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Sample records for sheath potential drops

  1. Influence of vacuum space on formation of potential sheath in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhm, H.S.

    1997-01-01

    Properties of potential sheaths developed in plasmas are investigated in terms of the plasma Debye length and the dimension of vacuum space. Biased plasma potential and the potential profile depend very sensitively on the geometrical configuration of plasma and vacuum space. The potential sheath is never developed near electrodes in high-density plasmas where the Debye length is much less than the dimension of the vacuum space. In this case, most of the potential drops occur in the vacuum space and almost no electric field exists inside the plasma. Parametric investigation of the potential sheath in terms of the vacuum-space and plasma dimensions is carried out. (orig.)

  2. Synthesis of sheath voltage drops in asymmetric radio-frequency discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonemura, Shigeru; Nanbu, Kenichi; Iwata, Naoaki

    2004-01-01

    A sheath voltage drop in asymmetric discharges is one of the most important parameters of radio-frequency capacitively coupled plasmas because it determines the kinetic energy of the ions incident on the target or substrate. In this study, we developed a numerical simulation code to estimate the sheath voltage drops and, consequently, the self-bias voltage. We roughly approximated general asymmetric rf discharges to one-dimensional spherical ones. The results obtained by using our simulation code are consistent with measurements and Lieberman's theory

  3. Ion acceleration in the plasma source sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birdsall, C.K.

    1986-01-01

    This note is a calculation of the potential drop for a planar plasma source, across the source sheath, into a uniform plasma region defined by vector E = 0 and/or perhaps ∂ 2 PHI/∂ x 2 = 0. The calculation complements that of Bohm who obtained the potential drop at the other end of a plasma, at a planar collector sheath. The result is a relation between the source ion flux and the source sheath potential drop and the accompanying ion acceleration. This planar source sheath ion acceleration mechanism (or that from a distributed source) can provide the pre-collector-sheath ion acceleration as found necessary by Bohm. 3 refs

  4. Measurements of the sheath potential in low density plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, J.W.; Khamis, R.A.; Sanduk, M.I.; Elliott, J.A.; Rusbridge, M.G.

    1992-01-01

    We have measured the sheath potential around a probe in a range of different plasma conditions in the UMIST, University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology, quadrupole GOLUX and in a related experiment in which the plasma expands freely to supersonic velocity. In the latter case, the sheath potential agrees well with an appropriately modified form of the usual expression for a field-free plasma, for both hydrogen and argon plasmas. In GOLUX, however, the sheath potential is found to be significantly less than the accepted value, even when the magnetic field is taken into account. For the slow moving plasma in the outer part of the quadrupole confining field, we present both theoretical and experimental results showing that the reduction is due to truncation of the electron velocity distribution as the probe drains electrons from a closed flux tube faster than they can be replaced. In the central hot plasma, however, this explanation cannot apply. Here, the plasma is moving at about sonic speed and magnetic effects are weak. Nevertheless, the results are significantly different from both in the field free experiment. (author)

  5. Potential drops supported by ion density cavities in the dynamic response of a plasma diode to an applied field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohm, M.; Torven, S.

    1990-06-01

    Experiments have shown that an applied voltage drop may either be supported by a cathode sheath or by a quasi-linear variation over the plasma lasting for several electron transit times. In the latter case an ion density cavity existed initially. An analytical model and numerical simulations are used to show that a cavity gives rise to a quasi-linear potential variation for applied voltage drops below a certain critical value. For larger values the drop concentrates to a cathode sheath. The quasi-linear profile steepens to a double layer for large cavity depths. (authors)

  6. Potential drop sensors for sodium loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvaraj, R.

    1978-11-01

    Potential drop sensors to detect the presence or the absence of sodium in pipe lines are described. These are very handy during loop charging and dumping operations. Their suitability to detect level surges and to monitor continuous level of liquid metals in certain applications is discussed. (author)

  7. Vlasov simulations of parallel potential drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Gunell

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available An auroral flux tube is modelled from the magnetospheric equator to the ionosphere using Vlasov simulations. Starting from an initial state, the evolution of the plasma on the flux tube is followed in time. It is found that when applying a voltage between the ends of the flux tube, about two thirds of the potential drop is concentrated in a thin double layer at approximately one Earth radius altitude. The remaining part is situated in an extended region 1–2 Earth radii above the double layer. Waves on the ion timescale develop above the double layer, and they move toward higher altitude at approximately the ion acoustic speed. These waves are seen both in the electric field and as perturbations of the ion and electron distributions, indicative of an instability. Electrons of magnetospheric origin become trapped between the magnetic mirror and the double layer during its formation. At low altitude, waves on electron timescales appear and are seen to be non-uniformly distributed in space. The temporal evolution of the potential profile and the total voltage affect the double layer altitude, which decreases with an increasing field aligned potential drop. A current–voltage relationship is found by running several simulations with different voltages over the system, and it agrees with the Knight relation reasonably well.

  8. Mitigating impact of thermal and rectified radio-frequency sheath potentials on edge localized modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gui, B. [Institute of Plasma Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Lawerence Livermore National Lab, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Xu, X. Q. [Lawerence Livermore National Lab, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Myra, J. R.; D' Ippolito, D. A. [Lodestar Research Corporation, Boulder, Colorado 80301 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    The mitigating impact of thermal and rectified radio frequency (RF) sheath potentials on the peeling-ballooning modes is studied non-linearly by employing a two-fluid three-field simulation model based on the BOUT++ framework. Additional shear flow and the Kelvin-Helmholtz effect due to the thermal and rectified RF sheath potential are induced. It is found that the shear flow increases the growth rate while the K-H effect decreases the growth rate slightly when there is a density gradient, but the energy loss of these cases is suppressed in the nonlinear phase. The stronger external electrostatic field due to the sheaths has a more significant effect on the energy loss suppression. From this study, it is found the growth rate in the linear phase mainly determines the onset of edge-localized modes, while the mode spectrum width in the nonlinear phase has an important impact on the turbulent transport. The wider mode spectrum leads to weaker turbulent transport and results in a smaller energy loss. Due to the thermal sheath and rectified RF sheath potential in the scrape-off-layer, the modified shear flow tears apart the peeling-ballooning filament and makes the mode spectrum wider, resulting in less energy loss. The perturbed electric potential and the parallel current near the sheath region is also suppressed locally due to the sheath boundary condition.

  9. The effect of an auxiliary discharge on anode sheath potentials in a transverse discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, J.E.; Gallimore, A.D.

    1997-01-01

    A novel scheme that employs the use of an auxiliary discharge has been shown to reduce markedly anode sheath potentials in a transverse discharge. An 8.8 A low-pressure argon discharge in the presence of a transverse magnetic field was used as the plasma source in this study. In such discharges, the transverse flux that is collected by the anode is severely limited due to marked reductions in the transverse diffusion coefficient. Findings of this study indicate that the local electron number density and the transverse flux increase when the auxiliary discharge is operated. Changes in these parameters are reflected in the measured anode sheath voltage. Anode sheath potentials, estimated by using Langmuir probes, were shown to be reduced by over 33% when the auxiliary discharge is operated. These reductions in anode sheath potentials translated into significant reductions in anode power flux as measured using water calorimeter techniques. The reductions in anode power flux also correlate well with changes in the electron transverse flux. Finally, techniques implementing these positive effects in real plasma accelerators are discussed. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  10. An analysis of pipe degradation shape using potential drop method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jegal, S.; Lee, S. H.

    1999-01-01

    The Potential Drop (PD) method, one of NDE (Non-Destructive Evaluation) method is used to analyze the thickness distribution of pipes degraded by FAC (Flow Accelerated Corrosion). A DCPD (Direct Current Potential Drop) system which can measure PD for direct current was made, and the specimens with line defects and cylinder type defects have been used for experiments to prove the theory of Potential Drop method and to find out the effects of each factors. The experiment to find out defect distributions has been performed and it is found that PD method can analyze almost correct position of defects

  11. Floating potential and sheath thickness for cylindrical and spherical probes in electronegative plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales Crespo, R.; Fernandez Palop, J.I.; Hernandez, M.A.; Borrego del Pino, S.; Diaz-Cabrera, J.M.; Ballesteros, J.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the floating potential, for cylindrical and spherical Langmuir probes immersed into an electronegative plasma, is determined by using a radial model described in a previous paper. This floating potential is determined for several probe radius values and ranks of plasma electronegativity, from almost electropositive plasmas to high electronegative plasmas. The thickness of the positive ion sheath is also determined for this kind of probes in electronegative plasmas, as well as the analytical expressions fitting this thickness, showing its dependence on the probe radius and electric potential

  12. Potential drop crack measurement systems for CANDU components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahney, R [Carleton Univ., Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    1994-12-31

    A project to develop an automated crack measurement system for CANDU pressure tube burst testing is currently underway. The system will utilize either Direct Current Potential Drop (DCPD) or Alternating Current Potential Drop (ACPD) techniques for crack measurement. The preliminary stage of the project involves testing and comparison of both ACPD and DCPD methods on a Zr - 2.5% Nb alloy plate with saw cuts (used to simulate cracks). Preliminary results show that both ACPD and DCPD techniques are capable of detecting cracks; further testing is in progress to determine the ability of each of the two systems to make accurate crack depth measurements. This paper will describe the two potential drop techniques and will present test results from the experimental program. (author). 10 refs., 7 figs.

  13. A suitable boundary condition for bounded plasma simulation without sheath resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, S.E.; Procassini, R.J.; Birdsall, C.K.; Cohen, B.I.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a technique that allows for a sheath boundary layer without having to resolve the inherently small space and time scales of the sheath region. We refer to this technique as the logical sheath boundary condition. This boundary condition, when incorporated into a direct-implicit particle code, permits large space- and time-scale simulations of bounded systems, which would otherwise be impractical on current supercomputers. The lack of resolution of the collector sheath potential drop obtained from conventional implicit simulations at moderate values of ω pe Δt and Δz/λ De provides the motivation for the development of the logical sheath boundary condition. The algorithm for use of the logical sheath boundary condition in a particle simulation is presented. Results from simulations which use the logical sheath boundary condition are shown to compare reasonably well with those from an analytic theory and simulations in which the sheath is resolved

  14. Experimental observations of anomalous potential drops over ion density cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohm, M.

    1991-08-01

    Experiments are reported showing the plasma potential response when a step voltage is applied over the plasma column between the two plasma sources in a triple plasma machine. The time resolution is sufficient to resolve potential variations caused essentially by the electron motion, and two independent probe methods are used to obtain this time resolution. Depending on the initial conditions two different responses were observed on the time scale of the electron motion. When the initial ion density varies along the plasma column and has a local minimum (that is, forms an ion density cavity), the applied potential drop becomes distributed over the cavity after a few electron transit times. Later the profile steepens to a double layer on the time scale of the ion motion. The width of the cavity is comparable to the length of the plasma column. When the initial density is axially uniform, most of the potential drop instead concentrates to a narrow region at the low potential end of the plasma column after a few electron transit times. On the time scale of the ion motion this potential drop begins to propagate into the plasma as a double layer. The results obtained are consistent with those from numerical simulations with similar boundary conditions. Further experiments are necessary to get conclusive insight into the voltage supporting capability of an ion density cavity. (au) (34 refs.)

  15. Four-point potential drop measurements for materials characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowler, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    The technique of measuring the voltage difference (potential drop) between two of the four electrodes of a four-point probe, in order to determine conductivity or surface resistivity of a test piece, is well established in the direct-current (dc) or quasi-dc regime. The technique finds wide usage in the semiconductor industry for the purpose of measuring surface resistivity of semiconductors, and also in the measurement of conductivity of metals, particularly of ferromagnetic metals for which conductivity cannot be easily measured using eddy-current nondestructive evaluation (NDE). In these applications, the conductivity of the test piece is deduced from an analytic formula that depends on the geometry of the probe and test piece. Such a formula requires, as an input, the measured value of the potential drop. Several analytical expressions exist for a variety of test-piece geometries and probe arrangements. Recently, it has been shown that broadband measurements of the potential drop, known as 'alternating current potential drop' (ac PD) measurements, can be used not only to obtain the conductivity of a test piece, but also its linear permeability μ. The beauty of this measurement is that the two parameters are completely decoupled in the quasi-static regime. In fact, μ does not appear in the quasi-static expression for σ. Hence, σ may be obtained from low-frequency ac PD measurements and then μ may be deduced as the frequency increases beyond the quasi-static regime, once σ is known. In this review, both dc and ac solutions that are useful in determining the conductivity of metals and semiconductors, and the permeability of ferromagnetic conductors, are summarized. In particular, flat test pieces with arbitrary thickness are considered. At the next level of complexity, a solution for a half-space coated with a surface layer is given, along with a discussion of the use of the four-point potential drop method for determining thickness of a surface layer, such

  16. Reconstruction of the time-averaged sheath potential profile in an argon RF plasma using the ion energy distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fivaz, M.; Brunner, S.; Schwarzenbach, W.; Howling, A.A.; Hollenstein, C.

    1994-10-01

    Charge-exchange collisions and radio-frequency excitation combine to give peaks in the ion energy distribution measured at the ground electrode of an argon plasma in a capacitive reactor. These peaks are used as a diagnostic to reconstruct the profile of the time-averaged potential in the sheath. Particle-In-Cell simulations show that the method is accurate. The method is applied to investigate the sheath thickness as a function of excitation frequency at constant plasma power. The time-averaged potential is found to be parabolic in both experimental measurements and numerical simulation. (author) 6 figs., 1 tab., 15 refs

  17. Potential drop technique for monitoring stress corrosion cracking growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neves, Celia F.C.; Schvartzman, Monica M.A.M.; Moreira, Pedro A.L.D.P.L.P.

    2002-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking is one of most severe damage mechanisms influencing the lifetime of components in the operation of nuclear power plants. To assess the initiation stages and kinetics of crack growth as the main parameters coming to residual lifetime determination, the testing facility should allow active loading of specimens in the environment which is close to the real operation conditions of assessed component. Under cooperation of CDTN/CNEN and International Atomic Energy Agency a testing system has been developed by Nuclear Research Institute, Czech Republic, that will be used for the environmentally assisted cracking testing at CDTN/CNEN. The facility allows high temperature autoclave corrosion mechanical testing in well-defined LWR water chemistry using constant load, slow strain rate and rising displacement techniques. The facility consists of autoclave and refreshing water loop enabling testing at temperatures up to 330 deg C. Active loading system allows the maximum load on a specimen as high as 60 kN. The potential drop measurement is used to determine the instant crack length and its growth rate. The paper presents the facility and describes the potential drop technique, that is one of the most used techniques to monitor crack growth in specimens under corrosive environments. (author)

  18. 2D potential structures induced by RF sheaths coupled with transverse currents in front of ICRH antenna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faudot, E.; Heuraux, S.; Colas, L.

    2004-01-01

    Sheaths are space charge regions at the plasma-wall. They are induced by the differential inertia between ions and electrons, and without external perturbation, they create a floating potential between the neutral plasma and the walls. In Tokamaks, these sheaths are locally enhanced by the RF (radiofrequency) electric field generated by the ICRF (ion cyclotron resonance frequency) antennas used to heat magnetic fusion plasmas at very high temperature. RF sheaths are located at the connection points of magnetic field lines to the wall, or to the bumpers which protect the antenna or to any part of the antenna structure. The asymmetric behaviour of these oscillating sheaths rectifies RF potentials in the plasma in front of antenna, to finally create nonlinearly a DC potential which can be much higher than the floating potential. We study specifically how the space-time distribution of these RF and DC rectified potentials is modified when nearby flux tubes are allowed to exchange perpendicular polarization current. To simulate that, a 2-dimensional (2D) fluid code has been implemented to compute the 2D RF potential map in a plane perpendicular to magnetic lines, and within the flute approximation the whole 3-dimensional potential map is deduced. In simulation, we consider a homogeneous transverse conductivity and use a 'test' potential map having, in absence of transverse currents, a Gaussian shape characterized by its width r 0 and its amplitude φ 0 . As a function of these 2 parameters (normalized respectively to a characteristic length for transverse transport and to the local temperature), we can estimate the peaking and the smoothing of the potential structure in the presence of polarization current. So, we are able to determine, for typical plasmas, the amplitude of DC potential peaks, particularly on antenna's corners, where hot spots appear during a shot. In Tore-supra conditions near antenna corners, potential structures that are shorter than 1 centimeter are

  19. 2D potential structures induced by RF sheaths coupled with transverse currents in front of ICRH antenna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faudot, E.; Heuraux, S.; Colas, L.

    2004-01-01

    Sheaths are space charge regions at the plasma-wall. They are induced by the differential inertia between ions and electrons, and without external perturbation, they create a floating potential between the neutral plasma and the walls. In tokamaks, these sheaths are locally enhanced by the RF (radiofrequency) electric field generated by the ICRF (ion cyclotron resonance frequency) antennas used to heat magnetic fusion plasmas at very high temperature. RF sheaths are located at the connection points of magnetic field lines to the wall, or to the bumpers which protect the antenna or to any part of the antenna structure. The asymmetric behaviour of these oscillating sheaths rectifies RF potentials in the plasma in front of antenna, to finally create nonlinearly a DC potential which can be much higher than the floating potential. We study specifically how the space-time distribution of these RF and DC rectified potentials is modified when nearby flux tubes are allowed to exchange perpendicular polarization current. To simulate that, a 2D (2-dimensional) fluid code has been implemented to compute the 2D RF potential map in a plane perpendicular to magnetic lines, and within the flute approximation the whole 3-dimensional potential map is deduced. In simulation, we consider a homogeneous transverse conductivity and use a 'test' potential map having, in absence of transverse currents, a Gaussian shape characterized by its width r0 and its amplitude φ 0 . As a function of these 2 parameters (normalized respectively to a characteristic length for transverse transport and to the local temperature), we can estimate the peaking and the smoothing of the potential structure in the presence of polarization current. So, we are able to determine, for typical plasmas, the amplitude of DC potential peaks, particularly on antenna's corners, where hot spots appear during a shot. In typical Tore Supra conditions near antenna corners potential structures less than centimetric are

  20. RF current distribution and topology of RF sheath potentials in front of ICRF antennae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colas, L.; Heuraux, S.; Bremond, S.; Bosia, G.

    2005-01-01

    The 2D (radial/poloidal) spatial topology of RF-induced convective cells developing radially in front of ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) antennae is investigated, in relation to the spatial distribution of RF currents over the metallic structure of the antenna. This is done via a Green's function, determined from the ICRF wave coupling equations, and well-suited to open field lines extending toroidally far away on both sides of the antenna. Using such formalism, combined with a full-wave calculation using the 3D antenna code ICANT (Pecoul S. et al 2000 Comput. Phys. Commun. 146 166-87), two classes of convective cells are analysed. The first one appears in front of phased arrays of straps, and depending on the strap phasing, its topology is interpreted using the poloidal profiles of either the RF current or the RF voltage of the strip line theory. The other class of convective cells is specific to antenna box corners and is evidenced for the first time. Based on such analysis, general design rules are worked out in order to reduce the RF-sheath potentials, which generalize those proposed in the earlier literature, and concrete antenna design options are tested numerically. The merits of aligning all strap centres on the same (tilted) flux tube, and of reducing the antenna box toroidal conductivity in its lower and upper parts, are discussed

  1. Barrier cell sheath formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesner, J.

    1980-04-01

    The solution for electrostatic potential within a simply modeled tandem mirror thermal barrier is seen to exhibit a sheath at each edge of the cell. The formation of the sheath requires ion collisionality and the analysis assmes that the collisional trapping rate into the barrier is considerably slower than the barrier pump rate

  2. Sheath structure transition controlled by secondary electron emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweigert, I. V.; Langendorf, S. J.; Walker, M. L. R.; Keidar, M.

    2015-04-01

    In particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision (PIC MCC) simulations and in an experiment we study sheath formation over an emissive floating Al2O3 plate in a direct current discharge plasma at argon gas pressure 10-4 Torr. The discharge glow is maintained by the beam electrons emitted from a negatively biased hot cathode. We observe three types of sheaths near the floating emissive plate and the transition between them is driven by changing the negative bias. The Debye sheath appears at lower voltages, when secondary electron emission is negligible. With increasing applied voltage, secondary electron emission switches on and a first transition to a new sheath type, beam electron emission (BEE), takes place. For the first time we find this specific regime of sheath operation near the floating emissive surface. In this regime, the potential drop over the plate sheath is about four times larger than the temperature of plasma electrons. The virtual cathode appears near the emissive plate and its modification helps to maintain the BEE regime within some voltage range. Further increase of the applied voltage U initiates the second smooth transition to the plasma electron emission sheath regime and the ratio Δφs/Te tends to unity with increasing U. The oscillatory behavior of the emissive sheath is analyzed in PIC MCC simulations. A plasmoid of slow electrons is formed near the plate and transported to the bulk plasma periodically with a frequency of about 25 kHz.

  3. In-Situ Creep Monitoring Using the Potential Drop Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhi, E.; Sposito, G.; Davies, C. M.; Cawley, P.; Nagy, P. B.

    2011-06-01

    A directional low-frequency Alternating Current Potential Drop (ACPD) sensor was developed for in-situ monitoring of creep in metals. The sensor relies on a modified ACPD technique that measures simultaneously both values of resistance in the axial and lateral directions using a square electrode configuration. As compared to the more commonly used in-line electrode configuration, the square arrangement used in this sensor is much more directional and thus allows the detection of creep-induced anisotropy and texture. The technique monitors the variation in the ratio of the measured axial and lateral resistances, therefore can efficiently separate the mostly isotropic common part of the resistivity variation caused by reversible temperature variations from the mostly anisotropic differential part caused by direct geometrical and indirect material effects of creep. Initially, this ratio is roughly proportional to the axial creep strain, while at later stages, the resistance ratio increases even faster with creep strain because of the formation of directional discontinuities such as preferentially oriented grain boundary cavities and multiple-site microcracks in the material.

  4. Sheath formation of a plasma containing multiply charged ions, cold and hot electrons, and emitted electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    It is quite well known that ion confinement is an important factor in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) as it is closely related to the plasma potential. A model of sheath formation was extended to a plasma containing multiply charged ions (MCIs), cold and hot electrons, and secondary electrons emitted either by MCIs or hot electrons. In the model, a modification of the 'Bohm criterion' was given, the sheath potential drop and the critical emission condition were also analyzed. It appears that the presence of hot electrons and emitted electrons strongly affects the sheath formation so that smaller hot electrons and larger emission current result in reduced sheath potential (or floating potential). However the sheath potential was found to become independent of the emission current J when J > J c , (where J c is the critical emission current. The paper is followed by the associated poster

  5. The electrostatic cylindrical sheath in a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chunhua; Sun Xiaoxia; Bai Dongxue

    2004-01-01

    The electrostatic sheath with a cylindrical geometry in an ion-electron plasma is investigated. Assuming a Boltzmann response to electrons and cold ions with bulk flow, it is shown that the radius of the cylindrical geometry do not affect the sheath potential significantly. The authors also found that the sheath potential profile is steeper in the cylindrical sheath compared to the slab sheath. The distinct feature of the cylindrical sheath is that the ion density distribution is not monotonous. The sheath region can be divided into three regions, two ascendant regions and one descendant region. (author)

  6. Effects of emitted electron temperature on the plasma sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheehan, J. P.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Wang, H.; Raitses, Y.; Sydorenko, D.; Hershkowitz, N.

    2014-01-01

    It has long been known that electron emission from a surface significantly affects the sheath surrounding that surface. Typical fluid theory of a planar sheath with emitted electrons assumes that the plasma electrons follow the Boltzmann relation and the emitted electrons are emitted with zero energy and predicts a potential drop of 1.03T e /e across the sheath in the floating condition. By considering the modified velocity distribution function caused by plasma electrons lost to the wall and the half-Maxwellian distribution of the emitted electrons, it is shown that ratio of plasma electron temperature to emitted electron temperature significantly affects the sheath potential when the plasma electron temperature is within an order of magnitude of the emitted electron temperature. When the plasma electron temperature equals the emitted electron temperature the emissive sheath potential goes to zero. One dimensional particle-in-cell simulations corroborate the predictions made by this theory. The effects of the addition of a monoenergetic electron beam to the Maxwellian plasma electrons were explored, showing that the emissive sheath potential is close to the beam energy only when the emitted electron flux is less than the beam flux

  7. Ratio of sheath thickness to Debye length for a slightly ionized continuum plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, J.

    1980-01-01

    The penetration of plasma sheaths for spherical probes in a slightly ionized continuum plasma has been computed for values of epsilon (the ratio of ion to electron temperature) of 0.01 and 1.0 with rhosub(p) (the ratio of probe radius to plasma Debye length) set at 5.10,20 and 30. Values of the potential drops at the sheath boundaries are presented

  8. Electron-hole drop (EHD) stability in deformation potential well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarov, A.G.; Tikhodeev, S.G.

    1984-01-01

    In heterogeneously-deformed Ge the stability of electron-hole droplets (EHD) being in a potential well is considered. It is shown that the potential well effect is equivalent to the decrease of effective density of phonon EHD charge. It is pointed out that heating EHD (for example, by IR radiation), can increase the phonon droplet charge and affect its stability

  9. Effects of Fast-Ion Injection on a Magnetized Sheath near a Floating Wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jiajia; Hu Zhanghu; Song Yuanhong; Wang Younian

    2013-01-01

    A fully kinetic particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo model is employed to self-consistently study the effects of fast-ion injection on sheath potential and electric field profile in collisional magnetized plasma with a floating absorbing wall. The influences of the fast-ion injection velocity and density, the magnetic field and angle θ 0 formed by the magnetic field and the x-axis on the sheath potential and electric field are discussed in detail. Numerical results show that increasing fast-ion injection density or decreasing injection velocity can enhance the potential drop and electric field in the sheath. Also, increasing the magnetic field strength can weaken the loss of charged particles to the wall and thus decrease the potential and electric field in the sheath. The time evolution of ion flux and velocity distribution on the wall is found to be significantly affected by the magnetic field.

  10. Compensation of the skin effect in low-frequency potential drop measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Corcoran, J; Nagy, PB

    2016-01-01

    Potential drop measurements are routinely used in the non-destructive evaluation of component integrity. Potential drop measurements use either direct current (DC) or alternating current (AC), the latter will have superior noise performance due to the ability to perform phase sensitive detection and the reduction of flicker noise. AC measurements are however subject to the skin effect where the current is electromagnetically constricted to the surface of the component. Unfortunately, the skin...

  11. The effect of mining data k-means clustering toward students profile model drop out potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purba, Windania; Tamba, Saut; Saragih, Jepronel

    2018-04-01

    The high of student success and the low of student failure can reflect the quality of a college. One of the factors of fail students was drop out. To solve the problem, so mining data with K-means Clustering was applied. K-Means Clustering method would be implemented to clustering the drop out students potentially. Firstly the the result data would be clustering to get the information of all students condition. Based on the model taken was found that students who potentially drop out because of the unexciting students in learning, unsupported parents, diffident students and less of students behavior time. The result of process of K-Means Clustering could known that students who more potentially drop out were in Cluster 1 caused Credit Total System, Quality Total, and the lowest Grade Point Average (GPA) compared between cluster 2 and 3.

  12. Stability of the plasma sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franklin, R.N.

    1979-12-01

    The stability of a collisionless sheath joined to a plasma in the presence of secondary emission of electrons from the sheath boundary is examined in the fluid approximation. Instability is unlikely to occur under floating conditions but if significant currents flow corresponding to increased wall-plasma potentials the system can go unstable. (author)

  13. Monitoring crack growth by a potential drop method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomlinson, J.R.

    1978-01-01

    A theoretical model has been developed for the surface current flow and potential distribution around a surface breaking crack. This model's predictions have been confirmed in the laboratory and the method applied on site. It proved possible by careful design and rigorous testing to overcome the problems of interference in an electrically noisy environment. The principal weaknesses of the technique are that it is only capable of detecting cracks that break the accessible surface of the component, and that there may be problems with conductive bridging across the crack. On the other hand, the lack of any sophisticated probe in contact with the component makes the method suitable for high temperature use, and, being an electrical method, it is capable of continuous use. The use of a.c., as opposed to d.c., enables lower currents to be used. Given good access to the crack tip, a high sensitivity can be obtained, which enables noise rejection to be achieved with the use of a high threshold. (orig.) [de

  14. Direct comparison of unloading compliance and potential drop techniques in J-integral testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGowan, J.J.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1984-01-01

    Single-specimen J-integral testing is performed commonly with the unloading compliance technique. Use of modern instrumentation techniques and powerful desktop computers have made this technique a standard. However, this testing technique is slow and tedious, with the loading rate fixed at a slow quasi-static rate. For these reasons the dc potential drop technique was investigated for crack length measurement during a J-integral test. For direct comparison, both unloading compliance and potential drop were used simultaneously during a J-integral test. The results showed good agreement between the techniques. However, the potential drop technique showed an offset in crack length due to plastic blunting processes. Taking this offset into account, J/sub Ic/ values calculated by both techniques compared well

  15. Detection and sizing of cracks using potential drop techniques based on electromagnetic induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Yasumoto; Kim, Hoon

    2011-01-01

    The potential drop techniques based on electromagnetic induction are classified into induced current focused potential drop (ICFPD) technique and remotely induced current potential drop (RICPD) technique. The possibility of numerical simulation of the techniques is investigated and the applicability of these techniques to the measurement of defects in conductive materials is presented. Finite element analysis (FEA) for the RICPD measurements on the plate specimen containing back wall slits is performed and calculated results by FEA show good agreement with experimental results. Detection limit of the RICPD technique in depth of back wall slits can also be estimated by FEA. Detection and sizing of artificial defects in parent and welded materials are successfully performed by the ICFPD technique. Applicability of these techniques to detection of cracks in field components is investigated, and most of the cracks in the components investigated are successfully detected by the ICFPD and RICPD techniques. (author)

  16. Continuous monitoring of back-wall stress corrosion cracking propagation by means of potential drop techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Yasumoto; Atsumi, Takeo; Shoji, Tetsuo

    2006-01-01

    In order to investigate the applicability of the potential drop techniques to the continuous monitoring of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) propagation, SCC tests were performed in a sodium thiosulfate solution at room temperature using plate specimens with weldments. The SCC propagation was monitored using the techniques of direct current potential drop (DCPD), alternating current potential drop (ACPD) and modified induced current potential drop (MICPD) on the reverse side that on which the SCC existed and effectiveness of each technique for the continuous monitoring from the reverse side of SCC was compared from the viewpoints of sensitivity to the crack propagation and measurement stability. The MICPD and DCPD techniques permit continuous monitoring of the back-wall SCC propagation, which initiates from a fatigue pre-crack at a depth of about 4 mm, from which it propagates through more than 80% of the specimen thickness. The MICPD technique can decrease the effect of the current flowing in the direction of the crack length by focusing the induced current into the local area of measurement using induction coils, so that the sensitivity of the continuous monitoring of the back wall SCC propagation is higher than that of the DCPD and ACPD techniques. (author)

  17. Potential Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) Cask Drop in the K West Basin South Loadout Pit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    POWERS, T.B.

    1999-01-01

    This calculation note documents the probabilistic calculation of a potential drop of a multi-canister overpack (MCO) cask or MCO cask and immersion pail at the K West Basin south loadout pit. The calculations are in support of the cask loading system (CLS) subproject alignment of CLS equipment in the K West Basin south loadout pit

  18. The use of potential drop techniques for the evaluation of environment assisted cracking of austenitic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lidar, P.; Hwang, I.S.; Ballinger, R.G.

    1992-01-01

    The DC potential drop technique has been adapted for strain measurements. An AC potential drop technique has been developed for crack detection. It has been demonstrated that a DC with switched polarity can have a strain accuracy of ±0.12% after yielding and a multi-frequency AC system with up to 200 kHz frequency can have a sensitivity of 50 μm for crack detection. The techniques have been applied to environment assisted cracking tests of Ni-Cr-Fe alloys in 350 degrees C water and austenitic stainless steel in 288 degrees C water using both static and dynamic loading. Long term signal stability is maintained given: (1) rigid probe attachments; (2) local preamplification; and (3) adequate lead grounding and shielding. The AC potential drop technique is found to be more suitable for constant load than for dynamic loading and is also compatible with aggressive environments. During dynamic loading, sensitivity can be significantly reduced due to serrated yielding. An analytical model has been developed to predict the DC and AC potential drops in a round bar geometry. A sensitivity analysis has been made to determine test to test variation associated with variations in supplied current, specimen dimensions, and probe spacing. Multifrequency analysis shows that the measured data agrees with the prediction at frequencies up to about 100 kHz. Above 100 kHz induced signal in the probes results in increases in potential drop and phase angle. The induced signal is reproducible and therefore may be related to the crack mouth opening displacement

  19. Novel Method for Sizing Metallic Bottom Crack Depth Using Multi-frequency Alternating Current Potential Drop Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Li Yuting; Gan Fangji; Wan Zhengjun; Liao Junbi; Li Wenqiang

    2015-01-01

    Potential drop techniques are of two types: the direct current potential drop (DCPD) technique and alternating current potential drop (ACPD) technique, and both of them are used in nondestructive testing. ACPD, as a kind of valid method in sizing metal cracks, has been applied to evaluate metal structures. However, our review of most available approaches revealed that some improvements can be done in measuring depth of metal bottom crack by means of ACPD, such as accuracy and sensitivity of s...

  20. Potential drop crack growth monitoring in high temperature biaxial fatigue tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzgerald, B.P.; Krempl, E.

    1993-01-01

    The present work describes a procedure for monitoring crack growth in high temperature, biaxial, low cycle fatigue tests. The reversing DC potential drop equipment monitors smooth, tubular type 304 stainless steel specimens during fatigue testing. Electrical interference from an induction heater is filtered out by an analog filter and by using a long integration time. A Fourier smoothing algorithm and two spline interpolations process the large data set. The experimentally determined electrical potential drop is compared with the theoretical electrostatic potential that is found by solving Laplace's equation for an elliptical crack in a semi-infinite conducting medium. Since agreement between theory and experiment is good, the method can be used to measure crack growth to failure from the threshold of detectability

  1. Application of the DC potential drop and the partial unloading methods to fracture mechanics tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heerens, J.; Schwalbe, K.H.; Hellmann, D.; Knaack, J.; Mueller-Roos, J.

    1985-01-01

    The ability of the DC potential drop method and the partial unloading technique to measure crack growth and to detect initation of crack growth has been investigated using a number of steels and aluminium alloys. It was found that within the range of parameters investigated both of these methods can be recommended for the determination of the R-curve; however, since at small amounts of crack growth the DC potential drop method gave more consistent results it is therefore considered to be superior. The initation values J(0) of J determined by fractography were compared with J(Ic) as obtained by current practice. It was found that J(Ic) is poorly related to initation or to specific amount of crack growth. A modification of the J(Ic) procedure is proposed. Two contacting arrangements of the DC potential drop method were checked for initation detection: one indicates initation by a potential minimum (related to a J value J(min)), the other by the intersection of the R-curve with the blunting line (related to a J value J(int)). (orig.) [de

  2. An improved potential drop method for measuring and monitoring defects in metallic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oppermann, W.; Keller, H.P.

    1993-01-01

    In the developed form described the direct current potential drop method is a reliable and relatively accurate procedure for the measuring and surveillance of surface cracks in metallic materials. There are also significant possibilities in practice of surveying cracks on the inaccessible side of the structure. The basis for the improvement in accuracy, in particular for short cracks, is firstly an improved measuring technique and secondly calibration curves determined using an electrolytic tank. Practical experience gained in conventional plants is to date positive. The opportunity exists of benefitting from the advantages that would be brought about by an increased use of the potential drop method in plant surveillance. In nuclear plants specifically this would achieve a reduction in the testing personnel's exposure to radiation. (orig.)

  3. Brownian diode: Molecular motor based on a semi-permeable Brownian particle with internal potential drop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plyukhin, A.V.

    2013-01-01

    A model of an autonomous isothermal Brownian motor with an internal propulsion mechanism is considered. The motor is a Brownian particle which is semi-transparent for molecules of surrounding ideal gas. Molecular passage through the particle is controlled by a potential similar to that in the transition rate theory, i.e. characterized by two stationary states with a finite energy difference separated by a potential barrier. The internal potential drop maintains the diode-like asymmetry of molecular fluxes through the particle, which results in the particle's stationary drift.

  4. RF sheaths for arbitrary B field angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ippolito, Daniel; Myra, James

    2014-10-01

    RF sheaths occur in tokamaks when ICRF waves encounter conducting boundaries and accelerate electrons out of the plasma. Sheath effects reduce the efficiency of ICRF heating, cause RF-specific impurity influxes from the edge plasma, and increase the plasma-facing component damage. The rf sheath potential is sensitive to the angle between the B field and the wall, the ion mobility and the ion magnetization. Here, we obtain a numerical solution of the non-neutral rf sheath and magnetic pre-sheath equations (for arbitrary values of these parameters) and attempt to infer the parametric dependences of the Child-Langmuir law. This extends previous work on the magnetized, immobile ion regime. An important question is how the rf sheath voltage distributes itself between sheath and pre-sheath for various B field angles. This will show how generally previous estimates of the rf sheath voltage and capacitance were reasonable, and to improve the RF sheath BC. Work supported by US DOE grants DE-FC02-05ER54823 and DE-FG02-97ER54392.

  5. On-Line Monitoring of Environment-Assisted Cracking in Nuclear Piping Using Array Probe Direct Current Potential Drop

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Y.; Choi, S.; Yoon, J. Y.; Nam, W. C.; Hwang, I. S.; Bromberg, Leslie; Stahle, Peter W; Ballinger, Ronald G

    2015-01-01

    A direct current potential drop method utilizing array probes with measurement ends maintaining an equalized potential designated as equi-potential switching array probe direct current potential drop (ESAP-DCPD) technique has been developed earlier at Seoul National University. This paper validates ESAP-DCPD technique by showing consistency among experimental measurements, analytical solution and numerical predictions using finite element analysis (FEA) of electric field changes with crack gr...

  6. Deformed potential energy of $^{263}Db$ in a generalized liquid drop model

    CERN Document Server

    Chen Bao Qiu; Zhao Yao Lin; 10.1088/0256-307X/20/11/009

    2003-01-01

    The macroscopic deformed potential energy for super-heavy nuclei /sup 263/Db, which governs the entrance and alpha decay channels, is determined within a generalized liquid drop model (GLDM). A quasi- molecular shape is assumed in the GLDM, which includes volume-, surface-, and Coulomb-energies, proximity effects, mass asymmetry, and an accurate nuclear radius. The microscopic single particle energies derived from a shell model in an axially deformed Woods- Saxon potential with a quasi-molecular shape. The shell correction is calculated by the Strutinsky method. The total deformed potential energy of a nucleus can be calculated by the macro-microscopic method as the summation of the liquid-drop energy and the Strutinsky shell correction. The theory is applied to predict the deformed potential energy of the experiment /sup 22/Ne+/sup 241/Am to /sup 263/Db* to /sup 259/Db+4 n, which was performed on the Heavy Ion Accelerator in Lanzhou. It is found that the neck in the quasi-molecular shape is responsible for t...

  7. Electrochemical noise measurements techniques and the reversing dc potential drop method applied to stress corrosion essays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, Omar Fernandes; Andrade, Arnaldo Paes de; MattarNeto, Miguel; Aoki, Idalina Vieira

    2002-01-01

    This paper aims to collect information and to discuss the electrochemical noise measurements and the reversing dc potential drop method, applied to stress corrosion essays that can be used to evaluate the nucleation and the increase of stress corrosion cracking in Alloy 600 and/or Alloy 182 specimens from Angra I Nuclear Power Plant. Therefore we will pretend to establish a standard procedure to essays to be realized on the new autoclave equipment on the Laboratorio de Eletroquimica e Corrosao do Departamento de Engenharia Quimica da Escola Politecnica da Universidade de Sao Paulo - Electrochemical and Corrosion Laboratory of the Chemical Engineering Department of Polytechnical School of Sao Paulo University, Brazil. (author)

  8. Evaluation of the nugget diameter in spot welded joints between two steel sheets by means of a potential drop technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohmyoh, Hironori; Ikarashi, Hidetomo; Matsui, Yoichi; Hasegawa, Yuta; Obara, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    A potential drop technique which utilizes the electrical circuit used in resistance spot welding is reported. Spot welded samples comprising two steel sheets were inserted between the two Cu electrodes and a constant direct current was supplied between the electrodes. The potential drop between two points, one on each electrode, was determined by analysis for various values of nugget diameter and various values of the contact resistance between the Cu electrodes and the steel sheet sample. The nugget diameter of the spot welded joint could be quantitatively evaluated from the measured potential drop and the equation obtained from the analysis. (paper)

  9. Evaluation of the nugget diameter in spot welded joints between two steel sheets by means of a potential drop technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohmyoh, Hironori; Ikarashi, Hidetomo; Matsui, Yoichi; Hasegawa, Yuta; Obara, Satoshi

    2015-08-01

    A potential drop technique which utilizes the electrical circuit used in resistance spot welding is reported. Spot welded samples comprising two steel sheets were inserted between the two Cu electrodes and a constant direct current was supplied between the electrodes. The potential drop between two points, one on each electrode, was determined by analysis for various values of nugget diameter and various values of the contact resistance between the Cu electrodes and the steel sheet sample. The nugget diameter of the spot welded joint could be quantitatively evaluated from the measured potential drop and the equation obtained from the analysis.

  10. Differential gene expression and transport functionality in the bundle sheath versus mesophyll - a potential role in leaf mineral homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigoda, Noa; Pasmanik-Chor, Metsada; Yang, Tianyuan; Yu, Ling; Moshelion, Menachem; Moran, Nava

    2017-06-01

    Under fluctuating ambient conditions, the ability of plants to maintain hydromineral homeostasis requires the tight control of long distance transport. This includes the control of radial transport within leaves, from veins to mesophyll. The bundle sheath is a structure that tightly wraps around leaf vasculature. It has been suggested to act as a selective barrier in the context of radial transport. This suggestion is based on recent physiological transport assays of bundle sheath cells (BSCs), as well as the anatomy of these cells.We hypothesized that the unique transport functionality of BSCs is apparent in their transcriptome. To test this, we compared the transcriptomes of individually hand-picked protoplasts of GFP-labeled BSCs and non-labeled mesophyll cells (MCs) from the leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana. Of the 90 genes differentially expressed between BSCs and MCs, 45% are membrane related and 20% transport related, a prominent example being the proton pump AHA2. Electrophysiological assays showed that the major AKT2-like membrane K+ conductances of BSCs and MCs had different voltage dependency ranges. Taken together, these differences may cause simultaneous but oppositely directed transmembrane K+ fluxes in BSCs and MCs, in otherwise similar conditions. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  11. Communication through plasma sheaths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korotkevich, A. O.; Newell, A. C.; Zakharov, V. E.

    2007-01-01

    We wish to transmit messages to and from a hypersonic vehicle around which a plasma sheath has formed. For long distance transmission, the signal carrying these messages must be necessarily low frequency, typically 2 GHz, to which the plasma sheath is opaque. The idea is to use the plasma properties to make the plasma sheath appear transparent

  12. Dynamic fracture testing of ferritic steels using direct current potential drop method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Y. J.; Kim, J. H.; Hwang, I. S.; Park, Y. W.

    2000-01-01

    To apply leak-before-break (LBB) concept to nuclear pipes, the dynamic strain aging of low carbon steel materials has to be considered. For this goal, the J-R tests are needed over a range of temperatures and loading rates, including rapid dynamic loading conditions. In dynamic J-R tests, the unloading compliance method can not be applied and usually the direct current potential drop (DCPD) method has been used. But, even the DCPD method was known to have the problem in defining the crack initiation point due to a potential peak arising in early part of loading of ferromagnetic materials. In this study, potential peaks characteristics were investigated for SA106Gr.C piping steels, and the definition of crack initiation point was made by back tracking from final physical crack length, and it was proposed that this technique could be applied to DCPD method in dynamic loading J-R test

  13. Evaluation of the Transient Eddy Current Potential Drop of a Four Point Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowler, J. R.

    2009-03-01

    The transient electrical potential drop of a four point probe has been calculated for the case where a current pulse is injected into a conductive plate via two surface contact electrodes and the voltage measured between two other contact electrodes. The four contact points can be co-linear but this is not always case. For example, they can form a rectangle. Usually such probes carry direct current or alternating current and are used to measure electrical conductivity, crack dimensions or variations of conductivity and magnetic permeability with depth. However, the advantage of a current pulse excitation is that information on the variations of material properties with depth can be acquired rapidly and conveniently. What is needed is a means to infer material properties such as the conductivity variations with depth from the transient field measurements. Here, as an initial step in developing this analysis, we report on the evaluation of transient potential drop signals for four point probes on a homogeneous conductive plates.

  14. Four-point probe measurements of a direct current potential drop on layered conductive cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Yi; Bowler, John R

    2012-01-01

    We have determined the steady state electric field due to direct current flowing via point contacts at the cylindrical surface of a uniformly layered conductive rod of finite length. The solution allows one to use four-point probe potential drop measurements to estimate the conductivity or thickness of the layer assuming that the other parameters are known. The electrical potential in the rod has a zero radial derivative at its surface except at the injection and extractions points. This means that the required solution can be expressed in terms of a Green’s function satisfying a Neumann boundary condition. Four-point measurements have been made to demonstrate the validity of theoretical results. (paper)

  15. Four-point probe measurements of a direct current potential drop on layered conductive cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi; Bowler, John R.

    2012-11-01

    We have determined the steady state electric field due to direct current flowing via point contacts at the cylindrical surface of a uniformly layered conductive rod of finite length. The solution allows one to use four-point probe potential drop measurements to estimate the conductivity or thickness of the layer assuming that the other parameters are known. The electrical potential in the rod has a zero radial derivative at its surface except at the injection and extractions points. This means that the required solution can be expressed in terms of a Green’s function satisfying a Neumann boundary condition. Four-point measurements have been made to demonstrate the validity of theoretical results.

  16. A direct current potential drop method for evaluating oxide film thickness formed in high-temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anzai, Hideya; Ishibashi, Ryo; Saka, Masumi

    2016-01-01

    To establish an evaluation technique for oxide film thickness in-situ, the applicability of a four-point-probe direct current potential drop method is discussed in this study. Several samples of JIS SUS316L stainless steel with different oxide film thickness were prepared after immersing them in oxygenated pure water at 288°C for different periods. The oxide film thickness was measured by cross sectional observation using a transmission electron microscope. Potential drop on the oxide surface was measured every second during an acquisition period of about 20 s while a constant current was being injected into the sample simultaneously. This kind of measurement was repeatedly carried out at several arbitrary contact positions on the surface of the same sample. The measurement results showed that the potential drop slightly changed during the acquisition period and the tendency varied at the different contact positions. Multiple measurements at different contact positions revealed that the tendency could be categorized into two general types: the decreasing potential drop and the increasing potential drop, defined by the overall trend of the potential drop during the acquisition time. It was found that the ratio of contact positions with a decreasing potential drop tendency to all the contact positions of measurement tended to increase as applied current increased. This tendency depended on the oxide film thickness. The threshold value of applied current was found to correlate well with the oxide film thickness when the occurrence rate of decreasing potential drop ranged from 70 to 90% showing the best correlation at 70%. (author)

  17. Edge effects in four-point direct current potential drop measurements on metal plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Y; Bowler, N; Bowler, J R; Huang, Y

    2009-01-01

    Four-point direct current potential drop (DCPD) measurements are commonly used to measure the conductivity (or resistivity) of semiconductors and ferrous or non-ferrous metals. The measured electrical potential difference is often interpreted in terms of analytic expressions developed for large plates that are either 'thin' or 'thick' relative to the probe length. It is well known that the presence of the back surface of a plate leads to a solution expressed in terms of an infinite series representing the current source and its images. This approach can be generalized to account for multiple surfaces in order to obtain a solution for a finite plate, but convergence of the series is poor when the plate dimensions are similar to or smaller than the separation of the current injection and extraction points. Here, Fourier series representations of the infinite sums are obtained. It is shown that the Fourier series converge with many fewer terms than the series obtained from image theory, for plates with dimensions similar to or smaller than the separation of the current injection and extraction points. Comparing calculated results for the potential drop obtained by a four-point probe centred on finite plates of varying dimension, with those for a probe in contact with a large (laterally infinite) plate, estimates are given of the uncertainty due to edge effects in measurements on small plates interpreted using analytic formulae developed for large plates. It is also shown that these uncertainties due to edge effects are reduced, for a given plate size, if the probe pick-up points are moved closer to the current injection points, rather than adopting the common arrangement in which the four probe points are equally spaced. Calculated values of DCPD are compared with experimental data taken on aluminium and spring-steel plates of various sizes and excellent agreement is obtained.

  18. Edge effects in four-point direct current potential drop measurements on metal plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y.; Bowler, N.; Bowler, J. R.; Huang, Y.

    2009-07-01

    Four-point direct current potential drop (DCPD) measurements are commonly used to measure the conductivity (or resistivity) of semiconductors and ferrous or non-ferrous metals. The measured electrical potential difference is often interpreted in terms of analytic expressions developed for large plates that are either 'thin' or 'thick' relative to the probe length. It is well known that the presence of the back surface of a plate leads to a solution expressed in terms of an infinite series representing the current source and its images. This approach can be generalized to account for multiple surfaces in order to obtain a solution for a finite plate, but convergence of the series is poor when the plate dimensions are similar to or smaller than the separation of the current injection and extraction points. Here, Fourier series representations of the infinite sums are obtained. It is shown that the Fourier series converge with many fewer terms than the series obtained from image theory, for plates with dimensions similar to or smaller than the separation of the current injection and extraction points. Comparing calculated results for the potential drop obtained by a four-point probe centred on finite plates of varying dimension, with those for a probe in contact with a large (laterally infinite) plate, estimates are given of the uncertainty due to edge effects in measurements on small plates interpreted using analytic formulae developed for large plates. It is also shown that these uncertainties due to edge effects are reduced, for a given plate size, if the probe pick-up points are moved closer to the current injection points, rather than adopting the common arrangement in which the four probe points are equally spaced. Calculated values of DCPD are compared with experimental data taken on aluminium and spring-steel plates of various sizes and excellent agreement is obtained.

  19. Potential risk factors associated with risk for drop-out and relapse during and following withdrawal of opioid prescription medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiwe, Susanne; Lönnquist, Ingeborg; Källmén, Håkan

    2011-10-01

    Withdrawal of opioid medication in patients with chronic pain has a drop-out and relapse problem. To evaluate if depressive symptoms, anxiety and pain intensity are potential risk factors for drop-out or relapse during the withdrawal process. Further, to assess internal consistency of scales for assessment of these potential risk factors. Twenty-nine patients were included. After 2 years 28 of these were followed-up. Those with depressive symptoms at baseline had a significant risk for drop-out from the withdrawal program (odds ratio 1.37) and relapse into use of opioids at follow-up (odds ratio 1.44). Drop-outs rated depressive symptoms significantly higher before detoxification. Those who relapsed rated significantly higher for pain intensity, depressive symptoms and abstinence prior to withdrawal. All scales had high reliability. To avoid drop-out and relapse clinical practice need to screen for depressive symptoms, pain intensity, and abstinence. This article presents significant reliability of scales useful within dependency centers. They can be used to identify these risk factors for drop-out and relapse, respectively, when initiating the withdrawal process. Taking these risk factors into consideration could improve the outcome of the withdrawal process by preventing drop-out and relapse. Copyright © 2011 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Analysis of a potential meteorite-dropping event over the south of Spain in 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madiedo, J. M.; Trigo-Rodríguez, J. M.

    2008-09-01

    Introduction Four potential meteorite-dropping events happened over Spain during 2007. All them are being carefully studied in the framework of the SPanish Meteor Network (SPMN). Due to the large range of visibility of these events, they usually appear far away from the recording stations, or in broad daylight. The later was the case of the most remarkable of these events: the diurnal bolide witnessed by thousands of people in the afternoon of May 10, at 17h57m01±5s UTC. That magnificent daylight event produced the Puerto Lápice meteorite, an eucrite with a total known weight of about 500 grams [1, 2]. Other wonderful event happened during the afternoon of March 2, 2007 at 18h51m06±1s UTC: a magnificent bolide (Fig. 1) was seen over the Pyrenees by several eyewitnesses located in Catalonia and Aragon, but also from the South of France. Unfortunately it was not recorded by SPMN stations and a very limited number of visual reports were received. Figure 1. The appearance of the March 2, 2007 bolide as drawn made by the second author and fortunate eyewitness from Sant Celoni (Barcelona). Another potential meteorite-dropping diurnal bolide was witnessed from several locations over the south of Spain on the afternoon of June 29. A sonic boom was reported by witnesses located near from the estimated impact area, in the province of Huelva (Andalusia). In some cases these also reported that the bolide generated electrophonic sounds and that the sonic boom was accompanied by vibration of objects inside their houses. However, despite several expeditions to the impact area have been made, the meteorite produced by this bolide has not been found yet. This is mainly due to the high uncertainty in the calculation of the impact point, as the region is quite unpopulated and just about a dozen of eyewitnesses could be interviewed. On the other hand, the characteristics of the vegetation that grows in the area also poses important difficulties to the search tasks. Besides, as in

  1. Electron cooling and finite potential drop in a magnetized plasma expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Sanchez, M. [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Navarro-Cavallé, J. [Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingeniería Aeronáutica y del Espacio, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Plaza Cardenal Cisneros 3, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Ahedo, E. [Departamento de Bioingeniería e Ingeniería Aeroespacial, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avda. Universidad 30, Leganés 28911, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-05-15

    The steady, collisionless, slender flow of a magnetized plasma into a surrounding vacuum is considered. The ion component is modeled as mono-energetic, while electrons are assumed Maxwellian upstream. The magnetic field has a convergent-divergent geometry, and attention is restricted to its paraxial region, so that 2D and drift effects are ignored. By using the conservation of energy and magnetic moment of particles and the quasi-neutrality condition, the ambipolar electric field and the distribution functions of both species are calculated self-consistently, paying attention to the existence of effective potential barriers associated to magnetic mirroring. The solution is used to find the total potential drop for a set of upstream conditions, plus the axial evolution of various moments of interest (density, temperatures, and heat fluxes). The results illuminate the behavior of magnetic nozzles, plasma jets, and other configurations of interest, showing, in particular, in the divergent plasma the collisionless cooling of electrons, and the generation of collisionless electron heat fluxes.

  2. Novel Method for Sizing Metallic Bottom Crack Depth Using Multi-frequency Alternating Current Potential Drop Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuting; Gan, Fangji; Wan, Zhengjun; Liao, Junbi; Li, Wenqiang

    2015-10-01

    Potential drop techniques are of two types: the direct current potential drop (DCPD) technique and alternating current potential drop (ACPD) technique, and both of them are used in nondestructive testing. ACPD, as a kind of valid method in sizing metal cracks, has been applied to evaluate metal structures. However, our review of most available approaches revealed that some improvements can be done in measuring depth of metal bottom crack by means of ACPD, such as accuracy and sensitivity of shallow crack. This paper studied a novel method which utilized the slope of voltage ratio-frequency curve to solve bottom crack depth by using a simple mathematic equation based on finite element analysis. It is found that voltage ratio varies linearly with frequency in the range of 5-15 Hz; this range is slightly higher than the equivalent frequency and lower than semi-permeable frequency. Simulation and experiment show that the novel method can measure the bottom crack depth accurately.

