqueous wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kang Suk; Chun, Ki Jung; Kim, Kug Chan; Choi, Yong Ho; Kim, Jin Kyu; Kim, In Gyu; Park, Hyo Koo; Lee, Keun Bae

    1992-01-01

    Uranium accumulated extracellularly on the surface of Rhodobacter capsulata and Rhodospirillum rubrum cells. The rate and extent accumulation were subject to environmental parameter such as pH, temperature, carbon source, trace element and interference by certain cations. Uranium accumulation by the cells was rapid and metabolism was not required for uranium uptake by both organism. Cell-bound uranium reached concentration of 22% (Rhodospirillum rubrum) and 24% (Rhdobacter capsulata)of the dry cell weight, but in the cells grown in the presence of inhibitory concentration of CoCl 2 , cell-bound uranium reached concentration of 27% (Rhodospirillum rubrum) and 29% (Rhodobacter capsulata) of dry cell weight. (Author)

  8. IDENTIFIKASI BAKTERI DARI IKAN TONGKOL (Euthynnus affinis YANG DIPERDAGANGKAN DI PASAR IKAN KEDONGANAN BALI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gusti Ayu Dianti Violentina

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ikan tongkol (Euthynnus affinis merupakan ikan konsumsi yang disukai masyarakat.Pengetahuan tentang bakteri yang ditemukan pada tubuh ikan ini sangat penting untuk tujuan kesehatan masyarakat dan kajian biologi ikan.  Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengidentifikasi bakteri yang berasosiasi dengan ikan tersebut.Bakteri dari usus ikan diambil secara aseptis dan ditumbuhkan pada Blood Agar dan Nutrient Broth. DNA total dari kultur agar cair diisolasi dengan chelax, gen 16S RNA diamplifikasi dengan PCR menggunakan primer universal dengan produk sekitar 1300 bp. Produk PCR dirunut dengan metode Big-Dye termination. Hasilnya disepadankan dan dianalisis dengan MEGA 6.0. Pada penelitian ini, 14 spesies bakteri yang memiliki > 99% kesamaan dengan data GenBankteridentifikasi, yaitu Photobacterium leiognathi, Uruburuella testudinis, Aeromonas molluscorum, Psychrobacter celer, Psychrobacer faecalis, Acinetobacter johnsonii, Vibrio gallicus, Bacillus megaterium, Vagococcus fessus, Shewanella baltica, Shewanella algae, Rothia nasimurium, Myroides phaeus dan Yersinia ruckeri. Peran bakteribakteri tersebut dalam biologi ikan dan kesehatan masyarakat perlu dikaji lebih lanjut.

  9. Highly active bidirectional electron transfer by a self-assembled electroactive reduced-graphene-oxide-hybridized biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Yang-Chun; Yu, Yang-Yang; Zhang, Xinhai; Song, Hao

    2014-04-22

    Low extracellular electron transfer performance is often a bottleneck in developing high-performance bioelectrochemical systems. Herein, we show that the self-assembly of graphene oxide and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 formed an electroactive, reduced-graphene-oxide-hybridized, three-dimensional macroporous biofilm, which enabled highly efficient bidirectional electron transfers between Shewanella and electrodes owing to high biomass incorporation and enhanced direct contact-based extracellular electron transfer. This 3D electroactive biofilm delivered a 25-fold increase in the outward current (oxidation current, electron flux from bacteria to electrodes) and 74-fold increase in the inward current (reduction current, electron flux from electrodes to bacteria) over that of the naturally occurring biofilms. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. The interaction of bacteria and metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansfeld, Florian

    2007-01-01

    This review discusses different examples for the interaction of bacteria and metal surfaces based on work reported previously by various authors and work performed by the author with colleagues at other institutions and with his graduate students at CEEL. Traditionally it has been assumed that the interaction of bacteria with metal surfaces always causes increased corrosion rates ('microbiologically influenced corrosion' (MIC)). However, more recently it has been observed that many bacteria can reduce corrosion rates of different metals and alloys in many corrosive environments. For example, it has been found that certain strains of Shewanella can prevent pitting of Al 2024 in artificial seawater, tarnishing of brass and rusting of mild steel. It has been observed that corrosion started again when the biofilm was killed by adding antibiotics. The mechanism of corrosion protection seems to be different for different bacteria since it has been found that the corrosion potential E corr became more negative in the presence of Shewanella ana and algae, but more positive in the presence of Bacillus subtilis. These findings have been used in an initial study of the bacterial battery in which Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was added to a cell containing Al 2024 and Cu in a growth medium. It was found that the power output of this cell continuously increased with time. In the microbial fuel cell (MFC) bacteria oxidize the fuel and transfer electrons directly to the anode. In initial studies EIS has been used to characterize the anode, cathode and membrane properties for different operating conditions of a MFC that contained Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Cell voltage (V)-current density (i) curves were obtained using potentiodynamic sweeps. The current output of a MFC has been monitored for different experimental conditions

  11. The interaction of bacteria and metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansfeld, Florian [Corrosion and Environmental Effects Laboratory (CEEL), The Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-0241 (United States)

    2007-10-10

    This review discusses different examples for the interaction of bacteria and metal surfaces based on work reported previously by various authors and work performed by the author with colleagues at other institutions and with his graduate students at CEEL. Traditionally it has been assumed that the interaction of bacteria with metal surfaces always causes increased corrosion rates ('microbiologically influenced corrosion' (MIC)). However, more recently it has been observed that many bacteria can reduce corrosion rates of different metals and alloys in many corrosive environments. For example, it has been found that certain strains of Shewanella can prevent pitting of Al 2024 in artificial seawater, tarnishing of brass and rusting of mild steel. It has been observed that corrosion started again when the biofilm was killed by adding antibiotics. The mechanism of corrosion protection seems to be different for different bacteria since it has been found that the corrosion potential E{sub corr} became more negative in the presence of Shewanella ana and algae, but more positive in the presence of Bacillus subtilis. These findings have been used in an initial study of the bacterial battery in which Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was added to a cell containing Al 2024 and Cu in a growth medium. It was found that the power output of this cell continuously increased with time. In the microbial fuel cell (MFC) bacteria oxidize the fuel and transfer electrons directly to the anode. In initial studies EIS has been used to characterize the anode, cathode and membrane properties for different operating conditions of a MFC that contained Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Cell voltage (V) - current density (i) curves were obtained using potentiodynamic sweeps. The current output of a MFC has been monitored for different experimental conditions. (author)

  12. North American International Society for Microbial Electrochemical Technologies Meeting (Abstracts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-18

    electrode interface in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Catarina Paquete1, Bruno Fonseca1, Ricardo O. Louro1 1 Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica...response to anodic pH variation in a dual chamber microbial fuel cell Valentina Margaria, Instituto Italiano di Tecnologia , Italy 2-15 Microbial...SnO2 nanostructured composite for cathode oxygen reduction reaction in microbial fuel cells Adriano Sacco, Instituto Italiano di Tecnologia , Italy 2

  13. Electrochemical Catalysis of Inorganic Complex K4[Fe(CN)6] by Shewanellaoneidensis MR-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Zhiyong; Wu, Ranran; Xiao, Yong

    The interaction between metal and bacteria is a universal and important biogeochemical processin environment. As a dissimilatory metal reduction bacterium, the electrochemically activebacteriium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can transfer intracellular electrons to minerals. This ability is attribute...... andelectrocatalysis mechanisms of S. oneidensis MR-1 are under investigation. The ability of S. oneidensis MR-1 to catalyze redoxaction of inorganic metal complex compounds will provide an insight on metal cycles in nature....

  14. Characterizing the Catalytic Potential of Deinococcus, Arthrobacter and other Robust Bacteria in Contaminated Subsurface Environments of the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daly, Michael J.

    2007-07-23

    Progress is briefly summarized in these areas: ionizing radiation resistance in bacteria; a hypothesis regarding ionizing radiation resistance emerging for bacterial cells; transcriptome analysis of irradiated D. radiodurans and Shewanella oneidensis; the role of metal reduction in Mn-dependnet Deinococcal species; and engineered Deinococcus strains as models for bioremediation. Key findings are also reported regarding protein oxidation as a possible key to bacterial desiccation resistance, and the whole-genome sequence of the thermophile Deinococcus geothermalis.

  15. Lactate Oxidation Coupled to Iron or Electrode Reduction by Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA

    KAUST Repository

    Call, D. F.

    2011-10-14

    Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA completely oxidized lactate and reduced iron or an electrode, producing pyruvate and acetate intermediates. Compared to the current produced by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, G. sulfurreducens PCA produced 10-times-higher current levels in lactate-fed microbial electrolysis cells. The kinetic and comparative analyses reported here suggest a prominent role of G. sulfurreducens strains in metaland electrode-reducing communities supplied with lactate. © 2011, American Society for Microbiology.

  16. Lactate Oxidation Coupled to Iron or Electrode Reduction by Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA

    KAUST Repository

    Call, D. F.; Logan, B. E.

    2011-01-01

    Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA completely oxidized lactate and reduced iron or an electrode, producing pyruvate and acetate intermediates. Compared to the current produced by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, G. sulfurreducens PCA produced 10-times-higher current levels in lactate-fed microbial electrolysis cells. The kinetic and comparative analyses reported here suggest a prominent role of G. sulfurreducens strains in metaland electrode-reducing communities supplied with lactate. © 2011, American Society for Microbiology.

  17. Nucleotide Sequences and Comparison of Two Large Conjugative Plasmids from Different Campylobacter species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    predicted protein of 24 kDa that shows 33% identity and 56% similarity to an invertase from Shewanella oneidensis. Invertases and resolvases have been...genes encoding the putative enzymes involved in DNA processing and transfer such as the nickase, helicase, primase, invertase and single-stand-binding...139–153. Edited by I. Nachamkin & M. J. Blaser. Washington, DC: American Society for Microbiology. Pansegrau, W. & Lanka, E. (1996). Enzymology of

  18. Isolation and Physiological Characterization of Psychrophilic Denitrifying Bacteria from Permanently Cold Arctic Fjord Sediments (Svalbard, Norway)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canion, Andy; Prakash, Om; Green, Stefan J.; Jahnke, Linda; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.; Kostka, Joel E.

    2013-01-01

    A large proportion of reactive nitrogen loss from polar sediments is mediated by denitrification, but microorganisms mediating denitrification in polar environments remain poorly characterized. A combined approach of most-probable-number (MPN) enumeration, cultivation and physiological characterization was used to describe psychrophilic denitrifying bacterial communities in sediments of three Arctic fjords in Svalbard (Norway). A MPN assay showed the presence of 10(sup 3)-10(sup 6) cells of psychrophilic nitrate-respiring bacteria g(sup -1) of sediment. Fifteen strains within the Proteobacteria were isolated using a systematic enrichment approach with organic acids as electron donors and nitrate as an electron acceptor. Isolates belonged to five genera, including Shewanella, Pseudomonas, Psychromonas (Gammaproteobacteria), Arcobacter (Epsilonproteobacteria) and Herminiimonas (Betaproteobacteria). All isolates were denitrifiers, except Shewanella, which exhibited the capacity for dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA). Growth from 0 to 40 degC demonstrated that all genera except Shewanella were psychrophiles with optimal growth below 15 degC, and adaptation to low temperature was demonstrated as a shift from primarily C16:0 saturated fatty acids to C16:1 monounsaturated fatty acids at lower temperatures. This study provides the first targeted enrichment and characterization of psychrophilic denitrifying bacteria from polar sediments, and two genera, Arcobacter and Herminiimonas, are isolated for the first time from permanently cold marine sediments.

  19. Larval settlement and metamorphosis of the mussel Mytilus coruscus in response to monospecific bacterial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin-Long; Shen, Pei-Jing; Liang, Xiao; Li, Yi-Feng; Bao, Wei-Yang; Li, Jia-Le

    2013-01-01

    The effects of bacterial biofilms (BFs) on larval settlement and metamorphosis of the mussel, Mytilus coruscus, were investigated in the laboratory. Of nine different isolates, Shewanella sp.1 BF induced the highest percentage of larval settlement and metamorphosis, whereas seven other isolates had a moderate inducing activity and one isolate, Pseudoalteromonas sp. 4, had a no inducing activity. The inducing activity of individual bacterial isolates was not correlated either with their phylogenetic relationship or with the surfaces from which they were isolated. Among the eight bacterial species that demonstrated inducing activity, bacterial density was significantly correlated with the inducing activity for each strain, with the exception of Vibrio sp. 1. The Shewanella sp. 1 BF cue that was responsible for inducing larval settlement and metamorphosis was further investigated. Treatment of the BFs with formalin, antibiotics, ultraviolet irradiation, heat, and ethanol resulted in a significant decrease in their inducing activities and cell survival. BF-conditioned water (CW) did not induce larval metamorphosis, but it triggered larval settlement behavior. A synergistic effect of CW with formalin-fixed Shewanella sp. 1 BF significantly promoted larval metamorphosis. Thus, a cocktail of chemical cues derived from bacteria may be necessary to stimulate larval settlement and metamorphosis in this species.

  20. First insights in the Eu(III) speciation in plant cell suspension cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moll, Henry; Sachs, Susanne [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Biogeochemistry

    2017-06-01

    More than 80 % of the initial Eu(III) amount was associated on Brassica napus cells after an incubation time of 24 h. The spectroscopic speciation of the cell-bound Eu(III) is characterized by an increased intensity of the {sup 7}F{sub 2} transition and prolonged luminescence lifetimes.

  1. Detection of membrane-bound and soluble antigens by magnetic levitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikkel Schou; Howard, Emily; Lu, Shulin

    2017-01-01

    blood cell-bound Epstein-Barr viral particles, and soluble IL-6, and validate the results by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy performed in parallel. Additionally, employing an inexpensive, single lens, manual focus, wifi-enabled camera, we extend the portability of our method for its...

  2. First insights in the Eu(III) speciation in plant cell suspension cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moll, Henry; Sachs, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    More than 80 % of the initial Eu(III) amount was associated on Brassica napus cells after an incubation time of 24 h. The spectroscopic speciation of the cell-bound Eu(III) is characterized by an increased intensity of the "7F_2 transition and prolonged luminescence lifetimes.

  3. Preparation of 125I-protein A usable for up to 10 months in immunoassays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrberg, T; Billestrup, Nils

    1984-01-01

    weeks resulted in a moderate decrease in maximal binding to immunoglobulin (from 91% to 64%), in TCA precipitable radioactivity (from 97% to 80%) and an approx. 30% decrease in the ability to detect cell bound immunoglobulin. It is concluded that gel electrophoretic purification of 125I...

  4. Amylolytic strains of Lactobacillus plantarum isolated from barley ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... naturally present in barley, and produced cell-bound and cell-free α-amylase at alkaline conditions. The two strains may be developed into starter cultures to facilitate the germination of barley and produce malt with a higher fermentable sugar content. Key words: Lactobacillus plantarum, starch hydrolysis, barley, malting ...

  5. FERMENTATION OF INULIN BY A NEW STRAIN OF CLOSTRIDIUM-THERMOAUTOTROPHICUM ISOLATED FROM DAHLIA TUBERS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DRENT, WJ; GOTTSCHAL, JC

    1991-01-01

    A new inulin-fermenting strain of Clostridium thermoautotrophicum was isolated through enrichment on dahlia tubers, and subsequent plating on agar media with undissolved inulin. Both the cell-bound and cell-free inulinase(s) functioned optimally at 60-degrees-C and at neutral pH. This new strain I1

  6. Cyanobacteria species identified in the Weija and Kpong reservoirs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Kpong and Weija reservoirs supply drinking water to Accra, Ghana. This study was conducted to identify the cyanobacteria present in these reservoirs and to ascertain whether current treatment processes remove whole cyanobacteria cells from the drinking water produced. Cyanotoxins are mostly cell bound and could ...

  7. Cell-surface acceleration of urokinase-catalyzed receptor cleavage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer-Hansen, G; Ploug, M; Behrendt, N

    1997-01-01

    by a prior incubation of the cells with uPA inactivated by diisopropyl fluorophosphate, demonstrating a requirement for specific receptor binding of the active uPA to obtain the high-efficiency cleavage of cell-bound uPAR. Furthermore, amino-terminal sequence analysis revealed that uPAR(2+3), purified from U...

  8. Responses to gamma radiation of selected microorganisms in sterile water and bovine muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dempster, J.F.; Halls, N.A.

    1986-01-01

    The responses to gamma-radiation of a number of food-associated microorganisms (Staphylococcus aureus, Yersinia enterocolitica, Pseudomonas putrefaciens) were studied in sterile distilled water and sterile bovine muscle slurry. Surviving cells were grown aerobically at room temperature on yeast extract dextrose tryptone agar (PCA, Oxoid). The D 1 0 of the Pseudomonas sp. was 27 Gy in water and the D 1 0 of the Yersinia sp. in water was 32 Gy. In the slurry resistance increased markedly; the Pseudomonas sp. was ten times more resistant (D 1 0 260 Gy) and the Yersinia sp. was seven times more resistant (D 1 0226 Gy). The Staph. aureus was equally sensitive in both systems (author)

  9. Microbiological spoilage of fish and fish products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Lone; Huss, Hans Henrik

    1996-01-01

    Spoilage of fresh and lightly preserved fish products is caused by microbial action. This paper reviews the current knowledge in terms of the microbiology of fish and fish products with particular emphasis on identification of specific spoilage bacteria and the qualitative and quantitative...... biochemical indicators of spoilage. Shewanzella putrefaciens and Pseudomonas spp. are the specific spoilage bacteria of iced fresh fish regardless of the origin of the fish. Modified atmosphere stored marine fish from temperate waters are spoiled by the CO2 resistant Photobacterium phosphoreum whereas Gram......- positive bacteria are likely spoilers of CO2 packed fish from fresh or tropical waters. Fish products with high salt contents may spoil due to growth of halophilic bacteria (salted fish) or growth of anaerobic bacteria and yeasts (barrel salted fish). Whilst the spoilage of fresh and highly salted fish...

  10. 海水网箱养殖大黄鱼病原菌研究%STUDIES ON THE PATHOGENIC BACTERIA OF Pseudosciaena crocea IN MARINE CAGE CULTURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林克冰; 周宸; 刘家富; 周胜利; 曾志南; 陈木

    1999-01-01

    从福建宁德地区患病大黄鱼(Pseudosciaena crocea)肝、肾、脾等组织分离出3株病原菌,进行纯化培养、人工感染、药敏试验及菌种鉴定等研究,根据形态及生理生化特征,其中2株致病菌归为哈维氏弧菌(Vibrio harveyi),另一株为腐败假单胞菌(Pseudomonas putrefaciens).药敏实验的结果表明,氟哌酸、环丙氟哌酸、氯霉素、庆大霉素和复方新诺明等对致病菌有较强的抑制作用.

  11. Preservation of organic matter in nontronite against iron redox cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Q.

    2015-12-01

    It is generally believed that clay minerals can protect organic matter from degradation in redox active environments, but both biotic and abiotic factors can influence the redox process and thus potentially change the clay-organic associations. However, the specific mechanisms involved in this process remain poorly understood. In this study, a model organic compound, 12-Aminolauric acid (ALA) was selected to intercalate into the structural interlayer of nontronite (an iron-rich smectite, NAu-2) to form an ALA-intercalated NAu-2 composite (ALA-NAu-2). Shawanella putrefaciens CN32 and sodium dithionite were used to reduce structural Fe(III) to Fe(II) in NAu-2 and ALA-NAu-2. The bioreduced ALA-NAu-2 was subsequently re-oxidized by air. The rates and extents of bioreduction and air re-oxidation were determined with wet chemistry methods. ALA release from ALA-NAu-2 via redox process was monitored. Mineralogical changes after iron redox cycle were investigated with X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. At the beginning stage of bioreduction, S. putrefaciens CN32 reduced Fe(III) from the edges of nontronite and preferentially reduced and dissolved small and poorly crystalline particles, and released ALA, resulting a positive correlation between ALA release and iron reduction extent (80%). Because bacteria are the principal agent for mediating redox process in natural environments, our results demonstrated that the structural interlayer of smectite can serve as a potential shelter to protect organic matter from oxidation.

  12. Treatment With High-Hydrostatic Pressure, Activated Film Packaging With Thymol Plus Enterocin AS-48, and Its Combination Modify the Bacterial Communities of Refrigerated Sea Bream (Sparus aurata Fillets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Ortega Blázquez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the impact of activated plastic films with thymol and enterocin AS-48 and high-hydrostatic pressure (HP treatment on the bacterial load and bacterial diversity of vacuum-packaged sea bream fillets under refrigerated storage for 10 days. The activated film and the HP treatment reduced aerobic mesophiles viable counts by 1.46 and 2.36 log cycles, respectively, while the combined treatment achieved a reduction of 4.13 log cycles. HP and combined treatments resulted in longer delays in bacterial growth. Proteobacteria were the dominant phyla in sea bream fillets. The relative abundance of Firmicutes increased by the end of storage both in controls and in samples treated by HP singly or in combination with the activated films. The predominant operational taxonomic units (OTUs found at time 0 in control samples (Listeria, Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, Enterobacteriaceae, Chryseobacterium rapidly changed during storage (with an increase of Vibrio, Photobacterium, and Shewanella together with Cloacibacterium and Lactobacillales by the end of storage. The activated film and the HP treatment induced drastic changes in bacterial diversity right after treatments (with Comamonadaceae, Methylobacterium, Acidovorax, and Sphingomonas as main OTUs and also induced further modifications during storage. Bacterial diversity in activated film samples was quite homogeneous during storage (with Vibrio, Photobacterium, and Shewanella as main OTUs and approached control samples. HP treatments (singly or in combination with activated films determined a high relative abundance of Acinetobacter (followed by Pseudomonas and Shewanella during early storage as well as a higher relative abundance of lactic acid bacteria by the end of storage. The results indicate that the complex dynamics of bacterial populations in the refrigerated sea bream fillets are markedly influenced by treatment and antimicrobials applied.

  13. Treatment With High-Hydrostatic Pressure, Activated Film Packaging With Thymol Plus Enterocin AS-48, and Its Combination Modify the Bacterial Communities of Refrigerated Sea Bream (Sparus aurata) Fillets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega Blázquez, Irene; Grande Burgos, María J; Pérez-Pulido, Rubén; Gálvez, Antonio; Lucas, Rosario

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the impact of activated plastic films with thymol and enterocin AS-48 and high-hydrostatic pressure (HP) treatment on the bacterial load and bacterial diversity of vacuum-packaged sea bream fillets under refrigerated storage for 10 days. The activated film and the HP treatment reduced aerobic mesophiles viable counts by 1.46 and 2.36 log cycles, respectively, while the combined treatment achieved a reduction of 4.13 log cycles. HP and combined treatments resulted in longer delays in bacterial growth. Proteobacteria were the dominant phyla in sea bream fillets. The relative abundance of Firmicutes increased by the end of storage both in controls and in samples treated by HP singly or in combination with the activated films. The predominant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) found at time 0 in control samples ( Listeria, Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, Enterobacteriaceae, Chryseobacterium ) rapidly changed during storage (with an increase of Vibrio, Photobacterium , and Shewanella together with Cloacibacterium and Lactobacillales by the end of storage). The activated film and the HP treatment induced drastic changes in bacterial diversity right after treatments (with Comamonadaceae, Methylobacterium, Acidovorax , and Sphingomonas as main OTUs) and also induced further modifications during storage. Bacterial diversity in activated film samples was quite homogeneous during storage (with Vibrio, Photobacterium , and Shewanella as main OTUs) and approached control samples. HP treatments (singly or in combination with activated films) determined a high relative abundance of Acinetobacter (followed by Pseudomonas and Shewanella ) during early storage as well as a higher relative abundance of lactic acid bacteria by the end of storage. The results indicate that the complex dynamics of bacterial populations in the refrigerated sea bream fillets are markedly influenced by treatment and antimicrobials applied.

