WorldWideScience

Sample records for shear thinning effects

  1. Onset of shear thinning in glassy liquids: Shear-induced small reduction of effective density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Akira

    2017-01-01

    We propose a simple mechanism for describing the onset of shear thinning in a high-density glassy liquid. In a shear flow, along the compression axis, the overlap between neighboring particles is more enhanced than that at equilibrium, meaning that the "effective" size is reduced along this axis. On the other hand, along the extension axis perpendicular to the compression axis, the average structural configurations are stretched, but it does not indicate the expansion of the "effective" size itself. This asymmetric shear flow effect for particles results in a small reduction of the "effective" density. Because, in glass-forming liquids, the structural relaxation time τ_{α} strongly depends on the density ρ, even a very small reduction of the effective density should lead to a significant decrease of the relaxation time under shear flow. We predict that the crossover shear rate from Newtonian to non-Newtonian flow behaviors is given by γ[over ̇]_{c}=[ρ(∂τ_{α}/∂ρ)]^{-1}, which can be much smaller than 1/τ_{α} near the glass transition point. It is shown that this prediction is consistent with the results of molecular dynamics simulations.

  2. Designing shear-thinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Arif Z.; Ewoldt, Randy H.

    2017-11-01

    Design in fluid mechanics often focuses on optimizing geometry (airfoils, surface textures, microfluid channels), but here we focus on designing fluids themselves. The dramatically shear-thinning ``yield-stress fluid'' is currently the most utilized non-Newtonian fluid phenomenon. These rheologically complex materials, which undergo a reversible transition from solid-like to liquid-like fluid flow, are utilized in pedestrian products such as paint and toothpaste, but also in emerging applications like direct-write 3D printing. We present a paradigm for yield-stress fluid design that considers constitutive model representation, material property databases, available predictive scaling laws, and the many ways to achieve a yield stress fluid, flipping the typical structure-to-rheology analysis to become the inverse: rheology-to-structure with multiple possible materials as solutions. We describe case studies of 3D printing inks and other flow scenarios where designed shear-thinning enables performance remarkably beyond that of Newtonian fluids. This work was supported by Wm. Wrigley Jr. Company and the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CMMI-1463203.

  3. Aspiration of human neutrophils: effects of shear thinning and cortical dissipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, J L; Dembo, M

    2001-12-01

    It is generally accepted that the human neutrophil can be mechanically represented as a droplet of polymeric fluid enclosed by some sort of thin slippery viscoelastic cortex. Many questions remain however about the detailed rheology and chemistry of the interior fluid and the cortex. To address these quantitative issues, we have used a finite element method to simulate the dynamics of neutrophils during micropipet aspiration using various plausible assumptions. The results were then systematically compared with aspiration experiments conducted at eight different combinations of pipet size and pressure. Models in which the cytoplasm was represented by a simple Newtonian fluid (i.e., models without shear thinning) were grossly incapable of accounting for the effects of pressure on the general time scale of neutrophil aspiration. Likewise, models in which the cortex was purely elastic (i.e., models without surface viscosity) were unable to explain the effects of pipet size on the general aspiration rate. Such models also failed to explain the rapid acceleration of the aspiration rate during the final phase of aspiration nor could they account for the geometry of the neutrophil during various phases of aspiration. Thus, our results indicate that a minimal mechanical model of the neutrophil needs to incorporate both shear thinning and surface viscosity to remain valid over a reasonable range of conditions. At low shear rates, the surface dilatation viscosity of the neutrophil was found to be on the order of 100 poise-cm, whereas the viscosity of the interior cytoplasm was on the order of 1000 poise. Both the surface viscosity and the interior viscosity seem to decrease in a similar fashion when the shear rate exceeds approximately 0.05 s(-1). Unfortunately, even models with both surface viscosity and shear thinning studied are still not sufficient to fully explain all the features of neutrophil aspiration. In particular, the very high rate of aspiration during the

  4. Effect of shear-thinning behaviour on liquid-liquid plug flow in microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roumpea, Evangelia; Chinaud, Maxime; Weheliye, Weheliye Hashi; Angeli, Panagiota; Kahouadji, Lyes; Matar, Omar K.

    2016-11-01

    The present work investigates the dynamics of plug formation of shear-thinning solutions in a 200 μm microchannel using a two-colour micro-PIV system. Measurements, including phase-averaged velocity fields, have been conducted both at the T-junction inlet and the main channel to enhance understanding of non-Newtonian liquid-liquid flows. Two aqueous glycerol solutions containing xanthan gum are used as the non-Newtonian fluids while 5 cSt silicone oil is the Newtonian phase. The current experimental results revealed a pronounced impact of the xanthan gum (shear-thinning behaviour) on the flow pattern transition boundaries, and enhance the fluid flowrates where plug flow occurred. The addition of polymer resulted also in different hydrodynamic characteristics such as a bullet-shaped plug and an increased film thickness between the plug and the wall. In the present work, the technique allows to capture the velocity field of both phases simultaneously. Experimental results are compared with the numerical simulations provided by the code BLUE. Project funded under the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) Programme Grant MEMPHIS.

  5. Shear thinning behaviors in magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetere, F. P.; Cassetta, M.; Perugini, D.

    2017-12-01

    Studies on magma rheology are of fundamental importance to understanding magmatic processes from depth to surface. Since viscosity is one of the most important parameter controlling eruption mechanisms, as well as lava flow emplacement, a comprehensive knowledge on the evolution of magma viscosities during crystallization is required. We present new viscosity data on partly crystalized basalt, andesite and analogue lavas comparable to those erupted on Mercury's northern volcanic plains. High-temperature viscosity measurements were performed using a rotational Anton Paar RheolabQC viscometer head at the PVRG labs, in Perugia (Italy) (http://pvrg.unipg.it). The relative proportion of phases in each experimental run were determined by image analysis on BS-SEM images at different magnifications; phases are glasses, clinopyroxene, spinel, plagioclase for the basalt, plagioclase and spinel for the andesite and pure enstatite and clinopyroxenes, for the analogue Mercury's composition. Glass and crystalline fractions determined by image analysis well correlate with compositions of residual melts. In order to constrain the viscosity (η) variations as a function of crystallinity, shear rate (γ) was varied from 0.1 to 5 s-1. Viscosity vs. time at constant temperature shows a typical S-shape curve. In particular, for basaltic composition η vary from 3.1-3.8 Pa s [log η] at 1493 K and crystallinity of 19 area % as γ vary from 1.0 to 0.1 s-1; the andesite viscosity evolution is 3.2 and 3.7 Pa s [log η] as γ varies from 1 to 0.1 at 1493 K and crystal content of 17 area %; finally, Mercury's analogue composition was investigated at different temperature ranging from 1533 to 1502 K (Vetere et al., 2017). Results, for γ = 0.1, 1.0 and 5.0 s-1, show viscosity variation between 2.7-4.0, 2.5-3.4 and 2.0-3.0 [log η inPa s] respectively while crystallinity vary from 9 to 27 (area %). As viscosity decreases as shear rate increases, these data points to a shear thinning behaviour

  6. Thermal convection of viscoelastic shear-thinning fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albaalbaki, Bashar; Khayat, Roger E; Ahmed, Zahir U

    2016-01-01

    The Rayleigh–Bénard convection for non-Newtonian fluids possessing both viscoelastic and shear-thinning behaviours is examined. The Phan-Thien–Tanner (PTT) constitutive equation is implemented to model the non-Newtonian character of the fluid. It is found that while the shear-thinning and viscoelastic effects could annihilate one another for the steady roll flow, presence of both behaviours restricts the roll stability limit significantly compared to the cases when the fluid is either inelastic shear-thinning or purely viscoelastic with constant viscosity. (paper)

  7. End Effects in Rotational Viscometry I. No-Slip Shear-Thinning Samples in the Z40 DIN Sensor.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wein, Ondřej; Večeř, Marek; Havlica, Jaromír

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 46, 5 (2007) , s. 765-772 ISSN 0035-4511. [Annual Rheology Conference AERC 2006 /3./. Crete, 27.04.2006-29.04.2006] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA104/04/0826; GA ČR GP104/06/P287; GA ČR GP104/05/P554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : rotational couette flow * shear-thinning fluids * end effects Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.110, year: 2007

  8. Shear Resistance Variations in Experimentally Sheared Mudstone Granules: A Possible Shear-Thinning and Thixotropic Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei; Xu, Qiang; Wang, Gonghui; Scaringi, Gianvito; Mcsaveney, Mauri; Hicher, Pierre-Yves

    2017-11-01

    We present results of ring shear frictional resistance for mudstone granules of different size obtained from a landslide shear zone. Little rate dependency of shear resistance was observed in sand-sized granules in any wet or dry test, while saturated gravel-sized granules exhibited significant and abrupt reversible rate-weakening (from μ = 0.6 to 0.05) at about 2 mm/s. Repeating resistance variations occurred also under constant shear displacement rate. Mudstone granules generate mud as they are crushed and softened. Shear-thinning and thixotropic behavior of the mud can explain the observed behavior: with the viscosity decreasing, the mud can flow through the coarser soil pores and migrate out from the shear zone. This brings new granules into contact which produces new mud. Thus, the process can start over. Similarities between experimental shear zones and those of some landslides in mudstone suggest that the observed behavior may play a role in some landslide kinematics.

  9. Shear thinning and shear thickening of a confined suspension of vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nait Ouhra, A.; Farutin, A.; Aouane, O.; Ez-Zahraouy, H.; Benyoussef, A.; Misbah, C.

    2018-01-01

    Widely regarded as an interesting model system for studying flow properties of blood, vesicles are closed membranes of phospholipids that mimic the cytoplasmic membranes of red blood cells. In this study we analyze the rheology of a suspension of vesicles in a confined geometry: the suspension, bound by two planar rigid walls on each side, is subject to a shear flow. Flow properties are then analyzed as a function of shear rate γ ˙, the concentration of the suspension ϕ , and the viscosity contrast λ =ηin/ηout , where ηin and ηout are the fluid viscosities of the inner and outer fluids, respectively. We find that the apparent (or effective viscosity) of the suspension exhibits both shear thinning (decreasing viscosity with shear rate) or shear thickening (increasing viscosity with shear rate) in the same concentration range. The shear thinning or thickening behaviors appear as subtle phenomena, dependant on viscosity contrast λ . We provide physical arguments on the origins of these behaviors.

  10. Swimming efficiency in a shear-thinning fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nganguia, Herve; Pietrzyk, Kyle; Pak, On Shun

    2017-12-01

    Micro-organisms expend energy moving through complex media. While propulsion speed is an important property of locomotion, efficiency is another factor that may determine the swimming gait adopted by a micro-organism in order to locomote in an energetically favorable manner. The efficiency of swimming in a Newtonian fluid is well characterized for different biological and artificial swimmers. However, these swimmers often encounter biological fluids displaying shear-thinning viscosities. Little is known about how this nonlinear rheology influences the efficiency of locomotion. Does the shear-thinning rheology render swimming more efficient or less? How does the swimming efficiency depend on the propulsion mechanism of a swimmer and rheological properties of the surrounding shear-thinning fluid? In this work, we address these fundamental questions on the efficiency of locomotion in a shear-thinning fluid by considering the squirmer model as a general locomotion model to represent different types of swimmers. Our analysis reveals how the choice of surface velocity distribution on a squirmer may reduce or enhance the swimming efficiency. We determine optimal shear rates at which the swimming efficiency can be substantially enhanced compared with the Newtonian case. The nontrivial variations of swimming efficiency prompt questions on how micro-organisms may tune their swimming gaits to exploit the shear-thinning rheology. The findings also provide insights into how artificial swimmers should be designed to move through complex media efficiently.

  11. The effect of dry shear aligning of nanotube thin films on the photovoltaic performance of carbon nanotube-silicon solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, Benedikt W; Tune, Daniel D; Flavel, Benjamin S

    2016-01-01

    Recent results in the field of carbon nanotube-silicon solar cells have suggested that the best performance is obtained when the nanotube film provides good coverage of the silicon surface and when the nanotubes in the film are aligned parallel to the surface. The recently developed process of dry shear aligning - in which shear force is applied to the surface of carbon nanotube thin films in the dry state, has been shown to yield nanotube films that are very flat and in which the surface nanotubes are very well aligned in the direction of shear. It is thus reasonable to expect that nanotube films subjected to dry shear aligning should outperform otherwise identical films formed by other processes. In this work, the fabrication and characterisation of carbon nanotube-silicon solar cells using such films is reported, and the photovoltaic performance of devices produced with and without dry shear aligning is compared.

  12. Effect of Carreau-Yasuda rheological parameters on subcritical Lapwood convection in horizontal porous cavity saturated by shear-thinning fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khechiba, Khaled; Mamou, Mahmoud; Hachemi, Madjid; Delenda, Nassim; Rebhi, Redha

    2017-06-01

    The present study is focused on Lapwood convection in isotropic porous media saturated with non-Newtonian shear thinning fluid. The non-Newtonian rheological behavior of the fluid is modeled using the general viscosity model of Carreau-Yasuda. The convection configuration consists of a shallow porous cavity with a finite aspect ratio and subject to a vertical constant heat flux, whereas the vertical walls are maintained impermeable and adiabatic. An approximate analytical solution is developed on the basis of the parallel flow assumption, and numerical solutions are obtained by solving the full governing equations. The Darcy model with the Boussinesq approximation and energy transport equations are solved numerically using a finite difference method. The results are obtained in terms of the Nusselt number and the flow fields as functions of the governing parameters. A good agreement is obtained between the analytical approximation and the numerical solution of the full governing equations. The effects of the rheological parameters of the Carreau-Yasuda fluid and Rayleigh number on the onset of subcritical convection thresholds are demonstrated. Regardless of the aspect ratio of the enclosure and thermal boundary condition type, the subcritical convective flows are seen to occur below the onset of stationary convection. Correlations are proposed to estimate the subcritical Rayleigh number for the onset of finite amplitude convection as a function of the fluid rheological parameters. Linear stability of the convective motion, predicted by the parallel flow approximation, is studied, and the onset of Hopf bifurcation, from steady convective flow to oscillatory behavior, is found to depend strongly on the rheological parameters. In general, Hopf bifurcation is triggered earlier as the fluid becomes more and more shear-thinning.

  13. Injectable shear-thinning nanoengineered hydrogels for stem cell delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thakur, Ashish; Jaiswal, Manish K.; Peak, Charles W.

    2016-01-01

    -thinning characteristics, and enhanced mechanical stiffness, elastomeric properties, and physiological stability. The shear-thinning characteristics of nanocomposite hydrogels are investigated for human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) delivery. The hMSCs showed high cell viability after injection and encapsulated cells......Injectable hydrogels are investigated for cell encapsulation and delivery as they can shield cells from high shear forces. One of the approaches to obtain injectable hydrogels is to reinforce polymeric networks with high aspect ratio nanoparticles such as two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials. 2D...... showed a circular morphology. The proposed shear-thinning nanoengineered hydrogels can be used for cell delivery for cartilage tissue regeneration and 3D bioprinting....

  14. Theoretical study of the flow in a fluid damper containing high viscosity silicone oil: Effects of shear-thinning and viscoelasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrakos, Alexandros; Dimakopoulos, Yannis; Tsamopoulos, John

    2018-03-01

    The flow inside a fluid damper where a piston reciprocates sinusoidally inside an outer casing containing high-viscosity silicone oil is simulated using a finite volume method, at various excitation frequencies. The oil is modeled by the Carreau-Yasuda (CY) and Phan-Thien and Tanner (PTT) constitutive equations. Both models account for shear-thinning, but only the PTT model accounts for elasticity. The CY and other generalised Newtonian models have been previously used in theoretical studies of fluid dampers, but the present study is the first to perform full two-dimensional (axisymmetric) simulations employing a viscoelastic constitutive equation. It is found that the CY and PTT predictions are similar when the excitation frequency is low, but at medium and higher frequencies, the CY model fails to describe important phenomena that are predicted by the PTT model and observed in experimental studies found in the literature, such as the hysteresis of the force-displacement and force-velocity loops. Elastic effects are quantified by applying a decomposition of the damper force into elastic and viscous components, inspired from large amplitude oscillatory shear theory. The CY model also overestimates the damper force relative to the PTT model because it underpredicts the flow development length inside the piston-cylinder gap. It is thus concluded that (a) fluid elasticity must be accounted for and (b) theoretical approaches that rely on the assumption of one-dimensional flow in the piston-cylinder gap are of limited accuracy, even if they account for fluid viscoelasticity. The consequences of using lower-viscosity silicone oil are also briefly examined.

  15. Size effects in shear interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    GARNIER, J

    2001-01-01

    In physical modelling (centrifuge tests, calibration chambers, laboratory tests), the size of the soil particles may not be negligible when compared to the dimensions of the models. Size effects may so disturb the response of the models and the experimental data obtained on these cannot be extended to true scale conditions. Different tests have been performed to study and quantify the size effects that may happen in shear interfaces between soils and structures : modified shear box tests, pul...

  16. Performance of a Polymer Flood with Shear-Thinning Fluid in Heterogeneous Layered Systems with Crossflow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Sang Lee

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of the potential of a polymer flood for mobility control requires an accurate model on the viscosities of displacement fluids involved in the process. Because most polymers used in EOR exhibit shear-thinning behavior, the effective viscosity of a polymer solution is a highly nonlinear function of shear rate. A reservoir simulator including the model for the shear-rate dependence of viscosity was used to investigate shear-thinning effects of polymer solution on the performance of the layered reservoir in a five-spot pattern operating under polymer flood followed by waterflood. The model can be used as a quantitative tool to evaluate the comparative studies of different polymer flooding scenarios with respect to shear-rate dependence of fluids’ viscosities. Results of cumulative oil recovery and water-oil ratio are presented for parameters of shear-rate dependencies, permeability heterogeneity, and crossflow. The results of this work have proven the importance of taking non-Newtonian behavior of polymer solution into account for the successful evaluation of polymer flood processes. Horizontal and vertical permeabilities of each layer are shown to impact the predicted performance substantially. In reservoirs with a severe permeability contrast between horizontal layers, decrease in oil recovery and sudden increase in WOR are obtained by the low sweep efficiency and early water breakthrough through highly permeable layer, especially for shear-thinning fluids. An increase in the degree of crossflow resulting from sufficient vertical permeability is responsible for the enhanced sweep of the low permeability layers, which results in increased oil recovery. It was observed that a thinning fluid coefficient would increase injectivity significantly from simulations with various injection rates. A thorough understanding of polymer rheology in the reservoir and accurate numerical modeling are of fundamental importance for the exact estimation

  17. EMHD micro-pumping of a non-conducting shear-thinning fluid under EDL phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaikwad, Harshad; Borole, Chetan; Basu, Dipankar N.; Mondal, Pranab K.

    2016-01-01

    The Electro-Magneto-Hydrodynamic (EMHD) pumping of a binary fluid system constituted by one non-conducting shear-thinning fluid (top layer) by exploiting the transverse momentum exchange through the interfacial viscous shearing effect from a conducting Newtonian fluid layer (bottom layer) in a microfluidic channel is investigated. An externally applied electric field drives the conducting fluid layer under the influence of an applied magnetic field as well. The study reveals that the volume transport of shear-thinning fluid gets augmented for low magnetic field strength, higher electrical double layer (EDL) effect, low viscosity ratio and moderate potential ratio. It is also established that the volumetric flow rate reduces significantly for the higher magnetic field strength. (author)

  18. Instabilities of convection patterns in a shear-thinning fluid between plates of finite conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varé, Thomas; Nouar, Chérif; Métivier, Christel

    2017-10-01

    Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a horizontal layer of a non-Newtonian fluid between slabs of arbitrary thickness and finite thermal conductivity is considered. The first part of the paper deals with the primary bifurcation and the relative stability of convective patterns at threshold. Weakly nonlinear analysis combined with Stuart-Landau equation is used. The competition between squares and rolls, as a function of the shear-thinning degree of the fluid, the slabs' thickness, and the ratio of the thermal conductivity of the slabs to that of the fluid is investigated. Computations of heat transfer coefficients are in agreement with the maximum heat transfer principle. The second part of the paper concerns the stability of the convective patterns toward spatial perturbations and the determination of the band width of the stable wave number in the neighborhood of the critical Rayleigh number. The approach used is based on the Ginzburg-Landau equations. The study of rolls stability shows that: (i) for low shear-thinning effects, the band of stable wave numbers is bounded by zigzag instability and cross-roll instability. Furthermore, the marginal cross-roll stability boundary enlarges with increasing shear-thinning properties; (ii) for high shear-thinning effects, Eckhaus instability becomes more dangerous than cross-roll instability. For square patterns, the wave number selection is always restricted by zigzag instability and by "rectangular Eckhaus" instability. In addition, the width of the stable wave number decreases with increasing shear-thinning effects. Numerical simulations of the planform evolution are also presented to illustrate the different instabilities considered in the paper.

  19. Bias of shear wave elasticity measurements in thin layer samples and a simple correction strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Jianqiang; Xu, Hao; Qiang, Bo; Giambini, Hugo; Kinnick, Randall; An, Kai-Nan; Chen, Shigao; Luo, Zongping

    2016-01-01

    Shear wave elastography (SWE) is an emerging technique for measuring biological tissue stiffness. However, the application of SWE in thin layer tissues is limited by bias due to the influence of geometry on measured shear wave speed. In this study, we investigated the bias of Young's modulus measured by SWE in thin layer gelatin-agar phantoms, and compared the result with finite element method and Lamb wave model simulation. The result indicated that the Young's modulus measured by SWE decreased continuously when the sample thickness decreased, and this effect was more significant for smaller thickness. We proposed a new empirical formula which can conveniently correct the bias without the need of using complicated mathematical modeling. In summary, we confirmed the nonlinear relation between thickness and Young's modulus measured by SWE in thin layer samples, and offered a simple and practical correction strategy which is convenient for clinicians to use.

  20. Droplet breakup driven by shear thinning solutions in a microfluidic T-junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarello, Enrico; Gupta, Anupam; Mistura, Giampaolo; Sbragaglia, Mauro; Pierno, Matteo

    2017-12-01

    Droplet-based microfluidics turned out to be an efficient and adjustable platform for digital analysis, encapsulation of cells, drug formulation, and polymerase chain reaction. Typically, for most biomedical applications, the handling of complex, non-Newtonian fluids is involved, e.g., synovial and salivary fluids, collagen, and gel scaffolds. In this study, we investigate the problem of droplet formation occurring in a microfluidic T-shaped junction, when the continuous phase is made of shear thinning liquids. At first, we review in detail the breakup process, providing extensive, side-by-side comparisons between Newtonian and non-Newtonian liquids over unexplored ranges of flow conditions and viscous responses. The non-Newtonian liquid carrying the droplets is made of Xanthan solutions, a stiff, rodlike polysaccharide displaying a marked shear thinning rheology. By defining an effective Capillary number, a simple yet effective methodology is used to account for the shear-dependent viscous response occurring at the breakup. The droplet size can be predicted over a wide range of flow conditions simply by knowing the rheology of the bulk continuous phase. Experimental results are complemented with numerical simulations of purely shear thinning fluids using lattice Boltzmann models. The good agreement between the experimental and numerical data confirm the validity of the proposed rescaling with the effective Capillary number.

  1. Numerical Investigation of the Performance of Kenics Static Mixers for the Agitation of Shear Thinning Fluids

    OpenAIRE

    A. Mahammedi; H. Ameur; A. Ariss

    2017-01-01

    The laminar flow of non-Newtonian fluids through a Kenics static mixer is investigated by using the CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) tool. The working fluids have a shear thinning behavior modeled by the Ostwald De Waele law. We focus on the effect of Reynolds number, fluid properties, twist angle and blade pitch on the flow characteristics and energy cost. The pressure drop information obtained from the simulations was compared to several experimental correlations and data available in the...

  2. Turbulent characteristics of shear-thinning fluids in recirculating flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, A.S. [Inst. Superior de Engenharia do Porto (Portugal). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica; Pinho, F.T. [Centro de Estudos de Fenomenos de Transporte, Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica e Gestao Industrial, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua dos Bragas, 4050-123 Porto (Portugal)

    2000-03-01

    A miniaturised fibre optic laser-Doppler anemometer was used to carry out a detailed hydrodynamic investigation of the flow downstream of a sudden expansion with 0.1-0.2% by weight shear-thinning aqueous solutions of xanthan gum. Upstream of the sudden expansion the pipe flow was fully-developed and the xanthan gum solutions exhibited drag reduction with corresponding lower radial and tangential normal Reynolds stresses, but higher axial Reynolds stress near the wall and a flatter axial mean velocity profile in comparison with Newtonian flow. The recirculation bubble length was reduced by more than 20% relative to the high Reynolds number Newtonian flow, and this was attributed to the occurrence further upstream of high turbulence for the non-Newtonian solutions, because of advection of turbulence and earlier high turbulence production in the shear layer. Comparisons with the measurements of Escudier and Smith (1999) with similar fluids emphasized the dominating role of inlet turbulence. The present was less anisotropic, and had lower maximum axial Reynolds stresses (by 16%) but higher radial turbulence (20%) than theirs. They reported considerably longer recirculating bubble lengths than we do for similar non-Newtonian fluids and Reynolds numbers. (orig.)

  3. Imaging the Microscopic Structure of Shear Thinning and Thickening Colloidal Suspensions

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, X.

    2011-09-01

    The viscosity of colloidal suspensions varies with shear rate, an important effect encountered in many natural and industrial processes. Although this non-Newtonian behavior is believed to arise from the arrangement of suspended particles and their mutual interactions, microscopic particle dynamics are difficult to measure. By combining fast confocal microscopy with simultaneous force measurements, we systematically investigate a suspension\\'s structure as it transitions through regimes of different flow signatures. Our measurements of the microscopic single-particle dynamics show that shear thinning results from the decreased relative contribution of entropic forces and that shear thickening arises from particle clustering induced by hydrodynamic lubrication forces. This combination of techniques illustrates an approach that complements current methods for determining the microscopic origins of non-Newtonian flow behavior in complex fluids.

  4. Shear thinning behavior of monolayer liquid lubricant films measured by fiber wobbling method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamamoto, Y; Itoh, S; Fukuzawa, K; Zhang, H

    2010-01-01

    It is essential to clarify mechanical properties of monolayer lubricant films coated on magnetic disks under shearing motion for designing future hard disk drives with ultra-low flying height. Many of previous researchers reported that strong shear rate dependence of viscoelasticity was one of the typical phenomena observed with molecularly thin liquid films. However, it has not been clarified whether or not perfluoropolyether (PFPE) lubricant films, which are used for the head-disk interface (HDI) lubrication, show shear thinning behavior under actual HDI conditions. In this study, we used the fiber wobbling method that can achieve both highly-sensitive shear force measurement and precise gap control and measured shear rate dependence of viscoelastic properties of monolayer PFPE films coated on the magnetic disk. Our experimental results showed that shear thinning does occur at high shear rate ranged from 10 2 to 10 6 s -1 .

  5. Extrusion Bioprinting of Shear-Thinning Gelatin Methacryloyl Bioinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wanjun; Heinrich, Marcel A; Zhou, Yixiao; Akpek, Ali; Hu, Ning; Liu, Xiao; Guan, Xiaofei; Zhong, Zhe; Jin, Xiangyu; Khademhosseini, Ali; Zhang, Yu Shrike

    2017-06-01

    Bioprinting is an emerging technique for the fabrication of 3D cell-laden constructs. However, the progress for generating a 3D complex physiological microenvironment has been hampered by a lack of advanced cell-responsive bioinks that enable bioprinting with high structural fidelity, particularly in the case of extrusion-based bioprinting. Herein, this paper reports a novel strategy to directly bioprint cell-laden gelatin methacryloyl (GelMA) constructs using bioinks of GelMA physical gels (GPGs) achieved through a simple cooling process. Attributed to their shear-thinning and self-healing properties, the GPG bioinks can retain the shape and form integral structures after deposition, allowing for subsequent UV crosslinking for permanent stabilization. This paper shows the structural fidelity by bioprinting various 3D structures that are typically challenging to fabricate using conventional bioinks under extrusion modes. Moreover, the use of the GPG bioinks enables direct bioprinting of highly porous and soft constructs at relatively low concentrations (down to 3%) of GelMA. It is also demonstrated that the bioprinted constructs not only permit cell survival but also enhance cell proliferation as well as spreading at lower concentrations of the GPG bioinks. It is believed that such a strategy of bioprinting will provide many opportunities in convenient fabrication of 3D cell-laden constructs for applications in tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and pharmaceutical screening. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Determining shear modulus of thin wood composite materials using a cantilever beam vibration method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng Guan; Houjiang Zhang; John F. Hunt; Haicheng Yan

    2016-01-01

    Shear modulus (G) of thin wood composite materials is one of several important indicators that characterizes mechanical properties. However, there is not an easy method to obtain this value. This study presents the use of a newly developed cantilever beam free vibration test apparatus to detect in-plane G of thin wood composite...

  7. Thin liquid films with time-dependent chemical reactions sheared by an ambient gas flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Achim; Stephan, Peter; Gambaryan-Roisman, Tatiana

    2017-08-01

    Chemical reactions in thin liquid films are found in many industrial applications, e.g., in combustion chambers of internal combustion engines where a fuel film can develop on pistons or cylinder walls. The reactions within the film and the turbulent outer gas flow influence film stability and lead to film breakup, which in turn can lead to deposit formation. In this work we examine the evolution and stability of a thin liquid film in the presence of a first-order chemical reaction and under the influence of a turbulent gas flow. Long-wave theory with a double perturbation analysis is used to reduce the complexity of the problem and obtain an evolution equation for the film thickness. The chemical reaction is assumed to be slow compared to film evolution and the amount of reactant in the film is limited, which means that the reaction rate decreases with time as the reactant is consumed. A linear stability analysis is performed to identify the influence of reaction parameters, material properties, and environmental conditions on the film stability limits. Results indicate that exothermic reactions have a stabilizing effect whereas endothermic reactions destabilize the film and can lead to rupture. It is shown that an initially unstable film can become stable with time as the reaction rate decreases. The shearing of the film by the external gas flow leads to the appearance of traveling waves. The shear stress magnitude has a nonmonotonic influence on film stability.

  8. Rheo-SAXS investigation of shear-thinning behaviour of very anisometric repulsive disc-like clay suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, A M; Baravian, C; Imperor-Clerc, M; De Silva, J; Paineau, E; Bihannic, I; Davidson, P; Meneau, F; Levitz, P; Michot, L J

    2011-05-18

    Aqueous suspensions of swelling clay minerals exhibit a rich and complex rheological behaviour. In particular, these repulsive systems display strong shear-thinning at very low volume fractions in both the isotropic and gel states. In this paper, we investigate the evolution with shear of the orientational distribution of aqueous clay suspensions by synchrotron-based rheo-SAXS experiments using a Couette device. Measurements in radial and tangential configurations were carried out for two swelling clay minerals of similar morphology and size, Wyoming montmorillonite and Idaho beidellite. The shear evolution of the small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) patterns displays significantly different features for these two minerals. The detailed analysis of the angular dependence of the SAXS patterns in both directions provides the average Euler angles of the statistical effective particle in the shear plane. We show that for both samples, the average orientation is fully controlled by the local shear stress around the particle. We then apply an effective approach to take into account multiple hydrodynamic interactions in the system. Using such an approach, it is possible to calculate the evolution of viscosity as a function of shear rate from the knowledge of the average orientation of the particles. The viscosity thus recalculated almost perfectly matches the measured values as long as collective effects are not too important in the system.

  9. Rheo-SAXS investigation of shear-thinning behaviour of very anisometric repulsive disc-like clay suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippe, A M; Baravian, C; Imperor-Clerc, M; De Silva, J; Davidson, P; Paineau, E; Bihannic, I; Michot, L J; Meneau, F; Levitz, P

    2011-01-01

    Aqueous suspensions of swelling clay minerals exhibit a rich and complex rheological behaviour. In particular, these repulsive systems display strong shear-thinning at very low volume fractions in both the isotropic and gel states. In this paper, we investigate the evolution with shear of the orientational distribution of aqueous clay suspensions by synchrotron-based rheo-SAXS experiments using a Couette device. Measurements in radial and tangential configurations were carried out for two swelling clay minerals of similar morphology and size, Wyoming montmorillonite and Idaho beidellite. The shear evolution of the small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) patterns displays significantly different features for these two minerals. The detailed analysis of the angular dependence of the SAXS patterns in both directions provides the average Euler angles of the statistical effective particle in the shear plane. We show that for both samples, the average orientation is fully controlled by the local shear stress around the particle. We then apply an effective approach to take into account multiple hydrodynamic interactions in the system. Using such an approach, it is possible to calculate the evolution of viscosity as a function of shear rate from the knowledge of the average orientation of the particles. The viscosity thus recalculated almost perfectly matches the measured values as long as collective effects are not too important in the system.

  10. Reverse flow and vortex breakdown in a shear-thinning fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabeza, C; Sarasua, G; Barrere, N; Marti, A C

    2011-01-01

    The effect of polymer concentration on the development of reverse secondary flow and vortex breakdown was studied using a viscoelastic solution of polyacrlylamide in water. The fluid was contained in cylindrical containers of two different radii, the top end wall of which rotated at a varying speed, thus, imparting a circulating motion to the fluid. Whereas using a newtonian fluid, streamlines will occupy the entire container, the flow of a shear-thinning fluid may divide into two cells of opposite circulating motion. The curve of critical Reynolds and elasticity numbers (Re, E) values corresponding to the development of reverse flow was obtained over a wide range of Re values. Vortex breakdown was found to occur at extremely low Re values.

  11. Buoyant miscible displacement flow of shear-thinning fluids: Experiments and Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ale Etrati Khosroshahi, Seyed Ali; Frigaard, Ian

    2017-11-01

    We study displacement flow of two miscible fluids with density and viscosity contrast in an inclined pipe. Our focus is mainly on displacements where transverse mixing is not significant and thus a two-layer, stratified flow develops. Our experiments are carried out in a long pipe, covering a wide range of flow-rates, inclination angles and viscosity ratios. Density and viscosity contrasts are achieved by adding Glycerol and Xanthan gum to water, respectively. At each angle, flow rate and viscosity ratio are varied and density contrast is fixed. We identify and map different flow regimes, instabilities and front dynamics based on Fr , Re / Frcosβ and viscosity ratio m. The problem is also studied numerically to get a better insight into the flow structure and shear-thinning effects. Numerical simulations are completed using OpenFOAM in both pipe and channel geometries and are compared against the experiments. Schlumberger, NSERC.

  12. Bubble formation in shear-thinning fluids: Laser image measurement and a novel correlation for detached volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Wenyuan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A laser image system has been established to quantify the characteristics of growing bubbles in quiescent shear-thinning fluids. Bubble formation mechanism was investigated by comparing the evolutions of bubble instantaneous shape, volume and surface area in two shear-thinning liquids with those in Newtonian liquid. The effects of solution mass concentration, gas chamber volume and orifice diameter on bubble detachment volume are discussed. By dimensional analysis, a single bubble volume detached within a moderate gas flowrate range was developed as a function of Reynolds number ,Re, Weber number, We, and gas chamber number, Vc, based on the orifice diameter. The results reveal that the generated bubble presents a slim shape due to the shear-thinning effect of the fluid. Bubble detachment volume increases with the solution mass concentration, gas chamber volume and orifice diameter. The results predicted by the present correlation agree better with the experimental data than the previous ones within the range of this paper.