  3. Development of a piping thickness monitoring system using equipotential switching direct current potential drop method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyung Ha, Ryu; Na Young, Lee; Il Soon, Hwang

    2007-01-01

    As nuclear power plants age, low alloy steel piping undergoes wall thickness reduction due to Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC). Persisting pipe rupture accidents prompted thinned pipe management programs. As a consequence extensive inspection activities are made based on the Ultrasonic Technique (UT). As the inspection points increase, time is needed to cover required inspection areas. In this paper, we present the Wide Range Monitoring (WiRM) concept with Equipotential Switching Direct Current Potential Drop (ES-DCPD) method by which FAC-active areas can be screened for detailed UT inspections. To apply ES-DCPD, we developed an electric resistance network model and electric field model based on Finite Element Analysis (FEA) to verify its feasibility. Experimentally we measured DCPD of the pipe elbow and confirmed the validity using UT inspections. For a more realistic validation test, we designed a high temperature flow test loop with environmental parameters turned for FAC simulation in the laboratory. Using electrochemical monitoring of water chemistry and local flow velocity prediction by computational fluid dynamic model, FAC rate is estimated. Based on the FAC prediction model and the simulation loop test, we plan to demonstrate the applicability of ES-DCPD in the PWR secondary environment. (authors)

  4. Influence of crack length on crack depth measurement by an alternating current potential drop technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raja, Manoj K; Mahadevan, S; Rao, B P C; Behera, S P; Jayakumar, T; Raj, Baldev

    2010-01-01

    An alternating current potential drop (ACPD) technique is used for sizing depth of surface cracks in metallic components. Crack depth estimations are prone to large deviations when ACPD measurements are made on very shallow and finite length cracks, especially in low conducting materials such as austenitic stainless steel (SS). Detailed studies have been carried out to investigate the influence of crack length and aspect ratio (length to depth) on depth estimation by performing measurements on electric discharge machined notches with the aspect ratio in the range of 1 to 40 in SS plates. In notches with finite length, an additional path for current to flow through the surface along the length is available causing the notch depths to be underestimated. The experimentally observed deviation in notch depth estimates is explained from a simple mathematical approach using the equivalent resistive circuit model based on the additional path available for the current to flow. A scheme is proposed to accurately measure the depth of cracks with finite lengths in SS components

  5. Spume Drops: Their Potential Role in Air-Sea Gas Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, Edward C.; Staniec, Allison; Vlahos, Penny

    2017-12-01

    After summarizing the time scales defining the change of the physical properties of spume and other droplets cast up from the sea surface, the time scales governing drop-atmosphere gas exchange are compared. Following a broad review of the spume drop production functions described in the literature, a subset of these functions is selected via objective criteria, to represent typical, upper bound, and lower bound production functions. Three complementary mechanisms driving spume-atmosphere gas exchange are described, and one is then used to estimate the relative importance, over a broad range of wind speeds, of this spume drop mechanism compared to the conventional, diffusional, sea surface mechanism in air-sea gas exchange. While remaining uncertainties in the wind dependence of the spume drop production flux, and in the immediate sea surface gas flux, preclude a definitive conclusion, the findings of this study strongly suggest that, at high wind speeds (>20 m s-1 for dimethyl sulfide and >30 m s-1 for gases such a carbon dioxide), spume drops do make a significant contribution to air-sea gas exchange.Plain Language SummaryThis paper evaluates the existing spume drop generation functions available to date and selects a reasonable upper, lower and mid range function that are reasonable for use in air sea exchange models. Based on these the contribution of spume drops to overall air sea gas exchange at different wind speeds is then evaluated to determine the % contribution of spume. Generally below 20ms-1 spume drops contribute <1% of gas exchange but may account for a significant amount of gas exchange at higher wind speeds.

  6. Structural instability of sheath potential distribution and its possible implications for the L/H transition in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Zensho; Yamada, Hiroshi.

    1988-07-01

    The Bohm equation of electrostatic potential distributions in one-dimensional plasmas has been studied for various Mach numbers and plasma potentials. Solvability and structural stability have been discussed using the Sagdeev potential. Implications of the structural stability for the L/H transitions in tokamak plasmas has been also discussed. (author)

  7. Impedance and electrically evoked compound action potential (ECAP drop within 24 hours after cochlear implantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Kuang-Chao Chen

    Full Text Available Previous animal study revealed that post-implantation electrical detection levels significantly declined within days. The impact of cochlear implant (CI insertion on human auditory pathway in terms of impedance and electrically evoked compound action potential (ECAP variation within hours after surgery remains unclear, since at this time frequency mapping can only commence weeks after implantation due to factors associated with wound conditions. The study presented our experiences with regards to initial switch-on within 24 hours, and thus the findings about the milieus inside cochlea within the first few hours after cochlear implantation in terms of impedance/ECAP fluctuations. The charts of fifty-four subjects with profound hearing impairment were studied. A minimal invasive approach was used for cochlear implantation, characterized by a small skin incision (≈ 2.5 cm and soft techniques for cochleostomy. Impedance/ECAP was measured intro-operatively and within 24 hours post-operatively. Initial mapping within 24 hours post-operatively was performed in all patients without major complications. Impedance/ECAP became significantly lower measured within 24 hours post-operatively as compared with intra-operatively (p<0.001. There were no differences between pre-operative and post-operative threshold for air-conduction hearing. A significant drop of impedance/ECAP in one day after cochlear implantation was revealed for the first time in human beings. Mechanisms could be related to the restoration of neuronal sensitivity to the electrical stimulation, and/or the interaction between the matrix enveloping the electrodes and the electrical stimulation of the initial switch-on. Less wound pain/swelling and soft techniques both contributed to the success of immediate initial mapping, which implied a stable micro-environment inside the cochlea despite electrodes insertion. Our research invites further studies to correlate initial impedance/ECAP changes

  8. Continuous monitoring of back wall stress corrosion cracking growth in sensitized type 304 stainless steel weldment by means of potential drop techniques

    OpenAIRE

    SATO, Y; ATSUMI, T; SHOJI, T

    2007-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests on welded specimens of sensitized type 304SS with a thickness of 20 mm were performed in sodium thiosulphate solution at room temperature, with continuous monitoring of the SCC growth, using the techniques of modified induced current potential drop (MICPD), alternating current potential drop (ACPD) and direct current potential drop (DCPD). The MICPD and DCPD techniques permit continuous monitoring of the back wall SCC, which initiates from a fatigue pre-c...

  9. Acceptability and Potential Effectiveness of a Foot Drop Stimulator in Children and Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, Laura A.; Curatalo, Lindsey A.; Alter, Katharine E.; Damiano, Diane L.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Ankle-foot orthoses are the standard of care for foot drop in cerebral palsy (CP), but may overly constrain ankle movement and limit function in those with mild CP. Functional electrical stimulation (FES) may be a less restrictive and more effective alternative, but has rarely been used in CP. The primary objective of this study was to…

  10. Behavior of collisional sheath in electronegative plasma with q-nonextensive electron distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgohain, Dima Rani; Saharia, K.

    2018-03-01

    Electronegative plasma sheath is addressed in a collisional unmagnetized plasma consisting of q-nonextensive electrons, Boltzmann distributed negative ions and cold fluid positive ions. Considering the positive ion-neutral collisions and ignoring the effects of ionization and collisions between negative species and positive ions (neutrals), a modified Bohm sheath criterion and hence floating potential are derived by using multifluid model. Using the modified Bohm sheath criterion, the sheath characteristics such as spatial profiles of density, potential and net space charge density have been numerically investigated. It is found that increasing values of q-nonextensivity, electronegativity and collisionality lead to a decrease of the sheath thickness and an increase of the sheath potential and the net space charge density. With increasing values of the electron temperature to negative ion temperature ratio, the sheath thickness increases and the sheath potential as well as the net space charge density in the sheath region decreases.

  11. A fully kinetic, self-consistent particle simulation model of the collisionless plasma--sheath region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Procassini, R.J.; Birdsall, C.K.; Morse, E.C.

    1990-01-01

    A fully kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) model is used to self-consistently determine the steady-state potential profile in a collisionless plasma that contacts a floating, absorbing boundary. To balance the flow of particles to the wall, a distributed source region is used to inject particles into the one-dimensional system. The effect of the particle source distribution function on the source region and collector sheath potential drops, and particle velocity distributions is investigated. The ion source functions proposed by Emmert et al. [Phys. Fluids 23, 803 (1980)] and Bissell and Johnson [Phys. Fluids 30, 779 (1987)] (and various combinations of these) are used for the injection of both ions and electrons. The values of the potential drops obtained from the PIC simulations are compared to those from the theories of Emmert et al., Bissell and Johnson, and Scheuer and Emmert [Phys. Fluids 31, 3645 (1988)], all of which assume that the electron density is related to the plasma potential via the Boltzmann relation. The values of the source region and total potential drop are found to depend on the choice of the electron source function, as well as the ion source function. The question of an infinite electric field at the plasma--sheath interface, which arises in the analyses of Bissell and Johnson and Scheuer and Emmert, is also addressed

  12. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha is a poor prognostic factor and potential therapeutic target in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suguru Fukushima

    Full Text Available Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST is a rare soft tissue sarcoma with poor prognosis. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1 plays a crucial role in the cellular response to hypoxia and regulates the expression of multiple genes involved in tumor progression in various cancers. However, the importance of the expression of HIF-1α in MPNSTs is unclear.The expression of HIF-1α was examined immunohistochemically in 82 MPNST specimens. Cell culture assays of human MPNST cells under normoxic and hypoxic conditions were used to evaluate the impact of anti-HIF-1α-specific siRNA inhibition on cell survival. A screening kit was employed to identify small molecules that inhibited HIF-1α.The nuclear expression of HIF-1α was positive in 75.6% of MPNST samples (62/82 cases. Positivity for HIF-1α was a significant poor prognostic factor both in univariate (P = 0.048 and multivariate (P ≤ 0.0001 analyses. HIF-1α knockdown abrogated MPNST cell growth, inducing apoptosis. Finally, chetomin, an inhibitor of HIF-1α, effectively inhibited the growth of MPNST cells and induced their apoptosis.Inhibition of HIF-1α signaling is a potential treatment option for MPNSTs.

  13. Characterizing Ductile Damage and Failure: Application of the Direct Current Potential Drop Method to Uncracked Tensile Specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Brinnel, V.; Döbereiner, B.; Münstermann, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Modern high-strength steels exhibit excellent ductility properties but their application is hindered by traditional design rules. A characterization of necessary safety margins for the ductile failure of these steels is therefore required. Direct observation of ductile damage within tests is currently not possible, only limited measurements can be made with synchrotron or X-ray radiation facilities. The direct current potential drop (DCPD) method can determine ductile crack propagation with l...

  14. Novel Method for Sizing Metallic Bottom Crack Depth Using Multi-frequency Alternating Current Potential Drop Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yuting

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Potential drop techniques are of two types: the direct current potential drop (DCPD technique and alternating current potential drop (ACPD technique, and both of them are used in nondestructive testing. ACPD, as a kind of valid method in sizing metal cracks, has been applied to evaluate metal structures. However, our review of most available approaches revealed that some improvements can be done in measuring depth of metal bottom crack by means of ACPD, such as accuracy and sensitivity of shallow crack. This paper studied a novel method which utilized the slope of voltage ratio-frequency curve to solve bottom crack depth by using a simple mathematic equation based on finite element analysis. It is found that voltage ratio varies linearly with frequency in the range of 5-15 Hz; this range is slightly higher than the equivalent frequency and lower than semi-permeable frequency. Simulation and experiment show that the novel method can measure the bottom crack depth accurately.

  15. A GCM study of organic matter in marine aerosol and its potential contribution to cloud drop activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. J. Roelofs

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available With the global aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM we investigate the potential influence of organic aerosol originating from the ocean on aerosol mass and chemical composition and the droplet concentration and size of marine clouds. We present sensitivity simulations in which the uptake of organic matter in the marine aerosol is prescribed for each aerosol mode with varying organic mass and mixing state, and with a geographical distribution and seasonality similar to the oceanic emission of dimethyl sulfide. Measurements of aerosol mass, aerosol chemical composition and cloud drop effective radius are used to assess the representativity of the model initializations. Good agreement with the measurements is obtained when organic matter is added to the Aitken, accumulation and coarse modes simultaneously. Representing marine organics in the model leads to higher cloud drop number concentrations and thus smaller cloud drop effective radii, and this improves the agreement with measurements. The mixing state of the organics and the other aerosol matter, i.e. internal or external depending on the formation process of aerosol organics, is an important factor for this. We estimate that globally about 75 Tg C yr−1 of organic matter from marine origin enters the aerosol phase, with comparable contributions from primary emissions and secondary organic aerosol formation.

  16. Experimental investigation of plasma sheaths in magnetic mirror and cusp configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhengqi; Wei, Zi-an; Ma, J. X.

    2017-11-01

    Sheath structures near a metal plate in a magnetized plasma were experimentally investigated in magnetic mirror and cusp configurations. Plasma parameters and the sheath potential distributions were probed by a planar and an emissive probe, respectively. The measured sheath profiles in the mirror configuration show that the sheath thickness first decreases and then increases when the magnetic strength is raised. A magnetic flux-tube model was used to explain this result. In the cusp configuration, the measured sheath thickness decreases with the increase of the coil current creating the magnetic cusp. However, when normalized by the electron Debye length, the dependence of the sheath thickness on the coil current is reversed.

  17. Sheath heating in low-pressure capacitive radio frequency discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, B.P.

    1991-01-01

    Capacitively coupled, parallel plate, r.f. discharges are commonly used for materials processing. The electrons in such a discharge gain and lose energy by reflection from the oscillating sheaths which form at the electrodes. Previous models of the electron heating by this mechanism have assumed that the sheath motion is slow compared to the electron thermal velocity, so that the electron energy change from each reflection is small. Here, the heating rate, density, and sheath width relations are derived analytically in the limit of very fast sheath motion. Numerical results are presented spanning the slow and fast limits. Results from particle-in-cell simulations show that in the large-energy-change regime, an electron beam is produced on each sheath expansion. At low pressure, this beam can traverse the plasma and interact with the sheath at the opposite electrode, producing a beam energy and density dependence on the length of the discharge. The beam produces a time and space varying warm tail on the electron energy distribution. Two revised heating models are derived, assuming power-law and two-temperature electron energy distributions, with temporal variation in electron temperature. These revised models yield new predictions for the variation of the power, density, and sheath thickness with applied r.f. voltage. These predictions are compared with simulation results and laboratory experiment. The electron sheath motion is investigated experimentally by observing the signal on a floating probe in the sheath region. This is compared to the signal product by a non-linear circuit model which accounts for the perturbation of the sheath potential by the probe and includes various forms of sheath motion. The experimental observations are consistent with the analytical predictions. Experimental observations of plasma-sheath resonance oscillations are presented which agree with analytical predictions

  18. Study of Hot Salt Stress Corrosion Crack Initiation of Alloy IMI 834 by using DC Potential Drop Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pustode, Mangesh D. [Bharat Forge Ltd., Pune (India); Dewangan, Bhupendra [Tata Steel, Jamshedpur (India); Raja, V. S. [Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai (India); Paulose, Neeta; Babu, Narendra [Gas Turbine Research Establishment (GTRE), Bangalore (India)

    2016-10-15

    DC potential drop technique was employed during the slow strain rate tests to study the hot salt stress corrosion crack (HSSCC) initiation at 300 and 400 ℃. Threshold stresses for HSSCC initiation were found to about 88 % of the yield strength at both temperatures, but the time from crack initiation to final failure (Δtscc) decreased significantly with temperature, which reflects larger tendency for brittle fracture and secondary cracking. The brittle fracture features consisted of transgranular cracking through the primary α grain and discontinuous faceted cracking through the transformed β grains.

  19. Electric Mars: A Large Trans-Terminator Electric Potential Drop on Closed Magnetic Field Lines Above Utopia Planitia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinson, Glyn; Mitchell, David; Xu, Shaosui; Glocer, Alex; Grebowsky, Joseph; Hara, Takuya; Lillis, Robert; Espley, Jared; Mazelle, Christian; Sauvaud, Jean-Andre

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Parallel electric fields and their associated electric potential structures play a crucial role inionospheric-magnetospheric interactions at any planet. Although there is abundant evidence that parallel electric fields play key roles in Martian ionospheric outflow and auroral electron acceleration, the fields themselves are challenging to directly measure due to their relatively weak nature. Using measurements by the Solar Wind Electron Analyzer instrument aboard the NASA Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN(MAVEN) Mars Scout, we present the discovery and measurement of a substantial (Phi) Mars 7.7 +/-0.6 V) parallel electric potential drop on closed magnetic field lines spanning the terminator from day to night above the great impact basin of Utopia Planitia, a region largely free of crustal magnetic fields. A survey of the previous 26 orbits passing over a range of longitudes revealed similar signatures on seven orbits, with a mean potential drop (Phi) Mars of 10.9 +/- 0.8 V, suggestive that although trans-terminator electric fields of comparable strength are not ubiquitous, they may be common, at least at these northerly latitudes.

  20. Electric Mars: A large trans-terminator electric potential drop on closed magnetic field lines above Utopia Planitia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinson, Glyn; Mitchell, David; Xu, Shaosui; Glocer, Alex; Grebowsky, Joseph; Hara, Takuya; Lillis, Robert; Espley, Jared; Mazelle, Christian; Sauvaud, Jean-André; Fedorov, Andrey; Liemohn, Mike; Andersson, Laila; Jakosky, Bruce

    2017-02-01

    Parallel electric fields and their associated electric potential structures play a crucial role in ionospheric-magnetospheric interactions at any planet. Although there is abundant evidence that parallel electric fields play key roles in Martian ionospheric outflow and auroral electron acceleration, the fields themselves are challenging to directly measure due to their relatively weak nature. Using measurements by the Solar Wind Electron Analyzer instrument aboard the NASA Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) Mars Scout, we present the discovery and measurement of a substantial (ΦMars=7.7 ± 0.6 V) parallel electric potential drop on closed magnetic field lines spanning the terminator from day to night above the great impact basin of Utopia Planitia, a region largely free of crustal magnetic fields. A survey of the previous 26 orbits passing over a range of longitudes revealed similar signatures on seven orbits, with a mean potential drop (ΦMars) of 10.9 ± 0.8 V, suggestive that although trans-terminator electric fields of comparable strength are not ubiquitous, they may be common, at least at these northerly latitudes.

  1. Effect of collisions on photoelectron sheath in a gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodha, Mahendra Singh; Mishra, S. K.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a study of the effect of the collision of electrons with atoms/molecules on the structure of a photoelectron sheath. Considering the half Fermi-Dirac distribution of photo-emitted electrons, an expression for the electron density in the sheath has been derived in terms of the electric potential and the structure of the sheath has been investigated by incorporating Poisson's equation in the analysis. The method of successive approximations has been used to solve Poisson's equation with the solution for the electric potential in the case of vacuum, obtained earlier [Sodha and Mishra, Phys. Plasmas 21, 093704 (2014)], being used as the zeroth order solution for the present analysis. The inclusion of collisions influences the photoelectron sheath structure significantly; a reduction in the sheath width with increasing collisions is obtained.

  2. The development of crack measurement system using the direct current potential drop method for use in the hot cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Do-Sik; Ahn, Sang-Bok; Lee, Key-Soon; Kim, Yong-Suk; Kwon, Sang-Chul

    1999-01-01

    The crack length measurement system using the direct current potential drop (DCPD) method was developed for the detection of crack growth initiation and subsequent crack growth. The experimental precautions and data processing procedure required for its application were also described find discussed. The system presented herein was specially built for use in fracture toughness testing of unirradiated or irradiated pressure tube materials from nuclear reactor. The application of this system for fracture toughness determination was illustrated from the test of curved compact tension specimens removed from CANDU reactor pressure tubes. The crack extension was monitored using the DCPD method. It is found that the changes of the potential drop and the changes of the crack length have a linear relationship. The final crack front was marked by heat-tinting after the test and the specimen broken open for determination of the initial and final physical crack length. The physical crack lengths, obtained by the 9-point average method described in ASTM E1737-96 on heat-tinted fracture surface, were used to calibrate the DCPD method for each test on an individual basis by matching the change in voltage to the crack extension. It is found that this system can be recommended for determination of the J-integral resistance (J-R) curve of unirradiated or irradiation materials in the hot cell, especially when testing at elevated temperature and in the environment chamber or furnace. (author)

  3. Potential suitable areas of giant ground sloths dropped before its extinction in South America

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lima-Ribeiro, Matheus Souza; Varela, Sara; Nogues, David Bravo

    2012-01-01

    of the climate preferences through time for the two species and modeled their potential distributions at last glacial maximum (LGM, 21 ky BP) and mid-Holocene (6 ky BP) using Bioclimatic Envelope Modeling (BEM), fossil records and paleoclimatic simulations. The model predictions showed a drastic reduction......Here we analyze the effects that climatic changes through last ice age had on the potential distributions and extinction risk dynamics of two extinct species of South American giant ground sloths, Eremotherium laurillardi and Megatherium americanum. We tested the assumption of stability...

  4. An improved potential drop method for measuring and monitoring defects in structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oppermann, W.; Keller, H.P.

    1991-01-01

    In its advanced form, the direct-current potential probe measuring technique is a reliable and relatively exact procedure for measuring and monitoring surface defects. In addition, there is the possibility - important for practical purposes - of measuring cracks at the inaccessible side of a component part. The improved accuracy, in particular with regard to short defects, is based on advanced measuring techniques and calibration curves determined at the electrolytical tank. (orig./DG) [de

  5. Sheath impedance effects in very high frequency plasma experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarzenbach, W.; Howling, A.A.; Fivaz, M.; Brunner, S.; Hollenstein, C.

    1995-05-01

    The frequency dependence (13.56 MHz to 70 MHz) of the ion energy distribution at the ground electrode was measured by mass spectrometry in a symmetrical capacitive argon discharge. Reduced sheath impedance at Very High Frequency allows high levels of plasma power and substrate ion flux whilst maintaining low levels of ion energy and electrode voltage. The lower limit of ion bombardment energy is fixed by the sheath floating potential at high frequency, in contrast to low frequencies where only the rf voltage amplitude is determinant. The capacitive sheaths are thinner at high frequencies which accentuates the high frequency reduction in sheath impedance. It is argued that the frequency dependence of sheath impedance is responsible for the principal characteristics of Very High Frequency plasmas. The measurements are summarised by simple physical descriptions and compared with a Particle-In-Cell simulation. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  6. Electric fields in the sheath formed in a 300 mm, dual frequency capacitive argon discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnat, E V; Miller, P A; Hebner, G A; Paterson, A M; Panagopoulos, T; Hammond, E; Holland, J

    2007-01-01

    The spatial structure and temporal evolution of the electric fields in a sheath formed in a dual frequency, 300 mm capacitive argon discharge are measured as functions of relative mixing between a low frequency current and a high frequency current. It is found that the overall structure of the sheath (potential across the sheath and the thickness of the sheath) are dominated by the lower frequency component while (smaller) oscillations in these quantities are dictated by the higher frequency component. Comparisons of the measured spatial and temporal profiles are made for Lieberman's and Robiche et al sheath model and with a particle in a cell calculation

  7. The magnetized sheath of a dusty plasma with grains size distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ou, Jing; Gan, Chunyun; Lin, Binbin; Yang, Jinhong

    2015-01-01

    The structure of a plasma sheath in the presence of dust grains size distribution (DGSD) is investigated in the multi-fluid framework. It is shown that effect of the dust grains with different sizes on the sheath structure is a collective behavior. The spatial distributions of electric potential, the electron and ion densities and velocities, and the dust grains surface potential are strongly affected by DGSD. The dynamics of dust grains with different sizes in the sheath depend on not only DGSD but also their radius. By comparison of the sheath structure, it is found that under the same expected value of DGSD condition, the sheath length is longer in the case of lognormal distribution than that in the case of uniform distribution. In two cases of normal and lognormal distributions, the sheath length is almost equal for the small variance of DGSD, and then the difference of sheath length increases gradually with increase in the variance

  8. Stability of the Tonks–Langmuir discharge pre-sheath

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tskhakaya, D. D. [Fusion@ÖAW, Institute of Applied Physics, TU Wien, Wiedner Hauptstraße 8-10, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Kos, L. [LECAD Laboratory, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Ljubljana, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Tskhakaya, D. [Fusion@ÖAW, Institute of Applied Physics, TU Wien, Wiedner Hauptstraße 8-10, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2016-03-15

    The article formulates the stability problem of the plasma sheath in the Tonks–Langmuir discharge. Using the kinetic description of the ion gas, i.e., the stability of the potential shape in the quasi-neutral pre-sheath regarding the high and low frequency, the perturbations are investigated. The electrons are assumed to be Maxwell–Boltzmann distributed. Regarding high-frequency perturbations, the pre-sheath is shown to be stable. The stability problem regarding low-frequency perturbations can be reduced to an analysis of the “diffusion like” equation, which results in the instability of the potential distribution in the pre-sheath. By means of the Particle in Cell simulations, also the nonlinear stage of low frequency oscillations is investigated. Comparing the figure obtained with the figure for linear stage, one can find obvious similarity in the spatial-temporal behavior of the potential.

  9. Application of the potential-drop method to measurements of hydrogen-induced sub-critical crack growth in zirconium-2.5 wt% niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, L.A.; Clarke, C.F.

    1977-10-01

    Adaptation of the potential-drop method of crack-following to the problem of hydrogen-induced sub-critical crack growth in Zr-2.5% Nb is described. Reasons for non-linearity in the calibration of crack extension against potential drop in compact tension specimens are discussed. It is shown that despite non-linearities, careful comparison of fractographic features with the potential-drop record can lead to a continuous plot of crack velocity against time or stress intensity factor. Procedures for correcting data through temperature and load changes are also described. The application of the technique to studies of the mechanism of hydrogen crack growth is illustrated with several examples. (author)

  10. ALINE: A device dedicated to understanding radio-frequency sheaths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Devaux

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In fusion devices, radiofrequency (RF antennas are used for heating the plasma. Those antennas and the plasma interact with each other through the so-called RF sheaths, layers of plasma where the quasi-neutrality breaks down and large electric fields arise. Among the effects of RF sheaths, there is the enhancement of the particles and energy fluxes toward the surface of the antenna, which in turn generate hot spots and release impurities, which are both deleterious for plasma operations. RF sheaths comprehension stumbles on the difficulty to achieve in situ measurements of the sheath properties, as scrape-off layer plasmas are a harsh environment. The very goal of the ALINE device is to tackle this issue and to fulfil the blank between numerical simulations and full-scale experiment by providing measurements within the RF sheaths in a controlled environment. In this paper we report on the latest experimental results from ALINE, in which a cylindrical Langmuir probe mounted on a remotely controlled and programmable arm allows for plasma characterizations in the three dimensions of space around the stainless steel antenna, including the sheath. We present a series of density and potential profiles and three dimension (3D maps in the plasma surrounding a stainless-steel RF antenna as well as in the sheath itself, for unmagnetized and magnetized plasmas.

  11. Evaluation of J-R curve testing of nuclear piping materials using the direct current potential drop technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackett, E.M.; Kirk, M.T.; Hays, R.A.

    1986-08-01

    A method is described for developing J-R curves for nuclear piping materials using the DC Potential Drop (DCPD) technique. Experimental calibration curves were developed for both three point bend and compact specimen geometries using ASTM A106 steel, a type 304 stainless steel and a high strength aluminum alloy. These curves were fit with a power law expression over the range of crack extension encountered during J-R curve tests (0.6 a/W to 0.8 a/W). The calibration curves were insensitive to both material and sidegrooving and depended solely on specimen geometry and lead attachment points. Crack initiation in J-R curve tests using DCPD was determined by a deviation from a linear region on a plot of COD vs. DCPD. The validity of this criterion for ASTM A106 steel was determined by a series of multispecimen tests that bracketed the initiation region. A statistical differential slope procedure for determination of the crack initiation point is presented and discussed. J-R curve tests were performed on ASTM A106 steel and type 304 stainless steel using both the elastic compliance and DCPD techniques to assess R-curve comparability. J-R curves determined using the two approaches were found to be in good agreement for ASTM A106 steel. The applicability of the DCPD technique to type 304 stainless steel and high rate loading of ferromagnetic materials is discussed. 15 refs., 33 figs

  12. Online monitoring method using Equipotential Switching Direct Current potential drop for piping wall loss by flow accelerated corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Kyung Ha; Lee, Tae Hyun; Kim, Ji Hak; Hwang, Il Soon; Lee, Na Young; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Jin Ho; Sohn, Chang Ho

    2010-01-01

    The flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) phenomenon persistently impacts plant reliability and personnel safety. We have shown that Equipotential Switching Direct Current Potential Drop (ES-DCPD) can be employed to detect piping wall loss induced by FAC. It has been demonstrated to have sufficient sensitivity to cover both long and short lengths of piping. Based on this, new FAC screening and inspection approaches have been developed. For example, resolution of ES-DCPD can be adjusted according to its monitoring purpose. The developed method shows good integrity during long test periods. It also shows good reproducibility. The Seoul National University FAC Accelerated Simulation Loop (SFASL) has been constructed for ES-DCPD demonstration purposes. During one demonstration, the piping wall was thinned by 23.7% through FAC for a 13,000 min test period. In addition to the ES-DCPD method, ultrasonic technique (UT) has been applied to SFASL for verification while water chemistry was continually monitored and controlled using electrochemical sensors. Developed electrochemical sensors showed accurate and stable water conditions in the SFASL during the test period. The ES-DCPD results were also theoretically predicted by the Sanchez-Caldera's model. The UT, however, failed to detect thinning because of its localized characteristics. Online UT that covers only local areas cannot assure the detection of wall loss.

  13. Gene Expression Profiling of the Intact Dermal Sheath Cup of Human Hair Follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niiyama, Shiro; Ishimatsu-Tsuji, Yumiko; Nakazawa, Yosuke; Yoshida, Yuzo; Soma, Tsutomu; Ideta, Ritsuro; Mukai, Hideki; Kishimoto, Jiro

    2018-04-24

    Cells that constitute the dermal papillae of hair follicles might be derived from the dermal sheath, the peribulbar component of which is the dermal sheath cup. The dermal sheath cup is thought to include the progenitor cells of the dermal papillae and possesses hair inductive potential; however, it has not yet been well characterized. This study investigated the gene expression profile of the intact dermal sheath cup, and identified dermal sheath cup signature genes, including extracellular matrix components and BMP-binding molecules, as well as TGF-b1 as an upstream regulator. Among these, GREM2, a member of the BMP antagonists, was found by in situ hybridization to be highly specific to the dermal sheath cup, implying that GREM2 is a key molecule contributing to maintenance of the properties of the dermal sheath cup.

  14. Development of ultrasonically levitated drops as microreactors for study of enzyme kinetics and potential as a universal portable analysis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheeline, A.; Pierre, Z.; Field, C. R.; Ginsberg, M. D.

    2009-05-01

    Development of microfluidics has focused on carrying out chemical synthesis and analysis in ever-smaller volumes of solution. In most cases, flow systems are made of either quartz, glass, or an easily moldable polymer such as polydimethylsiloxane (Whitesides 2006). As the system shrinks, the ratio of surface area to volume increases. For studies of either free radical chemistry or protein chemistry, this is undesirable. Proteins stick to surfaces, biofilms grow on surfaces, and radicals annihilate on walls (Lewis et al. 2006). Thus, under those circumstances where small amounts of reactants must be employed, typical microfluidic systems are incompatible with the chemistry one wishes to study. We have developed an alternative approach. We use ultrasonically levitated microliter drops as well mixed microreactors. Depending on whether capillaries (to form the drop) and electrochemical sensors are in contact with the drop or whether there are no contacting solids, the ratio of solid surface area to volume is low or zero. The only interface seen by reactants is a liquid/air interface (or, more generally, liquid/gas, as any gas may be used to support the drop). While drop levitation has been reported since at least the 1940's, we are the second group to carry out enzyme reactions in levitated drops, (Weis; Nardozzi 2005) and have fabricated the lowest power levitator in the literature (Field; Scheeline 2007). The low consumption aspects of ordinary microfluidics combine with a contact-free determination cell (the levitated drop) that ensures against cross-contamination, minimizes the likelihood of biofilm formation, and is robust to changes in temperature and humidity (Lide 1992). We report kinetics measurements in levitated drops and explain how outgrowths of these accomplishments will lead to portable chemistry/biology laboratories well suited to detection of a wide range of chemical and biological agents in the asymmetric battlefield environment.

  15. Simulations of rf-driven sheath formation in two dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riyopoulos, S.; Grossmann, W.; Drobot, A.; Kress, M.

    1992-01-01

    The results from two-dimensional particle simulations of sheath formation around periodic metal arrays placed inside magnetized plasmas and driven by oscillating voltages are reported. The main goal is the modeling of the plasma interaction with the Faraday bars surrounding the antennas during ion cyclotron tokamak heating. The study of the time-averaged potentials shows that the two-dimensional sheath structure depends on both the sheath length-to-thickness ratio and the inclination of the magnetic lines. The equipotential surfaces form closed, nested cells between adjacent bars. When the magnetic lines are nearly perpendicular to the potential gradients, the ion motion is dominated by the ExB drift, and ion streamlines form vortices around the equipotentials. At larger inclinations of the magnetic lines, the flow decouples from the equipotentials and ion transport is mainly along the potential gradients. The critical angle for the transition from vortex circulation to field aligned flow is computed. The effects of the cross-field ion transport on the sheath properties are discussed. It is shown that the sheath length and the magnetic line inclination affect the sheath scaling in the two-dimensional case. The one-dimensional theory results are recovered in the limit of high length-to-thickness ratio and large inclination of the magnetic lines

  16. Effects of a potential drop of a shipping cask, a waste container, and a bare fuel assembly during waste-handling operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, C.L.; Lee, J.; Lu, D.L.; Jardine, L.J.

    1991-12-01

    This study investigates the effects of potential drops of a typical shipping cask, waste container, and bare fuel assembly during waste-handling operations at the prospective Yucca Mountain Repository. The waste-handling process (one stage, no consolidation configuration) is examined to estimate the maximum loads imposed on typical casks and containers as they are handled by various pieces of equipment during waste-handling operations. Maximum potential drop heights for casks and containers are also evaluated for different operations. A nonlinear finite-element model is employed to represent a hybrid spent fuel container subject to drop heights of up to 30 ft onto a reinforced concrete floor. The impact stress, strain, and deformation are calculated, and compared to the failure criteria to estimate the limiting (maximum permissible) drop height for the waste container. A typical Westinghouse 17 x 17 PWR fuel assembly is analyzed by a simplified model to estimate the energy absorption by various parts of the fuel assembly during a 30 ft drop, and to determine the amount of kinetic energy in a fuel pin at impact. A nonlinear finite-element analysis of an individual fuel pin is also performed to estimate the amount of fuel pellet fracture due to impact. This work was completed on May 1990

  17. Anode sheath in Hall thrusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorf, L.; Semenov, V.; Raitses, Y.

    2003-01-01

    A set of hydrodynamic equations is used to describe quasineutral plasma in ionization and acceleration regions of a Hall thruster. The electron distribution function and Poisson equation are invoked for description of a near-anode region. Numerical solutions suggest that steady-state operation of a Hall thruster can be achieved at different anode sheath regimes. It is shown that the anode sheath depends on the thruster operating conditions, namely the discharge voltage and the mass flow rate

  18. The collisional capacitive RF sheath and the assumption of a sharp electron edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, Ralf Peter

    2008-10-01

    The transition from quasi-neutrality to charge depletion is one of the characteristic features of the plasma boundary sheath. It is often described in terms of the so-called step model which assumes a transition point (electron step) where the electron density drops from a value equal to the ion density (in the bulk) to a value of zero (in the sheath). Inserted into Poisson's equation, the step model yields an expression for the field which is realistic deep in the sheath but fails to merge correctly into the ambipolar field of the bulk. This work studies the consequences of that approximation for the example of the collision-dominated, capacitive RF sheath by Lieberman [1]. First, the model is solved exactly, using a relaxation scheme. Then, the step approximation is applied which recovers Lieberman's semi-analytical solution. It is demonstrated that the step approximation induces a spurious divergence of the ion density at the sheath edge and prevents a matching of the sheath model to a bulk model. Integral sheath quantities, on the other hand, like the capacitance or the overall voltage drop, are faithfully reproduced. [1] M. A. Lieberman, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 16, pp. 638-644 (1988).

  19. Numerical simulations of electric potential field for alternating current potential drop associated with surface cracks in low-alloy steel nuclear material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chun-Ping; Huang, Jiunn-Yuan

    2018-04-01

    Low-alloy steels used as structural materials in nuclear power plants are subjected to cyclic stresses during power plant operations. As a result, cracks may develop and propagate through the material. The alternating current potential drop technique is used to measure the lengths of cracks in metallic components. The depth of the penetration of the alternating current is assumed to be small compared to the crack length. This assumption allows the adoption of the unfolding technique to simplify the problem to a surface Laplacian field. The numerical modelling of the electric potential and current density distribution prediction model for a compact tension specimen and the unfolded crack model are presented in this paper. The goal of this work is to conduct numerical simulations to reduce deviations occurring in the crack length measurements. Numerical simulations were conducted on AISI 4340 low-alloy steel with different crack lengths to evaluate the electric potential distribution. From the simulated results, an optimised position for voltage measurements in the crack region was proposed.

  20. Uncertainty Analysis of the Results of Potential Cask Drops in the K West Basin South Loadout Pit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LEW, B.S.

    1999-01-01

    If a cask and Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) were to be dropped, the analysis established possible initial volumetric flow rates. The results of the uncertainty analysis demonstrated that even if a cask and MCO were to be dropped the possible initial volumetric flow rate through the opened floor/wall joint would be small. There is a 95% confidence (probability of 0.95) that the initial volumetric flow rate would be smaller than 411 gpm and a 99% confidence (probability of 0.99) that it would be smaller than 916 gpm

  1. Multimodal imaging in neurofibromatosis type 1-associated nerve sheath tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salamon, J.; Adam, G.; Mautner, V.F.; Derlin, T.

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a neurogenetic disorder. Individuals with NF1 may develop a variety of benign and malignant tumors of which peripheral nerve sheath tumors represent the most frequent entity. Plexiform neurofibromas may demonstrate a locally destructive growth pattern, may cause severe symptoms and may undergo malignant transformation into malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs). Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) represents the reference standard for detection of soft tissue tumors in NF1. It allows for identification of individuals with plexiform neurofibromas, for assessment of local tumor extent, and for evaluation of whole-body tumor burden on T2-weighted imaging. Multiparametric MRI may provide a comprehensive characterization of different tissue properties of peripheral nerve sheath tumors, and may identify parameters associated with malignant transformation. Due to the absence of any radiation exposure, whole-body MRI may be used for serial follow-up of individuals with plexiform neurofibromas. 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission-tomography (FDG PET/CT) allows a highly sensitive and specific detection of MPNST, and should be used in case of potential malignant transformation of a peripheral nerve sheath tumor. PET/CT provides a sensitive whole-body tumor staging. The use of contrast-enhanced CT for diagnosis of peripheral nerve sheath tumors is limited to special indications. To obtain the most precise readings, optimized examination protocols and dedicated radiologists and nuclear medicine physicians familiar with the complex and variable morphologies of peripheral nerve sheath tumors are required.

  2. Electric sheath and presheath in a collisionless, finite ion temperature plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmert, G.A.; Wieland, R.M.; Mense, A.T.; Davidson, J.N.

    1980-01-01

    The plasma-sheath equation for a collisionless plasma with arbitrary ion temperature in plane geometry is formulated. Outside the sheath, this equation is approximated by the plasma equation, for which an analytic solution for the electrostatic potential is obtained. In addition, the ion distribution function, the wall potential, and the ion energy and particle flux into the sheath are explicitly calculated. The plasma-sheath equation is also solved numerically with no approximation of the Debye length. The numerical results compare well with the analytical results when the Debye length is small

  3. Revisiting the plasma sheath—dust in plasma sheath

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, G. C. [Mathematical Science Division, IASST, Guwahati 781014 (India); Deka, R.; Bora, M. P., E-mail: mpbora@gauhati.ac.in [Physics Department, Gauhati University, Guwahati 781014 (India)

    2016-04-15

    In this work, we have considered the formation of warm plasma sheath in the vicinity of a wall in a plasma with considerable presence of dust particles. As an example, we have used the parameters relevant in case of plasma sheath formed around surfaces of various solid bodies in space, though the results obtained in this work can be applied to any other physical situation such as laboratory plasma. In the ion-acoustic time scale, we neglect the dust dynamics. The dust particles affect the sheath dynamics by affecting the Poisson equation which determines the plasma potential in the sheath region. It is important to note that our calculations are valid only when the amount of dust particles is not sufficient so as to affect the plasma dynamics in the dust-acoustic time scale, but enough to affect the plasma sheath. We have assumed the current to a dust particle to be balanced throughout the analysis. This makes the grain potential dependent on plasma potential, which is then incorporated into the Poisson equation. The resultant numerical model becomes an initial value problem, which is described by a 1-D integro-differential equation, which is then solved self-consistently by incorporating the change in plasma potential caused by inclusion of the dust potential in the Poisson equation.

  4. Sheath waves, non collisional dampings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marec, Jean Lucien Ernest

    1974-01-01

    When a metallic conductor is inserted into an ionised gas, an area of electron depletion is formed between the conductor and the plasma: the ionic sheath. Moreover, if the conductor is excited by an electric field, this ionic sheath plays an important role with respect to microwave properties. In this research thesis, the author addresses the range of frequencies smaller than the plasma frequency, and reports the study of resonance phenomena. After a presentation of the problem through a bibliographical study, the author recalls general characteristics of sheath wave propagation and of sheath resonances, and discusses the validity of different hypotheses (for example and among others, electrostatic approximations, cold plasma). Then, the author more particularly addresses theoretical problems related to non collisional dampings: brief bibliographical study, detailed presentation and description of the theoretical model, damping calculation methods. The author then justifies the design and performance of an experiment, indicates measurement methods used to determine plasma characteristics as well as other magnitudes which allow the description of mechanisms of propagation and damping of sheath waves. Experimental results are finally presented with respect to various parameters. The author discusses to which extent the chosen theoretical model is satisfying [fr

  5. Dust crystal in the electrode sheath of a gaseous discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweigert, I.V.; Schweigert, V.A.

    2002-01-01

    The phenomena observed in strongly coupled dusty plasmas in the electrode sheath of gas discharge clearly indicate that the screened Coulomb potential is not valid for inter-particle interaction. The reason why the conventional model breaks down is clear now. The strong electric field, accelerating ions toward the cathode, leads to an asymmetrical particle shielding and the appearance of an attractive component in the inter-particle force. The sheath plasma with micro-particles is non Hamiltonian system because of input of energy from ion flux from the bulk plasma. The models of interaction potential of microparticles in sheath are proposed. The first is the linear effective positive charge (EPC). On the basis of this model the stability of the dust crystal in the sheath is analyzed both analytically and in MD simulations. The scenario of crystal melting is described. The role of different types of defects in the local heating of the crystal is considered. The next non-linear model of sheath plasma with micro-particles allows to find all parameter of plasma crystal: particle charge, inter-particle distance and study the structural transition. We constructed the analytical expression for inter-particle potential and have found the mechanism acceleration of extra particle beneath the monolayer. Recently new more simple analytical kinetic approach, accounting for ion collisions, have been developed. The structural transition in the dust molecular was obtained in simulation with multipole expansion model interaction potential

  6. Self-consistent radial sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazeltine, R.D.

    1988-12-01

    The boundary layer arising in the radial vicinity of a tokamak limiter is examined, with special reference to the TEXT tokamak. It is shown that sheath structure depends upon the self-consistent effects of ion guiding-center orbit modification, as well as the radial variation of E /times/ B-induced toroidal rotation. Reasonable agreement with experiment is obtained from an idealized model which, however simplified, preserves such self-consistent effects. It is argued that the radial sheath, which occurs whenever confining magnetic field-lines lie in the plasma boundary surface, is an object of some intrinsic interest. It differs from the more familiar axial sheath because magnetized charges respond very differently to parallel and perpendicular electric fields. 11 refs., 1 fig

  7. Intrapontine malignant nerve sheath tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozić, Dusko; Nagulić, Mirjana; Samardzić, Miroslav

    2008-01-01

    . On pathological examination, the neoplasm appeared to be an intrapontine nerve sheath tumor originating most likely from the intrapontine segment of one of the cranial nerve fibres. The tumor showed exophytic growth, with consequent spread to adjacent subaracnoid space. MR spectroscopy revealed the presence......The primary source of malignant intracerebral nerve sheath tumors is still unclear We report the imaging and MR spectroscopic findings in a 39-year-old man with a very rare brain stem tumor MR examination revealed the presence of intraaxial brain stem tumor with a partial exophytic growth...

  8. Levitation and dynamics of a collection of dust particles in a fully ionized plasma sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitter, T.; Aslaksen, T.K.; Melandsoe, F.; Havnes, O.

    1994-01-01

    The authors have examined the dynamics of a collection of charged dust particles in the plasma sheath above a large body in a fully ionized space plasma when the radius of the large body is much larger than the sheath thickness. The dust particles are charged by the plasma, and the forces on the dust particles are assumed to be from the electric field in the sheath and from gravitation only. These forces will often act in opposite direction and may balance, making dust suspension and collection possible. The dust particles are supplied by injection or by electrostatic levitation. The ability of the sheath to collect dust particles, will be optimal for a certain combination of gravitation and plasma and dust particle parameters. In a dense dust sheath, the charges on the dust particles contribute significantly to the total space charge, and collective effects become important. These effects will reduce the magnitude of the sheath electric field strength and the charge on the dust particles. As dust particles are collected, the dust sheath is stretched and the largest dust particles may drop out, because the sheath is no longer able to suspend them. In a tenuous dust sheath, the inner layer, from the surface and about one Debye length thick, will be unstable for dust particle motion, and dust will not collect there. In a dense dust sheath, collective effects will decrease the thickness of this inner dust-free layer, making dust collection closer to the surface possible. By linearization of the force and current equations, they find the necessary and sufficient conditions which resemble those of planetary system bodies, but the results may also be of relevance to some laboratory plasmas

  9. Evaluation of the a.c. potential drop method to determine J-crack resistance curves for a pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, G.P.

    1989-01-01

    An evaluation has been carried out of the a.c. potential drop technique for determining J-crack growth resistance curves for a pressure vessel steel. The technique involves passing an alternating current through the specimen and relating the changes in the potential drop across the crack mouth to changes in crack length occuring during the test. The factors investigated were the current and voltage probe positions, the a.c. frequency and the test temperature. In addition, by altering the heat treatment of the material, J-crack resistance curves were obtained under both contained and non-contained yielding conditions. In all situations, accurate J-R curves could be determined. (author)

  10. Co-electrospinning fabrication and photocatalytic performance of TiO2/SiO2 core/sheath nanofibers with tunable sheath thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Houbao; Du, Pingfan; Song, Lixin; Xiong, Jie; Yang, Junjie; Xing, Tonghai; Liu, Xin; Wu, Rongrong; Wang, Minchao; Shao, Xiaoli

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The core–sheath TiO 2 /SiO 2 nanofibers were fabricated by co-electrospinning technique. • The catalytic property of nanofibers with different sheath thickness was studied. • The potential methods of improving catalytic efficiency are suggested. - Abstract: In this paper, core/sheath TiO 2 /SiO 2 nanofibers with tunable sheath thickness were directly fabricated via a facile co-electrospinning technique with subsequent calcination at 500 °C. The morphologies and structures of core/sheath TiO 2 /SiO 2 nanofibers were characterized by TGA, FESEM, TEM, FTIR, XPS and BET. It was found that the 1D core/sheath nanofibers are made up of anatase–rutile TiO 2 core and amorphous SiO 2 sheath. The influences of SiO 2 sheath and its thickness on the photoreactivity were evaluated by observing photo-degradation of methylene blue aqueous solution under the irradiation of UV light. Compared with pure TiO 2 nanofibers, the core/sheath TiO 2 /SiO 2 nanofibers performed a better catalytic performance. That was attributed to not only efficient separation of hole–electron pairs resulting from the formation of heterojunction but also larger surface area and surface silanol group which will be useful to provide higher capacity for oxygen adsorption to generate more hydroxyl radicals. And the optimized core/sheath TiO 2 /SiO 2 nanofibers with a sheath thickness of 37 nm exhibited the best photocatalytic performance

  11. Drop trampoline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantelot, Pierre; Coux, Martin; Clanet, Christophe; Quere, David

    2017-11-01

    Superhydrophobic substrates inspired from the lotus leaf have the ability to reflect impacting water drops. They do so very efficiently and contact lasts typically 10 ms for millimetric droplets. Yet unlike a lotus leaf most synthetic substrates are rigid. Focusing on the interplay between substrate flexibility and liquid repellency might allow us to understand the dynamic properties of natural surfaces. We perform liquid marbles impacts at velocity V onto thin ( 0.01 mm) stretched circular PDMS membranes. We obtain contact time reductions of up to 70%. The bouncing mechanism is drastically modified compared to that on a rigid substrate: the marble leaves the substrate while it is still spread in a disk shape as it is kicked upwards by the membrane. We show that the bouncing is controlled by an interplay between the dynamics of the drop and the membrane.

  12. Effect of radiofrequency on capacitance of low density plasma sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carneiro, L.T.; Cunha Rapozo, C. da

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that the influence of induced radiofrequency potential (V RF ) modifies the Bohm theory on ion saturation current, measured with Langmuir probes. The effect of radiofrequency potential on diode type plasma sheath resonance is also investigated. (M.C.K.)

  13. Plasma sheath criterion in thermal electronegative plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghomi, Hamid; Khoramabadi, Mansour; Ghorannevis, Mahmod; Shukla, Padma Kant

    2010-01-01

    The sheath formation criterion in electronegative plasma is examined. By using a multifluid model, it is shown that in a collisional sheath there will be upper as well as lower limits for the sheath velocity criterion. However, the parameters of the negative ions only affect the lower limit.

  14. Effect of electron emission on an ion sheath structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, M K; Phukan, A; Chakraborty, M

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on the variations of ion sheath structures due to the emission of both hot and cold electrons in the target plasma region of a double plasma device. The ion sheath is produced in front of a negatively biased plate. The plasma is produced by hot filament discharge in the source region, and no discharge is created in the target region of the device. The plate is placed in the target (diffused plasma) region where cold electron emitting filaments are present. These cold electrons are free from maintenance of discharge, which is sustained in the source region. The hot ionizing electrons are present in the source region. Three important parameters are changed by both hot and cold electrons i.e. plasma density, plasma potential and electron temperature. The decrease in plasma potential and the increase in plasma density lead to the contraction of the sheath. (paper)

  15. Mouse ES cells have a potential to differentiate into odontoblast-like cells using hanging drop method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, R; Ozeki, N; Yamaguchi, H; Tanaka, T; Nakata, K; Mogi, M; Nakamura, H

    2014-05-01

    We examined whether mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells can differentiate into odontoblast-like cells without epithelial-mesenchymal interaction. Cells were cultured by the 'hanging drop' method using a collagen type-I scaffold (CS) combined with bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-4 (CS/BMP-4). Expression of odontoblast-related mRNA and protein, and cell proliferation were performed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunofluorescence staining and WST-1 assay, respectively. Cells potently expressed odontoblast-related cell marker mRNAs following induction of odontoblastic differentiation. Dentin sialophosphoprotein, a marker of mature odontoblasts, was strongly expressed in differentiated ES cells. The cells also acquired an odontoblast-like functional phenotype, as evidenced by the appearance of alkaline phosphatase activity and calcification. The cell-surface expression of α2, α6, αV and αVβ3 integrin proteins was rapidly upregulated in differentiated cells. Finally, anti-α2 integrin antibody suppressed the expression of odontoblastic markers in cells grown using this culture system, suggesting that α2 integrin expression in ES cells triggers their differentiation into odontoblast-like cells. Mouse ES cells cultured by the 'hanging drop' method are able to differentiate into cells with odontoblast-specific physiological functions and cell-surface integrin protein expression. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The dust motion inside the magnetized sheath - The effect of drag forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, B. P.; Samarian, A.; Vladimirov, S. V.

    2010-01-01

    The isolated charged dust inside the magnetized plasma sheath moves under the influence of the electron and ion drag force and the sheath electrostatic field. The charge on the dust is a function of its radius as well as the value of the ambient sheath potential. It is shown that the charge on the dust determines its trajectory and dust performs the spiraling motion inside the sheath. The location of the turning spiral is determined by the number of negative charge on the dust, which in turn is a function of the dust radius. The back and forth spiraling motion finally causes the dust to move in a small, narrow region of the sheath. For a bigger dust particle, the dust moves closer to the sheath presheath boundary suggesting that the bigger grains, owing to the strong repulsion between the wall and dust, will be unable to travel inside the sheath. Only small, micron-sized grains can travel closer to the wall before repulsion pushes it back toward the plasma-sheath boundary. The temporal behavior of the spiraling dust motion appears like a damped harmonic oscillation, suggesting that the plasma drag force causes dissipation of the electrostatic energy. However, after initial damping, the grain keeps oscillating although with much smaller amplitude. The possible application of the present results to the ongoing sheath experiments is discussed.

  17. Effect of two-temperature electrons distribution on an electrostatic plasma sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ou, Jing; Xiang, Nong; Gan, Chunyun; Yang, Jinhong

    2013-01-01

    A magnetized collisionless plasma sheath containing two-temperature electrons is studied using a one-dimensional model in which the low-temperature electrons are described by Maxwellian distribution (MD) and high-temperature electrons are described by truncated Maxwellian distribution (TMD). Based on the ion wave approach, a modified sheath criterion including effect of TMD caused by high-temperature electrons energy above the sheath potential energy is established theoretically. The model is also used to investigate numerically the sheath structure and energy flux to the wall for plasmas parameters of an open divertor tokamak-like. Our results show that the profiles of the sheath potential, two-temperature electrons and ions densities, high-temperature electrons and ions velocities as well as the energy flux to the wall depend on the high-temperature electrons concentration, temperature, and velocity distribution function associated with sheath potential. In addition, the results obtained in the high-temperature electrons with TMD as well as with MD sheaths are compared for the different sheath potential

  18. Dropped Ceiling

    OpenAIRE

    Tabet, Rayyane

    2012-01-01

    On December 2nd 1950 the first drop of Saudi oil arrived to Lebanon via the newly constructed Trans-Arabian Pipeline, the world's longest pipeline and the largest American private investment in a foreign land. The 30inch wide structure which spanned 1213 kilometers passing through Saudi Arabia, Jordan, and Syria to end in Lebanon had required 3 years of planning and surveying, 2 years of installation, the fabrication of 256,000 tons of steel tubes, the employment of 30,000 workers, the ratifi...

  19. Performance Prediction of Centrifugal Compressor for Drop-In Testing Using Low Global Warming Potential Alternative Refrigerants and Performance Test Codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joo Hoon Park

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available As environmental regulations to stall global warming are strengthened around the world, studies using newly developed low global warming potential (GWP alternative refrigerants are increasing. In this study, substitute refrigerants, R-1234ze (E and R-1233zd (E, were used in the centrifugal compressor of an R-134a 2-stage centrifugal chiller with a fixed rotational speed. Performance predictions and thermodynamic analyses of the centrifugal compressor for drop-in testing were performed. A performance prediction method based on the existing ASME PTC-10 performance test code was proposed. The proposed method yielded the expected operating area and operating point of the centrifugal compressor with alternative refrigerants. The thermodynamic performance of the first and second stages of the centrifugal compressor was calculated as the polytropic state. To verify the suitability of the proposed method, the drop-in test results of the two alternative refrigerants were compared. The predicted operating range based on the permissible deviation of ASME PTC-10 confirmed that the temperature difference was very small at the same efficiency. Because the drop-in test of R-1234ze (E was performed within the expected operating range, the centrifugal compressor using R-1234ze (E is considered well predicted. However, the predictions of the operating point and operating range of R-1233zd (E were lower than those of the drop-in test. The proposed performance prediction method will assist in understanding thermodynamic performance at the expected operating point and operating area of a centrifugal compressor using alternative gases based on limited design and structure information.

  20. Non-Maxwellian plasma sheaths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haines, M.G.

    1998-01-01

    There is much experimental evidence that heat flux to divertor plates or to limiters is very asymmetric. For example, Lowry made measurements on poloidal limiters in JET, Stangeby and McCracken reported asymmetries in several experiments. In 1991 Haines considered the effects on the Child-Langmuir sheaths of having a net current flow. It was found that a sheath that receives more ions than electrons receives more energy flux than a sheath that receives more electrons than ions. We now extend the model to include for the electrons departures from a Maxwellian distribution arising from a net current flow, heat flow and thermoelectric effects in the scrape-off layer (SOL). It is envisaged that a net current flows in the SOL due to applied or induced electric fields, and is of a magnitude similar to that in the adjacent bulk plasma, though reduced due to the lower temperature in the SOL. We employ conventional linear transport theory eg. Braginskii, Epperlein and Haines in which the ions are a stationary Maxwellian. (orig.)