  14. Microbes Enhance Mobility of Arsenic in Pleistocene Aquifer Sand from Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Ratan K.; Zheng, Yan; Saltikov, Chad W.; Radloff, Kathleen A.; Mailloux, Brian; Ahmed, Kazi. M.; van Geen, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    Dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria can mobilize As, but few studies have studied such processes in deeper orange-colored Pleistocene sands containing 1–2 mg kg−1 As that are associated with low-As groundwater in Bangladesh. To address this gap, anaerobic incubations were conducted in replicate over 90 days using natural orange sands initially containing 0.14 mg kg−1 of 1 M phosphate-extractable As (24 hr), >99% as As(V), and 0.8 g kg−1 of 1.2 M HCl-leachable Fe (1 hr at 80°C), 95% as Fe(III). The sediment was resuspended in artificial groundwater, with or without lactate as a labile carbon source, and inoculated with metal-reducing Shewanella sp. ANA-3. Within 23 days, dissolved As concentrations increased to 17 μg L−1 with lactate, 97% as As(III), and 2 μg L−1 without lactate. Phosphate-extractable As concentrations increased 4-fold to 0.6 mg kg−1 in the same incubations, even without the addition of lactate. Dissolved As levels in controls without Shewanella, both with and without lactate, instead remained <1 μg L−1. These observations indicate that metal-reducers such as Shewanella can trigger As release to groundwater by converting sedimentary As to a more mobilizable form without the addition of high levels of labile carbon. Such interactions need to be better understood to determine the vulnerability of low-As aquifers from which drinking water is increasingly drawn in Bangladesh. PMID:21405115

  15. Treatment With High-Hydrostatic Pressure, Activated Film Packaging With Thymol Plus Enterocin AS-48, and Its Combination Modify the Bacterial Communities of Refrigerated Sea Bream (Sparus aurata) Fillets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega Blázquez, Irene; Grande Burgos, María J.; Pérez-Pulido, Rubén; Gálvez, Antonio; Lucas, Rosario

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the impact of activated plastic films with thymol and enterocin AS-48 and high-hydrostatic pressure (HP) treatment on the bacterial load and bacterial diversity of vacuum-packaged sea bream fillets under refrigerated storage for 10 days. The activated film and the HP treatment reduced aerobic mesophiles viable counts by 1.46 and 2.36 log cycles, respectively, while the combined treatment achieved a reduction of 4.13 log cycles. HP and combined treatments resulted in longer delays in bacterial growth. Proteobacteria were the dominant phyla in sea bream fillets. The relative abundance of Firmicutes increased by the end of storage both in controls and in samples treated by HP singly or in combination with the activated films. The predominant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) found at time 0 in control samples (Listeria, Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, Enterobacteriaceae, Chryseobacterium) rapidly changed during storage (with an increase of Vibrio, Photobacterium, and Shewanella together with Cloacibacterium and Lactobacillales by the end of storage). The activated film and the HP treatment induced drastic changes in bacterial diversity right after treatments (with Comamonadaceae, Methylobacterium, Acidovorax, and Sphingomonas as main OTUs) and also induced further modifications during storage. Bacterial diversity in activated film samples was quite homogeneous during storage (with Vibrio, Photobacterium, and Shewanella as main OTUs) and approached control samples. HP treatments (singly or in combination with activated films) determined a high relative abundance of Acinetobacter (followed by Pseudomonas and Shewanella) during early storage as well as a higher relative abundance of lactic acid bacteria by the end of storage. The results indicate that the complex dynamics of bacterial populations in the refrigerated sea bream fillets are markedly influenced by treatment and antimicrobials applied. PMID:29541064

  16. Low temperature S(0) biomineralization at a supraglacial spring system in the Canadian High Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, D F; Williamson, C; Grasby, S E; Pappalardo, R T; Spear, J R; Templeton, A S

    2011-07-01

    Elemental sulfur (S(0) ) is deposited each summer onto surface ice at Borup Fiord pass on Ellesmere Island, Canada, when high concentrations of aqueous H(2) S are discharged from a supraglacial spring system. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries generated from sulfur deposits were dominated by β-Proteobacteria, particularly Ralstonia sp. Sulfur-cycling micro-organisms such as Thiomicrospira sp., and ε-Proteobacteria such as Sulfuricurvales and Sulfurovumales spp. were also abundant. Concurrent cultivation experiments isolated psychrophilic, sulfide-oxidizing consortia, which produce S(0) in opposing gradients of Na(2) S and oxygen. 16S rRNA gene analyses of sulfur precipitated in gradient tubes show stable sulfur-biomineralizing consortia dominated by Marinobacter sp. in association with Shewanella, Loktanella, Rubrobacter, Flavobacterium, and Sphingomonas spp. Organisms closely related to cultivars appear in environmental 16S rRNA clone libraries; none currently known to oxidize sulfide. Once consortia were simplified to Marinobacter and Flavobacteria spp. through dilution-to-extinction and agar removal, sulfur biomineralization continued. Shewanella, Loktanella, Sphingomonas, and Devosia spp. were also isolated on heterotrophic media, but none produced S(0) alone when reintroduced to Na(2) S gradient tubes. Tubes inoculated with a Marinobacter and Shewanella spp. co-culture did show sulfur biomineralization, suggesting that Marinobacter may be the key sulfide oxidizer in laboratory experiments. Light, florescence and scanning electron microscopy of mineral aggregates produced in Marinobacter experiments revealed abundant cells, with filaments and sheaths variably mineralized with extracellular submicron sulfur grains; similar biomineralization was not observed in abiotic controls. Detailed characterization of mineral products associated with low temperature microbial sulfur-cycling may provide biosignatures relevant to future exploration of Europa and Mars. © 2011

  17. Bacterial Electrocatalysis of K4[Fe(CN)6] Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Zhiyong; Xiao, Yong; Wu, Ranran

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (MR-1), a model strain of electrochemically active bacteria, can transfer electrons from cell to extracellular electron acceptors including Fe(III) (hydro)oxides. It has been reported that several redox species such as cytochromes in membranes and flavins assist...... in the electron transport (ET) processes. However, the oxidization of metal compounds was barely described. Here we report electrocatalysis of K4[Fe(CN)6] oxidation by MR-1. K4[Fe(CN)6] is a redox inorganic compound and shows a reversible redox process on bare glassy carbon (GCE). This is reflected by a pair...

  18. Extracellular polymeric substances are transient media for microbial extracellular electron transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Yong; Zhang, Enhua; Zhang, Jingdong

    2017-01-01

    in microbiology and microbial exploitation for mineral bio-respiration, pollutant conversion, and bioenergy production. We have addressed these challenges by comparing pure and EPS-depleted samples of three representative electrochemically active strains viz Gram-negative Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Gram......-positive Bacillus sp. WS-XY1, and yeast Pichia stipites using technology from electrochemistry, spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and microbiology. Voltammetry discloses redox signals from cytochromes and flavins in intact MR-1 cells, whereas stronger signals from cytochromes and additional signals from both...

  19. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U04002-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 529_3951( CP000529 |pid:none) Polaromonas naphthalenivorans C... 39 0.15 AE009952_2826( AE009952 |pid:none) Yersinia pes.........done Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value N ( AU061399 ) Dictyostelium disc............done Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value EU937995_1( EU937995 |pid:none) Phytophthora sojae cal....022 FM992690_559( FM992690 |pid:none) Candida dubliniensis CD36 chromo... 42 0.0...1688( CP000571 |pid:none) Burkholderia pseudomallei 668 c... 38 0.25 CP000302_2086( CP000302 |pid:none) Shewanella denitrificans

  20. Human, recombinant interleukin-2 induces in vitro histamine release in a dose-dependent manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Petersen, L J; Skov, P S

    1995-01-01

    significantly in the supernatant from cells stimulated by rIL-2 in a dose-dependent manner both in patients and volunteers. Total cell-bound histamine was 49.3 +/- 4.1 ng/ml in patients compared to 78.5 +/- 7.7 ng/ml in volunteers (p ... was significantly enhanced in cancer patients compared to volunteers (*p manner in both cancer patients and volunteers. This may in part explain the severe toxicity observed during high...

  1. Interdisciplinary Studies on the Combat Readiness and Health Issues Faced by Military Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    University of Texas T and operational at the University of Texas at Dallas Center for BrainHealth located at 2200 W. Mockingbird Lane, Dallas, Texas...cells), and the targeted cells have been efficiently killed with NIR. This work is now published (Chakravarty et al., 2008) (Appendix B...mononuclear cells bound only to the CNTs coupled to the anti-CD25 mAb. Most importantly, only the specifically targeted cells were killed after exposure to

  2. Isolation and characterization of biosurfactant producing bacteria from Persian Gulf (Bushehr provenance).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanshahian, Mehdi

    2014-09-15

    Biosurfactants are surface active materials that are produced by some microorganisms. These molecules increase biodegradation of insoluble pollutants. In this study sediments and seawater samples were collected from the coastline of Bushehr provenance in the Persian Gulf and their biosurfactant producing bacteria were isolated. Biosurfactant producing bacteria were isolated by using an enrichment method in Bushnell-Hass medium with diesel oil as the sole carbon source. Five screening tests were used for selection of Biosurfactant producing bacteria: hemolysis in blood agar, oil spreading, drop collapse, emulsification activity and Bacterial Adhesion to Hydrocarbon test (BATH). These bacteria were identified using biochemical and molecular methods. Eighty different colonies were isolated from the collected samples. The most biosurfactant producing isolates related to petrochemical plants of Khark Island. Fourteen biosurfactant producing bacteria were selected between these isolates and 7 isolates were screened as these were predominant producers that belong to Shewanella alga, Shewanella upenei, Vibrio furnissii, Gallaecimonas pentaromativorans, Brevibacterium epidermidis, Psychrobacter namhaensis and Pseudomonas fluorescens. The largest clear zone diameters in oil spreading were observed for G. pentaromativorans strain O15. Also, this strain has the best emulsification activity and reduction of surface tension, suggesting it is the best of thee isolated strains. The results of this study confirmed that there is high diversity of biosurfactant producing bacteria in marine ecosystem of Iran and by application of these bacteria in petrochemical waste water environmental problems can be assisted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Microbial community analysis in rice paddy soils irrigated by acid mine drainage contaminated water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Min; Xiao, Tangfu; Ning, Zengping; Xiao, Enzong; Sun, Weimin

    2015-03-01

    Five rice paddy soils located in southwest China were selected for geochemical and microbial community analysis. These rice fields were irrigated with river water which was contaminated by Fe-S-rich acid mine drainage. Microbial communities were characterized by high-throughput sequencing, which showed 39 different phyla/groups in these samples. Among these phyla/groups, Proteobacteria was the most abundant phylum in all samples. Chloroflexi, Acidobacteria, Nitrospirae, and Bacteroidetes exhibited higher relative abundances than other phyla. A number of rare and candidate phyla were also detected. Moreover, canonical correspondence analysis suggested that pH, sulfate, and nitrate were significant factors that shaped the microbial community structure. In addition, a wide diversity of Fe- and S-related bacteria, such as GOUTA19, Shewanella, Geobacter, Desulfobacca, Thiobacillus, Desulfobacterium, and Anaeromyxobacter, might be responsible for biogeochemical Fe and S cycles in the tested rice paddy soils. Among the dominant genera, GOUTA19 and Shewanella were seldom detected in rice paddy soils.

  4. Mtr Extracellular Electron Transfer Pathways in Fe(III)-reducing or Fe(II)-oxidizing Bacteria: A Genomic Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Liang; Rosso, Kevin M.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2012-12-01

    Originally discovered in the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (MR-1), the Mtr (i.e., metal-reducing) pathway exists in all characterized strains of metal-reducing Shewanella. The protein components identified to date for the Mtr pathway of MR-1 include four multi-heme c-type cytochromes (c-Cyts), CymA, MtrA, MtrC and OmcA, and a porin-like, outer membrane protein MtrB. They are strategically positioned along the width of the MR-1 cell envelope to mediate electron transfer from the quinone/quinol pool in the inner-membrane to the Fe(III)-containing minerals external to the bacterial cells. A survey of microbial genomes revealed homologues of the Mtr pathway in other dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, including Aeromonas hydrophila, Ferrimonas balearica and Rhodoferax ferrireducens, and in the Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria Dechloromonas aromatica RCB, Gallionella capsiferriformans ES-2 and Sideroxydans lithotrophicus ES-1. The widespread distribution of Mtr pathways in Fe(III)-reducing or Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria emphasizes the importance of this type of extracellular electron transfer pathway in microbial redox transformation of Fe. Their distribution in these two different functional groups of bacteria also emphasizes the bi-directional nature of electron transfer reactions carried out by the Mtr pathways. The characteristics of the Mtr pathways may be shared by other pathways used by microorganisms for exchanging electrons with their extracellular environments.

  5. Effects of chitosan oligosaccharides on microbiota composition of silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix) determined by culture-dependent and independent methods during chilled storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Shiliang; Liu, Xiaochang; Huang, Zhan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Longteng; Luo, Yongkang

    2018-03-02

    This study evaluated the effects of chitosan oligosaccharides (COS) on the changes in quality and microbiota of silver carp fillets stored at 4 °C. During storage, 1% (w/v) COS treated samples maintained good quality, as evidenced by retarding sensory deterioration, inhibiting microbial growth, attenuating the production of total volatile basic nitrogen, putrescine, cadaverine and hypoxanthine, and delaying degradation of inosine monophosphate and hypoxanthine ribonucleotide. Meanwhile, variability in the predominant microbiota in different samples was investigated by culture-dependent and -independent methods. Based on sensory analysis, shelf-life of silver carp fillets was 4 days for the control and 6 days for COS treated samples. Meanwhile, Pseudomonas, followed by Aeromonas, Acinetobacter, and Shewanella were dominated in the control samples at day 4 and contributed to fish spoilage at day 6. However, COS inhibited the growth of Pseudomonas, Aeromonas, and Shewanella significantly. Consequently, Acinetobacter followed by Pseudomonas became the predominant microbiota in COS treated samples at day 6. With the growth of Pseudomonas, COS treated samples were spoiled at day 8. Therefore, COS improved the quality of fillets and prolonged the shelf life of silver carp fillets by 2 days during chilled storage, which was mainly due to their modulating effects on microbiota. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Far from superficial: microbial diversity associated with the skin and mucus of fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipriano, Rocco C.; Dove, Alistair; Cipriano, R.C.; Bruckner, A.W.; Shchelkunov, I.S.

    2011-01-01

    During horizontal or water-borne infection involving an obligate pathogen (e.g. – Aeromonas salmonicida, cause of furunculosis), the pathogen interacted with and influenced the microbial diversity of the dermal mucus of fish. Prior to infection, the prevalent bacterial flora cultured from juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) included Pseudomonas fluorescens, Comomonas terrigenia, Acinetobacter sp., Moraxella sp., Pseudomonas dimunita, Alcaligenes denitrificans, Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes, and Pseudomonas alcaligenes, Serratia liquefaciens, Aeromonas hydrophila, other motile Aeromonas spp., and Corynebacterium aquaticum. After A. salmonicida was initially detected in this population as an external mucus infection, Acinetobacter sp., Moraxella sp., C. terrigenia, P. fluorescens, and P. dimunita, Staphylococcus sp., and A. hydrophila, were also present in appreciable numbers. Within several weeks, however, the A. salmonicida infection amplified and composed 78% of the total flora in the mucus. Only P. dimunita (4%). P. fluorescens (2%), and C. terrigenia (1%) were cultured at that time and more than a third of these fish showed evidence of a systemic A. salmonicida infection within their kidneys. Eight weeks after oral oxytetracycline treatments, A. salmonicida was no longer isolated from the mucus or kidneys of any fish and glucose inert or other oxidative microbes (e.g., P. fluorescens, C. terrigenia, Acinetobacter sp., Moraxella sp.) were beginning to repopulate the external surface of the salmon in increasing frequency. Still present and composing fairly large percentages of the total flora were A. hydrophila, as well as Enterobacter sp., and P. putrefaciens. A normal microbial diversity was re-established as the fish recovered. In another investigation, reduced biological diversity was noted in the dermal mucus among smallmouth bass that were sampled from the Jackson River (Covington, VA). In these fish, A. hydrophila and P. putrefaciens were the two

  7. Detection of mycoplasmas in goat milk by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assunção, Patricia; Davey, Hazel M; Rosales, Ruben S; Antunes, Nuno T; de la Fe, Christian; Ramirez, Ana S; de Galarreta, Carlos M Ruiz; Poveda, Jose B

    2007-12-01

    The detection of mycoplasma in milk can be performed by either culture techniques or polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based methods. Although PCR can reduce the average diagnostic time to 5 h in comparison with the several days for the isolation of the agent, there is still a need to develop methods, which could give earlier results. For this purpose, we tested the ability of flow cytometry (FC) to detect mycoplasmas in milk samples. Milk samples inoculated with four different mycoplasmas, Mycoplasma agalactiae, Mycoplasma putrefaciens, Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. Capricolum, or Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides large-colony type, known to cause contagious agalactia in goats, were stained with the DNA stain SYBR Green I and analyzed by FC. Three goat milk samples, from which mycoplasmas have been isolated in broth medium were also analyzed. All mycoplasmas were easily distinguished from debris of milk samples, but it was not possible to distinguish between the different mycoplasma species. In our conditions, the detection limit of the technique was of the order of 10(3)-10(4) cells ml(-1). Furthermore, mycoplasmas were also distinguished from Staphylococcus aureus. FC together with SYBR Green I was able to distinguish between mycoplasma cells and debris present in milk samples and gave results in 20-30 min. This is an important first step in developing a robust, routine flow cytometric method for the detection of mycoplasmas in milk samples. (c) 2007 International Society for Analytical Cytology

  8. Laboratory scale bioremediation of diesel hydrocarbon in soil by indigenous bacterial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anjana; Rehman, Meenal Budholia

    2009-09-01

    In vitro experiment was performed by taking petrol pump soils and diesel in flasks with the micronutrients and macronutrients supplements. Cemented bioreactors having sterilized soil and diesel was used for in vivo analysis of diesel hydrocarbon degradation. There were two sets of experiments, first having three bioreactors (1) inoculated by KI. pneumoniae subsp. aerogenes with soil and diesel; (2) with addition of NH4NO3; and (3) served as control. In second set, one bioreactor was inoculated by bacterial consortium containing Moraxella saccharolytica, Alteromonas putrefaciens, KI. pneumoniae subsp. aerogenes and Pseudomonas fragi along with soil and diesel. The remaining two bioreactors (having NH4NO3 and control) were similar to the first set. The experiments were incubated for 30 days. Ability of bacterial inoculum to degrade diesel was analyzed through GC-MS. Smaller chain compounds were obtained after experimental period of 30 days. Rate of diesel degradation was better with the present bacterial consortium than individual bacteria. Present bacterial consortium can be a better choice for faster and complete remediation of contaminated hydrocarbon soils.

  9. Antibacterial and Antioxidant Activity of Essential Oil Terpenes against Pathogenic and Spoilage-Forming Bacteria and Cell Structure-Activity Relationships Evaluated by SEM Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Zengin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The antibacterial activity and antioxidant effect of the compounds α-terpineol, linalool, eucalyptol and α-pinene obtained from essential oils (EOs, against pathogenic and spoilage forming bacteria were determined. The antibacterial activities of these compounds were observed in vitro on four Gram-negative and three Gram-positive strains. S. putrefaciens was the most resistant bacteria to all tested components, with MIC values of 2% or higher, whereas E. coli O157:H7 was the most sensitive strain among the tested bacteria. Eucalyptol extended the lag phase of S. Typhimurium, E. coli O157:H7 and S. aureus at the concentrations of 0.7%, 0.6% and 1%, respectively. In vitro cell growth experiments showed the tested compounds had toxic effects on all bacterial species with different level of potency. Synergistic and additive effects were observed at least one dose pair of combination against S. Typhimurium, E. coli O157:H7 and S. aureus, however antagonistic effects were not found in these combinations. The results of this first study are encouraging for further investigations on mechanisms of antimicrobial activity of these EO components.

  10. Detection of irradiation in prepacked fresh fish and shrimp on the basis of the microbial flora

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spreekens, K.J.A. van; Toepoel, L.

    1978-01-01

    Many experiments have been carried out at our institute during the last four years while studying the prolongation of the shelf-life of prepacked fillets of cod (Gadus callarias) and plaice (Pleuronectes platessa) and cooked shrimp (Crangon crangon) by irradiation at a dose of 100 krad. For the bacteriological analysis in these experiments modified Long and Hammer's medium was used as enumeration medium. On this medium colonies of Pseudomonas putrefaciens, Photobacterium spp. and 'typical shrimp spoiling' bacteria (presumably Alteromonas spp.) can be differentiated. These and several other species that are involved in the spoilage of unirradiated fish and shrimp are eliminated by irradiation. In irradiated fish and shrimp Moraxella spp. predominated during the whole storage period. Their colonies typically differ from the colonies of the former species. Simple tests can be applied for the confirmation of the latter species. The predominance of Moraxella-type colonies on the plates in combination with the absence of colonies of the radiosensitive species mentioned above is indicative of irradiated samples. (author)

  11. A novel biocatalytic approach to acetylation of 1-β-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine by Aspergillus oryzae whole cell in organic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Feng; Zhu, Zhen; Zhao, Guang-Lei; Yu, Yi-Gang; Lai, Fu-Rao; Wu, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Biocatalytic acylation of 1-β-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine (ara-C) was developed using whole cell of Aspergillus oryzae as a novel catalyst. (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis indicated that the whole-cell biocatalyst had more specific activity toward the 3'-hydroxyl group than 5'-hydroxyl group among the available hydroxyl groups in sugar moiety of ara-C. Except for glucose and maltose, 11 carbon sources supplemented to basal media, including Spans, Tweens, olive oil and oleic acid, exhibited notable enhancement effects on both the cell growth and the acylation reactions. It was suggested that the carbon sources containing controlled-release oleic acid were the important substrates for the production of fungal cell-bound lipase with specific activity, partially due to a gradual induction effect of their released oleic acid on the cell-bound lipase production. Despite the low initial reaction rate and substrate conversion, the addition of 2.0 g/l Span 80 resulted in a higher 3'-regioselectivity of the cells than 81%. By using Tween 85 at its optimum concentration of 5.0 g/l, however, the highest initial rates (3.2 mmol/l h) and substrate conversion (76%) of the whole-cell catalyzed acylation of ara-C can be achieved. It was also found that the 3'-regioselectivity of the cells showed observable increase by extending the culture time. And the activity of cell-bound lipase drastically increased in the early stage of cell growth and then declined in the late culture stage, whatever the culture media used. Our results thus indicated that A. oryzae whole cell was a promising green tool for biosynthesis of nucleoside esters with potential bioactivities.

  12. Trehalolipid biosurfactants from nonpathogenic Rhodococcus actinobacteria with diverse immunomodulatory activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuyukina, Maria S; Ivshina, Irena B; Baeva, Tatiana A; Kochina, Olesia A; Gein, Sergey V; Chereshnev, Valery A

    2015-12-25

    Actinobacteria of the genus Rhodococcus produce trehalolipid biosurfactants with versatile biochemical properties and low toxicity. In recent years, these biosurfactants are increasingly studied as possible biomedical agents with expressed immunological activities. Applications of trehalolipids from Rhodococcus, predominantly cell-bound, in biomedicine are also attractive because their cost drawback could be less significant for high-value products. The review summarizes recent findings in immunomodulatory activities of trehalolipid biosurfactants from nonpathogenic Rhodococcus and related actinobacteria and compares their biomedical potential with well-known immunomodifying properties of trehalose dimycolates from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Molecular mechanisms of trehalolipid interactions with immunocompetent cells are also discussed. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Dynamics of transparent exopolymeric particles (TEP) and particle-associated carbohydrates in the Dona Paula bay, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhaskar, P.V.; Bhosle, N.B.

    filters. The filters were then placed on a glass slide having a drop of fluorescence free oil, another drop of oil placed over the filter paper and covered with a cover glass. The slide was then illuminated with a UV lamp and viewed at 1000x... to their properties. For example, Sal-PCHO is loosely attached polymers produced by phytoplankton, generally more labile and hence preferred by bacteria (Decho 1990). Alternately, CPCHO are cell-bound polymers, which have higher concentrations of acidic radicals...

  14. A simple assay for the detection of antibodies to endocrine islet cell surface antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contreas, G.; Madsen, O.D.; Vissing, H.; Lernmark, Aa.

    1986-01-01

    A simple and sensitive immunoradiometric assay for the detection of islet cell surface antibodies (CIRMA) has been developed. Live, transformed islet cells derived from a liver metastasis of a transplantable islet cell tumor were grown in removable microtiter wells and incubated with antibody. Cell-bound antibodies were quantitated using 125 I-labelled second antibodies. The assay was used to detect islet cell antibodies present in sera from non-diabetic and diabetic BB rats and proved to be particularly effective for screening hybridoma supernatants in order to identify monoclonal antibodies recognizing islet cell surface antigens. (Auth.)

  15. A simple method for affinity purification of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juweid, M; Sato, J; Paik, C; Onay-Basaran, S; Weinstein, J N; Neumann, R D [National Cancer Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1993-04-01

    A simple method is described for affinity purification of radiolabeled antibodies using glutaraldehyde-fixed tumor target cells. The cell-bound antibody fraction is removed from the cells by an acid wash and then immediately subjected to buffer-exchange chromatography. The method was applied to the D3 murine monoclonal antibody which binds to a 290 kDa antigen on the surface of Line 10 guinea pig carcinoma cells. No alteration in the molecular size profile was detected after acid washing. Purification resulted in a significant increase in immunoreactivity by an average of 14 [+-] 47% (SD; range 4-30%). (author).

  16. Methods for determining microcystins (peptide hepatotoxins) and microcystin-producing cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangolkar, Lalita N; Maske, Sarika S; Chakrabarti, Tapan

    2006-11-01

    Episodes of cyanobacterial toxic blooms and fatalities to animals and humans due to cyanobacterial toxins (CBT) are known worldwide. The hepatotoxins and neurotoxins (cyanotoxins) produced by bloom-forming cyanobacteria have been the cause of human and animal health hazards and even death. Prevailing concentration of cell bound endotoxin, exotoxin and the toxin variants depend on developmental stages of the bloom and the cyanobacterial (CB) species involved. Toxic and non-toxic strains do not show any predictable morphological difference. The current instrumental, immunological and molecular methods applied for determining microcystins (peptide hepatotoxins) and microcystin-producing cyanobacteria are reviewed.

  17. Clearance and localization of intravitreal liposomes in the aphakic vitrectomized eye

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stern, W.H.; Heath, T.D.; Lewis, G.P.; Guerin, C.J.; Erickson, P.A.; Lopez, N.G.; Hong, K.L.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have examined the fate of intravitreally injected liposomes in the aphakic, vitrectomized eye of the rabbit. Liposomes labelled with 125 [I]-p-hydroxybenzimidylphosphatidylethanolamine were eliminated rapidly from the intraocular fluid. Nonetheless, a significant fraction of these liposomes were found to bind to various ocular tissues including the retina, iris, sclera, and cornea. Ultrastructural studies with gold colloid-loaded liposomes revealed that retinal bound liposomes were attached to the inner limiting lamina but did not penetrate to the internal cells of the retina. Epiretinal cells bound and internalized gold colloid-loaded liposomes suggesting that these cells may be very sensitive to liposome mediated drug delivery

  18. Soluble CD36- a marker of the (pathophysiological) role of CD36 in the metabolic syndrome?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koonen, Debby P Y; Jensen, Majken K; Handberg, Aase

    2011-01-01

    associated with obesity and lipid components of the metabolic syndrome, with risk of heart disease and type 2 diabetes. Recently, non-cell bound CD36 was identified in human plasma and was termed soluble CD36 (sCD36). In this review we will describe the functions of CD36 in tissues and address the role of s......CD36 in the context of the metabolic syndrome. We will also highlight recent findings from human genetic studies looking at the CD36 locus in relation to metabolic profile in the general population. Finally, we present a model in which insulin resistance, oxLDL, low-grade inflammation and liver...

  19. Subsurface Bio-Immobilization of Plutonium: Experiment and Model Validation Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, Donald; Rittmann, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this project is to conduct a concurrent experimental and modeling study centered on the interactions of Shewanella algae BrY with plutonium and uranium species and phases. The most important objective of this research is to investigate the long-term stability of bioprecipitated immobilized actinide phases under changing redox conditions in biologically active systems. The long-term stability of bio-immobilized actinides (e.g. by bio-reduction) is a key criteria that defines the utility and effectiveness of a remediation/containment strategy for subsurface actinide contaminants. Plutonium, which is the focus of this project, is the key contaminant of concern at several DOE sites

  20. Enhanced Biofilm Formation and Increased Resistance to Antimicrobial Agents and Bacterial Invasion Are Caused by Synergistic Interactions in Multispecies Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burmølle, Mette; Webb, J.S.; Rao, D.

    2006-01-01

    from the surface of the marine alga Ulva australis, were screened for synergistic interactions within biofilms when present together in different combinations. Four isolates, Microbacterium phyllosphaerae, Shewanella japonica, Dokdonia donghaensis, and Acinetobacter lwoffii, were found to interact......Most biofilms in their natural environments are likely to consist of consortia of species that influence each other in synergistic and antagonistic manners. However, few reports specifically address interactions within multispecies biofilms. In this study, 17 epiphytic bacterial strains, isolated...... synergistically in biofilms formed in 96-well microtiter plates: biofilm biomass was observed to increase by >167% in biofilms formed by the four strains compared to biofilms composed of single strains. When exposed to the antibacterial agent hydrogen peroxide or tetracycline, the relative activity (exposed...

