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Sample records for sheath dissipation model

  1. A sheath model for arbitrary radiofrequency waveforms

    Turner, M. M.; Chabert, Pascal

    2012-10-01

    The sheath is often the most important region of a rf plasma, because discharge impedance, power absorption and ion acceleration are critically affected by the behaviour of the sheath. Consequently, models of the sheath are central to any understanding of the physics of rf plasmas. Lieberman has supplied an analytical model for a radio-frequency sheath driven by a single frequency, but in recent years interest has been increasing in radio-frequency discharges excited by increasingly complex wave forms. There has been limited success in generalizing the Lieberman model in this direction, because of mathematical complexities. So there is essentially no sheath model available to describe many modern experiments. In this paper we present a new analytical sheath model, based on a simpler mathematical framework than that of Lieberman. For the single frequency case, this model yields scaling laws that are identical in form to those of Lieberman, differing only by numerical coefficients close to one. However, the new model may be straightforwardly solved for arbitrary current waveforms, and may be used to derive scaling laws for such complex waveforms. In this paper, we will describe the model and present some illustrative examples.

  2. Annihilation model of the Tormac sheath

    Hammer, J.H.

    1979-02-01

    A one-dimensional, steady state fluid model is developed to describe the boundary layer between plasma and magnetic field that occurs in the Tormac sheath. Similar systems which may be treatable by the same model are tokamaks with divertors and reversed field mirrors. The model includes transport across the magnetic field as well as mirror losses along the field, the latter being represented as annihilation terms in the one-dimensional equations. The model equations are derived from the two-dimensional, time dependent hierarchy of equations generated by taking velocity moments of the kinetic equation including collisions

  3. ICRF antenna Faraday shield plasma sheath model

    Whealton, J.H.; Ryan, P.M.; Raridon, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    A two-dimensional nonlinear formulation that explicitly considers the plasma edge near a Faraday shield in a self-consistent manner is used in the modeling of the ion motion for a Faraday shield concept and model suggested by Perkins. Two models are considered that may provide significant insight into the generation of impurities for ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antennas. In one of these models a significant sheath periodically forms next to the Faraday screen, with ion acoustic waves heating the ions in the plasma. (orig.)

  4. The characteristics of RF modulated plasma boundary sheaths: An analysis of the standard sheath model

    Naggary, Schabnam; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter

    2015-09-01

    The characteristics of radio frequency (RF) modulated plasma boundary sheaths are studied on the basis of the so-called ``standard sheath model.'' This model assumes that the applied radio frequency ωRF is larger than the plasma frequency of the ions but smaller than that of the electrons. It comprises a phase-averaged ion model - consisting of an equation of continuity (with ionization neglected) and an equation of motion (with collisional ion-neutral interaction taken into account) - a phase-resolved electron model - consisting of an equation of continuity and the assumption of Boltzmann equilibrium -, and Poisson's equation for the electrical field. Previous investigations have studied the standard sheath model under additional approximations, most notably the assumption of a step-like electron front. This contribution presents an investigation and parameter study of the standard sheath model which avoids any further assumptions. The resulting density profiles and overall charge-voltage characteristics are compared with those of the step-model based theories. The authors gratefully acknowledge Efe Kemaneci for helpful comments and fruitful discussions.

  5. Experimental test of models of radio-frequency plasma sheaths

    Sobolewski, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    The ion current and sheath impedance were measured at the radio-frequency-powered electrode of an asymmetric, capacitively coupled plasma reactor, for discharges in argon at 1.33 endash 133 Pa. The measurements were used to test the models of the radio frequency sheath derived by Lieberman [IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 17, 338 (1989)] and Godyak and Sternberg [Phys. Rev. A 42, 2299 (1990)], and establish the range of pressure and sheath voltage in which they are valid. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  6. Dissipative Continuous Spontaneous Localization (CSL) model.

    Smirne, Andrea; Bassi, Angelo

    2015-08-05

    Collapse models explain the absence of quantum superpositions at the macroscopic scale, while giving practically the same predictions as quantum mechanics for microscopic systems. The Continuous Spontaneous Localization (CSL) model is the most refined and studied among collapse models. A well-known problem of this model, and of similar ones, is the steady and unlimited increase of the energy induced by the collapse noise. Here we present the dissipative version of the CSL model, which guarantees a finite energy during the entire system's evolution, thus making a crucial step toward a realistic energy-conserving collapse model. This is achieved by introducing a non-linear stochastic modification of the Schrödinger equation, which represents the action of a dissipative finite-temperature collapse noise. The possibility to introduce dissipation within collapse models in a consistent way will have relevant impact on the experimental investigations of the CSL model, and therefore also on the testability of the quantum superposition principle.

  7. Crises in a dissipative bouncing ball model

    Livorati, André L.P., E-mail: livorati@usp.br [Departamento de Física, UNESP, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Av. 24A, 1515, Bela Vista, 13506-900, Rio Claro, SP (Brazil); School of Mathematics, University of Bristol, Bristol, BS8 1TW (United Kingdom); Instituto de Física, IFUSP, Universidade de São Paulo, USP, Rua do Matão, Tr.R 187, Cidade Universitária, 05314-970, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Caldas, Iberê L. [Instituto de Física, IFUSP, Universidade de São Paulo, USP, Rua do Matão, Tr.R 187, Cidade Universitária, 05314-970, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Dettmann, Carl P. [School of Mathematics, University of Bristol, Bristol, BS8 1TW (United Kingdom); Leonel, Edson D. [Departamento de Física, UNESP, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Av. 24A, 1515, Bela Vista, 13506-900, Rio Claro, SP (Brazil)

    2015-11-06

    Highlights: • We studied a dissipative bouncing ball dynamics. • A two-dimensional nonlinear mapping describes the dynamics. • Crises between attractors and its manifolds were characterized. • A new physical crisis between vibrating platform and an attractor was characterized. • The existence of a ‘robust’ chaotic attractor was set. - Abstract: The dynamics of a bouncing ball model under the influence of dissipation is investigated by using a two-dimensional nonlinear mapping. When high dissipation is considered, the dynamics evolves to different attractors. The evolution of the basins of the attracting fixed points is characterized, as we vary the control parameters. Crises between the attractors and their boundaries are observed. We found that the multiple attractors are intertwined, and when the boundary crisis between their stable and unstable manifolds occurs, it creates a successive mechanism of destruction for all attractors originated by the sinks. Also, a physical impact crisis is described, an important mechanism in the reduction of the number of attractors.

  8. In vivo engineering of a functional tendon sheath in a hen model.

    Xu, Liang; Cao, Dejun; Liu, Wei; Zhou, Guangdong; Zhang, Wen Jie; Cao, Yilin

    2010-05-01

    Repair of injured tendon sheath remains a major challenge and this study explored the possibility of in vivo reconstruction of a tendon sheath with tendon sheath derived cells and polyglycolic acid (PGA) fibers in a Leghorn hen model. Total 55 Leghorn hens with a 1cm tendon sheath defect created in the left middle toe of each animal were randomly assigned into: (1) experimental group (n=19) that received a cell-PGA construct; (2) scaffold control group (n=18) that received a cell-free PGA scaffold; (3) blank control group (n=18) with the defect untreated. Tendon sheath cells were isolated, in vitro expanded, and seeded onto PGA scaffolds. After in vitro culture for 7 days, the constructs were in vivo implanted to repair the sheath defects. Alcian blue staining confirmed the ability of cultured cells to produce specific matrices containing acidic carboxyl mucopolysaccharide (mainly hyaluronic acid). In addition, the engineered sheath formed a relatively mature structure at 12 weeks post-surgery, which was similar to that of native counterpart, including a smooth inner surface, a well-developed sheath histological structure with a clear space between the tendon and the engineered sheath. More importantly, Work of Flexion assay revealed that the tendons needed less power consumption to glide inside the engineered sheath when compared to the tendons which were surrounded by scar-repaired tissues, indicating that the engineered sheaths had gained the function to a certain extent of preventing tendon adhesion. Taken together, these results suggest that tendon sheaths that are functionally and structurally similar to native sheaths are possible to be engineered in vivo using tendon sheath cells and PGA scaffolds. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Dissipative quantum dynamics and nonlinear sigma-model

    Tarasov, V.E.

    1992-01-01

    Sedov variational principle which is the generalization of the least action principle for the dissipative and irreversible processes and the classical dissipative mechanics in the phase space is considered. Quantum dynamics for the dissipative and irreversible processes is constructed. As an example of the dissipative quantum theory the nonlinear two-dimensional sigma-model is considered. The conformal anomaly of the energy momentum tensor trace for closed bosonic string on the affine-metric manifold is investigated. The two-loop metric beta-function for nonlinear dissipative sigma-model was calculated. The results are compared with the ultraviolet two-loop conterterms for affine-metric sigma model. 71 refs

  10. Dusty Plasma Modeling of the Fusion Reactor Sheath Including Collisional-Radiative Effects

    Dezairi, Aouatif; Samir, Mhamed; Eddahby, Mohamed; Saifaoui, Dennoun; Katsonis, Konstantinos; Berenguer, Chloe

    2008-01-01

    The structure and the behavior of the sheath in Tokamak collisional plasmas has been studied. The sheath is modeled taking into account the presence of the dust 2 and the effects of the charged particle collisions and radiative processes. The latter may allow for optical diagnostics of the plasma.

  11. Target normal sheath acceleration analytical modeling, comparative study and developments

    Perego, C.; Batani, D.; Zani, A.; Passoni, M.

    2012-01-01

    Ultra-intense laser interaction with solid targets appears to be an extremely promising technique to accelerate ions up to several MeV, producing beams that exhibit interesting properties for many foreseen applications. Nowadays, most of all the published experimental results can be theoretically explained in the framework of the target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) mechanism proposed by Wilks et al. [Phys. Plasmas 8(2), 542 (2001)]. As an alternative to numerical simulation various analytical or semi-analytical TNSA models have been published in the latest years, each of them trying to provide predictions for some of the ion beam features, given the initial laser and target parameters. However, the problem of developing a reliable model for the TNSA process is still open, which is why the purpose of this work is to enlighten the present situation of TNSA modeling and experimental results, by means of a quantitative comparison between measurements and theoretical predictions of the maximum ion energy. Moreover, in the light of such an analysis, some indications for the future development of the model proposed by Passoni and Lontano [Phys. Plasmas 13(4), 042102 (2006)] are then presented.

  12. Entropy model of dissipative structure on corporate social responsibility

    Li, Zuozhi; Jiang, Jie

    2017-06-01

    Enterprise is prompted to fulfill the social responsibility requirement by the internal and external environment. In this complex system, some studies suggest that firms have an orderly or chaotic entropy exchange behavior. Based on the theory of dissipative structure, this paper constructs the entropy index system of corporate social responsibility(CSR) and explores the dissipative structure of CSR through Brusselator model criterion. Picking up listed companies of the equipment manufacturing, the research shows that CSR has positive incentive to negative entropy and promotes the stability of dissipative structure. In short, the dissipative structure of CSR has a positive impact on the interests of stakeholders and corporate social images.

  13. Modelling of the dual frequency capacitive sheath in the intermediate pressure range

    Boyle, P C; Robiche, J; Turner, M M

    2004-01-01

    The nonlinearity of the plasma sheath in dual frequency capacitively coupled reactors is investigated for frequencies well above the ion plasma frequency. This work focuses on the behaviour of the voltage and the sheath width with respect to the driving current source and the collisionality regime. For typical plasma processing applications, the gas pressure ranges from a few milliTorrs to hundreds of milliTorrs, and the ion dynamics span different collisional regimes. To describe these different ion dynamics, we have used a collisionless model and a variable mobility model. The sheath widths and the voltages obtained from these two models have then been compared

  14. Comparison of a fuel sheath failure model with published experimental data

    Varty, R.L.; Rosinger, H.E.

    1982-01-01

    A fuel sheath failure model has been compared with the published results of experiments in which a Zircaloy-4 fuel sheath was subjected to a temperature ramp and a differential pressure until failure occurred. The model assumes that the deformation of the sheath is controlled by steady-state creep and that there is a relationship between tangential stress and temperature at the instant of failure. The sheath failure model predictions agree reasonably well with the experimental data. The burst temperature is slightly overpredicted by the model. The burst strain is overpredicted for small experimental burst strains but is underpredicted otherwise. The reasons for these trends are discussed and the extremely wide variation in burst strain reported in the literature is explained using the model

  15. A dissipative model of solar system

    Vladimir, V. G.

    2009-04-01

    rotation of planets, and the small tidal deformations arising under influence of gradients of gravitational forces. The method of division of movements receives the equations describing movements of the centers of weights of planets and their own rotations. In the offered model takes place a dissipation of the energy which source are internally viscous forces of each planet. The system supposes the first integral - the law of preservation of the kinetic moment concerning the centre of weights of system. As a result of deformations of planets in the law of the universal gravitation which has been written down for material points, there are small conservative amendments. The equations of movement describe movement of the centers of weights of planets and their rotation around of the centers of weights in view of the tidal phenomena and the dissipative forces. The connected system of the equations consists of 3N the vector equations of the second order representing the theorems of movement of the centers of weights of planets, and N the vector equations of the first order determining changes of the own kinetic moments of each planet. Stationary values of full mechanical energy on the variety set in integral of the kinetic moment, correspond to stationary movements - to rotations of system as firm body with constant angular speed around of the centre of weights of all system. Angular speed of stationary rotation is directed along a constant vector of the kinetic moment, and the axis of rotation is the main central axis of inertia of system. We shall notice, that deformations of planets in stationary movement are constant, as in system of coordinates rotating with constant angular speed centrifugal forces and forces of gravitational interaction of planets are constant. Stationary configurations of system are determined according to Routh`s technique as stationary points of the changed potential energy submitted by the sum potential energies of centrifugal and gravitational

  16. Verification of high voltage rf capacitive sheath models with particle-in-cell simulations

    Wang, Ying; Lieberman, Michael; Verboncoeur, John

    2009-10-01

    Collisionless and collisional high voltage rf capacitive sheath models were developed in the late 1980's [1]. Given the external parameters of a single-frequency capacitively coupled discharge, plasma parameters including sheath width, electron and ion temperature, plasma density, power, and ion bombarding energy can be estimated. One-dimensional electrostatic PIC codes XPDP1 [2] and OOPD1 [3] are used to investigate plasma behaviors within rf sheaths and bulk plasma. Electron-neutral collisions only are considered for collisionless sheaths, while ion-neutral collisions are taken into account for collisional sheaths. The collisionless sheath model is verified very well by PIC simulations for the rf current-driven and voltage-driven cases. Results will be reported for collisional sheaths also. [1] M. A. Lieberman, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 16 (1988) 638; 17 (1989) 338 [2] J. P. Verboncoeur, M. V. Alves, V. Vahedi, and C. K. Birdsall, J. Comp. Phys. 104 (1993) 321 [3] J. P. Verboncoeur, A. B. Langdon and N. T. Gladd, Comp. Phys. Comm. 87 (1995) 199

  17. Radio frequency sheaths in an oblique magnetic field

    Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    The physics of radio-frequency (rf) sheaths near a conducting surface is studied for plasmas immersed in a magnetic field that makes an oblique angle θ with the surface. A set of one-dimensional equations is developed that describes the dynamics of the time-dependent magnetic presheath and non-neutral Debye sheath. The model employs Maxwell-Boltzmann electrons, and the magnetization and mobility of the ions is determined by the magnetic field strength, and wave frequency, respectively. The angle θ, assumed to be large enough to insure an electron-poor sheath, is otherwise arbitrary. Concentrating on the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies, the equations are solved numerically to obtain the rectified (dc) voltage, the rf voltage across the sheath, and the rf current flowing through the sheath. As an application of this model, the sheath voltage-current relation is used to obtain the rf sheath impedance, which in turn gives an rf sheath boundary condition for the electric field at the sheath-plasma interface that can be used in rf wave codes. In general, the impedance has both resistive and capacitive contributions, and generalizes previous sheath boundary condition models. The resistive part contributes to parasitic power dissipation at the wall

  18. Energy-dissipation-model for metallurgical multi-phase-systems

    Mavrommatis, K.T. [Rheinisch-Westfaelische Technische Hochschule Aachen, Aachen (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    Entropy production in real processes is directly associated with the dissipation of energy. Both are potential measures for the proceed of irreversible processes taking place in metallurgical systems. Many of these processes in multi-phase-systems could then be modelled on the basis of the energy-dissipation associated with. As this entity can often be estimated using very simple assumptions from first principles, the evolution of an overall measure of systems behaviour can be studied constructing an energy-dissipation -based model of the system. In this work a formulation of this concept, the Energy-Dissipation-Model (EDM), for metallurgical multi-phase-systems is given. Special examples are studied to illustrate the concept, and benefits as well as the range of validity are shown. This concept might be understood as complement to usual CFD-modelling of complex systems on a more abstract level but reproducing essential attributes of complex metallurgical systems. (author)

  19. Energy-dissipation-model for metallurgical multi-phase-systems

    Mavrommatis, K T [Rheinisch-Westfaelische Technische Hochschule Aachen, Aachen (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    Entropy production in real processes is directly associated with the dissipation of energy. Both are potential measures for the proceed of irreversible processes taking place in metallurgical systems. Many of these processes in multi-phase-systems could then be modelled on the basis of the energy-dissipation associated with. As this entity can often be estimated using very simple assumptions from first principles, the evolution of an overall measure of systems behaviour can be studied constructing an energy-dissipation -based model of the system. In this work a formulation of this concept, the Energy-Dissipation-Model (EDM), for metallurgical multi-phase-systems is given. Special examples are studied to illustrate the concept, and benefits as well as the range of validity are shown. This concept might be understood as complement to usual CFD-modelling of complex systems on a more abstract level but reproducing essential attributes of complex metallurgical systems. (author)

  20. Physical models for the description of an electrodynamically accelerated plasma sheath

    Zambreanu, V.

    1977-01-01

    An analysis of the models proposed for the description of the plasma sheath dynamics in a coaxial system (of the same type as that operating at the Bucharest Institute of Physics) is presented. A particular attention is paid to the physical structure of the accelerated plasma. It has been shown that a self-consistent model could be derived from a phenomenological description of the sheath structure. The physical models presented so far in the literature have been classified into three groups: the hydrodynamic models, the plasma sheet models and the shock wave models. Each of these models is briefly described. The simplifying assumptions used in the construction of these models have been pointed out. The final conclusion has been that, under these assumptions, none of these models taken separately could completely and correctly describe the dynamical state of the plasma sheath. (author)

  1. Modeling compaction-induced energy dissipation of granular HMX

    Gonthier, K.A. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (US). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Menikoff, R.; Son, S.F.; Asay, B.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US)

    1998-12-31

    A thermodynamically consistent model is developed for the compaction of granular solids. The model is an extension of the single phase limit of two-phase continuum models used to describe Deflagration-to-Detonation Transition (DDT) experiments. The focus is on the energetics and dissipation of the compaction process. Changes in volume fraction are partitioned into reversible and irreversible components. Unlike conventional DDT models, the model is applicable from the quasi-static to dynamic compaction regimes for elastic, plastic, or brittle materials. When applied to the compaction of granular HMX (a brittle material), the model predicts results commensurate with experiments including stress relaxation, hysteresis, and energy dissipation. The model provides a suitable starting point for the development of thermal energy localization sub-scale models based on compaction-induced dissipation.

  2. An extended dissipative particle dynamics model

    Cotter, C J

    2003-01-01

    The method of dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) was introduced by Hoogerbrugge & Koelman to study meso-scale material processes. The theoretical investigation of the DPD method was initiated by Espanol who used a Fokker-Planck formulation of the DPD method and applied the Mori-Zwanzig projection operator calculus to obtain the equations of hydrodynamics for DPD. A current limitation of DPD is that it requires a clear separation of scales between the resolved and unresolved processes. In this note, we suggest a simple extension of DPD that allows for inclusion of unresolved processes with exponentially decaying variance for any value of the decay rate. The main point of the extension is that it is as easy to implement as DPD in a numerical algorithm.

  3. Modeling the Thermosphere as a Driven-Dissipative Thermodynamic System

    2013-03-01

    8 Figure 2: Illustration of the geocentric solar magnetospheric coordinate system............15 Figure 3: Diagram of the...to test new methods of modeling the thermospheric environment. Thermosphere as a Driven-Dissipative Thermodynamic System One approach for modeling... approach uses empirical coupling and relaxation constants to model the 4 input of energy to the thermosphere from the solar wind during

  4. An extension of a high temperature creep model to account for fuel sheath oxidation

    Boccolini, G.; Valli, G.

    1983-01-01

    Starting from the high-temperature creep model for Zircaloy fuel sheathing, the NIRVANA (developed by AECL), a multilayer model, is proposed in this paper: it includes the outer oxide plus alpha retained layers, and the inner core of beta or alpha plus beta material, all constrained to deform with the same creep rate. The model has been incorporated into the SPARA fuel computer code developed for the transient analysis of fuel rod behaviour in the CIRENE prototype reactor, but it is in principle valid for all Zircaloy fuel sheathings. Its predictions are compared with experimental results from burst tests on BWR and PWR type sheaths; the tests were carried out at CNEN under two research contracts with Ansaldo Meccanico Nucleare and Sigen-Sopren, respectively

  5. ΛCDM model with dissipative nonextensive viscous dark matter

    Gimenes, H. S.; Viswanathan, G. M.; Silva, R.

    2018-03-01

    Many models in cosmology typically assume the standard bulk viscosity. We study an alternative interpretation for the origin of the bulk viscosity. Using nonadditive statistics proposed by Tsallis, we propose a bulk viscosity component that can only exist by a nonextensive effect through the nonextensive/dissipative correspondence (NexDC). In this paper, we consider a ΛCDM model for a flat universe with a dissipative nonextensive viscous dark matter component, following the Eckart theory of bulk viscosity, without any perturbative approach. In order to analyze cosmological constraints, we use one of the most recent observations of Type Ia Supernova, baryon acoustic oscillations and cosmic microwave background data.

  6. Modeling of Sheath Ion-Molecule Reactions in Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition of Carbon Nanotubes

    Hash, David B.; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.

    2004-01-01

    In many plasma simulations, ion-molecule reactions are modeled using ion energy independent reaction rate coefficients that are taken from low temperature selected-ion flow tube experiments. Only exothermic or nearly thermoneutral reactions are considered. This is appropriate for plasma applications such as high-density plasma sources in which sheaths are collisionless and ion temperatures 111 the bulk p!asma do not deviate significantly from the gas temperature. However, for applications at high pressure and large sheath voltages, this assumption does not hold as the sheaths are collisional and ions gain significant energy in the sheaths from Joule heating. Ion temperatures and thus reaction rates vary significantly across the discharge, and endothermic reactions become important in the sheaths. One such application is plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes in which dc discharges are struck at pressures between 1-20 Torr with applied voltages in the range of 500-700 V. The present work investigates The importance of the inclusion of ion energy dependent ion-molecule reaction rates and the role of collision induced dissociation in generating radicals from the feedstock used in carbon nanotube growth.

  7. Electromagnetic particle in cell modeling of the plasma focus: Current sheath formation and lift off

    Seng, Y. S.; Lee, P.; Rawat, R. S.

    2014-01-01

    The shaping and formation of the current sheath takes place in the breakdown phase of a plasma focus device and critically controls the device performance. Electrostatic particle in cell codes, with magnetic effects ignored, have been used to model the breakdown phase. This Letter reports the successful development and implementation of an electromagnetic particle in cell (EMPIC) code, including magnetic effects self-consistently, to simulate the breakdown phase; from the ionization, localization and gliding discharge along the insulator to the time instant of current sheath lift off. The magnetic field was found to be appreciable from the time the current sheath came into contact with the anode with increased local current, initiating the voltage breakdown of the device as a result

  8. Log-Normal Turbulence Dissipation in Global Ocean Models

    Pearson, Brodie; Fox-Kemper, Baylor

    2018-03-01

    Data from turbulent numerical simulations of the global ocean demonstrate that the dissipation of kinetic energy obeys a nearly log-normal distribution even at large horizontal scales O (10 km ) . As the horizontal scales of resolved turbulence are larger than the ocean is deep, the Kolmogorov-Yaglom theory for intermittency in 3D homogeneous, isotropic turbulence cannot apply; instead, the down-scale potential enstrophy cascade of quasigeostrophic turbulence should. Yet, energy dissipation obeys approximate log-normality—robustly across depths, seasons, regions, and subgrid schemes. The distribution parameters, skewness and kurtosis, show small systematic departures from log-normality with depth and subgrid friction schemes. Log-normality suggests that a few high-dissipation locations dominate the integrated energy and enstrophy budgets, which should be taken into account when making inferences from simplified models and inferring global energy budgets from sparse observations.

  9. Critical review of hydraulic modeling on atmospheric heat dissipation

    Onishi, Y.; Brown, S.M.

    1977-01-01

    Objectives of this study were: to define the useful roles of hydraulic modeling in understanding the predicting atmospheric effects of heat dissipation systems; to assess the state-of-the-art of hydraulic modeling of atmospheric phenomena; to inventory potentially useful existing hydraulic modeling facilities both in the United States and abroad; and to scope hydraulic model studies to assist the assessment of atmospheric effects of nuclear energy centers

  10. Mathematical Modeling for Energy Dissipation Behavior of Velocity ...

    The developed oil-pressure damper is installed with an additional Relief Valve parallel to the Throttle Valve. This is intended to obtain an adaptive control by changing the damping coefficient of this damper using changeable orifice size. In order to simulate its actual energy-dissipating behavior, a serial friction model and a ...

  11. A non-linear dissipative model of magnetism

    Durand, P.; Paidarová, Ivana

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 89, č. 6 (2010), s. 67004 ISSN 1286-4854 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100400501 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : non-linear dissipative model of magnetism * thermodynamics * physical chemistry Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry http://epljournal.edpsciences.org/

  12. Emergent universe model with dissipative effects

    Debnath, P. S.; Paul, B. C.

    2017-12-01

    Emergent universe model is presented in general theory of relativity with isotropic fluid in addition to viscosity. We obtain cosmological solutions that permit emergent universe scenario in the presence of bulk viscosity that are described by either Eckart theory or Truncated Israel Stewart (TIS) theory. The stability of the solutions are also studied. In this case, the emergent universe (EU) model is analyzed with observational data. In the presence of viscosity, one obtains emergent universe scenario, which however is not permitted in the absence of viscosity. The EU model is compatible with cosmological observations.

  13. Dissipative N-point-vortex Models in the Plane

    Shashikanth, Banavara N.

    2010-02-01

    A method is presented for constructing point vortex models in the plane that dissipate the Hamiltonian function at any prescribed rate and yet conserve the level sets of the invariants of the Hamiltonian model arising from the SE (2) symmetries. The method is purely geometric in that it uses the level sets of the Hamiltonian and the invariants to construct the dissipative field and is based on elementary classical geometry in ℝ3. Extension to higher-dimensional spaces, such as the point vortex phase space, is done using exterior algebra. The method is in fact general enough to apply to any smooth finite-dimensional system with conserved quantities, and, for certain special cases, the dissipative vector field constructed can be associated with an appropriately defined double Nambu-Poisson bracket. The most interesting feature of this method is that it allows for an infinite sequence of such dissipative vector fields to be constructed by repeated application of a symmetric linear operator (matrix) at each point of the intersection of the level sets.

  14. Study on models for gap conductance between fuel and sheath for CANDU reactors

    Lee, K.M.; Ohn, M.Y.; Lim, H.S.; Choi, J.H.; Hwang, S.T.

    1995-01-01

    The gap conductance between the fuel and the sheath depends strongly on the gap width and has a significant influence on the amount of initial stored energy. The modified Ross and Stoute gap conductance model in ELESTRES is based on a simplified thermal deformation model for steady-state fuel temperature calculations. A review on a series of experiments reveals that fuel pellets crack, relocate, and are eccentrically positioned within the sheath rather than solid concentric cylinders. In this paper, the two recently-proposed gap conductance models (offset gap model and relocated gap model) are described and are applied to calculate the fuel-sheath gap conductances under experimental conditions and normal operating conditions in CANDU reactors. The good agreement between the experimentally-inferred and calculated gap conductance values demonstrates that the modified Ross and Stoute model was implemented correctly in ELESTRES. The predictions of the modified Ross and Stoute model provide conservative values for gap heat transfer and fuel surface temperature compared to the offset gap and relocated gap models for a limiting power envelope. (author)

  15. Studies of heating efficiencies and models of RF-sheaths for the JET antennae

    Hedin, J.

    1996-02-01

    A theoretical model for the appearance of RF-sheaths is developed to see if this can explain the expected lower heating efficiencies of the new A 2 antennae at JET. The equations are solved numerically. A general method for evaluation of the experimental data of the heating efficiencies of the new antennae at JET is developed and applied for discharges with and without the bumpy limiter on the D antennae. 8 refs, 26 figs

  16. FEAST 3.1: finite-element modeling of sheath deformation such as longitudinal ridging and collapse into axial gap

    Wang, X.; Xu, Z.; Kim, Y-S.; Lai, L.; Cheng, G.; Xu, S. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    During normal operation, the collapsible CANDU® fuel sheath deforms, especially, it may deform into longitudinal ridges or collapse instantaneously into the axial gaps between the end pellet and endcap or between two neighbouring pellets. These phenomena occur under certain conditions, such as the coolant pressure exceeding critical pressures for longitudinal ridging or axial collapse. Both longitudinal ridging and axial collapse phenomena result from plastic instability in the sheath under coolant pressure. Longitudinal ridging features one or multiple lobes or 'ridges' (outward from the sheath surface) formed along the sheath in the longitudinal direction. Axial collapse features a 'valley' around the sheath circumference. Both phenomena can lead to sheath overstrain, which in turn potentially leads to sheath failure. The LONGER code, which contains empirical correlations, has been used to predict the critical pressures for these two sheath deformation phenomena. To study fuel behaviour outside of the application ranges of the LONGER empirical correlations, a mechanistic model is needed. FEAST (Finite Element Analysis for Stresses) is an AECL computer code used to assess the structural integrity of the CANDU fuel element. The FEAST code has recently been developed (to Version 3.1) to model processes occurring during longitudinal ridge formation and instantaneous collapse into the axial gap. The new models include those for geometric non-linearity (large deformation, large material rotation), non-linear stress-strain curve for plastic deformation, Zr-4 sheath creep law, and variable Young’s Modulus etc. This paper describes the mechanistic model (FEAST 3.1) development for analyses of longitudinal ridging and instantaneous collapse into axial gap, and the comparison with the results from empirical correlations in LONGER. (author)

  17. FEAST 3.1: finite-element modeling of sheath deformation such as longitudinal ridging and collapse into axial gap

    Wang, X.; Xu, Z.; Kim, Y-S.; Lai, L.; Cheng, G.; Xu, S.

    2010-01-01

    During normal operation, the collapsible CANDU® fuel sheath deforms, especially, it may deform into longitudinal ridges or collapse instantaneously into the axial gaps between the end pellet and endcap or between two neighbouring pellets. These phenomena occur under certain conditions, such as the coolant pressure exceeding critical pressures for longitudinal ridging or axial collapse. Both longitudinal ridging and axial collapse phenomena result from plastic instability in the sheath under coolant pressure. Longitudinal ridging features one or multiple lobes or 'ridges' (outward from the sheath surface) formed along the sheath in the longitudinal direction. Axial collapse features a 'valley' around the sheath circumference. Both phenomena can lead to sheath overstrain, which in turn potentially leads to sheath failure. The LONGER code, which contains empirical correlations, has been used to predict the critical pressures for these two sheath deformation phenomena. To study fuel behaviour outside of the application ranges of the LONGER empirical correlations, a mechanistic model is needed. FEAST (Finite Element Analysis for Stresses) is an AECL computer code used to assess the structural integrity of the CANDU fuel element. The FEAST code has recently been developed (to Version 3.1) to model processes occurring during longitudinal ridge formation and instantaneous collapse into the axial gap. The new models include those for geometric non-linearity (large deformation, large material rotation), non-linear stress-strain curve for plastic deformation, Zr-4 sheath creep law, and variable Young’s Modulus etc. This paper describes the mechanistic model (FEAST 3.1) development for analyses of longitudinal ridging and instantaneous collapse into axial gap, and the comparison with the results from empirical correlations in LONGER. (author)

  18. Mars’ Low Dissipation Factor at 11-h - Interpretation from Anelasticity-Based Dissipation Model

    Castillo-Rogez, Julie; Choukroun, M.

    2010-10-01

    We explore the information contained in the ratio of the tidal Love number k2 to the dissipation factor Q characterizing the response of Mars to the tides exerted by its satellite Phobos (11-h period). Assuming that Mars can be approximated as a Maxwell body, Bills et al. [1] have inferred an average viscosity of the Martian mantle 8.7x1014 Pa s. Such a low viscosity appears inconsistent with Mars’ thermal evolution and current heat budget models. Alternative explanations include the presence of partial melt in the mantle [2], or the presence of an aquifer in the crust [3]. We revisit the interpretation of Mars’ k2/Q using a laboratory-based attenuation model that accounts for material viscoelasticity and anelasticity. As a first step, we have computed Mars’ k2/Q for an interior model that includes a solid inner core, a liquid core layer, a mantle, and crust (consistent with the observed moment of inertia, and k2 measured at the orbital period), and searched for the range of mantle viscosities that can explain the observed k2/Q. Successful models are characterized by an average mantle viscosity between 1018 and 1022 Pa s, which rules out the presence of partial melt in the mantle. We can narrow down that range by performing a more detailed calculation of the mineralogy and temperature profiles. Preliminary results will be presented at the meeting. References: [1] Bills et al. (2005) JGR 110, E00704; [2] Ruedas et al. (2009 White paper to the NRC Planetary Science decadal survey; [3] Bills et al. (2009) LPS 40, 1712. MC is supported by a NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellowship, administered by Oak Ridge Associated Universities. This work has been conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract to NASA. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  19. Barrier cell sheath formation

    Kesner, J.

    1980-04-01

    The solution for electrostatic potential within a simply modeled tandem mirror thermal barrier is seen to exhibit a sheath at each edge of the cell. The formation of the sheath requires ion collisionality and the analysis assmes that the collisional trapping rate into the barrier is considerably slower than the barrier pump rate

  20. Modelling of DC electric fields induced by RF sheath in front of ICRF antenna

    Faudot, E.; Heuraux, S.; Colas, L.

    2003-01-01

    Reducing the ICRF (ion cyclotron range frequency) antenna-plasma interaction is one of the key points for reaching very long tokamak discharges. One problem which limits such discharges, is the appearance of hot spots on the surface of the antenna: Radio Frequency (RF) sheaths modify the properties of the edge plasma by rectifying the RF potential along open magnetic field lines and can induce hot spots. This paper investigates the corrections to sheath potentials introduced by the interactions between adjacent flux tubes. Our theoretical study started from an oscillating double Langmuir probe model, in which a transverse influx of current was included. This model was confronted with 1D PIC simulations along a magnetic field line, and demonstrated that current exchanges can decrease mean potentials. A 2D electrostatic fluid code was then developed, which couples adjacent flux tubes in a poloidal cross section with collisional conductivity or polarization currents. It showed that transverse currents are able to smooth structures smaller than a characteristic size in the sheath potential maps (results for Tore Supra). These computed rectified potentials can be used to obtain the DC electric fields in front of the antenna. And then, it gives an estimate of the particle drift and the energy flux on the antenna structure, which can explain hot spots. (author)

  1. A modal approach to modeling spatially distributed vibration energy dissipation.

    Segalman, Daniel Joseph

    2010-08-01

    The nonlinear behavior of mechanical joints is a confounding element in modeling the dynamic response of structures. Though there has been some progress in recent years in modeling individual joints, modeling the full structure with myriad frictional interfaces has remained an obstinate challenge. A strategy is suggested for structural dynamics modeling that can account for the combined effect of interface friction distributed spatially about the structure. This approach accommodates the following observations: (1) At small to modest amplitudes, the nonlinearity of jointed structures is manifest primarily in the energy dissipation - visible as vibration damping; (2) Correspondingly, measured vibration modes do not change significantly with amplitude; and (3) Significant coupling among the modes does not appear to result at modest amplitudes. The mathematical approach presented here postulates the preservation of linear modes and invests all the nonlinearity in the evolution of the modal coordinates. The constitutive form selected is one that works well in modeling spatially discrete joints. When compared against a mathematical truth model, the distributed dissipation approximation performs well.

  2. Double Layered Sheath in Accurate HV XLPE Cable Modeling

    Gudmundsdottir, Unnur Stella; Silva, J. De; Bak, Claus Leth

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses modelling of high voltage AC underground cables. For long cables, when crossbonding points are present, not only the coaxial mode of propagation is excited during transient phenomena, but also the intersheath mode. This causes inaccurate simulation results for high frequency...

  3. A dissipative model of plasma equilibrium in toroidal systems

    Wobig, H.

    1985-10-01

    In order to describe a steady-state plasma equilibrium in tokamaks, stellarators or other non-axisymmetric configurations, the model of ideal MHD with isotropic plasma pressure is widely used. The ideal MHD - model of a toroidal plasma equilibrium requires the existence of closed magnetic surfaces. Several numerical codes have been developed in the past to solve the three-dimensional equilibrium problem, but so far no existence theorem for a solution has been proved. Another difficulty is the formation of magnetic islands and field line ergodisation, which can only be described in terms of ideal MHD if the plasma pressure is constant in the ergodic region. In order to describe the formation of magnetic islands and ergodisation of surfaces properly, additional dissipative terms have to be incorporated to allow decoupling of the plasma and magnetic field. In a collisional plasma viscosity and inelastic collisions introduce such dissipative processes. In the model used a friction term proportional to the velocity v vector of the plasma is included. Such a term originates from charge exchange interaction of the plasma with a nuetral background. With these modifications, the equilibrium problem reduces to a set of quasilinear elliptic equations for the pressure, the electric potential and the magnetic field. The paper deals with an existence theorem based on the Fixed - Point method of Schauder. It can be shown that a self-consistent and unique equilibrium exists if the friction term is large and the plasma pressure is sufficiently low. The essential role of the dissipative terms is to remove the singularities of the ideal MHD model on rational magnetic surfaces. The problem has a strong similarity to Benard cell convection, and consequently similar behaviour such as bifurcation and exchange of stability are expected. (orig./GG)

  4. Interaction of magnetized electrons with a boundary sheath: investigation of a specular reflection model

    Krüger, Dennis; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter

    2017-11-01

    This publication reports analytical and numerical results concerning the interaction of gyrating electrons with a plasma boundary sheath, with focus on partially magnetized technological plasmas. It is assumed that the electron Debye length {λ }{{D}} is much smaller than the electron gyroradius {r}{{L}}, and {r}{{L}} in turn much smaller than the mean free path λ and the gradient length L of the fields. Focusing on the scale of the gyroradius, the sheath is assumed as infinitesimally thin ({λ }{{D}}\\to 0), collisions are neglected (λ \\to ∞ ), the magnetic field is taken as homogeneous, and electric fields (=potential gradients) in the bulk are neglected (L\\to ∞ ). The interaction of an electron with the electric field of the plasma boundary sheath is represented by a specular reflection {v}\\to {v}-2{v}\\cdot {{e}}z {{e}}z of the velocity {v} at the plane z = 0 of a naturally oriented Cartesian coordinate system (x,y,z). The electron trajectory is then given as sequences of helical sections, with the kinetic energy ɛ and the canonical momenta p x and p y conserved, but not the position of the axis (base point {{R}}0), the slope (pitch angle χ), and the phase (gyrophase φ). A ‘virtual interaction’ which directly maps the incoming electrons to the outgoing ones is introduced and studied in dependence of the angle γ between the field and the sheath normal {{e}}z. The corresponding scattering operator is constructed, mathematically characterized, and given as an infinite matrix. An equivalent boundary condition for a transformed kinetic model is derived.

  5. Modeling of polarization phenomena due to RF sheaths and electron beams in magnetized plasma

    Faudot, E.

    2005-01-01

    This work investigates the problematic of hot spots induced by accelerated particle fluxes in tokamaks. It is shown that the polarization due to sheaths in the edge plasma in which an electron beam at a high level of energy is injected, can reach several hundreds volts and thus extend the deposition area. The notion of obstructed sheath is introduced and explains the acceleration of energy deposition by the decreasing of the sheath potential. Then, a 2-dimensional fluid modeling of flux tubes in front of ICRF antennae allows us to calculate the rectified potentials taking into account RF polarization currents transverse to magnetic field lines. The 2-dimensional fluid code designed validates the analytical results which show that the DC rectified potential is 50% greater with polarization currents than without. Finally, the simultaneous application of an electron beam and a RF potential reveals that the potentials due to each phenomenon are additives when RF potential is much greater than beam polarization. The density depletion of polarized flux tubes in 2-dimensional PIC (particles in cells) simulations is characterized but not yet explained. (author)

  6. A family of crisis in a dissipative Fermi accelerator model

    Leonel, Edson D.; Egydio de Carvalho, R.

    2007-01-01

    The Fermi accelerator model is studied in the framework of inelastic collisions. The dynamics of this problem is obtained by use of a two-dimensional nonlinear area-contracting map. We consider that the collisions of the particle with both periodically time varying and fixed walls are inelastic. We have shown that the dissipation destroys the mixed phase space structure of the nondissipative case and in special, we have obtained and characterized in this problem a family of two damping coefficients for which a boundary crisis occurs

  7. The constructive backlash dissipate effect model for concrete blocks

    Tepes-Onea Florin

    2004-01-01

    From physical point of view, the dumping represents the soil seismic excitation energy taken over process through internal absorption, rubbed between existent layers, as and cracks on rocky foundations. Generally, on heavy dams dynamic analysis it is considered a viscous dump, proportional with deformation speed. The dumping can be evaluated on experimental bases or on environmental conditions measurements. The latest determine higher values of dumping elements. This it could be explained with the local factors influence which is not possible to modeled as backlash treatment, foundation ground characteristics, the concrete technology. This represents atypical dissipate phenomenon. A major influence is done by the excitation level as real seism or experimental excitation. The present work is about to establish the influence of the dissipate effect of the backlash on concrete blocks. The backlash finite elements modeling make this possible, studying different situations as rub effect, cohesion effect, seismic action on varying directions with the same accelerogram of 0.4 g. The studied blocks have the same dimensions, the relative displacement being obtained by foundation stiffness modified under two block parts. (author)

  8. Quantum dynamics of the driven and dissipative Rabi model

    Henriet, Loïc; Ristivojevic, Zoran; Orth, Peter P.; Le Hur, Karyn

    2014-08-01

    The Rabi model considers a two-level system (or spin 1/2) coupled to a quantized harmonic oscillator and describes the simplest interaction between matter and light. The recent experimental progress in solid-state circuit quantum electrodynamics has engendered theoretical efforts to quantitatively describe the mathematical and physical aspects of the light-matter interaction beyond the rotating-wave approximation. We develop a stochastic Schrödinger equation approach which enables us to access the strong-coupling limit of the Rabi model and study the effects of dissipation and ac drive in an exact manner. We include the effect of Ohmic noise on the non-Markovian spin dynamics, resulting in Kondo-type correlations, as well as cavity losses. We compute the time evolution of spin variables in various conditions. As a consideration for future work, we discuss the possibility of reaching a steady state with one polariton in realistic experimental conditions.

  9. An information theory model for dissipation in open quantum systems

    Rogers, David M.

    2017-08-01

    This work presents a general model for open quantum systems using an information game along the lines of Jaynes’ original work. It is shown how an energy based reweighting of propagators provides a novel moment generating function at each time point in the process. Derivatives of the generating function give moments of the time derivatives of observables. Aside from the mathematically helpful properties, the ansatz reproduces key physics of stochastic quantum processes. At high temperature, the average density matrix follows the Caldeira-Leggett equation. Its associated Langevin equation clearly demonstrates the emergence of dissipation and decoherence time scales, as well as an additional diffusion due to quantum confinement. A consistent interpretation of these results is that decoherence and wavefunction collapse during measurement are directly related to the degree of environmental noise, and thus occur because of subjective uncertainty of an observer.

  10. Testing a dissipative kinetic k-essence model

    Cardenas, Victor H.; Villanueva, J.R. [Universidad de Valparaiso, Instituto de Fisica y Astronomia, Valparaiso (Chile); Centro de Astrofisica de Valparaiso, Valparaiso (Chile); Cruz, Norman [Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Departamento de Fisica, Santiago (Chile)

    2015-04-01

    In thiswork,we present a study of a purely kinetic k-essence model, characterized basically by a parameter α in presence of a bulk dissipative term, whose relationship between viscous pressure Π and energy density ρ of the background follows a polytropic type law, Π ∝ ρ{sup λ+1/2}, where λ, in principle, is a parameter without restrictions. Analytical solutions for the energy density of the k-essence field are found in two specific cases: λ = 1/2 and λ = (1 - α)/2α, and then we show that these solutions possess the same functional form as the non-viscous counterpart. Finally, both approaches are contrasted with observational data from type Ia supernova, and the most recent Hubble parameter measurements, and therefore, the best values for the parameters of the theory are found. (orig.)

  11. A Landau fluid model for dissipative trapped electron modes

    Hedrick, C.L.; Leboeuf, J.N.; Sidikman, K.L.

    1995-09-01

    A Landau fluid model for dissipative trapped electron modes is developed which focuses on an improved description of the ion dynamics. The model is simple enough to allow nonlinear calculations with many harmonics for the times necessary to reach saturation. The model is motivated by a discussion that starts with the gyro-kinetic equation and emphasizes the importance of simultaneously including particular features of magnetic drift resonance, shear, and Landau effects. To ensure that these features are simultaneously incorporated in a Landau fluid model with only two evolution equations, a new approach to determining the closure coefficients is employed. The effect of this technique is to reduce the matching of fluid and kinetic responses to a single variable, rather than two, and to allow focusing on essential features of the fluctuations in question, rather than features that are only important for other types of fluctuations. Radially resolved nonlinear calculations of this model, advanced in time to reach saturation, are presented to partially illustrate its intended use. These calculations have a large number of poloidal and toroidal harmonics to represent the nonlinear dynamics in a converged steady state which includes cascading of energy to both short and long wavelengths

  12. A fully kinetic, self-consistent particle simulation model of the collisionless plasma--sheath region

    Procassini, R.J.; Birdsall, C.K.; Morse, E.C.

    1990-01-01

    A fully kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) model is used to self-consistently determine the steady-state potential profile in a collisionless plasma that contacts a floating, absorbing boundary. To balance the flow of particles to the wall, a distributed source region is used to inject particles into the one-dimensional system. The effect of the particle source distribution function on the source region and collector sheath potential drops, and particle velocity distributions is investigated. The ion source functions proposed by Emmert et al. [Phys. Fluids 23, 803 (1980)] and Bissell and Johnson [Phys. Fluids 30, 779 (1987)] (and various combinations of these) are used for the injection of both ions and electrons. The values of the potential drops obtained from the PIC simulations are compared to those from the theories of Emmert et al., Bissell and Johnson, and Scheuer and Emmert [Phys. Fluids 31, 3645 (1988)], all of which assume that the electron density is related to the plasma potential via the Boltzmann relation. The values of the source region and total potential drop are found to depend on the choice of the electron source function, as well as the ion source function. The question of an infinite electric field at the plasma--sheath interface, which arises in the analyses of Bissell and Johnson and Scheuer and Emmert, is also addressed

  13. Verification of a mechanistic model for the strain rate of zircaloy-4 fuel sheaths during transient heating

    Hunt, C.E.L.

    1980-10-01

    A mechanistic strain rate model for Zircaloy-4, named NIRVANA, was tested against experiments where pressurized fuel sheaths were strained during complex temperature-stress-time histories. The same histories were then examined to determine the spread in calculated strain which may be expected because of variations in dimensions, chemical content and mechanical properties which are allowed in the fuel sheath specifications. It was found that the variations allowed by the specifications could result in a probable spread in the predicted strain of plus or minus a factor of two from the mean value. The experimental results were well within this range. (auth)

  14. A model for turbulent dissipation rate in a constant pressure ...

    J Dey

    the logarithmic region. However, measurement of the. Taylor microscale remains a difficult task, as it involves correlation function [1]. Consequently, an appreciation of the Taylor microscale, dissipation rate, etc., is lacking in practice due to complexity involved in estimating these quantities. Segalini et al [2] have proposed a ...

  15. NIRVANA, a high-temperature creep model for Zircaloy fuel sheathing

    Sills, H.E.; Holt, R.A.

    1979-05-01

    We have developed a multi-component model to describe the transient plastic deformation of Zircaloy fuel sheathing during high-temperature transients. From deformation maps we identify three deformation mechanisms which, in principle, occur in all three phase fields of Zircaloy (α, α+β, β): diffusional creep, dislocation creep, and athermal strian. A strain component occurring during the α → β transformation is also identified. Microstructural changes which alter deformation rates -grain structure, recrystallization, phase transformation -are accounted for. The individual components of the model represent known metallurgical phenomena. The combined model gives excellent agreement with transient test data from 700-1800 K, a range of heating rates from 0-100 K.s -1 , and a range of strain rates from 10 -5 to 10 -1 .s -1 . To enable comparison with available data the transient creep model was combined with an axially uniform, thin-walled tube representation having anisotropic material properties. The resulting computer code, NIRVANA provides facilities for simulating uniaxial and biaxial tube tests over specified stress/temperature histories. (author)

  16. A generalized model for optimal transport of images including dissipation and density modulation

    Maas, Jan; Rumpf, Martin; Schö nlieb, Carola; Simon, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    transport to strongly dissipative dynamics. For this model a robust and effective variational time discretization of geodesic paths is proposed. This requires to minimize a discrete path energy consisting of a sum of consecutive image matching functionals

  17. The semi-diurnal cycle of dissipation in a ROFI: model-measurement comparisons

    Simpson, John H.; Burchard, Hans; Fisher, Neil R.; Rippeth, Tom P.

    2002-07-01

    The Liverpool Bay Region of Freshwater Influence in the Irish Sea exhibits strong horizontal gradients which interact with the dominant tidal flow. A 25 h series of measurements of the cycle of turbulent dissipation with the FLY dissipation profiler shows a strong asymmetry between ebb and flood which is associated with a cycle of increasing stratification on the ebb and progressive mixing on the flood which results in vertical homogeneity as high water is approached. At this time strong dissipation extends throughout the water column in contrast to the ebb when there is a near shutdown of dissipation in the upper half of the column. The cycle of stratification and dissipation is closely consistent for the two semi-diurnal tidal cycles observed. We have attempted to simulate this situation, which involves a complex suite of processes including tidal straining and mixing, using a version of the k-ɛ closure scheme in a 1-d dynamical model which is forced by a combination of the observed tidal flow and horizontal temperature and salinity gradients. The latter were measured directly at the end of the observational series but, in order to focus on the cycle of dissipation, the correct reproduction of the temperature and salinity cycle can be assured by a nudging procedure which obliges the model temperature and salinity values to track the observations. With or without this procedure, the model gives a reasonable account of the dissipation and its asymmetric behaviour on ebb and flood although nudging improves the timing of peak dissipation in the upper part of the water column near highwater. The model has also been used to examine the ratio of shear production (P/ɛ) and buoyancy inputs to dissipation (B/ɛ). The variation of these quantities over the tidal cycle confirms the important role of convective motions forced by tidal straining near the end of the flood phase of the tide.

  18. Modeling the diurnal tide with dissipation derived from UARS/HRDI measurements

    M. A. Geller

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper uses dissipation values derived from UARS/HRDI observations in a recently published diurnal-tide model. These model structures compare quite well with the UARS/HRDI observations with respect to the annual variation of the diurnal tidal amplitudes and the size of the amplitudes themselves. It is suggested that the annual variation of atmospheric dissipation in the mesosphere-lower thermosphere is a major controlling factor in determining the annual variation of the diurnal tide.

  19. Plasma sheath criterion in thermal electronegative plasmas

    Ghomi, Hamid; Khoramabadi, Mansour; Ghorannevis, Mahmod; Shukla, Padma Kant

    2010-01-01

    The sheath formation criterion in electronegative plasma is examined. By using a multifluid model, it is shown that in a collisional sheath there will be upper as well as lower limits for the sheath velocity criterion. However, the parameters of the negative ions only affect the lower limit.

  20. Stability analysis of a model equilibrium for a gravito-electrostatic sheath in a colloidal plasma under external gravity effect

    Rajkhowa, Kavita Rani; Bujarbarua, S.; Dwivedi, C.B.

    1999-01-01

    The present contribution tries to find a scientific answer to the question of stability of an equilibrium plasma sheath in a colloidal plasma system under external gravity effect. A model equilibrium of hydrodynamical character has been discussed on the basis of quasi-hydrostatic approximation of levitational condition. It is found that such an equilibrium is highly unstable to a modified-ion acoustic wave with a conditional likelihood of linear driving of the so-called acoustic mode too. Thus, it is reported (within fluid treatment) that a plasma-sheath edge in a colloidal plasma under external gravity effect could be highly sensitive to the acoustic turbulence. Its consequential role on possible physical mechanism of Coulomb phase transition has been conjectured. However, more rigorous calculations as future course of work are required to corroborate our phenomenological suggestions. (author)

  1. Conditional dissipation of scalars in homogeneous turbulence: Closure for MMC modelling

    Wandel, Andrew P.

    2013-08-01

    While the mean and unconditional variance are to be predicted well by any reasonable turbulent combustion model, these are generally not sufficient for the accurate modelling of complex phenomena such as extinction/reignition. An additional criterion has been recently introduced: accurate modelling of the dissipation timescales associated with fluctuations of scalars about their conditional mean (conditional dissipation timescales). Analysis of Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) results for a passive scalar shows that the conditional dissipation timescale is of the order of the integral timescale and smaller than the unconditional dissipation timescale. A model is proposed: the conditional dissipation timescale is proportional to the integral timescale. This model is used in Multiple Mapping Conditioning (MMC) modelling for a passive scalar case and a reactive scalar case, comparing to DNS results for both. The results show that this model improves the accuracy of MMC predictions so as to match the DNS results more closely using a relatively-coarse spatial resolution compared to other turbulent combustion models.

  2. Using kinetic models to predict thermal degradation of fire-retardant-treated plywood roof sheathing

    Patricia Lebow; Jerrold E. Winandy; Patricia K. Lebow

    2003-01-01

    Between 1985-1995 a substantial number of multifamily housing units in the Eastern and Southern U.S. experienced problems with thermally degraded fire-retardant-treated (FRT) plywood roof sheathing. A series of studies conducted at the USDA Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory (FPL), examined the materials, chemical mechanisms, and process implications and has...

  3. Restrictions in Model Reduction for Polymer Chain Models in Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    Moreno Chaparro, Nicolas

    2014-06-06

    We model high molecular weight homopolymers in semidilute concentration via Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD). We show that in model reduction methodologies for polymers it is not enough to preserve system properties (i.e., density ρ, pressure p, temperature T, radial distribution function g(r)) but preserving also the characteristic shape and length scale of the polymer chain model is necessary. In this work we apply a DPD-model-reduction methodology for linear polymers recently proposed; and demonstrate why the applicability of this methodology is limited upto certain maximum polymer length, and not suitable for solvent coarse graining.

  4. Restrictions in Model Reduction for Polymer Chain Models in Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    Moreno Chaparro, Nicolas; Nunes, Suzana Pereira; Calo, Victor M.

    2014-01-01

    We model high molecular weight homopolymers in semidilute concentration via Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD). We show that in model reduction methodologies for polymers it is not enough to preserve system properties (i.e., density ρ, pressure p, temperature T, radial distribution function g(r)) but preserving also the characteristic shape and length scale of the polymer chain model is necessary. In this work we apply a DPD-model-reduction methodology for linear polymers recently proposed; and demonstrate why the applicability of this methodology is limited upto certain maximum polymer length, and not suitable for solvent coarse graining.

  5. Lumley's energy cascade dissipation rate model for boundary-free turbulent shear flows

    Duncan, B. S.

    1992-01-01

    True dissipation occurs mainly at the highest wavenumbers where the eddy sizes are comparatively small. These high wavenumbers receive their energy through the spectral cascade of energy starting with the largest eddies spilling energy into the smaller eddies, passing through each wavenumber until it is dissipated at the microscopic scale. However, a small percentage of the energy does not spill continuously through the cascade but is instantly passed to the higher wavenumbers. Consequently, the smallest eddies receive a certain amount of energy almost immediately. As the spectral energy cascade continues, the highest wavenumber needs a certain time to receive all the energy which has been transferred from the largest eddies. As such, there is a time delay, of the order of tau, between the generation of energy by the largest eddies and the eventual dissipation of this energy. For equilibrium turbulence at high Reynolds numbers, there is a wide range where energy is neither produced by the large eddies nor dissipated by viscosity, but is conserved and passed from wavenumber to higher wavenumbers. The rate at which energy cascades from one wavenumber to another is proportional to the energy contained within that wavenumber. This rate is constant and has been used in the past as a dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy. However, this is true only in steady, equilibrium turbulence. Most dissipation models contend that the production of dissipation is proportional to the production of energy and that the destruction of dissipation is proportional to the destruction of energy. In essence, these models state that the change in the dissipation rate is proportional to the change in the kinetic energy. This assumption is obviously incorrect for the case where there is no production of turbulent energy, yet energy continues to cascade from large to small eddies. If the time lag between the onset on the energy cascade to the destruction of energy at the microscale can be

  6. Estimating the accuracy of optic nerve sheath diameter measurement using a pocket-sized, handheld ultrasound on a simulation model.