  1. Poststroke Muscle Architectural Parameters of the Tibialis Anterior and the Potential Implications for Rehabilitation of Foot Drop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W. Ramsay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Poststroke dorsiflexor weakness and paretic limb foot drop increase the risk of stumbling and falling and decrease overall functional mobility. It is of interest whether dorsiflexor muscle weakness is primarily neurological in origin or whether morphological differences also contribute to the impairment. Ten poststroke hemiparetic individuals were imaged bilaterally using noninvasive medical imaging techniques. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to identify changes in tibialis anterior muscle volume and muscle belly length. Ultrasonography was used to measure fascicle length and pennation angle in a neutral position. We found no clinically meaningful bilateral differences in any architectural parameter across all subjects, which indicates that these subjects have the muscular capacity to dorsiflex their foot. Therefore, poststroke dorsiflexor weakness is primarily neural in origin and likely due to muscle activation failure or increased spasticity of the plantar flexors. The current finding suggests that electrical stimulation methods or additional neuromuscular retraining may be more beneficial than targeting muscle strength (i.e., increasing muscle mass.

  2. Slow-wave propagation and sheath interaction in the ion-cyclotron frequency range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myra, J R; D'Ippolito, D A

    2010-01-01

    In previous work (Myra J R and D'Ippolito D A 2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 101 195004) we studied the propagation of slow-wave (SW) resonance cones launched parasitically by a fast-wave antenna into a tenuous magnetized plasma. Here we extend the treatment of SW propagation and sheath interaction to 'dense' scrape-off-layer plasmas where the usual cold-plasma SW is evanescent. Using the sheath boundary condition, it is shown that for sufficiently close limiters, the SW couples to a sheath-plasma wave and is no longer evanescent, but radially propagating. A self-consistent calculation of the rf-sheath width yields the resulting sheath voltage in terms of the amplitude of the launched SW, plasma parameters and connection length. The conditions for avoiding potentially deleterious rf-wall interactions in tokamak rf heating experiments are summarized.

  3. A study on induced current focusing potential drop (ICFPD) technique. Examination of the sizing accuracy of defects and its frequency dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hoon; Shoji, Tetsuo

    1994-01-01

    Aiming at nondestructive detection and size prediction of defects with high accuracy and resolution, an Induced Current Focusing Potential Drop (ICFPD) technique has been developed. This technique can be applied for determining the location and size of defects in components with not only simple shape such as plain surface but also more complex shape and geometry such as curved surface and dissimilar joint. This paper describes the basic principle of ICFPD and its probe development. In this ICFPD, current was induced in a conductive material by a straight induction wire, which is electrically isolated, placed on it. The benefits of this new technique compared with the conventional ACPD are: (1) Current is induced and focused only at an explorating region. (2) Applicable to defect detection by scanning the sensor probe in an explorating region. (3) Applicable to defect detection in a weld joint of austenitic stainless steel. As the results of the innovation in instrumentation and the improvement in evaluation procedure by use of suitable parameters, the existence of defects is clearly observed as the variation of potential drops, and the nondimensional parameter (V c,max. /V avg. ) has a direct correlation with crack depth. Especially, for the depth less than 5 mm, the ICFPD shows higher sensitivity than the conventional ACPD at the frequencies of 3, 10 and 30 kHz. (author)

  4. Excitation of high-frequency electromagnetic waves by energetic electrons with a loss cone distribution in a field-aligned potential drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Shing F.; Vinas, Adolfo F.

    1994-01-01

    The electron cyclotron maser instability (CMI) driven by momentum space anisotropy (df/dp (sub perpendicular) greater than 0) has been invoked to explain many aspects, such as the modes of propagation, harmonic emissions, and the source characteristics of the auroral kilometric radiation (AKR). Recent satellite observations of AKR sources indicate that the source regions are often imbedded within the auroral acceleration region characterized by the presence of a field-aligned potential drop. In this paper we investigate the excitation of the fundamental extraordinary mode radiation due to the accelerated electrons. The momentum space distribution of these energetic electrons is modeled by a realistic upward loss cone as modified by the presence of a parallel potential drop below the observation point. On the basis of linear growth rate calculations we present the emission characteristics, such as the frequency spectrum and the emission angular distribution as functions of the plasma parameters. We will discuss the implication of our results on the generation of the AKR from the edges of the auroral density cavities.

  5. Comparison of S3-3 polar cap potential drops with the interplanetary magnetic field and models of magnetopause reconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wygant, J.R.; Torbert, R.B.; Mozer, F.S.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements of the cross polar cap electric potential, by the double probe electric field experiment aboard S3-3, from 55 orbits in the dawn-dusk plane are compared with the reconnection electric fields predicted by a variety of models, both theoretical and experimental. The purpose of these comparisons is to understand the extent to which nonreconnection contributes to the polar cap potential must be included, to determine the time response of the polar cap potential to time varying reconnection rates, and to determine the efficiency and saturation levels of the reconnection process. It is found that (1) After several hours of northward interplanetary magnetic field, the cross polar cap potential declines to progressively lower values than those after 1 hour of northward interplanetary magnetic field. This suggests that it requires several hours for the ionospheric polar cap potential to respond to the ''turning off'' of ''turning down'' of the reconnection process. (2) The decay of the polar cap potential is used to demonstrate that contirubtions to the polar cap potential not associated with the reconnection process can be limited to less than 20 kV. It is shown that contributions to the polar cap potential that scale with the dynamic pressure of the solar wind are limited to less than 1 kV. (3) The cross polar cap electric potential is best predicted by a weighted sum of contributions from interplanetary magnetic field parameter over the 4 hours previous to the measurement. The weighting functions have the form of an exponential decay 2--3 hours with the strongest weight on interplanetary parameters over the 1 hour previous to the measurement

  6. An analytical investigation: Effect of solar wind on lunar photoelectron sheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, S. K.; Misra, Shikha

    2018-02-01

    The formation of a photoelectron sheath over the lunar surface and subsequent dust levitation, under the influence of solar wind plasma and continuous solar radiation, has been analytically investigated. The photoelectron sheath characteristics have been evaluated using the Poisson equation configured with population density contributions from half Fermi-Dirac distribution of the photoemitted electrons and simplified Maxwellian statistics of solar wind plasma; as a consequence, altitude profiles for electric potential, electric field, and population density within the photoelectron sheath have been derived. The expression for the accretion rate of sheath electrons over the levitated spherical particles using anisotropic photoelectron flux has been derived, which has been further utilized to characterize the charging of levitating fine particles in the lunar sheath along with other constituent photoemission and solar wind fluxes. This estimate of particle charge has been further manifested with lunar sheath characteristics to evaluate the altitude profile of the particle size exhibiting levitation. The inclusion of solar wind flux into analysis is noticed to reduce the sheath span and altitude of the particle levitation; the dependence of the sheath structure and particle levitation on the solar wind plasma parameters has been discussed and graphically presented.

  7. Ultrasound diagnosis of rectus sheath hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, M. S.; Chang, J. C.; Rhee, C. B.

    1984-01-01

    6 cases of rectus sheath hematoma were correctly diagnosed by ultrasound. 2 cases had bilateral rectus sheath hematoma and 4 cases were unilateral. On ultrasound finding, relatively well defined oval or spindle like cystic mass situated in the area of rectus muscle on all cases. Ultrasound examination may give more definite diagnosis and extension rectus sheath hematoma and also helpful to follow up study of hematoma

  8. Tendon sheath fibroma in the thigh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Vincent M; Ashana, Adedayo O; de la Cruz, Michael; Lackman, Richard D

    2012-04-01

    Tendon sheath fibromas are rare, benign soft tissue tumors that are predominantly found in the fingers, hands, and wrists of young adult men. This article describes a tendon sheath fibroma that developed in the thigh of a 70-year-old man, the only known tendon sheath fibroma to form in this location. Similar to tendon sheath fibromas that develop elsewhere, our patient's lesion presented as a painless, slow-growing soft tissue nodule. Physical examination revealed a firm, nontender mass with no other associated signs or symptoms. Although the imaging appearance of tendon sheath fibromas varies, our patient's lesion appeared dark on T1- and bright on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. It was well marginated and enhanced with contrast.Histologically, tendon sheath fibromas are composed of dense fibrocollagenous stromas with scattered spindle-shaped fibroblasts and narrow slit-like vascular spaces. Most tendon sheath fibromas can be successfully removed by marginal excision, although 24% of lesions recur. No lesions have metastasized. Our patient's tendon sheath fibroma was removed by marginal excision, and the patient remained disease free 35 months postoperatively. Despite its rarity, tendon sheath fibroma should be included in the differential diagnosis of a thigh mass on physical examination or imaging, especially if it is painless, nontender, benign appearing, and present in men. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Double polymer sheathed carbon nanotube supercapacitors show enhanced cycling stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenqi; Wang, Shanshan; Wang, Chunhui; Wu, Shiting; Xu, Wenjing; Zou, Mingchu; Ouyang, An; Cao, Anyuan; Li, Yibin

    2015-12-01

    Pseudo-materials are effective in boosting the specific capacitance of supercapacitors, but during service their degradation may also be very strong, causing reduced cycling stability. Here, we show that a carbon nanotube sponge grafted by two conventional pseudo-polymer layers in sequence can serve as a porous supercapacitor electrode with significantly enhanced cycling stability compared with single polymer grafting. Creating conformal polymer coatings on the nanotube surface and the resulting double-sheath configuration are important structural factors leading to the enhanced performance. Combining different polymers as double sheaths as reported here might be a potential route to circumvent the dilemma of pseudo-materials, and to simultaneously improve the capacitance and stability for various energy storage devices.Pseudo-materials are effective in boosting the specific capacitance of supercapacitors, but during service their degradation may also be very strong, causing reduced cycling stability. Here, we show that a carbon nanotube sponge grafted by two conventional pseudo-polymer layers in sequence can serve as a porous supercapacitor electrode with significantly enhanced cycling stability compared with single polymer grafting. Creating conformal polymer coatings on the nanotube surface and the resulting double-sheath configuration are important structural factors leading to the enhanced performance. Combining different polymers as double sheaths as reported here might be a potential route to circumvent the dilemma of pseudo-materials, and to simultaneously improve the capacitance and stability for various energy storage devices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05978j

  10. Benign and malignant neurogenic tumors of nerve sheath origin on FDG PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, M. J.; Go, D. H.; Yoo, Y. H.; Shin, K. H.; Lee, J. D

    2004-01-01

    The differentiation between benign and malignant nerve sheath tumors is difficult based on conventional radiological imaging. This study was undertaken to investigate the value of FDG PET in distinguishing benign from malignant neurogenic tumors of nerve sheath origin. We performed a retrospective review of the medical record to select patients with nerve sheath tumors who had underdone FDG PET imaging. Fifteen patients (7F: 8M) with benign or malignant nerve sheath tumors were included in this study. Of the 15 patients, 9 were diagnosed with the known neurofibromatosis type I. A total of 19 nerve sheath tumors were included from the 15 patients. All patients had undergone FDG PET to evaluate for malignant potential of the known lesions. Images of FDG PET were semi-quantitatively analyzed and a region of interest (ROI) was placed over the area of the maximum FDG uptake and an average standardized uptake value was taken for final analysis. There were 5 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, 5 schwannomas, and 9 neurofibromas. The mean SUV was 2 (ranged from 1.6 to 3.3) for schwannomas, 1.3 (0.7 to 2.5) for neurofibromas, and 8.4 (4.6 to 12.2) for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. Of 14 benign tumors, all except one schwannoma showed a SUV less than 3. When a cutoff SUV of 4 was used to differentiate the nerve sheath tumors, all tumors were correctly classified as benign or malignant, respectively. Among the 9 patients diagnosed with neurofibromatosis type I. 4 had malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors and FDG PET accurately detected all the 4 lesions with malignant transformation. According to our results, FDG PET seems to have a great potential for accurately characterizing benign versus malignant nerve sheath tumors. It appears to be extremely useful for patients with neurofibromatosis to localize the lesion with malignant transformation

  11. Effects of an anode sheath on energy and momentum transfer in vacuum arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhenxing; Zhou, Zhipeng; Tian, Yunbo; Wang, Haoran; Wang, Jianhua; Geng, Yingsan; Liu, Zhiyuan

    2017-01-01

    Anode phenomena under high-current vacuum arcs have a significant impact on the interrupting capacity of vacuum interrupters. However, the vacuum arc energy flux and momentum flux on the anode—which are necessary boundary conditions for simulations—are either set to an imaginary distribution or calculated using simple formulas without considering anode sheath regulatory effects. The objective of this paper is to reveal the anode sheath effects on regulating the energy and momentum transfer from the arc column to the anode surface in vacuum arcs. A particle-in-cell model for the anode sheath is developed. The required input parameters are obtained from a magnetohydrodynamic model for the arc column. From the results, there exists a sheath near the anode with a negative voltage drop. Both the electron density and the ion density significantly decline in the anode sheath region. The kinetic energy of the ions absorbed by the anode consists of directed kinetic energy, random kinetic energy, and sheath acceleration energy. The sheath acceleration energy contribution is the largest, and the random kinetic energy also accounts for a large part that cannot be ignored. The arc pressure on the anode surface is mainly caused by ion impact, and the accelerating effect of the anode sheath on the ions cannot be neglected in pressure calculations. In addition, in the case of an arc current at 15 kA, the input energy and momentum upon the anode surface is not obviously affected by the evaporated atoms at surface temperatures of 1600 K and 2000 K. (paper)

  12. The Sheath-less Planar Langmuir Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, D. L.

    2017-12-01

    The Langmuir probe is one of the oldest plasma diagnostics, provided the plasma density and species temperature from analysis of a current-voltage curve as the voltage is swept over a practically chosen range. The analysis depends on a knowledge or theory of the many factors that influence the current-voltage curve including, probe shape, size, nearby perturbations, and the voltage reference. For applications in Low Earth Orbit, the Planar Langmuir Probe, PLP, is an attractive geometry because the ram ion current is very constant over many Volts of a sweep, allowing the ion density and electron temperature to be determined independently with the same instrument, at different points on the sweep. However, when the physical voltage reference is itself small and electrically floating as with a small spacecraft, the spacecraft and probe system become a double probe where the current collection theory depends on the interaction of the spacecraft with the plasma which is generally not as simple as the probe itself. The Sheath-less PLP, SPLP, interlaces on a single ram facing surface, two variably biased probe elements, broken into many small and intertwined segments on a scale smaller than the plasma Debye length. The SPLP is electrically isolated from the rest of the spacecraft. For relative bias potentials of a few volts, the ion current to all segments of each element will be constant, while the electron currents will vary as a function of the element potential and the electron temperature. Because the segments are small, intertwined, and floating, the assembly will always present the same floating potential to the plasma, with minimal growth as a function of voltage, thus sheath-less and still planar. This concept has been modelled with Nascap, and tested with a physical model inserted into a Low Earth Orbit-like chamber plasma. Results will be presented.

  13. Retroperitoneal and rectus sheath hematomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasotakis, George

    2014-02-01

    The retroperitoneum is rich in vascular structures and can harbor large hematomas, traumatic or spontaneous. The management of retroperitoneal hematomas depends on the mechanism of injury and whether they are pulsatile/expanding. Rectus sheath hematomas are uncommon abdominal wall hematomas secondary to trauma to the epigastric arteries of the rectus muscle. The common risk factors include anticoagulation, strenuous exercise, coughing, coagulation disorders, and invasive procedures on/through the abdominal wall. The management is largely supportive, with the reversal of anticoagulation and transfusions; angioembolization may be necessary. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A GCM study of organic matter in marine aerosol and its potential contribution to cloud drop activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, G.J.H.

    2007-01-01

    With the global aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM we investigate the potential influence of organic aerosol originating from the ocean on aerosol mass and chemical composition and the droplet concentration and size of marine clouds. We present sensitivity simulations in which the uptake of organic

  15. Comprehensive Study of Plasma-Wall Sheath Transport Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-26

    the floating potential of wall material samples immersed in a low-temperature plasma were studied. Hysteresis is found to be due to secondary electron...continued research into plasma sheath physics. Hysteresis effects observed in the floating potential of wall material samples immersed in a low... Journal of Applied Physics, Volume 119, March 2016, pp. 113305 1-5. DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for public release. 8 Figure 2

  16. Applicability of the Child-Langmuir laws versions for describing the glow discharge cathode sheath in CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisovskiy, Valeriy; Krol, Hennadii; Osmayev, Ruslan; Yegorenkov, Vladimir

    2016-09-01

    This work is devoted to the determination of the law that may be applicable to the description of the cathode sheath in CO2. To this end three versions of the Child-Langmuir law have been considered - a collision free one (for the ions moving through a cathode sheath without collisions with gas molecules) as well as two collision- related versions- one for a constant mean free path of positive ions and one for a constant mobility of positive ions. The current-voltage characteristics and the cathode sheath thickness of the glow discharge in carbon oxide have been simultaneously measured in the pressure range from 0.05 to 1 Torr and with the discharge current values up to 80 mA. The inter-electrode distance has been chosen such that the discharge consists only of the cathode sheath and a small portion of the negative glow, i.e. the experiments have been performed in short tubes. In this case the voltage drop across the cathode sheath is equal approximately to the voltage drop across the electrodes. In the whole range of the discharge conditions we have studied the cathode sheath characteristics are found to obey correctly only to the Child-Langmuir law version with a constant ion mobility. The reason for this phenomenon may be related with a significant conversion of carbon dioxide molecules.

  17. Determination of J-integral R-curves for the pressure vessel material A 533 B1 using the potential drop technique and the multi-specimen method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krompholz, K.; Ullrich, G.

    1985-01-01

    J-integral experiments at room temperature were performed on three point bend type specimens of the nuclear pressure vessel material A 533 B1 with a/w-ratios of 0.3 and 0.5. Following the ASTM-proposal for the multi-specimen technique a value is obtained close to the value obtained in the HSST round robin test. On the other hand, from the measurement of the Jsub(IC)-value by means of the potential drop technique there is an indication that a lower value of Jsub(IC) is correct. This is in agreement with the multi-specimen technique using linear regression lines without excluding 'invalid' points. That is reasonable if fractographic investigations gives clear indications that stable crack growth has occurred as is the case in this work. (Auth.)

  18. Soil sheaths, photosynthate distribution to roots, and rhizosphere water relations for Opuntia ficus-indica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, B.; North, G.B.; Nobel, P.S. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States))

    1993-09-01

    Soil sheaths incorporating aggregated soil particles surround young roots of many species, but the effects of such sheaths on water movement between roots and the soil are largely unknown. The quantity and location of root exudates associated with soil sheath along the entire length of its young roots, except within 1.4 cm of the tip. The soil sheaths, which average 0.7 mm in thickness, were composed of soil particles and root hairs, both of which were covered with exuded mucilaginous material. As determined with a [sup 14]C pulse-labeling technique, 2% of newly fixed [sup 14]C-photosynthate was translocated into the roots at 3d, 6% at 9 d, and 8% at 15 d after labeling. The fraction of insoluble [sup 14]C in the roots increased twofold from 3 d to 15 d. Over the same time period, 6%-9% of the [sup 14]C translocated to the roots was exuded into the soil. The soluble [sup 14]C compounds exuded into the soil were greater in the 3-cm segment at the root tip than elsewhere along the root, whereas mucilage was exuded relatively uniformly along roots 15 cm in length. The volumetric efflux of water increase for both sheathed and unsheathed roots as the soil water potential decreased form -0.1 MPa to -1.0 MPa. The efflux rate was greater for unsheathed roots than for sheathed roots, which were more turgid and had a higher water potential, especially at lower soil water potentials. During drying, soil particles in the sheaths aggregate more tightly, making the sheaths less permeable to water and possibly creating air gaps. The soil sheaths of O. ficus-indica thus reduce water loss from the roots to a drying soil. 34 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Primary optic nerve sheath meningioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeremic, Branislav [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Pitz, Susanne (eds.) [University Eye Hospital, Mainz (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM) is a rare tumour. Cases are usually separated into primary ONSM, which arises either intraorbitally or, less commonly, intracanalicularly, and secondary ONSM, which arises intracranially and subsequently invades the optic canal and orbit. This is the first book to cover all important aspects of the diagnosis and treatment of primary ONSM. After a general introduction, individual chapters discuss the clinical presentation, clinical examination and diagnosis, imaging, and histology. Treatment options are then addressed in detail, with special emphasis on external beam radiation therapy, and in particular stereotactic fractionated radiation therapy. The latter has recently produced consistently good results and is now considered the emerging treatment of choice for the vast majority of patients with primary ONSM. This well-illustrated book will prove invaluable to all practitioners who encounter primary ONSM in their clinical work. (orig.)

  20. Insulating and sheathing materials of electric and optical cables - Common test methods - Part 5-1: Methods specific to filling compounds - Drop-point - Separation of oil - Lower temperature brittleness - Total acid number - Absence of corrosive components - Permittivity at 23 °C - DC resistivity at 23 °C and 100 °C

    CERN Document Server

    International Electrotechnical Commission. Geneva

    2004-01-01

    Specifies the test methods for filling compounds of electric cables used with telecommunication equipment. Gives the methods for drop-point, separation of oil, lower temperature brittleness, total acid number, absence of corrosive components, permittivity at 23 °C, d.c. resistivity at 23°C and 100°C.

  1. Three-dimensional analysis of antenna sheaths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myra, J.R.; D'Ippolito, D.A.; Ho, Y.L.

    1996-01-01

    The present work is motivated by the importance of r.f. sheaths in determining the antenna-plasma interaction and the sensitivity of the sheaths to the complicated three-dimensional structure of modern ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) antennas. To analyze r.f. sheaths on the plasma facing regions of the launcher, we first calculate the contact points of the tokamak magnetic field lines on the surface of the antenna Faraday screen and nearby limiters for realistic three-dimensional magnetic flux surface and antenna geometries. Next, the r.f. voltage that can drive sheaths at the contact points is determined and used to assess the resulting sheath power dissipation, r.f.-driven sputtering, and r.f.-induced convective cells (which produce edge profile modification). The calculations are embodied in a computer code, ANSAT (antenna sheath analysis tool), and sample ANSAT runs are shown to highlight the physics- and geometry-dependent characteristics of the r.f. sheaths and their relationship to the antenna design. One use of ANSAT is therefore as a design tool, to assess the strengths and weaknesses of a given design with respect to critical voltage handling and edge plasma interaction issues. Additionally, examples are presented where ANSAT has been useful in the analysis and interpretation of ICRF experiments (orig.)

  2. Experimental Studies of Anode Sheath Phenomena in a Hall Thruster Discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorf, L.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N.J.

    2004-01-01

    Both electron-repelling and electron-attracting anode sheaths in a Hall thruster were characterized by measuring the plasma potential with biased and emissive probes [L. Dorf, Y. Raitses, V. Semenov, and N.J. Fisch, Appl. Phys. Let. 84 (2004) 1070]. In the present work, two-dimensional structures of the plasma potential, electron temperature, and plasma density in the near-anode region of a Hall thruster with clean and dielectrically coated anodes are identified. Possible mechanisms of anode sheath formation in a Hall thruster are analyzed. The path for current closure to the anode appears to be the determining factor in the anode sheath formation process. The main conclusion of this work is that the anode sheath formation in Hall thrusters differs essentially from that in the other gas discharge devices, like a glow discharge or a hollow anode, because the Hall thruster utilizes long electron residence times to ionize rather than high neutral pressures

  3. Fine structure of modal focusing effect in a three dimensional plasma-sheath-lens formed by disk electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stamate, Eugen; Yamaguchi, Masahito

    2015-01-01

    Modal and discrete focusing effects associated with three-dimensional plasma-sheath-lenses show promising potential for applications in ion beam extraction, mass spectrometry, plasma diagnostics and for basic studies of plasma sheath. The ion focusing properties can be adjusted by controlling the...

  4. Rectus sheath abscess after laparoscopic appendicectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golash Vishwanath

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Port site wound infection, abdominal wall hematoma and intraabdominal abscess formation has been reported after laparoscopic appendicectomy. We describe here a rectus sheath abscess which occurred three weeks after the laparoscopic appendicectomy. It was most likely the result of secondary infection of the rectus sheath hematoma due to bleeding into the rectus sheath from damage to the inferior epigastric arteries or a direct tear of the rectus muscle. As far as we are aware this complication has not been reported after laparoscopic appendicectomy.

  5. Verification of the Viability of Equipotential Switching Direct Current Potential Drop Method for Piping Wall Loss Monitoring with Signal Sensitivity Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Kyung Ha; Hwang, Il Soon; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2008-01-01

    Flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) phenomenon of low alloy carbon steels in nuclear power plant has been known as one of major degradation mechanisms. It has a potential to cause nuclear pipe rupture accident which may directly impact on the plant reliability and safety. Recently, the equipotential switching direct current potential drop (ES-DCPD) method has been developed, by the present authors, as a method to monitor wall loss in a piping. This method can rapidly monitor the thinning of piping, utilizing either the wide range monitoring (WiRM) or the narrow range monitoring (NaRM) technique. WiRM is a method to monitor wide range of straight piping, whereas NaRM focuses significantly on a narrow range such as an elbow. WiRM and NaRM can improve the reliability of the current FAC screening method that is based on computer modeling on fluid flow conditions. In this paper, the measurements by ES-DCPD are performed with signal sensitivity analyses in the laboratory environment for extended period and showed the viability of ES-DCPD for real plant applications.

  6. Effect of eccentric location of the RBMK CPS displacer graphite block in the shielding sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dostov, A.I.

    2001-01-01

    Temperature conditions and accumulation of Wigner energy in the graphite block of the RBMK reactor CPS (control power system) displacer is examined. It is shown, that at eccentric location of the block in the shielding sheath average temperature of the block drops sharply. Due to the design demerit quantity of the stored energy in the block may be so great, that its release will result in melting of the displacer tube. (author)

  7. Rectus sheath hematoma: three case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapan Selin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Rectus sheath hematoma is an uncommon cause of acute abdominal pain. It is an accumulation of blood in the sheath of the rectus abdominis, secondary to rupture of an epigastric vessel or muscle tear. It could occur spontaneously or after trauma. They are usually located infraumblically and often misdiagnosed as acute abdomen, inflammatory diseases or tumours of the abdomen. Case presentation We reported three cases of rectus sheath hematoma presenting with a mass in the abdomen and diagnosed by computerized tomography. The patients recovered uneventfully after bed rest, intravenous fluid replacement, blood transfusion and analgesic treatment. Conclusion Rectus sheath hematoma is a rarely seen pathology often misdiagnosed as acute abdomen that may lead to unnecessary laparotomies. Computerized tomography must be chosen for definitive diagnosis since ultrasonography is subject to error due to misinterpretation of the images. Main therapy is conservative management.

  8. Retroperitoneal Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumour: A Rare Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deger, Ayse Nur; Bayar, Mehmet Akif; Caydere, Muzaffer; Deger, Hakki; Tayfur, Mahir

    2015-09-01

    Malignant nerve sheath tumours (MPNST) are rare neoplasias and retroperitoneal cases are fairly rare and clinically difficult to be detected, but they are very agressive neoplasias. MPNST are frequently seen in head, neck and upper extremities. In patients with NF1; MPNST, a poor-prognostic lesion, may result from a malignant degeneration of a former plexiform neurofibroma. It is necessary to be aware of a potential malignancy in patients diagnosed with plexiform neurofibroma. We present a 21-year-old female with a diagnosis of MPNST. The patient was admited to the hospital because of a tumour in the subcutaneous region on her left buttock. The surgeon's clinical diagnosis was lipoma. After the pathological examination of biopsy specimen, the lesion was identified as "plexiform neurofibroma" and then the patient was diagnosed with Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1). Simultaneously, another mass on the retroperitoneal region was identified as malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST).

  9. Theory of the Electron Sheath and Presheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiner, Brett; Baalrud, Scott; Yee, Benjamin; Hopkins, Matthew; Barnat, Edward

    2015-09-01

    Electron sheaths are commonly found near Langmuir probes collecting the electron saturation current. The common assumption is that the probe collects the random flux of electrons incident on the sheath, which tacitly implies that there is no electron presheath and that the flux collected is due to a velocity space truncation of the velocity distribution function (VDF). This work provides a dedicated theory of electron sheaths, which suggests that electron sheaths are not so simple. Motivated by VDFs observed in recent Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations, we develop a 1D model for the electron sheath and presheath. In the model, under low temperature plasma conditions, an electron pressure gradient accelerates electrons in the presheath to a flow velocity that exceeds the electron thermal speed at the sheath edge. This pressure gradient allows the generation of large flows compared to those that would be generated by the electric field alone. It is due to this pressure gradient that the electron presheath extends much further into the plasma (nominally by a factor of √{mi /me }) than an analogous ion presheath. Results of the model are compared with PIC simulations. This work was supported by the Office of Fusion Energy Science at the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94SL85000 and by the Office of Science Graduate Student Research (SCGSR) program under Contract Number DE-AC05-06OR23100.

  10. A sheath model for arbitrary radiofrequency waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, M. M.; Chabert, Pascal

    2012-10-01

    The sheath is often the most important region of a rf plasma, because discharge impedance, power absorption and ion acceleration are critically affected by the behaviour of the sheath. Consequently, models of the sheath are central to any understanding of the physics of rf plasmas. Lieberman has supplied an analytical model for a radio-frequency sheath driven by a single frequency, but in recent years interest has been increasing in radio-frequency discharges excited by increasingly complex wave forms. There has been limited success in generalizing the Lieberman model in this direction, because of mathematical complexities. So there is essentially no sheath model available to describe many modern experiments. In this paper we present a new analytical sheath model, based on a simpler mathematical framework than that of Lieberman. For the single frequency case, this model yields scaling laws that are identical in form to those of Lieberman, differing only by numerical coefficients close to one. However, the new model may be straightforwardly solved for arbitrary current waveforms, and may be used to derive scaling laws for such complex waveforms. In this paper, we will describe the model and present some illustrative examples.

  11. Signal sensitivity of alternating current potential drop measurement for crack detection of conductive substrate with tunable coating materials through finite element modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Simha Sandeep; Zhao, Huijuan; Liu, Ming; Peng, Fei; Zhang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    We adopt a finite element numerical modeling approach to investigate the electromagnetic coupling effect of two parallel electric conductors with tunable electric conductivity σ and magnetic permeability μ . For two parallel conductors C and S ( μ C   ⋅  σ C   ≤  μ S   ⋅  σ S ), we find that the shape of current density profile of conductor S is dependent on the product of μ C   ⋅  σ C , while the magnitude is determined by the AC current frequency f . On the other hand, the frequency f affects not only the shape but also the magnitude of the current density profile of conductor C. We further adopt a coplanar model to investigate the signal sensitivity of alternating current potential drop (ACPD) measurement for both surface crack and inner crack detection. We find that with modified coating materials (lower electric conductivity and higher magnetic permeability, compared with the substrate material properties), the crack detection signal sensitivity can be greatly enhanced for both the cracks within the coating and at the coating/substrate interface, where cracks are most commonly encountered in real situations. (paper)

  12. How to Patch Active Plasma and Collisionless Sheath: Practical Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaganovich, Igor D.

    2002-01-01

    Most plasmas have a very thin sheath compared with the plasma dimension. This necessitates separate calculations of the plasma and sheath. The Bohm criterion provides the boundary condition for calculation of plasma profiles. To calculate sheath properties, a value of electric field at the plasma-sheath interface has to be specified in addition to the Bohm criterion. The value of the boundary electric field and robust procedure to approximately patch plasma and collisionless sheath with a very good accuracy are reported

  13. Balloon sheaths for gastrointestinal guidance and access: a preliminary phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Xu; Shin, Ji Hoon; Kim, Hyo Cheol; Woo, Cheol Woong; Woo, Sung Ha; Choi, Won Chan; Kim, Jong Gyu; Lim, Jin Oh; Kim, Tae Hyung; Yoon, Chang Jin; Song, Ho Young; Kang, Wee Chang

    2005-01-01

    We wanted to evaluate the feasibility and usefulness of a newly designed balloon sheath for gastrointestinal guidance and access by conducting a phantom study. The newly designed balloon sheath consisted of an introducer sheath and a supporting balloon. A coil catheter was advanced over a guide wire into two gastroduodenal phantoms (one was with stricture and one was without stricture); group I was without a balloon sheath, group II was with a deflated balloon sheath, and groups III and IV were with an inflated balloon and with the balloon in the fundus and body, respectively. Each test was performed for 2 minutes and it was repeated 10 times in each group by two researchers, and the positions reached by the catheter tip were recorded. Both researchers had better performances with both phantoms in order of group IV, III, II and I. In group IV, both researchers advanced the catheter tip through the fourth duodenal segment in both the phantoms. In group I, however, the catheter tip never reached the third duodenal segment in both the phantoms by both the researchers. The numeric values for the four study groups were significantly different for both the phantoms (ρ < 0.001). A significant difference was also found between group III and IV for both phantoms (ρ < 0.001). The balloon sheath seems to be feasible for clinical use, and it has good clinical potential for gastrointestinal guidance and access, particularly when the inflated balloon is placed in the gastric body

  14. Evaluation of the equine digital flexor tendon sheath using diagnostic ultrasound and contrast radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redding, W.R.

    1994-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the normal anatomy of the digital flexor tendon sheath using contrast radiography and diagnostic ultrasound. Iodinated contrast medium was injected into eight cadaver limbs and the limbs immediately frozen. Lateromedial and dorsopalmar/plantar radiographs were made. These limps were then cut transversely and proximal to distal radiographs of each slab were made. This cross sectional contrast methodology allowed the visualization of the relative size and shape of the superficial and deep digital flexor tendons as well as the potential space taken by effusions of the digital flexor tendon sheath. The second part of the study used twelve live animals with normal digital flexor tendon sheaths. Ultrasonographic measurement of the structures of the digital flexor tendon sheath at each level were compiled. This documented the ability of diagnostic ultrasound to image: 1) the superficial and deep digital flexor tendons, 2) the proximal and distal ring of the manica flexoria, 3) the straight and oblique sesamoidean ligaments, and 4) the mesotendinous attachments to the superficial and deep flexor tendons. Iodinated contrast medium was then injected into the digital flexor tendon sheath and the ultrasonography repeated. These images were compared with those obtained from contrast radiography and prosections of twenty normal limbs. The iodinated contrast medium enhanced sonographic imaging of the structures of the digital tendon sheath, particularly the abaxial borders of the superficial digital flexor tendon branches and the mesotendinous attachments to the superficial and deep digital flexor tendons

  15. Application of Spray Foam Insulation Under Plywood and Oriented Strand Board Roof Sheathing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grin, A. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Smegal, J. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Lstiburek, J. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Unvented roof strategies with open cell and closed cell spray polyurethane foam insulation sprayed to the underside of roof sheathing have been used since the mid-1990's to provide durable and efficient building enclosures. However, there have been isolated moisture related incidents reported anecdotally that raise potential concerns about the overall hygrothermal performance of these systems. This project involved hygrothermal modeling of a range of rainwater leakage and field evaluations of in-service residential roofs using spray foam insulation. All of the roof assemblies modeled exhibited drying capacity to handle minor rainwater leakage. All field evaluation locations of in-service residential roofs had moisture contents well within the safe range for wood-based sheathing. Explorations of eleven in-service roof systems were completed. The exploration involved taking a sample of spray foam from the underside of the roof sheathing, exposing the sheathing, then taking a moisture content reading. All locations had moisture contents well within the safe range for wood-based sheathing. One full-roof failure was reviewed, as an industry partner was involved with replacing structurally failed roof sheathing. In this case the manufacturer's investigation report concluded that the spray foam was installed on wet OSB based on the observation that the spray foam did not adhere well to the substrate and the pore structure of the closed cell spray foam at the ccSPF/OSB interface was indicative of a wet substrate.

  16. Dynamics of deforming drops

    OpenAIRE

    Bouwhuis, W.

    2015-01-01

    Liquid drops play a dominant role in numerous industrial applications, such as spray coating, spray painting, inkjet printing, lithography processes, and spraying/sprinkling in agriculture or gardening. In all of these examples, the generation, flight, impact, and spreading of drops are separate stages of the corresponding industrial processes, which are all thoroughly studied for many years. This thesis focuses on drop dynamics, impact phenomena, Leidenfrost drops, and pouring flows. Based o...

  17. Sheath and arc-column voltages in high-pressure arc discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benilov, M S; Benilova, L G; Li Heping; Wu Guiqing

    2012-01-01

    Electrical characteristics of a 1 cm-long free-burning atmospheric-pressure argon arc are calculated by means of a model taking into account the existence of a near-cathode space-charge sheath and the discrepancy between the electron and heavy-particle temperatures in the arc column. The computed arc voltage exhibits a variation with the arc current I similar to the one revealed by the experiment and exceeds experimental values by no more than approximately 2 V in the current range 20-175 A. The sheath contributes about two-thirds or more of the arc voltage. The LTE model predicts a different variation of the arc voltage with I and underestimates the experimental values appreciably for low currents but by no more than approximately 2 V for I ≳ 120 A. However, the latter can hardly be considered as a proof of unimportance of the space-charge sheath at high currents: the LTE model overestimates both the resistance of the bulk of the arc column and the resistance of the part of the column that is adjacent to the cathode, and this overestimation to a certain extent compensates for the neglect of the voltage drop in the sheath. Furthermore, if the latter resistance were evaluated in the framework of the LTE model in an accurate way, then the overestimation would be still much stronger and the obtained voltage would significantly exceed those observed in the experiment.

  18. Plasma sheath in non-Maxwellian plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Takuo; Horigome, Takashi

    1992-01-01

    Reviewing many theoretical and experimental works on the electron-energy distributions (EEDF) of various plasmas, we point out that many plasmas have EEDF of non-Maxwellian in shape. Therefore, the recent treatment of plasma sheath using the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution approximation should be improved. To do this, we have adopted Rutcher's standard distribution as a generalized form in place of the traditional Maxwellian, and found that the minimum energy of ions entering the sheath edge (Bohm's criterion) varies largely, and have also shown the variation of Debye length with the shape of EEDF. The length is the most important parameter to proceed with more detailed analysis on plasma-sheaths, and also to control them in the future. (author)

  19. Controlling laser ablation plasma with external electrodes. Application to sheath dynamics study and beam physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isono, Fumika; Nakajima, Mitsuo; Hasegawa, Jun; Kawamura, Tohru; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    The potential of laser ablation plasma was controlled successfully by using external ring electrodes. We found that an electron sheath is formed at the plasma boundary, which plays an important role in the potential formation. When the positively biased plasma reaches a grounded grid, electrons in the plasma are turned away and ions are accelerated, which leads to the formation of a virtual anode between the grid and an ion probe. We think that this device which can raise the plasma potential up to order of kV can be applied to the study of sheath dynamics and to a new type of ion beam extraction. (author)

  20. The components of the adsorption potential drop at the Ga and In-Ga electrodes in three solvents: a calculation with allowance for hydrophily of the Ag(111) single crystal face

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emets, V.V.; Damaskin, B.B.; Kazarinov, V.E.

    1996-01-01

    The components of adsorption potential drop on the Ga and In-Ga electrodes in water, DMPA and DSMO, taking into account hydrophily of Ag(111) single crystal face in the framework of the metal-solvent contact modified model, have been recalculated. The data obtained are compared with the previously acquired ones. It is pointed out that corrections for the components of adsorptional potential relating to account of Ag(111) face hydrophily are not negligible. 8 refs., 1 tab

  1. Optic Nerve Sheath Meningocele: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halimi, E.; Wavreille, O.; Rosenberg, R.; Bouacha, I.; Lejeune, J.-P.; Defoort-Dhellemmes, S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Isolated optic nerve sheath meningocele is a rare affection defined as the cystic enlargement of the optic nerve sheath filled with cerebrospinal fluid. We report the case of a 39-year-old woman presenting with bilateral meningocele uncovered during a routine examination for headache complaints. A 5-year follow-up validated the lesion’s clinical and imaging stability. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an essential tool in the diagnosis of this pathology, alongside characteristic symptoms indicating that the meningocele might have progressively expanded into the orbit. In this case we present a therapeutic approach based on pathophysiological hypotheses and review of the literature. PMID:28163760

  2. Arthroscopic sheath design and technical evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuijthof, Gabriëlle J. M.; Blankevoort, Leendert; Herder, Just L.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2009-01-01

    The maintenance of a clear view on the operation area is essential to perform a minimally invasive procedure In arthroscopy, this is achieved by irrigating the Joint with a saline fluid that is pumped through the joint At present the arthroscopic sheaths are not designed for optimal irrigation,

  3. RF-sheath assessment of ICRF antenna geometry for long pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colas, L.; Bremond, S.

    2003-01-01

    Monitoring powered ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) antennas in magnetic fusion devices has revealed localized modifications of the plasma edge in the antenna shadow, most of them probably related to an enhanced polarization of the scrape-off layer (SOL) through radio-frequency (RF) sheath rectification. Although tolerable on present short RF pulses, sheaths should be minimized, as they may hinder proper operation of steady-state antennas and other subsystems connected magnetically to them, such as lower hybrid grills. As a first step towards mitigating RF sheaths in the design of future antennas, the present paper analyses the spatial structure of sheath potential maps in their vicinity, in relation with the 3D topology of RF near fields and the geometry of antenna front faces. Various combinations of poloidal radiating straps are first considered, and results are confronted to those inferred from transmission line theory. The dependence of sheath potentials on RF voltages or RF currents is studied. The role of RF near-field symmetries along tilted field lines is stressed to interpret such effects as that of strap phasing. A generalization of the 'dipole effect' is proposed. With similar arguments, the behavior of Faraday screen corners, where hot spots concentrate on Tore-Supra (TS), is then studied. The merits of aligning the antenna structure with the tilted magnetic field are thus discussed. The effect of switching from TS (high RF voltage near corners) to ITER-like electrical configurations of the straps (high voltage near equatorial plane) is also analyzed. (authors)

  4. Scanning drop sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John

    2017-05-09

    Electrochemical experiments are performed on a collection of samples by suspending a drop of electrolyte solution between an electrochemical experiment probe and one of the samples that serves as a test sample. During the electrochemical experiment, the electrolyte solution is added to the drop and an output solution is removed from the drop. The probe and collection of samples can be moved relative to one another so the probe can be scanned across the samples.

  5. Scanning drop sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John M.; Shinde, Aniketa A.; Guevarra, Dan W.; Jones, Ryan J.; Marcin, Martin R.; Mitrovic, Slobodan

    2017-05-09

    Electrochemical or electrochemical and photochemical experiments are performed on a collection of samples by suspending a drop of electrolyte solution between an electrochemical experiment probe and one of the samples that serves as a test sample. During the electrochemical experiment, the electrolyte solution is added to the drop and an output solution is removed from the drop. The probe and collection of samples can be moved relative to one another so the probe can be scanned across the samples.

  6. Particle flows to shape and voltage surface discontinuities in the electron sheath surrounding a high voltage solar array in LEO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Roger N.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the numerical modeling of electron flows from the sheath surrounding high positively biased objects in LEO (Low Earth Orbit) to regions of voltage or shape discontinuity on the biased surfaces. The sheath equations are derived from the Two-fluid, Warm Plasma Model. An equipotential corner and a plane containing strips of alternating voltage bias are treated in two dimensions. A self-consistent field solution of the sheath equations is outlined and is pursued through one cycle. The electron density field is determined by numerical solution of Poisson's equation for the electrostatic potential in the sheath using the NASCAP-LEO relation between electrostatic potential and charge density. Electron flows are calculated numerically from the electron continuity equation. Magnetic field effects are not treated.

  7. Nonlinear oscillations of inviscid free drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzek, T. W.; Benner, R. E., Jr.; Basaran, O. A.; Scriven, L. E.

    1991-01-01

    The present analysis of free liquid drops' inviscid oscillations proceeds through solution of Bernoulli's equation to obtain the free surface shape and of Laplace's equation for the velocity potential field. Results thus obtained encompass drop-shape sequences, pressure distributions, particle paths, and the temporal evolution of kinetic and surface energies; accuracy is verified by the near-constant drop volume and total energy, as well as the diminutiveness of mass and momentum fluxes across drop surfaces. Further insight into the nature of oscillations is provided by Fourier power spectrum analyses of mode interactions and frequency shifts.

  8. Effects of neutral gas collisions on the power transmission factor at the divertor sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Futch, A.H.; Matthews, G.F.; Buchenauer, D.; Hill, D.N.; Jong, R.A.; Porter, G.D.

    1992-01-01

    We show that charge-exchange and other ion-neutral collision can reduce the power transmission factor of the plasma sheath, thereby lowering the ion impact energy and target plate sputtering. The power transmission factor relates the heat flux reaching the divertor target to the plasma density and temperature just in front of the surface: δ=Q surf /J ew k T e . Experimental data from the DIII-D tokamak suggests that δ could be as low as 2-3 near the region of peak divertor particle flux, instead of the 7-8 expected from usual sheath theory. Several effects combine to allow ion-neutral interactions to be important in the divertor plasma sheath. The shallow angle of incidence of the magnetic field (1-3deg in DIII-D) leads to the spatial extension of the sheath from approximately ρ i ∝1 mm normal to the plate to several centimeters along the field lines. Ionization reduces the sheath potential, and collisions reduce the ion impact energy. (orig.)

  9. Redefinition of the self-bias voltage in a dielectrically shielded thin sheath RF discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Teck Seng; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod

    2018-05-01

    In a geometrically asymmetric capacitively coupled discharge where the powered electrode is shielded from the plasma by a layer of dielectric material, the self-bias manifests as a nonuniform negative charging in the dielectric rather than on the blocking capacitor. In the thin sheath regime where the ion transit time across the powered sheath is on the order of or less than the Radiofrequency (RF) period, the plasma potential is observed to respond asymmetrically to extraneous impedances in the RF circuit. Consequently, the RF waveform on the plasma-facing surface of the dielectric is unknown, and the behaviour of the powered sheath is not easily predictable. Sheath circuit models become inadequate for describing this class of discharges, and a comprehensive fluid, electrical, and plasma numerical model is employed to accurately quantify this behaviour. The traditional definition of the self-bias voltage as the mean of the RF waveform is shown to be erroneous in this regime. Instead, using the maxima of the RF waveform provides a more rigorous definition given its correlation with the ion dynamics in the powered sheath. This is supported by a RF circuit model derived from the computational fluid dynamics and plasma simulations.

  10. Anode sheath transition in an anodic arc for synthesis of nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemchinsky, V. A.; Raitses, Y.

    2016-06-01

    The arc discharge with ablating anode or so-called anodic arc is widely used for synthesis of nanomaterials, including carbon nanotubes and fullerens, metal nanoparticles etc. We present the model of this arc, which confirms the existence of the two different modes of the arc operation with two different anode sheath regimes, namely, with negative anode sheath and with positive anode sheath. It was previously suggested that these regimes are associated with two different anode ablating modes—low ablation mode with constant ablation rate and the enhanced ablation mode (Fetterman et al 2008 Carbon 46 1322). The transition of the arc operation from low ablation mode to high ablation mode is determined by the current density at the anode. The model can be used to self-consistently determine the distribution of the electric field, electron density and electron temperature in the near-anode region of the arc discharge. Simulations of the carbon arc predict that for low arc ablating modes, the current is driven mainly by the electron diffusion to the anode. For positive anode sheath, the anode voltage is close to the ionization potential of anode material, while for negative anode sheath, the anode voltage is an order of magnitude smaller. It is also shown that the near-anode plasma, is far from the ionization equilibrium.

  11. Anode sheath transition in an anodic arc for synthesis of nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemchinsky, V A; Raitses, Y

    2016-01-01

    The arc discharge with ablating anode or so-called anodic arc is widely used for synthesis of nanomaterials, including carbon nanotubes and fullerens, metal nanoparticles etc. We present the model of this arc, which confirms the existence of the two different modes of the arc operation with two different anode sheath regimes, namely, with negative anode sheath and with positive anode sheath. It was previously suggested that these regimes are associated with two different anode ablating modes—low ablation mode with constant ablation rate and the enhanced ablation mode (Fetterman et al 2008 Carbon 46 1322). The transition of the arc operation from low ablation mode to high ablation mode is determined by the current density at the anode. The model can be used to self-consistently determine the distribution of the electric field, electron density and electron temperature in the near-anode region of the arc discharge. Simulations of the carbon arc predict that for low arc ablating modes, the current is driven mainly by the electron diffusion to the anode. For positive anode sheath, the anode voltage is close to the ionization potential of anode material, while for negative anode sheath, the anode voltage is an order of magnitude smaller. It is also shown that the near-anode plasma, is far from the ionization equilibrium. (paper)

  12. FEAST 3.1: finite-element modeling of sheath deformation such as longitudinal ridging and collapse into axial gap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, X.; Xu, Z.; Kim, Y-S.; Lai, L.; Cheng, G.; Xu, S. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    During normal operation, the collapsible CANDU® fuel sheath deforms, especially, it may deform into longitudinal ridges or collapse instantaneously into the axial gaps between the end pellet and endcap or between two neighbouring pellets. These phenomena occur under certain conditions, such as the coolant pressure exceeding critical pressures for longitudinal ridging or axial collapse. Both longitudinal ridging and axial collapse phenomena result from plastic instability in the sheath under coolant pressure. Longitudinal ridging features one or multiple lobes or 'ridges' (outward from the sheath surface) formed along the sheath in the longitudinal direction. Axial collapse features a 'valley' around the sheath circumference. Both phenomena can lead to sheath overstrain, which in turn potentially leads to sheath failure. The LONGER code, which contains empirical correlations, has been used to predict the critical pressures for these two sheath deformation phenomena. To study fuel behaviour outside of the application ranges of the LONGER empirical correlations, a mechanistic model is needed. FEAST (Finite Element Analysis for Stresses) is an AECL computer code used to assess the structural integrity of the CANDU fuel element. The FEAST code has recently been developed (to Version 3.1) to model processes occurring during longitudinal ridge formation and instantaneous collapse into the axial gap. The new models include those for geometric non-linearity (large deformation, large material rotation), non-linear stress-strain curve for plastic deformation, Zr-4 sheath creep law, and variable Young’s Modulus etc. This paper describes the mechanistic model (FEAST 3.1) development for analyses of longitudinal ridging and instantaneous collapse into axial gap, and the comparison with the results from empirical correlations in LONGER. (author)

  13. FEAST 3.1: finite-element modeling of sheath deformation such as longitudinal ridging and collapse into axial gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, X.; Xu, Z.; Kim, Y-S.; Lai, L.; Cheng, G.; Xu, S.

    2010-01-01

    During normal operation, the collapsible CANDU® fuel sheath deforms, especially, it may deform into longitudinal ridges or collapse instantaneously into the axial gaps between the end pellet and endcap or between two neighbouring pellets. These phenomena occur under certain conditions, such as the coolant pressure exceeding critical pressures for longitudinal ridging or axial collapse. Both longitudinal ridging and axial collapse phenomena result from plastic instability in the sheath under coolant pressure. Longitudinal ridging features one or multiple lobes or 'ridges' (outward from the sheath surface) formed along the sheath in the longitudinal direction. Axial collapse features a 'valley' around the sheath circumference. Both phenomena can lead to sheath overstrain, which in turn potentially leads to sheath failure. The LONGER code, which contains empirical correlations, has been used to predict the critical pressures for these two sheath deformation phenomena. To study fuel behaviour outside of the application ranges of the LONGER empirical correlations, a mechanistic model is needed. FEAST (Finite Element Analysis for Stresses) is an AECL computer code used to assess the structural integrity of the CANDU fuel element. The FEAST code has recently been developed (to Version 3.1) to model processes occurring during longitudinal ridge formation and instantaneous collapse into the axial gap. The new models include those for geometric non-linearity (large deformation, large material rotation), non-linear stress-strain curve for plastic deformation, Zr-4 sheath creep law, and variable Young’s Modulus etc. This paper describes the mechanistic model (FEAST 3.1) development for analyses of longitudinal ridging and instantaneous collapse into axial gap, and the comparison with the results from empirical correlations in LONGER. (author)

  14. Axisymmetric Liquid Hanging Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, Erich C.; Latychevskaia, Tatiana Yu

    2006-01-01

    The geometry of drops hanging on a circular capillary can be determined by numerically solving a dimensionless differential equation that is independent on any material properties, which enables one to follow the change of the height, surface area, and contact angle of drops hanging on a particular capillary. The results show that the application…

  15. Turbulence, bubbles and drops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, Roeland

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis, several questions related to drop impact and Taylor-Couette turbulence are answered. The deformation of a drop just before impact can cause a bubble to be entrapped. For many applications, such as inkjet printing, it is crucial to control the size of this entrapped bubble. To study

  16. Drop Tower Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, William A.

    2014-01-01

    The drop towers of yesteryear were used to make lead shot for muskets, as described in "The Physics Teacher" in April 2012. However, modern drop towers are essentially elevators designed so that the cable can "break" on demand, creating an environment with microgravity for a short period of time, currently up to nine seconds at…

  17. Dynamics of deforming drops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwhuis, W.

    2015-01-01

    Liquid drops play a dominant role in numerous industrial applications, such as spray coating, spray painting, inkjet printing, lithography processes, and spraying/sprinkling in agriculture or gardening. In all of these examples, the generation, flight, impact, and spreading of drops are separate

  18. Sheath-lens probe for negative ion detection in reactive plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamate, E.; Sugai, H.; Takai, O.; Ohe, K.

    2004-01-01

    A method that allows easy and inexpensive detection of negative ions is introduced. The method is based upon the electrostatic lens effect of the sheath layer evolving to a positively biased planar probe that focuses the negative charges to distinct regions on the surface. Trajectories of negative ions inside the sheath are obtained after computing the potential and electric field distribution by solving in three dimensions the nonlinear Poisson equation. The negative ions' flux to square and disk probes is developed in Ar/SF 6 and O 2 plasmas. The method allows negative ion detection with sensitivity higher than that of Langmuir probes

  19. The dust characteristics in the collisional plasma sheath at the presence of external magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shourkaei, Hossein Akbarian [AEOI, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Plasma Physics Research Group

    2015-05-15

    The characteristics of dust in a plasma sheath are investigated in the presence of an external magnetic field and taking into account neutral collision forces. By using the fluid model, the continuity and momentum equations of ions and dusts are solved numerically with various magnitudes of collision force. In various magnitude and directions of the magnetic field, the electron and ion density distribution, ion flow velocity, electron potential have been calculated. It is shown that magnetic field has obvious effect on the plasma sheath and the collision force reduces the dust kinetic energy.

  20. Genetic instability in nerve sheath cell tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogatto, Silvia Regina; Casartelli, Cacilda; Rainho, Claudia Aparecida

    1995-01-01

    After in vitro culture, we analyzed cytogenetically four acoustic nerve neurinomas, one intraspinal neurinoma and one neurofibroma obtainedfrom unrelated patients. Monosomy of chromosomes 22 and 16 was an abnormality common to all cases, followed in frequency by loss of chromosomes 18 (three cases...... by the presence of polyploid cells with inconsistent abnormalities, endoreduplications and telomeric associations resulting in dicentric chromosomes. It is probable that these cytogenetic abnormalities represent some kind of evolutionary advantage for the in vitro progression of nerve sheath tumors....

  1. Electron inertia effects on the planar plasma sheath problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte, V. N.; Clemente, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    The steady one-dimensional planar plasma sheath problem, originally considered by Tonks and Langmuir, is revisited. Assuming continuously generated free-falling ions and isothermal electrons and taking into account electron inertia, it is possible to describe the problem in terms of three coupled integro-differential equations that can be numerically integrated. The inclusion of electron inertia in the model allows us to obtain the value of the plasma floating potential as resulting from an electron density discontinuity at the walls, where the electrons attain sound velocity and the electric potential is continuous. Results from numerical computation are presented in terms of plots for densities, electric potential, and particles velocities. Comparison with results from literature, corresponding to electron Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution (neglecting electron inertia), is also shown.