  1. Diversity and antimicrobial potential of culturable heterotrophic bacteria associated with the endemic marine sponge Arenosclera brasiliensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintia P.J. Rua

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Marine sponges are the oldest Metazoa, very often presenting a complex microbial consortium. Such is the case of the marine sponge Arenosclera brasiliensis, endemic to Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. In this investigation we characterized the diversity of some of the culturable heterotrophic bacteria living in association with A. brasiliensis and determined their antimicrobial activity. The genera Endozoicomonas (N = 32, Bacillus (N = 26, Shewanella (N = 17, Pseudovibrio (N = 12, and Ruegeria (N = 8 were dominant among the recovered isolates, corresponding to 97% of all isolates. Approximately one third of the isolates living in association with A. brasiliensis produced antibiotics that inhibited the growth of Bacillus subtilis, suggesting that bacteria associated with this sponge play a role in its health.

  2. Dissolution of arsenic minerals mediated by dissimilatory arsenate reducing bacteria: estimation of the physiological potential for arsenic mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukasz, Drewniak; Liwia, Rajpert; Aleksandra, Mantur; Aleksandra, Sklodowska

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was characterization of the isolated dissimilatory arsenate reducing bacteria in the context of their potential for arsenic removal from primary arsenic minerals through reductive dissolution. Four strains, Shewanella sp. OM1, Pseudomonas sp. OM2, Aeromonas sp. OM4, and Serratia sp. OM17, capable of anaerobic growth with As (V) reduction, were isolated from microbial mats from an ancient gold mine. All of the isolated strains: (i) produced siderophores that promote dissolution of minerals, (ii) were resistant to dissolved arsenic compounds, (iii) were able to use the dissolved arsenates as the terminal electron acceptor, and (iii) were able to use copper minerals containing arsenic minerals (e.g., enargite) as a respiratory substrate. Based on the results obtained in this study, we postulate that arsenic can be released from some As-bearing polymetallic minerals (such as copper ore concentrates or middlings) under reductive conditions by dissimilatory arsenate reducers in indirect processes.

  3. AcEST: BP912187 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 9 Definition sp|P70079|KCRU_CHICK Creatine kinase, ubiquitous mitochondrial OS=Ga...gnments: (bits) Value sp|P70079|KCRU_CHICK Creatine kinase, ubiquitous mitochondr...ial O... 34 0.33 sp|Q9TTK8|KCRU_BOVIN Creatine kinase, ubiquitous mitochondrial O... 33 0.74 sp|P46430|GSTT1...NH_SHESA Ribonuclease H OS=Shewanella sp. (strain ANA... 32 1.7 sp|P12532|KCRU_HUMAN Creatine kinase, ubiqui...tous mitochondrial O... 31 2.2 sp|P25809|KCRU_RAT Creatine kinase, ubiquitous mitochondrial OS=... 31 2.8 sp|P30275|KCRU_MOUSE Creati

  4. Characterization of member of DUF1888 protein family, self-cleaving and self-assembling endopeptidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipiuk, Jerzy; Mulligan, Rory; Bargassa, Monireh; Hamilton, John E; Cunningham, Mark A; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2012-06-01

    The crystal structure of SO1698 protein from Shewanella oneidensis was determined by a SAD method and refined to 1.57 Å. The structure is a β sandwich that unexpectedly consists of two polypeptides; the N-terminal fragment includes residues 1-116, and the C-terminal one includes residues 117-125. Electron density also displayed the Lys-98 side chain covalently linked to Asp-116. The putative active site residues involved in self-cleavage were identified; point mutants were produced and characterized structurally and in a biochemical assay. Numerical simulations utilizing molecular dynamics and hybrid quantum/classical calculations suggest a mechanism involving activation of a water molecule coordinated by a catalytic aspartic acid.

  5. Characterization of Member of DUF1888 Protein Family, Self-cleaving and Self-assembling Endopeptidase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipiuk, Jerzy; Mulligan, Rory; Bargassa, Monireh; Hamilton, John E.; Cunningham, Mark A.; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    The crystal structure of SO1698 protein from Shewanella oneidensis was determined by a SAD method and refined to 1.57 Å. The structure is a β sandwich that unexpectedly consists of two polypeptides; the N-terminal fragment includes residues 1–116, and the C-terminal one includes residues 117–125. Electron density also displayed the Lys-98 side chain covalently linked to Asp-116. The putative active site residues involved in self-cleavage were identified; point mutants were produced and characterized structurally and in a biochemical assay. Numerical simulations utilizing molecular dynamics and hybrid quantum/classical calculations suggest a mechanism involving activation of a water molecule coordinated by a catalytic aspartic acid. PMID:22493430

  6. Facile method to stain the bacterial cell surface for super-resolution fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunsolus, Ian L.; Hu, Dehong; Mihai, Cosmin; Lohse, Samuel E.; Lee, Chang-Soo; Torelli, Marco; Hamers, Robert J.; Murphy, Catherine; Orr, Galya; Haynes, Christy L.

    2014-01-01

    A method to fluorescently stain the surfaces of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial cells compatible with super-resolution fluorescence microscopy is presented. This method utilizes a commercially-available fluorescent probe to label primary amines at the surface of the cell. We demonstrate efficient staining of two bacterial strains, the Gram-negative Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis 168. Using structured illumination microscopy and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, which require high quantum yield or specialized dyes, we show that this staining method may be used to resolve the bacterial cell surface with sub-diffraction-limited resolution. We further use this method to identify localization patterns of nanomaterials, specifically cadmium selenide quantum dots, following interaction with bacterial cells.

  7. Comparison of bacterial cells and amine-functionalized abiotic surfaces as support for Pd nanoparticle synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Corte, Simon; Bechstein, Stefanie; Lokanathan, Arcot R.

    2013-01-01

    An increasing demand for catalytic Pd nanoparticles has motivated the search for sustainable production methods. An innovative approach uses bacterial cells as support material for synthesizing Pd nanoparticles by reduction of Pd(II) with e.g. hydrogen or formate. Nevertheless, drawbacks...... nanoparticles, and that abiotic surfaces could support the Pd particle synthesis as efficiently as bacteria. In this study, we explore the possibility of replacing bacteria with amine-functionalized materials, and we compare different functionalization strategies. Pd nanoparticles formed on the support...... on these surfaces was higher than for Pd particles formed on Shewanella oneidensis cells. Smaller Pd nanoparticles generally have better catalytic properties, and previous studies have shown that the particle size can be lowered by increasing the amount of support material used during Pd particle formation. However...

  8. Foulant analysis of hollow fine fiber (HFF) membranes in Red Sea SWRO plants using membrane punch autopsy (MPA)

    KAUST Repository

    Green, Troy N.

    2017-06-12

    Membrane punch autopsy (MPA) is a procedure for quantitative foulant analysis of hollow fine fiber (HFF) permeators. In the past, quantitative autopsies of membranes were restricted to spiral wound. This procedure was developed at SWCC laboratories and tested on permeators of two commercial Red Sea reverse osmosis plants. For membrane autopsies, stainless steel hollow bore picks were penetrated to membrane cores and fibers extracted for foulant analysis. Quantitative analysis of extracted materials contained inorganic and organic foulants including bacteria. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis confirmed the presence of organic fouling functional groups and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in the presence of diatoms and silica most likely not from particulate sand. API analysis revealed the presence of Shewanella and two Vibrio microbial species confirmed by 16S rDNA sequence library. It was observed that fouling content of HFF cellulose triacetate (CTA) membranes were more than 800 times than polyamide spiral wound membranes.

  9. Respiratory arsenate reductase as a bidirectional enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richey, C.; Chovanec, P.; Hoeft, S.E.; Oremland, R.S.; Basu, P.; Stolz, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    The haloalkaliphilic bacterium Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii is capable of anaerobic chemolithoautotrophic growth by coupling the oxidation of arsenite (As(III)) to the reduction of nitrate and carbon dioxide. Analysis of its complete genome indicates that it lacks a conventional arsenite oxidase (Aox), but instead possesses two operons that each encode a putative respiratory arsenate reductase (Arr). Here we show that one homolog is expressed under chemolithoautotrophic conditions and exhibits both arsenite oxidase and arsenate reductase activity. We also demonstrate that Arr from two arsenate respiring bacteria, Alkaliphilus oremlandii and Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3, is also biochemically reversible. Thus Arr can function as a reductase or oxidase. Its physiological role in a specific organism, however, may depend on the electron potentials of the molybdenum center and [Fe–S] clusters, additional subunits, or constitution of the electron transfer chain. This versatility further underscores the ubiquity and antiquity of microbial arsenic metabolism.

  10. Dissolution of Arsenic Minerals Mediated by Dissimilatory Arsenate Reducing Bacteria: Estimation of the Physiological Potential for Arsenic Mobilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drewniak Lukasz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was characterization of the isolated dissimilatory arsenate reducing bacteria in the context of their potential for arsenic removal from primary arsenic minerals through reductive dissolution. Four strains, Shewanella sp. OM1, Pseudomonas sp. OM2, Aeromonas sp. OM4, and Serratia sp. OM17, capable of anaerobic growth with As (V reduction, were isolated from microbial mats from an ancient gold mine. All of the isolated strains: (i produced siderophores that promote dissolution of minerals, (ii were resistant to dissolved arsenic compounds, (iii were able to use the dissolved arsenates as the terminal electron acceptor, and (iii were able to use copper minerals containing arsenic minerals (e.g., enargite as a respiratory substrate. Based on the results obtained in this study, we postulate that arsenic can be released from some As-bearing polymetallic minerals (such as copper ore concentrates or middlings under reductive conditions by dissimilatory arsenate reducers in indirect processes.

  11. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U12092-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 446 |pid:none) Shewanella sp. MR-4, complete g... 47 9e-04 (Q5NC05) RecName: Full=Transcription term... beige protein homolog (l... 40 4.4 2 ( EK325198 ) 1095467004583 Global-Ocean-Sampling_GS-31-01-01-1... 34 5....0 2 ( AC154124 ) Mus musculus chromosome 5, clone RP24-63G13, comp... 40 5.7 5 ( EJ839652 ) 1093017822861 Global-Ocean-Sampli...om clone RP23-266C4 on chrom... 36 6.3 4 ( EJ354365 ) 1092963621964 Global-Ocean-Sampling_GS-28-01-01-1... 3...|pid:none) Streptomyces echinatus aranciamyc... 50 6e-05 A84014( A84014 ) SNF2 helicase BH2913 [imported] -

  12. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U11706-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available one) Shewanella baltica OS195, complet... 37 1.1 AJ875406_1( AJ875406 |pid:none) Candida intermedia mRNA for...none) Leishmania major strain Friedlin... 35 4.3 AD2736( AD2736 ) MFS permease [imported] - Agrobacterium tumefacie..... 36 3.0 8 ( ER451042 ) 1092963849549 Global-Ocean-Sampling_GS-35-01-01-1... 34 3.2 3 ( AC115626 ) Homo sapie...J956921 ) 1093018976377 Global-Ocean-Sampling_GS-30-02-01-1... 38 0.13 2 ( EJ412209 ) 1093012157126 Global-Ocean-Sampli...6 0.33 2 ( EK421366 ) 1095515508395 Global-Ocean-Sampling_GS-31-01-01-1... 42 0.48 2 ( AM430719 ) Vitis vini

  13. Use of atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy for correlative studies of bacterial capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stukalov, Oleg; Korenevsky, Anton; Beveridge, Terry J; Dutcher, John R

    2008-09-01

    Bacteria can possess an outermost assembly of polysaccharide molecules, a capsule, which is attached to their cell wall. We have used two complementary, high-resolution microscopy techniques, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), to study bacterial capsules of four different gram-negative bacterial strains: Escherichia coli K30, Pseudomonas aeruginosa FRD1, Shewanella oneidensis MR-4, and Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. TEM analysis of bacterial cells using different preparative techniques (whole-cell mounts, conventional embeddings, and freeze-substitution) revealed capsules for some but not all of the strains. In contrast, the use of AFM allowed the unambiguous identification of the presence of capsules on all strains used in the present study, including those that were shown by TEM to be not encapsulated. In addition, the use of AFM phase imaging allowed the visualization of the bacterial cell within the capsule, with a depth sensitivity that decreased with increasing tapping frequency.

  14. Rapid isolation of a facultative anaerobic electrochemically active bacterium capable of oxidizing acetate for electrogenesis and azo dyes reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Nan; Yuan, Shi-Jie; Wu, Chao; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Song, Xiang-Ning; Li, Wen-Wei; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-05-01

    In this study, 27 strains of electrochemically active bacteria (EAB) were rapidly isolated and their capabilities of extracellular electron transfer were identified using a photometric method based on WO3 nanoclusters. These strains caused color change of WO3 from white to blue in a 24-well agar plate within 40 h. Most of the isolated EAB strains belonged to the genera of Aeromonas and Shewanella. One isolate, Pantoea agglomerans S5-44, was identified as an EAB that can utilize acetate as the carbon source to produce electricity and reduce azo dyes under anaerobic conditions. The results confirmed the capability of P. agglomerans S5-44 for extracellular electron transfer. The isolation of this acetate-utilizing, facultative EBA reveals the metabolic diversity of environmental bacteria. Such strains have great potential for environmental applications, especially at interfaces of aerobic and anaerobic environments, where acetate is the main available carbon source.

  15. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U05414-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NA clone ZM... 76 1e-18 CP001071_756( CP001071 |pid:none) Akkermansia muciniphila ATCC BAA... 89 1e-18 AE017...CP000472 |pid:none) Shewanella piezotolerans WP3, com... 92 2e-17 AM286415_3721( AM286415 |pid:none) Yersini...lin,... 50 2e-06 AM494945_19( AM494945 |pid:none) Leishmania braziliensis chromosom... 55 5e-06 AP00725...0_22( DQ226510 |pid:none) Thellungiella halophila clone ThB... 94 2e-23 CP000116_2432( CP000116 |pid:none) Thiobacillus denitrificans...-17 CP000934_3554( CP000934 |pid:none) Cellvibrio japonicus Ueda107, c... 83 3e-17 AB274914_1( AB274914 |pid:none) Pleurochrysi

  16. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U05052-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available oenzyme Q10 homolog B ... 77 4e-13 FM992692_323( FM992692 |pid:none) Candida dubliniensis CD36 chromo... 77 ...E017345 |pid:none) Cryptococcus neoformans var. neo... 64 4e-09 AM920433_567( AM920433 |pid:none) Penicillium chrysogenum Wisconsi... |pid:none) Neisseria meningitidis serogroup... 35 1.7 FM992694_108( FM992694 |pid:none) Candida dublinie...nsis CD36 chromo... 35 1.7 CT005255_117( CT005255 |pid:none) Leishmania major strain Fried...1266( CP000606 |pid:none) Shewanella loihica PV-4, comple... 49 1e-04 AP006725_3810( AP006725 |pid:none) Klebsiella pneumoni

  17. A Simulation Tool for the Study of Symmetric Inversions in Bacterial Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Ulisses; Dias, Zanoni; Setubal, João C.

    We present the tool SIB that simulates genomic inversions in bacterial chromosomes. The tool simulates symmetric inversions but allows the appearance of nonsymmetric inversions by simulating small syntenic blocks frequently observed on bacterial genome comparisons. We evaluate SIB by comparing its results to real genome alignments. We develop measures that allow quantitative comparisons between real pairwise alignments (in terms of dotplots) and simulated ones. These measures allow an evaluation of SIB in terms of dendrograms. We evaluate SIB by comparing its results to whole chromosome alignments and maximum likelihood trees for three bacterial groups (the Pseudomonadaceae family and the Xanthomonas and Shewanella genera). We demonstrate an application of SIB by using it to evaluate the ancestral genome reconstruction tool MGR.

  18. An Ancient Protein Phosphatase, SHLP1, Is Critical to Microneme Development in Plasmodium Ookinetes and Parasite Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva-Maria Patzewitz

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Signaling pathways controlled by reversible protein phosphorylation (catalyzed by kinases and phosphatases in the malaria parasite Plasmodium are of great interest, for both increased understanding of parasite biology and identification of novel drug targets. Here, we report a functional analysis in Plasmodium of an ancient bacterial Shewanella-like protein phosphatase (SHLP1 found only in bacteria, fungi, protists, and plants. SHLP1 is abundant in asexual blood stages and expressed at all stages of the parasite life cycle. shlp1 deletion results in a reduction in ookinete (zygote development, microneme formation, and complete ablation of oocyst formation, thereby blocking parasite transmission. This defect is carried by the female gamete and can be rescued by direct injection of mutant ookinetes into the mosquito hemocoel, where oocysts develop. This study emphasizes the varied functions of SHLP1 in Plasmodium ookinete biology and suggests that it could be a novel drug target for blocking parasite transmission.

  19. A survey of culturable aerobic and anaerobic marine bacteria in de novo biofilm formation on natural substrates in St. Andrews Bay, Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnegan, Lucy; Garcia-Melgares, Manuel; Gmerek, Tomasz; Huddleston, W Ryan; Palmer, Alexander; Robertson, Andrew; Shapiro, Sarah; Unkles, Shiela E

    2011-10-01

    This study reports a novel study of marine biofilm formation comprising aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. Samples of quartz and feldspar, minerals commonly found on the earth, were suspended 5 m deep in the North Sea off the east coast of St. Andrews, Scotland for 5 weeks. The assemblage of organisms attached to these stones was cultivated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in the laboratory. Bacteria isolated on Marine Agar 2216 were all Gram-negative and identified to genus level by sequencing the gene encoding 16S rRNA. Colwellia, Maribacter, Pseudoaltermonas and Shewanella were observed in aerobically-grown cultures while Vibrio was found to be present in both aerobic and anaerobic cultures. The obligate anaerobic bacterium Psychrilyobacter atlanticus, a recently defined genus, was identified as a close relative of isolates grown anaerobically. The results provide valuable information as to the main players that attach and form de novo biofilms on common minerals in sea water.

  20. Characterizing the Catalytic Potential of Deinococcus, Arthrobacter and other Robust Bacteria in Contaminated Subsurface Environments of the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daly, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Ionizing Radiation (IR) Resistance in Bacteria. Until recently, there have been no clear physiologic predictors of a cell's ability to recover from ionizing radiation (IR) and other DOE-relevant oxidative stress conditions. In general, the most resistant bacteria have been Gram-positive (e.g., Deinococcus, Arthrobacter, Lactobacillus and Enterococcus spp.) and the most sensitive have been Gram-negative (e.g., Pseudomonas, Shewanella and Neisseria spp.). However, there are several reported exceptions to this paradigm, the Gram-negative cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis is extremely resistant to IR, whereas the Gram-positive Micrococcus luteus is sensitive. We have identified biomolecular signatures for radiation sensitivity and resistance which are independent of phylogeny, where very high and very low intracellular Mn/Fe concentration ratios correlated with very high and very low resistances, respectively; and restricting Mn(II) in the famously resistant Deinococcus radiodurans sensitized this eubacterium to IR

  1. Characterizing the Catalytic Potential of Deinococcus, Arthrobacter and other Robust Bacteria in Contaminated Subsurface Environments of the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredrickson, Jim K.; Daly, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Until recently, there have been no clear physiologic predictors of a cell's ability to recover from ionizing radiation (IR), desiccation, and other DOE-relevant oxidative stress conditions. In general, the most resistant bacteria have been Gram-positive (e.g., Deinococcus, Arthrobacter, Lactobacillus and Enterococcus spp.) and the most sensitive have been Gram-negative (e.g., Pseudomonas, Shewanella and Neisseria spp.). However, there are several reported exceptions to this paradigm, the Gram-negative cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis is extremely resistant to IR, whereas the Gram-positive Micrococcus luteus is sensitive. We have identified biomolecular signatures for radiation sensitivity and resistance which are independent of phylogeny, where very high and very low intracellular Mn/Fe concentration ratios correlated with very high and very low resistances, respectively; and restricting Mn(II) in the famously resistant Deinococcus radiodurans sensitized this eubacterium to IR (http://cfyn.ifas.ufl.edu/radiation.pdf)

  2. Characterizing the Catalytic Potential of Deinococcus, Arthrobacter and other Robust Bacteria in Contaminated Subsurface Environments of the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredrickson, Jim K.; Daly, Michael J.

    2006-06-01

    Until recently, there have been no clear physiologic predictors of a cell's ability to recover from ionizing radiation (IR), desiccation, and other DOE-relevant oxidative stress conditions. In general, the most resistant bacteria have been Gram-positive (e.g., Deinococcus, Arthrobacter, Lactobacillus & Enterococcus spp.) and the most sensitive have been Gram-negative (e.g., Pseudomonas, Shewanella & Neisseria spp.). However, there are several reported exceptions to this paradigm, the Gram-negative cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis is extremely resistant to IR, whereas the Gram-positive Micrococcus luteus is sensitive. We have identified biomolecular signatures for radiation sensitivity and resistance which are independent of phylogeny, where very high and very low intracellular Mn/Fe concentration ratios correlated with very high and very low resistances, respectively; and restricting Mn(II) in the famously resistant Deinococcus radiodurans sensitized this eubacterium to IR (http://cfyn.ifas.ufl.edu/radiation.pdf).

  3. Characterizing the Catalytic Potential of Deinococcus, Arthrobacter and other Robust Bacteria in Contaminated Subsurface Environments of the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daly, Michael J.

    2006-05-01

    Ionizing Radiation (IR) Resistance in Bacteria. Until recently, there have been no clear physiologic predictors of a cell's ability to recover from ionizing radiation (IR) and other DOE-relevant oxidative stress conditions. In general, the most resistant bacteria have been Gram-positive (e.g., Deinococcus, Arthrobacter, Lactobacillus & Enterococcus spp.) and the most sensitive have been Gram-negative (e.g., Pseudomonas, Shewanella & Neisseria spp.). However, there are several reported exceptions to this paradigm, the Gram-negative cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis is extremely resistant to IR, whereas the Gram-positive Micrococcus luteus is sensitive. We have identified biomolecular signatures for radiation sensitivity and resistance which are independent of phylogeny, where very high and very low intracellular Mn/Fe concentration ratios correlated with very high and very low resistances, respectively; and restricting Mn(II) in the famously resistant Deinococcus radiodurans sensitized this eubacterium to IR.

  4. Isolation and characterization of biosurfactant producing bacteria from Persian Gulf (Bushehr provenance)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanshahian, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Biosurfactant producing bacteria were isolated from Persian Gulf. • There is high diversity of biosurfactant producing bacteria in the Persian Gulf. • These bacteria are very useful for management of oil pollution in the sea. - Abstract: Biosurfactants are surface active materials that are produced by some microorganisms. These molecules increase biodegradation of insoluble pollutants. In this study sediments and seawater samples were collected from the coastline of Bushehr provenance in the Persian Gulf and their biosurfactant producing bacteria were isolated. Biosurfactant producing bacteria were isolated by using an enrichment method in Bushnell-Hass medium with diesel oil as the sole carbon source. Five screening tests were used for selection of Biosurfactant producing bacteria: hemolysis in blood agar, oil spreading, drop collapse, emulsification activity and Bacterial Adhesion to Hydrocarbon test (BATH). These bacteria were identified using biochemical and molecular methods. Eighty different colonies were isolated from the collected samples. The most biosurfactant producing isolates related to petrochemical plants of Khark Island. Fourteen biosurfactant producing bacteria were selected between these isolates and 7 isolates were screened as these were predominant producers that belong to Shewanella alga, Shewanella upenei, Vibrio furnissii, Gallaecimonas pentaromativorans, Brevibacterium epidermidis, Psychrobacter namhaensis and Pseudomonas fluorescens. The largest clear zone diameters in oil spreading were observed for G. pentaromativorans strain O15. Also, this strain has the best emulsification activity and reduction of surface tension, suggesting it is the best of thee isolated strains. The results of this study confirmed that there is high diversity of biosurfactant producing bacteria in marine ecosystem of Iran and by application of these bacteria in petrochemical waste water environmental problems can be assisted

  5. Redox Reactions of Reduced Flavin Mononucleotide (FMN), Riboflavin (RBF), and Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) with Ferrihydrite and Lepidocrocite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Zhi [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zachara, John M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shi, Liang [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Zheming [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Moore, Dean A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kennedy, David W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fredrickson, Jim K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-09-17

    Flavins are secreted by the dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella and can function as endogenous electron transfer mediators (ETM). In order to assess the potential importance of flavins in Fe(III) bioreduction, we investigated the redox reaction kinetics of reduced flavins (FMNH2 and RBFH2) with ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite. The organic reductants rapidly reduced and dissolved ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite in the pH range 4-8. The rate constant k for 2-line ferrihydrite reductive dissolution by FMNH2 was 87.5 ± 3.5 M-1∙s-1 at pH 7.0 in batch reactors, and the k was similar for RBFH2. For lepidocrocite, the k was 500 ± 61 M-1∙s-1 for FMNH2, and 236 ± 22 M-1∙s-1 for RBFH2. The surface area normalized initial reaction rates (ra) were between 0.08 and 77 μmoles∙m-2∙s-1 for various conditions in stopped-flow experiments. Initial rates (ro) were first-order with respect to Fe(III) oxide concentration, and ra increased with decreasing pH. Poorly crystalline 2-line ferrihydrite yielded the highest ra, followed by more crystalline 6-line ferrihydrite, and crystalline lepidocrocite. Compared to a previous whole-cell study with Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1, our findings suggest that ETM reduction by the Mtr pathway coupled to lactate oxidation are rate limiting, rather than heterogeneous electron transfer to the Fe(III) oxide.

  6. Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Potential of the Bifurcaria bifurcata Epiphytic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Horta

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Surface-associated marine bacteria are an interesting source of new secondary metabolites. The aim of this study was the isolation and identification of epiphytic bacteria from the marine brown alga, Bifurcaria bifurcata, and the evaluation of the antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of bacteria extracts. The identification of epiphytic bacteria was determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Bacteria extracts were obtained with methanol and dichloromethane (1:1 extraction. The antioxidant activity of extracts was performed by quantification of total phenolic content (TPC, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical scavenging activity and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC. Antimicrobial activities were evaluated against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis, Salmonella enteritidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans. A total of 39 Bifurcaria bifurcata-associated bacteria were isolated and 33 were identified as Vibrio sp. (48.72%, Alteromonas sp. (12.82%, Shewanella sp. (12.26%, Serratia sp. (2.56%, Citricoccus sp. (2.56%, Cellulophaga sp. (2.56%, Ruegeria sp. (2.56% and Staphylococcus sp. (2.56%. Six (15.38% of the 39 bacteria Bifurcaria bifurcata-associated bacteria presented less than a 90% Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST match, and some of those could be new. The highest antioxidant activity and antimicrobial activity (against B. subtilis was exhibited by strain 16 (Shewanella sp.. Several strains also presented high antimicrobial activity against S. aureus, mainly belonging to Alteromonas sp. and Vibrio sp. There were no positive results against fungi and Gram-negative bacteria. Bifurcaria bifurcata epiphytic bacteria were revealed to be excellent sources of natural antioxidant and antimicrobial compounds.

