WorldWideScience

Sample records for shergottites dar al

  1. Martian meteorite Dhofar 019: A new shergottite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, L. A.; Nazarov, M. A.; Shearer, C. K.; McSween, H. Y., Jr.; Cahill, J.; Neal, C. R.; Ivanova, M. A.; Barsukova, L. D.; Lentz, R. C.; Clayton, R. N.; Mayeda, T. K.

    2002-08-01

    Dhofar 019 is a new martian meteorite found in the desert of Oman. In texture, mineralogy, and major and trace element chemistry, this meteorite is classified as a basaltic shergottite. Olivine megacrysts are set within a groundmass composed of finer grained olivine, pyroxene (pigeonite and augite), and maskelynite. Minor phases are chromite-ulvöspinel, ilmenite, silica, K-rich feldspar, merrillite, chlorapatite, and pyrrhotite. Secondary phases of terrestrial origin include calcite, gypsum, celestite, Fe hydroxides, and smectite. Dhofar 019 is most similar to the Elephant Moraine (EETA) 79001 lithology A and Dar al Gani (DaG) 476/489 shergottites. The main features that distinguish Dhofar 019 from other shergottites are lack of orthopyroxene; lower Ni contents of olivine; the heaviest oxygen-isotopic bulk composition; and larger compositional ranges for olivine, maskelynite, and spinel, as well as a wide range for pyroxenes. The large compositional ranges of the minerals are indicative of relatively rapid crystallization. Modeling of olivine chemical zonations yield minimum cooling rates of 0.5-0.8 ?C/h. Spinel chemistry suggests that crystallization took place under one of the most reduced conditions for martian meteorites, at an oxygen fugacity of 3 log units below the quartz-fayalite-magnetite (QFM) buffer. The olivine megacrysts are heterogeneously distributed in the rock. Crystal size distribution analysis suggests that they constitute a population formed under steady-state conditions of nucleation and growth, although a few grains may be cumulates. The parent melt is thought to have been derived from partial melting of a light rare earth element- and platinum group element-depleted mantle source. Shergottites, EETA79001 lithology A, DaG 476/489, and Dhofar 019, although of different ages, comprise a particular type of martian rocks. Such rocks could have formed from chemically similar source(s) and parent melt(s), with their bulk compositions affected by

  2. Cosmogenic Records in 18 Ordinary Chondrites from the Dar Al Gani Region, Libya. 2; Radionclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welten, K. C.; Nishiizumi, K.; Finkel, R. C.; Hillegonds, D. J.; Jull, A. J. T.; Schultz, L.

    2003-01-01

    In the past decade more than 1000 meteorites have been recovered from the Dar al Gani (DaG) plateau in the Libyan part of the Sahara. The geological setting, meteorite pairings and density are described. So far, only a few terrestrial ages are known for DaG meteorites, e.g. 60+/- 20 kyr for the DaG 476 shergottite shower and 80+/- 20 kyr for the lunar meteorite DaG 262. However, from other desert areas, such as Oman, it is known that achondrites may survive much longer than chondritic meteorites, so the ages of these two achondrites may not be representative of the majority of the DaG meteorite collection, of which more than 90% are ordinary chondrites. In this work we report concentrations of the cosmogenic radionuclides, 14C (half-life = 5,730 yr), 41Ca (1.04x10 superscript 5 yr), Cl-36 (3.01x10 superscript 5 yr), Al-26 (7.05x10 superscript 5 yr) and 10Be (1.5x10 superscript 6 yr) to determine the terrestrial ages of DaG meteorites and constrain their pre-atmospheric size and exposure history.

  3. The role of sulfides in the fractionation of highly siderophile and chalcophile elements during the formation of martian shergottite meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Raphael J.; Fiorentini, Marco L.; Lorand, Jean-Pierre; Baratoux, David; Zaccarini, Federica; Ferrière, Ludovic; Prašek, Marko K.; Sener, Kerim

    2017-08-01

    The shergottite meteorites are ultramafic to mafic igneous rocks whose parental magmas formed from partial melting of the martian mantle. This study reports in-situ laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analyses for siderophile and chalcophile major and trace elements (i.e., Co, Ni, Cu, As, Se, Ag, Sb, Te, Pb, Bi, and the highly siderophile platinum-group elements, PGE: Os, Ir, Ru, Rh, Pt and Pd) of magmatic Fe-Ni-Cu sulfide assemblages from four shergottite meteorites. They include three geochemically similar incompatible trace element- (ITE-) depleted olivine-phyric shergottites (Yamato-980459, Dar al Gani 476 and Dhofar 019) that presumably formed from similar mantle and magma sources, and one distinctively ITE-enriched basaltic shergottite (Zagami). The sulfides in the shergottites have been variably modified by alteration on Earth and Mars, as well as by impact shock-shock related melting/volatilization during meteorite ejection. However, they inherit and retain their magmatic PGE signatures. The CI chondrite-normalized PGE concentration patterns of sulfides reproduce the whole-rock signatures determined in previous studies. These similarities indicate that sulfides exerted a major control on the PGE during shergottite petrogenesis. However, depletions of Pt (and Ir) in sulfide relative to the other PGE suggest that additional phases such discrete Pt-Fe-Ir alloys have played an important role in the concentration of these elements. These alloys are expected to have enhanced stability in reduced and FeO-rich shergottite magmas, and could be a common feature in martian igneous systems. A Pt-rich PGM was found to occur in a sulfide assemblage in Dhofar 019. However, its origin may be related to impact shock-related sulfide melting and volatilisation during meteorite ejection. In the ITE-depleted olivine-phyric shergottites, positive relationships exist between petrogenetic indicators (e.g., whole-rock Mg-number) and most moderately to

  4. Cosmogenic Records in 18 Ordinary Chondrites from the Dar Al Gani Region, Libya. 1; Noble Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, L.; Franke, L.; Welten, K. C.; Nishiizumi, K.; Jull, A. J. T.

    2003-01-01

    In the last decade thousands of meteorites have been recovered from hot deserts in the Sahara and Oman. One of the main meteorite concentration surfaces in the Sahara is the Dar al Gani plateau in Libya, which covers a total area of 8000 km2. More than 1000 meteorites have been reported from this area. The geological setting, meteorite pairings and the meteorite density of the Dar al Gani (DaG) field are described in more detail in [1]. In this work we report concentrations of the noble gas isotopes of He, Ne, Ar as well as 84Kr and 132Xe in 18 DaG meteorites. In a separate paper we will report the cosmogenic radionuclides [2]. We discuss the thermal history and cosmic-ray exposure (CRE) history of these meteorites, and evaluate the effects of the hot desert environment on the noble gas record.

  5. Primitive clasts in the Dar al Gani 319 polymict ureilite: Precursors of the ureilites

    OpenAIRE

    Ikeda, Yukio; Kita,Noriko T.; Morishita,Yuichi; Weisberg, Michael K.

    2003-01-01

    Primitive clasts in the polymict ureilite Dar al Gani (DaG) 319 include dark clasts, sulfide- or metal-rich clasts, and unusual chondritic fragments. The dark clasts consist mainly of phyllosilicates, sulfides and magnetite with or without fayalitic olivine. The sulfide-rich clasts consist of a silicate-rich matrix and heterogeneously distributed sulfide. The metal-rich clasts consist of a silicate-rich matrix with variable amounts of metal. The unusual chondritic fragments are chondrule and ...

  6. Solubility of Sulfur in Shergottitic Silicate Melts Up to 0.8 GPA: Implications for S Contents of Shergottites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, K.; Pando, K.M.; Danielson, L.

    2009-01-01

    Shergottites have high S contents (1300 to 4600 ppm; [1]), but it is unclear if they are sulfide saturated or under-saturated. This issue has fundamental implications for determining the long term S budget of the martian surface and atmosphere (from mantle degassing), as well as evolution of the highly siderophile elements (HSE) Au, Pd, Pt, Re, Rh, Ru, Ir, and Os, since concentrations of the latter are controlled by sulfide stability. Resolution of sulfide saturation depends upon temperature, pressure, oxygen fugacity (and FeO), and magma composition [2]. Expressions derived from experimental studies allow prediction of S contents, though so far they are not calibrated for shergottitic liquids [3-5]. We have carried out new experiments designed to test current S saturation models, and then show that existing calibrations are not suitable for high FeO and low Al2O3 compositions characteristic of shergottitic liquids. The new results show that existing models underpredict S contents of sulfide saturated shergottitic liquids by a factor of 2.

  7. Petrography and mineralogy of the ungrouped type 3 carbonaceous chondrite Dar al Gani 978

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ai-Cheng; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi

    2013-09-01

    Dar al Gani (DaG) 978 is an ungrouped type 3 carbonaceous chondrite. In this study, we report the petrography and mineralogy of Ca,Al-rich inclusions (CAI), amoeboid olivine aggregates (AOAs), chondrules, mineral fragments, and the matrix in DaG 978. Twenty-seven CAIs were found: 13 spinel-diopside-rich inclusions, 2 anorthite-rich inclusions, 11 spinel-troilite-rich inclusions, and 1 spinel-melilite-rich inclusion. Most CAIs have a layered texture that indicates a condensation origin and are most similar to those in R chondrites. Compound chondrules represent a high proportion (approximately 8%) of chondrules in DaG 978, which indicates a local dusty chondrule-forming region and multiple heating events. Most spinel and olivine in DaG 978 are highly Fe-rich, which corresponds to a petrologic type of >3.5 and a maximum metamorphic temperature of approximately 850-950 K. This conclusion is also supported by other observations in DaG 978: the presence of coarse inclusions of silicate and phosphate in Fe-Ni metal, restricted Ni-Co distributions in kamacite and taenite, and low S concentrations in the matrix. Mineralogic records of iron-alkali-halogen metasomatism, such as platy and porous olivine, magnetite, hedenbergite, nepheline, Na-rich in CAIs, and chlorapatite, are present, but relatively limited, in DaG 978. The fine-grained, intergrowth texture of spinel-troilite-rich inclusions was probably formed by reaction between pre-existing Al-rich silicates and shock-induced, high-temperature S-rich gas on the surface of the parent body of DaG 978. A shock-induced vein is present in the matrix of DaG 978, which indicates that the parent body of DaG 978 at least experienced a shock event with a shock stage up to S3.

  8. Petrology and chemistry of the Picritic Shergottite North West Africa 1068 (NWA 1068)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrat, J. A.; Jambon, A.; Bohn, M.; Gillet, P. h.; Sautter, V.; Göpel, C.; Lesourd, M.; Keller, F.

    2002-10-01

    We report on the petrology and chemistry of North West Africa 1068 (NWA 1068), a shergottite recently recovered in Morocco. This meteorite has a total known mass of about 577 g and comprises 23 fragments. The largest fragment is a greenish-brown rock devoid of fusion crust. It displays a porphyritic texture consisting of a fine-grained groundmass and olivine grains. Excluding the impact melt pockets and the minor carbonate veins produced by terrestrial weathering, modal analyses indicate the following mineral proportions: 52 vol% pyroxenes, 22% maskelynite, 21% olivine, 2% phosphates (merrillite and chlorapatite), 2% opaque oxides (mainly ilmenite and chromite) and sulfides, and 1% K-rich mesostasis. Olivines with various habits occur as clusters often associated with chromite, or single crystals ranging in size from 50 μm to 2 millimeters ("megacrysts"). These crystals originate probably from disrupted cumulates with strong affinities with peridotitic shergottites. The bulk composition of NWA 1068 has been determined for 45 elements. It is an Al-poor ferroan basaltic rock, rich in MgO. Its major element composition is similar to those reported for other picritic shergottites, especially EETA79001A. Furthermore, key element ratios such as Fe/Mn (45), Al/Ti (6.6), Na/Ti (1.83), Ga/Al (4.4 × 10 -4) and Na/Al (0.28) are typical of Martian meteorites. The trace elements demonstrate unambiguously that NWA 1068 is unpaired with any of the other hot desert finds: it is the first picritic shergottite with a REE pattern similar to those of Shergotty, Zagami, and Los Angeles. Incompatible element abundances indicate that NWA 1068 was not formed from a "primitive" shergottitic melt. It derived more likely from a basaltic shergottite, which has accumulated (and possibly partly digested) fragments of an olivine-rich lithology, in full agreement with major element abundances and petrographical interpretations.

  9. 2010 U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Topographic LiDAR: Mobile Bay, AL

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — USGS Contract: G10PC00026 Task Order Number: G10PD00578 LiDAR was collected at a nominal pulse spacing of 2.0 meters for a 700 square mile area to the east of Mobile...

  10. The age of the martian meteorite Northwest Africa 1195 and the differentiation history of the shergottites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Symes, S; Borg, L; Shearer, C; Irving, A

    2007-04-05

    Samarium-neodymium isotopic analyses of unleached and acid-leached mineral fractions from the recently identified olivine-bearing shergottite Northwest Africa 1195 yield a crystallization age of 348 {+-} 19 Ma and an {var_epsilon}{sub Nd}{sup 143} value of +40.1 {+-} 1.3. Maskelynite fractions do not lie on the Sm-Nd isochron and appear to contain a martian surface component with low {sup 147}Sm/{sup 144}Nd and {sup 143}Nd/{sup 144}Nd ratios that was added during shock. The Rb-Sr system is disturbed and does not yield an isochron. Terrestrial Sr appears to have affected all of the mineral fractions, although a maximum initial {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio of 0.701614 {+-} 16 is estimated by passing a 348 Ma reference isochron through the maskelynite fraction that is least affected by contamination. The high initial {var_epsilon}{sub Nd}{sup 143} value and the low initial {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio, combined with the geologically young crystallization age, indicate that Northwest Africa 1195 is derived from a source region characterized by a long-term incompatible element depletion. The age and initial Sr and Nd isotopic compositions of Northwest Africa 1195 are very similar to those of Queen Alexandra Range 94201, indicating these samples were derived from source regions with nearly identical Sr-Nd isotopic systematics. These similarities suggest that these two meteorites share a close petrogenetic relationship and might have been erupted from a common volcano. The meteorites Yamato 980459, Dar al Gani 476, Sayh al Uhaymir 005/008, and Dhofar 019 also have relatively old ages between 474-575 Ma and trace element and/or isotopic systematics that are indicative of derivation from incompatible-element-depleted sources. This suggests that the oldest group of meteorites is more closely related to one another than they are to the younger meteorites that are derived from less incompatible-element-depleted sources. Closed-system fractional crystallization of this suite of

  11. Sulfur Isotopes in Gas-rich Impact-Melt Glasses in Shergottites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M. N.; Hoppe, P.; Sutton, S. R.; Nyquist, Laurence E.; Huth, J.

    2010-01-01

    Large impact melt glasses in some shergottites contain huge amounts of Martian atmospheric gases and they are known as gas-rich impact-melt (GRIM) glasses. By studying the neutron-induced isotopic deficits and excesses in Sm-149 and Sm-150 isotopes resulting from Sm-149 (n,gamma) 150Sm reaction and 80Kr excesses produced by Br-79 (n,gamma) Kr-80 reaction in the GRIM glasses using mass-spectrometric techniques, it was shown that these glasses in shergottites EET79001 and Shergotty contain regolith materials irradiated by a thermal neutron fluence of approx.10(exp 15) n/sq cm near Martian surface. Also, it was shown that these glasses contain varying amounts of sulfates and sulfides based on the release patterns of SO2 (sulfate) and H2S (sulfide) using stepwise-heating mass-spectrometric techniques. Furthermore, EMPA and FE-SEM studies in basaltic-shergottite GRIM glasses EET79001, LithB (,507& ,69), Shergotty (DBS I &II), Zagami (,992 & ,994) showed positive correlation between FeO and "SO3" (sulfide + sulfate), whereas those belonging to olivine-phyric shergottites EET79001, LithA (,506, & ,77) showed positive correlation between CaO/Al2O3 and "SO3".

  12. Chemical Composition of Four Shergottites from Northwest Africa (NWA 2800, NWA, 5214, NWA 5990, NWA 6342)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S.; Humayun, M.; Jefferson, G.; Fields, D.; Righter, K.; Irving, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Shergottites represent the majority of recovered Martian meteorites. As basic igneous rocks, they formed from magmas that were emplaced in the Martian crust [1]. Due to the low ambient pressure of the Martian atmosphere, subaerial lavas and shallow magma chambers are expected to outgas volatile metals (e.g., Cd, Te, Re, Bi) [2]. The planetary abundances of the volatile siderophile and chalcophile elements are important at establishing the depth of core formation for Mars, and must be known as a baseline for understanding volcanic outgassing on Mars, particularly the large enrichments of S and Cl observed in modern Martian soils [3]. There is little data on volatile siderophile and chalcophile elements from Martian meteorites, excluding a few well-analyzed samples [2]. Further, a large number of shergottites being recovered from North West Africa are in need of chemical analysis. All of the shergottites are in need of state-of-the art analysis for such ratios as Ge/Si and Ga/Al, which can now be accomplished by LA-ICP-MS [2].

  13. Petrology and chemistry of the basaltic shergottite North West Africa 480

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrat, J. A.; Gillet, Ph.; Sautter, V.; Jambon, A.; Javoy, M.; Göpel, C.; Lesourd, M.; Keller, F.; Petit, E.

    2002-04-01

    North West Africa (NWA) 480 is a new martian meteorite of 28 g found in the Moroccan Sahara in November 2000. It consists mainly of large gray pyroxene crystals (the largest grains are up to 5 mm in length) and plagioclase converted to maskelynite. Excluding the melt pocket areas, modal analyses indicate the following mineral proportions: 72 vol% pyroxenes extensively zoned, 25% maskelynite, 1% phosphates (merrillite and chlorapatite), 1% opaque oxides (ilmenite, ulvospinel and chromite) and sulfides, and 1% others such as silica and fayalite. The compositional trend of NWA 480 pyroxenes is similar to that of Queen Alexandra Range (QUE) 94201 but in NWA 480 the pyroxene cores are more Mg-rich (En77-En65). Maskelynites display a limited zoning (An42-50Ab54-48Or2-4). Our observations suggest that NWA 480 formed from a melt with a low nuclei density at a slow cooling rate. The texture was achieved via a single-stage cooling where pyroxenes grew continuously. A similar model was previously proposed for QUE 94201 by McSween et al. (1996). NWA 480 is an Al-poor ferroan basaltic rock and resembles Zagami or Shergotty for major elements and compatible trace element abundances. The bulk rock analysis for oxygen isotopes yields V17O = +0.42%o, a value in agreement at the high margin, with those measured on other shergottites (Clayton and Mayeda, 1996; Romanek et al., 1998; Franchi et al., 1999). Its CI-normalized rare earth element pattern is similar to those of peridotitic shergottites such as Allan Hills (ALH)A77005, suggesting that these shergottites shared a similar parent liquid, or at least the same mantle source.

  14. Evaluating crustal contributions to enriched shergottites from the petrology, trace elements, and Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotope systematics of Northwest Africa 856

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdous, J.; Brandon, A. D.; Peslier, A. H.; Pirotte, Z.

    2017-08-01

    observed mineralogy throughout the sequence with progressive crystallization. The Ti/Al ratios in the clinopyroxenes are consistent with initial crystallization occurring at these depths followed by polybaric crystallization as the parent magma ascended to the surface. The REE abundances in the clinopyroxenes and maskelynite are consistent with progressive crystallization in a closed system. The new results for NWA 856 are combined with other shergottite data and are compared to mixing and assimilation and fractional crystallization (AFC) models using depleted shergottite magmas and ancient Martian crust as end-members. The models indicate that the range of REE abundances and ratios, when taken in isolation, can be successfully explained for all shergottites by crustal contamination. However, no successful crustal contamination model can explain the restricted εNdI of -6.8 ± 0.2 over the wide range of Mg# (0.65-0.25), and corresponding trace element variations from enriched shergottites to depleted shergottites. The findings indicate that the origin of the long-term ITE-enriched signature in enriched shergottites and the geochemical variability seen in shergottites is not a result of crustal contamination but instead reflects ancient mantle heterogeneity.

  15. Shock-induced deformation of Shergottites: Shock-pressures and perturbations of magmatic ages on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Goresy, Ahmed; Gillet, Ph.; Miyahara, M.; Ohtani, E.; Ozawa, S.; Beck, P.; Montagnac, G.

    2013-01-01

    Shergottites and Chassignites practiced major deformation effects whose nature, magnitude and relevance were controversially evaluated and disputatively debated. Our studies of many shocked shergottites present, contrary to numerous previous reports, ample evidence for pervasive shock-induced melting amounting of at least 23 vol.% of the shergottite consisting of maskelynite and pyrrhotite, partial melting of pyroxene, titanomagnetite, ilmenite and finding of several high-pressure polymorphs and pressure-induced dissociation reactions. Our results cast considerable doubt on using the refractive index (RI) or cathodoluminescence (CL) spectra of maskelynite, in estimating the magnitudes of peak-shock pressure in both shergottites and ordinary chondrites. RI of maskelynite was set after quenching of the feldspar liquid before decompression to maskelynite glass followed by glass relaxation after decompression at the closure temperature of relaxation. The RI procedure widely practiced in the past 38 years revealed unrealistic very high-pressure estimates discrepant with the high-pressure mineral inventory in shocked shergottites and ordinary chondrites and with results obtained by robust laboratory static experiments. Shergottites contain the silica high-pressure polymorphs: the scrutinyite-structured polymorph seifertite, a monoclinic ultra dense polymorph of silica with ZrO2-structure, stishovite, a dense liquidus assemblage consisting of stishovite + Na-hexa-aluminosilicate (Na-CAS) and both K-lingunite and Ca-lingunite. Applying individual high-pressure silica polymorphs alone like stishovite, to estimate the equilibrium shock pressure, is inadequate due to the considerable shift of their nominal upper pressure bounds intrinsically induced by spatially variable absorptions of minor oxides like Al2O3, Na2O, FeO, MgO and TiO2. This practice revealed variable pressure estimates even within the same shergottite subjected to the same peak-shock pressure. Occurrence of Na

  16. Crystallization Age of NWA 1460 Shergottite: Paradox Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C-Y.; Reese, Y. D.; Irving, A. J.

    2004-01-01

    We have determined the Rb-Sr age of basaltic shergottite NWA 1460 to be 312 +/- 3 Ma, and the Sm-Nd age to be 352 +/- 30 Ma. The initial Sr and Nd isotopic compositions of NWA 1460 suggest it is an earlier melting product of a Martian mantle source region similar to those of the Iherzolitic shergottites and basaltic shergottite EETA79001, lithology B. The new ages of NWA 1460 and other recently analyzed Martian meteorites leads us to reexamine the paradox that most of the Martian meteorites appear to be younger from the majority of the Martian surface. This paradox continues to pose a challenge to determining a reliable Martian chronology.

  17. Shergottite Lead Isotope Signature in Chassigny and the Nakhlites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J. H.; Simon, J. I.

    2017-01-01

    The nakhlites/chassignites and the shergottites represent two differing suites of basaltic martian meteorites. The shergottites have ages less than or equal to 0.6 Ga and a large range of initial Sr-/Sr-86 and epsilon (Nd-143) ratios. Conversely, the nakhlites and chassignites cluster at 1.3-1.4 Ga and have a limited range of initial Sr-87/Sr-86 and epsilon (Nd-143). More importantly, the shergottites have epsilon (W-182) less than 1, whereas the nakhlites and chassignites have epsilon (W-182) approximately 3. This latter observation precludes the extraction of both meteorite groups from a single source region. However, recent Pb isotopic analyses indicate that there may have been interaction between shergottite and nakhlite/chassignite Pb reservoirs.Pb Analyses of Chassigny: Two different studies haveinvestigated 207Pb/204Pb vs. 206Pb/204Pb in Chassigny: (i)TIMS bulk-rock analyses of successive leaches and theirresidue [3]; and (ii) SIMS analysis of individual minerals[4]. The bulk-rock analyses fall along a regression of SIMSplagioclase analyses that define an errorchron that is olderthan the Solar System (4.61±0.1 Ga); i.e., these define amixing line between Chassigny’s principal Pb isotopic components(Fig. 1). Augites and olivines in Chassingy (notshown) also fall along or near the plagioclase regression [4].This agreement indicates that the whole-rock leachateslikely measure indigenous, martian Pb, not terrestrial contamination[5]. SIMS analyses of K-spars and sulfides definea separate, sub-parallel trend having higher 207Pb/206Pbvalues ([4]; Fig. 1). The good agreement between the bulkrockanalyses and the SIMS analyses of plagioclases alsoindicates that the Pb in the K-spars and sulfides cannot be amajor component of Chassigny.The depleted reservoir sampled by Chassigny plagioclaseis not the same as the solar system initial (PAT) andrequires a multi-stage origin. Here we show a two-stagemodel (Fig. 1) with a 238U/204Pb (µ) of 0.5 for 4.5-2.4 Gaand a µ of

  18. Acid-Sulfate-Weathering Activity in Shergottite Sites on Mars Recorded in Grim Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, L. E.; Ross, K.; Sutton, S. R.; Schwandt, C. S.

    2011-01-01

    Based on mass spectrometric studies of sulfur species in Shergotty and EET79001, [1] and [2] showed that sulfates and sulfides occur in different proportions in shergottites. Sulfur speciation studies in gas-rich impact-melt (GRIM) glasses in EET79001 by the XANES method [3] showed that S K-XANES spectra in GRIM glasses from Lith A indicate that S is associated with Ca and Al presumably as sulfides/sulfates whereas the XANES spectra of amorphous sulfide globules in GRIM glasses from Lith B indicate that S is associated with Fe as FeS. In these amorphous iron sulfide globules, [4] found no Ni using FE-SEM and suggested that the globules resulting from immiscible sulfide melt may not be related to the igneous iron sulfides having approximately 1-3% Ni. Furthermore, in the amorphous iron sulfides from 507 GRIM glass, [5] determined delta(sup 34)S values ranging from +3.5%o to -3.1%o using Nano-SIMS. These values plot between the delta(sup 34)S value of +5.25%o determined in the sulfate fraction in Shergotty [6] at one extreme and the value of -1.7%o obtained for igneous sulfides in EET79001 and Shergotty [7] at the other. These results suggest that the amorphous Fe-S globules likely originated by shock reduction of secondary iron sulfate phases occurring in the regolith precursor materials during impact [7]. Sulfates in the regolith materials near the basaltic shergottite sites on Mars owe their origin to surficial acid-sulfate interactions. We examine the nature of these reactions by studying the composition of the end products in altered regolith materials. For the parent material composition, we use that of the host shergottite material in which the impact glasses are situated.

  19. Petrogenesis of the NWA 7320 enriched martian gabbroic shergottite: Insight into the martian crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udry, Arya; Howarth, Geoffrey H.; Lapen, Thomas J.; Righter, Minako

    2017-05-01

    Northwest Africa (NWA) 7320 is classified as a gabbroic shergottite, the second to be recognized in the martian meteorite record. This interpretation is based on: (1) the calculated bulk-rock rare earth element (REE) concentrations, which show the highest Eu positive anomaly (Eu/Eu∗ = 2.2) of all the shergottites, reflecting accumulation of plagioclase; and (2) the highest modal abundance of maskelynitized plagioclase (50 mod.%) compared to the other shergottites. The three-phase symplectite (fayalite + hedenbergite + silica) is present in NWA 7320 and formed as a result of the breakdown of metastable pyroxene/pyroxenoid margins on coarse-grained pyroxenes. The latter is indicative of metastable overgrowths on pyroxene cores during the final stages of crystallization, followed by relatively slow cooling at subsolidus conditions. The NWA 7320 parental melt originated from an incompatible trace element enriched and oxidized (∼FMQ) source as indicated by Sm-Nd, Lu-Hf isotope systematics, ilmenite-titanomagnetite pairs, the partition coefficient of Cr in pyroxene, and merrillite REE compositions. The Ti/Al ratio of pyroxene in NWA 7320 indicates an initial crystallization depth of 30-70 km (P = 4-9 kbar). However, the largest impact craters on Mars are <8 km in depth, indicating that NWA 7320 could not have been ejected from this depth and must have had a polybaric formation history. We suggest that the pyroxene phenocrysts began to crystallize at depth, but were entrained as antecrysts in a basaltic magma ascending to shallower levels in the martian crust. In addition, plagioclase likely crystallized during magma ascent, followed by subsequent accumulation in a shallow magma intrusion or sill, resulting in the gabbroic texture. Furthermore, the similarity in the radiogenic isotope composition of NWA 7320 to that of Los Angeles and NWA 856 suggest that these meteorites were linked to common volcanic system on Mars.

  20. Lead Isotopes in Olivine-Phyric Shergottite Tissint: Implications for the Geochemical Evolution of the Shergottite Source Mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriwaki, R.; Usui, T.; Simon, J. I.; Jones, J. H.; Yokoyama, T.

    2015-01-01

    Geochemically-depleted shergottites are basaltic rocks derived from a martian mantle source reservoir. Geochemical evolution of the martian mantle has been investigated mainly based on the Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, and Lu-Hf isotope systematics of the shergottites [1]. Although potentially informative, U-Th- Pb isotope systematics have been limited because of difficulties in interpreting the analyses of depleted meteorite samples that are more susceptible to the effects of near-surface processes and terrestrial contamination. This study conducts a 5-step sequential acid leaching experiment of the first witnessed fall of the geochemically-depleted olivinephyric shergottite Tissint to minimize the effect of low temperature distrubence. Trace element analyses of the Tissint acid residue (mostly pyroxene) indicate that Pb isotope compositions of the residue do not contain either a martian surface or terrestrial component, but represent the Tissint magma source [2]. The residue has relatively unradiogenic initial Pb isotopic compositions (e.g., 206Pb/204Pb = 10.8136) that fall within the Pb isotope space of other geochemically-depleted shergottites. An initial µ-value (238U/204Pb = 1.5) of Tissint at the time of crystallization (472 Ma [3]) is similar to a time-integrated mu- value (1.72 at 472 Ma) of the Tissint source mantle calculated based on the two-stage mantle evolution model [1]. On the other hand, the other geochemically-depleted shergottites (e.g., QUE 94201 [4]) have initial µ-values of their parental magmas distinctly lower than those of their modeled source mantle. These results suggest that only Tissint potentially reflects the geochemical signature of the shergottite mantle source that originated from cumulates of the martian magma ocean

  1. Provenance and Concentration of Water in the Shergottite Mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J. H.; Usui, T.; Alexander, C. M. O'D.; Simon, J. I.; Wang, J.

    2012-01-01

    The water content of the martian mantle is controversial. In particular, the role of water in the petrogenesis of the shergottites has been much debated. Although the shergottites, collectively, contain very little water [e.g., 1,2], some experiments have been interpreted to show that percent levels of water are required for the petrogenesis of shergottites such as Shergotty and Zagami [3]. In this latter interpretation, the general paucity of water in the shergottites and their constituent minerals is attributed to late-stage degassing. Y980459 (Y98) is a very primitive, perhaps even parental, martian basalt, with a one-bar liquidus temperature of approx.1400 C. Olivine is the liquidus phase, and olivine core compositions are in equilibrium with the bulk rock [e.g., 4]. Petrogenetically, therefore, Y98 has had a rather simple history and can potentially help constrain the role of water in martian igneous processes. In particular, once trapped, melt inclusions should not be affected by subsequent degassing.

  2. Rare Earth elements in individual minerals in Shergottites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwa, Meenakshi; Crozaz, Ghislaine

    1993-01-01

    Shergottites (i.e., Shergotty, Zagami, EETA79001, ALHA77005, and LEW88516) are an important set of achondrites because they comprise the majority of the SNC group of meteorites (nine, in total, known to us), which are likely to be samples of the planet Mars. Study of these meteorites may therefore provide valuable information about petrogenetic processes on a large planetary body other than Earth. Rare earth element (REE) distributions between various mineral phases were found to be useful in geochemically modeling the petrogenesis of various rock types (terrestrial and meteoritic). However, with the exception of a few ion microprobe studies and analyses of mineral separates, there has previously not been any comprehensive effort to characterize and directly compare REE in individual minerals in each of the five known shergottites. Ion microprobe analyses were made on thin sections of each of the shergottites. Minerals analyzed were pyroxenes (pigeonite and augite), maskelynite, and whitlockite. The REE concentrations in each mineral type in each shergottite is given.

  3. Evaluating Crustal Contamination Effects on the Lithophile Trace Element Budget of Shergottites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, A. D.; Ferdous, J.; Peslier, A. H.

    2017-01-01

    The origin of the incompatible trace element (ITE) enriched compositions of shergottites has been a point of contention for decades [1-2]. Two scenarios have been proposed, the first is that enriched shergottite compositions reflect an ITE-enriched mantle source, whereas in the second, the ITE enrichment reflects crustal contamination of mantle-derived parent magmas. Evidence supporting the first scenario is that the ITE-enriched shergottite compositions are consistent with the outcomes of magma ocean crystallization [3], and that Os-Nd isotope relationships for shergottites cannot be explained by realistic crustal contamination models [4]. In contrast, Cl and S isotopes are consistent with shergottite magmas interacting with Mars crust [5,6], and ITE-enriched olivine-hosted melt inclusions and interstitial glass are found in depleted shergottite Yamato 980459 [7]. These findings indicate that some level of crustal interaction occurred but the question of whether ITE-enrichments in some bulk shergottites reflect crustal contamination remains open. Recently, a Mars crustal breccia meteorite has been found, NWA 7034 and its paired stones, that is our best analogue to an average of Mars ancient crust [8-10]. This allows for better constraints on crustal contamination of shergottite magmas. We modeled magma-crust mixing and assimilation-fractional crystallization (AFC) using ITE-depleted shergottite compositions and bulk NWA 7034 and its clasts as end-members. The results of these models indicate that crustal contamination can only explain the ITE-enriched compositions of some bulk shergottites under unusual circumstances. It is thus likely that the shergottite range of compositions reflects primarily mantle sources.

  4. Sulfur Speciation in the Martian Regolith Component in Shergottite Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, Laurence E.; Sutton, S.; Huth, J.

    2009-01-01

    We have shown that Gas-Rich Impact-Melt (GRIM) glasses in Shergotty, Zagami, and EET79001 (Lith A and Lith B) contain Martian regolith components that were molten during impact and quenched into glasses in voids of host rock materials based on neutron-capture isotopes, i.e., Sm-150 excesses and Sm-149 deficits in Sm, and Kr-80 excesses produced from Br [1, 2]. These GRIM glasses are rich in S-bearing secondary minerals [3.4]. Evidence for the occurrence of CaSO4 and S-rich aluminosilicates in these glasses is provided by CaO-SO3 and Al2O3-SO3 correlations, which are consistent with the finding of gypsum laths protruding from the molten glass in EET79001 (Lith A) [5]. However, in the case of GRIM glasses from EET79001 (Lith B), Shergotty and Zagami, we find a different set of secondary minerals that show a FeO-SO3 correlation (but no MgOSO3 correlation), instead of CaO-SO3 and Al2O3-SO3 correlations observed in Lith A. These results might indicate different fluidrock interactions near the shergottite source region on Mars. The speciation of sulfur in these salt assemblages was earlier studied by us using XANES techniques [6], where we found that Lith B predominantly contains Fe-sulfide globules (with some sulfate). On the other hand, Lith A showed predominantly Casulfite/ sulfate with some FeS. Furthermore, we found Fe to be present as Fe2+ indicating little oxidation, if any, in these glasses. To examine the sulfide-sulfate association in these glasses, we studied their Fe/Ni ratios with a view to find diagnostic clues for the source fluid. The Fe-sulfide mineral (Fe(0.93)Ni(0.3)S) in EET79001, Lith A is pyrrhotite [7, 8]. It yields an Fe/Ni ratio of 31. In Shergotty, pyrrhotite occurs with a molar ratio of Fe:S of 0.94 and a Ni abundance of 0.12% yielding a Fe/Ni ratio of approx.500 [8]. In this study, we determined a NiO content of approx.0.1% and FeO/NiO ratio of approx.420 in S-rich globules in #507 (EET79001, Lith B) sample using FE-SEM. In the same sample

  5. Enriched Shergottite NWA 5298 As An Evolved Parent Melt: Trace Element Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Hejiu; Peslier, Anne H.; Lapen, Thomas J.; Shafer, John; Brandon, Alan; Irving, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Martian meteorite Northwest Africa 5298 is a basaltic shergottite that was found near Bir Gandouz (Morocco). Its martian origin was confirmed by oxygen isotopes [1], as well as Mn/Fe ratios in the pyroxenes and K/anorthite ratios in the plagioclases [2]. Here we present a petrographic and geochemical study of NWA 5298. Comparison of mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of this meteorite with other Martian rocks shows that NWA 5298 is not likely paired with any other known shergottites, but it has similarities to another basaltic shergottite Dhofar 378.

  6. Lead Isotope Compositions of Acid Residues from Olivine-Phyric Shergottite Tissint: Implications for Heterogeneous Shergottite Source Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriwaki, R.; Usui, T.; Yokoyama, T.; Simon, J. I.; Jones, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Geochemical studies of shergottites suggest that their parental magmas reflect mixtures between at least two distinct geochemical source reservoirs, producing correlations between radiogenic isotope compositions and trace element abundances. These correlations have been interpreted as indicating the presence of a reduced, incompatible element- depleted reservoir and an oxidized, incompatible- element-enriched reservoir. The former is clearly a depleted mantle source, but there is ongoing debate regarding the origin of the enriched reservoir. Two contrasting models have been proposed regarding the location and mixing process of the two geochemical source reservoirs: (1) assimilation of oxidized crust by mantle derived, reduced magmas, or (2) mixing of two distinct mantle reservoirs during melting. The former requires the ancient Martian crust to be the enriched source (crustal assimilation), whereas the latter requires isolation of a long-lived enriched mantle domain that probably originated from residual melts formed during solidification of a magma ocean (heterogeneous mantle model). This study conducts Pb isotope and trace element concentration analyses of sequential acid-leaching fractions (leachates and the final residues) from the geochemically depleted olivine-phyric shergottite Tissint. The results suggest that the Tissint magma is not isotopically uniform and sampled at least two geochemical source reservoirs, implying that either crustal assimilation or magma mixing would have played a role in the Tissint petrogenesis.

  7. Biosignatures in the Recrystallized Shock Melt Pocket of ALH-77005 Shergottite — Clues to Martian Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyollai, I.; Polgári, M.; Bérczi, Sz.; Gucsik, A.; Pál-Molnár, E.

    2017-11-01

    In the spinifex textured, recrystallized shock melt portion in ALH 77005 shergottite mineralized microbially produced texture (MMPT) - in form of pearl necklace-like, vermiform inner signatures - was measured, which we propose to have Martian origin.

  8. Concordant Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd Ages for NWA 1460: A 340 Ma Old Basaltic Shergottite Related to Lherzolitic Shergottites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C-Y; Reese, Y. D.; Irving, A. J.

    2006-01-01

    Preliminary Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd ages reported by [1] for the NWA 1460 basaltic shergottite are refined to 336+/-14 Ma and 345+/-21 Ma, respectively. These concordant ages are interpreted as dating a lava flow on the Martian surface. The initial Sr and Nd isotopic compositions of NWA 1460 suggest it is an earlier melting product of a Martian mantle source region similar to those of the lherzolitic shergottites and basaltic shergottite EETA79001, lithology B. We also examine the suggestion that generally "young" ages for other Martian meteorites should be reinterpreted in light of Pb-207/Pb-206 - Pb-204/Pb-206 isotopic systematics [2]. Published U-Pb isotopic data for nakhlites are consistent with ages of approx.1.36 Ga. The UPb isotopic systematics of some Martian shergottites and lherzolites that have been suggested to be approx.4 Ga old [2] are complex. We nevertheless suggest the data are consistent with crystallization ages of approx.173 Ma when variations in the composition of in situ initial Pb as well as extraneous Pb components are considered.

  9. Istidrākāt (Rectifications of Ibn Ḥajar in Fatḥ al-Bārī on Shamsud-Din al-Kermani in Kawakib al-Darārī Regarding judgment of Texts (Arabic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matti-Ur-Rehman Bin Abdul Rehman Hanafi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ṣaḥīḥ Bukhārī a collection of Aḥādīth of Prophet Muḥammad (May peace and blessing be upon him compiled by Imām Bukhārī. The Muslim scholars of past and present time gave great importance to this book by making their efforts to extract the treasures hidden in this book and to present the different approaches and benefits of this book. “Al Kawākib al-Durārī” by Imām Al kirmānī is an old explanation of Ṣaḥīḥ Bukhārī. He was among those scholars who were expert in many fields at a time like knowledge about Hadīth, its narrators, Commentary, Qirā’t, Qur‘ānic Sciences, Islamic Jurisprudence, Arabic language, Faith, Medicine, History, Geography, Astronomy etc. Hafiz Ibn Hajar who also had the specialization in science of hadith and knowledge about biographies of narrators. During studying “Fatḥ al Bārī” I found that Hafiz Ibn Hajar criticized on the commentary of Al kirmānī at many times in relating different sayings and signals. In this article I studied these comments of Hafiz Ibn Hajar on Imam Alkirmani a critical comparison. After research I have found that Hafiz Ibn Hajar has consulted “Al Kawākib al- Durārī” and quoted Imām Al kirmānī’s commentary and added it.This article approves that judgments of Hafiz Ibn Hajar on conversion and transformation of text and on distorted, additional and incomplete words in the text are more authentic than Imām Al kirmānī

  10. Evaluating Crustal Contamination Effects On The Lithophile Trace Element Budget Of Shergottites, NWA 856 As A Test Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, A. D.; Ferdous, J.; Peslier, A. H.

    2017-01-01

    The issue of whether crustal contamination has affected the lithophile trace element budget of shergottites has been a point of contention for decades. The evaluation has focused on the enriched shergottite compositions as an outcome of crustal contamination of mantle-derived parent magmas or, alternatively, the compositions of these stones reflect an incompatible trace element (ITE) enriched mantle source.

  11. Melt Inclusion Analysis of RBT 04262 with Relationship to Shergottites and Mars Surface Compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, S. A.; Brandon, A. D.; Peslier, A. H.

    2015-01-01

    Martian meteorite RBT 04262 is in the shergottite class. It displays the two lithologies typically found in "lherzolitic shergottites": one with a poikilitic texture of large pyroxene enclosing olivine and another with non-poikilitic texture. In the case of RBT 04262, the latter strongly ressembles an olivine- phyric shergottite which led the initial classification of this meteorite in that class. RBT 04262 has been studied with regards to its petrology, geochemistry and cosmic ray exposure and belongs to the enriched oxidized end-member of the shergottites. Studies on RBT 04262 have primarily focused on the bulk rock composition or each of the lithologies independently. To further elucidate RBT 04262's petrology and use it to better understand Martian geologic history, an in-depth study of its melt inclusions (MI) is being conducted. The MI chosen for this study are found within olivine grains. MI are thought to be trapped melts of the crystallizing magma preserved by the encapsulating olivine and offer snapshots of the composition of the magma as it evolves. Some MI, in the most Mg-rich part of the olivine of olivine-pyric shergottites, may even be representative of the meteorite parent melt.

  12. An Internal Regulatory Draft Law Written in the Beginning of Turkish Republic for the Library of Istanbul Darülfünun Cumhuriyetin Başlangıcında Kaleme Alınan İstanbul Darülfünunu Kütüphanesi'ne Ait Bir Dahilî Nizâmnâme Lâyihası

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Candemir

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Library of İstanbul Darülfünun which has been prepared in 1924 by the librarian of the Law Faculty. The draft law is important since it's preparation period and it's creator who was a librarian. Furthermore, this draft is the one of the most comprehensive documents on the Library of Istanbul Darülfünun containing the functions of description, management, shelving, budget, acquisition, working hours, public services, circulation within the Library of Istanbul Darülfünun. Makalenin konusunu teşkil eden İstanbul Darülfünunu Kütüphanesine ait dahilî nizâmnâme lâyihası (tasarısı, Cumhuriyetin başlangıcında (1924 yılında Hukuk Fakültesi Kütüphane Memuru tarafından kaleme alınmıştır. Bu bakımdan tasarı, hazırlanış tarihinin yanı sıra, hazırlayanın bir kütüphane memuru olması yönüyle de önem taşımaktadır. Ayrıca İstanbul Darülfünunu Kütüphanesi çerçevesinde tanım, yönetim, yerleştirme sistemi, bütçe, eser sağlama, çalışma saatleri, kütüphaneden yararlandırma, kitap ödünç verme gibi işlemleri içeren geniş kapsamlı bir belge durumundadır.

  13. Noble gases in LEW88516 shergottite: Evidence for exposure age pairing with ALH77005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.

    1993-01-01

    LEW88516 contains excess amounts of radiogenic Ar-40 and Xe-129 that are slightly greater than those observed in ALH77005, but in the same relative proportion as much larger excesses observed in EET79001. Cosmogenic He-3 and Ne-21 abundances in LEW88516 are very similar to those for ALH77005 and are consistent with a common initiation of cosmic ray exposure -2.8 Myr ago for four of the five shergottites. Exposure of these four shergottites could have been under different shielding in a common meteoroid, or in several objects.

  14. DAR ES SALAAM, TANZANIA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Othman-Specialion of Cadmium, Copper , Lead and Zinc in Msimbazi river ... Samples of water were taken from river Msimbazi that runs through the city of Dar es ... immediately subjected to laboratory analysis and when necessary stored in a.

  15. Rb-Sr And Sm-Nd Ages, and Petrogenesis of Depleted Shergottite Northwest Africa 5990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, C. Y.; Nyquist, L. E.; Reese, Y.; Irving, A. J.

    2011-01-01

    Northwest Africa (NWA) 5990 is a very fresh Martian meteorite recently found on Hamada du Draa, Morocco and was classified as an olivine-bearing diabasic igneous rock related to depleted shergottites [1]. The study of [1] also showed that NWA 5990 resembles QUE 94201 in chemical, textural and isotopic aspects, except QUE 94201 contains no olivine. The depleted shergottites are characterized by REE patterns that are highly depleted in LREE, older Sm-Nd ages of 327-575 Ma and highly LREE-depleted sources with Nd= +35+48 [2-7]. Age-dating these samples by Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr methods is very challenging because they have been strongly shocked and contain very low abundances of light rare earth elements (Sm and Nd), Rb and Sr. In addition, terrestrial contaminants which are commonly present in desert meteorites will compromise the equilibrium of isotopic systems. Since NWA 5990 is a very fresh meteorite, it probably has not been subject to significant desert weathering and thus is a good sample for isotopic studies. In this report, we present Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopic results for NWA 5990, discuss the correlation of the determined ages with those of other depleted shergottites, especially QUE 94201, and discuss the petrogenesis of depleted shergottites.

  16. Gusev-Meridiani-Type Soil Component Dissolved in Some Shock Glasses in Shergottites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, D. K.; Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, L. E.; Shi, C. Y.; Sutton, S.; Harrison, D. H.

    2015-01-01

    Modal analysis, based on APXS, MiniTES and Mossbauer results obtained at Gusev and Meridiani sites on Mars, indicates that Martian soils consist predominantly of igneous minerals such as olivine, pyroxene and feldspar (approximately70 - 80%), with the balance consisting of alteration minerals such as sulfates, silica and chlorides]. These studies also showed that soil alteration did not occur in-situ and igneous and alteration components are derived from different sources. Below, we analyse the chemical abundance data obtained from shock glasses in shergottites using mass balance mixing models. In these models, the two main end members used are (a) host rock chemical composition and (b) the GM soils average composition as the second component. Here, we consider the S-bearing phases as indicators of added alteration phases in the shock glasses and GM soils. Although the S-bearing phase in shock glasses occurs as micron sized sulfide blebs, we showed in earlier abstracts that sulfur was originally present as sulfate in impact glass-precursor materials and was subsequently reduced to sulfide during shock melting. This conclusion is based on results obtained from S-K XANES studies, Fe/S atomic ratios in sulfide blebs and 34S/32S isotopic measurements in these sulfide blebs. Additionally, sulfur in several EET79001 Lith. A glasses is found to correlate positively with Al2O3 and CaO (and negatively with FeO and MgO), suggesting the presence of Al- and Ca- sul-fate-bearing phases. The distribution of the 87Sr/86Sr iso-topic ratios determined in Lith. A glasses (,27 &,188 and,54) indicate that Martian soil gypsum and host rock material were mixed with each other in the glass precursors. In some vugs in Lith A glass,27 detected gypsum laths. Furthermore, the Martian regolith-de-rived component (where sulfur typically occurs as sul-fate) is identified in these glasses by determining neutron produced isotopic excesses/deficits in 80Kr and 149Sm isotopes. Moreover, the

  17. DAR LA PALABRA. En torno al lenguaje de los niños y las niñas en la cárcel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibiana Escobar\\u2013García

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo es parte de la investigación, los cuerpos de la excepción. Maternidad e infancia en la cárcel. Corresponde al referente teórico de una categoría vinculada al desarrollo del lenguaje de los niños en la institución carcelaria. El supuesto básico señala las condiciones de empobrecimiento del lenguaje en las cárceles y lo vincula a la suspensión antropológica mediante la cual allí se procede. Se asume que si bien la función habitual que se imagina para el sistema carcelario es la de normalizar a los sujetos, esta función da lugar a una más económica: proteger a la sociedad de los desechos antropológicos que repetidamente produce la Modernidad en el presente. No obstante, dicha protección sacrifica las condiciones de posibilidad de los niños que en la cárcel comparten la condena de sus madres.

  18. Stabile Chlorine Isotope Study of Martian Shergottites and Nakhlites; Whole Rock and Acid Leachates and Residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, N.; Nyquist, L. E.; Reese, Y.; Shih, C-Y; Fujitani, T.; Okano, O.

    2011-01-01

    We have established a precise analytical technique for stable chlorine isotope measurements of tiny planetary materials by TIMS (Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry) [1], for which the results are basically consistent with the IRMS tech-nique (gas source mass spectrometry) [2,3,4]. We present here results for Martian shergottites and nakhlites; whole rocks, HNO3-leachates and residues, and discuss the chlorine isotope evolution of planetary Mars.

  19. Tracking the Martian Mantle Signature in Olivine-Hosted Melt Inclusions of Basaltic Shergottites Yamato 980459 and Tissint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, T. J.; Simon, J. I.; Jones, J. H.; Usui, T.; Moriwaki, R.; Economos, R.; Schmitt, A.; McKeegan, K.

    2014-01-01

    The Martian shergottite meteorites are basaltic to lherzolitic igneous rocks that represent a period of relatively young mantle melting and volcanism, approximately 600-150 Ma (e.g. [1,2]). Their isotopic and elemental composition has provided important constraints on the accretion, evolution, structure and bulk composition of Mars. Measurements of the radiogenic isotope and trace element concentrations of the shergottite meteorite suite have identified two end-members; (1) incompatible trace element enriched, with radiogenic Sr and negative epsilon Nd-143, and (2) incompatible traceelement depleted, with non-radiogenic Sr and positive epsilon 143-Nd(e.g. [3-5]). The depleted component represents the shergottite martian mantle. The identity of the enriched component is subject to debate, and has been proposed to be either assimilated ancient martian crust [3] or from enriched domains in the martian mantle that may represent a late-stage magma ocean crystallization residue [4,5]. Olivine-phyric shergottites typically have the highest Mg# of the shergottite group and represent near-primitive melts having experienced minimal fractional crystallization or crystal accumulation [6]. Olivine-hosted melt inclusions (MI) in these shergottites represent the most chemically primitive components available to understand the nature of their source(s), melting processes in the martian mantle, and origin of enriched components. We present trace element compositions of olivine hosted melt inclusions in two depleted olivinephyric shergottites, Yamato 980459 (Y98) and Tissint (Fig. 1), and the mesostasis glass of Y98, using Secondary Ionization Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). We discuss our data in the context of understanding the nature and origin of the depleted martian mantle and the emergence of the enriched component.