  2. Sheath and heat flow of a two-electron-temperature plasma in the presence of electron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Kunihiro; Miyawaki, Fujio

    1992-01-01

    The electrostatic sheath and the heat flow of a two-electron-temperature plasma in the presence of electron emission are investigated analytically. It is shown that the energy flux is markedly enhanced to a value near the electron free-flow energy flux as a result of considerable reduction of the sheath potential due to electron emission if the fraction of hot electrons at the sheath edge is much smaller than one. If the hot- to cold-electron temperature ratio is of the order of ten and the hot electron density is comparable to the cold electron density, the action of the sheath as a thermal insulator is improved as a result of suppression of electron emission due to the space-charge effect of hot electrons. (author)

  3. Safety assessment of a dry storage container drop into irradiated fuel bays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parlatan, Y.; Oh, D.; Arguner, D.; Lei, Q.M.; Kulpa, T.; Bayoumi, M.H.

    2004-01-01

    In Pickering nuclear stations, Dry Storage Containers (DSCs) are employed to transfer used (irradiated) fuel from an irradiated fuel bay to a dry storage facility for interim storage. Each DSC is wet-loaded in the bay water with 4 fuel modules containing up to a total of 384 used fuel bundles that have been out of the reactor core for at least 10 years. Once the DSC is fully loaded, the crane in the bay raises the DSC for spray-wash such that the bottom of the DSC is never more than 2 m above the bay water surface. This paper presents a safety assessment of consequences of an unlikely event that a fully loaded DSC is accidentally dropped into an irradiated fuel bay from the highest possible elevation. Experiments and analyses performed elsewhere show that the DSC drop-generated shock waves will not threaten the structural integrity of an irradiated fuel bay. Therefore, this assessment only assesses the potential damage to the spent fuel bundles in the bay due to pressure transients generated by an accidental DSC drop. A bounding estimate approach has been used to calculate the upper limit of the pressure pulse and the resulting static and dynamic stresses on the fuel sheath. The bounding calculations and relevant experimental results demonstrate that an accidental drop of a fully loaded DSC into an irradiated fuel bay will not cause additional failures of the main fuel inventories stored in modules in the bay water, thus no consequential release of fission products into the bay water. (author)

  4. Randomized clinical trial of biodegradeable intraluminal sheath to prevent anastomotic leak after stapled colorectal anastomosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, I S; Morks, A N; Ten Cate Hoedemaker, H O; Burgerhof, J G M; Leuvenink, H G; van Praagh, J B; Ploeg, R J; Havenga, K

    Background: Anastomotic leakage is a potential major complication after colorectal surgery. The C-seal was developed to help reduce the clinical leakage rate. It is an intraluminal sheath that is stapled proximal to a colorectal anastomosis, covering it intraluminally and thus preventing intestinal

  5. Drop "impact" on an airfoil surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhenlong

    2018-05-17

    Drop impact on an airfoil surface takes place in drop-laden two-phase flow conditions such as rain and icing, which are encountered by wind turbines or airplanes. This phenomenon is characterized by complex nonlinear interactions that manifest rich flow physics and pose unique modeling challenges. In this article, the state of the art of the research about drop impact on airfoil surface in the natural drop-laden two-phase flow environment is presented. The potential flow physics, hazards, characteristic parameters, droplet trajectory calculation, drop impact dynamics and effects are discussed. The most key points in establishing the governing equations for a drop-laden flow lie in the modeling of raindrop splash and water film. The various factors affecting the drop impact dynamics and the effects of drop impact on airfoil aerodynamic performance are summarized. Finally, the principle challenges and future research directions in the field as well as some promising measures to deal with the adverse effects of drop-laden flows on airfoil performance are proposed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Radio frequency sheaths in an oblique magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    The physics of radio-frequency (rf) sheaths near a conducting surface is studied for plasmas immersed in a magnetic field that makes an oblique angle θ with the surface. A set of one-dimensional equations is developed that describes the dynamics of the time-dependent magnetic presheath and non-neutral Debye sheath. The model employs Maxwell-Boltzmann electrons, and the magnetization and mobility of the ions is determined by the magnetic field strength, and wave frequency, respectively. The angle θ, assumed to be large enough to insure an electron-poor sheath, is otherwise arbitrary. Concentrating on the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies, the equations are solved numerically to obtain the rectified (dc) voltage, the rf voltage across the sheath, and the rf current flowing through the sheath. As an application of this model, the sheath voltage-current relation is used to obtain the rf sheath impedance, which in turn gives an rf sheath boundary condition for the electric field at the sheath-plasma interface that can be used in rf wave codes. In general, the impedance has both resistive and capacitive contributions, and generalizes previous sheath boundary condition models. The resistive part contributes to parasitic power dissipation at the wall

  7. "Who am I supposed to let down?": The caring work and emotional practices of vocational educational training teachers working with potential drop-out students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippke, Lena

    2012-01-01

    initiatives and as a result, most colleges have established extended basic courses aimed at students with personal, social and/or academic difficulties. This paper aims to explore the emotional aspects of vocational educational teachers’ work and present a preliminary analysis of the notion of care....... Findings – The paper provides empirical insights into the emotional practices and the management of emotions related to prevention of dropout within an educational setting. It shows how emotional practices can provide both teachers and students with positive identities and make out a productive force...... that prevents students from dropping out. However the management of emotions also involves a range of dilemmas and ambivalences revealing the difficult limitations related to an institutionalization and professionalization of human care. Research limitations/implications – Because of the chosen research design...

  8. Optic Nerve Sheath Mechanics in VIIP Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raykin, Julia; Forte, Taylor E.; Wang, Roy; Feola, Andrew; Samuels, Brian; Myers, Jerry; Nelson, Emily; Gleason, Rudy; Ethier, C. Ross

    2016-01-01

    Visual Impairment Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome is a major concern in current space medicine research. While the exact pathology of VIIP is not yet known, it is hypothesized that the microgravity-induced cephalad fluid shift increases intracranial pressure (ICP) and drives remodeling of the optic nerve sheath. To investigate this possibility, we are culturing optic nerve sheath dura mater samples under different pressures and investigating changes in tissue composition. To interpret results from this work, it is essential to first understand the biomechanical response of the optic nerve sheath dura mater to loading. Here, we investigated the effects of mechanical loading on the porcine optic nerve sheath.Porcine optic nerves (number: 6) were obtained immediately after death from a local abattoir. The optic nerve sheath (dura mater) was isolated from the optic nerve proper, leaving a hollow cylinder of connective tissue that was used for biomechanical characterization. We developed a custom mechanical testing system that allowed for unconfined lengthening, twisting, and circumferential distension of the dura mater during inflation and under fixed axial loading. To determine the effects of variations in ICP, the sample was inflated (0-60 millimeters Hg) and circumferential distension was simultaneously recorded. These tests were performed under variable axial loads (0.6 grams - 5.6 grams at increments of 1 gram) by attaching different weights to one end of the dura mater. Results and Conclusions: The samples demonstrated nonlinear behavior, similar to other soft connective tissue (Figure 1). Large increases in diameter were observed at lower transmural pressures (approximately 0 to 5 millimeters Hg), whereas only small diameter changes were observed at higher pressures. Particularly interesting was the existence of a cross-over point at a pressure of approximately 11 millimeters Hg. At this pressure, the same diameter is obtained for all axial loads applied

  9. Sheath formation and extraction of ions from a constricted R.F ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Salam, F W; Helal, A G; El-Khabeary, H; El-Merai, N T [Accelerators Dept., Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo, (Egypt)

    1997-12-31

    The present work investigates the plasma characteristics in a constricted R. F. ion source. The extraction of ions from the plasma boundary and sheath formation were studied. The ion source physical parameters are discussed in order to understand the physical processes occurring within the discharge region up to the extraction system. Electron temperature and density were determined using Langmuir probe. The probe current-voltage characteristics were measured for different extraction voltages (ext.) = 0,500,1000, and 1250 volt at various constant R.F. powers. The effect of R.F. power on electron temperature was deduced for a beam = plasma discharge. This revealed that for a quasi-neutral (plasma) region the electron temperature increased linearly with the R.F. Power which leads to substantial electron heating and efficient electron energy transport in this region. Applying extraction voltage, the electron temperature drops as the ionization rate increases. The sheath thickness was obtained at constant extraction voltages. The curves show that if the ion current density increased, the sheath thickness decreased while it increases by increasing extraction voltage, and it is negligible in the plasma region. 13 figs.

  10. Sheath insulator final test report, TFE Verification Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    The sheath insulator in a thermionic cell has two functions. First, the sheath insulator must electrically isolate the collector form the outer containment sheath tube that is in contact with the reactor liquid metal coolant. Second, The sheath insulator must provide for high uniform thermal conductance between the collector and the reactor coolant to remove away waste heat. The goals of the sheath insulator test program were to demonstrate that suitable ceramic materials and fabrication processes were available, and to validate the performance of the sheath insulator for TFE-VP requirements. This report discusses the objectives of the test program, fabrication development, ex-reactor test program, in-reactor test program, and the insulator seal specifications

  11. Sheath insulator final test report, TFE Verification Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    The sheath insulator in a thermionic cell has two functions. First, the sheath insulator must electrically isolate the collector form the outer containment sheath tube that is in contact with the reactor liquid metal coolant. Second, The sheath insulator must provide for high uniform thermal conductance between the collector and the reactor coolant to remove away waste heat. The goals of the sheath insulator test program were to demonstrate that suitable ceramic materials and fabrication processes were available, and to validate the performance of the sheath insulator for TFE-VP requirements. This report discusses the objectives of the test program, fabrication development, ex-reactor test program, in-reactor test program, and the insulator seal specifications.

  12. Nondestructive testing of metallic sheath for internally cooled superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClung, R.W.; Cook, K.V.; Dodd, C.V.; Smith, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    For quality assurance in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Large Coil Program, we developed ultrasonic and eddy-current techniques to examine the JBK-75 alloy sheath for superconducting cable for a large magnet. Ultrasound was used to examine the strip before forming into the sheath, and eddy currents were used to examine the seam weld after the sheath had been formed around the cable

  13. Multimodal imaging in neurofibromatosis type 1-associated nerve sheath tumors; Multimodale Bildgebung bei Neurofibromatose-Typ-1-assoziierten Nervenscheidentumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salamon, J.; Adam, G. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Mautner, V.F. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Neurology; Derlin, T. [Hannover Medical School, Hannover (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2015-12-15

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a neurogenetic disorder. Individuals with NF1 may develop a variety of benign and malignant tumors of which peripheral nerve sheath tumors represent the most frequent entity. Plexiform neurofibromas may demonstrate a locally destructive growth pattern, may cause severe symptoms and may undergo malignant transformation into malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs). Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) represents the reference standard for detection of soft tissue tumors in NF1. It allows for identification of individuals with plexiform neurofibromas, for assessment of local tumor extent, and for evaluation of whole-body tumor burden on T2-weighted imaging. Multiparametric MRI may provide a comprehensive characterization of different tissue properties of peripheral nerve sheath tumors, and may identify parameters associated with malignant transformation. Due to the absence of any radiation exposure, whole-body MRI may be used for serial follow-up of individuals with plexiform neurofibromas. {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission-tomography (FDG PET/CT) allows a highly sensitive and specific detection of MPNST, and should be used in case of potential malignant transformation of a peripheral nerve sheath tumor. PET/CT provides a sensitive whole-body tumor staging. The use of contrast-enhanced CT for diagnosis of peripheral nerve sheath tumors is limited to special indications. To obtain the most precise readings, optimized examination protocols and dedicated radiologists and nuclear medicine physicians familiar with the complex and variable morphologies of peripheral nerve sheath tumors are required.

  14. Tumor targeted delivery of doxorubicin in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A B Madhankumar

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve sheath tumors are benign tumors that have the potential to transform into malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs. Interleukin-13 receptor alpha 2 (IL13Rα2 is a cancer associated receptor expressed in glioblastoma and other invasive cancers. We analyzed IL13Rα2 expression in several MPNST cell lines including the STS26T cell line, as well as in several peripheral nerve sheath tumors to utilize the IL13Rα2 receptor as a target for therapy. In our studies, we demonstrated the selective expression of IL13Rα2 in several peripheral nerve sheath tumors by immunohistochemistry (IHC and immunoblots. We established a sciatic nerve MPNST mouse model in NIH III nude mice using a luciferase transfected STS26T MPNST cell line. Similarly, analysis of the mouse sciatic nerves after tumor induction revealed significant expression of IL13Rα2 by IHC when compared to a normal sciatic nerve. IL13 conjugated liposomal doxorubicin was formulated and shown to bind and internalized in the MPNST cell culture model demonstrating cytotoxic effect. Our subsequent in vivo investigation in the STS26T MPNST sciatic nerve tumor model indicated that IL13 conjugated liposomal doxorubicin (IL13LIPDXR was more effective in inhibiting tumor progression compared to unconjugated liposomal doxorubicin (LIPDXR. This further supports that IL13 receptor targeted nanoliposomes is a potential approach for treating MPNSTs.

  15. Annihilation model of the Tormac sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, J.H.

    1979-02-01

    A one-dimensional, steady state fluid model is developed to describe the boundary layer between plasma and magnetic field that occurs in the Tormac sheath. Similar systems which may be treatable by the same model are tokamaks with divertors and reversed field mirrors. The model includes transport across the magnetic field as well as mirror losses along the field, the latter being represented as annihilation terms in the one-dimensional equations. The model equations are derived from the two-dimensional, time dependent hierarchy of equations generated by taking velocity moments of the kinetic equation including collisions

  16. ICRF antenna Faraday shield plasma sheath model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whealton, J.H.; Ryan, P.M.; Raridon, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    A two-dimensional nonlinear formulation that explicitly considers the plasma edge near a Faraday shield in a self-consistent manner is used in the modeling of the ion motion for a Faraday shield concept and model suggested by Perkins. Two models are considered that may provide significant insight into the generation of impurities for ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antennas. In one of these models a significant sheath periodically forms next to the Faraday screen, with ion acoustic waves heating the ions in the plasma. (orig.)

  17. The characteristics of RF modulated plasma boundary sheaths: An analysis of the standard sheath model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naggary, Schabnam; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter

    2015-09-01

    The characteristics of radio frequency (RF) modulated plasma boundary sheaths are studied on the basis of the so-called ``standard sheath model.'' This model assumes that the applied radio frequency ωRF is larger than the plasma frequency of the ions but smaller than that of the electrons. It comprises a phase-averaged ion model - consisting of an equation of continuity (with ionization neglected) and an equation of motion (with collisional ion-neutral interaction taken into account) - a phase-resolved electron model - consisting of an equation of continuity and the assumption of Boltzmann equilibrium -, and Poisson's equation for the electrical field. Previous investigations have studied the standard sheath model under additional approximations, most notably the assumption of a step-like electron front. This contribution presents an investigation and parameter study of the standard sheath model which avoids any further assumptions. The resulting density profiles and overall charge-voltage characteristics are compared with those of the step-model based theories. The authors gratefully acknowledge Efe Kemaneci for helpful comments and fruitful discussions.

  18. [Optimize dropping process of Ginkgo biloba dropping pills by using design space approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ji-Chen; Wang, Qing-Qing; Chen, An; Pan, Fang-Lai; Gong, Xing-Chu; Qu, Hai-Bin

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, a design space approach was applied to optimize the dropping process of Ginkgo biloba dropping pills. Firstly, potential critical process parameters and potential process critical quality attributes were determined through literature research and pre-experiments. Secondly, experiments were carried out according to Box-Behnken design. Then the critical process parameters and critical quality attributes were determined based on the experimental results. Thirdly, second-order polynomial models were used to describe the quantitative relationships between critical process parameters and critical quality attributes. Finally, a probability-based design space was calculated and verified. The verification results showed that efficient production of Ginkgo biloba dropping pills can be guaranteed by operating within the design space parameters. The recommended operation ranges for the critical dropping process parameters of Ginkgo biloba dropping pills were as follows: dropping distance of 5.5-6.7 cm, and dropping speed of 59-60 drops per minute, providing a reference for industrial production of Ginkgo biloba dropping pills. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  19. The plasma-sheath boundary region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franklin, R N

    2003-01-01

    In this review an attempt is made to give a broad coverage of the problem of joining plasma and sheath over a wide range of physical conditions. We go back to the earliest works quoting them, where appropriate, to understand what those who introduced the various terms associated with the structure of the plasma-sheath had in mind. We try to bring out the essence of the insights that have been gained subsequently, by quoting from the literature selectively, indicating how misunderstandings have arisen. In order to make it accessible to the generality of those currently working in low temperature plasmas we have sought to avoid mathematical complexity but retain physical insight, quoting from published work where appropriate. Nevertheless, in clarifying my own ideas I have found it necessary to do additional original work in order to give a consistent picture. In this way I have sought to bring together work in the late 1920s, the 1960s, and now mindful of the commercial importance of plasma processing, work over the past 15 years that adds to the general understanding. (topical review)

  20. Impact of granular drops

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, J. O.

    2013-07-15

    We investigate the spreading and splashing of granular drops during impact with a solid target. The granular drops are formed from roughly spherical balls of sand mixed with water, which is used as a binder to hold the ball together during free-fall. We measure the instantaneous spread diameter for different impact speeds and find that the normalized spread diameter d/D grows as (tV/D)1/2. The speeds of the grains ejected during the “splash” are measured and they rarely exceed twice that of the impact speed.

  1. Impact of granular drops

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, J. O.; Mansoor, Mohammad M.; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the spreading and splashing of granular drops during impact with a solid target. The granular drops are formed from roughly spherical balls of sand mixed with water, which is used as a binder to hold the ball together during free-fall. We measure the instantaneous spread diameter for different impact speeds and find that the normalized spread diameter d/D grows as (tV/D)1/2. The speeds of the grains ejected during the “splash” are measured and they rarely exceed twice that of the impact speed.

  2. A FAST study of quasi-static structure ("Inverted-V") potential drops and their latitudinal dependence in the premidnight sector and ramifications for the current-voltage relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombeck, J.; Cattell, C.; McFadden, J.

    2013-09-01

    Utilizing FAST satellite electron measurements, we present the first reported investigation of the dependency on latitude of quasi-static structure ("inverted-V") potential drop magnitude (Φ). A trend of lower Φ at lower latitudes in the premidnight sector on field lines with dark foot points was observed. This trend is supported both statistically and in individual satellite crossings. The existence of two distinct peaks in occurrence probability for Φ was also observed: one between ~2 kV and 10 kV and the other at somewhat less than 1 kV. The relative occurrence of structures with Φ in the higher (>2 kV) peak is significantly reduced with decreasing latitude. This partially accounts for the statistical trend of lower potential drop magnitudes at lower latitudes. The two Φ occurrence frequency peaks correspond to two different regimes (one with eΦ/kTe ~ or > 1 and one with eΦ/kTe current-voltage relation where source electron density rather than Φ is most directly controlled by the field-aligned current density. These observations and their ramifications represent a significant step forward in the understanding of field-aligned currents, auroral acceleration, and magnetospheric-ionospheric coupling.

  3. Magnetic sheath effect on the gross and net erosion rates due to impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellet, N.; Pégourié, B.; Martin, C.; Gunn, J. P.; Bufferand, H.; Roubin, P.

    2016-02-01

    Simulations of impurity trajectories in deuterium plasmas in the vicinity of the surface are performed by taking into account the magnetic sheath in conditions relevant for ITER and WEST. We show that the magnetic sheath has a strong effect on the average impact angle of impurities in divertor conditions and that it can lead to an increase of ≈ 60% at the gross erosion maximum for neon (Ne+4) compared to the case when only the cyclotron motion is considered. The evaluation of the net erosion has been undertaken by retaining local redeposition of tungsten (W). We investigate how it is affected by the sheath magnetic potential profile. The largest effect is however observed when an energy distribution is considered. In this case the number of particles that manage to exit the sheath is larger as it is dominated by the more energetic particles. The comparison with other work is also discussed. The application to a scenario of the WEST project is finally performed, which exhibits a moderate, however non negligible, erosion of the plasma facing components.

  4. Thermionic emission from monolayer graphene, sheath formation and its feasibility towards thermionic converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Shikha; Upadhyay Kahaly, M.; Mishra, S. K.

    2017-02-01

    A formalism describing the thermionic emission from a single layer graphene sheet operating at a finite temperature and the consequent formation of the thermionic sheath in its proximity has been established. The formulation takes account of two dimensional densities of state configuration, Fermi-Dirac (f-d) statistics of the electron energy distribution, Fowler's treatment of electron emission, and Poisson's equation. The thermionic current estimates based on the present analysis is found to be in reasonably good agreement with experimental observations (Zhu et al., Nano Res. 07, 1 (2014)). The analysis has further been simplified for the case where f-d statistics of an electron energy distribution converges to Maxwellian distribution. By using this formulation, the steady state sheath features, viz., spatial dependence of the surface potential and electron density structure in the thermionic sheath are derived and illustrated graphically for graphene parameters; the electron density in the sheath is seen to diminish within ˜10 s of Debye lengths. By utilizing the graphene based cathode in configuring a thermionic converter (TC), an appropriate operating regime in achieving the efficient energy conversion has been identified. A TC configured with the graphene based cathode (operating at ˜1200 K/work function 4.74 V) along with the metallic anode (operating at ˜400 K/ work function 2.0 V) is predicted to display ˜56% of the input thermal flux into the electrical energy, which infers approximately ˜84% of the Carnot efficiency.

  5. Floating fat in the wrist joint and in the tendon sheaths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Corroller, Thomas; Zink, Jean-Vincent; Champsaur, Pierre [Hopital Sainte-Marguerite, Radiology Department, Marseille (France); Parratte, Sebastien; Argenson, Jean-Noel [Hopital Sainte-Marguerite, Orthopaedic Surgery Department, Marseille (France)

    2010-09-15

    A traumatic fat effusion in a tendon sheath is an unreported entity. We report on the clinical and imaging features, including radiography and computed tomography (CT), of a fat-density effusion in the wrist joint and tendon sheaths of the extensor pollicis longus, extensor carpi radialis longus, and extensor carpi radialis brevis in a 28-year-old patient after a roller-skating accident. Radiographs showed a fracture of the distal radius and a wrist joint effusion. Preoperative CT examination exhibited two distinct layers resulting in a fat-fluid level pathognomonic of lipohemarthrosis in the radiocarpal joint. In addition, a fat-density effusion was noted in the sheaths of the second and third compartment extensor tendons. The lipohemarthrosis depicted on imaging classically results from the extrusion of fat from bone marrow into the joint space after an intraarticular fracture. Similarly, a traumatic fat effusion in a tendon sheath presents characteristic imaging features that may help to diagnose a potentially overlooked fracture. (orig.)

  6. Floating fat in the wrist joint and in the tendon sheaths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Corroller, Thomas; Zink, Jean-Vincent; Champsaur, Pierre; Parratte, Sebastien; Argenson, Jean-Noel

    2010-01-01

    A traumatic fat effusion in a tendon sheath is an unreported entity. We report on the clinical and imaging features, including radiography and computed tomography (CT), of a fat-density effusion in the wrist joint and tendon sheaths of the extensor pollicis longus, extensor carpi radialis longus, and extensor carpi radialis brevis in a 28-year-old patient after a roller-skating accident. Radiographs showed a fracture of the distal radius and a wrist joint effusion. Preoperative CT examination exhibited two distinct layers resulting in a fat-fluid level pathognomonic of lipohemarthrosis in the radiocarpal joint. In addition, a fat-density effusion was noted in the sheaths of the second and third compartment extensor tendons. The lipohemarthrosis depicted on imaging classically results from the extrusion of fat from bone marrow into the joint space after an intraarticular fracture. Similarly, a traumatic fat effusion in a tendon sheath presents characteristic imaging features that may help to diagnose a potentially overlooked fracture. (orig.)

  7. Embedded cladding surface thermocouples on Zircaloy-sheathed heater rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, S.C.

    1977-06-01

    Titanium-sheathed Type K thermocouples embedded in the cladding wall of zircaloy-sheathed heater rods are described. These thermocouples constitute part of a program intended to characterize the uncertainty of measurements made by surface-mounted cladding thermocouples on nuclear fuel rods. Fabrication and installation detail, and laboratory testing of sample thermocouple installations are included

  8. Electrospinning jet behaviors under the constraints of a sheath gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhao

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Increasing the ejection efficiency and uniformity of nanofibers is the key to applications of electrospinning technology. In this work, a novel electrospinning spinneret with a sheath gas passageway is designed. The frictional resistance that stems from the sheath gas provides additional stretching and restriction forces on the jet. The sheath gas also reduces interference and enhances the stability of the charged jet. A bead-on-strain simulation model is built up to determine the constraint effects of the sheath gas. Simulation results show that the sheath gas decreases the motion area and increases the stretching ratio of the liquid jet. The stretching force from the sheath gas decreases the diameter and increases the uniformity of the nanofiber. As the gas pressure increases from 0 kPa to 50 kPa, the critical voltage of the jet ejection decreases from 8.4 kV to 2.5 kV, the diameter of the nanofiber deposition zone decreases from 40 cm to 10 cm, and the diameter of the nanofibers decreases from 557.97 nm to 277.73 nm. The uniformity of nanofibers can be improved significantly using a sheath gas. The sheath gas contributes to the rapid deposition of a uniform nanofibrous membrane and the industrial applications of electrospinning.

  9. Significance of rice sheath photosynthesis: Yield determination by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using high-yielding hybrid rice Liangyopeijiu (LYP9), its male parent 9311 and hybrid rice Shanyou 63 (SY63) as the experimental materials, the photosynthesis of rice sheath was studied by 14C radio-autography. The results showed that rice sheath could trap sunlight and produce photosynthates, and these ...

  10. Anode Sheath Switching in a Carbon Nanotube Arc Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetterman, Abe; Raitses, Yevgeny; Keidar, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The anode ablation rate is investigated as a function of anode diameter for a carbon nanotube arc plasma. It is found that anomalously high ablation occurs for small anode diameters. This result is explained by the formation of a positive anode sheath. The increased ablation rate due to this positive anode sheath could imply greater production rate for carbon nanotubes.

  11. Two secondary drops

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Figure shows formation of two secondary drops of unequal size and their merger. The process is same as the earlier process until t= 0.039 Tc with necking occurring at two places, one at the bottom of the column and the other at the middle. The necking at the middle of the liquid column is due to Raleigh instability.

  12. Lambda-dropping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier; Schultz, Ulrik Pagh

    1997-01-01

    Lambda-lifting a functional program transforms it into a set of recursive equations. We present the symmetric transformation: lambda-dropping. Lambda-dropping a set of recursive equations restores block structure and lexical scope.For lack of scope, recursive equations must carry around all...... the parameters that any of their callees might possibly need. Both lambda-lifting and lambda-dropping thus require one to compute a transitive closure over the call graph:• for lambda-lifting: to establish the Def/Use path of each free variable (these free variables are then added as parameters to each...... of the functions in the call path);• for lambda-dropping: to establish the Def/Use path of each parameter (parameters whose use occurs in the same scope as their definition do not need to be passed along in the call path).Without free variables, a program is scope-insensitive. Its blocks are then free...

  13. Simulation of a two-dimensional sheath over a flat insulator-conductor interface on a radio-frequency biased electrode in a high-density plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Doosik; Economou, Demetre J.

    2004-01-01

    A combined fluid/Monte Carlo (MC) simulation was developed to study the two-dimensional (2D) sheath over a flat insulator/conductor interface on a radio-frequency (rf) biased electrode in a high-density plasma. The insulator capacitance increased the local impedance between the plasma and the bias voltage source. Thus, for uniform ion density and electron temperature far away from the wall, the sheath potential over the insulator was only a fraction of that over the conductor, resulting in a thinner sheath over the insulator. The fluid model provided the spatiotemporal profiles of the 2D sheath electric field. These were used as input to the MC simulation to compute the ion energy distribution (IED) and ion angular distribution (IAD) at different locations on the surface. The ion flux, IED, and IAD changed drastically across the insulator/conductor interface due to the diverging rf electric field in the distorted sheath. The ion flux was larger on the conductor at the expense of that on the insulator. Both the ion impact angle and angular spread increased progressively as the material interface was approached. The ion impact energy and energy spread were smaller on the insulator as compared to the conductor. For given plasma parameters, as the insulator thickness was increased, the sheath potential and thickness over the insulator decreased, and sheath distortion became more pronounced

  14. Modeling of polarization phenomena due to RF sheaths and electron beams in magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faudot, E.

    2005-01-01

    This work investigates the problematic of hot spots induced by accelerated particle fluxes in tokamaks. It is shown that the polarization due to sheaths in the edge plasma in which an electron beam at a high level of energy is injected, can reach several hundreds volts and thus extend the deposition area. The notion of obstructed sheath is introduced and explains the acceleration of energy deposition by the decreasing of the sheath potential. Then, a 2-dimensional fluid modeling of flux tubes in front of ICRF antennae allows us to calculate the rectified potentials taking into account RF polarization currents transverse to magnetic field lines. The 2-dimensional fluid code designed validates the analytical results which show that the DC rectified potential is 50% greater with polarization currents than without. Finally, the simultaneous application of an electron beam and a RF potential reveals that the potentials due to each phenomenon are additives when RF potential is much greater than beam polarization. The density depletion of polarized flux tubes in 2-dimensional PIC (particles in cells) simulations is characterized but not yet explained. (author)

  15. What is the size of a floating sheath? An answer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Farina; Naggary, Schabnam; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter

    2016-09-01

    The formation of a non-neutral boundary sheath in front of material surfaces is universal plasma phenomenon. Despite several decades of research, however, not all related issues are fully clarified. In a recent paper, Chabert pointed out that this lack of clarity applies even to the seemingly innocuous question ``What the size of a floating sheath?'' This contribution attempts to provide an answer that is not arbitrary: The size of a floating sheath is defined as the plate separation of an equivalent parallel plate capacitor. The consequences of the definition are explored with the help of a self-consistent sheath model, and a comparison is made with other sheath size definitions. Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft within SFB TR 87.

  16. Similarities and distinctions of CIR and Sheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yermolaev, Yuri; Lodkina, Irina; Nikolaeva, Nadezhda; Yermolaev, Michael

    2016-04-01

    On the basis of OMNI data and our catalog of large scale solar wind (SW) streams during 1976-2000 [Yermolaev et al., 2009] we study the average temporal profiles for two types of compressed regions: CIR (corotating interaction region - compressed region before High Speed Stream (HSS)) and Sheath (compressed region before fast Interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs), including Magnetic Cloud (MC) and Ejecta). As have been shown by Nikolaeva et al, [2015], the efficiency of magnetic storm generation is ~50% higher for Sheath and CIR than for ICME (MC and Ejecta), i.e. reaction magnetosphere depends on type of driver. To take into account the different durations of SW types, we use the double superposed epoch analysis (DSEA) method: rescaling the duration of the interval for all types in such a manner that, respectively, beginning and end for all intervals of selected type coincide [Yermolaev et al., 2010; 2015]. Obtained data allows us to suggest that the formation of all types of compression regions has the same physical mechanism irrespective of piston (HSS or ICME) type and differences are connected with geometry and full jumps of speed in edges of compression regions. If making the natural assumption that the gradient of speed is directed approximately on normal to the piston, CIR has the largest angle between the gradient of speed and the direction of average SW speed, and ICME - the smallest angle. The work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, projects 13-02-00158, 16-02-00125 and by Program of Presidium of the Russian Academy of Sciences. References: Nikolaeva, N. S. , Yu. I. Yermolaev, and I. G. Lodkina (2015), Modeling of the Corrected Dst* Index Temporal Profile on the Main Phase of the Magnetic Storms Generated by Different Types of Solar Wind, Cosmic Research, Vol. 53, No. 2, pp. 119-127. Yermolaev, Yu. I., N. S. Nikolaeva, I. G. Lodkina, and M. Yu. Yermolaev (2009), Catalog of Large-Scale Solar Wind Phenomena during 1976-2000, Cosmic Research

  17. Sheath rendezvous method: a novel distal protection technique during endovascular treatment of subclavian artery occlusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, Takuya; Urasawa, Kazushi; Nakama, Tatsuya; Nakagawa, Yuya; Tan, Michinao; Koshida, Ryoji; Sato, Katsuhiko

    2016-10-01

    To describe an innovative distal protection technique, "sheath rendezvous method", during endovascular treatment for subclavian arterial occlusions. 4.5F and 6F guiding sheath were inserted from left brachial and common femoral artery, respectively. 0.014″ guidewire retrogradely passed through occlusion and into antegrade sheath to establish a pull-through system. 3.0 mm balloon was used to expand occlusion and anchor to deliver retrograde sheath into antegrade one. Both sheaths locked by balloon dilatation crossed occlusion until antegrade sheath passed over lesion. Balloon expandable stent was delivered within antegrade sheath. Sheath was removed, and stent was implanted. We obtained an excellent outcome without complications.

  18. The role of the sheath in magnetized plasma turbulence and flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loizu, J.

    2013-01-01

    simulations of SOL turbulence are carried out to investigate the importance of the sheath in determining the equilibrium electric fields, intrinsic toroidal rotation, and SOL width, in different limited configurations. For each study carried out in this thesis, simple analytical models are developed to interpret the simulation results and reveal the fundamental mechanisms underlying the system dynamics. The electrostatic potential appears to be determined by a combined effect of sheath physics and electron adiabaticity. Intrinsic flows are driven by the sheath, while turbulence provides the mechanism for radial momentum transport. The position of the limiter can modify the turbulence properties in the SOL, thus playing an important role in setting the SOL width. (author)

  19. Influence of alkali metal oxides and alkaline earth metal oxides on the mitigation of stress corrosion cracking in CANDU fuel sheathing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metzler, J.; Ferrier, G.A.; Farahani, M.; Chan, P.K.; Corcoran, E.C., E-mail: Joseph.Metzler@rmc.ca [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC)can cause failures of CANDU Zircaloy-4 fuel sheathing. The process occurs when a corrosive element (i.e.,iodine) interacts with a susceptible material that is under sufficient strain at a high temperature. Currently, there is an ongoing effort to improve SCC mitigation strategies for future iterations of CANDU reactors. A potential mechanism for SCC mitigation involves utilizing alkali metal oxides and alkaline earth metal oxides that will sequester corrosive iodine while actively repairing a protective oxide layer on the sheath. SCC tests performed with sodium oxide (Na{sub 2}O) and calcium oxide (CaO) have shown to decrease significantly the sheath degradation. (author)

  20. Modelling of DC electric fields induced by RF sheath in front of ICRF antenna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faudot, E.; Heuraux, S.; Colas, L.

    2003-01-01

    Reducing the ICRF (ion cyclotron range frequency) antenna-plasma interaction is one of the key points for reaching very long tokamak discharges. One problem which limits such discharges, is the appearance of hot spots on the surface of the antenna: Radio Frequency (RF) sheaths modify the properties of the edge plasma by rectifying the RF potential along open magnetic field lines and can induce hot spots. This paper investigates the corrections to sheath potentials introduced by the interactions between adjacent flux tubes. Our theoretical study started from an oscillating double Langmuir probe model, in which a transverse influx of current was included. This model was confronted with 1D PIC simulations along a magnetic field line, and demonstrated that current exchanges can decrease mean potentials. A 2D electrostatic fluid code was then developed, which couples adjacent flux tubes in a poloidal cross section with collisional conductivity or polarization currents. It showed that transverse currents are able to smooth structures smaller than a characteristic size in the sheath potential maps (results for Tore Supra). These computed rectified potentials can be used to obtain the DC electric fields in front of the antenna. And then, it gives an estimate of the particle drift and the energy flux on the antenna structure, which can explain hot spots. (author)

  1. Characteristics of metal sheathed thermocouples in thermowell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuda, Takehiro; Nakase, Tsuyoshi; Tanabe, Yutaka; Yamada, Kunitaka; Yoshizaki, Akio; Roko, Kiyokazu

    1987-01-01

    Static and dynamic characteristics of thermowell type thermocouples which are planned to be used for the High-Temperature engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) have been investigated. A mock-up test section was installed in Kawasaki's Helium Test Loop (KH-200). Thermal characteristics tests were carried out under the 600 ∼ 1000 deg C temperature conditions. The test section was equipped with four types sheathed thermocouples; the well type, the non well type, and ones with and without the thermal radiation shielding plate. The measured temperature by the well type thermocouples with the shielding plate was only about 1.3 deg C higher than the one without the shielding plate at gas temperature 990 deg C. The measured time constant of the well type thermocouples was about 7 seconds in the condition of the heat transfer coefficient 1600 Kcal/m 2 h deg C on the well surface, and coincided with the calculated one by ''TRUMP'' code. (author)

  2. Benign nerve sheath tumor of stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudry, N.U.; Zafar, S.; Haque, I.U.

    2007-01-01

    Gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumors are a group of tumors, which originate from the mesenchymal stem cells of the gastrointestinal tract. Gastric schwannoma is a very rare gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumor, which represents only 0.2% of all gastric tumors and 4% of all benign gastric neoplasms. We report a 55 years old lady who suffered from pain epigastrium, vomiting, occasionally with blood, loss of appetite and weight loss. Endoscopic examination showed a round submucosal tumor with a central ulceration along the greater curvature of the stomach. The pathological examination revealed a picture of spindle cell tumor. Immunohistochemical stain was strongly positive for S-100 protein stain, and non-reactive for CD34, CD117, consistent with benign nerve sheath tumor of stomach i.e. gastric schwannoma. (author)

  3. Estimation of radiation losses from sheathed thermocouples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, I.L.; Coney, J.E.R.; Gibbs, B.M.

    2011-01-01

    Thermocouples are often used for temperature measurements in heat exchangers. However if the radiation losses from a thermocouple in a high temperature gas flow to colder surroundings are ignored significant errors can occur. Even at moderate temperature differences, these can be significant. Prediction of radiation losses from theory can be problematic, especially in situations where there are large variations in the measured temperatures as the emissivity and radiative heat transfer coefficient of the thermocouple are not constant. The following approach combines experimental results with established empirical relationships to estimate losses due to radiation in an annular heat exchanger at temperatures up to 950 o C. - Highlights: → Sheathed thermocouples are often used to measure temperatures in heat exchangers. → Errors are introduced if radiation losses are ignored. → Radiation losses are environment specific and may be significant. → Experimental and theoretical methods are used to estimate losses. → Hot side maximum temperature 950 o C.

  4. Plasma-Sheath Instability in Hall Thrusters Due to Periodic Modulation of the Energy of Secondary Electrons in Cyclotron Motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sydorenko, D.; Smolyakov, A.; Kaganovich, I.; Raitses, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Particle-in-cell simulation of Hall thruster plasmas reveals a plasma-sheath instability manifesting itself as a rearrangement of the plasma sheath near the thruster channel walls accompanied by a sudden change of many discharge parameters. The instability develops when the sheath current as a function of the sheath voltage is in the negative conductivity regime. The major part of the sheath current is produced by beams of secondary electrons counter-streaming between the walls. The negative conductivity is the result of nonlinear dependence of beam-induced secondary electron emission on the plasma potential. The intensity of such emission is defined by the beam energy. The energy of the beam in crossed axial electric and radial magnetic fields is a quasi-periodical function of the phase of cyclotron rotation, which depends on the radial profile of the potential and the thruster channel width. There is a discrete set of stability intervals determined by the final phase of the cyclotron rotation of secondary electrons. As a result, a small variation of the thruster channel width may result in abrupt changes of plasma parameters if the plasma state jumps from one stability interval to another

  5. Use of guiding sheaths in peroral fluoroscopic gastroduodenal stent placement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Jae-Ik; Shin, Ji Hoon; Song, Ho-Young; Yoon, Chang Jin; Nam, Deok Ho; Choi, Won-Chan; Lim, Jin-Oh

    2005-01-01

    Our purpose was to assess the safety and usefulness of guiding sheaths in peroral fluoroscopic gastroduodenal stent placement. Two types of guiding sheath were made from straight polytetrafluoroethylene tubes. Type A was 80 cm in length, 4 mm in outer diameter and 3 mm in inner diameter. Type B was 70 cm in length, 6 mm in outer diameter and 5 mm in inner diameter. The type A sheath was used in 18 patients in whom a catheter-guide wire combination failed to pass through a stricture. The type B sheath was used in 22 patients in whom a stent delivery system failed to pass through the stricture due to loop formation within the gastric lumen. The overall success rate for guiding a catheter-guide wire through a stricture after using the type A sheath was 89%. The overall success rate for passing a stent delivery system through a stricture after using the type B sheath was 100%. All procedures were tolerated by the patients without any significant complications. The guiding sheaths were safe and useful in peroral fluoroscopic gastroduodenal stent placement. (orig.)

  6. Abiotic Deposition of Fe Complexes onto Leptothrix Sheaths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunoh, Tatsuki; Hashimoto, Hideki; McFarlane, Ian R.; Hayashi, Naoaki; Suzuki, Tomoko; Taketa, Eisuke; Tamura, Katsunori; Takano, Mikio; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.; Kunoh, Hitoshi; Takada, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria classified in species of the genus Leptothrix produce extracellular, microtubular, Fe-encrusted sheaths. The encrustation has been previously linked to bacterial Fe oxidases, which oxidize Fe(II) to Fe(III) and/or active groups of bacterial exopolymers within sheaths to attract and bind aqueous-phase inorganics. When L. cholodnii SP-6 cells were cultured in media amended with high Fe(II) concentrations, Fe(III) precipitates visibly formed immediately after addition of Fe(II) to the medium, suggesting prompt abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III). Intriguingly, these precipitates were deposited onto the sheath surface of bacterial cells as the population was actively growing. When Fe(III) was added to the medium, similar precipitates formed in the medium first and were abiotically deposited onto the sheath surfaces. The precipitates in the Fe(II) medium were composed of assemblies of globular, amorphous particles (ca. 50 nm diameter), while those in the Fe(III) medium were composed of large, aggregated particles (≥3 µm diameter) with a similar amorphous structure. These precipitates also adhered to cell-free sheaths. We thus concluded that direct abiotic deposition of Fe complexes onto the sheath surface occurs independently of cellular activity in liquid media containing Fe salts, although it remains unclear how this deposition is associated with the previously proposed mechanisms (oxidation enzyme- and/or active group of organic components-involved) of Fe encrustation of the Leptothrix sheaths. PMID:27271677

  7. Abiotic Deposition of Fe Complexes onto Leptothrix Sheaths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuki Kunoh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria classified in species of the genus Leptothrix produce extracellular, microtubular, Fe-encrusted sheaths. The encrustation has been previously linked to bacterial Fe oxidases, which oxidize Fe(II to Fe(III and/or active groups of bacterial exopolymers within sheaths to attract and bind aqueous-phase inorganics. When L. cholodnii SP-6 cells were cultured in media amended with high Fe(II concentrations, Fe(III precipitates visibly formed immediately after addition of Fe(II to the medium, suggesting prompt abiotic oxidation of Fe(II to Fe(III. Intriguingly, these precipitates were deposited onto the sheath surface of bacterial cells as the population was actively growing. When Fe(III was added to the medium, similar precipitates formed in the medium first and were abiotically deposited onto the sheath surfaces. The precipitates in the Fe(II medium were composed of assemblies of globular, amorphous particles (ca. 50 nm diameter, while those in the Fe(III medium were composed of large, aggregated particles (≥3 µm diameter with a similar amorphous structure. These precipitates also adhered to cell-free sheaths. We thus concluded that direct abiotic deposition of Fe complexes onto the sheath surface occurs independently of cellular activity in liquid media containing Fe salts, although it remains unclear how this deposition is associated with the previously proposed mechanisms (oxidation enzyme- and/or active group of organic components-involved of Fe encrustation of the Leptothrix sheaths.

  8. Farris-Tang retractor in optic nerve sheath decompression surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, Jennifer A; Sokol, Jason A; Whittaker, Thomas J; Bernard, Benjamin; Farris, Bradley K

    2016-01-01

    Our purpose is to introduce the use of the Farris-Tang retractor in optic nerve sheath decompression surgery. The procedure of optic nerve sheath fenestration was reviewed at our tertiary care teaching hospital, including the use of the Farris-Tang retractor. Pseudotumor cerebri is a syndrome of increased intracranial pressure without a clear cause. Surgical treatment can be effective in cases in which medical therapy has failed and disc swelling with visual field loss progresses. Optic nerve sheath decompression surgery (ONDS) involves cutting slits or windows in the optic nerve sheath to allow cerebrospinal fluid to escape, reducing the pressure around the optic nerve. We introduce the Farris-Tang retractor, a retractor that allows for excellent visualization of the optic nerve sheath during this surgery, facilitating the fenestration of the sheath and visualization of the subsequent cerebrospinal fluid egress. Utilizing a medial conjunctival approach, the Farris-Tang retractor allows for easy retraction of the medial orbital tissue and reduces the incidence of orbital fat protrusion through Tenon's capsule. The Farris-Tang retractor allows safe, easy, and effective access to the optic nerve with good visualization in optic nerve sheath decompression surgery. This, in turn, allows for greater surgical efficiency and positive patient outcomes.

  9. The Tubular Sheaths Encasing Methanosaeta thermophila Filaments Are Functional Amyloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueholm, Morten S; Larsen, Poul; Finster, Kai; Stenvang, Marcel R; Christiansen, Gunna; Vad, Brian S; Bøggild, Andreas; Otzen, Daniel E; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    2015-08-14

    Archaea are renowned for their ability to thrive in extreme environments, although they can be found in virtually all habitats. Their adaptive success is linked to their unique cell envelopes that are extremely resistant to chemical and thermal denaturation and that resist proteolysis by common proteases. Here we employ amyloid-specific conformation antibodies and biophysical techniques to show that the extracellular cell wall sheaths encasing the methanogenic archaea Methanosaeta thermophila PT are functional amyloids. Depolymerization of sheaths and subsequent MS/MS analyses revealed that the sheaths are composed of a single major sheath protein (MspA). The amyloidogenic nature of MspA was confirmed by in vitro amyloid formation of recombinant MspA under a wide range of environmental conditions. This is the first report of a functional amyloid from the archaeal domain of life. The amyloid nature explains the extreme resistance of the sheath, the elastic properties that allow diffusible substrates to penetrate through expandable hoop boundaries, and how the sheaths are able to split and elongate outside the cell. The archaeal sheath amyloids do not share homology with any of the currently known functional amyloids and clearly represent a new function of the amyloid protein fold. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Evaluation of the crack initiation of curved compact tension specimens of a Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube using the unloading compliance and direct current potential drop methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Suk; Jeong, Hyeon Cheol; Ahn, Sang Bok

    2005-01-01

    The Direct Current Potential Drop(DCPD) method and the Unloading Compliance(UC) method with a crack opening displacement gauge were applied simultaneously to the Zr-2.5Nb Curved Compact Tension (CCT) specimens to determine which of the two methods can precisely determine the crack initiation point and hence the crack length for evaluation of their fracture toughness. The DCPD method detected the crack initiation at a smaller load-time displacement compared to the UC method. As a verification, a direct observation of the fracture surfaces on the curved compact tension specimens was made on the CCT specimens experiencing either 0.8 to 1.0 mm load line displacement or various loads from 50% to 80% of the maximum peak load, or P max . The DCPD method is concluded to be more precise in determining the crack initiation and fracture toughness, J in Zr-2.5Nb CCT specimens than the UC method

  11. Potential Eye Drop Based on a Calix[4]arene Nanoassembly for Curcumin Delivery: Enhanced Drug Solubility, Stability, and Anti-Inflammatory Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granata, Giuseppe; Paterniti, Irene; Geraci, Corrada; Cunsolo, Francesca; Esposito, Emanuela; Cordaro, Marika; Blanco, Anna Rita; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Consoli, Grazia M L

    2017-05-01

    Curcumin is an Indian spice with a wide spectrum of biological and pharmacological activities but poor aqueous solubility, rapid degradation, and low bioavailability that affect medical benefits. To overcome these limits in ophthalmic application, curcumin was entrapped in a polycationic calix[4]arene-based nanoaggregate by a simple and reproducible method. The calix[4]arene-curcumin supramolecular assembly (Calix-Cur) appeared as a clear colloidal solution consisting in micellar nanoaggregates with size, polydispersity index, surface potential, and drug loading percentage meeting the requirements for an ocular drug delivery system. The encapsulation in the calix[4]arene nanoassembly markedly enhanced the solubility, reduced the degradation, and improved the anti-inflammatory effects of curcumin compared to free curcumin in both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Calix-Cur did not compromise the viability of J774A.1 macrophages and suppressed pro-inflammatory marker expression in J774A.1 macrophages subjected to LPS-induced oxidative stress. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses showed that Calix-Cur reduced signs of inflammation in a rat model of LPS-induced uveitis when topically administrated in the eyes. Overall, the results supported the calix[4]arene nanoassembly as a promising nanocarrier for delivering curcumin to anterior ocular tissues.

  12. Ultrasonographic findings of pilar sheath acanthoma: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Dong Joo; Lee, Sun Joo; Kim, Seong Jin [Inje University College of Medicine, Busan Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    Pilar sheath acanthoma is a rare benign follicular hamartoma that presents with a central sinus containing keratinous material and is lined by epithelium. It typically occurs on the face, especially on the upper lip and forehead. In our case, the ultrasound (US) feature of pilar sheath acanthoma revealed a well-defined, oval hypoechoic nodule with hypoechoic capping within the dermis over the medial aspect of the calf. To the best of our knowledge, despite many reports on the clinicopathological aspects of pilar sheath acanthoma, this entity has not been well described in the radiologic literature, and US findings have not been documented.

  13. Experimental test of models of radio-frequency plasma sheaths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobolewski, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    The ion current and sheath impedance were measured at the radio-frequency-powered electrode of an asymmetric, capacitively coupled plasma reactor, for discharges in argon at 1.33 endash 133 Pa. The measurements were used to test the models of the radio frequency sheath derived by Lieberman [IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 17, 338 (1989)] and Godyak and Sternberg [Phys. Rev. A 42, 2299 (1990)], and establish the range of pressure and sheath voltage in which they are valid. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  14. Dynamics of Dust in a Plasma Sheath with Magnetic Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Ping; Liu Jinyuan; Gon Ye; Liu Yue; Wang Xiaogang

    2007-01-01

    Dynamics of dust in a plasma sheath with a magnetic field was investigated using a single particle model. The result shows that the radius, initial position, initial velocity of the dust particles and the magnetic field do effect their movement and equilibrium position in the plasma sheath. Generally, the dust particles with the same size, whatever original velocity and position they have, will locate at the same position in the end under the net actions of electrostatic, gravitational, neutral collisional, and Lorentz forces. But the dust particles will not locate in the plasma sheath if their radius is beyond a certain value

  15. Plasma sheath dynamics and parameters in focus and defocus conditions. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masoud, M.M.; Soliman, H.M.; El-Aragi, G.M.

    1996-01-01

    The study deals with the effect of the inner electrode polarity on the dynamic behaviour and parameters of plasma sheath in a coaxial discharge. The experimental investigations presented here were carried out in a coaxial plasma focus discharge device of mather geometry. It consisted of coaxial stainless steel hollow cylindrical electrodes with inner electrode 18.2 cm length and outer-electrode 31.5 cm length. The diameter of the inner and outer electrodes are 3.2 cm and 6.6 cm, respectively. The two electrodes are separated by a teflon disc at the breech. The outer electrode muzzle is connected to stainless steel expansion chamber of 23 cm length and 17 cm diameter. The discharge takes place in hydrogen gas with a base pressure of 1 torr. The experiments were conducted with 10 kV bank voltage, which corresponds to 100 K A peak discharge current. By using a double electric probe, It was found that the plasma electron density was higher near the negative electrode. Investigations using a miniature rogovsky coil have shown that, the radial and azimuthal current density increased with radial distance from negative electrode to positive electrode. The shape and the axial velocity of plasma sheath were measured using a magnetic probe. The experimental results indicate that, the plasma is thick near the negative electrode, in both cases of the outer or the inner electrode. Also it has been found that the axial plasma sheath velocity reaches its maximum value at the muzzle for positive and negative inner electrode. The magnitude of maximum axial velocity reaches 1.7 x 10 60 cm/s for positive inner electrode and decreased by 25% for negative inner electrode further investigations revealed that on interchanging the polarity from normal operation (positive inner electrode), it was found that with negative inner electrode the soft x-ray emission intensity dropped by three orders of magnitude from that with positive inner electrode. 9 figs

  16. Plasma sheath dynamics and parameters in focus and defocus conditions. Vol. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masoud, M M; Soliman, H M; El-Aragi, G M [Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion Department, Nuclear Research Centre, Atomic Energy Aurhority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    The study deals with the effect of the inner electrode polarity on the dynamic behaviour and parameters of plasma sheath in a coaxial discharge. The experimental investigations presented here were carried out in a coaxial plasma focus discharge device of mather geometry. It consisted of coaxial stainless steel hollow cylindrical electrodes with inner electrode 18.2 cm length and outer-electrode 31.5 cm length. The diameter of the inner and outer electrodes are 3.2 cm and 6.6 cm, respectively. The two electrodes are separated by a teflon disc at the breech. The outer electrode muzzle is connected to stainless steel expansion chamber of 23 cm length and 17 cm diameter. The discharge takes place in hydrogen gas with a base pressure of 1 torr. The experiments were conducted with 10 kV bank voltage, which corresponds to 100 K A peak discharge current. By using a double electric probe, It was found that the plasma electron density was higher near the negative electrode. Investigations using a miniature rogovsky coil have shown that, the radial and azimuthal current density increased with radial distance from negative electrode to positive electrode. The shape and the axial velocity of plasma sheath were measured using a magnetic probe. The experimental results indicate that, the plasma is thick near the negative electrode, in both cases of the outer or the inner electrode. Also it has been found that the axial plasma sheath velocity reaches its maximum value at the muzzle for positive and negative inner electrode. The magnitude of maximum axial velocity reaches 1.7 x 10{sup 60} cm/s for positive inner electrode and decreased by 25% for negative inner electrode further investigations revealed that on interchanging the polarity from normal operation (positive inner electrode), it was found that with negative inner electrode the soft x-ray emission intensity dropped by three orders of magnitude from that with positive inner electrode. 9 figs.

  17. Free drop impact analysis of shipping cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeiffer, P.A.; Kennedy, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    The WHAMS-2D and WHAMS-3D codes were used to analyze the dynamic response of the RAS/TREAT shielded shipping cask subjected to transient leadings for the purpose of assessing potential damage to the various components that comprise the the cask. The paper describes how these codes can be used to provide and intermediate level of detail between full three-dimensional finite element calculations and hand calculations which are cost effective for design purposes. Three free drops were adressed: (1) a thirty foot axial drop on either end; (2) a thirty foot oblique angle drop with the cask having several different orientations from the vertical with impact on the cask corner; and (3) a thirty foot side drop with simultaneous impact on the lifting trunnion and the bottom end. Results are presented for two models of the side and oblique angle drops; one model includes only the mass of the lapped sleeves of depleted uranium (DU) while the other includes the mass and stiffness of the DU. The results of the end drop analyses are given for models with and without imperfections in the cask. Comparison of the analysis to hand calculations and simplified analyses are given. (orig.)

  18. Application of Green's differential equation to the analysis of ion-matrix sheaths around wedge-shaped cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donolato, C

    2005-01-01

    A relation between the gradient of the electric field and mean curvature of equipotential surfaces (Green's differential equation) is applied to a two-dimensional free-boundary problem arising in the study of ion sheaths around wedge-shaped cathodes. With the assumption that the equipotential lines are hyperbolae, this relation leads to a nonlinear ordinary differential equation for the potential along the bisector line of the wedge. An approximate solution is found, which yields, in particular, the sheath width along this line as a function of the wedge angle. The resulting values are in good agreement with published results obtained by numerically solving Poisson's equation

  19. Blood drop patterns: Formation and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ruoyang; Zhang, Liyuan; Zang, Duyang; Shen, Wei

    2016-05-01

    The drying of a drop of blood or plasma on a solid substrate leads to the formation of interesting and complex patterns. Inter- and intra-cellular and macromolecular interactions in the drying plasma or blood drop are responsible for the final morphologies of the dried patterns. Changes in these cellular and macromolecular components in blood caused by diseases have been suspected to cause changes in the dried drop patterns of plasma and whole blood, which could be used as simple diagnostic tools to identify the health of humans and livestock. However, complex physicochemical driving forces involved in the pattern formation are not fully understood. This review focuses on the scientific development in microscopic observations and pattern interpretation of dried plasma and whole blood samples, as well as the diagnostic applications of pattern analysis. Dried drop patterns of plasma consist of intricate visible cracks in the outer region and fine structures in the central region, which are mainly influenced by the presence and concentration of inorganic salts and proteins during drying. The shrinkage of macromolecular gel and its adhesion to the substrate surface have been thought to be responsible for the formation of the cracks. Dried drop patterns of whole blood have three characteristic zones; their formation as functions of drying time has been reported in the literature. Some research works have applied engineering treatment to the evaporation process of whole blood samples. The sensitivities of the resultant patterns to the relative humidity of the environment, the wettability of the substrates, and the size of the drop have been reported. These research works shed light on the mechanisms of spreading, evaporation, gelation, and crack formation of the blood drops on solid substrates, as well as on the potential applications of dried drop patterns of plasma and whole blood in diagnosis. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Zircaloy sheathed thermocouples for PWR fuel rod temperature measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.V.; Wesley, R.D.; Wilkins, S.C.