  7. Antioxidant and antimicrobial potential of the Bifurcaria bifurcata epiphytic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horta, André; Pinteus, Susete; Alves, Celso; Fino, Nádia; Silva, Joana; Fernandez, Sara; Rodrigues, Américo; Pedrosa, Rui

    2014-03-24

    Surface-associated marine bacteria are an interesting source of new secondary metabolites. The aim of this study was the isolation and identification of epiphytic bacteria from the marine brown alga, Bifurcaria bifurcata, and the evaluation of the antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of bacteria extracts. The identification of epiphytic bacteria was determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Bacteria extracts were obtained with methanol and dichloromethane (1:1) extraction. The antioxidant activity of extracts was performed by quantification of total phenolic content (TPC), 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC). Antimicrobial activities were evaluated against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis, Salmonella enteritidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans. A total of 39 Bifurcaria bifurcata-associated bacteria were isolated and 33 were identified as Vibrio sp. (48.72%), Alteromonas sp. (12.82%), Shewanella sp. (12.26%), Serratia sp. (2.56%), Citricoccus sp. (2.56%), Cellulophaga sp. (2.56%), Ruegeria sp. (2.56%) and Staphylococcus sp. (2.56%). Six (15.38%) of the 39 bacteria Bifurcaria bifurcata-associated bacteria presented less than a 90% Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) match, and some of those could be new. The highest antioxidant activity and antimicrobial activity (against B. subtilis) was exhibited by strain 16 (Shewanella sp.). Several strains also presented high antimicrobial activity against S. aureus, mainly belonging to Alteromonas sp. and Vibrio sp. There were no positive results against fungi and Gram-negative bacteria. Bifurcaria bifurcata epiphytic bacteria were revealed to be excellent sources of natural antioxidant and antimicrobial compounds.

  8. Effects of disinfectant and biofilm on the corrosion of cast iron pipes in a reclaimed water distribution system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haibo; Hu, Chun; Hu, Xuexiang; Yang, Min; Qu, Jiuhui

    2012-03-15

    The effects of disinfection and biofilm on the corrosion of cast iron pipe in a model reclaimed water distribution system were studied using annular reactors (ARs). The corrosion scales formed under different conditions were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), while the bacterial characteristics of biofilm on the surface were determined using several molecular methods. The corrosion scales from the ARs with chlorine included predominantly α-FeOOH and Fe2O3, while CaPO3(OH)·2H2O and α-FeOOH were the predominant phases after chloramines replaced chlorine. Studies of the consumption of chlorine and iron release indicated that the formation of dense oxide layers and biofilm inhibited iron corrosion, causing stable lower chlorine decay. It was verified that iron-oxidizing bacteria (IOB) such as Sediminibacterium sp., and iron-reducing bacteria (IRB) such as Shewanella sp., synergistically interacted with the corrosion product to prevent further corrosion. For the ARs without disinfection, α-FeOOH was the predominant phase at the primary stage, while CaCO3 and α-FeOOH were predominant with increasing time. The mixed corrosion-inducing bacteria, including the IRB Shewanella sp., the IOB Sediminibacterium sp., and the sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) Limnobacter thioxidans strain, promoted iron corrosion by synergistic interactions in the primary period, while anaerobic IRB became the predominant corrosion bacteria, preventing further corrosion via the formation of protective layers. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Enrichment of Geobacter species in response to stimulation of Fe(III) reduction in sandy aquifer sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoeyenbos-West, O.L.; Nevin, K.P.; Anderson, R.T.; Lovely, D.R.

    2000-01-01

    Engineered stimulation of Fe(III) has been proposed as a strategy to enhance the immobilization of radioactive and toxic metals in metal-contaminated subsurface environments. Therefore, laboratory and field studies were conducted to determine which microbial populations would respond to stimulation of Fe(III) reduction in the sediments of sandy aquifers. In laboratory studies, the addition of either various organic electron donors or electron shuttle compounds stimulated Fe(III) reduction and resulted in Geobacter sequences becoming important constituents of the Bacterial 16S rDNA sequences that could be detected with PCR amplification and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Quantification of Geobacteraceae sequences with a PCR most-probable-number technique indicated that the extent to which numbers of Geobacter increased was related to the degree of stimulation of Fe(III) reduction. Geothrix species were also enriched in some instances, but were orders of magnitude less numerous than Geobacter species. Shewanella species were not detected, even when organic compounds known to be electron donors for Shewanella species were used to stimulate Fe(III) reduction in the sediments. Geobacter species were also enriched in two field experiments in which Fe(III) reduction was stimulated with the addition of benzoate or aromatic hydrocarbons. The apparent growth of Geobacter species concurrent with increased Fe(III) reduction suggests that Geobacter species were responsible for much of the Fe(III) reduction in all of the stimulation approaches evaluated in three geographically distinct aquifers. Therefore, strategies for subsurface remediation that involve enhancing the activity of indigenous Fe(III)-reducing populations in aquifers should consider the physiological properties of Geobacter species in their treatment design.

  10. Open and closed conformations of two SpoIIAA-like proteins (YP-749275.1 and YP-001095227.1) provide insights into membrane association and ligand binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Abhinav; Lomize, Andrei; Jin, Kevin K.; Carlton, Dennis; Miller, Mitchell D.; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Das, Debanu; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Anna; Han, Gye Won; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S. Sri; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Sefcovic, Natasha; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; Bedem, Henry van den; Weekes, Dana; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2009-01-01

    The crystal structures of two orthologous proteins from different Shewanella species have uncovered a resemblance to CRAL-TRIO carrier proteins, which suggest that they function as transporters of small nonpolar molecules. One protein adopts an open conformation, while the other adopts a closed structure that may act as a conformational switch in the transport of ligands at the membrane surface. The crystal structures of the proteins encoded by the YP-749275.1 and YP-001095227.1 genes from Shewanella frigidimarina and S. loihica, respectively, have been determined at 1.8 and 2.25 Å resolution, respectively. These proteins are members of a novel family of bacterial proteins that adopt the α/β SpoIIAA-like fold found in STAS and CRAL-TRIO domains. Despite sharing 54% sequence identity, these two proteins adopt distinct conformations arising from different dispositions of their α2 and α3 helices. In the ‘open’ conformation (YP-001095227.1), these helices are 15 Å apart, leading to the creation of a deep nonpolar cavity. In the ‘closed’ structure (YP-749275.1), the helices partially unfold and rearrange, occluding the cavity and decreasing the solvent-exposed hydrophobic surface. These two complementary structures are reminiscent of the conformational switch in CRAL-TRIO carriers of hydrophobic compounds. It is suggested that both proteins may associate with the lipid bilayer in their ‘open’ monomeric state by inserting their amphiphilic helices, α2 and α3, into the lipid bilayer. These bacterial proteins may function as carriers of nonpolar substances or as interfacially activated enzymes

  11. Electrochemical study of bio-corrosion mechanisms at the carbon steel interface in presence of iron-reducing and hydrogenotrophic bacteria in the nuclear waste disposal context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite-de-Souza-Moreira, Rebeca

    2013-01-01

    The safety of deep geological repository for nuclear waste is a very important and topical matter especially for the nuclear industry. Such as nuclear fuel the high level waste have to be stored for time frames of millions of years in metallic containers. Typically these containers should be placed in deep geological clay formations 500 metres underground. Corrosion processes, will take place after the re-saturation of the geological medium and under the prevalent anoxic conditions may lead to the generation of hydrogen. This gas accumulates in clay environment through the years and eventually becomes hazardous for steel containers. In the particular environment of geological repositories does not provide much biodegradable substances. This is the reason that hydrogen represents a new suitable energy source for hydrogenotrophic bacteria. Thereby formed bacterial bio-films on the containers may contribute to a process of fast decay of the steel, the so called bio-corrosion. The aim of this study is to characterize the electrochemical interfaces in order to obtain the mechanisms of bio-corrosion of carbon steels in presence of iron reducing and hydrogenotrophic bacterium Shewanella oneideinsis. The products of corrosion processes, namely hydrogen and iron (III) oxides are used as electron donor and acceptor, respectively. The amount of hydrogen consumed by Shewanella could be estimated with 10"-"4 mol s"-"1 using Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy (SECM) techniques. The influence of the local hydrogen generation was evaluated via chrono-amperometry. When hydrogen was locally generated above a carbon steel substrate an accelerated corrosion process can be observed. Eventually, using Local Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (LEIS) techniques, the mechanism of the generalised corrosion process was demonstrated. (author)

  12. Glutaminase-producing Meyerozyma (Pichia) guilliermondii isolated from Thai soy sauce fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryuman, Phichayaphorn; Lertsiri, Sittiwat; Visessanguan, Wonnop; Niamsiri, Nuttawee; Bhumiratana, Amaret; Assavanig, Apinya

    2015-01-02

    In this study, 34 yeast isolates were obtained from koji and moromi samples of Thai soy sauce fermentation. However, the most interesting yeast strain was isolated from the enriched 2 month-old (M2) moromi sample and identified as Meyerozyma (Pichia) guilliermondii EM2Y61. This strain is a salt-tolerant yeast that could tolerate up to 20% (w/v) NaCl and produce extracellular and cell-bound glutaminases. Interestingly, its glutaminases were more active in 18% (w/v) NaCl which is a salt concentration in moromi. The extracellular glutaminase's activity was found to be much higher than that of cell-bound glutaminase. The highest specific activity and stability of the extracellular glutaminase were found in 18% (w/v) NaCl at pH4.5 and 37°C. A challenge test by adding partially-purified extracellular glutaminase from M. guilliermondii EM2Y61 into 1 month-old (M1) moromi sample showed an increased conversion of L-glutamine to L-glutamic acid. This is the first report of glutaminase producing M. guilliermondii isolated from the moromi of Thai soy sauce fermentation. The results suggested the potential application of M. guilliermondii EM2Y61 as starter yeast culture to increase l-glutamic acid during soy sauce fermentation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Intracellular localization of Treponema denticola chymotrypsin-like proteinase in chronic periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Marttila

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Treponema denticola is an important periodontal pathogen capable of tissue invasion. Its chymotrypsin-like proteinase (CTLP can degrade a number of basement membrane components in vitro, thus suggesting a contribution to tissue invasion by the spirochete. The aim of this study was to analyze the localization of CTLP in chronic periodontitis tissues ex vivo. A polyclonal antibody specific to T. denticola cell-bound CTLP was used to detect the spirochetes in the gingival tissues of patients with moderate to severe chronic periodontitis (n=25 by immunohistochemistry and periodic acid-Schiff staining (PAS. The presence of T. denticola in the periodontal tissue samples was analyzed by PCR. Periodontal tissue samples of 12 of the 25 patients were found to be positive for T. denticola by PCR. Moreover, CTLP could be detected in the periodontal tissues of all these patients by immunohistochemistry. In the epithelium, the CTLP was mostly intracellular. Typically, the positive staining could be seen throughout the whole depth of the epithelium. When detected extracellularly, CTLP was localized mainly as granular deposits. The connective tissue stained diffusely positive in four cases. The positive staining co-localized with the PAS stain in nine cases. T. denticola and its CTLP could be detected in diseased human periodontium both intra- and extracellularly. The granular staining pattern was suggestive of the presence of T. denticola bacteria, whereas the more diffused staining pattern was indicative of the recent presence of the bacterium and shedding of the cell-bound proteinase.

  14. Diverse Profiles of Ricin-Cell Interactions in the Lung Following Intranasal Exposure to Ricin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Sapoznikov

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ricin, a plant-derived exotoxin, inhibits protein synthesis by ribosomal inactivation. Due to its wide availability and ease of preparation, ricin is considered a biothreat, foremost by respiratory exposure. We examined the in vivo interactions between ricin and cells of the lungs in mice intranasally exposed to the toxin and revealed multi-phasic cell-type-dependent binding profiles. While macrophages (MΦs and dendritic cells (DCs displayed biphasic binding to ricin, monophasic binding patterns were observed for other cell types; epithelial cells displayed early binding, while B cells and endothelial cells bound toxin late after intoxication. Neutrophils, which were massively recruited to the intoxicated lung, were refractive to toxin binding. Although epithelial cells bound ricin as early as MΦs and DCs, their rates of elimination differed considerably; a reduction in epithelial cell counts occurred late after intoxication and was restricted to alveolar type II cells only. The differential binding and cell-elimination patterns observed may stem from dissimilar accessibility of the toxin to different cells in the lung and may also reflect unequal interactions of the toxin with different cell-surface receptors. The multifaceted interactions observed in this study between ricin and the various cells of the target organ should be considered in the future development of efficient post-exposure countermeasures against ricin intoxication.

  15. Monocyte and plasma expression of TAM ligand and receptor in renal failure: Links to unregulated immunity and chronic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Iris J; Hilliard, Brendan A; Ulas, Mehriban; Yu, Daohai; Vangala, Chandan; Rao, Swati; Lee, Jean; Gadegbeku, Crystal A; Cohen, Philip L

    2015-06-01

    Chronic inflammation is increased in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and contributes to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Specific immune mechanisms and pathways that drive and maintain chronic inflammation in CKD are not well described. The TAM ligands (Gas6 and protein S) and receptors (Axl and Mer) have been recently recognized as playing a prominent role in immune regulation. The receptors exist in both soluble and cell-bound forms; the soluble receptors (sAxl and sMer) are believed to compete with the bound receptors and thus inhibit their function. In this study, we determined the expression of cell-bound and soluble TAM proteins in patients with CKD. CKD patients had significantly lower expression of Mer in monocytes, yet increased expression of soluble TAM receptors sAxl and sMer in plasma compared to controls. The metalloproteinase ADAM 17, responsible for cleavage of Mer to its soluble form, was increased in patient monocytes. Elevated levels of soluble TAM receptors were more evident in patients with progressive renal failure. These observations suggest that functional deficiency of TAM receptor-mediated regulation of inflammation may contribute to chronic inflammation in patients with CKD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Application of human erythrocytes to a radioimmune assay of immune complexes in serum. [Lupus erythematosus, type B hepatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuda, F; Miyakawa, Y; Mayumi, M [Tokyo Metropolitan Lab. of Public Health (Japan)

    1979-07-01

    An immune adherence receptor exists on the surface of primate erythrocytes, and has been characterized as a receptor for the activated third component of complement (C3b). Human red blood cells (RCBs, blood group O) were applied to a sensitive determination of complement-fixing, soluble immune complexes in serum. The method involved the binding of immune complexes with RBCs in the presence of complement and the detection of cell-bound IgG molecules by radiolabelled anti-human IgG antibodies. Since the binding of RBCs with monomeric IgG was minimal, cell bound IgG molecules were taken as representing immune complexes. When aggregated human gammaglobulin (AHG) was used as a model of immune complexes, as little as 5 ..mu..g dissolved in 1 ml of normal human serum were detected. The binding of RBCs with AHG was inhibited in EDTA solution where the classical complement pathway could not be activated. The RBC radioimmune assay was successfully applied to the determination of soluble immune complexes in pathological serum samples obtained from the patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and those with fulminant Type B hepatitis. False-positive results by autoantibodies against RBCs could be excluded by a Coombs test and by comparing the binding in the presence of complement with that in EDTA solution. The ubiquitous availability of RBCs coupled with a high sensitivity would allow the RBC radioimmune assay to be used as a further method of determining immune complexes in the serum.

  17. 99mTc-HMPAO Labelled WBC Scan in Experimental Abscess by Labelling Autologous Leukocytes with In-House-Synthesized HMPAO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong Soo; Shin, Hyung Sik; Ahn, Curie; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Choi, Kang Won; Koh, Chang Soon; Jung, Jae Min; Chung, Eun Ju

    1991-01-01

    With HMPAO we have synthesized in our laboratory, we labelled 99m Tc to canine leukocytes. Experimental abscess made by subcutaneous injection with Staphylococcus aureus was imaged with these 99m Tc labelled leukocytes. Labelling efficiency of HMPAO with 99m Tc was 66.2% ± 14.6% (N=9). Labelling efficiency of leukocytes with 99m Tc-HMPAO was 54% ± 7.79 (N=7). Cell bound radio activity in 99m Tc-HMPAO labelled leukocytes was around 80%. when these cells were incubated in plasma in vitro at 37 .deg. C for 5 hours. In vivo cell bound activity was over 80% at 24 hours after injection. One day and four days after inoculation, uptake at the inflammatory focus was found with 99m Tc labelled leukocytes. Uptake showed up in 4 hour image, and the uptake at the lesion was most prominent in 24 hour image. These findings show that in-house-synthesized HMPAO could be used for labelling leukocytes with 99m Tc, and that 99m Tc-HMPAO-labelled leukocytes were so stable and viable that inflammatory focus could be visualized with these 99m Tc-labelled leukocytes.

  18. Surface and virulence properties of environmental Vibrio cholerae non-O1 from Albufera Lake (Valencia, Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, C; Toranzo, A E; González, E A; Blanco, J; Pujalte, M J; Aznar, R; Garay, E

    1990-04-01

    A total of 140 environmental Vibrio cholerae non-O1 isolates, together with several culture collection strains from both environmental and clinical sources, were studied in relation to hemagglutination, surface hydrophobicity, and the enzymatic, hemolytic, cytotoxic, and enterotoxic activities of their extracellular products. A total of 78 and 62% of the strains produced hemagglutinins and exohemagglutinins, respectively. Four different hemagglutinating and two exohemagglutinating activities were found by using eight sugars in the inhibition assays. Cell-bound mannose-sensitive hemagglutination was detected mainly in chicken blood, whereas fucose-sensitive hemagglutination was recorded only in human blood. Cell-bound hemagglutinin resistant to all sugars tested was the only one related to surface hydrophobicity. The surface properties varied along the growth curves. The non-O1 strains displayed strong enzymatic and hemolytic activities, except for esculin hydrolysis. Of 26 non-O1 isolates selected for cytotoxin and enterotoxin production, 23 showed a wide spectrum of cytotoxic effects on cell lines of poikilothermic and homoiothermic species, but they were weakly enterotoxigenic in the infant mouse test. All extracellular products of cytotoxic strains were proteolytic, lipolytic, and hemolytic, and a high percentage produced hemagglutination of chicken blood. The cytotoxic factors in the non-O1 strains analyzed were not R plasmid mediated.

  19. 皱纹盘鲍(Haliotis discus hannai)肠道潜在益生菌的筛选及对幼鲍生长的影响*%SELECTION OF POTENTIAL PROBIOTICS FROM ABALONE INTESTIONAL AND THEIR EFFECTS ON GROWTH OF JUVENILE SMALL ABALONE HALIOTIS DISCUS HANNAI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜海峰; 刘小林; 常亚青; 冷晓飞; 李丹; 王高学

    2013-01-01

      采用体外实验筛选益生菌结合16S rDNA序列分析法,从124株不具有溶血作用的皱纹盘鲍(Haliotis discus hannai)肠道细菌中筛选得到5株潜在益生菌并进行了分子鉴定,进一步对5株潜在益生菌进行了安全性实验及体内饲喂实验。结果表明,2株具有拮抗哈维弧菌和灿烂弧菌能力的潜在益生菌分别被鉴定为Shewanella sp.(WA64)和Shewanella sp.(WA65),一株产海藻酸酶和淀粉酶的潜在益生菌被鉴定为Vibrio sp.(WA51),产蛋白酶潜在益生菌被鉴定为 Bacillus sp.(FA12),产琼脂酶潜在益生菌被鉴定为Tamlana sp.(FA86);安全性实验表明5株潜在益生菌在107cfu/ml下对皱纹盘鲍没有明显的毒害作用;通过体内饲喂实验发现,潜在益生菌 WA64、WA65的复合作用能够显著提高幼鲍增重率和存活率(P<0.05),并在生产条件下能够明显降低幼鲍的死亡量。经抗生素敏感性实验, WA64菌株对15种抗生素均敏感或中度敏感, WA65菌株仅对庆大霉素和链霉素2种抗生素产生耐药。%Five strains of potential probiotics isolated from 124 non-hemolysis strains of the GI of abalone in vitro were identified by 16S rDNA sequence analysis. In addition, pathogenicity and feeding experiment were conducted. Results show that Strain WA64 and WA65 which exhibit inhibitory effects against Vibrio harveyi, Vibrio splendidus are identified as Shewanella;WA51 produced amylase and alginase is identified as Vibrio;FA123 produced protease is identified as Ba-cillus; FA86 produced agarase is identified as Tamlana. Potential probiotics are safe to abalone under 107cfu/ml. Feeding experiment showed the weight gain ratio and survival rate were significantly increased in treatment supplemented with WA64 and WA65 (P<0.05). Furthermore, the effects of WA64 and WA65 in pilot scale trials show the mortality of juvenile small abalone decreases obviously. Antibiotic sensitivity assays revealed that strain WA64 was sensitive or

  20. Recycling of epidermal growth factor in a human pancreatic carcinoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korc, M.; Magun, B.E.

    1985-01-01

    PANC-1 human pancreatic carcinoma cells readily bound and internalized 125 I-labeled epidermal growth factor (EGF). Bound 125 I-labeled EGF was then partially processed to a number of high molecular weight acidic species. Percoll gradient centrifugation of cell homogenates indicated that the majority of 125 I activity localized to several intracellular vesicular compartments. Both intact EGF and its processed species were subsequently released into the incubation medium. A major portion of the released radioactivity was capable of rebinding to the cell. Only a small amount of bound 125 I-labeled EGF was degraded to low molecular weight products, and this degradation was completely blocked by methylamine. These findings suggest that in PANC-1 cells, bound EGF undergoes only limited processing. Both intact EGF and its major processed species bypass the cellular degradative pathways, are slowly released from the cell, and then rebind to the cell

  1. On-line solid-phase extraction coupled to liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry for the analysis of cyanotoxins in algal blooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayad, Paul B; Roy-Lachapelle, Audrey; Duy, Sung Vo; Prévost, Michèle; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2015-12-15

    An analytical method based on on-line SPE-LC-HESI-MS/MS has been developed for the detection and quantification of eight selected cyanotoxins in algal bloom waters that include mycrocystins, anatoxin-a and cylindrospermopsin. The injection volume was 2 mL according to the expected concentration of cyanotoxins in matrix. The method provides an analysis time of 7 min per sample, acceptable recovery values (91-101%), good precision (RSD cyanotoxins. All of the targeted cyanotoxins were detected with the exception of cylindrospermopsin. In addition, it was found that total microcystin concentrations in several surface water samples exceeded the proposed guidelines established by the province of Québec in Canada of 1.5 μg L(-1) as well as the World Health Organization of 1 μg L(-1) for both free and cell-bound microcystin-LR equivalent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Microbial cells as biosorbents for heavy metals: accumulation of Uranium by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strandberg, G.W.; Shumate, S.E. II; Parrott, J.R. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium accumulated extracellularly on the surfaces of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. The rate and extent of accumulation were subject to environmental parameters, such as pH, temperature, and interference by certain anions and cations. Uranium accumulation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurred intracellularly and was extremely rapid (<10 s), and no response to environmental parameters could be detected. Metabolism was not required for metal uptake by either organism. Cell-bound uranium reached a concentration of 10 to 15% of the dry cell weight, but only 32% of the S. cerevisiae cells and 44% of the P. aeruginosa cells within a given population possessed visible uranium deposits when examined by electron microscopy. Rates of uranium uptake by S. cerevisiae were increased by chemical pretreatment of the cells. Uranium could be removed chemically from S. cerevisiae cells, and the cells could then be reused as a biosorbent

  3. Production of Monascus pigments as extracellular crystals by cell suspension culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fengling; Liu, Lujie; Huang, Yaolin; Zhang, Xuehong; Wang, Zhilong

    2018-01-01

    It is generally accepted that Monascus pigments are predominantly cell-bound, including both intracellular and surface-bound pigments. This long-term misconception was corrected in the present work. Production of extracellular crystal pigments by submerged culture of Monascus sp. was confirmed by microscopic observation and collection of Monascus pigments from extracellular broth by direct membrane filtration. Following up the new fact, the bioactivity of mycelia as whole-cell biocatalyst for biosynthesis and biodegradation of Monascus pigments had been detailedly examined in both an aqueous solution and a nonionic surfactant micelle aqueous solution. Based on those experimental results, cell suspension culture in an aqueous medium was developed as a novel strategy for accumulation of high concentration of Monascus pigments. Thus, glucose feeding during submerged culture in the aqueous medium was carried out successfully and high orange Monascus pigments concentration of near 4 g/L was achieved.

  4. Cell-cell transmission of VSV-G pseudotyped lentivector particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy M Skinner

    Full Text Available Many replicating viruses, including HIV-1 and HTLV-1, are efficiently transmitted from the cell surface of actively infected cells upon contact with bystander cells. In a previous study, we reported the prolonged cell surface retention of VSV-G replication-deficient pseudotyped lentivector prior to endocytic entry. However, the competing kinetics of cell surface versus dissociation, neutralization or direct transfer to other cells have received comparatively little attention. Here we demonstrate that the relative efficiency of cell-cell surface transmission can outpace "cell-free" transduction at limiting vector input. This coincides with the prolonged half-life of cell bound vector but occurs, unlike HTLV-1, without evidence for particle aggregation. These studies suggest that cell-surface attachment stabilizes particles and alters neutralization kinetics. Our experiments provide novel insight into the underexplored cell-cell transmission of pseudotyped particles.

  5. Mechanisms of immune red cell destruction, and red cell compatibility testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garratty, G.