  20. Trace elements in olivine and the petrogenesis of the intermediate, olivine-phyric shergottite NWA 10170

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howarth, Geoffrey H.; Udry, Arya

    2017-02-01

    Olivine-phyric shergottites represent primitive basaltic to picritic rocks, spanning a large range of Mg# and olivine abundances. As primitive olivine-bearing magmas are commonly representative of their mantle source on Earth, understanding the petrology and evolution of olivine-phyric shergottites is critical in our understanding of Martian mantle compositions. We present data for the olivine-phyric shergottite Northwest Africa (NWA) 10170 to constrain the petrology with specific implications for magma plumbing-system dynamics. The calculated oxygen fugacity and bulk-rock REE concentrations (based on modal abundance) are consistent with a geochemically intermediate classification for NWA 10170, and overall similarity with NWA 6234. In addition, we present trace element data using laser ablation ICP-MS for coarse-grained olivine cores, and compare these data with terrestrial and Martian data sets. The olivines in NWA 10170 contain cores with compositions of Fo77 that evolve to rims with composition of Fo58, and are characterized by cores with low Ni contents (400-600 ppm). Nickel is compatible in olivine and such low Ni content for olivine cores in NWA 10170 suggests either early-stage fractionation and loss of olivine from the magma in a staging chamber at depth, or that Martian magmas have lower Ni than terrestrial magmas. We suggest that both are true in this case. Therefore, the magma does not represent a primary mantle melt, but rather has undergone 10-15% fractionation in a staging chamber prior to extrusion/intrusion at the surface of Mars. This further implies that careful evaluation of not only the Mg# but also the trace element concentrations of olivine needs to be conducted to evaluate pristine mantle melts versus those that have fractionated olivine (±pyroxene and oxide minerals) in staging chambers.

  1. Sulfur and iron speciation in gas-rich impact-melt glasses from basaltic shergottites determined by microXANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutton, S.R.; Rao, M.N.; Nyquist, L.E. (UofC); (Johnson Space Center)

    2008-04-28

    Sulfur and iron K XANES measurements were made on GRIM glasses from EET 79001. Iron is in the ferrous state. Sulfur speciation is predominately sulfide coordination but is Fe coordinated in Lith B and, most likely, Ca coordinated in Lith A. Sulfur is abundantly present as sulfate near Martian surface based on chemical and mineralogical investigations on soils and rocks in Viking, Pathfinder and MER missions. Jarosite is identified by Moessbauer studies on rocks at Meridian and Gusev, whereas MgSO{sub 4} is deduced from MgO-SO{sub 3} correlations in Pathfinder MER and Viking soils. Other sulfate minerals such as gypsum and alunogen/S-rich aluminosilicates and halides are detected only in martian meteorites such as shergottites and nakhlites using SEM/FE-SEM and EMPA techniques. Because sulfur has the capacity to occur in multiple valence states, determination of sulfur speciation (sulfide/sulfate) in secondary mineral assemblages in soils and rocks near Mars surface may help us understand whether the fluid-rock interactions occurred under oxidizing or reducing conditions. On Earth, volcanic rocks contain measurable quantities of sulfur present as both sulfide and sulfate. Carroll and Rutherford showed that oxidized forms of sulfur may comprise a significant fraction of total dissolved sulfur, if the oxidation state is higher than {approx}2 log fO{sub 2} units relative to the QFM buffer. Terrestrial samples containing sulfates up to {approx}25% in fresh basalts from the Galapagos Rift on one hand and high sulfide contents present in oceanic basalts on the other indicate that the relative abundance of sulfide and sulfate varies depending on the oxygen fugacity of the system. Basaltic shergottites (bulk) such as Shergotty, EET79001 and Zagami usually contain small amounts of sulfur ({approx}0.5%) as pyrrhotite. But, in isolated glass pockets containing secondary salts (known as GRIM glasses) in these meteorites, sulfur is present in high abundance ({approx}1-12%). To

  2. Nuclear tracks, Sm isotopes and neutron capture effects in the Elephant Morraine shergottite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, R. S.; Lugmair, G.; Tamhane, A. S.; Poupeau, G.

    1986-01-01

    Nuclear track studies, uranium concentration measurements and Sm-isotope studies have been performed on both lithologies A and B of the Elephant Morraine shergottite, EETA 79001. Track studies show that EETA 79001 was a rather small object in space with a preatmospheric radius of 12 + or - 2 cm, corresponding to a preatmospheric mass of 28 + or - 13 kg. Phosphates have U concentrations ranging from 0.3 to 1.3 ppm. There are occasional phosphates with excess fission tracks, possibly produced from neutron-induced fission of U and Th, during the regolith exposure in the shergottite parent body (SPB). Sm-isotope studies, while not showing any clear-cut excess in Sm-150, make it possible to derive meaningful upper limits to thermal neutron fluences of 2 to 3 x 10 to the 15th n/sq cm, during a possible regolith irradiation. These limits are consistent with the track data and also make it possible to derive an upper limit to the neutron exposure age of EETA 79001 of 55 Myr in the SPB regolith.

  3. 2007 South Carolina LiDAR: Charleston (partial), Jasper, and Colleton Counties

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LiDAR data collection was performed utilizing a Leica ALS-50 sensor, collecting multiple return x, y, and z data as well as intensity data. LiDAR data was processed...

  4. Iron Redox Systematics of Shergottites and Martian Magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, Kevin; Danielson, L. R.; Martin, A. M.; Newville, M.; Choi, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Martian meteorites record a range of oxygen fugacities from near the IW buffer to above FMQ buffer [1]. In terrestrial magmas, Fe(3+)/ SigmaFe for this fO2 range are between 0 and 0.25 [2]. Such variation will affect the stability of oxides, pyroxenes, and how the melt equilibrates with volatile species. An understanding of the variation of Fe(3+)/SigmaFe for martian magmas is lacking, and previous work has been on FeO-poor and Al2O3-rich terrestrial basalts. We have initiated a study of the iron redox systematics of martian magmas to better understand FeO and Fe2O3 stability, the stability of magnetite, and the low Ca/high Ca pyroxene [3] ratios observed at the surface.

  5. Crystallization history of enriched shergottites from Fe and Mg isotope fractionation in olivine megacrysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinet, Max; Charlier, Bernard; Namur, Olivier; Oeser, Martin; Médard, Etienne; Weyer, Stefan

    2017-06-01

    Martian meteorites are the only samples available from the surface of Mars. Among them, olivine-phyric shergottites are basalts containing large zoned olivine crystals with highly magnesian cores (Fo 70-85) and rims richer in Fe (Fo 45-60). The Northwest Africa 1068 meteorite is one of the most primitive ;enriched; shergottites (high initial 87Sr/86Sr and low initial ε143Nd). It contains olivine crystals as magnesian as Fo 77 and is a major source of information to constrain the composition of the parental melt, the composition and depth of the mantle source, and the cooling and crystallization history of one of the younger magmatic events on Mars (∼180 Ma). In this study, Fe-Mg isotope profiles analyzed in situ by femtosecond-laser ablation MC-ICP-MS are combined with compositional profiles of major and trace elements in olivine megacrysts. The cores of olivine megacrysts are enriched in light Fe isotopes (δ56FeIRMM-14 = -0.6 to -0.9‰) and heavy Mg isotopes (δ26MgDSM-3 = 0-0.2‰) relative to megacryst rims and to the bulk martian isotopic composition (δ56Fe = 0 ± 0.05‰, δ26Mg = -0.27 ± 0.04‰). The flat forsterite profiles of megacryst cores associated with anti-correlated fractionation of Fe-Mg isotopes indicate that these elements have been rehomogenized by diffusion at high temperature. We present a 1-D model of simultaneous diffusion and crystal growth that reproduces the observed element and isotope profiles. The simulation results suggest that the cooling rate during megacryst core crystallization was slow (43 ± 21 °C/year), and consistent with pooling in a deep crustal magma chamber. The megacryst rims then crystallized 1-2 orders of magnitude faster during magma transport toward the shallower site of final emplacement. Megacryst cores had a forsterite content 3.2 ± 1.5 mol% higher than their current composition and some were in equilibrium with the whole-rock composition of NWA 1068 (Fo 80 ± 1.5). NWA 1068 composition is thus close to a

  6. Preliminary Report on U-Th-Pb Isotope Systematics of the Olivine-Phyric Shergottite Tissint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriwaki, R.; Usui, T.; Yokoyama, T.; Simon, J. I.; Jones, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Geochemical studies of shergottites suggest that their parental magmas reflect mixtures between at least two distinct geochemical source reservoirs, producing correlations between radiogenic isotope compositions, and trace element abundances.. These correlations have been interpreted as indicating the presence of a reduced, incompatible-element- depleted reservoir and an oxidized, incompatible-element-rich reservoir. The former is clearly a depleted mantle source, but there has been a long debate regarding the origin of the enriched reservoir. Two contrasting models have been proposed regarding the location and mixing process of the two geochemical source reservoirs: (1) assimilation of oxidized crust by mantle derived, reduced magmas, or (2) mixing of two distinct mantle reservoirs during melting. The former clearly requires the ancient martian crust to be the enriched source (crustal assimilation), whereas the latter requires a long-lived enriched mantle domain that probably originated from residual melts formed during solidification of a magma ocean (heterogeneous mantle model). This study conducts Pb isotope and U-Th-Pb concentration analyses of the olivine-phyric shergottite Tissint because U-Th-Pb isotope systematics have been intensively used as a powerful radiogenic tracer to characterize old crust/sediment components in mantle- derived, terrestrial oceanic island basalts. The U-Th-Pb analyses are applied to sequential acid leaching fractions obtained from Tissint whole-rock powder in order to search for Pb isotopic source components in Tissint magma. Here we report preliminary results of the U-Th-Pb analyses of acid leachates and a residue, and propose the possibility that Tissint would have experienced minor assimilation of old martian crust.

  7. Identification of Martian Regolith Sulfur Components in Shergottites Using Sulfur K Xanes and Fe/S Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, S. R.; Ross, D. K.; Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, L. E.

    2014-01-01

    Based on isotopic anomalies in Kr and Sm, Sr-isotopes, S-isotopes, XANES results on S-speciation, Fe/S ratios in sulfide immiscible melts [5], and major element correlations with S determined in impact glasses in EET79001 Lith A & Lith B and Tissint, we have provided very strong evidence for the occurrence of a Martian regolith component in some impact melt glasses in shergottites. Using REE measurements by LA-ICP-MS in shergottite impact glasses, Barrat and co-workers have recently reported conflicting conclusions about the occurrence of Martian regolith components: (a) Positive evidence was reported for a Tissint impact melt, but (b) Negative evidence for impact melt in EET79001 and another impact melt in Tissint. Here, we address some specific issues related to sulfur speciation and their relevance to identifying Martian regolith components in impact glasses in EET79001 and Tissint using sulfur K XANES and Fe/S ratios in sulfide immiscible melts. XANES and FE-SEM measurements in approx. 5 micron size individual sulfur blebs in EET79001 and Tissint glasses are carried out by us using sub-micron size beams, whereas Barrat and coworkers used approx. 90 micron size laser spots for LA- ICP-MS to determine REE abundances in bulk samples of the impact melt glasses. We contend that Martian regolith components in some shergottite impact glasses are present locally, and that studying impact melts in various shergottites can give evidence both for and against regolith components because of sample heterogeneity.

  8. LiDAR for data efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    This report documents the AHMCT research project: LiDAR for Data Efficiency for the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT). The research objective was to evaluate mobile LiDAR technology to enhance safety, determine efficiency ga...

  9. 2002 Willapa Bay LiDAR Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA contracted with Spencer B. Gross, Inc. (SBG) to obtain airborne LiDAR of Willapa Bay, Washington during low tide conditions. The LiDAR data was processed to...

  10. Mineralogical Comparison of Olivine in Shergottites and A Shocked L Chondrite: Implications for Shock Histories of Brown Olivine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenouchi, A.; Mikouchi, T.; Yamaguchi, A.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2015-01-01

    Most Martian meteorites are heavily shocked, exhibiting numerous shock features, for example undulatory extinction of olivine and pyroxene, the presence of diaplectic glass ("maskelynite") and the formation of shock melt. Among these shock features, olivine darkening ("brown" olivine) is unique in Martian meteorites because no other meteorite group shows such a feature. Although the presence of brown olivine in shergottites was reported thirty years ago, detailed observation by TEM has not been performed until the NWA 2737 chassignite was discovered, whose olivine is darkened, being completely black in hand specimen. Fe metal nano-particles were found in NWA 2737 olivine which are considered to have been formed by olivine reduction during heavy shock. Subsequently, magnetite nano-particles were also found in other Martian meteorites and the coexistence of Fe metal and magnetite nano-particles was reported in the NWA 1950 shergottite and some Fe metal nano-particles were mantled by magnetite. Therefore, the formation process of nano-particles seems to be complex. Because "brown" olivine is unique to Martian meteorites, they have a potential to constrain their shock conditions. In order to better understand the shock history of Martian meteorites, we compared olivine in several shergottites with that in a highly-shocked L chondrite which contains ringwoodite.

  11. Nitrogen and noble gases in a glass sample from the LEW88516 shergottite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Richard H.; Pepin, Robert O.

    1993-01-01

    A glass separate from the LEW88516 shergottite was analyzed by step-wise combustion for N and noble gases to determine whether it contained trapped gas similar in composition to the martian atmosphere-like component previously observed in lithology C of EETA79001. Excesses of Ar-40 and Xe-129 were in fact observed in this glass, although the amounts of these excesses less than or = to 20% of those seen in the latter meteorite, and are comparable to the amounts seen in whole-rock analyses of LEW88516. The isotopic composition of N in LEW88516 does not show an enrichment in delta N-15 commensurate with the amount of isotopically-heavy N expected from the noble gases excesses. One must posit some extreme assumptions about the nature of the N components present in LEW88516 in order to allow the presence of the trapped nitrogen component. Alternatively, the N has somehow been decoupled from the noble gases, and was either never present of has been lost.

  12. 2013 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Tulalip Partnership

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In October 2012, WSI (Watershed Sciences, Inc.) was contracted by the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC)to collect Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data on a...

  13. 2013 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Nooksack

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In July 2012, WSI (Watershed Sciences, Inc.) was contracted by the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) to collect Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data on a...

  14. 2013 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Saddle Mountain

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In October 2013, WSI, a Quantum Spatial Company (QSI), was contracted by the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) to collect Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data...

  15. 2009 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Lewis County, Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. (WSI) collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data for the Lewis County survey area for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium. This data...

  16. 2015 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) LiDAR: WA DNR Lands (P2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In June 2014, WSI, a Quantum Spatial Inc. (QSI) company, was contracted by the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) to collect Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR)...

  17. 2014 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Willapa Valley (Delivery 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In January, 2014 WSI, a Quantum Spatial (QSI) company, was contracted by the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) to collect Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data...

  18. 2015 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) LiDAR: WA DNR Lands (P1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In June 2014, WSI, a Quantum Spatial Inc. (QSI) company, was contracted by the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) to collect Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR)...

  19. 2006 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Lewis County, WA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data of Western Lewis County for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium. This data set covers...

  20. Recognizing the Effects of Terrestrial Contamination on D/H Ratios in Shergottite Phosphates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, D. K.; Ito, M.; Hervig, R.; Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, L. E.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope ratios in shergottite phosphate minerals have been investigated by SIMS in the meteorites Queen Alexandra Range (QUE) 94201 and Los Angeles. We have also collected electron probe data on these phosphates in order to characterize the phosphate minerals and attempt to document any potential hydrogen isotopic differences between chlor-apatite and whitlockite. In the section of Los Angeles we studied (748), we found both chlor-apatite and whitlockite, but in the section of QUE 94201,38 studied, we found only whitlockite. In both meteorites, D/H ratios (expressed in units of delta D (sub SMOW) vary, from terrestrial values up to approximately 5400%o in QUE 94201, and to approximately 3800%o in Los Angeles. We have carefully examined the ion probed pits with high-resolution FE-SEM. In most cases where the D/H ratios are low, we have iden-tified cracks that instersect the ion probe pit. These cracks are not visible in the optical microscope attached to the SIMS instument, making them impossible to avoid during SIMS data collection. We contend that the low ratios are a function of substantial terrestrial contamination, and that similar contamination is a likely factor in previously published studies on D/H ratios in martian phosphates. Here we highlight the difficulty of attempts to constrain the martian mantle D/H ratio using phosphate data, given that both terrestrial contamination and martian mantle hydrogen will move phosphate D/H ratios in the same direction, toward lower values. We note that our data include some of the most deuterium-rich values ever reported for martian phosphates. It is clear that some of our measurements are only minimally or totally uncontaminated, but the question arises, are intermediate values diminished because of true martian variability, or do they reflect contamination?

  1. Infrastructure Investment Protection with LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-15

    The primary goal of this research effort was to explore the wide variety of uses of LiDAR technology and to evaluate their : applicability to NCDOT practices. NCDOT can use this information about LiDAR in determining how and when the : technology can...

  2. Saginaw Bay, MI LiDAR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TASK NAME:(NRCS) Saginaw Bay, MI LiDAR LiDAR Data Acquisition and Processing Production Task USGS Contract No. G10PC00057 Task Order No. G11PD01254 Woolpert Order...

  3. Hawaii DAR Dealer Reporting System Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2000 January, the Hawaii Division of Aquatic Resources (DAR) implemented a computerized data processing system for fish dealer data collected state-wide. Hawaii...

  4. Iowa LiDAR Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — This is collection level metadata for LAS and ASCII data files from the statewide Iowa Lidar Project. The Iowa Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) Project collects...

  5. USGS Atchafalaya 2 LiDAR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) dataset is a survey of the Atchafalaya Basin project area. The entire survey area for Atchafalaya encompasses approximately...

  6. Rare earth elements in minerals of the ALHA77005 shergottite and implications for its parent magma and crystallization history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Laura L.; Crozaz, Ghislaine; Mcsween, Harry Y., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Analyses of mineral REE and selected minor and trace elements were carried out on individual grains of pyroxenes, whitlockite, maskelynite, and olivine of the Antarctic shergottite ALHA77005, and the results are used to interpret its parent magma and crystallization history. The results of mineral compositions and textural observations suggest that ALHA77005 is a cumulate with about half cumulus material (olivine + chromite) and half postcumulus phases. Most of the REEs in ALHA77005 reside in whitlockite whose modal concentration is about 1 percent. Mineral REE data support previous suggestions that plagioclase and whitlockite crystallized late, and that low-Ca pyroxene initiated crystallization before high-Ca pyroxene. The REE patterns for the intercumulus liquid, calculated from distribution coefficients for ALHA77005 pyroxene, plagioclase, and whitlockite, are in very good agreement and are similar to that of Shergotty.

  7. A discussion of isotopic systematics and mineral zoning in the shergottites - Evidence for a 180 m.y. igneous crystallization age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    The chronologies of the Shergotty, Zagami, ALHA 77005, and EETA 79001 meteorites were reexamined on the basis of shergottites' petrography and mineral chemistry data. Among the various isochrons, the concordant Rb-Sr (about 180 Myr) and U-Th-Pb (about 190 Myr) internal isochrons are interpreted as representing the time of igneous crystallization, while the Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, and Pb-Pb whole-rock isochrons are interpreted as mixing lines, and are reasonably attributed to igneous processes such as wall-rock assimilation and magma mixing. If the approximated age of less than 200 Myr is correct, the shergottites represent the youngest known extraterrestrial basalts. This conclusion supports the hypothesis that the SNC meteorites are samples of Mars.

  8. Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr Isotopic Systematics of a Heavily Shocked Martian Meteorite Tissint and Petrogenesis of Depleted Shergottites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, C.-Y.; Nyquist, L. E.; Park, J.; Agee, Carl B.

    2014-01-01

    Tissint is a very fresh Martian meteorite that fell near the town of Tissint in Morocco on July 18, 2011. It contains abundant olivine megacrysts (23%) in a fine-grained matrix of pyroxene (55%), maskelynitized plagioclase (15%), opaques (4%) and melt pockets (3%) and is petrographically similar to lithologies A and C of picritic shergottite EETA 79001 [1,2]. The presence of 2 types of shock-induced glasses and all 7 high-pressure mineral phases that were ever found in melt pockets of Martian meteorites suggests it underwent an intensive shock metamorphism of 25 GPa and 2000 C localized in melt pockets [2]. Mineral textures suggest that olivines, pyroxenes and plagioclases probably did not experience such hightemperature. Earlier determinations of its age yielded 596+/-23 Ma [3] and 616+/-67 Ma [4], respectively, for the Sm-Nd system and 583+/-86 Ma for the Lu-Hf system [4], in agreement with the 575+/-18 Ma age of the oldest olivine-phyric depleted shergottite Dho 019 [5]. However, the exposure ages of Tissint (1 Ma [1, 6, 7]) and Dho 019 (20 Ma [8]) are very different requiring two separate ejection events. These previously determined Sm-Nd and Lu-Hf ages are older than the Ar-Ar maskelynite plateau age of 524+/-15 Ma [9], reversing the pattern usually observed for Martian meteorites. In order to clarify these age issues and place models for Tissint's petrogenesis on a firm basis, we present new Rb-Sr and Sm- Nd isotopic results for Tissint, and discuss (a) the shock effects on them and the Ar-Ar chronometer, (b) correlation of the determined ages with those of other depleted shergottites, and (c) the petrogenesis of depleted shergottites. Since the meteorite is a recent fall, terrestrial contamination is expected to be minimal, but, the strong shock metamorphism might be expected to compromise the equilibrium of the isotopic systems.

  9. Comparing RIEGL RiCOPTER UAV LiDAR Derived Canopy Height and DBH with Terrestrial LiDAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brede, Benjamin; Lau, Alvaro; Bartholomeus, Harm M; Kooistra, Lammert

    2017-10-17

    In recent years, LIght Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) and especially Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) systems have shown the potential to revolutionise forest structural characterisation by providing unprecedented 3D data. However, manned Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) requires costly campaigns and produces relatively low point density, while TLS is labour intense and time demanding. Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV)-borne laser scanning can be the way in between. In this study, we present first results and experiences with the RIEGL RiCOPTER with VUX ® -1UAV ALS system and compare it with the well tested RIEGL VZ-400 TLS system. We scanned the same forest plots with both systems over the course of two days. We derived Digital Terrain Model (DTMs), Digital Surface Model (DSMs) and finally Canopy Height Model (CHMs) from the resulting point clouds. ALS CHMs were on average 11.5 c m higher in five plots with different canopy conditions. This showed that TLS could not always detect the top of canopy. Moreover, we extracted trunk segments of 58 trees for ALS and TLS simultaneously, of which 39 could be used to model Diameter at Breast Height (DBH). ALS DBH showed a high agreement with TLS DBH with a correlation coefficient of 0.98 and root mean square error of 4.24 c m . We conclude that RiCOPTER has the potential to perform comparable to TLS for estimating forest canopy height and DBH under the studied forest conditions. Further research should be directed to testing UAV-borne LiDAR for explicit 3D modelling of whole trees to estimate tree volume and subsequently Above-Ground Biomass (AGB).

  10. Comparing RIEGL RiCOPTER UAV LiDAR Derived Canopy Height and DBH with Terrestrial LiDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Brede

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, LIght Detection And Ranging (LiDAR and especially Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS systems have shown the potential to revolutionise forest structural characterisation by providing unprecedented 3D data. However, manned Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS requires costly campaigns and produces relatively low point density, while TLS is labour intense and time demanding. Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV-borne laser scanning can be the way in between. In this study, we present first results and experiences with the RIEGL RiCOPTER with VUX ® -1UAV ALS system and compare it with the well tested RIEGL VZ-400 TLS system. We scanned the same forest plots with both systems over the course of two days. We derived Digital Terrain Model (DTMs, Digital Surface Model (DSMs and finally Canopy Height Model (CHMs from the resulting point clouds. ALS CHMs were on average 11.5 c m higher in five plots with different canopy conditions. This showed that TLS could not always detect the top of canopy. Moreover, we extracted trunk segments of 58 trees for ALS and TLS simultaneously, of which 39 could be used to model Diameter at Breast Height (DBH. ALS DBH showed a high agreement with TLS DBH with a correlation coefficient of 0.98 and root mean square error of 4.24 c m . We conclude that RiCOPTER has the potential to perform comparable to TLS for estimating forest canopy height and DBH under the studied forest conditions. Further research should be directed to testing UAV-borne LiDAR for explicit 3D modelling of whole trees to estimate tree volume and subsequently Above-Ground Biomass (AGB.

  11. Peregrinaciones parisinas: Rubén Darío

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Colombi

    1996-11-01

    Full Text Available Hacia 1900 se nuclea en París un grupo de corresponsales latinoamericanos conformando una suerte de enclave que reúne a figuras como Rubén Darío, Manuel Ugarte, Amado Nervo o Enrique Gómez Carrillo. Desde sus respectivas columnas estos cronistas construyen imágenes del mundo moderno atravesadas por el conflicto de pertenencia y marginalidad respecto al mismo. Este trabajo analiza las entregas que Rubén Darío escribe para La Nación de Buenos Aires durante la Feria Internacional de Paris de 1900, en relación con su contexto discursivo. En la enunciación de estas crónicas se alternan pasajes donde prima la superficialidad de la crónica elegante parisina con otras secciones argumentativas que dan cuenta de los desplazamientos de este sujeto entre el 'chroniqueur' y el intelectual que interviene -con la autoridad que le otorga su liderazgo estético- en el campo de los sucesos políticos, desmoronando cualquier 'fetichización' del espectáculo. Darío trama en su crónica la línea 'ondulante' de su prosa de artista con la línea 'informativa' de su tarea de diarista, imponiendo una marca 'modern style' a su escritura, que privilegia imágenes donde se fusionan elementos de ámbitos dispares; también se contamina de la retórica del acontecimiento moderno, en una hibridez propia del efecto sumativo de ese vasto mercado. Las crónicas, reunidas luego en Peregrinaciones de 1901, señalan también el pasaje entre el gran mercado cultural y el pequeño mercado estético, en una posición anfibia propia de esta textualidad

  12. LiDAR data for the Delta Area of California

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — LiDAR data for the Delta Area of California from the California Department of Water Resources. Bare earth grids from LiDAR.This data is in ESRI Grid format with 2...

  13. Terrain classification using multi-wavelength LiDAR data

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Judson J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited With the arrival of Optech’s Titan multispectral LiDAR sensor, it is now possible to simultaneously collect three different wavelengths of LiDAR data. Much of the work performed on multispectral LiDAR data involves gridding the point cloud to create Digital Elevation Models and multispectral image cubes. Gridding and raster analysis can have negative implications with respect to LiDAR data integrity and resolution. Presented here is a ...

  14. Green vegetable supply in Dar es Salaam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegerif, M.C.A.

    2015-01-01

    This article constructs a picture of green vegetable growing and supply in Dar es Salaam by looking at the lives and work of a small trader and an urban farmer. It reveals the importance of a range of distribution and trade networks and the integration of a wider city region, alongside urban and

  15. University of Dar es Salaam Library Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The University of Dar es Salaam Library Journal publishes articles on all aspects of Library and Information Science. These include organization and dissemination of information, library education and training, information technology and its application in libraries, book reviews and short communications. Authors are in ...

  16. Excreta Disposal in Dar-es-salaam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaggu, E.; Mashouri, D.; Buuren, van J.C.L.; Sanders, W.T.M.; Lettinga, G.

    2002-01-01

    The sociocultural and socioeconomic situation of sanitation in Dar-es-Salaam (Dsm), Tanzania, was studied with explicit emphasis on pit-latrines. Without considering the sociocultural conditions, the so-called best solution might not be the right one. Therefore, in order to achieve the intended

  17. Orienteerumiskaart vs. LiDAR / Marek Karm

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Karm, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Bakalaureusetööst, mille eesmärk oli võrrelda orienteerumiskaardi reljeefi LiDAR-i andmete põhjal saadava reljeefimudeliga ning leida vastus küsimusele, kas o-kaart võib olla kasulik kooste- või kontrollmaterjal mistahes reljeefimudelile

  18. oils marketed in dar es salaam

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Official Analytical Chemists (AOAC). ... METHODS. Seven brands of locally produced edible vegetable oils (Table 1) were randomly collected off the shelf around Dar es Salaam. Table 1: Edible oils, their brand and manufacturer names, ... in the Sealed bottles Were similarly analyzed for peroxide value over 60 days. 50 ...

  19. Dar es Salaam city in Tanzania

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. Engineering geological mapping of Dar es Salaam city in Tanzania has been carried out using desk studies supplemented by field reconnaissance as well as limited laboratory tests. Desk studies involved interpretation of medium to large-scale topographical maps,. Landsat imagery and sequential aerial ...

  20. 2013 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Nooksack

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In July 2012, WSI (Watershed Sciences, Inc.) was contracted by the Puget Sound LiDARConsortium (PSLC) to collect Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data on a...

  1. 2011 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Rattlesnake

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. (WSI) collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data on six days between September 15th and November 5th, and from November 6th - 13th,...

  2. 2005 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: North Puget Sound Lowlands

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Terrapoint collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data contributing to the Puget Sound Lowlands project of 2005. Arlington, City of Snohomish, Snohomish...

  3. 2005 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Yakima County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Terrapoint collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data to complete the 2005 project for Yakima County. This project has partial coverage of Yakima County,...

  4. 2003 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Snohomish County, Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TerraPoint surveyed and created this data for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium under contract. The area surveyed is approximately 167 square miles and covers a...

  5. 2005 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Lewis County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Terrapoint collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data for the Lewis County project of 2005. The project site covered approximately 223 square miles, divided...

  6. 2007 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Sumpter, OR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. (WS) collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data for the USDA Forest Service on September 17, 2007. The project covers an 8-mile...

  7. 2011 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Rattlesnake

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. (WSI) collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data on six days between September 15th and November 5th, and from November 6th ? 13th,...

  8. 2009 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Snohomish River Estuary

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. (WS) co-acquired Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data and Truecolor Orthophotographs of the Snohomish River Estuary, WA on July 20 &...

  9. 2005 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Olympic Peninsula

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Terrapoint collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data for the Olympic Peninsula project of 2005, totaling approximately 114.59 sq mi: 24.5 for Clallam...

  10. 2000 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Kitsap Peninsula, Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TerraPoint surveyed and created this data for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium under contract. The area surveyed is approximately 1,146 square miles and covers part...

  11. 2003 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Yakima County, Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TerraPoint surveyed and created this data for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium under contract. The area surveyed is approximately 77 square miles and covers a...

  12. 2003 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Lewis County, Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TerraPoint surveyed and created this data for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium under contract. The area surveyed is approximately 100 square miles and covers part of...

  13. 2012 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Upper Naches River, Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. (WSI) collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data of the Upper Naches River Valley and Nile Slide area of interest on September 30th,...

  14. LiDAR utility for natural resource managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew Thomas Hudak; Jeffrey Scott Evans; Alistair Mattthew Stuart. Smith

    2009-01-01

    Applications of LiDAR remote sensing are exploding, while moving from the research to the operational realm. Increasingly, natural resource managers are recognizing the tremendous utility of LiDAR-derived information to make improved decisions. This review provides a cross-section of studies, many recent, that demonstrate the relevance of LiDAR across a suite of...

  15. 2014 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Cedar River Watershed (Delivery 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In September 2013, WSI, a Quantum Spatial company (QSI), was contracted by the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) to collect Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR)...

  16. 2012 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Quinault River Watershed, Washington (Delivery 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. (WSI) collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data on the Quinault watershed survey area for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium. This...

  17. 2014 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Cedar River Watershed (Delivery 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In September 2013, WSI, a Quantum Spatial company (QSI), was contracted by the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) to collect Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR)...

  18. 2012 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Hoh River Watershed, Washington (Delivery 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. (WSI) collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data on the Hoh River watershed survey area for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium and the...

  19. Direct Georeferencing of Stationary LiDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Mohamed

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Unlike mobile survey systems, stationary survey systems are given very little direct georeferencing attention. Direct Georeferencing is currently being used in several mobile applications, especially in terrestrial and airborne LiDAR systems. Georeferencing of stationary terrestrial LiDAR scanning data, however, is currently performed indirectly through using control points in the scanning site. The indirect georeferencing procedure is often troublesome; the availability of control stations within the scanning range is not always possible. Also, field procedure can be laborious and involve extra equipment and target setups. In addition, the conventional method allows for possible human error due to target information bookkeeping. Additionally, the accuracy of this procedure varies according to the quality of the control used. By adding a dual GPS antenna apparatus to the scanner setup, thereby supplanting the use of multiple ground control points scattered throughout the scanning site, we mitigate not only the problems associated with indirect georeferencing but also induce a more efficient set up procedure while maintaining sufficient precision. In this paper, we describe a new method for determining the 3D absolute orientation of LiDAR point cloud using GPS measurements from two antennae firmly mounted on the optical head of a stationary LiDAR system. In this paper, the general case is derived where the orientation angles are not small; this case completes the theory of stationary LiDAR direct georeferencing. Simulation and real world field experimentation of the prototype implementation suggest a precision of about 0.05 degrees (~1 milli-radian for the three orientation angles.

  20. Sulfur and Iron Speciation in Gas-rich Impact-melt Glasses from Basaltic Shergottites Determined by Microxanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, S. R.; Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, L. E.

    2008-01-01

    Sulfur is abundantly present as sulfate near Martian surface based on chemical and mineralogical investigations on soils and rocks in Viking, Pathfinder and MER missions. Jarosite is identified by Mossbauer studies on rocks at Meridian and Gusev, whereas MgSO4 is deduced from MgO - SO3 correlations in Pathfinder MER and Viking soils. Other sulfate minerals such as gypsum and alunogen/ S-rich aluminosilicates and halides are detected only in martian meteorites such as shergottites and nakhlites using SEM/FE-SEM and EMPA techniques. Because sulfur has the capacity to occur in multiple valence states, determination of sulfur speciation (sulfide/ sulfate) in secondary mineral assemblages in soils and rocks near Mars surface may help us understand whether the fluid-rock interactions occurred under oxidizing or reducing conditions. To understand the implications of these observations for the formation of the Gas-rich Impact-melt (GRIM) glasses, we determined the oxidation state of Fe in the GRIM glasses using Fe K micro-XANES techniques.

  1. Complementary rare earth element patterns in unique achondrites, such as ALHA 77005 and shergottites, and in the earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, M.-S.; Schmitt, R. A.; Laul, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    Abundances of major, minor, and trace elements are determined in the Antarctic achondrite Allan Hills (ALHA) 77005 via sequential instrumental and radiochemical neutron activation analysis. The rare earth element (REE) abundances of ALHA 77005 reveal a unique chondritic normalized pattern; that is, the REEs are nearly unfractionated from La to Pr at approximately 1.0X chondrites, monotonically increased from Pr to Gd at approximately 3.4X with no Eu anomaly, nearly unfractionated from Gd and Ho and monotonically decreased from Ho to Lu at approximately 2.2X. It is noted that this unique REE pattern of ALHA 77005 can be modeled by a melting process involving a continuous melting and progressive partial removal of melt from a light REE enriched source material. In a model of this type, ALHA 77005 could represent either a crystallized cumulate from such a melt or the residual source material. Calculations show that the parent liquids for the shergottites could also be derived from a light REE enriched source material similar to that for ALHA 77005.

  2. La alternancia dar/hacer en construcciones con verbo de apoyo y nombre de comunicación

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Begoña Sanromán Vilas

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo defendemos que la selección de un verbo de apoyo por parte del nombre que lo acompaña, dentro del contexto de una construcción con verbo de apoyo, se basa en criterios semánticos. En concreto, el objetivo del estudio será el de descubrir qué componente(s del significado del nombre determina(n la selección de dar y cuál(es, la de hacer, dos de los verbos de apoyo más frecuentes en español. Para llevar a cabo esta tarea, analizamos nombres pertenecientes al campo semántico de la comunicación verbal que pueden coocurrir con ambos verbos, dar y hacer (dar/hacer una sugerencia, y los contrastamos con otros dos grupos de nombres de comunicación: 1 los que se combinan con dar, pero rechazan *hacer (dar/*hacer una respuesta y 2 los coocurren con hacer, pero no con *dar (*dar/hacer una pregunta. En la comparación de los grupos trataremos de probar dos hipótesis: una que opera a nivel paradigmático, describiendo los vínculos semánticos entre los verbos de apoyo y los correspondientes verbos plenos y otra, a nivel sintagmático, analizando qué otros verbos, aparte de dar y/o hacer, constituyen la coocurrencia léxica restringida de los nombres de comunicación objeto de estudio.

  3. Modelling Sensor and Target effects on LiDAR Waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosette, J.; North, P. R.; Rubio, J.; Cook, B. D.; Suárez, J.

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this research is to explore the influence of sensor characteristics and interactions with vegetation and terrain properties on the estimation of vegetation parameters from LiDAR waveforms. This is carried out using waveform simulations produced by the FLIGHT radiative transfer model which is based on Monte Carlo simulation of photon transport (North, 1996; North et al., 2010). The opportunities for vegetation analysis that are offered by LiDAR modelling are also demonstrated by other authors e.g. Sun and Ranson, 2000; Ni-Meister et al., 2001. Simulations from the FLIGHT model were driven using reflectance and transmittance properties collected from the Howland Research Forest, Maine, USA in 2003 together with a tree list for a 200m x 150m area. This was generated using field measurements of location, species and diameter at breast height. Tree height and crown dimensions of individual trees were calculated using relationships established with a competition index determined for this site. Waveforms obtained by the Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS) were used as validation of simulations. This provided a base from which factors such as slope, laser incidence angle and pulse width could be varied. This has enabled the effect of instrument design and laser interactions with different surface characteristics to be tested. As such, waveform simulation is relevant for the development of future satellite LiDAR sensors, such as NASA’s forthcoming DESDynI mission (NASA, 2010), which aim to improve capabilities of vegetation parameter estimation. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS We would like to thank scientists at the Biospheric Sciences Branch of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, in particular to Jon Ranson and Bryan Blair. This work forms part of research funded by the NASA DESDynI project and the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NE/F021437/1). REFERENCES NASA, 2010, DESDynI: Deformation, Ecosystem Structure and Dynamics of Ice. http

  4. The Mineralogy, Geochemistry, and Redox State of Multivalent Cations During the Crystallization of Primitive Shergottitic Liquids at Various (f)O2. Insights into the (f)O2 Fugacity of the Martian Mantle and Crustal Influences on Redox Conditions of Martian Magmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, C. K.; Bell, A. S.; Burger, P. V.; Papike, J. J.; Jones, J.; Le, L.; Muttik, N.

    2016-01-01

    The (f)O2 [oxygen fugacity] of crystallization for martian basalts has been estimated in various studies to range from IW-1 to QFM+4 [1-3]. A striking geochemical feature of the shergottites is the large range in initial Sr isotopic ratios and initial epsilon(sup Nd) values. Studies by observed that within the shergottite group the (f)O2 [oxygen fugacity] of crystallization is highly correlated with these chemical and isotopic characteristics with depleted shergottites generally crystallizing at reduced conditions and enriched shergottites crystallizing under more oxidizing conditions. More recent work has shown that (f)O2 [oxygen fugacity] changed during the crystallization of these magmas from one order of magnitude in Y980459 (Y98) to several orders of magnitude in Larkman Nunatak 06319. These real or apparent variations within single shergottitic magmas have been attributed to mixing of a xenocrystic olivine component, volatile loss-water disassociation, auto-oxidation during crystallization of mafic phases, and assimilation of an oxidizing crustal component (e.g. sulfate). In contrast to the shergottites, augite basalts such as NWA 8159 are highly depleted yet appear to be highly oxidized (e.g. QFM+4). As a first step in attempting to unravel petrologic complexities that influence (f)O2 [oxygen fugacity] in martian magmas, this study explores the effect of (f)O2 [oxygen fugacity] on the liquid line of descent (LLD) for a primitive shergottite liquid composition (Y98). The results of this study will provide a fundamental basis for reconstructing the record of (f)O2 [oxygen fugacity] in shergottites and other martian basalts, its effect on both mineral chemistries and valence state partitioning, and a means for examining the role of crystallization (and other more complex processes) on the petrologic linkages between olivine-phyric and pyroxene-plagioclase shergottites.

  5. The variability of ruthenium in chromite from chassignite and olivine-phyric shergottite meteorites: New insights into the behavior of PGE and sulfur in Martian magmatic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Raphael J.; Fiorentini, Marco L.; Baratoux, David; Ferrière, Ludovic; Locmelis, Marek; Tomkins, Andrew; Sener, Kerim A.

    2017-02-01

    The Martian meteorites comprise mantle-derived mafic to ultramafic rocks that formed in shallow intrusions and/or lava flows. This study reports the first in situ platinum-group element data on chromite and ulvöspinel from a series of dunitic chassignites and olivine-phyric shergottites, determined using laser-ablation ICP-MS. As recent studies have shown that Ru has strongly contrasting affinities for coexisting sulfide and spinel phases, the precise in situ analysis of this element in spinel can provide important insights into the sulfide saturation history of Martian mantle-derived melts. The new data reveal distinctive differences between the two meteorite groups. Chromite from the chassignites Northwest Africa 2737 (NWA 2737) and Chassigny contained detectable concentrations of Ru (up to 160 ppb Ru) in solid solution, whereas chromite and ulvöspinel from the olivine-phyric shergottites Yamato-980459 (Y-980459), Tissint, and Dhofar 019 displayed Ru concentrations consistently below detection limit (systems.

  6. Validity of the Apatite/Merrillite Relationship in Evaluating the Water Content in the Martian Mantle: Implications from Shergottite Northwest Africa (NWA 2975

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Słaby

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Phosphates from the Martian shergottite NWA 2975 were used to obtain insights into the source and subsequence differentiation of the melt/melts. The crystallization of two generations of fluorapatite (F > Cl~OH and F-rich, chlorapatite and ferromerrillite-merrillite were reconstructed from TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy and geochemical analyses. The research results indicated that the recognized volatiles budget of the two generations of fluorapatite was related to their magmatic origin. The apatite crystals crystallized from an evolved magma during its final differentiation and degassing stage. In turn, chlorapatite replaced ferromerrillite-merrillite and was not related to, mantle-derived shergottite magma. The relationship between merrillite and apatite indicates that apatite is most probably a product of merrillite reacting with fluids. REE (rare earth elements pattern of Cl-apatite might point to an origin associated with exogenous fluids mixed with fluids exsolved from evolved magma. The study shows that, among the three types of apatite, only the fluorapatite (F > Cl~OH is a reliable source for assessing the degree of Martian mantle hydration. The occurrence of apatite with merrillite requires detailed recognition of their relationship. Consequently, the automatic use of apatite to assess the water content of the magma source can lead to false assumptions if the origin of the apatite is not precisely determined.

  7. LiDAR Application for WInd Energy Efficiency : Final report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boorsma, K; Wagenaar, J.W.; Savenije, F.J.; Boquet, M.; Bierbooms, W.A.A.M.; Giyanani, A.H.; Rutteman, R.

    2016-01-01

    ECN with its partners TU DelŌ, Avent LiDAR Technologies and XEMC Darwind executed the four-year TKI Wind op Zee project LAWINE (LiDAR ApplicaƟon for WInd Energy Efficiency). In this project the applica Ɵon of LiDAR technology has been developed and validated so that it can be used to improve the

  8. 2004 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Portland, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The all returns ASCII files contain the X,Y,Z values of all the LiDAR returns collected during the survey mission. In addition each return also has a time stamp,...

  9. Approach to voxel-based carbon stock quanticiation using LiDAR data in tropical rainforest, Brunei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunji; Piao, Dongfan; Lee, Jongyeol; Lee, Woo-Kyun; Yoon, Mihae; Moon, Jooyeon

    2016-04-01

    Forest is an important means to adapt climate change as the only carbon sink recognized by the international community (KFS 2009). According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 5th Assessment Report (AR5), Agriculture, Forestry, and Other Land Use (AFOLU) sectors including forestry contributed 24% of total anthropogenic emissions in 2010 (IPCC 2014; Tubiello et al. 2015). While all sectors excluding AFOLU have increased Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions, land use sectors including forestry remains similar level as before due to decreasing deforestation and increasing reforestation. In earlier researches, optical imagery has been applied for analysis (Jakubowski et al. 2013). Optical imagery collects spectral information in 2D. It is difficult to effectively quantify forest stocks, especially in dense forest (Cui et al. 2012). To detect individual trees information from remotely sensed data, Light detection and ranging (LiDAR) has been used (Hyyppäet al. 2001; Persson et al. 2002; Chen et al. 2006). Moreover, LiDAR has the ability to actively acquire vertical tree information such as tree height using geo-registered 3D points (Kwak et al. 2007). In general, however, geo-register 3D point was used with a raster format which contains only 2D information by missing all the 3D data. Therefore, this research aimed to use the volumetric pixel (referred as "voxel") approach using LiDAR data in tropical rainforest, Brunei. By comparing the parameters derived from voxel based LiDAR data and field measured data, we examined the relationships between them for the quantification of forest carbon. This study expects to be more helpful to take advantage of the strategic application of climate change adaption.

  10. UNDERSTANDING THE MULTIDIMENSIONAL ISLAMIC FAITH THROUGH ‘ABD AL-GHANI AL-NABULUSI’S MYSTICAL PHILOSOPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Yamamoto

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper tries to present a new perspective on Islamic faith and Muslim identity to Muslim minorities who are challenged in practicing or following Islamic law in non-Islamic countries or non-Muslims in the contemporary world. It will uncover the multidimensional perspective of the concept of faith based on sin (dhanb and repentance (tawbah through the mystical philosophy of a Syrian scholar, Abd al-Ghani al-Nabulusi (d. 1143/1741 of the 18th century Ottoman Damascus who contributed to the field of Sufism particularly based on Ibn ‘Arabi’s thought of wahdat al-wujud (oneness of being and insan kamil (the perfect man. Nabulusi believes that anyone who lived during the inexistence of prophet’s revelation, inhabited an isolated place cut off from information about Islam, or lived in dar al-harb and did not make a hijra to dar al-islam could not be regarded as sinful in their deeds. However, faith in Allah is essential and infidelity is not forgiven regardless whether or not they live in dar al-islam or dar al-harb. Further, Nabulusi insists that true faith can be achieved by understanding the sin of existence; the ignorance of the difference of existence between Allah and men.  [Artikel ini menjelaskan identitas keberagamaan umat Islam minoritas yang dituntut untuk menerapkan syariat, namun harus hidup di negara non-muslim, dengan mendiskusikan perspektif multidimensional terhadap konsep dosa dan tobat seperti dikembangkan oleh Abd al-Ghanī al-Nabulusī (1143/1741, seorang sufi pemikir Syria, khususnya  wahdat al-wujūd dan insan kamil, yang hidup di masa kesultanan Usmani di Damaskus. Nabulusī berkeyakinan bahwa siapa saja yang hidup sebelum turunnya wahyu di masa Nabi, hidup di daerah terpencil yang tidak mengenal Islam, atau hidup di dar al-harb dan tidak hijrah ke dar al-islam, tidaklah dibebani dosa atas perbuatannya. Namun demikian, iman kepada Allah amatlah penting dan kekufuran tidaklah dimaafkan, baik seseorang tersebut hidup

  11. Liquid waste management: The case of Bahir Dar, Ethiopia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Human beings pollute the environment with their industrial and domestic wastes. In Bahir Dar Town there is no conventional municipal waste water collection and treatment system. Objective: The aim of this study was to describe the liquid waste disposal practices of the residents of Bahir Dar Town and to ...

  12. Assessing LiDAR elevation data for KDOT applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    LiDAR-based elevation surveys are a cost-effective means for mapping topography over large areas. LiDAR : surveys use an airplane-mounted or ground-based laser radar unit to scan terrain. Post-processing techniques are : applied to remove vegetation ...

  13. 2006 OSIP OGRIP Coastal Counties LiDAR Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 2006 OSIP digital LiDAR data was collected during the months of March and May (leaf-off conditions). The LiDAR covers the entire land area of the northern tier...

  14. 'Dar' + gerund in Ecuadorian Highland Spanish: contact-induced grammaticalization?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olbertz, H.

    2008-01-01

    The benefactive construction dar + gerund is used in the North Andean region only and is unknown elsewhere in the Spanish-speaking world. Based on the analysis of spontaneous data from Ecuadorian Highland Spanish, this paper provides a linguististic description of dar + gerund and of the social and

  15. SURVEY OF WOODY FLORA AND FAUNA OF THE BAHIR DAR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The surveyed fauna were mammals, reptiles, amphibians, and birds. More than. 80 species of birds were recorded in this relatively protected ecosystem. INTRODUCTION. Bahir Dar University (BDU) situated in Bahir Dar Town, the capital of the Amhara National. Regional State, is one of the nine prominent Universities in ...

  16. Liquid waste management: The case of Bahir Dar, Ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    Abstract. Background: Human beings pollute the environment with their industrial and domestic wastes. In Bahir Dar Town there is no conventional municipal waste water collection and treatment system. Objective: The aim of this study was to describe the liquid waste disposal practices of the residents of Bahir Dar Town.

  17. Design challenges facing urban development in Dar es Salaam City ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper aims at discussing building design challenges facing the city of Dar es Salaam. Information and data used for this paper were drawn from the study conducted in the city of Dar es Salaam and literature survey. The major concern is the negative effects associated with designs, construction activities and ...

  18. Analysis of inflow parameters using LiDARs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giyanani, A.H.; Bierbooms, W.A.A.M.; Van Bussel, G.J.W.

    2014-01-01

    Remote sensing of the atmospheric variables with the use of LiDAR is a relatively new technique for wind resource assessment and oncoming wind prediction in wind energy. The validation of LiDAR measurements and comparisons with other sensing elements thus, is of high importance for further

  19. 2006 OSIP OGRIP: Upland Counties LiDAR Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 2006 OSIP digital LiDAR data was collected during the months of March and May (leaf-off conditions). The LiDAR covers the entire land area of the northern tier...