  13. Evaluation of Thin Kevlar-Epoxy Fabric Panels Subjected to Shear Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Donald J.

    1996-01-01

    The results of an analytical and experimental investigation of 4-ply Kevlar-49-epoxy panels loaded by in-plane shear are presented. Approximately one-half of the panels are thin-core sandwich panels and the other panels are solid-laminate panels. Selected panels were impacted with an aluminum sphere at a velocity of either 150 or 220 ft/sec. The strength of panels impacted at 150 ft/sec was not reduced when compared to the strength of the undamaged panels, but the strength of panels impacted at 220 ft/sec was reduced by 27 to 40 percent. Results are presented for panels that were cyclically loaded from a load less than the buckling load to a load in the postbuckling load range. The thin-core sandwich panels had a lower fatigue life than the solid panels. The residual strength of the solid and sandwich panels cycled more than one million cycles exceeded the baseline undamaged panel strengths. The effect of hysteresis in the response of the sandwich panels is not significant. Results of a nonlinear finite element analysis conducted for each panel design are presented.

  14. Initial postbuckling analysis of elastoplastic thin-shear structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnoy, E. G.; Panosyan, G.

    1984-01-01

    The design of thin shell structures with respect to elastoplastic buckling requires an extended analysis of the influence of initial imperfections. For conservative design, the most critical defect should be assumed with the maximum allowable magnitude. This defect is closely related to the initial postbuckling behavior. An algorithm is given for the quasi-static analysis of the postbuckling behavior of structures that exhibit multiple buckling points. the algorithm based upon an energy criterion allows the computation of the critical perturbation which will be employed for the definition of the critical defect. For computational efficiency, the algorithm uses the reduced basis technique with automatic update of the modal basis. The method is applied to the axisymmetric buckling of cylindrical shells under axial compression, and conclusions are given for future research.

  15. Glass transition memorized by the enthalpy-entropy compensation in the shear thinning of supercooled metallic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Liu, Lin

    2018-06-01

    To unravel the true nature of glass transition, broader insights into glass forming have been gained by examining the stress-driven glassy systems, where strong shear thinning, i.e. a reduced viscosity under increasing shear rate, is encountered. It is argued that arbitrarily small stress-driven shear rates would ‘melt’ the glass and erase any memory of its thermal history. In this work, we report a glass transition memorized by the enthalpy-entropy compensation in strongly shear-thinned supercooled metallic liquids, which coincides with the thermal glass transition in both the transition temperature and the activation Gibbs free energy. Our findings provide distinctive insights into both glass forming and shear thinning, and enrich current knowledge on the ubiquitous enthalpy-entropy compensation empirical law in condensed matter physics.

  16. Pore scale simulations for the extension of the Darcy-Forchheimer law to shear thinning fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosco, Tiziana; Marchisio, Daniele; Lince, Federica; Boccardo, Gianluca; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2014-05-01

    Flow of non-Newtonian fluids through porous media at high Reynolds numbers is often encountered in chemical, pharmaceutical and food as well as petroleum and groundwater engineering and in many other industrial applications (1 - 2). In particular, the use of shear thinning polymeric solutions has been recently proposed to improve colloidal stability of micro- and nanoscale zerovalent iron particles (MZVI and NZVI) for groundwater remediation. In all abovementioned applications, it is of paramount importance to correctly predict the pressure drop resulting from non-Newtonian fluid flow through the porous medium. For small Reynolds numbers, usually up to 1, typical of laboratory column tests, the extended Darcy law is known to be applicable also to non Newtonian fluids, provided that all non-Newtonian effects are lumped together into a proper viscosity parameter (1,3). For higher Reynolds numbers (eg. close to the injection wells) non linearities between pressure drop and flow rate arise, and the Darcy-Forchheimer law holds for Newtonian fluids, while for non-Newtonian fluids, it has been demonstrated that, at least for simple rheological models (eg. power law fluids) a generalized Forchheimer law can be applied, even if the determination of the flow parameters (permeability K, inertial coefficient β, and equivalent viscosity) is not straightforward. This work (co-funded by European Union project AQUAREHAB FP7 - Grant Agreement Nr. 226565) aims at proposing an extended formulation of the Darcy-Forchheimer law also for shear-thinning fluids, and validating it against results of pore-scale simulations via computational fluid dynamics (4). Flow simulations were performed using Fluent 12.0 on four different 2D porous domains for Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids (Cross, Ellis and Carreau models). The micro-scale flow simulation results are analyzed in terms of 'macroscale' pressure drop between inlet and outlet of the model domain as a function of flow rate. The

  17. Shear flow effect on ion temperature gradient vortices in plasmas with sheared magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakrabarti, N.; Juul Rasmussen, J.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of velocity shear on ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven vortices in a nonuniform plasma in a curved, sheared magnetic field is investigated. In absence of parallel ion dynamics, vortex solutions for the ITG mode are studied analytically. It is shown that under certain conditions...... and ultimately lead to a dominating monopolar form. The effects of magnetic shear indicate it may destroy these structures. (C) 1999 American Institute of Physics....

  18. Motional Effect on Wall Shear Stresses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock, Samuel Alberg; Torben Fründ, Ernst; Yong Kim, Won

    Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death and severe disability. Wall Shear Stress (WSS), the stress exerted on vessel walls by the flowing blood is a key factor in the development of atherosclerosis. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is widely used for WSS estimations. Most CFD simulations...... are based on static models to ease computational burden leading to inaccurate estimations. The aim of this work was to estimate the effect of vessel wall deformations (expansion and bending) on WSS levels....

  19. Ionic liquid nanotribology: stiction suppression and surface induced shear thinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asencio, Rubén Álvarez; Cranston, Emily D; Atkin, Rob; Rutland, Mark W

    2012-07-03

    The friction and adhesion between pairs of materials (silica, alumina, and polytetrafluoroethylene) have been studied and interpreted in terms of the long-ranged interactions present. In ambient laboratory air, the interactions are dominated by van der Waals attraction and strong adhesion leading to significant frictional forces. In the presence of the ionic liquid (IL) ethylammonium nitrate (EAN) the van der Waals interaction is suppressed and the attractive/adhesive interactions which lead to "stiction" are removed, resulting in an at least a 10-fold reduction in the friction force at large applied loads. The friction coefficient for each system was determined; coefficients obtained in air were significantly larger than those obtained in the presence of EAN (which ranged between 0.1 and 0.25), and variation in the friction coefficients between systems was correlated with changes in surface roughness. As the viscosity of ILs can be relatively high, which has implications for the lubricating properties, the hydrodynamic forces between the surfaces have therefore also been studied. The linear increase in repulsive force with speed, expected from hydrodynamic interactions, is clearly observed, and these forces further inhibit the potential for stiction. Remarkably, the viscosity extracted from the data is dramatically reduced compared to the bulk value, indicative of a surface ordering effect which significantly reduces viscous losses.

  20. Structural performance of new thin-walled concrete sandwich panel system reinforced with bfrp shear connectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hodicky, Kamil; Hulin, Thomas; Schmidt, Jacob Wittrup

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new thin-walled concrete sandwich panel system reinforced with basalt fiber-reinforced plastic (BFRP) with optimum structural performances and a high thermal resistance developed by Connovate and Technical University of Denmark. The shear connecting system made of a BFRP grid...... is described and provides information on the structural design with its advantages. Experimental and numerical investigations of the BFRP connecting systems were performed. The experimental program included testing of small scale specimens by applying shear (push-off) loading and semi-full scale specimens...... on finite element modelling showed that the developed panel system meets the objectives of the research and is expected to have promising future....

  1. Effect of single-particle magnetostriction on the shear modulus of compliant magnetoactive elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Viktor M.; Snarskii, Andrei A.; Shamonin, Mikhail; Zorinets, Denis

    2017-03-01

    The influence of an external magnetic field on the static shear strain and the effective shear modulus of a magnetoactive elastomer (MAE) is studied theoretically in the framework of a recently introduced approach to the single-particle magnetostriction mechanism [V. M. Kalita et al., Phys. Rev. E 93, 062503 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevE.93.062503]. The planar problem of magnetostriction in an MAE with magnetically soft inclusions in the form of a thin disk (platelet) having the magnetic anisotropy in the plane of this disk is solved analytically. An external magnetic field acts with torques on magnetic filler particles, creates mechanical stresses in the vicinity of inclusions, induces shear strain, and increases the effective shear modulus of these composite materials. It is shown that the largest effect of the magnetic field on the effective shear modulus should be expected in MAEs with soft elastomer matrices, where the shear modulus of the matrix is less than the magnetic anisotropy constant of inclusions. It is derived that the effective shear modulus is nonlinearly dependent on the external magnetic field and approaches the saturation value in magnetic fields exceeding the field of particle anisotropy. It is shown that model calculations of the effective shear modulus correspond to a phenomenological definition of effective elastic moduli and magnetoelastic coupling constants. The obtained theoretical results compare well with known experimental data. Determination of effective elastic coefficients in MAEs and their dependence on magnetic field is discussed. The concentration dependence of the effective shear modulus at higher filler concentrations has been estimated using the method of Padé approximants, which predicts that both the absolute and relative changes of the magnetic-field-dependent effective shear modulus will significantly increase with the growing concentration of filler particles.

  2. Enhanced In Situ Chemical Oxidation Using Surfactants and Shear Thinning Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauswirth, S.; Sadeghi, S.; Cerda, C. C.; Espinoza, I.; Schultz, P. B.; Miller, C. T.

    2017-12-01

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) is an attractive approach for the remediation of recalcitrant contaminants, due to the fact that target compounds are degraded in place, precluding the need for ex situ treatment or disposal. However, field applications of ISCO approaches have been plagued by "rebound" of contaminant concentrations in groundwater weeks to months after treatment. The cause of rebound at a given site may vary, but is typically associated with back-diffusion from finer grained, low permeability units or the presence of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) that are incompletely degraded during treatment. Modifications to traditional ISCO methods have been proposed to overcome these challenges, including the use of shear-thinning polymers to improve delivery of oxidants to low permeability units and the addition of surfactants to improve dissolution of contaminants from NAPLs. In this work, we investigate the application of these approaches to the oxidation of manufactured gas plant (MGP) tars—NAPLs composed primarily of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). We conducted experiments to determine the mutual impact of each chemical component on the physical and chemical properties of the overall system. Specifically, experiments were designed to: determine the kinetics and overall effectiveness of contaminant-oxidant reactions for multiple oxidant-activator combinations; screen several common surfactants in terms of their ability to increase MGP tar solubility and their compatibility with oxidant systems; measure the impact of oxidants and surfactants on the rheology of several common polymer additives; and assess the effect of surfactants and polymers on the consumption of oxidants/activators and on the kinetics of contaminant-oxidant reactions. The results of this work provide insight into the chemical and physical mechanisms associated with enhanced ISCO approaches and an improved basis with which to model and design ISCO applications at both the lab

  3. Fluid Effects on Shear Waves in Finely Layered Porous Media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berryman, J G

    2004-01-01

    Although there are five effective shear moduli for any layered VTI medium, one and only one effective shear modulus for the layered system contains all the dependence of pore fluids on the elastic or poroelastic constants that can be observed in vertically polarized shear waves. Pore fluids can increase the magnitude the shear energy stored by this modulus by a term that ranges from the smallest to the largest shear moduli of the VTI system. But, since there are five shear moduli in play, the increase in shear energy overall is reduced by a factor of about 5 in general. We can therefore give definite bounds on the maximum increase of shear modulus, being about 20% of the permitted range, when gas is fully replaced by liquid. An attendant increase of density (depending on porosity and fluid density) by approximately 5 to 10% partially offsets the effect of this shear modulus increase. Thus, an increase of shear wave speed on the order of 5 to 10% is shown to be possible when circumstances are favorable - i.e., when the shear modulus fluctuations are large (resulting in strong anisotropy), and the medium behaves in an undrained fashion due to fluid trapping. At frequencies higher than seismic (such as sonic and ultrasonic waves for well-logging or laboratory experiments), short response times also produce the requisite undrained behavior and, therefore, fluids also affect shear waves at high frequencies by increasing rigidity

  4. Effect of Boundary Condition on the Shear Behaviour of Rock Joints in the Direct Shear Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahaaddini, M.

    2017-05-01

    The common method for determination of the mechanical properties of the rock joints is the direct shear test. This paper aims to study the effect of boundary condition on the results of direct shear tests. Experimental studies undertaken in this research showed that the peak shear strength is mostly overestimated. This problem is more pronounced for steep asperities and under high normal stresses. Investigation of the failure mode of these samples showed that tensile cracks are generated at the boundary of sample close to the specimen holders and propagated inside the intact materials. In order to discover the reason of observed failure mechanism in experiments, the direct shear test was simulated using PFC2D. Results of numerical models showed that the gap zone size between the upper and lower specimen holders has a significant effect on the shear mechanism. For the high gap size, stresses concentrate at the vicinity of the tips of specimen holders and result in generation and propagation of tensile cracks inside the intact material. However, by reducing the gap size, stresses are concentrated on asperities, and damage of specimen at its boundary is not observed. Results of this paper show that understanding the shear mechanism of rock joints is an essential step prior to interpreting the results of direct shear tests.

  5. Modelling secondary instability of co-current a thin gas-sheared film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vozhakov, I S; Cherdantsev, A V; Arkhipov, D G, E-mail: vozhakov@gmail.com [Kutateladze Institute of Thermophysics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    Recent experimental works found the existence of two types of waves on the surface of gas-sheared thin films. Slower short-living ‘secondary waves’ appear due to the instability of the rear slopes of faster long-living ‘primary waves’. In this paper, modelling of spatiotemporal evolution of liquid film in such kind of flows is performed using relatively simple theoretical models. The modelling results are directly compared with the experimental data. It is found that the phenomenon of secondary waves generation at the rear slopes of the primary waves is reproduced by the model. This allows us to reduce the number of hypotheses which explain the mechanism responsible for such instability. Recommendations for future theoretical investigations are proposed. (paper)

  6. Modelling secondary instability of co-current a thin gas-sheared film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vozhakov, I S; Cherdantsev, A V; Arkhipov, D G

    2016-01-01

    Recent experimental works found the existence of two types of waves on the surface of gas-sheared thin films. Slower short-living ‘secondary waves’ appear due to the instability of the rear slopes of faster long-living ‘primary waves’. In this paper, modelling of spatiotemporal evolution of liquid film in such kind of flows is performed using relatively simple theoretical models. The modelling results are directly compared with the experimental data. It is found that the phenomenon of secondary waves generation at the rear slopes of the primary waves is reproduced by the model. This allows us to reduce the number of hypotheses which explain the mechanism responsible for such instability. Recommendations for future theoretical investigations are proposed. (paper)

  7. Effects of magnetic shear on current penetration in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Pengyun; Wang Long

    2001-01-01

    The penetrations of the parallel and perpendicular components of plasma currents are interrelated to each other due to the existence of magnetic shear in a tokamak configuration. Effects of the shear on the penetration of Fourier components of toroidal plasma current are analysed in a cylindrical column model. The current penetration is obviously strengthened by the shear for a bell-bike conductivity profile and low safety factor and low aspect ratio

  8. Empirical resistive-force theory for slender biological filaments in shear-thinning fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Emily E.; Lauga, Eric

    2017-06-01

    Many cells exploit the bending or rotation of flagellar filaments in order to self-propel in viscous fluids. While appropriate theoretical modeling is available to capture flagella locomotion in simple, Newtonian fluids, formidable computations are required to address theoretically their locomotion in complex, nonlinear fluids, e.g., mucus. Based on experimental measurements for the motion of rigid rods in non-Newtonian fluids and on the classical Carreau fluid model, we propose empirical extensions of the classical Newtonian resistive-force theory to model the waving of slender filaments in non-Newtonian fluids. By assuming the flow near the flagellum to be locally Newtonian, we propose a self-consistent way to estimate the typical shear rate in the fluid, which we then use to construct correction factors to the Newtonian local drag coefficients. The resulting non-Newtonian resistive-force theory, while empirical, is consistent with the Newtonian limit, and with the experiments. We then use our models to address waving locomotion in non-Newtonian fluids and show that the resulting swimming speeds are systematically lowered, a result which we are able to capture asymptotically and to interpret physically. An application of the models to recent experimental results on the locomotion of Caenorhabditis elegans in polymeric solutions shows reasonable agreement and thus captures the main physics of swimming in shear-thinning fluids.

  9. Comprehensive Die Shear Test of Silicon Packages Bonded by Thermocompression of Al Layers with Thin Sn Capping or Insertions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiro Satoh

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Thermocompression bonding for wafer-level hermetic packaging was demonstrated at the lowest temperature of 370 to 390 °C ever reported using Al films with thin Sn capping or insertions as bonding layer. For shrinking the chip size of MEMS (micro electro mechanical systems, a smaller size of wafer-level packaging and MEMS–ASIC (application specific integrated circuit integration are of great importance. Metal-based bonding under the temperature of CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor backend process is a key technology, and Al is one of the best candidates for bonding metal in terms of CMOS compatibility. In this study, after the thermocompression bonding of two substrates, the shear fracture strength of dies was measured by a bonding tester, and the shear-fractured surfaces were observed by SEM (scanning electron microscope, EDX (energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, and a surface profiler to clarify where the shear fracture took place. We confirmed two kinds of fracture mode. One mode is Si bulk fracture mode, where the die shear strength is 41.6 to 209 MPa, proportionally depending on the area of Si fracture. The other mode is bonding interface fracture mode, where the die shear strength is 32.8 to 97.4 MPa. Regardless of the fracture modes, the minimum die shear strength is practical for wafer-level MEMS packaging.

  10. The effect of shear stress on solitary waves in arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiray, H

    1997-09-01

    In the present work, we study the propagation of solitary waves in a prestressed thick walled elastic tube filled with an incompressible inviscid fluid. In order to include the geometric dispersion in the analysis the wall inertia and shear deformation effects are taken into account for the inner pressure-cross-sectional area relation. Using the reductive perturbation technique, the propagation of weakly non-linear waves in the long-wave approximation is examined. It is shown that, contrary to thin tube theories, the present approach makes it possible to have solitary waves even for a Mooney-Rivlin (M-R) material. Due to dependence of the coefficients of the governing Korteweg-deVries equation on initial deformation, the solution profile changes with inner pressure and the axial stretch. The variation of wave profiles for a class of elastic materials are depicted in graphic forms. As might be seen from these illustrations, with increasing thickness ratio, the profile of solitary wave is steepened for a M-R material but it is broadened for biological tissue.

  11. Field Test of Enhanced Remedial Amendment Delivery Using a Shear-Thinning Fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Adamson, David; Oostrom, Martinus; Zhong, Lirong; Mackley, Rob D.; Fritz, Brad G.; Horner, Jacob A.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Thomle, Jonathan N.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Johnson, Christian D.; Rysz, Michal; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Newell, Charles J.

    2015-03-01

    Heterogeneity of hydraulic properties in aquifers may lead to contaminants residing in lower-permeability zones where it is difficult to deliver remediation amendments using conventional injection processes. The focus of this effort is to examine use of a shear-thinning fluid (STF) to improve the uniformity of remedial amendment distribution within a heterogeneous aquifer. Previous studies have demonstrated the significant potential of STFs for improving remedial amendment delivery in heterogeneous aquifers, but quantitative evaluation of these improvements from field applications are lacking. A field-scale test was conducted that compares data from successive injection of a tracer in water followed by injection of a tracer in a STF to evaluate the impact of the STF on tracer distribution uniformity in the presence of permeability contrasts within the targeted injection zone. Data from tracer breakthrough at multiple depth-discrete monitoring intervals and electrical resistivity tomography showed that inclusion of STF in the injection solution slowed movement in high-permeability pathways, improved delivery of amendment to low-permeability materials, and resulted in better uniformity in injected fluid distribution within the targeted treatment zone.

  12. Calanoid Copepod Behavior in Thin Layer Shear Flows: Freshwater Versus Marine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skipper, A. N.; Webster, D. R.; Yen, J.

    2015-11-01

    Marine copepods have been shown to behaviorally respond to vertical gradients of horizontal velocity and aggregate around thin layers. The current study addresses whether a freshwater copepod from an alpine lake demonstrates similar behavior response. Hesperodiaptomus shoshone is often the greatest biomass in alpine lakes and is the dominant zooplankton predator within its environment. The hypothesis is that H. shoshone responds to vertical gradients of horizontal velocity, which are associated with river outflows from alpine lakes, with fine-scale changes in swimming kinematics. The two calanoid copepods studied here, H. shoshone (freshwater) and Calanus finmarchicus(marine), are of similar size (2 - 4 mm), have similar morphologies, and utilize cruising as their primary swimming mode. The two animals differ not only in environment, but also in diet; H. shoshone is a carnivore, whereas C. finmarchicusis an herbivore. A laminar, planar jet (Bickley) was used in the laboratory to simulate a free shear flow. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) quantified the flow field. The marine species changed its swimming behavior significantly (increased swimming speed and turning frequency) and spent more time in the layer (40% vs. 70%) from control to treatment. In contrast, the freshwater species exhibited very few changes in either swimming behavior or residence time. Swimming kinematics and residence time results were also similar between males and females. Unlike the marine copepod, the results suggest the environmental flow structure is unimportant to the freshwater species.

  13. Size effects in thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Tellier, CR; Siddall, G

    1982-01-01

    A complete and comprehensive study of transport phenomena in thin continuous metal films, this book reviews work carried out on external-surface and grain-boundary electron scattering and proposes new theoretical equations for transport properties of these films. It presents a complete theoretical view of the field, and considers imperfection and impurity effects.

  14. Separate structure of two branches of sheared slab ηi mode and effects of plasma rotation shear in weak magnetic shear region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiquan Li; Kishimoto, Y.; Tuda, T.

    2000-01-01

    The separate structure of two branches of the sheared slab η i mode near the minimum-q magnetic surface is analysed and the effects of plasma rotation shears are considered in the weak magnetic shear region. Results show that the separation condition depends on the non-monotonous q profile and the deviation of rational surface from the minimum-q surface. Furthermore, it is found that the diamagnetic rotation shear may suppress the perturbation of the sheared slab η i mode at one side of the minimum-q surface, the poloidal rotation shear from the sheared E-vector x B-vector flow has a similar role to the slab mode structure when it possesses a direction same as the diamagnetic shear. A plausible interrelation between the separate structures of the two branches of the sheared slab mode and the discontinuity or gap of the radially global structure of the drift wave near the minimum-q surface observed in the toroidal particle simulation (Kishimoto Y et al 1998 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 40 A663) is discussed. It seems to support such a viewpoint: the double or/and global branches of the sheared slab η i mode near the minimum-q surface may become a bridge to connect the radially global structures of the drift wave at two sides of the minimum-q surface and the discontinuity may originate from the separate structures of these slab modes for a flatter q profile. (author)

  15. Stress in closed thin-walled tubes of single box subjected by shear forces and application to airfoils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zebbiche Toufik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The presented work is to develop a numerical computation program to determine the distribution of the shear stress to shear in closed tubes with asymmetric single thin wall section with a constant thickness and applications to airfoils and therefore determining the position and value of the maximum stress. In the literature, there are exact analytical solutions only for some sections of simple geometries such as circular section. Hence our interest is focused on the search of approximate numerical solutions for more complex sections used in aeronautics. In the second stage the position of the shear center is determined so that the section does not undergo torsion. The analytic function of the boundary of the airfoil is obtained by using the cubic spline interpolation since it is given in the form of tabulated points.

  16. Bulk Shear-Wave Transduction Experiments Using Magnetostrictive Transducers with a Thin Fe-Co Alloy Patch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae Ha; Cho, Seung Hyun; Ahn, Bong Young; Kwon, Hyu Sang [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    Recently, the results of many studies have clarified the successful performance of magnetostrictive transducers in which a ferromagnetic patch is used for the transduction of guided shear waves; this is because a thin ferromagnetic patch with strong magnetostriction is very useful for generating and detecting shear wave. This investigation deals with bulk shear wave transduction by means of magnetostriction; on the other hand, the existing studies have been focused on guided shear waves. A modular transducer was developed: this transducer comprised a coil, magnets, and a thin ferromagnetic patch that was made of Fe-Co alloy. Some experiments were conducted to verify the performance of the developed transducer. Radiation directivity pattern of the developed transducer was obtained, and a test to detect the damage on a side drill hole of a steel block specimen was carried out. From the results of these tests, the good performance of the transducer for nondestructive testing was verified on the basis of the signal-to-noise ratio and narrow beam directivity.

  17. A thin rivulet or ridge subject to a uniform transverse shear stress at its free surface due to an external airflow

    KAUST Repository

    Sullivan, J. M.; Paterson, C.; Wilson, S. K.; Duffy, B. R.

    2012-01-01

    We use the lubrication approximation to analyze three closely related problems involving a thin rivulet or ridge (i.e., a two-dimensional droplet) of fluid subject to a prescribed uniform transverse shear stress at its free surface due

  18. Simulation of shear plugging through thin plates using the GRIM Eulerian hydrocode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, P.; Cornish, R.; Cullis, I.; Lynch, N.

    2000-03-01

    Ballistic experiments have been performed using aluminum spheres against 10-mm rolled homogenous armour (RHA), MARS270, MARS300, and titanium alloy plates to investigate the influence of the plugging mechanism on material properties. The experiments have measured the threshold for plug mass and velocity as well as the recovered aluminum sphere mass over a range of velocities. Some of the experiments have been simulated using the in-house second generation Eulerian hydrocode GRIM. The calculations feature advanced material algorithms derived from interrupted tensile testing techniques and a triaxial failure model derived from notched tensile tests over a range of strain rates and temperatures. The effect of mesh resolution on the results has been investigated and understood. The simulation results illustrate the importance of the constitutive model in the shear localization process and the subsequent plugging phenomena. The stress triaxiality is seen as the dominant feature in controlling the onset and subsequent propagation of the crack leading to the shear plug. The simulations have demonstrated that accurate numerics coupled with accurate constitutive and fracture algorithms can successfully reproduce the observed experimental features. However, extrapolation of the fracture data leads to the simulations overpredicting the plug damage. The reasons for this are discussed.

  19. Shear-induced Long Range Order in Diblock Copolymer Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xuan; Russell, Thomas

    2007-03-01

    Shear is a well-established means of aligning block copolymer micro-domains in bulk; cylinder-forming block copolymers respond by orienting cylinder axes parallel to the flow direction, and macroscopic specimens with near-single-crystal texture can be obtained. A stepper motor is a brushless, synchronous electric motor that can divide a full rotation into a large number of steps. With the combination of a stepper motor and several gear boxes in our experiment, we can control the rotating resolution to be as small as 1 x10-4 degree/step. Also, with the help of a customized computer program we can control the motor speed in a very systematical way. By changing parameters such as the weight (or the uniform pressure) and the lateral force we can carry on experiment to examine the effect of lateral shear on different polymer systems such as PS-b-PEO (large χ) and PS-b-P2VP (small χ).

  20. Compressibility effects in the shear layer over a rectangular cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beresh, Steven J.; Wagner, Justin; Casper, Katya Marie

    2016-10-26

    we studied the influence of compressibility on the shear layer over a rectangular cavity of variable width in a free stream Mach number range of 0.6–2.5 using particle image velocimetry data in the streamwise centre plane. As the Mach number increases, the vertical component of the turbulence intensity diminishes modestly in the widest cavity, but the two narrower cavities show a more substantial drop in all three components as well as the turbulent shear stress. Furthermore, this contrasts with canonical free shear layers, which show significant reductions in only the vertical component and the turbulent shear stress due to compressibility. The vorticity thickness of the cavity shear layer grows rapidly as it initially develops, then transitions to a slower growth rate once its instability saturates. When normalized by their estimated incompressible values, the growth rates prior to saturation display the classic compressibility effect of suppression as the convective Mach number rises, in excellent agreement with comparable free shear layer data. The specific trend of the reduction in growth rate due to compressibility is modified by the cavity width.

  1. Effects of opening in shear walls of 30- storey building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Sharma

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Tall towers and multi-storey buildings have fascinated mankind from the beginning of civilization, their construction being initially for defense and subsequently for ecclesiastical purposes. These tall buildings because of its height, is affected by lateral forces due to wind or earthquake actions tends to snap the building in shear and push it over in bending. In general, the rigidity (i.e. Resistance to lateral deflection and stability (i.e. Resistance to overturning moments requirement become more important. Shear walls (Structural walls contribute significant lateral stiffness, strength, and overall ductility and energy dissipation capacity. In many structural walls a regular pattern of openings has to be provided due to various functional requirements such as to accommodate doors, windows and service ducts. Such type of openings reduces the stiffness of the shear wall to some extent depending on the shape and size of the opening. In the present parametric study, efforts are made to investigate and critically assess the effects of various size of openings in shear walls on the responses and behaviors of multi-storey buildings. The 30 storey Prototype buildings with different types of openings in shear wall with and without incorporating the volume of shear wall reduced in the boundary elements are analyzed using software E-TABS using Response spectrum method (1893(Part-1-2002 and Time history method.

  2. Discontinuous Shear Thickening and Dilatancy: Frictional Effects in Viscous Suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Jeffrey

    2015-03-01

    Shear thickening in concentrated suspensions has been well-known for quite a long time, yet a firm consensus on the basis for very abrupt or ``discontinuous'' shear thickening (DST) seen in suspensions of large solid fraction, ϕ, has not been reached. This work addresses the DST phenomenon, and proposes a simulation method based in the Stokesian Dynamics algorithm to explore the role of various forces between the particles, including hydrodynamic, conservative potential, and frictional interactions. This work shows that allowance for friction between spherical particles suspended in a viscous liquid causes a significant reduction in the jamming solid fraction of the mixture, ϕmax, taken as the maximum fraction at which the suspension will flow. A consequence of this is a shifting of the singularity in the effective viscosity, η, to smaller ϕmax, and the frictional suspension has a larger viscosity than does the frictionless suspension of the same solid fraction, as is clear from the standard empirical modeling of η (ϕ) =(1 - ϕ /ϕmax) - α , α ~ 2 . When a counterbalancing repulsive force between the particles, representative for example of charge-induced repulsion, is incorporated in the dynamics, the mixture undergoes a transition from frictionless to frictional interactions, and from low to high effective viscosity, at a critical shear rate. Comparison with experimental data shows remarkable agreement in the features of DST captured by the method. The basic algorithm and results of both rate-controlled and stress-controlled simulations will be presented. Like the shear stress, the magnitude of the normal stress exerted by the suspended particles also increases abruptly at the critical shear rate, consistent with the long-standing notion that dilatancy and shear-thickening are synonymous. We will show that considering all shear thickening materials as dilatant is a misconception, but demonstrate the validity of the connection of dilatancy with DST in

  3. Thinning Approximation for Two-Dimensional Scattering Patterns from Coarse-Grained Polymer Melts under Shear Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagita, Katsumi; Murashima, Takahiro; Takano, Hiroshi; Kawakatsu, Toshihiro

    2017-12-01

    We proposed a thinning approximation (TA) for estimation of the two-dimensional (2D) wide-angle scattering patterns from Kremer-Grest polymer melts under shear. In the TA, extra particles are inserted at the middle of bonds for fine-graining of the coarse-grained polymers. For the case without the TA, spots corresponding to the orientation of bonds at a high shear rate are difficult to observe because the bond length of successive particles is comparable to the distance between neighboring particles. With the insertion of the extra particles, a ring pattern originating from the neighboring particles can be moved to a wide-angle region. Thus, we can observe the spots at high shear rates. We also examined the relationship between 2D scattering patterns and the Weissenberg number, which is defined as the product of the shear rate and the longest relaxation time. It is confirmed that the relationship for coarse-grained polymers with the TA is consistent with that of the all-atomistic model of polyethylene.

  4. Effect of sheared flows on neoclassical tearing modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, A [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar (India); Chandra, D; Kaw, P [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar (India); Bora, M P [Physics Dept., Gauhati University, Guwahati (India); Kruger, S [Tech-X, Boulder, CO (United States); Ramos, J [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The influence of toroidal sheared equilibrium flows on the nonlinear evolution of classical and neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) is studied through numerical solutions of a set of reduced generalized MHD equations that include viscous force effects based on neoclassical closures. In general, differential flow is found to have a strong stabilizing influence leading to lower saturated island widths for the classical (m/n = 2/1) mode and reduced growth rates for the (m/n = 3/1) neoclassical mode. Velocity shear on the other hand is seen to make a destabilizing contribution. An analytic model calculation, consisting of a generalized Rutherford island evolution equation that includes shear flow effects is also presented and the numerical results are discussed in the context of this model. (author)

  5. Effect of Wall Shear Stress on Corrosion Inhibitor Film Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canto Maya, Christian M.

    In oil and gas production, internal corrosion of pipelines causes the highest incidence of recurring failures. Ensuring the integrity of ageing pipeline infrastructure is an increasingly important requirement. One of the most widely applied methods to reduce internal corrosion rates is the continuous injection of chemicals in very small quantities, called corrosion inhibitors. These chemical substances form thin films at the pipeline internal surface that reduce the magnitude of the cathodic and/or anodic reactions. However, the efficacy of such corrosion inhibitor films can be reduced by different factors such as multiphase flow, due to enhanced shear stress and mass transfer effects, loss of inhibitor due to adsorption on other interfaces such as solid particles, bubbles and droplets entrained by the bulk phase, and due to chemical interaction with other incompatible substances present in the stream. The first part of the present project investigated the electrochemical behavior of two organic corrosion inhibitors (a TOFA/DETA imidazolinium, and an alkylbenzyl dimethyl ammonium chloride), with and without an inorganic salt (sodium thiosulfate), and the resulting enhancement. The second part of the work explored the performance of corrosion inhibitor under multiphase (gas/liquid, solid/liquid) flow. The effect of gas/liquid multiphase flow was investigated using small and large scale apparatus. The small scale tests were conducted using a glass cell and a submersed jet impingement attachment with three different hydrodynamic patterns (water jet, CO 2 bubbles impact, and water vapor cavitation). The large scale experiments were conducted applying different flow loops (hilly terrain and standing slug systems). Measurements of weight loss, linear polarization resistance (LPR), and adsorption mass (using an electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance, EQCM) were used to quantify the effect of wall shear stress on the performance and integrity of corrosion inhibitor

  6. Wind shear coefficients and their effect on energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, Shafiqur; Al-Abbadi, Naif M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides realistic values of wind shear coefficients calculated using measured values of wind speed at 20, 30 and 40 m above the ground for the first time in Saudi Arabia in particular and, to the best of the authors' knowledge, in the Gulf region in general. The paper also presents air density values calculated using the measured air temperature and surface pressure and the effects of wind shear factor on energy production from wind machines of different sizes. The measured data used in the study covered a period of almost three years between June 17, 1995 and December 1998. An overall mean value of wind shear coefficient of 0.194 can be used with confidence to calculate the wind speed at different heights if measured values are known at one height. The study showed that the wind shear coefficient is significantly influenced by seasonal and diurnal changes. Hence, for precise estimations of wind speed at a height, both monthly or seasonal and hourly or night time and day time average values of wind shear coefficient must be used. It is suggested that the wind shear coefficients must be calculated either (i) using long term average values of wind speed at different heights or (ii) using those half hourly mean values of wind speed for which the wind shear coefficient lies in the range 0 and 0.51. The air density, calculated using measured temperature and pressure was found to be 1.18 kg/m 3 . The air density values were also found to vary with the season of the year and hour of the day, and hence, care must be taken when precise calculations are to be made. The air density values, as shown in this paper, have no significant variation with height. The energy production analysis showed that the actual wind shear coefficient presented in this paper produced 6% more energy compared to that obtained using the 1/7 power law. Similarly, higher plant capacity factors were obtained with the wind shear factor of 0.194 compared to that with 0.143

  7. Combined Ideal and Kinetic Effects on Reversed Shear Alfven Eigenmodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorelenkov, N.N.; Kramer, G.J.; Nazikian, R.