    Johnson, Garrett G R J; Zeiler, Frederick A; Unger, Bertram; Hansen, Gregory; Karakitsos, Dimitrios; Gillman, Lawrence M

    2016-12-01

    Ultrasound measurement of optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) appears to be a promising, rapid, non-invasive bedside tool for identification of elevated intra-cranial pressure. With improvements in ultrasound technology, machines are becoming smaller; however, it is unclear if these ultra-portable handheld units have the resolution to make these measurements precisely. In this study, we estimate the accuracy of ONSD measurement in a pocket-sized ultrasound unit. Utilizing a locally developed, previously validated model of the eye, ONSD was measured by two expert observers, three times with two machines and on five models with different optic nerve sheath sizes. A pocket ultrasound (Vscan, GE Healthcare) and a standard portable ultrasound (M-Turbo, SonoSite) were used to measure the models. Data was analyzed by Bland-Altman plot and intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). The ICC between raters for the SonoSite was 0.878, and for the Vscan was 0.826. The between-machine agreement ICC was 0.752. Bland-Altman agreement analysis between the two ultrasound methods showed an even spread across the range of sheath sizes, and that the Vscan tended to read on average 0.33 mm higher than the SonoSite for each measurement, with a standard deviation of 0.65 mm. Accurate ONSD measurement may be possible utilizing pocket-sized, handheld ultrasound devices despite their small screen size, lower resolution, and lower probe frequencies. Further study in human subjects is warranted for all newer handheld ultrasound models as they become available on the market.

  7. Two-stage dissipation in a superconducting microbridge: experiment and modeling

    Del Rio, L; Altshuler, E; Niratisairak, S; Haugen, Oe; Johansen, T H; Davidson, B A; Testa, G; Sarnelli, E

    2010-01-01

    Using fluorescent microthermal imaging we have investigated the origin of 'two-step' behavior in I-V curves for a current-carrying YBa 2 Cu 3 O x superconducting bridge. High resolution temperature maps reveal that as the applied current increases the first step in the voltage corresponds to local dissipation (hot spot), whereas the second step is associated with the onset of global dissipation throughout the entire bridge. A quantitative explanation of the experimental results is provided by a simple model for an inhomogeneous superconductor, assuming that the hot spot nucleates at a location with slightly depressed superconducting properties.

  8. Three-dimensional analysis of antenna sheaths

    Myra, J.R.; D'Ippolito, D.A.; Ho, Y.L.

    1996-01-01

    The present work is motivated by the importance of r.f. sheaths in determining the antenna-plasma interaction and the sensitivity of the sheaths to the complicated three-dimensional structure of modern ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) antennas. To analyze r.f. sheaths on the plasma facing regions of the launcher, we first calculate the contact points of the tokamak magnetic field lines on the surface of the antenna Faraday screen and nearby limiters for realistic three-dimensional magnetic flux surface and antenna geometries. Next, the r.f. voltage that can drive sheaths at the contact points is determined and used to assess the resulting sheath power dissipation, r.f.-driven sputtering, and r.f.-induced convective cells (which produce edge profile modification). The calculations are embodied in a computer code, ANSAT (antenna sheath analysis tool), and sample ANSAT runs are shown to highlight the physics- and geometry-dependent characteristics of the r.f. sheaths and their relationship to the antenna design. One use of ANSAT is therefore as a design tool, to assess the strengths and weaknesses of a given design with respect to critical voltage handling and edge plasma interaction issues. Additionally, examples are presented where ANSAT has been useful in the analysis and interpretation of ICRF experiments (orig.)

  9. A General Microscopic Traffic Model Yielding Dissipative Shocks

    Gaididei, Yuri Borisovich; Caputo, Jean Guy; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    2018-01-01

    We consider a general microscopic traffic model with a delay. An algebraic traffic function reduces the equation to the Aw-Rascle microscopic model while a sigmoid function gives the standard “follow the leader”. For zero delay we prove that the homogeneous solution is globally stable...

  10. Rate-independent dissipation in phase-field modelling of displacive transformations

    Tůma, K.; Stupkiewicz, S.; Petryk, H.

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, rate-independent dissipation is introduced into the phase-field framework for modelling of displacive transformations, such as martensitic phase transformation and twinning. The finite-strain phase-field model developed recently by the present authors is here extended beyond the limitations of purely viscous dissipation. The variational formulation, in which the evolution problem is formulated as a constrained minimization problem for a global rate-potential, is enhanced by including a mixed-type dissipation potential that combines viscous and rate-independent contributions. Effective computational treatment of the resulting incremental problem of non-smooth optimization is developed by employing the augmented Lagrangian method. It is demonstrated that a single Lagrange multiplier field suffices to handle the dissipation potential vertex and simultaneously to enforce physical constraints on the order parameter. In this way, the initially non-smooth problem of evolution is converted into a smooth stationarity problem. The model is implemented in a finite-element code and applied to solve two- and three-dimensional boundary value problems representative for shape memory alloys.

  11. Two updating methods for dissipative models with non symmetric matrices

    Billet, L.; Moine, P.; Aubry, D.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the feasibility of the extension of two updating methods to rotating machinery models is considered, the particularity of rotating machinery models is to use non-symmetric stiffness and damping matrices. It is shown that the two methods described here, the inverse Eigen-sensitivity method and the error in constitutive relation method can be adapted to such models given some modification.As far as inverse sensitivity method is concerned, an error function based on the difference between right hand calculated and measured Eigen mode shapes and calculated and measured Eigen values is used. Concerning the error in constitutive relation method, the equation which defines the error has to be modified due to the non definite positiveness of the stiffness matrix. The advantage of this modification is that, in some cases, it is possible to focus the updating process on some specific model parameters. Both methods were validated on a simple test model consisting in a two-bearing and disc rotor system. (author)

  12. MODELLING SOLUTIONS TO THE KdV-BURGERS EQUATION IN THE CASE OF NONHOMOGENEOUS DISSIPATIVE MEDIA

    V. Samokhin Alexey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of the soliton type solutions to the KdV-Burgers equation is studied numerically in the case of non- homogeneous dissipative media. A soliton moves from left to right and it does not change its form. The solitons with great- er amplitude are narrower and move faster. The aim of the presented research is to study the behavior of the soliton that, while moving in nondissipative medium encounters a barrier (finite or infinite with finite constant dissipation; one may imagine an impulse of light meeting on its way a partially absorbing layer. The modelling included the case of a finite dis- sipative layer similar to a wave passing through the air-glass-air as well as a wave passing from a nondissipative layer into a dissipative one (similar to the passage of light from air to water. The present paper is a continuation of the authors’ pub- lications. New results include a numerical model of the wave’s behavior for different types of the media non-homogeneity. The dissipation predictably results in reducing the soliton’s amplitude, but some new effects occur in the case of finite piecewise constant barrier on the soliton path: after the wave leaves the dissipative barrier it retains, on the whole, a soliton form yet some small and rapidly decreasing oscillations arises in front of the soliton. These oscillations are getting larger and spread as the soliton is moving of the barrier; the distance between the soliton and the oscillation grows. That is, the oscillations are faster than the soliton. The modelling used the Maple software PDETools packet; these activities were time and resources consuming.

  13. Baryon number dissipation at finite temperature in the standard model

    Mottola, E.; Raby, S.; Starkman, G.

    1990-01-01

    We analyze the phenomenon of baryon number violation at finite temperature in the standard model, and derive the relaxation rate for the baryon density in the high temperature electroweak plasma. The relaxation rate, γ is given in terms of real time correlation functions of the operator E·B, and is directly proportional to the sphaleron transition rate, Γ: γ preceq n f Γ/T 3 . Hence it is not instanton suppressed, as claimed by Cohen, Dugan and Manohar (CDM). We show explicitly how this result is consistent with the methods of CDM, once it is recognized that a new anomalous commutator is required in their approach. 19 refs., 2 figs

  14. Quantum phase transitions of light in a dissipative Dicke-Bose-Hubbard model

    Wu, Ren-Cun; Tan, Lei; Zhang, Wen-Xuan; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2017-09-01

    The impact that the environment has on the quantum phase transition of light in the Dicke-Bose-Hubbard model is investigated. Based on the quasibosonic approach, mean-field theory, and perturbation theory, the formulation of the Hamiltonian, the eigenenergies, and the superfluid order parameter are obtained analytically. Compared with the ideal cases, the order parameter of the system evolves with time as the photons naturally decay in their environment. When the system starts with the superfluid state, the dissipation makes the photons more likely to localize, and a greater hopping energy of photons is required to restore the long-range phase coherence of the localized state of the system. Furthermore, the Mott lobes depend crucially on the numbers of atoms and photons (which disappear) of each site, and the system tends to be classical with the number of atoms increasing; however, the atomic number is far lower than that expected under ideal circumstances. As there is an inevitable interaction between the coupled-cavity array and its surrounding environment in the actual experiments, the system is intrinsically dissipative. The results obtained here provide a more realistic image for characterizing the dissipative nature of quantum phase transitions in lossy platforms, which will offer valuable insight into quantum simulation of a dissipative system and which are helpful in guiding experimentalists in open quantum systems.

  15. Dissipation of the Herbicide Benzobicyclon Hydrolysate in a Model California Rice Field Soil.

    Williams, Katryn L; Gladfelder, Joshua J; Quigley, Lindsay L; Ball, David B; Tjeerdema, Ronald S

    2017-10-25

    The herbicide benzobicyclon (BZB; 3-(2-chloro-4-(methylsulfonyl)benzoyl)-2-phenylthiobicyclo[3.2.1]oct-2-en-4-one) has recently been approved for use on California rice fields by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA). Hydrolysis of BZB rapidly forms the active compound, benzobicyclon hydrolysate (BH), whose fate is currently not well understood. A model California rice soil was used to determine BH soil dissipation. The pK a and aqueous solubility were also determined, as experimental values are not currently available. Sorption data indicate BH does not bind tightly, or irreversibly, with this soil. Flooding resulted in decreased BH loss, indicating anaerobic microbes are less likely to transform BH compared to aerobic microorganisms. Temperature increased dissipation, while autoclaving decreased BH loss. Overall, dissipation was slow regardless of treatment. Further investigation is needed to elucidate the exact routes of loss in soil, though BH is expected to dissipate slowly in flooded rice field soil.

  16. Understanding performance properties of chemical engines under a trade-off optimization: Low-dissipation versus endoreversible model

    Tang, F. R.; Zhang, Rong; Li, Huichao; Li, C. N.; Liu, Wei; Bai, Long

    2018-05-01

    The trade-off criterion is used to systemically investigate the performance features of two chemical engine models (the low-dissipation model and the endoreversible model). The optimal efficiencies, the dissipation ratios, and the corresponding ratios of the dissipation rates for two models are analytically determined. Furthermore, the performance properties of two kinds of chemical engines are precisely compared and analyzed, and some interesting physics is revealed. Our investigations show that the certain universal equivalence between two models is within the framework of the linear irreversible thermodynamics, and their differences are rooted in the different physical contexts. Our results can contribute to a precise understanding of the general features of chemical engines.

  17. Consistent model reduction of polymer chains in solution in dissipative particle dynamics: Model description

    Moreno Chaparro, Nicolas

    2015-06-30

    We introduce a framework for model reduction of polymer chain models for dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations, where the properties governing the phase equilibria such as the characteristic size of the chain, compressibility, density, and temperature are preserved. The proposed methodology reduces the number of degrees of freedom required in traditional DPD representations to model equilibrium properties of systems with complex molecules (e.g., linear polymers). Based on geometrical considerations we explicitly account for the correlation between beads in fine-grained DPD models and consistently represent the effect of these correlations in a reduced model, in a practical and simple fashion via power laws and the consistent scaling of the simulation parameters. In order to satisfy the geometrical constraints in the reduced model we introduce bond-angle potentials that account for the changes in the chain free energy after the model reduction. Following this coarse-graining process we represent high molecular weight DPD chains (i.e., ≥200≥200 beads per chain) with a significant reduction in the number of particles required (i.e., ≥20≥20 times the original system). We show that our methodology has potential applications modeling systems of high molecular weight molecules at large scales, such as diblock copolymer and DNA.

  18. Communication through plasma sheaths

    Korotkevich, A. O.; Newell, A. C.; Zakharov, V. E.

    2007-01-01

    We wish to transmit messages to and from a hypersonic vehicle around which a plasma sheath has formed. For long distance transmission, the signal carrying these messages must be necessarily low frequency, typically 2 GHz, to which the plasma sheath is opaque. The idea is to use the plasma properties to make the plasma sheath appear transparent

  19. Lane-changing behavior and its effect on energy dissipation using full velocity difference model

    Wang, Jian; Ding, Jian-Xun; Shi, Qin; Kühne, Reinhart D.

    2016-07-01

    In real urban traffic, roadways are usually multilane with lane-specific velocity limits. Most previous researches are derived from single-lane car-following theory which in the past years has been extensively investigated and applied. In this paper, we extend the continuous single-lane car-following model (full velocity difference model) to simulate the three-lane-changing behavior on an urban roadway which consists of three lanes. To meet incentive and security requirements, a comprehensive lane-changing rule set is constructed, taking safety distance and velocity difference into consideration and setting lane-specific speed restriction for each lane. We also investigate the effect of lane-changing behavior on distribution of cars, velocity, headway, fundamental diagram of traffic and energy dissipation. Simulation results have demonstrated asymmetric lane-changing “attraction” on changeable lane-specific speed-limited roadway, which leads to dramatically increasing energy dissipation.

  20. boundary dissipation

    Mehmet Camurdan

    1998-01-01

    are coupled by appropriate trace operators. This overall model differs from those previously studied in the literature in that the elastic chamber floor is here more realistically modeled by a hyperbolic Kirchoff equation, rather than by a parabolic Euler-Bernoulli equation with Kelvin-Voight structural damping, as in past literature. Thus, the hyperbolic/parabolic coupled system of past literature is replaced here by a hyperbolic/hyperbolic coupled model. The main result of this paper is a uniform stabilization of the coupled PDE system by a (physically appealing boundary dissipation.

  1. Scaling Behaviour of Different Polymer Models in Dissipative Particle Dynamics of Unentangled Melts

    Posel, Zbyšek; Rousseau, B.; Lísal, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 15 (2014), s. 1274-1289 ISSN 0892-7022 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-02938S Grant - others:GA UJEP(CZ) 53222 15 0008 01; CNRS-ASRT(FR) 20206 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : coarse-grain potential * dissipative particle dynamics * rouse model Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.133, year: 2014

  2. Rate concept and retarded master equations for dissipative tight-binding models

    Egger, R.; Mak, C.H.; Weiss, U.

    1994-01-01

    Employing a ''noninteracting-cluster approximation,'' the dynamics of multistate dissipative tight-binding models has been formulated in terms of a set of generalized retarded master equations. The rates for the various pathways are expressed as power series in the intersite couplings. We apply this to the superexchange mechanism, which is relevant for bacterial photosynthesis and bridged electron transfer systems. This approach provides a general and unified description of both incoherent and coherent transport

  3. Modelling of radio frequency sheath and fast wave coupling on the realistic ion cyclotron resonant antenna surroundings and the outer wall

    Lu, L.; Colas, L.; Jacquot, J.; Després, B.; Heuraux, S.; Faudot, E.; Van Eester, D.; Crombé, K.; Křivská, A.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Helou, W.; Hillairet, J.

    2018-03-01

    In order to model the sheath rectification in a realistic geometry over the size of ion cyclotron resonant heating (ICRH) antennas, the self-consistent sheaths and waves for ICH (SSWICH) code couples self-consistently the RF wave propagation and the DC SOL biasing via nonlinear RF and DC sheath boundary conditions applied at plasma/wall interfaces. A first version of SSWICH had 2D (toroidal and radial) geometry, rectangular walls either normal or parallel to the confinement magnetic field B 0 and only included the evanescent slow wave (SW) excited parasitically by the ICRH antenna. The main wave for plasma heating, the fast wave (FW) plays no role on the sheath excitation in this version. A new version of the code, 2D SSWICH-full wave, was developed based on the COMSOL software, to accommodate full RF field polarization and shaped walls tilted with respect to B 0 . SSWICH-full wave simulations have shown the mode conversion of FW into SW occurring at the sharp corners where the boundary shape varies rapidly. It has also evidenced ‘far-field’ sheath oscillations appearing at the shaped walls with a relatively long magnetic connection length to the antenna, that are only accessible to the propagating FW. Joint simulation, conducted by SSWICH-full wave within a multi-2D approach excited using the 3D wave coupling code (RAPLICASOL), has recovered the double-hump poloidal structure measured in the experimental temperature and potential maps when only the SW is modelled. The FW contribution on the potential poloidal structure seems to be affected by the 3D effects, which was ignored in the current stage. Finally, SSWICH-full wave simulation revealed the left-right asymmetry that has been observed extensively in the unbalanced strap feeding experiments, suggesting that the spatial proximity effects in RF sheath excitation, studied for SW only previously, is still important in the vicinity of the wave launcher under full wave polarizations.

  4. Sequential modelling of ICRF wave near RF fields and asymptotic RF sheaths description for AUG ICRF antennas

    Jacquot Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A sequence of simulations is performed with RAPLICASOL and SSWICH to compare two AUG ICRF antennas. RAPLICASOL outputs have been used as input to SSWICH-SW for the AUG ICRF antennas. Using parallel electric field maps and the scattering matrix produced by RAPLICASOL, SSWICH-SW, reduced to its asymptotic part, is able to produce a 2D radial/poloidal map of the DC plasma potential accounting for the antenna input settings (total power, power balance, phasing. Two models of antennas are compared: 2-strap antenna vs 3-strap antenna. The 2D DC potential structures are correlated to structures of the parallel electric field map for different phasing and power balance. The overall DC plasma potential on the 3-strap antenna is lower due to better global RF currents compensation. Spatial proximity between regions of high RF electric field and regions where high DC plasma potentials are observed is an important factor for sheath rectification.

  5. Dissipative environment may improve the quantum annealing performances of the ferromagnetic p -spin model

    Passarelli, G.; De Filippis, G.; Cataudella, V.; Lucignano, P.

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the quantum annealing of the ferromagnetic p -spin model in a dissipative environment (p =5 and p =7 ). This model, in the large-p limit, codifies Grover's algorithm for searching in an unsorted database [L. K. Grover, Proceedings of the 28th Annual ACM Symposium on Theory of Computing (ACM, New York, 1996), pp. 212-219]. The dissipative environment is described by a phonon bath in thermal equilibrium at finite temperature. The dynamics is studied in the framework of a Lindblad master equation for the reduced density matrix describing only the spins. Exploiting the symmetries of our model Hamiltonian, we can describe many spins and extrapolate expected trends for large N and p . While at weak system-bath coupling the dissipative environment has detrimental effects on the annealing results, we show that in the intermediate-coupling regime, the phonon bath seems to speed up the annealing at low temperatures. This improvement in the performance is likely not due to thermal fluctuation but rather arises from a correlated spin-bath state and persists even at zero temperature. This result may pave the way to a new scenario in which, by appropriately engineering the system-bath coupling, one may optimize quantum annealing performances below either the purely quantum or the classical limit.

  6. Sheath waves, non collisional dampings

    Marec, Jean Lucien Ernest

    1974-01-01

    When a metallic conductor is inserted into an ionised gas, an area of electron depletion is formed between the conductor and the plasma: the ionic sheath. Moreover, if the conductor is excited by an electric field, this ionic sheath plays an important role with respect to microwave properties. In this research thesis, the author addresses the range of frequencies smaller than the plasma frequency, and reports the study of resonance phenomena. After a presentation of the problem through a bibliographical study, the author recalls general characteristics of sheath wave propagation and of sheath resonances, and discusses the validity of different hypotheses (for example and among others, electrostatic approximations, cold plasma). Then, the author more particularly addresses theoretical problems related to non collisional dampings: brief bibliographical study, detailed presentation and description of the theoretical model, damping calculation methods. The author then justifies the design and performance of an experiment, indicates measurement methods used to determine plasma characteristics as well as other magnitudes which allow the description of mechanisms of propagation and damping of sheath waves. Experimental results are finally presented with respect to various parameters. The author discusses to which extent the chosen theoretical model is satisfying [fr

  7. An improved mixing model providing joint statistics of scalar and scalar dissipation

    Meyer, Daniel W. [Department of Energy Resources Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Jenny, Patrick [Institute of Fluid Dynamics, ETH Zurich (Switzerland)

    2008-11-15

    For the calculation of nonpremixed turbulent flames with thin reaction zones the joint probability density function (PDF) of the mixture fraction and its dissipation rate plays an important role. The corresponding PDF transport equation involves a mixing model for the closure of the molecular mixing term. Here, the parameterized scalar profile (PSP) mixing model is extended to provide the required joint statistics. Model predictions are validated using direct numerical simulation (DNS) data of a passive scalar mixing in a statistically homogeneous turbulent flow. Comparisons between the DNS and the model predictions are provided, which involve different initial scalar-field lengthscales. (author)

  8. Nonlocal superelastic model of size-dependent hardening and dissipation in single crystal Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloys.

    Qiao, Lei; Rimoli, Julian J; Chen, Ying; Schuh, Christopher A; Radovitzky, Raul

    2011-02-25

    We propose a nonlocal continuum model to describe the size-dependent superelastic effect observed in recent experiments of single crystal Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloys. The model introduces two length scales, one in the free energy and one in the dissipation, which account for the size-dependent hardening and dissipation in the loading and unloading response of micro- and nanopillars subject to compression tests. The information provided by the model suggests that the size dependence observed in the dissipation is likely to be associated with a nonuniform evolution of the distribution of the austenitic and martensitic phases during the loading cycle. © 2011 American Physical Society

  9. Scalar Dissipation Modeling for Passive and Active Scalars: a priori Study Using Direct Numerical Simulation

    Selle, L. C.; Bellan, Josette

    2006-01-01

    Transitional databases from Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of three-dimensional mixing layers for single-phase flows and two-phase flows with evaporation are analyzed and used to examine the typical hypothesis that the scalar dissipation Probability Distribution Function (PDF) may be modeled as a Gaussian. The databases encompass a single-component fuel and four multicomponent fuels, two initial Reynolds numbers (Re), two mass loadings for two-phase flows and two free-stream gas temperatures. Using the DNS calculated moments of the scalar-dissipation PDF, it is shown, consistent with existing experimental information on single-phase flows, that the Gaussian is a modest approximation of the DNS-extracted PDF, particularly poor in the range of the high scalar-dissipation values, which are significant for turbulent reaction rate modeling in non-premixed flows using flamelet models. With the same DNS calculated moments of the scalar-dissipation PDF and making a change of variables, a model of this PDF is proposed in the form of the (beta)-PDF which is shown to approximate much better the DNS-extracted PDF, particularly in the regime of the high scalar-dissipation values. Several types of statistical measures are calculated over the ensemble of the fourteen databases. For each statistical measure, the proposed (beta)-PDF model is shown to be much superior to the Gaussian in approximating the DNS-extracted PDF. Additionally, the agreement between the DNS-extracted PDF and the (beta)-PDF even improves when the comparison is performed for higher initial Re layers, whereas the comparison with the Gaussian is independent of the initial Re values. For two-phase flows, the comparison between the DNS-extracted PDF and the (beta)-PDF also improves with increasing free-stream gas temperature and mass loading. The higher fidelity approximation of the DNS-extracted PDF by the (beta)-PDF with increasing Re, gas temperature and mass loading bodes well for turbulent reaction rate

  10. Influence of Dissipative Particle Dynamics parameters and wall models on planar micro-channel flows

    Wang, Yuyi; She, Jiangwei; Zhou, Zhe-Wei; microflow Group Team

    2017-11-01

    Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) is a very effective approach in simulating mesoscale hydrodynamics. The influence of solid boundaries and DPD parameters are typically very strong in DPD simulations. The present work studies a micro-channel Poisseuille flow. Taking the neutron scattering experiment and molecular dynamics simulation result as bench mark, the DPD results of density distribution and velocity profile are systematically studied. The influence of different levels of coarse-graining, the number densities of wall and fluid, conservative force coefficients, random and dissipative force coefficients, different wall model and reflective boundary conditions are discussed. Some mechanisms behind such influences are discussed and the artifacts in the simulation are identified with the bench mark. Chinese natural science foundation (A020405).

  11. Self-consistent radial sheath

    Hazeltine, R.D.

    1988-12-01

    The boundary layer arising in the radial vicinity of a tokamak limiter is examined, with special reference to the TEXT tokamak. It is shown that sheath structure depends upon the self-consistent effects of ion guiding-center orbit modification, as well as the radial variation of E /times/ B-induced toroidal rotation. Reasonable agreement with experiment is obtained from an idealized model which, however simplified, preserves such self-consistent effects. It is argued that the radial sheath, which occurs whenever confining magnetic field-lines lie in the plasma boundary surface, is an object of some intrinsic interest. It differs from the more familiar axial sheath because magnetized charges respond very differently to parallel and perpendicular electric fields. 11 refs., 1 fig

  12. Multiscale Modeling of Blood Flow: Coupling Finite Elements with Smoothed Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    Moreno Chaparro, Nicolas; Vignal, Philippe; Li, Jun; Calo, Victor M.

    2013-01-01

    A variational multi scale approach to model blood flow through arteries is proposed. A finite element discretization to represent the coarse scales (macro size), is coupled to smoothed dissipative particle dynamics that captures the fine scale features (micro scale). Blood is assumed to be incompressible, and flow is described through the Navier Stokes equation. The proposed cou- pling is tested with two benchmark problems, in fully coupled systems. Further refinements of the model can be incorporated in order to explicitly include blood constituents and non-Newtonian behavior. The suggested algorithm can be used with any particle-based method able to solve the Navier-Stokes equation.

  13. Thermo-electric transport in gauge/gravity models with momentum dissipation

    Amoretti, Andrea; Braggio, Alessandro; Maggiore, Nicola; Magnoli, Nicodemo; Musso, Daniele

    2014-09-01

    We present a systematic definition and analysis of the thermo-electric linear response in gauge/gravity systems focusing especially on models with massive gravity in the bulk and therefore momentum dissipation in the dual field theory. A precise treatment of finite counter-terms proves to be essential to yield a consistent physical picture whose hydrodynamic and beyond-hydrodynamics behaviors noticeably match with field theoretical expectations. The model furnishes a possible gauge/gravity description of the crossover from the quantum-critical to the disorder-dominated Fermi-liquid behaviors, as expected in graphene.

  14. Modeling heat dissipation at the nanoscale: an embedding approach for chemical reaction dynamics on metal surfaces.

    Meyer, Jörg; Reuter, Karsten

    2014-04-25

    We present an embedding technique for metallic systems that makes it possible to model energy dissipation into substrate phonons during surface chemical reactions from first principles. The separation of chemical and elastic contributions to the interaction potential provides a quantitative description of both electronic and phononic band structure. Application to the dissociation of O2 at Pd(100) predicts translationally "hot" oxygen adsorbates as a consequence of the released adsorption energy (ca. 2.6 eV). This finding questions the instant thermalization of reaction enthalpies generally assumed in models of heterogeneous catalysis. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Kovacs effect and fluctuation-dissipation relations in 1D kinetically constrained models

    Buhot, Arnaud

    2003-01-01

    Strong and fragile glass relaxation behaviours are obtained simply changing the constraints of the kinetically constrained Ising chain from symmetric to purely asymmetric. We study the out-of-equilibrium dynamics of these two models focusing on the Kovacs effect and the fluctuation-dissipation (FD) relations. The Kovacs or memory effect, commonly observed in structural glasses, is present for both constraints but enhanced with the asymmetric ones. Most surprisingly, the related FD relations satisfy the FD theorem in both cases. This result strongly differs from the simple quenching procedure where the asymmetric model presents strong deviations from the FD theorem

  16. Multiscale Modeling of Blood Flow: Coupling Finite Elements with Smoothed Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    Moreno Chaparro, Nicolas

    2013-06-01

    A variational multi scale approach to model blood flow through arteries is proposed. A finite element discretization to represent the coarse scales (macro size), is coupled to smoothed dissipative particle dynamics that captures the fine scale features (micro scale). Blood is assumed to be incompressible, and flow is described through the Navier Stokes equation. The proposed cou- pling is tested with two benchmark problems, in fully coupled systems. Further refinements of the model can be incorporated in order to explicitly include blood constituents and non-Newtonian behavior. The suggested algorithm can be used with any particle-based method able to solve the Navier-Stokes equation.

  17. Linear Multivariable Regression Models for Prediction of Eddy Dissipation Rate from Available Meteorological Data

    MCKissick, Burnell T. (Technical Monitor); Plassman, Gerald E.; Mall, Gerald H.; Quagliano, John R.

    2005-01-01

    Linear multivariable regression models for predicting day and night Eddy Dissipation Rate (EDR) from available meteorological data sources are defined and validated. Model definition is based on a combination of 1997-2000 Dallas/Fort Worth (DFW) data sources, EDR from Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS) deployment data, and regression variables primarily from corresponding Automated Surface Observation System (ASOS) data. Model validation is accomplished through EDR predictions on a similar combination of 1994-1995 Memphis (MEM) AVOSS and ASOS data. Model forms include an intercept plus a single term of fixed optimal power for each of these regression variables; 30-minute forward averaged mean and variance of near-surface wind speed and temperature, variance of wind direction, and a discrete cloud cover metric. Distinct day and night models, regressing on EDR and the natural log of EDR respectively, yield best performance and avoid model discontinuity over day/night data boundaries.

  18. A generalized model for optimal transport of images including dissipation and density modulation

    Maas, Jan

    2015-11-01

    © EDP Sciences, SMAI 2015. In this paper the optimal transport and the metamorphosis perspectives are combined. For a pair of given input images geodesic paths in the space of images are defined as minimizers of a resulting path energy. To this end, the underlying Riemannian metric measures the rate of transport cost and the rate of viscous dissipation. Furthermore, the model is capable to deal with strongly varying image contrast and explicitly allows for sources and sinks in the transport equations which are incorporated in the metric related to the metamorphosis approach by Trouvé and Younes. In the non-viscous case with source term existence of geodesic paths is proven in the space of measures. The proposed model is explored on the range from merely optimal transport to strongly dissipative dynamics. For this model a robust and effective variational time discretization of geodesic paths is proposed. This requires to minimize a discrete path energy consisting of a sum of consecutive image matching functionals. These functionals are defined on corresponding pairs of intensity functions and on associated pairwise matching deformations. Existence of time discrete geodesics is demonstrated. Furthermore, a finite element implementation is proposed and applied to instructive test cases and to real images. In the non-viscous case this is compared to the algorithm proposed by Benamou and Brenier including a discretization of the source term. Finally, the model is generalized to define discrete weighted barycentres with applications to textures and objects.

  19. Diffusion model analyses of the experimental data of 12C+27Al, 40Ca dissipative collisions

    SHEN Wen-qing; QIAO Wei-min; ZHU Yong-tai; ZHAN Wen-long

    1985-01-01

    Assuming that the intermediate system decays with a statistical lifetime, the general behavior of the threefold differential cross section d 3 tau/dZdEdtheta in the dissipative collisions of 68 MeV 12 C+ 27 Al and 68.6 MeV 12 C+ 40 Ca system is analyzed in the diffusion model framework. The lifetime of the intermediate system and the separation distance for the completely damped deep-inelastic component are obtained. The calculated results and the experimental data of the angular distributions and Wilczynski plots are compared. The probable reasons for the differences between them are briefly discussed

  20. Three-dimensional modeling of electron quasiviscous dissipation in guide-field magnetic reconnection

    Hesse, Michael; Kuznetsova, Masha; Schindler, Karl; Birn, Joachim

    2005-01-01

    A numerical study of guide-field magnetic reconnection in a three-dimensional model is presented. Starting from an initial, perturbed, force-free current sheet, it is shown that reconnection develops to an almost translationally invariant state, where magnetic perturbations are aligned primarily along the main current flow direction. An analysis of guide-field and electron flow signatures indicates behavior that is very similar to earlier, albeit not three-dimensional, simulations. Furthermore, a detailed investigation of electron pressure nongyrotropies in the central diffusion region confirms the major role the associated dissipation process plays in establishing the reconnection electric field

  1. Analytical and numerical modelling of thermoviscous shocks in their interactions in nonlinear fluids including dissipation

    Rasmussen, Anders Rønne; Sørensen, Mads Peter; Gaididei, Yuri Borisovich

    2010-01-01

    A wave equation, that governs finite amplitude acoustic disturbances in a thermoviscous Newtonian fluid, and includes nonlinear terms up to second order, is proposed. The equation preserves the Hamiltonian structure of the fundamental fluid dynamical equations in the non dissipative limit. An exact...... thermoviscous shock solution is derived. This solution is, in an overall sense, equivalent to the Taylor shock solution of the Burgers equation. However, in contrast to the Burgers equation, the model equation considered here is capable to describe waves propagating in opposite directions. Studies of head...

  2. Dissipation in adiabatic quantum computers: lessons from an exactly solvable model

    Keck, Maximilian; Montangero, Simone; Santoro, Giuseppe E.; Fazio, Rosario; Rossini, Davide

    2017-11-01

    We introduce and study the adiabatic dynamics of free-fermion models subject to a local Lindblad bath and in the presence of a time-dependent Hamiltonian. The merit of these models is that they can be solved exactly, and will help us to study the interplay between nonadiabatic transitions and dissipation in many-body quantum systems. After the adiabatic evolution, we evaluate the excess energy (the average value of the Hamiltonian) as a measure of the deviation from reaching the final target ground state. We compute the excess energy in a variety of different situations, where the nature of the bath and the Hamiltonian is modified. We find robust evidence of the fact that an optimal working time for the quantum annealing protocol emerges as a result of the competition between the nonadiabatic effects and the dissipative processes. We compare these results with the matrix-product-operator simulations of an Ising system and show that the phenomenology we found also applies for this more realistic case.

  3. How important is the friction model on the modeling of energy dissipation

    Lopez Arteaga, I.; Nijmeijer, H.

    2005-01-01

    Frictional forces arising from the relative motion of two contacting surfaces are a well-known source of energy dissipation. Sometimes this is an unwanted effect of the design, but it can also be intentionally used to increase the damping of a certain system in a simple and cost-effective way. In an

  4. ICRF Faraday shield plasma sheath models: Low and high conductivity limits

    Whealton, J.H.; Ryan, P.M.; Raridon, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    Using a 2-D nonlinear formulation which explicitly considers the plasma edge near a Faraday shield in a self consistent manner, progress is indicated in the modeling of the ion motion for a Faraday shield concept and model suggested by Perkins. Several models are considered which may provide significant insight into the impurities generation for ICRH antennas. 6 refs., 8 figs

  5. Increased Tidal Dissipation Using Advanced Rheological Models: Implications for Io and Tidally Active Exoplanets

    Renaud, Joe P.; Henning, Wade G.

    2018-04-01

    The advanced rheological models of Andrade and Sundberg & Cooper are compared to the traditional Maxwell model to understand how each affects the tidal dissipation of heat within rocky bodies. We find both Andrade and Sundberg–Cooper rheologies can produce at least 10× the tidal heating compared to a traditional Maxwell model for a warm (1400–1600 K) Io-like satellite. Sundberg–Cooper can cause even larger dissipation around a critical temperature and frequency. These models allow cooler planets to stay tidally active in the face of orbital perturbations—a condition we term “tidal resilience.” This has implications for the time evolution of tidally active worlds and the long-term equilibria they fall into. For instance, if Io’s interior is better modeled by the Andrade or Sundberg–Cooper rheologies, the number of possible resonance-forming scenarios that still produce a hot, modern Io is expanded, and these scenarios do not require an early formation of the Laplace resonance. The two primary empirical parameters that define the Andrade anelasticity are examined in several phase spaces to provide guidance on how their uncertainties impact tidal outcomes, as laboratory studies continue to constrain their real values. We provide detailed reference tables on the fully general equations required for others to insert the models of Andrade and Sundberg–Cooper into standard tidal formulae. Lastly, we show that advanced rheologies can greatly impact the heating of short-period exoplanets and exomoons, while the properties of tidal resilience could mean a greater number of tidally active worlds among all extrasolar systems.

  6. Modeling non-linear micromechanics of hydrogels using dissipative particle dynamics

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto; Alexeev, Alexander

    In response to an appropriate external stimulus microgels are capable of undergoing large and reversible changes in volume (10-20 times) which has made them attractive as microscopic actuators and drug delivery agents. However, the mechanics of microgels is not well understood in part due to inhomogeneities within the network. Full-scale atomistic modeling of micrometer-sized gel networks is currently not possible due to the large length and time scales involved. We develop a mesoscale model based on dissipative particle dynamics to examine the mechanics of microgels in solvent. By varying the osmotic pressure of the gels we probe the changes in bulk modulus for different values of the Flory-Huggins parameter. We examine how the bulk modulus depends on inhomogeneities we introduce within the gel structure by altering the crosslink density and by embedding rigid nanoparticles. Financial support provided by NSF CAREER Award (DMR-1255288) and NSF Graduate Research Fellowship, Grant No. DGE-1650044.

  7. Nano-colloid electrophoretic transport: Fully explicit modelling via dissipative particle dynamics

    Hassanzadeh Afrouzi, Hamid; Farhadi, Mousa; Sedighi, Kurosh; Moshfegh, Abouzar

    2018-02-01

    In present study, a novel fully explicit approach using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method is introduced for modelling electrophoretic transport of nano-colloids in an electrolyte solution. Slater type charge smearing function included in 3D Ewald summation method is employed to treat electrostatic interaction. Moreover, capability of different thermostats are challenged to control the system temperature and study the dynamic response of colloidal electrophoretic mobility under practical ranges of external electric field in nano scale application (0.072 600 in DPD units regardless of electric field intensity. Nosé-Hoover-Lowe-Andersen and Lowe-Andersen thermostats are found to function more effectively under high electric fields (E > 0.145 [ v / nm ]) while thermal equilibrium is maintained. Reasonable agreements are achieved by benchmarking the radial distribution function with available electrolyte structure modellings, as well as comparing reduced mobility against conventional Smoluchowski and Hückel theories, and numerical solution of Poisson-Boltzmann equation.

  8. A phenomenological model on the kink mode threshold varying with the inclination of sheath boundary

    Sun, X.; Intrator, T. P.; Sears, J.; Weber, T.; Liu, M.

    2013-01-01

    In nature and many laboratory plasmas, a magnetic flux tube threaded by current or a flux rope has a footpoint at a boundary. The current driven kink mode is one of the fundamental ideal magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in plasmas. It has an instability threshold that has been found to strongly depend on boundary conditions (BCs). We provide a theoretical model to explain the transition of this threshold dependence between nonline tied and line tied boundary conditions. We evaluate model parameters using experimentally measured plasma data, explicitly verify several kink eigenfunctions, and validate the model predictions for boundary conditions BCs that span the range between NLT and LT BCs. Based on this model, one could estimate the kink threshold given knowledge of the displacement of a flux rope end, or conversely estimate flux rope end motion based on knowledge of it kink stability threshold

  9. Bunched black (and grouped grey) swans: Dissipative and non-dissipative models of correlated extreme fluctuations in complex geosystems

    Watkins, N. W.

    2013-01-01

    I review the hierarchy of approaches to complex systems, focusing particularly on stochastic equations. I discuss how the main models advocated by the late Benoit Mandelbrot fit into this classification, and how they continue to contribute to cross-disciplinary approaches to the increasingly important problems of correlated extreme events and unresolved scales. The ideas have broad importance, with applications ranging across science areas as diverse as the heavy tailed distributions of intense rainfall in hydrology, after which Mandelbrot named the "Noah effect"; the problem of correlated runs of dry summers in climate, after which the "Joseph effect" was named; and the intermittent, bursty, volatility seen in finance and fluid turbulence.

  10. Predicting NonInertial Effects with Algebraic Stress Models which Account for Dissipation Rate Anisotropies

    Jongen, T.; Machiels, L.; Gatski, T. B.

    1997-01-01

    Three types of turbulence models which account for rotational effects in noninertial frames of reference are evaluated for the case of incompressible, fully developed rotating turbulent channel flow. The different types of models are a Coriolis-modified eddy-viscosity model, a realizable algebraic stress model, and an algebraic stress model which accounts for dissipation rate anisotropies. A direct numerical simulation of a rotating channel flow is used for the turbulent model validation. This simulation differs from previous studies in that significantly higher rotation numbers are investigated. Flows at these higher rotation numbers are characterized by a relaminarization on the cyclonic or suction side of the channel, and a linear velocity profile on the anticyclonic or pressure side of the channel. The predictive performance of the three types of models are examined in detail, and formulation deficiencies are identified which cause poor predictive performance for some of the models. Criteria are identified which allow for accurate prediction of such flows by algebraic stress models and their corresponding Reynolds stress formulations.

  11. Smoothed-particle-hydrodynamics modeling of dissipation mechanisms in gravity waves.

    Colagrossi, Andrea; Souto-Iglesias, Antonio; Antuono, Matteo; Marrone, Salvatore

    2013-02-01

    The smoothed-particle-hydrodynamics (SPH) method has been used to study the evolution of free-surface Newtonian viscous flows specifically focusing on dissipation mechanisms in gravity waves. The numerical results have been compared with an analytical solution of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations for Reynolds numbers in the range 50-5000. We found that a correct choice of the number of neighboring particles is of fundamental importance in order to obtain convergence towards the analytical solution. This number has to increase with higher Reynolds numbers in order to prevent the onset of spurious vorticity inside the bulk of the fluid, leading to an unphysical overdamping of the wave amplitude. This generation of spurious vorticity strongly depends on the specific kernel function used in the SPH model.

  12. Studies of nucleus-nucleus collisions with a schematic liquid-drop model and one-body dissipation

    Donangelo, R; Canto, L F

    1986-03-24

    The inclusion of an asymmetry friction term into the dissipation function of the schematic model of nuclear collisions due to WJ Swiatecki is found to change some of the earlier predictions of the model, in particular the scaling relation for the extra-push and extra-extra-push energies and the existence of a cliff phenomenon. (orig.).

  13. The Child-Langmuir law and analytical theory of collisionless to collision-dominated sheaths

    Benilov, M S

    2009-01-01

    This paper is concerned with summarizing simple analytical models of space-charge sheaths and tracing their relation to the Child-Langmuir model of an ion sheath. The topics discussed include the Child-Langmuir law and model of a collisionless ion sheath, the Mott-Gurney law and model of a collision-dominated ion sheath, the Bohm model of a collisionless ion-electron sheath, the Su-Lam-Cohen model of a collision-dominated ion-electron sheath, ion sheaths with arbitrary collisionality, high-accuracy boundary conditions for the Child-Langmuir and Mott-Gurney models of an ion sheath and the mathematical sense of Child-Langmuir type models of an ion sheath from the point of view of modern theoretical physics.

  14. Theory of the Electron Sheath and Presheath

    Scheiner, Brett; Baalrud, Scott; Yee, Benjamin; Hopkins, Matthew; Barnat, Edward

    2015-09-01

    Electron sheaths are commonly found near Langmuir probes collecting the electron saturation current. The common assumption is that the probe collects the random flux of electrons incident on the sheath, which tacitly implies that there is no electron presheath and that the flux collected is due to a velocity space truncation of the velocity distribution function (VDF). This work provides a dedicated theory of electron sheaths, which suggests that electron sheaths are not so simple. Motivated by VDFs observed in recent Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations, we develop a 1D model for the electron sheath and presheath. In the model, under low temperature plasma conditions, an electron pressure gradient accelerates electrons in the presheath to a flow velocity that exceeds the electron thermal speed at the sheath edge. This pressure gradient allows the generation of large flows compared to those that would be generated by the electric field alone. It is due to this pressure gradient that the electron presheath extends much further into the plasma (nominally by a factor of √{mi /me }) than an analogous ion presheath. Results of the model are compared with PIC simulations. This work was supported by the Office of Fusion Energy Science at the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94SL85000 and by the Office of Science Graduate Student Research (SCGSR) program under Contract Number DE-AC05-06OR23100.

  15. Energy dissipators

    Vischer, D. L; Hager, Willi H; Hager, W. H

    1995-01-01

    .... the book comprises chapters in farious fields such as hydraulic jump, stilling basins, ski jumps and plunge pools but introduces also a general account on various methods of dissipation, as well...

  16. Evaluation of two updating methods for dissipative models on a real structure

    Moine, P.; Billet, L.

    1996-01-01

    Finite Element Models are widely used to predict the dynamic behaviour from structures. Frequently, the model does not represent the structure with all be expected accuracy i.e. the measurements realised on the structure differ from the data predicted by the model. It is therefore necessary to update the model. Although many modeling errors come from inadequate representation of the damping phenomena, most of the model updating techniques are up to now restricted to conservative models only. In this paper, we present two updating methods for dissipative models using Eigen mode shapes and Eigen values as behavioural information from the structure. The first method - the modal output error method - compares directly the experimental Eigen vectors and Eigen values to the model Eigen vectors and Eigen values whereas the second method - the error in constitutive relation method - uses an energy error derived from the equilibrium relation. The error function, in both cases, is minimized by a conjugate gradient algorithm and the gradient is calculated analytically. These two methods behave differently which can be evidenced by updating a real structure constituted from a piece of pipe mounted on two viscous elastic suspensions. The updating of the model validates an updating strategy consisting in realizing a preliminary updating with the error in constitutive relation method (a fast to converge but difficult to control method) and then to pursue the updating with the modal output error method (a slow to converge but reliable and easy to control method). Moreover the problems encountered during the updating process and their corresponding solutions are given. (authors)

  17. Modeling of Dissipation Element Statistics in Turbulent Non-Premixed Jet Flames

    Denker, Dominik; Attili, Antonio; Boschung, Jonas; Hennig, Fabian; Pitsch, Heinz

    2017-11-01

    The dissipation element (DE) analysis is a method for analyzing and compartmentalizing turbulent scalar fields. DEs can be described by two parameters, namely the Euclidean distance l between their extremal points and the scalar difference in the respective points Δϕ . The joint probability density function (jPDF) of these two parameters P(Δϕ , l) is expected to suffice for a statistical reconstruction of the scalar field. In addition, reacting scalars show a strong correlation with these DE parameters in both premixed and non-premixed flames. Normalized DE statistics show a remarkable invariance towards changes in Reynolds numbers. This feature of DE statistics was exploited in a Boltzmann-type evolution equation based model for the probability density function (PDF) of the distance between the extremal points P(l) in isotropic turbulence. Later, this model was extended for the jPDF P(Δϕ , l) and then adapted for the use in free shear flows. The effect of heat release on the scalar scales and DE statistics is investigated and an extended model for non-premixed jet flames is introduced, which accounts for the presence of chemical reactions. This new model is validated against a series of DNS of temporally evolving jet flames. European Research Council Project ``Milestone''.

  18. Non-Maxwellian plasma sheaths

    Haines, M.G.

    1998-01-01

    There is much experimental evidence that heat flux to divertor plates or to limiters is very asymmetric. For example, Lowry made measurements on poloidal limiters in JET, Stangeby and McCracken reported asymmetries in several experiments. In 1991 Haines considered the effects on the Child-Langmuir sheaths of having a net current flow. It was found that a sheath that receives more ions than electrons receives more energy flux than a sheath that receives more electrons than ions. We now extend the model to include for the electrons departures from a Maxwellian distribution arising from a net current flow, heat flow and thermoelectric effects in the scrape-off layer (SOL). It is envisaged that a net current flows in the SOL due to applied or induced electric fields, and is of a magnitude similar to that in the adjacent bulk plasma, though reduced due to the lower temperature in the SOL. We employ conventional linear transport theory eg. Braginskii, Epperlein and Haines in which the ions are a stationary Maxwellian. (orig.)

  19. Discovery of intramolecular signal transduction network based on a new protein dynamics model of energy dissipation.

    Cheng-Wei Ma

    Full Text Available A novel approach to reveal intramolecular signal transduction network is proposed in this work. To this end, a new algorithm of network construction is developed, which is based on a new protein dynamics model of energy dissipation. A key feature of this approach is that direction information is specified after inferring protein residue-residue interaction network involved in the process of signal transduction. This enables fundamental analysis of the regulation hierarchy and identification of regulation hubs of the signaling network. A well-studied allosteric enzyme, E. coli aspartokinase III, is used as a model system to demonstrate the new method. Comparison with experimental results shows that the new approach is able to predict all the sites that have been experimentally proved to desensitize allosteric regulation of the enzyme. In addition, the signal transduction network shows a clear preference for specific structural regions, secondary structural types and residue conservation. Occurrence of super-hubs in the network indicates that allosteric regulation tends to gather residues with high connection ability to collectively facilitate the signaling process. Furthermore, a new parameter of propagation coefficient is defined to determine the propagation capability of residues within a signal transduction network. In conclusion, the new approach is useful for fundamental understanding of the process of intramolecular signal transduction and thus has significant impact on rational design of novel allosteric proteins.

  20. Theoretical Consolidation of Acoustic Dissipation

    Casiano, M. J.; Zoladz, T. F.

    2012-01-01

    In many engineering problems, the effects of dissipation can be extremely important. Dissipation can be represented by several parameters depending on the context and the models that are used. Some examples of dissipation-related parameters are damping ratio, viscosity, resistance, absorption coefficients, pressure drop, or damping rate. This Technical Memorandum (TM) describes the theoretical consolidation of the classic absorption coefficients with several other dissipation parameters including linearized resistance. The primary goal of this TM is to theoretically consolidate the linearized resistance with the absorption coefficient. As a secondary goal, other dissipation relationships are presented.

  1. Resolution and Energy Dissipation Characteristics of Implicit LES and Explicit Filtering Models for Compressible Turbulence

    Romit Maulik

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Solving two-dimensional compressible turbulence problems up to a resolution of 16, 384^2, this paper investigates the characteristics of two promising computational approaches: (i an implicit or numerical large eddy simulation (ILES framework using an upwind-biased fifth-order weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO reconstruction algorithm equipped with several Riemann solvers, and (ii a central sixth-order reconstruction framework combined with various linear and nonlinear explicit low-pass spatial filtering processes. Our primary aim is to quantify the dissipative behavior, resolution characteristics, shock capturing ability and computational expenditure for each approach utilizing a systematic analysis with respect to its modeling parameters or parameterizations. The relative advantages and disadvantages of both approaches are addressed for solving a stratified Kelvin-Helmholtz instability shear layer problem as well as a canonical Riemann problem with the interaction of four shocks. The comparisons are both qualitative and quantitative, using visualizations of the spatial structure of the flow and energy spectra, respectively. We observe that the central scheme, with relaxation filtering, offers a competitive approach to ILES and is much more computationally efficient than WENO-based schemes.

  2. Sheath heating in low-pressure capacitive radio frequency discharges

    Wood, B.P.

    1991-01-01

    Capacitively coupled, parallel plate, r.f. discharges are commonly used for materials processing. The electrons in such a discharge gain and lose energy by reflection from the oscillating sheaths which form at the electrodes. Previous models of the electron heating by this mechanism have assumed that the sheath motion is slow compared to the electron thermal velocity, so that the electron energy change from each reflection is small. Here, the heating rate, density, and sheath width relations are derived analytically in the limit of very fast sheath motion. Numerical results are presented spanning the slow and fast limits. Results from particle-in-cell simulations show that in the large-energy-change regime, an electron beam is produced on each sheath expansion. At low pressure, this beam can traverse the plasma and interact with the sheath at the opposite electrode, producing a beam energy and density dependence on the length of the discharge. The beam produces a time and space varying warm tail on the electron energy distribution. Two revised heating models are derived, assuming power-law and two-temperature electron energy distributions, with temporal variation in electron temperature. These revised models yield new predictions for the variation of the power, density, and sheath thickness with applied r.f. voltage. These predictions are compared with simulation results and laboratory experiment. The electron sheath motion is investigated experimentally by observing the signal on a floating probe in the sheath region. This is compared to the signal product by a non-linear circuit model which accounts for the perturbation of the sheath potential by the probe and includes various forms of sheath motion. The experimental observations are consistent with the analytical predictions. Experimental observations of plasma-sheath resonance oscillations are presented which agree with analytical predictions

  3. Simulation of an ITER-like dissipative divertor plasma with a combined edge plasma Navier-Stokes neutral model

    Knoll, D.A.; McHugh, P.R.; Krasheninnikov, S.I.; Sigmar, D.J.

    1996-01-01

    A combined edge plasma/Navier-Stokes neutral transport model is used to simulate dissipative divertor plasmas in the collisional limit for neutrals on a simplified two-dimensional slab geometry with ITER-like plasma conditions and scale lengths. The neutral model contains three momentum equations which are coupled to the plasma through ionization, recombination, and ion-neutral elastic collisions. The neutral transport coefficients are evaluated including both ion-neutral and neutral-neutral collisions. (orig.)

  4. An improved sheath impedance model for the Van Allen Probes EFW instrument: Effects of the spin axis antenna

    Hartley, D. P.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Bounds, S. R.; Averkamp, T. F.; Bonnell, J. W.; Santolík, Ondřej; Wygant, J. R.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 122, č. 4 (2017), s. 4420-4429 ISSN 2169-9380 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH15304 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) AP1401 Program:Akademická prémie - Praemium Academiae Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : antenna sheath impedance * electric field * Van Allen Probes * EFW * EMFISIS * whistler mode waves Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 2.733, year: 2016 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA023597/abstract

  5. Two-phase modelling of thermal dissipation in a natural basin

    Baltrenas, P.; Vaitiekunas, P.; Katinas, V.; Markevicius, A.

    2004-01-01

    The state of two-phase flow 'liquid-gas' has been modeled numerically by the three-dimensional method of complex research of heat and mass transfer. This allows examining the interaction of some transfer processes in a natural cooling basin (the Druksiai lake): the wind power and direction, variable water density, the coefficient of heat conduction and heat transfer of the water-air interface. Combined effect of these natural actions determines the heat amount that the basin is able to dissipate to the surrounding atmospheric media in thermal equilibrium (without changes in the mean water temperature). This paper presents a number of the most widely used expressions for the coefficients of vertical and horizontal heat transfer. On the basis of stream velocity and mean temperature profiles measured in the cooling pond as well as on that of their time variations suggestions are made that the mixing rate at the water surface is caused by natural space - time variation of the wind, and can be described by the value of eddy viscosity coefficient - 1 m2/s (numerical modeling with 0,9-1,3 m2/s). The wind influences the surface of the lake according to the experimental data, i e 1-3 % of the mean wind velocity. The model applies to the weakly wind, approximately 1-5 m/s of the mean wind velocity. Comparison of experimental and numerical results showed a qualitative agreement. For a better quantitative approximation, it is necessary to have more boundary conditions variable with time and to solve unsteady set equations for transfer processes. (author)

  6. Heat dissipation by blood circulation and airway tissue heat absorption in a canine model of inhalational thermal injury.

    Wan, Jiangbo; Zhang, Guoan; Qiu, Yuxuan; Wen, Chunquan; Fu, Tairan

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to further explore heat dissipation by blood circulation and airway tissue heat absorption in an inhalational thermal injury model. Twelve adult male Beagle dogs were divided into four groups to inhale heated air for 10min: the control group, group I (100.5°C), group II (161.5°C), and group III (218°C). The relative humidity and temperature of the inhaled heated air were measured in the heating tube and trachea, as were blood temperatures and flow velocities in both common jugular veins. Formulas were used to calculate the total heat quantity reduction of the heated air, heat dissipation by the blood, and airway tissue heat absorption. The blood temperatures of both the common jugular veins increased by 0.29°C±0.07°C to 2.96°C±0.24°C and the mean blood flow volume after injury induction was about 1.30-1.74 times greater than before injury induction. The proportions of heat dissipated by the blood and airway tissue heat absorption were 68.92%±14.88% and 31.13%±14.87%, respectively. The heat dissipating ability of the blood circulation was demonstrated and improved upon along with tissue heat absorption owing to increased regional blood flow. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  7. Dynamic shear-lag model for understanding the role of matrix in energy dissipation in fiber-reinforced composites.