  20. Darüşşifas Where Music Threapy was Practiced During Anatolian Seljuks and Ottomans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülşen Erdal

    2013-03-01

    günümüzde açıkça bilinmektedir. Bilinen en eski tedavi yöntemlerinden biri olan Müzikle tedavinin geçmişi binlerce yıl öncesine dayanır. Türklerin, müzikle tedavide İbn Sina, Razî, Farabî, Hasan Şuurî ve Gevrekzade Hasan Efendi gibi bilim adamlarının yaptıkları araştırmaların yer aldığı kitaplardan faydalanarak, Selçuklu ve Osmanlılar döneminde, akıl hastalıklarının tedavisine uygun akustikle inşa edilen hastaneler-darüşşifalarda kullanmaları, ilk ciddi müzikle tedavi uygulamaları olarak değerlendirilir. Darüşşifa, Türk ve İslam dünyasında pratiğe ve gözleme dayalı sağlık hizmetleri veren hastaları tedavi eden sağlık ve eğitim kurumlarına verilen isimlerden birisidir. Darüşşifalar Tıp mesleğinin uygulanmasına yönelik özel mimari anlayış içeren yapıları ile de ayrıcalıklı bir yere sahiptir. Türkler Anadolu’ya yerleşmeleri ile birlikte çeşitli imar faaliyetlerine başlamışlardır. Yapılan bu faaliyetler içerisinde kervansaraylar, medreseler ve camilerle birlikte darüşşifalar da bulunmaktadır. Selçuklu ve Osmanlı darüşşifalarında tıbbi konular araştırmalara ve bilimsel esaslara bağlı kalınarak işleniyor, aynı zamanda tıp medreselerinde cerrah yetiştiriliyordu. Yapılan eğitimler dışında tatbiki uygulamaların da yaptırıldığı bilinmektedir. Darrüşşifalar, Anadolu Selçuklu ve Osmanlı medreseleri plan şemasına uygun olarak tasarlanmıştır. Genelde derslerin verildiği ana eyvan ve farklı ihtiyaçlar için düzenlenmiş avlu etrafında yer alan odalardan oluşmaktaydı.Türk sanat tarihi içerisinde sıklıkla karşılaştığımız tıp siteleri aynı zamanda günümüz tıp fakültesi mantığı ile örtüşmektedir. Buralarda tedavi edici sağlık hizmetleri sunulmaktaydı. Müzikle tedavi yapılan darüşşifalardan günümüze ulaşan ve önem teşkil edenler bu çalışmada sanat tarihi ve müziğin iyileştirici gücünün yüzyıllar

  1. Classification and Characterization of Neotropical Rainforest Vegetation from Hyperspectral and LiDAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, M. M.; Prasad, S.; Jung, J.; Yang, H.; Zhang, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Mapping species and forest vertical structure at regional, continental, and global scale is of increasing importance for climate science and decision support systems. Remote sensing technologies have been widely utilized to achieve this goal since they help overcome limitations of the direct and indirect measurement approaches. While the use of multi-sensor data for characterizing forest structure has gained significant attention in recent years, research on the integration of full waveform LiDAR and hyperspectral data for a) classification and b) characterization of vegetation structure has been limited. Given sufficient labeled ground reference samples, supervised learning methods have evolved to effectively classify data in a high dimensional feature space. However, it is expensive and time-consuming to obtain labeled data, although the very high dimensionality of feature spaces from hyperspectral and LiDAR inputs make it difficult to design reliable classifiers with a limited quantity of labeled data. Therefore, it is important to concentrate on developing training data sets which are the most 'informative' and 'useful' for the classification task. Active learning (AL) was developed in the machine learning community, and has been demonstrated to be useful for classification of remote sensing data. In the active learning framework, classifiers are initially trained on a very limited pool of training samples, but additional informative and representative samples are identified from the abundant unlabeled data, labeled, and then inducted into this pool, thereby growing the training dataset in a systematic way. The goal is to choose data points such that a more accurate classification boundary is learned. We propose a novel Multi-kernel Active Learning (MKL-AL) approach that incorporates features from multiple sensors with an automatically optimized kernel composite ¬function, and kernel parameters are selected intelligently during the AL learning process. The

  2. Lava flow texture LiDAR signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelley, P.; Garry, W. B.; Scheidt, S. P.; Irwin, R. P., III; Fox, J.; Bleacher, J. E.; Hamilton, C. W.

    2014-12-01

    High-resolution point clouds and digital elevation models (DEMs) are used to investigate lava textures on the Big Island of Hawaii. An experienced geologist can distinguish fresh or degraded lava textures (e.g., blocky, a'a and pahoehoe) visually in the field. Lava texture depends significantly on eruption conditions, and it is therefore instructive, if accurately determined. In places where field investigations are prohibitive (e.g., Mercury, Venus, the Moon, Mars, Io and remote regions on Earth) lava texture must be assessed from remote sensing data. A reliable method for differentiating lava textures in remote sensing data remains elusive. We present preliminary results comparing properties of lava textures observed in airborne and terrestrial Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data. Airborne data, in this study, were collected in 2011 by Airborne 1 Corporation and have a ~1m point spacing. The authors collected the terrestrial data during a May 2014 field season. The terrestrial scans have a heterogeneous point density. Points close to the scanner are 1 mm apart while 200 m in the distance points are 10 cm apart. Both platforms offer advantages and disadvantages beyond the differences in scale. Terrestrial scans are a quantitative representation of what a geologist sees "on the ground". Airborne scans are a point of view routinely imaged by other remote sensing tools, and can therefore be quickly compared to complimentary data sets (e.g., spectral scans or image data). Preliminary results indicate that LiDAR-derived surface roughness, from both platforms, is useful for differentiating lava textures, but at different spatial scales. As all lava types are quite rough, it is not simply roughness that is the most advantageous parameter; rather patterns in surface roughness can be used to differentiate lava surfaces of varied textures. This work will lead to faster and more reliable volcanic mapping efforts for planetary exploration as well as terrestrial

  3. Processing LiDAR Data to Predict Natural Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairweather, Ian; Crabtree, Robert; Hager, Stacey

    2008-01-01

    ELF-Base and ELF-Hazards (wherein 'ELF' signifies 'Extract LiDAR Features' and 'LiDAR' signifies 'light detection and ranging') are developmental software modules for processing remote-sensing LiDAR data to identify past natural hazards (principally, landslides) and predict future ones. ELF-Base processes raw LiDAR data, including LiDAR intensity data that are often ignored in other software, to create digital terrain models (DTMs) and digital feature models (DFMs) with sub-meter accuracy. ELF-Hazards fuses raw LiDAR data, data from multispectral and hyperspectral optical images, and DTMs and DFMs generated by ELF-Base to generate hazard risk maps. Advanced algorithms in these software modules include line-enhancement and edge-detection algorithms, surface-characterization algorithms, and algorithms that implement innovative data-fusion techniques. The line-extraction and edge-detection algorithms enable users to locate such features as faults and landslide headwall scarps. Also implemented in this software are improved methodologies for identification and mapping of past landslide events by use of (1) accurate, ELF-derived surface characterizations and (2) three LiDAR/optical-data-fusion techniques: post-classification data fusion, maximum-likelihood estimation modeling, and hierarchical within-class discrimination. This software is expected to enable faster, more accurate forecasting of natural hazards than has previously been possible.

  4. Exploring tree species signature using waveform LiDAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, T.; Popescu, S. C.; Krause, K.

    2015-12-01

    Successful classification of tree species with waveform LiDAR data would be of considerable value to estimate the biomass stocks and changes in forests. Current approaches emphasize converting the full waveform data into discrete points to get larger amount of parameters and identify tree species using several discrete-points variables. However, ignores intensity values and waveform shapes which convey important structural characteristics. The overall goal of this study was to employ the intensity and waveform shape of individual tree as the waveform signature to detect tree species. The data was acquired by the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) within 250*250 m study area located in San Joaquin Experimental Range. Specific objectives were to: (1) segment individual trees using the smoothed canopy height model (CHM) derived from discrete LiDAR points; (2) link waveform LiDAR with above individual tree boundaries to derive sample signatures of three tree species and use these signatures to discriminate tree species in a large area; and (3) compare tree species detection results from discrete LiDAR data and waveform LiDAR data. An overall accuracy of the segmented individual tree of more than 80% was obtained. The preliminary results show that compared with the discrete LiDAR data, the waveform LiDAR signature has a higher potential for accurate tree species classification.

  5. Dar al-Kalima akadeemia kultuuri- ja konverentsikeskus "AD DAR" : Petlemm, Palestiina = Dar al-Kalima Academy Cultural and Convention Centre "AD DAR" : Bethlehem, Palestine, 1998-2003 / Juha Leviskä

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Leviskä, Juha

    2004-01-01

    Projekteerija: Vilhelm Helander, Juha Leviskä Arkkitehdit. Autorid Jyha Leviskä ja Jari Heikkinen, kaasautor Pekka Kivisalo, sisekujundaja Jari Heikkinen. Projekt 1998-1999, valmis 1999-2003. 2 joon.: plaan, vaade, 8 fotot: 4 välis- ja 4 sisevaadet

  6. TENSOR MODELING BASED FOR AIRBORNE LiDAR DATA CLASSIFICATION

    OpenAIRE

    Li, N.; Liu, C; Pfeifer, N; Yin, J. F.; Liao, Z.Y.; Zhou, Y

    2016-01-01

    Feature selection and description is a key factor in classification of Earth observation data. In this paper a classification method based on tensor decomposition is proposed. First, multiple features are extracted from raw LiDAR point cloud, and raster LiDAR images are derived by accumulating features or the “raw” data attributes. Then, the feature rasters of LiDAR data are stored as a tensor, and tensor decomposition is used to select component features. This tensor representation could kee...

  7. TENSOR MODELING BASED FOR AIRBORNE LiDAR DATA CLASSIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Feature selection and description is a key factor in classification of Earth observation data. In this paper a classification method based on tensor decomposition is proposed. First, multiple features are extracted from raw LiDAR point cloud, and raster LiDAR images are derived by accumulating features or the “raw” data attributes. Then, the feature rasters of LiDAR data are stored as a tensor, and tensor decomposition is used to select component features. This tensor representation could keep the initial spatial structure and insure the consideration of the neighborhood. Based on a small number of component features a k nearest neighborhood classification is applied.

  8. 2009 PSLC-USGS Topographic LiDAR: Wenatchee

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. (WS) collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data of the Wenatchee USGS area of interest (AOI) east of Wenatchee, WA on May 1nd ? May...

  9. 2009 PSLC-USGS Topographic LiDAR: Wenatchee

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. (WS) collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data of the Wenatchee USGS area of interest (AOI) east of Wenatchee, WA on May 1nd - May...

  10. Elevation - LiDAR Survey Minnehaha Creek, MN Watershed

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — LiDAR Bare-Earth Grid - Minnehaha Creek Watershed District. The Minnehaha Creek watershed is located primarily in Hennepin County, Minnesota. The watershed covers...

  11. Dar es Salaam Land Use and Informal Settlement Data Set

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Dar es Salaam Land Use and Informal Settlement Data Set represents urban land use and consolidation of informal settlements for the years 1982, 1992, 1998, and...

  12. LiDAR (Terrain), THURSTON COUNTY, WASHINGTON, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Fugro EarthData Company furnished the collection, processing, and development of LiDAR for 825 square miles in Washington (805 square miles of Thurston County and 20...

  13. Connecticut Statewide LiDAR 2016 - Blocks 1-7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This metadata record describes the Classified Point Cloud (LAS) for the 2016 Connecticut LiDAR project covering approximately 5240 square miles in seven blocks. The...

  14. Shipborne LiDAR system for coastal change monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, chang hwan; Park, chang hong; Kim, hyun wook; hyuck Kim, won; Lee, myoung hoon; Park, hyeon yeong

    2016-04-01

    Coastal areas, used as human utilization areas like leisure space, medical care, ports and power plants, etc., are regions that are continuously changing and interconnected with oceans and land and the sea level has risen by about 8cm (1.9mm / yr) due to global warming from 1964 year to 2006 year in Korea. Coastal erosion due to sea-level rise has caused the problem of marine ecosystems and loss of tourism resources, etc. Regular monitoring of coastal erosion is essential at key locations with such volatility. But the survey method of land mobile LiDAR (light detection and ranging) system has much time consuming and many restrictions. For effective monitoring beach erosion, KIOST (Korea Institute of Ocean Science & Technology) has constructed a shipborne mobile LiDAR system. The shipborne mobile LiDAR system comprised a land mobile LiDAR (RIEGL LMS-420i), an INS (inertial navigation system, MAGUS Inertial+), a RTKGPS (LEICA GS15 GS25), and a fixed platform. The shipborne mobile LiDAR system is much more effective than a land mobile LiDAR system in the measuring of fore shore areas without shadow zone. Because the vessel with the shipborne mobile LiDAR system is continuously moved along the shoreline, it is possible to efficiently survey a large area in a relatively short time. Effective monitoring of the changes using the constructed shipborne mobile LiDAR system for seriously eroded coastal areas will be able to contribute to coastal erosion management and response.

  15. Georeferenced LiDAR 3D Vine Plantation Map Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meritxell Queraltó

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of electronic devices for canopy characterization has recently been widely discussed. Among such devices, LiDAR sensors appear to be the most accurate and precise. Information obtained with LiDAR sensors during reading while driving a tractor along a crop row can be managed and transformed into canopy density maps by evaluating the frequency of LiDAR returns. This paper describes a proposed methodology to obtain a georeferenced canopy map by combining the information obtained with LiDAR with that generated using a GPS receiver installed on top of a tractor. Data regarding the velocity of LiDAR measurements and UTM coordinates of each measured point on the canopy were obtained by applying the proposed transformation process. The process allows overlap of the canopy density map generated with the image of the intended measured area using Google Earth®, providing accurate information about the canopy distribution and/or location of damage along the rows. This methodology was applied and tested on different vine varieties and crop stages in two important vine production areas in Spain. The results indicate that the georeferenced information obtained with LiDAR sensors appears to be an interesting tool with the potential to improve crop management processes.

  16. De Hoy Al Ayer... Y Viceversa

    OpenAIRE

    Mora, M.DH. Marlon

    2016-01-01

    Ese artículo trata de condensar dos generaciones ocultas hoy -los jóvenes- y el ayer -los adultos mayores- la idea es dar una pincelada de realidad al lector para concer como es la vida cotidiana de estos seres humanos.

  17. 2001-2002 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Clallam County, Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TerraPoint surveyed and created this data for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium under contract with Clallam County. The data covers an area of approximately 524...

  18. 2012 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Chehalis River Watershed Area, Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. (WSI) collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data for the Chehalis River Watershed study area on January 28th, February 2nd-7th,...

  19. 2006 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Eastern Washington and River Corridors

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. (WS) collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data in eastern Washington, eastern Oregon, and southern Canada in October and November,...

  20. 2007 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Eastern Washington and River Corridors

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. (WS) collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data in eastern Washington, eastern Oregon, and southern Canada in October and November,...

  1. 2002 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Unclassified Topographic LiDAR: Puget Sound Lowlands Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TerraPoint surveyed and created this data for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium under contract. The area surveyed is approximately 730 square miles and covers the...

  2. 2012-2013 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Hoh River Watershed, Washington (Deliveries 1 and 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. (WSI) collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data on the Hoh River watershed survey area for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium and the...

  3. LiDAR Vegetation Investigation and Signature Analysis System (LVISA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfle, Bernhard; Koenig, Kristina; Griesbaum, Luisa; Kiefer, Andreas; Hämmerle, Martin; Eitel, Jan; Koma, Zsófia

    2015-04-01

    Our physical environment undergoes constant changes in space and time with strongly varying triggers, frequencies, and magnitudes. Monitoring these environmental changes is crucial to improve our scientific understanding of complex human-environmental interactions and helps us to respond to environmental change by adaptation or mitigation. The three-dimensional (3D) description of the Earth surface features and the detailed monitoring of surface processes using 3D spatial data have gained increasing attention within the last decades, such as in climate change research (e.g., glacier retreat), carbon sequestration (e.g., forest biomass monitoring), precision agriculture and natural hazard management. In all those areas, 3D data have helped to improve our process understanding by allowing quantifying the structural properties of earth surface features and their changes over time. This advancement has been fostered by technological developments and increased availability of 3D sensing systems. In particular, LiDAR (light detection and ranging) technology, also referred to as laser scanning, has made significant progress and has evolved into an operational tool in environmental research and geosciences. The main result of LiDAR measurements is a highly spatially resolved 3D point cloud. Each point within the LiDAR point cloud has a XYZ coordinate associated with it and often additional information such as the strength of the returned backscatter. The point cloud provided by LiDAR contains rich geospatial, structural, and potentially biochemical information about the surveyed objects. To deal with the inherently unorganized datasets and the large data volume (frequently millions of XYZ coordinates) of LiDAR datasets, a multitude of algorithms for automatic 3D object detection (e.g., of single trees) and physical surface description (e.g., biomass) have been developed. However, so far the exchange of datasets and approaches (i.e., extraction algorithms) among LiDAR users

  4. UAS TOPOGRAPHIC MAPPING WITH VELODYNE LiDAR SENSOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Jozkow

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Unmanned Aerial System (UAS technology is nowadays willingly used in small area topographic mapping due to low costs and good quality of derived products. Since cameras typically used with UAS have some limitations, e.g. cannot penetrate the vegetation, LiDAR sensors are increasingly getting attention in UAS mapping. Sensor developments reached the point when their costs and size suit the UAS platform, though, LiDAR UAS is still an emerging technology. One issue related to using LiDAR sensors on UAS is the limited performance of the navigation sensors used on UAS platforms. Therefore, various hardware and software solutions are investigated to increase the quality of UAS LiDAR point clouds. This work analyses several aspects of the UAS LiDAR point cloud generation performance based on UAS flights conducted with the Velodyne laser scanner and cameras. The attention was primarily paid to the trajectory reconstruction performance that is essential for accurate point cloud georeferencing. Since the navigation sensors, especially Inertial Measurement Units (IMUs, may not be of sufficient performance, the estimated camera poses could allow to increase the robustness of the estimated trajectory, and subsequently, the accuracy of the point cloud. The accuracy of the final UAS LiDAR point cloud was evaluated on the basis of the generated DSM, including comparison with point clouds obtained from dense image matching. The results showed the need for more investigation on MEMS IMU sensors used for UAS trajectory reconstruction. The accuracy of the UAS LiDAR point cloud, though lower than for point cloud obtained from images, may be still sufficient for certain mapping applications where the optical imagery is not useful.

  5. Diseño e implementación de componentes software para dar soporte a la plataforma MEWiN en el sistema operativo Contiki

    OpenAIRE

    Navarro Hellín, Honorio

    2011-01-01

    El presente proyecto final de carrera que tiene como título: "Diseño e Implementación de componentes software para dar soporte a la plataforma MEWiN en el sistema operativo Contiki" pretende dar soporte software al dispositivo MEWiN desarrollado. En la actualidad el sistema operativo Contiki es uno de los más utilizados en el ámbito de las redes inalámbricas de sensores, dada su característica de código libre y su alta escalabilidad. La mayoría de fabricantes de dispositivos electrónicos u...

  6. LiDAR point classification based on sparse representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Pfeifer, Norbert; Liu, Chun

    2017-04-01

    In order to combine the initial spatial structure and features of LiDAR data for accurate classification. The LiDAR data is represented as a 4-order tensor. Sparse representation for classification(SRC) method is used for LiDAR tensor classification. It turns out SRC need only a few of training samples from each class, meanwhile can achieve good classification result. Multiple features are extracted from raw LiDAR points to generate a high-dimensional vector at each point. Then the LiDAR tensor is built by the spatial distribution and feature vectors of the point neighborhood. The entries of LiDAR tensor are accessed via four indexes. Each index is called mode: three spatial modes in direction X ,Y ,Z and one feature mode. Sparse representation for classification(SRC) method is proposed in this paper. The sparsity algorithm is to find the best represent the test sample by sparse linear combination of training samples from a dictionary. To explore the sparsity of LiDAR tensor, the tucker decomposition is used. It decomposes a tensor into a core tensor multiplied by a matrix along each mode. Those matrices could be considered as the principal components in each mode. The entries of core tensor show the level of interaction between the different components. Therefore, the LiDAR tensor can be approximately represented by a sparse tensor multiplied by a matrix selected from a dictionary along each mode. The matrices decomposed from training samples are arranged as initial elements in the dictionary. By dictionary learning, a reconstructive and discriminative structure dictionary along each mode is built. The overall structure dictionary composes of class-specified sub-dictionaries. Then the sparse core tensor is calculated by tensor OMP(Orthogonal Matching Pursuit) method based on dictionaries along each mode. It is expected that original tensor should be well recovered by sub-dictionary associated with relevant class, while entries in the sparse tensor associated with

  7. Waveform LiDAR across forest biomass gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesano, P. M.; Nelson, R. F.; Dubayah, R.; Sun, G.; Ranson, J.

    2011-12-01

    Detailed information on the quantity and distribution of aboveground biomass (AGB) is needed to understand how it varies across space and changes over time. Waveform LiDAR data is routinely used to derive the heights of scattering elements in each illuminated footprint, and the vertical structure of vegetation is related to AGB. Changes in LiDAR waveforms across vegetation structure gradients can demonstrate instrument sensitivity to land cover transitions. A close examination of LiDAR waveforms in footprints across a forest gradient can provide new insight into the relationship of vegetation structure and forest AGB. In this study we use field measurements of individual trees within Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS) footprints along transects crossing forest to non-forest gradients to examine changes in LVIS waveform characteristics at sites with low (LVIS waveforms to detect the forest AGB interval along a forest - non-forest transition in which the LVIS waveform lose the ability to discern differences in AGB. Our results help identify the lower end the forest biomass range that a ~20m footprint waveform LiDAR can detect, which can help infer accumulation of biomass after disturbances and during forest expansion, and which can guide the use of LiDAR within a multi-sensor fusion biomass mapping approach.

  8. A Study on Factors Affecting Airborne LiDAR Penetration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Chen Hsu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study uses data from different periods, areas and parameters of airborne LiDAR (light detection and ranging surveys to understand the factors that influence airborne LiDAR penetration rate. A discussion is presented on the relationships between these factors and LiDAR penetration rate. The results show that the flight height above ground level (AGL does not have any relationship with the penetration rate. There are some factors that should have larger influence. For example, the laser is affected by a wet ground surface by reducing the number of return echoes. The field of view (FOV has a slightly negative correlation with the penetration rate, which indicates that the laser incidence angle close to zero should achieve the best penetration. The vegetation cover rate also shows a negative correlation with the penetration rate, thus bare ground and reduced vegetation in the aftermath of a typhoon also cause high penetration rate. More return echoes could be extracted from the full-waveform system, thereby effectively improving the penetration rate. This study shows that full-waveform LiDAR is an effective method for increasing the number of surface reflected echoes. This study suggests avoiding LiDAR survey employment directly following precipitation to prevent laser echo reduction.

  9. municipal solid waste of dar es salaam

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    glass, metals, paper, plastics or paper were separated by hand. After sorting, each organic fraction of the waste samples was shredded using a blender to particles ..... shown to affect degradability of rice straw (Lequerica et al. 1984). The same reasoning may explain the relatively low extent of degradation achieved for the.

  10. Quantifying vertical and horizontal stand structure using terrestrial LiDAR in Pacific Northwest forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakova, Alexandra N.

    Stand level spatial distribution is a fundamental part of forest structure that influences many ecological processes and ecosystem functions. Vertical and horizontal spatial structure provides key information for forest management. Although horizontal stand complexity can be measured through stem mapping and spatial analysis, vertical complexity within the stand remains a mostly visual and highly subjective process. Tools and techniques in remote sensing, specifically LiDAR, provide three dimensional datasets that can help get at three dimensional forest stand structure. Although aerial LiDAR (ALS) is the most widespread form of remote sensing for measuring forest structure, it has a high omission rate in dense and structurally complex forests. In this study we used terrestrial LiDAR (TLS) to obtain high resolution three dimensional point clouds of plots from stands that vary by density and composition in the second-growth Pacific Northwest forest ecosystem. We used point cloud slicing techniques and object-based image analysis (OBIA) to produce canopy profiles at multiple points of vertical gradient. At each height point we produced segments that represented canopies or parts of canopies for each tree within the dataset. The resulting canopy segments were further analyzed using landscape metrics to quantify vertical canopy complexity within a single stand. Based on the developed method, we have successfully created a tool that utilizes three dimensional spatial information to accurately quantify the vertical structure of forest stands. Results show significant differences in the number and the total area of the canopy segments and gap fraction between each vertical slice within and between individual forest management plots. We found a significant relationship between the stand density and composition and the vertical canopy complexity. The methods described in this research make it possible to create horizontal stand profiles at any point along the vertical

  11. Adolescent Girls with illegally Induced Abortion in Dar es Salaam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, V; Silberschmidt, Margrethe; Mchumvu, Y

    2000-01-01

    This article reports on a study of induced abortion among adolescent girls in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, who were admitted to a district hospital in Dar es Salaam because of an illegally induced abortion in 1997. In the quantitative part of the study, 197 teenage girls (aged 14-19) were asked...... that gave them the right to seek family planning services and in practice these services are not being provided. There is a need for youth-friendly family planning services and to make abortion safe and legal, in order to reduce unwanted pregnancies and abortion-related complications and deaths among...

  12. Darüşşifas Where Music Threapy was Practiced During Anatolian Seljuks and Ottomans / Selçuklu ve Osmanlı Darüşşifalarında Müzikle Tedavi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülşen Erdal

    2013-03-01

    etki günümüzde açıkça bilinmektedir. Bilinen en eski tedavi yöntemlerinden biri olan Müzikle tedavinin geçmişi binlerce yıl öncesine dayanır. Türklerin, müzikle tedavide İbn Sina, Razî, Farabî, Hasan Şuurî ve Gevrekzade Hasan Efendi gibi bilim adamlarının yaptıkları araştırmaların yer aldığı kitaplardan faydalanarak, Selçuklu ve Osmanlılar döneminde, akıl hastalıklarının tedavisine uygun akustikle inşa edilen hastaneler-darüşşifalarda kullanmaları, ilk ciddi müzikle tedavi uygulamaları olarak değerlendirilir. Darüşşifa, Türk ve İslam dünyasında pratiğe ve gözleme dayalı sağlık hizmetleri veren hastaları tedavi eden sağlık ve eğitim kurumlarına verilen isimlerden birisidir. Darüşşifalar Tıp mesleğinin uygulanmasına yönelik özel mimari anlayış içeren yapıları ile de ayrıcalıklı bir yere sahiptir. Türkler Anadolu’ya yerleşmeleri ile birlikte çeşitli imar faaliyetlerine başlamışlardır. Yapılan bu faaliyetler içerisinde kervansaraylar, medreseler ve camilerle birlikte darüşşifalar da bulunmaktadır. Selçuklu ve Osmanlı darüşşifalarında tıbbi konular araştırmalara ve bilimsel esaslara bağlı kalınarak işleniyor, aynı zamanda tıp medreselerinde cerrah yetiştiriliyordu. Yapılan eğitimler dışında tatbiki uygulamaların da yaptırıldığı bilinmektedir. Darrüşşifalar, Anadolu Selçuklu ve Osmanlı medreseleri plan şemasına uygun olarak tasarlanmıştır. Genelde derslerin verildiği ana eyvan ve farklı ihtiyaçlar için düzenlenmiş avlu etrafında yer alan odalardan oluşmaktaydı. Türk sanat tarihi içerisinde sıklıkla karşılaştığımız tıp siteleri aynı zamanda günümüz tıp fakültesi mantığı ile örtüşmektedir. Buralarda tedavi edici sağlık hizmetleri sunulmaktaydı. Müzikle tedavi yapılan darüşşifalardan günümüze ulaşan ve önem teşkil edenler bu çalışmada sanat tarihi ve müziğin iyileştirici gücünün yüzyıllar

  13. 2004 Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Bare Earth Topographic LiDAR: Connecticut River

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LiDAR data is remotely sensed high-resolution elevation data collected by an airborne collection platform. The LiDAR files were converted from .PTS format to LAS...

  14. 2007 US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Jacksonville District US Virgin Islands LiDAR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) bare-earth classified LAS dataset is a topographic survey conducted for the USACE USVI LiDAR Project. These data were...

  15. 2011 U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Topographic LiDAR: Louisiana Region 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TASK NAME: Louisiana Region 2 LiDAR ARRA Task Order LiDAR Data Acquisition and Processing Production Task- Orleans, Plaquemines, St. Bernard, St. Tammany Parishes,...

  16. 2011 U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Topographic LiDAR: Louisiana Region 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TASK NAME: Louisiana Region 1 LiDAR ARRA Task Order LiDAR Data Acquisition and Processing Production Task- Vermillion, Iberia, St. Mary, Terrebonne, and Lafourche...

  17. Diagnóstico Territorial Integral del municipio de Ciudad Darío

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Dietsch

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available EN ESTE ARTÍCULO SE PRESENTA EL “DIAGNÓSTICO TERRITORIAL INTEGRAL de Ciudad Darío” realizado como trabajo de fin de curso de la Maestría en Desarrollo Rural de la Universidad Centroamericana. Este estudio ha buscado contribuir a la formulación de propuestas de intervención de los actores sociales del municipio de Ciudad Darío sobre los procesos estratégicos de desarrollo del territorio. Se realizó unazonificación integral del municipio, identificándose cuatro zonas: una zona alta, campesina de agricultura de subsistencia; una zona de laderas secas; una planicie seca de latifundio ganadero; y finalmente, una zona de llanos y vegas fértiles de riego semi-intensivo. Posteriormente, se identificaron y clasificaron por capital (ambiental, económico, social-humano y político-institucional y nivel territorial, los principales procesos de cambio que afectan o podrían afectar al municipio. Su análisis permitió caracterizar las principales oportunidades y amenazas para el desarrollo del territorio y, al relacionarlo con las fortalezas y debilidades identificadas en la zonificación, evidenciar los principales factores que podrían incidir en el municipio y sus principales retos. Para enfrentar estos retos, se identificaron tres ejes estratégicos: la reducción de los niveles de inseguridad alimentaria y vulnerabilidad ambiental del municipio; el fomento integral de las cadenas de producción de hortalizas; y la prevención de riesgos sociales. Para cada uno de estos ejes se ha definido un conjunto de acciones ordenadas por capital y nivel territorial, orientadas a incidir sobre los principales procesos de cambio identificados. Finalmente, se definieron ejes estratégicos transversales enfocados al desarrollo de capacidades de incidir sobre los procesos claves de desarrollo del municipio.

  18. Bahir Dar tannery effluent characterization and its impact on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to characterize Bahir Dar tannery effluent and determine its impact on the head of Blue Nile River using selected physicochemical parameters. Samples were taken from the direct effluent stream and four sampling sites (one upstream and three downstream) were selected along the river to determine ...

  19. Aggression; a Paradoxical pathology of the mind | Kitapondya | Dar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dar Es Salaam Medical Students' Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 15, No 1 (2008) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Aggression; a Paradoxical pathology of the mind.

  20. Coastal Marine Pollution in Dar es Salaam (Tanzania) relative to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Levels of microbial pollution in urban coastal waters off Dar es Salaam were excessive, indicating that water within the port channel was not safe for contact recreation. Seafood from areas adjacent to Msimbazi Creek and the Ocean Road sewer outfall was unfit for human consumption. Conversely, the water quality of Ras ...

  1. University of Dar es Salaam Library Journal: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. The University of Dar es Salaam Library Journal publishes articles on all aspects of library and information science. These include organization and dissemination of information, library education and training, information technology and its application in libraries, book reviews and short communications.

  2. Modeling low-height vegetation with airborne LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low-height vegetation, common in semiarid regions, is difficult to characterize with LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) due to similarities, in time and space, of the point returns of vegetation and ground. Other complications may occur due to the low-height vegetation structural characteristics a...

  3. Quantifying Ladder Fuels: A New Approach Using LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heather Kramer; Brandon Collins; Maggi Kelly; Scott Stephens

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between LiDAR and ladder fuels in the northern Sierra Nevada, California USA. Ladder fuels are often targeted in hazardous fuel reduction treatments due to their role in propagating fire from the forest floor to tree crowns. Despite their importance, ladder fuels are difficult to quantify. One common approach is to calculate canopy base...

  4. Causes of Conflict and Conflict Resolution Styles among Bahir Dar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Causes of Conflict and Conflict Resolution Styles among Bahir Dar University Students. ... Results from quantitative analysis, on other hand, showed that integration, compromise, and obliging were the most frequently used styles of conflict resolution. ANOVA showed that sex differences were found in dominating in favour of ...

  5. Nitrogen concentration estimation with hyperspectral LiDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Nevalainen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural lands have strong impact on global carbon dynamics and nitrogen availability. Monitoring changes in agricultural lands require more efficient and accurate methods. The first prototype of a full waveform hyperspectral Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR instrument has been developed at the Finnish Geodetic Institute (FGI. The instrument efficiently combines the benefits of passive and active remote sensing sensors. It is able to produce 3D point clouds with spectral information included for every point which offers great potential in the field of remote sensing of environment. This study investigates the performance of the hyperspectral LiDAR instrument in nitrogen estimation. The investigation was conducted by finding vegetation indices sensitive to nitrogen concentration using hyperspectral LiDAR data and validating their performance in nitrogen estimation. The nitrogen estimation was performed by calculating 28 published vegetation indices to ten oat samples grown in different fertilization conditions. Reference data was acquired by laboratory nitrogen concentration analysis. The performance of the indices in nitrogen estimation was determined by linear regression and leave-one-out cross-validation. The results indicate that the hyperspectral LiDAR instrument holds a good capability to estimate plant biochemical parameters such as nitrogen concentration. The instrument holds much potential in various environmental applications and provides a significant improvement to the remote sensing of environment.

  6. Mistletoe infection of woody plant species at Bahir Dar University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Study of woody plants composition and invasion by mistletoes was conducted in Bahir Dar University main campus vegetation. A total of 28009 individual trees were checked for mistletoes infection and 764 trees were found parasitized. Three species of mistletoes were identified. Erianthemum dregi was more frequent and ...

  7. The Pattern of Mortality in Dar es Salaam

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vihar

    compared to females but gradually the situation has reversed with time despite the constant general population ratio in Dar es Salaam. Conclusion: Mortality was found to be high in underfives and people aged 20 to 49 years. The distribution pattern of deaths tally with the distribution pattern of deaths caused by Malaria and ...

  8. Knowledge, attitudes and practice of Bahir Dar University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nowadays environmental problems have become issues of great concern to many parties. However, many people in Ethiopia seem to have low level of environmental knowledge. This study examined environmental awareness and attitudes of Bahir Dar University students. Data were collected from 523 respondents using ...

  9. (IMTU) PO BOX 77594, Dar es salaam Tan

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-07-06

    Jul 6, 2015 ... HEALTH SERVICES PROVISION TO ELDERLY PEOPLE AT TANDALE DISPENSARY,. KINONDONI MUNICIPALITY, DAR ES SALAAM TANZANIA. 1Rose Temu, 2Dr. Richard K, Arap Towett , 3Fariji Mtango. The majority (84%) were unemployed, while 96% had no pension. A majority of health workers.

  10. Dar es Salaam City and Challenges in Solid Waste Management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The focus of this paper is on challenges facing solid waste management in. Manzese and Sinza wards, in Dar es Salaam city. In this paper different ways of generating, disposing waste and the associated problems are surveyed. About 102 people were interviewed. Different methods were employed in data collection which ...

  11. Bovine Pulmonary Tuberculosis At Bahir Dar Municipality Abattoir ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bovine Pulmonary Tuberculosis At Bahir Dar Municipality Abattoir, Ethiopia. ... About 44.4 % of gross tuberculous lesions were found in the tracheo-bronchial lymph node while 33.4% in the mediastinal lymph node. Analysis of risk factors revealed that cross breed cattle were more likely to have high proportion of reactors ...

  12. Assessment on Vulnerable Youths Integration to Dar es Salaam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment on Vulnerable Youths Integration to Dar es Salaam Solid Waste Management for Improvement: Kinondoni Municipality Case. ... Thus, questionnaires and in-depth study were interchangeably employed to probe different stakeholder institutions involved in decentralized MSWM system on general performance in ...

  13. Application of Dar Zarrouk parameters to evaluate aquifer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The evaluation of the aquifer transmissivity in Ekpoma area of Edo State, Nigeria, was carried out by the application of the Dar Zarrouk Parameter (DZP). The Schlumberger array configuration in electrical resistivity survey was adopted in acquiring the data. The geoelectric parameters were obtained from the interpretation of ...

  14. CASE STUDY: Dar es Salaam, Tanzania — Building the food ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-12-20

    Dec 20, 2010 ... Today, Dar's thriving livestock trade is largely controlled by the well-to-do, who have the land and the income to invest in this lucrative market. The research also revealed ... and the elderly,” says Sawio. Farming, his research showed, is an integral part of the urban ecological, social, and economic system.

  15. Pulmonary aspergilloma: A 15 years experience in Dar es Salaam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is a paucity of literature on the prevalence and surgical treatment of pulmonary aspergilloma in African countries. This was a retrospective review of cases managed at the Thoracic Surgical Unit of Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, over a 15-year period from June 1986 to May 2000. Ten patients ...

  16. Suicidal ideation among school-attending adolescents in Dar es ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Suicidal ideation is an understudied risk factor for suicidal intent. The present study investigates the patterns and risk factors for suicidal ideation among a sample of school-attending adolescents in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Methods: This study examined secondary data collected in 2006 through the Global ...

  17. Scientific Review: Morning After Pill | Nuhu | Dar Es Salaam Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dar Es Salaam Medical Students' Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 18, No 1 (2011) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Scientific Review: Morning After Pill. Z Nuhu. Abstract.

  18. Assessment of Zooplankton Community Structure of the Bahir Dar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The zooplankton composition of the Bahir Dar gulf of Lake Tana was studied in June and July, 2007. A total of forty four zooplankton species made up of 16 species of rotifers, 16 species of cladocerans and 12 species of copepods and their developing stages were recorded in the following order of dominance; Rotifera ...

  19. Performance Analysis of Throughput at Bahir Dar University LAN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Computer scientists and network users have discovered that standard TCP does not perform well in high bandwidth delay environments. As a model, the Local Area Network of Bahir Dar University Engineering Faculty was tested and reported. . In this paper, we explore the challenges of achieving high throughput over real ...

  20. Noise induced hearing loss among industrial workers in Dar es ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Industrial area A and B randomly selected from among industries in Dar es Salaam. Subjects: One hundred and fifty workers from area A and fifty two employees from area B. Method: A questionnaire was filled and had their hearing thresholds measured by a pure tone audiometer ...

  1. Aloe; Beyond use as cosmetics | Pili | Dar Es Salaam Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dar Es Salaam Medical Students' Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 15, No 1 (2008) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load ...

  2. History of diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases | Lubinza | Dar Es ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dar Es Salaam Medical Students' Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 19, No 2 (2012) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load ...

  3. Coastal Marine Pollution in Dar es Salaam (Tanzania) relative to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The lack of sufficient wastewater treatment facilities is the main cause of current levels of some pollution in the coastal marine environment off Dar es Salaam. The implementation of industrial and municipal wastewater management would greatly improve this situation. The results ..... (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides.

  4. 2011 USGS Topographic LiDAR: Suwannee River Expansion

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — USGS Task Order No. G10PD00236 USGS Contract No. G10PC00093 The Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) dataset is a survey of the Suwannee River Expansion in...

  5. Treatment Options and Outcomes of Urethral Stricture in Dar Es ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Length, patient's age and co morbid factors play significant roles in the choice of treatment. Therefore ... (cic) were adopted as modes of treatment of patients with urethral stricture seeking urological services at Muhimbili National hospital and Tumaini hospital in Dar es Salaam, DVIU being the commonest mode treatment.

  6. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Commercial Drivers in Dar es ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Purpose: The objective of this study was, first, to assess the knowledge, attitude and practice of commercial drivers in Dar es Salaam with regard to medicines that impair driving, and second, to evaluate the adequacy of antihistamine label information. Methods: Drivers were interviewed using a questionnaire after obtaining ...

  7. SURVEY OF WOODY FLORA AND FAUNA OF THE BAHIR DAR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract: The aim of this project was to survey the flora and fauna of the main campus of. Bahir Dar Vniversity. It was necessary because the university campus is relatively well rehabilitated and it is very important that the composition of the vegetation, the regeneration capacity of the vegetation and the importance of the tree ...

  8. Accessibility, Congestion and Travel Delays in Dar es Salaam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melbye, Dea Christine; Møller-Jensen, Lasse; Andreasen, Manja Hoppe

    2015-01-01

    on to present a review of research into travel speed levels and congestion in Dar es Salaam. A set of city-wide maps of accessibility and delay levels are constructed based on available speed data and road network data obtained from the OpenStreetMap project and the findings are discussed with respect...

  9. PLANNING FOR THE AUTOMATION OF THE UNIVERSITY OF DAR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Planning activities in this stage are retrospective conversion, standardization and quality control, maintenance and backup issues. The paper concludes by summarizing the planning areas that were successful and those in which improvements could have been made. University of Dar es Salaam Library Journal Vol.5(2) ...

  10. Aloe; Beyond use as cosmetics | Pili | Dar Es Salaam Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dar Es Salaam Medical Students' Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 15, No 1 (2008) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Aloe; Beyond use as cosmetics. K Pili. Abstract. No Abstract ...

  11. Relationship between LiDAR-derived forest canopy height and Landsat images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristina Pascual; Antonio Garcia-Abril; Warren B. Cohen; Susana. Martin-Fernandez

    2010-01-01

    The mean and standard deviation (SD) of light detection and ranging (LiDAR)-derived canopy height are related to forest structure. However, LiDAR data typically cover a limited area and have a high economic cost compared with satellite optical imagery. Optical images may be required to extrapolate LiDAR height measurements across a broad landscape. Different spectral...

  12. Demystifying LiDAR technologies for temperate rainforest in the Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhonda Mazza; Demetrios Gatziolis

    2013-01-01

    Light detection and ranging (LiDAR), also known as airborne laser scanning, is a rapidly emerging technology for remote sensing. Used to help map, monitor, and assess natural resources, LiDAR data were first embraced by forestry professionals in Scandinavia as a tool for conducting forest inventories in the mid to late 1990s. Thus early LiDAR theory and applications...

  13. A multiscale curvature algorithm for classifying discrete return LiDAR in forested environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey S. Evans; Andrew T. Hudak

    2007-01-01

    One prerequisite to the use of light detection and ranging (LiDAR) across disciplines is differentiating ground from nonground returns. The objective was to automatically and objectively classify points within unclassified LiDAR point clouds, with few model parameters and minimal postprocessing. Presented is an automated method for classifying LiDAR returns as ground...

  14. Three-dimensional canopy fuel loading predicted using upward and downward sensing LiDAR systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas S. Skowronski; Kenneth L. Clark; Matthew Duveneck; John. Hom

    2011-01-01

    We calibrated upward sensing profiling and downward sensing scanning LiDAR systems to estimates of canopy fuel loading developed from field plots and allometric equations, and then used the LiDAR datasets to predict canopy bulk density (CBD) and crown fuel weight (CFW) in wildfire prone stands in the New Jersey Pinelands. LiDAR-derived height profiles were also...

  15. Forest structures retrieval from LiDAR onboard ULA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Xiaoxia; Chazette, Patrick; Totems, Julien; Marnas, Fabien; Sanak, Joseph

    2013-04-01

    Following the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the assessment of forest carbon stock is one of the main elements for a better understanding of the carbon cycle and its evolution following the climate change. The forests sequester 80% of the continental biospheric carbon and this efficiency is a function of the tree species and the tree health. The airborne backscatter LiDAR onboard the ultra light aircraft (ULA) can provide the key information on the forest vertical structures and evolution in the time. The most important structural parameter is the tree top height, which is directly linked to the above-ground biomass using non-linear relationships. In order to test the LiDAR capability for retrieving the tree top height, the LiDAR ULICE (Ultraviolet LIdar for Canopy Experiment) has been used over different forest types, from coniferous (maritime pins) to deciduous (oaks, hornbeams ...) trees. ULICE works at the wavelength of 355 nm with a sampling along the line-of-sight between 15 and 75 cm. According to the LiDAR signal to noise ratio (SNR), two different algorithms have been used in our study. The first algorithm is a threshold method directly based on the comparison between the LiDAR signal and the noise distributions, while the second one used a low pass filter by fitting a Gaussian curve family. In this paper, we will present these two algorithms and their evolution as a function of the SNR. The main error sources will be also discussed and assessed for each algorithm. The results show that these algorithms have great potential for ground-segment of future space borne LiDAR missions dedicated to the forest survey at the global scale. Acknowledgements: the canopy LiDAR system ULICE has been developed by CEA (Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique). It has been deployed with the support of CNES (Centre National d'Etude Spariales) and ANR (Agence Nationale de la Recherche). We acknowledge the ULA pilots Franck Toussaint for logistical help

  16. Object-Based Crop Species Classification Based on the Combination of Airborne Hyperspectral Images and LiDAR Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolong Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Identification of crop species is an important issue in agricultural management. In recent years, many studies have explored this topic using multi-spectral and hyperspectral remote sensing data. In this study, we perform dedicated research to propose a framework for mapping crop species by combining hyperspectral and Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR data in an object-based image analysis (OBIA paradigm. The aims of this work were the following: (i to understand the performances of different spectral dimension-reduced features from hyperspectral data and their combination with LiDAR derived height information in image segmentation; (ii to understand what classification accuracies of crop species can be achieved by combining hyperspectral and LiDAR data in an OBIA paradigm, especially in regions that have fragmented agricultural landscape and complicated crop planting structure; and (iii to understand the contributions of the crop height that is derived from LiDAR data, as well as the geometric and textural features of image objects, to the crop species’ separabilities. The study region was an irrigated agricultural area in the central Heihe river basin, which is characterized by many crop species, complicated crop planting structures, and fragmented landscape. The airborne hyperspectral data acquired by the Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI with a 1 m spatial resolution and the Canopy Height Model (CHM data derived from the LiDAR data acquired by the airborne Leica ALS70 LiDAR system were used for this study. The image segmentation accuracies of different feature combination schemes (very high-resolution imagery (VHR, VHR/CHM, and minimum noise fractional transformed data (MNF/CHM were evaluated and analyzed. The results showed that VHR/CHM outperformed the other two combination schemes with a segmentation accuracy of 84.8%. The object-based crop species classification results of different feature integrations indicated that

  17. 2011 U.S. Geological Survey Topographic LiDAR: LiDAR for the North East

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — USGS Contract: G10PC00026, Task Order Number: G10PD02143 Task Order Numbers: G10PD01027 (ARRA) and G10PD02143 (non-ARRA) The LiDAR for the North East Project, funded...

  18. 2012 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Jefferson and Clallam Counties, Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. (WSI) collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data for the Jefferson/Clallam study area on March 23rd-25th, April 13th-15th, and May...

  19. Reinstalación del Archivo Rubén Darío

    OpenAIRE

    Rudilla Barón, Paula; López Sánchez, Almudena

    2010-01-01

    El Archivo Rubén Darío recoge los documentos facilitados al Ministerio de Educación en 1956 por Doña Francisca Sánchez, compañera del poeta a partir del año 1899, año desde el cual conservó todos sus documentos hasta su muerte; y que fueron depositados posteriormente en la Facultad de Filología de la Universidad Complutense. Su ubicación definitiva es en la Biblioteca Histórica U.C.M., donde se lleva a cabo el proyecto de reinstalación para su óptima conservación a largo plazo. Parte de este ...

  20. Coastal and tidal landform detection from high resolution topobathymetric LiDAR data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikkel S.; Al-Hamdani, Zyad K.; Steinbacher, Frank

    Coastal and tidal environments are valuable ecosystems, which, however, are under pressure in many areas around the world due to globalisation and/or climate change. Detailed mapping of these environments is required in order to manage the coastal zone in a sustainable way. However, historically...... cell size of 0.5 m x 0.5 m were generated from the LiDAR point cloud with a mean point density in the order of 20 points/m2. The DEM was analysed morphometrically using a modification of the tool Benthic Terrain Modeler (BTM) developed by Wright et al. (2005). Initially, stage (the elevation...... the Bathymetric Positioning Index (BPI) from the BTM, moving average and standard deviation), slope parameters and area/perimeter ratios. Finally, these morphometric units were classified into six different types of landforms based on their stage and morphometric characteristics, i.e. either subtidal channel...

  1. 2005 Mississippi Merged LiDAR Data (2005 LiDAR data merged with 2005 Post-Katrina LiDAR data to create a bare-earth product for flood plain mapping in coastal Mississippi).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Pre- and post-hurricane Katrina LiDAR datasets of Hancock, Harrison, and Jackson Counties, MS, were merged into a seamless coverage by URS. The pre-Katrina LiDAR...

  2. SM-ND Age and REE Systematics of Larkman Nunatek 06319: Closed System Fractional Crystallization of a Shergottite Magma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, J. T.; Brandon, A. D.; Lapen T. J.; Righter, M.; Peslier, A. H.

    2010-01-01

    Sm-Nd isotopic data were collected on mineral separates and bulk rock powders of LAR 06319, yielding an age of 180+/-13 Ma (2(sigma)). This age is concordant with the Lu-Hf age (197+/-29 Ma, [1]) determined in conjunction with these data and the Sm-Nd age (190+/-26 Ma) of Shih et al., 2009 [2]. The Sm-Nd data form at statistically significant isochron (Fig. 1) that is controlled largely by leachate-residue pairs (samples with the R suffix are residues after leaching in cold 2N HCl for 10 minutes).

  3. San Clemente Island Baseline LiDAR Mapping Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Map showing the central island ridge (thick black line) separating primary drainage directions and stream networks (blue lines...outlets) and stream networks. Pour points drainage area values are shown as graduated symbols. 26 Stream and runoff erosion have developed...Technical Report 3032 December 2016 San Clemente Island Baseline LiDAR Mapping Final Report D. Bart Chadwick, Ph.D. Jennifer Ayers, Ph.D

  4. Coastal and tidal landform detection from high resolution topobathymetric LiDAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovgaard Andersen, Mikkel; Al-Hamdani, Zyad; Steinbacher, Frank; Rolighed Larsen, Laurids; Brandbyge Ernstsen, Verner

    2016-04-01

    Coastal and tidal environments are valuable ecosystems, which, however, are under pressure in many areas around the world due to globalisation and/or climate change. Detailed mapping of these environments is required in order to manage the coastal zone in a sustainable way. However, historically these transition zones between land and water are difficult or even impossible to map and investigate in high spatial resolution due to the challenging environmental conditions. The new generation of airborne topobathymetric light detection and ranging (LiDAR) potentially enables full-coverage and high-resolution mapping of these land-water transition zones. We have carried out topobathymetric LiDAR surveys in the Knudedyb tidal inlet system, a coastal environment in the Danish Wadden Sea which is part of the Wadden Sea National Park and UNESCO World Heritage. Detailed digital elevation models (DEMs) with a grid cell size of 0.5 m x 0.5 m were generated from the LiDAR point cloud with a mean point density in the order of 20 points/m2. The DEM was analysed morphometrically using a modification of the tool Benthic Terrain Modeler (BTM) developed by Wright et al. (2005). Initially, stage (the elevation in relation to tidal range) was used to divide the area of investigation into the different tidal zones, i.e. subtidal, intertidal and supratidal. Subsequently, morphometric units were identified and characterised by a combination of statistical neighbourhood analysis with varying window sizes (using the Bathymetric Positioning Index (BPI) from the BTM, moving average and standard deviation), slope parameters and area/perimeter ratios. Finally, these morphometric units were classified into six different types of landforms based on their stage and morphometric characteristics, i.e. either subtidal channel, intertidal flat, intertidal creek, linear bar, swash bar or beach dune. We hereby demonstrate the potential of using airborne topobathymetric LiDAR for seamless mapping of land

  5. Quantifying Ladder Fuels: A New Approach Using LiDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather A. Kramer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the relationship between LiDAR and ladder fuels in the northern Sierra Nevada, California USA. Ladder fuels are often targeted in hazardous fuel reduction treatments due to their role in propagating fire from the forest floor to tree crowns. Despite their importance, ladder fuels are difficult to quantify. One common approach is to calculate canopy base height, but this has many potential sources of error. LiDAR may be a way forward to better characterize ladder fuels, but has only been used to address this question peripherally and in only a few instances. After establishing that landscape fuel treatments reduced canopy and ladder fuels at our site, we tested which LiDAR-derived metrics best differentiated treated from untreated areas. The percent cover between 2 and 4 m had the most explanatory power to distinguish treated from untreated pixels across a range of spatial scales. When compared to independent plot-based measures of ladder fuel classes, this metric differentiated between high and low levels of ladder fuels. These findings point to several immediate applications for land managers and suggest new avenues of study that could lead to possible improvements in the way that we model wildfire behavior across forested landscapes in the US.