    1983-01-01

    The immune destruction of red cells can occur as a complement-mediated intravascular process, or extravascularly, where the red cells are destroyed by macrophages following interaction with cell-bound IgG1, IgG3, and/or C3b. Many of the factors that affect this in vivo destruction are not taken into account during in vitro pretransfusion compatibility testing. At present, even by use of more elaborate tests, it is difficult to accurately predict the fate of a transfused unit of blood. By using some simple information, such as antibody specificity and thermal range, it is sometimes possible to predict the outcome of transfusing a unit of blood that is incompatible in vitro. At other times it may be necessary to utilize 51 Cr-labeled red cells to determine the risk of transfusing such units. Because of the paucity of reported clinical correlations, macrophage/monocyte monolayer assays are of little practical value at present

  6. Status of Monte Carlo at Los Alamos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, W.L.; Cashwell, E.D.

    1980-01-01

    At Los Alamos the early work of Fermi, von Neumann, and Ulam has been developed and supplemented by many followers, notably Cashwell and Everett, and the main product today is the continuous-energy, general-purpose, generalized-geometry, time-dependent, coupled neutron-photon transport code called MCNP. The Los Alamos Monte Carlo research and development effort is concentrated in Group X-6. MCNP treats an arbitrary three-dimensional configuration of arbitrary materials in geometric cells bounded by first- and second-degree surfaces and some fourth-degree surfaces (elliptical tori). Monte Carlo has evolved into perhaps the main method for radiation transport calculations at Los Alamos. MCNP is used in every technical division at the Laboratory by over 130 users about 600 times a month accounting for nearly 200 hours of CDC-7600 time

  7. NASA Tech Briefs, April 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Topics covered include: Direct-Solve Image-Based Wavefront Sensing; Use of UV Sources for Detection and Identification of Explosives; Using Fluorescent Viruses for Detecting Bacteria in Water; Gradiometer Using Middle Loops as Sensing Elements in a Low-Field SQUID MRI System; Volcano Monitor: Autonomous Triggering of In-Situ Sensors; Wireless Fluid-Level Sensors for Harsh Environments; Interference-Detection Module in a Digital Radar Receiver; Modal Vibration Analysis of Large Castings; Structural/Radiation-Shielding Epoxies; Integrated Multilayer Insulation; Apparatus for Screening Multiple Oxygen-Reduction Catalysts; Determining Aliasing in Isolated Signal Conditioning Modules; Composite Bipolar Plate for Unitized Fuel Cell/Electrolyzer Systems; Spectrum Analyzers Incorporating Tunable WGM Resonators; Quantum-Well Thermophotovoltaic Cells; Bounded-Angle Iterative Decoding of LDPC Codes; Conversion from Tree to Graph Representation of Requirements; Parallel Hybrid Vehicle Optimal Storage System; and Anaerobic Digestion in a Flooded Densified Leachbed.

  8. Biomimetic insulin-imprinted polymer nanoparticles as a potential oral drug delivery system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Pijush Kumar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigate molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs, which form a three-dimensional image of the region at and around the active binding sites of pharmaceutically active insulin or are analogous to b cells bound to insulin. This approach was employed to create a welldefined structure within the nanospace cavities that make up functional monomers by cross-linking. The obtained MIPs exhibited a high adsorption capacity for the target insulin, which showed a significantly higher release of insulin in solution at pH 7.4 than at pH 1.2. In vivo studies on diabetic Wistar rats showed that the fast onset within 2 h is similar to subcutaneous injection with a maximum at 4 h, giving an engaged function responsible for the duration of glucose reduction for up to 24 h. These MIPs, prepared as nanosized material, may open a new horizon for oral insulin delivery.

  9. Omalizumab therapy for children and adolescents with severe allergic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Ciro

    2015-01-01

    Omalizumab, a therapeutic humanized monoclonal antibody specific for human IgE, was introduced in clinical practice more than a decade ago as an add-on therapy for moderate-to-severe allergic asthma in patients aged ≥12 years. Omalizumab has been demonstrated to be effective in adults with uncontrolled persistent asthma, with an excellent safety profile. In simple terms, omalizumab works by inhibiting the allergic cascade, that is, by neutralization of the circulating free IgE. This leads to reduction in the quantity of cell-bound IgE, downregulation of high-affinity IgE receptors, and, eventually, prevention of mediator release from effector cells. Evidence is far less abundant on the role of omalizumab in pediatric asthma. Although efficacy and safety of omalizumab in children and adolescents with uncontrolled, persistent allergic asthma has been recognized as well, further studies are needed to clarify a number of open questions in this specific patient population.

  10. Use of Ion-Channel Modulating Agents to Study Cyanobacterial Na+ - K+ Fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pomati Francesco

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we describe an experimental design aimed to investigate changes in total cellular levels of Na+ and K+ ions in cultures of freshwater filamentous cyanobacteria. Ion concentrations were measured in whole cells by flame photometry. Cellular Na+ levels increased exponentially with rising alkalinity, with K+ levels being maximal for optimal growth pH (~8. At standardized pH conditions, the increase in cellular Na+, as induced by NaCl at 10 mM, was coupled by the two sodium channel-modulating agents lidocaine hydrochloride at 1 &mgr;M and veratridine at 100 &mgr;M. Both the channel-blockers amiloride (1 mM and saxitoxin (1 &mgr;M, decreased cell-bound Na+ and K+ levels. Results presented demonstrate the robustness of well-defined channel blockers and channel-activators in the study of cyanobacterial Na+- K+ fluxes.

  11. Self-reactive CD4+ T cells and B cells in the blood in health and autoimmune disease: increased frequency of thyroglobulin-reactive cells in Graves' disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus H; Moeller, Ane Christine; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2006-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying activation of potentially self-reactive circulating B cells and T cells remain unclear. We measured the uptake of a self-antigen, thyroglobulin, by antigen presenting cells, and the subsequent proliferation of CD4(+) T cells and B cells from healthy controls and patients...... with autoimmune thyroiditis. In Hashimoto's thyroiditis, B cells bound increased amounts of thyroglobulin in a complement- and autoantibody-dependent manner, and the thyroglobulin-elicited proliferation of CD4(+) T cells and B cells was complement dependent. Increased proportions of Tg-responsive CD4(+) T cells...... and B cells were found in patients with Graves' disease. Notably, both patient groups and healthy controls exhibited higher proliferative responses to thyroglobulin than to a foreign recall antigen, tetanus toxoid. Our results suggest that self-tolerance can be broken by exposure of circulating...

  12. Display of wasp venom allergens on the cell surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borodina, Irina; Jensen, B. M.; Søndergaard, Ib

    2010-01-01

    Background: Yeast surface display is a technique, where the proteins of interest are expressed as fusions with yeast surface proteins and thus remain attached to the yeast cell wall after expression. Our purpose was to study whether allergens expressed on the cell surface of baker's yeast...... were expressed on the surface as fusions with a-agglutinin complex protein AGA2. The expression was confirmed by fluorescent cytometry (FACS) after staining the cells with antibody against a C-tag attached to the C-terminal end of the allergens. Phospholipase A1 and hyaluronidase retained...... their enzymatic activities. Phospholipase A1 severely inhibited the growth of the yeast cells. Antigen 5 - expressing yeast cells bound IgE antibodies from wasp venom allergic patient sera but not from control sera as demonstrated by FACS. Moreover, antigen 5 - expressing yeast cells were capable of mediating...

  13. Allergy to insect stings. IV. Diagnosis by radioallergosorbent test (R.A.S.T.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobotka, A.K.; Adkinson, N.F. Jr.; Valentine, M.D.; Lichtenstein, L.M.

    1978-01-01

    Radioallergosorbent tests (RAST(s)) have been developed and assessed for the diagnosis of insect hypersensitivity by using a purified allergen from honeybee venom, phospholipase A, and crude yellow jacket venom. Sera from 193 patients positive both by history and skin test to one of these insects were compared with various groups of control sera. Eighty percent of sera from skin test-positive patients were RAST positive; positive RAST were found in 16% of sera tested from skin test-negative patients. A highly positive RAST correlates well with a positive skin test and clinical sensitivity, but serum IgE is not measurable in many patients with mast cell or basophil bound antibody. Since biologically important reactions of antigen with IgE require that the antibody be cell bound, skin testing would be preferred to RAST if one were limited to a single test for the diagnosis of insect allergy

  14. Survival of Anaerobic Fe2+ Stress Requires the ClpXP Protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Brittany D; Redford, Kaitlyn E; Gralnick, Jeffrey A

    2018-04-15

    Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 is a versatile bacterium capable of respiring extracellular, insoluble ferric oxide minerals under anaerobic conditions. The respiration of iron minerals results in the production of soluble ferrous ions, which at high concentrations are toxic to living organisms. It is not fully understood how Fe 2+ is toxic to cells anaerobically, nor is it fully understood how S. oneidensis is able to resist high levels of Fe 2+ Here we describe the results of a transposon mutant screen and subsequent deletion of the genes clpX and clpP in S. oneidensis , which demonstrate that the protease ClpXP is required for anaerobic Fe 2+ resistance. Many cellular processes are known to be regulated by ClpXP, including entry into stationary phase, envelope stress response, and turnover of stalled ribosomes. However, none of these processes appears to be responsible for mediating anaerobic Fe 2+ resistance in S. oneidensis Protein trapping studies were performed to identify ClpXP targets in S. oneidensis under Fe 2+ stress, implicating a wide variety of protein targets. Escherichia coli strains lacking clpX or clpP also display increased sensitivity to Fe 2+ anaerobically, indicating Fe 2+ resistance may be a conserved role for the ClpXP protease system. Hypotheses regarding the potential role(s) of ClpXP during periods of high Fe 2+ are discussed. We speculate that metal-containing proteins are misfolded under conditions of high Fe 2+ and that the ClpXP protease system is necessary for their turnover. IMPORTANCE Prior to the evolution of cyanobacteria and oxygenic photosynthesis, life arose and flourished in iron-rich oceans. Today, aqueous iron-rich environments are less common, constrained to low-pH conditions and anaerobic systems such as stratified lakes and seas, digestive tracts, subsurface environments, and sediments. The latter two ecosystems often favor dissimilatory metal reduction, a process that produces soluble Fe 2+ from iron oxide minerals

  15. Effects of soluble flavin on heterogeneous electron transfer between surface-exposed bacterial cytochromes and iron oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zheming; Shi, Zhi; Shi, Liang; White, Gaye F.; Richardson, David J.; Clarke, Thomas A.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.

    2015-08-25

    Dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria can utilize insoluble Fe(Mn)-oxides as a terminal electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions. For Shewanella species specifically, some evidence suggests that iron reduction is associated with the secretion of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and riboflavin that are proposed to mediate electron transfer (Marsili et al., 2008). In this work, we used methyl viologen (MV•+)-encapsulated, porin-cytochrome complex (MtrCAB) embedded liposomes (MELs) as a synthetic model of the Shewanella outer membrane to investigate the proposed mediating behavior of secreted flavins. The reduction kinetics of goethite, hematite and lepidocrocite (200 µM) by MELs ([MV•+] ~ 42 µM and MtrABC ≤ 1 nM) were determined in the presence FMN at pH 7.0 in N2 atmosphere by monitoring the concentrations of MV•+ and FMN through their characteristic UV-visible absorption spectra. Experiments were performed where i) FMN and Fe(III)-oxide were mixed and then reacted with the reduced MELs and ii) FMN was reacted with the reduced MELs followed by addition of Fe(III)-oxide. The redox reactions proceeded in two steps: a fast step that was completed in a few seconds, and a slower one lasting over 400 seconds. For all three Fe(III)-oxides, the initial reaction rate in the presence of a low concentration of FMN (≤ 1 µM) was at least a factor of five faster than those with MELs alone, and orders of magnitude faster than those by FMNH2, suggesting that FMN may serve as a co-factor that enhances electron transfer from outer-membrane c-cytochromes to Fe(III)-oxides. The rate and extent of the initial reaction followed the order of lepidocrocite > hematite > goethite, the same as their reduction potentials, implying thermodynamic control on reaction rate. However, at higher FMN concentrations (> 1 µM), the reaction rates for both steps decreased and varied inversely with FMN concentration, indicating that FMN inhibited the MEL to Fe(III)-oxide electron transfer

  16. Identification and characterization of a highly variable region in mitochondrial genomes of fusarium species and analysis of power generation from microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzah, Haider Mousa

    In the microbial fuel cell (MFC) project, power generation from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was analyzed looking for a novel system for both energy generation and sustainability. The results suggest the possibility of generating electricity from different organic substances, which include agricultural and industrial by-products. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 generates usable electrons at 30°C using both submerged and solid state cultures. In the MFC biocathode experiment, most of the CO2 generated at the anodic chamber was converted into bicarbonate due the activity of carbonic anhydrase (CA) of the Gluconobacter sp.33 strain. These findings demonstrate the possibility of generation of electricity while at the same time allowing the biomimetic sequestration of CO2 using bacterial CA. In the mitochondrial genomes project, the filamentous fungal species Fusarium oxysporum was used as a model. This species causes wilt of several important agricultural crops. A previous study revealed that a highly variable region (HVR) in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of three species of Fusarium contained a large, variable unidentified open reading frame (LV-uORF). Using specific primers for two regions of the LV-uORF, six strains were found to contain the ORF by PCR and database searches identified 18 other strains outside of the Fusarium oxysporum species complex. The LV-uORF was also identified in three isolates of the F. oxysporum species complex. Interestingly, several F. oxysporum isolates lack the LV-uORF and instead contain 13 ORFs in the HVR, nine of which are unidentified. The high GC content and codon usage of the LV-uORF indicate that it did not co-evolve with other mt genes and was horizontally acquired and was introduced to the Fusarium lineage prior to speciation. The nonsynonymous/synonymous (dN/dS) ratio of the LV-uORFs (0.43) suggests it is under purifying selection and the putative polypeptide is predicted to be located in the mitochondrial membrane. Growth assays

  17. Biogeochemical Reactions Under Simulated Europa Ocean Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amashukeli, X.; Connon, S. A.; Gleeson, D. F.; Kowalczyk, R. S.; Pappalardo, R. T.

    2007-12-01

    Galileo data have demonstrated the probable presence of a liquid water ocean on Europa, and existence of salts and carbon dioxide in the satellite's surface ice (e.g., Carr et al., 1998; McCord et al., 1999, Pappalardo et al., 1999; Kivelson et al., 2000). Subsequently, the discovery of chemical signatures of extinct or extant life in Europa's ocean and on its surface became a distinct possibility. Moreover, understanding of Europa's potential habitability is now one of the major goals of the Europa Orbiter Flagship mission. It is likely, that in the early stages of Europa's ocean formation, moderately alkaline oceanic sulfate-carbonate species and a magnetite-silicate mantel could have participated in low-temperature biogeochemical sulfur, iron and carbon cycles facilitated by primitive organisms (Zolotov and Shock, 2004). If periodic supplies of fresh rock and sulfate-carbonate ions are available in Europa's ocean, then an exciting prospect exists that life may be present in Europa's ocean today. In our laboratory, we began the study of the plausible biogeochemical reactions under conditions appropriate to Europa's ocean using barophilic psychrophilic organisms that thrive under anaerobic conditions. In the near absence of abiotic synthetic pathways due to low Europa's temperatures, the biotic synthesis may present a viable opportunity for the formation of the organic and inorganic compounds under these extreme conditions. This work is independent of assumptions regarding hydrothermal vents at Europa's ocean floor or surface-derived oxidant sources. For our studies, we have fabricated a high-pressure (5,000 psi) reaction vessel that simulates aqueous conditions on Europa. We were also successful at reviving barophilic psychrophilic strains of Shewanella bacterium, which serve as test organisms in this investigation. Currently, facultative barophilic psychrophilic stains of Shewanella are grown in the presence of ferric food source; the strains exhibiting iron

  18. Estudio comparativo de la estructura del bacterioplancton en aguas del Mar Argentino mediante el método de pirosecuenciación 454 tag A comparative study of bacterioplankton structure in Argentinian Sea waters by the 454 - tag pyrosequencing method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Peressutti

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available El presente estudio brinda la primera información sobre diversidad y abundancia de las comunidades microbianas en dos ambientes del Mar Argentino obtenida mediante la técnica de pirosecuenciación tag ribosomal 454. Dentro del dominio Bacteria, se observaron más de 4 600 secuencias únicas a partir de 36 188 amplicones de tags y se identificaron 280 filotipos. Además, se detectaron cerca de 2 700 secuencias únicas a partir de más de 47 700 tags pertenecientes al dominio Archaea, lo que definió sólo 5 filotipos diferentes. La distancia de Jaccard presentó valores de 0,6 para bacterias y de 0,2 para arqueas, esto indica mayor diferencia entre las bacterias en los dos sitios. En el ambiente marino los filotipos más dominantes fueron Bacteroidetes Flavobacteriaceae, Proteobacteria Gammaproteobacteria, Proteobacteria Rhodobacteraceae y Proteobacteria Rickettsiales SAR11, mientras que en el estuario predominaron Pseudoalteromonadaceae Pseudoalteromonas, Proteobacteria Gammaproteobacteria, Proteobacteria Shewanella y Proteobacteria Rickettsiales SAR11. Los 2 filotipos de arqueas encontrados en mayor proporción fueron Archaea Euryarchaeota y Archaea Crenarchaeota. Las secuencias tag más numerosas representaron taxa caracterizados previamente, aunque también se halló un elevado número de filotipos de gran diversidad y de baja abundancia, que forman parte de la denominada "biosfera rara", aún no explorada, que pueden tener un papel ecológico crucial.The present study provides the first information about diversity and abundance of microbial communities in two environments of the Argentinian Sea by the 454 - tag pyrosequencing technique. We observed more than 4,600 unique bacterial sequences from 36,188 tag amplicons, forming 280 phylotypes. In addition, nearly 2,700 unique sequences from more than 47,700 tags identified as Archaea, defined only 5 different phylotypes. The Jaccard distance (0.6 for Bacteria and 0.2 for Archaea indicated

  19. Membrane Separated Flow Cell for Parallelized Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy to Characterize Electro-Active Microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stöckl, Markus; Schlegel, Christin; Sydow, Anne; Holtmann, Dirk; Ulber, Roland; Mangold, Klaus-Michael

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Development of a membrane separated electrochemical flow cell. • Simultaneous combination of EIS and CLSM. • Monitoring of bacterial cell attachment to anode of MFC. • Cell attachment of Shewanella oneidensis is shown. - Abstract: Understanding the attachment of electro-active bacteria to electrode surfaces and their subsequent biofilm formation is one of the major challenges for the establishment of bacterial bioelectrochemial systems (BES). For a constant observation of biofilm growth, providing information on different stages of biofilm formation, continuous monitoring methods are required. In this paper a combination of two powerful analytical methods, Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM), for biofilm monitoring is presented. A custom-built flow cell with a transparent indium tin oxide working electrode (WE) was constructed allowing monitoring of cell attachment to a working electrode simultaneously by EIS and CLSM. Cyclic Voltammetry (CV) and EIS of an iron (II)/iron (III) redox couple indicate that the flow cell is suitable for electrochemical experiments. An engineered Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (ATCC700550) producing eGFP was used as electro-active model organism to demonstrate the practical application of the flow cell as BES to monitor cell attachment simultaneously with EIS and CLSM. Applying the flow cell as MFC (transparent working electrode poised as anode) produced a typical current curve for such a system. From the equivalent circuit used to interpret EIS data the charge transfer resistance R CT is sensitive to attachment of microorganisms. Fitted R CT was increased initially after cell inoculation and then lowered constantly with progressing experimental time. In parallel taken CLSM images show that bacteria already adhered to the WE 5 min after inoculation. A mono- respectively bilayer of electro-active cells was observed after 17 h on the WE surface. With the presented

  20. Microbial profiles of commercial, vacuum-packaged, fresh pork of normal or short storage life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley, Richard A; Peirson, Michael D; Lam, Jocelyn; Tan, Kit Bee

    2004-12-01

    The microbial ecology of fresh vacuum-packed pork cuts during storage at -1.5 degrees C for up to 45 days was examined to characterize rates of microbial growth and pH changes in commercially prepared products of normal storage quality. Pork loins in commercial distribution with odour defects were also studied to determine a possible cause of the defects and avoid future problems. In addition, microbial profiles of pork cuts from two plants were compared, after storage for 25 days at -1.5 degrees C, to identify possible reasons for differences in the storage life of product from the plants. The effects of a change in sanitation procedures on the microbial populations of products stored for 25 days were also studied. With normal product, microbial growth in different packages progressed at different rates, reflecting differences in initial levels of bacterial contamination. All samples in the study reached 8 weeks without apparent organoleptic change and samples carried 5.8+/-1.2 log bacteria cm(-2) (mean+/-S.D.). The flora of loins with the odour defect were predominately lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and carnobacteria, but they contained large fractions of Enterobacteriaceae spoiled products, but species of Enterobacteriaceae and lactic acid bacteria could have contributed to spoilage. Comparison of microbial groups present in 16 other cuts, half from each of two commercial plants, which were stored for 25 days at -1.5 degrees C, showed that larger fractions of Enterobacteriaceae were present in samples from the plant having difficulty achieving the desired storage life. Additional bacterial samples from 12 cuts supplied by the latter plant obtained after adoption of an acid sanitizer step in the plant cleaning regimen, and also stored for 25 days at -1.5 degrees C, yielded few Enterobacteriaceae, Aeromonas or Shewanella. Use of an acid sanitizer in plant cleaning may be a means of controlling alkali-tolerant bacteria such as Aeromonas or Shewanella which can

  1. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia: From lab to bedside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R K Chaudhary

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA is not an uncommon clinical disorder and requires advanced, efficient immunohematological and transfusion support. Many AIHA patients have underlying disorder and therefore, it is incumbent upon the clinician to investigate these patients in detail, as the underlying condition can be of a serious nature such as lymphoproliferative disorder or connective tissue disorder. Despite advances in transfusion medicine, simple immunohematological test such as direct antiglobulin test (DAT still remains the diagnostic hallmark of AIHA. The sensitive gel technology has enabled the immunohematologist not only to diagnose serologically such patients, but also to characterize red cell bound autoantibodies with regard to their class, subclass and titer in a rapid and simplified way. Detailed characterization of autoantibodies is important, as there is a relationship between in vivo hemolysis and strength of DAT; red cell bound multiple immunoglobulins, immunoglobulin G subclass and titer. Transfusing AIHA patient is a challenge to the immunohematologist as it is encountered with difficulties in ABO grouping and cross matching requiring specialized serological tests such as alloadsorption or autoadsorption. At times, it may be almost impossible to find a fully matched unit to transfuse these patients. However, transfusion should not be withheld in a critically ill patient even in the absence of compatible blood. The "best match" or "least incompatible units" can be transfused to such patients under close supervision without any serious side-effects. All blood banks should have the facilities to perform the necessary investigations required to issue "best match" packed red blood cells in AIHA. Specialized techniques such as elution and adsorption, which at times are helpful in enhancing blood safety in AIHA should be established in all transfusion services.

  2. The Detoxification and Degradation of Benzothiazole from the Wastewater in Microbial Electrolysis Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianshu Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the high-production-volume chemical benzothiazole (BTH from synthetic water was fully degraded into less toxic intermediates of simple organic acids using an up-flow internal circulation microbial electrolysis reactor (UICMER under the hydraulic retention time (HRT of 24 h. The bioelectrochemical system was operated at 25 ± 2 °C and continuous-flow mode. The BTH loading rate varied during experiments from 20 g·m−3·day−1 to 110 g·m−3·day−1. BTH and soluble COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand removal efficiency reached 80% to 90% under all BTH loading rates. Bioluminescence based Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 ecotoxicity testing demonstrated that toxicity was largely decreased compared to the BTH wastewater influent and effluent of two control experiments. The results indicated that MEC (Microbial Electrolysis Cell was useful and reliable for improving BTH wastewater treatment efficiency, enabling the microbiological reactor to more easily respond to the requirements of higher loading rate, which is meaningful for economic and efficient operation in future scale-up.

  3. MicrobesOnline: an integrated portal for comparative and functional genomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehal, Paramvir; Joachimiak, Marcin; Price, Morgan; Bates, John; Baumohl, Jason; Chivian, Dylan; Friedland, Greg; Huang, Kathleen; Keller, Keith; Novichkov, Pavel; Dubchak, Inna; Alm, Eric; Arkin, Adam

    2011-07-14

    Since 2003, MicrobesOnline (http://www.microbesonline.org) has been providing a community resource for comparative and functional genome analysis. The portal includes over 1000 complete genomes of bacteria, archaea and fungi and thousands of expression microarrays from diverse organisms ranging from model organisms such as Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae to environmental microbes such as Desulfovibrio vulgaris and Shewanella oneidensis. To assist in annotating genes and in reconstructing their evolutionary history, MicrobesOnline includes a comparative genome browser based on phylogenetic trees for every gene family as well as a species tree. To identify co-regulated genes, MicrobesOnline can search for genes based on their expression profile, and provides tools for identifying regulatory motifs and seeing if they are conserved. MicrobesOnline also includes fast phylogenetic profile searches, comparative views of metabolic pathways, operon predictions, a workbench for sequence analysis and integration with RegTransBase and other microbial genome resources. The next update of MicrobesOnline will contain significant new functionality, including comparative analysis of metagenomic sequence data. Programmatic access to the database, along with source code and documentation, is available at http://microbesonline.org/programmers.html.

  4. Remediation of trichloroethylene by bio-precipitated and encapsulated palladium nanoparticles in a fixed bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennebel, Tom; Verhagen, Pieter; Simoen, Henri; De Gusseme, Bart; Vlaeminck, Siegfried E; Boon, Nico; Verstraete, Willy

    2009-08-01

    Trichloroethylene is a toxic and recalcitrant groundwater pollutant. Palladium nanoparticles bio-precipitated on Shewanella oneidensis were encapsulated in polyurethane, polyacrylamide, alginate, silica or coated on zeolites. The reactivity of these bio-Pd beads and zeolites was tested in batch experiments and trichloroethylene dechlorination followed first order reaction kinetics. The calculated k-values of the encapsulated catalysts were a factor of six lower compared to non-encapsulated bio-Pd. Bio-Pd, used as a catalyst, was able to dechlorinate 100 mgL(-1) trichloroethylene within a time period of 1h. The main reaction product was ethane; yet small levels of chlorinated intermediates were detected. Subsequently polyurethane cubes empowered with bio-Pd were implemented in a fixed bed reactor for the treatment of water containing trichloroethylene. The influent recycle configuration resulted in a cumulative removal of 98% after 22 h. The same reactor in a flow through configuration achieved removal rates up to 1059 mg trichloroethylene g Pd(-1)d(-1). This work showed that fixed bed reactors with bio-Pd polyurethane cubes can be instrumental for remediation of water contaminated with trichloroethylene.