    Liu, Junjie; Zhu, Wenqing; Yu, Zhongliang; Wei, Xiaoding

    2018-07-01

    Lightweight and high impact performance composite design is a big challenge for scientists and engineers. Inspired from well-known biological materials, e.g., the bones, spider silk, and claws of mantis shrimp, artificial composites have been synthesized for engineering applications. Presently, the design of ballistic resistant composites mainly emphasizes the utilization of light and high-strength fibers, whereas the contribution from matrix materials receives less attention. However, recent ballistic experiments on fiber-reinforced composites challenge our common sense. The use of matrix with "low-grade" properties enhances effectively the impact performance. In this study, we establish a dynamic shear-lag model to explore the energy dissipation through viscous matrix materials in fiber-reinforced composites and the associations of energy dissipation characteristics with the properties and geometries of constituents. The model suggests that an enhancement in energy dissipation before the material integrity is lost can be achieved by tuning the shear modulus and viscosity of a matrix. Furthermore, our model implies that an appropriately designed staggered microstructure, adopted by many natural composites, can repeatedly activate the energy dissipation process and thus improve dramatically the impact performance. This model demonstrates the role of matrix in energy dissipation, and stimulates new advanced material design concepts for ballistic applications. Biological composites found in nature often possess exceptional mechanical properties that man-made materials haven't be able to achieve. For example, it is predicted that a pencil thick spider silk thread can stop a flying Boeing airplane. Here, by proposing a dynamic shear-lag model, we investigate the relationships between the impact performance of a composite with the dimensions and properties of its constituents. Our analysis suggests that the impact performance of fiber-reinforced composites could improve

  8. Predictable topography simulation of SiO2 etching by C5F8 gas combined with a plasma simulation, sheath model and chemical reaction model

    Takagi, S; Onoue, S; Iyanagi, K; Nishitani, K; Shinmura, T; Kanoh, M; Itoh, H; Shioyama, Y; Akiyama, T; Kishigami, D

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a simulation for predicting reactive ion etching (RIE) topography, which is a combination of plasma simulation, the gas reaction model, the sheath model and the surface reaction model. The simulation is applied to the SiO 2 etching process of a high-aspect-ratio contact hole using C 5 F 8 gas. A capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) reactor of an 8-in. wafer was used in the etching experiments. The baseline conditions are RF power of 1500 W and gas pressure of 4.0 Pa in a gas mixture of Ar, O 2 and C 5 F 8 . The plasma simulation reproduces the tendency that CF 2 radical density increases rapidly and the electron density decreases gradually with increasing gas flow rate of C 5 F 8 . In the RIE topography simulation, the etching profiles such as bowing and taper shape at the bottom are reproduced in deep holes with aspect ratios greater than 19. Moreover, the etching profile, the dependence of the etch depth on the etching time, and the bottom diameter can be predicted by this simulation

  9. Dissipative relativistic hydrodynamics

    Imshennik, V.S.; Morozov, Yu.I.

    1989-01-01

    Using the comoving reference frame in the general non-inertial case, the relativistic hydrodynamics equations are derived with an account for dissipative effects in the matter. From the entropy production equation, the exact from for the dissipative tensor components is obtained. As a result, the closed system of equations of dissipative relativistic hydrodynamics is obtained in the comoving reference frame as a relativistic generalization of the known Navier-Stokes equations for Lagrange coordinates. Equations of relativistic hydrodynamics with account for dissipative effects in the matter are derived using the assocoated reference system in general non-inertial case. True form of the dissipative tensor components is obtained from entropy production equation. Closed system of equations for dissipative relativistic hydrodynamics is obtained as a result in the assocoated reference system (ARS) - relativistic generalization of well-known Navier-Stokes equations for Lagrange coordinates. Equation system, obtained in this paper for ARS, may be effectively used in numerical models of explosive processes with 10 51 erg energy releases which are characteristic for flashes of supernovae, if white dwarf type compact target suggested as presupernova

  10. Behavior of collisional sheath in electronegative plasma with q-nonextensive electron distribution

    Borgohain, Dima Rani; Saharia, K.

    2018-03-01

    Electronegative plasma sheath is addressed in a collisional unmagnetized plasma consisting of q-nonextensive electrons, Boltzmann distributed negative ions and cold fluid positive ions. Considering the positive ion-neutral collisions and ignoring the effects of ionization and collisions between negative species and positive ions (neutrals), a modified Bohm sheath criterion and hence floating potential are derived by using multifluid model. Using the modified Bohm sheath criterion, the sheath characteristics such as spatial profiles of density, potential and net space charge density have been numerically investigated. It is found that increasing values of q-nonextensivity, electronegativity and collisionality lead to a decrease of the sheath thickness and an increase of the sheath potential and the net space charge density. With increasing values of the electron temperature to negative ion temperature ratio, the sheath thickness increases and the sheath potential as well as the net space charge density in the sheath region decreases.

  11. A dissipative model of solar system and stability of stationary rotations

    Vilke, V. G.

    2009-04-01

    receives the equations describing movements of the centers of mass of planets and their own rotations. In the offered model takes place a dissipation of the energy which source are internally viscous forces of each planet. The system supposes the first integral - the law of preservation of the kinetic moment concerning the centre of mass of system. As a result of deformations of planets in the law of the universal gravitation which has been written down for material points, there are small conservative amendments. The equations of motion describe motions of the centers of mass of planets and their rotation around of the centers of mass in view of the tidal phenomena and the dissipative forces. The connected system of the equations consists of 3 the vector equations of the second order representing the theorems of motion of the center of mass of planets, and the vector equations of the first order determining changes of the own kinetic moments of each planet. Stationary values of full mechanical energy on the variety set in integral of the kinetic moment, correspond to stationary motions - to rotations of system as rigid body with constant angular velocity around of the centre of mass of all system. Angular velocity of stationary rotation is directed along a constant vector of the kinetic moment, and the axis of rotation is the principal central axis of inertia of system. We shall notice, that deformations of planets in stationary motion are constant, as in system of coordinates rotating with constant angular velocity centrifugal forces and forces of gravitational interaction of planets are constant. Stationary configurations of system are determined according to Routh`s technique as stationary points of the changed potential energy submitted by the sum potential energies of centrifugal and gravitational forces. The first variation of the changed potential energy addresses in zero on a stationary configuration. The judgment about stability stationary configurations is based

  12. Stochastic heating of a single Brownian particle by charge fluctuations in a radio-frequency produced plasma sheath

    Schmidt, Christian; Piel, Alexander

    2015-10-01

    The Brownian motion of a single particle in the plasma sheath is studied to separate the effect of stochastic heating by charge fluctuations from heating by collective effects. By measuring the particle velocities in the ballistic regime and by carefully determining the particle mass from the Epstein drag it is shown that for a pressure of 10 Pa, which is typical of many experiments, the proper kinetic temperature of the Brownian particle remains close to the gas temperature and rises only slightly with particle size. This weak effect is confirmed by a detailed model for charging and charge fluctuations in the sheath. A substantial temperature rise is found for decreasing pressure, which approximately shows the expected scaling with p-2. The system under study is an example for non-equilibrium Brownian motion under the influence of white noise without corresponding dissipation.

  13. Energy conversion and dissipation at dipolarization fronts: Theory, modeling and MMS observations

    Sitnov, M. I.; Motoba, T.; Merkin, V. G.; Ohtani, S.; Cohen, I. J.; Mauk, B.; Vines, S. K.; Anderson, B. J.; Moore, T. E.; Torbert, R. B.; Giles, B. L.; Burch, J. L.

    2017-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is one of the most important energy conversion mechanisms in space plasmas. In the classical picture it converts the energy of antiparallel magnetic fields into the kinetic and thermal energy of accelerated plasma particles in reconnection exhausts. It also involves energy dissipation near the X-line. This classical picture may be substantially modified in real space plasma configurations, such as the dayside magnetopause and the magnetotail. In particular, in the magnetotail the flows of accelerated particles may be strongly asymmetric along the tail with the domination of earthward flows. At the same time, strong energy conversion and even dissipation may occur away from the X-line, in particular, at dipolarization fronts. Here we present a theoretical picture of spontaneous magnetotail reconnection based on 3-D PIC simulations with the focus on plasma bulk flows, energy conversion and dissipation. This picture is compared with some observations from the MMS tail season. An important finding from these observations is that dipolarizations fronts may not only be regions of the total energy conversion with jE>0, but they may also be the sites of energy dissipation, both positive (jE'>0, E' is the electric field E in the system moving with one of the plasma species) and negative (jE'braking).

  14. A non-equilibrium phase transition in a dissipative forest model

    Messer, Joachim A.

    2009-01-01

    The shape of the biostress force for a stressed Lotka-Volterra network is for the first time derived from Lindblad's dissipative dynamics. Numerical solutions for stressed prey-predator systems with limited resources show a threshold. A non-equilibrium phase transition to a phase with ecosystem dying after a few enforced oscillations (waldsterben phase) occurs.

  15. Experimental investigation of plasma sheaths in magnetic mirror and cusp configurations

    Jiang, Zhengqi; Wei, Zi-an; Ma, J. X.

    2017-11-01

    Sheath structures near a metal plate in a magnetized plasma were experimentally investigated in magnetic mirror and cusp configurations. Plasma parameters and the sheath potential distributions were probed by a planar and an emissive probe, respectively. The measured sheath profiles in the mirror configuration show that the sheath thickness first decreases and then increases when the magnetic strength is raised. A magnetic flux-tube model was used to explain this result. In the cusp configuration, the measured sheath thickness decreases with the increase of the coil current creating the magnetic cusp. However, when normalized by the electron Debye length, the dependence of the sheath thickness on the coil current is reversed.

  16. multi-grids method development for the 3D modeling of the pellet-sheath mechanical interaction. Laboratory internship

    Leclerc, Willy

    2010-10-01

    In order to use a better approach to understand fuel behaviour by numerical simulation, Adaptive Mesh Refinement methods could become very useful. Today, the use of classical Finite Element methods do not enable a easy study of the different phenomenon undergone by the fuel. Important nodes number and calculus time are the two first reasons making the simulation hard to use and visualize. Moreover results reliability is difficult to ensure with a such kind of method. Adaptive Mesh Refinement methods advantages are important particularly if we need a quick convergence and a better mesh structure. The purpose of our study will be to push the method forward by explaining his qualities and putting into place 2D and 3D pellet/sheath interaction problem. (author) [fr

  17. Consistent model reduction of polymer chains in solution in dissipative particle dynamics: Model description

    Moreno Chaparro, Nicolas; Nunes, Suzana Pereira; Calo, Victor M.

    2015-01-01

    considerations we explicitly account for the correlation between beads in fine-grained DPD models and consistently represent the effect of these correlations in a reduced model, in a practical and simple fashion via power laws and the consistent scaling

  18. Observation-Based Dissipation and Input Terms for Spectral Wave Models, with End-User Testing

    2014-09-30

    Analysis Branch, NOAA/ NCEP/ EMC, 5200 Auth Road Room, 09 Camp Springs, MD 21746 phone: (301) 763-8000 x 7253 fax: (301)763-8545 email: Hendrik.Tolman...with the hurricane NOPP group of the University of Rhode Island. PI Rogers showed that recent analysis and improvement of the accuracy of the total...swell dissipation across the ocean. Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L06607, 4p 8

  19. The dust motion inside the magnetized sheath - The effect of drag forces

    Pandey, B. P.; Samarian, A.; Vladimirov, S. V.

    2010-01-01

    The isolated charged dust inside the magnetized plasma sheath moves under the influence of the electron and ion drag force and the sheath electrostatic field. The charge on the dust is a function of its radius as well as the value of the ambient sheath potential. It is shown that the charge on the dust determines its trajectory and dust performs the spiraling motion inside the sheath. The location of the turning spiral is determined by the number of negative charge on the dust, which in turn is a function of the dust radius. The back and forth spiraling motion finally causes the dust to move in a small, narrow region of the sheath. For a bigger dust particle, the dust moves closer to the sheath presheath boundary suggesting that the bigger grains, owing to the strong repulsion between the wall and dust, will be unable to travel inside the sheath. Only small, micron-sized grains can travel closer to the wall before repulsion pushes it back toward the plasma-sheath boundary. The temporal behavior of the spiraling dust motion appears like a damped harmonic oscillation, suggesting that the plasma drag force causes dissipation of the electrostatic energy. However, after initial damping, the grain keeps oscillating although with much smaller amplitude. The possible application of the present results to the ongoing sheath experiments is discussed.

  20. Electrospinning jet behaviors under the constraints of a sheath gas

    Yang Zhao

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Increasing the ejection efficiency and uniformity of nanofibers is the key to applications of electrospinning technology. In this work, a novel electrospinning spinneret with a sheath gas passageway is designed. The frictional resistance that stems from the sheath gas provides additional stretching and restriction forces on the jet. The sheath gas also reduces interference and enhances the stability of the charged jet. A bead-on-strain simulation model is built up to determine the constraint effects of the sheath gas. Simulation results show that the sheath gas decreases the motion area and increases the stretching ratio of the liquid jet. The stretching force from the sheath gas decreases the diameter and increases the uniformity of the nanofiber. As the gas pressure increases from 0 kPa to 50 kPa, the critical voltage of the jet ejection decreases from 8.4 kV to 2.5 kV, the diameter of the nanofiber deposition zone decreases from 40 cm to 10 cm, and the diameter of the nanofibers decreases from 557.97 nm to 277.73 nm. The uniformity of nanofibers can be improved significantly using a sheath gas. The sheath gas contributes to the rapid deposition of a uniform nanofibrous membrane and the industrial applications of electrospinning.

  1. What is the size of a floating sheath? An answer

    Voigt, Farina; Naggary, Schabnam; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter

    2016-09-01

    The formation of a non-neutral boundary sheath in front of material surfaces is universal plasma phenomenon. Despite several decades of research, however, not all related issues are fully clarified. In a recent paper, Chabert pointed out that this lack of clarity applies even to the seemingly innocuous question ``What the size of a floating sheath?'' This contribution attempts to provide an answer that is not arbitrary: The size of a floating sheath is defined as the plate separation of an equivalent parallel plate capacitor. The consequences of the definition are explored with the help of a self-consistent sheath model, and a comparison is made with other sheath size definitions. Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft within SFB TR 87.

  2. Essential equivalence of the general equation for the nonequilibrium reversible-irreversible coupling (GENERIC) and steepest-entropy-ascent models of dissipation for nonequilibrium thermodynamics.

    Montefusco, Alberto; Consonni, Francesco; Beretta, Gian Paolo

    2015-04-01

    By reformulating the steepest-entropy-ascent (SEA) dynamical model for nonequilibrium thermodynamics in the mathematical language of differential geometry, we compare it with the primitive formulation of the general equation for the nonequilibrium reversible-irreversible coupling (GENERIC) model and discuss the main technical differences of the two approaches. In both dynamical models the description of dissipation is of the "entropy-gradient" type. SEA focuses only on the dissipative, i.e., entropy generating, component of the time evolution, chooses a sub-Riemannian metric tensor as dissipative structure, and uses the local entropy density field as potential. GENERIC emphasizes the coupling between the dissipative and nondissipative components of the time evolution, chooses two compatible degenerate structures (Poisson and degenerate co-Riemannian), and uses the global energy and entropy functionals as potentials. As an illustration, we rewrite the known GENERIC formulation of the Boltzmann equation in terms of the square root of the distribution function adopted by the SEA formulation. We then provide a formal proof that in more general frameworks, whenever all degeneracies in the GENERIC framework are related to conservation laws, the SEA and GENERIC models of the dissipative component of the dynamics are essentially interchangeable, provided of course they assume the same kinematics. As part of the discussion, we note that equipping the dissipative structure of GENERIC with the Leibniz identity makes it automatically SEA on metric leaves.

  3. Diffusion model analyses of the experimental data of /sup 12/C+/sup 27/Al, /sup 40/Ca dissipative collisions

    Weng-qing, SHEN; Wei-men, QIAO; Yong-tai, ZHU; Wen-long, ZHAN

    1984-11-01

    Assuming that the intermediate system decays with a statistical lifetime, the general behavior of the threefold differential cross section d/sup 3/sigma/dZEdtheta in the dissipative collisions of 68 MeV /sup 12/C+/sup 27/Al and 68.6 MeV /sup 12/C+/sup 40/Ca system are analyzed in the diffusion model framework. The lifetime of the intermediate system and the separation distance for the completely damped deep inelastic component are obtained. The calculated results and the experimental data of the angular distributions and Wilczynski plots are compared. The probable reasons of the differences between them are briefly discussed.

  4. Dissipation of Wave Energy by Cohesive Sediments

    Kaihatu, James M; Sheremet, Alexandru

    2004-01-01

    Wave energy dissipation by bottom muds is studied. A dissipation mechanism which contains explicit expressions of wavenumber modification due to a viscous bottom fluid is incorporated into a nonlinear wave shoaling model...

  5. On the viscous dissipation modeling of thermal fluid flow in a porous medium

    Salama, Amgad

    2011-02-24

    The problem of viscous dissipation and thermal dispersion in saturated porous medium is numerically investigated for the case of non-Darcy flow regime. The fluid is induced to flow upward by natural convection as a result of a semi-infinite vertical wall that is immersed in the porous medium and is kept at constant higher temperature. The boundary layer approximations were used to simplify the set of the governing, nonlinear partial differential equations, which were then non-dimensionalized and solved using the finite elements method. The results for the details of the governing parameters are presented and investigated. It is found that the irreversible process of transforming the kinetic energy of the moving fluid to heat energy via the viscosity of the moving fluid (i.e.; viscous dissipation) resulted in insignificant generation of heat for the range of parameters considered in this study. On the other hand, thermal dispersion has shown to disperse heat energy normal to the wall more effectively compared with the normal diffusion mechanism. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  6. Epoxy cracking in the epoxy-impregnated superconducting winding: nonuniform dissipation of stress energy in a wire-epoxy matrix model

    Tsukamoto, O.; Iwasa, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The authors present the epoxy-crack-induced temperature data of copper wires imbedded in wire-epoxy resin composite model at 4.2 K. The experimental results show that the epoxy-crackinduced temperature rise is higher in the copper wires than in the epoxy matrix, indicating that in stress-induced wire-epoxy failure, stress energy stored in the wire-epoxy matrix is preferrentially dissipated in the wire. A plausible mechanism of the nonuniform dissipation is presented

  7. Stability of the plasma sheath

    Franklin, R.N.

    1979-12-01

    The stability of a collisionless sheath joined to a plasma in the presence of secondary emission of electrons from the sheath boundary is examined in the fluid approximation. Instability is unlikely to occur under floating conditions but if significant currents flow corresponding to increased wall-plasma potentials the system can go unstable. (author)

  8. Electro-Optomechanical Transduction & Quantum Hard-Sphere Model for Dissipative Rydberg-EIT Media

    Zeuthen, Emil

    by two key parameters, the signal transfer efficiency and added noise temperature. In terms of these, we may evaluate its performance in various tasks ranging from classical signal detection to quantum state conversion between, e.g., superconducting circuitry and traveling optical signals. Having...... transduction functionality into the well-established framework of electrical engineering, thereby facilitating its implementation in potential applications such as nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and radio astronomy. We consider such optomechanical sensing of weak electrical signals and discuss how...... in a cold, optically dense cloud with light fields propagating under the condition of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). This can lead to strong and non-linear dissipative dynamics at the quantum level that prevent slow-light polaritons from coexisting within a blockade radius of one another...

  9. Studies on the environmental chemistry and dissipation of 14C-labelled Deltamethrin and Amitraz in model dips

    Musumeci, M.R.; Coelho, P.V.; Luchini, L.C.

    1997-01-01

    The degradation of 14 C-labelled deltamethrin under variable conditions of pH and temperature, leaching of 14 C-labelled amitraz in soil columns and dissipation of these insecticides in model dipping vat was studied. Deltamethrin was stable for 28 d in buffer solutions at pH 4,7 and 8 and at temperature of 14, 28 and 35 deg. C, but degraded in a solution at pH 9. Metabolites identified by TLC corresponded to 3-phenoxybenzoic acid and 3-phenoxybenzyl alcohol. After 75 days of standing in a model dip, about 60% of the total radioactivity was found in the sediment and corresponded mainly to deltamethrin. When 14 C-Amitraz was applied to soil columns, placed under outdoor conditions, 4 months later all of the radiocarbon was found in the upper 10 cm section and about 90% of the recovered radioactivity corresponded with amitraz. A study of the dissipation of amitraz in a field vat showed that after 20 d of use the concentration of amitraz in a field dip decreased from 210 μg/mL to 155 μg/mL. (author)

  10. From dissipative dynamics to studies of heat transfer at the nanoscale: analysis of the spin-boson model.

    Boudjada, Nazim; Segal, Dvira

    2014-11-26

    We study in a unified manner the dissipative dynamics and the transfer of heat in the two-bath spin-boson model. We use the Bloch-Redfield (BR) formalism, valid in the very weak system-bath coupling limit, the noninteracting-blip approximation (NIBA), applicable in the nonadiabatic limit, and iterative, numerically exact path integral tools. These methodologies were originally developed for the description of the dissipative dynamics of a quantum system, and here they are applied to explore the problem of quantum energy transport in a nonequilibrium setting. Specifically, we study the weak-to-intermediate system-bath coupling regime at high temperatures kBT/ħ > ε, with ε as the characteristic frequency of the two-state system. The BR formalism and NIBA can lead to close results for the dynamics of the reduced density matrix (RDM) in a certain range of parameters. However, relatively small deviations in the RDM dynamics propagate into significant qualitative discrepancies in the transport behavior. Similarly, beyond the strict nonadiabatic limit NIBA's prediction for the heat current is qualitatively incorrect: It fails to capture the turnover behavior of the current with tunneling energy and temperature. Thus, techniques that proved meaningful for describing the RDM dynamics, to some extent even beyond their rigorous range of validity, should be used with great caution in heat transfer calculations, because qualitative-serious failures develop once parameters are mildly stretched beyond the techniques' working assumptions.

  11. Electric fields in the sheath formed in a 300 mm, dual frequency capacitive argon discharge

    Barnat, E V; Miller, P A; Hebner, G A; Paterson, A M; Panagopoulos, T; Hammond, E; Holland, J

    2007-01-01

    The spatial structure and temporal evolution of the electric fields in a sheath formed in a dual frequency, 300 mm capacitive argon discharge are measured as functions of relative mixing between a low frequency current and a high frequency current. It is found that the overall structure of the sheath (potential across the sheath and the thickness of the sheath) are dominated by the lower frequency component while (smaller) oscillations in these quantities are dictated by the higher frequency component. Comparisons of the measured spatial and temporal profiles are made for Lieberman's and Robiche et al sheath model and with a particle in a cell calculation

  12. Dynamics of Dust in a Plasma Sheath with Magnetic Field

    Duan Ping; Liu Jinyuan; Gon Ye; Liu Yue; Wang Xiaogang

    2007-01-01

    Dynamics of dust in a plasma sheath with a magnetic field was investigated using a single particle model. The result shows that the radius, initial position, initial velocity of the dust particles and the magnetic field do effect their movement and equilibrium position in the plasma sheath. Generally, the dust particles with the same size, whatever original velocity and position they have, will locate at the same position in the end under the net actions of electrostatic, gravitational, neutral collisional, and Lorentz forces. But the dust particles will not locate in the plasma sheath if their radius is beyond a certain value

  13. The formation of dissipative structures in polymers as a model of synergy

    Khanchich Oleg A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Synergetic is an interdisciplinary area and describes the emergence of various kinds of structures, using the representation of the natural sciences. In this paper we studied the conditions for the appearance of thermodynamically stable amorphous-crystalline supramolecular structures on the basis of practical importance for the production of heat-resistant high-strength polymer fibers semi-rigid systems. It is found that in the process of structure formation in the coagulation of the polymer from solutions having supramolecular structures area a definite geometric shape and dimensions. Pattern formation in such systems can simulate the processes studied synergy. This is occurring in the process of self-organization of dissipative structures, transitions from one structure to another. This most discussed matter of self-organization on the “optical” scale level, are observed spherulites have a “correct” form and certain geometric dimensions comparable to the wavelength of visible light. Previously, this polymer does not crystallize at all considered. It is shown that for the study of supramolecular structures are the most convenient and informative experimental approaches are polarization-optical methods, which are directly “tuned” to the optical anisotropy of the structure and morphology. The great advantage of these methods is also possible to study the kinetics of structure formation processes without interfering the system under study.

  14. Warm intermediate inflation in the Randall-Sundrum II model in the light of Planck 2015 and BICEP2 results: a general dissipative coefficient

    Herrera, Ramon [Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Instituto de Fisica, Valparaiso (Chile); Videla, Nelson [FCFM, Universidad de Chile, Departamento de Fisica, Santiago (Chile); Olivares, Marco [Universidad Diego Portales, Facultad de Ingenieria, Santiago (Chile)

    2015-05-15

    A warm inflationary Universe in the Randall- Sundrum II model during intermediate inflation is studied. For this purpose, we consider the general form for the dissipative coefficient Γ(T, φ) = C{sub φ}(T{sup m})/(φ{sup m-T}), and also we analyze this inflationary model in the weak and strong dissipative regimes. We study the evolution of the Universe under the slow-roll approximation and find solutions to the full effective Friedmann equation in the brane-world framework. In order to constrain the parameters in our model, we consider the recent data from the BICEP2 to Planck 2015 data together with the necessary condition for warm inflation T > H, and also the condition from the weak (or strong) dissipative regime. (orig.)

  15. Turbulence Dissipation Rates in the Planetary Boundary Layer from Wind Profiling Radars and Mesoscale Numerical Weather Prediction Models during WFIP2

    Bianco, L.; McCaffrey, K.; Wilczak, J. M.; Olson, J. B.; Kenyon, J.

    2016-12-01

    When forecasting winds at a wind plant for energy production, the turbulence parameterizations in the forecast models are crucial for understanding wind plant performance. Recent research shows that the turbulence (eddy) dissipation rate in planetary boundary layer (PBL) parameterization schemes introduces significant uncertainty in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Thus, developing the capability to measure dissipation rates in the PBL will allow for identification of weaknesses in, and improvements to the parameterizations. During a preliminary field study at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory in spring 2015, a 915-MHz wind profiling radar (WPR) measured dissipation rates concurrently with sonic anemometers mounted on a 300-meter tower. WPR set-up parameters (e.g., spectral resolution), post-processing techniques (e.g., filtering for non-atmospheric signals), and spectral averaging were optimized to capture the most accurate Doppler spectra for measuring spectral widths for use in the computation of the eddy dissipation rates. These encouraging results lead to the implementation of the observing strategy on a 915-MHz WPR in Wasco, OR, operating as part of the Wind Forecasting Improvement Project 2 (WFIP2). These observations are compared to dissipation rates calculated from the High-Resolution Rapid Refresh model, a WRF-based mesoscale numerical weather prediction model run for WFIP2 at 3000 m horizontal grid spacing and with a nest, which has 750-meter horizontal grid spacing, in the complex terrain region of the Columbia River Gorge. The observed profiles of dissipation rates are used to evaluate the PBL parameterization schemes used in the HRRR model, which are based on the modeled turbulent kinetic energy and a tunable length scale.

  16. The electrostatic cylindrical sheath in a plasma

    Wang Chunhua; Sun Xiaoxia; Bai Dongxue

    2004-01-01

    The electrostatic sheath with a cylindrical geometry in an ion-electron plasma is investigated. Assuming a Boltzmann response to electrons and cold ions with bulk flow, it is shown that the radius of the cylindrical geometry do not affect the sheath potential significantly. The authors also found that the sheath potential profile is steeper in the cylindrical sheath compared to the slab sheath. The distinct feature of the cylindrical sheath is that the ion density distribution is not monotonous. The sheath region can be divided into three regions, two ascendant regions and one descendant region. (author)

  17. Well-posedness and decay for the dissipative system modeling electro-hydrodynamics in negative Besov spaces

    Zhao, Jihong; Liu, Qiao

    2017-07-01

    In Guo and Wang (2012) [10], Y. Guo and Y. Wang developed a general new energy method for proving the optimal time decay rates of the solutions to dissipative equations. In this paper, we generalize this method in the framework of homogeneous Besov spaces. Moreover, we apply this method to a model arising from electro-hydrodynamics, which is a strongly coupled system of the Navier-Stokes equations and the Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations through charge transport and external forcing terms. We show that some weighted negative Besov norms of solutions are preserved along time evolution, and obtain the optimal time decay rates of the higher-order spatial derivatives of solutions by the Fourier splitting approach and the interpolation techniques.

  18. Anode sheath in Hall thrusters

    Dorf, L.; Semenov, V.; Raitses, Y.

    2003-01-01

    A set of hydrodynamic equations is used to describe quasineutral plasma in ionization and acceleration regions of a Hall thruster. The electron distribution function and Poisson equation are invoked for description of a near-anode region. Numerical solutions suggest that steady-state operation of a Hall thruster can be achieved at different anode sheath regimes. It is shown that the anode sheath depends on the thruster operating conditions, namely the discharge voltage and the mass flow rate

  19. Highly dissipative Hénon map behavior in the four-level model of the CO 2 laser with modulated losses

    Pando L., C. L.; Acosta, G. A. Luna; Meucci, R.; Ciofini, M.

    1995-02-01

    We show that the four-level model for the CO 2 laser with modulated losses behaves in a qualitatively similar way as the highly dissipative Hénon map. The ubiquity of elements of the universal sequence, their related symbolic dynamics, and the presence of reverse bifurcations of chaotic bands in the model are reminiscent of the logistic map which is the limit of the Hénon map when the Jacobian equals zero. The coexistence of attractors, its dynamics related to contraction of volumes in phase space and the associated return maps can be correlated with those of the highly dissipative Hénon map.

  20. Dynamic sheath studies in plasma source ion implantation

    Schever, J.T.; Shamim, M.; Conrad, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII) is a non-line-of-sight method for materials processing in which a target is immersed in a plasma and pulse biased to a high negative voltage (∼ 50 kV). A model of the dynamic sheath which forms under these conditions has been developed and applied to planar, cylindrical and spherical geometries. This model assumes that the transient sheath obeys the Child-Langmuir law for space charge limited emission at each instant during the propagation. Ions uncovered by the propagating sheath edge supply the space charge limited current. This yields an equation relating sheath edge velocity to position, which can be integrated to obtain the sheath edge position as a function of time. The same procedure used in cylindrical and spherical geometry results in a similar equation which must be integrated numerically. Comparison of results of experimental measurements, our model and simulation will be presented for the dynamic sheath edge position and target current waveform. Measurements of implanted dose uniformity of wedge shaped targets are also presented

  1. Intelligent system for statistically significant expertise knowledge on the basis of the model of self-organizing nonequilibrium dissipative system

    E. A. Tatokchin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of the modern educational technologies caused by broad introduction of comput-er testing and development of distant forms of education does necessary revision of methods of an examination of pupils. In work it was shown, need transition to mathematical criteria, exami-nations of knowledge which are deprived of subjectivity. In article the review of the problems arising at realization of this task and are offered approaches for its decision. The greatest atten-tion is paid to discussion of a problem of objective transformation of rated estimates of the ex-pert on to the scale estimates of the student. In general, the discussion this question is was con-cluded that the solution to this problem lies in the creation of specialized intellectual systems. The basis for constructing intelligent system laid the mathematical model of self-organizing nonequilibrium dissipative system, which is a group of students. This article assumes that the dissipative system is provided by the constant influx of new test items of the expert and non-equilibrium – individual psychological characteristics of students in the group. As a result, the system must self-organize themselves into stable patterns. This patern will allow for, relying on large amounts of data, get a statistically significant assessment of student. To justify the pro-posed approach in the work presents the data of the statistical analysis of the results of testing a large sample of students (> 90. Conclusions from this statistical analysis allowed to develop intelligent system statistically significant examination of student performance. It is based on data clustering algorithm (k-mean for the three key parameters. It is shown that this approach allows you to create of the dynamics and objective expertise evaluation.

  2. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) dissipation in rhizosphere based on molecular structure and effect size

    Ma Bin; Chen Huaihai; Xu Minmin; Hayat, Tahir; He Yan; Xu Jianming

    2010-01-01

    Rhizoremediation is a significant form of bioremediation for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). This study examined the role of molecular structure in determining the rhizosphere effect on PAHs dissipation. Effect size in meta-analysis was employed as activity dataset for building quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models and accumulative effect sizes of 16 PAHs were used for validation of these models. Based on the genetic algorithm combined with partial least square regression, models for comprehensive dataset, Poaceae dataset, and Fabaceae dataset were built. The results showed that information indices, calculated as information content of molecules based on the calculation of equivalence classes from the molecular graph, were the most important molecular structural indices for QSAR models of rhizosphere effect on PAHs dissipation. The QSAR model, based on the molecular structure indices and effect size, has potential to be used in studying and predicting the rhizosphere effect of PAHs dissipation. - Effect size based on meta-analysis was used for building PAHs dissipation quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models.

  3. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) dissipation in rhizosphere based on molecular structure and effect size

    Ma Bin; Chen Huaihai; Xu Minmin; Hayat, Tahir [Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Subtropical Soil and Plant Nutrition, College of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); He Yan, E-mail: yhe2006@zju.edu.c [Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Subtropical Soil and Plant Nutrition, College of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Xu Jianming, E-mail: jmxu@zju.edu.c [Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Subtropical Soil and Plant Nutrition, College of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China)

    2010-08-15

    Rhizoremediation is a significant form of bioremediation for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). This study examined the role of molecular structure in determining the rhizosphere effect on PAHs dissipation. Effect size in meta-analysis was employed as activity dataset for building quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models and accumulative effect sizes of 16 PAHs were used for validation of these models. Based on the genetic algorithm combined with partial least square regression, models for comprehensive dataset, Poaceae dataset, and Fabaceae dataset were built. The results showed that information indices, calculated as information content of molecules based on the calculation of equivalence classes from the molecular graph, were the most important molecular structural indices for QSAR models of rhizosphere effect on PAHs dissipation. The QSAR model, based on the molecular structure indices and effect size, has potential to be used in studying and predicting the rhizosphere effect of PAHs dissipation. - Effect size based on meta-analysis was used for building PAHs dissipation quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models.

  4. Fluctuation-dissipation relation and stationary distribution of an exactly solvable many-particle model for active biomatter far from equilibrium.

    Netz, Roland R

    2018-05-14

    An exactly solvable, Hamiltonian-based model of many massive particles that are coupled by harmonic potentials and driven by stochastic non-equilibrium forces is introduced. The stationary distribution and the fluctuation-dissipation relation are derived in closed form for the general non-equilibrium case. Deviations from equilibrium are on one hand characterized by the difference of the obtained stationary distribution from the Boltzmann distribution; this is possible because the model derives from a particle Hamiltonian. On the other hand, the difference between the obtained non-equilibrium fluctuation-dissipation relation and the standard equilibrium fluctuation-dissipation theorem allows us to quantify non-equilibrium in an alternative fashion. Both indicators of non-equilibrium behavior, i.e., deviations from the Boltzmann distribution and deviations from the equilibrium fluctuation-dissipation theorem, can be expressed in terms of a single non-equilibrium parameter α that involves the ratio of friction coefficients and random force strengths. The concept of a non-equilibrium effective temperature, which can be defined by the relation between fluctuations and the dissipation, is by comparison with the exactly derived stationary distribution shown not to hold, even if the effective temperature is made frequency dependent. The analysis is not confined to close-to-equilibrium situations but rather is exact and thus holds for arbitrarily large deviations from equilibrium. Also, the suggested harmonic model can be obtained from non-linear mechanical network systems by an expansion in terms of suitably chosen deviatory coordinates; the obtained results should thus be quite general. This is demonstrated by comparison of the derived non-equilibrium fluctuation dissipation relation with experimental data on actin networks that are driven out of equilibrium by energy-consuming protein motors. The comparison is excellent and allows us to extract the non

  5. Fluctuation-dissipation relation and stationary distribution of an exactly solvable many-particle model for active biomatter far from equilibrium

    Netz, Roland R.

    2018-05-01

    An exactly solvable, Hamiltonian-based model of many massive particles that are coupled by harmonic potentials and driven by stochastic non-equilibrium forces is introduced. The stationary distribution and the fluctuation-dissipation relation are derived in closed form for the general non-equilibrium case. Deviations from equilibrium are on one hand characterized by the difference of the obtained stationary distribution from the Boltzmann distribution; this is possible because the model derives from a particle Hamiltonian. On the other hand, the difference between the obtained non-equilibrium fluctuation-dissipation relation and the standard equilibrium fluctuation-dissipation theorem allows us to quantify non-equilibrium in an alternative fashion. Both indicators of non-equilibrium behavior, i.e., deviations from the Boltzmann distribution and deviations from the equilibrium fluctuation-dissipation theorem, can be expressed in terms of a single non-equilibrium parameter α that involves the ratio of friction coefficients and random force strengths. The concept of a non-equilibrium effective temperature, which can be defined by the relation between fluctuations and the dissipation, is by comparison with the exactly derived stationary distribution shown not to hold, even if the effective temperature is made frequency dependent. The analysis is not confined to close-to-equilibrium situations but rather is exact and thus holds for arbitrarily large deviations from equilibrium. Also, the suggested harmonic model can be obtained from non-linear mechanical network systems by an expansion in terms of suitably chosen deviatory coordinates; the obtained results should thus be quite general. This is demonstrated by comparison of the derived non-equilibrium fluctuation dissipation relation with experimental data on actin networks that are driven out of equilibrium by energy-consuming protein motors. The comparison is excellent and allows us to extract the non

  6. Plasma Sheath Behavior in a Coaxial Discharge Device

    EL-Aragi, G.; Soliman, H.M.; Masoud, M.M.

    2001-01-01

    The behavior of the plasma sheath has been studied experimentally and theoretically for 3 kJ coaxial discharge device. The discharge takes place in argon gas with pressure of 0.8 mbar. The experiments are conducted with a 10 kV bank charging voltage, which corresponds to 110 kA peak discharge current with time period of 34 μs. The experimental investigations have been studied using a magnetic probes and a miniature Rogowsky coil. A snowplough model is used to drive an analytical solution of the plasma sheath behavior in axial direction. Measurements of radial distribution of plasma sheath current density J r at the muzzle, show that J r has the following relation, J r is proportional to r -1.1 . From the experimental results and theoretical calculations of axial distribution of azimuthal magnetic field induction and plasma sheath velocity, the inclination angle between the normal of the plasma sheath with the axial distance at any axial position is evaluated and it has approximately a constant value for most axial distances. Also, the axial motion of plasma sheath acceleration is estimated experimentally a max = 0.13 x 10 12 ' cm / s 2 at z = 11 cm and from theoretical calculations a max = 0.15 x 10 12 cm/ s 2 at max z = 1.6 cm. A comparison of the experimental results with the theoretical calculations, under the assumption of the snowplough model are not in agreement. (author)

  7. Transport phenomena in dissipative heavy-ion collisions: the one-body dissipation approach

    Feldmeier, H.

    1987-01-01

    The paper reviews dissipative collisions between two atomic nuclei, with the help of the classical description of Brownian movement and the Langevin equation. The 'one-body dissipation model' for dissipative heavy-ion collisions is discussed, and its predictions are compared with measured data. Special attention is paid to the non-equilibrium relation between friction and diffusion. (U.K.)

  8. Two-dimensional photon-echo spectroscopy at a conical intersection: A two-mode pyrazine model with dissipation

    Sala, Matthieu; Egorova, Dassia

    2016-12-20

    The multi-dimensional electronic spectroscopy of ultrafast nuclear dynamics at conical intersections (CI) is an emerging field of investigation, which profits also from the recent extension of the techniques to the UV domain. We present a detailed computational study of oscillatory signatures in two-dimensional (2D) photon-echo spectroscopy (also known as 2D electronic spectroscopy, 2DES) for the two-mode pyrazine model with dissipation. Conventional 2D signals as well as the resulting beating maps are considered. Although of a reduced character, the model captures quite well all the main signatures of the excited-state dynamics of the molecule. Due to the ultrafast relaxation via the CI and no excited-state absorption from the low-lying dark state, the oscillatory components of the signal are found to be predominantly determined by the ground state bleach contribution. They reflect, therefore, the ground-state vibrational coherence induced in the Raman active mode. Beating maps provide a way to experimentally differentiate between ground state bleach and stimulated emission oscillatory components. The ultrafast decay of the latter constitutes a clear indirect signature of the CI. In the considered model, because of the sign properties of the involved transition dipole moments, the dominance of the ground-state coherence leads to anti-correlated oscillations of cross peaks located at symmetric positions with respect to the main diagonal.

  9. Properties of plasma sheath with ion temperature in magnetic fusion devices

    Liu Jinyuan; Wang Feng; Sun Jizhong

    2011-01-01

    The plasma sheath properties in a strong magnetic field are investigated in this work using a steady state two-fluid model. The motion of ions is affected heavily by the strong magnetic field in fusion devices; meanwhile, the effect of ion temperature cannot be neglected for the plasma in such devices. A criterion for the plasma sheath in a strong magnetic field, which differs from the well-known Bohm criterion for low temperature plasma sheath, is established theoretically with a fluid model. The fluid model is then solved numerically to obtain detailed sheath information under different ion temperatures, plasma densities, and magnetic field strengths.

  10. Experimentation, modelling and simulation of water droplets impact on ballooned sheath of PWR core fuel assemblies in a LOCA situation

    Lelong, Franck

    2010-01-01

    In a pressurized water reactor (PWR), during a Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA), liquid water evaporates and the fuel assemblies are not cooled anymore; as a consequence, the temperature rises to such an extent that some parts of the fuel assemblies can be deformed resulting in 'ballooned regions'. When reflooding occurs, the cooling of these partially blocked parts of the fuel assemblies will depend on the coolant flow that is a mixture of overheated vapour and under-saturated droplets. The aim of this thesis is to study the heat transfer between droplets and hot walls of the fuel rods. In this purpose, an experimental device has been designed in accordance with droplets and wall features (droplet velocity and diameter, wall temperature) representative of LOCA conditions. The cooling of a hot Nickel disk, previously heated by induction, is cooled down by a stream of monodispersed droplet. The rear face temperature profiles are measured by infrared thermography. Then, the estimation of wall heat flux is performed by an inverse conduction technique from these infrared images. The effect of droplet dynamical properties (diameter, velocity) on the heat flux is studied. These experimental data allow us to validate an analytical model of heat exchange between droplet and hot slab. This model is based on combined dynamical and thermal considerations. On the one hand, the droplet dynamics is considered through a spring analogy in order to evaluate the evolution of droplet features such as the spreading diameter when the droplet is squeezed over the hot surface. On the other hand, thermal parameters, such as the thickness of the vapour cushion beneath the droplet, are determined from an energy balance. In the short term, this model will be integrated in a CFD code (named NEPTUNE-CFD) to simulate the cooling of a reactor core during a LOCA, taking into account the droplet/wall heat exchange. (author)

  11. Modeling of polarization phenomena due to RF sheaths and electron beams in magnetized plasma; Modelisation de phenomenes de polarisation par des gaines rf et des faisceaux electroniques dans un plasma magnetise

    Faudot, E

    2005-07-01

    This work investigates the problematic of hot spots induced by accelerated particle fluxes in tokamaks. It is shown that the polarization due to sheaths in the edge plasma in which an electron beam at a high level of energy is injected, can reach several hundreds volts and thus extend the deposition area. The notion of obstructed sheath is introduced and explains the acceleration of energy deposition by the decreasing of the sheath potential. Then, a 2-dimensional fluid modeling of flux tubes in front of ICRF antennae allows us to calculate the rectified potentials taking into account RF polarization currents transverse to magnetic field lines. The 2-dimensional fluid code designed validates the analytical results which show that the DC rectified potential is 50% greater with polarization currents than without. Finally, the simultaneous application of an electron beam and a RF potential reveals that the potentials due to each phenomenon are additives when RF potential is much greater than beam polarization. The density depletion of polarized flux tubes in 2-dimensional PIC (particles in cells) simulations is characterized but not yet explained. (author)

  12. Atomic Structure of Type VI Contractile Sheath from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Salih, Osman; He, Shaoda; Planamente, Sara; Stach, Lasse; MacDonald, James T; Manoli, Eleni; Scheres, Sjors H W; Filloux, Alain; Freemont, Paul S

    2018-02-06

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa has three type VI secretion systems (T6SSs), H1-, H2-, and H3-T6SS, each belonging to a distinct group. The two T6SS components, TssB/VipA and TssC/VipB, assemble to form tubules that conserve structural/functional homology with tail sheaths of contractile bacteriophages and pyocins. Here, we used cryoelectron microscopy to solve the structure of the H1-T6SS P. aeruginosa TssB1C1 sheath at 3.3 Å resolution. Our structure allowed us to resolve some features of the T6SS sheath that were not resolved in the Vibrio cholerae VipAB and Francisella tularensis IglAB structures. Comparison with sheath structures from other contractile machines, including T4 phage and R-type pyocins, provides a better understanding of how these systems have conserved similar functions/mechanisms despite evolution. We used the P. aeruginosa R2 pyocin as a structural template to build an atomic model of the TssB1C1 sheath in its extended conformation, allowing us to propose a coiled-spring-like mechanism for T6SS sheath contraction. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Simulations of rf-driven sheath formation in two dimensions

    Riyopoulos, S.; Grossmann, W.; Drobot, A.; Kress, M.

    1992-01-01

    The results from two-dimensional particle simulations of sheath formation around periodic metal arrays placed inside magnetized plasmas and driven by oscillating voltages are reported. The main goal is the modeling of the plasma interaction with the Faraday bars surrounding the antennas during ion cyclotron tokamak heating. The study of the time-averaged potentials shows that the two-dimensional sheath structure depends on both the sheath length-to-thickness ratio and the inclination of the magnetic lines. The equipotential surfaces form closed, nested cells between adjacent bars. When the magnetic lines are nearly perpendicular to the potential gradients, the ion motion is dominated by the ExB drift, and ion streamlines form vortices around the equipotentials. At larger inclinations of the magnetic lines, the flow decouples from the equipotentials and ion transport is mainly along the potential gradients. The critical angle for the transition from vortex circulation to field aligned flow is computed. The effects of the cross-field ion transport on the sheath properties are discussed. It is shown that the sheath length and the magnetic line inclination affect the sheath scaling in the two-dimensional case. The one-dimensional theory results are recovered in the limit of high length-to-thickness ratio and large inclination of the magnetic lines

  14. Numerical Model for Predicting and Managing Heat Dissipation from a Neural Probe

    2013-05-10

    Distance from Probe Centerline [m] x ‐  3D  Model y ‐  3D  Model r ‐ 2D Model 12 difficult, especially on a micro-scale level. For this reason...of the screws and nuts 180 m across. 20 were of plastic construction. An aluminum sample holder was constructed by the USNA Fabrication Lab...voltage drop across the reference resistor. C. Biosimulant Gel At first, a hydroxyethyl cellulose gel was considered for use as the biosimulant gel, but

  15. Measurements of Dissipation Rate and Velocity/Pressure Gradient Correlation for Improvements to Gas Turbine Turbulent Flow Models

    Simpson, Roger L; Lowe, K. T; Orsi, Edgar

    2006-01-01

    ... Reynolds number turbulent flows. With at least 4 particles at a given instant this results in the fine-spatial-resolution instantaneous measurement of the complete rate-of-strain and vorticity tensors and the dissipative...

  16. On an elastic dissipation model as continuous approximation for discrete media

    I. V. Andrianov

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Construction of an accurate continuous model for discrete media is an important topic in various fields of science. We deal with a 1D differential-difference equation governing the behavior of an n-mass oscillator with linear relaxation. It is known that a string-type approximation is justified for low part of frequency spectra of a continuous model, but for free and forced vibrations a solution of discrete and continuous models can be quite different. A difference operator makes analysis difficult due to its nonlocal form. Approximate equations can be obtained by replacing the difference operators via a local derivative operator. Although application of a model with derivative of more than second order improves the continuous model, a higher order of approximated differential equation seriously complicates a solution of continuous problem. It is known that accuracy of the approximation can dramatically increase using Padé approximations. In this paper, one- and two-point Padé approximations suitable for justify choice of structural damping models are used.

  17. A Lattice-Boltzmann model to simulate diffractive nonlinear ultrasound beam propagation in a dissipative fluid medium

    Abdi, Mohamad; Hajihasani, Mojtaba; Gharibzadeh, Shahriar; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2012-12-01

    Ultrasound waves have been widely used in diagnostic and therapeutic medical applications. Accurate and effective simulation of ultrasound beam propagation and its interaction with tissue has been proved to be important. The nonlinear nature of the ultrasound beam propagation, especially in the therapeutic regime, plays an important role in the mechanisms of interaction with tissue. There are three main approaches in current computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods to model and simulate nonlinear ultrasound beams: macroscopic, mesoscopic and microscopic approaches. In this work, a mesoscopic CFD method based on the Lattice-Boltzmann model (LBM) was investigated. In the developed method, the Boltzmann equation is evolved to simulate the flow of a Newtonian fluid with the collision model instead of solving the Navier-Stokes, continuity and state equations which are used in conventional CFD methods. The LBM has some prominent advantages over conventional CFD methods, including: (1) its parallel computational nature; (2) taking microscopic boundaries into account; and (3) capability of simulating in porous and inhomogeneous media. In our proposed method, the propagating medium is discretized with a square grid in 2 dimensions with 9 velocity vectors for each node. Using the developed model, the nonlinear distortion and shock front development of a finiteamplitude diffractive ultrasonic beam in a dissipative fluid medium was computed and validated against the published data. The results confirm that the LBM is an accurate and effective approach to model and simulate nonlinearity in finite-amplitude ultrasound beams with Mach numbers of up to 0.01 which, among others, falls within the range of therapeutic ultrasound regime such as high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) beams. A comparison between the HIFU nonlinear beam simulations using the proposed model and pseudospectral methods in a 2D geometry is presented.

  18. Intrapontine malignant nerve sheath tumor

    Kozić, Dusko; Nagulić, Mirjana; Samardzić, Miroslav

    2008-01-01

    . On pathological examination, the neoplasm appeared to be an intrapontine nerve sheath tumor originating most likely from the intrapontine segment of one of the cranial nerve fibres. The tumor showed exophytic growth, with consequent spread to adjacent subaracnoid space. MR spectroscopy revealed the presence......The primary source of malignant intracerebral nerve sheath tumors is still unclear We report the imaging and MR spectroscopic findings in a 39-year-old man with a very rare brain stem tumor MR examination revealed the presence of intraaxial brain stem tumor with a partial exophytic growth...

  19. Effective thermal conductivity of a heat generating rod bundle dissipating heat by natural convection and radiation

    Senve, Vinay; Narasimham, G.S.V.L.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Transport processes in isothermal hexagonal sheath with 19 heat generating rods is studied. → Correlation is given to predict the maximum temperature considering all transport processes. → Effective thermal conductivity of rod bundle can be obtained using max temperature. → Data on the critical Rayleigh numbers for p/d ratios of 1.1-2.0 is presented. → Radiative heat transfer contributes to heat dissipation of 38-65% of total heat. - Abstract: A numerical study of conjugate natural convection and surface radiation in a horizontal hexagonal sheath housing 19 solid heat generating rods with cladding and argon as the fill gas, is performed. The natural convection in the sheath is driven by the volumetric heat generation in the solid rods. The problem is solved using the FLUENT CFD code. A correlation is obtained to predict the maximum temperature in the rod bundle for different pitch-to-diameter ratios and heat generating rates. The effective thermal conductivity is related to the heat generation rate, maximum temperature and the sheath temperature. Results are presented for the dimensionless maximum temperature, Rayleigh number and the contribution of radiation with changing emissivity, total wattage and the pitch-to-diameter ratio. In the simulation of a larger system that contains a rod bundle, the effective thermal conductivity facilitates simplified modelling of the rod bundle by treating it as a solid of effective thermal conductivity. The parametric studies revealed that the contribution of radiation can be 38-65% of the total heat generation, for the parameter ranges chosen. Data for critical Rayleigh number above which natural convection comes into effect is also presented.

  20. Spatiotemporal chaos and two-dimensional dissipative rogue waves in Lugiato-Lefever model

    Panajotov, Krassimir; Clerc, Marcel G.; Tlidi, Mustapha

    2017-06-01

    Driven nonlinear optical cavities can exhibit complex spatiotemporal dynamics. We consider the paradigmatic Lugiato-Lefever model describing driven nonlinear optical resonator. This model is one of the most-studied nonlinear equations in optics. It describes a large spectrum of nonlinear phenomena from bistability, to periodic patterns, localized structures, self-pulsating localized structures and to a complex spatiotemporal behavior. The model is considered also as prototype model to describe several optical nonlinear devices such as Kerr media, liquid crystals, left handed materials, nonlinear fiber cavity, and frequency comb generation. We focus our analysis on a spatiotemporal chaotic dynamics in one-dimension. We identify a route to spatiotemporal chaos through an extended quasiperiodicity. We have estimated the Kaplan-Yorke dimension that provides a measure of the strange attractor complexity. Likewise, we show that the Lugiato-Leferver equation supports rogues waves in two-dimensional settings. We characterize rogue-wave formation by computing the probability distribution of the pulse height. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Theory and Applications of the Lugiato-Lefever Equation", edited by Yanne K. Chembo, Damia Gomila, Mustapha Tlidi, Curtis R. Menyuk.

  1. Sheath-accumulating Propagation of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection

    Takahashi, Takuya; Shibata, Kazunari, E-mail: takahasi@kusastro.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto 607–8471 (Japan)

    2017-03-10

    Fast interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) are the drivers of strong space weather storms such as solar energetic particle events and geomagnetic storms. The connection between the space-weather-impacting solar wind disturbances associated with fast ICMEs at Earth and the characteristics of causative energetic CMEs observed near the Sun is a key question in the study of space weather storms, as well as in the development of practical space weather prediction. Such shock-driving fast ICMEs usually expand at supersonic speeds during the propagation, resulting in the continuous accumulation of shocked sheath plasma ahead. In this paper, we propose a “sheath-accumulating propagation” (SAP) model that describes the coevolution of the interplanetary sheath and decelerating ICME ejecta by taking into account the process of upstream solar wind plasma accumulation within the sheath region. Based on the SAP model, we discuss (1) ICME deceleration characteristics; (2) the fundamental condition for fast ICMEs at Earth; (3) the thickness of interplanetary sheaths; (4) arrival time prediction; and (5) the super-intense geomagnetic storms associated with huge solar flares. We quantitatively show that not only the speed but also the mass of the CME are crucial for discussing the above five points. The similarities and differences between the SAP model, the drag-based model, and the“snow-plow” model proposed by Tappin are also discussed.

  2. Dust crystal in the electrode sheath of a gaseous discharge

    Schweigert, I.V.; Schweigert, V.A.

    2002-01-01

    The phenomena observed in strongly coupled dusty plasmas in the electrode sheath of gas discharge clearly indicate that the screened Coulomb potential is not valid for inter-particle interaction. The reason why the conventional model breaks down is clear now. The strong electric field, accelerating ions toward the cathode, leads to an asymmetrical particle shielding and the appearance of an attractive component in the inter-particle force. The sheath plasma with micro-particles is non Hamiltonian system because of input of energy from ion flux from the bulk plasma. The models of interaction potential of microparticles in sheath are proposed. The first is the linear effective positive charge (EPC). On the basis of this model the stability of the dust crystal in the sheath is analyzed both analytically and in MD simulations. The scenario of crystal melting is described. The role of different types of defects in the local heating of the crystal is considered. The next non-linear model of sheath plasma with micro-particles allows to find all parameter of plasma crystal: particle charge, inter-particle distance and study the structural transition. We constructed the analytical expression for inter-particle potential and have found the mechanism acceleration of extra particle beneath the monolayer. Recently new more simple analytical kinetic approach, accounting for ion collisions, have been developed. The structural transition in the dust molecular was obtained in simulation with multipole expansion model interaction potential

  3. Sheath-accumulating Propagation of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection

    Takahashi, Takuya; Shibata, Kazunari

    2017-01-01

    Fast interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) are the drivers of strong space weather storms such as solar energetic particle events and geomagnetic storms. The connection between the space-weather-impacting solar wind disturbances associated with fast ICMEs at Earth and the characteristics of causative energetic CMEs observed near the Sun is a key question in the study of space weather storms, as well as in the development of practical space weather prediction. Such shock-driving fast ICMEs usually expand at supersonic speeds during the propagation, resulting in the continuous accumulation of shocked sheath plasma ahead. In this paper, we propose a “sheath-accumulating propagation” (SAP) model that describes the coevolution of the interplanetary sheath and decelerating ICME ejecta by taking into account the process of upstream solar wind plasma accumulation within the sheath region. Based on the SAP model, we discuss (1) ICME deceleration characteristics; (2) the fundamental condition for fast ICMEs at Earth; (3) the thickness of interplanetary sheaths; (4) arrival time prediction; and (5) the super-intense geomagnetic storms associated with huge solar flares. We quantitatively show that not only the speed but also the mass of the CME are crucial for discussing the above five points. The similarities and differences between the SAP model, the drag-based model, and the“snow-plow” model proposed by Tappin are also discussed.

  4. Coumaphos dissipation, degradation and binding to sediment in a model laboratory vat system using 14C-labelled acaricide

    Khan, S.U.; Behki, R.

    1997-01-01

    Dissipation and degradation of 14 C-labelled coumaphos in suspension and binding to sediment was studied in a model laboratory glass vat was studied. The water in the vat was treated with a mixture of 14 C-labelled and unlabelled coumaphos and initial concentration determined. Two weeks later 50 g soil was added to the suspension and 3 x 25 mL samples taken and analysis. The procedure was repeated every two weeks for 44 weeks. pH was also recorded at each sampling time. At the end of the experiment soil was extracted by using Soxhlet apparatus and by supercritical fluid extraction and concentrations of free and bound coumaphos and metabolites were determined. Very little dissipation of total 14 C occurred and 88% of the initial concentration was still present at the end of 44 weeks. The 14 C content in the filtrate declined to 20% but there was a corresponding increase in the 14 C content of the sediment mixed with emulsion. The pH of the suspension steadily decreased with time. HPLC analysis of the filtrate, soil wash and Soxhlet extract indicated the presence of coumaphos and three metabolites chlorferon, potasan and oxygen analogue of coumaphos. Analysis of supercritical fluid extract of the sediment-bound radioactivity showed the presence of coumaphos but no metabolites. In another study filtered and washed soil from the tank was incubated with an EPTC-degrading bacterial strain, Rhodococcus TE1 to study the effect on the metabolism of coumaphos. About 10.9% of 14 C was released in the incubation mixture and it contained mostly chlorferon with some oxygen analogue of coumaphos. Exposure of 14 C-labelled coumaphos to U.V. and sun lamp, to study photolysis, resulted in the formation of a brown precipitate. While the 14 C content in the filtrate decreased, its concentration in the precipitate increased. The filtrate contained primarily coumaphos, whereas, the precipitate contained coumaphos, chlorferon and potasan. These findings suggest that in the field vat the

  5. Decay of Kadomtsev-Petviashvili lumps in dissipative media

    Clarke, S.; Gorshkov, K.; Grimshaw, R.; Stepanyants, Y.