  6. LiDAR observation of the flow structure in typhoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Ting; Hsuan, Chung-Yao; Lin, Ta-Hui

    2015-04-01

    Taiwan is subject to 3.4 landfall typhoons each year in average, generally occurring in the third quarter of every year (July-September). Understanding of boundary-layer turbulence characteristics of a typhoon is needed to ensure the safety of both onshore and offshore wind turbines used for power generation. In this study, a floating LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) was deployed in a harbor to collect data of wind turbulence, atmospheric pressure, and temperature in three typhoon events (Matmo typhoon, Soulik typhoon, Trami typhoon). Data collected from the floating LiDAR and from meteorological stations located at Taipei, Taichung and Kaohsiung are adopted to analyse the wind turbulence characteristics in the three typhoon events. The measurement results show that the maximum 10-min average wind speed measured with the floating LiDAR is up to 24 m/s at a height of 200 m. Compared with other normal days, the turbulence intensity is lower in the three typhoon events where the wind speed has a rapid increase. Changes of wind direction take place clearly as the typhoons cross Taiwan from East to West. Within the crossing intervals, the vertical momentum flux is observed to have a significant pattern with both upward and downward propagating waves which are relevant to the flow structure of the typhoons.

  7. Review of the Sayh al Uhaymir (SaU 005, Plus Pairings, Martian Meteorite from Al Wusta, Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshad Ali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Al Wusta is a desert area in the Sultanate of Oman which is famous due to the discovery of a number of Martian and Lunar meteorites since the start of the present millennium. According to the Meteoritical Bulletin database, 137 approved Martian meteorites have been found worldwide, including 17 from Oman (4 from Zufar, 13 from Al Wusta region. Interestingly 11 finds in the last 15 years have been of Sayh al Uhaymir (SaU 005 and its pairings. These finds (estimated mass = 11.2 kg are linked to 10 search expeditions carried out between November 26, 1999 and March 2, 2014 by the Swiss group from the University of Bern and several anonymous meteorite hunters. The bulk of these meteorites (~97% is in the possession of anonymous collectors, negatively affecting Oman’s natural heritage and denying further research opportunities, given their associated scientific value. SaU 005 and its pairings belong to the shergottite group of the Shergotty-Nakhla-Chassigny (SNC meteorites, originating from various depths within the Martian mantle. We discuss the recently published oxygen isotope data of bulk and mineral fractions of SaU 008 recovered during the very first expedition in 1999 in the context of other shergottites found in Oman. The bulk oxygen isotope data of SaU 008 and Dhofar 019, another Martian meteorite from Oman, show a narrow range in δ18O values. Their Δ17O values are remarkably close to identical and fall linearly on a Martian fractionation line above the terrestrial fractionation line (TFL by + 0.32‰, suggesting that Mars’ mantle is homogeneous in oxygen isotopes. Petrographic and mineralogical data of SaU 005 and other pairings published in the Meteoritical Bulletin are compiled, and it is noted that all the meteorites are identical and are likely paired. The story behind these rare extra-terrestrial specimens demands a local meteorite museum and preliminary testing laboratory at Sultan Qaboos University (SQU to protect this treasure

  8. Detecting and connecting agricultural ditches using LiDAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelens, Jennifer; Dondeyne, Stefaan; Van Orshoven, Jos; Diels, Jan

    2017-04-01

    High-resolution hydrological data are essential for spatially-targeted water resource management decisions and future modelling efforts. For Flanders, small water courses like agricultural ditches and their connection to the river network are incomplete in the official digital atlas. High-resolution LiDAR data offer the prospect for automated detection of ditches, but there is no established method or software to do so nor to predict how these are connected to each other and the wider hydrographic network. An aerial LiDAR database encompassing at least 16 points per square meter linked with simultaneously collected digital RGB aerial images, is available for Flanders. The potential of detecting agricultural ditches and their connectivity based on point LiDAR data was investigated in a 1.9 km2 study area located in the alluvial valley of the river Demer. The area consists of agricultural parcels and woodland with a ditch network of approximately 17 km. The entire network of open ditches, and the location of culverts were mapped during a field survey to test the effectiveness of the proposed method. In the first step of the proposed method, the LiDAR point data were transformed into a raster DEM with a 1-m resolution to reduce the amount of data to be analyzed. This was done by interpolating the bare earth points using the nearest neighborhood method. In a next step, a morphological approach was used for detecting a preliminary network as traditional flow algorithms are not suitable for detecting small water courses in low-lying areas. This resulted in a preliminary classified raster image with ditch and non-ditch cells. After eliminating small details that are the result of background noise, the resulting classified raster image was vectorized to match the format of the digital watercourse network. As the vectorisation does not always adequately represent the shape of linear features, the results did not meet the high-quality cartographic needs. The spatial accuracy

  9. Joġrāfiyā-ye tārīḫī-ye Īrān (dar qarn-e nohum-e hijrī). Bar-gerefte az kitāb Qalqašandī : Ṣubḥ al-a⁽šā fī ṣinā⁽at al-inšā’. Traduction Maḥjūb al-Zuwayrī, Tehrān, 2001, 124 p.

    OpenAIRE

    Aigle, Denise

    2006-01-01

    Ce petit livre est composé de la traduction en persan d’extraits de la célèbre encyclopédie, le Ṣubḥ al-a⁽šā, d’al-Qalqašandī, auteur mamelouk du 15e s. Les extraits traduits concernent les données, contenues dans le Ṣubḥ, sur la géographie historique du « monde iranien » à l’époque ilkhanide, c’est-à-dire les territoires situés à l’est de l’Égypte. En effet, comme les autres ouvrages de ce type, l’encyclopédie d’al-Qalqašandī, bien qu’elle soit plutôt un manuel de chancellerie, contient une ...

  10. Surface expression of intraplate postglacial faults in Sweden: from LiDAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abduljabbar, Mawaheb; Ask, Maria; Bauer, Tobias; Lund, Björn; Smith, Colby; Mikko, Henrik; Munier, Raymond

    2016-04-01

    Large intraplate earthquakes, up to magnitude 8.0±0.3 (Lindblom et al. 2015) are inferred to have occurred in northern Fennoscandia at the end of, or just after the Weichselian deglaciation. More than a dozen large so-called postglacial faults (PGF) have been found in the region. The present-day microseismic activity is rather high in north Sweden, and there is a correlation between microseismicity and mapped PGF scarps: 71% of the observed earthquakes north of 66°N locate within 30 km to the southeast and 10 km to the northwest of PGFs (Lindblom et al., 2015). Surface expressions of PGFs in Sweden have mainly been mapped using aerial photogrammetry and trenching (e.g. Lagerbäck & Sundh 2008). Their detailed surface geometry may be investigated using the new high-resolution elevation model of Sweden (NNH) that has a vertical- and lateral resolution of 2 m and 0.25 m, respectively. With NNH data, known PGFs have been modified, and a number of new potential PGFs have been identified (Smith et al. 2014; Mikko et al. 2015). However, the detailed variation of their surface expression remains to be determined. Our main objective is to constrain the strike and surface offset (i.e., apparent vertical throw because of soil cover overlays the bedrock) across the PGF scarps. We anticipate using the results to constrain direction of fault motion and paleomagnitudes of PGFs, and in numerical analyzes to investigate the nature of PGFs. We have developed a methodology for analyzing PGF-geomorphology from LiDAR data using two main software platforms (Ask et al. 2015): (1) Move2015 by Midland Valley has been used for constructing 3D models of the surface traces of the PGFs to determine apparent vertical throw. The apparent hanging- and footwall cut off lines are digitized, and subsequent computation of coordinates is rather time efficient and provide continuous data of fault and soil geomorphology that can be statistically analyzed; and (2) ArcGIS 10.3 by Esri has mostly been

  11. Estimating pre-fire biomass for the 2013 California Rim Fire using airborne LiDAR and Landsat data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Alonso, M.; Casas Planes, Á.; Koltunov, A.; Ustin, S.; Falk, M.; Ramirez, C.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate knowledge of the amount and distribution of fuels is critical for appropriate fire planning and management, but also to improve carbon emissions estimates resulting from both wildland and prescribed fires. Airborne LiDAR (ALS) data has shown great capability to determine the amount of biomass in different ecosystems. Nevertheless, for most incidents a pre-fire LiDAR dataset that would enable the characterization of fuels before the incident is not available. Addressing this problem, we investigated the potential of combining a post-fire ALS dataset and a pre-fire Landsat image to model the pre-fire biomass distribution for the third-largest wildfire in California history, the Rim fire. Very high density (≈ 20 points/m2) ALS data was acquired covering the burned area plus a 2 km buffer. 500+ ALS-plots were located throughout the buffer area using a stratified random sampling scheme, with the strata defined by species group (coniferous, hardwood, and mixed forests) and diametric classes (5-9.9"; 10-19.9"; 20-29.9" and >30"). In these plots, individual tree crowns were delineated by the Watershed algorithm. Crown delineation was visually refined to avoid over- and under-segmentation errors, and the tree biomass was determined based on species-specific allometric equations. The biomass estimates for correctly delineated trees were subsequently aggregated to the plot-level. The next step is to derive a model relating the plot-level biomass to plot-level ALS-derived height and intensity metrics as explanatory variables. This model will be used to map pre-fire biomass in the buffer area outside the burn. To determine pre-fire biomass inside the fire perimeter, where ALS data are not available, we will use a statistical approach based on spectral information provided by a pre-fire Landsat image and its relationships with the 2 km buffer LiDAR-derived biomass estimates. We will validate our results with field measurements collected independently, before the fire.

  12. Development of a regional LiDAR field plot strategy for Oregon and Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvind Bhuta; Leah. Rathbun

    2015-01-01

    The National Forest System (NFS) Pacific Northwest Region (R6) has been flying LiDAR on a per project basis. Additional field data was also collected in situ to many of these LiDAR projects to aid in the development of predictive models and estimate values which are unattainable through LiDAR data alone (e.g. species composition, tree volume, and downed woody material...

  13. Tree-Species Classification in Subtropical Forests Using Airborne Hyperspectral and LiDAR Data

    OpenAIRE

    Xin Shen; Lin Cao

    2017-01-01

    Accurate classification of tree-species is essential for sustainably managing forest resources and effectively monitoring species diversity. In this study, we used simultaneously acquired hyperspectral and LiDAR data from LiCHy (Hyperspectral, LiDAR and CCD) airborne system to classify tree-species in subtropical forests of southeast China. First, each individual tree crown was extracted using the LiDAR data by a point cloud segmentation algorithm (PCS) and the sunlit portion of each crown wa...

  14. Can we estimate precipitation rate during snowfall using a scanning terrestrial LiDAR?

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeWinter, A. L.; Bair, E. H.; Davis, R. E.; Finnegan, D. C.; Gutmann, E. D.; Dozier, J.

    2012-12-01

    Accurate snowfall measurements in windy areas have proven difficult. To examine a new approach, we have installed an automatic scanning terrestrial LiDAR at Mammoth Mountain, CA. With this LiDAR, we have demonstrated effective snow depth mapping over a small study area of several hundred m2. The LiDAR also produces dense point clouds by detecting falling and blowing hydrometeors during storms. Daily counts of airborne detections from the LiDAR show excellent agreement with automated and manual snow water equivalent measurements, suggesting that LiDAR observations have the potential to directly estimate precipitation rate. Thus, we suggest LiDAR scanners offer advantages over precipitation radars, which could lead to more accurate precipitation rate estimates. For instance, uncertainties in mass-diameter and mass-fall speed relationships used in precipitation radar, combined with low reflectivity of snow in the microwave spectrum, produce errors of up to 3X in snowfall rates measured by radar. Since snow has more backscatter in the near-infrared wavelengths used by LiDAR compared to the wavelengths used by radar, and the LiDAR detects individual hydrometeors, our approach has more potential for directly estimating precipitation rate. A key uncertainty is hydrometeor mass. At our study site, we have also installed a Multi Angle Snowflake Camera (MASC) to measure size, fallspeed, and mass of individual hydrometeors. By combining simultaneous MASC and LiDAR measurements, we can estimate precipitation density and rate.

  15. ALS Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... toward a world without ALS! Walk to Defeat ALS® Walk to Defeat ALS® draws people of all ... We need your help. I Will Advocate National ALS Registry The National ALS Registry is a congressionally ...

  16. Detectability and geomorphometry of tufa barrages in a small forested karstic river using airborne LiDAR topo-bathymetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profe, Jörn; Höfle, Bernhard

    2017-04-01

    Tufas are secondary carbonate precipitations which occur ubiquitously in karstic environments. Thus, freshwater tufas are increasingly noticed as a high-resolution terrestrial paleoclimate archive. However, complex interactions between climate, hydrology and geomorphology drive tufa landscapes as a self-organizing system that creates a patchy transition zone between land and water at the decimeter scale. These feedbacks challenge the modern analogue technique to understand paleo-tufa evolution and require a detailed 3D characterization of tufa geomorphometry to better understand their shaping processes in relation to channel bed morphology. Due to the complex geometric nature of tufa landscapes and predominant land-water transition zones, new remote sensing techniques such as airborne sub-meter footprint LiDAR topo-bathymetry (ALTB) are necessary to enable a detailed 3D description. Using the Riegl VQ-820-G at the Kaisinger Brunnenbach, Germany, we successfully detected submerged and subaerial tufas with maximum total dam heights from 0.3 m up to 1.6 m (cf. Profe et al. 2016). In addition, slope and openness derived from a high-resolution digital terrain model (DTM) with 0.2 m spatial resolution provide insights into barrage morphology and orientation. We found that longitudinal slope analysis along the river course relates tufa morphology to channel bed morphology. Raster-based data quality control of the LiDAR topo-bathymetric DTM reveals an overall vertical data precision of 3 cm and an overall vertical data accuracy of 15.4 cm (1σ) (Profe et al. 2016). The 3D characterization of tufa landscapes facilitates the identification of monitoring and drilling sites for subsequent hydrological and geochemical studies that deepen our knowledge about the complex barrage formation processes. In the advent of UAV-borne LiDAR platforms, we are convinced that it becomes possible to reduce data uncertainty and to better represent e.g. tufa overhangs, vegetation cover and

  17. Familial ALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boylan, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Genes linked to ALS susceptibility are being identified at an increasing rate owing to advances in molecular genetic technology. Genetic mechanisms in ALS pathogenesis appear to exert major effects in ~10% of patients, but genetic factors at some level may be important components of disease risk in most ALS patients. Identification of gene variants associated with ALS has informed concepts of the pathogenesis of ALS, aided the identification of therapeutic targets, facilitated research to develop new ALS biomarkers, and supported the establishment of clinical diagnostic tests for ALS-linked genes. Translation of this knowledge to ALS therapy development is ongoing. PMID:26515623

  18. Analysis of a Large Rock Slope Failure on the East Wall of the LAB Chrysotile Mine in Canada: LiDAR Monitoring and Displacement Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudal, Philippe; Grenon, Martin; Turmel, Dominique; Locat, Jacques

    2017-04-01

    A major mining slope failure occurred in July 2012 on the East wall of the LAB Chrysotile mine in Canada. The major consequence of this failure was the loss of the local highway (Road 112), the main economic link between the region and the Northeast USA. This paper is part of a proposed integrated remote sensing-numerical modelling methodology to analyze mining rock slope stability. This paper presents the Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) monitoring of this slope failure. The main focus is the investigation of that rock slide using both terrestrial (TLS) and airborne (ALS) LiDAR scanning. Since 2010, four ALS and 14 TLS were performed to characterize and monitor the slide. First, laser scanning was used to investigate the geometry of the slide. The failure zone was 1100 m by 250 m in size with a mobilized volume of 25 hm3. Laser scanning was then used to investigate the rock slide's 3D displacement, thereby enabling a better understanding of the sliding kinematics. The results clearly demonstrate the ability of the proposed approach to monitor and quantify large-scale rock mass failure. The slope was monitored for a period of 5 years, and the total displacement was measured at every survey. The maximum cumulative total displacement reached was 145 m. This paper clearly shows the ability of LiDAR scanning to provide valuable quantitative information on large rock mass failures involving very large displacements.

  19. Determination of volatile concentrations in fluorapatite of Martian shergottite NWA 2975 by combining synchrotron FTIR, Raman spectroscopy, EMPA, and TEM, and inferences on the volatile budget of the apatite host-magma

    Science.gov (United States)

    SłAby, Ewa; Koch-Müller, Monika; FöRster, Hans-Jürgen; Wirth, Richard; Rhede, Dieter; Schreiber, Anja; Schade, Ulrich

    2016-02-01

    We combined the focused ion beam sample preparation technique with polarized synchrotron-based FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) spectroscopy, laser-Raman spectroscopy, electron microprobe analysis (EMPA), and transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis to identify and quantify structurally bound OH, F, Cl, and CO3 groups in fluorapatite from the Northwest Africa 2975 (NWA 2975) shergottite. In this study, the first FTIR spectra of the OH-stretching region from a Martian apatite are presented that show characteristic OH-bands of a F-rich, hydroxyl-bearing apatite. Depending on the method of apatite-formula calculation and whether charge balance is assumed or not, the FTIR-based quantification of the incorporated OH, expressed as wt% H2O, is in variably good agreement with the H2O concentration calculated from electron microprobe data. EMP analyses yielded between 0.35 and 0.54 wt% H2O, and IR data yielded an average H2O content of 0.31 ± 0.03 wt%, consistent with the lower range determined from EMP analyses. The TEM observations implied that the volatiles budget of fluorapatite is magmatic. The water content and the relative volatile ratios calculated for the NWA 2975 magma are similar to those established for other enriched or intermediate shergottites. It is difficult to define the source of enrichment: either Martian wet mantle or crustal assimilation. Comparing the environment of parental magma generation for NWA 2975 with the terrestrial mantle in terms of water content, it displays a composition intermediate between enriched and depleted MORB.

  20. 2001-2002 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Island County and Northeast Jefferson County, Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TerraPoint surveyed and created this data for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium under contract. The area surveyed is approximately 525 square miles and covers all of...

  1. Assessing LiDAR elevation data for KDOT applications : [technical summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    LiDAR-based elevation surveys : are a cost-effective means for : mapping topography over large : areas. LiDAR surveys use an : airplane-mounted or ground-based : laser radar unit to scan terrain. : Post-processing techniques are : applied to remove v...

  2. Utility of LiDAR for large area forest inventory applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas S. Skowronski; Andrew J. Lister

    2012-01-01

    Multi-resource inventory data are used in conjunction with Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data from the Pennsylvania Department of Natural Resource's PAMAP Program to assess the utility of extensive LiDAR acquisitions for large area forest assessments. Background, justification, and initial study designs are presented. The proposed study will involve three...

  3. Using LiDAR surveys to document floods: A case study of the 2008 Iowa flood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo; Krajewski, Witold F.; Goska, Radek; Young, Nathan

    2017-10-01

    Can we use Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), an emergent remote sensing technology with wide applications, to document floods with high accuracy? To explore the feasibility of this application, we propose a method to extract distributed inundation depths from a LiDAR survey conducted during flooding. This method consists of three steps: (1) collecting LiDAR data during flooding; (2) classifying the LiDAR observational points as flooded water surface points and non-flooded points, and generating a floodwater surface elevation model; and (3) subtracting the bare earth Digital Terrain Model (DTM) from the flood surface elevation model to obtain a flood depth map. We applied this method to the 2008 Iowa flood in the United States and evaluated the results using the high-water mark measurements, flood extent extracted from SPOT (Small Programmable Object Technology) imagery, and the near-simultaneously acquired aerial photography. The root mean squared error of the LiDAR-derived floodwater surface profile to high-water marks was 30 cm, the consistency between the two flooded areas derived from LiDAR and SPOT imagery was 72% (81% if suspicious isolated ponds in the SPOT-derived extent were removed), and LiDAR-derived flood extent had a horizontal resolution of ∼3 m. This work demonstrates that LiDAR technology has the potential to provide calibration and validation reference data with appreciable accuracy for improved flood inundation modeling.

  4. Airborne LiDAR reflective linear feature extraction for strip adjustment and horizontal accuracy determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    ODOT's Office of Aerial Engineering (OAE) has been using an Opetch 30/70 ALTM airborne LiDAR system for about four years. The introduction of LiDAR technology was a major development towards improving the mapping operations. The overall experiences a...

  5. Stationary LiDAR for traffic and safety applications - vehicles interpretation and tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the T-Scan project is to develop a data processing module for a novel LiDAR-based traffic scanner to collect highly accurate microscopic traffic data at road intersections. : T-Scan uses Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) technology that...

  6. Wetland inundation mapping and change monitoring using landsat and airborne LiDAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper presents a new approach for mapping wetland inundation change using Landsat and LiDAR intensity data. In this approach, LiDAR data were used to derive highly accurate reference subpixel inundation percentage (SIP) maps at the 30-m resolution. The reference SIP maps were then used to est...

  7. Microbial quality of drinking water in Dar es Salaam and use of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Water borne diseases are alarmingly high in urban areas like Dar es Salaam. Hence the importance of chlorine-based water disinfectant solutions such as Waterguard® that consists of 0.75% sodium hypochlorite. Waterguard® has been in the market in Dar es Salaam for about 4 years. Despite this, prevalence of ...

  8. Layer stacking: A novel algorithm for individual forest tree segmentation from LiDAR point clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias Ayrey; Shawn Fraver; John A. Kershaw; Laura S. Kenefic; Daniel Hayes; Aaron R. Weiskittel; Brian E. Roth

    2017-01-01

    As light detection and ranging (LiDAR) technology advances, it has become common for datasets to be acquired at a point density high enough to capture structural information from individual trees. To process these data, an automatic method of isolating individual trees from a LiDAR point cloud is required. Traditional methods for segmenting trees attempt to isolate...

  9. Anti-diabetic drugs in the private and public sector in Dar es Salaam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To compare availability, cost, affordability and sources of anti-diabetic drugs between private and public health facilities in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Design: Cross sectional descriptive study. Setting: Diabetic clinics in private and public health facilities in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Subjects: Eighty patients ...

  10. Flood Modeling Using a Synthesis of Multi-Platform LiDAR Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan M. Csontos

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the utility of a high resolution ground-based (mobile and terrestrial Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR dataset (0.2 m point-spacing supplemented with a coarser resolution airborne LiDAR dataset (5 m point-spacing for use in a flood inundation analysis. The techniques for combining multi-platform LiDAR data into a composite dataset in the form of a triangulated irregular network (TIN are described, and quantitative comparisons were made to a TIN generated solely from the airborne LiDAR dataset. For example, a maximum land surface elevation difference of 1.677 m and a mean difference of 0.178 m were calculated between the datasets based on sample points. Utilizing the composite and airborne LiDAR-derived TINs, a flood inundation comparison was completed using a one-dimensional steady flow hydraulic modeling analysis. Quantitative comparisons of the water surface profiles and depth grids indicated an underestimation of flooding extent, volume, and maximum flood height using the airborne LiDAR data alone. A 35% increase in maximum flood height was observed using the composite LiDAR dataset. In addition, the extents of the water surface profiles generated from the two datasets were found to be statistically significantly different. The urban and mountainous characteristics of the study area as well as the density (file size of the high resolution ground based LiDAR data presented both opportunities and challenges for flood modeling analyses.

  11. FY12 St Johns River Water Management LiDAR Survey: Putnam (FL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) dataset is a survey of the FY12 St Johns River Water Management LiDAR Survey, project area in north-central Florida and...

  12. Quantifying aboveground forest carbon pools and fluxes from repeat LiDAR surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew T. Hudak; Eva K. Strand; Lee A. Vierling; John C. Byrne; Jan U. H. Eitel; Sebastian Martinuzzi; Michael J. Falkowski

    2012-01-01

    Sound forest policy and management decisions to mitigate rising atmospheric CO2 depend upon accurate methodologies to quantify forest carbon pools and fluxes over large tracts of land. LiDAR remote sensing is a rapidly evolving technology for quantifying aboveground biomass and thereby carbon pools; however, little work has evaluated the efficacy of repeat LiDAR...

  13. Remote sensing of Sonoran Desert vegetation structure and phenology with ground-based LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankey, Joel B.; Munson, Seth M.; Webb, Robert H.; Wallace, Cynthia S.A.; Duran, Cesar M.

    2015-01-01

    Long-term vegetation monitoring efforts have become increasingly important for understanding ecosystem response to global change. Many traditional methods for monitoring can be infrequent and limited in scope. Ground-based LiDAR is one remote sensing method that offers a clear advancement to monitor vegetation dynamics at high spatial and temporal resolution. We determined the effectiveness of LiDAR to detect intra-annual variability in vegetation structure at a long-term Sonoran Desert monitoring plot dominated by cacti, deciduous and evergreen shrubs. Monthly repeat LiDAR scans of perennial plant canopies over the course of one year had high precision. LiDAR measurements of canopy height and area were accurate with respect to total station survey measurements of individual plants. We found an increase in the number of LiDAR vegetation returns following the wet North American Monsoon season. This intra-annual variability in vegetation structure detected by LiDAR was attributable to a drought deciduous shrub Ambrosia deltoidea, whereas the evergreen shrub Larrea tridentata and cactus Opuntia engelmannii had low variability. Benefits of using LiDAR over traditional methods to census desert plants are more rapid, consistent, and cost-effective data acquisition in a high-resolution, 3-dimensional context. We conclude that repeat LiDAR measurements can be an effective method for documenting ecosystem response to desert climatology and drought over short time intervals and at detailed-local spatial scale.

  14. Jean Lafitte 2013, 1.0 Meter LiDAR, Classified point cloud

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) dataset is a survey of the Jean Lafitte,G13PD00214, 1.0 Meter LiDAR Survey Area in south of New Orleans and encompasses 77...

  15. Investigating assumptions of crown archetypes for modelling LiDAR returns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calders, K.; Lewis, P.; Disney, M.; Verbesselt, J.; Herold, M.

    2013-01-01

    LiDAR has the potential to derive canopy structural information such as tree height and leaf area index (LAI), via models of the LiDAR signal. Such models often make assumptions regarding crown shape to simplify parameter retrieval and crown archetypes are typically assumed to contain a turbid

  16. Wayne and Washtenaw Counties 1.0 PPSM LiDAR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TASK NAME: Wayne and Washtenaw Counties 1.0 PPSM LiDAR LiDAR Data Acquisition and Processing Production Task USGS CONTRACT: 07CRCN0006 TASK ORDER NUMBER: G09PD00300...

  17. Epidemiological Studies on Bovine Mastitis in Smallholder Dairy Herds in the Dar es Salaam Region, Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kivaria, F.M.

    2006-01-01

    Recently the number of milking cows has increased substantially in the Dar es Salaam region due to an increasing demand for fresh milk in this densely populated urban centre. It is estimated that there are 1,765 smallholder dairy herds with 8,233 improved dairy animals in and around the Dar es

  18. Using satellite and airborne LiDAR to model woodpecker habitat occupancy at the landscape scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee A. Vierling; Kerri T. Vierling; Patrick Adam; Andrew T. Hudak

    2013-01-01

    Incorporating vertical vegetation structure into models of animal distributions can improve understanding of the patterns and processes governing habitat selection. LiDAR can provide such structural information, but these data are typically collected via aircraft and thus are limited in spatial extent. Our objective was to explore the utility of satellite-based LiDAR...

  19. Tree crown delineation from high resolution airborne LiDAR based on densities of high points

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahman, M.Z.A.; Gorte, B.G.H.

    2009-01-01

    Tree detection and tree crown delineation from Airborne LiDAR has been focusing mostly on utilizing the canopy height model (CHM). This paper presents a method for individual tree crown delineation based on densities of high points (DHP) from the high resolution Airborne LiDAR. The DHP method relies

  20. 2011-2013 Indiana Statewide Imagery and LiDAR Program: Lake Michigan Watershed Counties

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Indiana's Statewide LiDAR data is produced at 1.5-meter average post spacing for all 92 Indiana Counties covering more than 36,420 square miles. New LiDAR data was...

  1. A General-purpose Framework for Parallel Processing of Large-scale LiDAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z.; Hodgson, M.; Li, W.

    2016-12-01

    Light detection and ranging (LiDAR) technologies have proven efficiency to quickly obtain very detailed Earth surface data for a large spatial extent. Such data is important for scientific discoveries such as Earth and ecological sciences and natural disasters and environmental applications. However, handling LiDAR data poses grand geoprocessing challenges due to data intensity and computational intensity. Previous studies received notable success on parallel processing of LiDAR data to these challenges. However, these studies either relied on high performance computers and specialized hardware (GPUs) or focused mostly on finding customized solutions for some specific algorithms. We developed a general-purpose scalable framework coupled with sophisticated data decomposition and parallelization strategy to efficiently handle big LiDAR data. Specifically, 1) a tile-based spatial index is proposed to manage big LiDAR data in the scalable and fault-tolerable Hadoop distributed file system, 2) two spatial decomposition techniques are developed to enable efficient parallelization of different types of LiDAR processing tasks, and 3) by coupling existing LiDAR processing tools with Hadoop, this framework is able to conduct a variety of LiDAR data processing tasks in parallel in a highly scalable distributed computing environment. The performance and scalability of the framework is evaluated with a series of experiments conducted on a real LiDAR dataset using a proof-of-concept prototype system. The results show that the proposed framework 1) is able to handle massive LiDAR data more efficiently than standalone tools; and 2) provides almost linear scalability in terms of either increased workload (data volume) or increased computing nodes with both spatial decomposition strategies. We believe that the proposed framework provides valuable references on developing a collaborative cyberinfrastructure for processing big earth science data in a highly scalable environment.

  2. Now You See It… Now You Don’t: Understanding Airborne Mapping LiDAR Collection and Data Product Generation for Archaeological Research in Mesoamerica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Fernandez-Diaz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we provide a description of airborne mapping LiDAR, also known as airborne laser scanning (ALS, technology and its workflow from mission planning to final data product generation, with a specific emphasis on archaeological research. ALS observations are highly customizable, and can be tailored to meet specific research needs. Thus it is important for an archaeologist to fully understand the options available during planning, collection and data product generation before commissioning an ALS survey, to ensure the intended research questions can be answered with the resultant data products. Also this knowledge is of great use for the researcher trying to understand the quality and limitations of existing datasets collected for other purposes. Throughout the paper we use examples from archeological ALS projects to illustrate the key concepts of importance for the archaeology researcher.

  3. Urban agriculture and Anopheles habitats in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Dongus

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional survey of agricultural areas, combined with routinely monitored mosquito larval information, was conducted in urban Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, to investigate how agricultural and geographical features may influence the presence of Anopheles larvae. Data were integrated into a geographical information systems framework, and predictors of the presence of Anopheles larvae in farming areas were assessed using multivariate logistic regression with independent random effects. It was found that more than 5% of the study area (total size 16.8 km2 was used for farming in backyard gardens and larger open spaces. The proportion of habitats containing Anopheles larvae was 1.7 times higher in agricultural areas compared to other areas (95% confidence interval = 1.56-1.92. Significant geographic predictors of the presence of Anopheles larvae in gardens included location in lowland areas, proximity to river, and relatively impermeable soils. Agriculture-related predictors comprised specific seedbed types, mid-sized gardens, irrigation by wells, as well as cultivation of sugar cane or leafy vegetables. Negative predictors included small garden size, irrigation by tap water, rainfed production and cultivation of leguminous crops or fruit trees. Although there was an increased chance of finding Anopheles larvae in agricultural sites, it was found that breeding sites originated by urban agriculture account for less than a fifth of all breeding sites of malaria vectors in Dar es Salaam. It is suggested that strategies comprising an integrated malaria control effort in malaria-endemic African cities include participatory involvement of farmers by planting shade trees near larval habitats.

  4. Dynamic LiDAR-NDVI classification of fluvial landscape units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Núñez, Carolina; Parrot, Jean-François

    2015-04-01

    The lower basin of the Coatzacoalcos River is a wide floodplain in which, during the wet season, local and major flooding are distinguished. Both types of floods, intermittent and regional, are important in terms of resources; the regional flood sediments enrich the soils of the plains and intermittent floods allow obtaining aquatic resources for subsistence during the heatwave. In the floodplain different abandoned meanders and intermittent streams are quickly colonized by aquatic vegetation. However, from the 1990s, the Coatzacoalcos River floodplain has important topographic changes due to mining, road and bridges construction; erosion and sedimentation requires continuous parcel boundaries along with the increasing demand of channel reparation, embankments, levees and bridges associated to tributaries. NDVI data, LiDAR point cloud and various types of flood simulations taking into account the DTM are used to classify the dynamic landscape units. These units are associated to floods in relation with water resources, agriculture and livestock. In the study area, the first returns of the point cloud allow extracting vegetation strata. The last returns correspond to the bare earth surface, especially in this area with few human settlements. The surface that is not covered by trees or by aquatic vegetation, correspond to crops, pastures and bare soils. The classification is obtained by using the NDVI index coupled with vegetation strata and water bodies. The result shows that 47.96% of the area does not present active vegetation and it includes 31.53% of bare soils. Concerning the active vegetation, pastures, bushes and trees represent respectively 25.59%, 11.14% and 13.25%. The remaining 1.25% is distributed between water bodies with aquatic vegetation, trees and shrubs. Dynamic landscape units' classification represents a tool for monitoring water resources in a fluvial plain. This approach can be also applied to forest management, environmental services and

  5. Urban agriculture and Anopheles habitats in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongus, Stefan; Nyika, Dickson; Kannady, Khadija; Mtasiwa, Deo; Mshinda, Hassan; Gosoniu, Laura; Drescher, Axel W; Fillinger, Ulrike; Tanner, Marcel; Killeen, Gerry F; Castro, Marcia C

    2009-05-01

    A cross-sectional survey of agricultural areas, combined with routinely monitored mosquito larval information, was conducted in urban Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, to investigate how agricultural and geographical features may influence the presence of Anopheles larvae. Data were integrated into a geographical information systems framework, and predictors of the presence of Anopheles larvae in farming areas were assessed using multivariate logistic regression with independent random effects. It was found that more than 5% of the study area (total size 16.8 km2) was used for farming in backyard gardens and larger open spaces. The proportion of habitats containing Anopheles larvae was 1.7 times higher in agricultural areas compared to other areas (95% confidence interval = 1.56-1.92). Significant geographic predictors of the presence of Anopheles larvae in gardens included location in lowland areas, proximity to river, and relatively impermeable soils. Agriculture-related predictors comprised specific seedbed types, mid-sized gardens, irrigation by wells, as well as cultivation of sugar cane or leafy vegetables. Negative predictors included small garden size, irrigation by tap water, rainfed production and cultivation of leguminous crops or fruit trees. Although there was an increased chance of finding Anopheles larvae in agricultural sites, it was found that breeding sites originated by urban agriculture account for less than a fifth of all breeding sites of malaria vectors in Dar es Salaam. It is suggested that strategies comprising an integrated malaria control effort in malaria-endemic African cities include participatory involvement of farmers by planting shade trees near larval habitats.

  6. Delineation of peatland lagg boundaries from airborne LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, Melanie N.; Richardson, Murray C.; Price, Jonathan S.

    2017-09-01

    In Canada, peatlands are the most common type of wetland, but boundary delineation in peatland complexes has received little attention in the scientific literature. Typically, peatland boundaries are mapped as crisp, absolute features, and the transitional lagg zone—the ecotone found between a raised bog and the surrounding mineral land—is often overlooked. In this study, we aim (1) to advance existing approaches for detecting and locating laggs and lagg boundaries using airborne LiDAR surveys and (2) to describe the spatial distribution of laggs around raised bog peatlands. Two contrasting spatial analytical approaches for lagg detection were tested using five LiDAR-derived topographic and vegetation indices: topography, vegetation height, topographic wetness index, the standard deviation of the vegetation's height (as a proxy for the complexity of the vegetation's structure), and local indices of elevation variance. Using a dissimilarity approach (edge-detection, split-moving window analysis), no one variable accurately depicted both the lagg-mineral land and bog-lagg boundaries. Some indicators were better at predicting the bog-lagg boundary (i.e., vegetation height) and others at finding the lagg-mineral land boundary (i.e., topography). Dissimilarity analysis reinforces the usefulness of derived variables (e.g., wetness indices) in locating laggs, especially for those with weak topographic and vegetation gradients. When the lagg was confined between the bog and the adjacent upland, it took a linear form, parallel to the peatland's edge and was easier to predict. When the adjacent mineral land was flat or sloping away from the peatland, the lagg was discontinuous and intermittent and more difficult to predict.

  7. 2011 Japan tsunami survivor video based hydrograph and flow velocity measurements using LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, H. M.; Phillips, D. A.; Okayasu, A.; Shimozono, T.; Liu, H.; Mohammed, F.; Skanavis, V.; Synolakis, C. E.; Takahashi, T.

    2012-04-01

    On March 11, 2011, a magnitude Mw 9.0 earthquake occurred off the coast of Japan's Tohoku region causing catastrophic damage and loss of life. Numerous tsunami reconnaissance trips were conducted in Japan (Tohoku Earthquake and Tsunami Joint Survey Group). This report focuses on the surveys at 9 tsunami eyewitness video recording locations in Yoriisohama, Kesennuma, Kamaishi and Miyako along Japan's Sanriku coast and the subsequent video image calibration, processing, tsunami hydrograph and flow velocity analysis. Selected tsunami video recording sites were visited, eyewitnesses interviewed and some ground control points recorded during the initial tsunami reconnaissance from April 9 to 25. A follow-up survey from June 9 to 15, 2011 focused on terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) at locations with previously identified high quality eyewitness videos. We acquired precise topographic data using TLS at nine video sites with multiple scans acquired from different instrument positions at each site. These ground-based LiDAR measurements produce a 3-dimensional "point cloud" dataset. Digital photography from a scanner-mounted camera yields photorealistic 3D images. Integrated GPS measurements allow accurate georeferencing of the TLS data in an absolute reference frame such as WGS84. We deployed a Riegl VZ-400 scanner (1550 nm wavelength laser, 42,000 measurements/second, requires the calibration of the sector of view present in the eyewitness video recording based on visually identifiable ground control points measured in the LiDAR point cloud data. In a second step the video image motion induced by the panning of the video camera was determined from subsequent raw color images by means of planar particle image velocimetry (PIV) applied to fixed objects in the field of view. The third step involves the transformation of the raw tsunami video images from image coordinates to world coordinates. The mapping from video frame to real world coordinates follows the direct linear

  8. 2011 Japan tsunami current and flow velocity measurements from survivor videos using LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, H. M.; Phillips, D. A.; Okayasu, A.; Shimozono, T.; Liu, H.; Mohammed, F.; Skanavis, V.; Synolakis, C.; Takahashi, T.

    2011-12-01

    On March 11, 2011, a magnitude Mw 9.0 earthquake occurred off the coast of Japan's Tohoku region causing catastrophic damage and loss of life. Numerous tsunami reconnaissance trips were conducted in Japan (Tohoku Earthquake and Tsunami Joint Survey Group). This report focuses on the surveys at 9 tsunami eyewitness video recording locations in Yoriisohama, Kesennuma, Kamaishi and Miyako along Japan's Sanriku coast and the subsequent video image calibration, processing and tsunami flow velocity analysis. Selected tsunami video recording sites were visited, eyewitnesses interviewed and some ground control points recorded during the initial tsunami reconnaissance from April 9 to 25. A follow-up survey from June 9 to 15, 2011 focused on terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) at locations with previously identified high quality eyewitness videos. We acquired precise topographic data using TLS at nine video sites with multiple scans acquired from different instrument positions at each site. These ground-based LiDAR measurements produce a 3-dimensional "point cloud" dataset. Digital photography from a scanner-mounted camera yields photorealistic 3D images. Integrated GPS measurements allow accurate georeferencing of the TLS data in an absolute reference frame such as WGS84. We deployed a Riegl VZ-400 scanner (1550 nm wavelength laser, 42,000 measurements/second, requires the calibration of the sector of view present in the eyewitness video recording based on visually identifiable ground control points measured in the LiDAR point cloud data. In a second step the video image motion induced by the panning of the video camera was determined from subsequent raw color images by means of planar particle image velocimetry (PIV) applied to fixed objects in the field of view. The third step involves the transformation of the raw tsunami video images from image coordinates to world coordinates. The mapping from video frame to real world coordinates follows the direct linear transformation

  9. Mapping Forest Carbon by Fusing Terrestrial and Airborne LiDAR Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovall, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    The storage and flux of terrestrial carbon (C) is one of the largest and most uncertain components of the global C budget, the vast majority of which is held within the biomass of the world's forests. However, the spatial distribution and quantification of forest C remains difficult to measure on a large scale. Remote sensing of forests with airborne LiDAR has proven to be an extremely effective method of bridging the gap between data from plot-level forestry mensuration and landscape-scale C storage estimates, but the standard method of assessing forest C is typically based on national or regional-scale allometric equations that are often not representative on the local-scale. Improvement of these measurements is necessary in order for collaborative multi-national carbon monitoring programs such as REDD implemented by the UNFCCC to be successful in areas, such as tropical forests, with tree species that have insufficiently documented allometric relationships. The primary goal of this study is to set forth a pipeline for precise non-destructive monitoring of C storage by: 1) determining C storage on 15 1/10th ha plots in a 25.6 ha Virginia temperate forest using the recently updated national allometric equations from Chojnacky et. al 2014, 2) comparing these estimates to non-destructively determined individual tree biomass using several semi-automated approaches of three-dimensionally analyzing the point cloud from a high-precision Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS), and 3) creating a predictive model of forest C storage by fusing airborne LiDAR data to the plot-level TLS measurements. Our findings align with several other studies, indicating a strong relationship between allometrically-derived C estimates and TLS-derived C measurements (R2=0.93, n=30) using relatively few individuals, suggesting the potential application of these methods to species that are understudied or are without allometric relationships. Voxel based C storage was estimated on the plot level and

  10. Automatic registration of UAV-borne sequent images and LiDAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bisheng; Chen, Chi

    2015-03-01

    Use of direct geo-referencing data leads to registration failure between sequent images and LiDAR data captured by mini-UAV platforms because of low-cost sensors. This paper therefore proposes a novel automatic registration method for sequent images and LiDAR data captured by mini-UAVs. First, the proposed method extracts building outlines from LiDAR data and images and estimates the exterior orientation parameters (EoPs) of the images with building objects in the LiDAR data coordinate framework based on corresponding corner points derived indirectly by using linear features. Second, the EoPs of the sequent images in the image coordinate framework are recovered using a structure from motion (SfM) technique, and the transformation matrices between the LiDAR coordinate and image coordinate frameworks are calculated using corresponding EoPs, resulting in a coarse registration between the images and the LiDAR data. Finally, 3D points are generated from sequent images by multi-view stereo (MVS) algorithms. Then the EoPs of the sequent images are further refined by registering the LiDAR data and the 3D points using an iterative closest-point (ICP) algorithm with the initial results from coarse registration, resulting in a fine registration between sequent images and LiDAR data. Experiments were performed to check the validity and effectiveness of the proposed method. The results show that the proposed method achieves high-precision robust co-registration of sequent images and LiDAR data captured by mini-UAVs.

  11. Conservación de las tarjetas de visita del Archivo Rubén Darío

    OpenAIRE

    García Bustos, Irene

    2016-01-01

    El Artículo trata sobre el método de almacenamiento de la colección de tarjetas de visita pertenecientes al Archivo Rubén Darío, diseñado por la autora en el contexto de la reinstalación íntegra del citado Archivo que se viene desarrollando en la Biblioteca Histórica desde su recepción. La autora realizó este trabajo como parte de las prácticas extracurriculares del Grado en Conservación y Restauración del Patrimonio Cultural de la UCM llevadas a cabo en la Biblioteca Histórica de la UCM bajo...

  12. Genetic linkage mapping in an F2 perennial ryegrass population using DArT markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomaszewski, Céline; Byrne, Stephen; Foito, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    Perennial ryegrass is the principal forage grass species used in temperate agriculture. In recent years, significant efforts have been made to develop molecular marker strategies to allow cost-effective characterization of a large number of loci simultaneously. One such strategy involves using DAr......T markers, and a DArT array has recently been developed for the Lolium-Festuca complex. In this study, we report the first use of the DArTFest array to generate a genetic linkage map based on 326 markers in a Lolium perenne F2 population, consisting of 325 genotypes. For proof of concept, the map was used...

  13. Derechos fundamentales y el acceso al agua potable

    OpenAIRE

    Brasil, Deilton Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    Este trabajo analiza el acceso al agua potable como un derecho fundamental en el contexto del principio de la dignidad humana en la construcción de un Estado de Derecho Ambiental. Reconocer el acceso al agua como un derecho fundamental, es dar al Estado el deber de garantizar uma calidad esencial minima de vida saludable para las generaciones presentes y futuras, obtenidos por el suministro de agua, respetando las normas de potabilidad, la gestión del agua, protección administrativa y judicia...

  14. Frontiers in Using LiDAR to Analyze Urban Landscape Heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kunwar Krishna Veer

    Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) technology has facilitated extraordinary advances in our ability to remotely sense precise details of both built and natural environments. The inherent complexity of urban landscapes and the massive data volumes produced by LiDAR require unique methodological considerations for big data remote sensing over large metropolitan regions. The heterogeneous landscapes of the rapidly urbanizing Charlotte Metropolitan Region of North Carolina provided an ideal testing ground for developing methods of analysis for urban ecosystems over large regional extents, including: (1) fusion of LiDAR digital surface models (DSMs) with Landsat TM imagery to balance spatial resolution, data volume, and mapping accuracy of urban land covers, (2) comparison of LiDAR-derived metrics to fine grain optical imagery -- and their integration -- for detecting forest understory plant invaders, and (3) data reduction techniques for computationally efficient estimation of aboveground woody biomass in urban forests. In Chapter 1, I examined tradeoffs between potential gains in mapping accuracy and computational costs by integrating DSMs (structural and intensity) extracted from LiDAR with TM imagery and evaluating the degree to which TM, LiDAR, and LiDAR-TM fusion data discriminated land covers. I used Maximum Likelihood and Classification Tree algorithms to classify TM data, LiDAR data, and LiDAR-TM fusions. I assessed the relative contributions of LiDAR DSMs to map classification accuracy and identified an optimal spatial resolution of LiDAR DSMs for large area assessments of urban land cover. In Chapter 2, I analyzed combinations of datasets developed from categorized LiDAR-derived variables (Overstory, Understory, Topography, and Overall Vegetation Characteristics) and IKONOS imagery ( Optical) to detect and map the understory plant invader, Ligustrum sinense, using Random Forest (RF) and logistic regression (LR) algorithms, and I assessed the relative

  15. Methodology and Characteristics of Zad al-masir fi ‘ilm al-tafsirby AllamaIbn al-Jawzī (Urdu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Muhammad Riaz al Azhari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the methodology and characteristics of Zad al-masir fi ‘ilm al-tafsir. This is one the finest work of AllamaIbn al-Jawzī, a 6th century prominent Interpreter. Several editions of this Tafsir have been published. However, the edition of dar al-kitab al-‘arbi, Beirut published in four volumes is selected for this study. This exegesis is based on conventional narrations, authentic quotations from the Islamic Scholars and lingual & grammatical discussions. As a witness, causes of verses (asbabal-Nuz┴l,Makki and MadaniSurah’s (chapters, the abrogating and abrogated verses (al-nasikhwal-mans┴kh and Islamic jurisprudence have been discussed in it where needed. The quality of this translation which is admirable is that mostly authentic Ahadith from original sources, and references to well known basic books in relevant discussions have been described. `

  16. CMS: LiDAR Data for Forested Areas in Paragominas, Para, Brazil, 2012-2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides raw LiDAR point cloud data and derived Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) for five forested areas in the municipality of Paragominas, Para, Brazil,...

  17. 2012 USACE Post Hurricane Sandy Topographic LiDAR: Rhode Island and Massachusetts Coast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This topographic elevation point data derived from multiple return light detection and ranging (LiDAR) represents 354.272 square miles of coastline for Rhode Island...

  18. 2006-2008 PAMAP LiDAR Data of Pennsylvania (Southern Counties)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of classified LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) elevation points produced by the PAMAP Program. Additional information is available at the...

  19. Radiographic anatomy of the canine coxofemoral joint using the dorsal acetabular rim (DAR) view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumpatori, Brian J; Mathews, Kyle G; Roe, Simon R; Robertson, Ian D

    2003-01-01

    A radiographic study of the anatomy of the canine acetabulum was performed. The relationship between the area of dorsal acetabular rim that is subject to early damage in dogs with coxofemoral joint laxity, and the "DAR point" identified on dorsal acetabular rim (DAR) radiographic views was examined. Radiographs and digital photographs were made of the pelvis harvested from each of six skeletally mature dogs. Through analysis of these images, it was determined that in the standing animal, the DAR point is located 4-6 mm (or approximately 37 degrees) caudal to the dorsal acetabular rim area that is prone to early damage in dogs with coxofemoral joint laxity. This study suggests that the DAR radiographic view may under-represent changes to the dorsal acetabular rim in dogs with coxofemoral laxity.

  20. 2008 NWFWMD (Northwest Florida Water Management District) Florida LiDAR: Inland Okaloosa County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) LAS dataset is a survey of inland Okaloosa County, Florida not covered in the 2008 Florida Department of Emergency...

  1. 2012 USACE Post Sandy Topographic LiDAR: Rhode Island and Massachusetts Coast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This topographic elevation point data derived from multiple return light detection and ranging (LiDAR) represents 354.272 square miles of coastline for Rhode Island...

  2. Case of rhesus antigen weak D type 4.2. (DAR category detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. L. Golovkina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Serological methods of Rhesus antigens identification in humans cannot identify D-antigen variants. In this article the serological characteristics of Rhesus antigen D weak type 4.2. (Category DAR are described.

  3. 2008 Northwest Florida Water Management District (NWFWMD) LiDAR: Inland Okaloosa County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) LAS dataset is a survey of inland Okaloosa County, Florida not covered in the 2008 Florida Department of Emergency...

  4. 2009 National Renewable Energy Labratory/Boston Redevelopment Authority Topographic LiDAR: Boston, Massachusetts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC contracted with Sanborn to provide LiDAR mapping services for the Boston area. Utilizing multi-return systems, Light...

  5. 2014 U.S. Geological Survey CMGP LiDAR: Post Sandy (Connecticut)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The LiDAR data were processed to a bare-earth digital terrain model (DTM). Detailed breaklines and bare-earth Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) were produced for the...

  6. LiDAR Relative Reflectivity Surface (2011) for the St. Thomas East End Reserve, St. Thomas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a LiDAR (Light Detection & Ranging) 0.3x0.3 meter resolution relative seafloor reflectivity surface for the St. Thomas East End Reserve...

  7. CMS: LiDAR Data for Mangrove Forests in the Zambezi River Delta, Mozambique, 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides high-resolution LiDAR point cloud data collected during surveys over mangrove forests in the Zambezi River Delta in Mozambique in May 2014....

  8. 2009 Puget Sound Lidar Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Nooksack River

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. (WS) collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data of the Nooksack River in Washington on February 20th - 22nd, 2009. The total area of...

  9. 2007 Lake County Board of County Commissioners Topographic LiDAR: Lake County, Florida

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This metadata document describes the LiDAR point data in LAS format produced by Kucera covering the project area of Lake County, FL. The data produced is...

  10. 2009 Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Topographic LiDAR: Fort Kent, Maine

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Camp Dresser McKee Inc. contracted with Sanborn Map Company to provide LiDAR mapping services for Fort Kent, Maine. Utilizing multi-return systems, Light Detection...

  11. Airborne LiDAR : a new source of traffic flow data, executive summary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-01

    LiDAR (or airborne laser scanning) systems became a : dominant player in high-precision spatial data : acquisition in the late 90s. This new technology : quickly established itself as the main source of surface : information in commercial mapping,...