    2011-01-01

    A theory of Reversed Shear Alfven Eigenmodes (RSAEs) is developed for reversed magnetic field shear plasmas when the safety factor minimum, qmin, is at or above a rational value. The modes we study are known sometimes as either the bottom of the frequency sweep or the down sweeping RSAEs. We show that the ideal MHD theory is not compatible with the eigenmode solution in the reversed shear plasma with qmin above integer values. Corrected by special analytic FLR condition MHD dispersion of these modes nevertheless can be developed. Large radial scale part of the analytic RSAE solution can be obtained from ideal MHD and expressed in terms of the Legendre functions. The kinetic equation with FLR effects for the eigenmode is solved numerically and agrees with the analytic solutions. Properties of RSAEs and their potential implications for plasma diagnostics are discussed.

  8. Combined ideal and kinetic effects on reversed shear Alfven eigenmodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorelenkov, N. N.; Kramer, G. J.; Nazikian, R.

    2011-01-01

    A reversed shear Alfven eigenmodes (RSAEs) theory has been developed for reversed magnetic field shear plasmas when the safety factor minimum, q min , is at or above a rational value. The modes we study are known sometimes as either the bottom of the frequency sweep or the down sweeping RSAEs. We show that, strictly speaking, the ideal MHD theory is not compatible with the eigenmode solution in the reversed shear plasma with q min above integer values. Corrected by a special analytic finite Larmor radius (FLR) condition, MHD dispersion of these modes nevertheless can be developed. Numerically, MHD structure can serve as a good approximation for the RSAEs.The large radial scale part of the analytic RSAE solution can be obtained from ideal MHD and expressed in terms of the Legendre functions. The kinetic equation with FLR effects for the eigenmode is solved numerically and agrees with the analytic solutions. Properties of RSAEs and their potential implications for plasma diagnostics are discussed.

  9. The non-monotonic shear-thinning flow of two strongly cohesive concentrated suspensions

    OpenAIRE

    Buscall, Richard; Kusuma, Tiara E.; Stickland, Anthony D.; Rubasingha, Sayuri; Scales, Peter J.; Teo, Hui-En; Worrall, Graham L.

    2014-01-01

    The behaviour in simple shear of two concentrated and strongly cohesive mineral suspensions showing highly non-monotonic flow curves is described. Two rheometric test modes were employed, controlled stress and controlled shear-rate. In controlled stress mode the materials showed runaway flow above a yield stress, which, for one of the suspensions, varied substantially in value and seemingly at random from one run to the next, such that the up flow-curve appeared to be quite irreproducible. Th...

  10. Investigation of Shear-Thinning Behavior on Film Thickness and Friction Coefficient of Polyalphaolefin Base Fluids With Varying Olefin Copolymer Content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zolper, Thomas J.; He, Yifeng; Delferro, Massimiliano; Shiller, Paul; Doll, Gary; LotfizadehDehkordi, Babak; Ren, Ning; Lockwood, Frances; Marks, Tobin J.; Chung, Yip-Wah; Greco, Aaron; Erdemir, Ali; Wang, Qian

    2016-08-11

    This study investigates the rheological properties, elastohydrodynamic (EHD) film-forming capability, and friction coefficients of low molecular mass poly-alpha-olefin (PAO) base stocks with varying contents of high molecular mass olefin copolymers (OCPs) to assess their shear stability and their potential for energy-efficient lubrication. Several PAO-OCP mixtures were blended in order to examine the relationship between their additive content and tribological performance. Gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were used to characterize the molecular masses and structures, respectively. Density, viscosity, EHD film thickness, and friction were measured at 303 K, 348 K, and 398 K. Film thickness and friction were studied at entrainment speeds relevant to the boundary, mixed, and full-film lubrication regimes. The PAO-OCP mixtures underwent temporary shear-thinning resulting in decreases in film thickness and hydrodynamic friction. These results demonstrate that the shear characteristics of PAO-OCP mixtures can be tuned with the OCP content and provide insight into the effects of additives on EHD characteristics.

  11. Effects of ExB velocity shear and magnetic shear on turbulence and transport in magnetic confinement devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrell, K.H.

    1996-11-01

    One of the scientific success stories of fusion research over the past decade is the development of the ExB shear stabilization model to explain the formation of transport barriers in magnetic confinement devices. This model was originally developed to explain the transport barrier formed at the plasma edge in tokamaks after the L (low) to H (high) transition. This concept has the universality needed to explain the edge transport barriers seen in limiter and divertor tokamaks, stellarators, and mirror machines. More recently, this model has been applied to explain the further confinement improvement from H (high)-mode to VH (very high)-mode seen in some tokamaks, where the edge transport barrier becomes wider. Most recently, this paradigm has been applied to the core transport barriers formed in plasmas with negative or low magnetic shear in the plasma core. These examples of confinement improvement are of considerable physical interest; it is not often that a system self-organizes to a higher energy state with reduced turbulence and transport when an additional source of free energy is applied to it. The transport decrease that is associated with ExB velocity shear effects also has significant practical consequences for fusion research. The fundamental physics involved in transport reduction is the effect of ExB shear on the growth, radial extent and phase correlation of turbulent eddies in the plasma. The same fundamental transport reduction process can be operational in various portions of the plasma because there are a number ways to change the radial electric field Er. An important theme in this area is the synergistic effect of ExB velocity shear and magnetic shear. Although the ExB velocity shear appears to have an effect on broader classes of microturbulence, magnetic shear can mitigate some potentially harmful effects of ExB velocity shear and facilitate turbulence stabilization

  12. Effects of shear flow on phase nucleation and crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mura, Federica; Zaccone, Alessio

    2016-04-01

    Classical nucleation theory offers a good framework for understanding the common features of new phase formation processes in metastable homogeneous media at rest. However, nucleation processes in liquids are ubiquitously affected by hydrodynamic flow, and there is no satisfactory understanding of whether shear promotes or slows down the nucleation process. We developed a classical nucleation theory for sheared systems starting from the molecular level of the Becker-Doering master kinetic equation and we analytically derived a closed-form expression for the nucleation rate. The theory accounts for the effect of flow-mediated transport of molecules to the nucleus of the new phase, as well as for the mechanical deformation imparted to the nucleus by the flow field. The competition between flow-induced molecular transport, which accelerates nucleation, and flow-induced nucleus straining, which lowers the nucleation rate by increasing the nucleation energy barrier, gives rise to a marked nonmonotonic dependence of the nucleation rate on the shear rate. The theory predicts an optimal shear rate at which the nucleation rate is one order of magnitude larger than in the absence of flow.

  13. THE EFFECT OF ENVIRONMENT ON SHEAR IN STRONG GRAVITATIONAL LENSES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Kenneth C.; Zabludoff, Ann I.; Keeton, Charles R.; Williams, Kurtis A.; Momcheva, Ivelina G.

    2011-01-01

    Using new photometric and spectroscopic data in the fields of nine strong gravitational lenses that lie in galaxy groups, we analyze the effects of both the local group environment and line-of-sight (LOS) galaxies on the lens potential. We use Monte Carlo simulations to derive the shear directly from measurements of the complex lens environment, providing the first detailed independent check of the shear obtained from lens modeling. We account for possible tidal stripping of the group galaxies by varying the fraction of total mass apportioned between the group dark matter halo and individual group galaxies. The environment produces an average shear of γ = 0.08 (ranging from 0.02 to 0.17), significant enough to affect quantities derived from lens observables. However, the direction and magnitude of the shears do not match those obtained from lens modeling in three of the six four-image systems in our sample (B1422, RXJ1131, and WFI2033). The source of this disagreement is not clear, implying that the assumptions inherent in both the environment and lens model approaches must be reconsidered. If only the local group environment of the lens is included, the average shear is γ = 0.05 (ranging from 0.01 to 0.14), indicating that LOS contributions to the lens potential are not negligible. We isolate the effects of various theoretical and observational uncertainties on our results. Of those uncertainties, the scatter in the Faber-Jackson relation and error in the group centroid position dominate. Future surveys of lens environments should prioritize spectroscopic sampling of both the local lens environment and objects along the LOS, particularly those bright (I< 21.5) galaxies projected within 5' of the lens.

  14. Effect of shear span-to-depth ratio on the shear behavior of BFRP-RC deep beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alhamad Siyam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the shear behavior of deep concrete beams reinforced with basalt fiber reinforced polymer (BFRP bars for flexure without web reinforcements. The experimental testing performed herein consisted of a total of 4 short beams, three of which were reinforced with BFRP and one beam was reinforced with steel bars. The primary test variable was the shear-span-to-effective-depth ratio (a/d and its influence on the beams’ mid-span deflections, shear capacity, load-deformation relationships and the failure modes.

  15. Mean E×B shear effect on geodesic acoustic modes in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Rameswar; Gurcan, Ozgur D.

    2015-01-01

    E × B shearing effect on geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) is investigated for the first time both as an initial value problem in the shearing frame and as an eigenvalue value problem in the lab frame. The nontrivial effects are that E × B shearing couples the standard GAM perturbations to their complimentary poloidal parities. The resulting GAM acquires an effective inertia increasing in time leading to GAM damping. Eigenmode analysis shows that GAMs are radially localized by E × B shearing with the mode width being inversely proportional and radial wave number directly proportional to the shearing rate for weak shear. (author)

  16. Effective Shear Viscosity of Iron under Shock-Loading Condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Xiao-Juan; Liu Fu-Sheng; Sun Yan-Yun; Zhang Ming-Jian; Peng Xiao-Juan; Li Yong-Hong

    2011-01-01

    We combine the flyer-impact experiment and improve the finite difference method to solve whether the shear viscosity coefficient of shock iron is more reliable. We find that the numerical simulated profile agrees well with the measured one, from which the determined effective shear viscosity coefficients of shocked iron are 3000 ± 100 Pa·s and 4000 ± 100 Pa·s, respectively, at 103 GPa and 159 GPa. These values are more than 2000 ± 300 Pa·s of Li Y L et al.[Chin. Phys. Lett. 26 (2009) 038301] Our values are more reasonable because they are obtained from a comprehensive simulation for the full-shocked perturbation evolving process. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  17. Study on the application of shear-wave elastography to thin-layered media and tubular structure: Finite-element analysis and experiment verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jun-keun; Kondo, Kengo; Namita, Takeshi; Yamakawa, Makoto; Shiina, Tsuyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Shear-wave elastography (SWE) enables the noninvasive and quantitative evaluation of the mechanical properties of human soft tissue. Generally, shear-wave velocity (C S) can be estimated using the time-of-flight (TOF) method. Young’s modulus is then calculated directly from the estimated C S. However, because shear waves in thin-layered media propagate as guided waves, C S cannot be accurately estimated using the conventional TOF method. Leaky Lamb dispersion analysis (LLDA) has recently been proposed to overcome this problem. In this study, we performed both experimental and finite-element (FE) analyses to evaluate the advantages of LLDA over TOF. In FE analysis, we investigated why the conventional TOF is ineffective for thin-layered media. In phantom experiments, C S results estimated using the two methods were compared for 1.5 and 2% agar plates and tube phantoms. Furthermore, it was shown that Lamb waves can be applied to tubular structures by extracting lateral waves traveling in the long axis direction of the tube using a two-dimensional window. Also, the effects of the inner radius and stiffness (or shear wavelength) of the tube on the estimation performance of LLDA were experimentally discussed. In phantom experiments, the results indicated good agreement between LLDA (plate phantoms of 2 mm thickness: 5.0 m/s for 1.5% agar and 7.2 m/s for 2% agar; tube phantoms with 2 mm thickness and 2 mm inner radius: 5.1 m/s for 1.5% agar and 7.0 m/s for 2% agar; tube phantoms with 2 mm thickness and 4 mm inner radius: 5.3 m/s for 1.5% agar and 7.3 m/s for 2% agar) and SWE measurements (bulk phantoms: 5.3 m/s ± 0.27 for 1.5% agar and 7.3 m/s ± 0.54 for 2% agar).

  18. Effect of composite warming on shear bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Thomas F; Sigrist, Thomas W; Johnson, Gary M

    2018-01-01

    Several manufacturers produce devices designed to warm composite resins used in restorative dentistry. Previous investigators have examined the effects of heating composite restorative resins prior to placement and polymerization. Heating has been reported to reduce viscosity, improve ease of placement, enhance monomer conversion, and reduce microleakage. The aim of the present study was to compare shear bond strengths of room temperature (22°C) and prewarmed (54°C) restorative composite resin. Extracted bovine mandibular incisors were sectioned sagittally and embedded in acrylic cylinders. Enamel was selectively etched with 37% phosphoric acid, rinsed, and dried. Self-etching primer was applied to both enamel and dentin. Self-etching adhesive was then applied and photopolymerized. Composite resin capsules were then divided into prewarmed and room temperature groups. Fourteen composite specimens prewarmed in an incubator were applied to the prepared enamel and dentin and photopolymerized. Fourteen room temperature composite specimens were likewise placed. After storage in water for 24 hours, all composite specimens were subjected to shear stress testing. The resulting data were analyzed with a t test (P = 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between the shear bond strengths of the prewarmed and room temperature composite resin specimens. Warming does not appear to affect bond strength of composite resin bonded to both dentin and enamel.

  19. Effects of wind shear on the consequence model of the reactor safety study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprung, J.L.; Church, H.W.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of explicit incorporation of wind shear into the consequence model of the Reactor Safety study have been investigated. The integral of exposure (X/Q) over area is unchanged by directional shear and decreased by speed shear. Consequence model predictions of early fatalities are always decreased by wind shear. Where early fatalities are decreased, survivors are subject to latent effects and, therefore, latent effects increase. However, aggregate early fatalities and latent effects always are decreased. Because the magnitude of these changes is within the present uncertainties of the consequence model, explicit incorporation of wind shear in the consequence model is not now warranted

  20. Structure in sheared supercooled liquids: Dynamical rearrangements of an effective system of icosahedra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinney, Rhiannon; Liverpool, Tanniemola B; Royall, C Patrick

    2016-12-21

    We consider a binary Lennard-Jones glassformer whose super-Arrhenius dynamics are correlated with the formation of particles organized into icosahedra under simple steady state shear. We recast this glassformer as an effective system of icosahedra [Pinney et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 244507 (2015)]. From the observed population of icosahedra in each steady state, we obtain an effective temperature which is linearly dependent on the shear rate in the range considered. Upon shear banding, the system separates into a region of high shear rate and a region of low shear rate. The effective temperatures obtained in each case show that the low shear regions correspond to a significantly lower temperature than the high shear regions. Taking a weighted average of the effective temperature of these regions (weight determined by region size) yields an estimate of the effective temperature which compares well with an effective temperature based on the global mesocluster population of the whole system.

  1. Evaluation of size effect on shear strength of reinforced concrete ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of the longitudinal and the web reinforcement, shear span-to-depth ratio and the ... A simple equation for predicting the shear strength of reinforced concrete deep ..... AASHTO 2007 LRFD Bridge Design Specifications, American Association of ...

  2. A Shear Horizontal Waveguide Technique for Monitoring of High Temperature Pipe Thinning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheong, Yongmoo; Kim, Hongpyo; Lee, Duckhyun

    2014-01-01

    An ultrasonic thickness measurement method is a well-known and most commonly used non-destructive testing technique for wall thickness monitoring of a piping or plate. However, current commonly available ultrasonic transducers cannot withstand high temperatures of, above 200 .deg. C. Currently, the variation of wall thickness of the pipes is determined by a portable ultrasonic gauge during plant shutdowns. This manual ultrasonic method reveals several disadvantages: inspections have to be performed during shutdowns with the possible consequences of prolonging down time and increasing production losses, insulation has to be removed and replaced for each manual measurement, and scaffolding has to be installed to inaccessible areas, resulting in considerable cost for intervention. In addition, differences of the measurement conditions such as examiner, temperature, and couplant could result in measurement errors. It has been suggested that a structural health monitoring approach with permanently installed ultrasonic thickness gauges could have substantial benefits over current practices. In order to solve those fundamental problems occurring during the propagation of ultrasound at high temperature, a shear horizontal waveguide technique for wall thickness monitoring at high temperatures is developed. A dry clamping device without a couplant for the acoustic contact between waveguide and pipe surface was designed and fabricated. The shear horizontal waveguides and clamping device result in an excellent S/N ratio and high accuracy of measurement with long exposure in an elevated temperature condition. A computer program for on-line monitoring of the pipe thickness at high temperature for a long period of time was developed. The system can be applied to monitor the FAC in carbon steel piping in a nuclear power plant after a verification test for a long period of time

  3. Shear Tests and Calculation of Shear Resistance with the PC Program RFEM from Thin Partition Walls of Brick in Old Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korjenic Sinan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper is about the shear capacity of partition walls in old buildings based on shear tests which were carried out under real conditions in an existing building. There were experiments conducted on different floors and in each case, the maximum recordable horizontal force and the horizontal displacement of the respective mortar were measured. At the same time material studies and material investigations were carried out in the laboratory. The material parameters were used for the calculation of the precise shear capacity of each joint. In the shear tests, the maximum displacement of a mortar joint was determined at a maximum of two to four millimetres. Furthermore, no direct linear relationship between the theoretical load (wall above it and the shear stress occurred could be detected in the analysis of the experiment, as it was previously assumed.

  4. Shear Tests and Calculation of Shear Resistance with the PC Program RFEM from Thin Partition Walls of Brick in Old Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korjenic, Sinan; Nowak, Bernhard; Löffler, Philipp; Vašková, Anna

    2015-11-01

    This paper is about the shear capacity of partition walls in old buildings based on shear tests which were carried out under real conditions in an existing building. There were experiments conducted on different floors and in each case, the maximum recordable horizontal force and the horizontal displacement of the respective mortar were measured. At the same time material studies and material investigations were carried out in the laboratory. The material parameters were used for the calculation of the precise shear capacity of each joint. In the shear tests, the maximum displacement of a mortar joint was determined at a maximum of two to four millimetres. Furthermore, no direct linear relationship between the theoretical load (wall above it) and the shear stress occurred could be detected in the analysis of the experiment, as it was previously assumed.

  5. The modal density of composite beams incorporating the effects of shear deformation and rotary inertia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachoo, Richard; Bridge, Jacqueline

    2018-06-01

    Engineers and designers are often faced with the task of selecting materials that minimizes structural weight whilst meeting the required strength and stiffness. In many cases fibre reinforced composites (FRCs) are the materials of choice since they possess a combination of high strength and low density. Depending on the application, composites are frequently constructed to form long slender beam-like structures or flat thin plate-like structures. Such structures when subjected to random excitation have the potential to excite higher order vibratory modes which can contribute significantly to structure-borne sound. Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) is a framework for modeling the high frequency vibration of structures. The modal density, which is typically defined as the number of modes per unit Hertz in a frequency band, is a fundamental parameter when applying SEA. This study derives formulas for the modal density of a fibre reinforced composite beam coupled in bending and torsion. The effects of shear deformation and rotary inertia are accounted for in the formulation. The modal density is shown to be insensitive to boundary conditions. Numerical analyses were carried out to investigate the variation of modal density with fibre orientation including and excluding the effects of shear deformation and rotary inertia. It was observed that neglecting such effects leads to underestimating the mode count in a particular frequency band. In each frequency band there exists a fibre orientation for which the modal density is minimized. This angular orientation is shown to be dependent on the shear rigidity as well as the bending, torsional and coupling rigidities. The foregoing observation becomes more pronounced with increasing frequency. The paper also addresses the modal density beyond the wave-mode transition frequency where the beam supports three propagating waves.

  6. Shear effect on the plasma stability in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogutse, O.P.; Yurchenko, Eh.I.

    1979-01-01

    An analytical criterion of stability of balloon modes is obtained, taking into consideration two new physical effects: destabilization caused by intersection of branches of U-shaped oscillations and the balloon effect related to shear. An asymptotic variational method of solving differential equations having both periodical and non-periodical coefficients has been developed to determine the criterion. This method is a generalization of the sensitive method of asymptotic expansion, but unlike the latter, it allows one to take account of potential effects of the reflection type and wave penetration through the barrier. It is this fact that allows to describe the intersection of branch oscillations. The criterion obtained shows that plasma may be unstable even with configuration with circular magnetic surfaces

  7. Cooling of a microchannel with thin evaporating liquid film sheared by dry gas flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabova, Yu O.; Kuznetsov, V. V.

    2017-11-01

    A joint motion of thin liquid film and dry gas in a microchannel is investigated numerically at different values of initial concentration of the liquid vapor in the gas phase, taking into account the evaporation process. Major factors affecting the temperature distribution in the liquid and the gas phases are as follows: transfer of heat by liquid and gas flows, heat loses due to evaporation, diffusion heat exchange. Comparisons of the numerical results for the case of the dry gas and for the case of equilibrium concentration of vapor in the gas have been carried out. It is shown that use of dry gas enhances the heat dissipation from the heater. It is found out that not only intense evaporation occurs near the heating areas, but also in both cases vapor condensation takes place below the heater in streamwise direction.

  8. Phase Aberration and Attenuation Effects on Acoustic Radiation Force-Based Shear Wave Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrascal, Carolina Amador; Aristizabal, Sara; Greenleaf, James F; Urban, Matthew W

    2016-02-01

    Elasticity is measured by shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) methods using acoustic radiation force to create the shear waves. Phase aberration and tissue attenuation can hamper the generation of shear waves for in vivo applications. In this study, the effects of phase aberration and attenuation in ultrasound focusing for creating shear waves were explored. This includes the effects of phase shifts and amplitude attenuation on shear wave characteristics such as shear wave amplitude, shear wave speed, shear wave center frequency, and bandwidth. Two samples of swine belly tissue were used to create phase aberration and attenuation experimentally. To explore the phase aberration and attenuation effects individually, tissue experiments were complemented with ultrasound beam simulations using fast object-oriented C++ ultrasound simulator (FOCUS) and shear wave simulations using finite-element-model (FEM) analysis. The ultrasound frequency used to generate shear waves was varied from 3.0 to 4.5 MHz. Results: The measured acoustic pressure and resulting shear wave amplitude decreased approximately 40%-90% with the introduction of the tissue samples. Acoustic intensity and shear wave displacement were correlated for both tissue samples, and the resulting Pearson's correlation coefficients were 0.99 and 0.97. Analysis of shear wave generation with tissue samples (phase aberration and attenuation case), measured phase screen, (only phase aberration case), and FOCUS/FEM model (only attenuation case) showed that tissue attenuation affected the shear wave generation more than tissue aberration. Decreasing the ultrasound frequency helped maintain a focused beam for creation of shear waves in the presence of both phase aberration and attenuation.

  9. Roughness-dependent tribology effects on discontinuous shear thickening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chiao-Peng; Ramakrishna, Shivaprakash N; Zanini, Michele; Spencer, Nicholas D; Isa, Lucio

    2018-05-15

    Surface roughness affects many properties of colloids, from depletion and capillary interactions to their dispersibility and use as emulsion stabilizers. It also impacts particle-particle frictional contacts, which have recently emerged as being responsible for the discontinuous shear thickening (DST) of dense suspensions. Tribological properties of these contacts have been rarely experimentally accessed, especially for nonspherical particles. Here, we systematically tackle the effect of nanoscale surface roughness by producing a library of all-silica, raspberry-like colloids and linking their rheology to their tribology. Rougher surfaces lead to a significant anticipation of DST onset, in terms of both shear rate and solid loading. Strikingly, they also eliminate continuous thickening. DST is here due to the interlocking of asperities, which we have identified as "stick-slip" frictional contacts by measuring the sliding of the same particles via lateral force microscopy (LFM). Direct measurements of particle-particle friction therefore highlight the value of an engineering-tribology approach to tuning the thickening of suspensions. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  10. Effects of shearing on biogas production and microbial community structure during anaerobic digestion with recuperative thickening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shufan; Phan, Hop V; Bustamante, Heriberto; Guo, Wenshan; Ngo, Hao H; Nghiem, Long D

    2017-06-01

    Recuperative thickening can intensify anaerobic digestion to produce more biogas and potentially reduce biosolids odour. This study elucidates the effects of sludge shearing during the thickening process on the microbial community structure and its effect on biogas production. Medium shearing resulted in approximately 15% increase in biogas production. By contrast, excessive or high shearing led to a marked decrease in biogas production, possibly due to sludge disintegration and cell lysis. Microbial analysis using 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing showed that medium shearing increased the evenness and diversity of the microbial community in the anaerobic digester, which is consistent with the observed improved biogas production. By contrast, microbial diversity decreased under either excessive shearing or high shearing condition. In good agreement with the observed decrease in biogas production, the abundance of Bacteroidales and Syntrophobaterales (which are responsible for hydrolysis and acetogenesis) decreased due to high shearing during recuperative thickening. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Local effects in thin elastic shell due to thermal and mechanical loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taheri, S.

    1987-01-01

    For a thick cylinder (1/15)<(h/rm)<(1/3) the local effect is represented by the same field. When the local effect is negligible the Love-Kirchhoff solution is valid for a thick cylinder. A shear effect shell theory may give for a thin cylinder a large error compared to the exact 3D solution on a thermal shock. The Love-Kirchhoff solution is generally not valid in the vicinity of a clamped or simply supported edge. A finite element program of thin shell with shear effect or thick shell ist not really reliable. A combination of 3D local solution and Love-Kirchhoff global solution through a transition zone may replace a complete 3D solution for not very thick structures. (orig./GL)

  12. The Feasibility of Structural Health Monitoring Using the Fundamental Shear Horizontal Guided Wave in a Thin Aluminum Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Franklin Mansur Rodrigues Filho

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Structural health monitoring (SHM is emerging as an essential tool for constant monitoring of safety-critical engineering components. Ultrasonic guided waves stand out because of their ability to propagate over long distances and because they can offer good estimates of location, severity, and type of damage. The unique properties of the fundamental shear horizontal guided wave (SH0 mode have recently generated great interest among the SHM community. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of omnidirectional SH0 SHM in a thin aluminum plate using a three-transducer sparse array. Descriptions of the transducer, the finite element model, and the imaging algorithm are presented. The image localization maps show a good agreement between the simulations and experimental results. The SH0 SHM method proposed in this paper is shown to have a high resolution and to be able to locate defects within 5% of the true location. The short input signal as well the non-dispersive nature of SH0 leads to high resolution in the reconstructed images. The defect diameter estimated using the full width at half maximum was 10 mm or twice the size of the true diameter.

  13. Effects of nanoscale density inhomogeneities on shearing fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ben, Dalton,; Peter, Daivis,; Hansen, Jesper Schmidt

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that density inhomogeneities at the solid-liquid interface can have a strong effect on the velocity profile of a nanoconfined fluid in planar Poiseuille flow. However, it is difficult to control the density inhomogeneities induced by solid walls, making this type of system...... systems. Using the sinusoidal transverse force method to produce shearing velocity profiles and the sinusoidal longitudinal force method to produce inhomogeneous density profiles, we are able to observe the interactions between the two property inhomogeneities at the level of individual Fourier components....... This gives us a method for direct measurement of the coupling between the density and velocity fields and allows us to introduce various feedback control mechanisms which customize fluid behavior in individual Fourier components. We briefly discuss the role of temperature inhomogeneity and consider whether...

  14. Effect of fiber coating on interfacial shear strength of SiC/SiC by nano-indentation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinoki, T.; Zhang, W.; Kohyama, A.; Noda, T.

    1998-01-01

    In order to quantitatively evaluate mechanical properties of fibers, matrices and their interfaces in fiber reinforced SiC/SiC composites, fiber push-out tests have been carried out. From the indentation load vs. displacement relations, the fiber push-out process has been discussed in comparison with the C/C composites and the loads for fiber push-in and those for fiber push-out were estimated. The trends of load-displacement curve of fiber push-out process depended on specimen thickness. The curve in the case of thick specimen had a micro step indicating fiber push-in and a larger step corresponding to fiber push-out. However just a larger step indicating fiber push-out was seen without fiber push-in process in the case of thin specimen. Interfacial shear stress was discussed and defined in both cases. The effects of fiber coatings on interfacial shear stress obtained from thin specimens were analyzed. The relationship between bending stress and interfacial shear stress of SiC (pcs) /SiC (CVI) is preliminarily postulated together with microstructural characteristics of the composites. (orig.)

  15. Effect of rock joint roughness on its cyclic shear behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Mahdi Niktabar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Rock joints are often subjected to dynamic loads induced by earthquake and blasting during mining and rock cutting. Hence, cyclic shear load can be induced along the joints and it is important to evaluate the shear behavior of rock joint under this condition. In the present study, synthetic rock joints were prepared with plaster of Paris (PoP. Regular joints were simulated by keeping regular asperity with asperity angles of 15°–15° and 30°–30°, and irregular rock joints which are closer to natural joints were replicated by keeping the asperity angles of 15°–30° and 15°–45°. The sample size and amplitude of roughness were kept the same for both regular and irregular joints which were 298 mm × 298 mm × 125 mm and 5 mm, respectively. Shear test was performed on these joints using a large-scale direct shear testing machine by keeping the frequency and amplitude of shear load under constant cyclic condition with different normal stress values. As expected, the shear strength of rock joints increased with the increases in the asperity angle and normal load during the first cycle of shearing or static load. With the increase of the number of shear cycles, the shear strength decreased for all the asperity angles but the rate of reduction was more in case of high asperity angles. Test results indicated that shear strength of irregular joints was higher than that of regular joints at different cycles of shearing at low normal stress. Shearing and degradation of joint asperities on regular joints were the same between loading and unloading, but different for irregular joints. Shear strength and joint degradation were more significant on the slope of asperity with higher angles on the irregular joint until two angles of asperities became equal during the cycle of shearing and it started behaving like regular joints for subsequent cycles.

  16. investigation of shear strength parameters and effect of different

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    Keywords: Coconut husk ash; Compaction; Lateritic soil; Lime; Shear strength; Stabilization. 1. INTRODUCTION ... the cementation or interlocking of the soil particles [5]. Furthermore, it is ... of its siliceous, aluminous and iron oxide content [8].

  17. Effect of soft mode on shear viscosity of quark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukutome, Takahiko; Iwasaki, Masaharu

    2008-01-01

    We calculate the shear viscosity of quark matter at finite temperature and density. If we assume that the quark interacts with the soft mode, which is a collective mode of a quark-antiquark pair, the self-energy of the quark is calculated by quasi-particle random phase approximation. It is shown that its imaginary part is large and its mean free path is short. With the use of the Kubo formula, the shear viscosity of quark matter decreases. The Reynolds number of quark matter is estimated to be about 10. As temperature increases, shear viscosity increases gradually for T>200 MeV. Moreover it is shown that the shear viscosity also increases with the chemical potential for μ>200 MeV. (author)

  18. A thin rivulet or ridge subject to a uniform transverse shear stress at its free surface due to an external airflow

    KAUST Repository

    Sullivan, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    We use the lubrication approximation to analyze three closely related problems involving a thin rivulet or ridge (i.e., a two-dimensional droplet) of fluid subject to a prescribed uniform transverse shear stress at its free surface due to an external airflow, namely a rivulet draining under gravity down a vertical substrate, a rivulet driven by a longitudinal shear stress at its free surface, and a ridge on a horizontal substrate, and find qualitatively similar behaviour for all three problems. We show that, in agreement with previous numerical studies, the free surface profile of an equilibrium rivulet/ridge with pinned contact lines is skewed as the shear stress is increased from zero, and that there is a maximum value of the shear stress beyond which no solution with prescribed semi-width is possible. In practice, one or both of the contact lines will de-pin before this maximum value of the shear stress is reached, and so we consider situations in which the rivulet/ridge de-pins at one or both contact lines. In the case of de-pinning only at the advancing contact line, the rivulet/ridge is flattened and widened as the shear stress is increased from its critical value, and there is a second maximum value of the shear stress beyond which no solution with a prescribed advancing contact angle is possible. In contrast, in the case of de-pinning only at the receding contact line, the rivulet/ridge is thickened and narrowed as the shear stress is increased from its critical value, and there is a solution with a prescribed receding contact angle for all values of the shear stress. In general, in the case of de-pinning at both contact lines there is a critical "yield" value of the shear stress beyond which no equilibrium solution is possible and the rivulet/ridge will evolve unsteadily. In the Appendix, we show that an equilibrium rivulet/ridge with prescribed flux/area is quasi-statically stable to two-dimensional perturbations. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  19. Effect of coating thickness on interfacial shear behavior of zirconia-coated sapphire fibers in a polycrystalline alumina matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellmann, J.R.; Chou, Y.S.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of zirconia (ZrO 2 ) interfacial coatings on the interfacial shear behavior in sapphire reinforced alumina was examined in this study. Zirconia coatings of thicknesses ranging from 0.15 to 1.45 μm were applied to single crystal sapphire (Saphikon) fibers using a particulate loaded sol dipping technique. After calcining at 1,100 C in air, the coated fibers were incorporated into a polycrystalline alumina matrix via hot pressing. Interfacial shear strength and sliding behavior of the coated fibers was examined using thin-slice indentation fiber pushout and pushback techniques. In all cases, debonding and sliding occurred at the interface between the fibers and the coating. The coatings exhibited a dense microstructure and led to a higher interfacial shear strength (> 240 MPa) and interfacial sliding stress (> 75 MPa) relative to previous studies on the effect of a porous interphase on interfacial properties. The interfacial shear strength decreased with increasing fiber coating thickness (from 389 ± 59 to 241 ± 43 MPa for 0.15 to 1.45 microm thick coatings, respectively). Sliding behavior exhibited load modulation with increasing displacement during fiber sliding which is characteristic of fiber roughness-induced stick-slip. The high interfacial shear strengths and sliding stresses measured in this study, as well as the potentially strength degrading surface reconstruction observed on the coated fibers after hot pressing and heat treatment, indicate that dense zirconia coatings are not suitable candidates for optimizing composite toughness and strength in the sapphire fiber reinforced alumina system

  20. Effect of Sandblasting on Shear Bond Strength Composite Resin Veneer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octarina Octarina

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Attachment between restoration and enamel surface in indirect resin composite veneer restoration (IRCV is obtained using multi-step (MS resin cement. Recently, a one step self-adhesive dual-cured resin cement (SADRC was introduced. Objective: To determine the effect of sandblasting on shear bond strength (SBS of IRCV to enamel using MS resin cement and SADRC. Methods: Forty specimens of buccal surface of enamel human were light-cured in Solidilite chamber and were divided into two groups: IRCV without sandblasting (n=20 and with sandblasting for 10 seconds (n=20 and then bonded to enamel using MS (n=10 and SADRC (n=10, respectively. After 24h SBS of specimens were tested using a Universal Testing Machine. Data were analyzed statistically by one-way ANOVA. Results: The average SBS value of IRCV without SB and bonded with MS was 18.95+7.80MPa and MS with SB was 19.30+ SB (4.85+2.12MPa and SADRC with SB (9.57+3.45MPa(p<0.05. Conclusion: increased SBS VIRK to enamel using MS resin cement than SADRC.  