    2018-03-01

    The decay of Kadomtsev-Petviashvili lumps is considered for a few typical dissipations-Rayleigh dissipation, Reynolds dissipation, Landau damping, Chezy bottom friction, viscous dissipation in the laminar boundary layer, and radiative losses caused by large-scale dispersion. It is shown that the straight-line motion of lumps is unstable under the influence of dissipation. The lump trajectories are calculated for two most typical models of dissipation-the Rayleigh and Reynolds dissipations. A comparison of analytical results obtained within the framework of asymptotic theory with the direct numerical calculations of the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation is presented. Good agreement between the theoretical and numerical results is obtained.

  6. Dynamic Traffic Congestion Simulation and Dissipation Control Based on Traffic Flow Theory Model and Neural Network Data Calibration Algorithm

    Li Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Traffic congestion is a common problem in many countries, especially in big cities. At present, China’s urban road traffic accidents occur frequently, the occurrence frequency is high, the accident causes traffic congestion, and accidents cause traffic congestion and vice versa. The occurrence of traffic accidents usually leads to the reduction of road traffic capacity and the formation of traffic bottlenecks, causing the traffic congestion. In this paper, the formation and propagation of traffic congestion are simulated by using the improved medium traffic model, and the control strategy of congestion dissipation is studied. From the point of view of quantitative traffic congestion, the paper provides the fact that the simulation platform of urban traffic integration is constructed, and a feasible data analysis, learning, and parameter calibration method based on RBF neural network is proposed, which is used to determine the corresponding decision support system. The simulation results prove that the control strategy proposed in this paper is effective and feasible. According to the temporal and spatial evolution of the paper, we can see that the network has been improved on the whole.

  7. Time-dependent shell-model theory of dissipative heavy-ion collisions

    Ayik, S.; Noerenberg, W.

    1982-01-01

    A transport theory is formulated within a time-dependent shell-model approach. Time averaging of the equations for macroscopic quantities lead to irreversibility and justifies weak-coupling limit and Markov approximation for the (energy-conserving) one- and two-body collision terms. Two coupled equations for the occupation probabilities of dynamical single-particle states and for the collective variable are derived and explicit formulas for transition rates, dynamical forces, mass parameters and friction coefficients are given. The applicability of the formulation in terms of characteristic quantities of nuclear systems is considered in detail and some peculiarities due to memory effects in the initial equilibration process of heavy-ion collisions are discussed. (orig.)

  8. On the statistical and transport properties of a non-dissipative Fermi-Ulam model

    Livorati, André L. P.; Dettmann, Carl P.; Caldas, Iberê L.; Leonel, Edson D.

    2015-10-01

    The transport and diffusion properties for the velocity of a Fermi-Ulam model were characterized using the decay rate of the survival probability. The system consists of an ensemble of non-interacting particles confined to move along and experience elastic collisions with two infinitely heavy walls. One is fixed, working as a returning mechanism of the colliding particles, while the other one moves periodically in time. The diffusion equation is solved, and the diffusion coefficient is numerically estimated by means of the averaged square velocity. Our results show remarkably good agreement of the theory and simulation for the chaotic sea below the first elliptic island in the phase space. From the decay rates of the survival probability, we obtained transport properties that can be extended to other nonlinear mappings, as well to billiard problems.

  9. Microscopic nuclear dissipation. Pt. 2

    Yannouleas, C.; Dworzecka, M.; Griffin, J.J.

    1983-01-01

    We have formulated a microscopic, nonperturbative, time reversible model which exhibits a dissipative decay of collective motion for times short compared to the system's Poincare time. The model assumes an RPA approximate description of the initial collective state within a restricted subspace, then traces its time evolution when an additional subspace is coupled to the restricted subspace by certain simplified matrix elements. It invokes no statistical assumptions. The damping of the collective motion occurs via real transitions from the collective state to other more complicated nuclear states of the same energy. It corresponds therefore to the so called 'one-body' long mean free path limit of nuclear dissipation when the collective state describes a surface vibration. When the simplest RPA approximation is used, this process associates the dissipation with the escape width for direct particle emission to the continuum. When the more detailed second RPA is used, it associates the dissipation with the spreading width for transitions to the 2p-2h components of the nuclear compound states as well. The energy loss rate for sharp n-phonon initial states is proportional to the total collective energy, unlike the dissipation of a classical damped oscillator, where it is proportional to the kinetic energy only. However, for coherent, multi-phonon wave packets, which explicitly describe the time-dependent oscillations of the mean field, dissipation proportional only to the kinetic energy is obtained. Canonical coordinates for the collective degree of freedom are explicitly introduced and a nonlinear frictional hamiltonian to describe such systems is specified by the requirement that it yield the same time dependence for the collective motion as the microscopic model. Thus, for the first time a descriptive nonlinear hamiltonian is derived explicitly from the underlying microscopic model of a nuclear system. (orig.)

  10. Ion acceleration in the plasma source sheath

    Birdsall, C.K.

    1986-01-01

    This note is a calculation of the potential drop for a planar plasma source, across the source sheath, into a uniform plasma region defined by vector E = 0 and/or perhaps ∂ 2 PHI/∂ x 2 = 0. The calculation complements that of Bohm who obtained the potential drop at the other end of a plasma, at a planar collector sheath. The result is a relation between the source ion flux and the source sheath potential drop and the accompanying ion acceleration. This planar source sheath ion acceleration mechanism (or that from a distributed source) can provide the pre-collector-sheath ion acceleration as found necessary by Bohm. 3 refs

  11. Design of Cold-Formed Steel Screw Connections with Gypsum Sheathing at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures

    Wei Chen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Load-bearing cold-formed steel (CFS walls sheathed with double layers of gypsum plasterboard on both sides have demonstrated good fire resistance and attracted increasing interest for use in mid-rise CFS structures. As the main connection method, screw connections between CFS and gypsum sheathing play an important role in both the structural design and fire resistance of this wall system. However, studies on the mechanical behavior of screw connections with double-layer gypsum sheathing are still limited. In this study, 200 monotonic tests of screw connections with single- or double-layer gypsum sheathing at both ambient and elevated temperatures were conducted. The failure of screw connections with double-layer gypsum sheathing in shear was different from that of single-layer gypsum sheathing connections at ambient temperature, and it could be described as the breaking of the loaded sheathing edge combined with significant screw tilting and the loaded sheathing edge flexing fracture. However, the screw tilting and flexing fracture of the loaded sheathing edge gradually disappear at elevated temperatures. In addition, the influence of the loaded edge distance, double-layer sheathing and elevated temperatures is discussed in detail with clear conclusions. A unified design formula for the shear strength of screw connections with gypsum sheathing is proposed for ambient and elevated temperatures with adequate accuracy. A simplified load–displacement model with the post-peak branch is developed to evaluate the load–displacement response of screw connections with gypsum sheathing at ambient and elevated temperatures.

  12. Dissipation of Tidal Energy

    2002-01-01

    The moon's gravity imparts tremendous energy to the Earth, raising tides throughout the global oceans. What happens to all this energy? This question has been pondered by scientists for over 200 years, and has consequences ranging from the history of the moon to the mixing of the oceans. Richard Ray at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. and Gary Egbert of the College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Ore. studied six years of altimeter data from the TOPEX/Poseidon satellite to address this question. According to their report in the June 15 issue of Nature, about 1 terawatt, or 25 to 30 percent of the total tidal energy dissipation, occurs in the deep ocean. The remainder occurs in shallow seas, such as on the Patagonian Shelf. 'By measuring sea level with the TOPEX/Poseidon satellite altimeter, our knowledge of the tides in the global ocean has been remarkably improved,' said Richard Ray, a geophysicist at Goddard. The accuracies are now so high that this data can be used to map empirically the tidal energy dissipation. (Red areas, above) The deep-water tidal dissipation occurs generally near rugged bottom topography (seamounts and mid-ocean ridges). 'The observed pattern of deep-ocean dissipation is consistent with topographic scattering of tidal energy into internal motions within the water column, resulting in localized turbulence and mixing', said Gary Egbert an associate professor at OSU. One important implication of this finding concerns the possible energy sources needed to maintain the ocean's large-scale 'conveyor-belt' circulation and to mix upper ocean heat into the abyssal depths. It is thought that 2 terawatts are required for this process. The winds supply about 1 terawatt, and there has been speculation that the tides, by pumping energy into vertical water motions, supply the remainder. However, all current general circulation models of the oceans ignore the tides. 'It is possible that properly

  13. Dissipation of coumaphos acaricide in model cattle dipping vats and soil columns under sub-tropical climate of Delhi

    Jindal, T.; Singh, D.K.; Agarwal, H.C.

    1997-01-01

    The stability of coumaphos was studied in model dipping vats under field conditions using 14 C-labelled and unlabelled coumaphos, with or without additives. Four vats were used each containing 50 litre of water treated with 3.7 MBq 14 C and 10 g (AI) unlabelled coumaphos in 25 mL acetone. Vat 1 was control. Vat 2 and 3 were maintained at pH 5 by addition of superphosphate initially and at regular intervals as required. Vat 3 and 4 were treated with bacteriostat copper sulphate at 0.01 g per litre. The pH of vat 1 and 4 gradually increased with time from initial value of 7 to 8.47 and 7.57 respectively. In vat 1 and 4 the concentration of coumaphos declined from about initial concentration of 200 μg/mL to about 9 μg/mL in 255 days after initial treatment, whereas the persistence of coumaphos was more in vats 2 and 3. The stability of coumaphos in model vats increased significantly by maintaining a pH of 5 by addition of superphosphate. The pesticide residues consisted of 80 % or more of unchanged coumaphos. In addition potasan, chlorferon and 4 - methylumbelliferone were detected in small proportions. In another experiment the effect of pH was studied. Coumaphos was most stable at pH 5 as also observed in model vats under field conditions. Coumaphos did not leach below 10 cm in all the four cases. Dissipation, degradation and bound residue formation was more in case of alkali treated coumaphos than normal coumaphos. Aged residues of vat 3 were reasonably stable as copper sulphate inhibited the degradation of coumaphos in soil by microorganisms. Coumaphos along with the the above three metabolises were detected in the extractable insecticide residues from the soil, though the proportion of metabolises was much more than found in model vats. Again treatment of coumaphos with alkali further increased its metabolism and the soil bound residues were double as compared to untreated coumaphos

  14. Dissipative heavy-ion collisions

    Feldmeier, H.T.

    1985-01-01

    This report is a compilation of lecture notes of a series of lectures held at Argonne National Laboratory in October and November 1984. The lectures are a discussion of dissipative phenomena as observed in collisions of atomic nuclei. The model is based on a system which has initially zero temperature and the initial energy is kinetic and binding energy. Collisions excite the nuclei, and outgoing fragments or the compound system deexcite before they are detected. Brownian motion is used to introduce the concept of dissipation. The master equation and the Fokker-Planck equation are derived. 73 refs., 59 figs

  15. Coronal mass ejections and their sheath regions in interplanetary space

    Kilpua, Emilia; Koskinen, Hannu E. J.; Pulkkinen, Tuija I.

    2017-11-01

    Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) are large-scale heliospheric transients that originate from the Sun. When an ICME is sufficiently faster than the preceding solar wind, a shock wave develops ahead of the ICME. The turbulent region between the shock and the ICME is called the sheath region. ICMEs and their sheaths and shocks are all interesting structures from the fundamental plasma physics viewpoint. They are also key drivers of space weather disturbances in the heliosphere and planetary environments. ICME-driven shock waves can accelerate charged particles to high energies. Sheaths and ICMEs drive practically all intense geospace storms at the Earth, and they can also affect dramatically the planetary radiation environments and atmospheres. This review focuses on the current understanding of observational signatures and properties of ICMEs and the associated sheath regions based on five decades of studies. In addition, we discuss modelling of ICMEs and many fundamental outstanding questions on their origin, evolution and effects, largely due to the limitations of single spacecraft observations of these macro-scale structures. We also present current understanding of space weather consequences of these large-scale solar wind structures, including effects at the other Solar System planets and exoplanets. We specially emphasize the different origin, properties and consequences of the sheaths and ICMEs.

  16. Ontogeny of the sheathing leaf base in maize (Zea mays).

    Johnston, Robyn; Leiboff, Samuel; Scanlon, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Leaves develop from the shoot apical meristem (SAM) via recruitment of leaf founder cells. Unlike eudicots, most monocot leaves display parallel venation and sheathing bases wherein the margins overlap the stem. Here we utilized computed tomography (CT) imaging, localization of PIN-FORMED1 (PIN1) auxin transport proteins, and in situ hybridization of leaf developmental transcripts to analyze the ontogeny of monocot leaf morphology in maize (Zea mays). CT imaging of whole-mounted shoot apices illustrates the plastochron-specific stages during initiation of the basal sheath margins from the tubular disc of insertion (DOI). PIN1 localizations identify basipetal auxin transport in the SAM L1 layer at the site of leaf initiation, a process that continues reiteratively during later recruitment of lateral leaf domains. Refinement of these auxin transport domains results in multiple, parallel provascular strands within the initiating primordium. By contrast, auxin is transported from the L2 toward the L1 at the developing margins of the leaf sheath. Transcripts involved in organ boundary formation and dorsiventral patterning accumulate within the DOI, preceding the outgrowth of the overlapping margins of the sheathing leaf base. We suggest a model wherein sheathing bases and parallel veins are both patterned via the extended recruitment of lateral maize leaf domains from the SAM. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  17. Revisiting the plasma sheath—dust in plasma sheath

    Das, G. C. [Mathematical Science Division, IASST, Guwahati 781014 (India); Deka, R.; Bora, M. P., E-mail: mpbora@gauhati.ac.in [Physics Department, Gauhati University, Guwahati 781014 (India)

    2016-04-15

    In this work, we have considered the formation of warm plasma sheath in the vicinity of a wall in a plasma with considerable presence of dust particles. As an example, we have used the parameters relevant in case of plasma sheath formed around surfaces of various solid bodies in space, though the results obtained in this work can be applied to any other physical situation such as laboratory plasma. In the ion-acoustic time scale, we neglect the dust dynamics. The dust particles affect the sheath dynamics by affecting the Poisson equation which determines the plasma potential in the sheath region. It is important to note that our calculations are valid only when the amount of dust particles is not sufficient so as to affect the plasma dynamics in the dust-acoustic time scale, but enough to affect the plasma sheath. We have assumed the current to a dust particle to be balanced throughout the analysis. This makes the grain potential dependent on plasma potential, which is then incorporated into the Poisson equation. The resultant numerical model becomes an initial value problem, which is described by a 1-D integro-differential equation, which is then solved self-consistently by incorporating the change in plasma potential caused by inclusion of the dust potential in the Poisson equation.

  18. Coronal mass ejections and their sheath regions in interplanetary space

    Emilia Kilpua

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs are large-scale heliospheric transients that originate from the Sun. When an ICME is sufficiently faster than the preceding solar wind, a shock wave develops ahead of the ICME. The turbulent region between the shock and the ICME is called the sheath region. ICMEs and their sheaths and shocks are all interesting structures from the fundamental plasma physics viewpoint. They are also key drivers of space weather disturbances in the heliosphere and planetary environments. ICME-driven shock waves can accelerate charged particles to high energies. Sheaths and ICMEs drive practically all intense geospace storms at the Earth, and they can also affect dramatically the planetary radiation environments and atmospheres. This review focuses on the current understanding of observational signatures and properties of ICMEs and the associated sheath regions based on five decades of studies. In addition, we discuss modelling of ICMEs and many fundamental outstanding questions on their origin, evolution and effects, largely due to the limitations of single spacecraft observations of these macro-scale structures. We also present current understanding of space weather consequences of these large-scale solar wind structures, including effects at the other Solar System planets and exoplanets. We specially emphasize the different origin, properties and consequences of the sheaths and ICMEs.

  19. Quantum dissipation of a simple conservative system

    Ibeh, G. J.; Mshelia, E. D.

    2014-01-01

    A model of quantum dissipative system is presented. Here dissipation of energy is demonstrated as based on the coupling of a free translational motion of a centre of mass to a harmonic oscillator. The two-dimensional arrangement of two coupled particles of different masses is considered.

  20. RF sheaths for arbitrary B field angles

    D'Ippolito, Daniel; Myra, James

    2014-10-01

    RF sheaths occur in tokamaks when ICRF waves encounter conducting boundaries and accelerate electrons out of the plasma. Sheath effects reduce the efficiency of ICRF heating, cause RF-specific impurity influxes from the edge plasma, and increase the plasma-facing component damage. The rf sheath potential is sensitive to the angle between the B field and the wall, the ion mobility and the ion magnetization. Here, we obtain a numerical solution of the non-neutral rf sheath and magnetic pre-sheath equations (for arbitrary values of these parameters) and attempt to infer the parametric dependences of the Child-Langmuir law. This extends previous work on the magnetized, immobile ion regime. An important question is how the rf sheath voltage distributes itself between sheath and pre-sheath for various B field angles. This will show how generally previous estimates of the rf sheath voltage and capacitance were reasonable, and to improve the RF sheath BC. Work supported by US DOE grants DE-FC02-05ER54823 and DE-FG02-97ER54392.

  1. A study of dissipation, degradation and binding of 14C-labeled endosulfan to soil in model lysimeter

    Gonzalez, J.E.; Ceballos, J.; Amor, A.; Saiz, E.B. de

    1999-01-01

    The degradation, dissipation and binding of α-endosulfan in two agricultural soils and sand was studied in lysimeter system under outdoor conditions, using 14 C labeled insecticide. Dissipation was rapid during the first few weeks after application. The half life of disappearance was 38 to 61 days for the soils from Cerro Punta and El Ejido, whereas, in sand it was 91 days. The insecticide degraded by oxidation at the sulfite group to the sulfate. The resultant product underwent further degradation to form 14 CO 2 and bound residues. Although a significant amount of 14 C leached through the sand, which contained less that 0.1% organic matter, there was no leaching of endosulfan through the other two types of soil, when leaching was started immediately after treatment. (author)

  2. Sheath formation of a plasma containing multiply charged ions, cold and hot electrons, and emitted electrons

    You, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    It is quite well known that ion confinement is an important factor in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) as it is closely related to the plasma potential. A model of sheath formation was extended to a plasma containing multiply charged ions (MCIs), cold and hot electrons, and secondary electrons emitted either by MCIs or hot electrons. In the model, a modification of the 'Bohm criterion' was given, the sheath potential drop and the critical emission condition were also analyzed. It appears that the presence of hot electrons and emitted electrons strongly affects the sheath formation so that smaller hot electrons and larger emission current result in reduced sheath potential (or floating potential). However the sheath potential was found to become independent of the emission current J when J > J c , (where J c is the critical emission current. The paper is followed by the associated poster

  3. Heterogeneous dissipative composite structures

    Ryabov, Victor; Yartsev, Boris; Parshina, Ludmila

    2018-05-01

    The paper suggests mathematical models of decaying vibrations in layered anisotropic plates and orthotropic rods based on Hamilton variation principle, first-order shear deformation laminated plate theory (FSDT), as well as on the viscous-elastic correspondence principle of the linear viscoelasticity theory. In the description of the physical relationships between the materials of the layers forming stiff polymeric composites, the effect of vibration frequency and ambient temperature is assumed as negligible, whereas for the viscous-elastic polymer layer, temperature-frequency relationship of elastic dissipation and stiffness properties is considered by means of the experimentally determined generalized curves. Mitigation of Hamilton functional makes it possible to describe decaying vibration of anisotropic structures by an algebraic problem of complex eigenvalues. The system of algebraic equation is generated through Ritz method using Legendre polynomials as coordinate functions. First, real solutions are found. To find complex natural frequencies of the system, the obtained real natural frequencies are taken as input values, and then, by means of the 3rd order iteration method, complex natural frequencies are calculated. The paper provides convergence estimates for the numerical procedures. Reliability of the obtained results is confirmed by a good correlation between analytical and experimental values of natural frequencies and loss factors in the lower vibration tones for the two series of unsupported orthotropic rods formed by stiff GRP and CRP layers and a viscoelastic polymer layer. Analysis of the numerical test data has shown the dissipation & stiffness properties of heterogeneous composite plates and rods to considerably depend on relative thickness of the viscoelastic polymer layer, orientation of stiff composite layers, vibration frequency and ambient temperature.

  4. Effect of two-temperature electrons distribution on an electrostatic plasma sheath

    Ou, Jing; Xiang, Nong; Gan, Chunyun; Yang, Jinhong

    2013-01-01

    A magnetized collisionless plasma sheath containing two-temperature electrons is studied using a one-dimensional model in which the low-temperature electrons are described by Maxwellian distribution (MD) and high-temperature electrons are described by truncated Maxwellian distribution (TMD). Based on the ion wave approach, a modified sheath criterion including effect of TMD caused by high-temperature electrons energy above the sheath potential energy is established theoretically. The model is also used to investigate numerically the sheath structure and energy flux to the wall for plasmas parameters of an open divertor tokamak-like. Our results show that the profiles of the sheath potential, two-temperature electrons and ions densities, high-temperature electrons and ions velocities as well as the energy flux to the wall depend on the high-temperature electrons concentration, temperature, and velocity distribution function associated with sheath potential. In addition, the results obtained in the high-temperature electrons with TMD as well as with MD sheaths are compared for the different sheath potential

  5. Ultrasound diagnosis of rectus sheath hematoma

    Hwang, M. S.; Chang, J. C.; Rhee, C. B.

    1984-01-01

    6 cases of rectus sheath hematoma were correctly diagnosed by ultrasound. 2 cases had bilateral rectus sheath hematoma and 4 cases were unilateral. On ultrasound finding, relatively well defined oval or spindle like cystic mass situated in the area of rectus muscle on all cases. Ultrasound examination may give more definite diagnosis and extension rectus sheath hematoma and also helpful to follow up study of hematoma

  6. Dust charging and charge fluctuations in a weakly collisional radio-frequency sheath at low pressure

    Piel, Alexander; Schmidt, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Models for the charging of dust particles in the bulk plasma and in the sheath region are discussed. A new model is proposed that describes collision-enhanced ion currents in the sheath. The collisions result in a substantial reduction of the negative charge of the dust. Experimental data for the dust charge in the sheath can be described by this model when a Bi-Maxwellian electron distribution is taken into account. Expressions for the dust charging rate for all considered models are presented and their influence on the rise of the kinetic dust temperature is discussed

  7. Tendon sheath fibroma in the thigh.

    Moretti, Vincent M; Ashana, Adedayo O; de la Cruz, Michael; Lackman, Richard D

    2012-04-01

    Tendon sheath fibromas are rare, benign soft tissue tumors that are predominantly found in the fingers, hands, and wrists of young adult men. This article describes a tendon sheath fibroma that developed in the thigh of a 70-year-old man, the only known tendon sheath fibroma to form in this location. Similar to tendon sheath fibromas that develop elsewhere, our patient's lesion presented as a painless, slow-growing soft tissue nodule. Physical examination revealed a firm, nontender mass with no other associated signs or symptoms. Although the imaging appearance of tendon sheath fibromas varies, our patient's lesion appeared dark on T1- and bright on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. It was well marginated and enhanced with contrast.Histologically, tendon sheath fibromas are composed of dense fibrocollagenous stromas with scattered spindle-shaped fibroblasts and narrow slit-like vascular spaces. Most tendon sheath fibromas can be successfully removed by marginal excision, although 24% of lesions recur. No lesions have metastasized. Our patient's tendon sheath fibroma was removed by marginal excision, and the patient remained disease free 35 months postoperatively. Despite its rarity, tendon sheath fibroma should be included in the differential diagnosis of a thigh mass on physical examination or imaging, especially if it is painless, nontender, benign appearing, and present in men. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Retroperitoneal and rectus sheath hematomas.

    Kasotakis, George

    2014-02-01

    The retroperitoneum is rich in vascular structures and can harbor large hematomas, traumatic or spontaneous. The management of retroperitoneal hematomas depends on the mechanism of injury and whether they are pulsatile/expanding. Rectus sheath hematomas are uncommon abdominal wall hematomas secondary to trauma to the epigastric arteries of the rectus muscle. The common risk factors include anticoagulation, strenuous exercise, coughing, coagulation disorders, and invasive procedures on/through the abdominal wall. The management is largely supportive, with the reversal of anticoagulation and transfusions; angioembolization may be necessary. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Analytical study of dissipative solitary waves

    Dini, Fatemeh [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Emamzadeh, Mehdi Molaie [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khorasani, Sina [School of Electrical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, PO Box 11365-363, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bobin, Jean Louis [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Amrollahi, Reza [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sodagar, Majid [School of Electrical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, PO Box 11365-363, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khoshnegar, Milad [School of Electrical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, PO Box 11365-363, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-02-15

    In this paper, the analytical solution to a new class of nonlinear solitons is presented with cubic nonlinearity, subject to a dissipation term arising as a result of a first-order derivative with respect to time, in the weakly nonlinear regime. Exact solutions are found using the combination of the perturbation and Green's function methods up to the third order. We present an example and discuss the asymptotic behavior of the Green's function. The dissipative solitary equation is also studied in the phase space in the non-dissipative and dissipative forms. Bounded and unbounded solutions of this equation are characterized, yielding an energy conversation law for non-dissipative waves. Applications of the model include weakly nonlinear solutions of terahertz Josephson plasma waves in layered superconductors and ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability.

  10. Storage functions for dissipative linear systems are quadratic state functions

    Trentelman, Harry L.; Willems, Jan C.

    1997-01-01

    This paper deals with dissipative dynamical systems. Dissipative dynamical systems can be used as models for physical phenomena in which energy exchange with their environment plays a role. In a dissipative dynamical system, the book-keeping of energy is done via the supply rate and a storage

  11. The collisional capacitive RF sheath and the assumption of a sharp electron edge

    Brinkmann, Ralf Peter

    2008-10-01

    The transition from quasi-neutrality to charge depletion is one of the characteristic features of the plasma boundary sheath. It is often described in terms of the so-called step model which assumes a transition point (electron step) where the electron density drops from a value equal to the ion density (in the bulk) to a value of zero (in the sheath). Inserted into Poisson's equation, the step model yields an expression for the field which is realistic deep in the sheath but fails to merge correctly into the ambipolar field of the bulk. This work studies the consequences of that approximation for the example of the collision-dominated, capacitive RF sheath by Lieberman [1]. First, the model is solved exactly, using a relaxation scheme. Then, the step approximation is applied which recovers Lieberman's semi-analytical solution. It is demonstrated that the step approximation induces a spurious divergence of the ion density at the sheath edge and prevents a matching of the sheath model to a bulk model. Integral sheath quantities, on the other hand, like the capacitance or the overall voltage drop, are faithfully reproduced. [1] M. A. Lieberman, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 16, pp. 638-644 (1988).

  12. On the upper bound in the Bohm sheath criterion

    Kotelnikov, I. A., E-mail: I.A.Kotelnikov@inp.nsk.su; Skovorodin, D. I., E-mail: D.I.Skovorodin@inp.nsk.su [Russian Academy of Sciences, Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    The question is discussed about the existence of an upper bound in the Bohm sheath criterion, according to which the Debye sheath at the interface between plasma and a negatively charged electrode is stable only if the ion flow velocity in plasma exceeds the ion sound velocity. It is stated that, with an exception of some artificial ionization models, the Bohm sheath criterion is satisfied as an equality at the lower bound and the ion flow velocity is equal to the speed of sound. In the one-dimensional theory, a supersonic flow appears in an unrealistic model of a localized ion source the size of which is less than the Debye length; however, supersonic flows seem to be possible in the two- and three-dimensional cases. In the available numerical codes used to simulate charged particle sources with a plasma emitter, the presence of the upper bound in the Bohm sheath criterion is not supposed; however, the correspondence with experimental data is usually achieved if the ion flow velocity in plasma is close to the ion sound velocity.

  13. Domain patterns and hysteresis in phase-transforming solids: analysis and numerical simulations of a sharp interface dissipative model via phase-field approximation

    DeSimone, A.; Kružík, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 2 (2013), s. 481-499 ISSN 1556-1801 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP201/12/0671 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : hysteresis * shape memory Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.952, year: 2013 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2013/MTR/kruzik-domain patterns and hysteresis in phase-transforming solids analysis and numerical simulations of a sharp interface dissipative model via phase-field approximation.pdf

  14. Observed eddy dissipation in the Agulhas Current

    Braby, L

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available (negative) velocity anomalies propagate downstream in the Agulhas Current at 44 km/d (23 km/d). Many models are unable to represent these eddy dissipation processes, affecting our understanding of the Agulhas Current....

  15. Nuclear Dissipation from Fission Time

    Gontchar, I.; Morjean, M.; Basnary, S.

    2000-01-01

    Fission times, pre-scission neutron multiplicities and GDR pre-scission γ-ray multiplicities measured for uranium or thorium nuclei formed with temperatures T ∼ 1.8 MeV have been compared with calculations performed with CDSM2, a two-dimensional dynamical model combined with a statistical one. Among the three experimental approaches considered, fission times give access to the most precise pieces of information on nuclear dissipation at high excitation energy. For the temperature range under consideration, an agreement between the model and data is achieved if one-body dissipation is used with a strength factor k red ∼ 0.45 ± 0.10 applied to the wall term for the mononuclear configuration. (authors)

  16. Global dissipativity of continuous-time recurrent neural networks with time delay

    Liao Xiaoxin; Wang Jun

    2003-01-01

    This paper addresses the global dissipativity of a general class of continuous-time recurrent neural networks. First, the concepts of global dissipation and global exponential dissipation are defined and elaborated. Next, the sets of global dissipativity and global exponentially dissipativity are characterized using the parameters of recurrent neural network models. In particular, it is shown that the Hopfield network and cellular neural networks with or without time delays are dissipative systems

  17. The Sheath-less Planar Langmuir Probe

    Cooke, D. L.

    2017-12-01

    The Langmuir probe is one of the oldest plasma diagnostics, provided the plasma density and species temperature from analysis of a current-voltage curve as the voltage is swept over a practically chosen range. The analysis depends on a knowledge or theory of the many factors that influence the current-voltage curve including, probe shape, size, nearby perturbations, and the voltage reference. For applications in Low Earth Orbit, the Planar Langmuir Probe, PLP, is an attractive geometry because the ram ion current is very constant over many Volts of a sweep, allowing the ion density and electron temperature to be determined independently with the same instrument, at different points on the sweep. However, when the physical voltage reference is itself small and electrically floating as with a small spacecraft, the spacecraft and probe system become a double probe where the current collection theory depends on the interaction of the spacecraft with the plasma which is generally not as simple as the probe itself. The Sheath-less PLP, SPLP, interlaces on a single ram facing surface, two variably biased probe elements, broken into many small and intertwined segments on a scale smaller than the plasma Debye length. The SPLP is electrically isolated from the rest of the spacecraft. For relative bias potentials of a few volts, the ion current to all segments of each element will be constant, while the electron currents will vary as a function of the element potential and the electron temperature. Because the segments are small, intertwined, and floating, the assembly will always present the same floating potential to the plasma, with minimal growth as a function of voltage, thus sheath-less and still planar. This concept has been modelled with Nascap, and tested with a physical model inserted into a Low Earth Orbit-like chamber plasma. Results will be presented.

  18. Similarities and distinctions of CIR and Sheath

    Yermolaev, Yuri; Lodkina, Irina; Nikolaeva, Nadezhda; Yermolaev, Michael

    2016-04-01

    On the basis of OMNI data and our catalog of large scale solar wind (SW) streams during 1976-2000 [Yermolaev et al., 2009] we study the average temporal profiles for two types of compressed regions: CIR (corotating interaction region - compressed region before High Speed Stream (HSS)) and Sheath (compressed region before fast Interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs), including Magnetic Cloud (MC) and Ejecta). As have been shown by Nikolaeva et al, [2015], the efficiency of magnetic storm generation is ~50% higher for Sheath and CIR than for ICME (MC and Ejecta), i.e. reaction magnetosphere depends on type of driver. To take into account the different durations of SW types, we use the double superposed epoch analysis (DSEA) method: rescaling the duration of the interval for all types in such a manner that, respectively, beginning and end for all intervals of selected type coincide [Yermolaev et al., 2010; 2015]. Obtained data allows us to suggest that the formation of all types of compression regions has the same physical mechanism irrespective of piston (HSS or ICME) type and differences are connected with geometry and full jumps of speed in edges of compression regions. If making the natural assumption that the gradient of speed is directed approximately on normal to the piston, CIR has the largest angle between the gradient of speed and the direction of average SW speed, and ICME - the smallest angle. The work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, projects 13-02-00158, 16-02-00125 and by Program of Presidium of the Russian Academy of Sciences. References: Nikolaeva, N. S. , Yu. I. Yermolaev, and I. G. Lodkina (2015), Modeling of the Corrected Dst* Index Temporal Profile on the Main Phase of the Magnetic Storms Generated by Different Types of Solar Wind, Cosmic Research, Vol. 53, No. 2, pp. 119-127. Yermolaev, Yu. I., N. S. Nikolaeva, I. G. Lodkina, and M. Yu. Yermolaev (2009), Catalog of Large-Scale Solar Wind Phenomena during 1976-2000, Cosmic Research

  19. Limits to the critical transport current in superconducting (Bi,Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10 silver-sheathed tapes: The railway-switch model

    Hensel, B.; Grasso, G.; Fluekiger, R.

    1995-01-01

    We have proposed the ''railway-switch'' model to describe the superconducting transport current in (Bi,Pb) 2 Sr 2 Ca 2 Cu 3 O 10 silver-sheathed tapes. The model assumes that in the textured polycrystalline filament the frequent small-angle c-axis tilt grain boundaries (''railway switches'') constitute strong links for the supercurrent. With the objective to identify the mechanisms that limit the critical-current density in the tapes we present measurements of the transport critical current normal to the tape plane and of the current-transfer length along the tape axis. From I-V curves we obtain the longitudinal critical-current distribution and compare it to the thickness variation of the filament. The experiments have been performed on monofilamentary powder-in-tube samples prepared in long lengths by rolling as the only tape-forming process. For all investigated samples the critical-current density at T=77 K in self-field was in the range j c =20--30 kA/cm 2 . We conclude that the dominant limitation for the transport critical current in the tapes is imposed by the low intragrain critical-current density j c c along the c axis (as compared to the in-plane critical-current density j c ab ) and by the even lower critical-current density j c t across twist boundaries or intergrowths. Possibilities for an improvement of the performance of the (Bi,Pb) 2 Sr 2 Ca 2 Cu 3 O 10 silver-sheathed tapes are discussed

  20. Primary optic nerve sheath meningioma

    Jeremic, Branislav [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Pitz, Susanne (eds.) [University Eye Hospital, Mainz (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM) is a rare tumour. Cases are usually separated into primary ONSM, which arises either intraorbitally or, less commonly, intracanalicularly, and secondary ONSM, which arises intracranially and subsequently invades the optic canal and orbit. This is the first book to cover all important aspects of the diagnosis and treatment of primary ONSM. After a general introduction, individual chapters discuss the clinical presentation, clinical examination and diagnosis, imaging, and histology. Treatment options are then addressed in detail, with special emphasis on external beam radiation therapy, and in particular stereotactic fractionated radiation therapy. The latter has recently produced consistently good results and is now considered the emerging treatment of choice for the vast majority of patients with primary ONSM. This well-illustrated book will prove invaluable to all practitioners who encounter primary ONSM in their clinical work. (orig.)

  1. Approximate Teleportation of an Unknown Atomic-Entangled State with Dissipative Atom-Cavity Resonant Jaynes-Cummings Model

    LIU Zong-Liang; LI Shao-Hua; CHEN Chang-Yong

    2008-01-01

    We propose a scheme for approximately and conditionally teleporting an unknown atomic-entangled state in dissipative cavity QED.It is the further development of the scheme of [Phys.Rev.A 69 (2004) 064302],where the cavity mode decay has not been considered and the state teleportated is an unknown atomic state.In this paper,we investigate the influence of the decay on the approximate and conditional teleportation of the unknown atomic-entangled state,which is different from that teleportated in [Phys.Rev.A 69 (2004) 064302] and then give the fidelity of the teleportation,which depends on the cavity mode decay.The scheme may be generalized to not only the teleportation of the cavity-mode-entangled-state by means of a single atom but also the teleportation of the unknown trapped-ion-entangled-state in a linear ion trap.

  2. Artificial dissipation models applied to Euler equations for analysis of supersonic flow of helium gas around a geometric configurations ramp and diffusor type

    Rocha, Jussiê S., E-mail: jussie.soares@ifpi.edu.br [Instituto Federal do Piauí (IFPI), Valença, PI (Brazil); Maciel, Edisson Sávio de Góes, E-mail: edissonsavio@yahoo.com.br [Instituto Tecnológico de Aeronáutica (ITA), São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Lira, Carlos A.B.O., E-mail: cabol@ufpe.edu.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Sousa, Pedro A.S.; Neto, Raimundo N.C., E-mail: augusto.96pedro@gmail.com, E-mail: r.correia17@hotmail.com [Instituto Federal do Piauí (IFPI), Teresina, PI (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors - VHTGRs are studied by several research groups for the development of advanced reactors that can meet the world's growing energy demand. The analysis of the flow of helium coolant around the various geometries at the core of these reactors through computational fluid dynamics techniques is an essential tool in the development of conceptual designs of nuclear power plants that provide added security. This analysis suggests a close analogy with aeronautical cases widely studied using computational numerical techniques to solve systems of governing equations for the flow involved. The present work consists in using the DISSIPA2D{sub E}ULER code, to solve the Euler equations in a conservative form, in two-dimensional space employing a finite difference formulation for spatial discretization using the Euler method for explicit marching in time. The physical problem of supersonic flow along a ramp and diffusor configurations is considered. For this, the Jameson and Mavriplis algorithm and the artificial dissipation model linear of Pulliam was implemented. A spatially variable time step is employed aiming to accelerate the convergence to the steady state solution. The main purpose of this work is obtain computational tools for flow analysis through the study the cited dissipation model and describe their characteristics in relation to the overall quality of the solution, as well as obtain preliminary results for the development of computational tools of dynamic analysis of helium gas flow in gas-cooled reactors. (author)

  3. Artificial dissipation models applied to Navier-Stokes equations for analysis of supersonic flow of helium gas around a geometric configuration ramp type

    Rocha, Jussie Soares da; Maciel, Edisson Savio de G.; Lira, Carlos A.B. de O.

    2015-01-01

    Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors - VHTGRs are studied by several research groups for the development of advanced reactors that can meet the world's growing energy demand. The analysis of the flow of helium coolant around the various geometries at the core of these reactors through computational fluid dynamics techniques is an essential tool in the development of conceptual designs of nuclear power plants that provide added safety. This analysis suggests a close analogy with aeronautical cases widely studied using computational numerical techniques to solve systems of governing equations for the flow involved. The present work consists in solving the Navier-Stokes equations in a conservative form, in two-dimensional space employing a finite difference formulation for spatial discretization using the Euler method for explicit marching in time. The physical problem of supersonic laminar flow of helium gas along a ramp configuration is considered. For this, the Jameson and Mavriplis algorithm and the artificial dissipations models linear and nonlinear of Pulliam was implemented. A spatially variable time step is employed aiming to accelerate the convergence to the steady state solution. The main purpose of this work is to study the cited dissipation models and describe their characteristics in relation to the overall quality of the solution, aiming preliminary results for the development of computational tools of dynamic analysis of helium flow for the VHTGR core. (author)

  4. Artificial dissipation models applied to Euler equations for analysis of supersonic flow of helium gas around a geometric configurations ramp and diffusor type

    Rocha, Jussiê S.; Maciel, Edisson Sávio de Góes; Lira, Carlos A.B.O.; Sousa, Pedro A.S.; Neto, Raimundo N.C.

    2017-01-01

    Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors - VHTGRs are studied by several research groups for the development of advanced reactors that can meet the world's growing energy demand. The analysis of the flow of helium coolant around the various geometries at the core of these reactors through computational fluid dynamics techniques is an essential tool in the development of conceptual designs of nuclear power plants that provide added security. This analysis suggests a close analogy with aeronautical cases widely studied using computational numerical techniques to solve systems of governing equations for the flow involved. The present work consists in using the DISSIPA2D E ULER code, to solve the Euler equations in a conservative form, in two-dimensional space employing a finite difference formulation for spatial discretization using the Euler method for explicit marching in time. The physical problem of supersonic flow along a ramp and diffusor configurations is considered. For this, the Jameson and Mavriplis algorithm and the artificial dissipation model linear of Pulliam was implemented. A spatially variable time step is employed aiming to accelerate the convergence to the steady state solution. The main purpose of this work is obtain computational tools for flow analysis through the study the cited dissipation model and describe their characteristics in relation to the overall quality of the solution, as well as obtain preliminary results for the development of computational tools of dynamic analysis of helium gas flow in gas-cooled reactors. (author)

  5. Research on stress distribution regularity of cement sheaths of radial well based on ABAQUS

    Shi, Jihui; Cheng, Yuanfang; Li, Xiaolong; Xiao, Wen; Li, Menglai

    2017-12-01

    To ensure desirable outcome of hydraulic fracturing based on ultra-short radius radial systems, it is required to investigate the stress distribution regularity and stability of the cement sheath. On the basis of the theoretical model of the cement sheath stress distribution, a reservoir mechanical model was built using the finite element software, ABAQUS, according to the physical property of a certain oil reservoir of the Shengli oilfield. The stress distribution of the casing-cement-sheath-formation system under the practical condition was simulated, based on which analyses were conducted from multiple points of view. Results show that the stress on the internal interface of the cement sheath exceeds that on the external interface, and fluctuates with higher amplitudes, which means that the internal interface is the most failure-prone. The unevenness of the cement sheath stress distribution grows with the increasing horizontal principal stress ratio, and so does the variation magnitude. This indicates that higher horizontal principal stress ratios are unfavourable for the structural stability of the cement sheath. Both the wellbore quantity of the URRS and the physical property of the material can affect the cement sheath distribution. It is suggested to optimize the quantity of the radial wellbore and use cement with a lower elastic modulus and higher Poisson’s ratio. At last, the impact level of the above factor was analysed, with the help of the grey correlation analysis.

  6. Phenomenological approaches of dissipative heavy ion collisions

    Ngo, C.

    1983-09-01

    These lectures describe the properties of dissipative heavy ion collisions observed in low bombarding energy heavy ion reactions. These dissipative collisions are of two different types: fusion and deep inelastic reactions. Their main experimental properties are described on selected examples. It is shown how it is possible to give a simple interpretation to the data. A large number of phenomenological models have been developped to understand dissipative heavy ion collisions. The most important are those describing the collision by classical mechanics and friction forces, the diffusion models, and transport theories which merge both preceding approaches. A special emphasis has been done on two phenomena observed in dissipative heavy ion collisions: charge equilibratium for which we can show the existence of quantum fluctuations, and fast fission which appears as an intermediate mechanism between deep inelastic reactions and compound nucleus formation [fr

  7. THREE-DIMENSIONAL ATMOSPHERIC CIRCULATION MODELS OF HD 189733b AND HD 209458b WITH CONSISTENT MAGNETIC DRAG AND OHMIC DISSIPATION

    Rauscher, Emily; Menou, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    We present the first three-dimensional circulation models for extrasolar gas giant atmospheres with geometrically and energetically consistent treatments of magnetic drag and ohmic dissipation. Atmospheric resistivities are continuously updated and calculated directly from the flow structure, strongly coupling the magnetic effects with the circulation pattern. We model the hot Jupiters HD 189733b (T eq ≈ 1200 K) and HD 209458b (T eq ≈ 1500 K) and test planetary magnetic field strengths from 0 to 30 G. We find that even at B = 3 G the atmospheric structure and circulation of HD 209458b are strongly influenced by magnetic effects, while the cooler HD 189733b remains largely unaffected, even in the case of B = 30 G and super-solar metallicities. Our models of HD 209458b indicate that magnetic effects can substantially slow down atmospheric winds, change circulation and temperature patterns, and alter observable properties. These models establish that longitudinal and latitudinal hot spot offsets, day-night flux contrasts, and planetary radius inflation are interrelated diagnostics of the magnetic induction process occurring in the atmospheres of hot Jupiters and other similarly forced exoplanets. Most of the ohmic heating occurs high in the atmosphere and on the dayside of the planet, while the heating at depth is strongly dependent on the internal heat flux assumed for the planet, with more heating when the deep atmosphere is hot. We compare the ohmic power at depth in our models, and estimates of the ohmic dissipation in the bulk interior (from general scaling laws), to evolutionary models that constrain the amount of heating necessary to explain the inflated radius of HD 209458b. Our results suggest that deep ohmic heating can successfully inflate the radius of HD 209458b for planetary magnetic field strengths of B ≥ 3-10 G.

  8. Hamiltonian description and quantization of dissipative systems

    Enz, Charles P.

    1994-09-01

    Dissipative systems are described by a Hamiltonian, combined with a “dynamical matrix” which generalizes the simplectic form of the equations of motion. Criteria for dissipation are given and the examples of a particle with friction and of the Lotka-Volterra model are presented. Quantization is first introduced by translating generalized Poisson brackets into commutators and anticommutators. Then a generalized Schrödinger equation expressed by a dynamical matrix is constructed and discussed.

  9. Graphene heat dissipating structure

    Washburn, Cody M.; Lambert, Timothy N.; Wheeler, David R.; Rodenbeck, Christopher T.; Railkar, Tarak A.

    2017-08-01

    Various technologies presented herein relate to forming one or more heat dissipating structures (e.g., heat spreaders and/or heat sinks) on a substrate, wherein the substrate forms part of an electronic component. The heat dissipating structures are formed from graphene, with advantage being taken of the high thermal conductivity of graphene. The graphene (e.g., in flake form) is attached to a diazonium molecule, and further, the diazonium molecule is utilized to attach the graphene to material forming the substrate. A surface of the substrate is treated to comprise oxide-containing regions and also oxide-free regions having underlying silicon exposed. The diazonium molecule attaches to the oxide-free regions, wherein the diazonium molecule bonds (e.g., covalently) to the exposed silicon. Attachment of the diazonium plus graphene molecule is optionally repeated to enable formation of a heat dissipating structure of a required height.

  10. Sheath structure in negative ion sources for fusion (invited)

    McAdams, R.; King, D. B.; Surrey, E.; Holmes, A. J. T.

    2012-01-01

    In fusion negative ion sources, the negative ions are formed on the caesiated plasma grid predominantly by hydrogen atoms from the plasma. The space charge of the negative ions leaving the wall is not fully compensated by incoming positive ions and at high enough emission a virtual cathode is formed. This virtual cathode limits the flux of negative ions transported across the sheath to the plasma. A 1D collisionless model of the sheath is presented taking into account the virtual cathode. The model will be applied to examples of the ion source operation. Extension of the model to the bulk plasma shows good agreement with experimental data. A possible role for fast ions is discussed.

  11. Accounting for Debye sheath expansion for proud Langmuir probes in magnetic confinement fusion plasmas.

    Tsui, C K; Boedo, J A; Stangeby, P C

    2018-01-01

    A Child-Langmuir law-based method for accounting for Debye sheath expansion while fitting the current-voltage I-V characteristic of proud Langmuir probes (electrodes that extend into the volume of the plasma) is described. For Langmuir probes of a typical size used in tokamak plasmas, these new estimates of electron temperature and ion saturation current density values decreased by up to 60% compared to methods that did not account for sheath expansion. Changes to the collection area are modeled using the Child-Langmuir law and effective expansion perimeter l p , and the model is thus referred to as the "perimeter sheath expansion method." l p is determined solely from electrode geometry, so the method may be employed without prior measurement of the magnitude of the sheath expansion effects for a given Langmuir probe and can be used for electrodes of different geometries. This method correctly predicts the non-saturating ΔI/ΔV slope for cold, low-density plasmas where sheath-expansion effects are strong, as well as for hot plasmas where ΔI/ΔV ∼ 0, though it is shown that the sheath can still significantly affect the collection area in these hot conditions. The perimeter sheath expansion method has several advantages compared to methods where the non-saturating current is fitted: (1) It is more resilient to scatter in the I-V characteristics observed in turbulent plasmas. (2) It is able to separate the contributions to the ΔI/ΔV slope from sheath expansion to that of the high energy electron tail in high Te conditions. (3) It calculates the change in the collection area due to the Debye sheath for conditions where ΔI/ΔV ∼ 0 and for V = V f .

  12. Rectus sheath abscess after laparoscopic appendicectomy

    Golash Vishwanath

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Port site wound infection, abdominal wall hematoma and intraabdominal abscess formation has been reported after laparoscopic appendicectomy. We describe here a rectus sheath abscess which occurred three weeks after the laparoscopic appendicectomy. It was most likely the result of secondary infection of the rectus sheath hematoma due to bleeding into the rectus sheath from damage to the inferior epigastric arteries or a direct tear of the rectus muscle. As far as we are aware this complication has not been reported after laparoscopic appendicectomy.

  13. Mitigating impact of thermal and rectified radio-frequency sheath potentials on edge localized modes

    Gui, B. [Institute of Plasma Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Lawerence Livermore National Lab, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Xu, X. Q. [Lawerence Livermore National Lab, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Myra, J. R.; D' Ippolito, D. A. [Lodestar Research Corporation, Boulder, Colorado 80301 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    The mitigating impact of thermal and rectified radio frequency (RF) sheath potentials on the peeling-ballooning modes is studied non-linearly by employing a two-fluid three-field simulation model based on the BOUT++ framework. Additional shear flow and the Kelvin-Helmholtz effect due to the thermal and rectified RF sheath potential are induced. It is found that the shear flow increases the growth rate while the K-H effect decreases the growth rate slightly when there is a density gradient, but the energy loss of these cases is suppressed in the nonlinear phase. The stronger external electrostatic field due to the sheaths has a more significant effect on the energy loss suppression. From this study, it is found the growth rate in the linear phase mainly determines the onset of edge-localized modes, while the mode spectrum width in the nonlinear phase has an important impact on the turbulent transport. The wider mode spectrum leads to weaker turbulent transport and results in a smaller energy loss. Due to the thermal sheath and rectified RF sheath potential in the scrape-off-layer, the modified shear flow tears apart the peeling-ballooning filament and makes the mode spectrum wider, resulting in less energy loss. The perturbed electric potential and the parallel current near the sheath region is also suppressed locally due to the sheath boundary condition.

  14. Quantum Dissipative Systems

    Weiss, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Major advances in the quantum theory of macroscopic systems, in combination with stunning experimental achievements, have brightened the field and brought it to the attention of the general community in natural sciences. Today, working knowledge of dissipative quantum mechanics is an essential tool for many physicists. This book - originally published in 1990 and republished in 1999 as an enlarged second edition - delves much deeper than ever before into the fundamental concepts, methods, and applications of quantum dissipative systems, including the most recent developments. In this third edi

  15. Space dissipative structures

    Chernousenko, V.M.; Kuklin, V.M.; Panachenko, I.P.; Vorob'yov, V.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on a wide spectrum of oscillations that is excited due to the evolution instabilities, being in a weak above-threshold state, in the inequilibrium media with decaying spectrum. In this case the pumping, whose part is played by an intensive wave or occupation inversion in the active medium, synchronized the phases of excited modes and, thus, forms the space dissipative structure of the field. In dissipative nonlinear media with nondecaying spectrum the space structures, formed due to the development of instability, experience small-scale hexagonal modulation

  16. Rectus sheath hematoma: three case reports

    Kapan Selin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Rectus sheath hematoma is an uncommon cause of acute abdominal pain. It is an accumulation of blood in the sheath of the rectus abdominis, secondary to rupture of an epigastric vessel or muscle tear. It could occur spontaneously or after trauma. They are usually located infraumblically and often misdiagnosed as acute abdomen, inflammatory diseases or tumours of the abdomen. Case presentation We reported three cases of rectus sheath hematoma presenting with a mass in the abdomen and diagnosed by computerized tomography. The patients recovered uneventfully after bed rest, intravenous fluid replacement, blood transfusion and analgesic treatment. Conclusion Rectus sheath hematoma is a rarely seen pathology often misdiagnosed as acute abdomen that may lead to unnecessary laparotomies. Computerized tomography must be chosen for definitive diagnosis since ultrasonography is subject to error due to misinterpretation of the images. Main therapy is conservative management.

  17. Collective variables and dissipation

    Balian, R.

    1984-09-01

    This is an introduction to some basic concepts of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. We emphasize in particular the relevant entropy relative to a given set of collective variables, the meaning of the projection method in the Liouville space, its use to establish the generalized transport equations for these variables, and the interpretation of dissipation in the framework of information theory

  18. Dissipative hidden sector dark matter

    Foot, R.; Vagnozzi, S.

    2015-01-01

    A simple way of explaining dark matter without modifying known Standard Model physics is to require the existence of a hidden (dark) sector, which interacts with the visible one predominantly via gravity. We consider a hidden sector containing two stable particles charged under an unbroken U (1 )' gauge symmetry, hence featuring dissipative interactions. The massless gauge field associated with this symmetry, the dark photon, can interact via kinetic mixing with the ordinary photon. In fact, such an interaction of strength ε ˜10-9 appears to be necessary in order to explain galactic structure. We calculate the effect of this new physics on big bang nucleosynthesis and its contribution to the relativistic energy density at hydrogen recombination. We then examine the process of dark recombination, during which neutral dark states are formed, which is important for large-scale structure formation. Galactic structure is considered next, focusing on spiral and irregular galaxies. For these galaxies we modeled the dark matter halo (at the current epoch) as a dissipative plasma of dark matter particles, where the energy lost due to dissipation is compensated by the energy produced from ordinary supernovae (the core-collapse energy is transferred to the hidden sector via kinetic mixing induced processes in the supernova core). We find that such a dynamical halo model can reproduce several observed features of disk galaxies, including the cored density profile and the Tully-Fisher relation. We also discuss how elliptical and dwarf spheroidal galaxies could fit into this picture. Finally, these analyses are combined to set bounds on the parameter space of our model, which can serve as a guideline for future experimental searches.

  19. Spatial Inhomogeneity of Kinetic and Magnetic Dissipations in Thermal Convection

    Hotta, H. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Chiba university, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8522 (Japan)

    2017-08-20

    We investigate the inhomogeneity of kinetic and magnetic dissipations in thermal convection using high-resolution calculations. In statistically steady turbulence, the injected and dissipated energies are balanced. This means that a large amount of energy is continuously converted into internal energy via dissipation. As in thermal convection, downflows are colder than upflows and the inhomogeneity of the dissipation potentially changes the convection structure. Our investigation of the inhomogeneity of the dissipation shows the following. (1) More dissipation is seen around the bottom of the calculation domain, and this tendency is promoted with the magnetic field. (2) The dissipation in the downflow is much larger than that in the upflow. The dissipation in the downflow is more than 80% of the total at maximum. This tendency is also promoted with the magnetic field. (3) Although 2D probability density functions of the kinetic and magnetic dissipations versus the vertical velocity are similar, the kinetic and magnetic dissipations are not well correlated. Our result suggests that the spatial inhomogeneity of the dissipation is significant and should be considered when modeling a small-scale strong magnetic field generated with an efficient small-scale dynamo for low-resolution calculations.

  20. How to Patch Active Plasma and Collisionless Sheath: Practical Guide

    Kaganovich, Igor D.

    2002-01-01

    Most plasmas have a very thin sheath compared with the plasma dimension. This necessitates separate calculations of the plasma and sheath. The Bohm criterion provides the boundary condition for calculation of plasma profiles. To calculate sheath properties, a value of electric field at the plasma-sheath interface has to be specified in addition to the Bohm criterion. The value of the boundary electric field and robust procedure to approximately patch plasma and collisionless sheath with a very good accuracy are reported

  1. Moisture Durability with Vapor-Permeable Insulating Sheathing

    Lepage, R. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Lstiburek, J. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Exterior sheathing insulation is an effective strategy in increasing the overall R-value of wall assemblies; other benefits include decreasing the effects of thermal bridging and increasing the moisture durability of the built assembly. Vapor-permeable exterior insulation, such as mineral board or expanded polystyrene foam, are one such product that may be used to achieve these benefits. However, uncertainty exists on the effects of inward driven moisture and the interaction of increased sheathing temperatures on the moisture durability of the edifice. To address these concerns, Building Science Corporation (BSC) conducted a series of hygrothermal models for cities representing a range of different climate zones. This report describes the research project, key research questions, and the procedures utilized to analyse the problems.