  12. Airborne LiDAR : a new source of traffic flow data : executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-01

    LiDAR (or airborne laser scanning) systems became a : dominant player in high-precision spatial data : acquisition in the late 90s. This new technology : quickly established itself as the main source of surface : information in commercial mapping,...

  13. 2006-2008 PAMAP LiDAR Data of Pennsylvania (Northern Counties)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of classified LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) elevation points produced by the PAMAP Program. PAMAP data are organized into blocks, which...

  14. 2011 Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Topographic LiDAR: Quinnipiac River Watershed, Connecticut

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Quinnipiac AOI consists of one 443 square mile area. Ground Control is collected throughout the AOI for use in the processing of LiDAR data to ensure data...

  15. CMS: LiDAR-derived Canopy Height, Elevation for Sites in Kalimantan, Indonesia, 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset provides canopy height and elevation data products derived from airborne LiDAR data collected over 90 sites on the island of Borneo in late 2014. The...

  16. CMS: GLAS LiDAR-derived Global Estimates of Forest Canopy Height, 2004-2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides estimates of forest canopy height derived from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) LiDAR instrument that was aboard the NASA Ice,...

  17. 2010 U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Topographic LiDAR: San Francisco Bay, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The primary purpose of this project was to develop a consistent and accurate surface elevation dataset derived from high-accuracy Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR)...

  18. LiDAR Data, DEM, and Maximum Vegetation Height Product from Southern Idaho, 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset provides the point cloud data derived from small footprint waveform LiDAR data collected in August 2014 over Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed and...

  19. 2010 U.S. Geological Survey Topographic LiDAR: Atchafalaya Basin, Louisiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) dataset is a survey of the Atchafalaya Basin in south-central Louisiana. The entire survey area encompasses 981 square miles....

  20. LiDAR and DTM Data from Forested Land Near Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil, 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides LiDAR point clouds and digital terrain models (DTM) from surveys over the K34 tower site in the Cuieiras Biological Reserve, over forest...

  1. CMS: LiDAR Data for Forested Sites on Borneo Island, Kalimantan, Indonesia, 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset provides airborne LiDAR data collected over 90 sites totaling approximately 100,000 hectares of forested land in Kalimantan, Indonesia on the island of...

  2. 2006 U.S. Geological Survey Topographic LiDAR: Alameda County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data set is a survey of Alameda County in Northern California. The entire survey covers approximately 868.382 square miles....

  3. 2007 Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) LiDAR: Hillsborough/Little Manatee Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — EarthData International collected ADS-50 derived LiDAR over a portion of Hillsborough and Manatee Counties with a one meter post spacing. The period of collection...

  4. 2008 - 2009 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) South Coast LiDAR Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) contracted with Watershed Sciences, Inc. to collect high resolution topographic LiDAR data for...

  5. 2009 National Renewable Energy Laboratory/Boston Redevelopment Authority Topographic LiDAR: Boston, Massachusetts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC contracted with Sanborn to provide LiDAR mapping services for the Boston area. Utilizing multi-return systems, Light...

  6. 2006 Florida LiDAR: Escambia, Santa Rosa, and Walton Counties

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — ESCAMBIA: The Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) LAS dataset is a survey of select areas within Escambia County, Florida. These data were produced for Dewberry and...

  7. LiDAR and DTM Data from Tapajos National Forest in Para, Brazil, 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides LiDAR point clouds and digital terrain models (DTM) from surveys over the Tapajos National Forest in Belterra municipality, Para, Brazil...

  8. 2007 Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) LiDAR: Hernando County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is one component of a digital terrain model (DTM) for the Southwest Florida Water Management Districts FY2006 Digital Orthophoto (B089) and LiDAR...

  9. LiDAR-mast deviations in complex terrain and their simulation using CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Klaas

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available LiDARs (Light Detection and Ranging are becoming important tools for wind resource assessments in all kinds of terrain. Compared to mast measurements, mobility and flexibility are their greatest benefits. However, care needs to be taken when setting up a measurement campaign. The influence of complex terrain on the wind leads to inhomogeneous flow. This can cause considerable errors in ground based mono-static LiDAR measurements due to their measurement principle and simplifying assumptions.Within this work, wind measurements from Fraunhofer IWES’s 200 m research mast in complex terrain at “Rödeser Berg” in Kassel, Germany, and a pulsed Doppler LiDAR (Leosphere windcube, located at the mast, are compared. The relative deviation between the measurements of the horizontal wind speed by the LiDAR and the mast (LiDAR-mast deviations varies with wind direction and height. It ranges from about −4 % underestimation to +2.5 % overestimation by the LiDAR - for heights between 120 and 200 m. Two steady-state Reynolds-Averaged-Navier-Stokes (RANS Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD-models and a model based on linearized Navier-Stokes Equations were used to estimate the LiDAR error from a flow simulation. Model results were evaluated depending on model parameterisation such as forest height and density. Given the right parameterisations – especially for the forest model – the CFD-models showed a good performance when compared to the observed LiDAR-mast deviations. These simulations can thus be used to correct the LiDAR error induced by the complex flow.To demonstrate variations of LiDAR errors due to choice of measurement location, one of the models was run to calculate the wind flow in an area of 2×2km2$2\\times2\\,\\text{km}^{2}$ around the 200 m measurement mast. This allows the visualization of the estimated LiDAR errors to characterize measurement locations. Results showed the significant variation of measurement errors due to

  10. et al

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Schalk Cloete

    A possible avenue for dealing with the challenge of gastro-intestinal helminths is to select livestock for resistance ... genetic variation in resistance of sheep to nematode infestations (Greeff et al., 1995; Morris et al., 1996; .... The type of transformation that was applied resulted in minimal changes in conclusions derived from.

  11. Detecting understory plant invasion in urban forests using LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kunwar K.; Davis, Amy J.; Meentemeyer, Ross K.

    2015-06-01

    Light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data are increasingly used to measure structural characteristics of urban forests but are rarely used to detect the growing problem of exotic understory plant invaders. We explored the merits of using LiDAR-derived metrics alone and through integration with spectral data to detect the spatial distribution of the exotic understory plant Ligustrum sinense, a rapidly spreading invader in the urbanizing region of Charlotte, North Carolina, USA. We analyzed regional-scale L. sinense occurrence data collected over the course of three years with LiDAR-derived metrics of forest structure that were categorized into the following groups: overstory, understory, topography, and overall vegetation characteristics, and IKONOS spectral features - optical. Using random forest (RF) and logistic regression (LR) classifiers, we assessed the relative contributions of LiDAR and IKONOS derived variables to the detection of L. sinense. We compared the top performing models developed for a smaller, nested experimental extent using RF and LR classifiers, and used the best overall model to produce a predictive map of the spatial distribution of L. sinense across our country-wide study extent. RF classification of LiDAR-derived topography metrics produced the highest mapping accuracy estimates, outperforming IKONOS data by 17.5% and the integration of LiDAR and IKONOS data by 5.3%. The top performing model from the RF classifier produced the highest kappa of 64.8%, improving on the parsimonious LR model kappa by 31.1% with a moderate gain of 6.2% over the county extent model. Our results demonstrate the superiority of LiDAR-derived metrics over spectral data and fusion of LiDAR and spectral data for accurately mapping the spatial distribution of the forest understory invader L. sinense.

  12. Change Detection from differential airborne LiDAR using a weighted Anisotropic Iterative Closest Point Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Kusari, A.; Glennie, C. L.; Oskin, M. E.; Hinojosa-Corona, A.; Borsa, A. A.; Arrowsmith, R.

    2013-12-01

    Differential LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) from repeated surveys has recently emerged as an effective tool to measure three-dimensional (3D) change for applications such as quantifying slip and spatially distributed warping associated with earthquake ruptures, and examining the spatial distribution of beach erosion after hurricane impact. Currently, the primary method for determining 3D change is through the use of the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm and its variants. However, all current studies using ICP have assumed that all LiDAR points in the compared point clouds have uniform accuracy. This assumption is simplistic given that the error for each LiDAR point is variable, and dependent upon highly variable factors such as target range, angle of incidence, and aircraft trajectory accuracy. Therefore, to rigorously determine spatial change, it would be ideal to model the random error for every LiDAR observation in the differential point cloud, and use these error estimates as apriori weights in the ICP algorithm. To test this approach, we implemented a rigorous LiDAR observation error propagation method to generate estimated random error for each point in a LiDAR point cloud, and then determine 3D displacements between two point clouds using an anistropic weighted ICP algorithm. The algorithm was evaluated by qualitatively and quantitatively comparing post earthquake slip estimates from the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah Earthquake between a uniform weight and anistropically weighted ICP algorithm, using pre-event LiDAR collected in 2006 by Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Geografía (INEGI), and post-event LiDAR collected by The National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM).

  13. Sexual behaviours and associated factors among students at Bahir Dar University: a cross sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Mulu, Wondemagegn; Yimer, Mulat; Abera, Bayeh

    2014-01-01

    Background Sexual behaviour is the core of sexuality matters in adolescents and youths. Their modest or dynamic behaviour vulnerable them to risky sexual behaviours. In Ethiopia, there is scarcity of multicentered representative data on sexual behaviours in students to have a national picture at higher education. This study therefore conducted to assess sexual behaviours and associated factors at Bahir Dar University, Ethiopia. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted among Bahir Dar Uni...

  14. Modeling marbled murrelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus) habitat using LiDAR-derived canopy data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagar, Joan C.; Eskelson, Bianca N.I.; Haggerty, Patricia K.; Nelson, S. Kim; Vesely, David G.

    2014-01-01

    LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) is an emerging remote-sensing tool that can provide fine-scale data describing vertical complexity of vegetation relevant to species that are responsive to forest structure. We used LiDAR data to estimate occupancy probability for the federally threatened marbled murrelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus) in the Oregon Coast Range of the United States. Our goal was to address the need identified in the Recovery Plan for a more accurate estimate of the availability of nesting habitat by developing occupancy maps based on refined measures of nest-strand structure. We used murrelet occupancy data collected by the Bureau of Land Management Coos Bay District, and canopy metrics calculated from discrete return airborne LiDAR data, to fit a logistic regression model predicting the probability of occupancy. Our final model for stand-level occupancy included distance to coast, and 5 LiDAR-derived variables describing canopy structure. With an area under the curve value (AUC) of 0.74, this model had acceptable discrimination and fair agreement (Cohen's κ = 0.24), especially considering that all sites in our sample were regarded by managers as potential habitat. The LiDAR model provided better discrimination between occupied and unoccupied sites than did a model using variables derived from Gradient Nearest Neighbor maps that were previously reported as important predictors of murrelet occupancy (AUC = 0.64, κ = 0.12). We also evaluated LiDAR metrics at 11 known murrelet nest sites. Two LiDAR-derived variables accurately discriminated nest sites from random sites (average AUC = 0.91). LiDAR provided a means of quantifying 3-dimensional canopy structure with variables that are ecologically relevant to murrelet nesting habitat, and have not been as accurately quantified by other mensuration methods.

  15. Aboveground Biomass Modeling from Field and LiDAR Data in Brazilian Amazon Tropical Rain Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, C. A.; Hudak, A. T.; Vierling, L. A.; Keller, M. M.; Klauberg Silva, C. K.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical forests are an important component of global carbon stocks, but tropical forest responses to climate change are not sufficiently studied or understood. Among remote sensing technologies, airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) may be best suited for quantifying tropical forest carbon stocks. Our objective was to estimate aboveground biomass (AGB) using airborne LiDAR and field plot data in Brazilian tropical rain forest. Forest attributes such as tree density, diameter at breast height, and heights were measured at a combination of square plots and linear transects (n=82) distributed across six different geographic zones in the Amazon. Using previously published allometric equations, tree AGB was computed and then summed to calculate total AGB at each sample plot. LiDAR-derived canopy structure metrics were also computed at each sample plot, and random forest regression modelling was applied to predict AGB from selected LiDAR metrics. The LiDAR-derived AGB model was assessed using the random forest explained variation, adjusted coefficient of determination (Adj. R²), root mean square error (RMSE, both absolute and relative) and BIAS (both absolute and relative). Our findings showed that the 99th percentile of height and height skewness were the best LiDAR metrics for AGB prediction. The AGB model using these two best predictors explained 59.59% of AGB variation, with an Adj. R² of 0.92, RMSE of 33.37 Mg/ha (20.28%), and bias of -0.69 (-0.42%). This study showed that LiDAR canopy structure metrics can be used to predict AGC stocks in Tropical Forest with acceptable precision and accuracy. Therefore, we conclude that there is good potential to monitor carbon sequestration in Brazilian Tropical Rain Forest using airborne LiDAR data, large field plots, and the random forest algorithm.

  16. SVM-Based Classification of Segmented Airborne LiDAR Point Clouds in Urban Areas

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaogang Ning; Xiangguo Lin; Jixian Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Object-based point cloud analysis (OBPA) is useful for information extraction from airborne LiDAR point clouds. An object-based classification method is proposed for classifying the airborne LiDAR point clouds in urban areas herein. In the process of classification, the surface growing algorithm is employed to make clustering of the point clouds without outliers, thirteen features of the geometry, radiometry, topology and echo characteristics are calculated, a support vector machine (SVM) is ...

  17. Al Margen de las Cooperativas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutiérrez Estrada Julio

    1941-04-01

    Full Text Available El sistema Cooperativista, propiamente hablando, no viene a constituir una doctrina económica, es más bien una práctica, un modo de proceder en provecho de determinada agrupación de individuos que se asocian para defenderse de la usura del comercio y del intermediarismo parasitario. "El movimiento cooperativo es tan viejo como la revolución industrial, y ha crecido paralelamente a ella, podría decirse como una protesta en contra del sistema capitalista industrial. Generalmente se considera que tres principios fundamentales determinan su carácter distintivo. 1-Se esfuerza por dar "servido al costo" a sus miembros antes que beneficiarse del negocio con el público en general. El servicio de un grupo organizado se considera como un medio para obtener el máximum de eficacia con mínimo de desperdicio. 2-Insiste en que los beneficios pecuniarios se distribuyan al miembro como productor, después de deducir solamente el interés del capital al tipo que compite, y los salarios y jornales de los trabajadores. 3-Mantiene el control democrático del negocio por todos los participantes en él".

  18. Airborne Dual-Wavelength LiDAR Data for Classifying Land Cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Kai Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study demonstrated the potential of using dual-wavelength airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR data to classify land cover. Dual-wavelength LiDAR data were acquired from two airborne LiDAR systems that emitted pulses of light in near-infrared (NIR and middle-infrared (MIR lasers. The major features of the LiDAR data, such as surface height, echo width, and dual-wavelength amplitude, were used to represent the characteristics of land cover. Based on the major features of land cover, a support vector machine was used to classify six types of suburban land cover: road and gravel, bare soil, low vegetation, high vegetation, roofs, and water bodies. Results show that using dual-wavelength LiDAR-derived information (e.g., amplitudes at NIR and MIR wavelengths could compensate for the limitations of using single-wavelength LiDAR information (i.e., poor discrimination of low vegetation when classifying land cover.

  19. Airborne LiDAR Detects Selectively Logged Tropical Forest Even in an Advanced Stage of Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafi Kent

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Identifying historical forest disturbances is difficult, especially in selectively logged areas. LiDAR is able to measure fine-scale variations in forest structure over multiple kilometers. We use LiDAR data from ca. 16 km2 of forest in Sierra Leone, West Africa, to discriminate areas of old-growth from areas recovering from selective logging for 23 years. We examined canopy height variation and gap size distributions. We found that though recovering blocks of forest differed little in height from old-growth forest (up to 3 m, they had a greater area of canopy gaps (average 10.2% gap fraction in logged areas, compared to 5.6% in unlogged area; and greater numbers of gaps penetrating to the forest floor (162 gaps at 2 m height in logged blocks, and 101 in an unlogged block. Comparison of LiDAR measurements with field data demonstrated that LiDAR delivered accurate results. We found that gap size distributions deviated from power-laws reported previously, with substantially fewer large gaps than predicted by power-law functions. Our analyses demonstrate that LiDAR is a useful tool for distinguishing structural differences between old-growth and old-secondary forests. That makes LiDAR a powerful tool for REDD+ (Reduction of Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation programs implementation and conservation planning.

  20. The application of LiDAR to investigate foredune morphology and vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Thomas B.; Woodroffe, Colin D.

    2018-02-01

    LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) has been used to investigate coastal landform morphology, evolution, and change for almost a decade. Repeated airborne LiDAR surveys can provide the scientific community with significant observations of how shorelines have evolved, which may then enable forecasts of future patterns of change. However, there have been few studies that have considered the application of this new technology to the specific study of foredune morphology and vegetation. The accuracy and appropriateness of airborne LiDAR needs to be assessed, particularly where the density of vegetation may obscure the underlying topography, prior to interpreting derived geomorphic features. This study: i) tests the vertical accuracy of airborne LiDAR in 37 foredune systems along the coast of south-eastern Australia, and ii) demonstrates that it can be used to describe foredune morphology and vegetation in considerable detail. There was a strong correlation between the remotely-sensed LiDAR-derived elevation and field topographic and vegetation surveys (R2 = 0.96). A protocol for obtaining foredune geomorphic and botanical parameters is described. It enables widespread biogeomorphic characterisation along coasts for which LiDAR data is available, which can benefit both coastal managers and researchers alike.

  1. Ionospheric irregularities over Bahir Dar, Ethiopia during selected geomagnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassa, Tsegaye; Damtie, Baylie

    2017-07-01

    We have analyzed the effect of geomagnetic storms on the occurrence of ionospheric irregularities by considering seven case studies in the period of 2013-2014 over Bahir Dar, Ethiopia (11° N , 38° E). We inferred the irregularity indices from GPS phase fluctuation by computing the median of 1-min rate of change of total electron content (fp) along the ray paths from all satellites observed. The Fp -index was calculated as an hourly average fp -index values along the ray paths from all satellites observed during each hour. Our results revealed that the irregularity level was inhibited during post sunset hours of the main phase of the storms we considered. On average, the irregularity index has dropped from 400 (0.4 TECU/min) during quiet time to 50 (0.05 TECU/min) on disturbed time with an amount of 350 (0.35 TECU/min). However, in some of the cases, immediately after the onset of the storm, we observed the enhancement of irregularities. We found that only the observations on 01 June 2013 and 19 February 2014 exhibited a correspondence of the time of occurrence of the minimum of the Dst-index with inhibition of irregularities noted by other researchers. Our observations of the enhancement of irregularities on 17 March 2013 and 19 February 2014 can partly be explained by the orientation of the IMF BZ . Other measurements such as neutral wind, electric field are required to explain the observations on 29 June 2013, 06 July 2013, 09 November 2013 and 27 February 2014.

  2. Quantifying Forest Carbon and Structure with Terrestrial LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovall, A. E.; Shugart, H. H., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Current rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations are a major concern with significant global ramifications, however, of the carbon (C) fluxes that are known to occur on Earth, the terrestrial sink has the greatest amount of uncertainty. Improved monitoring of forest cover and change is required for reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD). We determine C storage from volume measurements with a high-precision Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS), substantially improving current standard ground validation techniques. This technology is utilized on several 30 m x 30 m plots in a Virginia temperate forest. Aboveground C is calculated on each of the study sites with commonly used allometric equations to offer a realistic comparison of field-based estimations to TLS-derived methods. The TLS and aerial LiDAR point cloud data are compared via the development of canopy height models at the plot scale. The novel method of point cloud voxelization is applied to our TLS data in order to produce detailed volumetric calculations in these complex forest ecosystems. Statistical output from the TLS data allows us to resolve and compare forest structure on scales from the individual plot to the entire forest landscape. The estimates produced from this research will be used to inform more widely available remote sensing datasets provided by NASA's Landsat satellites, significantly reducing the uncertainty of the terrestrial C cycle in temperate forests. Preliminary findings corroborate previous research, suggesting the potential for highly detailed monitoring of forest C storage as defined by the REDD initiative and analysis of complex ecosystem structure.

  3. NASA Fluid Lensing & MiDAR: Next-Generation Remote Sensing Technologies for Aquatic Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirayath, Ved

    2018-01-01

    We present two recent instrument technology developments at NASA, Fluid Lensing and MiDAR, and their application to remote sensing of Earth's aquatic systems. Fluid Lensing is the first remote sensing technology capable of imaging through ocean waves in 3D at sub-cm resolutions. MiDAR is a next-generation active hyperspectral remote sensing and optical communications instrument capable of active fluid lensing. Fluid Lensing has been used to provide 3D multispectral imagery of shallow marine systems from unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs, or drones), including coral reefs in American Samoa and stromatolite reefs in Hamelin Pool, Western Australia. MiDAR is being deployed on aircraft and underwater remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) to enable a new method for remote sensing of living and nonliving structures in extreme environments. MiDAR images targets with high-intensity narrowband structured optical radiation to measure an objectâ€"TM"s non-linear spectral reflectance, image through fluid interfaces such as ocean waves with active fluid lensing, and simultaneously transmit high-bandwidth data. As an active instrument, MiDAR is capable of remotely sensing reflectance at the centimeter (cm) spatial scale with a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) multiple orders of magnitude higher than passive airborne and spaceborne remote sensing systems with significantly reduced integration time. This allows for rapid video-frame-rate hyperspectral sensing into the far ultraviolet and VNIR wavelengths. Previously, MiDAR was developed into a TRL 2 laboratory instrument capable of imaging in thirty-two narrowband channels across the VNIR spectrum (400-950nm). Recently, MiDAR UV was raised to TRL4 and expanded to include five ultraviolet bands from 280-400nm, permitting UV remote sensing capabilities in UV A, B, and C bands and enabling mineral identification and stimulated fluorescence measurements of organic proteins and compounds, such as green fluorescent proteins in terrestrial and

  4. Parallel Landscape Driven Data Reduction & Spatial Interpolation Algorithm for Big LiDAR Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahil Sharma

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR topographic data provide highly accurate digital terrain information, which is used widely in applications like creating flood insurance rate maps, forest and tree studies, coastal change mapping, soil and landscape classification, 3D urban modeling, river bank management, agricultural crop studies, etc. In this paper, we focus mainly on the use of LiDAR data in terrain modeling/Digital Elevation Model (DEM generation. Technological advancements in building LiDAR sensors have enabled highly accurate and highly dense LiDAR point clouds, which have made possible high resolution modeling of terrain surfaces. However, high density data result in massive data volumes, which pose computing issues. Computational time required for dissemination, processing and storage of these data is directly proportional to the volume of the data. We describe a novel technique based on the slope map of the terrain, which addresses the challenging problem in the area of spatial data analysis, of reducing this dense LiDAR data without sacrificing its accuracy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first ever landscape-driven data reduction algorithm. We also perform an empirical study, which shows that there is no significant loss in accuracy for the DEM generated from a 52% reduced LiDAR dataset generated by our algorithm, compared to the DEM generated from an original, complete LiDAR dataset. For the accuracy of our statistical analysis, we perform Root Mean Square Error (RMSE comparing all of the grid points of the original DEM to the DEM generated by reduced data, instead of comparing a few random control points. Besides, our multi-core data reduction algorithm is highly scalable. We also describe a modified parallel Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW spatial interpolation method and show that the DEMs it generates are time-efficient and have better accuracy than the one’s generated by the traditional IDW method.

  5. Estimation of effective plant area index for South Korean forests using LiDAR system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Doo-Ahn; Lee, Woo-Kyun; Kafatos, Menas; Son, Yowhan; Cho, Hyun-Kook; Lee, Seung-Ho

    2010-07-01

    Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) systems can be used to estimate both vertical and horizontal forest structure. Woody components, the leaves of trees and the understory can be described with high precision, using geo-registered 3D-points. Based on this concept, the Effective Plant Area Indices (PAI(e)) for areas of Korean Pine (Pinus koraiensis), Japanese Larch (Larix leptolepis) and Oak (Quercus spp.) were estimated by calculating the ratio of intercepted and incident LIDAR laser rays for the canopies of the three forest types. Initially, the canopy gap fraction (G ( LiDAR )) was generated by extracting the LiDAR data reflected from the canopy surface, or inner canopy area, using k-means statistics. The LiDAR-derived PAI(e) was then estimated by using G ( LIDAR ) with the Beer-Lambert law. A comparison of the LiDAR-derived and field-derived PAI(e) revealed the coefficients of determination for Korean Pine, Japanese Larch and Oak to be 0.82, 0.64 and 0.59, respectively. These differences between field-based and LIDAR-based PAI(e) for the different forest types were attributed to the amount of leaves and branches in the forest stands. The absence of leaves, in the case of both Larch and Oak, meant that the LiDAR pulses were only reflected from branches. The probability that the LiDAR pulses are reflected from bare branches is low as compared to the reflection from branches with a high leaf density. This is because the size of the branch is smaller than the resolution across and along the 1 meter LIDAR laser track. Therefore, a better predictive accuracy would be expected for the model if the study would be repeated in late spring when the shoots and leaves of the deciduous trees begin to appear.

  6. Optimizing variable radius plot size and LiDAR resolution to model standing volume in conifer forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram Kumar Deo; Robert E. Froese; Michael J. Falkowski; Andrew T. Hudak

    2016-01-01

    The conventional approach to LiDAR-based forest inventory modeling depends on field sample data from fixed-radius plots (FRP). Because FRP sampling is cost intensive, combining variable-radius plot (VRP) sampling and LiDAR data has the potential to improve inventory efficiency. The overarching goal of this study was to evaluate the integration of LiDAR and VRP data....

  7. Gaussian Mixture Model with Variable Components for Full Waveform LiDAR Data Decomposition and RJMCMC Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Quanhua; LI, HONGYING; Li, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full waveform LiDAR data record the signal of the backscattered laser pulse. The elevation and the energy information of ground targets can be effectively obtained by decomposition of the full waveform LiDAR data. Therefore, waveform decomposition is the key to full waveform LiDAR data processing. However, in waveform decomposition, determining the number of the components is a focus and difficult problem. To this end, this paper presents a method which can automatically determine the number....

  8. Calculation of the overlap factor for scanning LiDAR based on the tridimensional ray-tracing method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ruiqiang; Jiang, Yuesong; Wen, Luhong; Wen, Donghai

    2017-06-01

    The overlap factor is used to evaluate the LiDAR light collection ability. Ranging LiDAR is mainly determined by the optical configuration. However, scanning LiDAR, equipped with a scanning mechanism to acquire a 3D coordinate points cloud for a specified target, is essential in considering the scanning effect at the same time. Otherwise, scanning LiDAR will reduce the light collection ability and even cannot receive any echo. From this point of view, we propose a scanning LiDAR overlap factor calculation method based on the tridimensional ray-tracing method, which can be applied to scanning LiDAR with any special laser intensity distribution, any type of telescope (reflector, refractor, or mixed), and any shape obstruction (i.e., the reflector of a coaxial optical system). A case study for our LiDAR with a scanning mirror is carried out, and a MATLAB program is written to analyze the laser emission and reception process. Sensitivity analysis is carried out as a function of scanning mirror rotation speed and detector position, and the results guide how to optimize the overlap factor for our LiDAR. The results of this research will have a guiding significance in scanning LiDAR design and assembly.

  9. Automated Detection of Geomorphic Features in LiDAR Point Clouds of Various Spatial Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorninger, Peter; Székely, Balázs; Zámolyi, András.; Nothegger, Clemens

    2010-05-01

    relevant results. Consequently, it could be verified that a topographic surface can be properly represented by a set of distinct planar structures. Therefore, the subsequent interpretation of those planes with respect to geomorphic characteristics is acceptable. The additional in situ geological measurements verified some of our findings in the sense that similar primary directions could be found that were derived from the LiDAR data set and (Zámolyi et al., 2010, this volume). References: P. Dorninger, N. Pfeifer: "A Comprehensive Automated 3D Approach for Building Extraction, Reconstruction, and Regularization from Airborne Laser Scanning Point Clouds"; Sensors, 8 (2008), 11; 7323 - 7343. C. Nothegger, P. Dorninger: "3D Filtering of High-Resolution Terrestrial Laser Scanner Point Clouds for Cultural Heritage Documentation"; Photogrammetrie, Fernerkundung, Geoinformation, 1 (2009), 53 - 63. A. Zámolyi, B. Székely, G. Molnár, A. Roncat, P. Dorninger, A. Pocsai, M. Wyszyski, P. Drexel: "Comparison of LiDAR derived directional topographic features with geologic field evidence: a case study of Doren landslide (Vorarlberg, Austria)"; EGU General Assembly 2010, Vienna, Austria

  10. Der städtebauliche Vertrag als rechtliches Instrument der Kooperation mit Privaten bei der Baulandentwicklung

    OpenAIRE

    Burmeister, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Die Arbeit stellt die Einsatzmöglichkeiten und die Grenzen städtebaulicher Verträge anhand zahlreicher Fälle aus der Praxis dar. Ausgehend von der Erkenntnis, daß ein optimales wirtschaftliches Verhandlungsergebnis mehr voraussetzt als eine rechtlich fehlerfreie Vertragskonstruktion, beleuchtet die Arbeit auch die Erfolgsbedingungen des Vertragsmanagements und der Vertragsgestaltung. Teil 1 gibt einen Überblick über den städtebaulichen Vertrag als rechtliches Instrument der Kooperation mit Pr...

  11. Spinning a laser web: predicting spider distributions using LiDAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vierling, K T; Bässler, C; Brandl, R; Vierling, L A; Weiss, I; Müller, J

    2011-03-01

    LiDAR remote sensing has been used to examine relationships between vertebrate diversity and environmental characteristics, but its application to invertebrates has been limited. Our objectives were to determine whether LiDAR-derived variables could be used to accurately describe single-species distributions and community characteristics of spiders in remote forested and mountainous terrain. We collected over 5300 spiders across multiple transects in the Bavarian National Park (Germany) using pitfall traps. We examined spider community characteristics (species richness, the Shannon index, the Simpson index, community composition, mean body size, and abundance) and single-species distribution and abundance with LiDAR variables and ground-based measurements. We used the R2 and partial R2 provided by variance partitioning to evaluate the predictive power of LiDAR-derived variables compared to ground measurements for each of the community characteristics. The total adjusted R2 for species richness, the Shannon index, community species composition, and body size had a range of 25-57%. LiDAR variables and ground measurements both contributed >80% to the total predictive power. For species composition, the explained variance was approximately 32%, which was significantly greater than expected by chance. The predictive power of LiDAR-derived variables was comparable or superior to that of the ground-based variables for examinations of single-species distributions, and it explained up to 55% of the variance. The predictability of species distributions was higher for species that had strong associations with shade in open-forest habitats, and this niche position has been well documented across the European continent for spider species. The similar statistical performance between LiDAR and ground-based measures at our field sites indicated that deriving spider community and species distribution information using LiDAR data can provide not only high predictive power at

  12. LiDAR, UAV or compass-clinometer? Accuracy, coverage and the effects on structural models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawood, Adam J.; Bond, Clare E.; Howell, John A.; Butler, Robert W. H.; Totake, Yukitsugu

    2017-05-01

    Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) and Structure from Motion (SfM) provide large amounts of digital data from which virtual outcrops can be created. The accuracy of these surface reconstructions is critical for quantitative structural analysis. Assessment of LiDAR and SfM methodologies suggest that SfM results are comparable to high data-density LiDAR on individual surfaces. The effect of chosen acquisition technique on the full outcrop and the efficacy on its virtual form for quantitative structural analysis and prediction beyond single bedding surfaces, however, is less certain. Here, we compare the accuracy of digital virtual outcrop analysis with traditional field data, for structural measurements and along-strike prediction of fold geometry from Stackpole syncline. In this case, the SfM virtual outcrop, derived from UAV imagery, yields better along-strike predictions and a more reliable geological model, in spite of lower accuracy surface reconstructions than LiDAR. This outcome is attributed to greater coverage by UAV and reliable reconstruction of a greater number of bedding planes than terrestrial LiDAR, which suffers from the effects of occlusion. Irrespective of the chosen acquisition technique, we find that workflows must incorporate careful survey planning, data processing and quality checking of derived data if virtual outcrops are to be used for robust structural analysis and along-strike prediction.

  13. Localized Segment Based Processing for Automatic Building Extraction from LiDAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parida, G.; Rajan, K. S.

    2017-05-01

    The current methods of object segmentation and extraction and classification of aerial LiDAR data is manual and tedious task. This work proposes a technique for object segmentation out of LiDAR data. A bottom-up geometric rule based approach was used initially to devise a way to segment buildings out of the LiDAR datasets. For curved wall surfaces, comparison of localized surface normals was done to segment buildings. The algorithm has been applied to both synthetic datasets as well as real world dataset of Vaihingen, Germany. Preliminary results show successful segmentation of the buildings objects from a given scene in case of synthetic datasets and promissory results in case of real world data. The advantages of the proposed work is non-dependence on any other form of data required except LiDAR. It is an unsupervised method of building segmentation, thus requires no model training as seen in supervised techniques. It focuses on extracting the walls of the buildings to construct the footprint, rather than focussing on roof. The focus on extracting the wall to reconstruct the buildings from a LiDAR scene is crux of the method proposed. The current segmentation approach can be used to get 2D footprints of the buildings, with further scope to generate 3D models. Thus, the proposed method can be used as a tool to get footprints of buildings in urban landscapes, helping in urban planning and the smart cities endeavour.

  14. Performance Assessment of High Resolution Airborne Full Waveform LiDAR for Shallow River Bathymetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Pan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We evaluate the performance of full waveform LiDAR decomposition algorithms with a high-resolution single band airborne LiDAR bathymetry system in shallow rivers. A continuous wavelet transformation (CWT is proposed and applied in two fluvial environments, and the results are compared to existing echo retrieval methods. LiDAR water depths are also compared to independent field measurements. In both clear and turbid water, the CWT algorithm outperforms the other methods if only green LiDAR observations are available. However, both the definition of the water surface, and the turbidity of the water significantly influence the performance of the LiDAR bathymetry observations. The results suggest that there is no single best full waveform processing algorithm for all bathymetric situations. Overall, the optimal processing strategies resulted in a determination of water depths with a 6 cm mean at 14 cm standard deviation for clear water, and a 16 cm mean and 27 cm standard deviation in more turbid water.

  15. Accuracy Assessment of LiDAR-Derived Digital Elevation Models Based on Approximation Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XiaoHang Liu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The cumulative error at a point in a LiDAR-derived DEM consists of three components: propagated LiDAR-sensor error, propagated ground error, and interpolation error. To combine these error components so as to assess the vertical accuracy of a LiDAR-derived DEM, statistical methods based on the error propagation theory are often used. Due to the existence of systematic error, statistical methods are only effective if a large number of checkpoints are available, which may not be affordable in many practical applications. This paper presents approximation theory as an alternative methodology that departs from error propagation theory in fundamental ways. Using approximation theory, an error bound of the cumulative error at any point in the study site can be obtained, thus informing users conservatively of the spatial variation of DEM accuracy and pointing out the weakly determined areas. The new method is illustrated from DEM users’ perspective by assessing whether a publicly available LiDAR-derived DEM meets FEMA’s accuracy standard for flood risk mapping. The paper calls for a change in the existing methods of assessing and reporting the errors in a LiDAR-derived DEM, in particular those introduced during the ground filtering process.

  16. Segmentation based building detection approach from LiDAR point cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anandakumar M. Ramiya

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Accurate building detection and reconstruction is an important challenge posed to the remote sensing community dealing with LiDAR point cloud. The inherent geometric nature of LiDAR point cloud provides a new dimension to the remote sensing data which can be used to produce accurate 3D building models at relatively less time compared to traditional photogrammetry based 3D reconstruction methods. 3D segmentation is a key step to bring out the implicit geometrical information from the LiDAR point cloud. This research proposes to use open source point cloud library (PCL for 3D segmentation of LiDAR point cloud and presents a novel histogram based methodology to separate the building clusters from the non building clusters. The proposed methodology has been applied on two different airborne LiDAR datasets acquired over part of urban region around Niagara Falls, Canada and southern Washington, USA. An overall building detection accuracy of 100% and 82% respectively is achieved for the two datasets. The performance of proposed methodology has been compared with the commercially available Terrasolid software. The results show that the buildings detected using open source point cloud library produce comparable results with the buildings detected using commercial software (buildings detection accuracy: 86.3% and 89.2% respectively for the two datasets.

  17. Challenges in diagnosing paediatric malaria in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strøm, Gro E A; Haanshuus, Christel G; Fataki, Maulidi; Langeland, Nina; Blomberg, Bjørn

    2013-07-03

    Malaria is a major cause of paediatric morbidity and mortality. As no clinical features clearly differentiate malaria from other febrile illnesses, and malaria diagnosis is challenged by often lacking laboratory equipment and expertise, overdiagnosis and overtreatment is common. Children admitted with fever at the general paediatric wards at Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH), Dar es Salaam, Tanzania from January to June 2009 were recruited consecutively and prospectively. Demographic and clinical features were registered. Routine thick blood smear microscopy at MNH was compared to results of subsequent thin blood smear microscopy, and rapid diagnostics tests (RDTs). Genus-specific PCR of Plasmodium mitochondrial DNA was performed on DNA extracted from whole blood and species-specific PCR was done on positive samples. Among 304 included children, 62.6% had received anti-malarials during the last four weeks prior to admission and 65.1% during the hospital stay. Routine thick blood smears, research blood smears, PCR and RDT detected malaria in 13.2%, 6.6%, 25.0% and 13.5%, respectively. Positive routine microscopy was confirmed in only 43% (17/40), 45% (18/40) and 53% (21/40), by research microscopy, RDTs and PCR, respectively. Eighteen percent (56/304) had positive PCR but negative research microscopy. Reported low parasitaemia on routine microscopy was associated with negative research blood slide and PCR. RDT-positive cases were associated with signs of severe malaria. Palmar pallor, low haemoglobin and low platelet count were significantly associated with positive PCR, research microscopy and RDT. The true morbidity attributable to malaria in the study population remains uncertain due to the discrepancies in results among the diagnostic methods. The current routine microscopy appears to result in overdiagnosis of malaria and, consequently, overuse of anti-malarials. Conversely, children with a false positive malaria diagnosis may die because they do not receive

  18. et al

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Schalk Cloete

    of the heritability of FEC before and after transformation as well as genetic correlations of FEC with live weight and .... The type of transformation that was applied resulted in minimal changes in conclusions derived from the data as ..... Morris, C.A., Clarke, J.N., Watson, T.G., Wrigglesworth, A.L. & Dobbie, J.L., 1996. Faecal ...

  19. al junctions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    processable conducting polymers (Fang, et al.,. 1992). It was found that when side chains are attached to the polymers, their processability and solubility are greatly enhanced (Bantikassegn. Workalemahu and Inganas, 1997). With improvements in the polymer processing, it has become possible to fabricate a range of thin.

  20. al junctions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    1997; Granstrom et al., 1998), organic solar cells. (Abay Gadisa and Bantikassegn Workalemahu,. 2002). ... Thermo ionic emission theory is applied to extract the parameters. Capacitance-voltage measurement is ... of the existence of a depletion region and to obtain the capacitance per unit area of the cell as well as.

  1. Characterization of the deformation and thermal behavior of granitic exfoliation sheets with LiDAR and infrared thermography (Yosemite Valley, USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerin, Antoine; Derron, Marc-Henri; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Collins, Brian D.; Stock, Greg M.

    2017-04-01

    Yosemite Valley is a long (11 km) and deep ( 1 km) glacier-carved valley, bounded by steep granitic cliffs cutting the western slope of the central Sierra Nevada mountain range (California, USA). These cliffs produce numerous rockfalls every year (925 events reported between 1857 and 2011) and this rockfall activity is often linked to the presence of sheeting joints (Stock et al., 2013), also called exfoliation joints, formed in response to stress changes associated with changes in the topography (Martel, 2011). Furthermore, the historical rockfall inventory indicates that many events occurred without recognized triggers (Austin et al., 2014), in summer time, and on sunny days in particular. This suggests that thermal stress changes are involved in triggering of rockfalls (Collins and Stock, 2016). To further characterize the relationship between thermal stresses and rock face deformation, we carried out three experiments in Yosemite Valley during October 2015: (i) monitoring of a sub-vertical granodiorite exfoliation sheet on the Rhombus Wall for 24 consecutive hours (from 8:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.) using terrestrial LiDAR, crackmeters and infrared thermal sensors; (ii) monitoring the El Capitan rockwall composed of tens of exfoliation sheets for 8 consecutive hours (from 5:30 p.m. to 1:30 a.m.) with terrestrial LiDAR and thermal imaging; (iii) collecting several sequences of thermal GigaPan panoramas during periods of rock cooling on both cliffs (Rhombus Wall and El Capitan). In parallel to these experiments, we also developed a method for calibrating and correcting the raw apparent temperature measured by our thermal imager (a FLIR T660 infrared camera) from thermoresistances, reflective and black papers and by using some information given by the LiDAR point clouds (range, dip and dip direction). LiDAR monitoring of experiments (i) and (ii) allowed us to detect millimetric deformations for the exfoliations sheets whose crack aperture is persistent, deep and greater

  2. International Journal of Science and Technology(STECH) Bahir Dar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nneka Umera-Okeke

    Soil condition. Introduction. In many countries, the use of energy crops, including the use of Jatropha as feedstock for biodiesel has increased significantly (Rowe et al., 2007). Jatropha curcas is highly .... Multicriteria decision making (MCDM) method exposes and integrates multiple choices in order to solve “real-world” ...

  3. Validation of sentinel-1A SAR coastal wind speeds against scanning LiDAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahsbahs, Tobias Torben; Badger, Merete; Karagali, Ioanna

    2017-01-01

    with respect to the distance to shore by validation against scanning LiDARs. Comparison of 15 Sentinel-1A wind retrievals using the GMF called C-band model 5.N (CMOD5.N) versus LiDARs show good agreement. It is found, when nondimenionalising with a reference point, that wind speed reductions are between 4......% and 8% from 3 km to 1 km from shore. Findings indicate that SAR wind retrievals give reliable wind speed measurements as close as 1 km to the shore. Comparisons of SAR winds versus two different LiDAR configurations yield root mean square error (RMSE) of 1.31 ms-1 and 1.42 ms-1 for spatially averaged...

  4. Crop detection and density estimation combing LiDAR points cloud with remote sensing image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yun; Lin, Ying

    2009-10-01

    To further improve the accuracy of crop detection and acquire more information for land use investigation and agriculture management, this paper proposes a variational level set model for crop detection by combining airborne LiDAR(Light Detection and Range) points cloud and aerial image simultaneously acquired by LiDAR device. Specifically, normalized digital surface model (nDSM) derived from raw LiDAR points cloud are combined with aerial image so as to alleviate the misclassification caused by insufficient information only based on remote sensing image data. This fusion combines spectral and height information of objects from both sensors. By classifying the combined image using our proposed level set model, crop can be discriminated. Then, the paper suggests a novel method based on classification to predict crop density in a given scene. Experiments have verified that the proposed scheme really improve the accuracy of crop detection and the effectiveness of the proposed scheme of crop density estimation.

  5. Dar es Salaam city temporal growth and its influence on transportation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Cosmas Mkalawa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at using spatial data to investigate and analyze the temporal spatial growth of the city of Dar es Salaam in Tanzania and quantify its relationship to transportation growth. The study will focus on the period from 1945 to 2012 and will use population and economic growth as parameters. The findings of this study show that there is a mutual relationship between Dar es Salaam’s urban growth, population, economy, and transportation. It found that transportation demand and infrastructure growth coincided with population growth; however, Dar es Salaam’s urban spatial expansion and residential area growth have been affected by transportation demand and infrastructure growth. It also found that enormous spatial expansion has caused dramatic changes in the daily share of travel modes and that these disparities have occurred in relation to urban growth and transport. Development initiatives and policies over time have not successfully solved this problem.

  6. Algunas novelas de Darío Fernández-Flórez: de Zarabanda (1944 a Alta Costura (1954. Temas escabrosos en tiempos de restricciones moralistas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montejo Gurruchaga, Lucía

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Dario Fernández-Flórez begins in 1944 with Zarabanda a narrative style of intellectual eroticism and inmoral atmosphere which attracted no attention. Six years later he published Lola, espejo oscuro the recollections of a high prostitute. The novel was an scandal and an immediate success. Although the topic and its treatment were odd at the time because the strict moral values which mantained Franco´s regime were ignored, the novel was published with no cuts at all. Censorship was deaf to all the voices that warned of its dangers. This had an explanation: Darío Fernández-Flórez held an important post in the Propaganda National Service. After his dismissal censors were less lenient.Darío Fernández-Flórez inicia en 1944 con Zarabanda una narrativa de erotismo intelectualizado y ambiente amoral que no tuvo ningún eco. Seis años después publicará Lola, espejo oscuro, las memorias de una prostituta de alto copete. La novela suscitó un gran escándalo y su éxito fue inmediato. Aunque el tema y su tratamiento eran inusitados en aquellos momentos porque la obra daba al traste con los estrictos valores morales que sustentaban el régimen franquista, la novela fue publicada sin recortes; la censura hizo oídos sordos a todas las voces que alertaban de su peligro. Este hecho tiene una explicación: Darío Fernández-Flórez ocupaba un cargo importante en el Servicio Nacional de Propaganda. Tras su cese, los censores serán menos benevolentes.

  7. Modeling Forest Aboveground Biomass and Volume Using Airborne LiDAR Metrics and Forest Inventory and Analysis Data in the Pacific Northwest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan D. Sheridan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The United States Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA Program provides a diverse selection of data used to assess the status of the nation’s forests using sample locations dispersed throughout the country. Airborne laser scanning (ALS systems are capable of producing accurate measurements of individual tree dimensions and also possess the ability to characterize forest structure in three dimensions. This study investigates the potential of discrete return ALS data for modeling forest aboveground biomass (AGBM and gross volume (gV at FIA plot locations in the Malheur National Forest, eastern Oregon utilizing three analysis levels: (1 individual subplot (r = 7.32 m; (2 plot, comprising four clustered subplots; and (3 hectare plot (r = 56.42 m. A methodology for the creation of three point cloud-based airborne LiDAR metric sets is presented. Models for estimating AGBM and gV based on LiDAR-derived height metrics were built and validated utilizing FIA estimates of AGBM and gV derived using regional allometric equations. Simple linear regression models based on the plot-level analysis out performed subplot-level and hectare-level models, producing R2 values of 0.83 and 0.81 for AGBM and gV, utilizing mean height and the 90th height percentile as predictors, respectively. Similar results were found for multiple regression models, where plot-level analysis produced models with R2 values of 0.87 and 0.88 for AGBM and gV, utilizing multiple height percentile metrics as predictor variables. Results suggest that the current FIA plot design can be used with dense airborne LiDAR data to produce area-based estimates of AGBM and gV, and that the increased spatial scale of hectare plots may be inappropriate for modeling AGBM of gV unless exhaustive tree tallies are available. Overall, this study demonstrates that ALS data can be used to create models that describe the AGBM and gV of Pacific Northwest FIA plots and highlights the potential of

  8. Improving Species Diversity and Biomass Estimates of Tropical Dry Forests Using Airborne LiDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Hernández-Stefanoni

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The spatial distribution of plant diversity and biomass informs management decisions to maintain biodiversity and carbon stocks in tropical forests. Optical remotely sensed data is often used for supporting such activities; however, it is difficult to estimate these variables in areas of high biomass. New technologies, such as airborne LiDAR, have been used to overcome such limitations. LiDAR has been increasingly used to map carbon stocks in tropical forests, but has rarely been used to estimate plant species diversity. In this study, we first evaluated the effect of using different plot sizes and plot designs on improving the prediction accuracy of species richness and biomass from LiDAR metrics using multiple linear regression. Second, we developed a general model to predict species richness and biomass from LiDAR metrics for two different types of tropical dry forest using regression analysis. Third, we evaluated the relative roles of vegetation structure and habitat heterogeneity in explaining the observed patterns of biodiversity and biomass, using variation partition analysis and LiDAR metrics. The results showed that with increasing plot size, there is an increase of the accuracy of biomass estimations. In contrast, for species richness, the inclusion of different habitat conditions (cluster of four plots over an area of 1.0 ha provides better estimations. We also show that models of plant diversity and biomass can be derived from small footprint LiDAR at both local and regional scales. Finally, we found that a large portion of the variation in species richness can be exclusively attributed to habitat heterogeneity, while biomass was mainly explained by vegetation structure.

  9. Tree-Species Classification in Subtropical Forests Using Airborne Hyperspectral and LiDAR Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Shen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Accurate classification of tree-species is essential for sustainably managing forest resources and effectively monitoring species diversity. In this study, we used simultaneously acquired hyperspectral and LiDAR data from LiCHy (Hyperspectral, LiDAR and CCD airborne system to classify tree-species in subtropical forests of southeast China. First, each individual tree crown was extracted using the LiDAR data by a point cloud segmentation algorithm (PCS and the sunlit portion of each crown was selected using the hyperspectral data. Second, different suites of hyperspectral and LiDAR metrics were extracted and selected by the indices of Principal Component Analysis (PCA and the mean decrease in Gini index (MDG from Random Forest (RF. Finally, both hyperspectral metrics (based on whole crown and sunlit crown and LiDAR metrics were assessed and used as inputs to Random Forest classifier to discriminate five tree-species at two levels of classification. The results showed that the tree delineation approach (point cloud segmentation algorithm was suitable for detecting individual tree in this study (overall accuracy = 82.9%. The classification approach provided a relatively high accuracy (overall accuracy > 85.4% for classifying five tree-species in the study site. The classification using both hyperspectral and LiDAR metrics resulted in higher accuracies than only hyperspectral metrics (the improvement of overall accuracies = 0.4–5.6%. In addition, compared with the classification using whole crown metrics (overall accuracies = 85.4–89.3%, using sunlit crown metrics (overall accuracies = 87.1–91.5% improved the overall accuracies of 2.3%. The results also suggested that fewer of the most important metrics can be used to classify tree-species effectively (overall accuracies = 85.8–91.0%.

  10. Detailed Hydrographic Feature Extraction from High-Resolution LiDAR Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danny L. Anderson

    2012-05-01

    Detailed hydrographic feature extraction from high-resolution light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data is investigated. Methods for quantitatively evaluating and comparing such extractions are presented, including the use of sinuosity and longitudinal root-mean-square-error (LRMSE). These metrics are then used to quantitatively compare stream networks in two studies. The first study examines the effect of raster cell size on watershed boundaries and stream networks delineated from LiDAR-derived digital elevation models (DEMs). The study confirmed that, with the greatly increased resolution of LiDAR data, smaller cell sizes generally yielded better stream network delineations, based on sinuosity and LRMSE. The second study demonstrates a new method of delineating a stream directly from LiDAR point clouds, without the intermediate step of deriving a DEM. Direct use of LiDAR point clouds could improve efficiency and accuracy of hydrographic feature extractions. The direct delineation method developed herein and termed “mDn”, is an extension of the D8 method that has been used for several decades with gridded raster data. The method divides the region around a starting point into sectors, using the LiDAR data points within each sector to determine an average slope, and selecting the sector with the greatest downward slope to determine the direction of flow. An mDn delineation was compared with a traditional grid-based delineation, using TauDEM, and other readily available, common stream data sets. Although, the TauDEM delineation yielded a sinuosity that more closely matches the reference, the mDn delineation yielded a sinuosity that was higher than either the TauDEM method or the existing published stream delineations. Furthermore, stream delineation using the mDn method yielded the smallest LRMSE.