  1. An investigation on vulnerability assessment of steel structures with thin steel shear wall through development of fragility curves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Gerami

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Fragility curves play an important role in damage assessment of buildings. Probability of damage induction to the structure against seismic events can be investigated upon generation of afore mentioned curves. In current research 360 time history analyses have been carried out on structures of 3, 10 and 20 story height and subsequently fragility curves have been adopted. The curves are developed based on two indices of inter story drifts and equivalent strip axial strains of the shear wall. Time history analysis is carried out in Perform 3d considering 10 far field seismograms and 10 near fields. Analysis of low height structures revealed that they are more vulnerable in accelerations lower than 0.8 g in near field earthquakes because of higher mode effects. Upon the generated fragility curves it was observed that middle and high structures have more acceptable performance and lower damage levels compared to low height structures in both near and far field seismic hazards.

  2. Experimental and numerical models of three-dimensional gravity-driven flow of shear-thinning polymer solutions used in vaginal delivery of microbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheyfets, Vitaly O; Kieweg, Sarah L

    2013-06-01

    HIV/AIDS is a growing global pandemic. A microbicide is a formulation of a pharmaceutical agent suspended in a delivery vehicle, and can be used by women to protect themselves against HIV infection during intercourse. We have developed a three-dimensional (3D) computational model of a shear-thinning power-law fluid spreading under the influence of gravity to represent the distribution of a microbicide gel over the vaginal epithelium. This model, accompanied by a new experimental methodology, is a step in developing a tool for optimizing a delivery vehicle's structure/function relationship for clinical application. We compare our model with experiments in order to identify critical considerations for simulating 3D free-surface flows of shear-thinning fluids. Here we found that neglecting lateral spreading, when modeling gravity-induced flow, resulted in up to 47% overestimation of the experimental axial spreading after 90 s. In contrast, the inclusion of lateral spreading in 3D computational models resulted in rms errors in axial spreading under 7%. In addition, the choice of the initial condition for shape in the numerical simulation influences the model's ability to describe early time spreading behavior. Finally, we present a parametric study and sensitivity analysis of the power-law parameters' influence on axial spreading, and to examine the impact of changing rheological properties as a result of dilution or formulation conditions. Both the shear-thinning index (n) and consistency (m) impacted the spreading length and deceleration of the moving front. The sensitivity analysis showed that gels with midrange m and n values (for the ranges in this study) would be most sensitive (over 8% changes in spreading length) to 10% changes (e.g., from dilution) in both rheological properties. This work is applicable to many industrial and geophysical thin-film flow applications of non-Newtonian fluids; in addition to biological applications in microbicide drug delivery.

  3. Experimental investigation of edge sheared flow development and configuration effects in the TJ-II stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedrosa, M.A.; Hidalgo, C.; Alonso, A.; Calderon, E.; Orozco, O.; Pablos, J.L. de

    2005-01-01

    Experimental results have shown that the generation of spontaneous perpendicular sheared flow (i.e. the naturally occurring shear layer) requires a minimum plasma density or gradient in the TJ-II stellarator. This finding has been observed by means of multiple plasma diagnostics, including probes, fast cameras, reflectometry and HIBP. The obtained shearing rate of the naturally occurring shear layer results in general comparable to the one observed during biasing-improved confinement regimes. It has been found that there is a coupling between the onset of sheared flow development and an increase in the level of plasma edge fluctuations pointing to turbulence as the main ingredient of the radial electric field drive; once the shear flow develops the level of turbulence tends to decrease. The link between the development of sheared flows and plasma density in TJ-II has been observed in different magnetic configurations and plasma regimes. Preliminary results show that the threshold density value depends on the iota value and on the magnetic ripple (plasma volume). Recent experiments carried out in the LHD stellarator have shown that edge sheared flows are also affected by the magnitude of edge magnetic ripple: the threshold density to trigger edge sheared flows increases with magnetic ripple . Those results have been interpreted as an evidence of the importance of neoclassical effect in the physics of ExB sheared flows. For some TJ-II magnetic configurations with higher edge iota (ι/2π≥ 1.8) there is a sharp increase in the edge density gradient simultaneous to a strong reduction of fluctuations and transport and a slight increase of the shearing rate and perpendicular rotation (≥2 km/s) as density increases above the threshold. The role of the edge ripple, the presence of edge rational surfaces and properties of turbulent transport are considered as possible ingredients to explain the spontaneous development of edge sheared flows in TJ-II. (author)

  4. The effects of shear and normal stress paths on rock friction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, W.A.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of variable normal stress on the coefficient of friction of smooth artificial surfaces in welded tuff was studied. The shear stress response to changes in normal stress during constant-velocity sliding suggests that friction depends on the history of the normal stress; or, more generally, the path in shear/normal stress space. 6 refs., 5 figs

  5. Shear zone nucleation and deformation transient: effect of heterogeneities and loading conditions in experimentally deformed calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, L. F. G.; Rybacki, E.; Dresen, G. H.; Kilian, R.

    2015-12-01

    In the Earth's middle to lower crust, strain is frequently localized along ductile shear zones, which commonly nucleate at structural and material heterogeneities. To investigate shear zone nucleation and development due to heterogeneities, we performed constant strain-rate (CSR) and constant stress (CS) simple shear (torsion) deformation experiments on Carrara marble samples containing weak (limestone) inclusions. The experiments were conducted in a Paterson-type gas deformation apparatus at 900 °C temperature and 400 MPa confining pressure and maximum bulk shear strains of 3. Peak shear stress was about 20 MPa for all the samples, followed by smooth weakening and steady state behavior. The strain is predominantly localized in the host marble within the process zone in front of the inclusion, defined by a zone of intense grain size reduction due to dynamic recrystallization. In CS tests a narrow shear zone developed in front of the inclusion, whereas in CSR experiments the deformation is more heterogeneously distributed, up to g=3.. In the later, secondary foliations oblique to the process zone and alternating thin, high-strain layers are common. In samples deformed at the same shear strain (g=1), the average recrystallized grain size in the process zone is similar for CS and CSR conditions. Crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) measurements shows that different grain sizes have slightly different CPO patterns. CPO strength varies for different grain sizes, with a CPO strength peak between 40-50 μm, decreasing progressively within smaller grain size, but with secondary peaks for different coarse-grained sizes. Our observations suggest that the initial formation and transient deformation of shear zones is strongly affected by loading conditions.

  6. Effect of temperature on the rheological properties with shear stress limit of iron oxide nanoparticle modified bentonite drilling muds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed S. Mohammed

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect of temperature on the rheological properties and weight loss of a water based bentonite drilling mud modified with iron oxide nanoparticle (nanoFe2O3 was investigated. The bentonite contents in the drilling muds were varied up to 6% by the weight of water and temperature was varied from 25 °C to 85 °C. The nanoFe2O3 content was varied between 0 and 1% by the weight of the drilling mud to modify the rheological properties of the drilling mud. The nanoFe2O3 and bentonite clay were characterized using the X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA. In the TGA study, the total weight loss at 800 °C for the bentonite decreased from 13% to 1.16%, a 91% reduction when the bentonite clay was mixed with 1% of nanoFe2O3. The results also showed that 1% of nanoFe2O3 increased the rheological properties of the drilling mud. The nanoFe2O3 modification increased the yield stress (τo and plastic viscosity (PV by 45–200% and 20–105% respectively based on the bentonite content and temperature of the drilling mud. The shear thinning behavior of the bentonite drilling mud with and without nanoFe2O3 has been quantified using the hyperbolic model and compared with three parameters Herschel–Bulkley model. The results showed that the hyperbolic model predicted the shear thinning relationship between the shear stress and shear strain rate of the nanoFe2O3 modified bentonite drilling mud very well. Also the hyperbolic model has a maximum shear stress limit whereas the Herschel–Bulkley model did not have a limit on the maximum shear stress. Based on the hyperbolic model the maximum shear stress for the 2%, 4% and 6% bentonite drilling muds without nanoFe2O3 at room temperature were 25 Pa, 35 Pa and 51 Pa respectively. The maximum shear stress for the 2%, 4% and 6% bentonite drilling muds modified with 1% nanoFe2O3 at 25 °C were 59 Pa, 84 Pa and 140 Pa respectively, hence an increase of 135–175

  7. Laboratory Studies on the Effects of Shear on Fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neitzel, Duane A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Dauble, Dennis D.; Mueller, Robert P.; Moursund, Russell A.; Abernethy, Cary S.; Guensch, Greg R.

    2000-09-20

    The overall objective of our studies was to specify an index describing the hydraulic force that fish experience when subjected to a shear environment. Fluid shear is a phenomenon that is important to fish. However, elevated levels of shear may result in strain rates that injure or kill fish. At hydroelectric generating facilities, concerns have been expressed that strain rates associated with passage through turbines, spillways, and fish bypass systems may adversely affect migrating fish. Development of fish friendly hydroelectric turbines requires knowledge of the physical forces (injury mechanisms) that impact entrained fish and the fish's tolerance to these forces. It requires up-front, pre-design specifications for the environmental conditions that occur within the turbine system, in other words, determining or assuming that those conditions known to injure fish will provide the descriptions of conditions that engineers must consider in the design of a turbine system. These biological specifications must be carefully and thoroughly documented throughout the design of a fish friendly turbine. To address the development of biological specifications, we designed and built a test facility where juvenile fish could be subjected to a range of shear environments and quantified their biological response.

  8. investigation of shear strength parameters and effect of different

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    of shear stress that will result in yielding of a soil mass under load and is ... in this research work was to offset the cost required for .... American Association of State Highway and ..... [15] British Standard Institute, Methods of testing soils.

  9. Effect of magnetic shear on dissipative drift instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzdar, P.N.; Chen, L.; Kaw, P.K.; Oberman, C.

    1978-03-01

    In this letter we report the results of a linear radial eigenmode analysis of dissipative drift waves in a plasma with magnetic shear and spatially varying density gradient. The results of the analysis are shown to be consistent with a recent experiment on the study of dissipative drift instabilities in a toroidal stellarator

  10. Shear flow effects on ion thermal transport in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, T.; Horton, W.; Dong, J.Q.; Kishimoto, Y.

    1995-03-01

    From various laboratory and numerical experiments, there is clear evidence that under certain conditions the presence of sheared flows in a tokamak plasma can significantly reduce the ion thermal transport. In the presence of plasma fluctuations driven by the ion temperature gradient, the flows of energy and momentum parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field are coupled with each other. This coupling manifests itself as significant off-diagonal coupling coefficients that give rise to new terms for anomalous transport. The authors derive from the gyrokinetic equation a set of velocity moment equations that describe the interaction among plasma turbulent fluctuations, the temperature gradient, the toroidal velocity shear, and the poloidal flow in a tokamak plasma. Four coupled equations for the amplitudes of the state variables radially extended over the transport region by toroidicity induced coupling are derived. The equations show bifurcations from the low confinement mode without sheared flows to high confinement mode with substantially reduced transport due to strong shear flows. Also discussed is the reduced version with three state variables. In the presence of sheared flows, the radially extended coupled toroidal modes driven by the ion temperature gradient disintegrate into smaller, less elongated vortices. Such a transition to smaller spatial correlation lengths changes the transport from Bohm-like to gyrobohm-like. The properties of these equations are analyzed. The conditions for the improved confined regime are obtained as a function of the momentum-energy deposition rates and profiles. The appearance of a transport barrier is a consequence of the present theory

  11. Understanding and representing the effect of wind shear on the turbulent transfer in the convective boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronda, R.J.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Pino, D.

    2012-01-01

    Goal of this study is to quantify the effect of wind shear on the turbulent transport in the dry Convective Boundary Layer (CBL). Questions addressed include the effect of wind shear on the depth of the mixed layer, the effect of wind shear on the depth and structure of the capping inversion, and

  12. The effects of polymer molecular weight on filament thinning and drop breakup in microchannels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arratia, P E; Cramer, L-A; Gollub, J P; Durian, D J

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the effects of fluid elasticity on the dynamics of filament thinning and drop breakup processes in a cross-slot microchannel. Elasticity effects are examined using dilute aqueous polymeric solutions of molecular weight (MW) ranging from 1.5x10 3 to 1.8x10 7 . Results for polymeric fluids are compared to those for a viscous Newtonian fluid. The shearing or continuous phase that induces breakup is mineral oil. All fluids possess similar shear-viscosity (∼0.2 Pa s) so that the viscosity ratio between the oil and aqueous phases is close to unity. Measurements of filament thickness as a function of time show different thinning behavior for the different aqueous fluids. For Newtonian fluids, the thinning process shows a single exponential decay of the filament thickness. For low MW fluids (10 3 , 10 4 and 10 5 ), the thinning process also shows a single exponential decay, but with a decay rate that is slower than for the Newtonian fluid. The decay time increases with polymer MW. For high MW (10 6 and 10 7 ) fluids, the initial exponential decay crosses over to a second exponential decay in which elastic stresses are important. We show that the decay rate of the filament thickness in this exponential decay regime can be used to measure the steady extensional viscosity of the fluids. At late times, all fluids cross over to an algebraic decay which is driven mainly by surface tension.

  13. Modeling of Metallic Glass Matrix Composites Under Compression: Microstructure Effect on Shear Band Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yunpeng; Qiu, Kun; Sun, Longgang; Wu, Qingqing

    2018-01-01

    The relationship among processing, microstructure, and mechanical performance is the most important for metallic glass matrix composites (MGCs). Numerical modeling was performed on the shear banding in MGCs, and the impacts of particle concentration, morphology, agglomerate, size, and thermal residual stress were revealed. Based on the shear damage criterion, the equivalent plastic strain acted as an internal state variable to depict the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of shear bands. The element deletion technique was employed to describe the process of transformation from shear band to micro-crack. The impedance effect of particle morphology on the propagation of shear bands was discussed, whereby the toughening mechanism was clearly interpreted. The present work contributes to the subsequent strengthening and toughening design of MGCs.

  14. Shear effects on crystallization behaviors and structure transitions of isotactic poly-1-butene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Jingqing; Guan, Peipei; Zhang, Yao

    2014-01-01

    Different melt pre-shear conditions were applied to isotactic poly-1-butene (iP-1-B) and the effect on the crystallization behaviors and the crystalline structure transitions of iP-1-B were investigated. The polarized optical microscope observations during isothermal crystallization process...... revealed that the applied melt pre-shear within the experimental range could enhance the nucleation of crystal II and accelerate the diameter growth of the formed spherulites. If the applied melt pre-shear rate was large enough, Shish-Kebabs structure could be formed. After the isothermal crystallization...... was formed in the melt pre-sheared iP-1-B samples. Further investigations were applied with synchrotron radiation instruments. Wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) after the crystal transition showed that the applied melt pre-shear could result in orientated fine...

  15. Effect of shear stress on the migration of hepatic stellate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sera, Toshihiro; Sumii, Tateki; Fujita, Ryosuke; Kudo, Susumu

    2018-01-01

    When the liver is damaged, hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) can change into an activated, highly migratory state. The migration of HSCs may be affected by shear stress due not only to sinusoidal flow but also by the flow in the space of Disse because this space is filled with blood plasma. In this study, we evaluated the effects of shear stress on HSC migration in a scratch-wound assay with a parallel flow chamber. At regions upstream of the wound area, the migration was inhibited by 0.6 Pa and promoted by 2.0 Pa shear stress, compared to the static condition. The platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB receptor, PDGFR-β, was expressed in all conditions and the differences were not significant. PDGF increased HSC migration, except at 0.6 Pa shear stress, which was still inhibited. These results indicate that another molecular factor, such as PDGFR-α, may act to inhibit the migration under low shear stress. At regions downstream of the wound area, the migration was smaller under shear stress than under the static condition, although the expression of PDGFR-β was significantly higher. In particular, the migration direction was opposite to the wound area under high shear stress; therefore, migration might be influenced by the intercellular environment. Our results indicate that HSC migration was influenced by shear stress intensity and the intercellular environment.

  16. Finite Element Simulation of the Shear Effect of Ultrasonic on Heat Exchanger Descaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shaolv; Wang, Zhihua; Wang, Hehui

    2018-03-01

    The shear effect on the interface of metal plate and its attached scale is an important mechanism of ultrasonic descaling, which is caused by the different propagation speed of ultrasonic wave in two different mediums. The propagating of ultrasonic wave on the shell is simulated based on the ANSYS/LS-DYNA explicit dynamic analysis. The distribution of shear stress in different paths under ultrasonic vibration is obtained through the finite element analysis and it reveals the main descaling mechanism of shear effect. The simulation result is helpful and enlightening to the reasonable design and the application of the ultrasonic scaling technology on heat exchanger.

  17. The effect of existing turbulence on stratified shear instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Alexis; Smyth, William

    2017-11-01

    Ocean turbulence is an essential process governing, for example, heat uptake by the ocean. In the stably-stratified ocean interior, this turbulence occurs in discrete events driven by vertical variations of the horizontal velocity. Typically, these events have been modelled by assuming an initially laminar stratified shear flow which develops wavelike instabilities, becomes fully turbulent, and then relaminarizes into a stable state. However, in the real ocean there is always some level of turbulence left over from previous events, and it is not yet understood how this turbulence impacts the evolution of future mixing events. Here, we perform a series of direct numerical simulations of turbulent events developing in stratified shear flows that are already at least weakly turbulent. We do so by varying the amplitude of the initial perturbations, and examine the subsequent development of the instability and the impact on the resulting turbulent fluxes. This work is supported by NSF Grant OCE1537173.

  18. Effects of opening in shear walls of 30- storey building

    OpenAIRE

    Ruchi Sharma; Jignesh A Amin

    2015-01-01

    Tall towers and multi-storey buildings have fascinated mankind from the beginning of civilization, their construction being initially for defense and subsequently for ecclesiastical purposes. These tall buildings because of its height, is affected by lateral forces due to wind or earthquake actions tends to snap the building in shear and push it over in bending. In general, the rigidity (i.e. Resistance to lateral deflection) and stability (i.e. Resistance to overturning moments) requirement ...

  19. Modelling of shear effects on thermal and particle transport in advanced Tokamak scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, D.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Baker, D.R.

    1999-01-01

    Evolution of thermal and particle internal transport barriers (ITBs) is studied by modelling the time-dependent energy and particle balance in DIII-D plasmas with reversed magnetic shear configurations and in JET discharges with monotonic or slightly reversed q-profiles and large ExB rotation shear. Simulations are performed with semi-empirical models for anomalous diffusion and particle pinch. Stabilizing effects of magnetic and ExB rotation shears are included in anomalous particle and heat diffusivity. Shear effects on particle and thermal transport are compared. Improved particle and energy confinement with the formation of an internal transport barrier (ITB) has been produced in DIII-D plasmas during current ramp-up accompanied with neutral beam injection (NBI). These plasmas are characterized by strong reversed magnetic shear and large ExB rotation shear which provide the reduction of anomalous fluxes. The formation of ITB's in the optimized shear (OS) JET scenario starts with strong NBI heating in a target plasma with a flat or slightly reversed q-profile pre-formed during current ramp-up with ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH). Our paper presents the modelling of particle and thermal transport for these scenarios. (authors)

  20. Development of Test Method for Simple Shear and Prediction of Hardening Behavior Considering the Branchings Effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dongwook; Bang, Sungsik; Kim, Minsoo; Lee, Hyungyil; Kim, Naksoo

    2013-01-01

    In this study we establish a process to predict hardening behavior considering the Branchings effect for zircaloy-4 sheets. When a metal is compressed after tension in forming, the yield strength decreases. For this reason, the Branchings effect should be considered in FE simulations of spring-back. We suggested a suitable specimen size and a method for determining the optimum tightening torque for simple shear tests. Shear stress-strain curves are obtained for five materials. We developed a method to convert the shear load-displacement curve to the effective stress-strain curve with Fea. We simulated the simple shear forward/reverse test using the combined isotropic/kinematic hardening model. We also investigated the change of the load-displacement curve by varying the hardening coefficients. We determined the hardening coefficients so that they follow the hardening behavior of zircaloy-4 in experiments

  1. Development of Test Method for Simple Shear and Prediction of Hardening Behavior Considering the Branchings Effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dongwook; Bang, Sungsik; Kim, Minsoo; Lee, Hyungyil; Kim, Naksoo [Sogang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In this study we establish a process to predict hardening behavior considering the Branchings effect for zircaloy-4 sheets. When a metal is compressed after tension in forming, the yield strength decreases. For this reason, the Branchings effect should be considered in FE simulations of spring-back. We suggested a suitable specimen size and a method for determining the optimum tightening torque for simple shear tests. Shear stress-strain curves are obtained for five materials. We developed a method to convert the shear load-displacement curve to the effective stress-strain curve with Fea. We simulated the simple shear forward/reverse test using the combined isotropic/kinematic hardening model. We also investigated the change of the load-displacement curve by varying the hardening coefficients. We determined the hardening coefficients so that they follow the hardening behavior of zircaloy-4 in experiments.

  2. Passivation Effects in Copper Thin Films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiederhirn, G.; Nucci, J.; Richter, G.; Arzt, E.; Balk, T. J.; Dehm, G.

    2006-01-01

    We studied the influence of a 10 nm AlxOy passivation on the stress-temperature behavior of 100 nm and 1 μm thick Cu films. At low temperatures, the passivation induces a large tensile stress increase in the 100 nm film; however, its effect on the 1 μm film is negligible. At high temperatures, the opposite behavior is observed; while the passivation does not change the 100 nm film behavior, it strengthens the 1 μm film by driving it deeper into compression. These observations are explained in light of a combination of constrained diffusional creep and dislocation dynamics unique to ultra-thin films

  3. Effects of biaxial oscillatory shear stress on endothelial cell proliferation and morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Amlan; Chakraborty, Sutirtha; Jala, Venkatakrishna R; Haribabu, Bodduluri; Sharp, M Keith; Berson, R Eric

    2012-03-01

    Wall shear stress (WSS) on anchored cells affects their responses, including cell proliferation and morphology. In this study, the effects of the directionality of pulsatile WSS on endothelial cell proliferation and morphology were investigated for cells grown in a Petri dish orbiting on a shaker platform. Time and location dependent WSS was determined by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). At low orbital speed (50 rpm), WSS was shown to be uniform (0-1 dyne/cm(2)) across the bottom of the dish, while at higher orbital speed (100 and 150 rpm), WSS remained fairly uniform near the center and fluctuated significantly (0-9 dyne/cm(2)) near the side walls of the dish. Since WSS on the bottom of the dish is two-dimensional, a new directional oscillatory shear index (DOSI) was developed to quantify the directionality of oscillating shear. DOSI approached zero for biaxial oscillatory shear of equal magnitudes near the center and approached one for uniaxial pulsatile shear near the wall, where large tangential WSS dominated a much smaller radial component. Near the center (low DOSI), more, smaller and less elongated cells grew, whereas larger cells with greater elongation were observed in the more uniaxial oscillatory shear (high DOSI) near the periphery of the dish. Further, cells aligned with the direction of the largest component of shear but were randomly oriented in low magnitude biaxial shear. Statistical analyses of the individual and interacting effects of multiple factors (DOSI, shear magnitudes and orbital speeds) showed that DOSI significantly affected all the responses, indicating that directionality is an important determinant of cellular responses. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Rheology of polyaniline-dinonylnaphthalene disulfonic acid (DNNDSA) montmorillonite clay nanocomposites in the sol state: shear thinning versus pseudo-solid behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garai, Ashesh; Nandi, Arun K

    2008-04-01

    The melt rheology of polyaniline (PANI)-dinonylnaphthalenedisulfonic acid (DNNDSA) gel nanocomposites (GNCs) with organically modified (modified with cetyl trimethylammonium bromide)-montmorillonite (om-MMT) clay has been studied for three different clay concentrations at the temperature range 120-160 degrees C. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dc-conductivity data (approximately 10(-3) S/cm) indicate that the PANI-DNNDSA melt is in sol state and it is not de-doped at that condition. The WAXS data indicate that in GNC-1 sol clay tactoids are in exfoliated state but in the other sols they are in intercalated state. The zero shear viscosity (eta0), storage modulus (G') and loss modulus (G") increase than that of pure gel in the GNCs. The pure sol and the sols of gel nanocomposites (GNCs) exhibit Newtonian behavior for low shear rate (clay concentration and the power law index (n) decreases with increase in clay concentration in the GNCs indicating increased shear thinning for the clay addition. Thus the sols of om-clay nanocomposites of PANI-DNNDSA system are easily processible. The storage modulus (G') of GNC sols are higher than that of pure PANI-DNNDSA sol, GNC1 sol shows a maximum of 733% increase in storage modulus and the percent increase decreases with increase in temperature. Exfoliated nature of clay tactoids has been attributed for the above dramatic increase of G'. The PANI-DNNDSA sol nanocomposites behave as a pseudo-solid at higher frequency where G' and loss modulus (G") show a crossover point in the frequency sweep experiment at a fixed temperature. The crossover frequency decreases with increase in clay concentration and it increases with increase in temperature for GNC sols. The pseudo-solid behavior has been explained from jamming or network formation of clay tactoids under shear. A probable explanation of the two apparently contradictory phenomena

  5. Effect of Re on stacking fault nucleation under shear strain in Ni by atomistic simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zheng-Guang; Wang Chong-Yu; Yu Tao

    2014-01-01

    The effect of Re on stacking fault (SF) nucleation under shear strain in Ni is investigated using the climbing image nudged elastic band method with a Ni—Al—Re embedded-atom-method potential. A parameter (ΔE sf b ), the activation energy of SF nucleation under shear strain, is introduced to evaluate the effect of Re on SF nucleation under shear strain. Calculation results show that ΔE sf b decreases with Re addition, which means that SF nucleation under shear strain in Ni may be enhanced by Re. The atomic structure observation shows that the decrease of ΔE sf b may be due to the expansion of local structure around the Re atom when SF goes through the Re atom. (rapid communication)

  6. Effect of mid-thickness rebar mesh on the behavior and punching shear strength of interior slab–column connection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Ibrahim

    2016-12-01

    The obtained results indicate that, the proposed shear reinforcement system has a positive effect in the enhancement of both the punching shear capacity and the strain energy of interior slab–column connection of both normal and high strength concrete. The general finite element software ANSYS can be used successfully to simulate the punching shear behavior of reinforced concrete flat plates.

  7. Fatigue life assessment of thin-walled welded joints under non-proportional load-time histories by the shear stress rate integral approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bolchoun

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue life tests under constant and variable amplitude loadings were performed on the tube-tube thin-walled welded specimens made of magnesium (AZ31 and AZ61 alloys. The tests included pure axial, pure torsional and combined in-phase and out-of-phase loadings with the load ratio  RR " ", " " 1  . For the tests with variable amplitude loads a Gaußdistributed loading spectrum with S L 4 5 10  cycles was used. Since magnesium welds show a fatigue life reduction under out-of-phase loads, a stress-based method, which takes this behavior into account, is proposed. The out-of-phase loading results in rotating shear stress vectors in the section planes, which are not orthogonal to the surface. This fact is used in order to provide an out-of-phase measure of the load. This measure is computed as an area covered by the shear stress vectors in all planes over a certain time interval, its computation involves the shear stress and the shear stress rate vectors in the individual planes. Fatigue life evaluation for the variable amplitudes loadings is performed using the Palmgren-Miner linear damage accumulation, whereas the total damage of every cycle is split up into two components: the amplitude component and the out-of-phase component. In order to compute the two components a modification of the rainflow counting method, which keeps track of the time intervals, where the cycles occur, must be used. The proposed method also takes into account different slopes of the pure axial and the pure torsional Wöhler-line by means of a Wöhler-line interpolation for combined loadings

  8. Effect of surface shear on cube texture formation in heavy cold-rolled Cu-45 at%Ni alloy substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Hui; Suo, Hongli; Liang, Yaru

    2015-01-01

    Two types of Cu-45 at%Ni alloy thin tapes with and without surface shear were obtained by different heavy cold rolling processes. The deformation and recrystallization textures of the two tapes were thoroughly investigated by electron back scattering diffraction technique. The results showed...... that a shear texture mainly covered the surface of the heavy deformed tapes because of the fraction between the surface of rolling mills and the thin tapes when the rolling force strongly reduced at high strain, which significantly reduced the fraction of rolling texture on the surface of the Cu-45at %Ni alloy...

  9. [Effects of surface treatment and adhesive application on shear bond strength between zirconia and enamel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinghui; Wu, Buling; Sun, Fengyang

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the effects of sandblasting and different orthodontic adhesives on shear bond strength between zirconia and enamel. Zirconia ceramic samples were designed and manufactured for 40 extracted human maxillary first premolars with CAD/CAM system. The samples were randomized into 4 groups for surface treatment with sandblasting and non-treated with adhesives of 3M Transbond XT or Jingjin dental enamel bonding resin. After 24 h of bonded fixation, the shear bond strengths were measured by universal mechanical testing machine and analyzed with factorial variance analysis. The shear bond strength was significantly higher in sandblasting group than in untreated group (Padhesives of Transbond XT and dental enamel bonding resin (P>0.05). The shear bond strength between zirconia and enamel is sufficient after sandblasting regardless of the application of either adhesive.

  10. Impact effects in thin-walled structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zukas, J.A.; Gaskill, B.

    1996-01-01

    A key parameter in the design of protective structures is the critical impact velocity, also known as the ballistic limit. This is the velocity below which a striker will fail to penetrate a barrier or some protective device. For strikers with regular shapes, such as cylinders (long and short), spheres and cones, analytical and empirical formulations for the determination of a ballistic limit exist at impact velocities ranging from 250 m/s to 6 km/s or higher. For non-standard shapes, two- and three-dimensional wave propagation codes (hydrocodes) can be valuable adjuncts to experiments in ballistic limit determinations. This is illustrated with the help of the ZeuS code in determining the ballistic limit of a short, tubular projectile striking a thin aluminum barrier and contrasting it to the value of the ballistic limit of a spherical projectile of equal mass against the same target. Several interesting features of the debris cloud generated by a tubular projectile striking a Whipple shield at hypervelocity are also pointed out. The paper concludes with a consideration of hydrodynamic ram effects in fluid-filled thin-walled structures. Where possible, comparisons are made of computed results with experimental data

  11. Effect of shear span, concrete strength and strrup spacing on behavior of pre-stressed concrete beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, S.; Bukhari, I.A.

    2007-01-01

    The shear strength of pre-stressed concrete beams is one of the most important factors to be considered in their design. The available data on shear behavior of pre-tensioned prestressed concrete beams is very limited. In this experimental study, pre-tensioned prestressed concrete I-beams are fabricated with normal and high- strength concretes, varying stirrup spacing and shear span-to-depth ratios. 1Wenty one I-beam specimens that are 300 mm deep and 3745-4960mm long are tested up to failure while deflections, cracking pattern, cracking and failure loads were recorded. The research results are compared with ACI 318-02 and Structure Analysis Program, Response 2000. It was observed that with the decrease in concrete strength, failure mode of prestressed concrete beams changes from flexure shear to web shear cracking for values of shear span-to-depth ratio less than 4.75. Increase in stirrup spacing decreased the effectiveness of stirrups in transmitting shear across crack as a result of which failure mode is changed to web shear cracking especially for beams with lower values of shear span-to-depth ratios. ACI code underestimates the shear carrying capacity of prestressed concrete beams with lower values of shear span- to-depth ratios. Response 2000 can be used more effectively in predicting shear behavior of normal strength prestressed concrete beams. (author)

  12. Nanostructured thin film coatings with different strengthening effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panfilov Yury

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of articles on strengthening thin film coatings were analyzed and a lot of unusual strengthening effects, such as super high hardness and plasticity simultaneously, ultra low friction coefficient, high wear-resistance, curve rigidity increasing of drills with small diameter, associated with process formation of nanostructured coatings by the different thin film deposition methods were detected. Vacuum coater with RF magnetron sputtering system and ion-beam source and arc evaporator for nanostructured thin film coating manufacture are represented. Diamond Like Carbon and MoS2 thin film coatings, Ti, Al, Nb, Cr, nitride, carbide, and carbo-nitride thin film materials are described as strengthening coatings.

  13. An investigation on vulnerability assessment of steel structures with thin steel shear wall through development of fragility curves

    OpenAIRE

    Mohsen Gerami; Saeed Ghaffari; Amir Mahdi Heidari Tafreshi

    2017-01-01

    Fragility curves play an important role in damage assessment of buildings. Probability of damage induction to the structure against seismic events can be investigated upon generation of afore mentioned curves. In current research 360 time history analyses have been carried out on structures of 3, 10 and 20 story height and subsequently fragility curves have been adopted. The curves are developed based on two indices of inter story drifts and equivalent strip axial strains of the shear wall. T...

  14. Effect of Shear Applied During a Pharmaceutical Process on Near Infrared Spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Eduardo; Pawar, Pallavi; Rodriguez, Sandra; Lysenko, Sergiy; Muzzio, Fernando J; Romañach, Rodolfo J

    2016-03-01

    This study describes changes observed in the near-infrared (NIR) diffuse reflectance (DR) spectra of pharmaceutical tablets after these tablets were subjected to different levels of strain (exposure to shear) during the mixing process. Powder shearing is important in the mixing of powders that are cohesive. Shear stress is created in a system by moving one surface over another causing displacements in the direction of the moving surface and is part of the mixing dynamics of particulates in many industries including the pharmaceutical industry. In continuous mixing, shear strain is developed within the process when powder particles are in constant movement and can affect the quality attributes of the final product such as dissolution. These changes in the NIR spectra could affect results obtained from NIR calibration models. The aim of the study was to understand changes in the NIR diffuse reflectance spectra that can be associated with different levels of strain developed during blend shearing of laboratory samples. Shear was applied using a Couette cell and tablets were produced using a tablet press emulator. Tablets with different shear levels were measured using NIR spectroscopy in the diffuse reflectance mode. The NIR spectra were baseline corrected to maintain the scattering effect associated with the physical properties of the tablet surface. Principal component analysis was used to establish the principal sources of variation within the samples. The angular dependence of elastic light scattering shows that the shear treatment reduces the size of particles and produces their uniform and highly isotropic distribution. Tablet compaction further reduces the diffuse component of scattering due to realignment of particles. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Effects of Particle Size on the Shear Behavior of Coarse Grained Soils Reinforced with Geogrid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daehyeon Kim

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to design civil structures that are supported by soils, the shear strength parameters of soils are required. Due to the large particle size of coarse-grained soils, large direct shear tests should be performed. In this study, large direct shear tests on three types of coarse grained soils (4.5 mm, 7.9 mm, and 15.9 mm were performed to evaluate the effects of particle size on the shear behavior of coarse grained soils with/without geogrid reinforcements. Based on the direct shear test results, it was found that, in the case of no-reinforcement, the larger the maximum particle size became, the larger the friction angle was. Compared with the no-reinforcement case, the cases reinforced with either soft geogrid or stiff geogrid have smaller friction angles. The cohesion of the soil reinforced with stiff geogrid was larger than that of the soil reinforced with soft geogrid. The difference in the shear strength occurs because the case with a stiff geogrid has more soil to geogrid contact area, leading to the reduction in interlocking between soil particles.