  2. Moisture Durability with Vapor-Permeable Insulating Sheathing

    Lepage, R. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Lstiburek, J. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Exterior sheathing insulation is an effective strategy in increasing the overall R-value of wall assemblies; other benefits include decreasing the effects of thermal bridging and increasing the moisture durability of the built assembly. Vapor-permeable exterior insulation, such as mineral board or expanded polystyrene foam, are one such product that may be used to achieve these benefits. However,uncertainty exists on the effects of inward driven moisture and the interaction of increased sheathing temperatures on the moisture durability of the edifice. To address these concerns, Building Science Corporation (BSC) conducted a series of hygrothermal models for cities representing a range of different climate zones. This report describes the research project, key research questions, and theprocedures utilized to analyse the problems.

  3. Effects of Fast-Ion Injection on a Magnetized Sheath near a Floating Wall

    Li Jiajia; Hu Zhanghu; Song Yuanhong; Wang Younian

    2013-01-01

    A fully kinetic particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo model is employed to self-consistently study the effects of fast-ion injection on sheath potential and electric field profile in collisional magnetized plasma with a floating absorbing wall. The influences of the fast-ion injection velocity and density, the magnetic field and angle θ 0 formed by the magnetic field and the x-axis on the sheath potential and electric field are discussed in detail. Numerical results show that increasing fast-ion injection density or decreasing injection velocity can enhance the potential drop and electric field in the sheath. Also, increasing the magnetic field strength can weaken the loss of charged particles to the wall and thus decrease the potential and electric field in the sheath. The time evolution of ion flux and velocity distribution on the wall is found to be significantly affected by the magnetic field.

  4. The endomembrane sheath: a key structure for understanding the plant cell?

    Reuzeau, C.; McNally, J. G.; Pickard, B. G.

    1997-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that integrin is abundant in endomembranes of plant cells, and the endomembranes are clad by a sheath of cytoskeleton including F-actin. A role for endomembrane integrin and the endomembrane sheath is proposed: this system might orchestrate metabolic regulation by providing and modulating loci for channelling, and might accelerate channeling as needed by dragging the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and organelles through the cytoplasm. To accomplish this "streaming", F-actin might lever against the rest of the endomembrane sheath and the ER might also lever against adhesion sites (i.e., plasmodesmata and plasmalemmal control centers). As an important agent in the control of cellular activities, according to this model, the endomembrane sheath would play a major part in responses to diverse signals and stresses, and under extreme stress cell survival would depend on the ability of the system to maintain enough integrity to direct critical syntheses and degradations.

  5. Transient chaotic transport in dissipative drift motion

    Oyarzabal, R.S. [Pós-Graduação em Ciências/Física, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, 84030-900, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Szezech, J.D. [Departamento de Matemática e Estatística, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, 84030-900, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Batista, A.M., E-mail: antoniomarcosbatista@gmail.com [Departamento de Matemática e Estatística, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, 84030-900, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Souza, S.L.T. de [Departamento de Física e Matemática, Universidade Federal de São João del Rei, 36420-000, Ouro Branco, MG (Brazil); Caldas, I.L. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, 05315-970, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Viana, R.L. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, 81531-990, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Sanjuán, M.A.F. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Tulipán s/n, 28933 Móstoles, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-04-22

    Highlights: • We consider a situation for which a chaotic transient is present in the dynamics of the two-wave model with damping. • The damping in plasma models can be a way for study a realistic behavior of confinement due the collisional effect. • The escape time as a function of the damping obey a power-law scaling. • We have made a qualitative transport analysis with a simple model that can be useful for more complete models. • We have shown that the pattern of the basin of attraction depends on the damping parameter. - Abstract: We investigate chaotic particle transport in magnetised plasmas with two electrostatic drift waves. Considering dissipation in the drift motion, we verify that the removed KAM surfaces originate periodic attractors with their corresponding basins of attraction. We show that the properties of the basins depend on the dissipation and the space-averaged escape time decays exponentially when the dissipation increases. We find positive finite time Lyapunov exponents in dissipative drift motion, consequently the trajectories exhibit transient chaotic transport. These features indicate how the transient plasma transport depends on the dissipation.

  6. The Presence of Turbulent and Ordered Local Structure within the ICME Shock-sheath and Its Contribution to Forbush Decrease

    Shaikh, Zubair; Bhaskar, Ankush [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism (IIG), New Panvel, Navi Mumbai-410218 (India); Raghav, Anil, E-mail: raghavanil1984@gmail.com [University Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Vidyanagari, Santacruz (E), Mumbai-400098 (India)

    2017-08-01

    The transient interplanetary disturbances evoke short-time cosmic-ray flux decrease, which is known as Forbush decrease. The traditional model and understanding of Forbush decrease suggest that the sub-structure of an interplanetary counterpart of coronal mass ejection (ICME) independently contributes to cosmic-ray flux decrease. These sub-structures, shock-sheath, and magnetic cloud (MC) manifest as classical two-step Forbush decrease. The recent work by Raghav et al. has shown multi-step decreases and recoveries within the shock-sheath. However, this cannot be explained by the ideal shock-sheath barrier model. Furthermore, they suggested that local structures within the ICME’s sub-structure (MC and shock-sheath) could explain this deviation of the FD profile from the classical FD. Therefore, the present study attempts to investigate the cause of multi-step cosmic-ray flux decrease and respective recovery within the shock-sheath in detail. A 3D-hodogram method is utilized to obtain more details regarding the local structures within the shock-sheath. This method unambiguously suggests the formation of small-scale local structures within the ICME (shock-sheath and even in MC). Moreover, the method could differentiate the turbulent and ordered interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) regions within the sub-structures of ICME. The study explicitly suggests that the turbulent and ordered IMF regions within the shock-sheath do influence cosmic-ray variations differently.

  7. A mathematical model of the rail track presented as a bar on elastic and dissipative supports under the influence of moving loads

    Darenskiy Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, the most common track model is the one in which rails are presented as bars of infinite length rested on continuous elastic foundation. However, some specialists consider the model to be rather ideal for railways in terms of track and the technical state of track. Calculation of track as a bar rested on numerous elastic supports with variable characteristics of stiffness under static loads has shown that application of methods of elastic foundation gives results understated by 17-24%. The study presents mathematic models of the vehicle/track dynamic system, and a design scheme of track presented as a bar on numerous elastic dissipative supports with non-linear characteristics, which is taken on the base of this system. The authors developed models and methods to define the reduced vertical stiffness of the track in the wheel/rail contact point, which considers rail elastic and geometric characteristics, stiffness of supports, distance between supports and distributed track mass. The value of stiffness is variable by time for each wheel at any time and various for the vehicle’s wheels. The mathematical model proposed has been implemented in Matlab software and will make it possible to conduct numerical research into the track/vehicle dynamics.

  8. Effects of an anode sheath on energy and momentum transfer in vacuum arcs

    Wang, Zhenxing; Zhou, Zhipeng; Tian, Yunbo; Wang, Haoran; Wang, Jianhua; Geng, Yingsan; Liu, Zhiyuan

    2017-01-01

    Anode phenomena under high-current vacuum arcs have a significant impact on the interrupting capacity of vacuum interrupters. However, the vacuum arc energy flux and momentum flux on the anode—which are necessary boundary conditions for simulations—are either set to an imaginary distribution or calculated using simple formulas without considering anode sheath regulatory effects. The objective of this paper is to reveal the anode sheath effects on regulating the energy and momentum transfer from the arc column to the anode surface in vacuum arcs. A particle-in-cell model for the anode sheath is developed. The required input parameters are obtained from a magnetohydrodynamic model for the arc column. From the results, there exists a sheath near the anode with a negative voltage drop. Both the electron density and the ion density significantly decline in the anode sheath region. The kinetic energy of the ions absorbed by the anode consists of directed kinetic energy, random kinetic energy, and sheath acceleration energy. The sheath acceleration energy contribution is the largest, and the random kinetic energy also accounts for a large part that cannot be ignored. The arc pressure on the anode surface is mainly caused by ion impact, and the accelerating effect of the anode sheath on the ions cannot be neglected in pressure calculations. In addition, in the case of an arc current at 15 kA, the input energy and momentum upon the anode surface is not obviously affected by the evaporated atoms at surface temperatures of 1600 K and 2000 K. (paper)

  9. Magnetically modified sheaths of Leptothrix sp. as an adsorbent for Amido black 10B removal

    Angelova, Ralitsa; Baldikova, Eva; Pospiskova, Kristyna; Safarikova, Mirka; Safarik, Ivo

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the biosorption of Amido black 10B dye from aqueous solutions on magnetically modified sheaths of Leptothrix sp. in a batch system. The magnetic modification of the sheaths was performed using both microwave synthesized iron oxide nano- and microparticles and perchloric acid stabilized ferrofluid. The native and both magnetically modified sheaths were characterized by SEM. Various parameters significantly affecting the adsorption process, such as pH, contact time, temperature and initial concentration, were studied in detail using the adsorbent magnetized by both methods. The highest adsorption efficiency was achieved at pH 2. The maximum adsorption capacities of both types of magnetized material at room temperature were found to be 339.2 and 286.1 mg of dye per 1 g of ferrofluid modified and microwave synthesized particles modified adsorbent, respectively. Thermodynamic study of dye adsorption revealed a spontaneous and endothermic process in the temperature range between 279.15 and 313.15 K. The data were fitted to various equilibrium and kinetic models. Experimental data matched well with the pseudo-second-order kinetics and Freundlich isotherm model. The Leptothrix sheaths have excellent efficacy for dye adsorption. This material can be used as an effective, low-cost adsorbent. - Highlights: • Magnetic modification of Leptothrix sheaths using two methods is proposed. • Such magnetic material is an excellent adsorbent for Amido black 10B. • The magnetically modified sheaths can be easily separated by magnets.

  10. Magnetically modified sheaths of Leptothrix sp. as an adsorbent for Amido black 10B removal

    Angelova, Ralitsa [Department of Nanobiotechnology, Biology Centre, ISB, CAS, Na Sadkach 7, 370 05 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic); Department of General and Industrial Microbiology, Faculty of Biology, Sofia University “St. Kliment Ohridski”, 8 Dragan Tsankov Blvd, 1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Laboratory Microwave Magnetics, Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee Blvd, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Baldikova, Eva [Global Change Research Institute, CAS, Na Sadkach 7, 370 05 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic); Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Agriculture, University of South Bohemia, Branisovska 1457, 370 05 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic); Pospiskova, Kristyna [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Palacky University, Slechtitelu 27, 783 71 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Safarikova, Mirka [Department of Nanobiotechnology, Biology Centre, ISB, CAS, Na Sadkach 7, 370 05 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic); Global Change Research Institute, CAS, Na Sadkach 7, 370 05 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic); Safarik, Ivo, E-mail: ivosaf@yahoo.com [Department of Nanobiotechnology, Biology Centre, ISB, CAS, Na Sadkach 7, 370 05 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic); Global Change Research Institute, CAS, Na Sadkach 7, 370 05 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic); Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Palacky University, Slechtitelu 27, 783 71 Olomouc (Czech Republic)

    2017-04-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the biosorption of Amido black 10B dye from aqueous solutions on magnetically modified sheaths of Leptothrix sp. in a batch system. The magnetic modification of the sheaths was performed using both microwave synthesized iron oxide nano- and microparticles and perchloric acid stabilized ferrofluid. The native and both magnetically modified sheaths were characterized by SEM. Various parameters significantly affecting the adsorption process, such as pH, contact time, temperature and initial concentration, were studied in detail using the adsorbent magnetized by both methods. The highest adsorption efficiency was achieved at pH 2. The maximum adsorption capacities of both types of magnetized material at room temperature were found to be 339.2 and 286.1 mg of dye per 1 g of ferrofluid modified and microwave synthesized particles modified adsorbent, respectively. Thermodynamic study of dye adsorption revealed a spontaneous and endothermic process in the temperature range between 279.15 and 313.15 K. The data were fitted to various equilibrium and kinetic models. Experimental data matched well with the pseudo-second-order kinetics and Freundlich isotherm model. The Leptothrix sheaths have excellent efficacy for dye adsorption. This material can be used as an effective, low-cost adsorbent. - Highlights: • Magnetic modification of Leptothrix sheaths using two methods is proposed. • Such magnetic material is an excellent adsorbent for Amido black 10B. • The magnetically modified sheaths can be easily separated by magnets.

  11. Application of Spray Foam Insulation Under Plywood and Oriented Strand Board Roof Sheathing

    Grin, A. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Smegal, J. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Lstiburek, J. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Unvented roof strategies with open cell and closed cell spray polyurethane foam insulation sprayed to the underside of roof sheathing have been used since the mid-1990's to provide durable and efficient building enclosures. However, there have been isolated moisture related incidents reported anecdotally that raise potential concerns about the overall hygrothermal performance of these systems. This project involved hygrothermal modeling of a range of rainwater leakage and field evaluations of in-service residential roofs using spray foam insulation. All of the roof assemblies modeled exhibited drying capacity to handle minor rainwater leakage. All field evaluation locations of in-service residential roofs had moisture contents well within the safe range for wood-based sheathing. Explorations of eleven in-service roof systems were completed. The exploration involved taking a sample of spray foam from the underside of the roof sheathing, exposing the sheathing, then taking a moisture content reading. All locations had moisture contents well within the safe range for wood-based sheathing. One full-roof failure was reviewed, as an industry partner was involved with replacing structurally failed roof sheathing. In this case the manufacturer's investigation report concluded that the spray foam was installed on wet OSB based on the observation that the spray foam did not adhere well to the substrate and the pore structure of the closed cell spray foam at the ccSPF/OSB interface was indicative of a wet substrate.

  12. Analysing half-lives for pesticide dissipation in plants

    Jacobsen, R.E.; Fantke, Peter; Trapp, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Overall dissipation of pesticides from plants is frequently measured, but the contribution of individual loss processes is largely unknown. We use a pesticide fate model for the quantification of dissipation by processes other than degradation. The model was parameterised using field studies....... Scenarios were established for Copenhagen/Denmark and Shanghai/PR China, and calibrated with measured results. The simulated dissipation rates of 42 pesticides were then compared with measured overall dissipation from field studies using tomato and wheat. The difference between measured overall dissipation...... and scenario. Accordingly, degradation is the most relevant dissipation process for these 42 pesticides, followed by growth dilution. Volatilisation was less relevant, which can be explained by the design of plant protection agents. Uptake of active compound from soil into plants leads to a negative...

  13. Studies of RF sheaths and diagnostics on IShTAR

    Crombé, K., E-mail: Kristel.Crombe@UGent.be [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); LPP-ERM/KMS, Royal Military Academy, Brussels (Belgium); Devaux, S.; Faudot, E.; Heuraux, S.; Moritz, J. [YIJL, UMR7198 CNRS-Université de Lorraine, Nancy (France); D’Inca, R.; Faugel, H.; Fünfgelder, H.; Jacquot, J.; Ochoukov, R. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Louche, F.; Tripsky, M.; Van Eester, D.; Wauters, T. [LPP-ERM/KMS, Royal Military Academy, Brussels (Belgium); Noterdaeme, J.-M. [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)

    2015-12-10

    IShTAR (Ion cyclotron Sheath Test ARrangement) is a linear magnetised plasma test facility for RF sheaths studies at the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik in Garching. In contrast to a tokamak, a test stand provides more liberty to impose the parameters and gives better access for the instrumentation and antennas. The project will support the development of diagnostic methods for characterising RF sheaths and validate and improve theoretical predictions. The cylindrical vacuum vessel has a diameter of 1 m and is 1.1 m long. The plasma is created by an external cylindrical plasma source equipped with a helical antenna that has been designed to excite the m=1 helicon mode. In inductive mode, plasma densities and electron temperatures have been characterised with a planar Langmuir probe as a function of gas pressure and input RF power. A 2D array of RF compensated Langmuir probes and a spectrometer are planned. A single strap RF antenna has been designed; the plasma-facing surface is aligned to the cylindrical plasma to ease the modelling. The probes will allow direct measurements of plasma density profiles in front of the RF antenna, and thus a detailed study of the density modifications induced by RF sheaths, which influences the coupling. The RF antenna frequency has been chosen to study different plasma wave interactions: the accessible plasma density range includes an evanescent and propagative behaviour of slow or fast waves, and allows the study of the effect of the lower hybrid resonance layer.

  14. Quantum dissipation from power-law memory

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2012-01-01

    A new quantum dissipation model based on memory mechanism is suggested. Dynamics of open and closed quantum systems with power-law memory is considered. The processes with power-law memory are described by using integration and differentiation of non-integer orders, by methods of fractional calculus. An example of quantum oscillator with linear friction and power-law memory is considered. - Highlights: ► A new quantum dissipation model based on memory mechanism is suggested. ► The generalization of Lindblad equation is considered. ► An exact solution of generalized Lindblad equation for quantum oscillator with linear friction and power-law memory is derived.

  15. Dissipative phenomena in condensed matter some applications

    Dattagupta, Sushanta

    2004-01-01

    From the field of nonequilibrium statistical physics, this graduate- and research-level volume treats the modeling and characterization of dissipative phenomena. A variety of examples from diverse disciplines like condensed matter physics, materials science, metallurgy, chemical physics etc. are discussed. Dattagupta employs the broad framework of stochastic processes and master equation techniques to obtain models for a wide range of experimentally relevant phenomena such as classical and quantum Brownian motion, spin dynamics, kinetics of phase ordering, relaxation in glasses, dissipative tunneling. It provides a pedagogical exposition of current research material and will be useful to experimentalists, computational physicists and theorists.

  16. Effect of rise-time patterns on dynamics of sheath expansion during plasma immersion ion implantation

    Huang Yongxian; Tian Xiubo; Yang Shiqin; Fu Ricky; Paul, C.K.

    2007-01-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) has been developed as a low-cost and efficient surface modification technique of irregularly-shaped objects. The effect of six pulse waves with different rise-time patterns on the spatio-temporal evolution of plasma sheath,energy and dose of ion implantation has been simulated by particle-in-cell modeling. Statistical results may be obtained through assuming the Boltzmann distribution of electrons, and solving Poisson and Newton equations for tracing each ion in the plasma sheath. The results show that rise-time pattern has a critical influence on the evolution of plasma sheath. There exists maximum thickness difference of plasma sheath for different waveforms. The acceleration of ions is non-uniform due to the non-uniformity of electrical field strength. The maximum gradient of electrical field appears near the edge of plasma sheath. The results also show that optimization of dose and energy of incident ions may be achieved through modification of rise-time pattern. The numerical simulation of sheath expansion can be effectively used to provide a scientific basis for optimizing the PIII process. (authors)

  17. Development of Ti-sheathed MgB2 wires with high critical current density

    Liang, G; Fang, H; Hanna, M; Yen, F; Lv, B; Alessandrini, M; Keith, S; Hoyt, C; Tang, Z; Salama, K

    2006-01-01

    Working towards developing lightweight superconducting magnets for future space and other applications, we have successfully fabricated mono-core Ti-sheathed MgB 2 wires by the powder-in-tube method. The wires were characterized by magnetization, electrical resistivity, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectrometry measurements. The results indicate that the Ti sheath does not react with the magnesium and boron, and the present wire rolling process can produce MgB 2 wires with a superconducting volume fraction of at least 64% in the core. Using the Bean model, it was found that at 5 K, the magnetic critical current densities, J c , measured in magnetic fields of 0, 5, and 8 T are about 4.2 x 10 5 , 3.6 x 10 4 , and 1.4 x 10 4 A cm -2 , respectively. At 20 K and 0 T, the magnetic J c is about 2.4 x 10 5 A cm -2 . These results show that at zero and low fields, the values of the magnetic J c for Ti-sheathed MgB 2 wires are comparable with the best results available for the Fe-sheathed MgB 2 wires. At high fields, however, the J c for Ti-sheathed MgB 2 wires appears higher than that for the Fe-sheathed MgB 2 wires

  18. Dynamics of quasi-stable dissipative systems

    Chueshov, Igor

    2015-01-01

    This book is  devoted to background material and recently developed mathematical methods in the study of infinite-dimensional dissipative systems. The theory of such systems is motivated by the long-term goal to establish rigorous mathematical models for turbulent and chaotic phenomena. The aim here is to offer general methods and abstract results pertaining to fundamental dynamical systems properties related to dissipative long-time behavior. The book systematically presents, develops and uses the quasi-stability method while substantially extending it by including for consideration new classes of models and PDE systems arising in Continuum Mechanics. The book can be used as a textbook in dissipative dynamics at the graduate level.   Igor Chueshov is a Professor of Mathematics at Karazin Kharkov National University in Kharkov, Ukraine.

  19. Plasma sheath in non-Maxwellian plasma

    Shimizu, Takuo; Horigome, Takashi

    1992-01-01

    Reviewing many theoretical and experimental works on the electron-energy distributions (EEDF) of various plasmas, we point out that many plasmas have EEDF of non-Maxwellian in shape. Therefore, the recent treatment of plasma sheath using the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution approximation should be improved. To do this, we have adopted Rutcher's standard distribution as a generalized form in place of the traditional Maxwellian, and found that the minimum energy of ions entering the sheath edge (Bohm's criterion) varies largely, and have also shown the variation of Debye length with the shape of EEDF. The length is the most important parameter to proceed with more detailed analysis on plasma-sheaths, and also to control them in the future. (author)

  20. The influence of the breakdown electric field in the configuration of lightning corona sheath on charge distribution in the channel

    Ignjatovic, Milan; Cvetic, Jovan; Heidler, Fridolin; Markovic, Slavoljub; Djuric, Radivoje

    2014-11-01

    A model of corona sheath that surrounds the thin core of the lightning channel has been investigated by using a generalized traveling current source return stroke model. The lightning channel is modeled by a charged corona sheath that stretches around a highly conductive central core through which the main current flows. The channel core with the negatively charged outer channel sheath forms a strong electric field, with an overall radial orientation. The return stroke process is modeled as the negative leader charge in the corona sheath being discharged by the positive charge coming from the channel core. Expressions that describe how the corona sheath radius evolves during the return stroke are obtained from the corona sheath model, which predicts charge motion within the sheath. The corona sheath model, set forth by Maslowski and Rakov (2006), Tausanovic et al. (2010), Marjanovic and Cvetic (2009), Cvetic et al. (2011) and Cvetic et al. (2012), divides the sheath onto three zones: zone 1 (surrounding the channel core with net positive charge), zone 2 (surrounding zone 1 with negative charge) and zone 3 (the outer zone, representing uncharged virgin air). In the present study, we have assumed a constant electric field inside zone 1, as suggested by experimental research of corona discharges in coaxial geometry conducted by Cooray (2000). The present investigation builds upon previous studies by Tausanovic et al. (2010) and Cvetic et al. (2012) in several ways. The value of the breakdown electric field has been varied for probing its effect on channel charge distribution prior and during the return stroke. With the aim of investigating initial space charge distribution along the channel, total electric field at the outer surface of the channel corona sheath, just before the return stroke, is calculated and compared for various return stroke models. A self-consistent algorithm is applied to the generalized traveling current source return stroke model, so that the

  1. Optic Nerve Sheath Meningocele: A Case Report

    Halimi, E.; Wavreille, O.; Rosenberg, R.; Bouacha, I.; Lejeune, J.-P.; Defoort-Dhellemmes, S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Isolated optic nerve sheath meningocele is a rare affection defined as the cystic enlargement of the optic nerve sheath filled with cerebrospinal fluid. We report the case of a 39-year-old woman presenting with bilateral meningocele uncovered during a routine examination for headache complaints. A 5-year follow-up validated the lesion’s clinical and imaging stability. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an essential tool in the diagnosis of this pathology, alongside characteristic symptoms indicating that the meningocele might have progressively expanded into the orbit. In this case we present a therapeutic approach based on pathophysiological hypotheses and review of the literature. PMID:28163760

  2. Attractors of dissipative structure in three dissipative fluids

    Kondoh, Yoshiomi

    1993-10-01

    A general theory with use of auto-correlations for distributions is presented to derive that realization of coherent structures in general dissipative dynamic systems is equivalent to that of self-organized states with the minimum dissipation rate for instantaneously contained energy. Attractors of dissipative structure are shown to be given by eigenfunctions for dissipative dynamic operators of the dynamic system and to constitute the self-organized and self-similar decay phase. Three typical examples applied to incompressible viscous fluids, to incompressible viscous and resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluids and to compressible resistive MHD plasmas are presented to lead to attractors in the three dissipative fluids and to describe a common physical picture of self-organization and bifurcation of the dissipative structure. (author)

  3. Power Dissipation in Division

    Liu, Wei; Nannarelli, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    A few classes of algorithms to implement division in hardware have been used over the years: division by digit-recurrence, by reciprocal approximation by iterative methods and by polynomial approximation. Due to the differences in the algorithms, a comparison among their implementation in terms o...... of performance and precision is sometimes hard to make. In this work, we use power dissipation and energy consumption as metrics to compare among those different classes of algorithms. There are no previous works in the literature presenting such a comparison....

  4. Dissipative Boltzmann-Robertson-Walker cosmologies

    Hiscock, W.A.; Salmonson, J.

    1991-01-01

    The equations governing a flat Robertson-Walker cosmological model containing a dissipative Boltzmann gas are integrated numerically. The bulk viscous stress is modeled using the Eckart and Israel-Stewart theories of dissipative relativistic fluids; the resulting cosmologies are compared and contrasted. The Eckart models are shown to always differ in a significant quantitative way from the Israel-Stewart models. It thus appears inappropriate to use the pathological (nonhyperbolic) Eckart theory for cosmological applications. For large bulk viscosities, both cosmological models approach asymptotic nonequilibrium states; in the Eckart model the total pressure is negative, while in the Israel-Stewart model the total pressure is asymptotically zero. The Eckart model also expands more rapidly than the Israel-Stewart models. These results suggest that ''bulk-viscous'' inflation may be an artifact of using a pathological fluid theory such as the Eckart theory

  5. Incorporating the CALPHAD sublattice approach of ordering into the phase-field model with finite interface dissipation

    Zhang, Lijun; Stratmann, Matthias; Du, Yong; Sundman, Bo; Steinbach, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    A new approach to incorporate the sublattice models in the CALPHAD (CALculation of PHAse Diagram) formalism directly into the phase-field formalism is developed. In binary alloys, the sublattice models can be classified into two types (i.e., “Type I” and “Type II”), depending on whether a direct one-to-one relation between the element site fraction in the CALPHAD database and the phase concentration in the phase-field model exists (Type I), or not (Type II). For “Type II” sublattice models, the specific site fractions, corresponding to a given mole fraction, have to be established via internal relaxation between different sublattices. Internal minimization of sublattice occupancy and solute evolution during microstructure transformation leads, in general, to a solution superior to the separate solution of the individual problems. The present coupling technique is validated for Fe–C and Ni–Al alloys. Finally, the model is extended into multicomponent alloys and applied to simulate the nucleation process of VC monocarbide from austenite matrix in a steel containing vanadium

  6. Transport Equations Resolution By N-BEE Anti-Dissipative Scheme In 2D Model Of Low Pressure Glow Discharge

    Kraloua, B.; Hennad, A.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to determine electric and physical properties by 2D modelling of glow discharge low pressure in continuous regime maintained by term constant source. This electric discharge is confined in reactor plan-parallel geometry. This reactor is filled by Argon monatomic gas. Our continuum model the order two is composed the first three moments the Boltzmann's equations coupled with Poisson's equation by self consistent method. These transport equations are discretized by the finite volumes method. The equations system is resolved by a new technique, it is about the N-BEE explicit scheme using the time splitting method.

  7. Explicit dissipative structures

    Roessler, O.E.

    1987-01-01

    Dissipative structures consisting of a few macrovariables arise out of a sea of reversible microvariables. Unexpected residual effects of the massive underlying reversibility, on the macrolevel, cannot therefore be excluded. In the age of molecular-dynamics simulations, explicit dissipative structures like excitable systems (explicit observers) can be generated in a computer from first reversible principles. A class of classical, 1-D Hamiltonian systems of chaotic type is considered which has the asset that the trajectorial behavior in phase space can be understood geometrically. If, as nuatural, the number of particle types is much smaller than that of particles, the Gibbs symmetry must be taken into account. The permutation invariance drastically changes the behavior in phase space (quasi-periodization). The explicity observer becomes effectively reversible on a short time scale. In consequence, his ability to measure microscopic motions is suspended in a characteristic fashion. Unlike quantum mechanics whose holistic nature cannot be transcended, the present holistic (internal-interface) effects - mimicking the former to some extent - can be understood fully in principle

  8. Effect of dissipation on dynamical fusion thresholds

    Sierk, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    The existence of dynamical thresholds to fusion in heavy nuclei (A greater than or equal to 200) due to the nature of the potential-energy surface is shown. These thresholds exist even in the absence of dissipative forces, due to the coupling between the various collective deformation degrees of freedom. Using a macroscopic model of nuclear shape dynamics, It is shown how three different suggested dissipation mechanisms increase by varying amounts the excitation energy over the one-dimensional barrier required to cause compound-nucleus formation. The recently introduced surface-plus-window dissipation may give a reasonable representation of experimental data on fusion thresholds, in addition to properly describing fission-fragment kinetic energies and isoscalar giant multipole widths. Scaling of threshold results to asymmetric systems is discussed. 48 refs., 10 figs

  9. Microscopic theory of one-body dissipation

    Koonin, S.E.; Randrup, J.; Hatch, R.; Kolomietz, V.

    1977-01-01

    A microscopic theory is developed for nuclear collective motion in the limit of a long nuclear mean-free path. Linear response techniques are applied to an independent particle model and expressions for the collective kinetic energy and rate of energy dissipation are obtained. For leptodermous systems, these quantities are characterized by mass and dissipation kernels coupling the velocities at different points on the nuclear surface. In a classical treatment, the kernels are given in terms of nucleon trajectories within the nuclear shape. In a quantal treatment, the dissipation kernel is related to the nuclear Green function. The spatial and thermal properties of the kernels are investigated. Corrections for the diffuseness of the potential and shell effects are also discussed. (Auth.)

  10. Dissipation and decoherence in quantum systems

    Menskii, Mikhail B

    2003-01-01

    The theory of dissipative quantum systems and its relation to the quantum theory of continuous measurements are reviewed. Constructing a correct theory of a dissipative quantum system requires that the system's interaction with its environment (reservoir) be taken into account. Since information about the system is 'recorded' in the state of the reservoir, the quantum theory of continuous measurements can be used to account for the influence of the reservoir. If based on the use of restricted path integrals, this theory does not require an explicit reservoir model and is therefore much simpler technically. (reviews of topical problems)

  11. The effect of oxygen on the failure of reactor fuel sheaths during a postulated loss-of-coolant accident

    Ferner, J.; Rosinger, H.E.

    1983-09-01

    The failure model for Zircaloy-4 reactor fuel sheaths was used to study the effect of steam oxidation on sheath burst strain. The model, in the form of a computer program called BURST-3, was used to calculate burst strain for a Zircaloy-4 sheath under arbitrary pressure and temperature sequences in an oxidizing (steam) atmosphere. In particular, BURST-3 was used in a parametric study to predict the sheath behaviour in steam as compared to an inert atmosphere, the effect of heating rate, and the effect of circumferential temperature variations on burst strain. It was found that fuel sheath oxidation, which decreases burst strain, becomes increasingly important with increasing temperature and/or time. An effective oxygen concentration of greater than 0.27 wt. percent will cause the sheath to fail with a negligible strain. The hottest region of a sheath will have the highest oxygen concentration, the largest localized strain, and will be the site of failure. The model predictions were compared to experimental data in the range 900 to 1600 K. Agreement between theory and experiment for all three heating rates (5, 25, and 100 K.s -1 ) was very good

  12. Accelerated Time-Domain Modeling of Electromagnetic Pulse Excitation of Finite-Length Dissipative Conductors over a Ground Plane via Function Fitting and Recursive Convolution

    Campione, Salvatore [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Warne, Larry K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sainath, Kamalesh [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Basilio, Lorena I. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-10-01

    In this report we overview the fundamental concepts for a pair of techniques which together greatly hasten computational predictions of electromagnetic pulse (EMP) excitation of finite-length dissipative conductors over a ground plane. In a time- domain, transmission line (TL) model implementation, predictions are computationally bottlenecked time-wise, either for late-time predictions (about 100ns-10000ns range) or predictions concerning EMP excitation of long TLs (order of kilometers or more ). This is because the method requires a temporal convolution to account for the losses in the ground. Addressing this to facilitate practical simulation of EMP excitation of TLs, we first apply a technique to extract an (approximate) complex exponential function basis-fit to the ground/Earth's impedance function, followed by incorporating this into a recursion-based convolution acceleration technique. Because the recursion-based method only requires the evaluation of the most recent voltage history data (versus the entire history in a "brute-force" convolution evaluation), we achieve necessary time speed- ups across a variety of TL/Earth geometry/material scenarios. Intentionally Left Blank

  13. Arthroscopic sheath design and technical evaluation

    Tuijthof, Gabriëlle J. M.; Blankevoort, Leendert; Herder, Just L.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2009-01-01

    The maintenance of a clear view on the operation area is essential to perform a minimally invasive procedure In arthroscopy, this is achieved by irrigating the Joint with a saline fluid that is pumped through the joint At present the arthroscopic sheaths are not designed for optimal irrigation,

  14. Dissipative nucleus-nucleus collisions: study of memory effects

    Agarwal, K.C.; Yadav, H.L.

    2002-01-01

    Dissipative collisions between two heavy nuclei are described in terms of a macroscopic dynamical model within the framework of a multi-dimensional Fokker-Planck equation. The reaction 86 Kr(8.18 MeV/u) + 166 Er has been used as a prototype to study and demonstrate the memory effects for dissipation and diffusion processes

  15. A Full-wave Model for Wave Propagation and Dissipation in the Inner Magnetosphere Using the Finite Element Method

    Valeo, Ernest; Johnson, Jay R.; Kim, Eun-Hwa; Phillips, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    A wide variety of plasma waves play an important role in the energization and loss of particles in the inner magnetosphere. Our ability to understand and model wave-particle interactions in this region requires improved knowledge of the spatial distribution and properties of these waves as well as improved understanding of how the waves depend on changes in solar wind forcing and/or geomagnetic activity. To this end, we have developed a two-dimensional, finite element code that solves the full wave equations in global magnetospheric geometry. The code describes three-dimensional wave structure including mode conversion when ULF, EMIC, and whistler waves are launched in a two-dimensional axisymmetric background plasma with general magnetic field topology. We illustrate the capabilities of the code by examining the role of plasmaspheric plumes on magnetosonic wave propagation; mode conversion at the ion-ion and Alfven resonances resulting from external, solar wind compressions; and wave structure and mode conversion of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves launched in the equatorial magnetosphere, which propagate along the magnetic field lines toward the ionosphere. We also discuss advantages of the finite element method for resolving resonant structures, and how the model may be adapted to include nonlocal kinetic effects.

  16. A two-dimensional model of the colonic crypt accounting for the role of the basement membrane and pericryptal fibroblast sheath.

    Sara-Jane Dunn

    Full Text Available The role of the basement membrane is vital in maintaining the integrity and structure of an epithelial layer, acting as both a mechanical support and forming the physical interface between epithelial cells and the surrounding connective tissue. The function of this membrane is explored here in the context of the epithelial monolayer that lines the colonic crypt, test-tube shaped invaginations that punctuate the lining of the intestine and coordinate a regular turnover of cells to replenish the epithelial layer every few days. To investigate the consequence of genetic mutations that perturb the system dynamics and can lead to colorectal cancer, it must be possible to track the emerging tissue level changes that arise in the crypt. To that end, a theoretical crypt model with a realistic, deformable geometry is required. A new discrete crypt model is presented, which focuses on the interaction between cell- and tissue-level behaviour, while incorporating key subcellular components. The model contains a novel description of the role of the surrounding tissue and musculature, based upon experimental observations of the tissue structure of the crypt, which are also reported. A two-dimensional (2D cross-sectional geometry is considered, and the shape of the crypt is allowed to evolve and deform. Simulation results reveal how the shape of the crypt may contribute mechanically to the asymmetric division events typically associated with the stem cells at the base. The model predicts that epithelial cell migration may arise due to feedback between cell loss at the crypt collar and density-dependent cell division, an hypothesis which can be investigated in a wet lab. This work forms the basis for investigation of the deformation of the crypt structure that can occur due to proliferation of cells exhibiting mutant phenotypes, experiments that would not be possible in vivo or in vitro.

  17. Redefinition of the self-bias voltage in a dielectrically shielded thin sheath RF discharge

    Ho, Teck Seng; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod

    2018-05-01

    In a geometrically asymmetric capacitively coupled discharge where the powered electrode is shielded from the plasma by a layer of dielectric material, the self-bias manifests as a nonuniform negative charging in the dielectric rather than on the blocking capacitor. In the thin sheath regime where the ion transit time across the powered sheath is on the order of or less than the Radiofrequency (RF) period, the plasma potential is observed to respond asymmetrically to extraneous impedances in the RF circuit. Consequently, the RF waveform on the plasma-facing surface of the dielectric is unknown, and the behaviour of the powered sheath is not easily predictable. Sheath circuit models become inadequate for describing this class of discharges, and a comprehensive fluid, electrical, and plasma numerical model is employed to accurately quantify this behaviour. The traditional definition of the self-bias voltage as the mean of the RF waveform is shown to be erroneous in this regime. Instead, using the maxima of the RF waveform provides a more rigorous definition given its correlation with the ion dynamics in the powered sheath. This is supported by a RF circuit model derived from the computational fluid dynamics and plasma simulations.

  18. Conservation laws shape dissipation

    Rao, Riccardo; Esposito, Massimiliano

    2018-02-01

    Starting from the most general formulation of stochastic thermodynamics—i.e. a thermodynamically consistent nonautonomous stochastic dynamics describing systems in contact with several reservoirs—we define a procedure to identify the conservative and the minimal set of nonconservative contributions in the entropy production. The former is expressed as the difference between changes caused by time-dependent drivings and a generalized potential difference. The latter is a sum over the minimal set of flux-force contributions controlling the dissipative flows across the system. When the system is initially prepared at equilibrium (e.g. by turning off drivings and forces), a finite-time detailed fluctuation theorem holds for the different contributions. Our approach relies on identifying the complete set of conserved quantities and can be viewed as the extension of the theory of generalized Gibbs ensembles to nonequilibrium situations.

  19. Dissipative binary collisions

    Aboufirassi, M; Angelique, J.C.; Bizard, G.; Bougault, R.; Brou, R.; Buta, A.; Colin, J.; Cussol, D.; Durand, D.; Genoux-Lubain, A.; Horn, D.; Kerambrun, A.; Laville, J.L.; Le Brun, C.; Lecolley, J.F.; Lefebvres, F.; Lopez, O.; Louvel, M.; Meslin, C.; Metivier, V.; Nakagawa, T.; Peter, J.; Popescu, R.; Regimbart, R.; Steckmeyer, J.C.; Tamain, B.; Vient, E.; Wieloch, A.; Yuasa-Nakagawa, K.

    1998-01-01

    The binary character of the heavy ion collisions at intermediate energies in the exit channel has been observed under 30 MeV/n in medium and heavy systems. Measurements in light systems at energies approaching ∼ 100 MeV/nucleon as well as in very heavy systems have allowed to extend considerably the investigations of this binary process. Thus, the study of the Pb + Au system showed that the complete charge events indicated two distinct sources: the quasi-projectile and the quasi-target. The characteristics of these two sources are rather well reproduced by a trajectory computation which takes into account the Coulomb and nuclear forces and the friction appearing from the projectile-target interaction. The Wilczynski diagram is used to probe the correlation between the kinetic energy quenching and the deflecting angle. In case of the system Pb + Au at 29 MeV/nucleon the diagram indicate dissipative binary collisions typical for low energies. This binary aspect was also detected in the systems Xe + Ag at 44 MeV/nucleon, 36 Ar + 27 Al and 64 Zn + nat Ti. Thus, it was possible to reconstruct the quasi-projectile and to study its mass and excitation energy evolution as a function of the impact parameter. The dissipative binary collisions represent for the systems and energies under considerations the main contribution to the cross section. This does not implies that there are not other processes; particularly, the more or less complete fusion is also observed but with a low cross section which decreases with the increase of bombardment energy. More exclusive measurements with the INDRA detector on quasi-symmetric systems as Ar + KCl and Xe + Sn seem to confirm the importance of the binary collisions. The two source reconstruction of the Xe + Sn data at 50 MeV/nucleon reproduces the same behaviour as that observed in the system Pb + Au at 29 MeV/nucleon

  20. Quantum Darwinism and non-Markovian dissipative dynamics from quantum phases of the spin-1/2 X X model

    Giorgi, Gian Luca; Galve, Fernando; Zambrini, Roberta

    2015-08-01

    Quantum Darwinism explains the emergence of a classical description of objects in terms of the creation of many redundant registers in an environment containing their classical information. This amplification phenomenon, where only classical information reaches the macroscopic observer and through which different observers can agree on the objective existence of such object, has been revived lately for several types of situations, successfully explaining classicality. We explore quantum Darwinism in the setting of an environment made of two level systems which are initially prepared in the ground state of the XX model, which exhibits different phases; we find that the different phases have different abilities to redundantly acquire classical information about the system, the "ferromagnetic phase" being the only one able to complete quantum Darwinism. At the same time we relate this ability to how non-Markovian the system dynamics is, based on the interpretation that non-Markovian dynamics is associated with backflow of information from environment to system, thus spoiling the information transfer needed for Darwinism. Finally, we explore mixing of bath registers by allowing a small interaction among them, finding that this spoils the stored information as previously found in the literature.

  1. Parametric investigations of target normal sheath acceleration experiments

    Zani, Alessandro; Sgattoni, Andrea; Passoni, Matteo

    2011-01-01

    One of the most important challenges related to laser-driven ion acceleration research is to actively control some important ion beam features. This is a peculiar topic in the light of future possible technological applications. In the present work we make use of one theoretical model for target normal sheath acceleration in order to reproduce recent experimental parametric studies about maximum ion energy dependencies on laser parameters. The key role played by pulse energy and intensity is enlightened. Finally the effective dependence of maximum ion energy on intensity is evaluated using a combined theoretical approach, obtained by means of an analytical and a particle-in-cell numerical investigation.

  2. Parametric investigations of target normal sheath acceleration experiments

    Zani, Alessandro; Sgattoni, Andrea; Passoni, Matteo

    2011-10-01

    One of the most important challenges related to laser-driven ion acceleration research is to actively control some important ion beam features. This is a peculiar topic in the light of future possible technological applications. In the present work we make use of one theoretical model for target normal sheath acceleration in order to reproduce recent experimental parametric studies about maximum ion energy dependencies on laser parameters. The key role played by pulse energy and intensity is enlightened. Finally the effective dependence of maximum ion energy on intensity is evaluated using a combined theoretical approach, obtained by means of an analytical and a particle-in-cell numerical investigation.

  3. Excitation of surface waves and electrostatic fields by a RF (radiofrequency systems) wave in a plasma sheath with current

    Gutierrez Tapia, C.

    1990-01-01

    It is shown in a one-dimensional model that when a current in a plasma sheath is present, the excitation of surface waves and electrostatic fields by a RF wave is possible in the sheath. This phenomena depends strongly on the joint action of Miller's and driven forces. It is also shown that the action of these forces are carried out at different characteristic times when the wave front travels through the plasma sheath. The influence of the current, in the steady limit, is taken into account by a small functional variation of the density perturbations and generated electrostatic field. (Author)

  4. Structural analysis of sheath folds in the Sylacauga Marble Group, Talladega slate belt, southern Appalachians

    Mies, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    Remnant blocks of marble from the Moretti-Harrah dimension-stone quarry provide excellent exposure of meter-scale sheath folds. Tubular structures with elliptical cross-sections (4 ???Ryz ??? 5) are the most common expression of the folds. The tubes are elongate subparallel to stretching lineation and are defined by centimeter-scale layers of schist. Eccentrically nested elliptical patterns and opposing asymmetry of folds ('S' and 'Z') are consistent with the sheath-fold interpretation. Sheath folds are locally numerous in the Moretti-Harrah quarry but are not widely distributed in the Sylacauga Marble Group; reconnaissance in neighboring quarries provided no additional observations. The presence of sheath folds in part of the Talladega slate belt indicates a local history of plastic, non-coaxial deformation. Such a history of deformation is substantiated by petrographic study of an extracted hinge from the Moretti-Harrah quarry. The sheath folds are modeled as due to passive amplification of initial structures during simple shear, using both analytic geometry and graphic simulation. As indicated by these models, relatively large shear strains (y ??? 9) and longitudinal initial structures are required. The shear strain presumably relates to NW-directed displacement of overlying crystalline rocks during late Paleozoic orogeny. ?? 1993.

  5. Anode sheath transition in an anodic arc for synthesis of nanomaterials

    Nemchinsky, V. A.; Raitses, Y.

    2016-06-01

    The arc discharge with ablating anode or so-called anodic arc is widely used for synthesis of nanomaterials, including carbon nanotubes and fullerens, metal nanoparticles etc. We present the model of this arc, which confirms the existence of the two different modes of the arc operation with two different anode sheath regimes, namely, with negative anode sheath and with positive anode sheath. It was previously suggested that these regimes are associated with two different anode ablating modes—low ablation mode with constant ablation rate and the enhanced ablation mode (Fetterman et al 2008 Carbon 46 1322). The transition of the arc operation from low ablation mode to high ablation mode is determined by the current density at the anode. The model can be used to self-consistently determine the distribution of the electric field, electron density and electron temperature in the near-anode region of the arc discharge. Simulations of the carbon arc predict that for low arc ablating modes, the current is driven mainly by the electron diffusion to the anode. For positive anode sheath, the anode voltage is close to the ionization potential of anode material, while for negative anode sheath, the anode voltage is an order of magnitude smaller. It is also shown that the near-anode plasma, is far from the ionization equilibrium.

  6. Anode sheath transition in an anodic arc for synthesis of nanomaterials

    Nemchinsky, V A; Raitses, Y

    2016-01-01

    The arc discharge with ablating anode or so-called anodic arc is widely used for synthesis of nanomaterials, including carbon nanotubes and fullerens, metal nanoparticles etc. We present the model of this arc, which confirms the existence of the two different modes of the arc operation with two different anode sheath regimes, namely, with negative anode sheath and with positive anode sheath. It was previously suggested that these regimes are associated with two different anode ablating modes—low ablation mode with constant ablation rate and the enhanced ablation mode (Fetterman et al 2008 Carbon 46 1322). The transition of the arc operation from low ablation mode to high ablation mode is determined by the current density at the anode. The model can be used to self-consistently determine the distribution of the electric field, electron density and electron temperature in the near-anode region of the arc discharge. Simulations of the carbon arc predict that for low arc ablating modes, the current is driven mainly by the electron diffusion to the anode. For positive anode sheath, the anode voltage is close to the ionization potential of anode material, while for negative anode sheath, the anode voltage is an order of magnitude smaller. It is also shown that the near-anode plasma, is far from the ionization equilibrium. (paper)

  7. A study of the effect of circumferential temperature variations on fuel-sheath strain in an inert atmosphere

    Ferner, J.; Rondeau, R.K.; Rosinger, H.E.

    1983-07-01

    A failure model for Zircaloy-4 fuel sheaths has been developed and used to predict the effect of circumferential temperature variations (ΔT) on fuel-sheath strain behaviour in an inert atmosphere. In addition, experimental data were generated for fuel-sheath failures in the α and (α+β)-phase regions and compared to the predictions of the model. For both the experimental data and the model predictions it was found that increasing ΔT decreases sheath strain. Most of the reduction in burst strain with increasing ΔT occurs in the first 15 K to 20 K. For high ΔT values, burst strains in the α- and (α+β)-phase regions tend to an asymptotic value in the range 5 to 20 percent, irrespective of both heating rate and circumferential temperature variation. The BURST-2 computer code was used for these calculations

  8. Quantum phase transition with dissipative frustration

    Maile, D.; Andergassen, S.; Belzig, W.; Rastelli, G.

    2018-04-01

    We study the quantum phase transition of the one-dimensional phase model in the presence of dissipative frustration, provided by an interaction of the system with the environment through two noncommuting operators. Such a model can be realized in Josephson junction chains with shunt resistances and resistances between the chain and the ground. Using a self-consistent harmonic approximation, we determine the phase diagram at zero temperature which exhibits a quantum phase transition between an ordered phase, corresponding to the superconducting state, and a disordered phase, corresponding to the insulating state with localized superconducting charge. Interestingly, we find that the critical line separating the two phases has a nonmonotonic behavior as a function of the dissipative coupling strength. This result is a consequence of the frustration between (i) one dissipative coupling that quenches the quantum phase fluctuations favoring the ordered phase and (ii) one that quenches the quantum momentum (charge) fluctuations leading to a vanishing phase coherence. Moreover, within the self-consistent harmonic approximation, we analyze the dissipation induced crossover between a first and second order phase transition, showing that quantum frustration increases the range in which the phase transition is second order. The nonmonotonic behavior is reflected also in the purity of the system that quantifies the degree of correlation between the system and the environment, and in the logarithmic negativity as an entanglement measure that encodes the internal quantum correlations in the chain.

  9. Characterizing pesticide dissipation in food crops

    Fantke, Peter; Juraske, R.; Jolliet, O.

    2013-01-01

    Ingestion of residues via consumption of food crops is the predominant exposure route of the general population toward pesticides. However, pesticide dissipation in crops constitutes a main source of uncertainty in estimating residues in harvested crop parts and subsequent human exposure. Neverth......Ingestion of residues via consumption of food crops is the predominant exposure route of the general population toward pesticides. However, pesticide dissipation in crops constitutes a main source of uncertainty in estimating residues in harvested crop parts and subsequent human exposure....... Nevertheless, dissipation is a key mechanism in models assessing pesticide distribution in the cropenvironment and the magnitude of residues in harvest. We provide a consistent framework for characterizing pesticide dissipation in food crops for use in modeling approaches applied in health risk and impact...... degradation is dominating. We are currently testing the regression to predict degradation half-lives in crops. By providing mean degradation half-lives at 20°C for more than 300 pesticides, we reduce uncertainty and improve assumptions in current practice of health risk and impact assessments....

  10. ELESTRES: performance of nuclear fuel, circumferential ridging, and multiaxial elastic-plastic stresses in sheaths

    Tayal, M.

    1986-10-01

    The finite element code ELESTRES models the two-dimensional axisymmetric behaviour of a CANDU fuel element during normal operation. The main focus of the code is to estimate temperatures, fission gas release, and axial variations of deformation/stresses in the pellet and in the sheath. Thus the code is able to predict details like stresses/strains at circumferential ridges. This paper describes the current version of ELESTRES. The emphasis is on a recent addition: multiaxial stresses in the sheath near circumferential ridges. For accuracy in the critical region, a fine mesh is used near the ridge. To keep computing costs low, a coarse mesh is used near the midplane of the pellet. Predictions of ELESTRES show good agreement with abouth 80 measurements of fission-gas-release. In this paper, we also present ELESTRES predictions of hoop strains in sheaths, for two irradiations: element ABS and bundle GB. For both irradiations, predictions, compare favourably with measurements. An illustrative example shows that near circumferential ridges, bending contributes to multiaxial stresses in the sheath. This can have a significant effect on sheath integrity, such as during stress-corrosion-cracking due to power-increases, or during corrosion-assisted-fatigue due to power cycling

  11. Theoretical and computational studies of the sheath of a planar wall

    Giraudo, Martina; Camporeale, Enrico; Delzanno, Gian Luca; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2012-03-01

    We present an investigation of the stability and nonlinear evolution of the sheath of a planar wall. We focus on the electrostatic limit. The stability analysis is conducted with a fluid model where continuity and momentum equations for the electrons and ions are coupled through Poisson's equation. The effect of electron emission from the wall is studied parametrically. Our results show that a sheath instability associated with the emitted electrons can exist. Following Ref. [1], it is interpreted as a Rayleigh-Taylor instability driven by the favorable combination of the sheath electron density gradient and electric field. Fully kinetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations will also be presented to investigate whether this instability indeed exists and to study the nonlinear effect of electron emission on the sheath profiles. The simulations will be conducted with CPIC, a new electrostatic PIC code that couples the standard PIC algorithm with strategies for generation and adaptation of the computational grid. [4pt] [1] G.L. Delzanno, ``A paradigm for the stability of the plasma sheath against fluid perturbations,'' Phys. Plasmas 18, 103508 (2011).

  12. Dissipative Axial Inflation

    Notari, Alessio

    2016-12-22

    We analyze in detail the background cosmological evolution of a scalar field coupled to a massless abelian gauge field through an axial term $\\frac{\\phi}{f_\\gamma} F \\tilde{F}$, such as in the case of an axion. Gauge fields in this case are known to experience tachyonic growth and therefore can backreact on the background as an effective dissipation into radiation energy density $\\rho_R$, which which can lead to inflation without the need of a flat potential. We analyze the system, for momenta $k$ smaller than the cutoff $f_\\gamma$, including numerically the backreaction. We consider the evolution from a given static initial condition and explicitly show that, if $f_\\gamma$ is smaller than the field excursion $\\phi_0$ by about a factor of at least ${\\cal O} (20)$, there is a friction effect which turns on before that the field can fall down and which can then lead to a very long stage of inflation with a generic potential. In addition we find superimposed oscillations, which would get imprinted on any kind of...

  13. Particle flows to shape and voltage surface discontinuities in the electron sheath surrounding a high voltage solar array in LEO

    Metz, Roger N.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the numerical modeling of electron flows from the sheath surrounding high positively biased objects in LEO (Low Earth Orbit) to regions of voltage or shape discontinuity on the biased surfaces. The sheath equations are derived from the Two-fluid, Warm Plasma Model. An equipotential corner and a plane containing strips of alternating voltage bias are treated in two dimensions. A self-consistent field solution of the sheath equations is outlined and is pursued through one cycle. The electron density field is determined by numerical solution of Poisson's equation for the electrostatic potential in the sheath using the NASCAP-LEO relation between electrostatic potential and charge density. Electron flows are calculated numerically from the electron continuity equation. Magnetic field effects are not treated.

  14. Genetic instability in nerve sheath cell tumors

    Rogatto, Silvia Regina; Casartelli, Cacilda; Rainho, Claudia Aparecida

    1995-01-01

    After in vitro culture, we analyzed cytogenetically four acoustic nerve neurinomas, one intraspinal neurinoma and one neurofibroma obtainedfrom unrelated patients. Monosomy of chromosomes 22 and 16 was an abnormality common to all cases, followed in frequency by loss of chromosomes 18 (three cases...... by the presence of polyploid cells with inconsistent abnormalities, endoreduplications and telomeric associations resulting in dicentric chromosomes. It is probable that these cytogenetic abnormalities represent some kind of evolutionary advantage for the in vitro progression of nerve sheath tumors....

  15. Modelling micro- and macrophysical contributors to the dissipation of an Arctic mixed-phase cloud during the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS

    K. Loewe

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic climate is changing; temperature changes in the Arctic are greater than at midlatitudes, and changing atmospheric conditions influence Arctic mixed-phase clouds, which are important for the Arctic surface energy budget. These low-level clouds are frequently observed across the Arctic. They impact the turbulent and radiative heating of the open water, snow, and sea-ice-covered surfaces and influence the boundary layer structure. Therefore the processes that affect mixed-phase cloud life cycles are extremely important, yet relatively poorly understood. In this study, we present sensitivity studies using semi-idealized large eddy simulations (LESs to identify processes contributing to the dissipation of Arctic mixed-phase clouds. We found that one potential main contributor to the dissipation of an observed Arctic mixed-phase cloud, during the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS field campaign, was a low cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC of about 2 cm−3. Introducing a high ice crystal concentration of 10 L−1 also resulted in cloud dissipation, but such high ice crystal concentrations were deemed unlikely for the present case. Sensitivity studies simulating the advection of dry air above the boundary layer inversion, as well as a modest increase in ice crystal concentration of 1 L−1, did not lead to cloud dissipation. As a requirement for small droplet numbers, pristine aerosol conditions in the Arctic environment are therefore considered an important factor determining the lifetime of Arctic mixed-phase clouds.

  16. Dissipative structures in magnetorotational turbulence

    Ross, Johnathan; Latter, Henrik N.

    2018-03-01

    Via the process of accretion, magnetorotational turbulence removes energy from a disk's orbital motion and transforms it into heat. Turbulent heating is far from uniform and is usually concentrated in small regions of intense dissipation, characterised by abrupt magnetic reconnection and higher temperatures. These regions are of interest because they might generate non-thermal emission, in the form of flares and energetic particles, or thermally process solids in protoplanetary disks. Moreover, the nature of the dissipation bears on the fundamental dynamics of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) itself: local simulations indicate that the large-scale properties of the turbulence (e.g. saturation levels, the stress-pressure relationship) depend on the short dissipative scales. In this paper we undertake a numerical study of how the MRI dissipates and the small-scale dissipative structures it employs to do so. We use the Godunov code RAMSES and unstratified compressible shearing boxes. Our simulations reveal that dissipation is concentrated in ribbons of strong magnetic reconnection that are significantly elongated in azimuth, up to a scale height. Dissipative structures are hence meso-scale objects, and potentially provide a route by which large scales and small scales interact. We go on to show how these ribbons evolve over time — forming, merging, breaking apart, and disappearing. Finally, we reveal important couplings between the large-scale density waves generated by the MRI and the small-scale structures, which may illuminate the stress-pressure relationship in MRI turbulence.