    1979-01-01

    Small diameter zircaloy sheathed thermocouples have been developed by EG and G Idaho, Inc., at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Surface mounted thermocouples were developed to measure the temperature of zircaloy clad fuel rods used in the Thermal Fuels Behavior Program (TFBP), and embedded thermocouples were developed for use by the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) Program for support tests using zircaloy clad electrically heated nuclear fuel rod simulators. The first objective of this developmental effort was to produce zircaloy sheathed thermocouples to replace titanium sheathed thermocouples and thereby eliminate the long-term corrosion of the titanium-to-zircaloy attachment weld. The second objective was to reduce the sheath diameter to obtain faster thermal response and minimize cladding temperature disturbance due to thermocouple attachment

  1. significance of rice sheath photosynthesis: yield determination by c ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    1State Key Laboratory of Hybrid Rice, Hunan Hybrid Rice Research Center, Changsha 410125, P.R. China. 2School of ... for contribution rates of sheath photosynthesis to economical yield. ..... related processes during ripening in rice plants.

  2. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumour of the Maxilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puja Sahai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 38-year-old man was diagnosed with malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour of the maxilla. He was treated with total maxillectomy. Histopathological examination of the resected specimen revealed a close resection margin. The tumour was of high grade with an MIB-1 labelling index of almost 60%. At six weeks following the surgery, he developed local tumour relapse. The patient succumbed to the disease at five months from the time of diagnosis. The present report underlines the locally aggressive nature of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour of the maxilla which necessitates an early therapeutic intervention. A complete resection with clear margins is the most important prognostic factor for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour in the head and neck region. Adjuvant radiotherapy may be considered to improve the local control. Future research may demarcate the role of targeted therapy for patients with malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour.

  3. Bilateral giant cell tumor of tendon sheath of tendoachilles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soma Datta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath arises from the synovium of tendon sheaths, joints, or bursae, mostly affects adults between 30 and 50 years of age, and is slightly more common in females. We report the case of a 32-years-old male presenting with pain in both ankles without any history of trauma. On clinical examination, tenderness on both tendoachilles and local thickening were observed. Ultrasonography showed thickening of local tendinous area with increase in anteroposterior diameter, and Doppler demonstrated increased flow in peritendinous area. MRI findings showed that most of the tumor had intermediate signal intensity and portions of the tumor had low signal intensity. Fine needle aspiration cytology confirmed the diagnosis of giant cell tumor of tendon sheath. Excision biopsy was done with no recurrence on five month follow-up. Review of literature did not reveal any similar result; so, bilateral giant cell tumor of tendon sheath of tendoachilles is a rare presentation.

  4. Measure Guideline: Guidance on Taped Insulating Sheathing Drainage Planes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grin, A. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Lstiburek, J. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The goal of this research is to provide durable and long-term water management solutions using exterior insulating sheathing as part of the water management system. It is possible to tape or seal the joints in insulating sheathing to create a drainage plane and even an air control layer. There exists the material durability component of the tape as well as the system durability component being the taped insulating sheathing as the drainage plane. This measure guideline provides best practice and product recommendations from the interviewed contractors and homebuilders who collectively have a vast amount of experience. Three significant issues were discussed with the group, which are required to make taped insulating sheathing a simple, long-term, and durable drainage plane: horizontal joints should be limited or eliminated wherever possible; where a horizontal joint exists use superior materials; and frequent installation inspection and regular trade training are required to maintain proper installation.

  5. Dropping out of school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Teneva

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The modern technological society needs educated people who, through their high professionalism, are called upon to create its progress. In this aspect, a serious problem stands out – the dropout from school of a large number of children, adolescents and young people. The object of the research is the premature interruption of training for a large number of Bulgarian students. The subject of the study is the causes that provoke the students’ dropping out of school. The aim is to differentiate the negative factors leading to dropping out of school, and to identify the motivating factors that encourage the individual to return to the educational environment. In order to realize the so set target, a specially designed test-questionnaire has been used. The survey was conducted among students attending evening courses who have left their education for various reasons and are currently back to the school institution. The contingent of the study includes 120 students from the evening schools. The results indicate that the reasons which prompted the students to leave school early differentiate into four groups: family, social, economic, educational, personal. The motivation to return to school has been dictated in the highest degree by the need for realization of the person on the labor market, followed by the possibility for full social functioning.

  6. Validating the collision-dominated Child-Langmuir law for a dc discharge cathode sheath in an undergraduate laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisovskiy, V; Yegorenkov, V

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a simple method of observing the collision-dominated Child-Langmuir law in the course of an undergraduate laboratory work devoted to studying the properties of gas discharges. To this end we employ the dc gas discharge whose properties are studied in sufficient detail. The undergraduate laboratory work itself is reduced to registering the voltage drop across the electrodes, the discharge current as well as the cathode sheath thickness. We can easily perform the measurements of all three quantities with sufficient accuracy in a laboratory equipped with vacuum pumps.

  7. Properties of leaves particleboard for sheathing application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuryawan, Arif; Rahmawaty

    2018-03-01

    Manufacturing particleboard (PB) made of leaves was carried out to make non-structural building components, such as insulation, partition, wall, and sheathing. Raw materials used dry leaves originated from plantation (palm oil leaves) and forest plantation (magahony leaves). The adhesive used was interior type thermosetting commercial resins, namely 10% urea-formaldehyde (UF) based on oven dry leaves. Hardener used for UF resin was 1% and 3% ammonium chloride (NH4Cl) 20% (w/w), respectively. Technically, the target density of PB was 0.8 g/cm3 with the dimension’s size of (250 x 250 x 10) mm3. The pressure, temperature, and time of pressing of the hot press were 25 kgf/cm2, 120C, and 10 minutes, respectively. After conditioning for one week, the PB then was evaluated their physical and mechanical properties according to Japanese Industrial Standard (JIS) A 5908 (2003). Results of this work showed: 1) Both types of PB (palm oil and mahagony leaves) were feasible to be produced for non-structural applications; 2) Addition of hardener enhanced the physical and mechanical properties of PB; 3) It was recommended to enhance the performance of the PB by manipulation of the raw materials and the design.

  8. Axial sheath dynamics in a plasma focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soliman, H.M.; El-Khalafawy, T.A.; Masoud, M.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents the result of investigation with a 10 kJ Mather type plasma focus. It is operated in hydrogen gas at ambient pressure of 0.15--1 torr and charging voltage of 8--11 kV. Radial distribution of the current sheath density with axial distance has been estimated. Plasma rotation in the expansion chamber in the absence of external magnetic field has been detected. A plasma flare from the plasma focus region propagating in the radial direction has been observed. Streak photography shows two plasma streams flowing simultaneously out of the muzzle. The mean energy of the electron beam ejected from the pinch region of the focused plasma, was measured by retarding field analyzer to be 0.32 keV. The electron temperature of the plasma focus at peak compression was determined by measuring the X-ray intensity as a function of absorber thickness at a distance of 62 cm from the focus. The electron temperature has been found to 3 keV

  9. Shear flow instability in a partially-ionized plasma sheath around a fast-moving vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sotnikov, V. I.; Mudaliar, S.; Genoni, T. C.; Rose, D. V.; Oliver, B. V.; Mehlhorn, T. A.

    2011-01-01

    The stability of ion acoustic waves in a sheared-flow, partially-ionized compressible plasma sheath around a fast-moving vehicle in the upper atmosphere, is described and evaluated for different flow profiles. In a compressible plasma with shear flow, instability occurs for any velocity profile, not just for profiles with an inflection point. A second-order differential equation for the electrostatic potential of excited ion acoustic waves in the presence of electron and ion collisions with neutrals is derived and solved numerically using a shooting method with boundary conditions appropriate for a finite thickness sheath in contact with the vehicle. We consider three different velocity flow profiles and find that in all cases that neutral collisions can completely suppress the instability.

  10. Contrast material filling of the peroneal tendon sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zadravecz, Gy.; Grexa, E.

    1981-01-01

    In case of complaints after fracture of the calcaneus the common sheath of the peroneus tendons was filled up with contrast material. The tendon sheath was punctured Oehind the external ankle. The three-directional radiograms clearly showed the dislocation and compression of the tendons, caused by the exostosis of the calcaneus. The concomitant tendovaginitis caused the complaints. This alteration was observed in 11% of all the calcaneus fractures. (L.E.)

  11. Cell Based Meniscal Repair Using an Aligned Bioactive Nanofibrous Sheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    to subsequently guide tissue regeneration , for example, by seeded tissue progenitor cells . To achieve this objective, the first step is to develop...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0104 TITLE: Cell -Based Meniscal Repair Using an Aligned Bioactive Nanofibrous Sheath PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Cell -Based Meniscal Repair Using an Aligned Bioactive Nanofibrous Sheath 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0104 5c. PROGRAM

  12. Composition of the sheath produced by the green alga Chlorella sorokiniana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K; Imase, M; Sasaki, K; Ohmura, N; Saiki, H; Tanaka, H

    2006-05-01

    To investigate the chemical characterization of the mucilage sheath produced by Chlorella sorokiniana. Algal mucilage sheath was hydrolysed with NaOH, containing EDTA. The purity of the hydrolysed sheath was determined by an ATP assay. The composition of polysaccharide in the sheath was investigated by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection. Sucrose, galacturonic acid, xylitol, inositol, ribose, mannose, arabinose, galactose, rhamnose and fructose were detected in the sheath as sugar components. Magnesium was detected in the sheath as a divalent cation using inductively coupled argon plasma. The sheath matrix also contained protein. It appears that the sheath is composed of sugars and metals. Mucilage sheath contains many kinds of saccharides that are produced as photosynthetic metabolites and divalent cations that are contained in the culture medium. This is the first report on chemical characterization of the sheath matrix produced by C. sorokiniana.

  13. Cutoff effects of electron velocity distribution to the properties of plasma parameters near the plasma-sheath boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelic, N.

    2011-01-01

    The plasma properties under high thermodynamic non-equilibrium condition, established due to the presence of electrically biased electrode, are investigated. Assumption of electron cut-off velocity distribution function (VDF), as done by Andrews and Varey in their investigations of the sheath region [J. Phys. A 3, 413 (1970)], has been extended here to both plasma and sheath regions. Analytic expressions for the moments of electron VDF, as well as for the electron screening temperature function dependence on the plasma-sheath local potential are derived. In deriving the ion velocity distribution the ''standard'' assumption of strict plasma quasineutrality, or equivalently vanishing of the plasma Debye length, is employed, whereas the ions are assumed to be generated at rest over the plasma region. However, unlike the standard approach of solving the plasma equation, where pure Boltzmann electron density profile is used, here we employ modified Boltzmann's electron density profile, due to cutoff effect of the electron velocity distribution. It is shown that under these conditions the quasineutrality equation solution is characterised by the electric field singularity for any negative value of the electrode bias potential as measured with respect to the plasma potential. The point of singularity i.e., the plasma length and its dependence on the electrode bias and sheath potential is established for the particular case of ionization profile mechanism proportional to the local electron density. Relevant parameters for the kinetic Bohm criterion are explicitly calculated for both ions and electrons, for arbitrary electrode bias.

  14. Studies of irradiated zircaloy fuel sheathing using XPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, P.K.; Irving, K.G.; Hocking, W.H.; Duclos, A.M.; Gerwing, A.F.

    1995-01-01

    The preliminary results reported here support the hypothesis that CANLUB graphite coating reduces the rate at which oxygen can react with fuel sheathing. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) characterization of Zircaloy sheathing obtained from extended-burnup Bruce-type elements (BDL-406-XY (555 MW.h/kgU) and BDL-406-AAH (731 MW.h/kgU)) irradiated in NRU indicates that CANLUB may reduce fuel sheath oxidation, and hence that fission-liberated oxygen may remain in the fuel. Chemical shifts in the Zr 3d spectra suggest that a stoichiometric (ZrO 2 ) oxide film was formed only on Zircaloy in direct contact with fuel. Particulate fuel adhering to the sheath was also determined to be systematically more oxidized on surfaces with CANLUB than on those without it. The unique association of tin on sheathing specimens with the non-CANLUB-coated specimens might also suggest that the tin had segregated from the sheathing. It must be emphasized that further experiments are required to better define the effect of CANLUB on fuel oxidation. (author). 14 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs

  15. Plasma Sheath Behavior in a Coaxial Discharge Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL-Aragi, G.; Soliman, H.M.; Masoud, M.M.

    2001-01-01

    The behavior of the plasma sheath has been studied experimentally and theoretically for 3 kJ coaxial discharge device. The discharge takes place in argon gas with pressure of 0.8 mbar. The experiments are conducted with a 10 kV bank charging voltage, which corresponds to 110 kA peak discharge current with time period of 34 μs. The experimental investigations have been studied using a magnetic probes and a miniature Rogowsky coil. A snowplough model is used to drive an analytical solution of the plasma sheath behavior in axial direction. Measurements of radial distribution of plasma sheath current density J r at the muzzle, show that J r has the following relation, J r is proportional to r -1.1 . From the experimental results and theoretical calculations of axial distribution of azimuthal magnetic field induction and plasma sheath velocity, the inclination angle between the normal of the plasma sheath with the axial distance at any axial position is evaluated and it has approximately a constant value for most axial distances. Also, the axial motion of plasma sheath acceleration is estimated experimentally a max = 0.13 x 10 12 ' cm / s 2 at z = 11 cm and from theoretical calculations a max = 0.15 x 10 12 cm/ s 2 at max z = 1.6 cm. A comparison of the experimental results with the theoretical calculations, under the assumption of the snowplough model are not in agreement. (author)

  16. Studies of irradiated zircaloy fuel sheathing using XPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, P K; Irving, K G [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada); Hocking, W H; Duclos, A M; Gerwing, A F [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, MB (Canada). Whiteshell Labs.

    1996-12-31

    The preliminary results reported here support the hypothesis that CANLUB graphite coating reduces the rate at which oxygen can react with fuel sheathing. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) characterization of Zircaloy sheathing obtained from extended-burnup Bruce-type elements (BDL-406-XY (555 MW.h/kgU) and BDL-406-AAH (731 MW.h/kgU)) irradiated in NRU indicates that CANLUB may reduce fuel sheath oxidation, and hence that fission-liberated oxygen may remain in the fuel. Chemical shifts in the Zr 3d spectra suggest that a stoichiometric (ZrO{sub 2}) oxide film was formed only on Zircaloy in direct contact with fuel. Particulate fuel adhering to the sheath was also determined to be systematically more oxidized on surfaces with CANLUB than on those without it. The unique association of tin on sheathing specimens with the non-CANLUB-coated specimens might also suggest that the tin had segregated from the sheathing. It must be emphasized that further experiments are required to better define the effect of CANLUB on fuel oxidation. (author). 14 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  17. Dynamic sheath studies in plasma source ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schever, J.T.; Shamim, M.; Conrad, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII) is a non-line-of-sight method for materials processing in which a target is immersed in a plasma and pulse biased to a high negative voltage (∼ 50 kV). A model of the dynamic sheath which forms under these conditions has been developed and applied to planar, cylindrical and spherical geometries. This model assumes that the transient sheath obeys the Child-Langmuir law for space charge limited emission at each instant during the propagation. Ions uncovered by the propagating sheath edge supply the space charge limited current. This yields an equation relating sheath edge velocity to position, which can be integrated to obtain the sheath edge position as a function of time. The same procedure used in cylindrical and spherical geometry results in a similar equation which must be integrated numerically. Comparison of results of experimental measurements, our model and simulation will be presented for the dynamic sheath edge position and target current waveform. Measurements of implanted dose uniformity of wedge shaped targets are also presented

  18. Atomic Structure of Type VI Contractile Sheath from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Osman; He, Shaoda; Planamente, Sara; Stach, Lasse; MacDonald, James T; Manoli, Eleni; Scheres, Sjors H W; Filloux, Alain; Freemont, Paul S

    2018-02-06

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa has three type VI secretion systems (T6SSs), H1-, H2-, and H3-T6SS, each belonging to a distinct group. The two T6SS components, TssB/VipA and TssC/VipB, assemble to form tubules that conserve structural/functional homology with tail sheaths of contractile bacteriophages and pyocins. Here, we used cryoelectron microscopy to solve the structure of the H1-T6SS P. aeruginosa TssB1C1 sheath at 3.3 Å resolution. Our structure allowed us to resolve some features of the T6SS sheath that were not resolved in the Vibrio cholerae VipAB and Francisella tularensis IglAB structures. Comparison with sheath structures from other contractile machines, including T4 phage and R-type pyocins, provides a better understanding of how these systems have conserved similar functions/mechanisms despite evolution. We used the P. aeruginosa R2 pyocin as a structural template to build an atomic model of the TssB1C1 sheath in its extended conformation, allowing us to propose a coiled-spring-like mechanism for T6SS sheath contraction. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Analytical expression for sheath edge around corner cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheridan, T E

    2009-01-01

    A simple analytical expression for the position of the sheath edge around a two-dimensional corner cathode with included angle θ c has been discovered. This expression is valid for weakly collisional sheaths in the Child-Langmuir regime φ c >> kT e /e, where -φ c e is the electron temperature. In polar coordinates (r, θ), the sheath edge is given by (r/s 0 )sin[πθ/(2π - θ c )] = [π/(2π - θ c )] where s 0 is the planar sheath width far from the vertex of the corner. This result is verified by comparison with previous numerical solutions (Watterson P A 1989 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 22 1300) for the knife edge (θ c = 0) and convex square corner (θ c = π/2). The observed agreement suggests that this expression gives the sheath edge for all corner angles, both concave and convex. The utility of this result is demonstrated by computing the full sheath solution for a knife-edge cathode with φ c = 100kT e /e.

  20. Drop jumping. II. The influence of dropping height on the biomechanics of drop jumping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobbert, M F; Huijing, P A; van Ingen Schenau, G J

    In the literature, athletes preparing for explosive activities are recommended to include drop jumping in their training programs. For the execution of drop jumps, different techniques and different dropping heights can be used. This study was designed to investigate for the performance of bounce

  1. Controlling charge on levitating drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilger, Ryan T; Westphall, Michael S; Smith, Lloyd M

    2007-08-01

    Levitation technologies are used in containerless processing of materials, as microscale manipulators and reactors, and in the study of single drops and particles. Presented here is a method for controlling the amount and polarity of charge on a levitating drop. The method uses single-axis acoustic levitation to trap and levitate a single, initially neutral drop with a diameter between 400 microm and 2 mm. This drop is then charged in a controllable manner using discrete packets of charge in the form of charged drops produced by a piezoelectric drop-on-demand dispenser equipped with a charging electrode. The magnitude of the charge on the dispensed drops can be adjusted by varying the voltage applied to the charging electrode. The polarity of the charge on the added drops can be changed allowing removal of charge from the trapped drop (by neutralization) and polarity reversal. The maximum amount of added charge is limited by repulsion of like charges between the drops in the trap. This charging scheme can aid in micromanipulation and the study of charged drops and particles using levitation.

  2. Correlation of the SLAP lesion with lesions of the medial sheath of the biceps tendon and intra-articular subscapularis tendon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennett William

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Superior labral anterior to posterior (SLAP lesions have been well described in the literature and are thought to be secondary to traction injuries to the biceps anchor and/or falls on the outstretched arm. The pulley has recently been described as a structure that aids in the prevention of biceps instability. The intra-articular subscapularis insertion (IASS has been noted to contribute to the robust nature of the medial sheath. The purpose of the study was to determine a potential correlation of SLAP lesions and pulley lesions with/without IASS lesions, (hereafter referred to as medial sheath as forces that can disrupt the biceps anchor and may also disrupt structures of the medial sheath or vice-versa. Materials and Methods: Three hundred and sixteen consecutive shoulder arthroscopies performed by one surgeon were reviewed retrospectively. Operative reports and arthroscopic pictures were carefully reviewed with particular attention paid to the labral and pulley pathology. Selection bias was noted as the author had never operated primarily for a Type 1 SLAP lesion. Following, however, and as such, the exclusion criteria, was a Type 1 SLAP. Results: There were a total of 30 SLAP lesions and a total of 126 medial sheath lesions. There were 13 patients who had both SLAP and medial sheath lesions. There were 17 patients who had a SLAP lesion without a medial sheath lesion. There were 96 medial sheath lesions without a SLAP. A comparison of rates between patients who had a medial sheath lesion with a SLAP and those who had a medial sheath lesion without a SLAP, for the 316 patients, and when tested with a Fisher exact test revealed that there was no statistical significance, P = 0.673. The prevalence of SLAP lesions in this population of 316 patients was 9.4%, Buford 1%, medial sheath lesions 39%, and SLAP and medial sheath lesions 4%. Interestingly, there were three Buford complexes, all associated with a SLAP and one Buford complex

  3. Genomic and Expression Profiling of Benign and Malignant Nerve Sheath Profiling of Benign and Malignant Nerve Sheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    Benign and Malignant Nerve Sheath Tumors in Neurofibromatosis Patients PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Matt van de Rijn, M.D., Ph.D. Torsten...Annual 3. DATES COVERED 1 May 2006 –30 Apr 2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Genomic and Expression Profiling of Benign and Malignant Nerve...Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0297 Title: Genomic and Expression Profiling of Benign and Malignant Nerve Sheath Tumors in Neurofibromatosis

  4. First drop dissimilarity in drop-on-demand inkjet devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Famili, Amin; Palkar, Saurabh A.; Baldy, William J. Jr.

    2011-01-01

    As inkjet printing technology is increasingly applied in a broader array of applications, careful characterization of its method of use is critical due to its inherent sensitivity. A common operational mode in inkjet technology known as drop-on-demand ejection is used as a way to deliver a controlled quantity of material to a precise location on a target. This method of operation allows ejection of individual or a sequence (burst) of drops based on a timed trigger event. This work presents an examination of sequences of drops as they are ejected, indicating a number of phenomena that must be considered when designing a drop-on-demand inkjet system. These phenomena appear to be driven by differences between the first ejected drop in a burst and those that follow it and result in a break-down of the linear relationship expected between driving amplitude and drop mass. This first drop, as quantified by high-speed videography and subsequent image analysis, can be different in morphology, trajectory, velocity, and volume from subsequent drops within a burst. These findings were confirmed orthogonally by both volume and mass measurement techniques which allowed quantitation down to single drops.

  5. Association between QTLs and morphological traits toward sheath blight resistance in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md Kamal; Jena, Kshirod Kumar; Bhuiyan, Md Atiqur Rahman; Wickneswari, Ratnam

    2016-01-01

    Sheath blight is considered the most significant disease of rice and causes enormous yield losses over the world. Breeding for resistant varieties is the only viable option to combat the disease efficiently. Seventeen diverged rice genotypes along with 17 QTL-linked SSR markers were evaluated under greenhouse conditions. Pearson’s correlation showed only the flag leaf angle had a significant correlation with sheath blight resistance under greenhouse screening. Multivariate analysis based on UPGMA clustering and principal component analysis (PCA) indicated that the flag leaf angle, flag leaf length, and plant compactness were significantly associated with the following SSR marker alleles: RM209 (116,130), RM202 (176), RM224 (126), RM257 (156), RM426 (175), and RM6971 (196), which are linked to the SB QTLs: QRlh11, qSBR11-3, qSBR11-1, qSBR9-1, qShB3-2, and qSB-9. A Mantel test suggested a weak relationship between the observed phenotypes and allelic variation patterns, implying the independent nature of morphological and molecular variations. Teqing and Tetep were found to be the most resistant cultivars. IR65482-4-136-2-2, MR219-4, and MR264 showed improved resistance potentials. These results suggest that the morphological traits and QTLs which have been found to associate with sheath blight resistance are a good choice to enhance resistance through pyramiding either 2 QTLs or QTLs and traits in susceptible rice cultivars. PMID:27795687

  6. Utilizing Bacillus to inhibit the growth and infection by sheath blight pathogen, Rhizoctoniasolani in rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margani, R.; Hadiwiyono; Widadi, S.

    2018-03-01

    Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn is a common pathogen of rice. The pathogen causes sheath blight of rice. The pathogen can cause loss in the production of rice up to 45%. So far, the disease however is still poorly taken care of by the farmers and researchers, so the control measures is nearly never practiced by the farmers in the fields. It due to the unavailability of effective control method of the disease. Therefore, development to control the disease is important. Bacillus is one of popular bacteria which is effective as biological control agent of a lot of pathogens in plants, but it has not been used for control sheath blight in rice yet. The current researches were aimed to study the potential of Bacillus collected from healthy rice as candidates of biological control agent of the disease. The results showed that some isolates showed indications to inhibit significantly the growth and infection of the pathogen. We obtained at least five isolates of Bacillus collected from leaves, sheath, and stem of healthy rice fields. All of the isolates could effectively inhibit the growth of R. solani in vitro on potato dextrose medium at range 30.33-58.00%, whereas in vivo B05 isolate was the most effective in inhibiting the infection of pathogen at 30.43%. It was not significantly different (P≥0.05) to application of hexaconazol with dosage of 2 ml L-1.

  7. Interaction of magnetized electrons with a boundary sheath: investigation of a specular reflection model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Dennis; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter

    2017-11-01

    This publication reports analytical and numerical results concerning the interaction of gyrating electrons with a plasma boundary sheath, with focus on partially magnetized technological plasmas. It is assumed that the electron Debye length {λ }{{D}} is much smaller than the electron gyroradius {r}{{L}}, and {r}{{L}} in turn much smaller than the mean free path λ and the gradient length L of the fields. Focusing on the scale of the gyroradius, the sheath is assumed as infinitesimally thin ({λ }{{D}}\\to 0), collisions are neglected (λ \\to ∞ ), the magnetic field is taken as homogeneous, and electric fields (=potential gradients) in the bulk are neglected (L\\to ∞ ). The interaction of an electron with the electric field of the plasma boundary sheath is represented by a specular reflection {v}\\to {v}-2{v}\\cdot {{e}}z {{e}}z of the velocity {v} at the plane z = 0 of a naturally oriented Cartesian coordinate system (x,y,z). The electron trajectory is then given as sequences of helical sections, with the kinetic energy ɛ and the canonical momenta p x and p y conserved, but not the position of the axis (base point {{R}}0), the slope (pitch angle χ), and the phase (gyrophase φ). A ‘virtual interaction’ which directly maps the incoming electrons to the outgoing ones is introduced and studied in dependence of the angle γ between the field and the sheath normal {{e}}z. The corresponding scattering operator is constructed, mathematically characterized, and given as an infinite matrix. An equivalent boundary condition for a transformed kinetic model is derived.

  8. The Drop Tower Bremen -Experiment Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Könemann, Thorben; von Kampen, Peter; Rath, Hans J.

    The idea behind the drop tower facility of the Center of Applied Space Technology and Micro-gravity (ZARM) in Bremen is to provide an inimitable technical opportunity of a daily access to short-term weightlessness on earth. In this way ZARM`s european unique ground-based microgravity laboratory displays an excellent economic alternative for research in space-related conditions at low costs comparable to orbital platforms. Many national and international ex-perimentalists motivated by these prospects decide to benefit from the high-quality and easy accessible microgravity environment only provided by the Drop Tower Bremen. Corresponding experiments in reduced gravity could open new perspectives of investigation methods and give scientists an impressive potential for a future technology and multidisciplinary applications on different research fields like Fundamental Physics, Astrophysics, Fluid Dynamics, Combus-tion, Material Science, Chemistry and Biology. Generally, realizing microgravity experiments at ZARM`s drop tower facility meet new requirements of the experimental hardware and may lead to some technical constraints in the setups. In any case the ZARM Drop Tower Operation and Service Company (ZARM FAB mbH) maintaining the drop tower facility is prepared to as-sist experimentalists by offering own air-conditioned laboratories, clean rooms, workshops and consulting engineers, as well as scientific personal. Furthermore, ZARM`s on-site apartment can be used for accommodations during the experiment campaigns. In terms of approaching drop tower experimenting, consulting of experimentalists is mandatory to successfully accomplish the pursued drop or catapult capsule experiment. For this purpose there will be a lot of expertise and help given by ZARM FAB mbH in strong cooperation to-gether with the experimentalists. However, in comparison to standard laboratory setups the drop or catapult capsule setup seems to be completely different at first view. While defining a

  9. Evaluation of the crack initiation of curved compact tension specimens of a Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube using the unloading compliance and direct current potential drop methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Hyeon Cheol; Ahn, Sang Bok; Park, Joong Chul; Kim, Young Suk

    2005-01-01

    Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes, carrying fuel bundles and heavy water coolant inside, degrade due to neutron irradiation and hydrogen embrittlement during their operation in heavy water reactors. The safety criterion for the Zr-2.5Nb tubes to meet is a leak-before-break (LBB) requirement. To evaluate a safety margin related to the LBB criterion, facture toughness of the pressure tubes are to be determined periodically with their operational time. For a reliable evaluation of the LBB safety criterion of the pressure tubes, it is required to precisely determine their fracture toughness. Since the fracture toughness or J of the pressure tubes is determined only by the extended crack length, it is important to reliably and precisely evaluate the advanced crack length. However, the problem lies with the detection of the crack opening point because prior plastic deformation before a start of the crack makes it difficult. The aim of this work is to evaluate which method can define the crack initiation point in the Zr- 2.5Nb compact tension specimens more precisely between the unloading compliance method with a crack opening displacement (COD) gauge and the direct current potential drop (DCPD) methods

  10. A donor-specific QTL, exhibiting allelic variation for leaf sheath hairiness in a nested association mapping population, is located on barley chromosome 4H

    KAUST Repository

    Saade, Stephanie; Kutlu, Burcu; Draba, Vera; Fö rster, Karin; Schumann, Erika; Tester, Mark A.; Pillen, Klaus; Maurer, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Leaf sheath hairiness is a morphological trait associated with various advantages, including tolerance to both abiotic and biotic stresses, thereby increasing yield. Understanding the genetic basis of this trait in barley can therefore improve the agronomic performance of this economically important crop. We scored leaf sheath hairiness in a two-year field trial in 1,420 BC1S3 lines from the wild barley nested association mapping (NAM) population HEB-25. Leaf sheath hairiness segregated in six out of 25 families with the reference parent Barke being glabrous. We detected the major hairy leaf sheath locus Hs (syn. Hsh) on chromosome 4H (111.3 cM) with high precision. The effects of the locus varied across the six different wild barley donors, with donor of HEB family 11 conferring the highest score of leaf sheath hairiness. Due to the high mapping resolution present in HEB-25, we were able to discuss physically linked pentatricopeptide repeat genes and subtilisin-like proteases as potential candidate genes underlying this locus. In this study, we proved that HEB-25 provides an appropriate tool to further understand the genetic control of leaf sheath hairiness in barley. Furthermore, our work represents a perfect starting position to clone the gene responsible for the 4H locus observed.

  11. A donor-specific QTL, exhibiting allelic variation for leaf sheath hairiness in a nested association mapping population, is located on barley chromosome 4H

    KAUST Repository

    Saade, Stephanie

    2017-12-07

    Leaf sheath hairiness is a morphological trait associated with various advantages, including tolerance to both abiotic and biotic stresses, thereby increasing yield. Understanding the genetic basis of this trait in barley can therefore improve the agronomic performance of this economically important crop. We scored leaf sheath hairiness in a two-year field trial in 1,420 BC1S3 lines from the wild barley nested association mapping (NAM) population HEB-25. Leaf sheath hairiness segregated in six out of 25 families with the reference parent Barke being glabrous. We detected the major hairy leaf sheath locus Hs (syn. Hsh) on chromosome 4H (111.3 cM) with high precision. The effects of the locus varied across the six different wild barley donors, with donor of HEB family 11 conferring the highest score of leaf sheath hairiness. Due to the high mapping resolution present in HEB-25, we were able to discuss physically linked pentatricopeptide repeat genes and subtilisin-like proteases as potential candidate genes underlying this locus. In this study, we proved that HEB-25 provides an appropriate tool to further understand the genetic control of leaf sheath hairiness in barley. Furthermore, our work represents a perfect starting position to clone the gene responsible for the 4H locus observed.

  12. The Child-Langmuir law and analytical theory of collisionless to collision-dominated sheaths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benilov, M S

    2009-01-01

    This paper is concerned with summarizing simple analytical models of space-charge sheaths and tracing their relation to the Child-Langmuir model of an ion sheath. The topics discussed include the Child-Langmuir law and model of a collisionless ion sheath, the Mott-Gurney law and model of a collision-dominated ion sheath, the Bohm model of a collisionless ion-electron sheath, the Su-Lam-Cohen model of a collision-dominated ion-electron sheath, ion sheaths with arbitrary collisionality, high-accuracy boundary conditions for the Child-Langmuir and Mott-Gurney models of an ion sheath and the mathematical sense of Child-Langmuir type models of an ion sheath from the point of view of modern theoretical physics.

  13. Effect of non-uniform Hall parameter on the electrode voltage drop in Faraday-type combustion MHD generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, G.P.; Rohatgi, V.K.

    1982-01-01

    Following a simplified approach, an expression is derived for the gas-dynamic voltage drop in a finitely segmented Faraday-type combustion MHD generator, taking into account the non-uniform Hall parameter across the channel. Combining the electrical sheath voltage drop, discussed briefly, with the gas-dynamic voltage drop, the effect of a non-uniform Hall parameter on the electrode voltage drop is studied using the theoretical and experimental input parameters of the Indian MHD channel test. The condition for the validity of the usual assumption of uniform Hall parameter across the channel is pointed out. Analysis of the measured electrode voltage drop predicts the real gas conductivity in the core to be in the range of 60 to 75 per cent of the theoretically calculated core conductivity. (author)

  14. Coronal mass ejections and their sheath regions in interplanetary space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpua, Emilia; Koskinen, Hannu E. J.; Pulkkinen, Tuija I.

    2017-11-01

    Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) are large-scale heliospheric transients that originate from the Sun. When an ICME is sufficiently faster than the preceding solar wind, a shock wave develops ahead of the ICME. The turbulent region between the shock and the ICME is called the sheath region. ICMEs and their sheaths and shocks are all interesting structures from the fundamental plasma physics viewpoint. They are also key drivers of space weather disturbances in the heliosphere and planetary environments. ICME-driven shock waves can accelerate charged particles to high energies. Sheaths and ICMEs drive practically all intense geospace storms at the Earth, and they can also affect dramatically the planetary radiation environments and atmospheres. This review focuses on the current understanding of observational signatures and properties of ICMEs and the associated sheath regions based on five decades of studies. In addition, we discuss modelling of ICMEs and many fundamental outstanding questions on their origin, evolution and effects, largely due to the limitations of single spacecraft observations of these macro-scale structures. We also present current understanding of space weather consequences of these large-scale solar wind structures, including effects at the other Solar System planets and exoplanets. We specially emphasize the different origin, properties and consequences of the sheaths and ICMEs.

  15. Ontogeny of the sheathing leaf base in maize (Zea mays).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Robyn; Leiboff, Samuel; Scanlon, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Leaves develop from the shoot apical meristem (SAM) via recruitment of leaf founder cells. Unlike eudicots, most monocot leaves display parallel venation and sheathing bases wherein the margins overlap the stem. Here we utilized computed tomography (CT) imaging, localization of PIN-FORMED1 (PIN1) auxin transport proteins, and in situ hybridization of leaf developmental transcripts to analyze the ontogeny of monocot leaf morphology in maize (Zea mays). CT imaging of whole-mounted shoot apices illustrates the plastochron-specific stages during initiation of the basal sheath margins from the tubular disc of insertion (DOI). PIN1 localizations identify basipetal auxin transport in the SAM L1 layer at the site of leaf initiation, a process that continues reiteratively during later recruitment of lateral leaf domains. Refinement of these auxin transport domains results in multiple, parallel provascular strands within the initiating primordium. By contrast, auxin is transported from the L2 toward the L1 at the developing margins of the leaf sheath. Transcripts involved in organ boundary formation and dorsiventral patterning accumulate within the DOI, preceding the outgrowth of the overlapping margins of the sheathing leaf base. We suggest a model wherein sheathing bases and parallel veins are both patterned via the extended recruitment of lateral maize leaf domains from the SAM. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  16. Sheath-accumulating Propagation of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Takuya; Shibata, Kazunari, E-mail: takahasi@kusastro.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto 607–8471 (Japan)

    2017-03-10

    Fast interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) are the drivers of strong space weather storms such as solar energetic particle events and geomagnetic storms. The connection between the space-weather-impacting solar wind disturbances associated with fast ICMEs at Earth and the characteristics of causative energetic CMEs observed near the Sun is a key question in the study of space weather storms, as well as in the development of practical space weather prediction. Such shock-driving fast ICMEs usually expand at supersonic speeds during the propagation, resulting in the continuous accumulation of shocked sheath plasma ahead. In this paper, we propose a “sheath-accumulating propagation” (SAP) model that describes the coevolution of the interplanetary sheath and decelerating ICME ejecta by taking into account the process of upstream solar wind plasma accumulation within the sheath region. Based on the SAP model, we discuss (1) ICME deceleration characteristics; (2) the fundamental condition for fast ICMEs at Earth; (3) the thickness of interplanetary sheaths; (4) arrival time prediction; and (5) the super-intense geomagnetic storms associated with huge solar flares. We quantitatively show that not only the speed but also the mass of the CME are crucial for discussing the above five points. The similarities and differences between the SAP model, the drag-based model, and the“snow-plow” model proposed by Tappin are also discussed.

  17. An investigation of tendon sheathing filler migration into concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.

    1998-03-01

    During some of the inspections at nuclear power plants with prestressed concrete containments, it was observed that the containments has experienced leakage of the tendon sheathing filler (i.e., streaks). The objective of this activity was to provide an indication of the extent of tendon sheathing filler leakage into the concrete and its affects on concrete properties. Literature was reviewed and concrete core samples were obtained from the Trojan Nuclear Plant and tested. The literature primarily addressed effects of crude or lubricating oils that are known to cause concrete damage. However, these materials have significantly different characteristics relative to the materials used as tendon sheathing fillers. Examination and testing of the concrete cores indicated that the appearance of tendon sheathing filler on the concrete surface was due to leakage from the conduits and its subsequent migration through cracks that were present. Migration of the tendon sheathing filler was confined to the cracks and there was no perceptible movement into the concrete. Results of compressive strength testing indicated that the concrete quality was consistent in the containment and that the strength had increased over 40% in 25.4 years relative to the average compressive strength at 28-days age

  18. Coronal mass ejections and their sheath regions in interplanetary space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Kilpua

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs are large-scale heliospheric transients that originate from the Sun. When an ICME is sufficiently faster than the preceding solar wind, a shock wave develops ahead of the ICME. The turbulent region between the shock and the ICME is called the sheath region. ICMEs and their sheaths and shocks are all interesting structures from the fundamental plasma physics viewpoint. They are also key drivers of space weather disturbances in the heliosphere and planetary environments. ICME-driven shock waves can accelerate charged particles to high energies. Sheaths and ICMEs drive practically all intense geospace storms at the Earth, and they can also affect dramatically the planetary radiation environments and atmospheres. This review focuses on the current understanding of observational signatures and properties of ICMEs and the associated sheath regions based on five decades of studies. In addition, we discuss modelling of ICMEs and many fundamental outstanding questions on their origin, evolution and effects, largely due to the limitations of single spacecraft observations of these macro-scale structures. We also present current understanding of space weather consequences of these large-scale solar wind structures, including effects at the other Solar System planets and exoplanets. We specially emphasize the different origin, properties and consequences of the sheaths and ICMEs.

  19. Sheath-accumulating Propagation of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Takuya; Shibata, Kazunari

    2017-01-01

    Fast interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) are the drivers of strong space weather storms such as solar energetic particle events and geomagnetic storms. The connection between the space-weather-impacting solar wind disturbances associated with fast ICMEs at Earth and the characteristics of causative energetic CMEs observed near the Sun is a key question in the study of space weather storms, as well as in the development of practical space weather prediction. Such shock-driving fast ICMEs usually expand at supersonic speeds during the propagation, resulting in the continuous accumulation of shocked sheath plasma ahead. In this paper, we propose a “sheath-accumulating propagation” (SAP) model that describes the coevolution of the interplanetary sheath and decelerating ICME ejecta by taking into account the process of upstream solar wind plasma accumulation within the sheath region. Based on the SAP model, we discuss (1) ICME deceleration characteristics; (2) the fundamental condition for fast ICMEs at Earth; (3) the thickness of interplanetary sheaths; (4) arrival time prediction; and (5) the super-intense geomagnetic storms associated with huge solar flares. We quantitatively show that not only the speed but also the mass of the CME are crucial for discussing the above five points. The similarities and differences between the SAP model, the drag-based model, and the“snow-plow” model proposed by Tappin are also discussed.

  20. Structural Conservation of the Myoviridae Phage Tail Sheath Protein Fold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aksyuk, Anastasia A.; Kurochkina, Lidia P.; Fokine, Andrei; Forouhar, Farhad; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim V.; Tong, Liang; Rossmann, Michael G. (SOIBC); (Purdue); (Columbia)

    2012-02-21

    Bacteriophage phiKZ is a giant phage that infects Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a human pathogen. The phiKZ virion consists of a 1450 {angstrom} diameter icosahedral head and a 2000 {angstrom}-long contractile tail. The structure of the whole virus was previously reported, showing that its tail organization in the extended state is similar to the well-studied Myovirus bacteriophage T4 tail. The crystal structure of a tail sheath protein fragment of phiKZ was determined to 2.4 {angstrom} resolution. Furthermore, crystal structures of two prophage tail sheath proteins were determined to 1.9 and 3.3 {angstrom} resolution. Despite low sequence identity between these proteins, all of these structures have a similar fold. The crystal structure of the phiKZ tail sheath protein has been fitted into cryo-electron-microscopy reconstructions of the extended tail sheath and of a polysheath. The structural rearrangement of the phiKZ tail sheath contraction was found to be similar to that of phage T4.

  1. Anomalous Capacitive Sheath with Deep Radio Frequency Electric Field Penetration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaganovich, Igor D.

    2002-01-01

    A novel nonlinear effect of anomalously deep penetration of an external radio-frequency electric field into a plasma is described. A self-consistent kinetic treatment reveals a transition region between the sheath and the plasma. Because of the electron velocity modulation in the sheath, bunches in the energetic electron density are formed in the transition region adjusted to the sheath. The width of the region is of order V(subscript T)/omega, where V(subscript T) is the electron thermal velocity, and w is frequency of the electric field. The presence of the electric field in the transition region results in a cooling of the energetic electrons and an additional heating of the cold electrons in comparison with the case when the transition region is neglected

  2. Plasma sheath axial phase dynamics in coaxial device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soliman, H.M. (Plasma Physics Dept., NRC, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)); Masoud, M.M. (Plasma Physics Dept., NRC, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt))

    1994-10-01

    The study of the plasma sheath dynamics in the axial phase has been carried out in a 3 kJ coaxial system of Mather type for two different inner electrode (IE) lengths, 20 cm and 31.5 cm. For both lengths, measurements showed that the plasma sheath is splitted into two layers at the breech, which is referred to as a shock front and its magnetic piston. It has been found that the two layers of the plasma current sheath rotate around the inner electrode. At the muzzle the back layer reverse its rotation direction due to the magnetic field structure of the system. Results showed that the axial velocity of the first layer is greater than the second one all over the axial phase within the range between 1.4 and 1.7. (orig.).

  3. Plasma sheath axial phase dynamics in coaxial device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soliman, H.M.; Masoud, M.M.

    1994-01-01

    The study of the plasma sheath dynamics in the axial phase has been carried out in a 3 kJ coaxial system of Mather type for two different inner electrode (IE) lengths, 20 cm and 31.5 cm. For both lengths, measurements showed that the plasma sheath is splitted into two layers at the breech, which is referred to as a shock front and its magnetic piston. It has been found that the two layers of the plasma current sheath rotate around the inner electrode. At the muzzle the back layer reverse its rotation direction due to the magnetic field structure of the system. Results showed that the axial velocity of the first layer is greater than the second one all over the axial phase within the range between 1.4 and 1.7. (orig.)

  4. Spontaneous rectus sheath hematoma: The utility of CT angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Pierro, MD

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We described the utility of computed tomography (CT angiography in detection of bleeding vessels for a rapid percutaneous arterial embolization of the spontaneous rectus sheath hematoma. A 70-year-old woman comes to our attention with acute abdominal pain and a low hemoglobin level. An unenhanced CT was performed demonstrating a large rectus sheath hematoma. A conservative management was initially established. Despite this therapy, the abdominal pain increased together with a further decrease of hemoglobin values. A CT angiography was then performed, demonstrating an active bleeding within the hematoma and addressing the patient to a rapid percutaneous arterial embolization. Keywords: Rectus sheath hematoma, Acute abdomen, Arterial embolization, CT angiography, Active bleeding

  5. Hanging drop crystal growth apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, Robert J. (Inventor); Witherow, William K. (Inventor); Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor); Bugg, Charles E. (Inventor); Suddath, Fred L. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    This invention relates generally to control systems for controlling crystal growth, and more particularly to such a system which uses a beam of light refracted by the fluid in which crystals are growing to detect concentration of solutes in the liquid. In a hanging drop apparatus, a laser beam is directed onto drop which refracts the laser light into primary and secondary bows, respectively, which in turn fall upon linear diode detector arrays. As concentration of solutes in drop increases due to solvent removal, these bows move farther apart on the arrays, with the relative separation being detected by arrays and used by a computer to adjust solvent vapor transport from the drop. A forward scattering detector is used to detect crystal nucleation in drop, and a humidity detector is used, in one embodiment, to detect relative humidity in the enclosure wherein drop is suspended. The novelty of this invention lies in utilizing angular variance of light refracted from drop to infer, by a computer algorithm, concentration of solutes therein. Additional novelty is believed to lie in using a forward scattering detector to detect nucleating crystallites in drop.

  6. Photovoltaic building sheathing element with anti-slide features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenihan, James R.; Langmaid, Joseph A.; Lopez, Leonardo C.

    2015-09-08

    The present invention is premised` upon an assembly that includes at least a photovoltaic building sheathing element capable of being affixed on a building structure, the photovoltaic building sheathing element. The element including a photovoltaic cell assembly, a body portion attached to one or more portions of the photovoltaic cell assembly; and at feast a first and a second connector assembly capable of directly or indirectly electrically connecting the photovoltaic cell assembly to one or more adjoining devices; wherein the body portion includes one or more geometric features adapted to engage a vertically adjoining device before installation.

  7. Dengue fever with rectus sheath hematoma: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anurag Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue fever, also known as breakbone fever, is an infectious tropical disease caused by the Dengue virus. It is associated with a number of complications, which are well documented. However, Dengue fever associated with rectus sheath hematoma (RSH is a very rare complication. Only one case report has been published prior supporting the association of Dengue fever with RSH. We report a case of Dengue fever who presented with RSH and was successfully treated conservatively. RSH is also an uncommon cause of acute abdominal pain. It is accumulation of blood in the sheath of the rectus abdominis, secondary to rupture of an epigastric vessel or muscle tear.

  8. Use of a hot sheath Tormac for advance fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, M.A.

    1977-01-01

    The use of hot electrons in a Tormac sheath is predicted to improve stability and increase ntau by an order of magnitude. An effective ntau for energy containment is derived and system parameters for several advance fuels are shown. In none of the advance fuels cases considered is a reactor with fields greater than 10 Wb or major plasma radius of more than 3 m required for ignition. Minimum systems have power output of under 100 MW thermal. System parameters for a hot sheath Tormac have a wide latitude. Sizes, magnetic fields, operating temperatures can be chosen to optimize engineering and economic considerations

  9. Laser-induced fluorescence measurements of argon and xenon ion velocities near the sheath boundary in 3 ion species plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yip, Chi-Shung; Hershkowitz, Noah [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Severn, Greg [Department of Physics, University of San Diego, San Diego, California 92110 (United States); Baalrud, Scott D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    The Bohm sheath criterion is studied with laser-induced fluorescence in three ion species plasmas using two tunable diode lasers. Krypton is added to a low pressure unmagnetized DC hot filament discharge in a mixture of argon and xenon gas confined by surface multi-dipole magnetic fields. The argon and xenon ion velocity distribution functions are measured at the sheath-presheath boundary near a negatively biased boundary plate. The potential structures of the plasma sheath and presheath are measured by an emissive probe. Results are compared with previous experiments with Ar–Xe plasmas, where the two ion species were observed to reach the sheath edge at nearly the same speed. This speed was the ion sound speed of the system, which is consistent with the generalized Bohm criterion. In such two ion species plasmas, instability enhanced collisional friction was demonstrated [Hershkowitz et al., Phys. Plasmas 18(5), 057102 (2011).] to exist which accounted for the observed results. When three ion species are present, it is demonstrated under most circumstances the ions do not fall out of the plasma at their individual Bohm velocities. It is also shown that under most circumstances the ions do not fall out of the plasma at the system sound speed. These observations are also consistent with the presence of the instabilities.

  10. Fabrication and use of zircaloy/tantalum-sheathed cladding thermocouples and molybdenum/rhenium-sheathed fuel centerline thermocouples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, S.C.; Sepold, L.K.

    1985-01-01

    The thermocouples described in this report are zircaloy/tantalum-sheathed and molybdenum/rhenium alloy-sheathed instruments intended for fuel rod cladding and fuel centerline temperature measurements, respectively. Both types incorporate beryllium oxide insulation and tungsten/rhenium alloy thermoelements. These thermocouples, operated at temperatures of 2000 0 C and above, were developed for use in the internationally sponsored Severe Fuel Damage test series in the Power Burst Facility. The fabrication steps for both thermocouple types are described in detail. A laser-welding attachment technique for the cladding-type thermocouple is presented, and experience with alternate materials for cladding and fuel therocouples is discussed

  11. Theory of magnetostriction of electron-hole drops in Ge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markiewicz, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    A large mass of electron-hole liquid (γ drop) formed in a strain-induced potential well in Ge is known to distort its shape significantly in a magnetic field B > or approx. = 1 kG. It is shown in this paper that the shape change can be understood in detail as due to a ''recombination current'' of electron-hole pairs needed to replace those pairs which recombine in the drop volume. The Lorentz force deflects this current and produces a macroscopic dipole current loop inside the drop. The drop then changes shape to minimize its total energy, including magnetic, strain, and surface energies. While the drop usually flattens along the field direction, both para- and diamagnetic effects (elongated drops) are found to be possible, depending on excitation conditions, in accord with experiment. Similar effects are predicted to occur in small drops in unstrained Ge. This paper presents a magnetohydrodynamic theory of the magnetostriction which takes into account density variations which occur in the strain well and in high magnetic fields. A simpler theory is given for the special case in which the drop may be considered incompressible (small drops and moderate fields). Effects of carrier mass anisotropy and fluid viscosity are taken into consideration

  12. Studying the field induced breakup of acoustically levitated drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warschat, C.; Riedel, J.

    2017-10-01

    Coulomb fission of charged droplets (The terms drop and droplet are often used synonymous. Throughout this manuscript, to avoid confusion, the terms drop and droplet will be used for liquid spheres with radii in the millimeter range and the micrometer range, respectively. In our experiments, the first correspond to the parent drop while the latter describes the ejected progeny droplets.) is a well-studied natural phenomenon. Controlled droplet fission is already successfully employed in several technological applications. Still, since the occurring surface rupture relies on the exact understanding and description of the liquid gas boundary, some details are still under debate. Most empirical systematic studies observe falling micrometer droplets passing through the electric field inside a plate capacitor. This approach, although easily applicable and reliable, limits the experimental degrees of freedom regarding the observable time and the maximum size of the drops and can only be performed in consecutive individual observations of different subsequent drops. Here we present a novel setup to study the field induced breakup of acoustically levitated drops. The design does not bear any restrictions towards the temporal window of observation, and allows handling of drops of a tunable radius ranging from 10 μm to several millimeters and a real-time monitoring of one single drop. Our comprehensive study includes a time resolved visual inspection, laser shadowgraphy, laser induced fluorescence imaging, and ambient mass spectrometric interrogation of the nascent Taylor cone. The results shown for a millimeter sized drop, previously inaccessible for Coulomb fission experiments, are mostly comparable with previous results for smaller drops. The major difference is the time scale and the threshold potential of the drop rupture. Both values, however, resemble theoretically extrapolations to the larger radius. The technique allows for a systematic study of breakup behavior of

  13. Semisupervised Community Detection by Voltage Drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Ji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many applications show that semisupervised community detection is one of the important topics and has attracted considerable attention in the study of complex network. In this paper, based on notion of voltage drops and discrete potential theory, a simple and fast semisupervised community detection algorithm is proposed. The label propagation through discrete potential transmission is accomplished by using voltage drops. The complexity of the proposal is OV+E for the sparse network with V vertices and E edges. The obtained voltage value of a vertex can be reflected clearly in the relationship between the vertex and community. The experimental results on four real networks and three benchmarks indicate that the proposed algorithm is effective and flexible. Furthermore, this algorithm is easily applied to graph-based machine learning methods.

  14. Analytical solutions and particle simulations of cross-field plasma sheaths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerver, M.J.; Parker, S.E.; Theilhaber, K.

    1989-01-01

    Particles simulations have been made of an infinite plasma slab, bounded by absorbing conducting walls, with a magnetic field parallel to the walls. The simulations have been either 1-D, or 2-D, with the magnetic field normal to the simulation plane. Initially, the plasma has a uniform density between the walls, and there is a uniform source of ions and electrons to replace particles lost to the walls. In the 1-D case, there is no diffusion of the particle guiding centers, and the plasma remains uniform in density and potential over most of the slab, with sheaths about a Debye length wide where the potential rises to the wall potential. In the 2-D case, the density profile becomes parabolic, going almost to zero at the walls, and there is a quasineutral presheath in the bulk of the plasma, in addition to sheaths near the walls. Analytic expressions are found for the density and potential profiles in both cases, including, in the 2-D case, the magnetic presheath due to finite ion Larmor radius, and the effects of the guiding center diffusion rate being either much less than or much grater than the energy diffusion rate. These analytic expressions are shown to agree with the simulations. A 1-D simulation with Monte Carlo guiding center diffusion included gives results that are good agreement with the much more expensive 2-D simulation. 17 refs., 10 figs

  15. Potentiation of intraocular absorption and drug metabolism of N-acetylcarnosine lubricant eye drops: drug interaction with sight threatening lipid peroxides in the treatment for age-related eye diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babizhayev, Mark A

    2009-01-01

    Cataract is the dominant cause of blindness worldwide. Studies of the morphological structure and biophysical changes of the lens in human senile cataracts have demonstrated the disappearance of normal fiber structure in the opaque region of the lens and the disintegration of the lens fiber plasma membrane in the lens tissue. Morphological and biochemical techniques have revealed the regions in human cataractous lenses in which the plasma membrane derangement occurs as the primary light scattering centers which cause the observed lens opacity. Human cataract formation is mostly considered to be a multifactorial disease; however, oxidative stress might be one of the leading causes for both nuclear and cortical cataract. Phospholipid molecules modified with oxygen, accumulating in the lipid bilayer, change its geometry and impair lipid-lipid and protein-lipid interactions in lenticular fiber membranes. Electron microscopy data of human lenses at various stages of age-related cataract document that these disruptions were globules, vacuoles, multilamellar membranes, and clusters of highly undulating membranes. The opaque shades of cortical cataracts represent cohorts of locally affected fibres segregated from unaffected neighbouring fibres by plasma membranes. Other potential scattering centers found throughout the mature cataract nucleus included variations in staining density between adjacent cells, enlarged extracellular spaces between undulating membrane pairs, and protein-like deposits in the extracellular space. These affected parts had membranes with a fine globular aspect and in cross-section proved to be filled with medium to large globular elements. Lipid peroxidation (LPO) is a pathogenetic and causative factor of cataract. Increased concentrations of primary molecular LPO products (diene conjugates, lipid hydroperoxides, fatty acid oxy-derivatives) and end fluorescent LPO products were detected in the lipid moieties of the aqueous humor samples and human

  16. Potential profile near singularity point in kinetic Tonks-Langmuir discharges as a function of the ion sources temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kos, L.; Tskhakaya, D. D.; Jelić, N.