  16. Effects of Particle Size on the Shear Behavior of Coarse Grained Soils Reinforced with Geogrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daehyeon; Ha, Sungwoo

    2014-02-07

    In order to design civil structures that are supported by soils, the shear strength parameters of soils are required. Due to the large particle size of coarse-grained soils, large direct shear tests should be performed. In this study, large direct shear tests on three types of coarse grained soils (4.5 mm, 7.9 mm, and 15.9 mm) were performed to evaluate the effects of particle size on the shear behavior of coarse grained soils with/without geogrid reinforcements. Based on the direct shear test results, it was found that, in the case of no-reinforcement, the larger the maximum particle size became, the larger the friction angle was. Compared with the no-reinforcement case, the cases reinforced with either soft geogrid or stiff geogrid have smaller friction angles. The cohesion of the soil reinforced with stiff geogrid was larger than that of the soil reinforced with soft geogrid. The difference in the shear strength occurs because the case with a stiff geogrid has more soil to geogrid contact area, leading to the reduction in interlocking between soil particles.

  17. Simulated effect on the compressive and shear mechanical properties of bionic integrated honeycomb plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chenglin; Chen, Jinxiang; Wu, Zhishen; Xie, Juan; Zu, Qiao; Lu, Yun

    2015-05-01

    Honeycomb plates can be applied in many fields, including furniture manufacturing, mechanical engineering, civil engineering, transportation and aerospace. In the present study, we discuss the simulated effect on the mechanical properties of bionic integrated honeycomb plates by investigating the compressive and shear failure modes and the mechanical properties of trabeculae reinforced by long or short fibers. The results indicate that the simulated effect represents approximately 80% and 70% of the compressive and shear strengths, respectively. Compared with existing bionic samples, the mass-specific strength was significantly improved. Therefore, this integrated honeycomb technology remains the most effective method for the trial manufacturing of bionic integrated honeycomb plates. The simulated effect of the compressive rigidity is approximately 85%. The short-fiber trabeculae have an advantage over the long-fiber trabeculae in terms of shear rigidity, which provides new evidence for the application of integrated bionic honeycomb plates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of Noise and Vibration on the Solid to Liquid Fluidization Transition in Small Dense Granular Systems Under Shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melhus, Martin Frederic

    2011-07-01

    Granular materials exhibit bulk properties that are distinct from conventional solids, liq- uids, and gases, due to the dissipative nature of the inter-granular forces. Understanding the fundamentals of granular materials draws upon and gives insight into many fields at the current frontiers of physics, such as plasticity of solids, fracture and friction, com- plex systems such as colloids, foams and suspensions, and a variety of biological systems. Particulate flows are widespread in geophysics, and are also essential to many industries. Despite the importance of these phenomena, we lack a theoretical model that explains most behaviors of granular materials. Since granular assemblies are highly dissipative, they are often far from mechanical equilibrium, making most classical analyses inappli- cable. A theory for dilute granular systems exists, but for dense granular systems (by far the majority of granular systems in the real world) no comparable theory is accepted. We approach this problem by examining the fluidization, or transition from solid to liquid, in dense granular systems. In this study, the separate effects of random noise and vibration on the static to flowing transition of a dense granular assembly under planar shear is studied numerically using soft contact particle dynamics simulations in two dimensions. We focus on small systems in a thin planar Couette cell, examining the bistable region while increasing shear, with varying amounts of random noise or vibration, and determine the statistics of the shear required for the onset of flow. We find that the applied power is the key parameter in determining the magnitude of the effects of the noise or vibration, with vibration frequency also having an influence. Similarities and differences between noise and vibration are determined, and the results compare favorably with a two phase model for dense granular flow.

  19. Effects of flow unsteadiness on the wall shear stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiri, K; Cervantes, M J; Raisee, M

    2012-01-01

    Measurements were performed on pulsating fully turbulent flows in a pipe test rig with a diameter of 100 mm. Sinusoidal oscillatory flow at different frequencies was superimposed on a mean flow of averaged Reynolds number Re=20000 based on the pipe diameter. The measurements have been performed at different forcing frequencies (0.001 + < 0.08) covering all the oscillatory regimes; quasi-steady, relaxation, quasi laminar and high frequency. The amplitude of the flow oscillation was small enough to allow a linear response in the measurements, i.e., all flow parameters showed an oscillatory behavior at the frequency of the flow. The amplitude of the oscillatory flow was about 10% of the mean velocity in all cases. The results include mean and phase averaged values of different parameters. The centerline velocity was measured by a 2D LDA system. Hot film and constant temperature anemometry system was used to determine the wall shear stress. Bulk velocity and pressure gradient along the pipe were also acquired. The results showed a good agreement with the previous analytical, experimental and numerical results available in the literature.

  20. Effects of earthquake induced rock shear on containment system integrity. Laboratory testing plan development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Read, Rodney S.

    2011-07-01

    This report describes a laboratory-scale testing program plan to address the issue of earthquake induced rock shear effects on containment system integrity. The document contains a review of relevant literature from SKB covering laboratory testing of bentonite clay buffer material, scaled analogue tests, and the development of related material models to simulate rock shear effects. The proposed testing program includes standard single component tests, new two-component constant volume tests, and new scaled analogue tests. Conceptual drawings of equipment required to undertake these tests are presented along with a schedule of tests. The information in this document is considered sufficient to engage qualified testing facilities, and to guide implementation of laboratory testing of rock shear effects. This document was completed as part of a collaborative agreement between SKB and Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) in Canada

  1. Effects of earthquake induced rock shear on containment system integrity. Laboratory testing plan development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Read, Rodney S. (RSRead Consulting Inc. (Canada))

    2011-07-15

    This report describes a laboratory-scale testing program plan to address the issue of earthquake induced rock shear effects on containment system integrity. The document contains a review of relevant literature from SKB covering laboratory testing of bentonite clay buffer material, scaled analogue tests, and the development of related material models to simulate rock shear effects. The proposed testing program includes standard single component tests, new two-component constant volume tests, and new scaled analogue tests. Conceptual drawings of equipment required to undertake these tests are presented along with a schedule of tests. The information in this document is considered sufficient to engage qualified testing facilities, and to guide implementation of laboratory testing of rock shear effects. This document was completed as part of a collaborative agreement between SKB and Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) in Canada

  2. A new model of cavern diameter based on a validated CFD study on stirring of a highly shear-thinning fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Story, Anna; Jaworski, Zdzisław

    2017-01-01

    Results of numerical simulations of momentum transfer for a highly shear-thinning fluid (0.2% Carbopol) in a stirred tank equipped with a Prochem Maxflo T type impeller are presented. The simulation results were validated using LDA data and both tangential and axial force measurements in the laminar and early transitional flow range. A good agreement between the predicted and experimental results of the local fluid velocity components was found. From the predicted and experimental values of both tangential and axial forces, the power number, Po , and thrust number, Th , were also calculated. Values of the absolute relative deviations were below 4.0 and 10.5%, respectively, for Po and Th , which confirms a satisfactory agreement with experiments. An intensive mixing zone, known as cavern, was observed near the impeller. In this zone, the local values of fluid velocity, strain rate, Metzner-Otto coefficient, shear stress and intensity of energy dissipation were all characterized by strong variability. Based on the results of experimental study a new model using non-dimensional impeller force number was proposed to predict the cavern diameter. Comparative numerical simulations were also carried out for a Newtonian fluid (water) and their results were similarly well verified using LDA measurements, as well as experimental power number values.

  3. Studies on Impingement Effects of Low Density Jets on Surfaces — Determination of Shear Stress and Normal Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathian, Sarith. P.; Kurian, Job

    2005-05-01

    This paper presents the results of the Laser Reflection Method (LRM) for the determination of shear stress due to impingement of low-density free jets on flat plate. For thin oil film moving under the action of aerodynamic boundary layer the shear stress at the air-oil interface is equal to the shear stress between the surface and air. A direct and dynamic measurement of the oil film slope is measured using a position sensing detector (PSD). The thinning rate of oil film is directly measured which is the major advantage of the LRM over LISF method. From the oil film slope history, direct calculation of the shear stress is done using a three-point formula. For the full range of experiment conditions Knudsen numbers varied till the continuum limit of the transition regime. The shear stress values for low-density flows in the transition regime are thus obtained using LRM and the measured values of shear show fair agreement with those obtained by other methods. Results of the normal pressure measurements on a flat plate in low-density jets by using thermistors as pressure sensors are also presented in the paper. The normal pressure profiles obtained show the characteristic features of Newtonian impact theory for hypersonic flows.

  4. Effect of total cementitious content on shear strength of high-volume fly ash concrete beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arezoumandi, Mahdi; Volz, Jeffery S.; Ortega, Carlos A.; Myers, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Existing design standards conservatively predicted the capacity of the HVFAC beams. ► In general, the HVFAC beams exceeded the code predicted shear strengths. ► The cementitious content did not have effect on the shear behavior of the HVFAC beams. - Abstract: The production of portland cement – the key ingredient in concrete – generates a significant amount of carbon dioxide. However, due to its incredible versatility, availability, and relatively low cost, concrete is the most consumed manmade material on the planet. One method of reducing concrete’s contribution to greenhouse gas emissions is the use of fly ash to replace a significant amount of the cement. This paper compares two experimental studies that were conducted to investigate the shear strength of full-scale beams constructed with high-volume fly ash concrete (HVFAC) – concrete with at least 50% of the cement replaced with fly ash. The primary difference between the two studies involved the amount of cementitious material, with one mix having a relatively high total cementitious content (502 kg/m 3 ) and the other mix having a relatively low total cementitious content (337 kg/m 3 ). Both mixes utilized a 70% replacement of portland cement with a Class C fly ash. Each of these experimental programs consisted of eight beams (six without shear reinforcing and two with shear reinforcing in the form of stirrups) with three different longitudinal reinforcement ratios. The beams were tested under a simply supported four-point loading condition. The experimental shear strengths of the beams were compared with both the shear provisions of selected standards (US, Australia, Canada, Europe, and Japan) and a shear database of conventional concrete (CC) specimens. Furthermore, statistical data analyses (both parametric and nonparametric) were performed to evaluate whether or not there is any statistically significant difference between the shear strength of both mixes. Results of these

  5. The effect of shear force on ink transfer in gravure offset printing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Taik-Min; Lee, Seung-Hyun; Noh, Jae-Ho; Kim, Dong-Soo; Chun, Sangki

    2010-01-01

    This paper asserts that shear force plays an important role in the printing mechanism of gravure offset line printing. To that end, a theoretical printing model showing shear force dependence on the printing angle is proposed. The decrement of the internal angle between the printing direction and the pattern-line direction increases shear force, thereby enhancing the amount of transferred ink in the off stage. A printing experiment using pattern-line widths of 80 µm and 20 µm shows the angle dependence of the line width, thickness and amount of transferred ink, reflecting the effect of shear force. The effect of the internal angle on cross-sectional differences in lines with a width of 20 µm and with angle variation is greater than that in lines with a width of 80 µm, which corresponds with the theoretical prediction that shear force has greater influence on a narrower line. The strong correlation between the experimental data and the theoretical model supports the validation of the theoretical model

  6. Assessment of the Effects of Entrainment and Wind Shear on Nuclear Cloud Rise Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalewski, Daniel; Jodoin, Vincent

    2001-04-01

    Accurate modeling of nuclear cloud rise is critical in hazard prediction following a nuclear detonation. This thesis recommends improvements to the model currently used by DOD. It considers a single-term versus a three-term entrainment equation, the value of the entrainment and eddy viscous drag parameters, as well as the effect of wind shear in the cloud rise following a nuclear detonation. It examines departures from the 1979 version of the Department of Defense Land Fallout Interpretive Code (DELFIC) with the current code used in the Hazard Prediction and Assessment Capability (HPAC) code version 3.2. The recommendation for a single-term entrainment equation, with constant value parameters, without wind shear corrections, and without cloud oscillations is based on both a statistical analysis using 67 U.S. nuclear atmospheric test shots and the physical representation of the modeling. The statistical analysis optimized the parameter values of interest for four cases: the three-term entrainment equation with wind shear and without wind shear as well as the single-term entrainment equation with and without wind shear. The thesis then examines the effect of cloud oscillations as a significant departure in the code. Modifications to user input atmospheric tables are identified as a potential problem in the calculation of stabilized cloud dimensions in HPAC.

  7. Effect of Quaternary Ammonium Salt on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets to Enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannaneh Ghadirian

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study sought to assess the effect of quaternary ammonium salt (QAS on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets to enamel.Materials and Methods: In this in vitro experimental study, 0, 10, 20 and 30% concentrations of QAS were added to Transbond XT primer. Brackets were bonded to 60 premolar teeth using the afore-mentioned adhesive mixtures, and the shear bond strength of the four groups (n=15 was measured using a universal testing machine. After debonding, the adhesive remnant index (ARI score was determined under a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA.Results: The mean and standard deviation of shear bond strength of the control and 10%, 20% and 30% groups were 23.54±6.31, 21.81±2.82, 20.83±8.35 and 22.91±5.66 MPa, respectively. No significant difference was noted in shear bond strength of the groups (P=0.83. Study groups were not different in terms of ARI scores (P=0.80.Conclusions: The results showed that addition of QAS to Transbond XT primer had no adverse effect on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

  8. Effect of grape seed extract against biodegradation of composite resin-dentin shear bond strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generosa, D. M.; Suprastiwi, E.; Asrianti, D.

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to analyze the effect of grape seed extract (GSE) on resin-dentin shear bond strength. A group of 48 dentin samples were divided into 6 groups. The six groups, each with eight specimens, included group 1 (control), group 2 (control + NaOCl 10%), group 3 (2.9% GSE application before etching), group 4 (2.9% GSE application before etching + NaOCl 10%), group 5 (2.9% GSE application after etching), and group 6 (2.9% GSE application after etching + NaOCl 10%). Shear bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine. Statistical analysis was done with the Kruskal-Wallis test and the Mann-Whitney U test. The highest median value was in group 3, and the lowest value was in group 5. GSE can improve the shear bond strength (p = 0.002 and 0.001), but it has no effect on reducing biodegradation (p = 0.141).

  9. On the appearance of vorticity and gradient shear bands in wormlike micellar solutions of different CPCl/salt systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mütze, Annekathrin, E-mail: muetzea@ethz.ch; Heunemann, Peggy; Fischer, Peter [ETH Zürich, Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, Schmelzbergstrasse 9, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2014-11-01

    Wormlike micellar salt/surfactant solutions (X-salicylate, cetylpyridinium chloride) are studied with respect to the applied shear stress, concentration, temperature, and composition of the counterions (X = lithium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium) of the salicylate salt solute to determine vorticity and gradient shear bands. A combination of rheological measurements, laser technique, video analysis, and rheo-small-angle neutron scattering allow for a detailed exploration of number and types of shear bands. Typical flow curves of the solutions show Newtonian, shear-thinning, and shear-thickening flow behavior. In the shear-thickening regime, the solutions show vorticity and gradient shear bands simultaneously, in which vorticity shear bands dominate the visual effect, while gradient shear bands always coexist and predominate the rheological response. It is shown that gradient shear bands change their phases (turbid, clear) with the same frequency as the shear rate oscillates, whereas vorticity shear bands change their phases with half the frequency of the shear rate. Furthermore, we show that with increasing molecular mass of the counterions the number of gradient shear bands increases, while the number of vorticity shear bands remains constant. The variation of temperature, shear stress, concentration, and counterions results in a predictable change in the rheological behavior and therefore allows adjustment of the number of vorticity shear bands in the shear band regime.

  10. Synergistic effects of the safety factor and shear flows on development of internal transport barriers in reversed shear plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, A.K.; Dong, J.Q.; Qu, W.X.; Qiu, X.M.

    2002-01-01

    A new suppression mechanism of turbulent transport, characteristic of the synergism between safety factor and shear flows, is proposed to explain the internal transport barriers (ITBs) observed in neutral-beam-heated tokamak discharges with reversed magnetic shear. It is shown that the evolution of turbulent transport with the strength of the suppression mechanism reproduces the basic features of the formation and development of ITBs observed in experiments. In addition, the present analyses predict the possibility of global ion and electron heat transport barriers

  11. Laboratory studies on the effects of shear on fish: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neitzel, Duane A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richmond, M. C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dauble, D. D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mueller, R. P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Moursund, R. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Abernethy, C. S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Guensch, G. R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cada, G. F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2000-09-01

    The overall objective of these studies was to specify an index describing the hydraulic force that fish experience when subjected to a shear environment. Fluid shear is a phenomenon that is important to fish. However, elevated levels of shear may result in strain rates that injure or kill fish. At hydroelectric generating facilities, concerns have been expressed that strain rates associated with passage through turbines, spillways, and fish bypass systems may adversely affect migrating fish. Development of fish-friendly hydroelectric turbines requires knowledge of the physical forces (injury mechanisms) that impact entrained fish and the fish’s tolerance to these forces. It requires up-front, pre-design specifications for the environmental conditions that occur within the turbine system; in other words, determining or assuming conditions known to injure fish will assist engineers in the design of a fish-friendly turbine system. To address the development of biological specifications, this experiment designed and built a test facility where juvenile fish could be subjected to a range of shear environments and quantified their biological response. The test data reported here provide quantified strain rates and the relationship of these forces to direct and indirect biological effects on fish. The study concludes that juvenile salmonids and American shad should survive shear environments where strain rates do not exceed 500 cm/s/cm at a Dy of 1.8 cm. Additional studies are planned with a sensor fish to better link hydraulic conditions found within the laboratory and field environments.

  12. Effect of bone-soft tissue friction on ultrasound axial shear strain elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Songyuan; Chaudhry, Anuj; Kim, Namhee; Reddy, J N; Righetti, Raffaella

    2017-07-12

    Bone-soft tissue friction is an important factor affecting several musculoskeletal disorders, frictional syndromes and the ability of a bone fracture to heal. However, this parameter is difficult to determine using non-invasive imaging modalities, especially in clinical settings. Ultrasound axial shear strain elastography is a non-invasive imaging modality that has been used in the recent past to estimate the bonding between different tissue layers. As most elastography methods, axial shear strain elastography is primarily used in soft tissues. More recently, this technique has been proposed to assess the bone-soft tissue interface. In this paper, we investigate the effect of a variation in bone-soft tissue friction coefficient in the resulting axial shear strain elastograms. Finite element poroelastic models of bone specimens exhibiting different bone-soft tissue friction coefficients were created and mechanically analyzed. These models were then imported to an ultrasound elastography simulation module to assess the presence of axial shear strain patterns. In vitro experiments were performed to corroborate selected simulation results. The results of this study show that the normalized axial shear strain estimated at the bone-soft tissue interface is statistically correlated to the bone-soft tissue coefficient of friction. This information may prove useful to better interpret ultrasound elastography results obtained in bone-related applications and, possibly, monitor bone healing.

  13. Effect of Shear History on Rheology of Time-Dependent Colloidal Silica Gels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo H. S. Santos

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a rheological study describing the effects of shear on the flow curves of colloidal gels prepared with different concentrations of fumed silica (4%, 5%, 6%, and 7% and a hydrophobic solvent (Hydrocarbon fuel, JP-8. Viscosity measurements as a function of time were carried out at different shear rates (10, 50, 100, 500, and 1000 s−1, and based on this data, a new structural kinetics model was used to describe the system. Previous work has based the analysis of time dependent fluids on the viscosity of the intact material, i.e., before it is sheared, which is a condition very difficult to achieve when weak gels are tested. The simple action of loading the gel in the rheometer affects its structure and rheology, and the reproducibility of the measurements is thus seriously compromised. Changes in viscosity and viscoelastic properties of the sheared material are indicative of microstructural changes in the gel that need to be accounted for. Therefore, a more realistic method is presented in this work. In addition, microscopical images (Cryo-SEM were obtained to show how the structure of the gel is affected upon application of shear.

  14. Effect of shear connectors on local buckling and composite action in steel concrete composite walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Kai; Varma, Amit H.; Malushte, Sanjeev R.; Gallocher, Stewart

    2014-01-01

    Steel concrete composite (SC) walls are being used for the third generation nuclear power plants, and also being considered for small modular reactors. SC walls consist of thick concrete walls with exterior steel faceplates serving as reinforcement. These steel faceplates are anchored to the concrete infill using shear connectors, for example, headed steel studs. The steel faceplate thickness (t p ) and yield stress (F y ), and the shear connector spacing (s), stiffness (k s ), and strength (Q n ) determine: (a) the level of composite action between the steel plates and the concrete infill, (b) the development length of steel faceplates, and (c) the local buckling of the steel faceplates. Thus, the shear connectors have a significant influence on the behavior of composite SC walls, and should be designed accordingly. This paper presents the effects of shear connector design on the level of composite action and development length of steel faceplates in SC walls. The maximum steel plate slenderness, i.e., ratio of shear connector spacing-to-plate thickness (s/t p ) ratio to prevent local buckling before yielding is also developed based on the existing experimental database and additional numerical analysis

  15. Effect of shear connectors on local buckling and composite action in steel concrete composite walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Kai, E-mail: kai-zh@purdue.edu [School of Civil Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Varma, Amit H., E-mail: ahvarma@purdue.edu [School of Civil Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Malushte, Sanjeev R., E-mail: smalusht@bechtel.com [Bechtel Power Corporation, Frederick, MD (United States); Gallocher, Stewart, E-mail: stewart.gallocher@steelbricks.com [Modular Walling Systems Ltd., Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-01

    Steel concrete composite (SC) walls are being used for the third generation nuclear power plants, and also being considered for small modular reactors. SC walls consist of thick concrete walls with exterior steel faceplates serving as reinforcement. These steel faceplates are anchored to the concrete infill using shear connectors, for example, headed steel studs. The steel faceplate thickness (t{sub p}) and yield stress (F{sub y}), and the shear connector spacing (s), stiffness (k{sub s}), and strength (Q{sub n}) determine: (a) the level of composite action between the steel plates and the concrete infill, (b) the development length of steel faceplates, and (c) the local buckling of the steel faceplates. Thus, the shear connectors have a significant influence on the behavior of composite SC walls, and should be designed accordingly. This paper presents the effects of shear connector design on the level of composite action and development length of steel faceplates in SC walls. The maximum steel plate slenderness, i.e., ratio of shear connector spacing-to-plate thickness (s/t{sub p}) ratio to prevent local buckling before yielding is also developed based on the existing experimental database and additional numerical analysis.

  16. Effect of particle-particle shearing on the bioleaching of sulfide minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, N; Karamanev, D G; Margaritis, A

    2002-11-05

    The biological leaching of sulfide minerals, used for the production of gold, copper, zinc, cobalt, and other metals, is very often carried out in slurry bioreactors, where the shearing between sulfide particles is intensive. In order to be able to improve the efficiency of the bioleaching, it is of significant importance to know the effect of particle shearing on the rate of leaching. The recently proposed concept of ore immobilization allowed us to study the effect of particle shearing on the rate of sulfide (pyrite) leaching by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. Using this concept, we designed two very similar bioreactors, the main difference between which was the presence and absence of particle-particle shearing. It was shown that when the oxygen mass transfer was not the rate-limiting step, the rate of bioleaching in the frictionless bioreactor was 2.5 times higher than that in a bioreactor with particle friction (shearing). The concentration of free suspended cells in the frictionless bioreactor was by orders of magnitude lower than that in the frictional bioreactor, which showed that particle friction strongly reduces the microbial attachment to sulfide surface, which, in turn, reduces the rate of bioleaching. Surprisingly, it was found that formation of a layer of insoluble iron salts on the surface of sulfide particles is much slower under shearless conditions than in the presence of particle-particle shearing. This was explained by the effect of particle friction on liquid-solid mass transfer rate. The results of this study show that reduction of the particle friction during bioleaching of sulfide minerals can bring important advantages not only by increasing significantly the bioleaching rate, but also by increasing the rate of gas-liquid oxygen mass transfer, reducing the formation of iron precipitates and reducing the energy consumption. One of the efficient methods for reduction of particle friction is ore immobilization in a porous matrix. Copyright 2002

  17. Pore Fluid Effects on Shear Modulus for Sandstones with Soft Anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berryman, J G

    2004-01-01

    A general analysis of poroelasticity for vertical transverse isotropy (VTI) shows that four eigenvectors are pure shear modes with no coupling to the pore-fluidmechanics. The remaining two eigenvectors are linear combinations of pure compression and uniaxial shear, both of which are coupled to the fluid mechanics. After reducing the problem to a 2x2 system, the analysis shows in a relatively elementary fashion how a poroelastic system with isotropic solid elastic frame, but with anisotropy introduced through the poroelastic coefficients, interacts with the mechanics of the pore fluid and produces shear dependence on fluid properties in the overall mechanical system. The analysis shows, for example, that this effect is always present (though sometimes small in magnitude) in the systems studied, and can be quite large (up to a definite maximum increase of 20 per cent) in some rocks--including Spirit River sandstone and Schuler-Cotton Valley sandstone

  18. Experimental investigation of the effects of high-frequency electroactive morphing on the shear-layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheller, Johannes; Rizzo, Karl-Joseph; Jodin, Gurvan; Duhayon, Eric; Rouchon, Jean-François; Hunt, Julian; Braza, Marianna

    2015-11-01

    Time-resolved PIV measurements are conducted at a Reynolds number of 270 . 000 downstream of the trailing edge of a NACA4412 airfoil equipped with trailing-edge piezoelectric tab actuators to investigate the high-frequency low-amplitude actuation's effect on the shear-layer. A comparison of the time-averaged Reynolds stress tensor components at different actuation frequency reveals a significant impact of the actuation on the shear-layer dynamics. A proper orthogonal decomposition analysis is conducted in order to investigate the actuation's impact on the vortex breakdown. It will be shown that a specific low-amplitude actuation frequency enables a reduction of the predominant shear-layer frequencies.

  19. Effect of Substrate Friction in a Two-Dimensional Granular Couette Shearing Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeman, Chris; Garg, Shila

    2001-03-01

    An investigation of the effect of substrate friction on the kinematics of rigid granular material in a two-dimensional granular Couette shearing cell was conducted. Cylindrical disks resting on a substrate were packed between a stationary outer ring and a rotating inner wheel. Previous work reports the velocity and particle rotation rates as a function of packing fraction and shearing rates [1]. The authors report the existence of a stick-slip condition of the disks in contact with the shearing wheel. The focus of our study is to investigate the impact of the substrate friction on the stick-slip condition as well as the kinematics of the system in general. [1] C.T. Veje, Daniel W. Howell, and R.P Behringer, Phys. Rev. E 59, 739 (1999). This research was partially supported by the Copeland Fund, administered by The College of Wooster. C.T. received support from NASA GRC LERCIP internship program.

  20. The effect of viscosity on the resistive tearing mode with the presence of shear flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, X.L.; Morrison, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of small isotropic viscosity on the ''constant ψ'' tearing mode in the presence of shear flow, is analyzed by the boundary layer approach. It is found that the influence of viscosity depends upon the parameter (G'(0)/F'(0)), where G'(0) and F'(0) denote that shear and magnetic field shear at the magnetic null plane, respectively. When |(G'(0)/F'(0))| much-lt 1, the tearing mode growth rate is suppressed by the viscosity, but not completely stabilized. When |(G'(0)/F'(0))| ∼ in the order of (1) and the viscosity is comparable with the resistivity, the growth rate vanishes as ((1 - G'(0) 2 /F'(0) 2 ) 1/3 ), when G'(0) 2 → F'(0) 2 from below. In the case where (1 - G'(0) 2 /F'(0) 2 ) < 0 matching cannot be achieved. 8 refs

  1. Shear Alfvén Wave with Quantum Exchange-Correlation Effects in Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Zahid; Jamil, M.; Rasheed, A.; Asif, M.

    2017-09-01

    The dust shear Alfvén wave is studied in three species dusty quantum plasmas. The quantum effects are incorporated through the Fermi degenerate pressure, tunneling potential, and in particular the exchange-correlation potential. The significance of exchange-correlation potential is pointed out by a graphical description of the dispersion relation, which shows that the exchange potential magnifies the phase speed. The low-frequency shear Alfvén wave is studied while considering many variables. The shear Alfvén wave gains higher phase speed at the range of small angles for the upper end of the wave vector spectrum. The increasing dust charge and the external magnetic field reflect the increasing tendency of phase speed. This study may explain many natural mechanisms associated with long wavelength radiations given in the summary.

  2. Effects of texture on shear band formation in plane strain tension/compression and bending

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuroda, M.; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2007-01-01

    In this study, effects of typical texture components observed in rolled aluminum alloy sheets on shear band formation in plane strain tension/compression and bending are systematically studied. The material response is described by a generalized Taylor-type polycrystal model, in which each grain ...... shear band formation in bent specimens is compared to that in the tension/compression problem. Finally, the present results are compared to previous related studies, and the efficiency of the present method for materials design in future is discussed....

  3. Effect of initial void shape on ductile failure in a shear field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2015-01-01

    For voids in a shear field unit cell model analyses have been used to show that ductile failure is predicted even though the stress triaxiality is low or perhaps negative, so that the void volume fraction does not grow during deformation. Here, the effect of the void shape is studied by analyzing...... with circular cross-section, i.e. the voids in shear flatten out to micro-cracks, which rotate and elongate until interaction with neighboring micro-cracks gives coalescence. Even though the mechanism of ductile failure is the same, the load carrying capacity predicted, for the same initial void volume fraction...

  4. Effect of length of thinning area on the failure behavior of carbon steel pipe containing a defect of wall thinning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Weon; Park, Chi Yong

    2003-01-01

    The present study performed pipe failure tests using 102 mm-Sch. 80 carbon steel pipe with various simulated wall thinning defects, to investigate the effect of axial length of wall thinning and internal pressure on the failure behavior of pipe thinned by flow accelerated corrosion (FAC). The tests were conducted under loading conditions of four-point bending with and without internal pressure. The results showed that a failure mode of pipe with a defect depended on the magnitude of internal pressure and axial thinning length as well as stress type and thinning depth and circumferential angle. Both load carrying capability (LCC) and deformation capability (DC) were depended on stress type in the thinning area and dimensions of thinning defect. For applying tensile stress to the thinned area, the dependence of LCC on the axial length of wall thinning was determined by circumferential thinning angle, and the DC was proportionally increased with increase in axial length of wall thinning regardless of the circumferential angle. For applying compressive stress to thinned area, however, the LCC was decreased with increase in axial length of the thinned area. Also, the effect of internal pressure on failure behavior was characterized by failure mode of thinned pipe, and it promoted crack occurrence and mitigated a local buckling of the thinned area

  5. The effect of air thinning on dentin adhesive bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, T J; Schwartz, R S

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if air thinning three dentin adhesives would affect bond strength to dentin. Ninety human molars were mounted in acrylic and the occlusal surfaces ground to expose a flat dentin surface. Thirty teeth were randomly assigned to one of the following dentin bonding agent/composite combinations: A) Universal Bond 3/TPH (Caulk), B) All-Bond 2/Bis-Fil-P (Bisco), and C) Scotchbond Multi-Purpose/Z-100 (3m). The primers were applied following the manufacturers' instructions. The adhesives were applied by two methods. A thin layer of adhesive was applied with a brush to 15 specimens in each group and light cured. Adhesive was brushed on to the remaining 15 teeth in the group, air thinned for 3 seconds, and then polymerized. The appropriate composite was applied in 2 mm increments and light cured utilizing a 5 mm-in-diameter split Teflon mold. Following 3 months of water storage, all groups were shear tested to failure on an Instron Universal Testing Machine. Bond strength was significantly higher in all groups when the dentin bonding agent was painted on without being air thinned. Scotchbond Multi-Purpose had significantly higher bond strength than All-Bond 2, which had significantly higher bond strength than Universal Bond 3.

  6. Effect of chlorhexidine on the shear bond strength of self-etch ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of chlorhexidine on shear bond strength of self-etch adhesives to dentin. The crowns of 60 sound human premolars were horizontally sectioned to expose the coronal dentin. Dentin surfaces were polished with 320 grit silicon carbide papers, and were randomly divided into 4 ...

  7. The use of laser technology to investigate the effect of railway ballast roundness on shear strength

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mvelase, GM

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available of roundness. Triaxial tests were conducted to determine the effect of the roundness on the shear strength properties of the materials. A Mohr-Coulomb failure model was successfully developed from the results to represent individual materials tested...

  8. Effect of shear on cubic phases in gels of a diblock copolymer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamley, I.W.; Pople, J.A.; Fairclough, J.P.A.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of shear on the orientation of cubic micellar phases formed by a poly(oxyethylene)poly(oxybutylene) diblock copolymer in aqueous solution has been investigated using small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). SAXS was performed on samples oriented in...

  9. Effect of Different Peat Size and Pre-Consolidation Pressure of Reconstituted Peat on Effective Undrained Shear Strength Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhar, ATS; Norhaliza, W.; Ismail, B.; Ezree, AM; Nizam, ZM

    2017-08-01

    Shear strength of the soil is one of the most important parameters in engineering design, especially during the pre- or post-construction periods, since it is mainly used to measure and evaluate the foundation or slope stability of soil. Peat normally known as a soil that has a very low value of shear strength, and in order to determine and understand the shear strength of the peat, it is a difficult task in geotechnical engineering due to several factors such as types of fabrics, the origin of the soil, water content, organic matter and the degree of humification. The aim of this study is to determine the effective undrained shear strength properties of reconstituted peat of different sizes. All the reconstituted peat samples were formed with the size that passed the opening sieve of 0.425 mm (effective undrained shear strength properties for reconstituted peat effective shear strength properties for the reconstituted peat effective undrained shear strength properties result obtained from the tests show that the reconstituted peat pore pressure, Δu, show both of shear strength.

  10. Shear-lag effect and its effect on the design of high-rise buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dat Bui Thanh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available For super high-rise buildings, the analysis and selection of suitable structural solutions are very important. The structure has not only to carry the gravity loads (self-weight, live load, etc., but also to resist lateral loads (wind and earthquake loads. As the buildings become taller, the demand on different structural systems dramatically increases. The article considers the division of the structural systems of tall buildings into two main categories - interior structures for which the major part of the lateral load resisting system is located within the interior of the building, and exterior structures for which the major part of the lateral load resisting system is located at the building perimeter. The basic types of each of the main structural categories are described. In particular, the framed tube structures, which belong to the second main category of exterior structures, seem to be very efficient. That type of structure system allows tall buildings resist the lateral loads. However, those tube systems are affected by shear lag effect - a nonlinear distribution of stresses across the sides of the section, which is commonly found in box girders under lateral loads. Based on a numerical example, some general conclusions for the influence of the shear-lag effect on frequencies, periods, distribution and variation of the magnitude of the internal forces in the structure are presented.