  17. Direct and indirect detection of dissipative dark matter

    Fan, JiJi; Katz, Andrey; Shelton, Jessie, E-mail: jijifan1982@gmail.com, E-mail: katz.andrey@gmail.com, E-mail: jshelton137@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    We study the constraints from direct detection and solar capture on dark matter scenarios with a subdominant dissipative component. This dissipative dark matter component in general has both a symmetric and asymmetric relic abundance. Dissipative dynamics allow this subdominant dark matter component to cool, resulting in its partial or total collapse into a smaller volume inside the halo (e.g., a dark disk) as well as a reduced thermal velocity dispersion compared to that of normal cold dark matter. We first show that these features considerably relax the limits from direct detection experiments on the couplings between standard model (SM) particles and dissipative dark matter. On the other hand, indirect detection of the annihilation of the symmetric dissipative dark matter component inside the Sun sets stringent and robust constraints on the properties of the dissipative dark matter. In particular, IceCube observations force dissipative dark matter particles with mass above 50 GeV to either have a small coupling to the SM or a low local density in the solar system, or to have a nearly asymmetric relic abundance. Possible helioseismology signals associated with purely asymmetric dissipative dark matter are discussed, with no present constraints.

  18. Direct and indirect detection of dissipative dark matter

    Fan, JiJi; Katz, Andrey; Shelton, Jessie

    2014-01-01

    We study the constraints from direct detection and solar capture on dark matter scenarios with a subdominant dissipative component. This dissipative dark matter component in general has both a symmetric and asymmetric relic abundance. Dissipative dynamics allow this subdominant dark matter component to cool, resulting in its partial or total collapse into a smaller volume inside the halo (e.g., a dark disk) as well as a reduced thermal velocity dispersion compared to that of normal cold dark matter. We first show that these features considerably relax the limits from direct detection experiments on the couplings between standard model (SM) particles and dissipative dark matter. On the other hand, indirect detection of the annihilation of the symmetric dissipative dark matter component inside the Sun sets stringent and robust constraints on the properties of the dissipative dark matter. In particular, IceCube observations force dissipative dark matter particles with mass above 50 GeV to either have a small coupling to the SM or a low local density in the solar system, or to have a nearly asymmetric relic abundance. Possible helioseismology signals associated with purely asymmetric dissipative dark matter are discussed, with no present constraints

  19. Energy dissipation through wind-generated breaking waves

    ZHANG Shuwen; CAO Ruixue; XIE Lingling

    2012-01-01

    Wave breaking is an important process that controls turbulence properties and fluxes of heat and mass in the upper oceanic layer.A model is described for energy dissipation per unit area at the ocean surface attributed to wind-generated breaking waves,in terms of ratio of energy dissipation to energy input,windgenerated wave spectrum,and wave growth rate.Also advanced is a vertical distribution model of turbulent kinetic energy,based on an exponential distribution method.The result shows that energy dissipation rate depends heavily on wind speed and sea state.Our results agree well with predictions of previous works.

  20. Dissipation of magnetic energy during disruptive current termination

    Yamazaki, K.; Schmidt, G.L.

    1983-09-01

    The magnetic coupling during a disruption between the plasma and the various coil systems on the PDX tokamak has been modeled. Using measured coil currents, the model indicates that dissipation of magnetic energy in the plasma equal to 75 % of the energy stored in the poloidal field of the plasma current does occur and that coupling between the plasma and the coil systems can reduce such dissipation. In the case of PDX ohmic discharges, bolometric measurements of radiation and charge exchange, integrated over a disruption, account for 90 % of the calculated energy dissipation. (author)

  1. The dust characteristics in the collisional plasma sheath at the presence of external magnetic field

    Shourkaei, Hossein Akbarian [AEOI, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Plasma Physics Research Group

    2015-05-15

    The characteristics of dust in a plasma sheath are investigated in the presence of an external magnetic field and taking into account neutral collision forces. By using the fluid model, the continuity and momentum equations of ions and dusts are solved numerically with various magnitudes of collision force. In various magnitude and directions of the magnetic field, the electron and ion density distribution, ion flow velocity, electron potential have been calculated. It is shown that magnetic field has obvious effect on the plasma sheath and the collision force reduces the dust kinetic energy.

  2. Child–Langmuir law applicability for a cathode sheath description of glow discharge in hydrogen

    Lisovskiy, V A; Artushenko, K P; Yegorenkov, V D

    2016-01-01

    The present paper reveals that the Child-Langmuir law version with the constant ion mobility has to be applied for the cathode sheath description of the glow discharge in hydrogen. Using the analytical model we demonstrate that even in a high electric field the constant mobility law version rather than that for the constant ion mean free path has to hold in the case of impeded charge exchange and the dominant effect of polarization forces on the ion motion through the cathode sheath. (paper)

  3. Measurement of electric field and gradient in the plasma sheath using clusters of floating microspheres

    Sheridan, T. E.; Katschke, M. R.; Wells, K. D.

    2007-01-01

    A method for measuring the time-averaged vertical electric field and its gradient in the plasma sheath using clusters with n=2 or 3 floating microspheres of known mass is described. The particle charge q is found by determining the ratio of the breathing frequency to the center-of-mass frequency for horizontal (in-plane) oscillations. The electric field at the position of the particles is then calculated using the measured charge-to-mass ratio, and the electric-field gradient is determined from the vertical resonance frequency. The Debye length is also found. Experimental results are in agreement with a simple sheath model

  4. Optic Nerve Sheath Mechanics in VIIP Syndrome

    Raykin, Julia; Forte, Taylor E.; Wang, Roy; Feola, Andrew; Samuels, Brian; Myers, Jerry; Nelson, Emily; Gleason, Rudy; Ethier, C. Ross

    2016-01-01

    Visual Impairment Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome is a major concern in current space medicine research. While the exact pathology of VIIP is not yet known, it is hypothesized that the microgravity-induced cephalad fluid shift increases intracranial pressure (ICP) and drives remodeling of the optic nerve sheath. To investigate this possibility, we are culturing optic nerve sheath dura mater samples under different pressures and investigating changes in tissue composition. To interpret results from this work, it is essential to first understand the biomechanical response of the optic nerve sheath dura mater to loading. Here, we investigated the effects of mechanical loading on the porcine optic nerve sheath.Porcine optic nerves (number: 6) were obtained immediately after death from a local abattoir. The optic nerve sheath (dura mater) was isolated from the optic nerve proper, leaving a hollow cylinder of connective tissue that was used for biomechanical characterization. We developed a custom mechanical testing system that allowed for unconfined lengthening, twisting, and circumferential distension of the dura mater during inflation and under fixed axial loading. To determine the effects of variations in ICP, the sample was inflated (0-60 millimeters Hg) and circumferential distension was simultaneously recorded. These tests were performed under variable axial loads (0.6 grams - 5.6 grams at increments of 1 gram) by attaching different weights to one end of the dura mater. Results and Conclusions: The samples demonstrated nonlinear behavior, similar to other soft connective tissue (Figure 1). Large increases in diameter were observed at lower transmural pressures (approximately 0 to 5 millimeters Hg), whereas only small diameter changes were observed at higher pressures. Particularly interesting was the existence of a cross-over point at a pressure of approximately 11 millimeters Hg. At this pressure, the same diameter is obtained for all axial loads applied

  5. Dissipative systems and Bateman's Hamiltonian

    Pedrosa, I.A.; Baseia, B.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown, by using canonical transformations, that one can construct Bateman's Hamiltonian from a Hamiltonian for a conservative system and obtain a clear physical interpretation which explains the ambiguities emerging from its application to describe dissipative systems. (Author) [pt

  6. Bounds imposed on the sheath velocity of a dense plasma focus by conservation laws and ionization stability condition

    Auluck, S. K. H.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental data compiled over five decades of dense plasma focus research are consistent with the snowplow model of sheath propagation, based on the hypothetical balance between magnetic pressure driving the plasma into neutral gas ahead and “wind pressure” resisting its motion. The resulting sheath velocity, or the numerically proportional “drive parameter,” is known to be approximately constant for devices optimized for neutron production over 8 decades of capacitor bank energy. This paper shows that the validity of the snowplow hypothesis, with some correction, as well as the non-dependence of sheath velocity on device parameters, have their roots in local conservation laws for mass, momentum, and energy coupled with the ionization stability condition. Both upper and lower bounds on sheath velocity are shown to be related to material constants of the working gas and independent of the device geometry and capacitor bank impedance

  7. Bounds imposed on the sheath velocity of a dense plasma focus by conservation laws and ionization stability condition

    Auluck, S. K. H., E-mail: skhauluck@gmail.com, E-mail: skauluck@barc.gov.in [Physics Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai (India)

    2014-09-15

    Experimental data compiled over five decades of dense plasma focus research are consistent with the snowplow model of sheath propagation, based on the hypothetical balance between magnetic pressure driving the plasma into neutral gas ahead and “wind pressure” resisting its motion. The resulting sheath velocity, or the numerically proportional “drive parameter,” is known to be approximately constant for devices optimized for neutron production over 8 decades of capacitor bank energy. This paper shows that the validity of the snowplow hypothesis, with some correction, as well as the non-dependence of sheath velocity on device parameters, have their roots in local conservation laws for mass, momentum, and energy coupled with the ionization stability condition. Both upper and lower bounds on sheath velocity are shown to be related to material constants of the working gas and independent of the device geometry and capacitor bank impedance.

  8. Dissipation element analysis of turbulent scalar fields

    Wang Lipo; Peters, Norbert

    2008-01-01

    Dissipation element analysis is a new approach for studying turbulent scalar fields. Gradient trajectories starting from each material point in a scalar field Φ'(x-vector,t) in ascending directions will inevitably reach a maximal and a minimal point. The ensemble of material points sharing the same pair ending points is named a dissipation element. Dissipation elements can be parameterized by the length scale l and the scalar difference Δφ ', which are defined as the straight line connecting the two extremal points and the scalar difference at these points, respectively. The decomposition of a turbulent field into dissipation elements is space-filling. This allows us to reconstruct certain statistical quantities of fine scale turbulence which cannot be obtained otherwise. The marginal probability density function (PDF) of the length scale distribution based on a Poisson random cutting-reconnection process shows satisfactory agreement with the direct numerical simulation (DNS) results. In order to obtain the further information that is needed for the modeling of scalar mixing in turbulence, such as the marginal PDF of the length of elements and all conditional moments as well as their scaling exponents, there is a need to model the joint PDF of l and Δφ ' as well. A compensation-defect model is put forward in this work to show the dependence of Δφ ' on l. The agreement between the model prediction and DNS results is satisfactory, which may provide another explanation of the Kolmogorov scaling and help to improve turbulent mixing models. Furthermore, intermittency and cliff structure can also be related to and explained from the joint PDF.

  9. Dissipative Effect and Tunneling Time

    Samyadeb Bhattacharya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The quantum Langevin equation has been studied for dissipative system using the approach of Ford et al. Here, we have considered the inverted harmonic oscillator potential and calculated the effect of dissipation on tunneling time, group delay, and the self-interference term. A critical value of the friction coefficient has been determined for which the self-interference term vanishes. This approach sheds new light on understanding the ion transport at nanoscale.

  10. Sheath insulator final test report, TFE Verification Program

    1994-07-01

    The sheath insulator in a thermionic cell has two functions. First, the sheath insulator must electrically isolate the collector form the outer containment sheath tube that is in contact with the reactor liquid metal coolant. Second, The sheath insulator must provide for high uniform thermal conductance between the collector and the reactor coolant to remove away waste heat. The goals of the sheath insulator test program were to demonstrate that suitable ceramic materials and fabrication processes were available, and to validate the performance of the sheath insulator for TFE-VP requirements. This report discusses the objectives of the test program, fabrication development, ex-reactor test program, in-reactor test program, and the insulator seal specifications

  11. Sheath insulator final test report, TFE Verification Program

    1994-07-01

    The sheath insulator in a thermionic cell has two functions. First, the sheath insulator must electrically isolate the collector form the outer containment sheath tube that is in contact with the reactor liquid metal coolant. Second, The sheath insulator must provide for high uniform thermal conductance between the collector and the reactor coolant to remove away waste heat. The goals of the sheath insulator test program were to demonstrate that suitable ceramic materials and fabrication processes were available, and to validate the performance of the sheath insulator for TFE-VP requirements. This report discusses the objectives of the test program, fabrication development, ex-reactor test program, in-reactor test program, and the insulator seal specifications.

  12. Dissipation and spontaneous symmetry breaking in brain dynamics

    Freeman, Walter J; Vitiello, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    We compare the predictions of the dissipative quantum model of the brain with neurophysiological data collected from electroencephalograms resulting from high-density arrays fixed on the surfaces of primary sensory and limbic areas of trained rabbits and cats. Functional brain imaging in relation to behavior reveals the formation of coherent domains of synchronized neuronal oscillatory activity and phase transitions predicted by the dissipative model

  13. Dissipative axial inflation

    Notari, Alessio [Departament de Física Fondamental i Institut de Ciències del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, Barcelona, 08028 Spain (Spain); Tywoniuk, Konrad, E-mail: notari@ffn.ub.es, E-mail: konrad.tywoniuk@cern.ch [Theoretical Physics Department, CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2016-12-01

    We analyze in detail the background cosmological evolution of a scalar field coupled to a massless abelian gauge field through an axial term φ/ f {sub γ} F ∼ F , such as in the case of an axion. Gauge fields in this case are known to experience tachyonic growth and therefore can backreact on the background as an effective dissipation into radiation energy density ρ{sub R}, which can lead to inflation without the need of a flat potential. We analyze the system, for momenta k smaller than the cutoff f {sub γ}, including the backreaction numerically. We consider the evolution from a given static initial condition and explicitly show that, if f {sub γ} is smaller than the field excursion φ{sub 0} by about a factor of at least O (20), there is a friction effect which turns on before the field can fall down and which can then lead to a very long stage of inflation with a generic potential. In addition we find superimposed oscillations, which would get imprinted on any kind of perturbations, scalars and tensors. Such oscillations have a period of 4–5 efolds and an amplitude which is typically less than a few percent and decreases linearly with f {sub γ}. We also stress that the curvature perturbation on uniform density slices should be sensitive to slow-roll parameters related to ρ{sub R} rather than φ-dot {sup 2}/2 and we discuss the existence of friction terms acting on the perturbations, although we postpone a calculation of the power spectrum and of non-gaussianity to future work and we simply define and compute suitable slow roll parameters. Finally we stress that this scenario may be realized in the axion case, if the coupling 1/ f {sub γ} to U(1) (photons) is much larger than the coupling 1/ f {sub G} to non-abelian gauge fields (gluons), since the latter sets the range of the potential and therefore the maximal allowed φ{sub 0∼} f {sub G}.

  14. Dissipation and decoherence in Brownian motion

    Bellomo, Bruno [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche ed Astronomiche dell' Universita di Palermo, Via Archirafi, 36, 90123 Palermo (Italy); Barnett, Stephen M [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Jeffers, John [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-15

    We consider the evolution of a Brownian particle described by a measurement-based master equation. We derive the solution to this equation for general initial conditions and apply it to a Gaussian initial state. We analyse the effects of the diffusive terms, present in the master equation, and describe how these modify uncertainties and coherence length. This allows us to model dissipation and decoherence in quantum Brownian motion.

  15. Nondestructive testing of metallic sheath for internally cooled superconductor

    McClung, R.W.; Cook, K.V.; Dodd, C.V.; Smith, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    For quality assurance in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Large Coil Program, we developed ultrasonic and eddy-current techniques to examine the JBK-75 alloy sheath for superconducting cable for a large magnet. Ultrasound was used to examine the strip before forming into the sheath, and eddy currents were used to examine the seam weld after the sheath had been formed around the cable

  16. Sheath and arc-column voltages in high-pressure arc discharges

    Benilov, M S; Benilova, L G; Li Heping; Wu Guiqing

    2012-01-01

    Electrical characteristics of a 1 cm-long free-burning atmospheric-pressure argon arc are calculated by means of a model taking into account the existence of a near-cathode space-charge sheath and the discrepancy between the electron and heavy-particle temperatures in the arc column. The computed arc voltage exhibits a variation with the arc current I similar to the one revealed by the experiment and exceeds experimental values by no more than approximately 2 V in the current range 20-175 A. The sheath contributes about two-thirds or more of the arc voltage. The LTE model predicts a different variation of the arc voltage with I and underestimates the experimental values appreciably for low currents but by no more than approximately 2 V for I ≳ 120 A. However, the latter can hardly be considered as a proof of unimportance of the space-charge sheath at high currents: the LTE model overestimates both the resistance of the bulk of the arc column and the resistance of the part of the column that is adjacent to the cathode, and this overestimation to a certain extent compensates for the neglect of the voltage drop in the sheath. Furthermore, if the latter resistance were evaluated in the framework of the LTE model in an accurate way, then the overestimation would be still much stronger and the obtained voltage would significantly exceed those observed in the experiment.

  17. Transport of negative ions across a double sheath with a virtual cathode

    McAdams, R; King, D B; Surrey, E; Holmes, A J T

    2011-01-01

    A one-dimensional analytical model of the sheath in a negative ion source, such as those proposed for heating and diagnostic beams on present and future fusion devices, has been developed. The model, which is collisionless, describes the transport of surface produced negative ions from a cathode, across the sheath to a plasma containing electrons, positive ions and negative ions. It accounts for the situation where the emitted flux of negative ions is greater than the space charge limit, where the electric field at the cathode is negative, and a virtual cathode is formed. It is shown that, in the presence of a virtual cathode, there is a maximum current density of negative ions that can be transported across the sheath into the plasma. Furthermore, for high rates of surface production the virtual cathode persists regardless of the negative bias applied to the cathode, so that the current density transported across the sheath is limited. This is a significant observation and implies that present negative ion sources may not be exploiting all of the surface production available. The model is used to calculate the transported negative ion flux in a number of examples. The limitations of the model and proposed future work are also discussed.

  18. Correlated Photon Dynamics in Dissipative Rydberg Media

    Zeuthen, Emil; Gullans, Michael J.; Maghrebi, Mohammad F.; Gorshkov, Alexey V.

    2017-07-01

    Rydberg blockade physics in optically dense atomic media under the conditions of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) leads to strong dissipative interactions between single photons. We introduce a new approach to analyzing this challenging many-body problem in the limit of a large optical depth per blockade radius. In our approach, we separate the single-polariton EIT physics from Rydberg-Rydberg interactions in a serialized manner while using a hard-sphere model for the latter, thus capturing the dualistic particle-wave nature of light as it manifests itself in dissipative Rydberg-EIT media. Using this approach, we analyze the saturation behavior of the transmission through one-dimensional Rydberg-EIT media in the regime of nonperturbative dissipative interactions relevant to current experiments. Our model is able to capture the many-body dynamics of bright, coherent pulses through these strongly interacting media. We compare our model with available experimental data in this regime and find good agreement. We also analyze a scheme for generating regular trains of single photons from continuous-wave input and derive its scaling behavior in the presence of imperfect single-photon EIT.

  19. Energy Dissipation-Based Method for Fatigue Life Prediction of Rock Salt

    He, Mingming; Huang, Bingqian; Zhu, Caihui; Chen, Yunsheng; Li, Ning

    2018-05-01

    The fatigue test for rock salt is conducted under different stress amplitudes, loading frequencies, confining pressures and loading rates, from which the evaluation rule of the dissipated energy is revealed and analysed. The evolution of energy dissipation under fatigue loading is divided into three stages: the initial stage, the second stage and the acceleration stage. In the second stage, the energy dissipation per cycle remains stable and shows an exponential relation with the stress amplitude; the failure dissipated energy only depends on the mechanical behaviour of the rock salt and confining pressure, but it is immune to the loading conditions. The energy dissipation of fatigued rock salt is discussed, and a novel model for fatigue life prediction is proposed on the basis of energy dissipation. A simple model for evolution of the accumulative dissipated energy is established. Its prediction results are compared with the test results, and the proposed model is validated.

  20. Tumor targeted delivery of doxorubicin in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors.

    A B Madhankumar

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve sheath tumors are benign tumors that have the potential to transform into malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs. Interleukin-13 receptor alpha 2 (IL13Rα2 is a cancer associated receptor expressed in glioblastoma and other invasive cancers. We analyzed IL13Rα2 expression in several MPNST cell lines including the STS26T cell line, as well as in several peripheral nerve sheath tumors to utilize the IL13Rα2 receptor as a target for therapy. In our studies, we demonstrated the selective expression of IL13Rα2 in several peripheral nerve sheath tumors by immunohistochemistry (IHC and immunoblots. We established a sciatic nerve MPNST mouse model in NIH III nude mice using a luciferase transfected STS26T MPNST cell line. Similarly, analysis of the mouse sciatic nerves after tumor induction revealed significant expression of IL13Rα2 by IHC when compared to a normal sciatic nerve. IL13 conjugated liposomal doxorubicin was formulated and shown to bind and internalized in the MPNST cell culture model demonstrating cytotoxic effect. Our subsequent in vivo investigation in the STS26T MPNST sciatic nerve tumor model indicated that IL13 conjugated liposomal doxorubicin (IL13LIPDXR was more effective in inhibiting tumor progression compared to unconjugated liposomal doxorubicin (LIPDXR. This further supports that IL13 receptor targeted nanoliposomes is a potential approach for treating MPNSTs.

  1. Astrophysical constraints on Planck scale dissipative phenomena.

    Liberati, Stefano; Maccione, Luca

    2014-04-18

    The emergence of a classical spacetime from any quantum gravity model is still a subtle and only partially understood issue. If indeed spacetime is arising as some sort of large scale condensate of more fundamental objects, then it is natural to expect that matter, being a collective excitation of the spacetime constituents, will present modified kinematics at sufficiently high energies. We consider here the phenomenology of the dissipative effects necessarily arising in such a picture. Adopting dissipative hydrodynamics as a general framework for the description of the energy exchange between collective excitations and the spacetime fundamental degrees of freedom, we discuss how rates of energy loss for elementary particles can be derived from dispersion relations and used to provide strong constraints on the base of current astrophysical observations of high-energy particles.

  2. Dissipation-driven quantum phase transitions in collective spin systems

    Morrison, S; Parkins, A S

    2008-01-01

    We consider two different collective spin systems subjected to strong dissipation-on the same scale as interaction strengths and external fields-and show that either continuous or discontinuous dissipative quantum phase transitions can occur as the dissipation strength is varied. First, we consider a well-known model of cooperative resonance fluorescence that can exhibit a second-order quantum phase transition, and analyse the entanglement properties near the critical point. Next, we examine a dissipative version of the Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick interacting collective spin model, where we find that either first- or second-order quantum phase transitions can occur, depending only on the ratio of the interaction and external field parameters. We give detailed results and interpretation for the steady-state entanglement in the vicinity of the critical point, where it reaches a maximum. For the first-order transition we find that the semiclassical steady states exhibit a region of bistability. (fast track communication)

  3. Magnetic intermittency of solar wind turbulence in the dissipation range

    Pei, Zhongtian; He, Jiansen; Tu, Chuanyi; Marsch, Eckart; Wang, Linghua

    2016-04-01

    The feature, nature, and fate of intermittency in the dissipation range are an interesting topic in the solar wind turbulence. We calculate the distribution of flatness for the magnetic field fluctuations as a functionof angle and scale. The flatness distribution shows a "butterfly" pattern, with two wings located at angles parallel/anti-parallel to local mean magnetic field direction and main body located at angles perpendicular to local B0. This "butterfly" pattern illustrates that the flatness profile in (anti-) parallel direction approaches to the maximum value at larger scale and drops faster than that in perpendicular direction. The contours for probability distribution functions at different scales illustrate a "vase" pattern, more clear in parallel direction, which confirms the scale-variation of flatness and indicates the intermittency generation and dissipation. The angular distribution of structure function in the dissipation range shows an anisotropic pattern. The quasi-mono-fractal scaling of structure function in the dissipation range is also illustrated and investigated with the mathematical model for inhomogeneous cascading (extended p-model). Different from the inertial range, the extended p-model for the dissipation range results in approximate uniform fragmentation measure. However, more complete mathematicaland physical model involving both non-uniform cascading and dissipation is needed. The nature of intermittency may be strong structures or large amplitude fluctuations, which may be tested with magnetic helicity. In one case study, we find the heating effect in terms of entropy for large amplitude fluctuations seems to be more obvious than strong structures.

  4. The plasma-sheath boundary region

    Franklin, R N

    2003-01-01

    In this review an attempt is made to give a broad coverage of the problem of joining plasma and sheath over a wide range of physical conditions. We go back to the earliest works quoting them, where appropriate, to understand what those who introduced the various terms associated with the structure of the plasma-sheath had in mind. We try to bring out the essence of the insights that have been gained subsequently, by quoting from the literature selectively, indicating how misunderstandings have arisen. In order to make it accessible to the generality of those currently working in low temperature plasmas we have sought to avoid mathematical complexity but retain physical insight, quoting from published work where appropriate. Nevertheless, in clarifying my own ideas I have found it necessary to do additional original work in order to give a consistent picture. In this way I have sought to bring together work in the late 1920s, the 1960s, and now mindful of the commercial importance of plasma processing, work over the past 15 years that adds to the general understanding. (topical review)

  5. Research on Characteristics of New Energy Dissipation With Symmetrical Structure

    Ming, Wen; Huang, Chun-mei; Huang, Hao-wen; Wang, Xin-fang

    2018-03-01

    Utilizing good energy consumption capacity of arc steel bar, a new energy dissipation with symmetrical structure was proposed in this article. On the base of collection experimental data of damper specimen Under low cyclic reversed loading, finite element models were built by using ANSYS software, and influences of parameter change (Conduction rod diameter, Actuation plate thickness, Diameter of arc steel rod, Curved bars initial bending) on energy dissipation performance were analyzed. Some useful conclusions which can lay foundations for practical application were drawn.

  6. Tidal dissipation in the subsurface ocean of Enceladus

    Matsuyama, I.; Hay, H.; Nimmo, F.; Kamata, S.

    2017-12-01

    Icy satellites of the outer solar system have emerged as potential habitable worlds due to the presence of subsurface oceans. As a long-term energy source, tidal heating in these oceans can influence the survivability of subsurface oceans, and the thermal, rotational, and orbital evolution of these satellites. Additionally, the spatial and temporal variation of tidal heating has implications for the interior structure and spacecraft observations. Previous models for dissipation in thin oceans are not generally applicable to icy satellites because either they ignore the presence of an overlying solid shell or use a thin shell membrane approximation. We present a new theoretical treatment for tidal dissipation in thin oceans with overlying shells of arbitrary thickness and apply it to Enceladus. The shell's resistance to ocean tides increases with shell thickness, reducing tidal dissipation as expected. Both the magnitude of energy dissipation and the resonant ocean thicknesses decrease as the overlying shell thickness increases, as previously shown using a membrane approximation. In contrast to previous work based on the traditional definition of the tidal quality factor, Q, our new definition is consistent with higher energy dissipation for smaller Q, and introduces a lower limit on Q. The dissipated power and tides are not in phase with the forcing tidal potential due to the delayed ocean response. The phase lag depends on the Rayleigh friction coefficient and ocean and shell thicknesses, which implies that phase lag observations can be used to constrain these parameters. Eccentricity heating produces higher dissipation near the poles, while obliquity heating produces higher dissipation near the equator, in contrast to the dissipation patterns in the shell. The time-averaged surface distribution of tidal heating can generate lateral shell thickness variations, providing an additional constraint on the Rayleigh friction coefficient. Explaining the endogenic power

  7. Dissipative structures and related methods

    Langhorst, Benjamin R; Chu, Henry S

    2013-11-05

    Dissipative structures include at least one panel and a cell structure disposed adjacent to the at least one panel having interconnected cells. A deformable material, which may comprise at least one hydrogel, is disposed within at least one interconnected cell proximate to the at least one panel. Dissipative structures may also include a cell structure having interconnected cells formed by wall elements. The wall elements may include a mesh formed by overlapping fibers having apertures formed therebetween. The apertures may form passageways between the interconnected cells. Methods of dissipating a force include disposing at least one hydrogel in a cell structure proximate to at least one panel, applying a force to the at least one panel, and forcing at least a portion of the at least one hydrogel through apertures formed in the cell structure.

  8. Mode transition of power dissipation and plasma parameters in an asymmetric capacitive discharge

    Lee, Soo-Jin; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Bang, Jin-young; Oh, Seung-Ju; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2013-01-01

    Electrical characteristics and plasma parameters were experimentally investigated in asymmetric capacitively coupled plasma with various argon gas pressures. At a low discharge current region, the transferred power to the plasma was proportional to the current, while the transferred power increased proportionally to square of the current at a high discharge current region. The mode transition of power dissipation occurred at the lower discharge current region with the high gas pressure. At the low radio-frequency power or low discharge current, the plasma density increased linearly with the discharge current, while at the high power or high discharge current, the rate of an increase in the plasma density depended on the gas pressures. A transition of the discharge resistance was also found when the mode transition of the power dissipation occurred. These changes in the electrical characteristics and the plasma parameters were mainly caused by the power dissipation mode transition from the plasma bulk to the sheath in the capacitive discharge with the asymmetric electrode, which has extremely high self-bias voltages. - Highlights: • Mode transition of the power dissipation in an asymmetrical capacitive discharge • Evolution of the discharge power, electrode voltage, and discharge impedance • Electron temperature and plasma density on the power dissipation mode transition

  9. Embedded cladding surface thermocouples on Zircaloy-sheathed heater rods

    Wilkins, S.C.

    1977-06-01

    Titanium-sheathed Type K thermocouples embedded in the cladding wall of zircaloy-sheathed heater rods are described. These thermocouples constitute part of a program intended to characterize the uncertainty of measurements made by surface-mounted cladding thermocouples on nuclear fuel rods. Fabrication and installation detail, and laboratory testing of sample thermocouple installations are included

  10. Sheath structure transition controlled by secondary electron emission

    Schweigert, I. V.; Langendorf, S. J.; Walker, M. L. R.; Keidar, M.

    2015-04-01

    In particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision (PIC MCC) simulations and in an experiment we study sheath formation over an emissive floating Al2O3 plate in a direct current discharge plasma at argon gas pressure 10-4 Torr. The discharge glow is maintained by the beam electrons emitted from a negatively biased hot cathode. We observe three types of sheaths near the floating emissive plate and the transition between them is driven by changing the negative bias. The Debye sheath appears at lower voltages, when secondary electron emission is negligible. With increasing applied voltage, secondary electron emission switches on and a first transition to a new sheath type, beam electron emission (BEE), takes place. For the first time we find this specific regime of sheath operation near the floating emissive surface. In this regime, the potential drop over the plate sheath is about four times larger than the temperature of plasma electrons. The virtual cathode appears near the emissive plate and its modification helps to maintain the BEE regime within some voltage range. Further increase of the applied voltage U initiates the second smooth transition to the plasma electron emission sheath regime and the ratio Δφs/Te tends to unity with increasing U. The oscillatory behavior of the emissive sheath is analyzed in PIC MCC simulations. A plasmoid of slow electrons is formed near the plate and transported to the bulk plasma periodically with a frequency of about 25 kHz.

  11. Significance of rice sheath photosynthesis: Yield determination by ...

    Using high-yielding hybrid rice Liangyopeijiu (LYP9), its male parent 9311 and hybrid rice Shanyou 63 (SY63) as the experimental materials, the photosynthesis of rice sheath was studied by 14C radio-autography. The results showed that rice sheath could trap sunlight and produce photosynthates, and these ...

  12. Anode Sheath Switching in a Carbon Nanotube Arc Plasma

    Fetterman, Abe; Raitses, Yevgeny; Keidar, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The anode ablation rate is investigated as a function of anode diameter for a carbon nanotube arc plasma. It is found that anomalously high ablation occurs for small anode diameters. This result is explained by the formation of a positive anode sheath. The increased ablation rate due to this positive anode sheath could imply greater production rate for carbon nanotubes.

  13. Dissipation range turbulent cascades in plasmas

    Terry, P. W.; Almagri, A. F.; Forest, C. B.; Nornberg, M. D.; Rahbarnia, K.; Sarff, J. S.; Fiksel, G.; Hatch, D. R.; Jenko, F.; Prager, S. C.; Ren, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Dissipation range cascades in plasma turbulence are described and spectra are formulated from the scaled attenuation in wavenumber space of the spectral energy transfer rate. This yields spectra characterized by the product of a power law and exponential fall-off, applicable to all scales. Spectral indices of the power law and exponential fall-off depend on the scaling of the dissipation, the strength of the nonlinearity, and nonlocal effects when dissipation rates of multiple fluctuation fields are different. The theory is used to derive spectra for MHD turbulence with magnetic Prandtl number greater than unity, extending previous work. The theory is also applied to generic plasma turbulence by considering the spectrum from damping with arbitrary wavenumber scaling. The latter is relevant to ion temperature gradient turbulence modeled by gyrokinetics. The spectrum in this case has an exponential component that becomes weaker at small scale, giving a power law asymptotically. Results from the theory are compared to three very different types of turbulence. These include the magnetic plasma turbulence of the Madison Symmetric Torus, the MHD turbulence of liquid metal in the Madison Dynamo Experiment, and gyrokinetic simulation of ion temperature gradient turbulence.

  14. Effects of Subscale Size and Shape on Global Energy Dissipation in a Multiscale Model of a Fiber-Reinforced Composite Exhibiting Post-Peak Strain Softening Using Abaqus and FEAMAC

    Pineda, Evan, J.; Bednarcyk, Brett, A.; Arnold, Steven, M.

    2012-01-01

    A mesh objective crack band model is implemented in the generalized method of cells (GMC) micromechanics model to predict failure of a composite repeating unit cell (RUC). The micromechanics calculations are achieved using the MAC/GMC core engine within the ImMAC suite of micromechanics codes, developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The microscale RUC is linked to a macroscale Abaqus/Standard finite element model using the FEAMAC multiscale framework (included in the ImMAC suite). The effects of the relationship between the characteristic length of the finite element and the size of the microscale RUC on the total energy dissipation of the multiscale model are investigated. A simple 2-D composite square subjected to uniaxial tension is used to demonstrate the effects of scaling the dimensions of the RUC such that the length of the sides of the RUC are equal to the characteristic length of the finite element. These results are compared to simulations where the size of the RUC is fixed, independent of the element size. Simulations are carried out for a variety of mesh densities and element shapes, including square and triangular. Results indicate that a consistent size and shape must be used to yield preserve energy dissipation across the scales.

  15. Application of a gradient diffusion and dissipation time scale ratio model for prediction of mean and fluctuating temperature fields in liquid sodium downstream of a multi-bore jet block

    Bremhorst, K.; Listijono, J.B.H.; Krebs, L.; Mueller, U.

    1989-01-01

    A previously developed diffusivity based based model, for the prediction of mean and fluctuating temperatures in water flow downstream of a multi-bore jet block in which one jet is heated, is applied to a flow of sodium in apparatus of similar geometry. Some measurements not readily possible in sodium or water flows for this geometry are made using air in order to verify assumptions used in the model. The earlier derived mathematical model is modified to remove assumptions relating to turbulence. Reynolds number and turbulence Peclet number in the relationship between velocity and temperature microscales. Spalding's model, relating fluctuating velocity and temperature dissipation rates, is tested. A significant effect on this relationship due to the low Prandtl number of liquid sodium is identified. Measurements performed behind a multi-bore jet block with air as the working fluid have verified the non-isotropic nature of the large-scale flow. Results clearly show that measurements performed in water can be transferred to liquid sodium provided that molecular diffusion is included in the mean temperature equation, allowance is made for the Prandtl number effect on the dissipation time scale ratio and the coefficient of gradient diffusion of mean square temperature fluctuations is assumed equal to the eddy diffusivity of heat. (author)

  16. Zero temperature dissipation and holography

    Banerjee, Pinaki; Sathiapalan, B. [Institute of Mathematical Sciences,CIT Campus, Taramani, Chennai 600 113 (India)

    2016-04-14

    We use holographic techniques to study the zero-temperature limit of dissipation for a Brownian particle moving in a strongly coupled CFT at finite temperature in various space-time dimensions. The dissipative term in the boundary theory for ω→0, T→0 with ω/T held small and fixed, does not match the same at T=0, ω→0. Thus the T→0 limit is not smooth for ω

  17. Electron inertia effects on the planar plasma sheath problem

    Duarte, V. N.; Clemente, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    The steady one-dimensional planar plasma sheath problem, originally considered by Tonks and Langmuir, is revisited. Assuming continuously generated free-falling ions and isothermal electrons and taking into account electron inertia, it is possible to describe the problem in terms of three coupled integro-differential equations that can be numerically integrated. The inclusion of electron inertia in the model allows us to obtain the value of the plasma floating potential as resulting from an electron density discontinuity at the walls, where the electrons attain sound velocity and the electric potential is continuous. Results from numerical computation are presented in terms of plots for densities, electric potential, and particles velocities. Comparison with results from literature, corresponding to electron Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution (neglecting electron inertia), is also shown.

  18. Effect of collisions on photoelectron sheath in a gas

    Sodha, Mahendra Singh; Mishra, S. K.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a study of the effect of the collision of electrons with atoms/molecules on the structure of a photoelectron sheath. Considering the half Fermi-Dirac distribution of photo-emitted electrons, an expression for the electron density in the sheath has been derived in terms of the electric potential and the structure of the sheath has been investigated by incorporating Poisson's equation in the analysis. The method of successive approximations has been used to solve Poisson's equation with the solution for the electric potential in the case of vacuum, obtained earlier [Sodha and Mishra, Phys. Plasmas 21, 093704 (2014)], being used as the zeroth order solution for the present analysis. The inclusion of collisions influences the photoelectron sheath structure significantly; a reduction in the sheath width with increasing collisions is obtained.

  19. Sheath impedance effects in very high frequency plasma experiments

    Schwarzenbach, W.; Howling, A.A.; Fivaz, M.; Brunner, S.; Hollenstein, C.

    1995-05-01

    The frequency dependence (13.56 MHz to 70 MHz) of the ion energy distribution at the ground electrode was measured by mass spectrometry in a symmetrical capacitive argon discharge. Reduced sheath impedance at Very High Frequency allows high levels of plasma power and substrate ion flux whilst maintaining low levels of ion energy and electrode voltage. The lower limit of ion bombardment energy is fixed by the sheath floating potential at high frequency, in contrast to low frequencies where only the rf voltage amplitude is determinant. The capacitive sheaths are thinner at high frequencies which accentuates the high frequency reduction in sheath impedance. It is argued that the frequency dependence of sheath impedance is responsible for the principal characteristics of Very High Frequency plasmas. The measurements are summarised by simple physical descriptions and compared with a Particle-In-Cell simulation. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  20. ENERGY DISSIPATION PROCESSES IN SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    Wang, Y.; Wei, F. S.; Feng, X. S.; Sun, T. R.; Zuo, P. B. [SIGMA Weather Group, State Key Laboratory for Space Weather, National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Xu, X. J. [Space Science Institute, Macau University of Science and Technology, Macao (China); Zhang, J., E-mail: yw@spaceweather.ac.cn [School of Physics, Astronomy and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, MSN 3F3, Fairfax, Virginia 22030 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Turbulence is a chaotic flow regime filled by irregular flows. The dissipation of turbulence is a fundamental problem in the realm of physics. Theoretically, dissipation ultimately cannot be achieved without collisions, and so how turbulent kinetic energy is dissipated in the nearly collisionless solar wind is a challenging problem. Wave particle interactions and magnetic reconnection (MR) are two possible dissipation mechanisms, but which mechanism dominates is still a controversial topic. Here we analyze the dissipation region scaling around a solar wind MR region. We find that the MR region shows unique multifractal scaling in the dissipation range, while the ambient solar wind turbulence reveals a monofractal dissipation process for most of the time. These results provide the first observational evidences for intermittent multifractal dissipation region scaling around a MR site, and they also have significant implications for the fundamental energy dissipation process.

  1. An analytic expression for the sheath criterion in magnetized plasmas with multi-charged ion species

    Hatami, M. M.

    2015-01-01

    The generalized Bohm criterion in magnetized multi-component plasmas consisting of multi-charged positive and negative ion species and electrons is analytically investigated by using the hydrodynamic model. It is assumed that the electrons and negative ion density distributions are the Boltzmann distribution with different temperatures and the positive ions enter into the sheath region obliquely. Our results show that the positive and negative ion temperatures, the orientation of the applied magnetic field and the charge number of positive and negative ions strongly affect the Bohm criterion in these multi-component plasmas. To determine the validity of our derived generalized Bohm criterion, it reduced to some familiar physical condition and it is shown that monotonically reduction of the positive ion density distribution leading to the sheath formation occurs only when entrance velocity of ion into the sheath satisfies the obtained Bohm criterion. Also, as a practical application of the obtained Bohm criterion, effects of the ionic temperature and concentration as well as magnetic field on the behavior of the charged particle density distributions and so the sheath thickness of a magnetized plasma consisting of electrons and singly charged positive and negative ion species are studied numerically

  2. The ion polytropic coefficient in a collisionless sheath containing hot ions

    Lin, Binbin; Xiang, Nong, E-mail: xiangn@ipp.ac.cn; Ou, Jing [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Center for Magnetic Fusion Theory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2016-08-15

    The fluid approach has been widely used to study plasma sheath dynamics. For a sheath containing hot ions whose temperature is greater than the electron's, how to truncate the fluid hierarchy chain equations while retaining to the fullest extent of the kinetic effects is always a difficult problem. In this paper, a one-dimensional, collisionless sheath containing hot ions is studied via particle-in-cell simulations. By analyzing the ion energy equation and taking the kinetic effects into account, we have shown that the ion polytropic coefficient in the vicinity of the sheath edge is approximately constant so that the state equation with the modified polytropic coefficient can be used to close the hierarchy chain of the ion fluid equations. The value of the polytropic coefficient strongly depends on the hot ion temperature and its concentration in the plasma. The semi-analytical model is given to interpret the simulation results. As an application, the kinetic effects on the ion saturation current density in the probe theory are discussed.

  3. Sheath rendezvous method: a novel distal protection technique during endovascular treatment of subclavian artery occlusions.

    Haraguchi, Takuya; Urasawa, Kazushi; Nakama, Tatsuya; Nakagawa, Yuya; Tan, Michinao; Koshida, Ryoji; Sato, Katsuhiko

    2016-10-01

    To describe an innovative distal protection technique, "sheath rendezvous method", during endovascular treatment for subclavian arterial occlusions. 4.5F and 6F guiding sheath were inserted from left brachial and common femoral artery, respectively. 0.014″ guidewire retrogradely passed through occlusion and into antegrade sheath to establish a pull-through system. 3.0 mm balloon was used to expand occlusion and anchor to deliver retrograde sheath into antegrade one. Both sheaths locked by balloon dilatation crossed occlusion until antegrade sheath passed over lesion. Balloon expandable stent was delivered within antegrade sheath. Sheath was removed, and stent was implanted. We obtained an excellent outcome without complications.

  4. The role of the sheath in magnetized plasma turbulence and flows

    Loizu, J.

    2013-01-01

    Controlled nuclear fusion could provide our society with a clean, safe, and virtually inexhaustible source of electric power production. The tokamak has proven to be capable of producing large amounts of fusion reactions by conning magnetically the fusion fuel at sufficiently high density and temperature, thus in the plasma state. Because of turbulence, however, high temperature plasma reaches the outermost region of the tokamak, the Scrape-Off Layer (SOL), which features open magnetic field lines that channel particles and heat into a dedicated region of the vacuum vessel. The plasma dynamics in the SOL is crucial in determining the performance of tokamak devices, and constitutes one of the greatest uncertainties in the success of the fusion program. In the last few years, the development of numerical codes based on reduced fluid models has provided a tool to study turbulence in open field line configurations. In particular, the GBS (Global Braginskii Solver) code has been developed at CRPP and is used to perform global, three-dimensional, full-n, flux-driven simulations of plasma turbulence in open field lines. Reaching predictive capabilities is an outstanding challenge that involves a proper treatment of the plasma-wall interactions at the end of the field lines, to well describe the particle and energy losses. This involves the study of plasma sheaths, namely the layers forming at the interface between plasmas and solid surfaces, where the drift and quasi neutrality approximations break down. This is an investigation of general interest, as sheaths are present in all laboratory plasmas. This thesis presents progress in the understanding of plasma sheaths and their coupling with the turbulence in the main plasma. A kinetic code is developed to study the magnetized plasma-wall transition region and derive a complete set of analytical boundary conditions that supply the sheath physics to fluid codes. These boundary conditions are implemented in the GBS code and

  5. Dissipative effects in Multilevel Systems

    Solomon, A I [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Open University, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Schirmer, S G [Department of Applied Maths and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2007-11-15

    Dissipation is sometimes regarded as an inevitable and regrettable presence in the real evolution of a quantum system. However, the effects may not always be malign, although often non-intuitive and may even be beneficial. In this note we we display some of these effects for N-level systems, where N = 2,3,4. We start with an elementary introduction to dissipative effects on the Bloch Sphere, and its interior, the Bloch Ball, for a two-level system. We describe explicitly the hamiltonian evolution as well as the purely dissipative dynamics, in the latter case giving the t {yields} {infinity} limits of the motion. This discussion enables us to provide an intuitive feeling for the measures of control-reachable states. For the three-level case we discuss the impossibility of isolating a two-level (qubit) subsystem; this is a Bohm-Aharonov type consequence of dissipation. We finally exemplify the four-level case by giving constraints on the decay of two-qubit entanglement.

  6. Characteristics of metal sheathed thermocouples in thermowell

    Okuda, Takehiro; Nakase, Tsuyoshi; Tanabe, Yutaka; Yamada, Kunitaka; Yoshizaki, Akio; Roko, Kiyokazu

    1987-01-01

    Static and dynamic characteristics of thermowell type thermocouples which are planned to be used for the High-Temperature engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) have been investigated. A mock-up test section was installed in Kawasaki's Helium Test Loop (KH-200). Thermal characteristics tests were carried out under the 600 ∼ 1000 deg C temperature conditions. The test section was equipped with four types sheathed thermocouples; the well type, the non well type, and ones with and without the thermal radiation shielding plate. The measured temperature by the well type thermocouples with the shielding plate was only about 1.3 deg C higher than the one without the shielding plate at gas temperature 990 deg C. The measured time constant of the well type thermocouples was about 7 seconds in the condition of the heat transfer coefficient 1600 Kcal/m 2 h deg C on the well surface, and coincided with the calculated one by ''TRUMP'' code. (author)

  7. Benign nerve sheath tumor of stomach

    Chaudry, N.U.; Zafar, S.; Haque, I.U.

    2007-01-01

    Gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumors are a group of tumors, which originate from the mesenchymal stem cells of the gastrointestinal tract. Gastric schwannoma is a very rare gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumor, which represents only 0.2% of all gastric tumors and 4% of all benign gastric neoplasms. We report a 55 years old lady who suffered from pain epigastrium, vomiting, occasionally with blood, loss of appetite and weight loss. Endoscopic examination showed a round submucosal tumor with a central ulceration along the greater curvature of the stomach. The pathological examination revealed a picture of spindle cell tumor. Immunohistochemical stain was strongly positive for S-100 protein stain, and non-reactive for CD34, CD117, consistent with benign nerve sheath tumor of stomach i.e. gastric schwannoma. (author)

  8. Estimation of radiation losses from sheathed thermocouples

    Roberts, I.L.; Coney, J.E.R.; Gibbs, B.M.

    2011-01-01

    Thermocouples are often used for temperature measurements in heat exchangers. However if the radiation losses from a thermocouple in a high temperature gas flow to colder surroundings are ignored significant errors can occur. Even at moderate temperature differences, these can be significant. Prediction of radiation losses from theory can be problematic, especially in situations where there are large variations in the measured temperatures as the emissivity and radiative heat transfer coefficient of the thermocouple are not constant. The following approach combines experimental results with established empirical relationships to estimate losses due to radiation in an annular heat exchanger at temperatures up to 950 o C. - Highlights: → Sheathed thermocouples are often used to measure temperatures in heat exchangers. → Errors are introduced if radiation losses are ignored. → Radiation losses are environment specific and may be significant. → Experimental and theoretical methods are used to estimate losses. → Hot side maximum temperature 950 o C.

  9. Scalar dissipation rate and dissipative anomaly in isotropic turbulence

    Donzis, D.A.; Sreenivasan, K.R.; Yeung, P.K.

    2006-12-01

    We examine available data from experiment and recent numerical simulations to explore the supposition that the scalar dissipation rate in turbulence becomes independent of the fluid viscosity when the viscosity is small and of scalar diffusivity when the diffusivity is small. The data are interpreted in the context of semi-empirical spectral theory of Obukhov and Corrsin when the Schmidt number, Sc, is below unity, and of Batchelor's theory when Sc is above unity. Practical limits in terms of the Taylor-microscale Reynolds number, R λ , as well as Sc, are deduced for scalar dissipation to become sensibly independent of molecular properties. In particular, we show that such an asymptotic state is reached if R λ Sc 1/2 >> 1 for Sc λ 1. (author)

  10. Use of guiding sheaths in peroral fluoroscopic gastroduodenal stent placement

    Bae, Jae-Ik; Shin, Ji Hoon; Song, Ho-Young; Yoon, Chang Jin; Nam, Deok Ho; Choi, Won-Chan; Lim, Jin-Oh

    2005-01-01

    Our purpose was to assess the safety and usefulness of guiding sheaths in peroral fluoroscopic gastroduodenal stent placement. Two types of guiding sheath were made from straight polytetrafluoroethylene tubes. Type A was 80 cm in length, 4 mm in outer diameter and 3 mm in inner diameter. Type B was 70 cm in length, 6 mm in outer diameter and 5 mm in inner diameter. The type A sheath was used in 18 patients in whom a catheter-guide wire combination failed to pass through a stricture. The type B sheath was used in 22 patients in whom a stent delivery system failed to pass through the stricture due to loop formation within the gastric lumen. The overall success rate for guiding a catheter-guide wire through a stricture after using the type A sheath was 89%. The overall success rate for passing a stent delivery system through a stricture after using the type B sheath was 100%. All procedures were tolerated by the patients without any significant complications. The guiding sheaths were safe and useful in peroral fluoroscopic gastroduodenal stent placement. (orig.)

  11. ALINE: A device dedicated to understanding radio-frequency sheaths

    S. Devaux

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In fusion devices, radiofrequency (RF antennas are used for heating the plasma. Those antennas and the plasma interact with each other through the so-called RF sheaths, layers of plasma where the quasi-neutrality breaks down and large electric fields arise. Among the effects of RF sheaths, there is the enhancement of the particles and energy fluxes toward the surface of the antenna, which in turn generate hot spots and release impurities, which are both deleterious for plasma operations. RF sheaths comprehension stumbles on the difficulty to achieve in situ measurements of the sheath properties, as scrape-off layer plasmas are a harsh environment. The very goal of the ALINE device is to tackle this issue and to fulfil the blank between numerical simulations and full-scale experiment by providing measurements within the RF sheaths in a controlled environment. In this paper we report on the latest experimental results from ALINE, in which a cylindrical Langmuir probe mounted on a remotely controlled and programmable arm allows for plasma characterizations in the three dimensions of space around the stainless steel antenna, including the sheath. We present a series of density and potential profiles and three dimension (3D maps in the plasma surrounding a stainless-steel RF antenna as well as in the sheath itself, for unmagnetized and magnetized plasmas.

  12. Abiotic Deposition of Fe Complexes onto Leptothrix Sheaths

    Kunoh, Tatsuki; Hashimoto, Hideki; McFarlane, Ian R.; Hayashi, Naoaki; Suzuki, Tomoko; Taketa, Eisuke; Tamura, Katsunori; Takano, Mikio; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.; Kunoh, Hitoshi; Takada, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria classified in species of the genus Leptothrix produce extracellular, microtubular, Fe-encrusted sheaths. The encrustation has been previously linked to bacterial Fe oxidases, which oxidize Fe(II) to Fe(III) and/or active groups of bacterial exopolymers within sheaths to attract and bind aqueous-phase inorganics. When L. cholodnii SP-6 cells were cultured in media amended with high Fe(II) concentrations, Fe(III) precipitates visibly formed immediately after addition of Fe(II) to the medium, suggesting prompt abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III). Intriguingly, these precipitates were deposited onto the sheath surface of bacterial cells as the population was actively growing. When Fe(III) was added to the medium, similar precipitates formed in the medium first and were abiotically deposited onto the sheath surfaces. The precipitates in the Fe(II) medium were composed of assemblies of globular, amorphous particles (ca. 50 nm diameter), while those in the Fe(III) medium were composed of large, aggregated particles (≥3 µm diameter) with a similar amorphous structure. These precipitates also adhered to cell-free sheaths. We thus concluded that direct abiotic deposition of Fe complexes onto the sheath surface occurs independently of cellular activity in liquid media containing Fe salts, although it remains unclear how this deposition is associated with the previously proposed mechanisms (oxidation enzyme- and/or active group of organic components-involved) of Fe encrustation of the Leptothrix sheaths. PMID:27271677

  13. Abiotic Deposition of Fe Complexes onto Leptothrix Sheaths

    Tatsuki Kunoh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria classified in species of the genus Leptothrix produce extracellular, microtubular, Fe-encrusted sheaths. The encrustation has been previously linked to bacterial Fe oxidases, which oxidize Fe(II to Fe(III and/or active groups of bacterial exopolymers within sheaths to attract and bind aqueous-phase inorganics. When L. cholodnii SP-6 cells were cultured in media amended with high Fe(II concentrations, Fe(III precipitates visibly formed immediately after addition of Fe(II to the medium, suggesting prompt abiotic oxidation of Fe(II to Fe(III. Intriguingly, these precipitates were deposited onto the sheath surface of bacterial cells as the population was actively growing. When Fe(III was added to the medium, similar precipitates formed in the medium first and were abiotically deposited onto the sheath surfaces. The precipitates in the Fe(II medium were composed of assemblies of globular, amorphous particles (ca. 50 nm diameter, while those in the Fe(III medium were composed of large, aggregated particles (≥3 µm diameter with a similar amorphous structure. These precipitates also adhered to cell-free sheaths. We thus concluded that direct abiotic deposition of Fe complexes onto the sheath surface occurs independently of cellular activity in liquid media containing Fe salts, although it remains unclear how this deposition is associated with the previously proposed mechanisms (oxidation enzyme- and/or active group of organic components-involved of Fe encrustation of the Leptothrix sheaths.

  14. Farris-Tang retractor in optic nerve sheath decompression surgery.

    Spiegel, Jennifer A; Sokol, Jason A; Whittaker, Thomas J; Bernard, Benjamin; Farris, Bradley K

    2016-01-01

    Our purpose is to introduce the use of the Farris-Tang retractor in optic nerve sheath decompression surgery. The procedure of optic nerve sheath fenestration was reviewed at our tertiary care teaching hospital, including the use of the Farris-Tang retractor. Pseudotumor cerebri is a syndrome of increased intracranial pressure without a clear cause. Surgical treatment can be effective in cases in which medical therapy has failed and disc swelling with visual field loss progresses. Optic nerve sheath decompression surgery (ONDS) involves cutting slits or windows in the optic nerve sheath to allow cerebrospinal fluid to escape, reducing the pressure around the optic nerve. We introduce the Farris-Tang retractor, a retractor that allows for excellent visualization of the optic nerve sheath during this surgery, facilitating the fenestration of the sheath and visualization of the subsequent cerebrospinal fluid egress. Utilizing a medial conjunctival approach, the Farris-Tang retractor allows for easy retraction of the medial orbital tissue and reduces the incidence of orbital fat protrusion through Tenon's capsule. The Farris-Tang retractor allows safe, easy, and effective access to the optic nerve with good visualization in optic nerve sheath decompression surgery. This, in turn, allows for greater surgical efficiency and positive patient outcomes.

  15. The Tubular Sheaths Encasing Methanosaeta thermophila Filaments Are Functional Amyloids.

    Dueholm, Morten S; Larsen, Poul; Finster, Kai; Stenvang, Marcel R; Christiansen, Gunna; Vad, Brian S; Bøggild, Andreas; Otzen, Daniel E; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    2015-08-14

    Archaea are renowned for their ability to thrive in extreme environments, although they can be found in virtually all habitats. Their adaptive success is linked to their unique cell envelopes that are extremely resistant to chemical and thermal denaturation and that resist proteolysis by common proteases. Here we employ amyloid-specific conformation antibodies and biophysical techniques to show that the extracellular cell wall sheaths encasing the methanogenic archaea Methanosaeta thermophila PT are functional amyloids. Depolymerization of sheaths and subsequent MS/MS analyses revealed that the sheaths are composed of a single major sheath protein (MspA). The amyloidogenic nature of MspA was confirmed by in vitro amyloid formation of recombinant MspA under a wide range of environmental conditions. This is the first report of a functional amyloid from the archaeal domain of life. The amyloid nature explains the extreme resistance of the sheath, the elastic properties that allow diffusible substrates to penetrate through expandable hoop boundaries, and how the sheaths are able to split and elongate outside the cell. The archaeal sheath amyloids do not share homology with any of the currently known functional amyloids and clearly represent a new function of the amyloid protein fold. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. EFFECTS OF LOCAL DISSIPATION PROFILES ON MAGNETIZED ACCRETION DISK SPECTRA

    Tao, Ted; Blaes, Omer

    2013-01-01

    We present spectral calculations of non-LTE accretion disk models appropriate for high-luminosity stellar mass black hole X-ray binary systems. We first use a dissipation profile based on scaling the results of shearing box simulations of Hirose et al. to a range of annuli parameters. We simultaneously scale the effective temperature, orbital frequency, and surface density with luminosity and radius according to the standard α-model. This naturally brings increased dissipation to the disk surface layers (around the photospheres) at small radii and high luminosities. We find that the local spectrum transitions directly from a modified blackbody to a saturated Compton scattering spectrum as we increase the effective temperature and orbital frequency while decreasing midplane surface density. Next, we construct annuli models based on the parameters of a L/L Edd = 0.8 disk orbiting a 6.62 solar mass black hole using two modified dissipation profiles that explicitly put more dissipation per unit mass near the disk surface. The new dissipation profiles are qualitatively similar to the one found by Hirose et al., but produce strong near power-law spectral tails. Our models also include physically motivated magnetic acceleration support based once again on scaling the Hirose et al. results. We present three full-disk spectra, each based on one of the dissipation prescriptions. Our most aggressive dissipation profile results in a disk spectrum that is in approximate quantitative agreement with certain observations of the steep power-law spectral states from some black hole X-ray binaries.