  5. Identification of Apis mellifera gut microbiota with MALDI TOF MS Biotyper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Gasper

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The honey bee, Apis mellifera, is critically important for the pollination of many economically important crops. Continued colony losses have called for a deeper understanding of both symbiotic and pathogenic microbial interactions, particularly as they relate to food storage and the pollination environment. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore and characterize the bacteria colonizing the alimentary tract of the native honey bees using MALDI TOF MS Biotyper. Content of the intestinal tract was cultured for isolation of Gram-negative, Gram-positive microorganisms and yeasts. Then, the identification of isolates with MALDI-TOF MS Biotyper was done. Results showed that the most abundant genera in bees’ samples were Lactobacillus, Pseudomonas and Serratia. Altogether, 12 genera with 21 bacterial species and one yeast genus with two species were isolated. Bacteria were represented with Acidovorax facilis, Lactobacillus gasseri, L. amylovorus, L. kunkeei, L. fructivorans, Pseudomonas oryzihabitans, Ps. brenneri, Ps. indica, Micrococcus luteus, Serratia fonticola, Ser. marcescens, Ser. ureilytica, Hafnia alvei, Candida magnolia, Bacillus oleronius, B. horneckiae, Issatchenkia orientalis, Pantoea agglomerans, Enterobacter cloacae, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staph. pasteuri, Shewanella profunda.  The results of the study shows that the microflora of the bees gut is heterogenic and depend of locality and resources of environment for bees.

  6. Microbial Reducibility of Fe(III Phases Associated with the Genesis of Iron Ore Caves in the Iron Quadrangle, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceth W. Parker

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The iron mining regions of Brazil contain thousands of “iron ore caves” (IOCs that form within Fe(III-rich deposits. The mechanisms by which these IOCs form remain unclear, but the reductive dissolution of Fe(III (hydroxides by Fe(III reducing bacteria (FeRB could provide a microbiological mechanism for their formation. We evaluated the susceptibility of Fe(III deposits associated with these caves to reduction by the FeRB Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to test this hypothesis. Canga, an Fe(III-rich duricrust, contained poorly crystalline Fe(III phases that were more susceptible to reduction than the Fe(III (predominantly hematite associated with banded iron formation (BIF, iron ore, and mine spoil. In all cases, the addition of a humic acid analogue enhanced Fe(III reduction, presumably by shuttling electrons from S. oneidensis to Fe(III phases. The particle size and quartz-Si content of the solids appeared to exert control on the rate and extent of Fe(III reduction by S. oneidensis, with more bioreduction of Fe(III associated with solid phases containing more quartz. Our results provide evidence that IOCs may be formed by the activities of Fe(III reducing bacteria (FeRB, and the rate of this formation is dependent on the physicochemical and mineralogical characteristics of the Fe(III phases of the surrounding rock.

  7. Significant improvement of intestinal microbiota of gibel carp (Carassius auratus gibelio) after traditional Chinese medicine feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Z B; Gatesoupe, F-J; Li, T T; Wang, X H; Zhang, Q Q; Feng, D Y; Feng, Y Q; Chen, H; Li, A H

    2018-03-01

    Increasing attention has been attracted to intestinal microbiota, due to interactions with nutrition, metabolism and immune defence of the host. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) feed additives have been applied in aquaculture to improve fish health, but the interaction with fish gut microbiota is still poorly understood. This study aimed to explore the effect of adding TCM in feed on the intestinal microbiota of gibel carp (Carassius auratus gibelio). Bacterial communities of 16 fish intestinal contents and one water sample were characterized by high-throughput sequencing and analysis of the V4-V5 region of the 16S rRNA gene. The results showed that the composition and structure of the bacterial community were significantly altered by the TCM feeding. Some phyla increased markedly (Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, etc.), while Fusobacteria were significantly reduced. Concurrently, the richness and diversity of the taxonomic units increased, and the microbiota composition of TCM-treated fish was more homogeneous among individuals. At the genus level, the addition of TCM tended to reduce the incidence of potential pathogens (Aeromonas, Acinetobacter and Shewanella), while stimulating the emergence of some potential probiotics (Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, Bacillus and Pseudomonas). These data suggested that the feed additive could regulate the fish intestinal microbiota by reinforcing the microbial balance. This study may provide useful information for further application of TCM for diseases prevention and stress management in aquaculture. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. Enhanced reductive dechlorination of DDT in an anaerobic system of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria and iron oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, F.B.; Li, X.M.; Zhou, S.G.; Zhuang, L.; Cao, F.; Huang, D.Y.; Xu, W.; Liu, T.X.; Feng, C.H.

    2010-01-01

    The transformation of DDT was studied in an anaerobic system of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria (Shewanella decolorationis S12) and iron oxide (α-FeOOH). The results showed that S. decolorationis could reduce DDT into DDD, and DDT transformation rate was accelerated by the presence of α-FeOOH. DDD was observed as the primary transformation product, which was demonstrated to be transformed in the abiotic system of Fe 2+ + α-FeOOH and the system of DIRB + α-FeOOH. The intermediates of DDMS and DBP were detected after 9 months, likely suggesting that reductive dechlorination was the main dechlorination pathway of DDT in the iron-reducing system. The enhanced reductive dechlorination of DDT was mainly due to biogenic Fe(II) sorbed on the surface of α-FeOOH, which can serve as a mediator for the transformation of DDT. This study demonstrated the important role of DIRB and iron oxide on DDT and DDD transformation under anaerobic iron-reducing environments. - This is the first case reporting the reductive dechlorination of DDT in an anaerobic system of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria and iron oxide.

  9. Biofilm formation on a TiO2 nanotube with controlled pore diameter and surface wettability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anitha, V C; Narayan Banerjee, Arghya; Woo Joo, Sang; Lee, Jin-Hyung; Lee, Jintae; Ki Min, Bong

    2015-01-01

    Titania (TiO 2 ) nanotube arrays (TNAs) with different pore diameters (140 − 20 nm) are fabricated via anodization using hydrofluoric acid (HF) containing ethylene glycol (EG) by changing the HF-to-EG volume ratio and the anodization voltage. To evaluate the effects of different pore diameters of TiO 2 nanotubes on bacterial biofilm formation, Shewanella oneidensis (S. oneidensis) MR-1 cells and a crystal-violet biofilm assay are used. The surface roughness and wettability of the TNA surfaces as a function of pore diameter, measured via the contact angle and AFM techniques, are correlated with the controlled biofilm formation. Biofilm formation increases with the decreasing nanotube pore diameter, and a 20 nm TiO 2 nanotube shows the maximum biofilm formation. The measurements revealed that 20 nm surfaces have the least hydrophilicity with the highest surface roughness of ∼17 nm and that they show almost a 90% increase in the effective surface area relative to the 140 nm TNAs, which stimulate the cells more effectively to produce the pili to attach to the surface for more biofilm formation. The results demonstrate that bacterial cell adhesion (and hence, biofilm formation) can effectively be controlled by tuning the roughness and wettability of TNAs via controlling the pore diameters of TNA surfaces. This biofilm formation as a function of the surface properties of TNAs can be a potential candidate for both medical applications and as electrodes in microbial fuel cells. (paper)

  10. Evaluation of pyrrolidonyl arylamidase for the identification of nonfermenting Gram-negative rods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombicino, Karina A; Almuzara, Marisa N; Famiglietti, Angela M R; Vay, Carlos

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the activity of pyrrolidonyl arylamidase (PYR) for the differentiation and identification of nonfermenting gram negative rods (NFGNR), 293 isolates were tested. A 24 h culture of each test organism was prepared. From this a 108-109 cfu/mL suspension was added to 0.25 mL of sterile physiologic solution. A PYR disk was then added and the test was incubated for 30 minutes at 35-37 degrees C, at environmental atmosphere. Reading was done by adding 1 drop of cinnamaldehyde reagent. Strains of Acinetobacter baumannii, Acinetobacter haemolyticus, Alcaligenes faecalis, Bergeyella zoohelcum, Bordetella bronchiseptica, Bordetella hinzii, Brevundimonas diminuta, Brevundimonas vesicularis, Brucella ovis, Brucella spp., Brucella suis, Burkholderia cepacia complex, Moraxella catarrhalis, Moraxella lacunata, Moraxella nonliquefaciens, Moraxella osloensis, Oligella ureolytica, Pseudomonas alcaligenes, Pseudomonas mendocina, Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Pseudomonas Vb3, Psychrobacter phenylpyruvicus, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia were PYR negative. On the other hand Achromobacter piechaudii, Achromobacter denitrificans, Achromobacter xylosoxidans, Burkholderia gladioli, Chryseobacterium gleum-indologenes, Comamonas testosroni, Cupriavidus pauculus, Delftia acidovorans, Elizabethkingia meningoseptica, Myroides spp., Ochrobactrum anthropi, Pseudomonas oryzihabitans, Ralstonia pickettii, Rhizobium radiobacter, Shewanella spp., Sphingobacterium multivorum, Sphingobacterium spiritivorum, and Weeksella virosa were PYR positive. Finally, Acinetobacter lwoffii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Roseomonas spp., and Sphingomonas paucimobilis-parapaucimobilis were PYR variable. PYR testing should be considered as a useful tool to facilitate the identification of NFGNR.

  11. Electron Transfer Strategies Regulate Carbonate Mineral and Micropore Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhirui; Tice, Michael M

    2018-01-01

    Some microbial carbonates are robust biosignatures due to their distinct morphologies and compositions. However, whether carbonates induced by microbial iron reduction have such features is unknown. Iron-reducing bacteria use various strategies to transfer electrons to iron oxide minerals (e.g., membrane-bound enzymes, soluble electron shuttles, nanowires, as well as different mechanisms for moving over or attaching to mineral surfaces). This diversity has the potential to create mineral biosignatures through manipulating the microenvironments in which carbonate precipitation occurs. We used Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Geothrix fermentans, and Geobacter metallireducens GS-15, representing three different strategies, to reduce solid ferric hydroxide in order to evaluate their influence on carbonate and micropore formation (micro-size porosity in mineral rocks). Our results indicate that electron transfer strategies determined the morphology (rhombohedral, spherical, or long-chained) of precipitated calcium-rich siderite by controlling the level of carbonate saturation and the location of carbonate formation. Remarkably, electron transfer strategies also produced distinctive cell-shaped micropores in both carbonate and hydroxide minerals, thus producing suites of features that could potentially serve as biosignatures recording information about the sizes, shapes, and physiologies of iron-reducing organisms. Key Words: Microbial iron reduction-Micropore-Electron transfer strategies-Microbial carbonate. Astrobiology 18, 28-36.

  12. Enhanced degradation of phenolic compounds in coal gasification wastewater by a novel integration of micro-electrolysis with biological reactor (MEBR) under the micro-oxygen condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Weiwei; Han, Yuxing; Xu, Chunyan; Han, Hongjun; Ma, Wencheng; Zhu, Hao; Li, Kun; Wang, Dexin

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this work was to study an integration of micro-electrolysis with biological reactor (MEBR) for strengthening removal of phenolic compounds in coal gasification wastewater (CGW). The results indicated MEBR achieved high efficiencies in removal of COD and phenolic compounds as well as improvement of biodegradability of CGW under the micro-oxygen condition. The integrated MEBR process was more favorable to improvement of the structural stability of activated sludge and biodiversity of specific functional microbial communities. Especially, Shewanella and Pseudomonas were enriched to accelerate the extracellular electron transfer, finally facilitating the degradation of phenolic compounds. Moreover, MEBR process effectively relieved passivation of Fe-C filler surface and prolonged lifespan of Fe-C filler. Accordingly, the synergetic effect between iron-carbon micro-electrolysis (ICME) and biological action played a significant role in performance of the integrated process. Therefore, the integrated MEBR was a promising practical process for enhancing CGW treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Uranium Biominerals Precipitated by an Environmental Isolate of Serratia under Anaerobic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsome, Laura; Morris, Katherine; Lloyd, Jonathan. R.

    2015-01-01

    Stimulating the microbially-mediated precipitation of uranium biominerals may be used to treat groundwater contamination at nuclear sites. The majority of studies to date have focussed on the reductive precipitation of uranium as U(IV) by U(VI)- and Fe(III)-reducing bacteria such as Geobacter and Shewanella species, although other mechanisms of uranium removal from solution can occur, including the precipitation of uranyl phosphates via bacterial phosphatase activity. Here we present the results of uranium biomineralisation experiments using an isolate of Serratia obtained from a sediment sample representative of the Sellafield nuclear site, UK. When supplied with glycerol phosphate, this Serratia strain was able to precipitate 1 mM of soluble U(VI) as uranyl phosphate minerals from the autunite group, under anaerobic and fermentative conditions. Under phosphate-limited anaerobic conditions and with glycerol as the electron donor, non-growing Serratia cells could precipitate 0.5 mM of uranium supplied as soluble U(VI), via reduction to nano-crystalline U(IV) uraninite. Some evidence for the reduction of solid phase uranyl(VI) phosphate was also observed. This study highlights the potential for Serratia and related species to play a role in the bioremediation of uranium contamination, via a range of different metabolic pathways, dependent on culturing or in situ conditions. PMID:26132209

  14. Evidence for the role of horizontal transfer in generating pVT1, a large mosaic conjugative plasmid from the clam pathogen, Vibrio tapetis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaël Erauso

    Full Text Available The marine bacterium Vibrio tapetis is the causative agent of the brown ring disease, which affects the clam Ruditapes philippinarum and causes heavy economic losses in North of Europe and in Eastern Asia. Further characterization of V. tapetis isolates showed that all the investigated strains harbored at least one large plasmid. We determined the sequence of the 82,266 bp plasmid pVT1 from the CECT4600(T reference strain and analyzed its genetic content. pVT1 is a mosaic plasmid closely related to several conjugative plasmids isolated from Vibrio vulnificus strains and was shown to be itself conjugative in Vibrios. In addition, it contains DNA regions that have similarity with several other plasmids from marine bacteria (Vibrio sp., Shewanella sp., Listonella anguillarum and Photobacterium profundum. pVT1 contains a number of mobile elements, including twelve Insertion Sequences or inactivated IS genes and an RS1 phage element related to the CTXphi phage of V. cholerae. The genetic organization of pVT1 underscores an important role of horizontal gene transfer through conjugative plasmid shuffling and transposition events in the acquisition of new genetic resources and in generating the pVT1 modular organization. In addition, pVT1 presents a copy number of 9, relatively high for a conjugative plasmid, and appears to belong to a new type of replicon, which may be specific to Vibrionaceae and Shewanelleacae.

  15. Bioleaching of arsenic in contaminated soil using metal-reducing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, So-Ra; Lee, Jong-Un; Chon, Hyo-Taek

    2014-05-01

    A study on the extraction of arsenic in the contaminated soil collected from an old smelting site in Korea was carried out using metal-reducing bacteria. Two types of batch-type experiments, biostimulation and bioaugmentation, were conducted for 28 days under anaerobic conditions. The biostimulation experiments were performed through activation of indigenous bacteria by supply with glucose or lactate as a carbon source. The contaminated, autoclaved soil was inoculated with metal-reducing bacteria, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and S. algae BrY, in the bioaugmentation experiments. The results indicated that the maximum concentration of the extracted As was 11.2 mg/L at 4 days from the onset of the experiment when 20 mM glucose was supplied and the extraction efficiency of As ranged 60~63% in the biostimulation experiments. In the case of bioaugmentation, the highest dissolved As concentration was 24.4 mg/L at 2 days, though it dramatically decreased over time through re-adsorption onto soil particles. After both treatments, mode of As occurrence in the soil appeared to be changed to readily extractable fractions. This novel technique of bioleaching may be practically applied for remediation of As-contaminated soil after determination of optimum operational conditions such as operation time and proper carbon source and its concentration.

  16. Lactic Acid Bacteria Selection for Biopreservation as a Part of Hurdle Technology Approach Applied on Seafood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman Wiernasz

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available As fragile food commodities, microbial, and organoleptic qualities of fishery and seafood can quickly deteriorate. In this context, microbial quality and security improvement during the whole food processing chain (from catch to plate, using hurdle technology, a combination of mild preserving technologies such as biopreservation, modified atmosphere packaging, and superchilling, are of great interest. As natural flora and antimicrobial metabolites producers, lactic acid bacteria (LAB are commonly studied for food biopreservation. Thirty-five LAB known to possess interesting antimicrobial activity were selected for their potential application as bioprotective agents as a part of hurdle technology applied to fishery products. The selection approach was based on seven criteria including antimicrobial activity, alteration potential, tolerance to chitosan coating, and superchilling process, cross inhibition, biogenic amines production (histamine, tyramine, and antibiotics resistance. Antimicrobial activity was assessed against six common spoiling bacteria in fishery products (Shewanella baltica, Photobacterium phosphoreum, Brochothrix thermosphacta, Lactobacillus sakei, Hafnia alvei, Serratia proteamaculans and one pathogenic bacterium (Listeria monocytogenes in co-culture inhibitory assays miniaturized in 96-well microtiter plates. Antimicrobial activity and spoilage evaluation, both performed in cod and salmon juice, highlighted the existence of sensory signatures and inhibition profiles, which seem to be species related. Finally, six LAB with no unusual antibiotics resistance profile nor histamine production ability were selected as bioprotective agents for further in situ inhibitory assays in cod and salmon based products, alone or in combination with other hurdles (chitosan, modified atmosphere packing, and superchilling.

  17. High-pressure-induced water penetration into 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagae, Takayuki; Kawamura, Takashi; Chavas, Leonard M. G.; Niwa, Ken; Hasegawa, Masashi; Kato, Chiaki; Watanabe, Nobuhisa

    2012-01-01

    Structures of 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase were determined at pressures ranging from 0.1 to 650 MPa. Comparison of these structures gives a detailed picture of the swelling of a cavity at the dimer interface and the generation of a new cleft on the molecular surface, which are accompanied by water penetration. Hydrostatic pressure induces structural changes in proteins, including denaturation, the mechanism of which has been attributed to water penetration into the protein interior. In this study, structures of 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase (IPMDH) from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were determined at about 2 Å resolution under pressures ranging from 0.1 to 650 MPa using a diamond anvil cell (DAC). Although most of the protein cavities are monotonically compressed as the pressure increases, the volume of one particular cavity at the dimer interface increases at pressures over 340 MPa. In parallel with this volume increase, water penetration into the cavity could be observed at pressures over 410 MPa. In addition, the generation of a new cleft on the molecular surface accompanied by water penetration could also be observed at pressures over 580 MPa. These water-penetration phenomena are considered to be initial steps in the pressure-denaturation process of IPMDH

  18. Cell-secreted flavins bound to membrane cytochromes dictate electron transfer reactions to surfaces with diverse charge and pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Akihiro; Kalathil, Shafeer; Deng, Xiao; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Nakamura, Ryuhei; Nealson, Kenneth H

    2014-07-11

    The variety of solid surfaces to and from which microbes can deliver electrons by extracellular electron transport (EET) processes via outer-membrane c-type cytochromes (OM c-Cyts) expands the importance of microbial respiration in natural environments and industrial applications. Here, we demonstrate that the bifurcated EET pathway of OM c-Cyts sustains the diversity of the EET surface in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 via specific binding with cell-secreted flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and riboflavin (RF). Microbial current production and whole-cell differential pulse voltammetry revealed that RF and FMN enhance EET as bound cofactors in a similar manner. Conversely, FMN and RF were clearly differentiated in the EET enhancement by gene-deletion of OM c-Cyts and the dependency of the electrode potential and pH. These results indicate that RF and FMN have specific binding sites in OM c-Cyts and highlight the potential roles of these flavin-cytochrome complexes in controlling the rate of electron transfer to surfaces with diverse potential and pH.

  19. Conformational control of the binding of diatomic gases to cytochrome c'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manole, Andreea; Kekilli, Demet; Svistunenko, Dimitri A; Wilson, Michael T; Dobbin, Paul S; Hough, Michael A

    2015-06-01

    The cytochromes c' (CYTcp) are found in denitrifying, methanotrophic and photosynthetic bacteria. These proteins are able to form stable adducts with CO and NO but not with O2. The binding of NO to CYTcp currently provides the best structural model for the NO activation mechanism of soluble guanylate cyclase. Ligand binding in CYTcps has been shown to be highly dependent on residues in both the proximal and distal heme pockets. Group 1 CYTcps typically have a phenylalanine residue positioned close to the distal face of heme, while for group 2, this residue is typically leucine. We have structurally, spectroscopically and kinetically characterised the CYTcp from Shewanella frigidimarina (SFCP), a protein that has a distal phenylalanine residue and a lysine in the proximal pocket in place of the more common arginine. Each monomer of the SFCP dimer folds as a 4-alpha-helical bundle in a similar manner to CYTcps previously characterised. SFCP exhibits biphasic binding kinetics for both NO and CO as a result of the high level of steric hindrance from the aromatic side chain of residue Phe 16. The binding of distal ligands is thus controlled by the conformation of the phenylalanine ring. Only a proximal 5-coordinate NO adduct, confirmed by structural data, is observed with no detectable hexacoordinate distal NO adduct.

  20. Characterization of the microbiota of the skin and oral cavity of Oreochromis niloticusCaracterização da microbiota da pele e cavidade oral de Oreochromis niloticusdoi:10.12662/2317-3076jhbs.v4i3.767.p193-197.2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmar Maciel Lima Junior

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fish are usually exposed to higher microbial loads than land or air animals. The microbiota of fish mostly consists of Pseudomonas spp., Aeromonas spp., Shewanella putrefasciens, Acinetobacter spp. and Moraxella spp. The objective of this study was to analyze the oral cavity, and skin tissue microbiota on the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus, a fish species raised commercially in Brazil. Methods: Samples were collected from the oral cavity and skin of 20 Nile tilapia specimens (Oreochromis niloticus, each weighing approximately 1,000 grams. The samples were cultures for quantitative analysis on sheep blood agar (SBA and chromID™ CPS® agar (CPS. Results: Eleven different bacterial species were identified on CPS and SBA plates. Gram-negative species were the most prevalent, while gram-positive Globicatella spp, Streptococcus spp and Enterococcus faecalis were also found. Pseudomonas aeruginosa species were isolated from all samples. Gram-positive Enterococcus faecalis was found in 70 and 60% of the skin and oral samples, respectively. Conclusion: For all samples studied, the microbial load was less than 100,000 CFU/g of tissue. This value is a cutoff standardized for the American Society of Microbiology to differentiate the causal agent from the colonizers. In light of this result and considering the absence of infectious signs in the fish samples, we conclude that the CFU values found in this study reflect a normal, non-infectious colonization/microbiota.

  1. Charge-associated effects of fullerene derivatives on microbialstructural integrity and central metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Ashcroft, Jared M.; Chen, Ding; Min, Guangwei; Kim, Chul; Murkhejee, Bipasha; Larabell, Carolyn; Keasling, Jay D.; Chen,Fanqing Frank

    2007-01-23

    The effects of four types of fullerene compounds (C60,C60-OH, C60-COOH, C60-NH2) were examined on two model microorganisms(Escherichia coli W3110 and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1). Positivelycharged C60-NH2 at concentrations as low as 10 mg/L inhibited growth andreduced substrate uptake for both microorganisms. Scanning ElectronMicroscopy (SEM) revealed damage to cellular structures.Neutrally-charged C60 and C60-OH had mild negative effects on S.oneidensis MR-1, whereas the negatively-charged C60-COOH did not affecteither microorganism s growth. The effect of fullerene compounds onglobal metabolism was further investigated using [3-13C]L-lactateisotopic labeling, which tracks perturbations to metabolic reaction ratesin bacteria by examining the change in the isotopic labeling pattern inthe resulting metabolites (often amino acids).1-3 The 13C isotopomeranalysis from all fullerene-exposed cultures revealed no significantdifferences in isotopomer distributions from unstressed cells. Thisresult indicates that microbial central metabolism is robust toenvironmental stress inflicted by fullerene nanoparticles. In addition,although C60-NH2 compounds caused mechanical stress on the cell wall ormembrane, both S. oneidensis MR-1 and E. coli W3110 can efficientlyalleviate such stress by cell aggregation and precipitation of the toxicnanoparticles. The results presented here favor the hypothesis thatfullerenes cause more membrane stress4, 5, 6 than perturbation to energymetabolism7

  2. Enhance wastewater biological treatment through the bacteria induced graphene oxide hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Liang; Jin, Ziheng; Wang, Dian; Wang, Yuanpeng; Lu, Yinghua

    2018-01-01

    The interaction between bacteria and graphene-family materials like pristine graphene, graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) is such an elusive issue that its implication in environmental biotechnology is unclear. Herein, two kinds of self-assembled bio-rGO-hydrogels (BGHs) were prepared by cultivating specific Shewanella sp. strains with GO solution for the first time. The microscopic examination by SEM, TEM and CLSM indicated a porous 3D structure of BGHs, in which live bacteria firmly anchored and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) abundantly distributed. Spectra of XRD, FTIR, XPS and Raman further proved that GO was reduced to rGO by bacteria along with the gelation process, which suggests a potential green technique to produce graphene. Based on the characterization results, four mechanisms for the BGH formation were proposed, i.e., stacking, bridging, rolling and cross-linking of rGO sheets, through the synergistic effect of activities and EPS from special bacteria. More importantly, the BGHs obtained in this study were found able to achieve unique cleanup performance that the counterpart free bacteria could not fulfill, as exemplified in Congo red decolorization and Cr(VI) bioreduction. These findings therefore enlighten a prospective application of graphene materials for the biological treatment of wastewaters in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A Decaheme Cytochrome as a Molecular Electron Conduit in Dye-Sensitized Photoanodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Ee Taek; Sheikh, Khizar; Orchard, Katherine L; Hojo, Daisuke; Radu, Valentin; Lee, Chong-Yong; Ainsworth, Emma; Lockwood, Colin; Gross, Manuela A; Adschiri, Tadafumi; Reisner, Erwin; Butt, Julea N; Jeuken, Lars J C

    2015-01-01

    In nature, charge recombination in light-harvesting reaction centers is minimized by efficient charge separation. Here, it is aimed to mimic this by coupling dye-sensitized TiO2 nanocrystals to a decaheme protein, MtrC from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, where the 10 hemes of MtrC form a ≈7-nm-long molecular wire between the TiO2 and the underlying electrode. The system is assembled by forming a densely packed MtrC film on an ultra-flat gold electrode, followed by the adsorption of approximately 7 nm TiO2 nanocrystals that are modified with a phosphonated bipyridine Ru(II) dye (RuP). The step-by-step construction of the MtrC/TiO2 system is monitored with (photo)electrochemistry, quartz-crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Photocurrents are dependent on the redox state of the MtrC, confirming that electrons are transferred from the TiO2 nanocrystals to the surface via the MtrC conduit. In other words, in these TiO2/MtrC hybrid photodiodes, MtrC traps the conduction-band electrons from TiO2 before transferring them to the electrode, creating a photobioelectrochemical system in which a redox protein is used to mimic the efficient charge separation found in biological photosystems. PMID:26180522

  4. Effect of quorum sensing signals produced by seaweed-associated bacteria on carpospore liberation from Gracilaria dura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra Pal Singh

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Epiphytic and endophytic bacteria associated with green macroalgae Ulva (U. fasciata and U. lactuca and red macroalgae Gracilaria (G. corticata and G. dura have been identified from three different seasons to evaluate the effect of quorum sensing molecules on carpospores liberation from Gracilaria dura. The bacterial isolates belonging to the orders Bacillales, Pseudomonadales, Alteromonadales and Vibrionales were present in all seasons, whereas Actinomycetales and Enterobacteriales were confined to pre-monsoon and post-monsoon seasons, respectively. Among all the Gram-negative bacteria, seven isolates were found to produce different types of N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs. Interestingly, Shewanella algae produced five types of AHL: C4-HSL, HC4-HSL, C6-HSL, 3-oxo-C6-HSL and 3-oxo-C12-HSL. Subsequently, the AHLs producing bacterial isolates were screened for carpospore liberation from G. dura and these isolates were found to positively induce carpospore liberation over the control. Also, observed that carpospore liberation increased significantly in C4- and C6-HSL treated cystocarps. Sodium dodecyl sulfate and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the total protein of the C4- and C6-HSL-treated cystocarps showed two specific peptide bands of different molecular weights (50 kDa and 60 kDa as compared to the control, confirming their indirect effect on carpospore liberation.