  11. Shear-lag effect and its effect on the design of high-rise buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanh Dat, Bui; Traykov, Alexander; Traykova, Marina

    2018-03-01

    For super high-rise buildings, the analysis and selection of suitable structural solutions are very important. The structure has not only to carry the gravity loads (self-weight, live load, etc.), but also to resist lateral loads (wind and earthquake loads). As the buildings become taller, the demand on different structural systems dramatically increases. The article considers the division of the structural systems of tall buildings into two main categories - interior structures for which the major part of the lateral load resisting system is located within the interior of the building, and exterior structures for which the major part of the lateral load resisting system is located at the building perimeter. The basic types of each of the main structural categories are described. In particular, the framed tube structures, which belong to the second main category of exterior structures, seem to be very efficient. That type of structure system allows tall buildings resist the lateral loads. However, those tube systems are affected by shear lag effect - a nonlinear distribution of stresses across the sides of the section, which is commonly found in box girders under lateral loads. Based on a numerical example, some general conclusions for the influence of the shear-lag effect on frequencies, periods, distribution and variation of the magnitude of the internal forces in the structure are presented.

  12. An analytical study of the effects of transverse shear deformation and anisotropy on natural vibration frequencies of laminated cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegley, Dawn C.

    1988-01-01

    Natural vibration frequencies of orthotropic and anisotropic simply supported right circular cylinders are predicted using a higher-order transverse-shear deformation theory. A comparison of natural vibration frequencies predicted by first-order transverse-shear deformation theory and the higher-order theory shows that an additional allowance for transverse shear deformation has a negligible effect on the lowest predicted natural vibration frequencies of laminated cylinders but significantly reduces the higher natural vibration frequencies. A parametric study of the effects of ply orientation on the natural vibration frequencies of laminated cylinders indicates that while stacking sequence affects natural vibration frequencies, cylinder geometry is more important in predicting transverse-shear deformation effects. Interaction curves for cylinders subjected to axial compressive loadings and low natural vibration frequencies indicate that transverse shearing effects are less important in predicting low natural vibration frequencies than in predicting axial compressive buckling loads. The effects of anisotropy are more important than the effects of transverse shear deformation for most strongly anisotropic laminated cylinders in predicting natural vibration frequencies. However, transverse-shear deformation effects are important in predicting high natural vibration frequencies of thick-walled laminated cylinders. Neglecting either anisotropic effects or transverse-shear deformation effects leads to non-conservative errors in predicted natural vibration frequencies.

  13. An analytical study of the effects of transverse shear deformation and anisotropy on natural vibation frequencies of laminated cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegley, Dawn C.

    1989-01-01

    Natural vibration frequencies of orthotropic and anisotropic simply supported right circular cylinders are predicted using a higher-order transverse-shear deformation theory. A comparison of natural vibration frequencies predicted by first-order transverse-shear deformation theory and the higher-order theory shows that an additional allowance for transverse shear deformation has a negligible effect on the lowest predicted natural vibration frequencies of laminated cylinders but significantly reduces the higher natural vibration frequencies. A parametric study of the effects of ply orientation on the natural vibration frequencies of laminated cylinders indicates that while stacking sequence affects natural vibration frequencies, cylinder geometry is more important in predicting transverse-shear deformation effects. Interaction curves for cylinders subjected to axial compressive loadings and low natural vibration frequencies indicate that transverse shearing effects are less important in predicting low natural vibration frequencies than in predicting axial compressive buckling loads. The effects of anisotropy are more important than the effects of transverse shear deformation for most strongly anisotropic laminated cylinders in predicting natural vibration frequencies. However, transverse-shear deformation effects are important in predicting high natural vibration frequencies of thick-walled laminated cylinders. Neglecting either anisotropic effects or transverse-shear deformation effects leads to non-conservative errors in predicted natural vibration frequencies.

  14. Effect of cohesion on local compaction and granulation of sheared soft granular materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Sudeshna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper results from an ongoing investigation of the effect of cohesion on the compaction of sheared soft wet granular materials. We compare dry non-cohesive and wet moderately-to-strongly cohesive soft almost frictionless granular materials and report the effect of cohesion between the grains on the local volume fraction. We study this in a three dimensional, unconfined, slowly sheared split-bottom ring shear cell, where materials while sheared are subject to compression under the confining weight of the material above. Our results show that inter-particle cohesion has a considerable impact on the compaction of soft materials. Cohesion causes additional stresses, due to capillary forces between particles, leading to an increase in volume fraction due to higher compaction. This effect is not visible in a system of infinitely stiff particles. In addition, acting oppositely, we observe a general decrease in volume fraction due to increased cohesion for frictional particle, which we attribute to the role of contact friction that enhances dilation.

  15. Effect of Different Loading Conditions on the Nucleation and Development of Shear Zones Around Material Heterogeneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybacki, E.; Nardini, L.; Morales, L. F.; Dresen, G.

    2017-12-01

    Rock deformation at depths in the Earth's crust is often localized in high temperature shear zones, which occur in the field at different scales and in a variety of lithologies. The presence of material heterogeneities has long been recognized to be an important cause for shear zones evolution, but the mechanisms controlling initiation and development of localization are not fully understood, and the question of which loading conditions (constant stress or constant deformation rate) are most favourable is still open. To better understand the effect of boundary conditions on shear zone nucleation around heterogeneities, we performed a series of torsion experiments under constant twist rate (CTR) and constant torque (CT) conditions in a Paterson-type deformation apparatus. The sample assemblage consisted of copper-jacketed Carrara marble hollow cylinders with one weak inclusion of Solnhofen limestone. The CTR experiments were performed at maximum bulk strain rates of 1.8-1.9*10-4 s-1, yielding shear stresses of 19-20 MPa. CT tests were conducted at shear stresses between 18.4 and 19.8 MPa resulting in shear strain rates of 1-2*10-4 s-1. All experiments were run at 900 °C temperature and 400 MPa confining pressure. Maximum bulk shear strains (γ) were ca. 0.3 and 1. Strain localized within the host marble in front of the inclusion in an area termed process zone. Here grain size reduction is intense and local shear strain (estimated from markers on the jackets) is up to 8 times higher than the applied bulk strain, rapidly dropping to 2 times higher at larger distance from the inclusion. The evolution of key microstructural parameters such as average grain size and average grain orientation spread (GOS, a measure of lattice distortion) within the process zone, determined by electron backscatter diffraction analysis, differs significantly as a function of loading conditions. Both parameters indicate that, independent of bulk strain and distance from the inclusion, the

  16. Effect of shear strain on the deflection of a clamped magnetostrictive film-substrate system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ming Zhenghui; Ming Li; Bo Zou; Xia Luo

    2011-01-01

    The effect of in-plane shear strain of a clamped bimorph on the deflection produced by magnetization of the film is investigated. The deflection is found by minimizing the Gibbs free energy with respect to four parameters, strains and curvatures along x and y directions at the interface, by assuming that the curvature in the y direction varies as a function of aspect ratio w/l along x. A set of standard linear equations of four parameters are obtained and the deflection is expressed in terms of the four parameters by solving the equations using Cramer rules. The inconsistencies pointed out by previous authors are also reviewed. For actuators made of thick and short clamped film-substrate system, the in-plane shear deformation should not be omitted. The present calculation model can give a relatively simple and accurate prediction of deflection for thick and short specimens of aspect ratio w/l<10, which supports the results obtained by finite element modeling. - Highlights: → We model the deflection of a thick magnetostrictive film-substrate cantilever plate. → Total stress along z from magnetic field is not zero without external force. → Effect of in-plane shear strain in calculating deflection examined. → Analytical solution of deflection obtained by assuming a curvature function. → Shear strain for short cantilever film-substrate plate considered.

  17. The effects of buoyancy on shear-induced melt bands in a compacting porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, S. L.

    2009-03-01

    It has recently been shown [Holtzman, B., Groebner, N., Zimmerman, M., Ginsberg, S., Kohlstedt, D., 2003. Stress-driven melt segregation in partially molten rocks. Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst. 4, Art. No. 8607; Holtzman, B.K., Kohlstedt, D.L., 2007. Stress-driven melt segregation and strain partitioning in partially molten rocks: effects of stress and strain. J. Petrol. 48, 2379-2406] that when partially molten rock is subjected to simple shear, bands of high and low porosity are formed at a particular angle to the direction of instantaneous maximum extension. These have been modeled numerically and it has been speculated that high porosity bands may form an interconnected network with a bulk, effective permeability that is enhanced in a direction parallel to the bands. As a result, the bands may act to focus mantle melt towards the axis of mid-ocean ridges [Katz, R.F., Spiegelman, M., Holtzman, B., 2006. The dynamics of melt and shear localization in partially molten aggregates. Nature 442, 676-679]. In this contribution, we examine the combined effects of buoyancy and matrix shear on a deforming porous layer. The linear theory of Spiegelman [Spiegelman, M., 1993. Flow in deformable porous media. Part 1. Simple analysis. J. Fluid Mech. 247, 17-38; Spiegelman, M., 2003. Linear analysis of melt band formation by simple shear. Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst. 4, doi:10.1029/2002GC000499, Article 8615] and Katz et al. [Katz, R.F., Spiegelman, M., Holtzman, B., 2006. The dynamics of melt and shear localization in partially molten aggregates. Nature 442, 676-679] is generalized to include both the effects of buoyancy and matrix shear on a deformable porous layer with strain-rate dependent rheology. The predictions of linear theory are compared with the early time evolution of our 2D numerical model and they are found to be in excellent agreement. For conditions similar to the upper mantle, buoyancy forces can be similar to or much greater than matrix shear-induced forces. The

  18. Influence of Normal and Shear Stress on the Hydraulic Transmissivity of Thin Cracks in a Tight Quartz Sandstone, a Granite, and a Shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, Ernest H.; Mecklenburgh, Julian

    2018-02-01

    Transmissivity of fluids along fractures in rocks is reduced by increasing normal stress acting across them, demonstrated here through gas flow experiments on Bowland shale, and oil flow experiments on Pennant sandstone and Westerly granite. Additionally, the effect of imposing shear stress at constant normal stress was determined, until frictional sliding started. In all cases, increasing shear stress causes an accelerating reduction of transmissivity by 1 to 3 orders of magnitude as slip initiated, as a result of the formation of wear products that block fluid pathways. Only in the case of granite, and to a lesser extent in the sandstone, was there a minor amount of initial increase of transmissivity prior to the onset of slip. These results cast into doubt the commonly applied presumption that cracks with high resolved shear stresses are the most conductive. In the shale, crack transmissivity is commensurate with matrix permeability, such that shales are expected always to be good seals. For the sandstone and granite, unsheared crack transmissivity was respectively 2 and 2.5 orders of magnitude greater than matrix permeability. For these rocks crack transmissivity can dominate fluid flow in the upper crust, potentially enough to permit maintenance of a hydrostatic fluid pressure gradient in a normal (extensional) faulting regime.

  19. Effects of relative density and accumulated shear strain on post-liquefaction residual deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kim

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The damage caused by liquefaction, which occurs following an earthquake, is usually because of settlement and lateral spreading. Generally, the evaluation of liquefaction has been centered on settlement, that is, residual volumetric strain. However, in actual soil, residual shear and residual volumetric deformations occur simultaneously after an earthquake. Therefore, the simultaneous evaluation of the two phenomena and the clarification of their relationship are likely to evaluate post-liquefaction soil behaviors more accurately. Hence, a quantitative evaluation of post-liquefaction damage will also be possible. In this study, the effects of relative density and accumulated shear strain on post-liquefaction residual deformations were reviewed through a series of lateral constrained-control hollow cylindrical torsion tests under undrained conditions. In order to identify the relationship between residual shear and residual volumetric strains, this study proposed a new test method that integrates monotonic loading after cyclic loading, and K0-drain after cyclic loading – in other words, the combination of cyclic loading, monotonic loading, and the K0 drain. In addition, a control that maintained the lateral constrained condition across all the processes of consolidation, cyclic loading, monotonic loading, and drainage was used to reproduce the anisotropy of in situ ground. This lateral constrain control was performed by controlling the axial strain, based on the assumption that under undrained conditions, axial and lateral strains occur simultaneously, and unless axial strain occurs, lateral strain does not occur. The test results confirmed that the recovery of effective stresses, which occur during monotonic loading and drainage after cyclic loading, respectively, result from mutually different structural restoration characteristics. In addition, in the ranges of 40–60% relative density and 50–100% accumulated shear strain, relative

  20. Injectable Shear-Thinning CaSO4/FGF-18-Incorporated Chitin-PLGA Hydrogel Enhances Bone Regeneration in Mice Cranial Bone Defect Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivashanmugam, A; Charoenlarp, Pornkawee; Deepthi, S; Rajendran, Arunkumar; Nair, Shantikumar V; Iseki, Sachiko; Jayakumar, R

    2017-12-13

    For craniofacial bone regeneration, shear-thinning injectable hydrogels are favored over conventional scaffolds because of their improved defect margin adaptability, easier handling, and ability to be injected manually into deeper tissues. The most accepted method, after autografting, is the use of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2); however, complications such as interindividual variations, edema, and poor cost-efficiency in supraphysiological doses have been reported. The endogenous synthesis of BMP-2 is desirable, and a molecule which induces this is fibroblast growth factor-18 (FGF-18) because it can upregulate the BMP-2 expression  by supressing noggin. We developed a chitin-poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) composite hydrogel by regeneration chemistry and then incorporated CaSO 4 and FGF-18 for this purpose. Rheologically, a 7-fold increase in the elastic modulus was observed in the CaSO 4 -incorporated chitin-PLGA hydrogels as compared to the chitin-PLGA hydrogel. Shear-thinning Herschel-Bulkley fluid nature was observed for both hydrogels. Chitin-PLGA/CaSO 4 gel showed sustained release of FGF-18. In vitro osteogenic differentiation showed an enhanced alkaline phosphatase (ALP) expression in the FGF-18-containing chitin-PLGA/CaSO 4 gel when compared to cells alone. Further, it was confirmed by studying the expression of osteogenic genes [RUNX2, ALP, BMP-2, osteocalcin (OCN), and osteopontin (OPN)], immunofluorescence staining of BMP-2, OCN, and OPN, and alizarin red S staining. Incorporation of FGF-18 in the hydrogel increased the endothelial cell migration. Further, the regeneration potential of the prepared hydrogels was tested in vivo, and longitudinal live animal μ-CT was performed. FGF-18-loaded chitin-PLGA/CaSO 4 showed early and almost complete bone healing in comparison with chitin-PLGA/CaSO 4 , chitin-PLGA/FGF-18, chitin-PLGA, and sham control systems, as confirmed by hematoxylin and eosin and osteoid tetrachrome stainings

  1. Effects of magnetic field, sheared flow and ablative velocity on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, D.; Zhang, W.L.; Wu, Z.W.

    2005-01-01

    It is found that magnetic field has a stabilization effect whereas the sheared flow has a destabilization effect on the RT instability in the presence of sharp interface. RT instability only occurs in the long wave region and can be completely suppressed if the stabilizing effect of magnetic field dominates. The RT instability increases with wave number and flow shear, and acts much like a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability when destabilizing effect of sheared flow dominates. It is shown that both of ablation velocity and magnetic filed have stabilization effect on RT instability in the presence of continued interface. The stabilization effect of magnetic field takes place for whole waveband and becomes more significant for the short wavelength. The RT instability can be completely suppressed by the cooperated effect of magnetic field and ablation velocity so that the ICF target shell may be unnecessary to be accelerated to very high speed. The growth rate decreases as the density scale length increases. The stabilization effect of magnetic field is more significant for the short density scale length. (author)

  2. The effect of shape on the fracture of a soft elastic gel subjected to shear load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundan, Krishna Kant; Ghatak, Animangsu

    2018-02-21

    For brittle solids, the fracture energy is the energy required to create a unit area of new surface through the process of division. For crosslinked materials, it is a function of the intrinsic properties like crosslinking density and bond strength of the crosslinks. Here we show that the energy released due to fracture can depend also on the shape of a joint made of this material. Our experiment involves two gel blocks connected via a thin gel disk. The disk is formed into different regular and exotic shapes, but with identical areas of cross-section. When one of the blocks is sheared with respect to the other, the shear load increases with vertical displacement, eventually causing a fracture at a threshold load. The maximum fracture load is different for different disks and among different regularly shaped disks, it is at a maximum for pentagon and hexagon shapes. The fracture energy release rate of the joint depends also on the aspect ratio (height/width) of the shapes. Our experiments also throw light on possible reasons for such a dependence on the shape of the joints.

  3. Degree of saturation effect on the grout-soil interface shear strength of soil nailing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the grouted soil nailing system, the bonding strength of cement grout-soil interface offers the required resistance to maintain the stability of whole structure. In practice, soil nailing applications are often placed at unsaturated conditions, such as soil slopes, shallow foundations, retaining walls and pavement structures. In these cases, the water content in the soil nail zone may increase or decrease due to rain water or dry weather, and even cannot become saturated during their design service life. In this study, the effect of water content (degree of saturation on the shear strength of interface between cement grout and sand are experimentally investigated by means of direct shear test. Meanwhile the water retention curve was determined and interface microstructure was observed. Experimental results show that the shear strength of interface changes non-monotonously with degree of saturation when the interface was prepared, due to the non-monotonousness of the cohesiveness between soil particles. The less the cohesiveness between sand particles, the more grout was observed been penetrated into the voids, and thus the larger the interface shear stress.

  4. Effect of stable-density stratification on counter gradient flux of a homogeneous shear flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lida, Oaki; Nagano, Yasutaka [Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya (Japan). Department of Mechanical Engineering

    2007-01-15

    We performed direct numerical simulations of homogeneous shear flow under stable-density stratification to study the buoyancy effects on the heat and momentum transfer. These numerical data were compared with those of a turbulent channel flow to investigate the similarity between the near-wall turbulence and the homogeneous shear flow. We also investigated the generation mechanism of the persistent CGFs (counter gradient fluxes) appearing at the higher wavenumbers of the cospectrum, and lasting over a long time without oscillation. Spatially, the persistent CGFs are associated with the longitudinal vortical structure, which is elongated in the streamwise direction and typically observed in both homogeneous shear flow and near-wall turbulence. The CGFs appear at both the top and bottom of this longitudinal vortical structure, and expand horizontally with an increase in the Richardson number. It was found that the production and turbulent-diffusion terms are responsible for the distribution of the Reynolds shear stress including the persistent CGFs. The buoyancy term, combined with the swirling motion of the vortex, contributes to expand the persistent CGF regions and decrease the down gradient fluxes. (author)

  5. Effect of glutaraldehyde and ferric sulfate on shear bond strength of adhesives to primary dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhakar A

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of alternative pulpotomy agents such as glutaraldehyde and ferric sulfate on the shear bond strength of self-etch adhesive systems to dentin of primary teeth. Materials and Methods: Eighty human primary molar teeth were sectioned in a mesiodistal direction and divided into experimental and control groups. Lingual dentin specimens in experimental groups were treated with glutaraldehyde and ferric sulfate. Buccal surfaces soaked in water served as control group. Each group was then divided into two groups based on the adhesive system used: Clearfil SE Bond and Adper Prompt L-Pop. A teflon mold was used to build the composite (Filtek Z-250 cylinders on the dentinal surface of all the specimens. Shear bond strength was tested for all the specimens with an Instron Universal Testing Machine. The failure mode analysis was performed with a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM. Results: The results revealed that glutaraldehyde and ferric sulfate significantly reduced the shear bond strength of the tested adhesive systems to primary dentin. Clearfil SE Bond showed much higher shear bond strength than Adper Prompt L Pop to primary dentin. SEM analysis revealed a predominant cohesive failure mode for both adhesive systems. Conclusion: This study revealed that the pulpotomy medicaments glutaraldehyde and ferric sulfate adversely affected the bonding of self-etch adhesive systems to primary dentin.

  6. Dynamic deformation and failure characteristic of rock foundation by means of effect of cyclic shear loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Yoshikazu; Hibino, Satoshi; Kanagawa, Tadashi; Komada, Hiroya; Nakagawa, Kameichiro

    1984-01-01

    The main structures of nuclear power plants are built on hard and soft rocks. The rock-dynamic properties used for investigating the stability of the structures have been determined so far by laboratory tests for soft rocks. In hard rocks, however, joints and cracks exist, and the test including these effects is not able to be performed in laboratories at present. Therefore, a dynamic repeating shearing test equipment to be used under the condition including the joints and cracks of actual ground has been made for a base rock of tuff breccia. In this paper, the test results are reported as follows. The geological features of the testing site and the arrangement of tested rocks, the preparation for tests, test equipment, loading method, measuring method, analysis, and the result and the examination. The results of dynamic deformation and failure characteristics were as follows: (1) the dynamic shear-elasticity-modulus Gd of the base rock showed greater values as the normal stress increased, while Gd decreased and showed the strain dependence as the dynamic shear strain amplitude γ increased; (2) the relationship between Gd and γ was well represented with the equation proposed by Hardin-Drnevich; (3) damping ratio increased as γ increased, and decreased as normal stress increased; (4) When a specimen was about to break, γ suddenly increased, and the dynamic shear strain amplitude at yield point was in the range of approximately (3.4 to 4.1) x 10 -3 . (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  7. Evaluation of hygrothermal effects on the shear properties of Carall composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botelho, E.C.; Pardini, L.C.; Rezende, M.C.

    2007-01-01

    Fiber metal laminates are the frontline materials for aeronautical and space structures. These composites consists of layers of 2024-T3-aluminum alloy and composite prepreg layers. When the composite layer is a carbon fiber prepreg, the fiber metal laminate, named Carall, offers significant improvements over current available materials for aircraft structures. While weight reduction and improved damage tolerance characteristics were the prime drivers to develop this new family of materials, it turns out that they have additional benefits, which become more and more important for today's designers, such as cost reduction and improved safety. The degradation of composites is due to environmental effects mainly on the chemical and/or physical properties of the polymer matrix leading to loss of adhesion of fiber/resin interface. Also, the reduction of fiber strength and stiffness are expected due to environmental degradation. Changes in interface/interphase properties leads to more pronounced changes in shear properties than any other mechanical properties. In this work, the influence of moisture in shear properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composites and Carall have been investigated by using interlaminar shear (ILSS) and Iosipescu tests. It was observed that hygrothermal conditioning reduces the Iosipescu shear strength of CF/E and Carall composites due to the moisture absorption in these materials

  8. Loading Effects on Resolution in Thin Layer Chromatography and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 11. Loading Effects on Resolution in Thin Layer Chromatography and Paper Chromatography. K Girigowda V H Mulimani. Classroom Volume 10 Issue 11 November 2005 pp 79-84 ...

  9. The effects of green infrastructure on exceedance of critical shear stress in Blunn Creek watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannak, Sa'd.

    2017-10-01

    Green infrastructure (GI) has attracted city planners and watershed management professional as a new approach to control urban stormwater runoff. Several regulatory enforcements of GI implementation created an urgent need for quantitative information on GI practice effectiveness, namely for sediment and stream erosion. This study aims at investigating the capability and performance of GI in reducing stream bank erosion in the Blackland Prairie ecosystem. To achieve the goal of this study, we developed a methodology to represent two types of GI (bioretention and permeable pavement) into the Soil Water Assessment Tool, we also evaluated the shear stress and excess shear stress for stream flows in conjunction with different levels of adoption of GI, and estimated potential stream bank erosion for different median soil particle sizes using real and design storms. The results provided various configurations of GI schemes in reducing the negative impact of urban stormwater runoff on stream banks. Results showed that combining permeable pavement and bioretention resulted in the greatest reduction in runoff volumes, peak flows, and excess shear stress under both real and design storms. Bioretention as a stand-alone resulted in the second greatest reduction, while the installation of detention pond only had the least reduction percentages. Lastly, results showed that the soil particle with median diameter equals to 64 mm (small cobbles) had the least excess shear stress across all design storms, while 0.5 mm (medium sand) soil particle size had the largest magnitude of excess shear stress. The current study provides several insights into a watershed scale for GI planning and watershed management to effectively reduce the negative impact of urban stormwater runoff and control streambank erosion.

  10. Mechanical properties and local mobility of atactic-polystyrene films under constant-shear deformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hudzinskyy, D.; Michels, M.A.J.; Lyulin, A.V.

    2012-01-01

    We have performed molecular-dynamics simulations of atactic polystyrene thin films to study the effect of shear rate, pressure, and temperature on the stress-strain behaviour, the relevant energetic contributions and non-affine displacements of polymer chains during constant-shear deformation. Under

  11. Shear machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astill, M.; Sunderland, A.; Waine, M.G.

    1980-01-01

    A shear machine for irradiated nuclear fuel elements has a replaceable shear assembly comprising a fuel element support block, a shear blade support and a clamp assembly which hold the fuel element to be sheared in contact with the support block. A first clamp member contacts the fuel element remote from the shear blade and a second clamp member contacts the fuel element adjacent the shear blade and is advanced towards the support block during shearing to compensate for any compression of the fuel element caused by the shear blade (U.K.)

  12. Investigation of the Shear Flow Effect and Tip Clearance on a Low Speed Axial Flow Compressor Cascade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Varpe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the effect of inlet shear flow on the tip leakage flow in an axial flow compressor cascade. A flow with a high shear rate is generated in the test section of an open circuit cascade wind tunnel by using a combination of screens with a prescribed solidity. It is observed that a stable shear flow of shear rate 1.33 is possible and has a gradual decay rate until 15 times the height of the shear flow generator downstream. The computational results obtained agree well with the available experimental data on the baseline configuration. The detailed numerical analysis shows that the tip clearance improves the blade loading near the tip through the promotion of favorable incidence by the tip leakage flow. The tip clearance shifts the centre of pressure on the blade surface towards the tip. It, however, has no effect on the distribution of end wall loss and deviation angle along the span up to 60% from the hub. In the presence of a shear inflow, the end wall effects are considerable. On the other hand, with a shear inflow, the effects of tip leakage flow are observed to be partly suppressed. The shear flow reduces the tip leakage losses substantially in terms of kinetic energy associated with it.

  13. Effects of silane application on the shear bond strength of ceramic orthodontic brackets to enamel surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinandi Sri Pudyani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fixed orthodontic appliances with ceramic brackets are used frequently to fulfill the aesthetic demand of patient through orthodontic treatment. Ceramic brackets have some weaknesses such as bond strength and enamel surface damage. In high bond strength the risk of damage in enamel surfaces increases after debonding. Purpose: This study aimed to determine the effect of silane on base of bracket and adhesive to shear bond strength and enamel structure of ceramic bracket. Method: Sixteen extracted upper premolars were randomly divided into four groups based on silane or no silane on the bracket base and on the adhesive surface. Design of the base on ceramic bracket in this research was microcrystalline to manage the influence of mechanical interlocking. Samples were tested in shear mode on a universal testing machine after attachment. Following it, adhesive remnant index (ARI scores were used to assess bond failure site. Statistical analysis was performed using a two-way Anova and the Mann-Whitney test. A scanning electron microscope (SEM with a magnification of 2000x was used to observe enamel structure after debonding. Result: Shear bond strength was increased between group without silane and group with silane on the base of bracket (p<0,05. There was no significance different between group without silane and group with silane on adhesive (p<0,05. Conclusion: Application of silane on base of bracket increases shear bond strength, however, application of silane on adhesive site does not increase shear bond strength of ceramic bracket. Most bonding failure occurred at the enamel adhesive interface and damage occurred on enamel structure in group contains silane of ceramic bracket.

  14. Settling of isolated particles and of suspensions in a shear-thinning medium; Sedimentation de particules isolees et de suspensions en milieu rheofluidifiant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daugan, S.

    2002-11-01

    After drawing up a balance sheet of current knowledge of settling of particles and suspensions in Newtonian and non Newtonian fluids, we introduce the characterisation of the fluid-particles system and especially the shear-thinning behavior of Xanthan solutions. This experimental study is organised into two parts. First of all, we study the settling behavior of a few particles falling along their line of centres. The conditions for particles aggregation with respect to the rheological properties of the suspending fluid are systematically reported. To that extent, rheological relaxation experiments are performed. Once aggregated, the particles velocities are much more important that the velocity of a single one. We show that a simple model, based on the Newtonian case, allows to predict the position and the velocity of each particle with respect to the initial separation distance between them. The second part of this work is devoted to the study of the settling behavior of spherical and monodisperse particles suspensions according to the particles volume fraction, the polymer concentration of the suspending fluid and the geometry of the sedimenting cell. From a model giving the particle volume fraction as a function of the luminous intensity transmitted by the suspension, we show that three regimes of different kinetics occur. During the second regime, the particle volume fraction decreases exponentially with time and the observed phenomena are very fast. Finally, we study the spatial structuration of the suspension and we link it to the topography of the sediment obtained at the end of the sedimentation. (author)

  15. Shear localization and effective wall friction in a wall bounded granular flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artoni, Riccardo; Richard, Patrick

    2017-06-01

    In this work, granular flow rheology is investigated by means of discrete numerical simulations of a torsional, cylindrical shear cell. Firstly, we focus on azimuthal velocity profiles and study the effect of (i) the confining pressure, (ii) the particle-wall friction coefficient, (iii) the rotating velocity of the bottom wall and (iv) the cell diameter. For small cell diameters, azimuthal velocity profiles are nearly auto-similar, i.e. they are almost linear with the radial coordinate. Different strain localization regimes are observed : shear can be localized at the bottom, at the top of the shear cell, or it can be even quite distributed. This behavior originates from the competition between dissipation at the sidewalls and dissipation in the bulk of the system. Then we study the effective friction at the cylindrical wall, and point out the strong link between wall friction, slip and fluctuations of forces and velocities. Even if the system is globally below the sliding threshold, force fluctuations trigger slip events, leading to a nonzero wall slip velocity and an effective wall friction coefficient different from the particle-wall one. A scaling law was found linking slip velocity, granular temperature in the main flow direction and effective friction. Our results suggest that fluctuations are an important ingredient for theories aiming to capture the interface rheology of granular materials.

  16. Effect of pulse pressure on borehole stability during shear swirling flow vibration cementing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihua Cui

    Full Text Available The shear swirling flow vibration cementing (SSFVC technique rotates the downhole eccentric cascade by circulating cementing fluid. It makes the casing eccentrically revolve at high speed around the borehole axis. It produces strong agitation action to the annulus fluid, makes it in the state of shear turbulent flow, and results in the formation of pulse pressure which affects the surrounding rock stress. This study was focused on 1 the calculation of the pulse pressure in an annular turbulent flow field based on the finite volume method, and 2 the analysis of the effect of pulse pressure on borehole stability. On the upside, the pulse pressure is conducive to enhancing the liquidity of the annulus fluid, reducing the fluid gel strength, and preventing the formation of fluid from channeling. But greater pulse pressure may cause lost circulation and even formation fracturing. Therefore, in order to ensure smooth cementing during SSFVC, the effect of pulse pressure should be considered when cementing design.

  17. Effect of nonthermal plasma treatment on surface chemistry of commercially-pure titanium and shear bond strength to autopolymerizing acrylic resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vechiato-Filho, Aljomar José, E-mail: aljomarvechiatoflo@gmail.com [Department of Dental Materials and Prosthodontics, Aracatuba Dental School, Univ. Estadual Paulista — UNESP, Aracatuba, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Silva Vieira Marques, Isabella da [Department of Prosthodontics and Periodontology, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Santos, Daniela Micheline dos [Department of Dental Materials and Prosthodontics, Aracatuba Dental School, Univ. Estadual Paulista — UNESP, Aracatuba, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Oliveira Matos, Adaias [Department of Prosthodontics and Periodontology, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Rangel, Elidiane Cipriano; Cruz, Nilson Cristino da [Laboratory of Technological Plasmas (LaPTec), Engineering College, Univ. Estadual Paulista — UNESP, Sorocaba, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Barão, Valentim Adelino Ricardo [Department of Prosthodontics and Periodontology, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2016-03-01

    The effect of nonthermal plasma on the surface characteristics of commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti), and on the shear bond strength between an autopolymerizing acrylic resin and cp-Ti was investigated. A total of 96 discs of cp-Ti were distributed into four groups (n = 24): Po (no surface treatment), SB (sandblasting), Po + NTP and SB + NTP (methane plasma). Surface characterization was performed through surface energy, surface roughness, scanning microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction tests. Shear bond strength test was conducted immediately and after thermocycling. Surface treatment affected the surface energy and roughness of cp-Ti discs (P < .001). SEM–EDS showed the presence of the carbide thin film. XRD spectra revealed no crystalline phase changes. The SB + NTP group showed the highest bond strength values (6.76 ± 0.70 MPa). Thermocycling reduced the bond strength of the acrylic resin/cp-Ti interface (P < .05), except for Po group. NTP is an effective treatment option for improving the shear bond strength between both materials. - Highlights: • We tested the bond strength between two widely used materials in dentistry (acrylic and titanium). • We performed an innovative surface treatment with nonthermal plasma. • Increasing adhesion will avoid complications of full-arch implant-retained prostheses.

  18. The Effects of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes on the Shear Piezoelectricity of Biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, Conrad; Fitz-Gerald, James M.; Harrison, Joycelyn S.; Park, Cheol

    2008-01-01

    Shear piezoelectricity was investigated in a series of composites consisting of increased loadings of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in poly (gamma-benzyl-L-glutamate), or PBLG. The effects of the SWCNTs on this material property in PBLG will be discussed. Their influence on the morphology of the polymer (degree of orientation and crystallinity), and electrical and dielectric properties of the composite will be reported

  19. Nested separatrices in simple shear flows: the effect of localized disturbances on stagnation lines

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, M.C.T.; Gaskell, P.H.; Savage, M.D.

    2005-01-01

    The effects of localized two-dimensional disturbances on the structure of shear flows featuring a stagnation line are investigated. A simple superposition of a planar Couette flow and Moffatt's [J. Fluid Mech. 18, 1--18 (1964)] streamfunction for the decay of a disturbance between infinite stationary parallel plates shows that in general the stagnation line is replaced by a chain of alternating elliptic and hyperbolic stagnation points with a separation equal to 2.78 times the half-gap betwee...

  20. Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets and Disinclusion Buttons: Effect of Water and Saliva Contamination

    OpenAIRE

    Sfondrini, Maria Francesca; Fraticelli, Danilo; Gandini, Paola; Scribante, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of water and saliva contamination on the shear bond strength and failure site of orthodontic brackets and lingual buttons. Materials and Methods. 120 bovine permanent mandibular incisors were randomly divided into 6 groups of 20 specimens each. Both orthodontic brackets and disinclusion buttons were tested under three different enamel surface conditions: (a) dry, (b) water contamination, and (c) saliva contamination. Brackets and buttons...

  1. The Effect of a Shear Flow on the Uptake of LDL and Ac-LDL by Cultured Vascular Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Koichi; Karino, Takeshi

    The effects of a shear flow on the uptake of fluorescence-labeled low-density lipoprotein (DiI-LDL), acetylated LDL (DiI-Ac-LDL), and lucifer yellow (LY; a tracer of fluid-phase endocytosis) by cultured bovine aortic ECs were studied using a rotating-disk shearing apparatus. It was found that 2hours’ exposure of ECs to a laminar shear flow that imposed ECs an area-mean shear stress of 10dynes/cm2 caused an increase in the uptake of DiI-LDL and LY. By contrast, the uptake of DiI-Ac-LDL was decreased by exposure of the ECs to a shear flow. Addition of dextran sulfate (DS), a competitive inhibitor of scavenger receptors, reversed the effect of a shear flow on the uptake of DiI-Ac-LDL, resulting in an increase by the imposition of a shear flow, while the uptake of DiI-LDL and LY remained unaffected. It was concluded that a shear flow promotes the endocytosis of DiI-LDL and LY by ECs, but suppresses the uptake of DiI-Ac-LDL by ECs by inhibiting scavenger receptor-mediated endocytosis.