    2011-05-01

    A plasma-sheath transition analysis requires a reliable mathematical expression for the plasma potential profile Φ(x) near the sheath edge xs in the limit ɛ ≡λD/ℓ =0 (where λD is the Debye length and ℓ is a proper characteristic length of the discharge). Such expressions have been explicitly calculated for the fluid model and the singular (cold ion source) kinetic model, where exact analytic solutions for plasma equation (ɛ =0) are known, but not for the regular (warm ion source) kinetic model, where no analytic solution of the plasma equation has ever been obtained. For the latter case, Riemann [J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 24, 493 (1991)] only predicted a general formula assuming relatively high ion-source temperatures, i.e., much higher than the plasma-sheath potential drop. Riemann's formula, however, according to him, never was confirmed in explicit solutions of particular models (e.g., that of Bissell and Johnson [Phys. Fluids 30, 779 (1987)] and Scheuer and Emmert [Phys. Fluids 31, 3645 (1988)]) since "the accuracy of the classical solutions is not sufficient to analyze the sheath vicinity" [Riemann, in Proceedings of the 62nd Annual Gaseous Electronic Conference, APS Meeting Abstracts, Vol. 54 (APS, 2009)]. Therefore, for many years, there has been a need for explicit calculation that might confirm the Riemann's general formula regarding the potential profile at the sheath edge in the cases of regular very warm ion sources. Fortunately, now we are able to achieve a very high accuracy of results [see, e.g., Kos et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 093503 (2009)]. We perform this task by using both the analytic and the numerical method with explicit Maxwellian and "water-bag" ion source velocity distributions. We find the potential profile near the plasma-sheath edge in the whole range of ion source temperatures of general interest to plasma physics, from zero to "practical infinity." While within limits of "very low" and "relatively high" ion source temperatures

  17. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the oculomotor nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozic, D; Nagulic, M; Ostojic, J

    2006-01-01

    We present the short-term follow-up magnetic resonance (MR) studies and 1H-MR spectroscopy in a child with malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the oculomotor nerve associated with other less aggressive cranial nerve schwannomas. The tumor revealed perineural extension and diffuse nerve...

  18. Extraction of antioxidant pigments from dye sorghum leaf sheaths

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kayode, A.P.P.; Bara, C.A.; Dalode-Vieira, G.; Linnemann, A.R.; Nout, M.J.R.

    2012-01-01

    Extraction of antioxidant biocolorant pigments from leaf sheaths of dye sorghum was optimized. Effects of temperature and ethanol concentration of the extraction solvent on the concentrations of the 3-deoxyanthocyanidins, total phenolics and total anthocyanins, and the colour parameters of the

  19. Ion clusters, REB, and current sheath characteristics in focused discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bortolotti, A.; Brzosko, J.; DeChiara, P.; Kilic, H.; Mezzetti, F.; Nardi, V.; Powell, C.; Zeng, D.

    1990-01-01

    Small fluctuations in the current sheath characteristics (peak current density, FWHM of leading sheath, control parameters of sheath internal structure) are linked to wide fluctuations of ion and ion cluster emission from the pinch. Magnetic probe data are used for correlating variations of current sheath parameters with particle emission intensity, Z/M composition, particle energy spectrum. The emission of ion and ion clusters at 90 degrees from the axis of a plasma focus discharge is monitored simultaneously with the 0 degrees emission. The particle energy spectrum is analyzed with a Thomson (parabola) spectrometer (time resolution ∼ 1 nanosec). The cross-sectional structure of the REB at 180 degrees along the discharge axis is monitored via the deposition of collective-field accelerated ions on a target in the REB direction. Etched tracks of ion and ion clusters are in all cases recorded on CR-39 plates. Sharp peaks of the D + -ion spectrum at 90 degrees are found for E > 200 keV/unit charge in all focused discharges. These peaks are due to ion crossing of the azimuthal magnetic field of the pinch region, in a predominant ion cluster structure

  20. Electron sheath collapse in an applied-B ion diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grechikha, A.V.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of the electron sheath collapse in an applied-B ion diode due to the presence of the resistive anode plasma layer was found. This effect is more damaging at higher diode voltages and may be responsible for the parasitic load effect observed in the experiments. (author). 4 figs., 2 refs

  1. Synovial sarcoma mimicking benign peripheral nerve sheath tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larque, Ana B.; Nielsen, G.P.; Chebib, Ivan [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Pathology, Boston, MA (United States); Bredella, Miriam A. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-11-15

    To assess the radiographic and clinicopathologic features of synovial sarcoma of the nerve that were clinically or radiologically interpreted as benign peripheral nerve sheath tumor. Five patients with synovial sarcoma arising from the peripheral nerve and interpreted clinically and radiologically as peripheral nerve sheath tumors were identified. Clinicopathologic and imaging features were evaluated. There were three females and two males, ranging in age from 28 to 50 (mean 35.8) years. Most patients (4/5) complained of a mass, discomfort or pain. MR images demonstrated a heterogeneous, enhancing, soft tissue mass contiguous with the neurovascular bundle. On histologic examination, most tumors were monophasic synovial sarcoma (4/5). At the time of surgery, all tumors were noted to arise along or within a peripheral nerve. All patients were alive with no evidence of disease with median follow-up of 44 (range 32-237) months. For comparison, approximately 775 benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors of the extremities were identified during the same time period. Primary synovial sarcoma of the nerve can mimic peripheral nerve sheath tumors clinically and on imaging and should be included in the differential diagnosis for tumors arising from peripheral nerves. (orig.)

  2. Charge of a macroscopic particle in a plasma sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samarian, A.A.; Vladimirov, S.V.

    2003-01-01

    Charging of a macroscopic body levitating in a rf plasma sheath is studied experimentally and theoretically. The nonlinear charge vs size dependence is obtained. The observed nonlinearity is explained on the basis of an approach taking into account different plasma conditions for the levitation positions of different particles. The importance of suprathermal electrons' contribution to the charging process is demonstrated

  3. Mineralized fibroma of the tendon sheath presenting as a bursitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Corroller, Thomas; Champsaur, Pierre [Hopital Sainte-Marguerite, Service de Radiologie, Marseille (France); Faculte de Medecine de Marseille, Departement d' Anatomie, Marseille (France); Bouvier-Labit, Corinne [Hopital La Timone, Service d' Anatomopathologie, Marseille (France); Sbihi, Abderrahmane [Clinique Juge, Service de Chirurgie orthopedique, Marseille (France)

    2008-12-15

    We report on the clinical, imaging - including ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging - and histological features of a fibroma of the tendon sheath with mineralized chondroid and osseous metaplasia, presenting as a semimembranosus bursitis. The anatomical characteristics of the semimembranosus bursa are demonstrated by dissection in a cadaveric specimen and correlated with the imaging findings in our patient. (orig.)

  4. Mineralized fibroma of the tendon sheath presenting as a bursitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Corroller, Thomas; Champsaur, Pierre; Bouvier-Labit, Corinne; Sbihi, Abderrahmane

    2008-01-01

    We report on the clinical, imaging - including ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging - and histological features of a fibroma of the tendon sheath with mineralized chondroid and osseous metaplasia, presenting as a semimembranosus bursitis. The anatomical characteristics of the semimembranosus bursa are demonstrated by dissection in a cadaveric specimen and correlated with the imaging findings in our patient. (orig.)

  5. The Bohm criterion for a dusty plasma sheath

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    undergo temperature fluctuations due to collision, the mean square fluctuation in their temperature is much less than the equilibrium temperature. The problem of sheath dynamics with the plasma–wall interactions is of great importance in a number of areas, viz., plasma ion implantation, high-density com- puter chip ...

  6. Spine Patterning Is Guided by Segmentation of the Notochord Sheath

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wopat, Susan; Bagwell, Jennifer; Sumigray, Kaelyn D.; Dickson, Amy L.; Huitema, Leonie F.A.; Poss, Kenneth D.; Schulte-Merker, Stefan; Bagnat, Michel

    2018-01-01

    The spine is a segmented axial structure made of alternating vertebral bodies (centra) and intervertebral discs (IVDs) assembled around the notochord. Here, we show that, prior to centra formation, the outer epithelial cell layer of the zebrafish notochord, the sheath, segments into alternating

  7. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor: MRI and CT Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. O. Kragha

    2015-01-01

    important in its diagnosis. A rare case of MPNST that produced urinary retention and bowel incontinence is presented that may aid clinicians in the diagnosis of this rare clinical entity. Motor weakness, central enhancement, and immunohistochemistry may assist in the diagnosis of MPNST and differentiation between benign peripheral nerve sheath tumor (BPNST and MPNST.

  8. On the upper bound in the Bohm sheath criterion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotelnikov, I. A., E-mail: I.A.Kotelnikov@inp.nsk.su; Skovorodin, D. I., E-mail: D.I.Skovorodin@inp.nsk.su [Russian Academy of Sciences, Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    The question is discussed about the existence of an upper bound in the Bohm sheath criterion, according to which the Debye sheath at the interface between plasma and a negatively charged electrode is stable only if the ion flow velocity in plasma exceeds the ion sound velocity. It is stated that, with an exception of some artificial ionization models, the Bohm sheath criterion is satisfied as an equality at the lower bound and the ion flow velocity is equal to the speed of sound. In the one-dimensional theory, a supersonic flow appears in an unrealistic model of a localized ion source the size of which is less than the Debye length; however, supersonic flows seem to be possible in the two- and three-dimensional cases. In the available numerical codes used to simulate charged particle sources with a plasma emitter, the presence of the upper bound in the Bohm sheath criterion is not supposed; however, the correspondence with experimental data is usually achieved if the ion flow velocity in plasma is close to the ion sound velocity.

  9. Electron sheath collapse in an applied-B ion diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grechikha, A V [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany). Institut fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik

    1997-12-31

    The effect of the electron sheath collapse in an applied-B ion diode due to the presence of the resistive anode plasma layer was found. This effect is more damaging at higher diode voltages and may be responsible for the parasitic load effect observed in the experiments. (author). 4 figs., 2 refs.

  10. Internal pressure effects in the AIRCO-LCT conductor sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luton, J.N.; Clinard, J.A.; Lue, J.W.; Gray, W.H.; Summers, L.T.; Kershaw, R.

    1985-01-01

    The large Nb 3 Sn superconducting test coil produced by Westinghouse Electric Corporation for the international Large Coil Task (LCT) utilizes a conductor composed of cabled multifilamentary strands immersed in flowing supercritical helium contained by a square structural sheath made of the high-strength stainless alloy JBX-75. Peak pressures of a few hundred atmospheres are predicted to occur during quench, and measurement of these pressures seems feasible only through penetrations of the sheath wall. Fully processed short lengths of conductor were taken from production ends, fitted with pressure taps and strain gauges, and pressurized with helium gas. Failure, at 1000 atm at liquid nitrogen temperature, was by a catastrophic splitting of the sheath at a corner. Strain measurements and burst pressure agreed with elastic-plastic finite element stress calculations made for the sheath alone. Neither the production seam weld nor the pressure tap penetrations or their fillet welds contributed to the failure, although the finite element calculations show that these areas were also highly stressed, and examination of the failed sample showed that the finite welds were of poor quality. Failure was by tensile overload, with no evidence of fatigue

  11. Reexcision Perineural Invasion and Epithelial Sheath Neuroma Possibly on a Spectrum of Postinjury Reactive Hyperplasia Mediated by IL-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, James Y; Nuovo, Gerard; Kline, Mitchell; Magro, Cynthia M

    2017-01-01

    Epithelial sheath neuroma is a rarely recognized but established entity in the medical literature. First described in 2000 by Requena et al, there have only been 7 published cases to date, mostly in female patients and presenting as symptomatic solitary lesions on the back without a known history of trauma. In 2006, Beer et al described and reviewed a dozen cases in which epithelial sheath neuroma-like features were seen in the advent of a surgical procedure, which was termed "re-excision perineural invasion" and attributed to possible eccrine duct implantation during surgery. Our case is a 66-year-old male patient who underwent an excision of a melanocytic neoplasm in which a reactive epithelial sheath neuroma was incidentally discovered in the excision specimen, adjacent to the biopsy site cicatrix. Histologically, there was benign cutaneous nerve hyperplasia with a proliferation of squamous epithelium in intimate apposition to the nerve bundles in the superficial dermis. We postulate that the process active in the formation of re-excision perineural invasion is the same as in epithelial sheath neuroma and that minor trauma not appreciable on histologic examination is responsible in the latter entity. We performed IL-6 staining and documented that IL-6 was upregulated at the interface of the nerve and reactive epithelium, but was absent in nerves distant from the site of surgery, suggesting that IL-6 may be essential to the lesion's development. The recognition of reactive epithelial sheath neuroma including the subcategory of re-excision perineural invasion is crucial for the dermatopathologist to prevent mislabeling this reactive entity as a perineural squamous cell carcinoma, which has clinical consequences for the patient such as wider re-excision and radiation treatment. Additionally, we have identified a potential pathophysiologic basis for this lesion.

  12. Use of a pressure sensing sheath: comparison with standard means of blood pressure monitoring in catheterization procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, Phillip D; South, Charles; Klucznik, Richard P; Liu, Kenneth C; Novakovic, Robin L; Puri, Ajit S; Pride, G Lee; Aagaard-Kienitz, Beverly; Ray, Abishek; Elliott, Alan C

    2017-08-01

    Monitoring of blood pressure (BP) during procedures is variable, depending on multiple factors. Common methods include sphygmomanometer (BP cuff), separate radial artery catheterization, and side port monitoring of an indwelling sheath. Each means of monitoring has disadvantages, including time consumption, added risk, and signal dampening due to multiple factors. We sought an alternative approach to monitoring during procedures in the catheterization laboratory. A new technology involving a 330 µm fiberoptic sensor embedded in the wall of a sheath structure was tested against both radial artery catheter and sphygmomanometer readings obtained simultaneous with readings recorded from the pressure sensing system (PSS). Correlations and Bland-Altman analysis were used to determine whether use of the PSS could substitute for these standard techniques. The results indicated highly significant correlations in systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressures (MAP) when compared against radial artery catheterization (p<0.0001), and MAP means differed by <4%. Bland-Altman analysis of the data suggested that the sheath measurements can replace a separate radial artery catheter. While less striking, significant correlations were seen when PSS readings were compared against BP cuff readings. The PSS has competitive functionality to that seen with a dedicated radial artery catheter for BP monitoring and is available immediately on sheath insertion without the added risk of radial catheterization. The sensor is structurally separated from the primary sheath lumen and readings are unaffected by device introduction through the primary lumen. Time delays and potential complications from radial artery catheterization are avoided. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour of the bladder associated with neurofibromatosis I.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, Julie

    2008-12-01

    Neurofibromatosis is a hamartomatous disorder of autonomic peripheral nerve sheaths associated with peripheral nerve sheath tumours. Most tumours are neurofibromas; however, the genitourinary system is rarely involved. We present a rare case of a nerve sheath tumour of the bladder in a young patient, which was discovered to be malignant.

  14. 30 CFR 15.32 - Tolerances for weight of explosive, sheath, wrapper, and specific gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., wrapper, and specific gravity. 15.32 Section 15.32 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... explosive, sheath, wrapper, and specific gravity. (a) The weight of the explosive, the sheath, and the outer.... (c) The specific gravity of the explosive and sheath shall be within ±7.5 percent of that specified...

  15. File list: His.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 Histone Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  16. File list: ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 All antigens Neural Nerve Sheath Neopla...sms SRX337965 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  17. File list: Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: Pol.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 RNA polymerase Neural Nerve Sheath Neop...lasms http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  19. File list: Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 TFs and others Neural Nerve Sheath Neop...lasms SRX337965 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 RNA polymerase Neural Nerve Sheath Neop...lasms http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 Histone Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  2. File list: Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 TFs and others Neural Nerve Sheath Neop...lasms SRX337965 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  3. File list: DNS.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 DNase-seq Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  4. File list: Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 Unclassified Neural Nerve Sheath Neopla...sms http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  5. File list: DNS.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 DNase-seq Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  6. File list: ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 All antigens Neural Nerve Sheath Neopla...sms SRX337965 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  7. File list: Pol.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 RNA polymerase Neural Nerve Sheath Neop...lasms http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  8. File list: Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. File list: DNS.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 DNase-seq Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  10. File list: DNS.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 DNase-seq Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 Histone Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  12. File list: Oth.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 TFs and others Neural Nerve Sheath Neop...lasms SRX337965 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  13. File list: ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 All antigens Neural Nerve Sheath Neopla...sms SRX337965 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  14. File list: Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: His.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. 45-FOOT HIGH DROP TOWER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Drop Tower is used to simulate and measure the impact shocks that are exerted on parachute loads when they hit the ground. It is also used for HSL static lift to...

  19. 24 hydrocarbon degradation in poultry droppings and cassava peels

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OLUWOLE AKINNAGBE

    2009-01-01

    Jan 1, 2009 ... This greenhouse study was aimed at determining the potentials of poultry droppings (PD) and cassava peels ... shift in the composition of bacterial community to ..... Oil and Gas Journal. pp. ... Prentice-Hall of India Private Ltd.

  20. Fast, kinetically self-consistent simulation of RF modulated plasma boundary sheaths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shihab, Mohammed; Ziegler, Dennis; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter

    2012-01-01

    A mathematical model is presented which enables the efficient, kinetically self-consistent simulation of RF modulated plasma boundary sheaths in all technically relevant discharge regimes. It is defined on a one-dimensional geometry where a Cartesian x-axis points from the electrode or wall at x E ≡ 0 towards the plasma bulk. An arbitrary endpoint x B is chosen ‘deep in the bulk’. The model consists of a set of kinetic equations for the ions, Boltzmann's relation for the electrons and Poisson's equation for the electrical field. Boundary conditions specify the ion flux at x B and a periodically—not necessarily harmonically—modulated sheath voltage V(t) or sheath charge Q(t). The equations are solved in a statistical sense. However, it is not the well-known particle-in-cell (PIC) scheme that is employed, but an alternative iterative algorithm termed ensemble-in-spacetime (EST). The basis of the scheme is a discretization of the spacetime, the product of the domain [x E , x B ] and the RF period [0, T]. Three modules are called in a sequence. A Monte Carlo module calculates the trajectories of a large set of ions from their start at x B until they reach the electrode at x E , utilizing the potential values on the nodes of the spatio-temporal grid. A harmonic analysis module reconstructs the Fourier modes n im (x) of the ion density n i (x, t) from the calculated trajectories. A field module finally solves the Boltzmann-Poisson equation with the calculated ion densities to generate an updated set of potential values for the spatio-temporal grid. The iteration is started with the potential values of a self-consistent fluid model and terminates when the updates become sufficiently small, i.e. when self-consistency is achieved. A subsequent post-processing determines important quantities, in particular the phase-resolved and phase-averaged values of the ion energy and angular distributions and the total energy flux at the electrode. A drastic reduction of the

  1. Annual Occurrence of Meteorite-Dropping Fireballs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalova, Natalia; Jopek, Tadeusz J.

    2016-07-01

    The event of Chelyabinsk meteorite has brought about change the earlier opinion about limits of the sizes of potentially dangerous asteroidal fragments that crossed the Earth's orbit and irrupted in the Earth's atmosphere making the brightest fireball. The observations of the fireballs by fireball networks allows to get the more precise data on atmospheric trajectories and coordinates of predicted landing place of the meteorite. For the reason to search the periods of fireball activity is built the annual distribution of the numbers of meteorites with the known fall dates and of the meteorite-dropping fireballs versus the solar longitude. The resulting profile of the annual activity of meteorites and meteorite-dropping fireballs shows several periods of increased activity in the course of the year. The analysis of the atmospheric trajectories and physical properties of sporadic meteorite-dropping fireballs observed in Tajikistan by instrumental methods in the summer‒autumn periods of increased fireballs activity has been made. As a result the structural strength, the bulk density and terminal mass of the studied fireballs that can survive in the Earth atmosphere and became meteorites was obtained. From the photographic IAU MDC_2003 meteor database and published sources based on the orbit proximity as determined by D-criterion of Southworth and Hawkins the fireballs that could be the members of group of meteorite-dropping fireballs, was found. Among the near Earth's objects (NEOs) the searching for parent bodies for meteorite-dropping fireballs was made and the evolution of orbits of these objects in the past on a long interval of time was investigated.

  2. Fast wave experiments in LAPD: RF sheaths, convective cells and density modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, T. A.; van Compernolle, B.; Martin, M.; Gekelman, W.; Pribyl, P.; van Eester, D.; Crombe, K.; Perkins, R.; Lau, C.; Martin, E.; Caughman, J.; Tripathi, S. K. P.; Vincena, S.

    2017-10-01

    An overview is presented of recent work on ICRF physics at the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA. The LAPD has typical plasma parameters ne 1012 -1013 cm-3, Te 1 - 10 eV and B 1000 G. A new high-power ( 150 kW) RF system and fast wave antenna have been developed for LAPD. The source runs at a frequency of 2.4 MHz, corresponding to 1 - 7fci , depending on plasma parameters. Evidence of rectified RF sheaths is seen in large increases ( 10Te) in the plasma potential on field lines connected to the antenna. The rectified potential scales linearly with antenna current. The rectified RF sheaths set up convective cells of local E × B flows, measured indirectly by potential measurements, and measured directly with Mach probes. At high antenna powers substantial modifications of the density profile were observed. The plasma density profile initially exhibits transient low frequency oscillations (10 kHz). The amplitude of the fast wave fields in the core plasma is modulated at the same low frequency, suggesting fast wave coupling is affected by the density rearrangement. Work performed at the Basic Plasma Science Facility, supported jointly by the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy.

  3. Cell wall and enzyme changes during the graviresponse of the leaf-sheath pulvinus of oat (Avena sativa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibeaut, David M.; Karuppiah, Nadarajah; Chang, S.-R.; Brock, Thomas G.; Vadlamudi, Babu; Kim, Donghern; Ghosheh, Najati S.; Rayle, David L.; Carpita, Nicholas C.; Kaufman, Peter B.

    1990-01-01

    The graviresponse of the leaf-sheath pulvinus of oat (Avena sativa) involves an asymmetric growth response and asymmetric processes involving degradation of starch and cell wall synthesis. Cellular and biochemical events were studied by investigation of the activities of related enzymes and changes in cell walls and their constituents. It is suggested that an osmotic potential gradient acts as the driving factor for growth, while wall extensibility is a limiting factor in pulvinus growth.

  4. Collaborative Research: Understanding Ion Losses to Plasma Boundaries Sheaths and Presheaths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hershkowitz, Noah [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Sheaths are common to all bounded steady-state plasmas. This includes laboratory, industrial, fusion, and in some cases even space plasmas. They form in general to balance particle loss and maintain quasi-neutrality in plasmas. Electrons are lighter than the ions by 2000 times or more (depending on the gas), and in most plasmas ion temperatures are rarely higher than the electron temperature and generally much lower. Thus in most cases, negative potential sheaths occur to confine electrons and allow ions to be freely lost. We have investigated how a plasma locally response to a positive bias on a small electrode, and have established area criteria which plasma reacts differently to the positive bias – first a pure electron sheath, and a global non-ambipolar regime where all electrons are lost to the electrode, and a double layer structure identified as a virtual cathode forms to limiting electron loss and maintain quasi-neutrality, and finally a anode spot regime where a secondary discharge occurs in front of the electrode, turning it into the major loss area of the entire plasma. Electrode area and plasma parameters criteria for these regimes were established, and the effect of the virtual cathode on the electrode’s I-V characteristics was investigated. We have also developed a global non-ambipolar electron source to replace hollow cathodes in a number of plasma applications. This eliminates the lifetime limitation and maintenance cost of hollow cathodes as they easily wear out easily and cannot be replaced in space applications.

  5. Prediction of etching-shape anomaly due to distortion of ion sheath around a large-scale three-dimensional structure by means of on-wafer monitoring technique and computer simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Tomohiro; Ohtake, Hiroto; Araki, Ryosuke; Yanagisawa, Yuuki; Samukawa, Seiji; Iwasaki, Takuya; Ono, Kohei; Miwa, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    A system for predicting distortion of a profile during plasma etching was developed. The system consists of a combination of measurement and simulation. An ‘on-wafer sheath-shape sensor’ for measuring the plasma-sheath parameters (sheath potential and thickness) on the stage of the plasma etcher was developed. The sensor has numerous small electrodes for measuring sheath potential and saturation ion-current density, from which sheath thickness can be calculated. The results of the measurement show reasonable dependence on source power, bias power and pressure. Based on self-consistent calculation of potential distribution and ion- and electron-density distributions, simulation of the sheath potential distribution around an arbitrary 3D structure and the trajectory of incident ions from the plasma to the structure was developed. To confirm the validity of the distortion prediction by comparing it with experimentally measured distortion, silicon trench etching under chlorine inductively coupled plasma (ICP) was performed using a sample with a vertical step. It was found that the etched trench was distorted when the distance from the step was several millimetres or less. The distortion angle was about 20° at maximum. Measurement was performed using the on-wafer sheath-shape sensor in the same plasma condition as the etching. The ion incident angle, calculated as a function of distance from the step, successfully reproduced the experimentally measured angle, indicating that the combination of measurement by the on-wafer sheath-shape sensor and simulation can predict distortion of an etched structure. This prediction system will be useful for designing devices with large-scale 3D structures (such as those in MEMS) and determining the optimum etching conditions to obtain the desired profiles. (paper)

  6. Drop Spreading with Random Viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Jensen, Oliver

    2016-11-01

    Airway mucus acts as a barrier to protect the lung. However as a biological material, its physical properties are known imperfectly and can be spatially heterogeneous. In this study we assess the impact of these uncertainties on the rate of spreading of a drop (representing an inhaled aerosol) over a mucus film. We model the film as Newtonian, having a viscosity that depends linearly on the concentration of a passive solute (a crude proxy for mucin proteins). Given an initial random solute (and hence viscosity) distribution, described as a Gaussian random field with a given correlation structure, we seek to quantify the uncertainties in outcomes as the drop spreads. Using lubrication theory, we describe the spreading of the drop in terms of a system of coupled nonlinear PDEs governing the evolution of film height and the vertically-averaged solute concentration. We perform Monte Carlo simulations to predict the variability in the drop centre location and width (1D) or area (2D). We show how simulation results are well described (at much lower computational cost) by a low-order model using a weak disorder expansion. Our results show for example how variability in the drop location is a non-monotonic function of the solute correlation length increases. Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council.

  7. Thermocapillary reorientation of Janus drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, Rodolfo; Saenz, Pedro

    2017-11-01

    Janus drops, named after the Ancient Roman two-faced god, are liquid drops formed from two immiscible fluids. Experimental observations indicate that a Janus drop may re-orientate in response to an applied external thermal gradient due to the Marangoni effect. Depending on the angle between the interior interface and the direction of the temperature gradient, disparities in the physical properties of the constituent liquids may lead to asymmetries in the thermocapillary flow. As a result, the drop will move along a curved path until a torque-free configuration is achieved, point after which it will continue on a straight trajectory. Here, we present the results of a theoretical investigation of this realignment phenomenon in the Stokes regime and in the limit of non-deformable interfaces. A 3D semi-analytical method in terms of polar spherical harmonics is developed to characterize and rationalize the hydrodynamic response (forces and torques), flow (velocity and temperature distribution) and trajectory of a Janus drop moving during the temperature-driven reorientation process. Furthermore, we discuss how this phenomenon may be exploited to develop dynamically reconfigurable micro-lenses. This work was partially supported by the US National Science Foundation through Grants DMS-1614043 and DMS-1719637.

  8. In vivo engineering of a functional tendon sheath in a hen model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liang; Cao, Dejun; Liu, Wei; Zhou, Guangdong; Zhang, Wen Jie; Cao, Yilin

    2010-05-01

    Repair of injured tendon sheath remains a major challenge and this study explored the possibility of in vivo reconstruction of a tendon sheath with tendon sheath derived cells and polyglycolic acid (PGA) fibers in a Leghorn hen model. Total 55 Leghorn hens with a 1cm tendon sheath defect created in the left middle toe of each animal were randomly assigned into: (1) experimental group (n=19) that received a cell-PGA construct; (2) scaffold control group (n=18) that received a cell-free PGA scaffold; (3) blank control group (n=18) with the defect untreated. Tendon sheath cells were isolated, in vitro expanded, and seeded onto PGA scaffolds. After in vitro culture for 7 days, the constructs were in vivo implanted to repair the sheath defects. Alcian blue staining confirmed the ability of cultured cells to produce specific matrices containing acidic carboxyl mucopolysaccharide (mainly hyaluronic acid). In addition, the engineered sheath formed a relatively mature structure at 12 weeks post-surgery, which was similar to that of native counterpart, including a smooth inner surface, a well-developed sheath histological structure with a clear space between the tendon and the engineered sheath. More importantly, Work of Flexion assay revealed that the tendons needed less power consumption to glide inside the engineered sheath when compared to the tendons which were surrounded by scar-repaired tissues, indicating that the engineered sheaths had gained the function to a certain extent of preventing tendon adhesion. Taken together, these results suggest that tendon sheaths that are functionally and structurally similar to native sheaths are possible to be engineered in vivo using tendon sheath cells and PGA scaffolds. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Zircaloy-sheathed element rods fitted with thermo-couples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardy de Sigoyer, B.; Jacques, F.; Thome, P.

    1963-01-01

    In order to carry out thermal conductivity measurements on UO 2 in conditions similar to those under which fuel rods are used, it was necessary to measure the temperature at the interior of a fuel element sheathed in zircaloy. The temperatures are taken with Thermocoax type thermocouples, that is to say fitted with a very thin sheath of stainless steel or Inconel. It is known also that fusion welding of zircaloy onto stainless steel is impossible and that high temperature welded joints are very difficult because of their aggressiveness. The technique used consists in brazing the thermocouples to relatively large stainless steel parts and then joining these plugs by electron bombardment welding to diffused stainless steel-zircaloy couplings. The properties of these diffused couplings and of the brazed joints were studied; the various stages in the fabrication of the containers are also described. (authors) [fr

  10. Moisture Durability with Vapor-Permeable Insulating Sheathing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepage, R. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Lstiburek, J. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Exterior sheathing insulation is an effective strategy in increasing the overall R-value of wall assemblies; other benefits include decreasing the effects of thermal bridging and increasing the moisture durability of the built assembly. Vapor-permeable exterior insulation, such as mineral board or expanded polystyrene foam, are one such product that may be used to achieve these benefits. However, uncertainty exists on the effects of inward driven moisture and the interaction of increased sheathing temperatures on the moisture durability of the edifice. To address these concerns, Building Science Corporation (BSC) conducted a series of hygrothermal models for cities representing a range of different climate zones. This report describes the research project, key research questions, and the procedures utilized to analyse the problems.

  11. Moisture Durability with Vapor-Permeable Insulating Sheathing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepage, R. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Lstiburek, J. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Exterior sheathing insulation is an effective strategy in increasing the overall R-value of wall assemblies; other benefits include decreasing the effects of thermal bridging and increasing the moisture durability of the built assembly. Vapor-permeable exterior insulation, such as mineral board or expanded polystyrene foam, are one such product that may be used to achieve these benefits. However,uncertainty exists on the effects of inward driven moisture and the interaction of increased sheathing temperatures on the moisture durability of the edifice. To address these concerns, Building Science Corporation (BSC) conducted a series of hygrothermal models for cities representing a range of different climate zones. This report describes the research project, key research questions, and theprocedures utilized to analyse the problems.

  12. Sheath structure in negative ion sources for fusion (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McAdams, R.; King, D. B.; Surrey, E.; Holmes, A. J. T.

    2012-01-01

    In fusion negative ion sources, the negative ions are formed on the caesiated plasma grid predominantly by hydrogen atoms from the plasma. The space charge of the negative ions leaving the wall is not fully compensated by incoming positive ions and at high enough emission a virtual cathode is formed. This virtual cathode limits the flux of negative ions transported across the sheath to the plasma. A 1D collisionless model of the sheath is presented taking into account the virtual cathode. The model will be applied to examples of the ion source operation. Extension of the model to the bulk plasma shows good agreement with experimental data. A possible role for fast ions is discussed.

  13. Out-of-pile fatigue tests on Zircaloy CANDU sheaths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, Maria; Ciocanescu, Marin; Gheorghiu, Constantin; Pitigoi, Vasile; Ducu, Catalin; Malinovschi, Viorel

    2005-01-01

    The paper outlines the achievements in the nuclear research field of cooperation on Nuclear Fuel performed as part of the collaboration under the Memorandum of Understanding, settled between Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) and Institute for Nuclear Research (ICN), The sheath behavior was simulated using out-of-pile fatigue tests, in conditions identical with those met during the operation in power cycling of CANDU reactor, except for irradiation. A special test rig, designed and carried-out at ICN ensured the experimental requirements according to the Canadian testing procedure. The description of the experimental setup and monitoring of testing parameters were also done. The fatigue life time, expressed as number of cycles to rupture (N), was measured as a function of the total strain amplitude (e) induced in the Zircaloy-4 sheath samples. Strain-Life time fatigue dependence (e-N) under low cycle fatigue conditions was also verified using the Coffin-Manson correlation. (authors)

  14. Interfacial Instabilities in Evaporating Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, Ross; Sefiane, Khellil; Matar, Omar

    2007-11-01

    We study the effect of substrate thermal properties on the evaporation of sessile drops of various liquids. An infra-red imaging technique was used to record the interfacial temperature. This technique illustrates the non-uniformity in interfacial temperature distribution that characterises the evaporation process. Our results also demonstrate that the evaporation of methanol droplets is accompanied by the formation of wave-trains in the interfacial temperature field; similar patterns, however, were not observed in the case of water droplets. More complex patterns are observed for FC-72 refrigerant drops. The effect of substrate thermal conductivity on the structure of the complex pattern formation is also elucidated.

  15. Optic Nerve Sheath Mechanics and Permeability in VIIP Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raykin, Julia; Best, Lauren; Gleason, Rudy; Mulugeta, Lealem; Myers, Jerry; Nelson, Emily; Samuels, Brian C.; Ethier, C. R.

    2014-01-01

    Long-duration space flight carries the risk of developing Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome, a spectrum of ophthalmic changes including posterior globe flattening, choroidal folds, distension of the optic nerve sheath (ONS), optic nerve kinking and potentially permanent degradation of visual function. The slow onset of VIIP, its chronic nature, and certain clinical features strongly suggest that biomechanical factors acting on the ONS play a role in VIIP. Here we measure several relevant ONS properties needed to model VIIP biomechanics. The ONS (meninges) of fresh porcine eyes (n7) was reflected, the nerve proper was truncated near the sclera, and the meninges were repositioned to create a hollow cylinder of meningeal connective tissue attached to the posterior sclera. The distal end was cannulated, sealed, and pressure clamped (mimicking cerebrospinal fluid [CSF] pressure), while the eye was also cannulated for independent control of intraocular pressure (IOP). The meninges were inflated (CSF pressure cycling 7-50 mmHg) while ONS outer diameter was imaged. In another set of experiments (n4), fluid permeation rate across the meninges was recorded by observing the drainage of an elevated fluid reservoir (30 mmHg) connected to the meninges. The ONS showed behavior typical of soft tissues: viscoelasticity, with hysteresis in early preconditioning cycles and repeatable behavior after 4 cycles, and nonlinear stiffening, particularly at CSF pressures 15 mmHg (Figure). Tangent moduli measured from the loading curve were 372 101, 1199 358, and 2050 379 kPa (mean SEM) at CSF pressures of 7, 15 and 30 mmHg, respectively. Flow rate measurements through the intact meninges at 30mmHg gave a permeability of 1.34 0.46 lmincm2mmHg (mean SEM). The ONS is a tough, strain-stiffening connective tissue that is surprisingly permeable. The latter observation suggests that there could be significant CSF drainage through the ONS into the orbit, likely important

  16. Biomechanics of the Optic Nerve Sheath in VIIP Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethier, C. Ross; Raykin, Julia; Gleason, Rudy; Mulugeta, Lealem; Myers, Jerry; Nelson, Emily; Samuels, Brian C.

    2014-01-01

    Long-duration space flight carries the risk of developing Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome, a spectrum of ophthalmic changes including posterior globe flattening, choroidal folds, distension of the optic nerve sheath (ONS), optic nerve kinking and potentially permanent degradation of visual function. The slow onset of VIIP, its chronic nature, and certain clinical features strongly suggest that biomechanical factors acting on the ONS play a role in VIIP. Here we measure several relevant ONS properties needed to model VIIP biomechanics. The ONS (meninges) of fresh porcine eyes (n7) was reflected, the nerve proper was truncated near the sclera, and the meninges were repositioned to create a hollow cylinder of meningeal connective tissue attached to the posterior sclera. The distal end was cannulated, sealed, and pressure clamped (mimicking cerebrospinal fluid [CSF] pressure), while the eye was also cannulated for independent control of intraocular pressure (IOP). The meninges were inflated (CSF pressure cycling 7-50 mmHg) while ONS outer diameter was imaged. In another set of experiments (n4), fluid permeation rate across the meninges was recorded by observing the drainage of an elevated fluid reservoir (30 mmHg) connected to the meninges. The ONS showed behavior typical of soft tissues: viscoelasticity, with hysteresis in early preconditioning cycles and repeatable behavior after 4 cycles, and nonlinear stiffening, particularly at CSF pressures 15 mmHg (Figure). Tangent moduli measured from the loading curve were 372 101, 1199 358, and 2050 379 kPa (mean SEM) at CSF pressures of 7, 15 and 30 mmHg, respectively. Flow rate measurements through the intact meninges at 30mmHg gave a permeability of 1.34 0.46 lmincm2mmHg (mean SEM). The ONS is a tough, strain-stiffening connective tissue that is surprisingly permeable. The latter observation suggests that there could be significant CSF drainage through the ONS into the orbit, likely important

  17. Studies of RF sheaths and diagnostics on IShTAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crombé, K., E-mail: Kristel.Crombe@UGent.be [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); LPP-ERM/KMS, Royal Military Academy, Brussels (Belgium); Devaux, S.; Faudot, E.; Heuraux, S.; Moritz, J. [YIJL, UMR7198 CNRS-Université de Lorraine, Nancy (France); D’Inca, R.; Faugel, H.; Fünfgelder, H.; Jacquot, J.; Ochoukov, R. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Louche, F.; Tripsky, M.; Van Eester, D.; Wauters, T. [LPP-ERM/KMS, Royal Military Academy, Brussels (Belgium); Noterdaeme, J.-M. [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)

    2015-12-10

    IShTAR (Ion cyclotron Sheath Test ARrangement) is a linear magnetised plasma test facility for RF sheaths studies at the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik in Garching. In contrast to a tokamak, a test stand provides more liberty to impose the parameters and gives better access for the instrumentation and antennas. The project will support the development of diagnostic methods for characterising RF sheaths and validate and improve theoretical predictions. The cylindrical vacuum vessel has a diameter of 1 m and is 1.1 m long. The plasma is created by an external cylindrical plasma source equipped with a helical antenna that has been designed to excite the m=1 helicon mode. In inductive mode, plasma densities and electron temperatures have been characterised with a planar Langmuir probe as a function of gas pressure and input RF power. A 2D array of RF compensated Langmuir probes and a spectrometer are planned. A single strap RF antenna has been designed; the plasma-facing surface is aligned to the cylindrical plasma to ease the modelling. The probes will allow direct measurements of plasma density profiles in front of the RF antenna, and thus a detailed study of the density modifications induced by RF sheaths, which influences the coupling. The RF antenna frequency has been chosen to study different plasma wave interactions: the accessible plasma density range includes an evanescent and propagative behaviour of slow or fast waves, and allows the study of the effect of the lower hybrid resonance layer.

  18. Photovoltaic sheathing element with one or more tabs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keenihan, James R; Langmaid, Joseph A; Lopez, Leonardo C.

    2017-02-07

    The present invention is premised upon an assembly that includes at least a photovoltaic sheathing element capable of being affixed on a building structure. The shingle including at least a photovoltaic cell assembly, a body portion attached to one or more portions of the photovoltaic cell assembly. Wherein the body portion includes one or more top peripheral tabs each capable of fitting under one or more vertically adjoining devices.

  19. Comparative Oncogenomics for Peripheral Nerve Sheath Cancer Gene Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    and MPNSTs by determining whether these same genes are mutated in human tumors. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Nothing listed 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...sheath tumour (MPNST). In: Louis DNO, H.;Wiestler,O.D.;Cavenee,W.K., editor. WHO Classification of Tumours of the Central Nervous System. Lyon: IARC...Location Sex Major or Micro WHO Grade H6 DRG Male Major IV H9 Trigeminal ganglion Female Major III H17 Trigeminal ganglion Male Major II H19 Sciatic

  20. A rare case of bilateral optic nerve sheath meningioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somen Misra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 60-year-old female presented with gradual, painless, progressive diminution of vision, and progressive proptosis of left eye since 7 years. Ophthalmological examination revealed mild proptosis and total optic atrophy in the left eye. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and computed tomography (CT brain with orbit showed bilateral optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM involving the intracranial, intracanalicular, intraorbital part of the optic nerve extending up to optic chiasma and left cavernous sinus.

  1. Modelling of radio frequency sheath and fast wave coupling on the realistic ion cyclotron resonant antenna surroundings and the outer wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, L.; Colas, L.; Jacquot, J.; Després, B.; Heuraux, S.; Faudot, E.; Van Eester, D.; Crombé, K.; Křivská, A.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Helou, W.; Hillairet, J.

    2018-03-01

    In order to model the sheath rectification in a realistic geometry over the size of ion cyclotron resonant heating (ICRH) antennas, the self-consistent sheaths and waves for ICH (SSWICH) code couples self-consistently the RF wave propagation and the DC SOL biasing via nonlinear RF and DC sheath boundary conditions applied at plasma/wall interfaces. A first version of SSWICH had 2D (toroidal and radial) geometry, rectangular walls either normal or parallel to the confinement magnetic field B 0 and only included the evanescent slow wave (SW) excited parasitically by the ICRH antenna. The main wave for plasma heating, the fast wave (FW) plays no role on the sheath excitation in this version. A new version of the code, 2D SSWICH-full wave, was developed based on the COMSOL software, to accommodate full RF field polarization and shaped walls tilted with respect to B 0 . SSWICH-full wave simulations have shown the mode conversion of FW into SW occurring at the sharp corners where the boundary shape varies rapidly. It has also evidenced ‘far-field’ sheath oscillations appearing at the shaped walls with a relatively long magnetic connection length to the antenna, that are only accessible to the propagating FW. Joint simulation, conducted by SSWICH-full wave within a multi-2D approach excited using the 3D wave coupling code (RAPLICASOL), has recovered the double-hump poloidal structure measured in the experimental temperature and potential maps when only the SW is modelled. The FW contribution on the potential poloidal structure seems to be affected by the 3D effects, which was ignored in the current stage. Finally, SSWICH-full wave simulation revealed the left-right asymmetry that has been observed extensively in the unbalanced strap feeding experiments, suggesting that the spatial proximity effects in RF sheath excitation, studied for SW only previously, is still important in the vicinity of the wave launcher under full wave polarizations.

  2. Internal flow of acoustically levitated drops undergoing sectorial oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, C.L.; Xie, W.J.; Yan, Z.L.; Wei, B.

    2010-01-01

    We present the experimental observation and theoretical analysis of fluid flow in acoustically levitated water drop undergoing sectorial oscillations. The fluid always flows between the extended sections and the compressed sections. The magnitude of fluid velocity decreases from the equatorial fringe to the centre of levitated drop. The maximum fluid velocity is 60-160 mm/s and the Reynolds number of the oscillations is estimated to be 137-367. The internal flow of the drop is analyzed as potential flow, and the fluid velocity is found to be horizontal. In the equatorial plane, the calculated stream lines and velocity profiles agree well with the experimental observations.

  3. 15N Hyperpolarization of Imidazole-15N2 for Magnetic Resonance pH Sensing via SABRE-SHEATH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchepin, Roman V; Barskiy, Danila A; Coffey, Aaron M; Theis, Thomas; Shi, Fan; Warren, Warren S; Goodson, Boyd M; Chekmenev, Eduard Y

    2016-06-24

    15 N nuclear spins of imidazole- 15 N 2 were hyperpolarized using NMR signal amplification by reversible exchange in shield enables alignment transfer to heteronuclei (SABRE-SHEATH). A 15 N NMR signal enhancement of ∼2000-fold at 9.4 T is reported using parahydrogen gas (∼50% para-) and ∼0.1 M imidazole- 15 N 2 in methanol:aqueous buffer (∼1:1). Proton binding to a 15 N site of imidazole occurs at physiological pH (p K a ∼ 7.0), and the binding event changes the 15 N isotropic chemical shift by ∼30 ppm. These properties are ideal for in vivo pH sensing. Additionally, imidazoles have low toxicity and are readily incorporated into a wide range of biomolecules. 15 N-Imidazole SABRE-SHEATH hyperpolarization potentially enables pH sensing on scales ranging from peptide and protein molecules to living organisms.

  4. Contribution to the physical study of sheath failure detections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangin, Jean-Paul

    1968-11-01

    As the study of an installation aimed at the detection of sheath failure requires the knowledge of a great number of data related to all the fields of nuclear technology (fission mechanisms, sheath failure mechanisms, recoil of fission products, distribution of the heat transfer fluid in the reactor, techniques of measurement of beta and gamma neutrons, nuclear safety, and so on), this report aims at highlighting some specific issues, more particularly those related to sensors based on delayed neutrons. After having recalled the principles of sheath failure detection, the author presents the various aspects of the study of the formation of fission products and of their passage into the heat transfer fluid: detection by using delayed neutrons, detection by electrostatic collection, passage of fuel fission products into the coolant (recoil, corrosion, gaseous diffusion in the fuel), formation of fission products in the fuel (fission product efficiency). He reports the study of the transport of fission products by the coolant from their place of birth to the place of measurement. He presents the system of measurement by detection of delayed neutrons and by electrostatic collection, reports a sensitivity calculation, a background noise assessment, the determination of detection threshold, and the application of sensitivity and detection thresholds calculations [fr

  5. Unirradiated UO2 in irradiated zirconium alloy sheathing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, R.D.; Hardy, D.G.; Hunt, C.E.L.; Scoberg, J.A.

    1979-07-01

    Zircaloy-clad UO 2 fuel elements have defected in power reactors when element power outputs were raised significantly after a long irradiation at low power. We have irradiated fuel elements fabricated from fresh UO 2 pellets and zirconium alloy sheaths previously irradiated without fuel. This gave a fuel element with radiation-damaged low-ductility sheathing but with no fission products in the fuel. The elements were power boosted in-reactor to linear power outputs up to 84 kW/m for two five-day periods. No elements defected despite sheath strains of 0.82 percent at circumferential ridge postions. Half of these elements were subsequently soaked at low power to build up the fission product inventory in the fuel and then power boosted to 63 kW/m for a third time. Two elements defected on this final boost. We conclude that these defects were caused by fission product induced stress-corrosion cracking and that this mechanism plays an importent role in power reactor fuel defects. (auth)

  6. Fixation Strength of Polyetheretherketone Sheath-and-Bullet Device for Soft Tissue Repair in the Foot and Ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Jay; Fischer, Brian; Nute, Michael; Rizza, Robert

    Tendon transfers are often performed in the foot and ankle. Recently, interference screws have been a popular choice owing to their ease of use and fixation strength. Considering the benefits, one disadvantage of such devices is laceration of the soft tissues by the implant threads during placement that potentially weaken the structural integrity of the grafts. A shape memory polyetheretherketone bullet-in-sheath tenodesis device uses circumferential compression, eliminating potential damage from thread rotation and maintaining the soft tissue orientation of the graft. The aim of this study was to determine the pullout strength and failure mode for this device in both a synthetic bone analogue and porcine bone models. Thirteen mature bovine extensor tendons were secured into ten 4.0 × 4.0 × 4.0-cm cubes of 15-pound per cubic foot solid rigid polyurethane foam bone analogue models or 3 porcine femoral condyles using the 5 × 20-mm polyetheretherketone soft tissue anchor. The bullet-in-sheath device demonstrated a mean pullout of 280.84 N in the bone analog models and 419.47 N in the porcine bone models. (p = .001). The bullet-in-sheath design preserved the integrity of the tendon graft, and none of the implants dislodged from their original position. Copyright © 2017 The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Transperitoneal rectus sheath block and transversus abdominis plane block for laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair: A novel approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Jun; Watanabe, Jun; Nagata, Masato; Sawatsubashi, Yusuke; Akiyama, Masaki; Tajima, Takehide; Arase, Koichi; Minagawa, Noritaka; Torigoe, Takayuki; Nakayama, Yoshifumi; Horishita, Reiko; Kida, Kentaro; Hamada, Kotaro; Hirata, Keiji

    2017-08-01

    A laparoscopic approach for inguinal hernia repair is now considered the gold standard. Laparoscopic surgery is associated with a significant reduction in postoperative pain. Epidural analgesia cannot be used in patients with perioperative anticoagulant therapy because of complications such as epidural hematoma. As such, regional anesthetic techniques, such as ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block and transversus abdominis plane block, have become increasingly popular. However, even these anesthetic techniques have potential complications, such as rectus sheath hematoma, if vessels are damaged. We report the use of a transperitoneal laparoscopic approach for rectus sheath block and transversus abdominis plane block as a novel anesthetic procedure. An 81-year-old woman with direct inguinal hernia underwent laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal inguinal repair. Epidural anesthesia was not performed because anticoagulant therapy was administered. A Peti-needle™ was delivered through the port, and levobupivacaine was injected though the peritoneum. Surgery was performed successfully, and the anesthetic technique did not affect completion of the operative procedure. The patient was discharged without any complications. This technique was feasible, and the procedure was performed safely. Our novel analgesia technique has potential use as a standard postoperative regimen in various laparoscopic surgeries. Additional prospective studies to compare it with other techniques are required. © 2017 Japan Society for Endoscopic Surgery, Asia Endosurgery Task Force and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. Novel root-fungus symbiosis in Ericaceae: sheathed ericoid mycorrhiza formed by a hitherto undescribed basidiomycete with affinities to Trechisporales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Vohník

    Full Text Available Ericaceae (the heath family are widely distributed calcifuges inhabiting soils with inherently poor nutrient status. Ericaceae overcome nutrient limitation through symbiosis with ericoid mycorrhizal (ErM fungi that mobilize nutrients complexed in recalcitrant organic matter. At present, recognized ErM fungi include a narrow taxonomic range within the Ascomycota, and the Sebacinales, basal Hymenomycetes with unclamped hyphae and imperforate parenthesomes. Here we describe a novel type of basidiomycetous ErM symbiosis, termed 'sheathed ericoid mycorrhiza', discovered in two habitats in mid-Norway as a co-dominant mycorrhizal symbiosis in Vaccinium spp. The basidiomycete forming sheathed ErM possesses clamped hyphae with perforate parenthesomes, produces 1- to 3-layer sheaths around terminal parts of hair roots and colonizes their rhizodermis intracellularly forming hyphal coils typical for ErM symbiosis. Two basidiomycetous isolates were obtained from sheathed ErM and molecular and phylogenetic tools were used to determine their identity; they were also examined for the ability to form sheathed ErM and lignocellulolytic potential. Surprisingly, ITS rDNA of both conspecific isolates failed to amplify with the most commonly used primer pairs, including ITS1 and ITS1F + ITS4. Phylogenetic analysis of nuclear LSU, SSU and 5.8S rDNA indicates that the basidiomycete occupies a long branch residing in the proximity of Trechisporales and Hymenochaetales, but lacks a clear sequence relationship (>90% similarity to fungi currently placed in these orders. The basidiomycete formed the characteristic sheathed ErM symbiosis and enhanced growth of Vaccinium spp. in vitro, and degraded a recalcitrant aromatic substrate that was left unaltered by common ErM ascomycetes. Our findings provide coherent evidence that this hitherto undescribed basidiomycete forms a morphologically distinct ErM symbiosis that may occur at significant levels under natural conditions, yet

  9. Fluid flow in drying drops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelderblom, Hanneke

    2013-01-01

    When a suspension drop evaporates, it leaves behind a drying stain. Examples of these drying stains encountered in daily life are coffee or tea stains on a table top, mineral rings on glassware that comes out of the dishwasher, or the salt deposits on the streets in winter. Drying stains are also

  10. Pressure drop in contraction flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    This note is a supplement to Dynamic of Polymeric Liquids (DPL) page 178. DPL gives an equation for the pressure drop in a tapered (and circular) contraction, valid only at low angles. Here the general definition of contraction flow (the Bagley correction) and a more general method to find...

  11. Crown sheath rot of rice: host-range and varietal resistance to Gaeumannomyces graminis var. graminis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília do Nascimento Peixoto

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Several gramineous plants occurring in rice fields show symptoms of crown sheath rot of rice, caused by Gaeumannomyces graminis var. graminis (Ggg, under natural conditions of infection. The pathogenicity of the Ggg-a 01 isolate, collected from rice, was tested on seven grass species and eight cereals, under greenhouse conditions, in order to get information on host-range and resistance of rice genotypes to crown sheath rot. The inoculation tests showed that the rice isolate was pathogenic to weeds such as Echinochloa crusgalli, Pennisetum setosum, Brachiaria sp., Digitaria horizontalis, Brachiaria plantaginea, Eleusine indica and Cenchrus echinatus, and that these species are potential hosts to the pathogen. Winter cereals such as wheat, oat, rye, barley and triticale, as well as sorghum, maize and millet, presented different degrees of susceptibility to the Ggg-a isolate. Significant differences were observed in relation to lesion height and production of hyphopodia and perithecia on culms. Perithecia were not observed on millet, sorghum, southern sandbur and maize. The resistance of 58 upland rice genotypes was tested, and the SCIA16 and SCIA08 genotypes presented lesion height significantly smaller, being considered resistant, when compared to the highly susceptible CNAS10351 genotype.

  12. AC losses of single-core MgB{sub 2} wires with different metallic sheaths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kováč, J., E-mail: elekjkov@savba.sk; Šouc, J.; Kováč, P.; Hušek, I.

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • AC losses in single-core MgB{sub 2} wires with different metallic sheaths have been measured. • It has been shown that metallic sheath can affect the measured AC loss considerably. • GlidCop and Stainless Steel have negligible effect to the overall loss. • Strong contribution of eddy currents has been found in the wire with well conductive copper sheath. • Due to Monel sheath AC loss of MgB{sub 2} core is not visible. - Abstract: AC losses of single-core MgB{sub 2} superconductors with different metallic sheaths (Cu, GlidCop, stainless steel and Monel) have been measured and analyzed. These wires were exposed to external magnetic field with frequencies 72 and 144 Hz and amplitudes up to 0.1 T at temperatures ranged from 18 to 40 K. The obtained results have shown that applied metallic sheath can affect the measured AC loss considerably. In the case of GlidCop and Stainless Steel a negligible small effect of metallic sheath was observed. Strong contribution of eddy currents has been found in the wire with well conductive copper sheath. In the case of Monel sheath, the hysteresis loss of magnetic sheath is dominated and AC loss of MgB{sub 2} core is practically not visible.

  13. Studies on the transmission of sub-THz waves in magnetized inhomogeneous plasma sheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Kai; Shen, Linfang; Yao, Ming; Deng, Xiaohua; Chen, Zhou; Hong, Lujun

    2018-01-01

    There have been many studies on the sub-terahertz (sub-THz) wave transmission in reentry plasma sheaths. However, only some of them have paid attention to the transmission of sub-THz waves in magnetized plasma sheaths. In this paper, the transmission of sub-THz waves in both unmagnetized and magnetized reentry plasma sheaths was investigated. The impacts of temporal evolution of the plasma sheath on the wave transmission were studied. The transmission of "atmospheric window" frequencies in a magnetized plasma sheath was discussed in detail. According to the study, the power transmission rates (Tp) for the left hand circular (LHC) and the right hand circular modes in the magnetized plasma sheath are obviously higher and lower than those in the unmagnetized plasma sheath, respectively. The Tp of LHC mode increases with both wave frequency and external magnetic field strength. Also, the Tp of LHC mode in both magnetized and unmagnetized plasma sheaths varies with time due to the temporal evolution of the plasma sheath. Moreover, the performance of sub-THz waves in magnetized plasma sheath hints at a new approach to the "blackout" problem. The new approach, which is in the capability of modern technology, is to utilize the communication system operating at 140 GHz with an onboard magnet installed near the antenna.