  17. Dissipative light-bullets in the filamentation of femtosecond pulses

    Porras, M.A.; Gonzalo, I.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. With the growing interest in filamentation in solid and liquid media, the regime of filamentation with anomalous dispersion is receiving more attention. In this work we show that basics aspects of the filament dynamics in this regime can be explained in terms of a novel type of light-bullet, which is not of solitary or of conical types, but a wave-packet that maximizes the energy dissipation into the medium while remaining localized and stationary in propagation. We first show that a nonlinear optical medium at a given carrier wave length at which dispersion is anomalous, supports 'dissipative' light-bullets, i.e., waves localized in space and time and that propagate without change as a result of a balance between nonlinear compression and nonlinear absorption. Among them, the particular dissipative light-bullet with the highest possible dissipation is unique in a given medium, in the sense that all its properties are fixed by the properties of the medium at the carrier wave length. In this light-bullet, self-focusing continuously transports energy towards the pulse center by an amount that just compensates for the nonlinear losses. Figure 1(a) shows the radial profiles of the dissipative light-bullets that maximizes energy dissipation for several orders of multi-photon absorption responsible for the nonlinear losses. We have also found that this dissipative light-bullet tends to be spontaneously formed in the filamentary dynamics in media with anomalous dispersion. Figure 1(b) shows the peak intensity, the total energy and losses of a pulse that undergoes self-focusing and filamentation in an ideal medium with only Kerr nonlinearity and multi-photon absorption. This simple model reproduces the particularly long filament 'segments' and the 'burst' observed in experiments and in more accurate simulations. The peak intensity in the filament is identical to that of the dissipative light-bullet with maximum dissipation, and the

  18. Dissipative neutrino oscillations in randomly fluctuating matter

    Benatti, F.; Floreanini, R.

    2005-01-01

    The generalized dynamics describing the propagation of neutrinos in randomly fluctuating media is analyzed: It takes into account matter-induced, decoherence phenomena that go beyond the standard Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. A widely adopted density fluctuation pattern is found to be physically untenable: A more general model needs to be instead considered, leading to flavor changing effective neutrino-matter interactions. They induce new, dissipative effects that modify the neutrino oscillation pattern in a way amenable to a direct experimental analysis

  19. Dissipative neutrino oscillations in randomly fluctuating matter

    Benatti, F.; Floreanini, R.

    2005-01-01

    The generalized dynamics describing the propagation of neutrinos in randomly fluctuating media is analyzed: It takes into account matter-induced, decoherence phenomena that go beyond the standard Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. A widely adopted density fluctuation pattern is found to be physically untenable: A more general model needs to be instead considered, leading to flavor changing effective neutrino-matter interactions. They induce new, dissipative effects that modify the neutrino oscillation pattern in a way amenable to a direct experimental analysis.

  20. Estimating Half-Lives for Pesticide Dissipation from Plants

    Fantke, Peter; Gillespie, Brenda W.; Juraske, Ronnie

    2014-01-01

    Pesticide risk and impact assessment models critically rely on and are sensitive to information describing dissipation from plants. Despite recent progress, experimental data are not available for all relevant pesticide−plant combinations, and currently no model predicting plant dissipation...... accounts for the influence of substance properties, plant characteristics, temperature, and study conditions. In this study, we propose models to estimate half-lives for pesticide dissipation from plants and provide recommendations for how to use our results. On the basis of fitting experimental...... under field conditions. Half-lives range from 0.2 days for pyrethrins to 31 days for dalapon. Parameter estimates are provided to correct for specific plant species, temperatures, and study conditions. Finally, we propose a predictive regression model for pesticides without available measured...

  1. Plasma sheath physics and dose uniformity in enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition

    Li Liuhe; Li Jianhui; Kwok, Dixon T. K.; Chu, Paul K.; Wang Zhuo

    2009-01-01

    Based on the multiple-grid particle-in-cell code, an advanced simulation model is established to study the sheath physics and dose uniformity along the sample stage in order to provide the theoretical basis for further improvement of enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition. At t=7.0 μs, the expansion of the sheath in the horizontal direction is hindered by the dielectric cage. The electron focusing effect is demonstrated by this model. Most of the ions at the inside wall of the cage are implanted into the edge of the sample stage and a relatively uniform ion fluence distribution with a large peak is observed at the end. Compared to the results obtained from the previous model, a higher implant fluence and larger area of uniformity are disclosed.

  2. Ultrasonographic findings of pilar sheath acanthoma: A case report

    Kang, Dong Joo; Lee, Sun Joo; Kim, Seong Jin [Inje University College of Medicine, Busan Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    Pilar sheath acanthoma is a rare benign follicular hamartoma that presents with a central sinus containing keratinous material and is lined by epithelium. It typically occurs on the face, especially on the upper lip and forehead. In our case, the ultrasound (US) feature of pilar sheath acanthoma revealed a well-defined, oval hypoechoic nodule with hypoechoic capping within the dermis over the medial aspect of the calf. To the best of our knowledge, despite many reports on the clinicopathological aspects of pilar sheath acanthoma, this entity has not been well described in the radiologic literature, and US findings have not been documented.

  3. Microgravity-Driven Optic Nerve/Sheath Biomechanics Simulations

    Ethier, C. R.; Feola, A.; Myers, J. G.; Nelson, E.; Raykin, J.; Samuels, B.

    2016-01-01

    Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome is a concern for long-duration space flight. Current thinking suggests that the ocular changes observed in VIIP syndrome are related to cephalad fluid shifts resulting in altered fluid pressures [1]. In particular, we hypothesize that increased intracranial pressure (ICP) drives connective tissue remodeling of the posterior eye and optic nerve sheath (ONS). We describe here finite element (FE) modeling designed to understand how altered pressures, particularly altered ICP, affect the tissues of the posterior eye and optic nerve sheath (ONS) in VIIP. METHODS: Additional description of the modeling methodology is provided in the companion IWS abstract by Feola et al. In brief, a geometric model of the posterior eye and optic nerve, including the ONS, was created and the effects of fluid pressures on tissue deformations were simulated. We considered three ICP scenarios: an elevated ICP assumed to occur in chronic microgravity, and ICP in the upright and supine positions on earth. Within each scenario we used Latin hypercube sampling (LHS) to consider a range of ICPs, ONH tissue mechanical properties, intraocular pressures (IOPs) and mean arterial pressures (MAPs). The outcome measures were biomechanical strains in the lamina cribrosa, optic nerve and retina; here we focus on peak values of these strains, since elevated strain alters cell phenotype and induce tissue remodeling. In 3D, the strain field can be decomposed into three orthogonal components, denoted as first, second and third principal strains. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: For baseline material properties, increasing ICP from 0 to 20 mmHg significantly changed strains within the posterior eye and ONS (Fig. 1), indicating that elevated ICP affects ocular tissue biomechanics. Notably, strains in the lamina cribrosa and retina became less extreme as ICP increased; however, within the optic nerve, the occurrence of such extreme strains greatly increased as

  4. Simulation of a two-dimensional sheath over a flat insulator-conductor interface on a radio-frequency biased electrode in a high-density plasma

    Kim, Doosik; Economou, Demetre J.

    2004-01-01

    A combined fluid/Monte Carlo (MC) simulation was developed to study the two-dimensional (2D) sheath over a flat insulator/conductor interface on a radio-frequency (rf) biased electrode in a high-density plasma. The insulator capacitance increased the local impedance between the plasma and the bias voltage source. Thus, for uniform ion density and electron temperature far away from the wall, the sheath potential over the insulator was only a fraction of that over the conductor, resulting in a thinner sheath over the insulator. The fluid model provided the spatiotemporal profiles of the 2D sheath electric field. These were used as input to the MC simulation to compute the ion energy distribution (IED) and ion angular distribution (IAD) at different locations on the surface. The ion flux, IED, and IAD changed drastically across the insulator/conductor interface due to the diverging rf electric field in the distorted sheath. The ion flux was larger on the conductor at the expense of that on the insulator. Both the ion impact angle and angular spread increased progressively as the material interface was approached. The ion impact energy and energy spread were smaller on the insulator as compared to the conductor. For given plasma parameters, as the insulator thickness was increased, the sheath potential and thickness over the insulator decreased, and sheath distortion became more pronounced

  5. 3D geometry and kinematic evolution of the Wadi Mayh sheath fold, Oman, using detailed mapping from high-resolution photography

    Cornish, Sam; Searle, Mike

    2017-08-01

    The Wadi Mayh sheath fold in north-eastern Oman is one of the largest and best-exposed sheath folds known, and presents a unique opportunity to better understand this somewhat enigmatic style of deformation. We undertook high-resolution photographic surveying along Wadi Mayh to document the sheath fold in 61 georeferenced panoramic photomerges. Here we present ten such images that provide a structural interpretation of the sheath fold and surrounding structure. We resolve this structure in a simplified three-dimensional model and in two orthogonal cross sections, and propose a kinematic evolution to explain the geometry. The Wadi Mayh sheath fold is the most prominent example within what we suggest is a composite sequence of sheath folds, which is itself enclosed within a SSW-closing recumbent syncline at the base of the major Saih Hatat nappe. Sheath folding is accommodated within Permian Saiq Formation limestones showing carpholite assemblages (6-8 kbar; 275-375 °C). A major discontinuity separates this sequence from enveloping older rock units. The sequence formed during progressive top-to-north, ductile shearing as the overlying nappe migrated northwards with respect to the underthrusting Hulw unit. This process occurred during SSW-directed exhumation of partially subducted continental crust in NE Oman, approximately 15 Ma after obduction of the Oman ophiolite initiated.

  6. Dissipation and nuclear collective motion

    Hofmann, Helmut; Jensen, A.S.; Ngo, Christian; Siemens, P.J.; California Univ., Berkeley

    1979-01-01

    This contribution is intended to give a brief summary of a forthcoming paper which shall review extensively the linear response theory for dissipation and statistical fluctuations as well as its application to heavy-ion collisions. It shall contain new results on the following subjects: numerical computations of response functions and transport coefficients; dissipation in a self-consistent treatment of harmonic vibrations; introduction of collective variables within a quantum theory. The method used consists of an extended version of the Bohm and Pines treatment of the electron gas. It allows to deduce a quantum Hamiltonian for the collective and intrinsic motion including coupling terms; discussion and solution of a quantal Master equation for non-linear collective motion. Additionally, a somewhat elaborate discussion of the problems of irreversibility is given, especially in connection to a treatment within the moving basis

  7. Kinetic approach to relativistic dissipation

    Gabbana, A.; Mendoza, M.; Succi, S.; Tripiccione, R.

    2017-08-01

    Despite a long record of intense effort, the basic mechanisms by which dissipation emerges from the microscopic dynamics of a relativistic fluid still elude complete understanding. In particular, several details must still be finalized in the pathway from kinetic theory to hydrodynamics mainly in the derivation of the values of the transport coefficients. In this paper, we approach the problem by matching data from lattice-kinetic simulations with analytical predictions. Our numerical results provide neat evidence in favor of the Chapman-Enskog [The Mathematical Theory of Non-Uniform Gases, 3rd ed. (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, U.K., 1970)] procedure as suggested by recent theoretical analyses along with qualitative hints at the basic reasons why the Chapman-Enskog expansion might be better suited than Grad's method [Commun. Pure Appl. Math. 2, 331 (1949), 10.1002/cpa.3160020403] to capture the emergence of dissipative effects in relativistic fluids.

  8. Collisionless dissipation of Langmuir turbulence

    Erofeev, V.I.

    2002-01-01

    An analysis of two experimental observations of Langmuir wave collapse is performed. The corresponding experimental data are shown to give evidence against the collapse. The physical reason for preventing the collapses is found to be the nonresonant electron diffusion in momentums. In this process, plasma thermal electrons are efficiently heated at the expense of wave energy, and intense collisionless wave dissipation takes place. The basic reason of underestimation of this phenomenon in traditional theory is shown to be the substitution of real plasma by a plasma probabilistic ensemble. A theory of nonresonant electron diffusion in a single collisionless plasma is developed. It is shown that corresponding collisionless wave dissipation may arrest spectral energy transfer towards small wave numbers

  9. Anisotropy dissipation in quantum cosmology

    Calzetta, E.; Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellon I, 1428 Buenos Aires, Argentina)

    1991-01-01

    We study the issue of decoherence and dissipation in the wave function of the Universe for a Bianchi type-I universe with classical and quantum matter. We obtain a coarse-grained description by tracing over the matter degrees of freedom. Provided that for small universes the wave function of the universe is concentrated on a neighborhood of the isotropic configuration, then the coarse-grained density matrix of the universe will show an even more marked peak around isotropy for large universes. In this sense we can say that, while decoherence makes the reduced density matrix of the universe diagonal, dissipation causes the universe to be isotropic with a high probability for large radii

  10. Dissipative time-dependent quantum transport theory.

    Zhang, Yu; Yam, Chi Yung; Chen, GuanHua

    2013-04-28

    A dissipative time-dependent quantum transport theory is developed to treat the transient current through molecular or nanoscopic devices in presence of electron-phonon interaction. The dissipation via phonon is taken into account by introducing a self-energy for the electron-phonon coupling in addition to the self-energy caused by the electrodes. Based on this, a numerical method is proposed. For practical implementation, the lowest order expansion is employed for the weak electron-phonon coupling case and the wide-band limit approximation is adopted for device and electrodes coupling. The corresponding hierarchical equation of motion is derived, which leads to an efficient and accurate time-dependent treatment of inelastic effect on transport for the weak electron-phonon interaction. The resulting method is applied to a one-level model system and a gold wire described by tight-binding model to demonstrate its validity and the importance of electron-phonon interaction for the quantum transport. As it is based on the effective single-electron model, the method can be readily extended to time-dependent density functional theory.

  11. Dissipative fluid mechanics of nuclei

    Morgenstern, B.

    1987-11-01

    With the aim to describe nucleus-nucleus collisions at low energies in the present thesis for the first time dissipative fluid dynamics for large-amplitude nuclear motion have been formulated. Thereby the collective dynamics are described in a scaling approximation in which the wave function of the system is distorted by a vortex-free velocity field. For infintely extended nuclear matter this scaling of the wave functions leads to a deformation of the Fermi sphere. Two-body collisions destroy the collective deformation of the Fermi sphere and yield so the dissipative contribution of the motion. Equations of motion for a finite set of collective variables and a field equation for the collective velocity potential in the limit of infinitely many degrees of freedom were developed. In the elastic limit oscillations around the equilibrium position are described. For small collective amplitudes and vortex-free velocity fields the integrodifferential equation for the velocity potential in the elastic limit could be transformed to the divergence of the field equation of fluid dynamics. In the dissipative limit an equation results which is similar to the Navier-Stokes equation and transforms to the divergence of the Navier-Stokes equation for vortex-free fields. It was shown that generally the dynamics of the many-body system is described by non-Markovian equations. (orig./HSI) [de

  12. Dynamics of dissipative systems and computational physics

    Adam, Gh.; Scutaru, H.; Ixaru, L.; Adam, S.; Rizea, M.; Stefanescu, E.; Mihalache, D.; Mazilu, D.; Crasovan, L.

    2002-01-01

    given. These coefficients describe correlated transitions of the system and environment particles, depending on the dissipative two-body potential V, the populations f(ε α ), f(ε β ) and the densities g(ε α ), g(ε β ) of the environment states. Therefrom we infer that for a normal Fermi-Dirac distribution of the environment particles, the decay processes are favored in comparison with the excitation ones, while for a reversed distribution of the environment populations the excitations are favored. Concerning the second topics approached in the frame of this project one starts from admitting that the topologic charge of a soliton is an integer number 's' which arises in the axial symmetric solution of the local amplitude of the electromagnetic wave, A(z, x, y) = U(z, r) exp (isθ) of the (2+1)-dimensional Ginzburg-Landau equation. The 's' parameter is also called 'spin' or 'vorticity'. The investigation conducted within this topics has been directed along two main lines: (i) The study of fundamental phenomena concerning vortex solitons in dissipative (open) systems, and (ii) Comparison of the specific properties of the vortex type solitons in Hamiltonian (conservative) systems and in dissipative systems. The following fundamental results have been obtained: 1. Formulation of the relevant physical model and identification of the values of the physical parameters of the model. 2. Systematic analysis of the stable localized solutions of the (2+1)-dimensional Ginzburg-Landau equation in media characterized by cubic saturable nonlinearities. 3. Extensive numerical simulations of the (2+1)-dimensional Ginzburg-Landau equation in polar coordinates resulting in the demonstration of the occurrence of stable two-dimensional solutions characterized by axial symmetry both for non-vanishing 'spin' (annular, vortex type solitons) and vanishing 'spin' (fundamental solitons). The study of the propagation of these solitons under azimuthal perturbations demonstrates soliton

  13. Nanomechanical dissipation at a tip-induced Kondo onset

    Baruselli, Pier Paolo; Fabrizio, Michele; Tosatti, Erio

    2017-08-01

    The onset or demise of Kondo effect in a magnetic impurity on a metal surface can be triggered, as sometimes observed, by the simple mechanical nudging of a tip. Such a mechanically driven quantum phase transition must reflect in a corresponding mechanical dissipation peak; yet, this kind of signature has not been focused upon so far. Aiming at the simplest theoretical modeling, we treat the impurity as an Anderson impurity model, the tip action as a hybridization switching, and solve the problem by numerical renormalization group. Studying this model as function of temperature and magnetic field we are able to isolate the Kondo contribution to dissipation. While that is, reasonably, of the order of the Kondo energy, its temperature evolution shows a surprisingly large tail even above the Kondo temperature. The detectability of Kondo mechanical dissipation in atomic force microscopy is also discussed.

  14. Dissipative dark matter halos: The steady state solution

    Foot, R.

    2018-02-01

    Dissipative dark matter, where dark matter particle properties closely resemble familiar baryonic matter, is considered. Mirror dark matter, which arises from an isomorphic hidden sector, is a specific and theoretically constrained scenario. Other possibilities include models with more generic hidden sectors that contain massless dark photons [unbroken U (1 ) gauge interactions]. Such dark matter not only features dissipative cooling processes but also is assumed to have nontrivial heating sourced by ordinary supernovae (facilitated by the kinetic mixing interaction). The dynamics of dissipative dark matter halos around rotationally supported galaxies, influenced by heating as well as cooling processes, can be modeled by fluid equations. For a sufficiently isolated galaxy with a stable star formation rate, the dissipative dark matter halos are expected to evolve to a steady state configuration which is in hydrostatic equilibrium and where heating and cooling rates locally balance. Here, we take into account the major cooling and heating processes, and numerically solve for the steady state solution under the assumptions of spherical symmetry, negligible dark magnetic fields, and that supernova sourced energy is transported to the halo via dark radiation. For the parameters considered, and assumptions made, we were unable to find a physically realistic solution for the constrained case of mirror dark matter halos. Halo cooling generally exceeds heating at realistic halo mass densities. This problem can be rectified in more generic dissipative dark matter models, and we discuss a specific example in some detail.

  15. Effects of fast monoenergetic electrons on the ion dynamics near the cathode in a pulsed direct current plasma sheath

    Sharifian, M.; Shokri, B.

    2008-01-01

    A detailed one-dimensional simulation of the ion dynamics of the plasma sheath near a substrate (cathode) in the presence of fast monoenergetic electrons has been carried out in this article. The sheath evolution is investigated by using a fluid model assuming that the ions, plasma electrons and monoenergetic, fast electrons act as three fluids (fluid approach). The effect of the density of fast electrons on the ion density, ion velocity, and ion energy near the cathode and the evolution of the sheath boundary in front of the cathode are separately explored. Also, the variation of the ion velocity and ion density at the vicinity of the cathode as a function of time is investigated in the absence and presence of the electron beam. Results indicate that the presence of fast electrons in the sheath causes significant change in the sheath thickness and therefore basically changes the ion velocity, ion density, and ion impact energy on the cathode compared to the absence of the electron beam case

  16. Zircaloy sheathed thermocouples for PWR fuel rod temperature measurements

    Anderson, J.V.; Wesley, R.D.; Wilkins, S.C.

    1979-01-01

    Small diameter zircaloy sheathed thermocouples have been developed by EG and G Idaho, Inc., at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Surface mounted thermocouples were developed to measure the temperature of zircaloy clad fuel rods used in the Thermal Fuels Behavior Program (TFBP), and embedded thermocouples were developed for use by the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) Program for support tests using zircaloy clad electrically heated nuclear fuel rod simulators. The first objective of this developmental effort was to produce zircaloy sheathed thermocouples to replace titanium sheathed thermocouples and thereby eliminate the long-term corrosion of the titanium-to-zircaloy attachment weld. The second objective was to reduce the sheath diameter to obtain faster thermal response and minimize cladding temperature disturbance due to thermocouple attachment

  17. significance of rice sheath photosynthesis: yield determination by c ...

    ACSS

    1State Key Laboratory of Hybrid Rice, Hunan Hybrid Rice Research Center, Changsha 410125, P.R. China. 2School of ... for contribution rates of sheath photosynthesis to economical yield. ..... related processes during ripening in rice plants.

  18. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumour of the Maxilla

    Puja Sahai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 38-year-old man was diagnosed with malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour of the maxilla. He was treated with total maxillectomy. Histopathological examination of the resected specimen revealed a close resection margin. The tumour was of high grade with an MIB-1 labelling index of almost 60%. At six weeks following the surgery, he developed local tumour relapse. The patient succumbed to the disease at five months from the time of diagnosis. The present report underlines the locally aggressive nature of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour of the maxilla which necessitates an early therapeutic intervention. A complete resection with clear margins is the most important prognostic factor for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour in the head and neck region. Adjuvant radiotherapy may be considered to improve the local control. Future research may demarcate the role of targeted therapy for patients with malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour.

  19. Bilateral giant cell tumor of tendon sheath of tendoachilles

    Soma Datta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath arises from the synovium of tendon sheaths, joints, or bursae, mostly affects adults between 30 and 50 years of age, and is slightly more common in females. We report the case of a 32-years-old male presenting with pain in both ankles without any history of trauma. On clinical examination, tenderness on both tendoachilles and local thickening were observed. Ultrasonography showed thickening of local tendinous area with increase in anteroposterior diameter, and Doppler demonstrated increased flow in peritendinous area. MRI findings showed that most of the tumor had intermediate signal intensity and portions of the tumor had low signal intensity. Fine needle aspiration cytology confirmed the diagnosis of giant cell tumor of tendon sheath. Excision biopsy was done with no recurrence on five month follow-up. Review of literature did not reveal any similar result; so, bilateral giant cell tumor of tendon sheath of tendoachilles is a rare presentation.

  20. Measure Guideline: Guidance on Taped Insulating Sheathing Drainage Planes

    Grin, A. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Lstiburek, J. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The goal of this research is to provide durable and long-term water management solutions using exterior insulating sheathing as part of the water management system. It is possible to tape or seal the joints in insulating sheathing to create a drainage plane and even an air control layer. There exists the material durability component of the tape as well as the system durability component being the taped insulating sheathing as the drainage plane. This measure guideline provides best practice and product recommendations from the interviewed contractors and homebuilders who collectively have a vast amount of experience. Three significant issues were discussed with the group, which are required to make taped insulating sheathing a simple, long-term, and durable drainage plane: horizontal joints should be limited or eliminated wherever possible; where a horizontal joint exists use superior materials; and frequent installation inspection and regular trade training are required to maintain proper installation.

  1. Stability of the Tonks–Langmuir discharge pre-sheath

    Tskhakaya, D. D. [Fusion@ÖAW, Institute of Applied Physics, TU Wien, Wiedner Hauptstraße 8-10, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Kos, L. [LECAD Laboratory, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Ljubljana, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Tskhakaya, D. [Fusion@ÖAW, Institute of Applied Physics, TU Wien, Wiedner Hauptstraße 8-10, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2016-03-15

    The article formulates the stability problem of the plasma sheath in the Tonks–Langmuir discharge. Using the kinetic description of the ion gas, i.e., the stability of the potential shape in the quasi-neutral pre-sheath regarding the high and low frequency, the perturbations are investigated. The electrons are assumed to be Maxwell–Boltzmann distributed. Regarding high-frequency perturbations, the pre-sheath is shown to be stable. The stability problem regarding low-frequency perturbations can be reduced to an analysis of the “diffusion like” equation, which results in the instability of the potential distribution in the pre-sheath. By means of the Particle in Cell simulations, also the nonlinear stage of low frequency oscillations is investigated. Comparing the figure obtained with the figure for linear stage, one can find obvious similarity in the spatial-temporal behavior of the potential.

  2. Properties of leaves particleboard for sheathing application

    Nuryawan, Arif; Rahmawaty

    2018-03-01

    Manufacturing particleboard (PB) made of leaves was carried out to make non-structural building components, such as insulation, partition, wall, and sheathing. Raw materials used dry leaves originated from plantation (palm oil leaves) and forest plantation (magahony leaves). The adhesive used was interior type thermosetting commercial resins, namely 10% urea-formaldehyde (UF) based on oven dry leaves. Hardener used for UF resin was 1% and 3% ammonium chloride (NH4Cl) 20% (w/w), respectively. Technically, the target density of PB was 0.8 g/cm3 with the dimension’s size of (250 x 250 x 10) mm3. The pressure, temperature, and time of pressing of the hot press were 25 kgf/cm2, 120C, and 10 minutes, respectively. After conditioning for one week, the PB then was evaluated their physical and mechanical properties according to Japanese Industrial Standard (JIS) A 5908 (2003). Results of this work showed: 1) Both types of PB (palm oil and mahagony leaves) were feasible to be produced for non-structural applications; 2) Addition of hardener enhanced the physical and mechanical properties of PB; 3) It was recommended to enhance the performance of the PB by manipulation of the raw materials and the design.

  3. Axial sheath dynamics in a plasma focus

    Soliman, H.M.; El-Khalafawy, T.A.; Masoud, M.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents the result of investigation with a 10 kJ Mather type plasma focus. It is operated in hydrogen gas at ambient pressure of 0.15--1 torr and charging voltage of 8--11 kV. Radial distribution of the current sheath density with axial distance has been estimated. Plasma rotation in the expansion chamber in the absence of external magnetic field has been detected. A plasma flare from the plasma focus region propagating in the radial direction has been observed. Streak photography shows two plasma streams flowing simultaneously out of the muzzle. The mean energy of the electron beam ejected from the pinch region of the focused plasma, was measured by retarding field analyzer to be 0.32 keV. The electron temperature of the plasma focus at peak compression was determined by measuring the X-ray intensity as a function of absorber thickness at a distance of 62 cm from the focus. The electron temperature has been found to 3 keV

  4. Dissipative motion perturbation theory and exact solutions

    Lodder, J.J.

    1976-06-01

    Dissipative motion of classical and quantum systems is described. In particular, attention is paid to systems coupled to the radiation field. A dissipative equation of motion for a particle in an arbitrary potential coupled to the radiation field is derived by means of perturbation theory. The usual divrgencies associated with the radiation field are eliminated by the application of a theory of generalized functions. This theory is developed as a subject in its own right and is presented independently. The introduction of classical zero-point energy makes the classical equa tion of motion for the phase density formally the same as its quantum counterpart. In particular, it is shown that the classical zero-point energy prevents the collapse of a classical H-atom and gives rise to a classical ground state. For systems with a quadratic Hamiltoian, the equation of motion can be solved exactly, even in the continuum limit for the radiation field, by means of the new generalized functions. Classically, the Fokker-Planck equation is found without any approximations, and quantum mechanically, the only approximation is the neglect of the change in the ground state caused by the interaction. The derivation is valid even for strong damping and arbitrarily short times. There is no transient time. For harmonic oscillators complete equivalence is shown to exist between quantum mechanics and classical mechanics with zero-point energy. A discussion of the derivation of the Pauli equation is given and perturbation theory is compared with the exact derivation. The exactly solvable models are used to calculate the Langevin force of the radiation field. The result is that the classical Langevin force is exactly delta-correlated, while the quantum Langevin force is not delta-correlated at all. The fluctuation-dissipation theorem is shown to be an exact consequence of the solution to the equations of motion

  5. Contrast material filling of the peroneal tendon sheath

    Zadravecz, Gy.; Grexa, E.

    1981-01-01

    In case of complaints after fracture of the calcaneus the common sheath of the peroneus tendons was filled up with contrast material. The tendon sheath was punctured Oehind the external ankle. The three-directional radiograms clearly showed the dislocation and compression of the tendons, caused by the exostosis of the calcaneus. The concomitant tendovaginitis caused the complaints. This alteration was observed in 11% of all the calcaneus fractures. (L.E.)

  6. Cell Based Meniscal Repair Using an Aligned Bioactive Nanofibrous Sheath

    2017-07-01

    to subsequently guide tissue regeneration , for example, by seeded tissue progenitor cells . To achieve this objective, the first step is to develop...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0104 TITLE: Cell -Based Meniscal Repair Using an Aligned Bioactive Nanofibrous Sheath PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Cell -Based Meniscal Repair Using an Aligned Bioactive Nanofibrous Sheath 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0104 5c. PROGRAM

  7. Composition of the sheath produced by the green alga Chlorella sorokiniana.

    Watanabe, K; Imase, M; Sasaki, K; Ohmura, N; Saiki, H; Tanaka, H

    2006-05-01

    To investigate the chemical characterization of the mucilage sheath produced by Chlorella sorokiniana. Algal mucilage sheath was hydrolysed with NaOH, containing EDTA. The purity of the hydrolysed sheath was determined by an ATP assay. The composition of polysaccharide in the sheath was investigated by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection. Sucrose, galacturonic acid, xylitol, inositol, ribose, mannose, arabinose, galactose, rhamnose and fructose were detected in the sheath as sugar components. Magnesium was detected in the sheath as a divalent cation using inductively coupled argon plasma. The sheath matrix also contained protein. It appears that the sheath is composed of sugars and metals. Mucilage sheath contains many kinds of saccharides that are produced as photosynthetic metabolites and divalent cations that are contained in the culture medium. This is the first report on chemical characterization of the sheath matrix produced by C. sorokiniana.

  8. Hydrodynamic relaxations in dissipative particle dynamics

    Hansen, J. S.; Greenfield, Michael L.; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2018-01-01

    This paper studies the dynamics of relaxation phenomena in the standard dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) model [R. D. Groot and P. B. Warren, J. Chem. Phys. 107, 4423 (1997)]. Using fluctuating hydrodynamics as the framework of the investigation, we focus on the collective transverse and longitudinal dynamics. It is shown that classical hydrodynamic theory predicts the transverse dynamics at relatively low temperatures very well when compared to simulation data; however, the theory predictions are, on the same length scale, less accurate for higher temperatures. The agreement with hydrodynamics depends on the definition of the viscosity, and here we find that the transverse dynamics are independent of the dissipative and random shear force contributions to the stress. For high temperatures, the spectrum for the longitudinal dynamics is dominated by the Brillouin peak for large length scales and the relaxation is therefore governed by sound wave propagation and is athermal. This contrasts the results at lower temperatures and small length scale, where the thermal process is clearly present in the spectra. The DPD model, at least qualitatively, re-captures the underlying hydrodynamical mechanisms, and quantitative agreement is excellent at intermediate temperatures for the transverse dynamics.

  9. Dissipativity analysis of the base isolated benchmark structure with magnetorheological fluid dampers

    Erkus, Baris; Johnson, Erik A

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the dissipativity and performance characteristics of the semiactive control of the base isolated benchmark structure with magnetorheological (MR) fluid dampers. Previously, the authors introduced the concepts of dissipativity and dissipativity indices in the semiactive control of structures with smart dampers and studied the dissipativity characteristics of simple structures with idealized dampers. To investigate the effects of semiactive controller dissipativity characteristics on the overall performance of the base isolated benchmark building, a clipped optimal control strategy with a linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) controller and a 20 ton MR fluid damper model is used. A cumulative index is proposed for quantifying the overall dissipativity of a control system with multiple control devices. Two control designs with different dissipativity and performance characteristics are considered as the primary controller in clipped optimal control. Numerical simulations reveal that the dissipativity indices can be classified into two groups that exhibit distinct patterns. It is shown that the dissipativity indices identify primary controllers that are more suitable for application with MR dampers and provide useful information in the semiactive design process that complements other performance indices. The computational efficiency of the proposed dissipativity indices is verified by comparing computation times

  10. Studies of irradiated zircaloy fuel sheathing using XPS

    Chan, P.K.; Irving, K.G.; Hocking, W.H.; Duclos, A.M.; Gerwing, A.F.

    1995-01-01

    The preliminary results reported here support the hypothesis that CANLUB graphite coating reduces the rate at which oxygen can react with fuel sheathing. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) characterization of Zircaloy sheathing obtained from extended-burnup Bruce-type elements (BDL-406-XY (555 MW.h/kgU) and BDL-406-AAH (731 MW.h/kgU)) irradiated in NRU indicates that CANLUB may reduce fuel sheath oxidation, and hence that fission-liberated oxygen may remain in the fuel. Chemical shifts in the Zr 3d spectra suggest that a stoichiometric (ZrO 2 ) oxide film was formed only on Zircaloy in direct contact with fuel. Particulate fuel adhering to the sheath was also determined to be systematically more oxidized on surfaces with CANLUB than on those without it. The unique association of tin on sheathing specimens with the non-CANLUB-coated specimens might also suggest that the tin had segregated from the sheathing. It must be emphasized that further experiments are required to better define the effect of CANLUB on fuel oxidation. (author). 14 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs

  11. Effects of emitted electron temperature on the plasma sheath

    Sheehan, J. P.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Wang, H.; Raitses, Y.; Sydorenko, D.; Hershkowitz, N.

    2014-01-01

    It has long been known that electron emission from a surface significantly affects the sheath surrounding that surface. Typical fluid theory of a planar sheath with emitted electrons assumes that the plasma electrons follow the Boltzmann relation and the emitted electrons are emitted with zero energy and predicts a potential drop of 1.03T e /e across the sheath in the floating condition. By considering the modified velocity distribution function caused by plasma electrons lost to the wall and the half-Maxwellian distribution of the emitted electrons, it is shown that ratio of plasma electron temperature to emitted electron temperature significantly affects the sheath potential when the plasma electron temperature is within an order of magnitude of the emitted electron temperature. When the plasma electron temperature equals the emitted electron temperature the emissive sheath potential goes to zero. One dimensional particle-in-cell simulations corroborate the predictions made by this theory. The effects of the addition of a monoenergetic electron beam to the Maxwellian plasma electrons were explored, showing that the emissive sheath potential is close to the beam energy only when the emitted electron flux is less than the beam flux

  12. Studies of irradiated zircaloy fuel sheathing using XPS

    Chan, P K; Irving, K G [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada); Hocking, W H; Duclos, A M; Gerwing, A F [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, MB (Canada). Whiteshell Labs.

    1996-12-31

    The preliminary results reported here support the hypothesis that CANLUB graphite coating reduces the rate at which oxygen can react with fuel sheathing. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) characterization of Zircaloy sheathing obtained from extended-burnup Bruce-type elements (BDL-406-XY (555 MW.h/kgU) and BDL-406-AAH (731 MW.h/kgU)) irradiated in NRU indicates that CANLUB may reduce fuel sheath oxidation, and hence that fission-liberated oxygen may remain in the fuel. Chemical shifts in the Zr 3d spectra suggest that a stoichiometric (ZrO{sub 2}) oxide film was formed only on Zircaloy in direct contact with fuel. Particulate fuel adhering to the sheath was also determined to be systematically more oxidized on surfaces with CANLUB than on those without it. The unique association of tin on sheathing specimens with the non-CANLUB-coated specimens might also suggest that the tin had segregated from the sheathing. It must be emphasized that further experiments are required to better define the effect of CANLUB on fuel oxidation. (author). 14 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  13. Multimodal imaging in neurofibromatosis type 1-associated nerve sheath tumors

    Salamon, J.; Adam, G.; Mautner, V.F.; Derlin, T.

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a neurogenetic disorder. Individuals with NF1 may develop a variety of benign and malignant tumors of which peripheral nerve sheath tumors represent the most frequent entity. Plexiform neurofibromas may demonstrate a locally destructive growth pattern, may cause severe symptoms and may undergo malignant transformation into malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs). Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) represents the reference standard for detection of soft tissue tumors in NF1. It allows for identification of individuals with plexiform neurofibromas, for assessment of local tumor extent, and for evaluation of whole-body tumor burden on T2-weighted imaging. Multiparametric MRI may provide a comprehensive characterization of different tissue properties of peripheral nerve sheath tumors, and may identify parameters associated with malignant transformation. Due to the absence of any radiation exposure, whole-body MRI may be used for serial follow-up of individuals with plexiform neurofibromas. 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission-tomography (FDG PET/CT) allows a highly sensitive and specific detection of MPNST, and should be used in case of potential malignant transformation of a peripheral nerve sheath tumor. PET/CT provides a sensitive whole-body tumor staging. The use of contrast-enhanced CT for diagnosis of peripheral nerve sheath tumors is limited to special indications. To obtain the most precise readings, optimized examination protocols and dedicated radiologists and nuclear medicine physicians familiar with the complex and variable morphologies of peripheral nerve sheath tumors are required.

  14. Analytical expression for sheath edge around corner cathodes

    Sheridan, T E

    2009-01-01

    A simple analytical expression for the position of the sheath edge around a two-dimensional corner cathode with included angle θ c has been discovered. This expression is valid for weakly collisional sheaths in the Child-Langmuir regime φ c >> kT e /e, where -φ c e is the electron temperature. In polar coordinates (r, θ), the sheath edge is given by (r/s 0 )sin[πθ/(2π - θ c )] = [π/(2π - θ c )] where s 0 is the planar sheath width far from the vertex of the corner. This result is verified by comparison with previous numerical solutions (Watterson P A 1989 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 22 1300) for the knife edge (θ c = 0) and convex square corner (θ c = π/2). The observed agreement suggests that this expression gives the sheath edge for all corner angles, both concave and convex. The utility of this result is demonstrated by computing the full sheath solution for a knife-edge cathode with φ c = 100kT e /e.

  15. Power injected in dissipative systems and the fluctuation theorem

    Aumaître, S.; Fauve, S.; McNamara, S.; Poggi, P.

    We consider three examples of dissipative dynamical systems involving many degrees of freedom, driven far from equilibrium by a constant or time dependent forcing. We study the statistical properties of the injected and dissipated power as well as the fluctuations of the total energy of these systems. The three systems under consideration are: a shell model of turbulence, a gas of hard spheres colliding inelastically and excited by a vibrating piston, and a Burridge-Knopoff spring-block model. Although they involve different types of forcing and dissipation, we show that the statistics of the injected power obey the ``fluctuation theorem" demonstrated in the case of time reversible dissipative systems maintained at constant total energy, or in the case of some stochastic processes. Although this may be only a consequence of the theory of large deviations, this allows a possible definition of ``temperature" for a dissipative system out of equilibrium. We consider how this ``temperature" scales with the energy and the number of degrees of freedom in the different systems under consideration.

  16. Compaction shock dissipation in low density granular explosive

    Rao, Pratap T.; Gonthier, Keith A., E-mail: gonthier@me.lsu.edu; Chakravarthy, Sunada [Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States)

    2016-06-14

    The microstructure of granular explosives can affect dissipative heating within compaction shocks that can trigger combustion and initiate detonation. Because initiation occurs over distances that are much larger than the mean particle size, homogenized (macroscale) theories are often used to describe local thermodynamic states within and behind shocks that are regarded as the average manifestation of thermodynamic fields at the particle scale. In this paper, mesoscale modeling and simulation are used to examine how the initial packing density of granular HMX (C{sub 4}H{sub 8}N{sub 8}O{sub 8}) C{sub 4}H{sub 8}N{sub 8}O{sub 8} having a narrow particle size distribution influences dissipation within resolved, planar compaction shocks. The model tracks the evolution of thermomechanical fields within large ensembles of particles due to pore collapse. Effective shock profiles, obtained by averaging mesoscale fields over space and time, are compared with those given by an independent macroscale compaction theory that predicts the variation in effective thermomechanical fields within shocks due to an imbalance between the solid pressure and a configurational stress. Reducing packing density is shown to reduce the dissipation rate within shocks but increase the integrated dissipated work over shock rise times, which is indicative of enhanced sensitivity. In all cases, dissipated work is related to shock pressure by a density-dependent power law, and shock rise time is related to pressure by a power law having an exponent of negative one.

  17. Dissipative elastic metamaterial with a low-frequency passband

    Yongquan Liu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We design and experimentally demonstrate a dissipative elastic metamaterial structure that functions as a bandpass filter with a low-frequency passband. The mechanism of dissipation in this structure is well described by a mass-spring-damper model that reveals that the imaginary part of the wavenumber is non-zero, even in the passband of dissipative metamaterials. This indicates that transmittance in this range can be low. A prototype for this viscoelastic metamaterial model is fabricated by 3D printing techniques using soft and hard acrylics as constituent materials. The transmittance of the printed metamaterial is measured and shows good agreement with theoretical predictions, demonstrating its potential in the design of compact waveguides, filters and other advanced devices for controlling mechanical waves.

  18. Mechanical characterisation of porcine rectus sheath under uniaxial and biaxial tension.

    Lyons, Mathew

    2014-06-03

    Incisional hernia development is a significant complication after laparoscopic abdominal surgery. Intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) is known to initiate the extrusion of intestines through the abdominal wall, but there is limited data on the mechanics of IAP generation and the structural properties of rectus sheath. This paper presents an explanation of the mechanics of IAP development, a study of the uniaxial and biaxial tensile properties of porcine rectus sheath, and a simple computational investigation of the tissue. Analysis using Laplace׳s law showed a circumferential stress in the abdominal wall of approx. 1.1MPa due to an IAP of 11kPa, commonly seen during coughing. Uniaxial and biaxial tensile tests were conducted on samples of porcine rectus sheath to characterise the stress-stretch responses of the tissue. Under uniaxial tension, fibre direction samples failed on average at a stress of 4.5MPa at a stretch of 1.07 while cross-fibre samples failed at a stress of 1.6MPa under a stretch of 1.29. Under equi-biaxial tension, failure occurred at 1.6MPa with the fibre direction stretching to only 1.02 while the cross-fibre direction stretched to 1.13. Uniaxial and biaxial stress-stretch plots are presented allowing detailed modelling of the tissue either in silico or in a surrogate material. An FeBio computational model of the tissue is presented using a combination of an Ogden and an exponential power law model to represent the matrix and fibres respectively. The structural properties of porcine rectus sheath have been characterised and add to the small set of human data in the literature with which it may be possible to develop methods to reduce the incidence of incisional hernia development.

  19. Genomic and Expression Profiling of Benign and Malignant Nerve Sheath Profiling of Benign and Malignant Nerve Sheath

    2007-05-01

    Benign and Malignant Nerve Sheath Tumors in Neurofibromatosis Patients PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Matt van de Rijn, M.D., Ph.D. Torsten...Annual 3. DATES COVERED 1 May 2006 –30 Apr 2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Genomic and Expression Profiling of Benign and Malignant Nerve...Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0297 Title: Genomic and Expression Profiling of Benign and Malignant Nerve Sheath Tumors in Neurofibromatosis

  20. Effect of sheath material on critical current characteristics of MgB2 at high temperatures

    Kiuchi, M.; Yamauchi, K.; Kurokawa, T.; Otabe, E.S.; Matsushita, T.; Okada, M.; Tanaka, K.; Kumakura, H.; Kitaguchi, H.

    2004-01-01

    Critical current density and irreversibility field were measured at various temperatures and magnetic fields for MgB 2 PIT tape specimens with different sheaths materials. The experimental results were compared with theoretical estimations using the flux creep-flow model. It is found that the hardness of sheath material indirectly affects the pinning property only through the packing density of MgB 2 . It is considered that the critical current density is mainly determined by a low value of distributed local critical current density determined by grain connectivity. On the other hand, the irreversibility field which is approximately the same among the three tapes is mainly determined by the average pinning strength

  1. Theory of a wall sheath in a gas-discharge plasma

    Dvinin, S.A.; Dovzhenko, V.A.; Kuzovnikov, A.A.

    1999-01-01

    An integro-differential equation is proposed that generalizes the plasma-sheath (Langmuir-Tonks) equation to include charge exchange between ions and neutrals in a discharge plasma and makes it possible to correctly analyze how the discharge evolves from the regime of collisionless ion motion to the diffusive regime in pure gases with allowance for the space charge in the sheath at the plasma boundary. The integro-differential equation is solved numerically, and the ionization rate is calculated as a function of the ratio between the ion mean free path and the characteristic discharge dimension. The ion energy distribution function in the positive column of a discharge plasma is computed. The parameter range in which the positive column can exist is examined, and the limits of applicability of different discharge models are analyzed depending on the relations between the ion mean free path, Debye length, and discharge dimension

  2. Designing Biomimetic, Dissipative Material Systems

    Balazs, Anna C. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Chemical Engineering Dept.; Whitesides, George M. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Biology; Brinker, C. Jeffrey [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering. Dept. of Chemistry. Dept. of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology. Center for Micro-Engineered Materials; Aranson, Igor S. [UChicago, LLC., Argonne, IL (United States); Chaikin, Paul [New York Univ. (NYU), NY (United States). Dept. of Physics; Dogic, Zvonimir [Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Glotzer, Sharon [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering. Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering. Dept. of Macromolecular Science and Engineering Physics; Hammer, Daniel [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States). School of Engineering and Applied Science; Irvine, Darrell [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering and Biological Engineering; Little, Steven R. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Chemical Engineering Dept.; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Parikh, Atul N. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Biomedical Engineering. Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science; Stupp, Samuel [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering. Dept. of Chemistry. Dept. of Medicine. Dept. of Biomedical Engineering; Szostak, Jack [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Biology

    2016-01-21

    Throughout human history, new materials have been the foundation of transformative technologies: from bronze, paper, and ceramics to steel, silicon, and polymers, each material has enabled far-reaching advances. Today, another new class of materials is emerging—one with both the potential to provide radically new functions and to challenge our notion of what constitutes a “material”. These materials would harvest, transduce, or dissipate energy to perform autonomous, dynamic functions that mimic the behaviors of living organisms. Herein, we discuss the challenges and benefits of creating “dissipative” materials that can potentially blur the boundaries between living and non-living matter.

  3. Engineering dissipation with phononic spectral hole burning

    Behunin, R. O.; Kharel, P.; Renninger, W. H.; Rakich, P. T.

    2017-03-01

    Optomechanics, nano-electromechanics, and integrated photonics have brought about a renaissance in phononic device physics and technology. Central to this advance are devices and materials supporting ultra-long-lived photonic and phononic excitations that enable novel regimes of classical and quantum dynamics based on tailorable photon-phonon coupling. Silica-based devices have been at the forefront of such innovations for their ability to support optical excitations persisting for nearly 1 billion cycles, and for their low optical nonlinearity. While acoustic phonon modes can persist for a similar number of cycles in crystalline solids at cryogenic temperatures, it has not been possible to achieve such performance in silica, as silica becomes acoustically opaque at low temperatures. We demonstrate that these intrinsic forms of phonon dissipation are greatly reduced (by >90%) by nonlinear saturation using continuous drive fields of disparate frequencies. The result is a form of steady-state phononic spectral hole burning that produces a wideband transparency window with optically generated phonon fields of modest (nW) powers. We developed a simple model that explains both dissipative and dispersive changes produced by phononic saturation. Our studies, conducted in a microscale device, represent an important step towards engineerable phonon dynamics on demand and the use of glasses as low-loss phononic media.

  4. Linear electromagnetic excitation of an asymmetric low pressure capacitive discharge with unequal sheath widths

    Lieberman, M. A., E-mail: lieber@eecs.berkeley.edu; Lichtenberg, A. J.; Kawamura, E. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-1770 (United States); Chabert, P. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, UPMC, Paris XI, Observatoire de Paris, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2016-01-15

    It is well-known that standing waves having radially center-high radio frequency (rf) voltage profiles exist in high frequency capacitive discharges. In this work, we determine the symmetric and antisymmetric radially propagating waves in a cylindrical capacitive discharge that is asymmetrically driven at the lower electrode by an rf voltage source. The discharge is modeled as a uniform bulk plasma which at lower frequencies has a thicker sheath at the smaller area powered electrode and a thinner sheath at the larger area grounded electrode. These are self-consistently determined at a specified density using the Child law to calculate sheath widths and the electron power balance to calculate the rf voltage. The fields and the system resonant frequencies are determined. The center-to-edge voltage ratio on the powered electrode is calculated versus frequency, and central highs are found near the resonances. The results are compared with simulations in a similar geometry using a two-dimensional hybrid fluid-analytical code, giving mainly a reasonable agreement. The analytic model may be useful for finding good operating frequencies for a given discharge geometry and power.

  5. Observation-based input and dissipation version of WAVEWATCH III

    Zieger, Stefan; Babanin, Alexander; Rogers, Erick; Young, Ian

    2013-04-01

    Measurements collected at Lake George, Australia, resulted in new insights on the processes of wind wave interaction and white-capping dissipation and consequently new parameterisations of these source terms. The new nonlinear wind input source term accounts for dependence of the growth increment on wave steepness, for airflow separation which leads to a relative reduction of the growth under extreme wind conditions, and for negative growth rate under adverse winds. The new wave breaking and whitecapping dissipation source function features two separate terms: the inherent breaking term and a cumulative dissipation term due to influences of longer waves on wave breaking of shorter waves. Another novel feature of this dissipation is the threshold in terms of spectral density: below this threshold breaking stops and whitecapping becomes zero. In such conditions dissipation due to wave interaction with water turbulence takes over, which regime is particularly relevant for decaying seas and for swell. This paper describes these source terms implemented in WAVEWATCH III and evaluates the performance against existing source terms in duration-limited simulations and against buoy measurements for windsea-dominated conditions. Results show agreement by means of growth curves and integral parameters in the simulations and hindcast. The paper also introduces wave breaking probability as model output, along with standard wind-wave metrics.

  6. Comparison of Energy Dissipation, Stiffness, and Damage of Structural Oriented Strand Board (OSB, Conventional Gypsum, and Viscoelastic Gypsum Shearwalls Subjected to Cyclic Loads

    Andrew S. Blasetti

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A key element in the seismic load resisting system of a wood framed structure is the shear wall which is typically sheathed on one side with plywood or oriented strand board (OSB and gypsum on the other. The shear capacity of gypsum sheathed shear walls is typically neglected in high seismic areas due to the susceptibility of conventional drywall screw connections to damage caused by earthquakes. The earthquake resistance of an innovative viscoelastic (VE gypsum shearwall is evaluated and compared to conventional structural and non-structural walls. Ten 8 ft × 8 ft wood framed wall specimens of three configurations [nailed-OSB, screw-gypsum, and VE polymer-gypsum] were subjected to a cyclic test protocol. The energy dissipation, stiffness, and damage characteristics of all shearwalls are reported herein. Testing results indicate the VE-gypsum walls can dissipate more energy than the OSB structural panels and 500% more energy that the conventional gypsum sheathed walls and contains a constant source of energy dissipation not seen in the structural and non-structural walls. The wall stiffness of the OSB wall degrades at a far greater rate that the VE gypsum wall and at continued cycling degrades below the VE wall stiffness. Unlike both of the conventional wall types, the VE wall showed no visible or audible signs of damage when subjected to shear displacements up to 1.

  7. Natural approach to quantum dissipation

    Taj, David; Öttinger, Hans Christian

    2015-12-01

    The dissipative dynamics of a quantum system weakly coupled to one or several reservoirs is usually described in terms of a Lindblad generator. The popularity of this approach is certainly due to the linear character of the latter. However, while such linearity finds justification from an underlying Hamiltonian evolution in some scaling limit, it does not rely on solid physical motivations at small but finite values of the coupling constants, where the generator is typically used for applications. The Markovian quantum master equations we propose are instead supported by very natural thermodynamic arguments. They themselves arise from Markovian master equations for the system and the environment which preserve factorized states and mean energy and generate entropy at a non-negative rate. The dissipative structure is driven by an entropic map, called modular, which introduces nonlinearity. The generated modular dynamical semigroup (MDS) guarantees for the positivity of the time evolved state the correct steady state properties, the positivity of the entropy production, and a positive Onsager matrix with symmetry relations arising from Green-Kubo formulas. We show that the celebrated Davies Lindblad generator, obtained through the Born and the secular approximations, generates a MDS. In doing so we also provide a nonlinear MDS which is supported by a weak coupling argument and is free from the limitations of the Davies generator.

  8. Hyphenation of capillary high-performance ion-exchange chromatography with mass spectrometry using sheath-flow electrospray ionization.

    Kochmann, Sven; Matysik, Frank-Michael

    2014-12-15

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is an attractive method for extending capillary-size ion chromatography (cHPIC) to create a valuable technique for speciation analysis. For hyphenation, the aqueous effluent of cHPIC has to be transformed into a volatile mixture for MS while preserving analytical concentrations as well as peak shapes during transfer from cHPIC to MS. Finally, the approach should technically be flexible and easy-to-use. A combination of cHPIC and sheath-flow electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS offers to solve all these challenges. cHPIC/sheath-flow-ESI-TOFMS was used in this study for the speciation analysis of various arsenic model compounds. These model compounds were analyzed with different hyphenation setups and configurations of cHPIC/MS and their respective assets and drawbacks were examined and discussed. The parameters (flow rate and composition of sheath liquid) of sheath-flow ESI and their influence on the performance of the spray and the sensitivity of the detector were investigated and compared with those of sheathless ESI. Using an injection valve to couple cHPIC and MS was found to be the best method for hyphenation, since it constitutes a flexible and dead-volume-free approach. The investigation of sheath-flow ESI revealed that the flow rate of the sheath liquid has to resemble the flow rate of the IC effluent to ensure a stable spray and that a composition of 2-propanol/water/ammonia at 50:50:0.2 (v/v/v) suits most applications without unilaterally promoting the sensitivity for either organic or inorganic compounds. The optimized setup and conditions were successfully applied to the analysis of a mixture of important arsenic species and used to determine limits of detection of organic and inorganic arsenic species (3.7 µg L(-1) elemental arsenic). A method for cHPIC/sheath-flow-ESI-MS was developed. The method was shown to be a valuable tool for speciation and trace analysis. It features no dead volume, fast transfer from IC to MS, only minimal

  9. Memory effects in dissipative nucleus-nucleus collision

    Yadav, H.L.; Agarwal, K.C.

    2002-01-01

    A macroscopic dynamical model within the framework of a multidimensional Fokker-Planck equation is employed for a theoretical description of low-energy dissipative collisions between two heavy nuclei. The effect of two-body collisions leading to intrinsic equilibrium has been treated phenomenologically using the basic concepts of dissipative diabatic dynamics. The heavy-ion reaction 86 Kr(8.18 MeV/u) + 166 Er has been as a prototype to study and demonstrate the memory effects for dissipation and diffusion processes. Our calculated results for the deflection angle, angular distributions dσ/dθ cm , energy distributions dσ/dΔΕ, and element distributions dσ/dΖ illustrate a remarkable dependence on the memory effects and are consistent with the experimental data

  10. Memory effects in dissipative nucleus-nucleus collision

    Yadav, H L

    2002-01-01

    A macroscopic dynamical model within the framework of a multidimensional Fokker-Planck equation is employed for a theoretical description of low-energy dissipative collisions between two heavy nuclei. The effect of two-body collisions leading to intrinsic equilibrium has been treated phenomenologically using the basic concepts of dissipative diabatic dynamics. The heavy-ion reaction sup 8 sup 6 Kr(8.18 MeV/u) + sup 1 sup 6 sup 6 Er has been as a prototype to study and demonstrate the memory effects for dissipation and diffusion processes. Our calculated results for the deflection angle, angular distributions d sigma/d theta sub c sub m , energy distributions d sigma/d DELTA EPSILON, and element distributions d sigma/d ZETA illustrate a remarkable dependence on the memory effects and are consistent with the experimental data

  11. Energy Dissipation Rate in an Agitated Crucible Containing Molten Metal

    Li, Tao; Shimasaki, Shin-ichi; Narita, Shunsuke; Taniguchi, Shoji

    2017-10-01

    The energy dissipation rate (EDR) is an important parameter for characterizing the behavior of inclusion coagulation in agitated molten metal. To clarify the inclusion coagulation mechanism, we review previous water model studies by particularly focusing on the relation between the impeller torque and the EDR of the fluid, which indicates the ratio of energy dissipated in the viscous medium to the energy inputted by the rotating impeller. In the present study, simulations coupled with experiments were performed to determine the relation between the torque and the effective EDR for water and liquid Al in crucibles with and without baffles.