  2. Thermoelectric effects of amorphous Ga-Sn-O thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Tokiyoshi; Uenuma, Mutsunori; Kimura, Mutsumi

    2017-07-01

    The thermoelectric effects of an amorphous Ga-Sn-O (a-GTO) thin film have been evaluated as a physical parameter of a novel oxide semiconductor. Currently, a-GTO thin films are greatly desired not only because they do not contain rare metals and are therefore free from problems on the exhaustion of resources and the increase in cost but also because their initial characteristics and performance stabilities are excellent when they are used in thin-film transistors. In this study, an a-GTO thin film was deposited on a quartz substrate by RF magnetron sputtering and postannealing was performed in air at 350 °C for 1 h using an annealing furnace. The Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity of the a-GTO thin film were -137 µV/K and 31.8 S/cm at room temperature, and -183 µV/K and 43.8 S/cm at 397 K, respectively, and as a result, the power factor was 1.47 µW/(cm·K2) at 397 K; these values were roughly as high as those of amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O (a-IGZO) thin films. Therefore, a-GTO thin films will be a candidate material for thermoelectric devices fabricated in a large area at a low cost by controlling the carrier mobility, carrier density, device structures, and so forth.

  3. A mixed-effects model approach for the statistical analysis of vocal fold viscoelastic shear properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chet C; Chan, Roger W; Sun, Han; Zhan, Xiaowei

    2017-11-01

    A mixed-effects model approach was introduced in this study for the statistical analysis of rheological data of vocal fold tissues, in order to account for the data correlation caused by multiple measurements of each tissue sample across the test frequency range. Such data correlation had often been overlooked in previous studies in the past decades. The viscoelastic shear properties of the vocal fold lamina propria of two commonly used laryngeal research animal species (i.e. rabbit, porcine) were measured by a linear, controlled-strain simple-shear rheometer. Along with published canine and human rheological data, the vocal fold viscoelastic shear moduli of these animal species were compared to those of human over a frequency range of 1-250Hz using the mixed-effects models. Our results indicated that tissues of the rabbit, canine and porcine vocal fold lamina propria were significantly stiffer and more viscous than those of human. Mixed-effects models were shown to be able to more accurately analyze rheological data generated from repeated measurements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Turbulence in tokamak plasmas. Effect of a radial electric field shear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payan, J.

    1994-05-01

    After a review of turbulence and transport phenomena in tokamak plasmas and the radial electric field shear effect in various tokamaks, experimental measurements obtained at Tore Supra by the means of the ALTAIR plasma diagnostic technique, are presented. Electronic drift waves destabilization mechanisms, which are the main features that could describe the experimentally observed microturbulence, are then examined. The effect of a radial electric field shear on electronic drift waves is then introduced, and results with ohmic heating are studied together with relations between turbulence and transport. The possible existence of ionic waves is rejected, and a spectral frequency modelization is presented, based on the existence of an electric field sheared radial profile. The position of the inversion point of this field is calculated for different values of the mean density and the plasma current, and the modelization is applied to the TEXT tokamak. The radial electric field at Tore Supra is then estimated. The effect of the ergodic divertor on turbulence and abnormal transport is then described and the density fluctuation radial profile in presence of the ergodic divertor is modelled. 80 figs., 120 refs

  5. Accurate measurement of the piezoelectric coefficient of thin films by eliminating the substrate bending effect using spatial scanning laser vibrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leighton, Glenn J T; Huang, Zhaorong

    2010-01-01

    One of the major difficulties in measuring the piezoelectric coefficient d 33,f for thin films is the elimination of the contribution from substrate bending. We show by theoretical analysis and experimental measurements that by bonding thin film piezoelectric samples to a substantial holder, the substrate bending can be minimized to a negligible level. Once the substrate bending can be effectively eliminated, single-beam laser scanning vibrometry can be used to measure the precise strain distribution of a piezoelectric thin film under converse actuation. A significant strain increase toward the inside edge of the top electrode (assuming a fully covered bottom electrode) and a corresponding strain peak in the opposite direction just outside the electrode edge were observed. These peaks were found to increase with the increasing Poisson's ratio and transverse piezoelectric coefficient of the piezoelectric thin film. This is due to the non-continuity of the electric field at the edge of the top electrode, which leads to the concentration of shear stress and electric field in the vicinity of the electrode edge. The measured d 33,f was found to depend not only on the material properties such as the electromechanical coefficients of the piezoelectric thin films and elastic coefficients of the thin film and the substrate, but also on the geometry factors such as the thickness of the piezoelectric films, the dimensions of the electrode, and also the thickness of the substrate

  6. Effects of array arrangements in nano-patterned thin film media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Hilo, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, the effect of different arrays arrangements on the magnetic behaviour of patterned thin film media is simulated. The modeled films consist of 80x80 cobalt grains of uniform diameter (20 nm) distributed into two different array arrangement: hexagonal (triangular) or square arrays. In addition to that, for each array arrangement, two cases of anisotropy orientations, random and textured films are considered. For both array arrangements and media orientations, hysteresis loops at different array separation (d) were simulated. Predictions show that for closely packed films, the shearing effects on the magnetization loop are much larger for the square array arrangement than the hexagonal one. According to these predictions, the bit switching field distribution in interacting 2D systems is much narrower for the hexagonal array arrangement. This result could be very important for high-density magnetic recording where a narrow bit switching field distribution is required.

  7. Effect of shear stress on electromagnetic behaviors in superconductor-ferromagnetic bilayer structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Huadong; Zhao, Meng; Jing, Ze; Zhou, Youhe

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, the electromagnetic response and shielding behaviour of superconductor-ferromagnetic bilayer structure are studied. The magnetomechanical coupling in ferromagnetic materials is also considered. Based on the linear piezomagnetic coupling model and anti-plane shear deformation, the current density and magnetic field in superconducting strip are obtained firstly. The effect of shear stress on the magnetization of strip is discussed. Then, we consider the magnetic cloak for superconductor-ferromagnetic bilayer structure. The magnetic permeability of ferromagnetic material is obtained for perfect cloaking in uniform magnetic field with magnetomechanical coupling in ferromagnet. The simulation results show that the electromagnetic response in superconductors will change by applying the stress only to the ferromagnetic material. In addition, the performance of invisibility of structure for non-uniform field will be affected by mechanical stress. It may provide a method to achieve tunability of superconducting properties with mechanical loadings.

  8. The Effect of Wetting Gravity Regime on Shear Strength of SAC and Sn-Pb Solder Lap Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sona, Mrunali; Prabhu, K. Narayan

    2017-09-01

    The failure of solder joints due to imposed stresses in an electronic assembly is governed by shear bond strength. In the present study, the effect of wetting gravity regime on single-lap shear strength of Sn-0.3Ag-0.7Cu and Sn-2.5Ag-0.5Cu solder alloys reflowed between bare copper substrates as well as Ni-coated Cu substrates was investigated. Samples were reflowed for 10 s, T gz (time corresponding to the end of gravity regime) and 100 s individually and tested for single-lap shear strength. The single-lap shear test was also carried out on eutectic Sn-Pb/Cu- and Sn-Pb/Ni-coated Cu specimens to compare the shear strength values obtained with those of lead-free alloys. The eutectic Sn-Pb showed significantly higher ultimate shear strength on bare Cu substrates when compared to Sn-Ag-Cu alloys. However, SAC alloys reflowed on nickel-coated copper substrate exhibited higher shear strength when compared to eutectic Sn-Pb/Ni-coated Cu specimens. All the substrate/solder/substrate lap joint specimens that were reflowed for the time corresponding to the end of gravity regime exhibited maximum ultimate shear strength.

  9. Irradiated Effect on Shear-Moment Interaction of Reinforced Concrete Slab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Jun Yeon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, HyungTae; Park, Kyoungsoo [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang-Ho [Hyundai Engineering, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Several deleterious mechanisms include chronic high-temperature exposure, freeze-thaw, and chemical attack and have been reviewed extensively in the literature. On the other hand, the effect of irradiation on RC needs further investigations for the long-term operation of existing NPPs. In this regard, the RC biological shield structure is located in closest proximity to a reactor core and expected to see the highest levels of irradiation over the lifetime. The biological shield structure may undergo a large lateral load from earthquake and become thicker for a suitable shielding. Although the bending strength is easily predictable with the altering steel properties, the more complete behaviors should be studied to see if the promised performance is achievable. Given this, in this study, the shear-moment (VM) interaction of a typical one-way slab representing the biological shield structure is investigated with incremental neutron irradiation. The effect of radiation on the behavior of one-way slab is presented by the shear and moment capacity interaction diagram. The results suggest that the yield strength increase of the longitudinal reinforcement barely affects the shear strength but it increases the bending strength significantly. This may be misleading, however, as the structural capacity to observe the energy from environmental loadings such as earthquake would be actually reducing.

  10. The mitigation effect of sheared axial flow on the rayleigh-taylor instability in Z-pinch plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yang

    2005-01-01

    A magnetohydrodynamic formulation is derived to investigate the mitigation effects of the sheared axial flow on the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in Z-pinch plasma. The dispersion relation of the compressible model is given. The mitigation effects of sheared axial flow on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of Z-pinch plasma in the compressible and incompressible models are compared respectively, and the effect of compressible on the instability of system with sheared axial flow is discussed. It is found that, compressibility effects can stabilize the Rayleigh-Taylor/Kelvin-Helmholtz (RT/KH) instability, and this allows the sheared axial flow mitigate the RT instability far more effectively. The authors also find that, at the early stage of the implosion, if the temperature of the plasma is not very high, the compressible model is much more suitable to describing the state of system than the incompressible one. (author)

  11. The effect of convection and shear on the damping and propagation of pressure waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiel, Barry Vincent

    Combustion instability is the positive feedback between heat release and pressure in a combustion system. Combustion instability occurs in the both air breathing and rocket propulsion devices, frequently resulting in high amplitude spinning waves. If unchecked, the resultant pressure fluctuations can cause significant damage. Models for the prediction of combustion instability typically include models for the heat release, the wave propagation and damping. Many wave propagation models for propulsion systems assume negligible flow, resulting in the wave equation. In this research the effect of flow on wave propagation was studied both numerically and experimentally. Two experiential rigs were constructed, one with axial flow to study the longitudinal waves, the other with swirling flow to study circumferential waves. The rigs were excited with speakers and the resultant pressure was measured simultaneously at many locations. Models of the rig were also developed. Equations for wave propagation were derived from the Euler Equations. The resultant resembled the wave equation with three additional terms, two for the effect of the convection and a one for the effect of shear of the mean flow on wave propagation. From the experimental and numerical data several conclusions were made. First, convection and shear both act as damping on the wave propagation, reducing the magnitude of the Frequency Response Function and the resonant frequency of the modes. Second, the energy extracted from the mean flow as a result of turbulent shear for a given condition is frequency dependent, decreasing with increasing frequency. The damping of the modes, measured for the same shear flow, also decreased with frequency. Finally, the two convective terms cause the anti-nodes of the modes to no longer be stationary. For both the longitudinal and circumferential waves, the anti-nodes move through the domain even for mean flow Mach numbers less than 0.10. It was concluded that convection

  12. The Effect of Shear Flow on the Isotropic-Nematic Transition in Liquid Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmsted, Peter David

    1991-08-01

    In this thesis I will discuss the effects of shear flow on the Isotropic-Nematic phase transition in liquid crystals. Shear flow has dramatic orienting effects on the rod-like constituents of nematic liquid crystals, with the general effects of (1) inducing order in the high-temperature isotropic phase, and (2) dictating a direction of alignment for the low-temperature nematic phase. Shear flow also imposes a biaxial symmetry on both the high and low temperature phases, thereby changing the nature of the symmetry-breaking at the transition. We develop coupled deterministic dynamical equations for the 5-component nematic order parameter and the fluid velocity, which may be considered generalizations of the Leslie-Ericksen and Navier-Stokes equations, respectively. We examine the stable stationary solutions to these equations to determine the nature of the non-equilibrium phases, and discuss the analogies and differences between this system and equilibrium systems. From homogeneous solutions we obtain a state diagram analogous to that of a Van der Waals fluid, including a two-state region and a discontinuous transition which terminates at a critical point. To resolve the question of the analog of the Maxwell construction to distinguish locally stable states, we construct stable inhomogeneous interfacial states. From an analysis of these states we determine a coexistence line and find exponents characterizing the shape of the coexistence curve and the interface thickness as the critical point is approached. We find mean-field critical behavior, and comment on the possibility of the analogs of spinodal decomposition and nucleation. Finally, we develop a formalism for describing light scattering from biaxial steady state, and investigate the Gaussian level fluctuations about these states. In the vicinity of the critical point we find singular behavior analogous to critical opalescence of a simple fluid at its critical point. We also find anisotropic correlations at the

  13. Repulsive effects of hydrophobic diamond thin films on biomolecule detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruslinda, A. Rahim, E-mail: ruslindarahim@gmail.com [Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, Jln Kgr-Alor Setar, Seriab, 01000 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Department of Nano Science and Nano Engineering, School of Advance Science and Engineering, Ohkubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, 169-8555 Tokyo (Japan); Ishiyama, Y. [Department of Nano Science and Nano Engineering, School of Advance Science and Engineering, Ohkubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, 169-8555 Tokyo (Japan); Penmatsa, V. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler Street, Miami, FL 33174 (United States); Ibori, S.; Kawarada, H. [Department of Nano Science and Nano Engineering, School of Advance Science and Engineering, Ohkubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, 169-8555 Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • We report the effect of fluorine plasma treatment on diamond thin film to resist the nonspecific adsorption of biomolecules. • The diamond thin film were highly hydrophobic with a surface energy value of ∼25 mN/m. • The repulsive effect shows excellent binding efficiency for both DNA and HIV-1 Tat protein. - Abstract: The repulsive effect of hydrophobic diamond thin film on biomolecule detection, such as single-nucleotide polymorphisms and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 trans-activator of transcription peptide protein detection, was investigated using a mixture of a fluorine-, amine-, and hydrogen-terminated diamond surfaces. These chemical modifications lead to the formation of a surface that effectively resists the nonspecific adsorption of proteins and other biomolecules. The effect of fluorine plasma treatment on elemental composition was also investigated via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XPS results revealed a fluorocarbon layer on the diamond thin films. The contact angle measurement results indicated that the fluorine-treated diamond thin films were highly hydrophobic with a surface energy value of ∼25 mN/m.

  14. Repulsive effects of hydrophobic diamond thin films on biomolecule detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruslinda, A. Rahim; Ishiyama, Y.; Penmatsa, V.; Ibori, S.; Kawarada, H.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We report the effect of fluorine plasma treatment on diamond thin film to resist the nonspecific adsorption of biomolecules. • The diamond thin film were highly hydrophobic with a surface energy value of ∼25 mN/m. • The repulsive effect shows excellent binding efficiency for both DNA and HIV-1 Tat protein. - Abstract: The repulsive effect of hydrophobic diamond thin film on biomolecule detection, such as single-nucleotide polymorphisms and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 trans-activator of transcription peptide protein detection, was investigated using a mixture of a fluorine-, amine-, and hydrogen-terminated diamond surfaces. These chemical modifications lead to the formation of a surface that effectively resists the nonspecific adsorption of proteins and other biomolecules. The effect of fluorine plasma treatment on elemental composition was also investigated via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XPS results revealed a fluorocarbon layer on the diamond thin films. The contact angle measurement results indicated that the fluorine-treated diamond thin films were highly hydrophobic with a surface energy value of ∼25 mN/m

  15. Shear flows induced by nonlinear evolution of double tearing modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhengxiong; Kishimoto, Y.; Li, J. Q.; Wang Xiaogang; Dong, J. Q.

    2008-01-01

    Shear flows induced by nonlinear evolution of double tearing modes are investigated in a resistive magnetohydrodynamic model with slab geometry. It is found that intensive and thin poloidal shear flow layers are generated in the magnetic island region driven by coupled reconnection process at both rational surfaces. The structure of the flow layers keeps evolving after the merging of magnetic separatrices and forms a few narrow vortices along the open field lines in the final stage of magnetic reconnection. The effects of the distance between both rational surfaces and the initial magnetic shear on the nonlinear evolution of the plasma flows are also taken into consideration and the relevant mechanism is discussed

  16. Multiscale modeling of the effect of carbon nanotube orientation on the shear deformation properties of reinforced polymer-based composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montazeri, A. [Institute for Nano-Science and Technology, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Computational Physical Sciences Research Laboratory, School of Nano-Science, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghi, M. [Institute for Nano-Science and Technology, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Naghdabadi, R., E-mail: naghdabd@sharif.ed [Institute for Nano-Science and Technology, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rafii-Tabar, H. [Computational Physical Sciences Research Laboratory, School of Nano-Science, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, and Research Centre for Medical Nanotechnology and Tissue Engineering, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Evin, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-04-04

    A combination of molecular dynamics (MD), continuum elasticity and FEM is used to predict the effect of CNT orientation on the shear modulus of SWCNT-polymer nanocomposites. We first develop a transverse-isotropic elastic model of SWCNTs based on the continuum elasticity and MD to compute the transverse-isotropic elastic constants of SWCNTs. These constants are then used in an FEM-based simulation to investigate the effect of SWCNT alignment on the shear modulus of nanocomposites. Furthermore, shear stress distributions along the nanotube axis and over its cross-sectional area are investigated to study the effect of CNT orientation on the shear load transfer. - Highlights: A transverse-isotropic elastic model of SWCNTs is presented. A hierarchical MD/FEM multiscale model of SWCNT-polymer composites is developed. Behavior of these nanocomposites under shear deformation is studied. A symmetric shear stress distribution occurs only in SWCNTs with 45{sup o} orientation. The total shear load sustained is greatest in the case of 45{sup o} orientation.

  17. Multiscale modeling of the effect of carbon nanotube orientation on the shear deformation properties of reinforced polymer-based composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montazeri, A.; Sadeghi, M.; Naghdabadi, R.; Rafii-Tabar, H.

    2011-01-01

    A combination of molecular dynamics (MD), continuum elasticity and FEM is used to predict the effect of CNT orientation on the shear modulus of SWCNT-polymer nanocomposites. We first develop a transverse-isotropic elastic model of SWCNTs based on the continuum elasticity and MD to compute the transverse-isotropic elastic constants of SWCNTs. These constants are then used in an FEM-based simulation to investigate the effect of SWCNT alignment on the shear modulus of nanocomposites. Furthermore, shear stress distributions along the nanotube axis and over its cross-sectional area are investigated to study the effect of CNT orientation on the shear load transfer. - Highlights: → A transverse-isotropic elastic model of SWCNTs is presented. → A hierarchical MD/FEM multiscale model of SWCNT-polymer composites is developed. → Behavior of these nanocomposites under shear deformation is studied. → A symmetric shear stress distribution occurs only in SWCNTs with 45 o orientation. → The total shear load sustained is greatest in the case of 45 o orientation.

  18. Seebeck effect of some thin film carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beensh-Marchwicka, G.; Prociow, E.

    2002-01-01

    Several materials have been investigated for high-temperature thin film thermocouple applications. These include silicon carbide with boron (Si-C-B), ternary composition based on Si-C-Mn, fourfold composition based on Si-C-Zr-B and tantalum carbide (TaC). All materials were deposited on quartz or glass substrates using the pulse sputter deposition technique. Electrical conduction and thermoelectric power were measured for various compositions at 300-550 K. It has been found, that the efficiency of thermoelectric power of films containing Si-C base composition was varied from 0.0015-0.034 μW/cmK 2 . However for TaC the value about 0.093 μW/cmK 2 was obtained. (author)

  19. Effects of Hybrid Coat on shear bond strength of five cements: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yue; Zhou, Hou-De; Feng, Yun-Zhi

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the sealing performance of Hybrid Coat and its influence on the shear bond strength of five dentin surface cements. Six premolars were pretreated to expose the dentin surface prior to the application of Hybrid Coat. The microscopic characteristics of the dentinal surfaces were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Then, 40 premolars were sectioned longitudinally, and 80 semi-sections were divided into a control group (untreated) and a study group (treated by Hybrid Coat). Alloy restoration was bonded to the teeth specimen using five different cements. Shear bond strength was measured by the universal testing machine. The fracture patterns and the adhesive interface were observed using astereomicroscope. SEM revealed that the lumens of dentinal tubules were completely occluded by Hybrid Coat. The Hybrid Coat significantly improved the shear bond strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) and resin cement (RC) but weakened the performance of zinc phosphate cement (ZPC), zinc polycarboxylate cement (ZPCC) and glass ionomer cement (GIC). Hybrid Coat is an effective dentinal tubule sealant, and therefore its combined use with resin or resin-modified glass ionomer cements can be applied for the prostheses attachment purpose.

  20. Effect of saliva decontamination procedures on shear bond strength of a one-step adhesive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ülker, E; Bilgin, S; Kahvecioğlu, F; Erkan, A I

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of different saliva decontamination procedures on the shear bond strength of a one-step universal adhesive system (Single Bond™ Universal Adhesive, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA). The occlusal surfaces of 75 human third molars were ground to expose dentin. The teeth were divided into the following groups: Group 1 (control group): Single Bond™ Universal Adhesive was applied to the prepared tooth according to the manufacturer's recommendations and light cured; no contamination procedure was performed. Group 2: Bonding, light curing, saliva contamination, and dry. Group 3: Bonding, light curing, saliva contamination, rinse, and dry. Group 4: After the procedure performed in Group 2, reapplication of bonding. Group 5: After the procedure performed in Group 3, reapplication of bonding. Then, composite resins were applied with cylindrical-shaped plastic matrixes and light cured. For shear bond testing, a notch-shaped force transducer apparatus was applied to each specimen at the interface between the tooth and composite until failure occurred. The data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA. One-way ANOVA revealed significant differences in shear bond strength between the control group and experimental Groups 2 and 4 (P 0.05). The present in vitro study showed that water rinsing is necessary if cured adhesive resin is contaminated with saliva to ensure adequate bond strength.

  1. Effect of blood contamination on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets and disinclusion buttons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfondrini, Maria Francesca; Gatti, Sara; Scribante, Andrea

    2011-07-01

    Our aim was to assess the effect of blood contamination on the shear bonding strength and sites of failure of orthodontic brackets and bondable buttons. We randomly divided 160 bovine permanent mandibular incisors into 8 groups of 20 specimens each. Both orthodontic brackets (Step brackets, Leone, Sesto Fiorentino, Italy) and bondable buttons (Flat orthodontic buttons, Leone, Sesto Fiorentino, Italy) were tested on four different enamel surfaces: dry; contamination with blood before priming; after priming; and before and after priming. Brackets and buttons were bonded to the teeth and subsequently tested using a Instron universal testing machine. Shear bonding strength and the rate of adhesive failures were recorded. Data were analysed using the analysis of variance (ANOVA), Scheffè tests, and the chi-square test. Uncontaminated enamel surfaces showed the highest bonding strengths for both brackets and buttons. When they were contaminated with blood, orthodontic brackets had significantly lower shear strengths than bondable buttons (P=0.0001). There were significant differences in sites of failure among the groups for the various enamel surfaces (P=0.001). Contamination of enamel by blood during bonding lowers the strength of the bond, more so with orthodontic brackets than with bondable buttons. Copyright © 2010 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets and disinclusion buttons: effect of water and saliva contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfondrini, Maria Francesca; Fraticelli, Danilo; Gandini, Paola; Scribante, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of water and saliva contamination on the shear bond strength and failure site of orthodontic brackets and lingual buttons. 120 bovine permanent mandibular incisors were randomly divided into 6 groups of 20 specimens each. Both orthodontic brackets and disinclusion buttons were tested under three different enamel surface conditions: (a) dry, (b) water contamination, and (c) saliva contamination. Brackets and buttons were bonded to the teeth and subsequently tested using a Instron universal testing machine. Shear bond strength values and adhesive failure rate were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA and Tukey tests (strength values) and Chi squared test (ARI Scores). Noncontaminated enamel surfaces showed the highest bond strengths for both brackets and buttons. Under water and saliva contamination orthodontic brackets groups showed significantly lower shear strengths than disinclusion buttons groups. Significant differences in debond locations were found among the groups under the various enamel surface conditions. Water and saliva contamination of enamel during the bonding procedure lowers bond strength values, more with orthodontic brackets than with disinclusion buttons.

  3. Assessing the effects of hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrighetto, Augusto Ricardo; de Leão Withers, Eduardo Henrique; Grando, Karlos Giovani; Ambrosio, Aldrieli Regina; Shimizu, Roberto Hideo; Melo, Ana Cláudia

    2016-01-01

    Tooth bleaching is, today, one of the most widespread cosmetic treatments in dental practice,  so it is important to determine whether it can interfere with orthodontic bonding or not. The aim of this study was to assess the in vitro effects of 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets. Forty-five upper bicuspids were divided into three groups (n = 15). In the control Group (C), the brackets were bonded without previous bleaching treatment. Group 1 (G1) was treated with 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent 24 h before bracket bonding. Group 2 was also bleached, and the brackets were bonded after 30 days. The shear bond strength of the brackets was measured using an EMIC machine, and the results were analyzed by ANOVA. There were no statistically significant differences between the three groups (P > 0.05), with Group C showing a mean bond strength of 9.72 ± 2.63 MPa, G1 of 8.09 ± 2.63 MPa, and G2 of 11.15 ± 4.42 MPa. It was possible to conclude that 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent does not affect the shear strength of orthodontic brackets bonded 24 h and 30 days after bleaching.

  4. Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets and Disinclusion Buttons: Effect of Water and Saliva Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfondrini, Maria Francesca; Fraticelli, Danilo; Gandini, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of water and saliva contamination on the shear bond strength and failure site of orthodontic brackets and lingual buttons. Materials and Methods. 120 bovine permanent mandibular incisors were randomly divided into 6 groups of 20 specimens each. Both orthodontic brackets and disinclusion buttons were tested under three different enamel surface conditions: (a) dry, (b) water contamination, and (c) saliva contamination. Brackets and buttons were bonded to the teeth and subsequently tested using a Instron universal testing machine. Shear bond strength values and adhesive failure rate were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA and Tukey tests (strength values) and Chi squared test (ARI Scores). Results. Noncontaminated enamel surfaces showed the highest bond strengths for both brackets and buttons. Under water and saliva contamination orthodontic brackets groups showed significantly lower shear strengths than disinclusion buttons groups. Significant differences in debond locations were found among the groups under the various enamel surface conditions. Conclusions. Water and saliva contamination of enamel during the bonding procedure lowers bond strength values, more with orthodontic brackets than with disinclusion buttons. PMID:23762825

  5. Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets and Disinclusion Buttons: Effect of Water and Saliva Contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Francesca Sfondrini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of water and saliva contamination on the shear bond strength and failure site of orthodontic brackets and lingual buttons. Materials and Methods. 120 bovine permanent mandibular incisors were randomly divided into 6 groups of 20 specimens each. Both orthodontic brackets and disinclusion buttons were tested under three different enamel surface conditions: (a dry, (b water contamination, and (c saliva contamination. Brackets and buttons were bonded to the teeth and subsequently tested using a Instron universal testing machine. Shear bond strength values and adhesive failure rate were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA and Tukey tests (strength values and Chi squared test (ARI Scores. Results. Noncontaminated enamel surfaces showed the highest bond strengths for both brackets and buttons. Under water and saliva contamination orthodontic brackets groups showed significantly lower shear strengths than disinclusion buttons groups. Significant differences in debond locations were found among the groups under the various enamel surface conditions. Conclusions. Water and saliva contamination of enamel during the bonding procedure lowers bond strength values, more with orthodontic brackets than with disinclusion buttons.

  6. The effect of enamel bleaching on the shear bond strengths of metal and ceramic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztaş, E; Bağdelen, G; Kiliçoğlu, H; Ulukapi, H; Aydin, I

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of bleaching and delayed bonding on the shear bond strengths of metal and ceramic brackets bonded with light and chemically cure composite resin to human enamel. One hundred and twenty extracted human premolar teeth were randomly divided into three groups of 40 each. The first two groups were bleached with 20 per cent carbamide peroxide (CP) at-home bleaching agent. No bleaching procedures were applied to the third group and served as control. The first two and control groups were divided into equal subgroups according to different adhesive-bracket combinations. Specimens in group 1 (n = 40) were bonded 24 hours after bleaching process was completed while the specimens in group 2 (n = 40) were bonded 14 days after. The specimens in all groups were debonded with a Universal testing machine while the modified adhesive remnant index was used to evaluate fracture properties. No statistically significant differences were found between the shear bond strengths of metal and ceramic brackets bonded to bleached enamel after 24 hours, 14 days, and unbleached enamel with light or chemical cure adhesives (P > 0.05). The mode of failure was mostly at the bracket/adhesive interface and cohesive failures within the resin were also observed. Our findings indicated that at-home bleaching agents that contain 20 per cent CP did not significantly affect the shear bond strength of metal and ceramic orthodontic brackets to enamel when bonding is performed 24 hours or 14 days after bleaching.

  7. Effect of microstructure on the nucleation and initiation of adiabatic shear bands (ASBs) during impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boakye Yiadom, Solomon, E-mail: boakyeys@cc.umanitoba.ca; Khaliq Khan, Abdul, E-mail: abdulkhaliq.khan@umanitoba.ca; Bassim, Nabil, E-mail: nabil.bassim@ad.umanitoba.ca

    2014-10-06

    While instability may occur homogenously during plastic deformation, the formation of adiabatic shear band (ASBs) does not follow a homogenous instability during impact. Geometrical stress concentration sites and/or microstructural inhomogeneities result in the nucleation and initiation of shear strain localization. In this study, initial microstructural inhomogeneity was found to produce nucleation sites for the initiation of ASBs. It was observed that double misfit interfaces and boundary layers with random arrangement of atomic columns are formed around precipitated carbides and they increase the volume fraction of dislocation sources within the specimens. The AISI 4340 steel specimens which were tempered at the lowest temperature had smaller precipitated carbides with high aspect ratios densely distributed within the matrix and were easily susceptible to the formation of ASBs. As the tempering temperature increased, the relative sizes of the carbides increased with a corresponding reduction in their aspect ratios and their distribution density within the matrix and thus were more resistant to the formation of ASBs. In this study, it is demonstrated that the intersection of an activated dislocation source with the direction of maximum shear (regions of stress concentrations) within the specimens during impact, is a necessary condition for the point of intersection to act as a possible site for the nucleation of ASBs, depending on the rate of dislocation generation, local strain and strain rate. At a constant carbide volume fraction, the higher susceptibility of the tempered specimens to the initiation of ASBs is attributed to the volume fraction of the points of intersection between activated dislocation sources and direction of maximum shear during impact. Additionally, the smaller carbides, with their higher aspect ratios and distribution densities, accentuate the effect of strain gradients and the microstructural inhomogeneities associated with the tempered

  8. The effects of silver coating on friction coefficient and shear bond strength of steel orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arash, Valiollah; Anoush, Keivan; Rabiee, Sayed Mahmood; Rahmatei, Manuchehr; Tavanafar, Saeid

    2015-01-01

    Aims of the present study was to measure frictional resistance between silver coated brackets and different types of arch wires, and shear bond strength of these brackets to the tooth. In an experimental clinical research 28 orthodontic brackets (standard, 22 slots) were coated with silver ions using electroplate method. Six brackets (coated: 3, uncoated: 3) were evaluated with Scanning Electron Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy. The amount of friction in 15 coated brackets was measured with three different kinds of arch wires (0.019 × 0.025-in stainless steel [SS], 0.018-in stainless steel [SS], 0.018-in Nickel-Titanium [Ni-Ti]) and compared with 15 uncoated steel brackets. In addition, shear bond strength values were compared between 10 brackets with silver coating and 10 regular brackets. Universal testing machine was used to measure shear bond strength and the amount of friction between the wires and brackets. SPSS 18 was used for data analysis with t-test. SEM and AFM results showed deposition of a uniform layer of silver, measuring 8-10 μm in thickness on bracket surfaces. Silver coating led to higher frictional forces in all the three types of arch wires, which was statistically significant in 0.019 × 0.025-in SS and 0.018-in Ni-Ti, but it did not change the shear bond strength significantly. Silver coating with electroplating method did not affect the bond strength of the bracket to enamel; in addition, it was not an effective method for decreasing friction in sliding mechanics. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Optical emission, vibrational feature, and shear-thinning aspect of Tb3+-doped Gd2O3 nanoparticle-based novel ferrofluids irradiated by gamma photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Nibedita; Hazarika, Samiran; Saha, Abhijit; Mohanta, Dambarudhar

    2013-10-01

    The present work reports on the spectroscopic and rheological properties of un-exposed and gamma (γ-) irradiated rare earth (RE) oxide nanoparticle-based ferrofluids (FFs). The FFs were produced by dispersing surfactant coated terbium (Tb3+)-doped gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoparticles in the ethanol medium and later on they were subjected to energetic γ-irradiation (1.25 MeV) at select doses (97 Gy and 2.635 kGy). The synthesized RE oxide nanoparticles were of ˜7 nm size and having a cubic crystal structure, as predicted from transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction studies. Fourier transformed infra-red (FT-IR) spectra showed an adequate blue shift of the Gd-O vibrational stretching mode from a wavenumber value of ˜558 cm-1, for the un-irradiated sample to a value of ˜540 cm-1 corresponding to the irradiated sample (2.635 kGy). In contrast, photoluminescence spectra have revealed modification of defect states along with Tb3+ assisted radiative transitions. The rheology measurements have illustrated unusual shear thinning behavior of the FFs, with an apparently improved power index (s) value from 0.34 to 0.50, obtained for increasing γ-dose cases. The variation of the decay parameter with irradiation dose, as predicted from the nature of apparent viscosity curves, is attributed to the defect formation, role of impurity ions (Tb3+), and weakening of inter nanoparticle bonding. The unusual properties of the novel RE oxide based FFs may find scope in sealing and shielding elements in the radiation environment including accelerator and other related zones.

  10. Effects of cyclic shear loads on strength, stiffness and dilation of rock fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanakorn Kamonphet

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Direct shear tests have been performed to determine the peak and residual shear strengths of fractures in sandstone, granite and limestone under cyclic shear loading. The fractures are artificially made in the laboratory by tension inducing and saw-cut methods. Results indicate that the cyclic shear load can significantly reduce the fracture shear strengths and stiffness. The peak shear strengths rapidly decrease after the first cycle and tend to remain unchanged close to the residual strengths through the tenth cycle. Degradation of the first order asperities largely occurs after the first cycle. The fracture dilation rates gradually decrease from the first through the tenth cycles suggesting that the second order asperities continuously degrade after the first load cycle. The residual shear strengths are lower than the peak shear strengths and higher than those of the smooth fractures. The strength of smooth fracture tends to be independent of cyclic shear loading.

  11. Development of shear bands in amorphous-crystalline metallic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozdnyakov, V.A.