  14. Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Insulating Sheathing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, P. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Eng, P. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Lepage, R. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The addition of insulation to the exterior of buildings is an effective means of increasing the thermal resistance of both wood framed walls as well as mass masonry wall assemblies. For thick layers of exterior insulation (levels greater than 1.5 inches), the use of wood furring strips attached through the insulation back to the structure has been used by many contractors and designers as a means to provide a convenient cladding attachment location (Straube and Smegal 2009, Pettit 2009, Joyce 2009, Ueno 2010). The research presented in this report is intended to help develop a better understanding of the system mechanics involved and the potential for environmental exposure induced movement between the furring strip and the framing. BSC sought to address the following research questions: 1. What are the relative roles of the mechanisms and the magnitudes of the force that influence the vertical displacement resistance of the system? 2. Can the capacity at a specified deflection be reliably calculated using mechanics based equations? 3. What are the impacts of environmental exposure on the vertical displacement of furring strips attached directly through insulation back to a wood structure?

  15. Electric generation and ratcheted transport of contact-charged drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartier, Charles A.; Graybill, Jason R.; Bishop, Kyle J. M.

    2017-10-01

    We describe a simple microfluidic system that enables the steady generation and efficient transport of aqueous drops using only a constant voltage input. Drop generation is achieved through an electrohydrodynamic dripping mechanism by which conductive drops grow and detach from a grounded nozzle in response to an electric field. The now-charged drops are transported down a ratcheted channel by contact charge electrophoresis powered by the same voltage input used for drop generation. We investigate how the drop size, generation frequency, and transport velocity depend on system parameters such as the liquid viscosity, interfacial tension, applied voltage, and channel dimensions. The observed trends are well explained by a series of scaling analyses that provide insight into the dominant physical mechanisms underlying drop generation and ratcheted transport. We identify the conditions necessary for achieving reliable operation and discuss the various modes of failure that can arise when these conditions are violated. Our results demonstrate that simple electric inputs can power increasingly complex droplet operations with potential opportunities for inexpensive and portable microfluidic systems.

  16. The urogenital-hypogastric sheath: an anatomical observation on the relationship between the inferomedial extension of renal fascia and the hypogastric nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X F; Luo, G H; Ding, Z H; Li, G X; Chen, X W; Zhong, S Z

    2014-11-01

    The study aimed to perform an anatomical observation on the inferomedial extension of the renal fascia (RF) to the pelvis and explore its relationship with the hypogastric nerves (HGNs). Gross anatomy was performed on 12 formalin-fixed and 12 fresh cadavers. Sectional anatomy was performed on four formalin-fixed cadavers. Different from the traditional concept, both the anterior and posterior RF included the outer and inner layer with different inferomedial extensions. The multiple layers of RF extended downward to form a sandwich-like and compound fascia sheath with potential and expandable spaces which was named as "the urogenital-hypogastric sheath." Below the level of the origin of the inferior mesenteric artery, the bilateral urogenital-hypogastric sheath communicated with the counterpart in front of the great vessels in the midline and the superior hypogastric plexus ran into the urogenital-hypogastric sheath which carried the HGNs, ureters, and genital vessels downward to their terminations in the pelvis. In the retrorectal space, the urogenital-hypogastric sheath surrounded the fascia propria of the rectum posterolaterally as a layer of coat containing HGNs. The multiple layers of RF with different extensions are the anatomical basis of the formation of the urogenital-hypogastric sheath. As a special fascial structure in the retroperitoneal space and the pelvis, emphasis on its formation and morphology may be helpful for not only unifying the controversies about the relationship between the pelvic fascia and HGNs but also improving the intraoperative preservation of the HGNs by dissecting in the correct surgical plane.

  17. Rice-Infecting Pseudomonas Genomes Are Highly Accessorized and Harbor Multiple Putative Virulence Mechanisms to Cause Sheath Brown Rot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quibod, Ian Lorenzo; Grande, Genelou; Oreiro, Eula Gems; Borja, Frances Nikki; Dossa, Gerbert Sylvestre; Mauleon, Ramil; Cruz, Casiana Vera; Oliva, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Sheath rot complex and seed discoloration in rice involve a number of pathogenic bacteria that cannot be associated with distinctive symptoms. These pathogens can easily travel on asymptomatic seeds and therefore represent a threat to rice cropping systems. Among the rice-infecting Pseudomonas, P. fuscovaginae has been associated with sheath brown rot disease in several rice growing areas around the world. The appearance of a similar Pseudomonas population, which here we named P. fuscovaginae-like, represents a perfect opportunity to understand common genomic features that can explain the infection mechanism in rice. We showed that the novel population is indeed closely related to P. fuscovaginae. A comparative genomics approach on eight rice-infecting Pseudomonas revealed heterogeneous genomes and a high number of strain-specific genes. The genomes of P. fuscovaginae-like harbor four secretion systems (Type I, II, III, and VI) and other important pathogenicity machinery that could probably facilitate rice colonization. We identified 123 core secreted proteins, most of which have strong signatures of positive selection suggesting functional adaptation. Transcript accumulation of putative pathogenicity-related genes during rice colonization revealed a concerted virulence mechanism. The study suggests that rice-infecting Pseudomonas causing sheath brown rot are intrinsically diverse and maintain a variable set of metabolic capabilities as a potential strategy to occupy a range of environments. PMID:26422147

  18. Osteocalcin expressing cells from tendon sheaths in mice contribute to tendon repair by activating Hedgehog signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yi; Zhang, Xu; Huang, Huihui; Xia, Yin; Yao, YiFei; Mak, Arthur Fuk-Tat; Yung, Patrick Shu-Hang; Chan, Kai-Ming; Wang, Li; Zhang, Chenglin; Huang, Yu; Mak, Kingston King-Lun

    2017-01-01

    Both extrinsic and intrinsic tissues contribute to tendon repair, but the origin and molecular functions of extrinsic tissues in tendon repair are not fully understood. Here we show that tendon sheath cells harbor stem/progenitor cell properties and contribute to tendon repair by activating Hedgehog signaling. We found that Osteocalcin (Bglap) can be used as an adult tendon-sheath-specific marker in mice. Lineage tracing experiments show that Bglap-expressing cells in adult sheath tissues pos...

  19. Design of Cold-Formed Steel Screw Connections with Gypsum Sheathing at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Load-bearing cold-formed steel (CFS walls sheathed with double layers of gypsum plasterboard on both sides have demonstrated good fire resistance and attracted increasing interest for use in mid-rise CFS structures. As the main connection method, screw connections between CFS and gypsum sheathing play an important role in both the structural design and fire resistance of this wall system. However, studies on the mechanical behavior of screw connections with double-layer gypsum sheathing are still limited. In this study, 200 monotonic tests of screw connections with single- or double-layer gypsum sheathing at both ambient and elevated temperatures were conducted. The failure of screw connections with double-layer gypsum sheathing in shear was different from that of single-layer gypsum sheathing connections at ambient temperature, and it could be described as the breaking of the loaded sheathing edge combined with significant screw tilting and the loaded sheathing edge flexing fracture. However, the screw tilting and flexing fracture of the loaded sheathing edge gradually disappear at elevated temperatures. In addition, the influence of the loaded edge distance, double-layer sheathing and elevated temperatures is discussed in detail with clear conclusions. A unified design formula for the shear strength of screw connections with gypsum sheathing is proposed for ambient and elevated temperatures with adequate accuracy. A simplified load–displacement model with the post-peak branch is developed to evaluate the load–displacement response of screw connections with gypsum sheathing at ambient and elevated temperatures.

  20. From nuclei to liquid drops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Huidobro, F.; Michaelian, K.; Perez, A.; Rodriguez, V. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico). Inst. de Fisica; Carjan, N. [Bordeaux-1 Univ., 33 - Gradignan (France). Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires

    1995-12-31

    Collisions of symmetric mercury-drop pairs have been studied experimentally as a function of impact parameter, in a relative-velocity range going from a coalescence-dominated region to interactions yielding several residues. The experiments are compared with predictions of a dynamical model used in nuclear physics. The time evolution of the shapes is well reproduced by the simulation. (authors). 8 refs., 3 figs.

  1. The dynamics of Leidenfrost drops

    OpenAIRE

    van Limbeek, Michiel Antonius Jacobus

    2017-01-01

    Temperature control is omnipresent in today’s life: from keeping your fridge cold, maintaining a room at a pleasant temperature or preventing your computer from overheating. Efficient ways of heat transfer are often based on phase change, making use of the high latent heat of evaporation. In the context of spray cooling, liquid drops are impacting a hot plate to ensure a rapid cooling. At some temperature however, no contact occurs between the liquid and the plate, and the heat transfer rate ...

  2. Liquid drops attract or repel by the inverted Cheerios effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpitschka, Stefan; Pandey, Anupam; Lubbers, Luuk A; Weijs, Joost H; Botto, Lorenzo; Das, Siddhartha; Andreotti, Bruno; Snoeijer, Jacco H

    2016-07-05

    Solid particles floating at a liquid interface exhibit a long-ranged attraction mediated by surface tension. In the absence of bulk elasticity, this is the dominant lateral interaction of mechanical origin. Here, we show that an analogous long-range interaction occurs between adjacent droplets on solid substrates, which crucially relies on a combination of capillarity and bulk elasticity. We experimentally observe the interaction between droplets on soft gels and provide a theoretical framework that quantitatively predicts the interaction force between the droplets. Remarkably, we find that, although on thick substrates the interaction is purely attractive and leads to drop-drop coalescence, for relatively thin substrates a short-range repulsion occurs, which prevents the two drops from coming into direct contact. This versatile interaction is the liquid-on-solid analog of the "Cheerios effect." The effect will strongly influence the condensation and coarsening of drops on soft polymer films, and has potential implications for colloidal assembly and mechanobiology.

  3. Electrostatic charging and levitation of helium II drops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemela, J.J.

    1997-01-01

    Liquid Helium II drops, of diameter 1 mm or less, are charged with positive helium ions and subsequently levitated by static electric fields. Stable levitation was achieved for drops of order 100-150 micrometers in diameter. The suspended drops could be translated to arbitrary positions within the levitator using additional superimposed DC electric fields, and also could be made to oscillate stably about their average positions by means of an applied time-varying electric field. A weak corona discharge was used to produce the necessary ions for levitation. A novel superfluid film flow device, developed for the controlled deployment of large charged drops, is described. Also discussed is an adjustable electric fountain that requires only a field emission tip operating at modest potentials, and works in both Helium I and Helium II

  4. Dropped fuel damage prediction techniques and the DROPFU code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mottershead, K.J.; Beardsmore, D.W.; Money, G.

    1995-01-01

    During refuelling, and fuel handling, at UK Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor (AGR) stations it is recognised that the accidental dropping of fuel is a possibility. This can result in dropping individual fuel elements, a complete fuel stringer, or a whole assembly. The techniques for assessing potential damage have been developed over a number of years. This paper describes how damage prediction techniques have subsequently evolved to meet changing needs. These have been due to later fuel designs and the need to consider drops in facilities outside the reactor. The paper begins by briefly describing AGR fuel and possible dropped fuel scenarios. This is followed by a brief summary of the damage mechanisms and the assessment procedure as it was first developed. The paper then describes the additional test work carried out, followed by the detailed numerical modelling. Finally, the paper describes the extensions to the practical assessment methods. (author)

  5. Device for making liquid drops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Masao; Fukuda, Fumito; Nishikawa, Masana; Ishii, Takeshi.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To provide a device for producing liquid drops in the form of liquefied gases indispensable to make deuterium and tritium ice pellets used as a fusion fuel in a tokamak type fusion reactor. Structure: First, pressure P 1 at the upper surface of liquefied gas in a container and outlet pressure P 2 of a nozzle disposed at the lower part of the container are adjusted into the state of P 1 >= P 2 , and it is preset so that even under such conditions, the liquefied gas from the nozzle is not naturally flown out. Next, a vibration plate disposed within the container is rapidly downwardly advanced toward the nozzle through a predetermined distance. As a result, pressure of the liquefied gas within a depression under the vibration plate rises instantaneously or in a pulse fashion to dissatisfy the aforesaid set condition whereby the liquefied gas may be flown out from the nozzle in the form of liquid drops. In accordance with the present device, it is possible to produce a suitable number of drops at a suitable point. (Yoshihara, H.)

  6. Properties of plasma sheath with ion temperature in magnetic fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jinyuan; Wang Feng; Sun Jizhong

    2011-01-01

    The plasma sheath properties in a strong magnetic field are investigated in this work using a steady state two-fluid model. The motion of ions is affected heavily by the strong magnetic field in fusion devices; meanwhile, the effect of ion temperature cannot be neglected for the plasma in such devices. A criterion for the plasma sheath in a strong magnetic field, which differs from the well-known Bohm criterion for low temperature plasma sheath, is established theoretically with a fluid model. The fluid model is then solved numerically to obtain detailed sheath information under different ion temperatures, plasma densities, and magnetic field strengths.

  7. Slow Wave Propagation and Sheath Interaction for ICRF Waves in the Tokamak SOL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.

    2009-01-01

    In previous work we studied the propagation of slow-wave resonance cones launched parasitically by a fast-wave antenna into a tenuous magnetized plasma. Here we extend the previous calculation to ''dense'' scrape-off-layer (SOL) plasmas where the usual slow wave is evanescent. Using the sheath boundary condition, it is shown that for sufficiently close limiters, the slow wave couples to a sheath plasma wave and is no longer evanescent, but radially propagating. A self-consistent calculation of the rf-sheath width yields the resulting sheath voltage in terms of the amplitude of the launched SW, plasma parameters and connection length.

  8. Role of CD44 in Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Growth and Metastasis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sherman, Larry

    2003-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are aggressive, difficult to treat tumors that occur in type I neurofibromatosis patients with an increased incidence compared to the general population...

  9. Role of CD44 in Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Growth and Metastasis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sherman, Larry

    2001-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are aggressive, difficult to treat tumors that occur in type I neurofibromatosis patients with an increased incidence compared to the general population...

  10. Community structure of filamentous, sheath-building sulfur bacteria, Thioploca spp, off the coast of Chile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, HN; Jørgensen, BB; Fossing, HA

    1996-01-01

    of Concepcion was investigated,vith respect to biomass, species distribution, and three-dimensional orientation of the sheaths, Thioploca sheaths and filaments were found across the whole shelf area within the oxygen minimum zone, The maximum wet weight of sheaths, 800 g m(-2), was found at a depth of 90 m......The filamentous sulfur bacteria Thioploca spp, produce dense bacterial mats in the shelf area off the coast of Chile and Peru. The mat consists of common sheaths, shared by many filaments, that reach 5 to 10 cm dean into the sediment, The structure of the Thioploca communities off the Bay...

  11. Direct measurement of the plasma potential in the edge of ASDEX Upgrade using a self emitting probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohde, V.; Laux, M.; Bachmann, P.; Herrmann, A.; Weinlich, M.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we present first measurements of the plasma potential close to the separatrix in ASDEX Upgrade using a self emitting tip. The probe was inserted into the edge plasma of AUG using the midplane manipulator. Assuming Maxwellian plasmas, the observations agree with the predicted voltage drop in the plasma sheath, V pl ps -V fl =2.5T e , where V pl ps is the plasma potential at the presheath boundary and V fl the floating potential. Applying this technique a rapid change of the plasma potential was observed close to the separatrix during Ohmic discharges. From the gradient we derive a radial electric field E r of about -5 kV/m close to separatrix. Further out the field strength changes sign and we find up to +7 kV/m in the SOL. (orig.)

  12. Miscellaneous conditions of tendons, tendon sheaths, and ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, S J; Dik, K J

    1995-08-01

    The use of diagnostic ultrasonography has greatly enhances our ability to diagnose injuries of tendons and tendon sheaths that were previously either unrecognized or poorly understood. For may of these injuries, there is currently only a small amount of follow-up data. This article considers injuries of the deep digital flexor tendon and its accessory ligament, the carpal tunnel syndrome soft tissue swellings on the dorsal aspect of the carpus, intertubercular (bicipital) bursitis and bicipital tendinitis, injuries of the gastrocnemius tendon, common calcaneal tendinitis, rupture of peroneus (fibularis tertius) and ligaments injuries of the back.

  13. The new concept of ureteral access sheath with guidewire disengagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breda, Alberto; Emiliani, Esteban; Millán, Felix

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To prospectively evaluate the new Flexor©Parallel™ Rapid Release™ (Cook(®), Bloomington, IN, USA) access sheath (UAS) which allows the use of a single wire to serve as both safety and working guide. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between June and September 2014, adult patients from five European...... by the surgeons on a scale from very bad to very good. RESULTS: In total, 134 UASs were used in 67 male and 67 female patients. Fifty percent of ureters (67 patients) were pre-stented. Ninety percent of the procedures were therapeutic. The overall successful insertion rate was 94 %. Pre-stenting status...

  14. Parametric investigations of target normal sheath acceleration experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zani, Alessandro; Sgattoni, Andrea; Passoni, Matteo

    2011-01-01

    One of the most important challenges related to laser-driven ion acceleration research is to actively control some important ion beam features. This is a peculiar topic in the light of future possible technological applications. In the present work we make use of one theoretical model for target normal sheath acceleration in order to reproduce recent experimental parametric studies about maximum ion energy dependencies on laser parameters. The key role played by pulse energy and intensity is enlightened. Finally the effective dependence of maximum ion energy on intensity is evaluated using a combined theoretical approach, obtained by means of an analytical and a particle-in-cell numerical investigation.

  15. Parametric investigations of target normal sheath acceleration experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zani, Alessandro; Sgattoni, Andrea; Passoni, Matteo

    2011-10-01

    One of the most important challenges related to laser-driven ion acceleration research is to actively control some important ion beam features. This is a peculiar topic in the light of future possible technological applications. In the present work we make use of one theoretical model for target normal sheath acceleration in order to reproduce recent experimental parametric studies about maximum ion energy dependencies on laser parameters. The key role played by pulse energy and intensity is enlightened. Finally the effective dependence of maximum ion energy on intensity is evaluated using a combined theoretical approach, obtained by means of an analytical and a particle-in-cell numerical investigation.

  16. Repairing a steam generator tube by inserting a sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaudin, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    According to the invention, the mechanical deformation of the sheath, realized by expansion in its end part opposite to the expanded end within the tube plate, is situated along a limited height, and the parameters of the said mechanical deformation are calculated according to the welding parameters applied consecutively. Besides, the said welding parameters are determined according to the initial mechanical deformation to obtain stress relaxation more particularly in the singular zones of the mechanical deformation. The present invention applies to the repair of PWR steam generator tubes [fr

  17. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor arisen from plexiform Neurofibromatosis type 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirova, G.; Penkov, M.; Hadjidekov, G.; Parvanova, V.

    2005-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 is multisystemic neurocutaneous disorder involving both neuroectodermal and mesenchymal texture and the most common familial cancer predisposing syndrome in humans. Tumors occurring in patients with NF1 are primarily peripheral neurofibromas. They can continue to develop throughout life and the rate of appearance may vary greatly from year to year. At the same time any new and rapid change noted at clinical examination - increase volume, pain or neurological deficit, requires biopsy because of potential malignant transformation of the neurofibroma into neurofibrosarcoma. The definitive treatment depends on the respectable character of the tumor. In this case the authors document two cases of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor occurring in the association with NF type l

  18. Load drop evaluation for TWRS FSAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julyk, L.J.; Ralston, G.L.

    1996-09-30

    Operational or remediation activities associated with existing underground high-level waste storage tank structures at the Hanford Site often require the installation/removal of various equipment items. To gain tank access for installation or removal of this equipment, large concrete cover blocks must be removed and reinstalled in existing concrete pits above the tanks. An accidental drop of the equipment or cover blocks while being moved over the tanks that results in the release of contaminants to the air poses a potential risk to onsite workers or to the offsite public. To minimize this potential risk, the use of critical lift hoisting and rigging procedures and restrictions on lift height are being considered during development of the new tank farm Basis for Interim Operation and Final Safety Analysis Report. The analysis contained herein provides information for selecting the appropriate lift height restrictions for these activities.

  19. Vortex flow in acoustically levitated drops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Z.L.; Xie, W.J. [Department of Applied Physics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China); Wei, B., E-mail: bbwei@nwpu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China)

    2011-08-29

    The internal flow of acoustically levitated water drops is investigated experimentally. This study reveals a kind of vortex flow which rotates in the meridional plane of the levitated drop. The magnitude of fluid velocity is nearly vanishing at the drop center, whereas it increases toward the free surface of a levitated drop until the maximum value of about 80 mm/s. A transition of streamline shapes from concentric circles to ellipses takes place at the distance of about 1.2 mm from the drop center. The fluid velocity distribution is plotted as a function of polar angle for seven characteristic streamlines. -- Highlights: → We experimentally observe the internal flow of acoustically levitated water drops. → We present a fascinating structure of vortex flow inside the levitated water drop. → This vortex flow rotates around the drop center in the meridional plane. → Velocity distribution information of this vortex flow is quantitatively analyzed.

  20. Vortex flow in acoustically levitated drops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Z.L.; Xie, W.J.; Wei, B.

    2011-01-01

    The internal flow of acoustically levitated water drops is investigated experimentally. This study reveals a kind of vortex flow which rotates in the meridional plane of the levitated drop. The magnitude of fluid velocity is nearly vanishing at the drop center, whereas it increases toward the free surface of a levitated drop until the maximum value of about 80 mm/s. A transition of streamline shapes from concentric circles to ellipses takes place at the distance of about 1.2 mm from the drop center. The fluid velocity distribution is plotted as a function of polar angle for seven characteristic streamlines. -- Highlights: → We experimentally observe the internal flow of acoustically levitated water drops. → We present a fascinating structure of vortex flow inside the levitated water drop. → This vortex flow rotates around the drop center in the meridional plane. → Velocity distribution information of this vortex flow is quantitatively analyzed.

  1. Measure Guideline: Guidance on Taped Insulating Sheathing Drainage Planes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grin, A.; Lstiburek, J.

    2014-09-01

    This guide provides information and recommendations to the following groups: insulation contractors; general contractors; builders; home remodelers; mechanical contractors; and homeowners, as a guide to the work that needs to be done. The order of work completed during home construction and retrofit improvements is important. Health and safety issues must be addressed first and are more important than durability issues. And durability issues are more important than saving energy. Not all techniques can apply to all houses. Special conditions will require special action. Some builders or homeowners will wish to do more than the important but basic retrofit strategies outlined by this guide. The following are best practice and product recommendations from the interviewed contractors and homebuilders who collectively have a vast amount of experience. Three significant items were discussed with the group which are required to make taped insulating sheathing a simple, long term, and durable drainage plane: 1. Horizontal joints should be limited or eliminated wherever possible; 2. Where a horizontal joint exists use superior materials; 3. Frequent installation inspection and regular trade training are required to maintain proper installation. Section 5 of this measure guideline contains the detailed construction procedure for the three recommended methods to effectively seal the joints in exterior insulating sheathing to create a simple, long term, and durable drainage plane.

  2. Electrohydrodynamics of suspension of liquid drops in AC fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Halim, Md.; Esmaeeli, Asghar

    2012-11-01

    Manipulation of liquid drops by an externally applied electric field is currently the focus of increased attention because of its relevance in a broad range of industrial processes. The effect of a uniform DC electric field on a solitary drop is well studied; however, less is know about the impact of electric field on suspension of liquid drops, and very little information is available on the impact of AC field on a single or a suspension of drops. Here we report the results of Direct Numerical Simulations of electrohydrodynamics of suspension of liquid drops. The governing equations are solved using a front tracking/finite difference technique, in conjunction with Taylor's leaky dielectric model. The imposed electric potential comprises of two parts, a time-independent base and a time-dependent part. The goal is to explore the relative importance of these two components in setting the statistically steady state behavior of the suspension. To this end, we report the results of three sets of simulations, where (i) the time-dependent part act as a perturbation on the base potential, (ii) the two components are of the same order, and (iii) the time-dependent part is much larger than the base potential. The problem is studied as a function of the governing nondimensional parameters.

  3. Drag and drop display & builder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolshakov, Timofei B.; Petrov, Andrey D.; /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    The Drag and Drop (DnD) Display & Builder is a component-oriented system that allows users to create visual representations of data received from data acquisition systems. It is an upgrade of a Synoptic Display mechanism used at Fermilab since 2002. Components can be graphically arranged and logically interconnected in the web-startable Project Builder. Projects can be either lightweight AJAX- and SVG-based web pages, or they can be started as Java applications. The new version was initiated as a response to discussions between the LHC Controls Group and Fermilab.

  4. CANFLEX fuel bundle junction pressure drop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H. J.; Chung, C. H.; Jun, J. S.; Hong, S. D.; Chang, S. K.; Kim, B. D.

    1996-11-01

    This report describes the junction pressure drop test results which are to used to determine the alignment angle between bundles to achieve the most probable fuel string pressure drop for randomly aligned bundles for use in the fuel string total pressure drop test. (author). 4 tabs., 17 figs

  5. CANFLEX fuel bundle junction pressure drop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H. J.; Chung, C. H.; Jun, J. S.; Hong, S. D.; Chang, S. K.; Kim, B. D.

    1996-11-01

    This report describes the junction pressure drop test results which are to used to determine the alignment angle between bundles to achieve the most probable fuel string pressure drop for randomly aligned bundles for use in the fuel string total pressure drop test. (author). 4 tabs., 17 figs.

  6. 49 CFR 178.603 - Drop test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... used for the hydrostatic pressure or stacking test. Exceptions for the number of steel and aluminum..., non-resilient, flat and horizontal surface. (e) Drop height. Drop heights, measured as the vertical... than flat drops, the center of gravity of the test packaging must be vertically over the point of...

  7. Dusty Plasma Modeling of the Fusion Reactor Sheath Including Collisional-Radiative Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dezairi, Aouatif; Samir, Mhamed; Eddahby, Mohamed; Saifaoui, Dennoun; Katsonis, Konstantinos; Berenguer, Chloe

    2008-01-01

    The structure and the behavior of the sheath in Tokamak collisional plasmas has been studied. The sheath is modeled taking into account the presence of the dust 2 and the effects of the charged particle collisions and radiative processes. The latter may allow for optical diagnostics of the plasma.

  8. On the biogenesis of the myelin sheath : Cognate polarized trafficking pathways in oligodendrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, H; Hoekstra, D

    2000-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes, the myelinating cells of the central nervous system, are capable of transporting vast quantities of proteins and of lipids, In particular galactosphingolipids, to the myelin sheath. The sheath is continuous with the plasma membrane of the oligodendrocyte, but the composition of

  9. Measurement of sheath thickness by lining out grooves in the Hall-type stationary plasma thrusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Daren; Wu Zhiwen; Ning Zhongxi; Wang Xiaogang

    2007-01-01

    Using grooves created along the axial direction of the discharge channel, a method for measuring sheath thickness in Hall-type stationary plasma thrusters has been developed. By distorting the wall surface using these grooves, it is possible to numerically study the effect of the wall surface on the sheath and near wall conductivity. Monte Carlo method is applied to calculate the electron temperature variation with different groove depths. The electron dynamic process in the plasma is described by a test particle method with the electron randomly entering the sheath from the discharge channel and being reflected back. Numerical results show that the reflected electron temperature is hardly affected by the wall surface if the groove depth is much less than the sheath thickness. On the other hand, the reflected electron temperature increases if the groove depth is much greater than the sheath thickness. The reflected electron temperature has a sharp jump when the depth of groove is on the order of the sheath thickness. The simulation is repeated with different sheath thicknesses and the results are the same. Therefore, a diagnosis mean of the sheath thickness can be developed based on the method. Also the simulation results are in accord with the experimental data. Besides, the measurement method may be applicable to other plasma device with similar orthogonal steady state electrical and magnetic fields

  10. Electrohydrodynamics of a viscous drop with inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nganguia, H; Young, Y-N; Layton, A T; Lai, M-C; Hu, W-F

    2016-05-01

    Most of the existing numerical and theoretical investigations on the electrohydrodynamics of a viscous drop have focused on the creeping Stokes flow regime, where nonlinear inertia effects are neglected. In this work we study the inertia effects on the electrodeformation of a viscous drop under a DC electric field using a novel second-order immersed interface method. The inertia effects are quantified by the Ohnesorge number Oh, and the electric field is characterized by an electric capillary number Ca_{E}. Below the critical Ca_{E}, small to moderate electric field strength gives rise to steady equilibrium drop shapes. We found that, at a fixed Ca_{E}, inertia effects induce larger deformation for an oblate drop than a prolate drop, consistent with previous results in the literature. Moreover, our simulations results indicate that inertia effects on the equilibrium drop deformation are dictated by the direction of normal electric stress on the drop interface: Larger drop deformation is found when the normal electric stress points outward, and smaller drop deformation is found otherwise. To our knowledge, such inertia effects on the equilibrium drop deformation has not been reported in the literature. Above the critical Ca_{E}, no steady equilibrium drop deformation can be found, and often the drop breaks up into a number of daughter droplets. In particular, our Navier-Stokes simulations show that, for the parameters we use, (1) daughter droplets are larger in the presence of inertia, (2) the drop deformation evolves more rapidly compared to creeping flow, and (3) complex distribution of electric stresses for drops with inertia effects. Our results suggest that normal electric pressure may be a useful tool in predicting drop pinch-off in oblate deformations.

  11. Capillary Thinning of Particle-laden Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagoner, Brayden; Thete, Sumeet; Jahns, Matt; Doshi, Pankaj; Basaran, Osman

    2015-11-01

    Drop formation is central in many applications such as ink-jet printing, microfluidic devices, and atomization. During drop formation, a thinning filament is created between the about-to-form drop and the fluid hanging from the nozzle. Therefore, the physics of capillary thinning of filaments is key to understanding drop formation and has been thoroughly studied for pure Newtonian fluids. The thinning dynamics is, however, altered completely when the fluid contains particles, the physics of which is not well understood. In this work, we explore the impact of solid particles on filament thinning and drop formation by using a combination of experiments and numerical simulations.

  12. Vibration-Induced Climbing of Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, P.; Eggers, J.; Deegan, R. D.

    2007-10-01

    We report an experimental study of liquid drops moving against gravity, when placed on a vertically vibrating inclined plate, which is partially wetted by the drop. The frequency of vibrations ranges from 30 to 200 Hz, and, above a threshold in vibration acceleration, drops experience an upward motion. We attribute this surprising motion to the deformations of the drop, as a consequence of an up or down symmetry breaking induced by the presence of the substrate. We relate the direction of motion to contact angle measurements. This phenomenon can be used to move a drop along an arbitrary path in a plane, without special surface treatments or localized forcing.

  13. Fibroma of the tendon sheath of the long head of the biceps tendon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeseneer, Michel de; Shahabpour, Maryam; Isacker, Tom van; Lenchik, Leon; Caillie, Marie-Astrid van

    2014-01-01

    Fibroma of the tendon sheath is a benign tumor that is less common than giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath. Both tumors may present as a painless, slowly enlarging mass. Radiological findings may be similar for both tumors. Histologically, fibroma of the tendon sheath lacks the hemosiderin-laden macrophages that are typical for giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath. We report on a 49-year-old woman with fibroma of the tendon sheath of the long head of the biceps tendon. In our case, on MR images, we observed band-like hypointense areas centrally in the tumor, mild patchy contrast enhancement, and most importantly, no decrease of signal intensity on gradient echo images. These characteristics reflected histological findings. (orig.)

  14. The anatomy of the first sacral nerve root sheath shown by computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, N R; Dixon, A K; Freer, C E

    1989-08-01

    Analysis of 25 patients with normal computed tomographic appearances at the lumbosacral junction revealed wide variation in the anatomical level at which the first sacral nerve root sheaths were seen emerging from the theca. In nine patients (36%), the S1 nerve root sheaths were first recognized at the level of the lumbosacral disc. In 14 patients (56%), the sheaths emerged cranial to the disc; it is possible that these patients may be more prone to neurological complications related to disc or facet joint disease, especially if the sheath is laterally sited within the lateral recess. Conversely, that minority of patients (two, 8%) in whom the root sheaths emerge caudal to the disc level may be relatively protected from neurological complications.

  15. Investigation of the CANLUB/sheath interface in CANDU fuel at extended burnup by XPS and SEM/WDX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hocking, W.H.; Behnke, R.; Duclos, A.M.; Gerwing, A.F.; Chan, P.K.

    1997-01-01

    A systematic investigation of the fuel-sheath interface in CANDU fuel as a function of extended burnup has been undertaken by XPS and SEM/WDX analysis. Adherent deposits of UO 2 and fission products, including Cs, Ba, Rb, I, Te, Cd and possibly Ru, have been routinely identified on CANLUB coated and bare Zircaloy surfaces. Some trends in the distribution and chemistry of key fission products have begun to emerge. Several potential mechanisms for degradation of the CANLUB graphite layer at high burnup have been practically excluded. New evidence of carbon relocation within the fuel element and limited reaction with excess oxygen has also been obtained. (author)

  16. Who is dropping your course?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storrs, Alex; Ghent, C.; Labattaglia, R.

    2011-01-01

    We present an analysis of pre and post instruction instruments in a basic astronomy course. This analysis is built on the Light and Spectroscopy Concept Inventory (LSCI, Bardar et al. 2007). In addition to assessing our student's gain in knowledge of this fundamental topic, we have added some demographic questions. While the primary purpose is to compare the gain in knowledge during a semester of instruction to changes in instruction, we also look at the demographics of students who take the pretest but not the posttest. These students are usually excluded from this type of analysis. We look for trends in the demographic information among students who drop the course, and suggest ways to make the course more palatable. References: Bardar et al., 2007: "Development and Validation of the Light and Spectroscopy Concept Inventory", Astr. Ed. Rev. 5(2), 103-113

  17. Magnetically focused liquid drop radiator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botts, Thomas E.; Powell, James R.; Lenard, Roger

    1986-01-01

    A magnetically focused liquid drop radiator for application in rejecting rgy from a spacecraft, characterized by a magnetizable liquid or slurry disposed in operative relationship within the liquid droplet generator and its fluid delivery system, in combination with magnetic means disposed in operative relationship around a liquid droplet collector of the LDR. The magnetic means are effective to focus streams of droplets directed from the generator toward the collector, thereby to assure that essentially all of the droplets are directed into the collector, even though some of the streams may be misdirected as they leave the generator. The magnetic focusing means is also effective to suppress splashing of liquid when the droplets impinge on the collector.

  18. Giant Cell Tumour of Tendon Sheath Masquerading As Trigger Finger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Rahimawati

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 59-year-old female who presented in the general orthopaedic clinic with triggering of her right middle finger. She did not respond to conventional treatment methods; subsequently she underwent surgical open release under local anaesthesia. Five months postoperatively, the patient presented with signs and symptoms of acute flexor tenosynovitis, and was thought to have a postoperative infection. Re-examination by a hand surgeon raised the possibility of a different aetiology. Based on clinical findings and response to initial treatment, giant cell tumour of the flexor tendon sheath was suspected and later confirmed following surgical biopsy. A high index of suspicion and knowledge of the variegated presentations of giant cell tumour in the hand are beneficial in these types of cases.

  19. Primary malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor at unusual location

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souvagya Panigrahi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST is a rare soft tissue sarcoma. Most arise in association with major nerve trunks. Their most common anatomical sites are the proximal portions of the upper and lower extremities and the trunk. MPNSTs have rarely been reported in literature to occur in other unusual body parts. We review all such cases reported till now in terms of site of origin, surgical treatment, adjuvant therapy and outcome and shortly describe our experience with two of these cases. Both of our case presented with lump at unusual sites resembling neurofibroma, one at orbitotemporal area and other in the paraspinal region with characteristic feature of neurofibroma with the exception that both had very short history of progression. They underwent gross total removal of the tumor with adjuvant radiotherapy postoperatively. At 6-month follow-up both are doing well with no evidence of recurrence.

  20. Experiments on Alignment of Dust Particles in Plasma Sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samarian, A.A.; Vladimirov, S.V.; James, B.W.

    2005-01-01

    Here, we report an experimental investigation of the stability of vertical and horizontal confinement of dust particles levitated in an rf sheath. The experiments were carried out in argon plasma with micron-sized dust particles. Changes of particle arrangement were triggered by changing the discharge parameters, applying an additional bias to the confining electrode and by laser beam. The region where the transition was triggered by changes of discharge parameters and the transition from horizontal to vertical alignment has been found to be more pronounced than for the reverse transition. A clear hysteretic effect was observed for transitions triggered by changes of the confining voltage. A vertical alignment occurs in a system of two dust horizontally arranged particles with the decrease of the particle separation. This disruption is attributed to the formation of the common ion wake in the system

  1. Assessing the permeability of the rat sciatic nerve epineural sheath against compounds with local anesthetic activity: an ex vivo electrophysiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagiava, Alexia; Theophilidis, George

    2013-10-01

    Abstract Studies have shown that the sciatic nerve epineural sheath acts as a barrier and has a delaying effect on the diffusion of local anesthetics into the nerve fibers and endoneurium. The purpose of this work is to assess and to quantify the permeability of the epineural sheath. For this purpose, we isolated the rat sciatic nerve in a three-chamber recording bath that allowed us to monitor the constant in amplitude evoked nerve compound action potential (nCAP) for over 24 h. For nerves exposed to the compounds under investigation, we estimated the IT50 the time required to inhibit the nCAP to 50% of its initial value. For desheathed nerves, the half-vitality time was denoted as IT50(-) and for the ensheath normal nerves as IT50(+). There was no significant difference between the IT50 of desheathed and ensheathed nerves exposed to normal saline. The IT50(-) for nerves exposed to 40 mM lidocaine was 12.1 ± 0.95 s (n=14) and the IT50(+) was 341.4 ± 2.49 s (n=6). The permeability (P) coefficient of the epineural sheath was defined as the ratio IT50(+)/IT50(-). The P coefficient for 40 mM lidocaine and linalool was 28.2 and 3.48, correspondingly, and for 30 mM 2-heptanone was 4.87. This is an indication that the epineural sheath provided a stronger barrier against lidocaine, compared to natural local anesthetics, linalool and 2-heptanone. The methodology presented here is a useful tool for studying epineural sheath permeability to compounds with local anesthetic properties.

  2. File list: NoD.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: InP.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: NoD.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: InP.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. File list: InP.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: NoD.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: InP.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 Input control Neural Nerve Sheath Neopl...asms http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  9. Hydrocarbon Degradation In Poultry Droppings And Cassava Peels ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This greenhouse study was aimed at determining the potentials of poultry droppings (PD) and cassava peels (CP) for nutrient-enhanced biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbon (THC) in a well drained Typic Paleustults using the THC levels and degradation duration as remediation indices. The performance of the organic ...

  10. Collision-dominated dust sheaths and voids - observations in micro-gravity experiments and numerical investigation of the force balance relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsytovich, V N; Morfill, G; Konopka, U; Thomas, H

    2003-01-01

    Numerical solutions of stationary force balance equations are used to investigate the possible dust configurations (dust structures) in complex plasmas between two floating potential plane electrodes. The distance between electrodes is assumed to be larger than the ion-neutral mean free path and the hydrodynamic description is used. It includes the known forces operating in this limit, the ionization source and the dust charge variations. The stationary balance equations are solved both in the case of the presence of one-size dust grains and for the case of a mixture of grains with two different sizes. Recent micro-gravity experiments with single-size dust grains and two-different-size dust grains show the formation of a system of dust sheaths and dust voids between the two plane electrodes. The observed configurations of dust structures depend strongly on the gas pressure and the degree of ionization used. The numerical investigations are able to show the necessary conditions for the types of structure to be created and give their size. The size of the structures observed is larger than the ion-neutral mean free path and is of the order of magnitude of that obtained numerically. The numerical investigations give details of the spatial distributions, the dust particles, the electron/ion densities, the ion drift velocity and dust charges inside and outside different dust structures. These details have not yet been investigated experimentally and can indicate directions for further experimental work to be performed. The single-dust-sheath structure with single-size dust particles surrounded by dust free regions (dust wall-voids) and floating potential electrodes is computed. Such a structure was observed recently and the computational results are in agreement with observations. It is shown that more often a dust void in the centre is observed. It is found that a dust void in the centre region between two electrodes is formed if the ionization rate is larger than the

  11. Neck extensor muscle weakness (Dropped head syndrome) following radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatia, S.; Miller, R.C.; Lachance, D.L.

    2006-01-01

    Background. Dropped head syndrome is an unusual condition in which the head cannot be held upright in its normal anatomic position secondary to pronounced, isolated, neck extensor muscle weakness. Case report. A case of dropped head syndrome in a female with a history of radiotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma and a clinical history consistent with multiple sclerosis is presented, and potential etiologies are discussed. Conclusions. Muscular atrophy and lower motor neuron injury secondary to isolated anterior horn cell injury from radiotherapy emerge as the most likely etiology. (author)

  12. Medium carbon vanadium micro alloyed steels for drop forging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeszensky, Gabor; Plaut, Ronald Lesley

    1992-01-01

    Growing competitiveness of alternative manufacturing routes requires cost minimization in the production of drop forged components. The authors analyse the potential of medium carbon, vanadium microalloyed steels for drop forging. Laboratory and industrial experiments have been carried out emphasizing deformation and temperature cycles, strain rates and dwell times showing a typical processing path, associated mechanical properties and corresponding microstructures. The steels the required levels of mechanical properties on cooling after forging, eliminating subsequent heat treatment. The machinability of V-microalloyed steels is also improved when compared with plain medium carbon steels. (author)

  13. Research on stress distribution regularity of cement sheaths of radial well based on ABAQUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jihui; Cheng, Yuanfang; Li, Xiaolong; Xiao, Wen; Li, Menglai

    2017-12-01

    To ensure desirable outcome of hydraulic fracturing based on ultra-short radius radial systems, it is required to investigate the stress distribution regularity and stability of the cement sheath. On the basis of the theoretical model of the cement sheath stress distribution, a reservoir mechanical model was built using the finite element software, ABAQUS, according to the physical property of a certain oil reservoir of the Shengli oilfield. The stress distribution of the casing-cement-sheath-formation system under the practical condition was simulated, based on which analyses were conducted from multiple points of view. Results show that the stress on the internal interface of the cement sheath exceeds that on the external interface, and fluctuates with higher amplitudes, which means that the internal interface is the most failure-prone. The unevenness of the cement sheath stress distribution grows with the increasing horizontal principal stress ratio, and so does the variation magnitude. This indicates that higher horizontal principal stress ratios are unfavourable for the structural stability of the cement sheath. Both the wellbore quantity of the URRS and the physical property of the material can affect the cement sheath distribution. It is suggested to optimize the quantity of the radial wellbore and use cement with a lower elastic modulus and higher Poisson’s ratio. At last, the impact level of the above factor was analysed, with the help of the grey correlation analysis.

  14. Hertwig’s Epithelial Root Sheath Fate during Initial Cellular Cementogenesis in Rat Molars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Tsuneyuki; Yamada, Tamaki; Yamamoto, Tomomaya; Hasegawa, Tomoka; Hongo, Hiromi; Oda, Kimimitsu; Amizuka, Norio

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate the fate of the epithelial root sheath during initial cellular cementogenesis, we examined developing maxillary first molars of rats by immunohistochemistry for keratin, vimentin, and tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNALP) and by TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL). The advancing root end was divided into three sections, which follow three distinct stages of initial cellular cementogenesis: section 1, where the epithelial sheath is intact; section 2, where the epithelial sheath becomes fragmented; and section 3, where initial cellular cementogenesis begins. After fragmentation of the epithelial sheath, many keratin-positive epithelial sheath cells were embedded in the rapidly growing cellular cementum. A few unembedded epithelial cells located on the cementum surface. Dental follicle cells, precementoblasts, and cementoblasts showed immunoreactivity for vimentin and TNALP. In all three sections, there were virtually no cells possessing double immunoreactivity for vimentin-keratin or TNALP-keratin and only embedded epithelial cells showed TUNEL reactivity. Taken together, these findings suggest that: (1) epithelial sheath cells divide into two groups; one group is embedded in the cementum and thereafter dies by apoptosis, and the other survives on the cementum surface as epithelial cell rests of Malassez; and (2) epithelial sheath cells do not undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition during initial cellular cementogenesis

  15. Statistical analysis of mirror mode waves in sheath regions driven by interplanetary coronal mass ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ala-Lahti, Matti M.; Kilpua, Emilia K. J.; Dimmock, Andrew P.; Osmane, Adnane; Pulkkinen, Tuija; Souček, Jan

    2018-05-01

    We present a comprehensive statistical analysis of mirror mode waves and the properties of their plasma surroundings in sheath regions driven by interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME). We have constructed a semi-automated method to identify mirror modes from the magnetic field data. We analyze 91 ICME sheath regions from January 1997 to April 2015 using data from the Wind spacecraft. The results imply that similarly to planetary magnetosheaths, mirror modes are also common structures in ICME sheaths. However, they occur almost exclusively as dip-like structures and in mirror stable plasma. We observe mirror modes throughout the sheath, from the bow shock to the ICME leading edge, but their amplitudes are largest closest to the shock. We also find that the shock strength (measured by Alfvén Mach number) is the most important parameter in controlling the occurrence of mirror modes. Our findings suggest that in ICME sheaths the dominant source of free energy for mirror mode generation is the shock compression. We also suggest that mirror modes that are found deeper in the sheath are remnants from earlier times of the sheath evolution, generated also in the vicinity of the shock.

  16. Verification of high voltage rf capacitive sheath models with particle-in-cell simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Lieberman, Michael; Verboncoeur, John

    2009-10-01

    Collisionless and collisional high voltage rf capacitive sheath models were developed in the late 1980's [1]. Given the external parameters of a single-frequency capacitively coupled discharge, plasma parameters including sheath width, electron and ion temperature, plasma density, power, and ion bombarding energy can be estimated. One-dimensional electrostatic PIC codes XPDP1 [2] and OOPD1 [3] are used to investigate plasma behaviors within rf sheaths and bulk plasma. Electron-neutral collisions only are considered for collisionless sheaths, while ion-neutral collisions are taken into account for collisional sheaths. The collisionless sheath model is verified very well by PIC simulations for the rf current-driven and voltage-driven cases. Results will be reported for collisional sheaths also. [1] M. A. Lieberman, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 16 (1988) 638; 17 (1989) 338 [2] J. P. Verboncoeur, M. V. Alves, V. Vahedi, and C. K. Birdsall, J. Comp. Phys. 104 (1993) 321 [3] J. P. Verboncoeur, A. B. Langdon and N. T. Gladd, Comp. Phys. Comm. 87 (1995) 199

  17. Bacterial and fungal flora of seagull droppings in Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cragg, John; Clayton, Yvonne M.

    1971-01-01

    In Jersey 166 fresh and 122 dried seagull droppings were obtained and studied locally and in London for the presence of bacteria and fungi of potentially pathogenic nature. There were no salmonella or shigella bacteria isolated from the two groups but there was a high proportion of Candida albicans obtained from the fresh material (21·7%) and only 1·6% from the dry faeces. Cryptococcus neoformans and Histoplasma capsulatum were not found in either the dry or fresh droppings. The normal bacterial and fungal flora of the seagull was established and it is considered that the C. albicans in fresh gull droppings would not materially increase albicans infections in man. PMID:5104846

  18. Green chemistry and nanofabrication in a levitated Leidenfrost drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelaziz, Ramzy; Disci-Zayed, Duygu; Hedayati, Mehdi Keshavarz; Pöhls, Jan-Hendrik; Zillohu, Ahnaf Usman; Erkartal, Burak; Chakravadhanula, Venkata Sai Kiran; Duppel, Viola; Kienle, Lorenz; Elbahri, Mady

    2013-10-01

    Green nanotechnology focuses on the development of new and sustainable methods of creating nanoparticles, their localized assembly and integration into useful systems and devices in a cost-effective, simple and eco-friendly manner. Here we present our experimental findings on the use of the Leidenfrost drop as an overheated and charged green chemical reactor. Employing a droplet of aqueous solution on hot substrates, this method is capable of fabricating nanoparticles, creating nanoscale coatings on complex objects and designing porous metal in suspension and foam form, all in a levitated Leidenfrost drop. As examples of the potential applications of the Leidenfrost drop, fabrication of nanoporous black gold as a plasmonic wideband superabsorber, and synthesis of superhydrophilic and thermal resistive metal-polymer hybrid foams are demonstrated. We believe that the presented nanofabrication method may be a promising strategy towards the sustainable production of functional nanomaterials.

  19. Time resolved measurements of plasma potential across an anode double layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohoata, V.; Popa, Gh.; Schrittwieser, R.; Ionita, Codrina

    2002-01-01

    Experimental results are presented on self-sustained oscillations produced by the dynamics of an anode double layer or fireball in a DP-machine. By additional ionisation processes the fireball is formed in front of an additional small plane anode inserted in the diffusive plasma. An annular (ring) electrode surrounds the anode. The thickness of the ion sheath in front of this ring affects the anode current by controlling its effective diameter during the fireball oscillations. The ring potential controls first the oscillation frequency of the anode current, but also other characteristics of the instability. The ring potential was chosen as a pulsed one so that only single anode double layer instability can be excited. The ring signal was used for triggering the data acquisition system. The spatial distribution of the plasma potential in front of the anode is presented as a time resolved measurement one. A negative drop potential was found that controls the charge flux particle across the double layer. Also the plasma density inside the fireball relaxes during the disrupting time controlled by ambipolar diffusion and also by the negative potential drop. (authors)

  20. Sepsis from dropped clips at laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, Sarwat

    2001-01-01

    We report seven patients in whom five dropped surgical clips and two gallstones were visualized in the peritoneal cavity, on radiological studies. In two, subphrenic abscesses and empyemas developed as a result of dropped clips into the peritoneal cavity during or following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. In one of these two, a clip was removed surgically from the site of an abscess. In two other patients dropped gallstones, and in three, dropped clips led to no complications. These were seen incidentally on studies done for other indications. Abdominal abscess secondary to dropped gallstones is a well-recognized complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). We conclude that even though dropped surgical clips usually do not cause problems, they should be considered as a risk additional to other well-known causes of post-LC abdominal sepsis

  1. Accounting for Debye sheath expansion for proud Langmuir probes in magnetic confinement fusion plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, C K; Boedo, J A; Stangeby, P C

    2018-01-01

    A Child-Langmuir law-based method for accounting for Debye sheath expansion while fitting the current-voltage I-V characteristic of proud Langmuir probes (electrodes that extend into the volume of the plasma) is described. For Langmuir probes of a typical size used in tokamak plasmas, these new estimates of electron temperature and ion saturation current density values decreased by up to 60% compared to methods that did not account for sheath expansion. Changes to the collection area are modeled using the Child-Langmuir law and effective expansion perimeter l p , and the model is thus referred to as the "perimeter sheath expansion method." l p is determined solely from electrode geometry, so the method may be employed without prior measurement of the magnitude of the sheath expansion effects for a given Langmuir probe and can be used for electrodes of different geometries. This method correctly predicts the non-saturating ΔI/ΔV slope for cold, low-density plasmas where sheath-expansion effects are strong, as well as for hot plasmas where ΔI/ΔV ∼ 0, though it is shown that the sheath can still significantly affect the collection area in these hot conditions. The perimeter sheath expansion method has several advantages compared to methods where the non-saturating current is fitted: (1) It is more resilient to scatter in the I-V characteristics observed in turbulent plasmas. (2) It is able to separate the contributions to the ΔI/ΔV slope from sheath expansion to that of the high energy electron tail in high Te conditions. (3) It calculates the change in the collection area due to the Debye sheath for conditions where ΔI/ΔV ∼ 0 and for V = V f .

  2. Evaluation of the Effusion within Biceps Long Head Tendon Sheath Using Ultrasonography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, In; Lee, Hyo-Jin; Kim, Sung-Eun; Bae, Sung-Ho; Lee, Kwang-Yeol; Park, Kwang-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Background Many shoulder diseases are related to glenohumeral joint synovitis and effusion. The purpose of the present study is to detect effusion within the biceps long head tendon sheath as the sign of glenohumeral joint synovitis using ultrasonography, and to evaluate the clinical meaning of effusion within the biceps long head tendon sheath. Methods A consecutive series of 569 patients who underwent ultrasonography for shoulder pain were reviewed retrospectively and ultimately, 303 patients were included. The authors evaluated the incidence and amount of the effusion within the biceps long head tendon sheath on the ultrasonographic short axis view. Furthermore, the authors evaluated the correlation between the amount of effusion within the biceps long head tendon sheath and the range of motion and the functional score. Results The effusion within the biceps long head tendon sheath was detected in 58.42% of the patients studied: 69.23% in adhesive capsulitis, 56.69% in rotator cuff tear, 41.03% in calcific tendinitis, and 33.33% in biceps tendinitis. The average amount of the effusion within the biceps long head tendon sheath was 1.7 ± 1.6 mm, and it was measured to be the largest in adhesive capsulitis. The amount of effusion within biceps long head tendon sheath showed a moderate to high degree of correlation with the range of motion, and a low degree of correlation with the functional score and visual analogue scale for pain in each type of shoulder disease. Conclusions The effusion within the biceps long head tendon sheath is closely related to the range of motion and clinical scores in patients with painful shoulders. Ultrasonographic detection of the effusion within the biceps long head tendon sheath might be a simple and easy method to evaluate shoulder function. PMID:26330958

  3. Hydrothermal waves in evaporating sessile drops

    OpenAIRE

    Brutin, D.; Rigollet, F.; Niliot, C. Le

    2009-01-01

    Drop evaporation is a simple phenomena but still unclear concerning the mechanisms of evaporation. A common agreement of the scientific community based on experimental and numerical work evidences that most of the evaporation occurs at the triple line. However, the rate of evaporation is still empirically predicted due to the lack of knowledge on the convection cells which develop inside the drop under evaporation. The evaporation of sessile drop is more complicated than it appears due to the...

  4. Parametric resonance in acoustically levitated water drops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, C.L.; Xie, W.J.; Wei, B.

    2010-01-01

    Liquid drops can be suspended in air with acoustic levitation method. When the sound pressure is periodically modulated, the levitated drop is usually forced into an axisymmetric oscillation. However, a transition from axisymmetric oscillation into sectorial oscillation occurs when the modulation frequency approaches some specific values. The frequency of the sectorial oscillation is almost exactly half of the modulation frequency. It is demonstrated that this transition is induced by the parametric resonance of levitated drop. The natural frequency of sectorial oscillation is found to decrease with the increase of drop distortion extent.

  5. Parametric resonance in acoustically levitated water drops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, C.L.; Xie, W.J. [Department of Applied Physics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China); Wei, B., E-mail: bbwei@nwpu.edu.c [Department of Applied Physics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China)

    2010-05-10

    Liquid drops can be suspended in air with acoustic levitation method. When the sound pressure is periodically modulated, the levitated drop is usually forced into an axisymmetric oscillation. However, a transition from axisymmetric oscillation into sectorial oscillation occurs when the modulation frequency approaches some specific values. The frequency of the sectorial oscillation is almost exactly half of the modulation frequency. It is demonstrated that this transition is induced by the parametric resonance of levitated drop. The natural frequency of sectorial oscillation is found to decrease with the increase of drop distortion extent.

  6. Soft drop jet mass measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Roloff, Jennifer Kathryn; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Calculations of jet substructure observables that are accurate beyond leading-logarithm accuracy have recently become available. Such observables are significant not only for probing the collinear regime of QCD that is largely unexplored at a hadron collider, but also for improving the understanding of jet substructure properties that are used in many studies at the Large Hadron Collider. This poster documents a measurement of the first jet substructure quantity at a hadron collider to be calculated at next-to-next-to-leading-logarithm accuracy. The normalized, differential cross-section is measured as a function of log( ρ^2), where ρ is the ratio of the soft-drop mass to the ungroomed jet transverse momentum. This quantity is measured in dijet events from 32.9 ifb of sqrt(s) = 13 TeV proton-proton collisions recorded by the ATLAS detector. The data are unfolded to correct for detector effects and compared to precise QCD calculations and leading-logarithm particle-level Monte Carlo simulations.