  12. Importance of post-shock streams and sheath region as drivers of intense magnetospheric storms and high-latitude activity

    K. E. J. Huttunen

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic disturbances in the Earth's magnetosphere can be very different depending on the type of solar wind driver. We have determined the solar wind causes for intense magnetic storms (DstDst index was more difficult to model for a sheath region or a post-shock stream driven storm than for a storm caused by a magnetic cloud.

  13. Dissipation of Turbulence in the Wake of a Wind Turbine

    Lundquist, J. K.; Bariteau, L.

    2015-02-01

    The wake of a wind turbine is characterized by increased turbulence and decreased wind speed. Turbines are generally deployed in large groups in wind farms, and so the behaviour of an individual wake as it merges with other wakes and propagates downwind is critical in assessing wind-farm power production. This evolution depends on the rate of turbulence dissipation in the wind-turbine wake, which has not been previously quantified in field-scale measurements. In situ measurements of winds and turbulence dissipation from the wake region of a multi-MW turbine were collected using a tethered lifting system (TLS) carrying a payload of high-rate turbulence probes. Ambient flow measurements were provided from sonic anemometers on a meteorological tower located near the turbine. Good agreement between the tower measurements and the TLS measurements was established for a case without a wind-turbine wake. When an operating wind turbine is located between the tower and the TLS so that the wake propagates to the TLS, the TLS measures dissipation rates one to two orders of magnitude higher in the wake than outside of the wake. These data, collected between two and three rotor diameters downwind of the turbine, document the significant enhancement of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate within the wind-turbine wake. These wake measurements suggest that it may be useful to pursue modelling approaches that account for enhanced dissipation. Comparisons of wake and non-wake dissipation rates to mean wind speed, wind-speed variance, and turbulence intensity are presented to facilitate the inclusion of these measurements in wake modelling schemes.

  14. Nonlinear von Neumann equations for quantum dissipative systems

    Messer, J.; Baumgartner, B.

    1978-01-01

    For pure states nonlinear Schroedinger equations, the so-called Schroedinger-Langevin equations are well-known to model quantum dissipative systems of the Langevin type. For mixtures it is shown that these wave equations do not extend to master equations, but to corresponding nonlinear von Neumann equations. Solutions for the damped harmonic oscillator are discussed. (Auth.)

  15. Nonlinear von Neumann equations for quantum dissipative systems

    Messer, J.; Baumgartner, B.

    For pure states nonlinear Schroedinger equations, the so-called Schroedinger-Langevin equations are well-known to model quantum dissipative systems of the Langevin type. For mixtures it is shown that these wave equations do not extend to master equations, but to corresponding nonlinear von Neumann equations. Solutions for the damped harmonic oscillator are discussed. (Author)

  16. Towards better integrators for dissipative particle dynamics simulations

    Besold, Gerhard; Vattulainen, Ilpo Tapio; Karttunen, Mikko

    2000-01-01

    Coarse-grained models that preserve hydrodynamics provide a natural approach to study collective properties of soft-matter systems. Here, we demonstrate that commonly used integration schemes in dissipative particle dynamics give rise to pronounced artifacts in physical quantities such as the com...

  17. Information-theoretic outlook of the quantum dissipation problem

    Kowalski, A.M.; Plastino, A.; Proto, A.N.

    1992-08-01

    The interaction between two harmonic oscillators, a classical and a quantum one, coupled through a linear term, is analyzed by recourse to the generalized Ehrenfest theorem. The model is able to mimic dissipating behaviour for the quantum oscillator without violation of any quantum rule. (author). 13 refs, 5 figs

  18. Salvianolic acid B protects the myelin sheath around injured spinal cord axons

    Zhe Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Salvianolic acid B, an active pharmaceutical compound present in Salvia miltiorrhiza, exerts a neuroprotective effect in animal models of brain and spinal cord injury. Salvianolic acid B can promote recovery of neurological function; however, its protective effect on the myelin sheath after spinal cord injury remains poorly understood. Thus, in this study, in vitro tests showed that salvianolic acid B contributed to oligodendrocyte precursor cell differentiation, and the most effective dose was 20 μg/mL. For in vivo investigation, rats with spinal cord injury were intraperitoneally injected with 20 mg/kg salvianolic acid B for 8 weeks. The amount of myelin sheath and the number of regenerating axons increased, neurological function recovered, and caspase-3 expression was decreased in the spinal cord of salvianolic acid B-treated animals compared with untreated control rats. These results indicate that salvianolic acid B can protect axons and the myelin sheath, and can promote the recovery of neurological function. Its mechanism of action is likely to be associated with inhibiting apoptosis and promoting the differentiation and maturation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells.

  19. An investigation of tendon sheathing filler migration into concrete

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.

    1998-03-01

    During some of the inspections at nuclear power plants with prestressed concrete containments, it was observed that the containments has experienced leakage of the tendon sheathing filler (i.e., streaks). The objective of this activity was to provide an indication of the extent of tendon sheathing filler leakage into the concrete and its affects on concrete properties. Literature was reviewed and concrete core samples were obtained from the Trojan Nuclear Plant and tested. The literature primarily addressed effects of crude or lubricating oils that are known to cause concrete damage. However, these materials have significantly different characteristics relative to the materials used as tendon sheathing fillers. Examination and testing of the concrete cores indicated that the appearance of tendon sheathing filler on the concrete surface was due to leakage from the conduits and its subsequent migration through cracks that were present. Migration of the tendon sheathing filler was confined to the cracks and there was no perceptible movement into the concrete. Results of compressive strength testing indicated that the concrete quality was consistent in the containment and that the strength had increased over 40% in 25.4 years relative to the average compressive strength at 28-days age

  20. Structural Conservation of the Myoviridae Phage Tail Sheath Protein Fold

    Aksyuk, Anastasia A.; Kurochkina, Lidia P.; Fokine, Andrei; Forouhar, Farhad; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim V.; Tong, Liang; Rossmann, Michael G. (SOIBC); (Purdue); (Columbia)

    2012-02-21

    Bacteriophage phiKZ is a giant phage that infects Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a human pathogen. The phiKZ virion consists of a 1450 {angstrom} diameter icosahedral head and a 2000 {angstrom}-long contractile tail. The structure of the whole virus was previously reported, showing that its tail organization in the extended state is similar to the well-studied Myovirus bacteriophage T4 tail. The crystal structure of a tail sheath protein fragment of phiKZ was determined to 2.4 {angstrom} resolution. Furthermore, crystal structures of two prophage tail sheath proteins were determined to 1.9 and 3.3 {angstrom} resolution. Despite low sequence identity between these proteins, all of these structures have a similar fold. The crystal structure of the phiKZ tail sheath protein has been fitted into cryo-electron-microscopy reconstructions of the extended tail sheath and of a polysheath. The structural rearrangement of the phiKZ tail sheath contraction was found to be similar to that of phage T4.

  1. A Study on Aspect Ratio of Heat Dissipation Fin for the Heat Dissipation Performance of Ultra Constant Discharge Lamp

    Ko, Dong Guk; Cong Ge, Jun; Im, Ik Tae; Choi, Nag Jung; Kim, Min Soo

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed the heat dissipation performance of UCD lamp ballast fin with various aspect ratios. The minimum grid size was 0.02 mm and the number of grid was approximately 11,000. In order to determine the influence of the aspect ratio on the heat dissipation performance of UCD lamp ballast fin, the heat transfer area of the fin was kept constant at 4 mm2. The aspect ratios of the fin were 2 mm: 2 mm (basic model), 1.5 mm: 2.7 mm and 2.7 mm: 1.5 mm, respectively. The heat flux and heat flux time at fin were kept constant at 1×105 W/m2 and 10 seconds, respectively. The heat dissipation performance by the fin was the best at an aspect ratio of 1.5 mm: 2.7 mm.

  2. On the upper ocean turbulent dissipation rate due to microscale breakers and small whitecaps

    Banner, Michael L.; Morison, Russel P.

    2018-06-01

    In ocean wave modelling, accurately computing the evolution of the wind-wave spectrum depends on the source terms and the spectral bandwidth used. The wave dissipation rate source term which spectrally quantifies wave breaking and other dissipative processes remains poorly understood, including the spectral bandwidth needed to capture the essential model physics. The observational study of Sutherland and Melville (2015a) investigated the relative dissipation rate contributions of breaking waves, from large-scale whitecaps to microbreakers. They concluded that a large fraction of wave energy was dissipated by microbreakers. However, in strong contrast with their findings, our analysis of their data and other recent data sets shows that for young seas, microbreakers and small whitecaps contribute only a small fraction of the total breaking wave dissipation rate. For older seas, we find microbreakers and small whitecaps contribute a large fraction of the breaking wave dissipation rate, but this is only a small fraction of the total dissipation rate, which is now dominated by non-breaking contributions. Hence, for all the wave age conditions observed, microbreakers make an insignificant contribution to the total wave dissipation rate in the wave boundary layer. We tested the sensitivity of the results to the SM15a whitecap analysis methodology by transforming the SM15a breaking data using our breaking crest processing methodology. This resulted in the small-scale breaking waves making an even smaller contribution to the total wave dissipation rate, and so the result is independent of the breaker processing methodology. Comparison with other near-surface total TKE dissipation rate observations also support this conclusion. These contributions to the spectral dissipation rate in ocean wave models are small and need not be explicitly resolved.

  3. “Orphan” γ-Ray Flares and Stationary Sheaths of Blazar Jets

    MacDonald, Nicholas R.; Jorstad, Svetlana G.; Marscher, Alan P.

    2017-11-01

    Blazars exhibit flares across the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Many γ-ray flares are highly correlated with flares detected at longer wavelengths; however, a small subset appears to occur in isolation, with little or no correlated variability at longer wavelengths. These “orphan” γ-ray flares challenge current models of blazar variability, most of which are unable to reproduce this type of behavior. MacDonald et al. have developed the Ring of Fire model to explain the origin of orphan γ-ray flares from within blazar jets. In this model, electrons contained within a blob of plasma moving relativistically along the spine of the jet inverse-Compton scatter synchrotron photons emanating off of a ring of shocked sheath plasma that enshrouds the jet spine. As the blob propagates through the ring, the scattering of the ring photons by the blob electrons creates an orphan γ-ray flare. This model was successfully applied to modeling a prominent orphan γ-ray flare observed in the blazar PKS 1510-089. To further support the plausibility of this model, MacDonald et al. presented a stacked radio map of PKS 1510-089 containing the polarimetric signature of a sheath of plasma surrounding the spine of the jet. In this paper, we extend our modeling and stacking techniques to a larger sample of blazars: 3C 273, 4C 71.01, 3C 279, 1055+018, CTA 102, and 3C 345, the majority of which have exhibited orphan γ-ray flares. We find that the model can successfully reproduce these flares, while our stacked maps reveal the existence of jet sheaths within these blazars.

  4. Variational principles for dissipative waves

    Dodin, I. Y.; Ruiz, D. E.

    2016-10-01

    Variational methods are a powerful tool in plasma theory. However, their applications are typically restricted to conservative systems or require doubling of variables, which often contradicts the purpose of the variational approach altogether. We show that these restrictions can be relaxed for some classes of dynamical systems that are of practical interest in plasma physics, particularly including dissipative plasma waves. Applications will be discussed to calculating dispersion relations and modulational dynamics of individual plasma waves and wave ensembles. The work was supported by the NNSA SSAA Program through DOE Research Grant No. DE-NA0002948, by the U.S. DOE through Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466, and by the U.S. DOD NDSEG Fellowship through Contract No. 32-CFR-168a.

  5. Tracking the attenuation and nonbreaking dissipation of swells using altimeters

    Jiang, Haoyu; Stopa, Justin E.; Wang, He; Husson, Romain; Mouche, Alexis; Chapron, Bertrand; Chen, Ge

    2016-02-01

    A method for systematically tracking swells across oceanic basins is developed by taking advantage of high-quality data from space-borne altimeters and wave model output. The evolution of swells is observed over large distances based on 202 swell events with periods ranging from 12 to 18 s. An empirical attenuation rate of swell energy of about 4 × 10-7 m-1 is estimated using these observations, and the nonbreaking energy dissipation rates of swells far away from their generating areas are also estimated using a point source model. The resulting acceptance range of nonbreaking dissipation rates is -2.5 to 5.0 × 10-7 m-1, which corresponds to a dissipation e-folding scales of at least 2000 km for steep swells, to almost infinite for small-amplitude swells. These resulting rates are consistent with previous studies using in-situ and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) observations. The frequency dispersion and angular spreading effects during swell propagation are discussed by comparing the results with other studies, demonstrating that they are the two dominant processes for swell height attenuation, especially in the near field. The resulting dissipation rates from these observations can be used as a reference for ocean engineering and wave modeling, and for related studies such as air-sea and wind-wave-turbulence interactions.

  6. Solvable Family of Driven-Dissipative Many-Body Systems

    Foss-Feig, Michael; Young, Jeremy T.; Albert, Victor V.; Gorshkov, Alexey V.; Maghrebi, Mohammad F.

    2017-11-01

    Exactly solvable models have played an important role in establishing the sophisticated modern understanding of equilibrium many-body physics. Conversely, the relative scarcity of solutions for nonequilibrium models greatly limits our understanding of systems away from thermal equilibrium. We study a family of nonequilibrium models, some of which can be viewed as dissipative analogues of the transverse-field Ising model, in that an effectively classical Hamiltonian is frustrated by dissipative processes that drive the system toward states that do not commute with the Hamiltonian. Surprisingly, a broad and experimentally relevant subset of these models can be solved efficiently. We leverage these solutions to compute the effects of decoherence on a canonical trapped-ion-based quantum computation architecture, and to prove a no-go theorem on steady-state phase transitions in a many-body model that can be realized naturally with Rydberg atoms or trapped ions.

  7. Effect of electron emission on an ion sheath structure

    Mishra, M K; Phukan, A; Chakraborty, M

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on the variations of ion sheath structures due to the emission of both hot and cold electrons in the target plasma region of a double plasma device. The ion sheath is produced in front of a negatively biased plate. The plasma is produced by hot filament discharge in the source region, and no discharge is created in the target region of the device. The plate is placed in the target (diffused plasma) region where cold electron emitting filaments are present. These cold electrons are free from maintenance of discharge, which is sustained in the source region. The hot ionizing electrons are present in the source region. Three important parameters are changed by both hot and cold electrons i.e. plasma density, plasma potential and electron temperature. The decrease in plasma potential and the increase in plasma density lead to the contraction of the sheath. (paper)

  8. Anomalous Capacitive Sheath with Deep Radio Frequency Electric Field Penetration

    Kaganovich, Igor D.

    2002-01-01

    A novel nonlinear effect of anomalously deep penetration of an external radio-frequency electric field into a plasma is described. A self-consistent kinetic treatment reveals a transition region between the sheath and the plasma. Because of the electron velocity modulation in the sheath, bunches in the energetic electron density are formed in the transition region adjusted to the sheath. The width of the region is of order V(subscript T)/omega, where V(subscript T) is the electron thermal velocity, and w is frequency of the electric field. The presence of the electric field in the transition region results in a cooling of the energetic electrons and an additional heating of the cold electrons in comparison with the case when the transition region is neglected

  9. Plasma sheath axial phase dynamics in coaxial device

    Soliman, H.M. (Plasma Physics Dept., NRC, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)); Masoud, M.M. (Plasma Physics Dept., NRC, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt))

    1994-10-01

    The study of the plasma sheath dynamics in the axial phase has been carried out in a 3 kJ coaxial system of Mather type for two different inner electrode (IE) lengths, 20 cm and 31.5 cm. For both lengths, measurements showed that the plasma sheath is splitted into two layers at the breech, which is referred to as a shock front and its magnetic piston. It has been found that the two layers of the plasma current sheath rotate around the inner electrode. At the muzzle the back layer reverse its rotation direction due to the magnetic field structure of the system. Results showed that the axial velocity of the first layer is greater than the second one all over the axial phase within the range between 1.4 and 1.7. (orig.).

  10. Plasma sheath axial phase dynamics in coaxial device

    Soliman, H.M.; Masoud, M.M.

    1994-01-01

    The study of the plasma sheath dynamics in the axial phase has been carried out in a 3 kJ coaxial system of Mather type for two different inner electrode (IE) lengths, 20 cm and 31.5 cm. For both lengths, measurements showed that the plasma sheath is splitted into two layers at the breech, which is referred to as a shock front and its magnetic piston. It has been found that the two layers of the plasma current sheath rotate around the inner electrode. At the muzzle the back layer reverse its rotation direction due to the magnetic field structure of the system. Results showed that the axial velocity of the first layer is greater than the second one all over the axial phase within the range between 1.4 and 1.7. (orig.)

  11. Spontaneous rectus sheath hematoma: The utility of CT angiography

    Antonio Pierro, MD

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We described the utility of computed tomography (CT angiography in detection of bleeding vessels for a rapid percutaneous arterial embolization of the spontaneous rectus sheath hematoma. A 70-year-old woman comes to our attention with acute abdominal pain and a low hemoglobin level. An unenhanced CT was performed demonstrating a large rectus sheath hematoma. A conservative management was initially established. Despite this therapy, the abdominal pain increased together with a further decrease of hemoglobin values. A CT angiography was then performed, demonstrating an active bleeding within the hematoma and addressing the patient to a rapid percutaneous arterial embolization. Keywords: Rectus sheath hematoma, Acute abdomen, Arterial embolization, CT angiography, Active bleeding

  12. Photovoltaic building sheathing element with anti-slide features

    Keenihan, James R.; Langmaid, Joseph A.; Lopez, Leonardo C.

    2015-09-08

    The present invention is premised` upon an assembly that includes at least a photovoltaic building sheathing element capable of being affixed on a building structure, the photovoltaic building sheathing element. The element including a photovoltaic cell assembly, a body portion attached to one or more portions of the photovoltaic cell assembly; and at feast a first and a second connector assembly capable of directly or indirectly electrically connecting the photovoltaic cell assembly to one or more adjoining devices; wherein the body portion includes one or more geometric features adapted to engage a vertically adjoining device before installation.

  13. Dengue fever with rectus sheath hematoma: A case report

    Anurag Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue fever, also known as breakbone fever, is an infectious tropical disease caused by the Dengue virus. It is associated with a number of complications, which are well documented. However, Dengue fever associated with rectus sheath hematoma (RSH is a very rare complication. Only one case report has been published prior supporting the association of Dengue fever with RSH. We report a case of Dengue fever who presented with RSH and was successfully treated conservatively. RSH is also an uncommon cause of acute abdominal pain. It is accumulation of blood in the sheath of the rectus abdominis, secondary to rupture of an epigastric vessel or muscle tear.

  14. Use of a hot sheath Tormac for advance fuels

    Levine, M.A.

    1977-01-01

    The use of hot electrons in a Tormac sheath is predicted to improve stability and increase ntau by an order of magnitude. An effective ntau for energy containment is derived and system parameters for several advance fuels are shown. In none of the advance fuels cases considered is a reactor with fields greater than 10 Wb or major plasma radius of more than 3 m required for ignition. Minimum systems have power output of under 100 MW thermal. System parameters for a hot sheath Tormac have a wide latitude. Sizes, magnetic fields, operating temperatures can be chosen to optimize engineering and economic considerations

  15. Dissipative Solitons that Cannot be Trapped

    Pardo, Rosa; Perez-Garcia, Victor M.

    2006-01-01

    We show that dissipative solitons in systems with high-order nonlinear dissipation cannot survive in the presence of trapping potentials of the rigid wall or asymptotically increasing type. Solitons in such systems can survive in the presence of a weak potential but only with energies out of the interval of existence of linear quantum mechanical stationary states

  16. Dissipative electromagnetism from a nonequilibrium thermodynamics perspective

    Jelic, A.; Hütter, M.; Öttinger, H.C.

    2006-01-01

    Dissipative effects in electromagnetism on macroscopic scales are examined by coarse-graining the microscopic Maxwell equations with respect to time. We illustrate a procedure to derive the dissipative effects on the macroscopic scale by using a Green-Kubo type expression in terms of the microscopic

  17. Dissipation in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Santanu Pal

    1984-01-01

    This paper deals with the mechanism of one- and two-body dissipations in nucleus-nucleus collisions. The average energy transferred to nuclear excitations is calculated using a time-dependent density matrix approach with lowest-order approximations. Considering the nuclei as Fermi gases, and using a gaussian-type NN interaction as the basic perturbation, simplified expressions are obtained for energy dissipations. These expressions are quite instructive to follow a number of interesting aspects of one- and two-body dissipations. It is theoretically observed that the memory time for the two-body dissipation is significantly smaller than that of one-body dissipation. A threshold-type dependence of the transferred energy on the relative velocity between the two nuclei is also observed. This threshold velocity is found to be related with the intrinsic nucleon kinetic energy for two-body dissipation and with the nuclear size for the one-body case. This observation further suggests that the total dissipated energy is shared between the two nuclei approximately in the ratio of their masses. The physical origin of these observations is also explained. Numerical calculations further illustrate some characteristic features of one- and two-body dissipations. (orig.)

  18. On the stability of dissipative MHD equilibria

    Teichmann, J.

    1979-04-01

    The global stability of stationary equilibria of dissipative MHD is studied uisng the direct Liapunov method. Sufficient and necessary conditions for stability of the linearized Euler-Lagrangian system with the full dissipative operators are given. The case of the two-fluid isentropic flow is discussed. (orig.)

  19. Null Controllability of a Nonlinear Dissipative System and Application to the Detection of the Incomplete Parameter for a Nonlinear Population Dynamics Model

    Yacouba Simporé

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We first prove a null controllability result for a nonlinear system derived from a nonlinear population dynamics model. In order to tackle the controllability problem we use an adapted Carleman inequality. Next we consider the nonlinear population dynamics model with a source term called the pollution term. In order to obtain information on the pollution term we use the method of sentinel.

  20. Magnetic storm generation by large-scale complex structure Sheath/ICME

    Grigorenko, E. E.; Yermolaev, Y. I.; Lodkina, I. G.; Yermolaev, M. Y.; Riazantseva, M.; Borodkova, N. L.

    2017-12-01

    We study temporal profiles of interplanetary plasma and magnetic field parameters as well as magnetospheric indices. We use our catalog of large-scale solar wind phenomena for 1976-2000 interval (see the catalog for 1976-2016 in web-side ftp://ftp.iki.rssi.ru/pub/omni/ prepared on basis of OMNI database (Yermolaev et al., 2009)) and the double superposed epoch analysis method (Yermolaev et al., 2010). Our analysis showed (Yermolaev et al., 2015) that average profiles of Dst and Dst* indices decrease in Sheath interval (magnetic storm activity increases) and increase in ICME interval. This profile coincides with inverted distribution of storm numbers in both intervals (Yermolaev et al., 2017). This behavior is explained by following reasons. (1) IMF magnitude in Sheath is higher than in Ejecta and closed to value in MC. (2) Sheath has 1.5 higher efficiency of storm generation than ICME (Nikolaeva et al., 2015). The most part of so-called CME-induced storms are really Sheath-induced storms and this fact should be taken into account during Space Weather prediction. The work was in part supported by the Russian Science Foundation, grant 16-12-10062. References. 1. Nikolaeva N.S., Y. I. Yermolaev and I. G. Lodkina (2015), Modeling of the corrected Dst* index temporal profile on the main phase of the magnetic storms generated by different types of solar wind, Cosmic Res., 53(2), 119-127 2. Yermolaev Yu. I., N. S. Nikolaeva, I. G. Lodkina and M. Yu. Yermolaev (2009), Catalog of Large-Scale Solar Wind Phenomena during 1976-2000, Cosmic Res., , 47(2), 81-94 3. Yermolaev, Y. I., N. S. Nikolaeva, I. G. Lodkina, and M. Y. Yermolaev (2010), Specific interplanetary conditions for CIR-induced, Sheath-induced, and ICME-induced geomagnetic storms obtained by double superposed epoch analysis, Ann. Geophys., 28, 2177-2186 4. Yermolaev Yu. I., I. G. Lodkina, N. S. Nikolaeva and M. Yu. Yermolaev (2015), Dynamics of large-scale solar wind streams obtained by the double superposed epoch

  1. A suitable boundary condition for bounded plasma simulation without sheath resolution

    Parker, S.E.; Procassini, R.J.; Birdsall, C.K.; Cohen, B.I.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a technique that allows for a sheath boundary layer without having to resolve the inherently small space and time scales of the sheath region. We refer to this technique as the logical sheath boundary condition. This boundary condition, when incorporated into a direct-implicit particle code, permits large space- and time-scale simulations of bounded systems, which would otherwise be impractical on current supercomputers. The lack of resolution of the collector sheath potential drop obtained from conventional implicit simulations at moderate values of ω pe Δt and Δz/λ De provides the motivation for the development of the logical sheath boundary condition. The algorithm for use of the logical sheath boundary condition in a particle simulation is presented. Results from simulations which use the logical sheath boundary condition are shown to compare reasonably well with those from an analytic theory and simulations in which the sheath is resolved

  2. Fabrication and use of zircaloy/tantalum-sheathed cladding thermocouples and molybdenum/rhenium-sheathed fuel centerline thermocouples

    Wilkins, S.C.; Sepold, L.K.

    1985-01-01

    The thermocouples described in this report are zircaloy/tantalum-sheathed and molybdenum/rhenium alloy-sheathed instruments intended for fuel rod cladding and fuel centerline temperature measurements, respectively. Both types incorporate beryllium oxide insulation and tungsten/rhenium alloy thermoelements. These thermocouples, operated at temperatures of 2000 0 C and above, were developed for use in the internationally sponsored Severe Fuel Damage test series in the Power Burst Facility. The fabrication steps for both thermocouple types are described in detail. A laser-welding attachment technique for the cladding-type thermocouple is presented, and experience with alternate materials for cladding and fuel therocouples is discussed

  3. Intrinsic Energy Dissipation Limits in Nano and Micromechanical Resonators

    Iyer, Srikanth Subramanian

    Resonant microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) have enabled miniaturization of high-performance inertial sensors, radio-frequency filters, timing references and mass-based chemical sensors. Despite the increasing prevalence of MEMS resonators for these applications, the energy dissipation in these structures is not well-understood. Accurate prediction of the energy loss and the resulting quality factor (Q) has significant design implications because it is directly related to device performance metrics including sensitivity for resonant sensors, bandwidth for radio-frequency filters and phase-noise for timing references. In order to assess the future potential for MEMS resonators it is critically important to evaluate the energy dissipation limits, which will dictate the ultimate performance resonant MEMS devices can achieve. This work focuses on the derivation and evaluation of the intrinsic mechanical energy dissipation limit for single-crystal nano and micromechanical resonators due to anharmonic phonon-phonon scattering in the Akhiezer regime. The energy loss is derived using perturbation theory and the linearized Boltzmann transport equation for phonons, and includes the direction and polarization dependent mode-Gruneisen parameters in order to capture the strain-induced anharmonicity among phonon branches. Evaluation of the quality factor limit reveals that Akhiezer damping, previously thought to depend only on material properties, has a strong dependence on crystal orientation and resonant mode shape. The robust model provides a dissipation limit for all resonant modes including shear-mode vibrations, which have significantly reduced energy loss because dissipative phonon-phonon scattering is restricted to volume-preserving phonon branches, indicating that Lame or wine-glass mode resonators will have the highest upper limit on mechanical efficiency. Finally, the analytical dissipation model is integrated with commercial finite element software in order to

  4. Effect of radiofrequency on capacitance of low density plasma sheath

    Carneiro, L.T.; Cunha Rapozo, C. da

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that the influence of induced radiofrequency potential (V RF ) modifies the Bohm theory on ion saturation current, measured with Langmuir probes. The effect of radiofrequency potential on diode type plasma sheath resonance is also investigated. (M.C.K.)

  5. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the oculomotor nerve

    Kozic, D; Nagulic, M; Ostojic, J

    2006-01-01

    We present the short-term follow-up magnetic resonance (MR) studies and 1H-MR spectroscopy in a child with malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the oculomotor nerve associated with other less aggressive cranial nerve schwannomas. The tumor revealed perineural extension and diffuse nerve...

  6. Double polymer sheathed carbon nanotube supercapacitors show enhanced cycling stability

    Zhao, Wenqi; Wang, Shanshan; Wang, Chunhui; Wu, Shiting; Xu, Wenjing; Zou, Mingchu; Ouyang, An; Cao, Anyuan; Li, Yibin

    2015-12-01

    Pseudo-materials are effective in boosting the specific capacitance of supercapacitors, but during service their degradation may also be very strong, causing reduced cycling stability. Here, we show that a carbon nanotube sponge grafted by two conventional pseudo-polymer layers in sequence can serve as a porous supercapacitor electrode with significantly enhanced cycling stability compared with single polymer grafting. Creating conformal polymer coatings on the nanotube surface and the resulting double-sheath configuration are important structural factors leading to the enhanced performance. Combining different polymers as double sheaths as reported here might be a potential route to circumvent the dilemma of pseudo-materials, and to simultaneously improve the capacitance and stability for various energy storage devices.Pseudo-materials are effective in boosting the specific capacitance of supercapacitors, but during service their degradation may also be very strong, causing reduced cycling stability. Here, we show that a carbon nanotube sponge grafted by two conventional pseudo-polymer layers in sequence can serve as a porous supercapacitor electrode with significantly enhanced cycling stability compared with single polymer grafting. Creating conformal polymer coatings on the nanotube surface and the resulting double-sheath configuration are important structural factors leading to the enhanced performance. Combining different polymers as double sheaths as reported here might be a potential route to circumvent the dilemma of pseudo-materials, and to simultaneously improve the capacitance and stability for various energy storage devices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05978j

  7. Extraction of antioxidant pigments from dye sorghum leaf sheaths

    Kayode, A.P.P.; Bara, C.A.; Dalode-Vieira, G.; Linnemann, A.R.; Nout, M.J.R.

    2012-01-01

    Extraction of antioxidant biocolorant pigments from leaf sheaths of dye sorghum was optimized. Effects of temperature and ethanol concentration of the extraction solvent on the concentrations of the 3-deoxyanthocyanidins, total phenolics and total anthocyanins, and the colour parameters of the

  8. Ion clusters, REB, and current sheath characteristics in focused discharges

    Bortolotti, A.; Brzosko, J.; DeChiara, P.; Kilic, H.; Mezzetti, F.; Nardi, V.; Powell, C.; Zeng, D.

    1990-01-01

    Small fluctuations in the current sheath characteristics (peak current density, FWHM of leading sheath, control parameters of sheath internal structure) are linked to wide fluctuations of ion and ion cluster emission from the pinch. Magnetic probe data are used for correlating variations of current sheath parameters with particle emission intensity, Z/M composition, particle energy spectrum. The emission of ion and ion clusters at 90 degrees from the axis of a plasma focus discharge is monitored simultaneously with the 0 degrees emission. The particle energy spectrum is analyzed with a Thomson (parabola) spectrometer (time resolution ∼ 1 nanosec). The cross-sectional structure of the REB at 180 degrees along the discharge axis is monitored via the deposition of collective-field accelerated ions on a target in the REB direction. Etched tracks of ion and ion clusters are in all cases recorded on CR-39 plates. Sharp peaks of the D + -ion spectrum at 90 degrees are found for E > 200 keV/unit charge in all focused discharges. These peaks are due to ion crossing of the azimuthal magnetic field of the pinch region, in a predominant ion cluster structure

  9. Electron sheath collapse in an applied-B ion diode

    Grechikha, A.V.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of the electron sheath collapse in an applied-B ion diode due to the presence of the resistive anode plasma layer was found. This effect is more damaging at higher diode voltages and may be responsible for the parasitic load effect observed in the experiments. (author). 4 figs., 2 refs

  10. Synovial sarcoma mimicking benign peripheral nerve sheath tumor

    Larque, Ana B.; Nielsen, G.P.; Chebib, Ivan [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Pathology, Boston, MA (United States); Bredella, Miriam A. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-11-15

    To assess the radiographic and clinicopathologic features of synovial sarcoma of the nerve that were clinically or radiologically interpreted as benign peripheral nerve sheath tumor. Five patients with synovial sarcoma arising from the peripheral nerve and interpreted clinically and radiologically as peripheral nerve sheath tumors were identified. Clinicopathologic and imaging features were evaluated. There were three females and two males, ranging in age from 28 to 50 (mean 35.8) years. Most patients (4/5) complained of a mass, discomfort or pain. MR images demonstrated a heterogeneous, enhancing, soft tissue mass contiguous with the neurovascular bundle. On histologic examination, most tumors were monophasic synovial sarcoma (4/5). At the time of surgery, all tumors were noted to arise along or within a peripheral nerve. All patients were alive with no evidence of disease with median follow-up of 44 (range 32-237) months. For comparison, approximately 775 benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors of the extremities were identified during the same time period. Primary synovial sarcoma of the nerve can mimic peripheral nerve sheath tumors clinically and on imaging and should be included in the differential diagnosis for tumors arising from peripheral nerves. (orig.)

  11. Charge of a macroscopic particle in a plasma sheath

    Samarian, A.A.; Vladimirov, S.V.

    2003-01-01

    Charging of a macroscopic body levitating in a rf plasma sheath is studied experimentally and theoretically. The nonlinear charge vs size dependence is obtained. The observed nonlinearity is explained on the basis of an approach taking into account different plasma conditions for the levitation positions of different particles. The importance of suprathermal electrons' contribution to the charging process is demonstrated

  12. Mineralized fibroma of the tendon sheath presenting as a bursitis

    Le Corroller, Thomas; Champsaur, Pierre [Hopital Sainte-Marguerite, Service de Radiologie, Marseille (France); Faculte de Medecine de Marseille, Departement d' Anatomie, Marseille (France); Bouvier-Labit, Corinne [Hopital La Timone, Service d' Anatomopathologie, Marseille (France); Sbihi, Abderrahmane [Clinique Juge, Service de Chirurgie orthopedique, Marseille (France)

    2008-12-15

    We report on the clinical, imaging - including ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging - and histological features of a fibroma of the tendon sheath with mineralized chondroid and osseous metaplasia, presenting as a semimembranosus bursitis. The anatomical characteristics of the semimembranosus bursa are demonstrated by dissection in a cadaveric specimen and correlated with the imaging findings in our patient. (orig.)

  13. Mineralized fibroma of the tendon sheath presenting as a bursitis

    Le Corroller, Thomas; Champsaur, Pierre; Bouvier-Labit, Corinne; Sbihi, Abderrahmane

    2008-01-01

    We report on the clinical, imaging - including ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging - and histological features of a fibroma of the tendon sheath with mineralized chondroid and osseous metaplasia, presenting as a semimembranosus bursitis. The anatomical characteristics of the semimembranosus bursa are demonstrated by dissection in a cadaveric specimen and correlated with the imaging findings in our patient. (orig.)

  14. The Bohm criterion for a dusty plasma sheath

    undergo temperature fluctuations due to collision, the mean square fluctuation in their temperature is much less than the equilibrium temperature. The problem of sheath dynamics with the plasma–wall interactions is of great importance in a number of areas, viz., plasma ion implantation, high-density com- puter chip ...

  15. Spine Patterning Is Guided by Segmentation of the Notochord Sheath

    Wopat, Susan; Bagwell, Jennifer; Sumigray, Kaelyn D.; Dickson, Amy L.; Huitema, Leonie F.A.; Poss, Kenneth D.; Schulte-Merker, Stefan; Bagnat, Michel

    2018-01-01

    The spine is a segmented axial structure made of alternating vertebral bodies (centra) and intervertebral discs (IVDs) assembled around the notochord. Here, we show that, prior to centra formation, the outer epithelial cell layer of the zebrafish notochord, the sheath, segments into alternating

  16. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor: MRI and CT Findings

    K. O. Kragha

    2015-01-01

    important in its diagnosis. A rare case of MPNST that produced urinary retention and bowel incontinence is presented that may aid clinicians in the diagnosis of this rare clinical entity. Motor weakness, central enhancement, and immunohistochemistry may assist in the diagnosis of MPNST and differentiation between benign peripheral nerve sheath tumor (BPNST and MPNST.

  17. Electron sheath collapse in an applied-B ion diode

    Grechikha, A V [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany). Institut fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik

    1997-12-31

    The effect of the electron sheath collapse in an applied-B ion diode due to the presence of the resistive anode plasma layer was found. This effect is more damaging at higher diode voltages and may be responsible for the parasitic load effect observed in the experiments. (author). 4 figs., 2 refs.

  18. Internal pressure effects in the AIRCO-LCT conductor sheath

    Luton, J.N.; Clinard, J.A.; Lue, J.W.; Gray, W.H.; Summers, L.T.; Kershaw, R.

    1985-01-01

    The large Nb 3 Sn superconducting test coil produced by Westinghouse Electric Corporation for the international Large Coil Task (LCT) utilizes a conductor composed of cabled multifilamentary strands immersed in flowing supercritical helium contained by a square structural sheath made of the high-strength stainless alloy JBX-75. Peak pressures of a few hundred atmospheres are predicted to occur during quench, and measurement of these pressures seems feasible only through penetrations of the sheath wall. Fully processed short lengths of conductor were taken from production ends, fitted with pressure taps and strain gauges, and pressurized with helium gas. Failure, at 1000 atm at liquid nitrogen temperature, was by a catastrophic splitting of the sheath at a corner. Strain measurements and burst pressure agreed with elastic-plastic finite element stress calculations made for the sheath alone. Neither the production seam weld nor the pressure tap penetrations or their fillet welds contributed to the failure, although the finite element calculations show that these areas were also highly stressed, and examination of the failed sample showed that the finite welds were of poor quality. Failure was by tensile overload, with no evidence of fatigue

  19. Lagrangian descriptors in dissipative systems.

    Junginger, Andrej; Hernandez, Rigoberto

    2016-11-09

    The reaction dynamics of time-dependent systems can be resolved through a recrossing-free dividing surface associated with the transition state trajectory-that is, the unique trajectory which is bound to the barrier region for all time in response to a given time-dependent potential. A general procedure based on the minimization of Lagrangian descriptors has recently been developed by Craven and Hernandez [Phys. Rev. Lett., 2015, 115, 148301] to construct this particular trajectory without requiring perturbative expansions relative to the naive transition state point at the top of the barrier. The extension of the method to account for dissipation in the equations of motion requires additional considerations established in this paper because the calculation of the Lagrangian descriptor involves the integration of trajectories in forward and backward time. The two contributions are in general very different because the friction term can act as a source (in backward time) or sink (in forward time) of energy, leading to the possibility that information about the phase space structure may be lost due to the dominance of only one of the terms. To compensate for this effect, we introduce a weighting scheme within the Lagrangian descriptor and demonstrate that for thermal Langevin dynamics it preserves the essential phase space structures, while they are lost in the nonweighted case.

  20. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour of the bladder associated with neurofibromatosis I.

    O'Brien, Julie

    2008-12-01

    Neurofibromatosis is a hamartomatous disorder of autonomic peripheral nerve sheaths associated with peripheral nerve sheath tumours. Most tumours are neurofibromas; however, the genitourinary system is rarely involved. We present a rare case of a nerve sheath tumour of the bladder in a young patient, which was discovered to be malignant.

  1. 30 CFR 15.32 - Tolerances for weight of explosive, sheath, wrapper, and specific gravity.

    2010-07-01

    ..., wrapper, and specific gravity. 15.32 Section 15.32 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... explosive, sheath, wrapper, and specific gravity. (a) The weight of the explosive, the sheath, and the outer.... (c) The specific gravity of the explosive and sheath shall be within ±7.5 percent of that specified...

  2. File list: His.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 Histone Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  3. File list: ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 All antigens Neural Nerve Sheath Neopla...sms SRX337965 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 TFs and others Neural Nerve Sheath Neop...lasms SRX337965 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  5. File list: Pol.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 RNA polymerase Neural Nerve Sheath Neop...lasms http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  6. File list: Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 TFs and others Neural Nerve Sheath Neop...lasms SRX337965 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  7. File list: Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 RNA polymerase Neural Nerve Sheath Neop...lasms http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 Histone Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  9. File list: Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 TFs and others Neural Nerve Sheath Neop...lasms SRX337965 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  10. File list: DNS.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 DNase-seq Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  11. File list: Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 Unclassified Neural Nerve Sheath Neopla...sms http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  12. File list: DNS.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 DNase-seq Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  13. File list: ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 All antigens Neural Nerve Sheath Neopla...sms SRX337965 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  14. File list: Pol.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 RNA polymerase Neural Nerve Sheath Neop...lasms http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  15. File list: Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 Unclassified Neural Nerve Sheath Neopla...sms http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  16. File list: DNS.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 DNase-seq Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  17. File list: DNS.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 DNase-seq Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 Histone Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  19. File list: Oth.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 TFs and others Neural Nerve Sheath Neop...lasms SRX337965 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  20. File list: ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 All antigens Neural Nerve Sheath Neopla...sms SRX337965 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  1. File list: Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 Unclassified Neural Nerve Sheath Neopla...sms http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  2. File list: His.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 Histone Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  3. File list: Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 RNA polymerase Neural Nerve Sheath Neop...lasms http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  4. File list: ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 All antigens Neural Nerve Sheath Neopla...sms SRX337965 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  5. Electrical Characteristics, Electrode Sheath and Contamination Layer Behavior of a Meso-Scale Premixed Methane-Air Flame Under AC/DC Electric Fields

    Chen, Qi; Yan, Limin; Zhang, Hao; Li, Guoxiu

    2016-05-01

    Electrical characteristics of a nozzle-attached meso-scale premixed methane-air flame under low-frequency AC (0-4300 V, 0-500 Hz) and DC (0-3300 V) electric fields were studied. I-V curves were measured under different experimental conditions to estimate the magnitude of the total current 100-102 μA, the electron density 1015-1016 m-3 and further the power dissipation ≤ 0.7 W in the reaction zone. At the same time, the meso-scale premixed flame conductivity 10-4-10-3 Ω-1·m-1 as a function of voltage and frequency was experimentally obtained and was believed to represent a useful order-of magnitude estimate. Moreover, the influence of the collision sheath relating to Debye length (31-98 μm) and the contamination layer of an active electrode on measurements was discussed, based on the combination of simulation and theoretical analysis. As a result, the electrode sheath dimension was evaluated to less than 0.5 mm, which indicated a complex effect of the collision sheath on the current measurements. The surface contamination effect of an active electrode was further analyzed using the SEM imaging method, which showed elements immigration during the contamination layer formation process. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51376021), and the Fundamental Research Fund for Major Universities (No. 2013JBM079)

  6. Final Report. Evaluating the Climate Sensitivity of Dissipative Subgrid-Scale Mixing Processes and Variable Resolution in NCAR's Community Earth System Model

    Jablonowski, Christiane [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-12-14

    The goals of this project were to (1) assess and quantify the sensitivity and scale-dependency of unresolved subgrid-scale mixing processes in NCAR’s Community Earth System Model (CESM), and (2) to improve the accuracy and skill of forthcoming CESM configurations on modern cubed-sphere and variable-resolution computational grids. The research thereby contributed to the description and quantification of uncertainties in CESM’s dynamical cores and their physics-dynamics interactions.

  7. Ion trapping within the dust grain plasma sheath

    Jovanovic, D.; Shukla, P.K.

    2002-01-01

    One of the most important and still unresolved problems in the physics of dusty plasmas is the determination of the dust charge. The grains are not directly accessible to measurements and it is necessary to have a reliable theoretical model of the electron and ion dynamics inside the Debye sphere for the interpretation of the relevant experimental data, which include also the effects of the surrounding electron and ion clouds. Recent computer simulations [6] and laboratory experiments [9] indicate that the plasma sheath is dominated by trapped ions, orbiting the grain on closed trajectories at distances smaller than the Debye radius, that cannot be accounted for by the classical theories. We present the first analytical, fully self-consistent, calculations of the electrostatic shielding of a charged dust grain in a collisional plasma. In the regime when the mean free path for the ion-dust collisions is larger than that for the ion-neutral collisions, we solve the kinetic equation for the ions, coupled with Boltzmann distributed electrons and Poisson's equation. The ion velocity distribution function, in the form of a spherically symmetric ion hole, is found to be anisotropic in the presence of charge-exchange collisions. The number of trapped ions and their spatial distribution are determined from the interplay between the collective plasma interaction and the collisional trapping/de-trapping. The stationary state results from the self-tuning of the trapped ion density by the feedback based on the nonlocality of the collisional integral, and on the ion mixing in the radial direction along elongated orbits. Our results confirm the existence of a strong Debye shielding of the dust charge, allowing also the over-population of the trapped ion distribution (ion hump)

  8. Observations of turbulent energy dissipation rate in the upper ocean of the central South China Sea

    Chen, G.

    2016-02-01

    Measurements of turbulent energy dissipation rate, velocity, temperature, and salinity were obtained in the upper ocean of the central South China Sea (14.5˚N, 117.0˚E) during an experimental campaign from May 11th to 13th 2010. Dissipation rate was elevated ( 10-7 Wkg-1) at night by convection mixing and was weakened ( 10-9 Wkg-1) in daytime due to the warming stratification. Thermocline dissipation rate varied with time ( 10-9 Wkg-1 to 10-8 Wkg-1) under the influence of internal waves. Energy was transferred from the diurnal internal tides to high frequency internal waves through nonlinear wave-wave interactions. This energy cascade process was accompanied by elevated shear and enhanced dissipation, which played an important role in the turbulent mixing in thermocline. Compare with the thermocline dissipation, dissipation below the thermocline was more stable and weak ( 10-10 Wkg-1). The observed dissipation rate during the measurement was well parameterized by the MacKinnon-Gregg parameterization (a model based on a reinterpretation of wave-wave interaction theory), whereas the Gregg-Henyey parameterization was not in good agreement with the observed dissipation rate.

  9. Development of a low Reynolds number turbulence stress and heat flux equation model. A new type wall boundary condition for dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy aided by DNS data base

    Nishimura, M.

    1998-04-01

    To predict thermal-hydraulic phenomena in actual plant under various conditions accurately, adequate simulation of laminar-turbulent flow transition is of importance. A low Reynolds number turbulence model is commonly used for a numerical simulation of the laminar-turbulent transition. The existing low Reynolds number turbulence models generally demands very thin mesh width between a wall and a first computational node from the wall, to keep accuracy and stability of numerical analyses. There is a criterion for the distance between the wall and the first computational node in which non-dimensional distance y + must be less than 0.5. Due to this criterion the suitable distance depends on Reynolds number. A liquid metal sodium is used for a coolant in first reactors therefore, Reynolds number is usually one or two order higher than that of the usual plants in which air and water are used for the work fluid. This makes the load of thermal-hydraulic numerical simulation of the liquid sodium relatively heavier. From above context, a new method is proposed for providing wall boundary condition of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate ε. The present method enables the wall-first node distance 10 times larger compared to the existing models. A function of the ε wall boundary condition has been constructed aided by a direct numerical simulation (DNS) data base. The method was validated through calculations of a turbulent Couette flow and a fully developed pipe flow and its laminar-turbulent transition. Thus the present method and modeling are capable of predicting the laminar-turbulent transition with less mesh numbers i.e. lighter computational loads. (J.P.N.)

  10. Fourier analysis of nonself-averaging quasiperiodic oscillations in the excitation functions of dissipative heavy-ion collisions: quantum chaos in dissipative heavy-ion collisions?

    Kun, S.Yu.; Australian Nat. Univ., Canberra; Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT

    1997-01-01

    We employ stochastic modelling of statistical reactions with memory to study quasiperiodic oscillations in the excitation functions of dissipative heavy-ion collisions. The Fourier analysis of excitation function oscillations is presented. It suggests that S-matrix spin and parity decoherence, damping of the coherent nuclear rotation and quantum chaos are sufficient conditions to explain the nonself-averaging of quasiperiodic oscillations in the excitation functions of dissipative heavy-ion collisions. (orig.)

  11. Theoretical analysis, infrared and structural investigations of energy dissipation in metals under cyclic loading

    Plekhov, O.A.; Saintier, N.; Palin-Luc, T.; Uvarov, S.V.; Naimark, O.B.

    2007-01-01

    The infrared and structural investigations of energy dissipation processes in metals subjected to cyclic loading have given impetus to the development of a new thermodynamic model with the capability of describing the energy balance under plastic deformation. The model is based on the statistical description of the mesodefect ensemble evolution and its influence on the dissipation ability of the material. Constitutive equations have been formulated for plastic and structural strains, which allow us to describe the stored and dissipated parts of energy under plastic flow. Numerical results indicate that theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the experimentally observed temperature data

  12. Energy dissipation of Alfven wave packets deformed by irregular magnetic fields in solar-coronal arches

    Similon, Philippe L.; Sudan, R. N.

    1989-01-01

    The importance of field line geometry for shear Alfven wave dissipation in coronal arches is demonstrated. An eikonal formulation makes it possible to account for the complicated magnetic geometry typical in coronal loops. An interpretation of Alfven wave resonance is given in terms of gradient steepening, and dissipation efficiencies are studied for two configurations: the well-known slab model with a straight magnetic field, and a new model with stochastic field lines. It is shown that a large fraction of the Alfven wave energy flux can be effectively dissipated in the corona.

  13. Dissipation, dephasing and quantum Darwinism in qubit systems with random unitary interactions

    Balaneskovic, Nenad; Mendler, Marc

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the influence of dissipation and decoherence on quantum Darwinism by generalizing Zurek's original qubit model of decoherence and the establishment of pointer states [W.H. Zurek, Nat. Phys. 5, 181 (2009); see also arXiv: quant-ph/0707.2832v1, pp. 14-19.]. Our model allows for repeated multiple qubit-qubit couplings between system and environment which are described by randomly applied two-qubit quantum operations inducing entanglement, dissipation and dephasing. The resulting stationary qubit states of system and environment are investigated. They exhibit the intricate influence of entanglement generation, dissipation and dephasing on this characteristic quantum phenomenon.

  14. Fractional Stochastic Differential Equations Satisfying Fluctuation-Dissipation Theorem

    Li, Lei; Liu, Jian-Guo; Lu, Jianfeng

    2017-10-01

    We propose in this work a fractional stochastic differential equation (FSDE) model consistent with the over-damped limit of the generalized Langevin equation model. As a result of the `fluctuation-dissipation theorem', the differential equations driven by fractional Brownian noise to model memory effects should be paired with Caputo derivatives, and this FSDE model should be understood in an integral form. We establish the existence of strong solutions for such equations and discuss the ergodicity and convergence to Gibbs measure. In the linear forcing regime, we show rigorously the algebraic convergence to Gibbs measure when the `fluctuation-dissipation theorem' is satisfied, and this verifies that satisfying `fluctuation-dissipation theorem' indeed leads to the correct physical behavior. We further discuss possible approaches to analyze the ergodicity and convergence to Gibbs measure in the nonlinear forcing regime, while leave the rigorous analysis for future works. The FSDE model proposed is suitable for systems in contact with heat bath with power-law kernel and subdiffusion behaviors.

  15. Dissipative structures and biological rhythms

    Goldbeter, Albert

    2017-10-01

    Sustained oscillations abound in biological systems. They occur at all levels of biological organization over a wide range of periods, from a fraction of a second to years, and with a variety of underlying mechanisms. They control major physiological functions, and their dysfunction is associated with a variety of physiological disorders. The goal of this review is (i) to give an overview of the main rhythms observed at the cellular and supracellular levels, (ii) to briefly describe how the study of biological rhythms unfolded in the course of time, in parallel with studies on chemical oscillations, (iii) to present the major roles of biological rhythms in the control of physiological functions, and (iv) the pathologies associated with the alteration, disappearance, or spurious occurrence of biological rhythms. Two tables present the main examples of cellular and supracellular rhythms ordered according to their period, and their role in physiology and pathophysiology. Among the rhythms discussed are neural and cardiac rhythms, metabolic oscillations such as those occurring in glycolysis in yeast, intracellular Ca++ oscillations, cyclic AMP oscillations in Dictyostelium amoebae, the segmentation clock that controls somitogenesis, pulsatile hormone secretion, circadian rhythms which occur in all eukaryotes and some bacteria with a period close to 24 h, the oscillatory dynamics of the enzymatic network driving the cell cycle, and oscillations in transcription factors such as NF-ΚB and tumor suppressors such as p53. Ilya Prigogine's concept of dissipative structures applies to temporal oscillations and allows us to unify within a common framework the various rhythms observed at different levels of biological organization, regardless of their period and underlying mechanism.

  16. Floating potential and sheath thickness for cylindrical and spherical probes in electronegative plasmas

    Morales Crespo, R.; Fernandez Palop, J.I.; Hernandez, M.A.; Borrego del Pino, S.; Diaz-Cabrera, J.M.; Ballesteros, J.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the floating potential, for cylindrical and spherical Langmuir probes immersed into an electronegative plasma, is determined by using a radial model described in a previous paper. This floating potential is determined for several probe radius values and ranks of plasma electronegativity, from almost electropositive plasmas to high electronegative plasmas. The thickness of the positive ion sheath is also determined for this kind of probes in electronegative plasmas, as well as the analytical expressions fitting this thickness, showing its dependence on the probe radius and electric potential

  17. Fast, kinetically self-consistent simulation of RF modulated plasma boundary sheaths

    Shihab, Mohammed; Ziegler, Dennis; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter

    2012-01-01

    A mathematical model is presented which enables the efficient, kinetically self-consistent simulation of RF modulated plasma boundary sheaths in all technically relevant discharge regimes. It is defined on a one-dimensional geometry where a Cartesian x-axis points from the electrode or wall at x E ≡ 0 towards the plasma bulk. An arbitrary endpoint x B is chosen ‘deep in the bulk’. The model consists of a set of kinetic equations for the ions, Boltzmann's relation for the electrons and Poisson's equation for the electrical field. Boundary conditions specify the ion flux at x B and a periodically—not necessarily harmonically—modulated sheath voltage V(t) or sheath charge Q(t). The equations are solved in a statistical sense. However, it is not the well-known particle-in-cell (PIC) scheme that is employed, but an alternative iterative algorithm termed ensemble-in-spacetime (EST). The basis of the scheme is a discretization of the spacetime, the product of the domain [x E , x B ] and the RF period [0, T]. Three modules are called in a sequence. A Monte Carlo module calculates the trajectories of a large set of ions from their start at x B until they reach the electrode at x E , utilizing the potential values on the nodes of the spatio-temporal grid. A harmonic analysis module reconstructs the Fourier modes n im (x) of the ion density n i (x, t) from the calculated trajectories. A field module finally solves the Boltzmann-Poisson equation with the calculated ion densities to generate an updated set of potential values for the spatio-temporal grid. The iteration is started with the potential values of a self-consistent fluid model and terminates when the updates become sufficiently small, i.e. when self-consistency is achieved. A subsequent post-processing determines important quantities, in particular the phase-resolved and phase-averaged values of the ion energy and angular distributions and the total energy flux at the electrode. A drastic reduction of the

  18. Interaction of Soybean 7S Globulin Peptide with Cell Membrane Model via Isothermal Titration Calorimetry, Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation, and Langmuir Monolayer Study.

    Zou, Yuan; Pan, Runting; Ruan, Qijun; Wan, Zhili; Guo, Jian; Yang, Xiaoquan

    2018-05-16

    To understand the underlying molecular mechanism of the cholesterol-lowering effect of soybean 7S globulins, the interactions of their pepsin-released peptides (7S-peptides) with cell membrane models consisting of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC), and cholesterol (CHOL) were systematically studied. The results showed that 7S-peptides were bound to DPPC/DOPC/CHOL liposomes mainly through van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonds, and the presence of higher CHOL concentrations enhanced the binding affinity (e.g., DPPC/DOPC/CHOL = 1:1:0, binding ratio = 0.114; DPPC/DOPC/CHOL = 1:1:1, binding ratio = 2.02). Compression isotherms indicated that the incorporation of 7S-peptides increased the DPPC/DOPC/CHOL monolayer fluidity and the lipid raft size. The presence of CHOL accelerated the 7S-peptide accumulation on lipid rafts, which could serve as platforms for peptides to develop into β-sheet rich structures. These results allow us to hypothesize that 7S-peptides may indirectly influence membrane protein functions via altering the membrane organization in the enterocytes.

  19. Dissipation and oscillatory solvation forces in confined liquids studied by small amplitude atomic force spectroscopy

    de Beer, Sissi; van den Ende, Henricus T.M.; Mugele, Friedrich

    2010-01-01

    We determine conservative and dissipative tip–sample interaction forces from the amplitude and phase response of acoustically driven atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers using a non-polar model fluid (octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane, which displays strong molecular layering) and atomically flat

  20. Low moduli elastomers with low viscous dissipation

    Bejenariu, Anca Gabriela; Yu, Liyun; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2012-01-01

    A controlled reaction schema for addition curing silicones leads to both significantly lower elastic modulus and lower viscous dissipation than for the chemically identical network prepared by the traditional reaction schema....