  11. 'Dar Kenn Ghal Sahhtek'--an eating disorder and obesity service in Malta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilina, Francesca Falzon; Grech, Anton; Zerafa, Darleen; Agius, Mark; Voon, Valerie

    2015-09-01

    This paper will describe the incidence of eating disorders, with particular focus on obesity and binge eating, within the Island of Malta. The development of and 'Dar Kenn Ghal Sahhtek', the first centre for eating disorders in Malta will then be recounted, and the effective therapeutic interventions provided in it will be described. One important function of this unit is the treatment of excessive obesity. Some epidemiological data on the Obese Patients in DKS, relating to the incidence of Binge Eating Disorder in the DKS patient group will be given. This data was collected during a collaboritive research project between the Psychiatry Department of Cambridge University and 'Dar Kenn Ghal Sahhtek'.

  12. Countering Al-Shabaab: A Case to Minimize Transnational Terrorist Threats Against Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    terrorists after the death of Al-Qaeda member Nabhan Saleh in 2009, who was among the masterminds of the two U.S. Embassy bombings in Nairobi and Dar es ...National Congress AQAP Al-Qaeda in the Arab Peninsula AQI Al-Qaeda in Iraq ARS Alliance for the Re-liberation of Somalia AU African Union COG... salaam in 1998. See Bill Roggio, “Uganda Attack Carried out by Shabaab Cell Named after Slain Al-Qaeda Leader,” The Long war Journal, July 15, 2010

  13. Not seeing the forest for the points: Novel LiDAR metrics elucidate forest structure and increase LiDAR usability by managers

    OpenAIRE

    Kramer, Heather Anuhea

    2016-01-01

    Forest and fire ecology have long utilized remote sensing datasets to learn more about landscapes. Advances in gps spatial accuracy, GIS software capabilities, computing power, and remote sensing technology and software, as well as increases in the spatial and temporal resolution of remote sensing products, have made remote sensing a critical component of forest and fire ecology. Aerial light detection and ranging (LiDAR) is a fast-growing active remote-sensing technology that can be mined fo...

  14. Comparing LiDAR-Generated to ground- surveyed channel cross-sectional profiles in a forested mountain stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian C. Dietterick; Russell White; Ryan. Hilburn

    2012-01-01

    Airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) holds promise to provide an alternative to traditional ground-based survey methods for stream channel characterization and some change detection purposes, even under challenging landscape conditions. This study compared channel characteristics measured at 53 ground-surveyed and LiDAR-derived crosssectional profiles located...

  15. Airborne LiDAR reflective linear feature extraction for strip adjustment and horizontal accuracy determination : executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    The Office of Aerial Engineering (OAE) has been : using an Optech 30/70 ALTM airborne LiDAR system : for about four years. The introduction of LiDAR : technology was a major development towards : improving the mapping operations, and the overall : ex...

  16. Comparison of LiDAR-derived data and high resolution true color imagery for extracting urban forest cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron E. Maxwell; Adam C. Riley; Paul. Kinder

    2013-01-01

    Remote sensing has many applications in forestry. Light detection and ranging (LiDAR) and high resolution aerial photography have been investigated as means to extract forest data, such as biomass, timber volume, stand dynamics, and gap characteristics. LiDAR return intensity data are often overlooked as a source of input raster data for thematic map creation. We...

  17. Remote Sensing of Sonoran Desert Vegetation Structure and Phenology with Ground-Based LiDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel B. Sankey

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Long-term vegetation monitoring efforts have become increasingly important for understanding ecosystem response to global change. Many traditional methods for monitoring can be infrequent and limited in scope. Ground-based LiDAR is one remote sensing method that offers a clear advancement to monitor vegetation dynamics at high spatial and temporal resolution. We determined the effectiveness of LiDAR to detect intra-annual variability in vegetation structure at a long-term Sonoran Desert monitoring plot dominated by cacti, deciduous and evergreen shrubs. Monthly repeat LiDAR scans of perennial plant canopies over the course of one year had high precision. LiDAR measurements of canopy height and area were accurate with respect to total station survey measurements of individual plants. We found an increase in the number of LiDAR vegetation returns following the wet North American Monsoon season. This intra-annual variability in vegetation structure detected by LiDAR was attributable to a drought deciduous shrub Ambrosia deltoidea, whereas the evergreen shrub Larrea tridentata and cactus Opuntia engelmannii had low variability. Benefits of using LiDAR over traditional methods to census desert plants are more rapid, consistent, and cost-effective data acquisition in a high-resolution, 3-dimensional context. We conclude that repeat LiDAR measurements can be an effective method for documenting ecosystem response to desert climatology and drought over short time intervals and at detailed-local spatial scale.

  18. Computer-based synthetic data to assess the tree delineation algorithm from airborne LiDAR survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei Wang; Andrew G. Birt; Charles W. Lafon; David M. Cairns; Robert N. Coulson; Maria D. Tchakerian; Weimin Xi; Sorin C. Popescu; James M. Guldin

    2013-01-01

    Small Footprint LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) has been proposed as an effective tool for measuring detailed biophysical characteristics of forests over broad spatial scales. However, by itself LiDAR yields only a sample of the true 3D structure of a forest. In order to extract useful forestry relevant information, this data must be interpreted using mathematical...

  19. Quantitative analysis of woodpecker habitat using high-resolution airborne LiDAR estimates of forest structure and composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    James E. Garabedian; Robert J. McGaughey; Stephen E. Reutebuch; Bernard R. Parresol; John C. Kilgo; Christopher E. Moorman; M. Nils. Peterson

    2014-01-01

    Light detection and ranging (LiDAR) technology has the potential to radically alter the way researchers and managers collect data on wildlife–habitat relationships. To date, the technology has fostered several novel approaches to characterizing avian habitat, but has been limited by the lack of detailed LiDAR-habitat attributes relevant to species across a continuum of...

  20. AL Amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desport Estelle

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Definition of the disease AL amyloidosis results from extra-cellular deposition of fibril-forming monoclonal immunoglobulin (Ig light chains (LC (most commonly of lambda isotype usually secreted by a small plasma cell clone. Most patients have evidence of isolated monoclonal gammopathy or smoldering myeloma, and the occurrence of AL amyloidosis in patients with symptomatic multiple myeloma or other B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders is unusual. The key event in the development of AL amyloidosis is the change in the secondary or tertiary structure of an abnormal monoclonal LC, which results in instable conformation. This conformational change is responsible for abnormal folding of the LC, rich in β leaves, which assemble into monomers that stack together to form amyloid fibrils. Epidemiology AL amyloidosis is the most common type of systemic amyloidois in developed countries with an estimated incidence of 9 cases/million inhabitant/year. The average age of diagnosed patients is 65 years and less than 10% of patients are under 50. Clinical description The clinical presentation is protean, because of the wide number of tissues or organs that may be affected. The most common presenting symptoms are asthenia and dyspnoea, which are poorly specific and may account for delayed diagnosis. Renal manifestations are the most frequent, affecting two thirds of patients at presentation. They are characterized by heavy proteinuria, with nephrotic syndrome and impaired renal function in half of the patients. Heart involvement, which is present at diagnosis in more than 50% of patients, leading to restrictive cardiopathy, is the most serious complication and engages prognosis. Diagnostic methods The diagnosis relies on pathological examination of an involved site showing Congo red-positive amyloid deposits, with typical apple-green birefringence under polarized light, that stain positive with an anti-LC antibody by immunohistochemistry and

  1. KML-Based Access and Visualization of High Resolution LiDAR Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, C. J.; Blair, J. L.; Nandigam, V.; Memon, A.; Baru, C.; Arrowsmith, J. R.

    2008-12-01

    Over the past decade, there has been dramatic growth in the acquisition of LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) high-resolution topographic data for earth science studies. Capable of providing digital elevation models (DEMs) more than an order of magnitude higher resolution than those currently available, LiDAR data allow earth scientists to study the processes that contribute to landscape evolution at resolutions not previously possible yet essential for their appropriate representation. These datasets also have significant implications for earth science education and outreach because they provide an accurate representation of landforms and geologic hazards. Unfortunately, the massive volume of data produced by LiDAR mapping technology can be a barrier to their use. To make these data available to a larger user community, we have been exploring the use of Keyhole Markup Language (KML) and Google Earth to provide access to LiDAR data products and visualizations. LiDAR digital elevation models are typically delivered in a tiled format that lends itself well to a KML-based distribution system. For LiDAR datasets hosted in the GEON OpenTopography Portal (www.opentopography.org) we have developed KML files that show the extent of available LiDAR DEMs and provide direct access to the data products. Users interact with these KML files to explore the extent of the available data and are able to select DEMs that correspond to their area of interest. Selection of a tile loads a download that the user can then save locally for analysis in their software of choice. The GEON topography system also has tools available that allow users to generate custom DEMs from LiDAR point cloud data. This system is powerful because it enables users to access massive volumes of raw LiDAR data and to produce DEM products that are optimized to their science applications. We have developed a web service that converts the custom DEM models produced by the system to a hillshade that is delivered to

  2. The use of airborne LiDAR data for the analysis of debris flow events in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Scheidl

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A methodology of magnitude estimates for debris flow events is described using airborne LiDAR data. Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR is a widely used technology to generate digital elevation information. LiDAR data in alpine regions can be obtained by several commercial companies where the automated filtering process is proprietary and varies from companies to companies. This study describes the analysis of geomorphologic changes using digital terrain models derived from commercial LiDAR data. The estimation of the deposition volumes is based on two digital terrain models covering the same area but differing in their time of survey. In this study two surveyed deposition areas of debris flows, located in the canton of Berne, Switzerland, were chosen as test cases. We discuss different grid interpolating techniques, other preliminary work and the accuracy of the used LiDAR data and volume estimates.

  3. Childhood Burn Injuries in Children in Dar es Salaam: Patterns and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted in the three city hospitals of Dar es Salaam and two national referral hospitals to describe the pattern of burn injuries and to determine victims\\' and guardians\\' perceptions of the causes and prevention of burns. The study included all injured children younger than 18 years attending Mwananyamala, ...

  4. Total canopy transmittance estimated from small-footprint, full-waveform airborne LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milenković, Milutin; Wagner, Wolfgang; Quast, Raphael; Hollaus, Markus; Ressl, Camillo; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2017-06-01

    Canopy transmittance is a directional and wavelength-specific physical parameter that quantifies the amount of radiation attenuated when passing through a vegetation layer. The parameter has been estimated from LiDAR data in many different ways over the years. While early LiDAR methods treated each returned echo equally or weighted the echoes according to their return order, recent methods have focused more on the echo energy. In this study, we suggest a new method of estimating the total canopy transmittance considering only the energy of ground echoes. Therefore, this method does not require assumptions for the reflectance or absorption behavior of vegetation. As the oblique looking geometry of LiDAR is explicitly considered, canopy transmittance can be derived for individual laser beams and can be mapped spatially. The method was applied on a contemporary full-waveform LiDAR data set collected under leaf-off conditions and over a study site that contains two sub regions: one with a mixed (coniferous and deciduous) forest and another that is predominantly a deciduous forest in an alluvial plain. The resulting canopy transmittance map was analyzed for both sub regions and compared to aerial photos and the well-known fractional cover method. A visual comparison with aerial photos showed that even single trees and small canopy openings are visible in the canopy transmittance map. In comparison with the fractional cover method, the canopy transmittance map showed no saturation, i.e., there was better separability between patches with different vegetation structure.

  5. 2002 Maryland Department of Natural Resources LiDAR: Worcester County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) is a method of locating objects on the ground using aerial-borne equipment. It is similar to RADAR or SONAR in that the two-way...

  6. Aboveground biomass estimation with airborne hyperspectral and LiDAR data in Tesinske Beskydy Mountains

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brovkina, Olga; Zemek, František; Fabiánek, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 1 (2015), s. 35-46 ISSN 1803-2451 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415; GA MŠk OC09001 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : forest aboveground biomass * hyperspectral data * airborne LiDAR * Beskydy Mountains Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  7. Adaptive algorithm for classifying LiDAR data into water and land points by multifeature statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Li-Xin; Yang, Biao; Jiang, Jian-Ping; Cao, Guan-Zhong

    2016-10-01

    Classifying light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data into water and land points is an issue for the application of low-attitude airborne LiDAR (e.g., digital terrain model generation and river shoreline extraction). To solve the problem of distinguishing the water points from the land points in complex landscapes, an adaptive classification algorithm of water LiDAR point clouds is proposed, which consists of the following steps. First, the descriptors of local terrain slope and point density are designed by analyzing the characteristics of low-altitude airborne LiDAR water point clouds. Then Bayes' theorem is introduced to establish membership functions of the elevation, slope, and density. Next, the adaptive weights of the individual membership functions are determined according to the t-test of the independent samples of water and land points. Finally, a classification model based on multifeature statistics is obtained, and the adaptive classification threshold of the model is determined by the probability density of the training samples. Typical experiments conducted in the middle-lower Yangtze River riparian zone indicate that water classification accuracies higher than 99% are obtained by this algorithm, even in complex landscapes with mudflats and inland plains.

  8. Comparison of LiDAR- and photointerpretation-based estimates of canopy cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demetrios Gatziolis

    2012-01-01

    An evaluation of the agreement between photointerpretation- and LiDARbased estimates of canopy cover was performed using 397 90 x 90 m reference areas in Oregon. It was determined that at low canopy cover levels LiDAR estimates tend to exceed those from photointerpretation and that this tendency reverses at high canopy cover levels. Characteristics of the airborne...

  9. Biology and management of fish stocks in Bahir Dar Gulf, Lake Tana, Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wudneh, T.

    1998-01-01

    The biology of the fish stocks of the major species in the Bahir Dar Gulf of Lake Tana, the largest lake in Ethiopia, has been studied based on data collected during August 1990 to September 1993. The distribution, reproduction patterns, growth and mortality dynamics and gillnet selectivity

  10. 2006 Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Topographic LiDAR: Cumberland and York Counties, Maine

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In the fall of 2006, Sanborn Map Company was contracted by Camp Dresser McKee, Inc (CDM) to execute a LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) survey campaign in the...

  11. Mobile hybrid LiDAR & infrared sensing for natural gas pipeline monitoring compendium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This item consists of several documents that were created throughout the Mobile Hybrid LiDAR & Infrared Sensing for Natural Gas Pipeline Monitoring project, No. RITARS-14-H-RUT, which was conducted from January 15, 2014 to June 30, 2016. Documents in...

  12. Shape Detection from Raw LiDAR Data with Subspace Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Xu, Kai

    2017-09-01

    LiDAR scanning has become a prevalent technique for digitalizing large-scale outdoor scenes. However, the raw LiDAR data often contain imperfections, e.g., missing large regions, anisotropy of sampling density, and contamination of noise and outliers, which are the major obstacles that hinder its more ambitious and higher level applications in digital city modeling. Observing that 3D urban scenes can be locally described with several low dimensional subspaces, we propose to locally classify the neighborhoods of the scans to model the substructures of the scenes. The key enabler is the adaptive kernel-scale scoring, filtering and clustering of substructures, making it possible to recover the local structures at all points simultaneously, even in the presence of severe data imperfections. Integrating the local analyses leads to robust shape detection from raw LiDAR data. On this basis, we develop several urban scene applications and verify them on a number of LiDAR scans with various complexities and styles, which demonstrates the effectiveness and robustness of our methods.

  13. Multispectral LiDAR Data for Land Cover Classification of Urban Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salem Morsy

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Airborne Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR systems usually operate at a monochromatic wavelength measuring the range and the strength of the reflected energy (intensity from objects. Recently, multispectral LiDAR sensors, which acquire data at different wavelengths, have emerged. This allows for recording of a diversity of spectral reflectance from objects. In this context, we aim to investigate the use of multispectral LiDAR data in land cover classification using two different techniques. The first is image-based classification, where intensity and height images are created from LiDAR points and then a maximum likelihood classifier is applied. The second is point-based classification, where ground filtering and Normalized Difference Vegetation Indices (NDVIs computation are conducted. A dataset of an urban area located in Oshawa, Ontario, Canada, is classified into four classes: buildings, trees, roads and grass. An overall accuracy of up to 89.9% and 92.7% is achieved from image classification and 3D point classification, respectively. A radiometric correction model is also applied to the intensity data in order to remove the attenuation due to the system distortion and terrain height variation. The classification process is then repeated, and the results demonstrate that there are no significant improvements achieved in the overall accuracy.

  14. A comparison of two open source LiDAR surface classification algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade T. Tinkham; Hongyu Huang; Alistair M.S. Smith; Rupesh Shrestha; Michael J. Falkowski; Andrew T. Hudak; Timothy E. Link; Nancy F. Glenn; Danny G. Marks

    2011-01-01

    With the progression of LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) towards a mainstream resource management tool, it has become necessary to understand how best to process and analyze the data. While most ground surface identification algorithms remain proprietary and have high purchase costs; a few are openly available, free to use, and are supported by published results....

  15. Survey of woody flora and fauna of the Bahir Dar University main ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this project was to survey the flora and fauna of the main campus of Bahir Dar Vniversity. It was necessary because the university campus is relatively well rehabilitated and it is very important that the composition of the vegetation, the regeneration capacity of the vegetation and the importance of the tree species ...

  16. The effect of El Nino on trypanosome infection in cattle in Dar es ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results also indicated that cattle exposure to tsetse challenge was higher in high altitude parts of Dar es Salaam compared to low-lying areas after El Nino. The observation suggests that El Nino phenomenon influenced tsetse redistribution in many tsetse endemic areas and the increase in infection rate after El Nino ...

  17. Automatic extraction of pavement markings on streets from point cloud data of mobile LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Zhong, Ruofei; Tang, Tao; Wang, Liuzhao; Liu, Xianlin

    2017-08-01

    Pavement markings provide an important foundation as they help to keep roads users safe. Accurate and comprehensive information about pavement markings assists the road regulators and is useful in developing driverless technology. Mobile light detection and ranging (LiDAR) systems offer new opportunities to collect and process accurate pavement markings’ information. Mobile LiDAR systems can directly obtain the three-dimensional (3D) coordinates of an object, thus defining spatial data and the intensity of (3D) objects in a fast and efficient way. The RGB attribute information of data points can be obtained based on the panoramic camera in the system. In this paper, we present a novel method process to automatically extract pavement markings using multiple attribute information of the laser scanning point cloud from the mobile LiDAR data. This method process utilizes a differential grayscale of RGB color, laser pulse reflection intensity, and the differential intensity to identify and extract pavement markings. We utilized point cloud density to remove the noise and used morphological operations to eliminate the errors. In the application, we tested our method process on different sections of roads in Beijing, China, and Buffalo, NY, USA. The results indicated that both correctness (p) and completeness (r) were higher than 90%. The method process of this research can be applied to extract pavement markings from huge point cloud data produced by mobile LiDAR.

  18. How Children Living in Poor Areas of Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania Perceive Their Own Multiple Intelligences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Pauline; Humble, Steve; Chan, David W.

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out with 1,857 poor children from 17 schools, living in low-income areas of Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania. All children took the "Student Multiple Intelligences Profile" (SMIP) questionnaire as part of a bigger project that gathered data around concepts and beliefs of talent. This paper sets out two aims, first to…

  19. 2010 U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) ARRA Topographic LiDAR: Coastal Maine

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — USGS Contract: G10PC00026 Task Order Number: G10PD02143 Task Order Number: G10PD01027 LiDAR was collected at a 2.0 meter nominal post spacing (2.0m GSD) for...

  20. Fast and nondestructive method for leaf level chlorophyll estimation using hyperspectral LiDAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nevalainen, O.; Hakala, T.; Suomalainen, J.M.; Mäkipää, R.; Peltoniemi, M.; Krooks, A.; Kaasalainen, S.

    2014-01-01

    We propose an empirical method for nondestructive estimation of chlorophyll in tree canopies. The first prototype of a full waveform hyperspectral LiDAR instrument has been developed by the Finnish Geodetic Institute (FGI). The instrument efficiently combines the benefits of passive and active

  1. Patterns and correlates of solid waste disposal practices in Dar es ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examines the patterns and correlations of solid waste disposal practices among households in urbanized and populated Dar es Salaam city in Tanzania. The Tanzanian Household Budget Survey (HBS) data covering many households' characteristics was used. Multinomial Logit (MNL) model was applied to ...

  2. Prevalence and risk factors for obstructive sleep apnoea in Dar es ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to determine the prevalence and risk factors for obstructive sleep apnoea in Dar es Salaam, ... Keywords: sleep apnoea, obstructive, risk factors, prevalence, polysomnography, Tanzania .... analysis method whereby variables used to assess SES were converted into binary variables, their means ...

  3. Lead pollution in urban roadside environments of Dar es Salaam city

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lead is among the most toxic elements in nature. It is non-biodegradable and its toxicity does not change with time. Use of leaded gasoline in motor vehicles is known as the major source of lead pollution in cities in the world. Dar es Salaam, the main city of Tanzania, has thousands of cars traveling along its roads. The lead ...

  4. Numerical modeling of the airflow around a forest edge using LiDAR-derived forest heigths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boudreault, Louis-Etienne; Dellwik, Ebba; Bechmann, Andreas

    A 3D methodology to quantify the effect of forests on the mean wind flow field is presented. The methodology is based on the treatment of forest raw data of light detection and ranging (LiDAR) scans, and a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method based on a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (Ra...

  5. Registration of optical imagery and LiDAR data using an inherent geometrical constraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wuming; Zhao, Jing; Chen, Mei; Chen, Yiming; Yan, Kai; Li, Linyuan; Qi, Jianbo; Wang, Xiaoyan; Luo, Jinghui; Chu, Qing

    2015-03-23

    A novel method for registering imagery with Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) data is proposed. It is based on the phenomenon that the back-projection of LiDAR point cloud of an object should be located within the object boundary in the image. Using this inherent geometrical constraint, the registration parameters computation of both data sets only requires LiDAR point clouds of several objects and their corresponding boundaries in the image. The proposed registration method comprises of four steps: point clouds extraction, boundary extraction, back-projection computation and registration parameters computation. There are not any limitations on the geometrical and spectral properties of the object. So it is suitable not only for structured scenes with man-made objects but also for natural scenes. Moreover, the proposed method based on the inherent geometrical constraint can register two data sets derived from different parts of an object. It can be used to co-register TLS (Terrestrial Laser Scanning) LiDAR point cloud and UAV (Unmanned aerial vehicle) image, which are obtaining more attention in the forest survey application. Using initial registration parameters comparable to POS (position and orientation system) accuracy, the performed experiments validated the feasibility of the proposed registration method.

  6. A DATA DRIVEN METHOD FOR BUILDING RECONSTRUCTION FROM LiDAR POINT CLOUDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sajadian

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Airborne laser scanning, commonly referred to as LiDAR, is a superior technology for three-dimensional data acquisition from Earth's surface with high speed and density. Building reconstruction is one of the main applications of LiDAR system which is considered in this study. For a 3D reconstruction of the buildings, the buildings points should be first separated from the other points such as; ground and vegetation. In this paper, a multi-agent strategy has been proposed for simultaneous extraction and segmentation of buildings from LiDAR point clouds. Height values, number of returned pulse, length of triangles, direction of normal vectors, and area are five criteria which have been utilized in this step. Next, the building edge points are detected using a new method named "Grid Erosion". A RANSAC based technique has been employed for edge line extraction. Regularization constraints are performed to achieve the final lines. Finally, by modelling of the roofs and walls, 3D building model is reconstructed. The results indicate that the proposed method could successfully extract the building from LiDAR data and generate the building models automatically. A qualitative and quantitative assessment of the proposed method is then provided.

  7. LiDAR Point Cloud and Stereo Image Point Cloud Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    and tree health information, resulting in a complete model of the forest inventory . LiDAR collected point clouds and stereo-image-derived point...N. C., Pitt, D., & Woods, M. (2013). The utility of image-based point clouds for forest inventory : a comparison with airborne laser scanning

  8. Interpersonal Conflicts and Styles of Managing Conflicts among Students at Bahir Dar University, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazezew, Arega; Neka, Mulugeta

    2017-01-01

    Interpersonal conflict happens everywhere and at any time and is inherent in all societies. However, the methods of managing such conflict are quite different from one organisation to the other. The general objective of the study was to assess interpersonal conflicts and styles of managing conflicts among students at Bahir Dar University.…

  9. DARS-associated leukoencephalopathy can mimic a steroid-responsive neuroinflammatory disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, Nicole I.; Toro, Camilo; Kister, Ilya; Latif, Kartikasalwah Abd; Leventer, Richard; Pizzino, Amy; Simons, Cas; Abbink, Truus E. M.; Taft, Ryan J.; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Vanderver, Adeline

    2015-01-01

    To describe the expanding clinical spectrum of a recently described hereditary leukoencephalopathy, hypomyelination with brainstem and spinal cord involvement and leg spasticity, which is caused by mutations in the aspartyl tRNA-synthetase encoding gene DARS, including patients with an adolescent

  10. DARS-associated leukoencephalopathy can mimic a steroid-responsive neuroinflammatory disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, N.I.; Toro, C.; Kister, I.; Abd Latif, K.; Leventer, R.; Pizzino, A.; Simons, C.; Abbink, G.E.M.; Taft, R.J.; van der Knaap, M.S.; Vanderver, A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe the expanding clinical spectrum of a recently described hereditary leukoencephalopathy, hypomyelination with brainstem and spinal cord involvement and leg spasticity, which is caused by mutations in the aspartyl tRNA-synthetase encoding gene DARS, including patients with an

  11. Geospatial revolution and remote sensing LiDAR in Mesoamerican archaeology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Arlen F; Chase, Diane Z; Fisher, Christopher T; Leisz, Stephen J; Weishampel, John F

    2012-08-07

    The application of light detection and ranging (LiDAR), a laser-based remote-sensing technology that is capable of penetrating overlying vegetation and forest canopies, is generating a fundamental shift in Mesoamerican archaeology and has the potential to transform research in forested areas world-wide. Much as radiocarbon dating that half a century ago moved archaeology forward by grounding archaeological remains in time, LiDAR is proving to be a catalyst for an improved spatial understanding of the past. With LiDAR, ancient societies can be contextualized within a fully defined landscape. Interpretations about the scale and organization of densely forested sites no longer are constrained by sample size, as they were when mapping required laborious on-ground survey. The ability to articulate ancient landscapes fully permits a better understanding of the complexity of ancient Mesoamerican urbanism and also aids in modern conservation efforts. The importance of this geospatial innovation is demonstrated with newly acquired LiDAR data from the archaeological sites of Caracol, Cayo, Belize and Angamuco, Michoacán, Mexico. These data illustrate the potential of technology to act as a catalytic enabler of rapid transformational change in archaeological research and interpretation and also underscore the value of on-the-ground archaeological investigation in validating and contextualizing results.

  12. Dynamic displacement estimation by fusing LDV and LiDAR measurements via smoothing based Kalman filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kiyoung; Sohn, Hoon

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a smoothing based Kalman filter to estimate dynamic displacement in real-time by fusing the velocity measured from a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) and the displacement from a light detection and ranging (LiDAR). LiDAR can measure displacement based on the time-of-flight information or the phase-shift of the laser beam reflected off form a target surface, but it typically has a high noise level and a low sampling rate. On the other hand, LDV primarily measures out-of-plane velocity of a moving target, and displacement is estimated by numerical integration of the measured velocity. Here, the displacement estimated by LDV suffers from integration error although LDV can achieve a lower noise level and a much higher sampling rate than LiDAR. The proposed data fusion technique estimates high-precision and high-sampling rate displacement by taking advantage of both LiDAR and LDV measurements and overcomes their limitations by adopting a real-time smoothing based Kalman filter. To verify the performance of the proposed dynamic displacement estimation technique, a series of lab-scale tests are conducted under various loading conditions.

  13. 2014 U.S. Geological Survey CMGP LiDAR: Post Sandy (Pennsylvania)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fugro EarthData, Inc. (Fugro) was tasked by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to plan, acquire, process, and produce derivative products of LiDAR data at a nominal...

  14. Impact of a refined airborne LiDAR stochastic model for natural hazard applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glennie, C. L.; Bolkas, D.; Fotopoulos, G.

    2016-12-01

    Airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) is often employed to derive multi-temporal Digital Elevation Models (DEMs), that are used to estimate vertical displacement resulting from natural hazards such as landslides, rockfalls and erosion. Vertical displacements are estimated by computing the difference between two DEMs separated by a specified time period and applying a threshold to remove the inherent noise. Thus, reliable information about the accuracy of DEMs is essential. The assessment of airborne LiDAR errors is typically based on (i) independent ground control points (ii) forward error propagation utilizing the LiDAR geo-referencing equation. The latter approach is dependent on the stochastic model information of the LiDAR measurements. Furthermore, it provides the user with point-by-point accuracy estimation. In this study, a refined stochastic model is obtained through variance component estimation (VCE) for a dataset in Houston, Texas. Results show that initial stochastic information was optimistic by 35% for both horizontal coordinates and ellipsoidal heights. To assess the impact of a refined stochastic model, surface displacement simulations are evaluated. The simulations include scenarios with topographic slopes that vary from 10º to 60º, and vertical displacement of ±1 to ±5 m. Results highlight the cases where a reliable stochastic model is important. A refined stochastic model can be used in practical applications for determining appropriate noise thresholds in vertical displacement, improve quantitative analysis, and enhance relevant decision-making.

  15. Geo-referenced digital data acquisition and processing system using LiDAR technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-01

    LiDAR technology, introduced in the late 90s, has received wide acceptance in airborne surveying as a leading : tool for obtaining high-quality surface data at decimeter-level vertical accuracy in an unprecedentedly short : turnaround time. State-of-...

  16. LiDAR Relative Reflectivity Surface (2011) for Coral Bay, St. John

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a LiDAR (Light Detection & Ranging) 0.3x0.3 meter resolution relative seafloor reflectivity surface for Coral Bay, St. John in the U.S....

  17. LiDAR Relative Reflectivity Surface (2011) for Fish Bay, St. John

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a LiDAR (Light Detection & Ranging) 0.3x0.3 meter resolution relative seafloor reflectivity surface for Fish Bay, St. John in the U.S....

  18. Multispectral LiDAR Data for Land Cover Classification of Urban Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsy, Salem; Shaker, Ahmed; El-Rabbany, Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Airborne Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) systems usually operate at a monochromatic wavelength measuring the range and the strength of the reflected energy (intensity) from objects. Recently, multispectral LiDAR sensors, which acquire data at different wavelengths, have emerged. This allows for recording of a diversity of spectral reflectance from objects. In this context, we aim to investigate the use of multispectral LiDAR data in land cover classification using two different techniques. The first is image-based classification, where intensity and height images are created from LiDAR points and then a maximum likelihood classifier is applied. The second is point-based classification, where ground filtering and Normalized Difference Vegetation Indices (NDVIs) computation are conducted. A dataset of an urban area located in Oshawa, Ontario, Canada, is classified into four classes: buildings, trees, roads and grass. An overall accuracy of up to 89.9% and 92.7% is achieved from image classification and 3D point classification, respectively. A radiometric correction model is also applied to the intensity data in order to remove the attenuation due to the system distortion and terrain height variation. The classification process is then repeated, and the results demonstrate that there are no significant improvements achieved in the overall accuracy. PMID:28445432

  19. HIV-1 infection and fertility in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania | Sedgh ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to examine the association of HIV-1 infection with rates of pregnancy and pregnancy loss in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. A retrospective cohort study of 1,006 HIV-infected women and 485 uninfected women was employed. In multivariate analyses controlling for other predictors of pregnancy, the ...

  20. Airborne hyperspectral and LiDAR data integration for weed detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamás, János; Lehoczky, Éva; Fehér, János; Fórián, Tünde; Nagy, Attila; Bozsik, Éva; Gálya, Bernadett; Riczu, Péter

    2014-05-01

    Agriculture uses 70% of global available fresh water. However, ca. 50-70% of water used by cultivated plants, the rest of water transpirated by the weeds. Thus, to define the distribution of weeds is very important in precision agriculture and horticulture as well. To survey weeds on larger fields by traditional methods is often time consuming. Remote sensing instruments are useful to detect weeds in larger area. In our investigation a 3D airborne laser scanner (RIEGL LMS-Q680i) was used in agricultural field near Sopron to scouting weeds. Beside the airborne LiDAR, hyperspectral imaging system (AISA DUAL) and air photos helped to investigate weed coverage. The LiDAR survey was carried out at early April, 2012, before sprouting of cultivated plants. Thus, there could be detected emerging of weeds and direction of cultivation. However airborne LiDAR system was ideal to detect weeds, identification of weeds at species level was infeasible. Higher point density LiDAR - Terrestrial laser scanning - systems are appropriate to distinguish weed species. Based on the results, laser scanner is an effective tool to scouting of weeds. Appropriate weed detection and mapping systems could contribute to elaborate water and herbicide saving management technique. This publication was supported by the OTKA project K 105789.

  1. University of Dar es Salaam Library Journal - Vol 12, No 1 (2017)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Impact of Smart-phones Usage on Third-Year Undergraduates in Tanzania: A Case of the University of Dar es Salaam · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Elias Mwabungulu, Hosea Mungwabi, 87-105 ...

  2. A comparison of two open source LiDAR surface classification algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    With the progression of LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) towards a mainstream resource management tool, it has become necessary to understand how best to process and analyze the data. While most ground surface identification algorithms remain proprietary and have high purchase costs; a few are op...

  3. Development of DArT-based PCR markers for selecting drought-tolerant spring barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiust, Anna; Rapacz, Marcin; Wójcik-Jagła, Magdalena; Tyrka, Mirosław

    2015-08-01

    The tolerance of spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cultivars to spring drought is an important agronomic trait affecting crop yield and quality in Poland. Therefore, breeders require new molecular markers to select plants with lower spring drought susceptibility. With the advent of genomic selection technology, simple molecular tools may still be applicable to screen material for markers of the most important traits and in-depth genome scanning. In previous studies, diversity arrays technology (DArT)-based genetic maps were constructed for F2 populations of Polish fodder and malt barley elite breeding lines, and 15 and 18 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) related to spring drought tolerance were identified, respectively. In this paper, we show the results of a conversion of 30 DArT markers corresponding to 11 QTLs into simple sequence repeat (SSR) and sequence tagged site (STS) markers. Twenty-two polymorphic markers were obtained, including 13 DArT-based SSRs. Additionally, 31 SSR markers, located in close proximity to the DArT markers, were selected from the GrainGenes database and tested. Further analyses of 24 advanced breeding lines with different drought tolerances confirmed that five out of the 30 converted markers, as well as three out of the 31 additional SSR markers, were effective in marker-assisted selection for drought tolerance. The possible function of clones related to these markers in drought tolerance is discussed.

  4. Real-time surveillance system for marine environment based on HLIF LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babichenko, Sergey; Sobolev, Innokenti; Aleksejev, Valeri; Sõro, Oliver

    2017-10-01

    The operational monitoring of the risk areas of marine environment requires cost-effective solutions. One of the options is the use of sensor networks based on fixed installations and moving platforms (coastal boats, supply-, cargo-, and passenger vessels). Such network allows to gather environmental data in time and space with direct links to operational activities in the controlled area for further environmental risk assessment. Among many remote sensing techniques the LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) based on Light Induced Fluorescence (LIF) is the tool of direct assessment of water quality variations caused by chemical pollution, colored dissolved organic matter, and phytoplankton composition. The Hyperspectral LIF (HLIF) LiDAR acquires comprehensive LIF spectra and analyses them by spectral pattern recognition technique to detect and classify the substances in water remotely. Combined use of HLIF LiDARs with Real-Time Data Management System (RTDMS) provides the economically effective solution for the regular monitoring in the controlled area. OCEAN VISUALS in cooperation with LDI INNOVATION has developed Oil in Water Locator (OWL™) with RTDMS (OWL MAP™) based on HLIF LiDAR technique. This is a novel technical solution for monitoring of marine environment providing continuous unattended operations. OWL™ has been extensively tested on board of various vessels in the North Sea, Norwegian Sea, Barents Sea, Baltic Sea and Caribbean Sea. This paper describes the technology features, the results of its operational use in 2014-2017, and outlook for the technology development.

  5. Airborne LiDAR : a new source of traffic flow data, research implementation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-01

    LiDAR (or airborne laser scanning) systems became a dominant player in high-precision spatial data acquisition in the late 90's. This new technology quickly established itself as the main source of surface information in commercial mapping, deliverin...

  6. Cannabis use among young people in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to explore the factors associated with initiation and continued use of cannabis among youths in Dar es salaam, Tanzania. The study employed an explorative qualitative design, using in-depth interviews. Purposive sampling and snowball techniques were used to obtain the study participants.

  7. Prevalence and risk factors for obstructive sleep apnoea in Dar es ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a common cause of daytime sleepiness, a condition associated with accidents, antisocial behaviour, mood disturbances, cognitive dysfunctions and inefficiency at work. This study was carried out to determine the prevalence and risk factors for obstructive sleep apnoea in Dar ...

  8. LiDAR measurements of full scale wind turbine wake characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose; Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Mann, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    Full scale wind speed measurements, recorded inside the wake of an operating 2MW/80m wind turbine,has been performed during the spring 2009, as part of the EU-TOPFARM project. Longitudinal wind speeds in wake cross sections are measured with a LiDAR system mounted in the rear of the nacelle. The ...

  9. Child Labour in Urban Agriculture: The Case of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlozi, Malongo R. S.

    1995-01-01

    Urban agriculture in Dar es Salaam was found to use child labor of both children with parents of higher and lower socioeconomic status (SES). Discusses policy implications and calls for the education of parents of lower SES not to expect an economic contribution from their children's labor, and the education of children about their rights. (LZ)

  10. Pit Latrine Emptying Behavior and Demand for Sanitation Services in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Marion W.; Cumming, Oliver; Cairncross, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    Pit latrines are the main form of sanitation in unplanned areas in many rapidly growing developing cities. Understanding demand for pit latrine fecal sludge management (FSM) services in these communities is important for designing demand-responsive sanitation services and policies to improve public health. We examine latrine emptying knowledge, attitudes, behavior, trends and rates of safe/unsafe emptying, and measure demand for a new hygienic latrine emptying service in unplanned communities in Dar Es Salaam (Dar), Tanzania, using data from a cross-sectional survey at 662 residential properties in 35 unplanned sub-wards across Dar, where 97% had pit latrines. A picture emerges of expensive and poor FSM service options for latrine owners, resulting in widespread fecal sludge exposure that is likely to increase unless addressed. Households delay emptying as long as possible, use full pits beyond what is safe, face high costs even for unhygienic emptying, and resort to unsafe practices like ‘flooding out’. We measured strong interest in and willingness to pay (WTP) for the new pit emptying service at 96% of residences; 57% were WTP ≥U.S. $17 to remove ≥200 L of sludge. Emerging policy recommendations for safe FSM in unplanned urban communities in Dar and elsewhere are discussed. PMID:25734790

  11. Patterns and correlates of solid waste disposal practices in Dar es ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    cities in developing countries did not get proper SWM services and most ... knowledge on solid waste disposal in Dar es Salaam city. Specifically, the ...... Dubbeling M, Pasquini M (2010). The Growth of Cities in East-Africa: Consequences for Urban Food Supply (pp. 1–34). RUAF Foundation for the World Bank. Ezebilo EE ...

  12. Assessment of the. Free Health Care Provision System in Bahir Dar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    usually very hard to implement in those countries that have adopted them. Poor means testing mechanisms for proper targeting have been the main reasons for this problem. Objective: To describe the practice of providing free health care in Bahir Dar area (northern. Ethiopia) and to assess the presence and extent of ...

  13. Key events and their effects on cycling behaviour in Dar-es-Salaam : abstract + powerpoint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nkurunziza, A.; Zuidgeest, M.H.P.; Brussel, M.J.G.; van Maarseveen, M.F.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    The paper explores key events and investigates their effects on cycling behaviour in the city of Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania. The objective of the study is to identify specific key events during a person’s life course with a significant effect on change of travel behaviour towards cycling in relation to

  14. planning for the automation of the university of dar es salaam library

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper examines the planning process for the automation of the University of Dar es Salaam Library. The planning phases described include the preparation phase, planning for implementation and database construction. The major issues during the preparation phase are the discussion on the context of automation, ...

  15. Urban Classification Techniques Using the Fusion of LiDAR and Spectral Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    multispectral spectra for selected minerals, dry, and green vegetation (From Kruse, 2007...File Format LiDAR - Light Detection and Ranging LVIS - Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor MPiA - Multi-Pulse in Air MSI - Multispectral Imaging...right) multispectral spectra for selected minerals, dry, and green vegetation (From Kruse, 2007). 2. Multispectral Classification This section

  16. Multispectral LiDAR Data for Land Cover Classification of Urban Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsy, Salem; Shaker, Ahmed; El-Rabbany, Ahmed

    2017-04-26

    Airborne Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) systems usually operate at a monochromatic wavelength measuring the range and the strength of the reflected energy (intensity) from objects. Recently, multispectral LiDAR sensors, which acquire data at different wavelengths, have emerged. This allows for recording of a diversity of spectral reflectance from objects. In this context, we aim to investigate the use of multispectral LiDAR data in land cover classification using two different techniques. The first is image-based classification, where intensity and height images are created from LiDAR points and then a maximum likelihood classifier is applied. The second is point-based classification, where ground filtering and Normalized Difference Vegetation Indices (NDVIs) computation are conducted. A dataset of an urban area located in Oshawa, Ontario, Canada, is classified into four classes: buildings, trees, roads and grass. An overall accuracy of up to 89.9% and 92.7% is achieved from image classification and 3D point classification, respectively. A radiometric correction model is also applied to the intensity data in order to remove the attenuation due to the system distortion and terrain height variation. The classification process is then repeated, and the results demonstrate that there are no significant improvements achieved in the overall accuracy.

  17. Dynamic Data Filtering of Long-Range Doppler LiDAR Wind Speed Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hauke Beck

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Doppler LiDARs have become flexible and versatile remote sensing devices for wind energy applications. The possibility to measure radial wind speed components contemporaneously at multiple distances is an advantage with respect to meteorological masts. However, these measurements must be filtered due to the measurement geometry, hard targets and atmospheric conditions. To ensure a maximum data availability while producing low measurement errors, we introduce a dynamic data filter approach that conditionally decouples the dependency of data availability with increasing range. The new filter approach is based on the assumption of self-similarity, that has not been used so far for LiDAR data filtering. We tested the accuracy of the dynamic data filter approach together with other commonly used filter approaches, from research and industry applications. This has been done with data from a long-range pulsed LiDAR installed at the offshore wind farm ‘alpha ventus’. There, an ultrasonic anemometer located approximately 2.8 km from the LiDAR was used as reference. The analysis of around 1.5 weeks of data shows, that the error of mean radial velocity can be minimised for wake and free stream conditions.

  18. Analysis of airborne LiDAR surveys to quantify the characteristic morphologies of northern forested wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray C. Richardson; Carl P. J. Mitchell; Brian A. Branfireun; Randall K. Kolka

    2010-01-01

    A new technique for quantifying the geomorphic form of northern forested wetlands from airborne LiDAR surveys is introduced, demonstrating the unprecedented ability to characterize the geomorphic form of northern forested wetlands using high-resolution digital topography. Two quantitative indices are presented, including the lagg width index (LWI) which objectively...

  19. Modeling commuter preferences for the proposed bus rapid transit in Dar-es-Salaam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nkurunziza, A.; Zuidgeest, M.H.P.; Brussel, M.J.G.; van Maarseveen, M.F.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    The paper analyzes individual commuter preferences towards the proposed bus rapid transit (BRT) system in Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania. The objective of the survey was to identify how commuters perceive and value the proposed BRT service quality attributes. A stated preference survey of potential users

  20. Pit Latrine Emptying Behavior and Demand for Sanitation Services in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion W. Jenkins

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Pit latrines are the main form of sanitation in unplanned areas in many rapidly growing developing cities. Understanding demand for pit latrine fecal sludge management (FSM services in these communities is important for designing demand-responsive sanitation services and policies to improve public health. We examine latrine emptying knowledge, attitudes, behavior, trends and rates of safe/unsafe emptying, and measure demand for a new hygienic latrine emptying service in unplanned communities in Dar Es Salaam (Dar, Tanzania, using data from a cross-sectional survey at 662 residential properties in 35 unplanned sub-wards across Dar, where 97% had pit latrines. A picture emerges of expensive and poor FSM service options for latrine owners, resulting in widespread fecal sludge exposure that is likely to increase unless addressed. Households delay emptying as long as possible, use full pits beyond what is safe, face high costs even for unhygienic emptying, and resort to unsafe practices like ‘flooding out’. We measured strong interest in and willingness to pay (WTP for the new pit emptying service at 96% of residences; 57% were WTP ≥U.S. $17 to remove ≥200 L of sludge. Emerging policy recommendations for safe FSM in unplanned urban communities in Dar and elsewhere are discussed.

  1. 2012-2013 U.S. Geological Survey LiDAR: Territory of Guam

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Territory of Guam, LiDAR Task G11PD01189 This task order is for production of surface model products of The Territory of Guam. The models are produced from data...

  2. Into the third dimension: Benefits of incorporating LiDAR data in wildlife habitat models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melissa J. Merrick; John L. Koprowski; Craig Wilcox

    2013-01-01

    LiDAR (Light detection and ranging) is a tool with potential for characterizing wildlife habitat by providing detailed, three-dimensional landscape information not available from other remote sensing applications. The ability to accurately map structural components such as canopy height, canopy cover, woody debris, tree density, and ground surface has potential to...

  3. Interventions That Increase Enrolment of Women in Higher Education: The University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilango, Nasero Charles; Qin, Yu Hai; Nyoni, Watende Pius; Senguo, Richard Allen

    2017-01-01

    Gender equality and equity has long been a focus area in Tanzanian government, encouraging the increased recruitment of female students in to higher education. This article investigates the effectiveness of affirmative action policy interventions that introduced and designed to increase female students' enrolment at the University of Dar es…

  4. Smoking among in-school adolescents in Dar Es Salam, Tanzania ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using data from the 2003 Dar es Salaam (Tanzania) Global Youth Tobacco Survey (GYTS), we assessed factors associated with current cigarette smoking among adolescents. We estimated frequencies and conducted logistic regression analysis to identify predictors of current cigarette smoking. Of the 1947 students ...

  5. Skeleton-based botanic tree diameter estimation from dense LiDAR data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bucksch, A.; Lindenbergh, R.C.; Menenti, M.; Raman, M.Z.

    2009-01-01

    New airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) measurement systems, like the FLI-MAP 400 System, make it possible to obtain high density data containing far more information about single objects, like trees, than traditional airborne laser systems. Therefore, it becomes feasible to analyze

  6. Genetics and Human Agency: Comment on Dar-Nimrod and Heine (2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkheimer, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Dar-Nimrod and Heine (2011) decried genetic essentialism without denying the importance of genetics in the genesis of human behavior, and although I agree on both counts, a deeper issue remains unaddressed: how should we adjust our cognitions about our own behavior in light of genetic influence, or is it perhaps not necessary to take genetics into…

  7. Object-Based Classification of Abandoned Logging Roads under Heavy Canopy Using LiDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Sherba

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available LiDAR-derived slope models may be used to detect abandoned logging roads in steep forested terrain. An object-based classification approach of abandoned logging road detection was employed in this study. First, a slope model of the study site in Marin County, California was created from a LiDAR derived DEM. Multiresolution segmentation was applied to the slope model and road seed objects were iteratively grown into candidate objects. A road classification accuracy of 86% was achieved using this fully automated procedure and post processing increased this accuracy to 90%. In order to assess the sensitivity of the road classification to LiDAR ground point spacing, the LiDAR ground point cloud was repeatedly thinned by a fraction of 0.5 and the classification procedure was reapplied. The producer’s accuracy of the road classification declined from 79% with a ground point spacing of 0.91 to below 50% with a ground point spacing of 2, indicating the importance of high point density for accurate classification of abandoned logging roads.

  8. Examining conifer canopy structural complexity across forest ages and elevations with LiDAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van R. Kane; Jonathan D. Bakker; Robert J. McGaughey; James A. Lutz; Rolf F. Gersonde; Jerry F. Franklin

    2010-01-01

    LiDAR measurements of canopy structure can be used to classify forest stands into structural stages to study spatial patterns of canopy structure, identify habitat, or plan management actions. A key assumption in this process is that differences in canopy structure based on forest age and elevation are consistent with predictions from models of stand development. Three...

  9. Estimation of Forest Topsoil Properties Using Airborne LiDAR-Derived Intensity and Topographic Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Li

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Forest topsoil supports vegetation growth and contains the majority of soil nutrients that are important indices of soil fertility and quality. Therefore, estimating forest topsoil properties, such as soil organic matter (SOM, total nitrogen (Total N, pH, litter-organic (O-A horizon depth (Depth and available phosphorous (AvaP, is of particular importance for forest development and management. As an emerging technology, light detection and ranging (LiDAR can capture the three-dimensional structure and intensity information of scanned objects, and can generate high resolution digital elevation models (DEM using ground echoes. Moreover, great power for estimating forest topsoil properties is enclosed in the intensity information of ground echoes. However, the intensity has not been well explored for this purpose. In this study, we collected soil samples from 62 plots and the coincident airborne LiDAR data in a Korean pine forest in Northeast China, and assessed the effectiveness of both multi-scale intensity data and LiDAR-derived topographic factors for estimating forest topsoil properties. The results showed that LiDAR-derived variables could be robust predictors of four topsoil properties (SOM, Total N, pH, and Depth, with coefficients of determination (R2 ranging from 0.46 to 0.66. Ground-returned intensity was identified as the most effective predictor for three topsoil properties (SOM, Total N, and Depth with R2 values of 0.17–0.64. Meanwhile, LiDAR-derived topographic factors, except elevation and sediment transport index, had weak explanatory power, with R2 no more than 0.10. These findings suggest that the LiDAR intensity of ground echoes is effective for estimating several topsoil properties in forests with complicated topography and dense canopy cover. Furthermore, combining intensity and multi-scale LiDAR-derived topographic factors, the prediction accuracies (R2 were enhanced by negligible amounts up to 0.40, relative to using

  10. Response categories and anger measurement: do fewer categories result in poorer measurement?: development of the DAR5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorne, Graeme; Mouthaan, Joanne; Forbes, David; Novaco, Raymond W

    2006-02-01

    Anger is a key long-term outcome from trauma exposure, regardless of trauma type, and it is implicated as a moderator of response to treatment. It therefore seems important that anger is assessed in both epidemiological studies of trauma sequelae and in intervention evaluation research. This study explored the measurement properties of a recently investigated anger scale, the Dimensions of Anger Reactions (DAR) Scale. In our previous study, the DAR was found to be a measure of trait anger, but although brief, the nine response categories per item may have confused respondents, suggesting fewer response categories may work equally well. Additionally, our previous analysis suggested there were two redundant items within the DAR. Three samples of Australian veterans were used to investigate the psychometric properties associated with alterations to the response categories of the DAR; veterans who participated in the DAR validation study, those participating in group therapy programmes for post-traumatic stress disorder, and veterans participating in lifestyle programmes. Item response theory analysis was used to explore the internal properties of competing DAR models, and models were assessed against external criteria. The results showed that the number of item responses in the DAR exceeded channel capacity, and that response bias occurred in the second half of the instrument. We hypothesized that this was due to respondents not discriminating among the many response categories. Based on a modelling exercise in which we reduced the number of DAR items from 7 to 5 and the number of response categories from 9 to 5, validation tests showed that there was no loss of sensitivity, reliability or validity. To avoid confusion with the DAR, we have referred to the revised version of the DAR as the DAR5. We conclude that the DAR5, which abbreviates the original DAR to half its original length, has similar psychometric properties and is therefore to be preferred especially for

  11. Applying a weighted random forests method to extract karst sinkholes from LiDAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Junfeng; Pierskalla, William P.