  7. Sequential modelling of ICRF wave near RF fields and asymptotic RF sheaths description for AUG ICRF antennas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacquot Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A sequence of simulations is performed with RAPLICASOL and SSWICH to compare two AUG ICRF antennas. RAPLICASOL outputs have been used as input to SSWICH-SW for the AUG ICRF antennas. Using parallel electric field maps and the scattering matrix produced by RAPLICASOL, SSWICH-SW, reduced to its asymptotic part, is able to produce a 2D radial/poloidal map of the DC plasma potential accounting for the antenna input settings (total power, power balance, phasing. Two models of antennas are compared: 2-strap antenna vs 3-strap antenna. The 2D DC potential structures are correlated to structures of the parallel electric field map for different phasing and power balance. The overall DC plasma potential on the 3-strap antenna is lower due to better global RF currents compensation. Spatial proximity between regions of high RF electric field and regions where high DC plasma potentials are observed is an important factor for sheath rectification.

  8. Dust charging and charge fluctuations in a weakly collisional radio-frequency sheath at low pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piel, Alexander; Schmidt, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Models for the charging of dust particles in the bulk plasma and in the sheath region are discussed. A new model is proposed that describes collision-enhanced ion currents in the sheath. The collisions result in a substantial reduction of the negative charge of the dust. Experimental data for the dust charge in the sheath can be described by this model when a Bi-Maxwellian electron distribution is taken into account. Expressions for the dust charging rate for all considered models are presented and their influence on the rise of the kinetic dust temperature is discussed

  9. Normal tendon sheath of the second to fifth fingers as seen on oblique views

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, E.

    1984-01-01

    Oblique views of the fingers, using a low kilovolt technique, show a portion of the tendon sheaths which can be regarded as representative of the entire sheath. Because of the varying obliquity of each finger, this proportion differs in the fingers. With increasing age the projected portion of the sheath becomes smaller because it is covered by increasing bone formation in the insertion of the tendon sheat. Normal values have been obtained for adults according to their decades; from these, quite minor degrees of tendon sheat thickening can be determined. In camptodactyly of the fifth finger, which is not uncommon, the tendon sheat may be widened in the absence of a tenosynovitis.

  10. Modelling of the dual frequency capacitive sheath in the intermediate pressure range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, P C; Robiche, J; Turner, M M

    2004-01-01

    The nonlinearity of the plasma sheath in dual frequency capacitively coupled reactors is investigated for frequencies well above the ion plasma frequency. This work focuses on the behaviour of the voltage and the sheath width with respect to the driving current source and the collisionality regime. For typical plasma processing applications, the gas pressure ranges from a few milliTorrs to hundreds of milliTorrs, and the ion dynamics span different collisional regimes. To describe these different ion dynamics, we have used a collisionless model and a variable mobility model. The sheath widths and the voltages obtained from these two models have then been compared

  11. Abduction of Arm Facilitates Correction of Kinked Peel-Away Sheath During Subclavian Central Line Placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunghoon

    2015-12-01

    A tunneled central line catheter placement using a subclavian vein approach can be complicated by an occurrence of peel-away sheath kink which prevents the advancement of the catheter through the sheath. The kink is created due to the angular junction of subclavian and brachiocephalic veins which meet at 90 degree angle. A technique is described which corrects the peel-away sheath kink by extending the subclavian/brachiocephalic vein angle to greater than 90 degrees by abducting the patient's arm. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The relative axial expansions under irradiation of stacks of UO{sub 2} pellets in zircaloy sheaths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Notley, M. J.F.

    1962-08-15

    An experiment was performed to measure the relative axial movement of UO{sub 2} fuel pellets inside a Zircaloy sheath. Although the results must be treated with some reservation, the inferences are that there is very little relative movement between the fuel and the sheath when the two are in firm pressure contact. Relative movement was in the range 0.075 {+-} 0.03 cm for a 30 cm fuel length, and was not greatly affected by the power output, profile of the pellet end-faces or the diametral clearance left between the fuel and the sheath on assembly. However in two elements that had thick sheaths to withstand the coolant pressure and that were assembled with large diametral clearances (2% of the diameter) the available axial clearance for relative fuel/ sheath movement (1%) was fully taken up. The thin sheathed elements showed residual axial expansions of up to 0.17 cm, indicating that the pellets move relative to the sheath only until frictional forces are sufficient for the sheath to grip the fuel; thereafter the sheath is extended. The measurements also indicate that sheath elongation is governed by the temperature at the contact points between adjacent pellets, eg. at the inner edge of a pellet shoulder, as long as that temperature is below approximately 1000{sup o}C. At higher temperatures, the UO{sub 2} is too plastic to exert sufficient force to strain the sheath. (author)

  13. Dissociation and Re-Aggregation of Multicell-Ensheathed Fragments Responsible for Rapid Production of Massive Clumps of Leptothrix Sheaths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunoh, Tatsuki; Nagaoka, Noriyuki; McFarlane, Ian R.; Tamura, Katsunori; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.; Kunoh, Hitoshi; Takada, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Species of the Fe/Mn-oxidizing bacteria Leptothrix produce tremendous amounts of microtubular, Fe/Mn-encrusted sheaths within a few days in outwells of groundwater that can rapidly clog water systems. To understand this mode of rapid sheath production and define the timescales involved, behaviors of sheath-forming Leptothrix sp. strain OUMS1 were examined using time-lapse video at the initial stage of sheath formation. OUMS1 formed clumps of tangled sheaths. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of a thin layer of bacterial exopolymer fibrils around catenulate cells (corresponding to the immature sheath). In time-lapse videos, numerous sheath filaments that extended from the periphery of sheath clumps repeatedly fragmented at the apex of the same fragment, the fragments then aggregated and again elongated, eventually forming a large sheath clump comprising tangled sheaths within two days. In this study, we found that fast microscopic fragmentation, dissociation, re-aggregation and re-elongation events are the basis of the rapid, massive production of Leptothrix sheaths typically observed at macroscopic scales. PMID:27490579

  14. Magnetic microscopy for characterization of local critical current in iron-sheathed MgB2 wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashikawa, K.; Yamamoto, A.; Kiss, T.; Ye, S.; Matsumoto, A.; Kumakura, H.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We developed a characterization method of local critical current in MgB 2 wires. • Local homogeneity was visualized by the scanning Hall-probe microscopy (SHPM). • Local critical current value was quantified with the aid of the finite element method (FEM). • MgB 2 wire still has inhomogeneous distribution in local critical current. • Higher potential than that estimated by the four-probe transport method was suggested. - Abstract: We have developed a characterization method of local critical current in iron-sheathed MgB 2 wires. Local homogeneity was visualized by the scanning Hall-probe microscopy (SHPM). The value of local critical current was quantified with the aid of the finite element method (FEM) considering the ferromagnetic properties of the iron sheath. The results suggested that MgB 2 wires fabricated by internal Mg diffusion processes still have large longitudinal inhomogeneity and much higher potential than that estimated by the four-probe transport method. This will be very important information for making a correct strategy for further development of MgB 2 wires

  15. Drop Impact Dynamics with Sessile Drops and Geometries: Spreading, Jetting, and Fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilger, Christopher F.

    The tendency of surface tension to cause small parcels of fluid to form into drops allows convenient packaging, transport, dispersal of liquid phase matter. Liquid drop impacts with solids, liquids, and other drops have realized and additional future applications in biological, manufacturing, heat transfer, and combustion systems. Experiments were conducted to investigate the dynamics of multiple drop collisions, rather than the most-studied phenomenon of single drop impacts. Additional drop impacts were performed on rigid hemispheres representing sessile drops, angled substrates, and into the vertex of two tilted surfaces arranged into a vee shape. A qualitative inspection of drop-sessile drop impacts shows distinct post-impact shapes depending on the offset distance between the drops. At intermediate offset distances, distinct jets issue from the overlap region between the two drops projected areas. These jets are observed to reach their maximum extent at a critical offset distance ratio, epsilon epsilon ˜ 0.75-0.80, with substrate contact angle and W e having a lesser effect. Capillary waves that traverse the sessile drop after collision cause a lower aspect ratio liquid column to emanate from the sessile drop opposite the impact. In order to better understand the jetting phenomenon seen in the offset drop-sessile drop impacts, simpler solid geometries are investigated that elicit a similar behavior. Solid hemispheres do not show the singular jetting observed in the fluidic case, however, a simple vee formed by two intersection planar substrates do jet in a similar fashion to the fluidic case. A geometric model with partnered experiments is developed to describe the bisymmetric spread of an impacting drop on an angled substrate. This geometric model is used to guide a time of arrival based model for various features of the drop impact, which is used to predict jetting in various vee channel experiments.

  16. Microgravity-Driven Optic Nerve/Sheath Biomechanics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethier, C. R.; Feola, A.; Myers, J. G.; Nelson, E.; Raykin, J.; Samuels, B.

    2016-01-01

    Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome is a concern for long-duration space flight. Current thinking suggests that the ocular changes observed in VIIP syndrome are related to cephalad fluid shifts resulting in altered fluid pressures [1]. In particular, we hypothesize that increased intracranial pressure (ICP) drives connective tissue remodeling of the posterior eye and optic nerve sheath (ONS). We describe here finite element (FE) modeling designed to understand how altered pressures, particularly altered ICP, affect the tissues of the posterior eye and optic nerve sheath (ONS) in VIIP. METHODS: Additional description of the modeling methodology is provided in the companion IWS abstract by Feola et al. In brief, a geometric model of the posterior eye and optic nerve, including the ONS, was created and the effects of fluid pressures on tissue deformations were simulated. We considered three ICP scenarios: an elevated ICP assumed to occur in chronic microgravity, and ICP in the upright and supine positions on earth. Within each scenario we used Latin hypercube sampling (LHS) to consider a range of ICPs, ONH tissue mechanical properties, intraocular pressures (IOPs) and mean arterial pressures (MAPs). The outcome measures were biomechanical strains in the lamina cribrosa, optic nerve and retina; here we focus on peak values of these strains, since elevated strain alters cell phenotype and induce tissue remodeling. In 3D, the strain field can be decomposed into three orthogonal components, denoted as first, second and third principal strains. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: For baseline material properties, increasing ICP from 0 to 20 mmHg significantly changed strains within the posterior eye and ONS (Fig. 1), indicating that elevated ICP affects ocular tissue biomechanics. Notably, strains in the lamina cribrosa and retina became less extreme as ICP increased; however, within the optic nerve, the occurrence of such extreme strains greatly increased as

  17. Many Drops Make a Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaitanya S. Mudgal

    2014-03-01

    greater knowledge, better skills and disseminate this knowledge through this journal to influence as many physicians and their patients as possible. They have taken the knowledge of their teachers, recognized their giants and are now poised to see further than ever before. My grandmother often used to quote to me a proverb from India, which when translated literally means “Many drops make a lake”. I cannot help but be amazed by the striking similarities between the words of Newton and this Indian saying. Therefore, while it may seem intuitive, I think it must be stated that it is vital for the betterment of all our patients that we recognize our own personal lakes to put our drops of knowledge into. More important is that we recognize that it is incumbent upon each and every one of us to contribute to our collective lakes of knowledge such as ABJS. And finally and perhaps most importantly we need to be utterly cognizant of never letting such lakes of knowledge run dry.... ever.

  18. Physical Watermarking for Securing Cyber-Physical Systems via Packet Drop Injections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozel, Omur [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Weekrakkody, Sean [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Sinopoli, Bruno [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2017-10-23

    Physical watermarking is a well known solution for detecting integrity attacks on Cyber-Physical Systems (CPSs) such as the smart grid. Here, a random control input is injected into the system in order to authenticate physical dynamics and sensors which may have been corrupted by adversaries. Packet drops may naturally occur in a CPS due to network imperfections. To our knowledge, previous work has not considered the role of packet drops in detecting integrity attacks. In this paper, we investigate the merit of injecting Bernoulli packet drops into the control inputs sent to actuators as a new physical watermarking scheme. With the classical linear quadratic objective function and an independent and identically distributed packet drop injection sequence, we study the effect of packet drops on meeting security and control objectives. Our results indicate that the packet drops could act as a potential physical watermark for attack detection in CPSs.

  19. Self-wrapping of an ouzo drop induced by evaporation on a superamphiphobic surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, H.; Diddens, C.; Versluis, M.; Butt, H.J.; Lohse, D.; Zhang, X.

    2017-01-01

    Evaporation of multi-component drops is crucial to various technologies and has numerous potential applications because of its ubiquity in nature. Superamphiphobic surfaces, which are both superhydrophobic and superoleophobic, can give a low wettability not only for water drops but also for oil

  20. [Dropped head syndrome as first manifestation of primary hyperparathyroid myopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Kiyobumi; Koseki, Sayo; Ikegami, Kenji; Onishi, Iichiroh; Tomimitsu, Hiyoryuki; Shintani, Shuzo

    2018-03-28

    75 years old woman presented with 6-month history of progressive dropped head syndrome. Neurological examination revealed moderate weakness of flexor and extensor of neck and mild weakness of proximal appendicular muscles with normal deep tendon reflexes. The needle electromyography showed short duration and low amplitude motor unit potential. No fibrillation potentials or positive sharp waves were seen. Biopsy of deltoid muscle was normal. Laboratory studies showed elevated levels of serum calcium (11.8 mg/dl, upper limit of normal 10.1) and intact parathyroid hormone (104 pg/ml, upper limit of normal 65), and decreased level of serum phosphorus (2.3 mg/dl, lower limit of normal 2.7). Ultrasonography and enhanced computed tomography revealed a parathyroid tumor. The tumor was removed surgically. Pathological examination proved tumor to be parathyroid adenoma. Dropped head and weakness of muscles were dramatically improved within a week after the operation. Although hyperparathyroidism is a rare cause of dropped head syndrome, neurologists must recognize hyperparathyroidism as a treatable cause of dropped head syndrome.

  1. Drop test facility available to private industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shappert, L.B.; Box, W.D.

    1983-01-01

    In 1978, a virtually unyielding drop test impact pad was constructed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Tower Shielding Facility (TSF) for the testing of heavy shipping containers designed for transporting radioactive materials. Because of the facility's unique capability for drop-testing large, massive shipping packages, it has been identified as a facility which can be made available for non-DOE users

  2. University Drop-Out: An Italian Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belloc, Filippo; Maruotti, Antonello; Petrella, Lea

    2010-01-01

    University students' drop-out is a crucial issue for the universities' efficiency evaluation and funding. In this paper, we analyze the drop-out rate of the Economics and Business faculty of Sapienza University of Rome. We use administrative data on 9,725 undergraduates students enrolled in three-years bachelor programs from 2001 to 2007 and…

  3. Total Site Heat Integration Considering Pressure Drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kew Hong Chew

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Pressure drop is an important consideration in Total Site Heat Integration (TSHI. This is due to the typically large distances between the different plants and the flow across plant elevations and equipment, including heat exchangers. Failure to consider pressure drop during utility targeting and heat exchanger network (HEN synthesis may, at best, lead to optimistic energy targets, and at worst, an inoperable system if the pumps or compressors cannot overcome the actual pressure drop. Most studies have addressed the pressure drop factor in terms of pumping cost, forbidden matches or allowable pressure drop constraints in the optimisation of HEN. This study looks at the implication of pressure drop in the context of a Total Site. The graphical Pinch-based TSHI methodology is extended to consider the pressure drop factor during the minimum energy requirement (MER targeting stage. The improved methodology provides a more realistic estimation of the MER targets and valuable insights for the implementation of the TSHI design. In the case study, when pressure drop in the steam distribution networks is considered, the heating and cooling duties increase by 14.5% and 4.5%.

  4. Why Do Students Drop Advanced Mathematics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Ilana

    2004-01-01

    Students, especially black, Latino and Native American youth and students of low socio-economic status drop out of advanced mathematics. Teachers must coordinate their expectations, their knowledge of students and their teaching practices in order to stop struggling students from dropping out of advanced math classes.

  5. The Tubular Sheaths Encasing Methanosaeta and Methanospirillum Filaments are Functional Amyloids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dueholm, Morten Simonsen; Larsen, Poul; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    Archaea are well-recognized for their ability to thrive in extreme environments, although they can be found in virtually all habitats. Their adaptive success is linked to their unique cell envelopes, which often display extremely resistant to chemical and thermal denaturation and resist proteolysis...... techniques to show that the extracellular cell wall sheaths of the methanogenic archaea Methanosaeta and Methanospirillum are functional amyloid structures. Depolymerization of sheaths with formic acid and reducing agents and subsequent MS/MS analysis revealed that the sheaths are composed of a single major...... sheath protein (MspA). The amyloidogenic nature of MspA was confirmed by in vitro amyloid formation of recombinant MspA under a wide range of environmental conditions. This is the first report of a functional amyloid from the archaeal domain of life. The amyloid properties explain the extreme resistance...

  6. The endomembrane sheath: a key structure for understanding the plant cell?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuzeau, C.; McNally, J. G.; Pickard, B. G.

    1997-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that integrin is abundant in endomembranes of plant cells, and the endomembranes are clad by a sheath of cytoskeleton including F-actin. A role for endomembrane integrin and the endomembrane sheath is proposed: this system might orchestrate metabolic regulation by providing and modulating loci for channelling, and might accelerate channeling as needed by dragging the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and organelles through the cytoplasm. To accomplish this "streaming", F-actin might lever against the rest of the endomembrane sheath and the ER might also lever against adhesion sites (i.e., plasmodesmata and plasmalemmal control centers). As an important agent in the control of cellular activities, according to this model, the endomembrane sheath would play a major part in responses to diverse signals and stresses, and under extreme stress cell survival would depend on the ability of the system to maintain enough integrity to direct critical syntheses and degradations.

  7. Comparison of a fuel sheath failure model with published experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varty, R.L.; Rosinger, H.E.

    1982-01-01

    A fuel sheath failure model has been compared with the published results of experiments in which a Zircaloy-4 fuel sheath was subjected to a temperature ramp and a differential pressure until failure occurred. The model assumes that the deformation of the sheath is controlled by steady-state creep and that there is a relationship between tangential stress and temperature at the instant of failure. The sheath failure model predictions agree reasonably well with the experimental data. The burst temperature is slightly overpredicted by the model. The burst strain is overpredicted for small experimental burst strains but is underpredicted otherwise. The reasons for these trends are discussed and the extremely wide variation in burst strain reported in the literature is explained using the model

  8. Effects of Reentry Plasma Sheath on GPS Patch Antenna Polarization Property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A plasma sheath enveloping a reentry vehicle would affect performances of on-board antenna greatly, especially the navigation antennas. This paper studies the effects of reentry plasma sheath on a GPS right-hand circularly polarized (RHCP patch antenna polarization property during a typical reentry process. Utilizing the algorithm of finite integration technique, the polarization characteristic of a GPS antenna coated by a plasma sheath is obtained. Results show that the GPS RHCP patch antenna radiation pattern distortions as well as polarization deteriorations exist during the entire reentry process, and the worst polarization mismatch loss between a GPS antenna and RHCP GPS signal is nearly 3 dB. This paper also indicates that measures should be taken to alleviate the plasma sheath for maintaining the GPS communication during the reentry process.

  9. Influence of plasma density and plasma sheath dynamics on the ion implantation by plasma immersion technique

    OpenAIRE

    Ensinger, Wolfgang

    1996-01-01

    Influence of plasma density and plasma sheath dynamics on the ion implantation by plasma immersion technique / B. Rauschenbach ... - In: Nuclear instruments and methods in physics research. B. 113. 1996. S. 266-269

  10. Benign Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor in a Wild Toco Toucan ( Ramphastos toco ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Marcelo P N; Fernandes, Natalia C C A; Nemer, Viviane C; Neto, Ramiro N Dias; Teixeira, Rodrigo H F; Miranda, Bruna S; Mamprim, Maria J; Catão-Dias, José L; Réssio, Rodrigo A

    2016-09-01

    Peripheral nerve sheath tumors are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms that comprise neurofibromas, schwannomas, neurilemmomas, and perineuromas. In animals, peripheral nerve sheath neoplasms are most commonly diagnosed in dogs and cattle, followed by horses, goats, and cats, but their occurrence is uncommon in birds. An adult, free-living, male toco (common) toucan ( Ramphastos toco ) was admitted to the zoo animal clinic with weight loss, dehydration, and presence of a soft nodule adhered to the medial portion of the left pectoral muscle. Clinical, cytologic, and computed tomography scan results were indicative of a neoplasm. The toucan died during surgical resection of the mass. Necropsy, histopathologic, and immunohistochemical findings confirmed the diagnosis of benign peripheral nerve sheath tumor. To our knowledge, benign peripheral nerve sheath tumor has not previously been reported in a toucan or any other species in the order Piciformes.

  11. Child-Langmuir law for cathode sheath of glow discharge in CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisovskiy, V.A.; Krol, H.H.; Osmayev, R.O.; Yegorenkov, V.D.

    2016-01-01

    This work is devoted to the determination of the law that may be applicable to the description of the cathode sheath in CO 2 . To this end three versions of the Child-Langmuir law have been considered - a collision free one (for the ions moving through a cathode sheath without collisions with gas molecules) as well as two collision- related versions - one for a constant mean free path of positive ions and one for a constant mobility of positive ions. The current-voltage characteristics and the cathode sheath thickness of the glow discharge in CO 2 have been simultaneously measured in the pressure range from 0.05 to 1 Torr and with the discharge current values up to 80 mA. In the whole range of the discharge conditions we have studied the cathode sheath characteristics are found to obey correctly only to the Child-Langmuir law version with a constant ion mobility.

  12. ICME-driven sheath regions deplete the outer radiation belt electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hietala, H.; Kilpua, E. K.; Turner, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    It is an outstanding question in space weather and solar wind-magnetosphere interaction studies, why some storms result in an increase of the outer radiation belt electron fluxes, while others deplete them or produce no change. One approach to this problem is to look at differences in the storm drivers. Traditionally drivers have been classified to Stream Interaction Regions (SIRs) and Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs). However, an 'ICME event' is a complex structure: The core is a magnetic cloud (MC; a clear flux rope structure). If the mass ejection is fast enough, it can drive a shock in front of it. This leads to the formation of a sheath region between the interplanetary shock and the leading edge of the MC. While both the sheath and the MC feature elevated solar wind speed, their other properties are very different. For instance, the sheath region has typically a much higher dynamic pressure than the magnetic cloud. Moreover, the sheath region has a high power in magnetic field and dynamic pressure Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) range fluctuations, while the MC is characterised by an extremely smooth magnetic field. Magnetic clouds have been recognised as important drivers magnetospheric activity since they can comprise long periods of very large southward Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF). Nevertheless, previous studies have shown that sheath regions can also act as storm drivers. In this study, we analyse the effects of ICME-driven sheath regions on the relativistic electron fluxes observed by GOES satellites on the geostationary orbit. We perform a superposed epoch analysis of 31 sheath regions from solar cycle 23. Our results show that the sheaths cause an approximately one order of magnitude decrease in the 24h-averaged electron fluxes. Typically the fluxes also stay below the pre-event level for more than two days. Further analysis reveals that the decrease does not depend on, e.g., whether the sheath interval contains predominantly northward

  13. Wetting and evaporation of binary mixture drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefiane, Khellil; David, Samuel; Shanahan, Martin E R

    2008-09-11

    Experimental results on the wetting behavior of water, methanol, and binary mixture sessile drops on a smooth, polymer-coated substrate are reported. The wetting behavior of evaporating water/methanol drops was also studied in a water-saturated environment. Drop parameters (contact angle, shape, and volume) were monitored in time. The effects of the initial relative concentrations on subsequent evaporation and wetting dynamics were investigated. Physical mechanisms responsible for the various types of wetting behavior during different stages are proposed and discussed. Competition between evaporation and hydrodynamic flow are evoked. Using an environment saturated with water vapor allowed further exploration of the controlling mechanisms and underlying processes. Wetting stages attributed to differential evaporation of methanol were identified. Methanol, the more volatile component, evaporates predominantly in the initial stage. The data, however, suggest that a small proportion of methanol remained in the drop after the first stage of evaporation. This residual methanol within the drop seems to influence subsequent wetting behavior strongly.

  14. CPAS Preflight Drop Test Analysis Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englert, Megan E.; Bledsoe, Kristin J.; Romero, Leah M.

    2015-01-01

    Throughout the Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) drop test program, the CPAS Analysis Team has developed a simulation and analysis process to support drop test planning and execution. This process includes multiple phases focused on developing test simulations and communicating results to all groups involved in the drop test. CPAS Engineering Development Unit (EDU) series drop test planning begins with the development of a basic operational concept for each test. Trajectory simulation tools include the Flight Analysis and Simulation Tool (FAST) for single bodies, and the Automatic Dynamic Analysis of Mechanical Systems (ADAMS) simulation for the mated vehicle. Results are communicated to the team at the Test Configuration Review (TCR) and Test Readiness Review (TRR), as well as at Analysis Integrated Product Team (IPT) meetings in earlier and intermediate phases of the pre-test planning. The ability to plan and communicate efficiently with rapidly changing objectives and tight schedule constraints is a necessity for safe and successful drop tests.

  15. Pressure drop in ET-RR-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattab, M.; Mina, A.R.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of pressure drop through a bundle comprising 16 rods and their lower arrangement grid as well as orifices similar to those of ET-RR-1 core have been done. Experiments are carried out under adiabatic turbulent flow conditions at about 35 degree C. Bundle Reynolds number range is 4 x 10 -2 x 10. Orifices of diameters 4.5, 3.25 or 2.5 cm. are mounted underneath the bundle. The bundle and lower grid pressure drop coefficients are 3.75 and 1.8 respectively. Orifices pressure drop coefficients are 2.65, 19.67 and 53.55 respectively. The ratio of bundle pressure drop to that of 4.5 cm. Orifice diameter is 1.415. The pressure drop coefficients are utilizer to calculate flow through bundles. The flow rate per bundle is 39.1, 20.4 or 13.1 m 3 /hr. Depending on orifice diameter

  16. MRI of intraspinal nerve sheath tumours presenting with sciatica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loke, T.K.L.; Chan, C.S.; Ma, H.T.G.; Ward, S.C.; Metreweli, C.

    1995-01-01

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of 14 intraspinal nerve sheath tumours (NST) presenting with sciatica were reviewed. The group comprised seven schwannomas, six neurofibromas and one perineuroma. The tumours were either iso- or hypointense with respect to spinal cord on T1-weighted (T1W) images; almost all tumours were hyperintense compared with spinal cord on T2-weighted (T2W) images. The tumours were all detectable on unenhanced T1 W images. Nine NST were scanned following Gadolinium-Diethylenetriamine penta acetic acid (DTPA) injection and all showed intense enhancement. This aids differentiation from sequestrated disc fragments. Tumours were more likely to show homogeneous enhancement unless they were recurrent tumours. Rim enhancement occurs more commonly in schwannomas and this can be used to differentiate these from neurofibromas. It is estimated that on unenhanced images, schwannomas cannot be distinguished from neurofibromas. Four tumours occurred at T1 1-T12. There was poor correlation of the site of the lesion with the clinical findings. It is recommended that the MRI studies in patients with sciatica should include the lower thoracic region especially if no protruded disc was found in the lumbar region. 15 refs., 4 figs

  17. MRI of intraspinal nerve sheath tumours presenting with sciatica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loke, T.K.L.; Chan, C.S. [United Christian Hospital (Hong Kong). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Ma, H.T.G. [St Teresa`s Hospital, Kowloon (Hong Kong). MRI and CT scanning Dept.; Ward, S.C.; Metreweli, C. [Prince of wales Hospital, New Territories (Hong Kong). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology

    1995-08-01

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of 14 intraspinal nerve sheath tumours (NST) presenting with sciatica were reviewed. The group comprised seven schwannomas, six neurofibromas and one perineuroma. The tumours were either iso- or hypointense with respect to spinal cord on T1-weighted (T1W) images; almost all tumours were hyperintense compared with spinal cord on T2-weighted (T2W) images. The tumours were all detectable on unenhanced T1 W images. Nine NST were scanned following Gadolinium-Diethylenetriamine penta acetic acid (DTPA) injection and all showed intense enhancement. This aids differentiation from sequestrated disc fragments. Tumours were more likely to show homogeneous enhancement unless they were recurrent tumours. Rim enhancement occurs more commonly in schwannomas and this can be used to differentiate these from neurofibromas. It is estimated that on unenhanced images, schwannomas cannot be distinguished from neurofibromas. Four tumours occurred at T1 1-T12. There was poor correlation of the site of the lesion with the clinical findings. It is recommended that the MRI studies in patients with sciatica should include the lower thoracic region especially if no protruded disc was found in the lumbar region. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Reflection of ion acoustic waves by the plasma sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, I.; Kuehl, H.H.

    1984-01-01

    The reflection coefficient R for linear monochromatic ion acoustic waves incident on the transonic layer and sheath from the plasma interior is calculated. The treatment differs from previous analyses in that (1) the exact zero-order ion density and velocity profiles for a planar, bounded plasma are used, and the zero-order charge separation is not neglected, and (2) the first-order quantities near the transonic layer are considered in detail, including first-order charge separation, whereby it is found that no coupling to the beam modes exists, and that the functional form of the first-order solution is completely determined. It is shown that the upper bound for Vertical BarRVertical Bar is (1)/(3) . The largest reflection occurs for frequencies which are small compared with the ionization frequency, and generally decreases with increasing frequency. By Fourier superposition, the reflection of a pulse is computed. For a narrow incident pulse, the reflected pulse is greatly distorted and is small compared with the incident pulse. For a broad pulse, the reflected pulse is similar in shape to the incident pulse, and has a magnitude which is approximately (1)/(3) of the incident pulse

  19. Improvements in the weldability of a superconductor sheath material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, L.T.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of chemistry and heat treatment variation on the 4-K tensile properties of A-286, a candidate sheath material for force-cooled superconductors. Currently, full use of A-286 and similar superalloys is limited by the observed low yield and ultimate tensile strengths in the welded and aged condition. The low strength is shown to be associated with the formation of precipitate-free zones as a result of alloying-element segregation during weld pool solidification. It has been determined that minor modifications of the weld-metal chemistry by the addition of Ti reduce precipitate-free-zone formation, resulting in matching weld-metal and base-plate strengths at 4 K. Furthermore, nucleation of the γ' hardening phase has been found to be a strong function of temperature and composition. Modified heat-treatment schedules have been determined that are amenable to superconductor fabrication and that resulted in increased weld hardening and improved 4-K tensile properties

  20. Sperm protein 17 is expressed in the sperm fibrous sheath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albani Elena

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sperm protein 17 (Sp17 is a highly conserved mammalian protein characterized in rabbit, mouse, monkey, baboon, macaque, human testis and spermatozoa. mRNA encoding Sp17 has been detected in a range of murine and human somatic tissues. It was also recognized in two myeloma cell lines and in neoplastic cells from patients with multiple myeloma and ovarian carcinoma. These data all indicate that Sp17 is widely distributed in humans, expressed not only in germinal cells and in a variety of somatic tissues, but also in neoplastic cells of unrelated origin. Methods Sp17 expression was analyzed by immunocytochemistry and transmission electron microscopy on spermatozoa. Results Here, we demonstrate the ultrastructural localization of human Sp17 throughout the spermatozoa flagellar fibrous sheath, and its presence in spermatozoa during in vitro states from their ejaculation to the oocyte fertilization. Conclusion These findings suggest a possible role of Sp17 in regulating sperm maturation, capacitation, acrosomal reaction and interactions with the oocyte zona pellucida during the fertilization process. Further, the high degree of sequence conservation throughout its N-terminal half, and the presence of an A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP-binding motif within this region, suggest that Sp17 might play a regulatory role in a protein kinase A-independent AKAP complex in both germinal and somatic cells.

  1. Target normal sheath acceleration analytical modeling, comparative study and developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perego, C.; Batani, D.; Zani, A.; Passoni, M.

    2012-01-01

    Ultra-intense laser interaction with solid targets appears to be an extremely promising technique to accelerate ions up to several MeV, producing beams that exhibit interesting properties for many foreseen applications. Nowadays, most of all the published experimental results can be theoretically explained in the framework of the target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) mechanism proposed by Wilks et al. [Phys. Plasmas 8(2), 542 (2001)]. As an alternative to numerical simulation various analytical or semi-analytical TNSA models have been published in the latest years, each of them trying to provide predictions for some of the ion beam features, given the initial laser and target parameters. However, the problem of developing a reliable model for the TNSA process is still open, which is why the purpose of this work is to enlighten the present situation of TNSA modeling and experimental results, by means of a quantitative comparison between measurements and theoretical predictions of the maximum ion energy. Moreover, in the light of such an analysis, some indications for the future development of the model proposed by Passoni and Lontano [Phys. Plasmas 13(4), 042102 (2006)] are then presented.

  2. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours in inherited disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evans D

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours (MPNST are rare tumours known to occur at high frequency in neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1, but may also occur in other cancer prone syndromes. Methods The North West Regional Genetic Register covers a population of 4.1 million and was interrogated for incidence of MPNST in 12 cancer prone syndromes. Age, incidence and survival curves were generated for NF1. Results Fifty two of 1254 NF1 patients developed MPNST, with MPNST also occurring in 2/181 cases of schwannomatosis and 2/895 NF2 patients. Three cases were also noted in TP53 mutation carriers. However, there were no cases amongst 5727BRCA1/2 carriers and first degree relatives, 2029 members from Lynch syndrome families, nor amongst 447 Familial Adenomatous Polyposis, 202 Gorlin syndrome, nor 87 vHL cases. Conclusion MPNST is associated with schwannomatosis and TP53 mutations and is confirmed at high frequency in NF1. It appears to be only increased in NF2 amongst those that have been irradiated. The lifetime risk of MPNST in NF1 is between 9–13%.

  3. Ganglion of the Flexor Tendon Sheath at the A2 Pulley - Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Gunaseelan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available There are few reported cases of flexor tendon sheath ganglion arising from the A2 pulley. We report a case of a flexor tendon sheath ganglion in a 17-year old female who presented with pain, triggering and a swelling at the base of her right ring finger. During the excision biopsy, a ganglion measuring 0.5×0.8×0.4 cm in size was removed from the A2 pulley area.

  4. Genomic and Expression Profiling of Benign and Malignant Nerve Sheath Tumors in Neurofibromatosis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    DAMD17-03-1-0297 Title: Genomic and Expression Pr ofiling of Benign and Malignant Nerve Sheath Tumors in Neurofibromatosis Patients...have determined the gene expression signature for benign and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors and found that the major trend in transformation...However, EGFR data in soft tissue neoplasms is limited. Using a variety of benign and malignant spindle cell neoplasms, we assessed EGFR status by

  5. Can using a peel-away sheath in shunt implantation prevent ventricular catheter obstruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camlar, Mahmut; Ersahin, Yusuf; Ozer, Fusun Demirçivi; Sen, Fatih; Orman, Mehmet

    2011-02-01

    Shunt obstruction is the most common shunt complication. In 2003, Kehler et al. used peel-away sheath while implanting the ventricular catheter in 20 patients. They found less revision rate in the peel-away sheath group. We aimed to test the efficacy of this technique in cadavers. We used 100 fresh brains obtained from medicolegal autopsies. Posterior parietal and frontal approaches were used to puncture the lateral ventricle in each cerebral hemisphere. The ventricle is punctured with a peel-away sheath system. After the ventricle is reached, the mandarin is retracted and the ventricular catheter is introduced through the opening. The ventricular catheter was removed from the ventricle, the opening at the tip of the ventricular catheter was checked out for obstruction, and the number of patent and plugged openings was recorded. This procedure was repeated four times for each location with and without using peel-away sheath. The control group consisted of the procedures done without using peel-away sheath. The number of the plugged openings in the peel-away sheath group was significantly smaller than the control group. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of gender and left and right cerebral hemispheres. The obstruction rate was significantly lower in the posterior parietal approach. Pearson's correlation showed that increasing age was associated with less obstruction rate. Peel-away sheath decreases the number of plugged openings of the ventricular catheter. A clinical cooperative study is needed to prove that a peel-away sheath should be included in the ventricular shunt systems in the market.

  6. Targeting the ECM to Enhance Drug Delivery in Nf1-Associated Nerve Sheath Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    development of the principal discipline(s) of the project? • We have learned that the drug PEGPH20, which degrades a component of connective tissue called...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0114 TITLE: Targeting the ECM to Enhance Drug Delivery in Nf1-Associated Nerve Sheath Tumors PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...14 Sep 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER NF140089 Targeting the ECM to Enhance Drug Delivery in Nf1-Associated Nerve Sheath Tumors 5b

  7. Tunneled dialysis catheter exchange with fibrin sheath disruption is not associated with increased rate of bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valliant, Amanda M; Chaudhry, Muhammad K; Yevzlin, Alexander S; Astor, Brad; Chan, Micah R

    2015-01-01

    Tunneled dialysis catheters are the most common form of vascular access among incident dialysis patients in the United States. Fibrin sheath formation is a frequent cause of late catheter dysfunction requiring an exchange procedure with balloon disruption of the fibrin sheath. It is unknown whether fibrin sheath disruption is associated with increased incidence of bacteremia or catheter failure. We reviewed all tunneled dialysis catheter exchange procedures at the University of Wisconsin between January 2008 and December 2011. The primary outcome was incidence of bacteremia, defined as positive blood cultures within 2 weeks of the procedure. Catheter failure, requiring intervention or replacement, was examined as a secondary outcome. Baseline characteristics examined included diabetic status, gender, race and age. A total of 163 procedures were reviewed; 67 (41.1%) had fibrin sheath disruption and 96 did not. Bacteremia occurred in 4.5% (3/67) of those with and 3.1% (3/97) of those without fibrin sheath disruption (p=0.65). Fibrin sheath disruption was not significantly associated with the risk of catheter failure (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR]=1.34; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.87-2.10; p=0.18). Diabetes was associated with greater risk of catheter failure (aHR=1.88; 95% CI: 1.19-2.95; p=0.006), whereas higher age was associated with a lower risk of catheter failure (aHR per 10 years=0.83; 95% CI: 0.72-0.96; p=0.01). This study demonstrates that there is no significant increase in bacteremia and subsequent catheter dysfunction rates after fibrin sheath disruption compared to simple over the wire exchange. These results are encouraging given the large numbers of patients utilizing tunneled catheters for initial hemodialysis access and the known rates of fibrin sheath formation leading to catheter failure.

  8. Fibrin Sheath Angioplasty: A Technique to Prevent Superior Vena Cava Stenosis Secondary to Dialysis Catheters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Robert I.; Garcia, Lorena De Marco; Chawla, Ankur; Panetta, Thomas F.

    2012-01-01

    Fibrin sheaths are a heterogeneous matrix of cells and debris that form around catheters and are a known cause of central venous stenosis and catheter failure. A total of 50 cases of central venous catheter fibrin sheath angioplasty (FSA) after catheter removal or exchange are presented. A retrospective review of an outpatient office database identified 70 eligible patients over a 19-month period. After informed consent was obtained, the dialysis catheter exiting the skin was clamped, amputated, and a wire was inserted. The catheter was then removed and a 9-French sheath was inserted into the superior vena cava, a venogram was performed. If a fibrin sheath was present, angioplasty was performed using an 8 × 4 or 10 × 4 balloon along the entire length of the fibrin sheath. A completion venogram was performed to document obliteration of the sheath. During the study, 50 patients were diagnosed with a fibrin sheath, and 43 had no pre-existing central venous stenosis. After FSA, 39 of the 43 patient's (91%) central systems remained patent without the need for subsequent interventions; 3 patients (7%) developed subclavian stenoses requiring repeat angioplasty and stenting; 1 patent (2.3%) developed an occlusion requiring a reintervention. Seven patients with prior central stenosis required multiple angioplasties; five required stenting of their central lesions. Every patient had follow-up fistulograms to document long-term patency. We propose that FSA is a prudent and safe procedure that may help reduce the risk of central venous stenosis from fibrin sheaths due to central venous catheters. PMID:23997555

  9. Measurements of electric charge and screening length of microparticles in a plasma sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Ishihara, O.

    2009-01-01

    An experiment is described in which microparticles are levitated within a rf sheath above a conducting plate in argon plasma. The microparticles forming a two-dimensional crystal structure are considered to possess Debye screening Coulomb potential φ(r)=(Q/4πε 0 r)exp(-r/λ), where Q is the electric charge, r is distance, and λ is the screening length. When the crystal structure is slanted with an angle θ, a particle experiences a force Mg sin θ, where M is the mass of the particle and g is acceleration due to gravity, which must be equal to the Debye screened Coulomb force from other particles. By changing θ, relations for λ(Q) are measured. The screening length λ and Q are determined uniquely from the crossing points of several relations. The electric charge Q is also estimated from a floating potential measured with a probe. The measured λ is nearly equal to an ion Debye length.

  10. Magnetically modified sheaths of Leptothrix sp. as an adsorbent for Amido black 10B removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelova, Ralitsa; Baldikova, Eva; Pospiskova, Kristyna; Safarikova, Mirka; Safarik, Ivo

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the biosorption of Amido black 10B dye from aqueous solutions on magnetically modified sheaths of Leptothrix sp. in a batch system. The magnetic modification of the sheaths was performed using both microwave synthesized iron oxide nano- and microparticles and perchloric acid stabilized ferrofluid. The native and both magnetically modified sheaths were characterized by SEM. Various parameters significantly affecting the adsorption process, such as pH, contact time, temperature and initial concentration, were studied in detail using the adsorbent magnetized by both methods. The highest adsorption efficiency was achieved at pH 2. The maximum adsorption capacities of both types of magnetized material at room temperature were found to be 339.2 and 286.1 mg of dye per 1 g of ferrofluid modified and microwave synthesized particles modified adsorbent, respectively. Thermodynamic study of dye adsorption revealed a spontaneous and endothermic process in the temperature range between 279.15 and 313.15 K. The data were fitted to various equilibrium and kinetic models. Experimental data matched well with the pseudo-second-order kinetics and Freundlich isotherm model. The Leptothrix sheaths have excellent efficacy for dye adsorption. This material can be used as an effective, low-cost adsorbent. - Highlights: • Magnetic modification of Leptothrix sheaths using two methods is proposed. • Such magnetic material is an excellent adsorbent for Amido black 10B. • The magnetically modified sheaths can be easily separated by magnets.

  11. Magnetically modified sheaths of Leptothrix sp. as an adsorbent for Amido black 10B removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelova, Ralitsa [Department of Nanobiotechnology, Biology Centre, ISB, CAS, Na Sadkach 7, 370 05 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic); Department of General and Industrial Microbiology, Faculty of Biology, Sofia University “St. Kliment Ohridski”, 8 Dragan Tsankov Blvd, 1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Laboratory Microwave Magnetics, Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee Blvd, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Baldikova, Eva [Global Change Research Institute, CAS, Na Sadkach 7, 370 05 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic); Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Agriculture, University of South Bohemia, Branisovska 1457, 370 05 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic); Pospiskova, Kristyna [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Palacky University, Slechtitelu 27, 783 71 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Safarikova, Mirka [Department of Nanobiotechnology, Biology Centre, ISB, CAS, Na Sadkach 7, 370 05 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic); Global Change Research Institute, CAS, Na Sadkach 7, 370 05 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic); Safarik, Ivo, E-mail: ivosaf@yahoo.com [Department of Nanobiotechnology, Biology Centre, ISB, CAS, Na Sadkach 7, 370 05 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic); Global Change Research Institute, CAS, Na Sadkach 7, 370 05 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic); Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Palacky University, Slechtitelu 27, 783 71 Olomouc (Czech Republic)

    2017-04-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the biosorption of Amido black 10B dye from aqueous solutions on magnetically modified sheaths of Leptothrix sp. in a batch system. The magnetic modification of the sheaths was performed using both microwave synthesized iron oxide nano- and microparticles and perchloric acid stabilized ferrofluid. The native and both magnetically modified sheaths were characterized by SEM. Various parameters significantly affecting the adsorption process, such as pH, contact time, temperature and initial concentration, were studied in detail using the adsorbent magnetized by both methods. The highest adsorption efficiency was achieved at pH 2. The maximum adsorption capacities of both types of magnetized material at room temperature were found to be 339.2 and 286.1 mg of dye per 1 g of ferrofluid modified and microwave synthesized particles modified adsorbent, respectively. Thermodynamic study of dye adsorption revealed a spontaneous and endothermic process in the temperature range between 279.15 and 313.15 K. The data were fitted to various equilibrium and kinetic models. Experimental data matched well with the pseudo-second-order kinetics and Freundlich isotherm model. The Leptothrix sheaths have excellent efficacy for dye adsorption. This material can be used as an effective, low-cost adsorbent. - Highlights: • Magnetic modification of Leptothrix sheaths using two methods is proposed. • Such magnetic material is an excellent adsorbent for Amido black 10B. • The magnetically modified sheaths can be easily separated by magnets.

  12. Effect of rise-time patterns on dynamics of sheath expansion during plasma immersion ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yongxian; Tian Xiubo; Yang Shiqin; Fu Ricky; Paul, C.K.

    2007-01-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) has been developed as a low-cost and efficient surface modification technique of irregularly-shaped objects. The effect of six pulse waves with different rise-time patterns on the spatio-temporal evolution of plasma sheath,energy and dose of ion implantation has been simulated by particle-in-cell modeling. Statistical results may be obtained through assuming the Boltzmann distribution of electrons, and solving Poisson and Newton equations for tracing each ion in the plasma sheath. The results show that rise-time pattern has a critical influence on the evolution of plasma sheath. There exists maximum thickness difference of plasma sheath for different waveforms. The acceleration of ions is non-uniform due to the non-uniformity of electrical field strength. The maximum gradient of electrical field appears near the edge of plasma sheath. The results also show that optimization of dose and energy of incident ions may be achieved through modification of rise-time pattern. The numerical simulation of sheath expansion can be effectively used to provide a scientific basis for optimizing the PIII process. (authors)

  13. Development of Ti-sheathed MgB2 wires with high critical current density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, G; Fang, H; Hanna, M; Yen, F; Lv, B; Alessandrini, M; Keith, S; Hoyt, C; Tang, Z; Salama, K

    2006-01-01

    Working towards developing lightweight superconducting magnets for future space and other applications, we have successfully fabricated mono-core Ti-sheathed MgB 2 wires by the powder-in-tube method. The wires were characterized by magnetization, electrical resistivity, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectrometry measurements. The results indicate that the Ti sheath does not react with the magnesium and boron, and the present wire rolling process can produce MgB 2 wires with a superconducting volume fraction of at least 64% in the core. Using the Bean model, it was found that at 5 K, the magnetic critical current densities, J c , measured in magnetic fields of 0, 5, and 8 T are about 4.2 x 10 5 , 3.6 x 10 4 , and 1.4 x 10 4 A cm -2 , respectively. At 20 K and 0 T, the magnetic J c is about 2.4 x 10 5 A cm -2 . These results show that at zero and low fields, the values of the magnetic J c for Ti-sheathed MgB 2 wires are comparable with the best results available for the Fe-sheathed MgB 2 wires. At high fields, however, the J c for Ti-sheathed MgB 2 wires appears higher than that for the Fe-sheathed MgB 2 wires

  14. Drop impact splashing and air entrapment

    KAUST Repository

    Thoraval, Marie-Jean

    2013-03-01

    Drop impact is a canonical problem in fluid mechanics, with numerous applications in industrial as well as natural phenomena. The extremely simple initial configuration of the experiment can produce a very large variety of fast and complex dynamics. Scientific progress was made in parallel with major improvements in imaging and computational technologies. Most recently, high-speed imaging video cameras have opened the exploration of new phenomena occurring at the micro-second scale, and parallel computing allowed realistic direct numerical simulations of drop impacts. We combine these tools to bring a new understanding of two fundamental aspects of drop impacts: splashing and air entrapment. The early dynamics of a drop impacting on a liquid pool at high velocity produces an ejecta sheet, emerging horizontally in the neck between the drop and the pool. We show how the interaction of this thin liquid sheet with the air, the drop or the pool, can produce micro-droplets and bubble rings. Then we detail how the breakup of the air film stretched between the drop and the pool for lower impact velocities can produce a myriad of micro-bubbles.

  15. Drop size measurements in Venturi scrubbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez Alonso, D.; Azzopardi, B.J. [Nottingham Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Goncalves, J.A.S.; Coury, J.R. [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Quimica

    2001-07-01

    Venturi scrubbers are high efficiency gas cleaners in which suspended particles are removed from gas streams by drops formed by liquid atomisation, usually in the Venturi throat. The size of the drops formed are of fundamental importance to the performance of the equipment, both in terms of pressure drop and dust removal efficiency. In this study, drop sizes in a cylindrical laboratory-scale Venturi scrubber were measured using a laser diffraction technique. Gas velocity and liquid to gas ratios varied from 50 to 90 m/s and 0.5 to 2.0 1/m{sup 3}, respectively. Water was injected using two different arrangements: either as jets in the throat or as a film just upstream of the convergence. Drop size measurements were performed at three positions in the case of jet injection: two located along the throat, and the last one at the end of the diffuser. The present data shows that the Sauter mean diameter of the spray can be well correlated by the equation of Boll et al. (J. Air Pollut. Control Assoc. 24 (1974) 932). Drop size distributions are satisfactorily represented by a Rosin-Rammler function. This paper also provides a simple method for calculating the parameters of the Rosin-Rammler function. As a result of this work, drop sizes in Venturi scrubbers can be estimated with much higher accuracy. (Author)

  16. Selective pH-Responsive Core-Sheath Nanofiber Membranes for Chem/Bio/Med Applications: Targeted Delivery of Functional Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Daewoo; Steckl, Andrew J

    2017-12-13

    Core-sheath fibers using different Eudragit materials were successfully produced, and their controlled multi-pH responses have been demonstrated. Core-sheath fibers made of Eudragit L 100 (EL100) core and Eudragit S 100 (ES100) sheath provide protection and/or controlled release of core material at pH 6 by adjusting the sheath thickness (controlled by the flow rate of source polymer solution). The thickest sheath (∼250 nm) provides the least core release ∼1.25%/h, while the thinnest sheath (∼140 nm) provides much quicker release ∼16.75%/h. Furthermore, switching core and sheath material dramatically altered the pH response. Core-sheath fibers made of ES100 core and EL100 sheath can provide a consistent core release rate, while the sheath release rate becomes higher as the sheath layer becomes thinner. For example, the thinnest sheath (∼120 nm) provides a core and sheath release ratio of 1:2.5, while the thickest sheath (∼200 nm) shows only a ratio of 1:1.7. All core-sheath Eudragit fibers show no noticeable release at pH 5, while they are completely dissolved at pH 7. Extremely high surface area in the porous network of the fiber membranes provides much faster (>30 times) response to external pH changes as compared to that of equivalent cast films.

  17. "Self-Shaping" of Multicomponent Drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholakova, Diana; Valkova, Zhulieta; Tcholakova, Slavka; Denkov, Nikolai; Smoukov, Stoyan K

    2017-06-13

    In our recent study we showed that single-component emulsion drops, stabilized by proper surfactants, can spontaneously break symmetry and transform into various polygonal shapes during cooling [ Denkov Nature 2015 , 528 , 392 - 395 ]. This process involves the formation of a plastic rotator phase of self-assembled oil molecules beneath the drop surface. The plastic phase spontaneously forms a frame of plastic rods at the oil drop perimeter which supports the polygonal shapes. However, most of the common substances used in industry appear as mixtures of molecules rather than pure substances. Here we present a systematic study of the ability of multicomponent emulsion drops to deform upon cooling. The observed trends can be summarized as follows: (1) The general drop-shape evolution for multicomponent drops during cooling is the same as with single-component drops; however, some additional shapes are observed. (2) Preservation of the particle shape upon freezing is possible for alkane mixtures with chain length difference Δn ≤ 4; for greater Δn, phase separation within the droplet is observed. (3) Multicomponent particles prepared from alkanes with Δn ≤ 4 plastify upon cooling due to the formation of a bulk rotator phase within the particles. (4) If a compound, which cannot induce self-shaping when pure, is mixed with a certain amount of a compound which induces self-shaping, then drops prepared from this mixture can also self-shape upon cooling. (5) Self-emulsification phenomena are also observed for multicomponent drops. In addition to the three recently reported mechanisms of self-emulsification [ Tcholakova Nat. Commun. 2017 , ( 8 ), 15012 ], a new (fourth) mechanism is observed upon freezing for alkane mixtures with Δn > 4. It involves disintegration of the particles due to a phase separation of alkanes upon freezing.

  18. Thyrotoxicosis Presenting as Unilateral Drop Foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Kenju; Miyata, Hajime; Motegi, Takahide; Shibano, Ken; Ishiguro, Hideaki

    2017-01-01

    Neuromuscular disorders associated with hyperthyroidism have several variations in their clinical phenotype, such as ophthalmopathy, periodic paralysis, and thyrotoxic myopathy. We herein report an unusual case of thyrotoxic myopathy presenting as unilateral drop foot. Histopathological examinations of the left tibialis anterior muscle showed marked variation in the fiber size, mild inflammatory cell infiltration, and necrotic and regenerated muscle fibers with predominantly type 1 fiber atrophy. Medical treatment with propylthiouracil resulted in complete improvement of the left drop foot. This case expands the phenotype of thyrotoxicosis and suggests that thyrotoxicosis be considered as a possible cause of unilateral drop foot.

  19. Preparation and characterisation of superheated drop detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamoorthy, P.

    1989-01-01

    Basic mechanism of bubble nucleation in superheated drops with respect to minimum energy of radiation and temperature is discussed. Experimental details and techniques for the preparation of Superheated Drop Detectors (SDDs) is explained. For the sample preparation, homogeneous composition of polymer (Morarfloc) and glycerine was used as the host medium and three different refrigerants Mafron-21, Mafron-12 and Mafron-11/12 (50:50) were chosen as the sensitive liquids. A pressure reactor developed at Health and Safety Laboratory is used for dispersing the sensitive liquid drops in the homogeneous composition under pressure. Some of the imporatant detector characteristics were studied. (author). 26 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  20. A smart core-sheath nanofiber that captures and releases red blood cells from the blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Q.; Hou, J.; Zhao, C.; Xin, Z.; Jin, J.; Li, C.; Wong, S.-C.; Yin, J.

    2016-01-01

    A smart core-sheath nanofiber for non-adherent cell capture and release is demonstrated. The nanofibers are fabricated by single-spinneret electrospinning of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm), polycaprolactone (PCL) and nattokinase (NK) solution blends. The self-assembly of PNIPAAm and PCL blends during the electrospinning generates the core-sheath PCL/PNIPAAm nanofibers with PNIPAAm as the sheath. The PNIPAAm-based core-sheath nanofibers are switchable between hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity with temperature change and enhance stability in the blood. When the nanofibers come in contact with blood, the NK is released from the nanofibers to resist platelet adhesion on the nanofiber surface, facilitating the direct capture and isolation of red blood cells (RBCs) from the blood above phase-transition temperature of PNIPAAm. Meanwhile, the captured RBCs are readily released from the nanofibers with temperature stimuli in an undamaged manner. The release efficiency of up to 100% is obtained while maintaining cellular integrity and function. This work presents promising nanofibers to effectively capture non-adherent cells and release for subsequent molecular analysis and diagnosis of single cells.A smart core-sheath nanofiber for non-adherent cell capture and release is demonstrated. The nanofibers are fabricated by single-spinneret electrospinning of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm), polycaprolactone (PCL) and nattokinase (NK) solution blends. The self-assembly of PNIPAAm and PCL blends during the electrospinning generates the core-sheath PCL/PNIPAAm nanofibers with PNIPAAm as the sheath. The PNIPAAm-based core-sheath nanofibers are switchable between hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity with temperature change and enhance stability in the blood. When the nanofibers come in contact with blood, the NK is released from the nanofibers to resist platelet adhesion on the nanofiber surface, facilitating the direct capture and isolation of red blood cells (RBCs) from