  5. Phylogenetic relationships among marine Alteromonas-like proteobacteria: emended description of the family Alteromonadaceae and proposal of Pseudoalteromonadaceae fam. nov., Colwelliaceae fam. nov., Shewanellaceae fam. nov., Moritellaceae fam. nov., Ferrimonadaceae fam. nov., Idiomarinaceae fam. nov. and Psychromonadaceae fam. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Elena P; Flavier, Sébastien; Christen, Richard

    2004-09-01

    The phylogenetic relationships among marine Alteromonas-like bacteria of the genera Alteromonas, Pseudoalteromonas, Glaciecola, Thalassomonas, Colwellia, Idiomarina, Oceanimonas, Oceanisphaera, Shewanella, Moritella, Ferrimonas, Psychromonas and several other genera of the 'Gammaproteobacteria' were studied. Results of 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses revealed that some members of these genera formed several coherent groups at the family level. Characteristic signature oligonucleotides for studied taxa were defined. Signature positions are divided into three classes: (i) single compensatory mutations, (ii) double compensatory mutations and (iii) mutations affecting nucleotides not paired in the secondary structure. The 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity level within genera was 93 % or above. This value can be a useful additional criterion for genus discrimination. On the basis of this work and previous polyphasic taxonomic studies, the circumscription of the family Alteromonadaceae is limited to the genera Alteromonas and Glaciecola and the creation is proposed of the families Pseudoalteromonadaceae fam. nov. to accommodate bacteria of the genera Pseudoalteromonas and Algicola gen. nov. (formerly Pseudoalteromonas bacteriolytica) and Colwelliaceae fam. nov. to accommodate bacteria of the genera Colwellia and Thalassomonas. Bacteria of the genera Oceanimonas and Oceanisphaera formed a robust cluster and shared common signature oligonucleotides. Because of deep branching and lack of association with any other genus, the following families are proposed that include single genera: Idiomarinaceae fam. nov., Psychromonadaceae fam. nov., Moritellaceae fam. nov., Ferrimonadaceae fam. nov. and Shewanellaceae fam. nov. Finally, this study also revealed that [Hyphomicrobium] indicum should be reclassified as Photobacterium indicum comb. nov.

  6. Influence of Calcium on Microbial Reduction of Solid Phase Uranium (VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Jeon, Byong-Hun; Zachara, John M.; Wang, Zheming

    2007-01-01

    The effect of calcium on microbial reduction of a solid phase U(VI), sodium boltwoodite (NaUO2SiO3OH · 1.5H2O), was evaluated in a culture of a dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium (DMRB), Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. Batch experiments were performed in a non-growth bicarbonate medium with lactate as electron donor at pH 7 buffered with PIPES. Calcium increased both the rate and extent of Na-boltwoodite dissolution by increasing its solubility through the formation of a ternary aqueous calcium-uranyl-carbonate species. The ternary species, however, decreased the rates of microbial reduction of aqueous U(VI). Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that microbial reduction of solid phase U(VI) is a sequentially coupled process of Na-boltwoodite dissolution, U(VI) aqueous speciation, and microbial reduction of dissolved U(VI) to U(IV) that accumulated on bacterial surfaces/periplasm. The overall rates of microbial reduction of solid phase U(VI) can be described by the coupled rates of dissolution and microbial reduction that were both influenced by calcium. The results demonstrated that dissolved U(VI) concentration during microbial reduction was a complex function of solid phase U(VI) dissolution kinetics, aqueous U(VI) speciation, and microbial activity

  7. Changes in Translational Efficiency is a Dominant Regulatory Mechanism in the Environmental Response of Bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Ronald C.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Serres, Margrethe H.; Linggi, Bryan E.; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Hill, Eric A.; Romine, Margaret F.; Lipton, Mary S.; Wiley, H. S.

    2013-09-23

    To understand how cell physiological state affects mRNA translation, we used Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 grown under steady state conditions at either aerobic or suboxic conditions. Using a combination of quantitative proteomics and RNA-Seq, we generated high-confidence data on >1000 mRNA and protein pairs. By using a steady state model, we found that differences in protein-mRNA ratios were primarily caused by differences in the translational efficiency of specific genes. When oxygen levels were lowered, 28% of the proteins showed at least a 2-fold change in expression. Altered transcription levels appeared responsible for 26% of the protein changes, altered translational efficiency appeared responsible for 46% and a combination of both were responsible for the remaining 28%. Changes in translational efficiency were significantly correlated with the codon usage pattern of the genes and measurable tRNA pools changed in response to altered O2 levels. Our results suggest that changes in the translational efficiency of proteins, in part caused by altered tRNA pools, is a major determinant of regulated protein expression in bacteria.

  8. Functional characterization of Gram-negative bacteria from different genera as multiplex cadmium biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereza-Malcolm, Lara; Aracic, Sanja; Kannan, Ruban; Mann, Gülay; Franks, Ashley E

    2017-08-15

    Widespread presence of cadmium in soil and water systems is a consequence of industrial and agricultural processes. Subsequent accumulation of cadmium in food and drinking water can result in accidental consumption of dangerous concentrations. As such, cadmium environmental contamination poses a significant threat to human health. Development of microbial biosensors, as a novel alternative method for in situ cadmium detection, may reduce human exposure by complementing traditional analytical methods. In this study, a multiplex cadmium biosensing construct was assembled by cloning a single-output cadmium biosensor element, cadRgfp, and a constitutively expressed mrfp1 onto a broad-host range vector. Incorporation of the duplex fluorescent output [green and red fluorescence proteins] allowed measurement of biosensor functionality and viability. The biosensor construct was tested in several Gram-negative bacteria including Pseudomonas, Shewanella and Enterobacter. The multiplex cadmium biosensors were responsive to cadmium concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 10µgml -1 , as well as several other heavy metals, including arsenic, mercury and lead at similar concentrations. The biosensors were also responsive within 20-40min following exposure to 3µgml -1 cadmium. This study highlights the importance of testing biosensor constructs, developed using synthetic biology principles, in different bacterial genera. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Dehydrochlorination of 1,1,1-trichloroethane and pentachloroethane by microbially reduced ferruginous smectite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Kostka, Joel E; Larson, Richard A; Stucki, Joseph W; Wu, Jun

    2003-05-01

    Reduction of structural Fe(III) in smectite clay minerals has been identified as a means to promote dechlorination of polychlorinated ethanes, but its environmental significance has yet to be fully assessed because Fe reduction has normally been achieved by agents uncommon in the environment (e.g., dithionite). This study reports the dehydrochlorination of pentachloroethane and 1,1,1-trichloroethane in the presence of ferruginous smectite reduced by two cultures of microorganisms, Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 (MR-R) and an enrichment culture from rice paddy soils (PS-R), in aqueous suspension under anoxic conditions. Microbially reduced ferruginous smectite facilitated dehydrochlorination of 1,1,1-trichloroethane to 1,1-dichloroethene with up to 60% conversion within 3 h of incubation time. In contrast, no formation of 1,1-dichloroethene was observed after incubation of 1,1,1-trichloroethane with chemically reduced ferruginous smectite for 24 h. Microbially reduced ferruginous smectite by MR-R and PS-R promoted the dehydrochlorination of pentachloroethane to tetrachloroethene by 80 and 15%, respectively, after 3 h of incubation time. The conversion of pentachloroethane to tetrachloroethene in the presence of chemically reduced ferruginous smectite after 24 h was 65%. These results indicate that structural Fe(II) in clay minerals has the potential to be an important reductant controlling the fate of organic chemicals in contaminated sediments.

  10. [Isolation, identification and characterization of acid-producing strains from psychrotolerant biogas fermentation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Yongqing; Zhang, Wei; Mandlaa; Tian, Ruihua; Wang, Ruigang; Duan, Kaihong

    2015-11-04

    The aim of this study was to screen acid-producing strains from the broth of psychrotolerant biogas fermentation and evaluate the acid-producing character of them. Acid-producing strains were isolated by a medium with methyl red at 4 degrees C in Petri dishes and identified by morphology observation and 16S rRNA sequencing. Moreover, the ability of hydrolysis of starch, fermentation of carbohydrates, liquefaction of gelatin and production of catalase were studied. Two acid-producing strains (FJ-8 and FJ-15) were isolated. The result of the 16S rRNA phylogenetic tree shows that FJ-8 and FJ-15 belong to Pseudomonas sp. and Shewanella sp., respectively. Both FJ-8 and FJ-15 could hydrolyze starch, liquidize gelatin and produce catalase. The optimum temperature for acid-producing of FJ-8 and FJ-15 is 15 degrees C and 20 degrees C, respectively. After 10 days cultivation at 4 degrees C, the concentration of acetic acid was 792 mg/L and 966 mg/L of FJ-8 and FJ-15, respectively. The selected strains, FJ-8 and FJ-15, have the potential to produce acids at low temperature.

  11. Enhanced reductive dechlorination of DDT in an anaerobic system of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria and iron oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, F.B., E-mail: cefbli@soil.gd.c [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agricultural Environment Pollution Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environmental and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Li, X.M. [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agricultural Environment Pollution Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environmental and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Zhou, S.G.; Zhuang, L. [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agricultural Environment Pollution Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environmental and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Cao, F. [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agricultural Environment Pollution Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environmental and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Huang, D.Y.; Xu, W.; Liu, T.X. [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agricultural Environment Pollution Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environmental and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Feng, C.H. [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China)

    2010-05-15

    The transformation of DDT was studied in an anaerobic system of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria (Shewanella decolorationis S12) and iron oxide (alpha-FeOOH). The results showed that S. decolorationis could reduce DDT into DDD, and DDT transformation rate was accelerated by the presence of alpha-FeOOH. DDD was observed as the primary transformation product, which was demonstrated to be transformed in the abiotic system of Fe{sup 2+} + alpha-FeOOH and the system of DIRB + alpha-FeOOH. The intermediates of DDMS and DBP were detected after 9 months, likely suggesting that reductive dechlorination was the main dechlorination pathway of DDT in the iron-reducing system. The enhanced reductive dechlorination of DDT was mainly due to biogenic Fe(II) sorbed on the surface of alpha-FeOOH, which can serve as a mediator for the transformation of DDT. This study demonstrated the important role of DIRB and iron oxide on DDT and DDD transformation under anaerobic iron-reducing environments. - This is the first case reporting the reductive dechlorination of DDT in an anaerobic system of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria and iron oxide.

  12. Culturable diversity of halophilic bacteria in foreshore soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irshad, Aarzoo; Ahmad, Irshad; Kim, Seung Bum

    2014-01-01

    Halophilic bacteria are commonly found in natural environments containing significant concentration of NaCl such as inland salt lakes and evaporated sea-shore pools, as well as environments such as curing brines, salted food products and saline soils. Dependence on salt is an important phenotypic characteristic of halophilic bacteria, which can be used in the polyphasic characterization of newly discovered microorganisms. In this study the diversity of halophilic bacteria in foreshore soils of Daecheon, Chungnam, and Saemangeum, Jeonbuk, was investigated. Two types of media, namely NA and R2A supplemented with 3%, 5%, 9%, 15%, 20% and 30% NaCl were used. More than 200 halophilic bacteria were isolated and BOX-PCR fingerprinting analysis was done for the typing of the isolates. The BLAST identification results showed that isolated strains were composed of 4 phyla, Firmicutes (60%), Proteobacteria (31%), Bacteriodetes (5%) and Actinobacteria (4%). Isolates were affiliated with 16 genera and 36 species. Bacillus was the dominant genus in the phylum Firmicutes, comprising 24% of the total isolates. Halomonas (12%) and Shewanella (12%) were also found as the main genera. These findings show that the foreshore soil of Daecheon Beach and Saemangeum Sea of Korea represents an untapped source of bacterial biodiversity.

  13. Efficacy evaluation of a new water sanitizer for increasing the shelf life of Southern Australian King George Whiting and Tasmanian Atlantic Salmon fillets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazandi, Manouchehr; Deo, Permal; Ferro, Sergio; Venter, Henrietta; Pi, Hongfei; Crabb, Simon; Amorico, Tony; Ogunniyi, Abiodun D; Trott, Darren J

    2017-12-01

    The bacterial species and specific spoilage organisms associated with the Southern Australian King George Whiting (KGW) and Tasmanian Atlantic Salmon (TAS), and the efficacy of a HOCl-containing water-based sanitization product (Electro-Chemically Activated Solution, by ECAS4) in extending the shelf life of KGW and TAS fillets were evaluated. Fillets were washed with an ECAS4 solution containing either 45 ppm or 150 ppm of free chlorine and bacterial species enumerated on selective and non-selective media, followed by identification of pure isolates by 16 S rRNA gene sequencing. The dominant spoilage microbiota in KGW and TAS fillets stored at 4 ± 1 °C were Pseudomonas spp. and Shewanella spp. At either concentration, ECAS4 significantly reduced total bacterial load and specific spoilage organisms on KGW and TAS fillets (approx. 1-2 log colony-forming units) during storage and significantly extended the shelf life of the fillets by 2 and 4 days, respectively. The significant increase in shelf life and quality of fillets was corroborated by raw and cooked sensory evaluation. ECAS4 sanitization could have a significant impact on the overall food industry, translating into health and economic benefits through reduction of food spoilage bacteria and potentially, foodborne pathogens without many of the disadvantages of currently approved biocides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The effect of flavin electron shuttles in microbial fuel cells current production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velasquez-Orta, Sharon B. [Newcastle Univ., Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom). School of Civil Engineering and Geosciences; Newcastle Univ., Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom). School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials; Head, Ian M.; Curtis, Thomas P. [Newcastle Univ., Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom). School of Civil Engineering and Geosciences; Scott, Keith [Newcastle Univ., Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom). School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials; Lloyd, Jonathan R.; Canstein, Harald von [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Earth, Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences

    2010-02-15

    The effect of electron shuttles on electron transfer to microbial fuel cell (MFC) anodes was studied in systems where direct contact with the anode was precluded. MFCs were inoculated with Shewanella cells, and flavins used as the electron shuttling compound. In MFCs with no added electron shuttles, flavin concentrations monitored in the MFCs' bulk liquid increased continuously with FMN as the predominant flavin. The maximum concentrations were 0.6 {mu}M for flavin mononucleotide and 0.2 {mu}M for riboflavin. In MFCs with added flavins, micro-molar concentrations were shown to increase current and power output. The peak current was at least four times higher in MFCs with high concentrations of flavins (4.5-5.5 {mu}M) than in MFCs with low concentrations (0.2-0.6 {mu}M). Although high power outputs (around 150 mW/m{sup 2}) were achieved in MFCs with high concentrations of flavins, a Clostridium-like bacterium along with other reactor limitations affected overall coulombic efficiencies (CE) obtained, achieving a maximum CE of 13%. Electron shuttle compounds (flavins) permitted bacteria to utilise a remote electron acceptor (anode) that was not accessible to the cells allowing current production until the electron donor (lactate) was consumed. (orig.)

  15. In Situ Molecular Imaging of the Biofilm and Its Matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Yuanzhao; Zhou, Yufan; Yao, Juan; Szymanski, Craig J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Shi, Liang; Cao, B.; Zhu, Zihua; Yu, Xiao-Ying

    2016-11-15

    Molecular mapping of live biofilms at submicron resolution presents a grand challenge. Here, we present the first chemical mapping results of biofilm extracellular polymeric sub-stance (EPS) components in biofilms using correlative imaging be-tween super resolution florescence microscopy and liquid time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Shewanella oneidensis is used as a model organism. Heavy metal anions chro-mate (Cr2O72-) consisting of chromium Cr (VI) was a model envi-ronmental stressor used to treat the biofilms. Of particular interest, biologically relevant water clusters have been first observed in the biofilms. Characteristic fragments of biofilm matrix components such as proteins, polysaccharides, and lipids can be spatially im-aged. Furthermore, characteristic fatty acids (e.g., palmitic acid), quinolone signal, and riboflavin fragments are found to respond af-ter the biofilm is treated with Cr (VI), leading to biofilm dispersion. Significant changes in water clusters and quorum sensing signals indicative of intercellular communication in the aqueous environ-ment are observed, suggesting that they might result in fatty acid synthesis and inhibit riboflavin production. The Cr (VI) reduction seems to follow the Mtr pathway leading to Cr (III) formation. Our approach potentially opens a new avenue for mechanistic insight of microbial community processes and communications using in situ imaging mass spectrometry and superresolution optical micros-copy.

  16. Discrimination of Four Marine Biofilm-Forming Bacteria by LC-MS Metabolomics and Influence of Culture Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favre, Laurie; Ortalo-Magné, Annick; Greff, Stéphane; Pérez, Thierry; Thomas, Olivier P; Martin, Jean-Charles; Culioli, Gérald

    2017-05-05

    Most marine bacteria can form biofilms, and they are the main components of biofilms observed on marine surfaces. Biofilms constitute a widespread life strategy, as growing in such structures offers many important biological benefits. The molecular compounds expressed in biofilms and, more generally, the metabolomes of marine bacteria remain poorly studied. In this context, a nontargeted LC-MS metabolomics approach of marine biofilm-forming bacterial strains was developed. Four marine bacteria, Persicivirga (Nonlabens) mediterranea TC4 and TC7, Pseudoalteromonas lipolytica TC8, and Shewanella sp. TC11, were used as model organisms. The main objective was to search for some strain-specific bacterial metabolites and to determine how culture parameters (culture medium, growth phase, and mode of culture) may affect the cellular metabolism of each strain and thus the global interstrain metabolic discrimination. LC-MS profiling and statistical partial least-squares discriminant analyses showed that the four strains could be differentiated at the species level whatever the medium, the growth phase, or the mode of culture (planktonic vs biofilm). A MS/MS molecular network was subsequently built and allowed the identification of putative bacterial biomarkers. TC8 was discriminated by a series of ornithine lipids, while the P. mediterranea strains produced hydroxylated ornithine and glycine lipids. Among the P. mediterranea strains, TC7 extracts were distinguished by the occurrence of diamine derivatives, such as putrescine amides.

  17. Biosupported Bimetallic Pd Au Nanocatalysts for Dechlorination of Environmental Contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Corte, S.; Fitts, J.; Hennebel, T.; Sabbe, T.; Bliznuk, V.; Verschuere, S.; van der Lelie, D.; Verstraete, W.; Boon, N.

    2011-08-30

    Biologically produced monometallic palladium nanoparticles (bio-Pd) have been shown to catalyze the dehalogenation of environmental contaminants, but fail to efficiently catalyze the degradation of other important recalcitrant halogenated compounds. This study represents the first report of biologically produced bimetallic Pd/Au nanoparticle catalysts. The obtained catalysts were tested for the dechlorination of diclofenac and trichloroethylene. When aqueous bivalent Pd(II) and trivalent Au(III) ions were both added to concentrations of 50 mg L{sup -1} and reduced simultaneously by Shewanella oneidensis in the presence of H{sub 2}, the resulting cell-associated bimetallic nanoparticles (bio-Pd/Au) were able to dehalogenate 78% of the initially added diclofenac after 24 h; in comparison, no dehalogenation was observed using monometallic bio-Pd or bio-Au. Other catalyst-synthesis strategies did not show improved dehalogenation of TCE and diclofenac compared with bio-Pd. Synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction, (scanning) transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy indicated that the simultaneous reduction of Pd and Au supported on cells of S. oneidensis resulted in the formation of a unique bimetallic crystalline structure. This study demonstrates that the catalytic activity and functionality of possibly environmentally more benign biosupported Pd-catalysts can be improved by coprecipitation with Au.

  18. Molecular Structure of Endotoxins from Gram-negative Marine Bacteria: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Molinaro

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Marine bacteria are microrganisms that have adapted, through millions of years, to survival in environments often characterized by one or more extreme physical or chemical parameters, namely pressure, temperature and salinity. The main interest in the research on marine bacteria is due to their ability to produce several biologically active molecules, such as antibiotics, toxins and antitoxins, antitumor and antimicrobial agents. Nonetheless, lipopolysaccharides (LPSs, or their portions, from Gram-negative marine bacteria, have often shown low virulence, and represent potential candidates in the development of drugs to prevent septic shock. Besides, the molecular architecture of such molecules is related to the possibility of thriving in marine habitats, shielding the cell from the disrupting action of natural stress factors. Over the last few years, the depiction of a variety of structures of lipids A, core oligosaccharides and O-specific polysaccharides from LPSs of marine microrganisms has been given. In particular, here we will examine the most recently encountered structures for bacteria belonging to the genera Shewanella, Pseudoalteromonas and Alteromonas, of the γ-Proteobacteria phylum, and to the genera Flavobacterium, Cellulophaga, Arenibacter and Chryseobacterium, of the Cytophaga- Flavobacterium-Bacteroides phylum. Particular attention will be paid to the chemical features expressed by these structures (characteristic monosaccharides, non-glycidic appendages, phosphate groups, to the typifying traits of LPSs from marine bacteria and to the possible correlation existing between such features and the adaptation, over years, of bacteria to marine environments.

  19. Sponge-Associated Bacteria Produce Non-cytotoxic Melanin Which Protects Animal Cells from Photo-Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayan, Vijitha; Jasmin, Chekidhenkuzhiyil; Anas, Abdulaziz; Parakkaparambil Kuttan, Sreelakshmi; Vinothkumar, Saradavey; Perunninakulath Subrayan, Parameswaran; Nair, Shanta

    2017-09-01

    Melanin is a photo-protective polymer found in many organisms. Our research shows that the bacteria associated with darkly pigmented sponges (Haliclona pigmentifera, Sigmadocia pumila, Fasciospongia cavernosa, Spongia officinalis, and Callyspongia diffusa) secrete non-cytotoxic melanin, with antioxidant activity that protects animal cells from photo-toxicity. Out of 156 bacterial strains screened, 22 produced melanin and these melanin-producing bacteria (MPB) were identified as Vibrio spp., Providencia sp., Bacillus sp., Shewanella sp., Staphylococcus sp., Planococcus sp., Salinococcus sp., and Glutamicibacter sp. Maximum melanin production was exhibited by Vibrio alginolyticus Marine Microbial Reference Facility (MMRF) 534 (50 mg ml -1 ), followed by two isolates of Vibrio harveyi MMRF 535 (40 mg ml -1 ) and MMRF 546 (30 mg ml -1 ). Using pathway inhibition assay and FT-IR spectral analysis, we identified the melanin secreted into the culture medium of MPB as 1,8-dihydroxynaphthalene-melanin. The bacterial melanin was non-cytotoxic to mouse fibroblast L929 cells and brine shrimps up to a concentration of 200 and 500 ppm, respectively. Bacterial melanin showed antioxidant activity at very low concentration (IC 50 -9.0 ppm) and at 50 ppm, melanin protected L929 cells from UV-induced intracellular reactive oxygen stress. Our study proposes sponge-associated bacteria as a potential source of non-cytotoxic melanin with antioxidant potentials.

  20. Identification of bacterial strains isolated from the Mediterranean Sea exhibiting different abilities of biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian-Jaisson, Florence; Ortalo-Magné, Annick; Guentas-Dombrowsky, Linda; Armougom, Fabrice; Blache, Yves; Molmeret, Maëlle

    2014-07-01

    The Mediterranean Sea has rarely been investigated for the characterization of marine bacteria as compared to other marine environments such as the Atlantic or Pacific Ocean. Bacteria recovered from inert surfaces are poorly studied in these environments, when it has been shown that the community structure of attached bacteria can be dissimilar from that of planktonic bacteria present in the water column. The objectives of this study were to identify and characterize marine bacteria isolated from biofilms developed on inert surfaces immersed in the Mediterranean Sea and to evaluate their capacity to form a biofilm in vitro. Here, 13 marine bacterial strains have been isolated from different supports immersed in seawater in the Bay of Toulon (France). Phylogenetic analysis and different biological and physico-chemical properties have been investigated. Among the 13 strains recovered, 8 different genera and 12 different species were identified including 2 isolates of a novel bacterial species that we named Persicivirga mediterranea and whose genus had never been isolated from the Mediterranean Sea. Shewanella sp. and Pseudoalteromonas sp. were the most preponderant genera recovered in our conditions. The phenotypical characterization revealed that one isolate belonging to the Polaribacter genus differed from all the other ones by its hydrophobic properties and poor ability to form biofilms in vitro. Identifying and characterizing species isolated from seawater including from Mediterranean ecosystems could be helpful for example, to understand some aspects of bacterial biodiversity and to further study the mechanisms of biofilm (and biofouling) development in conditions approaching those of the marine environment.

  1. A Novel Nano/Micro-Fluidic Reactor for Evaluation of Pore-Scale Reactive Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werth, C. J.; Alcalde, R.; Ghazvini, S.; Sanford, R. A.; Fouke, B. W.; Valocchi, A. J.