    2016-02-01

    Detailed mapping of sinkholes provides critical information for mitigating sinkhole hazards and understanding groundwater and surface water interactions in karst terrains. LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) measures the earth's surface in high-resolution and high-density and has shown great potentials to drastically improve locating and delineating sinkholes. However, processing LiDAR data to extract sinkholes requires separating sinkholes from other depressions, which can be laborious because of the sheer number of the depressions commonly generated from LiDAR data. In this study, we applied the random forests, a machine learning method, to automatically separate sinkholes from other depressions in a karst region in central Kentucky. The sinkhole-extraction random forest was grown on a training dataset built from an area where LiDAR-derived depressions were manually classified through a visual inspection and field verification process. Based on the geometry of depressions, as well as natural and human factors related to sinkholes, 11 parameters were selected as predictive variables to form the dataset. Because the training dataset was imbalanced with the majority of depressions being non-sinkholes, a weighted random forests method was used to improve the accuracy of predicting sinkholes. The weighted random forest achieved an average accuracy of 89.95% for the training dataset, demonstrating that the random forest can be an effective sinkhole classifier. Testing of the random forest in another area, however, resulted in moderate success with an average accuracy rate of 73.96%. This study suggests that an automatic sinkhole extraction procedure like the random forest classifier can significantly reduce time and labor costs and makes its more tractable to map sinkholes using LiDAR data for large areas. However, the random forests method cannot totally replace manual procedures, such as visual inspection and field verification.

  12. MAPPING THE RISK OF FOREST WIND DAMAGE USING AIRBORNE SCANNING LiDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Saarinen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Wind damage is known for causing threats to sustainable forest management and yield value in boreal forests. Information about wind damage risk can aid forest managers in understanding and possibly mitigating damage impacts. The objective of this research was to better understand and quantify drivers of wind damage, and to map the probability of wind damage. To accomplish this, we used open-access airborne scanning light detection and ranging (LiDAR data. The probability of wind-induced forest damage (PDAM in southern Finland (61°N, 23°E was modelled for a 173 km2 study area of mainly managed boreal forests (dominated by Norway spruce and Scots pine and agricultural fields. Wind damage occurred in the study area in December 2011. LiDAR data were acquired prior to the damage in 2008. High spatial resolution aerial imagery, acquired after the damage event (January, 2012 provided a source of model calibration via expert interpretation. A systematic grid (16 m x 16 m was established and 430 sample grid cells were identified systematically and classified as damaged or undamaged based on visual interpretation using the aerial images. Potential drivers associated with PDAM were examined using a multivariate logistic regression model. Risk model predictors were extracted from the LiDAR-derived surface models. Geographic information systems (GIS supported spatial mapping and identification of areas of high PDAM across the study area. The risk model based on LiDAR data provided good agreement with detected risk areas (73 % with kappa-value 0,47. The strongest predictors in the risk model were mean canopy height and mean elevation. Our results indicate that open-access LiDAR data sets can be used to map the probability of wind damage risk without field data, providing valuable information for forest management planning.

  13. Land Cover Classification Accuracy Assessment Using Full-Waveform LiDAR Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Tsung Chang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The geomorphology of Taiwan is characterized by marked changes in terrain, geological fractures, and frequent natural disasters. Because of sustained economic growth, urbanization and land development, the land cover in Taiwan has undergone frequent use changes. Among the various technologies for monitoring changes in land cover, remote sensing technologies, such as LiDAR, are efficient tools for collecting a broad range of spectral and spatial data. Two types of airborne LiDAR systems exist; full-waveform (FW LiDAR and traditional discrete-echo LiDAR. Because reflected waveforms are affected by the land object material type and properties, the waveform features can be applied to analyze the characteristics specifically associated with land-cover classification (LCC. Five types of land cover that characterize the volcanic Guishan Island were investigated. The automatic LCC method was used to elucidate the spectral, geomorphometric and textural characteristics. Interpretation keys accompanied by additional information were extracted from the FW LiDAR data for subsequent statistical and separation analyses. The results show that the Gabor texture and geomorphometric features, such as the normalized digital surface model (nDSM and slopes can enhance the overall LCC accuracy to higher than 90%. Moreover, both the producer and user accuracy can be higher than 92% for forest and built-up types using amplitude and pulse width. Although the waveform characteristics did not perform as well as anticipated due to the waveform data sampling rate, the data provides suitable training samples for testing the waveform feature effects.

  14. Development and mapping of DArT markers within the Festuca - Lolium complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Studer Bruno

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Grasses are among the most important and widely cultivated plants on Earth. They provide high quality fodder for livestock, are used for turf and amenity purposes, and play a fundamental role in environment protection. Among cultivated grasses, species within the Festuca-Lolium complex predominate, especially in temperate regions. To facilitate high-throughput genome profiling and genetic mapping within the complex, we have developed a Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT array for five grass species: F. pratensis, F. arundinacea, F. glaucescens, L. perenne and L. multiflorum. Results The DArTFest array contains 7680 probes derived from methyl-filtered genomic representations. In a first marker discovery experiment performed on 40 genotypes from each species (with the exception of F. glaucescens for which only 7 genotypes were used, we identified 3884 polymorphic markers. The number of DArT markers identified in every single genotype varied from 821 to 1852. To test the usefulness of DArTFest array for physical mapping, DArT markers were assigned to each of the seven chromosomes of F. pratensis using single chromosome substitution lines while recombinants of F. pratensis chromosome 3 were used to allocate the markers to seven chromosome bins. Conclusion The resources developed in this project will facilitate the development of genetic maps in Festuca and Lolium, the analysis on genetic diversity, and the monitoring of the genomic constitution of the Festuca × Lolium hybrids. They will also enable marker-assisted selection for multiple traits or for specific genome regions.

  15. Building Change Detection Using Old Aerial Images and New LiDAR Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouji Du

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Building change detection is important for urban area monitoring, disaster assessment and updating geo-database. 3D information derived from image dense matching or airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR is very effective for building change detection. However, combining 3D data from different sources is challenging, and so far few studies have focused on building change detection using both images and LiDAR data. This study proposes an automatic method to detect building changes in urban areas using aerial images and LiDAR data. First, dense image matching is carried out to obtain dense point clouds and then co-registered LiDAR point clouds using the iterative closest point (ICP algorithm. The registered point clouds are further resampled to a raster DSM (Digital Surface Models. In a second step, height difference and grey-scale similarity are calculated as change indicators and the graph cuts method is employed to determine changes considering the contexture information. Finally, the detected results are refined by removing the non-building changes, in which a novel method based on variance of normal direction of LiDAR points is proposed to remove vegetated areas for positive building changes (newly building or taller and nEGI (normalized Excessive Green Index is used for negative building changes (demolish building or lower. To evaluate the proposed method, a test area covering approximately 2.1 km2 and consisting of many different types of buildings is used for the experiment. Results indicate 93% completeness with correctness of 90.2% for positive changes, while 94% completeness with correctness of 94.1% for negative changes, which demonstrate the promising performance of the proposed method.

  16. Estimating Stand Volume and Above-Ground Biomass of Urban Forests Using LiDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Giannico

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Assessing forest stand conditions in urban and peri-urban areas is essential to support ecosystem service planning and management, as most of the ecosystem services provided are a consequence of forest stand characteristics. However, collecting data for assessing forest stand conditions is time consuming and labor intensive. A plausible approach for addressing this issue is to establish a relationship between in situ measurements of stand characteristics and data from airborne laser scanning (LiDAR. In this study we assessed forest stand volume and above-ground biomass (AGB in a broadleaved urban forest, using a combination of LiDAR-derived metrics, which takes the form of a forest allometric model. We tested various methods for extracting proxies of basal area (BA and mean stand height (H from the LiDAR point-cloud distribution and evaluated the performance of different models in estimating forest stand volume and AGB. The best predictors for both models were the scale parameters of the Weibull distribution of all returns (except the first (proxy of BA and the 95th percentile of the distribution of all first returns (proxy of H. The R2 were 0.81 (p < 0.01 for the stand volume model and 0.77 (p < 0.01 for the AGB model with a RMSE of 23.66 m3·ha−1 (23.3% and 19.59 Mg·ha−1 (23.9%, respectively. We found that a combination of two LiDAR-derived variables (i.e., proxy of BA and proxy of H, which take the form of a forest allometric model, can be used to estimate stand volume and above-ground biomass in broadleaved urban forest areas. Our results can be compared to other studies conducted using LiDAR in broadleaved forests with similar methods.

  17. BUILDING DAMAGE ASSESSMENT AFTER EARTHQUAKE USING POST-EVENT LiDAR DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Rastiveis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available After an earthquake, damage assessment plays an important role in leading rescue team to help people and decrease the number of mortality. Damage map is a map that demonstrates collapsed buildings with their degree of damage. With this map, finding destructive buildings can be quickly possible. In this paper, we propose an algorithm for automatic damage map generation after an earthquake using post-event LiDAR Data and pre-event vector map. The framework of the proposed approach has four main steps. To find the location of all buildings on LiDAR data, in the first step, LiDAR data and vector map are registered by using a few number of ground control points. Then, building layer, selected from vector map, are mapped on the LiDAR data and all pixels which belong to the buildings are extracted. After that, through a powerful classifier all the extracted pixels are classified into three classes of “debris”, “intact building” and “unclassified”. Since textural information make better difference between “debris” and “intact building” classes, different textural features are applied during the classification. After that, damage degree for each candidate building is estimated based on the relation between the numbers of pixels labelled as “debris” class to the whole building area. Calculating the damage degree for each candidate building, finally, building damage map is generated. To evaluate the ability proposed method in generating damage map, a data set from Port-au-Prince, Haiti’s capital after the 2010 Haiti earthquake was used. In this case, after calculating of all buildings in the test area using the proposed method, the results were compared to the damage degree which estimated through visual interpretation of post-event satellite image. Obtained results were proved the reliability of the proposed method in damage map generation using LiDAR data.

  18. A universal airborne LiDAR approach for tropical forest carbon mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asner, Gregory P; Mascaro, Joseph; Muller-Landau, Helene C; Vieilledent, Ghislain; Vaudry, Romuald; Rasamoelina, Maminiaina; Hall, Jefferson S; van Breugel, Michiel

    2012-04-01

    Airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) is fast turning the corner from demonstration technology to a key tool for assessing carbon stocks in tropical forests. With its ability to penetrate tropical forest canopies and detect three-dimensional forest structure, LiDAR may prove to be a major component of international strategies to measure and account for carbon emissions from and uptake by tropical forests. To date, however, basic ecological information such as height-diameter allometry and stand-level wood density have not been mechanistically incorporated into methods for mapping forest carbon at regional and global scales. A better incorporation of these structural patterns in forests may reduce the considerable time needed to calibrate airborne data with ground-based forest inventory plots, which presently necessitate exhaustive measurements of tree diameters and heights, as well as tree identifications for wood density estimation. Here, we develop a new approach that can facilitate rapid LiDAR calibration with minimal field data. Throughout four tropical regions (Panama, Peru, Madagascar, and Hawaii), we were able to predict aboveground carbon density estimated in field inventory plots using a single universal LiDAR model (r ( 2 ) = 0.80, RMSE = 27.6 Mg C ha(-1)). This model is comparable in predictive power to locally calibrated models, but relies on limited inputs of basal area and wood density information for a given region, rather than on traditional plot inventories. With this approach, we propose to radically decrease the time required to calibrate airborne LiDAR data and thus increase the output of high-resolution carbon maps, supporting tropical forest conservation and climate mitigation policy.

  19. Dar casa a las voces infantiles, reflexiones desde la historia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Sosenksi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo reflexiono sobre algunas paradojas que surgen al rescatar las voces de las niñas y los niños en las investigaciones académicas. Analizo qué se hace desde la academia con las voces infantiles una vez que las investigaciones o proyectos llegan a su fin. Aquí planteo que es necesario pensar en la voz infantil como un documento que puede enmarcarse en diversos géneros discursivos. En tanto se sostiene que las niñas y los niños son autores de discursos y de documentos, en este texto propongo que las voces infantiles sean preservadas y compartidas, con la finalidad de que puedan ser reutilizadas y reinterpretadas. Para ello sugiero la construcción de archivos con documentos infantiles.

  20. LiDAR-IMU Time Delay Calibration Based on Iterative Closest Point and Iterated Sigma Point Kalman Filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wanli

    2017-03-08

    The time delay calibration between Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) and Inertial Measurement Units (IMUs) is an essential prerequisite for its applications. However, the correspondences between LiDAR and IMU measurements are usually unknown, and thus cannot be computed directly for the time delay calibration. In order to solve the problem of LiDAR-IMU time delay calibration, this paper presents a fusion method based on iterative closest point (ICP) and iterated sigma point Kalman filter (ISPKF), which combines the advantages of ICP and ISPKF. The ICP algorithm can precisely determine the unknown transformation between LiDAR-IMU; and the ISPKF algorithm can optimally estimate the time delay calibration parameters. First of all, the coordinate transformation from the LiDAR frame to the IMU frame is realized. Second, the measurement model and time delay error model of LiDAR and IMU are established. Third, the methodology of the ICP and ISPKF procedure is presented for LiDAR-IMU time delay calibration. Experimental results are presented that validate the proposed method and demonstrate the time delay error can be accurately calibrated.

  1. Development and validation of the Dimensional Anhedonia Rating Scale (DARS) in a community sample and individuals with major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Sakina J; Quilty, Lena C; Sproule, Beth A; Cyriac, Anna; Michael Bagby, R; Kennedy, Sidney H

    2015-09-30

    Anhedonia, a core symptom of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), is predictive of antidepressant non-response. In contrast to the definition of anhedonia as a "loss of pleasure", neuropsychological studies provide evidence for multiple facets of hedonic function. The aim of the current study was to develop and validate the Dimensional Anhedonia Rating Scale (DARS), a dynamic scale that measures desire, motivation, effort and consummatory pleasure across hedonic domains. Following item selection procedures and reliability testing using data from community participants (N=229) (Study 1), the 17-item scale was validated in an online study with community participants (N=150) (Study 2). The DARS was also validated in unipolar or bipolar depressed patients (n=52) and controls (n=50) (Study 3). Principal components analysis of the 17-item DARS revealed a 4-component structure mapping onto the domains of anhedonia: hobbies, food/drink, social activities, and sensory experience. Reliability of the DARS subscales was high across studies (Cronbach's α=0.75-0.92). The DARS also demonstrated good convergent and divergent validity. Hierarchical regression analysis revealed the DARS showed additional utility over the Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale (SHAPS) in predicting reward function and distinguishing MDD subgroups. These studies provide support for the reliability and validity of the DARS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Object-based habitat mapping using very high spatial resolution multispectral and hyperspectral imagery with LiDAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onojeghuo, Alex Okiemute; Onojeghuo, Ajoke Ruth

    2017-07-01

    This study investigated the combined use of multispectral/hyperspectral imagery and LiDAR data for habitat mapping across parts of south Cumbria, North West England. The methodology adopted in this study integrated spectral information contained in pansharp QuickBird multispectral/AISA Eagle hyperspectral imagery and LiDAR-derived measures with object-based machine learning classifiers and ensemble analysis techniques. Using the LiDAR point cloud data, elevation models (such as the Digital Surface Model and Digital Terrain Model raster) and intensity features were extracted directly. The LiDAR-derived measures exploited in this study included Canopy Height Model, intensity and topographic information (i.e. mean, maximum and standard deviation). These three LiDAR measures were combined with spectral information contained in the pansharp QuickBird and Eagle MNF transformed imagery for image classification experiments. A fusion of pansharp QuickBird multispectral and Eagle MNF hyperspectral imagery with all LiDAR-derived measures generated the best classification accuracies, 89.8 and 92.6% respectively. These results were generated with the Support Vector Machine and Random Forest machine learning algorithms respectively. The ensemble analysis of all three learning machine classifiers for the pansharp QuickBird and Eagle MNF fused data outputs did not significantly increase the overall classification accuracy. Results of the study demonstrate the potential of combining either very high spatial resolution multispectral or hyperspectral imagery with LiDAR data for habitat mapping.

  3. Extraction of Forest Dynamics and Biophysical Parameters Using LiDAR and PolInSAR Data Fusion Approach (A Case Study of Lope National Park, Gabon)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourshamsi, M.

    2016-12-01

    Forests play a vital role in the global carbon cycle (Balzter et al., 2005). They store large amounts of carbon in the form of biomass (Balzter et al., 2008). Biomass is the key forest parameters (Mette et al., 2004) due to its relevance to the global carbon cycle modelling and international programmes aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation and forest degradations (REDD) in tropical areas. Direct measurement of biomass in the field is time consuming and expensive at it requires destructive sampling. Remote sensing approaches are indispensable to map large areas routinely, overcoming some of the limitations of the field measurement approach. However, remote sensing technique alone is not able to estimate biomass directly. Forest biomass can be estimated indirectly from some other forest parameters extracted more accurately from the remotely sensed images; such parameters are collectively known as vertical structure and include tree height, forest canopy height, canopy density braches and stems in a given area. Knowledge of vertical structure is a key factor for quantifying the terrestrial carbon cycle effectively (Mette et al., 2004, Balzter et al., 2007, Gama et al., 2010). Several approaches have been proposed for the biomass estimation from forest vertical structural parameters, but there are still large uncertainties in biomass maps and hence carbon models. In the near future different types of satellite missions are going to be launched to provide data for testing new approaches in terms of improving the accuracy of extracted parameters. The two key missions that are planned to be launched are ESA's BIOMASS (P-band radar) and NASA's GEDI (LiDAR). In my PhD a novel approach will be developed and tested for a site within Lope National Park in Gabon in support of these forthcoming missions by fusing airborne Polarimetric SAR Interferometry (PolInSAR) datasets acquired by the L band NASA's UAVSAR instrument, LiDAR datasets acquired by the

  4. Del excentrismo formalista al principio del montaje

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez-Biosca, Vicente

    1994-01-01

    J.Mª Pozuelo sostenía que la contribución fundamental de la OPOIAZ consistió en la rentabilidad del término teórico desautomatización oponiéndolo al de mero desvío. Esta consideración de conjunto puede ponerse en relación con el fenómeno que se ha dado en llamar 'crisis de la literariedad'. Con esta expresión se levanta acta de la decadencia producida desde finales de los años sesenta del paradigma formalista de cuño inmanentista en beneficio de una multiplicidad de paradigmas que Darío Villa...

  5. Rapid, high-resolution measurement of leaf area and leaf orientation using terrestrial LiDAR scanning data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Brian N.; Mahaffee, Walter F.

    2017-06-01

    The rapid evolution of high performance computing technology has allowed for the development of extremely detailed models of the urban and natural environment. Although models can now represent sub-meter-scale variability in environmental geometry, model users are often unable to specify the geometry of real domains at this scale given available measurements. An emerging technology in this field has been the use of terrestrial LiDAR scanning data to rapidly measure the three-dimensional geometry of trees, such as the distribution of leaf area. However, current LiDAR methods suffer from the limitation that they require detailed knowledge of leaf orientation in order to translate projected leaf area into actual leaf area. Common methods for measuring leaf orientation are often tedious or inaccurate, which places constraints on the LiDAR measurement technique. This work presents a new method to simultaneously measure leaf orientation and leaf area within an arbitrarily defined volume using terrestrial LiDAR data. The novelty of the method lies in the direct measurement of the fraction of projected leaf area G from the LiDAR data which is required to relate projected leaf area to total leaf area, and in the new way in which radiation transfer theory is used to calculate leaf area from the LiDAR data. The method was validated by comparing LiDAR-measured leaf area to (1) ‘synthetic’ or computer-generated LiDAR data where the exact area was known, and (2) direct measurements of leaf area in the field using destructive sampling. Overall, agreement between the LiDAR and reference measurements was very good, showing a normalized root-mean-squared-error of about 15% for the synthetic tests, and 13% in the field.

  6. Diversity arrays technology (DArT for pan-genomic evolutionary studies of non-model organisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen E James

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: High-throughput tools for pan-genomic study, especially the DNA microarray platform, have sparked a remarkable increase in data production and enabled a shift in the scale at which biological investigation is possible. The use of microarrays to examine evolutionary relationships and processes, however, is predominantly restricted to model or near-model organisms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study explores the utility of Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT in evolutionary studies of non-model organisms. DArT is a hybridization-based genotyping method that uses microarray technology to identify and type DNA polymorphism. Theoretically applicable to any organism (even one for which no prior genetic data are available, DArT has not yet been explored in exclusively wild sample sets, nor extensively examined in a phylogenetic framework. DArT recovered 1349 markers of largely low copy-number loci in two lineages of seed-free land plants: the diploid fern Asplenium viride and the haploid moss Garovaglia elegans. Direct sequencing of 148 of these DArT markers identified 30 putative loci including four routinely sequenced for evolutionary studies in plants. Phylogenetic analyses of DArT genotypes reveal phylogeographic and substrate specificity patterns in A. viride, a lack of phylogeographic pattern in Australian G. elegans, and additive variation in hybrid or mixed samples. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results enable methodological recommendations including procedures for detecting and analysing DArT markers tailored specifically to evolutionary investigations and practical factors informing the decision to use DArT, and raise evolutionary hypotheses concerning substrate specificity and biogeographic patterns. Thus DArT is a demonstrably valuable addition to the set of existing molecular approaches used to infer biological phenomena such as adaptive radiations, population dynamics, hybridization, introgression, ecological

  7. Detection and correction of LiDAR raster data from the Italian national remote sensing programme and production of a suitable CHM to forest volume estimation in Calabria (southern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floris A

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Detection and correction of LiDAR raster data from the Italian national remote sensing programme and production of a suitable CHM to forest volume estimation in Calabria (southern Italy. The AlForLab project, a Public-Private Laboratory which is part of the Cluster MEA (Materials Energy Environment addressed to the Calabria Region (southern Italy, has gained great benefit by using LiDAR data acquired in the frame of a national remote sensing programme of the Ministry of the Environment and Protection of Land and Sea. This kind of LiDAR data, distributed in raster format and publicly available for research and non-profit purposes, have proved to be a suitable tool to support forest management. Their usage, however, has required the recognition and correction of non-forest elements included in the Digital Surface Model (DSM, like electric powerlines, wind turbines, sub-vertical rocks and viaducts. Such outliers, if remaining into the Canopy height Model (CHM, can generate potential errors in application of LiDAR-based prediction models. This paper proposes some semi-automatic pre-processing procedures, directly applicable on raster data, in order to obtain a CHM without non-forest elements. The methods described here have been developed in open-source environment (R and QGIS. The correction procedures carried out were tested in three municipalities having forest area between 1700 and 5400 ha, and characterized by different types of outliers. The performances of the methods were evaluated by comparing the estimated forest volume obtained before and after their application. Although low total volume changes were observed on the entire study areas (about 0.5%, corresponding to 1500 to 7200 m3, more significant effects, tens to hundreds cubic meters per hectare of overestimation, can occur in stands or forest compartments with a high presence of outliers. In conclusion, the proposed methods have proved to be suitable to achieve a reliable CHM for

  8. Change detection of riverbed movements using river cross-sections and LiDAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Michael; Höfle, Bernhard; Mandlburger, Gottfried; Rutzinger, Martin

    2010-05-01

    Today, Airborne LiDAR derived digital terrain models (DTMs) are used for several aspects in different scientific disciplines, such as hydrology, geomorphology or archaeology. In the field of river geomorphology, LiDAR data sets can provide information on the riverine vegetation, the level and boundary of the water body, the elevation of the riparian foreland and their roughness. The LiDAR systems in use for topographic data acquisition mainly operate with wavelengths of at least 1064nm and, thus, are not able to penetrate water. LiDAR sensors with two wavelengths are available (bathymetric LiDAR), but they can only provide elevation information of riverbeds or lakes, if the water is clear and the minimum water depth exceeds 1.5m. In small and shallow rivers it is impossible to collect information of the riverbed, regardless of the used LiDAR sensor. In this article, we present a method to derive a high-resolution DTM of the riverbed and to combine it with the LiDAR DTM resulting in a watercourse DTM (DTM-W) as a basis for calculating the changes in the riverbed during several years. To obtain such a DTM-W we use river cross-sections acquired by terrestrial survey or echo-sounding. First, a differentiation between water and land has to be done. A highly accurate water surface can be derived by using a water surface delineation algorithm, which incorporates the amplitude information of the LiDAR point cloud and additional geometrical features (e.g. local surface roughness). The second step is to calculate a thalweg line, which is the lowest flow path in the riverbed. This is achieved by extracting the lowest point of each river cross section and by fitting a B-spline curve through those points. In the next step, the centerline of the river is calculated by applying a shrinking algorithm of the water boundary polygon. By averaging the thalweg line and the centerline, a main flow path line can be computed. Subsequently, a dense array of 2D-profiles perpendicular to the

  9. From medieval Dar al-Islam to contemporary Malta: raḥl toponymy in a wider western Mediterranean context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Dalli

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The diffusion of raḥl placenames in Andalus and the islands of Majorca, Sicily and Malta in the High Middle Ages has long been noted, studied, and served as the subject of scholarly debate. With the transition of these western Mediterranean lands from Islam to Christianity in the wake of the Iberian Reconquista and the establishment of the Norman Kingdom of Sicily, the raḥl did not disappear, but rather became a staple of Christian colonization records in Majorca and Sicily. The same cross-cultural process extends to the example of Malta, where the survival of an Arabic dialect arguably assisted the retention of the raḥl as a living model for placenaming. The paper argues that the raḥl toponym, originally representing a small-scale and individual unit, lent itself particularly well in the insular contexts of the medieval Christian expansion, fitting flexibly in the wider framework of cultural hybridization.

  10. Coronary bypass surgery in patients aged 70 years and over: Mortality, morbidity, & length of stay. Dar al-fouad experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Ghali

    2014-03-01

    This study supports the continued performance of coronary artery bypass grafting in patients 70 years. Advanced age alone should not deter a cardiac surgeon from offering such a potentially beneficial intervention.

  11. Imperial Russia as Dar al-Islam? Nineteenth-Century Debates on Ijtihad and Taqlid among the Volga Tatars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemper, M.

    2015-01-01

    The Muslims of the Russian Empire provide us with some interesting cases of how local Islamic scholars used the language and genres of Islamic law to describe their situation in a "northern" and non-Muslim state. The development of Islamic law in nineteenth-century Russia was influenced by close

  12. Introduction of ‘The Bastard’ in the Urban Fabric of the Tetuan Medina - Dar Oddi House

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Serran, Julio; García-Carrillo, Fabián; Santiago-Zaragoza, Juan Manuel; Ouadighi El Oddi, Feirouz

    2017-10-01

    The medina of Tetuan has suffered a steady growing since its founding at the end of xv century by Sidi al-Mandary. It has always followed the Islamic city rules and included those works carried away by the sultan. This process had two breaking moments, that of the occupation of the city by the Spanish army in 1860 and the establishment of the Spanish protectorate. The first inside widening of the Luneta Street of the medina took place when the Rif War had already finished (provoked by the establishment of the Spanish Protectorate). The Widening was being built and the “modernity” could astonish anyone. The motives for Hadj Ahmed El Oddi to build his own house in the heart of the medina should be searched in the “kaida”, that is the tradition so close to the muslin character of Tetuan. Building inside the medina meant not only keeping the familiar tradition but following the way of life their family, neighbours, friends kept. It was considered improper to do it in a different place. They could own properties in the new quarters, but only to be rented, not to be first residence. Dar Oddi was built in 1920 in the city centre al-Blal, the oldest quarter of the medina of Tetuan. Built on the foundation of a demolished house would be built as the new houses already built inside the medina by neighbours and relatives. That ‘current fashion’ was similar to a muslin house of the beginning of the xx century: based on the tradition but contaminated by the social changes taking place outside he medina and in short inside.

  13. An example for the application of music therapy in the medical history: Divrigi Darüssifa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selim Bedri Benek

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The Seljuks built up so many medical buildings and darüssifas in lots of cities, and gave importance to medicina as well as the other branches of science. They provided great contributions to the development of modern medicine with darüssifas and medical centers by the treatment they applied as well as health care. Music therapy was applied with certain methods in these health centers where mental and spiritual diseases were tried to be treated. Sivas Divrigi Darüssifa, amongst the first ones in this concept and continued its existence until today, has an important place in terms of our medical history.

  14. Disciplina del crédito bancario y protección al consumidor

    OpenAIRE

    Cascante Avilés, Helvetia

    2014-01-01

    El título de esta obra es ”Disciplina del Contrato de Crédito Bancario y Protección al Consumidor”. Con esta denominación, se ha querido dar cabida a conceptos como Entidad Bancaria, Contrato de Crédito, Consumo, Consumidor, y de cómo se regula, interviene el ente bancario y se protege al consumidor en el ejercicio de esta actividad, como de la evolución legislativa reciente en materia de protección al consumidor, para culminar con el ejercicio de sus derechos en el Contrato de Crédito Bancar...

  15. 2014 Mobile County, AL Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Atlantic was contracted to acquire high resolution topographic LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) data located in Mobile County, Alabama. The intent was to collect...

  16. Derechos fundamentales y el acceso al agua potable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deilton Ribeiro Brasil

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo analiza el acceso al agua potable como un derecho fundamental en el contexto del principio de la dignidad humana en la construcción de un Estado de Derecho Ambiental. Reconocer el acceso al agua como un derecho fundamental, es dar al Estado el deber de garantizar uma calidad esencial minima de vida saludable para las generaciones presentes y futuras, obtenidos por el suministro de agua, respetando las normas de potabilidad, la gestión del agua, protección administrativa y judicial de las aguas y la conciencia de la importancia de una acción conjunta entre el gobierno y la sociedad para la preservación de los recursos hídricos en el contexto de la sociedad del riesgo.

  17. Evaluation of hyperspectral LiDAR for monitoring rice leaf nitrogen by comparison with multispectral LiDAR and passive spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jia; Shi, Shuo; Gong, Wei; Yang, Jian; Du, Lin; Song, Shalei; Chen, Biwu; Zhang, Zhenbing

    2017-01-01

    Fast and nondestructive assessment of leaf nitrogen concentration (LNC) is critical for crop growth diagnosis and nitrogen management guidance. In the last decade, multispectral LiDAR (MSL) systems have promoted developments in the earth and ecological sciences with the additional spectral information. With more wavelengths than MSL, the hyperspectral LiDAR (HSL) system provides greater possibilities for remote sensing crop physiological conditions. This study compared the performance of ASD FieldSpec Pro FR, MSL, and HSL for estimating rice (Oryza sativa) LNC. Spectral reflectance and biochemical composition were determined in rice leaves of different cultivars (Yongyou 4949 and Yangliangyou 6) throughout two growing seasons (2014-2015). Results demonstrated that HSL provided the best indicator for predicting rice LNC, yielding a coefficient of determination (R2) of 0.74 and a root mean square error of 2.80 mg/g with a support vector machine, similar to the performance of ASD (R2 = 0.73). Estimation of rice LNC could be significantly improved with the finer spectral resolution of HSL compared with MSL (R2 = 0.56).

  18. Characterization of Forest Ecosystems by combined Radiative Transfer Modeling for Imaging Spectrometer and LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koetz, B.; Sun, G.; Morsdorf, F.; Rubio, J.; Kimes, D.; Ranson, J.

    2009-04-01

    This research was motivated by the increased information dimensionality provided by current Earth Observation systems measuring the complex and dynamic medium of the vegetated surface of the Earth. Advanced and reliable algorithms that fully exploit this enhanced Earth Observation information are needed to deliver consistent data sets of the Earth vegetation condition describing its spatial distribution and change over time. Spectral observation provided by imaging spectrometers and the waveform from large-footprint LiDAR are now available from space for forest ecosystem studies. The imaging spectrometer data contains information about the biochemical composition of the canopy foliage, and is widely used to estimate biophysical canopy parameters such as LAI and fractional cover. LiDAR responds to the vertical distribution of scatters and permits inferences about the plant structures required to supply water and mechanical support to those surfaces. Various canopy height indices derived from LiDAR waveform have been successfully used to infer forest above-ground biomass and the characterization of canopy structure. The structure parameters derived from LiDAR data can improve the accuracy and robustness of canopy parameter retrieval from imaging spectrometer by reducing uncertainties related to the canopy structure. The specific information content, inherent to the observations of imaging spectrometry and LIDAR, assesses thus different but complementary characteristics of the complex vegetation canopy. The combination of these two information dimensions offers a unique and reliable canopy characterization including information relevant to different aspects of the biochemical and biophysical properties and thus understanding of processes within forest ecosystems. A comprehensive canopy characterization of a forest ecosystem is derived from the combined remote sensing signal of imaging spectrometry and large footprint LIDAR. The inversion of two linked physically based

  19. Determinants of acceptance of cervical cancer screening in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kahesa, Crispin; Kjaer, Susanne; Mwaiselage, Julius

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To describe how demographic characteristics and knowledge of cervical cancer influence screening acceptance among women living in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. METHODS: Multistage cluster sampling was carried out in 45 randomly selected streets in Dar es Salaam. Women between...... the ages of 25--59 who lived in the sampled streets were invited to a cervical cancer screening; 804 women accepted and 313 rejected the invitation. Information on demographic characteristics and knowledge of cervical cancer were obtained through structured questionnaire interviews. RESULTS: Women aged 35...... to accept screening in comparison with women who had five or more children (ORs 3.21). Finally, knowledge of cervical cancer and awareness of the existing screening program were also associated with increased acceptance rates (ORs of 5.90 and 4.20). CONCLUSION: There are identifiable subgroups where...

  20. Contour Cluster Shape Analysis for Building Damage Detection from Post-earthquake Airborne LiDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HE Meizhang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Detection of the damaged building is the obligatory step prior to evaluate earthquake casualty and economic losses. It's very difficult to detect damaged buildings accurately based on the assumption that intact roofs appear in laser data as large planar segments whereas collapsed roofs are characterized by many small segments. This paper presents a contour cluster shape similarity analysis algorithm for reliable building damage detection from the post-earthquake airborne LiDAR point cloud. First we evaluate the entropies of shape similarities between all the combinations of two contour lines within a building cluster, which quantitatively describe the shape diversity. Then the maximum entropy model is employed to divide all the clusters into intact and damaged classes. The tests on the LiDAR data at El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake rupture prove the accuracy and reliability of the proposed method.

  1. Comparative study of building footprint estimation methods from LiDAR point clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozas, E.; Rivera, F. F.; Cabaleiro, J. C.; Pena, T. F.; Vilariño, D. L.

    2017-10-01

    Building area calculation from LiDAR points is still a difficult task with no clear solution. Their different characteristics, such as shape or size, have made the process too complex to automate. However, several algorithms and techniques have been used in order to obtain an approximated hull. 3D-building reconstruction or urban planning are examples of important applications that benefit of accurate building footprint estimations. In this paper, we have carried out a study of accuracy in the estimation of the footprint of buildings from LiDAR points. The analysis focuses on the processing steps following the object recognition and classification, assuming that labeling of building points have been previously performed. Then, we perform an in-depth analysis of the influence of the point density over the accuracy of the building area estimation. In addition, a set of buildings with different size and shape were manually classified, in such a way that they can be used as benchmark.

  2. Automated Extraction of 3D Trees from Mobile LiDAR Point Clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Yu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an automated algorithm for extracting 3D trees directly from 3D mobile light detection and ranging (LiDAR data. To reduce both computational and spatial complexities, ground points are first filtered out from a raw 3D point cloud via blockbased elevation filtering. Off-ground points are then grouped into clusters representing individual objects through Euclidean distance clustering and voxel-based normalized cut segmentation. Finally, a model-driven method is proposed to achieve the extraction of 3D trees based on a pairwise 3D shape descriptor. The proposed algorithm is tested using a set of mobile LiDAR point clouds acquired by a RIEGL VMX-450 system. The results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  3. Automatic segmentation of road overpasses and detection of mortar efflorescence using mobile LiDAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Jorge, H.; Puente, I.; Riveiro, B.; Martínez-Sánchez, J.; Arias, P.

    2013-12-01

    This manuscript presents a novel method to automatize the efflorescence detection process in road overpasses using the geometric and radiometric informations from mobile LiDAR data. The study is performed over three main groups of algorithms. First, a data reduction algorithm based on the point cloud normalization, radial and vegetation filters is implemented. A second group of segmentation and classification algorithms uses the incidence angle derived by the LiDAR sensors to separate overpasses from pavement data. Finally, an algorithm to classify efflorescence considering its reflectivity lower than the surrounding granite is developed. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the method, using field data from the New Bridge of Ourense (Spain).

  4. Exclusive DD¯${m{Dar D}}$ meson pair production in peripheral ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luszczak Marta

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The cross sections for exclusive D+D- and DD¯${D^0ar D^0}$ meson pair production in peripheral nucleus - nucleus collisions are calculated and several differential distributions are presented. The calculation of the elementary γγ → DD¯${m{Dar D}}$ cross section is done within the heavy-quark approximation and in the Brodsky- Lapage formalism with distribution amplitudes describing recent CLEO data on leptonic D+ decay. Absorption effects are discussed and quantified. The cross sections of a few nb are predicted for RHIC and of a few hundreds of nb for LHC with details depending on the approximation made in calculating elementary γγ → DD¯${m{Dar D}}$ cross sections.

  5. Canopy Height and Biomass from LiDAR Surveys at La Selva, Costa Rica, 1998 and 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains land-use, canopy height, and aboveground carbon estimates derived from LiDAR data collected at La Selva Biological Station in Costa Rica in...

  6. Gaussian Mixture Model with Variable Components for Full Waveform LiDAR Data Decomposition and RJMCMC Algorithm

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    ZHAO Quanhua; LI Hongying; LI Yu

    2015-01-01

    .... Therefore, waveform decomposition is the key to full waveform LiDAR data processing. However, in waveform decomposition, determining the number of the components is a focus and difficult problem...

  7. 2007 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DoGAMI) LiDAR: Northwest Oregon and Portland Metro Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data for the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DoGAMI) and the Oregon...

  8. 2005 US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Post-Hurricane Katrina LiDAR: Mississippi and Western Alabama

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LiDAR data was acquired for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Mobile District in September-October 2005 along the coastline of Hancock, Harrison, Jackson...

  9. Towards Automation in Landcover Mapping from LiDAR Data in Alpine Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorninger, Peter; Briese, Christian; Nothegger, Clemens; Klauser, Armin

    2010-05-01

    Digital terrain models derived from airborne LiDAR (often referred to as airborne laser scanning) are commonly used for various applications in geomorphology. The ongoing development in sensor technology makes flight campaigns with some 10 points per square meter economically feasible for large areas. Simultaneously, the achievable accuracy of the originally acquired points as well as those of the derived products increases due to improved measurement techniques. Additionally, full-waveform (FWF) laser scanning systems record the time-dependent strength of the backscattered signal. This allows for the determination of numerous points (i.e. echoes) for one emitted laser beam hitting multiple targets within its footprint. Practically, about five echoes may be determined from the digitized signal form. Furthermore, additional attributes can be determined for each echo. These are, for example, a reflectivity measure (amplitude), the widening of the echo (echo width), or the sequence of the echoes of a single shot. By considering the polar measurement range and atmospheric conditions, a physical calibration of such measurements is possible. The application of FWF information to increase the accuracy and the reliability of digital terrain models especially in areas with dense vegetation was shown by Doneus & Briese (2006). However, these additional attributes are rarely used for object or landcover classification. This is still the domain of automated image interpretation (e.g. Zebedin et al., 2006). Nevertheless, image interpretation has well known deficiencies in areas with vegetation or if shadows occur. Therefore, we tested a hybrid approach which uses conventional first echo / last echo (FE/LE) airborne laser scanning data (first and last pulse) and an RGB-orthophoto. The testing site is located in an alpine area in Tyrol, Austria. For the classification, topographic models, a slope map, a local roughness measure and a penetration ratio were determined from the

  10. Gold - A novel deconvolution algorithm with optimization for waveform LiDAR processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tan; Popescu, Sorin C.; Krause, Keith; Sheridan, Ryan D.; Putman, Eric

    2017-07-01

    Waveform Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data have advantages over discrete-return LiDAR data in accurately characterizing vegetation structure. However, we lack a comprehensive understanding of waveform data processing approaches under different topography and vegetation conditions. The objective of this paper is to highlight a novel deconvolution algorithm, the Gold algorithm, for processing waveform LiDAR data with optimal deconvolution parameters. Further, we present a comparative study of waveform processing methods to provide insight into selecting an approach for a given combination of vegetation and terrain characteristics. We employed two waveform processing methods: (1) direct decomposition, (2) deconvolution and decomposition. In method two, we utilized two deconvolution algorithms - the Richardson-Lucy (RL) algorithm and the Gold algorithm. The comprehensive and quantitative comparisons were conducted in terms of the number of detected echoes, position accuracy, the bias of the end products (such as digital terrain model (DTM) and canopy height model (CHM)) from the corresponding reference data, along with parameter uncertainty for these end products obtained from different methods. This study was conducted at three study sites that include diverse ecological regions, vegetation and elevation gradients. Results demonstrate that two deconvolution algorithms are sensitive to the pre-processing steps of input data. The deconvolution and decomposition method is more capable of detecting hidden echoes with a lower false echo detection rate, especially for the Gold algorithm. Compared to the reference data, all approaches generate satisfactory accuracy assessment results with small mean spatial difference (parameter uncertainty analysis demonstrates that the Gold algorithm outperforms other approaches in dense vegetation areas, with the smallest RMSE, and the RL algorithm performs better in sparse vegetation areas in terms of RMSE. Additionally, the high

  11. Governance challenges and coalition building among urban environmental stakeholders in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mtani, Anna

    2004-06-01

    Rapid urbanization is arguably one of the most complex and important socioeconomic phenomena of the new millennium. It represents major and irreversible changes in production and consumption patterns and the way people interact with nature. The impact of urbanization will continue to bring about major changes especially in many countries in the developing world that are experiencing rapid urbanization. The serious environmental and development challenges facing Dar es Salaam, the largest commercial center of Tanzania, are highlighted in this report.

  12. Quantifying tropical dry forest type and succession: substantial improvement with LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian Martinuzzi; William A. Gould; Lee A. Vierling; Andrew T. Hudak; Ross F. Nelson; Jeffrey S. Evans

    2012-01-01

    Improved technologies are needed to advance our knowledge of the biophysical and human factors influencing tropical dry forests, one of the world’s most threatened ecosystems. We evaluated the use of light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data to address two major needs in remote sensing of tropical dry forests, i.e., classification of forest types and delineation of...

  13. Combining LiDAR and IKONOS data for eco-hydrological classification of an ombrotrophic peatland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, K; Bennie, J J; Milton, E J; Hughes, P D M; Lindsay, R; Meade, R

    2010-01-01

    Remote sensing techniques have potential for peatland monitoring, but most previous work has focused on spectral approaches that often result in poor discrimination of cover types and neglect structural information. Peatlands contain structural "microtopes" (e.g., hummocks and hollows) which are linked to hydrology, biodiversity and carbon sequestration, and information on surface structure is thus a useful proxy for peatland condition. The objective of this work was to develop and test a new eco-hydrological mapping technique for ombrotrophic (rain-fed) peatlands using a combined spectral-structural remote sensing approach. The study site was Wedholme Flow, Cumbria, UK. Airborne light dectection and ranging (LiDAR) data were used with IKONOS data in a combined multispectral-structural approach for mapping peatland condition classes. LiDAR data were preprocessed so that spatial estimates of minimum and maximum land surface height, variance and semi-variance (from semi-variogram analysis) were extracted. These were assimilated alongside IKONOS data into a maximum likelihood classification procedure, and thematic outputs were compared. Ecological survey data were used to validate the results. Considerable improvements in thematic separation of peatland classes were achieved when spatially-distributed measurements of LiDAR variance or semi-variance were included. Specifically, the classification accuracy improved from 71.8% (IKONOS data only) to 88.0% when a LiDAR semi-variance product was used. Of note was the improved delineation of management classes (including Eriophorum bog, active raised bog and degraded raised bog). The application of a combined textural-optical approach can improve land cover mapping in areas where reliance on purely spectral discrimination approaches would otherwise result in considerable thematic uncertainty.

  14. Estimation of Forest Topsoil Properties Using Airborne LiDAR-Derived Intensity and Topographic Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Chao Li; Yanli Xu; Zhaogang Liu; Shengli Tao; Fengri Li; Jingyun Fang

    2016-01-01

    Forest topsoil supports vegetation growth and contains the majority of soil nutrients that are important indices of soil fertility and quality. Therefore, estimating forest topsoil properties, such as soil organic matter (SOM), total nitrogen (Total N), pH, litter-organic (O-A) horizon depth (Depth) and available phosphorous (AvaP), is of particular importance for forest development and management. As an emerging technology, light detection and ranging (LiDAR) can capture the three-dimensiona...

  15. Strategies for minimizing sample size for use in airborne LiDAR-based forest inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junttila, Virpi; Finley, Andrew O.; Bradford, John B.; Kauranne, Tuomo

    2013-01-01

    Recently airborne Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) has emerged as a highly accurate remote sensing modality to be used in operational scale forest inventories. Inventories conducted with the help of LiDAR are most often model-based, i.e. they use variables derived from LiDAR point clouds as the predictive variables that are to be calibrated using field plots. The measurement of the necessary field plots is a time-consuming and statistically sensitive process. Because of this, current practice often presumes hundreds of plots to be collected. But since these plots are only used to calibrate regression models, it should be possible to minimize the number of plots needed by carefully selecting the plots to be measured. In the current study, we compare several systematic and random methods for calibration plot selection, with the specific aim that they be used in LiDAR based regression models for forest parameters, especially above-ground biomass. The primary criteria compared are based on both spatial representativity as well as on their coverage of the variability of the forest features measured. In the former case, it is important also to take into account spatial auto-correlation between the plots. The results indicate that choosing the plots in a way that ensures ample coverage of both spatial and feature space variability improves the performance of the corresponding models, and that adequate coverage of the variability in the feature space is the most important condition that should be met by the set of plots collected.

  16. Abu Dhabi Basemap Update Using the LiDAR Mobile Mapping Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshaiba, Omar; Amparo Núñez-Andrés, M.; Lantada, Nieves

    2016-04-01

    Mobile LiDAR system provides a new technology which can be used to update geospatial information by direct and rapid data collection. This technology is faster than the traditional survey ways and has lower cost. Abu Dhabi Municipal System aims to update its geospatial system frequently as the government entities have invested heavily in GIS technology and geospatial data to meet the repaid growth in the infrastructure and construction projects in recent years. The Emirate of Abu Dhabi has witnessed a huge growth in infrastructure and construction projects in recent years. Therefore, it is necessary to develop and update its basemap system frequently to meet their own organizational needs. Currently, the traditional ways are used to update basemap system such as human surveyors, GPS receivers and controller (GPS assigned computer). Then the surveyed data are downloaded, edited and reviewed manually before it is merged to the basemap system. Traditional surveying ways may not be applicable in some conditions such as; bad weather, difficult topographic area and boundary area. This paper presents a proposed methodology which uses the Mobile LiDAR system to update basemap in Abu Dhabi by using daily transactions services. It aims to use and integrate the mobile LiDAR technology into the municipality's daily workflow such that it becomes the new standard cost efficiency operating procedure for updating the base-map in Abu Dhabi Municipal System. On another note, the paper will demonstrate the results of the innovated workflow for the base-map update using the mobile LiDAR point cloud and few processing algorithms.

  17. Evaluation of Landslide Mapping Techniques and LiDAR-based Conditioning Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalingam, R.; Olsen, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Landslides are a major geohazard, which result in significant human, infrastructure, and economic losses. Landslide susceptibility mapping can help communities to plan and prepare for these damaging events. Mapping landslide susceptible locations using GIS and remote sensing techniques is gaining popularity in the past three decades. These efforts use a wide variety of procedures and consider a wide range of factors. Unfortunately, each study is often completed differently and independently of others. Further, the quality of the datasets used varies in terms of source, data collection, and generation, which can propagate errors or inconsistencies into the resulting output maps. Light detection and ranging (LiDAR) has proved to have higher accuracy in representing the continuous topographic surface, which can help minimize this uncertainty. The primary objectives of this paper are to investigate the applicability and performance of terrain factors in landslide hazard mapping, determine if LiDAR-derived datasets (slope, slope roughness, terrain roughness, stream power index and compound topographic index) can be used for predictive mapping without data representing other common landslide conditioning factors, and evaluate the differences in landslide susceptibility mapping using widely-used statistical approaches. The aforementioned factors were used to produce landslide susceptibility maps for a 140 km2 study area in northwest Oregon using six representative techniques: frequency ratio, weights of evidence, logistic regression, discriminant analysis, artificial neural network, and support vector machine. Most notably, the research showed an advantage in selecting fewer critical conditioning factors. The most reliable factors all could be derived from a single LiDAR DEM, reducing the need for laborious and costly data gathering. Most of the six techniques showed similar statistical results; however, ANN showed less accuracy for predictive mapping. Keywords : LiDAR

  18. Identification of four Drosophila allatostatins as the cognate ligands for the Drosophila orphan receptor DAR-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenz, C; Williamson, M; Hansen, G N

    2001-01-01

    -Thr-Arg-Pro-Gln-Pro-Phe-Asn-Phe-Gly-Leu-NH(2)) is the most effective in causing a second messenger cascade (measured as bioluminescence; threshold, 10(-9) M; EC(50), 10(-8) M), whereas the others are less effective and about equally potent (EC(50), 8 x 10(-8) M). Northern blots showed that the DAR-2 gene is expressed in embryos, larvae...

  19. La Argentina del Centenario en Mundial magazine de Rubén Darío

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Torres

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A variety of texts about Latin American Republics are published in the illustrated Mundial Magazine, directed by Rubén Darío. During the commemoration of the 9th of July 1911, in the spirit of the centenary, the poet publishes the chronicle "República Argentina" with seventeen photographies. In this piece of work the relationship between text and photos concerning the ruling class of Argentina of those years will be analized

  20. IINFORMAL LABOUR MARKET IN TANZANIA : A case of Kinondoni district in Dar es Salaam

    OpenAIRE

    Setebe, Juliet

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Juliet Manzala Setebe. Informal Labor Market in Tanzania: A case of Kinondoni District in Dar es Salaam. Jarvenpaa Autumn 2011, 48p., 2 appendices . Diaconia University of Applied Sciences, Diak South, Jarvenpaa Unit, Degree Program in Social Services (DSS). Informal Labor Market is a concept that has been researched for more than twenty years, but no one has come up with a concrete definition. Many researchers referred to it as activities which are done outside the governm...

  1. LiDAR-based Prediction of Arthropod Abundance at the Southern Slopes of Mt. Kilimanjaro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Alice

    2017-04-01

    LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) is a remote sensing technology that offers high-resolution three-dimensional information about the covered area. These three-dimensional datasets were used in this work to derive structural parameters of the vegetation to predict the abundance of eight different arthropod assemblages with several models. For the model training of each arthropod assemblage, different versions (extent, filters) of the LiDAR datasets were provided and evaluated. Furthermore the importance of each of the LiDAR-derived structural parameters for each model was calculated. The best input dataset and structural parameters were used for the prediction of the abundance of arthropod assemblages. The analyses of the prediction results across seven different landuse types and the eight arthropod assemblages exposed, that for the arthropod assemblages, LiDAR-based predictions were in general best feasible for "Orthoptera" (average R2 (coefficient of determination) over all landuses: 0.14), even though the predictions for the other arthropod assemblages reached values of the same magnitude. It was also found that the landuse type "disturbed forest" showed the best results (average R2 over all assemblages: 0.20), whereas "home garden" was the least predictable (average R2 over all assemblages: 0.04). Differenciated by arthropod-landuse pairs, the results showed distinct differences and the R2 values diverged clearly. It was shown, that when model settings were optimized for only one arthropod taxa, values for R2 could reach values up to 0.55 ("Orthoptera" in "disturbed forest"). The analysis of the importance of each structural parameter for the prediction revealed that about one third of the 18 used parameters were always among the most important ones for the prediction of all assemblages. This strong ranking of parameters implied that focus for further research needs to be put on the selection of predictor variables.

  2. Analyse und Optimierung von fokussierten LiDAR-Systemen für Windkraftanlagen

    OpenAIRE

    Beuth, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Diese Dissertation beschäftigt sich mit der Auslegung fokussierter LiDAR-Sensorsysteme zur dopplerbasierten Messung der Windgeschwindigkeit für den prädiktiven Einsatz auf Windkraftanlagen. Für die Systemauslegung werden Geometrien des optischen Aufbaus mit Parametern der Windkraftanlage verknüpft, um eine Beurteilungsform für die Fähigkeit einer prädiktiven Steuerung zu entwickeln. Modellierungen und Messungen zeigen erhebliche Unterschiede zu den Annahmen des Standes der Technik.

  3. An Algorithm to Identify and Localize Suitable Dock Locations from 3-D LiDAR Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    7 5.2 OpenCV ...this algorithm to inspire their own ideas. Figure 4: Velodyne HDL-32E LiDAR (Velodyne 2011) 8 5.2 OpenCV The final algorithm also uses...techniques while not losing time by writing algorithms, it was decided that OpenCV would be used for the image processing steps just as PCL was used for the

  4. Flying Under the LiDAR: Relating Forest Structure to Bat Community Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, A. C.; Weishampel, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    Bats are important to many ecological processes such as pollination, insect (and by proxy, disease) control, and seed dispersal and can be used to monitor ecosystem health. However, they are facing unprecedented extinction risks from habitat degradation as well as pressures from pathogens (e.g., white-nose syndrome) and wind turbines. LiDAR allows ecologists to measure structural variables of forested landscapes with increased precision and accuracy at broader spatial scales than previously possible. This study used airborne LiDAR to classify forest habitat/canopy structure at the Ordway-Swisher Biological Station (OSBS) in north central Florida. LiDAR data were acquired by the NEON airborne observation platform in summer 2014. OSBS consists of open-canopy pine savannas, closed-canopy hardwood hammocks, and seasonally wet prairies. Multiple forest structural parameters (e.g., mean, maximum, and standard deviation of height returns) were derived from LiDAR point clouds using the USDA software program FUSION. K-means clustering was used to segregate each 5x5 m raster across the ~3765 ha OSBS area into six different clusters based on the derived canopy metrics. Cluster averages for maximum, mean, and standard deviation of return heights ranged from 0 to 19.4 m, 0 to 15.3 m, and 0 to 3.0 m, respectively. To determine the relationships among these landscape-canopy features and bat species diversity and abundances, AnaBat II bat detectors were deployed from May to September in 2015 stratified by these distinct clusters. Bat calls were recorded from sunset to sunrise during each sampling period. Species were identified using AnalookW. A statistical regression model selection approach was performed in order to evaluate how forest attributes such as understory clutter, open regions, open and closed canopy, etc. influence bat communities. This knowledge provides a deeper understanding of habitat-species interactions to better manage survival of these species.

  5. Risk factors associated with pre-term birth in Dar es Salaam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... p-value 0.004), cervical incompetence (AOR = 11.6; 95%CI 1.1-121.5; p-value 0.04), polyhydramnios (AOR = 8.3; 95%CI 1.7-40.2; p-value 0.008), and lack of antenatal visits (AOR = 5.1; 95%CI 1.4-17.8; p-value 0.042).Conclusion: This study has identified several risk factors for preterm birth in the city of Dar es Salaam.

  6. An approach to conifer stem localization and modeling in high density airborne LiDAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harikumar, A.; Bovolo, F.; Bruzzone, L.

    2017-10-01

    Individual tree level inventory performed using high density multi-return airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) systems provides both internal and external geometric details on individual tree crowns. Among them, the parameters such as, the stem location, and Diameter at Breast Height of the stem (DBH) are very relevant for accurate biomass, and forest growth estimation. However, methods that can accurately estimate these parameters along the vertical canopy are lacking in the state of the art. Thus, we propose a method to locate and model the stem by analyzing the empty volume that appears within the 3D high density LiDAR point cloud of a conifer, due to the stem. In a high LiDAR density data, the points most proximal to the stem location in the upper half of the crown are very likely due to laser reflections from the stem and/or the branch-stem junctions. By locating accurately these points, we can define the lattice of points representing branch-stem junctions and use it to model the empty volume associated to the stem location. We identify these points by using a state-of-the-art internal crown structure modelling technique that models individual conifer branches in a high density LiDAR data. Under the assumption that conifer stem can be closely modelled using a cone shape, we regression fit a geometric shape onto the lattice of branch-stem junction points. The parameters of the geometric shape are used to accurately estimate the diameter at breast height, and height of the tree. The experiments were performed on a set of hundred conifers consisting of trees from six dominant European conifer species, for which the height and the DBH were known. The results prove the method to be accurate.

  7. NASA Goddard’s LiDAR, Hyperspectral and Thermal (G-LiHT Airborne Imager

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuong Ly

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The combination of LiDAR and optical remotely sensed data provides unique information about ecosystem structure and function. Here, we describe the development, validation and application of a new airborne system that integrates commercial off the shelf LiDAR hyperspectral and thermal components in a compact, lightweight and portable system. Goddard’s LiDAR, Hyperspectral and Thermal (G-LiHT airborne imager is a unique system that permits simultaneous measurements of vegetation structure, foliar spectra and surface temperatures at very high spatial resolution (~1 m on a wide range of airborne platforms. The complementary nature of LiDAR, optical and thermal data provide an analytical framework for the development of new algorithms to map plant species composition, plant functional types, biodiversity, biomass and carbon stocks, and plant growth. In addition, G-LiHT data enhance our ability to validate data from existing satellite missions and support NASA Earth Science research. G-LiHT’s data processing and distribution system is designed to give scientists open access to both low- and high-level data products (http://gliht.gsfc.nasa.gov, which will stimulate the community development of synergistic data fusion algorithms. G-LiHT has been used to collect more than 6,500 km2 of data for NASA-sponsored studies across a broad range of ecoregions in the USA and Mexico. In this paper, we document G-LiHT design considerations, physical specifications, instrument performance and calibration and acquisition parameters. In addition, we describe the data processing system and higher-level data products that are freely distributed under NASA’s Data and Information policy.

  8. NASA Goddards LiDAR, Hyperspectral and Thermal (G-LiHT) Airborne Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Bruce D.; Corp, Lawrence A.; Nelson, Ross F.; Middleton, Elizabeth M.; Morton, Douglas C.; McCorkel, Joel T.; Masek, Jeffrey G.; Ranson, Kenneth J.; Ly, Vuong; Montesano, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    The combination of LiDAR and optical remotely sensed data provides unique information about ecosystem structure and function. Here, we describe the development, validation and application of a new airborne system that integrates commercial off the shelf LiDAR hyperspectral and thermal components in a compact, lightweight and portable system. Goddard's LiDAR, Hyperspectral and Thermal (G-LiHT) airborne imager is a unique system that permits simultaneous measurements of vegetation structure, foliar spectra and surface temperatures at very high spatial resolution (approximately 1 m) on a wide range of airborne platforms. The complementary nature of LiDAR, optical and thermal data provide an analytical framework for the development of new algorithms to map plant species composition, plant functional types, biodiversity, biomass and carbon stocks, and plant growth. In addition, G-LiHT data enhance our ability to validate data from existing satellite missions and support NASA Earth Science research. G-LiHT's data processing and distribution system is designed to give scientists open access to both low- and high-level data products (http://gliht.gsfc.nasa.gov), which will stimulate the community development of synergistic data fusion algorithms. G-LiHT has been used to collect more than 6,500 km2 of data for NASA-sponsored studies across a broad range of ecoregions in the USA and Mexico. In this paper, we document G-LiHT design considerations, physical specifications, instrument performance and calibration and acquisition parameters. In addition, we describe the data processing system and higher-level data products that are freely distributed under NASA's Data and Information policy.

  9. Estimating Volume, Biomass, and Carbon in Hedmark County, Norway Using a Profiling LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Ross; Naesset, Erik; Gobakken, T.; Gregoire, T.; Stahl, G.

    2009-01-01

    A profiling airborne LiDAR is used to estimate the forest resources of Hedmark County, Norway, a 27390 square kilometer area in southeastern Norway on the Swedish border. One hundred five profiling flight lines totaling 9166 km were flown over the entire county; east-west. The lines, spaced 3 km apart north-south, duplicate the systematic pattern of the Norwegian Forest Inventory (NFI) ground plot arrangement, enabling the profiler to transit 1290 circular, 250 square meter fixed-area NFI ground plots while collecting the systematic LiDAR sample. Seven hundred sixty-three plots of the 1290 plots were overflown within 17.8 m of plot center. Laser measurements of canopy height and crown density are extracted along fixed-length, 17.8 m segments closest to the center of the ground plot and related to basal area, timber volume and above- and belowground dry biomass. Linear, nonstratified equations that estimate ground-measured total aboveground dry biomass report an R(sup 2) = 0.63, with an regression RMSE = 35.2 t/ha. Nonstratified model results for the other biomass components, volume, and basal area are similar, with R(sup 2) values for all models ranging from 0.58 (belowground biomass, RMSE = 8.6 t/ha) to 0.63. Consistently, the most useful single profiling LiDAR variable is quadratic mean canopy height, h (sup bar)(sub qa). Two-variable models typically include h (sup bar)(sub qa) or mean canopy height, h(sup bar)(sub a), with a canopy density or a canopy height standard deviation measure. Stratification by productivity class did not improve the nonstratified models, nor did stratification by pine/spruce/hardwood. County-wide profiling LiDAR estimates are reported, by land cover type, and compared to NFI estimates.

  10. Use of LiDAR to Assist in Delineating Waters of the United States, Including Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    floors, terrace fronts, paleochannels, and alluvial fans , using a 2.0 m resolution LiDAR-derived DEM with a vertical accuracy of 0.10 m. Likewise, a 0.5...Mobile Laser Scanning NCALM National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping NCED National Center for Earth-Surface Dynamics NDEP National Digital...NCALM. National Center for Earth-Surface Dynamics These stream restoration data were created or compiled by scientists fund- ed by the National Center

  11. Exploitation of Full-Waveform LiDAR to Characterize / Exploit Under Canopy Targets - Foliage Penetration (FOPEN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-28

    specific targets, and (3) full waveform application in forestry . Exploitation of Full-waveform LiDAR to Characterize/Exploit under Canopy Targets...Foliage Penetration (FOPEN)   9    The review on current waveform processing methods, LiDAR-specific targets and forestry applications clearly indicates...proceedings of IGARSS 2012, Munich, Germany, July 23-27, 2012. Molnar, B., Laky, S., and Toth, Ch. (2011): Using Full Waveform Data in Urban Areas

  12. High-Density LiDAR Mapping of the Ancient City of Mayapán

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Hare

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A 2013 survey of a 40 square kilometer area surrounding Mayapán, Yucatan, Mexico used high-density LiDAR data to map prehispanic architecture and related natural features. Most of the area is covered by low canopy dense forest vegetation over karstic hilly terrain that impedes full coverage archaeological survey. We used LiDAR at 40 laser points per square meter to generate a bare earth digital elevation model (DEM. Results were evaluated with comparisons to previously mapped areas and with traditional archaeological survey methods for 38 settlement clusters outside of the city wall. Ground checking employed full coverage survey of selected 500 m grid squares, as well as documentation of the chronology and detail of new public and domestic settlement features and cenotes. Results identify the full extent of continued, contemporary Postclassic settlement (A.D. 1150–1450 outside of the city wall to at least 500 meters to the east, north, and west. New data also reveal an extensive modified landscape of terraformed residential hills, rejolladas, and dense settlement dating from Preclassic through Classic Periods. The LiDAR data also allow for the identification of rooms, benches, and stone property walls and lanes within the city.

  13. Foliar and woody materials discriminated using terrestrial LiDAR in a mixed natural forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xi; Skidmore, Andrew K.; Darvishzadeh, Roshanak; Niemann, K. Olaf; Liu, Jing; Shi, Yifang; Wang, Tiejun

    2018-02-01

    Separation of foliar and woody materials using remotely sensed data is crucial for the accurate estimation of leaf area index (LAI) and woody biomass across forest stands. In this paper, we present a new method to accurately separate foliar and woody materials using terrestrial LiDAR point clouds obtained from ten test sites in a mixed forest in Bavarian Forest National Park, Germany. Firstly, we applied and compared an adaptive radius near-neighbor search algorithm with a fixed radius near-neighbor search method in order to obtain both radiometric and geometric features derived from terrestrial LiDAR point clouds. Secondly, we used a random forest machine learning algorithm to classify foliar and woody materials and examined the impact of understory and slope on the classification accuracy. An average overall accuracy of 84.4% (Kappa = 0.75) was achieved across all experimental plots. The adaptive radius near-neighbor search method outperformed the fixed radius near-neighbor search method. The classification accuracy was significantly higher when the combination of both radiometric and geometric features was utilized. The analysis showed that increasing slope and understory coverage had a significant negative effect on the overall classification accuracy. Our results suggest that the utilization of the adaptive radius near-neighbor search method coupling both radiometric and geometric features has the potential to accurately discriminate foliar and woody materials from terrestrial LiDAR data in a mixed natural forest.

  14. Algorithm for Extracting Digital Terrain Models under Forest Canopy from Airborne LiDAR Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almasi S. Maguya

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Extracting digital elevationmodels (DTMs from LiDAR data under forest canopy is a challenging task. This is because the forest canopy tends to block a portion of the LiDAR pulses from reaching the ground, hence introducing gaps in the data. This paper presents an algorithm for DTM extraction from LiDAR data under forest canopy. The algorithm copes with the challenge of low data density by generating a series of coarse DTMs by using the few ground points available and using trend surfaces to interpolate missing elevation values in the vicinity of the available points. This process generates a cloud of ground points from which the final DTM is generated. The algorithm has been compared to two other algorithms proposed in the literature in three different test sites with varying degrees of difficulty. Results show that the algorithm presented in this paper is more tolerant to low data density compared to the other two algorithms. The results further show that with decreasing point density, the differences between the three algorithms dramatically increased from about 0.5m to over 10m.

  15. Sociocultural factors that reduce risks of homicide in Dar es Salaam: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibusi, Stephen Matthew; Ohnishi, Mayumi; Outwater, Anne; Seino, Kaoruko; Kizuki, Masashi; Takano, Takehito

    2013-10-01

    This study was performed to examine the potential contributions of sociocultural activities to reduce risks of death by homicide. This study was designed as a case control study. Relatives of 90 adult homicide victims in Dar es Salaam Region, Tanzania, in 2005 were interviewed. As controls, 211 participants matched for sex and 5-year age group were randomly selected from the same region and interviewed regarding the same contents. Bivariate analysis revealed significant differences between victims and controls regarding educational status, occupation, family structure, frequent heavy drinking, hard drug use and religious attendance. Conditional logistic regression analysis indicated that the following factors were significantly related to not becoming victims of homicide: being in employment (unskilled labour: OR=0.04, skilled labour: OR=0.07, others: OR=0.04), higher educational status (OR=0.02), residence in Dar es Salaam after becoming an adult (compared with those who have resided in Dar es Salaam since birth: OR=3.95), living with another person (OR=0.07), not drinking alcohol frequently (OR=0.15) and frequent religious service attendance (OR=0.12). Frequent religious service attendance, living in the same place for a long time and living with another person were shown to be factors that contribute to preventing death by homicide, regardless of place of residence and neighbourhood environment. Existing non-structural community resources and social cohesive networks strengthen individual and community resilience against violence.

  16. Sociocultural factors that reduce risks of homicide in Dar es Salaam: a case control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibusi, Stephen Matthew; Ohnishi, Mayumi; Outwater, Anne; Seino, Kaoruko; Kizuki, Masashi; Takano, Takehito

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study was performed to examine the potential contributions of sociocultural activities to reduce risks of death by homicide. Methods This study was designed as a case control study. Relatives of 90 adult homicide victims in Dar es Salaam Region, Tanzania, in 2005 were interviewed. As controls, 211 participants matched for sex and 5-year age group were randomly selected from the same region and interviewed regarding the same contents. Results Bivariate analysis revealed significant differences between victims and controls regarding educational status, occupation, family structure, frequent heavy drinking, hard drug use and religious attendance. Conditional logistic regression analysis indicated that the following factors were significantly related to not becoming victims of homicide: being in employment (unskilled labour: OR=0.04, skilled labour: OR=0.07, others: OR=0.04), higher educational status (OR=0.02), residence in Dar es Salaam after becoming an adult (compared with those who have resided in Dar es Salaam since birth: OR=3.95), living with another person (OR=0.07), not drinking alcohol frequently (OR=0.15) and frequent religious service attendance (OR=0.12). Conclusions Frequent religious service attendance, living in the same place for a long time and living with another person were shown to be factors that contribute to preventing death by homicide, regardless of place of residence and neighbourhood environment. Existing non-structural community resources and social cohesive networks strengthen individual and community resilience against violence. PMID:23322260

  17. Supporting Indonesia's National Forest Monitoring System with LiDAR Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    Scientists at Applied GeoSolutions, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Winrock International, and the University of New Hampshire are working with the government of Indonesia to enhance the National Forest Monitoring System in Kalimantan, Indonesia. The establishment of a reliable, transparent, and comprehensive NFMS has been limited by a dearth of relevant data that are accurate, low-cost, and spatially resolved at subnational scales. In this NASA funded project, we are developing, evaluating, and validating several critical components of a NFMS in Kalimantan, Indonesia, focusing on the use of LiDAR and radar imagery for improved carbon stock and forest degradation information. Applied GeoSolutions and the University of New Hampshire have developed an Open Source Software package to process large amounts LiDAR data quickly, easily, and accurately. The Open Source project is called lidar2dems and includes the classification of raw LAS point clouds and the creation of Digital Terrain Models (DTMs), Digital Surface Models (DSMs), and Canopy Height Models (CHMs). Preliminary estimates of forest structure and forest damage from logging from these data sets support the idea that comprehensive, well documented, freely available software for processing LiDAR data can enable countries such as Indonesia to cost effectively monitor their forests with high precision.

  18. Characterisation of the surface morphology of an alpine alluvial fan using airborne LiDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cavalli

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Alluvial fans of alpine torrents are both natural deposition areas for sediment discharged by floods and debris flows, and preferred sites for agriculture and settlements. Hazard assessment on alluvial fans depends on proper identification of flow processes and their potential intensity. This study used LiDAR data to examine the morphology of the alluvial fan of a small alpine stream (Moscardo Torrent, Eastern Italian Alps. A high-resolution DTM from LiDAR data was used to calculate a shaded relief map, plan curvature and an index of topographic roughness based on the standard deviation of elevation within a moving window. The surface complexity of the alluvial fan, also influenced by human activities, clearly arose from the analysis. The surface roughness, defined here as the local topography variability, is compared with a previous classification of the fan surface based on field surveys. The results demonstrate that topographic analysis of ground based LiDAR DTM can be a useful tool to objectively investigate fan morphology and hence alluvial fan hazard assessment.

  19. A Global Corrected SRTM DEM Product Over Vegetated Areas Using LiDAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, X.; Guo, Q.; Su, Y.; Hu, T.

    2016-12-01

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) digital elevation model (DEM) is one of the most complete and frequently used global-scale DEM products in various applications. However, previous studies have shown that the SRTM DEM is systematically higher than the actual land surface in vegetated mountain areas. The objective of this study is to propose a procedure to calibrate the SRTM DEM over global vegetated mountain areas. To address this, we firstly collected airborne LiDAR data over 200,000 km2 globally used as ground truth data to analyze the uncertainty of the SRTM DEM. The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS)/ICESat (Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite) data were used as complementary data in areas lack of airborne LiDAR data. Secondly, we modelled the SRTM DEM error for each vegetation type using regression methods. Tree height, canopy cover, and terrain slope were used as dependent variables to model the SRTM DEM error. Finally, these regression models were used to estimate the SRTM DEM error in vegetated mountain areas without LiDAR data coverage, and therefore correct the SRTM DEM. Our results show that the new corrected SRTM DEM can significantly reduce the systematic bias of the SRTM DEM in vegetated mountain areas.

  20. Marine Habitat Mapping Incorporating Both Derivatives of LiDAR Data and Hydrodynamic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant Smith

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Accurate and efficient species-based marine habitat assessment is in great demand for the marine environment. Remote sensing techniques including airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR derived bathymetry can now be used, in concert with suitable ground truthing, to produce marine habitat maps over wide areas. Hydrodynamic conditions, e.g., current speeds and wave exposure influence habitat types through direct impact on marine organisms, as well as influence on sediment transport and, hence, substrate type. Habitat classification and mapping was carried out using both LiDAR derivatives and hydrodynamic parameters derived from numerical modelling at a location off the coast of Port Hedland in the Pilbara region of Western Australia, 1660 km north of Perth. Habitat classes included seagrass, algae, invertebrates, hard coral, and areas where there is no evident epibenthos. The inclusion of the hydrodynamic parameters significantly increased the accuracy of the classification by 7.7% when compared to using LiDAR derivatives alone.

  1. Phylogenetic Relationships between Four Salix L. Species Based on DArT Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy A. Przyborowski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to evaluate the usefulness of DArT markers in genotypic identification of willow species and describe genetic relationships between four willow species: Salix viminalis, S. purpurea, S. alba and S. triandra. The experimental plant material comprised 53 willow genotypes of these four species, which are popularly grown in Poland. DArT markers seem to identify Salix species with a high degree of accuracy. As a result, the examined species were divided into four distinct groups which corresponded to the four analyzed species. In our study, we observed that S. triandra was very different genetically from the other species, including S. alba which is generally classified into the same subgenus of Salix. The above corroborates the findings of other authors who relied on molecular methods to reveal that the classification of S. triandra to the subgenus Salix was erroneous. The Principal Coordinate Analysis (PCoA and the neighbor-joining dendrogram also confirmed the clear division of the studied willow genotypes into four clusters corresponding to individual species. This confirmed the usefulness of DArT markers in taxonomic analyses and identification of willow species.

  2. IsoDAR@KamLAND:A Conceptual Design Report for the Conventional Facilities arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso, Jose R.

    This document describes requirements for the caverns to house the cyclotron, beam transport line, and target systems; issues associated with transport and assembly of components on the site; electrical power, cooling and ventilation; as well as issues associated with radiation protection of the environment and staff of KamLAND who will be interfacing with IsoDAR during its operational phases. Specifics of IsoDAR operations at the KamLAND site are not addressed. Recent developments in planning for deployment of IsoDAR include the identification of a potential new site for the experiment, where the target can be placed directly on the equatorial plane of the KamLAND detector, and also, an upgrade of the detector resolution to 3\\%/$\\sqrt{E(MeV)}$. The option of the new site might allow, depending on the results of shielding and background evaluations in KamLAND, for an increase in event rate by about a factor of 1.6 owing to increased solid angle for the detector, improving the physics reach for a same period of...

  3. AN EFFICIENT METHOD FOR AUTOMATIC ROAD EXTRACTION BASED ON MULTIPLE FEATURES FROM LiDAR DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The road extraction in urban areas is difficult task due to the complicated patterns and many contextual objects. LiDAR data directly provides three dimensional (3D points with less occlusions and smaller shadows. The elevation information and surface roughness are distinguishing features to separate roads. However, LiDAR data has some disadvantages are not beneficial to object extraction, such as the irregular distribution of point clouds and lack of clear edges of roads. For these problems, this paper proposes an automatic road centerlines extraction method which has three major steps: (1 road center point detection based on multiple feature spatial clustering for separating road points from ground points, (2 local principal component analysis with least squares fitting for extracting the primitives of road centerlines, and (3 hierarchical grouping for connecting primitives into complete roads network. Compared with MTH (consist of Mean shift algorithm, Tensor voting, and Hough transform proposed in our previous article, this method greatly reduced the computational cost. To evaluate the proposed method, the Vaihingen data set, a benchmark testing data provided by ISPRS for “Urban Classification and 3D Building Reconstruction” project, was selected. The experimental results show that our method achieve the same performance by less time in road extraction using LiDAR data.

  4. Assessment of human thermal perception in the hot-humid climate of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndetto, Emmanuel L.; Matzarakis, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, is a typical African city along the Indian Ocean coast, and therefore an important urban area to examine human thermal perception in the hot-humid tropical climate. Earlier research on human bioclimate at Dar es Salaam indicated that heat stress prevails during the hot season from October to March, peaking between December and February, particularly the early afternoons. In order to assess the human thermal perception and adaptation, two popular places, one at an urban park and another at a beach environment, were selected and questionnaire surveys were conducted in August-September 2013 and January 2014, concurrently with local micro-meteorological measurements at survey locations. The thermal conditions were quantified in terms of the thermal index of the physiologically equivalent temperature (PET) using the micro-scale climate model RayMan. The thermal comfort range of human thermal comfort and the local thermal adaptive capacity were determined in respect to the thermal index by binning thermal sensation votes. The thermal comfort range was found to be well above that in temperate climates at about 23-31 °C of PET. The study could significantly contribute to urban planning in Dar es Salaam and other coastal cities in the tropics.

  5. [Estimating individual tree aboveground biomass of the mid-subtropical forest using airborne LiDAR technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Tan, Chang; Lei, Pi-Feng

    2014-11-01

    Taking Wugang forest farm in Xuefeng Mountain as the research object, using the airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data under leaf-on condition and field data of concomitant plots, this paper assessed the ability of using LiDAR technology to estimate aboveground biomass of the mid-subtropical forest. A semi-automated individual tree LiDAR cloud point segmentation was obtained by using condition random fields and optimization methods. Spatial structure, waveform characteristics and topography were calculated as LiDAR metrics from the segmented objects. Then statistical models between aboveground biomass from field data and these LiDAR metrics were built. The individual tree recognition rates were 93%, 86% and 60% for coniferous, broadleaf and mixed forests, respectively. The adjusted coefficients of determination (R(2)adj) and the root mean squared errors (RMSE) for the three types of forest were 0.83, 0.81 and 0.74, and 28.22, 29.79 and 32.31 t · hm(-2), respectively. The estimation capability of model based on canopy geometric volume, tree percentile height, slope and waveform characteristics was much better than that of traditional regression model based on tree height. Therefore, LiDAR metrics from individual tree could facilitate better performance in biomass estimation.

  6. Decomposition of LiDAR waveforms by B-spline-based modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiang; Li, Qing-Quan; Wu, Guofeng; Zhu, Jiasong

    2017-06-01

    Waveform decomposition is a widely used technique for extracting echoes from full-waveform LiDAR data. Most previous studies recommended the Gaussian decomposition approach, which employs the Gaussian function in laser pulse modeling. As the Gaussian-shape assumption is not always satisfied for real LiDAR waveforms, some other probability distributions (e.g., the lognormal distribution, the generalized normal distribution, and the Burr distribution) have also been introduced by researchers to fit sharply-peaked and/or heavy-tailed pulses. However, these models cannot be universally used, because they are only suitable for processing the LiDAR waveforms in particular shapes. In this paper, we present a new waveform decomposition algorithm based on the B-spline modeling technique. LiDAR waveforms are not assumed to have a priori shapes but rather are modeled by B-splines, and the shape of a received waveform is treated as the mixture of finite transmitted pulses after translation and scaling transformation. The performance of the new model was tested using two full-waveform data sets acquired by a Riegl LMS-Q680i laser scanner and an Optech Aquarius laser bathymeter, comparing with three classical waveform decomposition approaches: the Gaussian, generalized normal, and lognormal distribution-based models. The experimental results show that the B-spline model performed the best in terms of waveform fitting accuracy, while the generalized normal model yielded the worst performance in the two test data sets. Riegl waveforms have nearly Gaussian pulse shapes and were well fitted by the Gaussian mixture model, while the B-spline-based modeling algorithm produced a slightly better result by further reducing 6.4% of fitting residuals, largely benefiting from alleviating the adverse impact of the ringing effect. The pulse shapes of Optech waveforms, on the other hand, are noticeably right-skewed. The Gaussian modeling results deviated significantly from original signals, and

  7. Surface Water Detection Using Fused Synthetic Aperture Radar, Airborne LiDAR and Optical Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, A.; Irwin, K.; Beaulne, D.; Fotopoulos, G.; Lougheed, S. C.

    2016-12-01

    Each remote sensing technique has its unique set of strengths and weaknesses, but by combining techniques the classification accuracy can be increased. The goal of this project is to underline the strengths and weaknesses of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), LiDAR and optical imagery data and highlight the opportunities where integration of the three data types can increase the accuracy of identifying water in a principally natural landscape. The study area is located at the Queen's University Biological Station, Ontario, Canada. TerraSAR-X (TSX) data was acquired between April and July 2016, consisting of four single polarization (HH) staring spotlight mode backscatter intensity images. Grey-level thresholding is used to extract surface water bodies, before identifying and masking zones of radar shadow and layover by using LiDAR elevation models to estimate the canopy height and applying simple geometry algorithms. The airborne LiDAR survey was conducted in June 2014, resulting in a discrete return dataset with a density of 1 point/m2. Radiometric calibration to correct for range and incidence angle is applied, before classifying the points as water or land based on corrected intensity, elevation, roughness, and intensity density. Panchromatic and multispectral (4-band) imagery from Quickbird was collected in September 2005 at spatial resolutions of 0.6m and 2.5m respectively. Pixel-based classification is applied to identify and distinguish water bodies from land. A classification system which inputs SAR-, LiDAR- and optically-derived water presence models in raster formats is developed to exploit the strengths and weaknesses of each technique. The total percentage of water detected in the sample area for SAR backscatter, LiDAR intensity, and optical imagery was 27%, 19% and 18% respectively. The output matrix of the classification system indicates that in over 72% of the study area all three methods agree on the classification. Analysis was specifically targeted

  8. Flood Risk Mapping Using LiDAR for Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim L. Webster

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A significant portion of the Canadian Maritime coastline has been surveyed with airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR. The purpose of these surveys has been to map the risk of flooding from storm surges and projected long-term sea‑level rise from climate change and to include projects in all three Maritime Provinces: Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia. LiDAR provides the required details in order to map the flood inundation from 1 to 2 m storm surge events, which cause coastal flooding in many locations in this region when they occur at high tide levels. The community of Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, adjacent to the Bay of Fundy, has been surveyed with LiDAR and a 1 m DEM (Digital Elevation Model was constructed for the flood inundation mapping. Validation of the LiDAR using survey grade GPS indicates a vertical accuracy better than 30 cm. A benchmark storm, known as the Groundhog Day storm (February 1–3, 1976, was used to assess the flood maps and to illustrate the effects of different sea-level rise projections based on climate change scenarios if it were to re-occur in 100 years time. Near shore bathymetry has been merged with the LiDAR and local wind observations used to model the impact of significant waves during this benchmark storm. Long-term (ca. greater than 30 years time series of water level observations from across the Bay of Fundy in Saint John, New Brunswick, have been used to estimate return periods of water levels under present and future sea-level rise conditions. Results indicate that under current sea-level rise conditions this storm has a 66 year return period. With a modest relative sea-level (RSL rise of 80 cm/century this decreases to 44 years and, with a possible upper limit rise of 220 cm/century, this decreases further to 22 years. Due to the uncertainty of climate change scenarios and sea-level rise, flood inundation maps have been constructed at 10 cm increments up to the 9 m contour

  9. AUTOMATIC 3D BUILDING MODEL GENERATIONS WITH AIRBORNE LiDAR DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Yastikli

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available LiDAR systems become more and more popular because of the potential use for obtaining the point clouds of vegetation and man-made objects on the earth surface in an accurate and quick way. Nowadays, these airborne systems have been frequently used in wide range of applications such as DEM/DSM generation, topographic mapping, object extraction, vegetation mapping, 3 dimensional (3D modelling and simulation, change detection, engineering works, revision of maps, coastal management and bathymetry. The 3D building model generation is the one of the most prominent applications of LiDAR system, which has the major importance for urban planning, illegal construction monitoring, 3D city modelling, environmental simulation, tourism, security, telecommunication and mobile navigation etc. The manual or semi-automatic 3D building model generation is costly and very time-consuming process for these applications. Thus, an approach for automatic 3D building model generation is needed in a simple and quick way for many studies which includes building modelling. In this study, automatic 3D building models generation is aimed with airborne LiDAR data. An approach is proposed for automatic 3D building models generation including the automatic point based classification of raw LiDAR point cloud. The proposed point based classification includes the hierarchical rules, for the automatic production of 3D building models. The detailed analyses for the parameters which used in hierarchical rules have been performed to improve classification results using different test areas identified in the study area. The proposed approach have been tested in the study area which has partly open areas, forest areas and many types of the buildings, in Zekeriyakoy, Istanbul using the TerraScan module of TerraSolid. The 3D building model was generated automatically using the results of the automatic point based classification. The obtained results of this research on study area verified

  10. Mobile LiDAR Measurement for Aerosol Investigation in South-Central Hebei, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    qin, kai; Wu, Lixin; Zheng, Yunhui; Wong Man, Sing; Wang, Runfeng; Hu, Mingyu; Lang, Hongmei; Wang, Luyao; Bai, Yang; Rao, Lanlan

    2016-04-01

    With the rapid industrialization and urbanization in China during the last decades, the increasing anthropogenic pollutant emissions have significantly caused serious air pollution problems which are adversely influencing public health. Hebei is one of the most air polluted provinces in China. In January 2013, an extremely severe and persistent haze episode with record-breaking PM2.5 outbreak affecting hundreds of millions of people occurred over eastern and northern China. During that haze episode, 7 of the top 10 most polluted cities in China were located in the Hebei Province according to the report of China's Ministry of Environmental Protection. To investigate and the spatial difference and to characterize the vertical distribution of aerosol in different regions of south-central Hebei, mobile measurements were carried out using a mini micro pulse LiDAR system (model: MiniMPL) in March 2014. The mobile LiDAR kit consisting of a MiniMPL, a vibration reduction mount, a power inverter, a Windows surface tablet and a GPS receiver were mounted in a car watching though the sunroof opening. For comparison, a fixed measurement using a traditional micro pulse LiDAR system (model: MPL-4B) was conducted simultaneously in Shijiazhuang, the capital of Hebei Province. The equipped car was driven from downtown Shijiazhuang by way of suburban and rural area to downtown Cangzhou, Handan, and Baoding respectively at almost stable speed around 100Km per hour along different routes which counted in total more than 1000Km. The results can be summarized as: 1) the spatial distribution of total aerosol optical depth along the measurement routes in south-central Hebei was controlled by local terrain and population in general, with high values in downtown and suburban in the plain areas, and low values in rural areas along Taihang mountain to the west and Yan mountain to the north; 2) obviously high AODs were obtained at roads crossing points, inside densely populated area and nearby

  11. LiDAR Sampling Density for Forest Resource Inventories in Ontario, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dave Etheridge

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the past two decades there has been an abundance of research demonstrating the utility of airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR for predicting forest biophysical/inventory variables at the plot and stand levels. However, to date there has been little effort to develop a set of protocols for data acquisition and processing that would move governments or the forest industry towards cost-effective implementation of this technology for strategic and tactical (i.e., operational forest resource inventories. The goal of this paper is to initiate this process by examining the significance of LiDAR data acquisition (i.e., point density for modeling forest inventory variables for the range of species and stand conditions representing much of Ontario, Canada. Field data for approximately 200 plots, sampling a broad range of forest types and conditions across Ontario, were collected for three study sites. Airborne LiDAR data, characterized by a mean density of 3.2 pulses m−2 were systematically decimated to produce additional datasets with densities of approximately 1.6 and 0.5 pulses m−2. Stepwise regression models, incorporating LiDAR height and density metrics, were developed for each of the three LiDAR datasets across a range of forest types to estimate the following forest inventory variables: (1 average height (R2(adj = 0.75–0.95; (2 top height (R2(adj = 0.74–0.98; (3 quadratic mean diameter (R2(adj = 0.55–0.85; (4 basal area (R2(adj = 0.22–0.93; (5 gross total volume (R2(adj = 0.42–0.94; (6 gross merchantable volume (R2(adj = 0.35–0.93; (7 total aboveground biomass (R2(adj = 0.23–0.93; and (8 stem density (R2(adj = 0.17–0.86. Aside from a few cases (i.e., average height and density for some stand types, no decimation effect was observed with respect to the precision of the prediction of the majority of forest variables, which suggests that a mean density of 0.5 pulses m−2 is sufficient for plot and stand level

  12. Fusion of Airborne Discrete-Return LiDAR and Hyperspectral Data for Land Cover Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shezhou Luo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Accurate land cover classification information is a critical variable for many applications. This study presents a method to classify land cover using the fusion data of airborne discrete return LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging and CASI (Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager hyperspectral data. Four LiDAR-derived images (DTM, DSM, nDSM, and intensity and CASI data (48 bands with 1 m spatial resolution were spatially resampled to 2, 4, 8, 10, 20 and 30 m resolutions using the nearest neighbor resampling method. These data were thereafter fused using the layer stacking and principal components analysis (PCA methods. Land cover was classified by commonly used supervised classifications in remote sensing images, i.e., the support vector machine (SVM and maximum likelihood (MLC classifiers. Each classifier was applied to four types of datasets (at seven different spatial resolutions: (1 the layer stacking fusion data; (2 the PCA fusion data; (3 the LiDAR data alone; and (4 the CASI data alone. In this study, the land cover category was classified into seven classes, i.e., buildings, road, water bodies, forests, grassland, cropland and barren land. A total of 56 classification results were produced, and the classification accuracies were assessed and compared. The results show that the classification accuracies produced from two fused datasets were higher than that of the single LiDAR and CASI data at all seven spatial resolutions. Moreover, we find that the layer stacking method produced higher overall classification accuracies than the PCA fusion method using both the SVM and MLC classifiers. The highest classification accuracy obtained (OA = 97.8%, kappa = 0.964 using the SVM classifier on the layer stacking fusion data at 1 m spatial resolution. Compared with the best classification results of the CASI and LiDAR data alone, the overall classification accuracies improved by 9.1% and 19.6%, respectively. Our findings also demonstrated that the

  13. Investigating the spatial distribution of water levels in the Mackenzie Delta using airborne LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkinson, C.; Crasto, N.; Marsh, P.; Forbes, D.; Lesack, L.

    2011-01-01

    Airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data were used to map water level (WL) and hydraulic gradients (??H/??x) in the Mackenzie Delta. The LiDAR WL data were validated against eight independent hydrometric gauge measurements and demonstrated mean offsets from - 0??22 to + 0??04 m (??channel lengths exceeding 5-10 km where the WL change exceeded local noise levels in the LiDAR data. For the entire Delta, the LiDAR sample coverage indicated a rate of change in longitudinal gradient (??2H/??x) of 5??5 ?? 10-10 m m-2; therefore offering a potential means to estimate average flood stage hydraulic gradient for areas of the Delta not sampled or monitored. In the Outer Delta, within-channel and terrain gradient measurements all returned a consistent estimate of - 1 ?? 10-5 m m-1, suggesting that this is a typical hydraulic gradient for the downstream end of the Delta. For short reaches (Channels in the middle of the Delta, significant and consistent hydraulic gradient estimates of - 5 ?? 10-5 m m-1 were observed. Evidence that hydraulic gradients can vary over short distances, however, was observed in the Peel Channel immediately upstream of Aklavik. A positive elevation anomaly (bulge) of > 0??1 m was observed at a channel constriction entering a meander bend, suggesting a localized modification of the channel hydraulics. Furthermore, water levels in the anabranch channels of the Peel River were almost 1 m higher than in Middle Channel of the Mackenzie River. This suggests: (i) the channels are elevated and have shallower bank heights in this part of the delta, leading to increased cross-delta and along-channel hydraulic gradients; and/or (ii) a proportion of the Peel River flow is lost to Middle Channel due to drainage across the delta through anastamosing channels. This study has demonstrated that airborne LiDAR data contain valuable information describing Arctic river delta water surface and hydraulic attributes that would be challenging to acquire by other

  14. Multiple-LiDAR measurements of wind turbine wakes: effect of the atmospheric stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerio Iungo, Giacomo; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2013-04-01

    Aerodynamic design and optimization of a wind farm layout are mainly based on the evaluation of wind turbine wake recovery by moving downstream, and on the characterization of wake interactions within a wind farm. Indeed, the power production of downstream wind turbine rows is strictly affected by the cumulative wake produced by the turbines deployed upstream. Wind turbine wakes are dependent on their aerodynamic features, and being immersed in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), they are also affected by surface heterogeneity, e.g. site topography and surface coverage, and atmospheric stability. The ABL stability is typically classified as neutral, convective or stable. In a neutral ABL the mechanical turbulent production is the dominating phenomenon. Conversely, for a convective ABL the turbulent kinetic energy and vertical transport phenomena are enhanced by positive buoyancy. Finally, for a stable ABL, a lower turbulence level is typically observed with an increased wind shear. For the present campaign convective ABL was typically observed during day-time, and neutral ABL for early morning and sunset periods. The aim of the present work is the evaluation of the influence of the ABL stability on downstream evolution of wind turbine wakes, which is mainly controlled by different ABL turbulence characteristics. Field measurements of the wake produced from a 2 MW Enercon E-70 wind turbine were performed with three scanning Doppler wind LiDARs. The wind and atmospheric conditions were characterized through a sonic anemometer deployed in proximity of the wind turbine. One LiDAR was placed at a distance about 12 rotor diameters upstream of the turbine in order to characterize the incoming wind. Two additional LiDARs were typically used to perform wake measurements. Tests were performed over the wake vertical symmetry plane in order to characterize wake recovery. Measurements were also carried out over conical surfaces in order to investigate the wind turbine wake

  15. Automatic 3d Building Model Generations with Airborne LiDAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yastikli, N.; Cetin, Z.

    2017-11-01

    LiDAR systems become more and more popular because of the potential use for obtaining the point clouds of vegetation and man-made objects on the earth surface in an accurate and quick way. Nowadays, these airborne systems have been frequently used in wide range of applications such as DEM/DSM generation, topographic mapping, object extraction, vegetation mapping, 3 dimensional (3D) modelling and simulation, change detection, engineering works, revision of maps, coastal management and bathymetry. The 3D building model generation is the one of the most prominent applications of LiDAR system, which has the major importance for urban planning, illegal construction monitoring, 3D city modelling, environmental simulation, tourism, security, telecommunication and mobile navigation etc. The manual or semi-automatic 3D building model generation is costly and very time-consuming process for these applications. Thus, an approach for automatic 3D building model generation is needed in a simple and quick way for many studies which includes building modelling. In this study, automatic 3D building models generation is aimed with airborne LiDAR data. An approach is proposed for automatic 3D building models generation including the automatic point based classification of raw LiDAR point cloud. The proposed point based classification includes the hierarchical rules, for the automatic production of 3D building models. The detailed analyses for the parameters which used in hierarchical rules have been performed to improve classification results using different test areas identified in the study area. The proposed approach have been tested in the study area which has partly open areas, forest areas and many types of the buildings, in Zekeriyakoy, Istanbul using the TerraScan module of TerraSolid. The 3D building model was generated automatically using the results of the automatic point based classification. The obtained results of this research on study area verified that automatic 3D

  16. LESTO: an Open Source GIS-based toolbox for LiDAR analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschi, Silvia; Antonello, Andrea; Tonon, Giustino

    2015-04-01

    During the last five years different research institutes and private companies stared to implement new algorithms to analyze and extract features from LiDAR data but only a few of them also created a public available software. In the field of forestry there are different examples of software that can be used to extract the vegetation parameters from LiDAR data, unfortunately most of them are closed source (even if free), which means that the source code is not shared with the public for anyone to look at or make changes to. In 2014 we started the development of the library LESTO (LiDAR Empowered Sciences Toolbox Opensource): a set of modules for the analysis of LiDAR point cloud with an Open Source approach with the aim of improving the performance of the extraction of the volume of biomass and other vegetation parameters on large areas for mixed forest structures. LESTO contains a set of modules for data handling and analysis implemented within the JGrassTools spatial processing library. The main subsections are dedicated to 1) preprocessing of LiDAR raw data mainly in LAS format (utilities and filtering); 2) creation of raster derived products; 3) flight-lines identification and normalization of the intensity values; 4) tools for extraction of vegetation and buildings. The core of the LESTO library is the extraction of the vegetation parameters. We decided to follow the single tree based approach starting with the implementation of some of the most used algorithms in literature. These have been tweaked and applied on LiDAR derived raster datasets (DTM, DSM) as well as point clouds of raw data. The methods range between the simple extraction of tops and crowns from local maxima, the region growing method, the watershed method and individual tree segmentation on point clouds. The validation procedure consists in finding the matching between field and LiDAR-derived measurements at individual tree and plot level. An automatic validation procedure has been developed

  17. Buildings classification from airborne LiDAR point clouds through OBIA and ontology driven approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomljenovic, Ivan; Belgiu, Mariana; Lampoltshammer, Thomas J.

    2013-04-01

    In the last years, airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data proved to be a valuable information resource for a vast number of applications ranging from land cover mapping to individual surface feature extraction from complex urban environments. To extract information from LiDAR data, users apply prior knowledge. Unfortunately, there is no consistent initiative for structuring this knowledge into data models that can be shared and reused across different applications and domains. The absence of such models poses great challenges to data interpretation, data fusion and integration as well as information transferability. The intention of this work is to describe the design, development and deployment of an ontology-based system to classify buildings from airborne LiDAR data. The novelty of this approach consists of the development of a domain ontology that specifies explicitly the knowledge used to extract features from airborne LiDAR data. The overall goal of this approach is to investigate the possibility for classification of features of interest from LiDAR data by means of domain ontology. The proposed workflow is applied to the building extraction process for the region of "Biberach an der Riss" in South Germany. Strip-adjusted and georeferenced airborne LiDAR data is processed based on geometrical and radiometric signatures stored within the point cloud. Region-growing segmentation algorithms are applied and segmented regions are exported to the GeoJSON format. Subsequently, the data is imported into the ontology-based reasoning process used to automatically classify exported features of interest. Based on the ontology it becomes possible to define domain concepts, associated properties and relations. As a consequence, the resulting specific body of knowledge restricts possible interpretation variants. Moreover, ontologies are machinable and thus it is possible to run reasoning on top of them. Available reasoners (FACT++, JESS, Pellet) are used to check

  18. Remote sensing systems – Platforms and sensors: Aerial, satellites, UAVs, optical, radar, and LiDAR: Chapter 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Sudhanshu S.; Rao, Mahesh N.; Thenkabail, Prasad S.; Fitzerald, James E.

    2015-01-01

    The American Society of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing defined remote sensing as the measurement or acquisition of information of some property of an object or phenomenon, by a recording device that is not in physical or intimate contact with the object or phenomenon under study (Colwell et al., 1983). Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI) in its geographic information system (GIS) dictionary defines remote sensing as “collecting and interpreting information about the environment and the surface of the earth from a distance, primarily by sensing radiation that is naturally emitted or reflected by the earth’s surface or from the atmosphere, or by sending signals transmitted from a device and reflected back to it (ESRI, 2014).” The usual source of passive remote sensing data is the measurement of reflected or transmitted electromagnetic radiation (EMR) from the sun across the electromagnetic spectrum (EMS); this can also include acoustic or sound energy, gravity, or the magnetic field from or of the objects under consideration. In this context, the simple act of reading this text is considered remote sensing. In this case, the eye acts as a sensor and senses the light reflected from the object to obtain information about the object. It is the same technology used by a handheld camera to take a photograph of a person or a distant scenic view. Active remote sensing, however, involves sending a pulse of energy and then measuring the returned energy through a sensor (e.g., Radio Detection and Ranging [RADAR], Light Detection and Ranging [LiDAR]). Thermal sensors measure emitted energy by different objects. Thus, in general, passive remote sensing involves the measurement of solar energy reflected from the Earth’s surface, while active remote sensing involves synthetic (man-made) energy pulsed at the environment and the return signals are measured and recorded.

  19. Landslide detection using LiDAR data and data mining technology: Ali Mountain Highway case study (Taiwan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Youg-Sin; Yu, Teng-To; Tarolli, Paolo

    2017-04-01

    Taiwan mountains are severely affected each year by landslides, rock falls, and debris flows where the roads system suffer the most critical consequences. Among all mountain highways, Ali Highway, located into the main entrance of Alishan Mountain region, is one of the most landslide-prone areas in southern Taiwan. During the typhoon season, between May and August, the probability of occurrence of mass movements is at higher level than usual seeing great erosion rates. In fact, during Typhoon Morakot, in 2009, the intense rainfall caused abrupt interruption of the circulation for three months triggering several landslides (Liu et al. 2012). The topographic features such as slope, roughness and curvature among others have been extracted from 1 m DTM derived by a LiDAR dataset (collected in 2015) to investigate the slope failures along the Ali Mountain Highway. The high-resolution DTM highlighted that the hydrogeomorphological (e.g. density of stream, the distance from the ridge and terrain) features are one of the most influencing factors affecting the change and the instability of the slopes. To detect the landslide area, the decision tree classifier and the random forest algorithm (RF) have been adopted. The results provided a suitable analysis of the area involved in the failure. This will be a useful step in the understanding (and management) landslide processes of study area. References Liu CN, Dong JJ, Chen CJ, Lee WF (2012) Typical landslides and related mechanisms in Ali Mountain highway induced by typhoon Morakot: Perspectives from engineering geology. Landslides 9:239-254.

  20. Accuracy of Forest Road and Stream Channel Characteristics Derived from LiDAR Terrain Data in Forested Mountain Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, R. A.; Dietterick, B. C.

    2008-12-01

    Airborne LiDAR data is now commonly used to create digital elevation models with a vertical accuracy and grid resolution that surpasses traditional sources of topographic data. The improved topographic detail of LiDAR-derived DEMs allows for identification and measurement of important topographic features including forest roads, historic landslides and potentially unstable areas. When used conjunction with GIS-based flow accumulation algorithms, high-resolution DEMs can also provide improvements to the positional accuracy, longitudinal profile, stream lengths of topographically-derived stream channels. LiDAR data collected over forested and steep terrain however, requires careful evaluation. The reduced density and variable spacing of LiDAR ground returns, which is often encountered in these settings, reduces the effective resolution of LiDAR DEMs and may limit fine-scale topographic mapping. This study tested the completeness and accuracy forest road and stream channel features mapped using a 1.5 m LiDAR-derived DEM for a 526-hectare watershed in the Santa Cruz mountains in California. Positional accuracy, longitudinal slope and length of LiDAR-derived features were compared to field-survey measurements obtained using total station. LiDAR-derived measurements were also compared to measurements from traditional data sources such as a USGS 10 m DEM and a 1 m orthophoto. The LiDAR- derived road was manually digitized from the LiDAR hillshade and slope layers, with a positional accuracy of 2.2 m normal to the field-surveyed centerline. LiDAR-derived road slope was accurate to within 0.59% of field-surveyed slope at a 95% confidence interval. The entire 4 km road length could be mapped using the LiDAR data. Due to the dense overstory canopy only 18% of that road length could be identified from the orthophoto. Stream channel features derived using Arc Hydro were compared to field-surveyed data at six 100 m study reaches. The average positional accuracy of the derived