    2017-12-01

    The reactive transport of pollutants in groundwater can be affected by the presence of stressor chemicals, which inhibit microbial functions. The stressor can be a primary reactant (e.g., trichloroethene), a reaction product (e.g., nitrite from nitrate), or some other chemical present in groundwater (e.g., antibiotic). In this work, a novel nano/microfluidic cell was developed to examine the effect of the antibiotic ciprofloxacin on nitrate reduction coupled to lactate oxidation. The reactor contains parallel boundary channels that deliver flow and solutes on either side of a pore network. The boundary channels are separated from the pore network by one centimeter-long, one micrometer-thick walls perforated by hundreds of nanoslits. The nanoslits allow solute mass transfer from the boundary channels to the pore network, but not microbial passage. The pore network was inoculated with a pure culture of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, and this was allowed to grow on lactate and nitrate in the presence of ciprofloxacin, all delivered through the boundary channels. Microbial growth patterns suggest inhibition from ciprofloxacin and the nitrate reduction product nitrite, and a dependence on nitrate and lactate mass transfer rates from the boundary channels. A numerical model was developed to interpret the controlling mechanisms, and results indicate cell chemotaxis also affects nitrate reduction and microbial growth. The results are broadly relevant to bioremediation efforts where one or more chemicals that inhibit microbial growth are present and inhibit pollutant degradation rates.

  2. MicrobesOnline: an integrated portal for comparative and functional genomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehal, Paramvir S.; Joachimiak, Marcin P.; Price, Morgan N.; Bates, John T.; Baumohl, Jason K.; Chivian, Dylan; Friedland, Greg D.; Huang, Katherine H.; Keller, Keith; Novichkov, Pavel S.; Dubchak, Inna L.; Alm, Eric J.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2009-09-17

    Since 2003, MicrobesOnline (http://www.microbesonline.org) has been providing a community resource for comparative and functional genome analysis. The portal includes over 1000 complete genomes of bacteria, archaea and fungi and thousands of expression microarrays from diverse organisms ranging from model organisms such as Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae to environmental microbes such as Desulfovibrio vulgaris and Shewanella oneidensis. To assist in annotating genes and in reconstructing their evolutionary history, MicrobesOnline includes a comparative genome browser based on phylogenetic trees for every gene family as well as a species tree. To identify co-regulated genes, MicrobesOnline can search for genes based on their expression profile, and provides tools for identifying regulatory motifs and seeing if they are conserved. MicrobesOnline also includes fast phylogenetic profile searches, comparative views of metabolic pathways, operon predictions, a workbench for sequence analysis and integration with RegTransBase and other microbial genome resources. The next update of MicrobesOnline will contain significant new functionality, including comparative analysis of metagenomic sequence data. Programmatic access to the database, along with source code and documentation, is available at http://microbesonline.org/programmers.html.

  3. The use of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in the evaluation of the electrochemical properties of a microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, Aswin K; Bretschger, Orianna; Nealson, Kenneth H; Mansfeld, Florian

    2008-04-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) has been used to determine several electrochemical properties of the anode and cathode of a mediator-less microbial fuel cell (MFC) under different operational conditions. These operational conditions included a system with and without the bacterial catalyst and EIS measurements at the open-circuit potential of the anode and the cathode or at an applied cell voltage. In all cases the impedance spectra followed a simple one-time-constant model (OTCM) in which the solution resistance is in series with a parallel combination of the polarization resistance and the electrode capacitance. Analysis of the impedance spectra showed that addition of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to a solution of buffer and lactate greatly increased the rate of the lactate oxidation at the anode under open-circuit conditions. The large decrease of open-circuit potential of the anode increased the cell voltage of the MFC and its power output. Measurements of impedance spectra for the MFC at different cell voltages resulted in determining the internal resistance (R(int)) of the MFC and it was found that R(int) is a function of cell voltage. Additionally, R(int) was equal to R(ext) at the cell voltage corresponding to maximum power, where R(ext) is the external resistance that must be applied across the circuit to obtain the maximum power output.

  4. Analysis of bacterial metagenomes from the Southwestern Gulf of Mexico for pathogens detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobedo-Hinojosa, Wendy; Pardo-López, Liliana

    2017-07-31

    Little is known about the diversity of bacteria in the Southwestern Gulf of Mexico. The aim of the study illustrated in this perspective was to search for the presence of bacterial pathogens in this ecosystem, using metagenomic data recently generated by the Mexican research group known as the Gulf of Mexico Research Consortium. Several genera of bacteria annotated as pathogens were detected in water and sediment marine samples. As expected, native and ubiquitous pathogenic bacteria genera such as Burkolderia, Halomonas, Pseudomonas, Shewanella and Vibrio were highly represented. Surprisingly, non-native genera of public health concern were also detected, including Borrelia, Ehrlichia, Leptospira, Mycobacterium, Mycoplasma, Salmonella, Staphylococcus, Streptococcus and Treponema. While there are no previous metagenomics studies of this environment, the potential influences of natural, anthropogenic and ecological factors on the diversity of putative pathogenic bacteria found in it are reviewed. The taxonomic annotation herein reported provides a starting point for an improved understanding of bacterial biodiversity in the Southwestern Gulf of Mexico. It also represents a useful tool in public health as it may help identify infectious diseases associated with exposure to marine water and ingestion of fish or shellfish, and thus may be useful in predicting and preventing waterborne disease outbreaks. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Characterisation of the bacterial community structures in the intestine of Lampetra morii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingying; Xie, Wenfang; Li, Qingwei

    2016-07-01

    The metagenomic analysis and 16S rDNA sequencing method were used to investigate the bacterial community in the intestines of Lampetra morii. The bacterial community structure in L. morii intestine was relatively simple. Eight different operational taxonomic units were observed. Chitinophagaceae_unclassified (26.5 %) and Aeromonas spp. (69.6 %) were detected as dominant members at the genus level. The non-dominant genera were as follows: Acinetobacter spp. (1.4 %), Candidatus Bacilloplasma (2.5 %), Enterobacteria spp. (1.5 %), Shewanella spp. (0.04 %), Vibrio spp. (0.09 %), and Yersinia spp. (1.8 %). The Shannon-Wiener (H) and Simpson (1-D) indexes were 0.782339 and 0.5546, respectively. The rarefaction curve representing the bacterial community richness and Shannon-Wiener curve representing the bacterial community diversity reached asymptote, which indicated that the sequence depth were sufficient to represent the majority of species richness and bacterial community diversity. The number of Aeromonas in lamprey intestine was two times higher after stimulation by lipopolysaccharide than PBS. This study provides data for understanding the bacterial community harboured in lamprey intestines and exploring potential key intestinal symbiotic bacteria essential for the L. morii immune response.

  6. Metabolic Profiling Directly from the Petri Dish Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watrous, Jeramie D.; Roach, Patrick J.; Heath, Brandi S.; Alexandrov, Theodore; Laskin, Julia; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2013-11-05

    Understanding molecular interaction pathways in complex biological systems constitutes a treasure trove of knowledge that might facilitate the specific, chemical manipulation of the countless microbiological systems that occur throughout our world. However, there is a lack of methodologies that allow the direct investigation of chemical gradients and interactions in living biological systems, in real time. Here, we report the use of nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nanoDESI) imaging mass spectrometry for in vivo metabolic profiling of living bacterial colonies directly from the Petri dish with absolutely no sample preparation needed. Using this technique, we investigated single colonies of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Bacillus subtilis 3610, and Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) as well as a mixed biofilm of S. oneidensis MR-1 and B. subtilis 3610. Data from B. subtilis 3610 and S. coelicolor A3(2) provided a means of validation for the method while data from S. oneidensis MR-1 and the mixed biofilm showed a wide range of compounds that this bacterium uses for the dissimilatory reduction of extracellular metal oxides, including riboflavin, iron-bound heme and heme biosynthetic intermediates, and the siderophore putrebactin.

  7. Identities of epilithic hydrocarbon-utilizing diazotrophic bacteria from the Arabian Gulf Coasts, and their potential for oil bioremediation without nitrogen supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwan, Samir; Mahmoud, Huda; Khanafer, Majida; Al-Habib, Aamar; Al-Hasan, Redha

    2010-08-01

    Gravel particles from four sites along the Arabian Gulf coast in autumn, winter, and spring were naturally colonized with microbial consortia containing between 7 and 400 × 10(2) cm(-2) of cultivable oil-utilizing bacteria. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of 70 representatives of oil-utilizing bacteria revealed that they were predominantly affiliated with the Gammaproteobacteria and the Actinobacteria. The Gammaproteobacteria comprised among others, the genera Pseudomonas, Pseudoalteromonas, Shewanella, Marinobacter, Psychrobacter, Idiomarina, Alcanivorax, Cobetia, and others. Actinobacteria comprised the genera Dietzia, Kocuria, Isoptericola, Rhodococcus, Microbacterium, and others. In autumn, Firmicutes members were isolated from bay and nonbay stations while Alphaproteobacteria were detected only during winter from Anjefa bay station. Fingerprinting by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of amplified 16S rRNA genes of whole microbial consortia confirmed the culture-based bacterial diversities in the various epilithons in various sites and seasons. Most of the representative oil-utilizing bacteria isolated from the epilithons were diazotrophic and could attenuate oil also in nitrogen-rich (7.9-62%) and nitrogen-free (4-54%) cultures, which, makes the microbial consortia suitable for oil bioremediation in situ, without need for nitrogen supplementation. This was confirmed in bench-scale experiments in which unfertilized oily seawater was bioremediated by epilithon-coated gravel particles.

  8. Detection of Food Spoilage and Pathogenic Bacteria Based on Ligation Detection Reaction Coupled to Flow-Through Hybridization on Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Böhme

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional culturing methods are still commonly applied for bacterial identification in the food control sector, despite being time and labor intensive. Microarray technologies represent an interesting alternative. However, they require higher costs and technical expertise, making them still inappropriate for microbial routine analysis. The present study describes the development of an efficient method for bacterial identification based on flow-through reverse dot-blot (FT-RDB hybridization on membranes, coupled to the high specific ligation detection reaction (LDR. First, the methodology was optimized by testing different types of ligase enzymes, labeling, and membranes. Furthermore, specific oligonucleotide probes were designed based on the 16S rRNA gene, using the bioinformatic tool Oligonucleotide Retrieving for Molecular Applications (ORMA. Four probes were selected and synthesized, being specific for Aeromonas spp., Pseudomonas spp., Shewanella spp., and Morganella morganii, respectively. For the validation of the probes, 16 reference strains from type culture collections were tested by LDR and FT-RDB hybridization using universal arrays spotted onto membranes. In conclusion, the described methodology could be applied for the rapid, accurate, and cost-effective identification of bacterial species, exhibiting special relevance in food safety and quality.

  9. In-situ growth of graphene/polyaniline for synergistic improvement of extracellular electron transfer in bioelectrochemical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, De-Zhen; Yu, Yang-Yang; Xie, Rong-Rong; Zhang, Chun-Lian; Yang, Yuan; Zhai, Dan-Dan; Yang, Guodong; Liu, Lei; Yong, Yang-Chun

    2017-01-15

    Graphene composite has been widely used in various bioelectrochemical systems (BES). However, it is suffered from tedious fabrication procedure and ambiguous mechanism for its effect on BES. Here, a one-step and in-situ strategy for simultaneously graphene exfoliation and aniline polymerization was developed for fabrication of graphene/PANI composite electrode (GO/PANI OS ). This GO/PANI OS outperformed graphite paper (GP), GP with PANI (GP/PANI) and GP with electrochemical exfoliated graphene (GO H2SO4 ) in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 inoculated BES (improved the power density output, i.e., 24, 3.4 and 5.7 times of GP , GP/PANI and GO H2SO4 , respectively). Further analysis revealed a synergistic improvement on both direct and mediated extracellular electron transfer of S. oneidensis MR-1 by GO/PANI OS contributed to its performance enhancement in BES. This work not only provided a simple strategy for graphene composite fabrication, but also unveiled the underlying mechanism for its stimulation on BES, which promises new opportunity of graphene composite application in various biosystems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Phylogenetic characterization of epibiotic bacteria in the accessory nidamental gland and egg capsules of the squid Loligo pealei (Cephalopoda:Loliginidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, E; Paster, B J; Hughes, D; Zurek, L; Moser, D P; Teske, A; Sogin, M L

    2001-03-01

    Sexually mature female squid Loligo pealei harbour dense bacterial communities in their accessory nidamental glands (ANGs) and in their egg capsules (ECs). This study describes a molecular approach using the 16S rRNA gene (rDNA) to identify bacterial populations within the ANG and the ECs of the North Atlantic squid species L. pealei. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and 16S rDNA analysis showed that predominantly alpha- and, to a lesser extent, gamma-proteobacteria were the predominant components of the ANG and EC bacterial communities. Sequencing results showed the presence of alpha-proteobacterial populations affiliated with the Roseobacter group and additional deep-branching alpha-proteobacterial lineages. In contrast, isolates from the ANG and ECs contained only a few alpha-proteobacteria of the Roseobacter group compared with several gamma-proteobacterial isolates, mostly Shewanella and Pseudoalteromonas species. Most of the ANG-associated bacterial populations were also found within the ECs of L. pealei. The molecular approach allowed the visualization of alpha-proteobacteria as major constituents of a bacterial symbiosis within the reproductive system of the Loliginidae.

  11. Improving the Molecular Ion Signal Intensity for In Situ Liquid SIMS Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yufan; Yao, Juan; Ding, Yuanzhao; Yu, Jiachao; Hua, Xin; Evans, James E; Yu, Xiaofei; Lao, David B; Heldebrant, David J; Nune, Satish K; Cao, Bin; Bowden, Mark E; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Wang, Xue-Lin; Zhu, Zihua

    2016-12-01

    In situ liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) enabled by system for analysis at the liquid vacuum interface (SALVI) has proven to be a promising new tool to provide molecular information at solid-liquid and liquid-vacuum interfaces. However, the initial data showed that useful signals in positive ion spectra are too weak to be meaningful in most cases. In addition, it is difficult to obtain strong negative molecular ion signals when m/z>200. These two drawbacks have been the biggest obstacle towards practical use of this new analytical approach. In this study, we report that strong and reliable positive and negative molecular signals are achievable after optimizing the SIMS experimental conditions. Four model systems, including a 1,8-diazabicycloundec-7-ene (DBU)-base switchable ionic liquid, a live Shewanella oneidensis biofilm, a hydrated mammalian epithelia cell, and an electrolyte popularly used in Li ion batteries were studied. A signal enhancement of about two orders of magnitude was obtained in comparison with non-optimized conditions. Therefore, molecular ion signal intensity has become very acceptable for use of in situ liquid SIMS to study solid-liquid and liquid-vacuum interfaces. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  12. Microbial population dynamics during startup of a full-scale anaerobic digester treating industrial food waste in Kyoto eco-energy project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ike, Michihiko; Inoue, Daisuke; Miyano, Tomoki; Liu, Tong Tong; Sei, Kazunari; Soda, Satoshi; Kadoshin, Shiro

    2010-06-01

    The microbial community in a full-scale anaerobic digester (2300m3) treating industrial food waste in the Kyoto Eco-Energy Project was analyzed using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism for eubacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes. Both thermophilic and mesophilic sludge of treated swine waste were seeded to the digestion tank. During the 150-day startup period, coffee grounds as a main food waste, along with potato, kelp and boiled beans, tofu, bean curd lees, and deep-fried bean curd were fed to the digestion process step-by-step (max. 40t/d). Finally, the methane yield reached 360m3/t-feed with 40days' retention time, although temporary accumulation of propionate was observed. Eubacterial communities that formed in the thermophilic digestion tank differed greatly from both thermophilic and mesophilic types of seed sludge. Results suggest that the Actinomyces/Thermomonospora and Ralstonia/Shewanella were contributors for hydrolyzation and degradation of food waste into volatile fatty acids. Acetate-utilizing methanogens, Methanosaeta, were dominant in seed sludges of both types, but they decreased drastically during processing in the digestion tank. Methanosarcina and Methanobrevibacter/Methanobacterium were, respectively, possible main contributors for methane production from acetate and H2 plus CO2. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A structural basis for the regulatory inactivation of DnaA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qingping; McMullan, Daniel; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Carlton, Dennis; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Das, Debanu; Deller, Marc C; Duan, Lian; Elsliger, Marc-Andre; Feuerhelm, Julie; Hale, Joanna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K; Johnson, Hope A; Klock, Heath E; Knuth, Mark W; Kozbial, Piotr; Sri Krishna, S; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; Miller, Mitchell D; Morse, Andrew T; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Oommachen, Silvya; Paulsen, Jessica; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L; Sefcovic, Natasha; Trame, Christine; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Hodgson, Keith O; Wooley, John; Deacon, Ashley M; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A; Wilson, Ian A

    2009-01-16

    Regulatory inactivation of DnaA is dependent on Hda (homologous to DnaA), a protein homologous to the AAA+ (ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities) ATPase region of the replication initiator DnaA. When bound to the sliding clamp loaded onto duplex DNA, Hda can stimulate the transformation of active DnaA-ATP into inactive DnaA-ADP. The crystal structure of Hda from Shewanella amazonensis SB2B at 1.75 A resolution reveals that Hda resembles typical AAA+ ATPases. The arrangement of the two subdomains in Hda (residues 1-174 and 175-241) differs dramatically from that of DnaA. A CDP molecule anchors the Hda domains in a conformation that promotes dimer formation. The Hda dimer adopts a novel oligomeric assembly for AAA+ proteins in which the arginine finger, crucial for ATP hydrolysis, is fully exposed and available to hydrolyze DnaA-ATP through a typical AAA+ type of mechanism. The sliding clamp binding motifs at the N-terminus of each Hda monomer are partially buried and combine to form an antiparallel beta-sheet at the dimer interface. The inaccessibility of the clamp binding motifs in the CDP-bound structure of Hda suggests that conformational changes are required for Hda to form a functional complex with the clamp. Thus, the CDP-bound Hda dimer likely represents an inactive form of Hda.

  14. Kinetics of U(VI) reduction by a dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium under non-growth conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truex, M.J.; Peyton, B.M.; Valentine, N.B.; Gorby, Y.A.

    1997-01-01

    Dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganisms may be useful in processes designed for selective removal of uranium from aqueous streams. These bacteria can use U(VI) as an electron acceptor and thereby reduce soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV). While significant research has been devoted to demonstrating and describing the mechanism of dissimilatory metal reduction, the reaction kinetics necessary to apply this for remediation processes have not been adequately defined. In this study, pure culture Shewanella alga strain BrY reduced U(VI) under non-growth conditions in the presence of excess lactate as the electron donor. Initial U(VI) concentrations ranged from 13 to 1,680microM. A maximum specific U(VI) reduction rate of 2.37 micromole-U(VI)/(mg-biomass h) and Monod half-saturation coefficient of 132 microM-U(VI) were calculated from measured U(VI) reduction rates. U(VI) reduction activity was sustained at 60% of this rate for at least 80 h. The initial presence of oxygen at a concentration equal to atmospheric saturation at 22 C delays but does not prevent U(VI) reduction. The rate of U(VI) reduction by BrY is comparable or better than rates reported for other metal reducing species. BrY reduces U(VI) at a rate that is 30% of its Fe(III) reduction rate

  15. Synergistic microbial consortium for bioenergy generation from complex natural energy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Victor Bochuan; Yam, Joey Kuok Hoong; Chua, Song-Lin; Zhang, Qichun; Cao, Bin; Chye, Joachim Loo Say; Yang, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Microbial species have evolved diverse mechanisms for utilization of complex carbon sources. Proper combination of targeted species can affect bioenergy production from natural waste products. Here, we established a stable microbial consortium with Escherichia coli and Shewanella oneidensis in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) to produce bioenergy from an abundant natural energy source, in the form of the sarcocarp harvested from coconuts. This component is mostly discarded as waste. However, through its usage as a feedstock for MFCs to produce useful energy in this study, the sarcocarp can be utilized meaningfully. The monospecies S. oneidensis system was able to generate bioenergy in a short experimental time frame while the monospecies E. coli system generated significantly less bioenergy. A combination of E. coli and S. oneidensis in the ratio of 1:9 (v:v) significantly enhanced the experimental time frame and magnitude of bioenergy generation. The synergistic effect is suggested to arise from E. coli and S. oneidensis utilizing different nutrients as electron donors and effect of flavins secreted by S. oneidensis. Confocal images confirmed the presence of biofilms and point towards their importance in generating bioenergy in MFCs.

  16. Electron Transfer Strategies Regulate Carbonate Mineral and Micropore Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhirui; Tice, Michael M.

    2018-01-01

    Some microbial carbonates are robust biosignatures due to their distinct morphologies and compositions. However, whether carbonates induced by microbial iron reduction have such features is unknown. Iron-reducing bacteria use various strategies to transfer electrons to iron oxide minerals (e.g., membrane-bound enzymes, soluble electron shuttles, nanowires, as well as different mechanisms for moving over or attaching to mineral surfaces). This diversity has the potential to create mineral biosignatures through manipulating the microenvironments in which carbonate precipitation occurs. We used Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Geothrix fermentans, and Geobacter metallireducens GS-15, representing three different strategies, to reduce solid ferric hydroxide in order to evaluate their influence on carbonate and micropore formation (micro-size porosity in mineral rocks). Our results indicate that electron transfer strategies determined the morphology (rhombohedral, spherical, or long-chained) of precipitated calcium-rich siderite by controlling the level of carbonate saturation and the location of carbonate formation. Remarkably, electron transfer strategies also produced distinctive cell-shaped micropores in both carbonate and hydroxide minerals, thus producing suites of features that could potentially serve as biosignatures recording information about the sizes, shapes, and physiologies of iron-reducing organisms.

  17. Efficient aspartic acid production by a psychrophile-based simple biocatalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Takahisa; Hamada, Mai; Nakashimada, Yutaka; Kato, Junichi

    2015-10-01

    We previously constructed a Psychrophile-based Simple bioCatalyst (PSCat) reaction system, in which psychrophilic metabolic enzymes are inactivated by heat treatment, and used it here to study the conversion of aspartic acid from fumaric acid mediated by the activity of aspartate ammonia-lyase (aspartase). In Escherichia coli, the biosynthesis of aspartic acid competes with that of L-malic acid produced from fumaric acid by fumarase. In this study, E. coli aspartase was expressed in psychrophilic Shewanella livingstonensis Ac10 heat treated at 50 °C for 15 min. The resultant PSCat could convert fumaric acid to aspartic acid without the formation of L-malic acid because of heat inactivation of psychrophilic fumarase activity. Furthermore, alginate-immobilized PSCat produced high yields of aspartic acid and could be re-used nine times. The results of our study suggest that PSCat can be applied in biotechnological production as a new approach to increase the yield of target compounds.

  18. Antibiotic Resistance of Gram Negatives isolates from loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) in the central Mediterranean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foti, M; Giacopello, C; Bottari, Teresa; Fisichella, V; Rinaldo, D; Mammina, C

    2009-09-01

    Previous studies on fish and marine mammals support the hypothesis that marine species harbor antibiotic resistance and therefore may serve as reservoirs for antibiotic-resistance genetic determinants. The aim of this study was to assess the resistance to antimicrobial agents of Gram negative strains isolated from loggerhead sea turtles (Carettacaretta). Oral and cloacal swabs from 19 live-stranded loggerhead sea turtles, with hooks fixed into the gut, were analyzed. The antimicrobial resistance of the isolates to 31 antibiotics was assessed using the disk-diffusion method. Conventional biochemical tests identified Citrobacter spp., Proteus spp., Enterobacter spp., Escherichia spp., Providencia spp., Morganella spp., Pantoea spp., Pseudomonas spp. and Shewanella spp. Highest prevalences of resistance was detected to carbenicillin (100%), cephalothin (92.6%), oxytetracycline (81.3%) and amoxicillin (77.8%). The isolates showing resistance to the widest range of antibiotics were identified as Citrobacterfreundii, Proteusvulgaris, Providenciarettgeri and Pseudomonasaeruginosa. In this study, antibiotic resistant bacteria reflect marine contamination by polluted effluents and C.caretta is considered a bioindicator which can be used as a monitor for pollution.

  19. Acetone Formation in the Vibrio Family: a New Pathway for Bacterial Leucine Catabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemecek-Marshall, Michele; Wojciechowski, Cheryl; Wagner, William P.; Fall, Ray

    1999-01-01

    There is current interest in biological sources of acetone, a volatile organic compound that impacts atmospheric chemistry. Here, we determined that leucine-dependent acetone formation is widespread in the Vibrionaceae. Sixteen Vibrio isolates, two Listonella species, and two Photobacterium angustum isolates produced acetone in the presence of l-leucine. Shewanella isolates produced much less acetone. Growth of Vibrio splendidus and P. angustum in a fermentor with controlled aeration revealed that acetone was produced after a lag in late logarithmic or stationary phase of growth, depending on the medium, and was not derived from acetoacetate by nonenzymatic decarboxylation in the medium. l-Leucine, but not d-leucine, was converted to acetone with a stoichiometry of approximately 0.61 mol of acetone per mol of l-leucine. Testing various potential leucine catabolites as precursors of acetone showed that only α-ketoisocaproate was efficiently converted by whole cells to acetone. Acetone production was blocked by a nitrogen atmosphere but not by electron transport inhibitors, suggesting that an oxygen-dependent reaction is required for leucine catabolism. Metabolic labeling with deuterated (isopropyl-d7)-l-leucine revealed that the isopropyl carbons give rise to acetone with full retention of deuterium in each methyl group. These results suggest the operation of a new catabolic pathway for leucine in vibrios that is distinct from the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A pathway seen in pseudomonads. PMID:10601206

  20. Ratiometric Gas Reporting: A Nondisruptive Approach To Monitor Gene Expression in Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hsiao-Ying; Masiello, Caroline A; Del Valle, Ilenne; Gao, Xiaodong; Bennett, George N; Silberg, Jonathan J

    2018-03-16

    Fluorescent proteins are ubiquitous tools that are used to monitor the dynamic functions of natural and synthetic genetic circuits. However, these visual reporters can only be used in transparent settings, a limitation that complicates nondisruptive measurements of gene expression within many matrices, such as soils and sediments. We describe a new ratiometric gas reporting method for nondisruptively monitoring gene expression within hard-to-image environmental matrices. With this approach, C 2 H 4 is continuously synthesized by ethylene forming enzyme to provide information on viable cell number, and CH 3 Br is conditionally synthesized by placing a methyl halide transferase gene under the control of a conditional promoter. We show that ratiometric gas reporting enables the creation of Escherichia coli biosensors that report on acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) autoinducers used for quorum sensing by Gram-negative bacteria. Using these biosensors, we find that an agricultural soil decreases the bioavailable concentration of a long-chain AHL up to 100-fold. We also demonstrate that these biosensors can be used in soil to nondisruptively monitor AHLs synthesized by Rhizobium leguminosarum and degraded by Bacillus thuringiensis. Finally, we show that this new reporting approach can be used in Shewanella oneidensis, a bacterium that lives in sediments.