    2004-01-01

    A theoretical study is made into conditions of shear band evolution in amorphous-crystalline alloys with various morphological types of structural constituents. The condition of shear band evolution in thin amorphous alloys in the interior of the crystalline matrix is obtained. It is shown that a scale effect exists which manifests itself in suppression of the process of localized plastic flow with amorphous alloy thickness decreasing down to the limit. The analysis of the condition for shear band evolution in an amorphous alloy with nanocrystalline inclusions is accomplished. The relationship of a critical stress of shear band evolution to a volume fraction of disperse crystal inclusions is obtained. A consideration is also given to the evolution of shear bands in the material containing amorphous and crystalline areas of micro meter size. For the alloy with the structure of this type conditions for propagation of localized flows by a relay race type mechanism are determined [ru

  12. Effective stresses and shear failure pressure from in situ Biot's coefficient, Hejre Field, North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regel, Jeppe Bendix; Orozova-Bekkevold, Ivanka; Andreassen, Katrine Alling

    2017-01-01

    , is significantly different from 1. The log-derived Biot's coefficient is above 0.8 in the Shetland Chalk Group and in the Tyne Group, and 0.6-0.8 in the Heno Sandstone Formation. We show that the effective vertical and horizontal stresses obtained using the log-derived Biot's coefficient result in a drilling......We propose a combination of Biot's equations for effective stress and the expression for shear failure in a rock to obtain an expression for minimum pore pressure in a stable vertical well bore. We show that a Biot's coefficient calculated from logging data in the Hejre Field, North Sea...

  13. Effect of surface treatment of prefabricated teeth on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets

    OpenAIRE

    Cumerlato, Marina; Lima, Eduardo Martinelli de; Osorio, Leandro Berni; Mota, Eduardo Gonçalves; Menezes, Luciane Macedo de; Rizzatto, Susana Maria Deon

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the effects of grinding, drilling, sandblasting, and ageing prefabricated teeth (PfT) on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets, as well as the effects of surface treatments on the adhesive remnant index (ARI). Methods: One-hundred-ninety-two PfT were divided into four groups (n = 48): Group 1, no surface treatment was done; Group 2, grinding was performed with a cylindrical diamond bur; Group 3,...

  14. EFFECT OF MEASUREMENT ERRORS ON PREDICTED COSMOLOGICAL CONSTRAINTS FROM SHEAR PEAK STATISTICS WITH LARGE SYNOPTIC SURVEY TELESCOPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bard, D.; Chang, C.; Kahn, S. M.; Gilmore, K.; Marshall, S. [KIPAC, Stanford University, 452 Lomita Mall, Stanford, CA 94309 (United States); Kratochvil, J. M.; Huffenberger, K. M. [Department of Physics, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL 33124 (United States); May, M. [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); AlSayyad, Y.; Connolly, A.; Gibson, R. R.; Jones, L.; Krughoff, S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Ahmad, Z.; Bankert, J.; Grace, E.; Hannel, M.; Lorenz, S. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Haiman, Z.; Jernigan, J. G., E-mail: djbard@slac.stanford.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); and others

    2013-09-01

    We study the effect of galaxy shape measurement errors on predicted cosmological constraints from the statistics of shear peak counts with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). We use the LSST Image Simulator in combination with cosmological N-body simulations to model realistic shear maps for different cosmological models. We include both galaxy shape noise and, for the first time, measurement errors on galaxy shapes. We find that the measurement errors considered have relatively little impact on the constraining power of shear peak counts for LSST.

  15. Effect of UV irradiation on the shear bond strength of titanium with segmented polyurethane through gamma-mercapto propyl trimethoxysilane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Harumi; Hirohashi, Yohei; Doi, Hisashi; Tsutsumi, Yusuke; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Noda, Kazuhiko; Hanawa, Takao

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of UV irradiation on shear bond strength between a titanium (Ti) and a segmented polyurethane (SPU) composite through gamma-mercapto propyl trimethoxysilane (gamma-MPS). To this end, the shear bond strength of Ti/SPU interface of Ti-SPU composite under varying conditions of ultraviolet ray (UV) irradiation was evaluated by a shear bond test. The glass transition temperatures of SPU with and without UV irradiation were also determined using differential scanning calorimetry. It was found that the shear bond strength of Ti/SPU interface increased with UV irradiation. However, excessive UV irradiation decreased the shear bond strength of Ti/SPU interface. Glass transition temperature was found to increase during 40-60 seconds of UV irradiation. In terms of durability after immersion in water at 37 degrees C for 30 days, shear bond strength was found to improve with UV irradiation. In conclusion, UV irradiation to a Ti-SPU composite was clearly one of the means to improve the shear bond strength of Ti/SPU interface.

  16. Surface effects on anti-plane shear waves propagating in magneto-electro-elastic nanoplates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Bin; Zhang, Chunli; Chen, Weiqiu; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2015-01-01

    Material surfaces may have a remarkable effect on the mechanical behavior of magneto-electro-elastic (or multiferroic) structures at nanoscale. In this paper, a surface magneto-electro-elasticity theory (or effective boundary condition formulation), which governs the motion of the material surface of magneto-electro-elastic nanoplates, is established by employing the state-space formalism. The properties of anti-plane shear (SH) waves propagating in a transversely isotropic magneto-electro-elastic plate with nanothickness are investigated by taking surface effects into account. The size-dependent dispersion relations of both antisymmetric and symmetric SH waves are presented. The thickness-shear frequencies and the asymptotic characteristics of the dispersion relations considering surface effects are determined analytically as well. Numerical results show that surface effects play a very pronounced role in elastic wave propagation in magneto-electro-elastic nanoplates, and the dispersion properties depend strongly on the chosen surface material parameters of magneto-electro-elastic nanoplates. As a consequence, it is possible to modulate the waves in magneto-electro-elastic nanoplates through surface engineering. (paper)

  17. Effect of stress-state and spacing on voids in a shear-field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2012-01-01

    in the overall average stress state can be prescribed. This also allows for studies of the effect of different initial void spacing in the two in-plane coordinate directions. The stress states considered are essentially simple shear, with various levels of tensile stresses or compressive stresses superposed, i.......e. low positive stress triaxiality or even negative stress triaxiality. For high aspect ratio unit cells a clear localization band is found inside the cell, which actually represents several parallel bands, due to periodicity. In the materials represented by a low aspect ratio unit cell localization...

  18. On shear rheology of gel propellants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahimi, Shai; Peretz, Arie [RAFAEL, MANOR Propulsion and Explosive Systems Division, Haifa (Israel); Natan, Benveniste [Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel)

    2007-04-15

    Selected fuel, oxidizer and simulant gels were prepared and rheologically characterized using a rotational rheometer. For fuel gelation both organic and inorganic gellants were utilized, whereas oxidizers and simulants were gelled with addition of silica and polysaccharides, respectively. The generalized Herschel-Bulkley constitutive model was found to most adequately represent the gels studied. Hydrazine-based fuels, gelled with polysaccharides, were characterized as shear-thinning pseudoplastic fluids with low shear yield stress, whereas inhibited red-fuming nitric acid (IRFNA) and hydrogen peroxide oxidizers, gelled with silica, were characterized as yield thixotropic fluids with significant shear yield stress. Creep tests were conducted on two rheological types of gels with different gellant content and the results were fitted by Burgers-Kelvin viscoelastic constitutive model. The effect of temperature on the rheological properties of gel propellant simulants was also investigated. A general rheological classification of gel propellants and simulants is proposed. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  19. Shielding Effectiveness of a Thin Film Window

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Eric

    1998-01-01

    .... The predicted shielding effectiveness was 29 dB based on theoretical calculations. The error analysis of the shielding effectiveness showed that this predicted value was within the measurement error...

  20. A numerical approach for assessing effects of shear on equivalent permeability and nonlinear flow characteristics of 2-D fracture networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Richeng; Li, Bo; Jiang, Yujing; Yu, Liyuan

    2018-01-01

    Hydro-mechanical properties of rock fractures are core issues for many geoscience and geo-engineering practices. Previous experimental and numerical studies have revealed that shear processes could greatly enhance the permeability of single rock fractures, yet the shear effects on hydraulic properties of fractured rock masses have received little attention. In most previous fracture network models, single fractures are typically presumed to be formed by parallel plates and flow is presumed to obey the cubic law. However, related studies have suggested that the parallel plate model cannot realistically represent the surface characters of natural rock fractures, and the relationship between flow rate and pressure drop will no longer be linear at sufficiently large Reynolds numbers. In the present study, a numerical approach was established to assess the effects of shear on the hydraulic properties of 2-D discrete fracture networks (DFNs) in both linear and nonlinear regimes. DFNs considering fracture surface roughness and variation of aperture in space were generated using an originally developed code DFNGEN. Numerical simulations by solving Navier-Stokes equations were performed to simulate the fluid flow through these DFNs. A fracture that cuts through each model was sheared and by varying the shear and normal displacements, effects of shear on equivalent permeability and nonlinear flow characteristics of DFNs were estimated. The results show that the critical condition of quantifying the transition from a linear flow regime to a nonlinear flow regime is: 10-4 〈 J hydraulic gradient. When the fluid flow is in a linear regime (i.e., J reduce the equivalent permeability significantly in the orientation perpendicular to the sheared fracture as much as 53.86% when J = 1, shear displacement Ds = 7 mm, and normal displacement Dn = 1 mm. By fitting the calculated results, the mathematical expression for δ2 is established to help choose proper governing equations when

  1. High Pressure Oxydesulphurisation of Coal—Effect of Oxidizing Agent, Solvent, Shear and Agitator Configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moinuddin Ghauri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The ambient temperature high pressure oxydesulphurisation technique was investigated to reduce the sulphur content. Prince of Wales coal was chosen for this study. The focus of the study was to investigate the reduction of both pyritic and organic sulphur while changing the KMnO4/Coal ratio, agitation speed, agitator configuration, and shear. The effect of different concentrations of acetone as a solvent and effect of particle size on the sulphur removal was also studied by a series of experimental runs at ambient temperature. Heating value recovery was found to be increased with the decreased KMnO4/Coal ratio and with decreased acetone concentration. It was found that sulphur removal was enhanced with the increase in shear using a turbine impeller. The effect of particle size was more significant on the pyritic sulphur removal as compared to the organic sulphur removal while heating value recovery was found to increase with decreased desulphurization tome for both, under atmospheric and high pressure.

  2. Shear Elasticity and Shear Viscosity Imaging in Soft Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yiqun

    In this thesis, a new approach is introduced that provides estimates of shear elasticity and shear viscosity using time-domain measurements of shear waves in viscoelastic media. Simulations of shear wave particle displacements induced by an acoustic radiation force are accelerated significantly by a GPU. The acoustic radiation force is first calculated using the fast near field method (FNM) and the angular spectrum approach (ASA). The shear waves induced by the acoustic radiation force are then simulated in elastic and viscoelastic media using Green's functions. A parallel algorithm is developed to perform these calculations on a GPU, where the shear wave particle displacements at different observation points are calculated in parallel. The resulting speed increase enables rapid evaluation of shear waves at discrete points, in 2D planes, and for push beams with different spatial samplings and for different values of the f-number (f/#). The results of these simulations show that push beams with smaller f/# require a higher spatial sampling rate. The significant amount of acceleration achieved by this approach suggests that shear wave simulations with the Green's function approach are ideally suited for high-performance GPUs. Shear wave elasticity imaging determines the mechanical parameters of soft tissue by analyzing measured shear waves induced by an acoustic radiation force. To estimate the shear elasticity value, the widely used time-of-flight method calculates the correlation between shear wave particle velocities at adjacent lateral observation points. Although this method provides accurate estimates of the shear elasticity in purely elastic media, our experience suggests that the time-of-flight (TOF) method consistently overestimates the shear elasticity values in viscoelastic media because the combined effects of diffraction, attenuation, and dispersion are not considered. To address this problem, we have developed an approach that directly accounts for all

  3. Calibration Method to Eliminate Zeroth Order Effect in Lateral Shearing Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Chao; Xiang, Yang; Qi, Keqi; Chen, Dawei

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, a calibration method is proposed which eliminates the zeroth order effect in lateral shearing interferometry. An analytical expression of the calibration error function is deduced, and the relationship between the phase-restoration error and calibration error is established. The analytical results show that the phase-restoration error introduced by the calibration error is proportional to the phase shifting error and zeroth order effect. The calibration method is verified using simulations and experiments. The simulation results show that the phase-restoration error is approximately proportional to the phase shift error and zeroth order effect, when the phase shifting error is less than 2° and the zeroth order effect is less than 0.2. The experimental result shows that compared with the conventional method with 9-frame interferograms, the calibration method with 5-frame interferograms achieves nearly the same restoration accuracy.

  4. Numerical linear analysis of the effects of diamagnetic and shear flow on ballooning modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanqing, HUANG; Tianyang, XIA; Bin, GUI

    2018-04-01

    The linear analysis of the influence of diamagnetic effect and toroidal rotation at the edge of tokamak plasmas with BOUT++ is discussed in this paper. This analysis is done by solving the dispersion relation, which is calculated through the numerical integration of the terms with different physics. This method is able to reveal the contributions of the different terms to the total growth rate. The diamagnetic effect stabilizes the ideal ballooning modes through inhibiting the contribution of curvature. The toroidal rotation effect is also able to suppress the curvature-driving term, and the stronger shearing rate leads to a stronger stabilization effect. In addition, through linear analysis using the energy form, the curvature-driving term provides the free energy absorbed by the line-bending term, diamagnetic term and convective term.

  5. Effect of LASER Irradiation on the Shear Bond Strength of Zirconia Ceramic Surface to Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Shahabi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Reliable bonding between tooth substrate and zirconia-based ceramic restorations is always of great importance. The laser might be useful for treatment of ceramic surfaces. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of laser irradiation on the shear bond strength of zirconia ceramic surface to dentin. Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, 40 Cercon zirconia ceramic blocks were fabricated. The surface treatment was performed using sandblasting with 50-micrometer Al2O3, CO2 laser, or Nd:YAG laser in each test groups. After that, the specimens were cemented to human dentin with resin cement. The shear bond strength of ceramics to dentin was determined and failure mode of each specimen was analyzed by stereo-microscope and SEM investigations. The data were statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and Tukey multiple comparisons. The surface morphology of one specimen from each group was investigated under SEM. Results: The mean shear bond strength of zirconia ceramic to dentin was 7.79±3.03, 9.85±4.69, 14.92±4.48 MPa for CO2 irradiated, Nd:YAG irradiated, and sandblasted specimens, respectively. Significant differences were noted between CO2 (P=0.001 and Nd:YAG laser (P=0.017 irradiated specimens with sandblasted specimens. No significant differences were observed between two laser methods (P=0.47. The mode of bond failure was predominantly adhesive in test groups (CO2 irradiated specimens: 75%, Nd:YAG irradiated: 66.7%, and sandblasting: 41.7%. Conclusion: Under the limitations of the present study, surface treatment of zirconia ceramics using CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers was not able to produce adequate bond strength with dentin surfaces in comparison to sandblasting technique. Therefore, the use of lasers with the mentioned parameters may not be recommended for the surface treatment of Cercon ceramics.

  6. Effect of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength of nanofilled composite repairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazaleh Ahmadizenouz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Repairing aged composite resin is a challenging process. Many surface treatment options have been proposed to this end. This study evaluated the effect of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength (SBS of nano-filled composite resin repairs. Methods. Seventy-five cylindrical specimens of a Filtek Z350XT composite resin were fabricated and stored in 37°C distilled water for 24 hours. After thermocycling, the specimens were divided into 5 groups according to the following surface treatments: no treatment (group 1; air abrasion with 50-μm aluminum oxide particles (group 2; irradiation with Er:YAG laser beams (group 3; roughening with coarse-grit diamond bur + 35% phosphoric acid (group 4; and etching with 9% hydrofluoric acid for 120 s (group 5. Another group of Filtek Z350XT composite resin samples (4×6 mm was fabricated for the measurement of cohesive strength (group 6. A silane coupling agent and an adhesive system were applied after each surface treatment. The specimens were restored with the same composite resin and thermocycled again. A shearing force was applied to the interface in a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests (P < 0.05. Results. One-way ANOVA indicated significant differences between the groups (P < 0.05. SBS of controls was significantly lower than the other groups; differences between groups 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 were not significant. Surface treatment with diamond bur + 35% phosphoric acid resulted in the highest bond strength. Conclusion. All the surface treatments used in this study improved the shear bond strength of nanofilled composite resin used.

  7. EFFECT OF ION ∇ B DRIFT DIRECTION ON TURBULENCE FLOW AND FLOW SHEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FENZI, C; McKEE, G.R; BURRELL, K.H; CARLSTROM, T.N; FONCK, R.J; GROEBNER, R.J

    2003-01-01

    The divertor magnetic geometry has a significant effect on the poloidal flow and resulting flow shear of turbulence in the outer region of L-mode tokamak plasmas, as determined via two-dimensional measurements of density fluctuations with Beam Emission Spectroscopy on DIII-D. Plasmas with similar parameters, except that in one case the ion (del)B drift points towards the divertor X-point (lower single-null, LSN), and in the other case, the ion (del)B drift points away from the divertor X-point (upper single-null, USN), are compared. Inside of r/a=0.9, the turbulence characteristics (amplitude, flow direction, correlation lengths) are similar in both cases, while near r/a=0.92, a dramatic reversal of the poloidal flow of turbulence relative to the core flow direction is observed in plasmas with the ion (del)B drift pointing towards the divertor X-point. No such flow reversal is observed in plasmas with the ion (del)B drift pointing away from the divertor X-point. This poloidal flow reversal results in a significantly larger local shear in the poloidal turbulence flow velocity in plasmas with the ion (del)B drift pointing towards the divertor X-point. Additionally, these plasmas locally exhibit significant dispersion, with two distinct and counter-propagating turbulence modes. Likewise, the radial correlation length of the turbulence is reduced in these plasmas, consistent with biorthogonal decomposition measurements of dominant turbulence structures. The naturally occurring turbulence flow shear in these LSN plasmas may facilitate the LH transition that occurs at an input power of roughly one-half to one-third that of corresponding plasmas with the ion (del)B drift pointing away from the X-point

  8. Effect of surface treatment of prefabricated teeth on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumerlato, Marina; Lima, Eduardo Martinelli de; Osorio, Leandro Berni; Mota, Eduardo Gonçalves; Menezes, Luciane Macedo de; Rizzatto, Susana Maria Deon

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the effects of grinding, drilling, sandblasting, and ageing prefabricated teeth (PfT) on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets, as well as the effects of surface treatments on the adhesive remnant index (ARI). One-hundred-ninety-two PfT were divided into four groups (n = 48): Group 1, no surface treatment was done; Group 2, grinding was performed with a cylindrical diamond bur; Group 3, two drillings were done with a spherical diamond bur; Group 4, sandblasting was performed with 50-µm aluminum oxide. Before the experiment, half of the samples stayed immersed in distilled water at 37oC for 90 days. Brackets were bonded with Transbond XT and shear strength tests were carried out using a universal testing machine. SBS were compared by surface treatment and by ageing with two-way ANOVA, followed by Tukey's test. ARI scores were compared between surface treatments with Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Dunn's test. Surface treatments on PfT enhanced SBS of brackets (pgrinding) (pgrinding. There was a positive correlation between SBS and ARI.

  9. Statistical shear lag model - unraveling the size effect in hierarchical composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaoding; Filleter, Tobin; Espinosa, Horacio D

    2015-05-01

    Numerous experimental and computational studies have established that the hierarchical structures encountered in natural materials, such as the brick-and-mortar structure observed in sea shells, are essential for achieving defect tolerance. Due to this hierarchy, the mechanical properties of natural materials have a different size dependence compared to that of typical engineered materials. This study aimed to explore size effects on the strength of bio-inspired staggered hierarchical composites and to define the influence of the geometry of constituents in their outstanding defect tolerance capability. A statistical shear lag model is derived by extending the classical shear lag model to account for the statistics of the constituents' strength. A general solution emerges from rigorous mathematical derivations, unifying the various empirical formulations for the fundamental link length used in previous statistical models. The model shows that the staggered arrangement of constituents grants composites a unique size effect on mechanical strength in contrast to homogenous continuous materials. The model is applied to hierarchical yarns consisting of double-walled carbon nanotube bundles to assess its predictive capabilities for novel synthetic materials. Interestingly, the model predicts that yarn gauge length does not significantly influence the yarn strength, in close agreement with experimental observations. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of Calcifications on Breast Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography: An Investigational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Adriana; Mehrmohammadi, Mohammad; Denis, Max; Bayat, Mahdi; Stan, Daniela L; Fatemi, Mostafa; Alizad, Azra

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effects of macrocalcifications and clustered microcalcifications associated with benign breast masses on shear wave elastography (SWE). SuperSonic Imagine (SSI) and comb-push ultrasound shear elastography (CUSE) were performed on three sets of phantoms to investigate how calcifications of different sizes and distributions influence measured elasticity. To demonstrate the effect in vivo, three female patients with benign breast masses associated with mammographically-identified calcifications were evaluated by CUSE. Apparent maximum elasticity (Emax) estimates resulting from individual macrocalcifications (with diameters of 2mm, 3mm, 5mm, 6mm, 9mm, 11mm, and 15mm) showed values over 50 kPa for all cases, which represents more than 100% increase over background (~21kPa). We considered a 2cm-diameter circular region of interest for all phantom experiments. Mean elasticity (Emean) values varied from 26 kPa to 73 kPa, depending on the macrocalcification size. Highly dense clusters of microcalcifications showed higher Emax values than clusters of microcalcification with low concentrations, but the difference in Emean values was not significant. Our results demonstrate that the presence of large isolated macrocalcifications and highly concentrated clusters of microcalcifications can introduce areas with apparent high elasticity in SWE. Considering that benign breast masses normally have significantly lower elasticity values than malignant tumors, such areas with high elasticity appearing due to presence of calcification in benign breast masses may lead to misdiagnosis.

  11. Effect of Calcifications on Breast Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography: An Investigational Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Gregory

    Full Text Available To investigate the effects of macrocalcifications and clustered microcalcifications associated with benign breast masses on shear wave elastography (SWE.SuperSonic Imagine (SSI and comb-push ultrasound shear elastography (CUSE were performed on three sets of phantoms to investigate how calcifications of different sizes and distributions influence measured elasticity. To demonstrate the effect in vivo, three female patients with benign breast masses associated with mammographically-identified calcifications were evaluated by CUSE.Apparent maximum elasticity (Emax estimates resulting from individual macrocalcifications (with diameters of 2mm, 3mm, 5mm, 6mm, 9mm, 11mm, and 15mm showed values over 50 kPa for all cases, which represents more than 100% increase over background (~21kPa. We considered a 2cm-diameter circular region of interest for all phantom experiments. Mean elasticity (Emean values varied from 26 kPa to 73 kPa, depending on the macrocalcification size. Highly dense clusters of microcalcifications showed higher Emax values than clusters of microcalcification with low concentrations, but the difference in Emean values was not significant.Our results demonstrate that the presence of large isolated macrocalcifications and highly concentrated clusters of microcalcifications can introduce areas with apparent high elasticity in SWE. Considering that benign breast masses normally have significantly lower elasticity values than malignant tumors, such areas with high elasticity appearing due to presence of calcification in benign breast masses may lead to misdiagnosis.

  12. Large-Amplitude Long-Wave Instability of a Supersonic Shear Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messiter, A. F.

    1995-01-01

    For sufficiently high Mach numbers, small disturbances on a supersonic vortex sheet are known to grow in amplitude because of slow nonlinear wave steepening. Under the same external conditions, linear theory predicts slow growth of long-wave disturbances to a thin supersonic shear layer. An asymptotic formulation is given here which adds nonzero shear-layer thickness to the weakly nonlinear formulation for a vortex sheet. Spatial evolution is considered, for a spatially periodic disturbance having amplitude of the same order, in Reynolds number, as the shear-layer thickness. A quasi-equilibrium inviscid nonlinear critical layer is found, with effects of diffusion and slow growth appearing through nonsecularity condition. Other limiting cases are also considered, in an attempt to determine a relationship between the vortex-sheet limit and the long-wave limit for a thin shear layer; there appear to be three special limits, corresponding to disturbances of different amplitudes at different locations along the shear layer.

  13. The Effect of CuO Nanoparticles on Antimicrobial Effects and Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toodehzaeim, Mohammad Hossein; Zandi, Hengameh; Meshkani, Hamidreza; Hosseinzadeh Firouzabadi, Azadeh

    2018-03-01

    Orthodontic appliances facilitate microbial plaque accumulation and increase the chance of white spot lesions. There is a need for new plaque control methods independent of patient's cooperation. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of incorporating copper oxide (CuO) nanoparticles on antimicrobial properties and bond strength of orthodontic adhesive. CuO nanoparticles were added to the composite transbond XT at concentrations of 0.01, 0.5 and 1 wt.%. To evaluate the antimicrobial properties of composites containing nanoparticles, the disk agar diffusion test was used. For this purpose, 10 discs from each concentration of nano-composites (totally 30 discs) and 10 discs from conventional composite (as the control group) were prepared. Then the diameter of streptococcus mutans growth inhibition around each disc was determined in blood agar medium. To evaluate the shear bond strength, with each concentration of nano-composites as well as the control group (conventional composite), 10 metal brackets were bonded to the human premolars and shear bond strength was determined using a universal testing machine. Nano-composites in all three concentrations showed significant antimicrobial effect compared to the control group ( p nano-composites compared to control group ( p = 0.695). Incorporating CuO nanoparticles into adhesive in all three studied concentrations added antimicrobial effects to the adhesive with no adverse effects on shear bond strength.

  14. Hall effect of K-doped superconducting thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Eunseon; Lee, Nam Hoon; Kang, Won Nam [Dept. of physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Tae Jong; Kim, Dong Ho [Dept. of physics, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan(Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    We have studied Hall effect for potassium (K)-doped BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}superconducting thin films by analyzing the relation between the longitudinal resistivity (ρ{sub xy}) and the Hall resistivity (ρ{sub xy}). The thin films used in this study were fabricated on Al{sub O3} (000l) substrates by using an ex-situ pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique under a high-vacuum condition of ∼10{sup -6} Torr. The samples showed the high superconducting transition temperatures (T{sub C}) of ∼40 K. The ρ{sub xx} and ρ{sub xy}the for K-doped BaFeAs{sub 2} thin films were measured by using a physical property measurement system (PPMS) with a temperature sweep (T-sweep) mode at an applied current density of 100 A/cm{sup 2} and at magnetic fields from 0 up to 9 T. We report the T-sweep results of the ρ{sub xx} and the ρ{sub xy} to investigate Hall scaling behavior on the basis of the relation of ρ{sub xy} = A(ρ{sub xy}){sup β}. The ρ{sub xx} values are 3.0 ± 0.2 in the c-axis-oriented K-doped BaFeAs{sub 2} thin films, whereas the thin films with various oriented-directions like a polycrystal showed slightly lower β than that of c-axis-oriented thin films. Interestingly, the β value is decreased with increasing magnetic fields.

  15. Material Models to Study the Bauschinger Effect on an Aluminum Shear Test Specimen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, Rui P. R.; Gracio, Jose J.; Yoon, Jeong-Whan

    2007-01-01

    Sheet metal forming processes generally involve complex loadings and nonlinear material models. Combinations of drawing, re-drawing and/or reverse drawing operations commonly induce cyclic loads with non-proportional strain paths, leading to Bauschinger effects that can not be predicted by conventional isotropic hardening laws. In order to properly represent this effect, it is also required to accommodate an appropriate kinematic hardening model along with an anisotropic yield function. In this work, two different approaches will be used to predict the Bauschinger effect for an Aluminum shear test specimen: the rate dependent crystal plasticity model and a new combined isotropic/kinematic hardening model based on the two yield surfaces approach (loading and boundary yield surfaces), as recently proposed

  16. EFFECT OF SHEARING DURING PREGNANCY ON PRODUCTIVE PERFORMANCE IN THE POST-PARTUM PERIOD OF EWES ON EXTENSIVE HUSBANDRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Marques Guyoti

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of shearing during pregnancy has been described as a tool for improving productivity in sheep and for minimizing perinatal mortality in lambs through the increase of fetal development. This study assessed the effect of shearing around 74 days of gestation on the productive performance of ewes and lambs during the first month of life. Forty Corriedale ewes were inseminated in autumn in Southern Brazil. All ewes were kept together at the same pasture under extensive husbandry conditions. The ewes were randomly separated into two treatment groups: twenty animals were completely sheared at 74 ± 6 days of pregnancy, and twenty were kept without sheared during pregnancy, composing the control group. Ewes and their lambs were evaluated at three different times during the experiment: at birth, between 15 and 21 days post-partum and between 22 and 45 days post-partum. Ewes had their body condition score, body weight, placental weight, milk production and serum concentrations of beta-hydroxybutyrate measured, while lambs had hematocrit, hemoglobin, and plasma lactate and glucose, as well as body weight at birth and until wean determined. Values of hematocrit and hemoglobin were lower and body weight at birth and at wean was higher in the group of lambs born from sheared ewes. Placenta weight was higher in sheared ewes. Body condition score and beta-hydroxybutyrate showed no differences between groups. Milk production of sheared ewes (1.26 L/day was higher than in control group (0.93 L/day. Shearing ewes at 74 days of pregnancy was efficient for the better development of lambs at post-birth, reducing perinatal mortality rates.

  17. Geometrical resonance effects in thin superconducting films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedellec, P.

    1977-01-01

    Electron tunneling density of states measurements on thick and clear superconducting films (S 1 ) backed by films in the normal or superconducting state (S 2 ) show geometrical resonance effects associated with the spatial variation of Δ(x), the pair potential, near the interface S 1 -S 2 . The present understanding of this so-called 'Tomasch effect' is described. The dispersion relation and the nature of excitations in the superconducting state are introduced. It is shown that the introduction of Green functions give a general description of the superconducting state. The notion of Andreev scattering at the S 1 -S 2 interface is presented and connect the geometrical resonance effects to interference process between excitations. The different physical parameters involved are defined and used in the discussion of some experimental results: the variation of the period in energy with the superconducting thickness is connected to the renormalized group velocity of excitations traveling perpendicular to the film. The role of the barrier potential at the interface on the Tomasch effect is described. The main results discussed are: the decrease of the amplitude of the Tomasch structures with energy is due to the loss of the mixed electron-hole character of the superconducting excitations far away from the Fermi level; the variation of the pair potential at the interface is directly related to the amplitude of the oscillations; the tunneling selectivity is an important parameter as the amplitude as well as the phase of the oscillations are modified depending on the value of the selectivity; the phase of the Tomasch oscillations is different for an abrupt change of Δ at the interface and for a smooth variation. An ambiguity arises due to the interplay between these parameters. Finally, some experiments, which illustrate clearly the predicted effects are described [fr

  18. Effects of a poloidally asymmetric ionization source on toroidal drift wave stability and the generation of sheared parallel flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A.S.; Diamond, P.H.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of a poloidally asymmetric ionization source on both dissipative toroidal drift wave stability and the generation of mean sheared parallel flow are examined. The first part of this work extends the development of a local model of ionization-driven drift wave turbulence [Phys. Fluids B 4, 877 (1992)] to include the effects of magnetic shear and poloidal source asymmetry, as well as poloidal mode coupling due to both magnetic drifts and the source asymmetry. Numerical and analytic investigation confirm that ionization effects can destabilize collisional toroidal drift waves. However, the mode structure is determined primarily by the magnetic drifts, and is not overly effected by the poloidal source asymmetry. The ionization source drives a purely inward particle flux, which can explain the anomalously rapid uptake of particles which occurs in response to gas puffing. In the second part of this work, the role poloidal asymmetries in both the source and turbulent particle diffusion play in the generation of sheared mean parallel flow is examined. Analysis indicates that predictions of sonic parallel shear flow [v parallel (r)∼c s ] are an unphysical result of the assumption of purely parallel flow (i.e., v perpendicular =0) and the neglect of turbulent parallel momentum transport. Results indicate that the flow produced is subcritical to the parallel shear flow instability when diamagnetic effects are properly considered

  19. Excited waves in shear layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechert, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    The generation of instability waves in free shear layers is investigated. The model assumes an infinitesimally thin shear layer shed from a semi-infinite plate which is exposed to sound excitation. The acoustical shear layer excitation by a source further away from the plate edge in the downstream direction is very weak while upstream from the plate edge the excitation is relatively efficient. A special solution is given for the source at the plate edge. The theory is then extended to two streams on both sides of the shear layer having different velocities and densities. Furthermore, the excitation of a shear layer in a channel is calculated. A reference quantity is found for the magnitude of the excited instability waves. For a comparison with measurements, numerical computations of the velocity field outside the shear layer were carried out.

  20. Effects of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on shear performance of laminated nanocomposite bonded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davood Askari and Mehrdad N Ghasemi-Nejhad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective is to improve the most commonly addressed weakness of the laminated composites (i.e. delamination due to poor interlaminar strength using carbon nanotubes (CNTs as reinforcement between the laminae and in the transverse direction. In this work, a chemical vapor deposition technique has been used to grow dense vertically aligned arrays of CNTs over the surface of chemically treated two-dimensionally woven cloth and fiber tows. The nanoforest-like fabrics can be used to fabricate three-dimensionally reinforced laminated nanocomposites. The presence of CNTs aligned normal to the layers and in-between the layers of laminated composites is expected to considerably enhance the properties of the laminates. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach, composite single lap-joint specimens were fabricated for interlaminar shear strength testing. It was observed that the single lap-joints with through-the-thickness CNT reinforcement can carry considerably higher shear stresses and strains. Close examination of the test specimens showed that the failure of samples with CNT nanoforests was completely cohesive, while the samples without CNT reinforcement failed adhesively. This concludes that the adhesion of adjacent carbon fabric layers can be considerably improved owing to the presence of vertically aligned arrays of CNT nanoforests.

  1. Effects of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on shear performance of laminated nanocomposite bonded joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askari, Davood; Ghasemi-Nejhad, Mehrdad N

    2012-08-01

    The main objective is to improve the most commonly addressed weakness of the laminated composites (i.e. delamination due to poor interlaminar strength) using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as reinforcement between the laminae and in the transverse direction. In this work, a chemical vapor deposition technique has been used to grow dense vertically aligned arrays of CNTs over the surface of chemically treated two-dimensionally woven cloth and fiber tows. The nanoforest-like fabrics can be used to fabricate three-dimensionally reinforced laminated nanocomposites. The presence of CNTs aligned normal to the layers and in-between the layers of laminated composites is expected to considerably enhance the properties of the laminates. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach, composite single lap-joint specimens were fabricated for interlaminar shear strength testing. It was observed that the single lap-joints with through-the-thickness CNT reinforcement can carry considerably higher shear stresses and strains. Close examination of the test specimens showed that the failure of samples with CNT nanoforests was completely cohesive, while the samples without CNT reinforcement failed adhesively. This concludes that the adhesion of adjacent carbon fabric layers can be considerably improved owing to the presence of vertically aligned arrays of CNT nanoforests.

  2. Cross-flow shearing effects on the trajectory of highly buoyant bent-over plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohidi, Ali; Kaye, Nigel Berkeley; Gollner, Michael J.

    2017-11-01

    The dynamics of highly buoyant plumes in cross-flow is ubiquitous throughout both industrial and environmental phenomena. The rise of smoke from a chimney, wastewater discharge into river currents, and dispersion of wildfire plumes are only a few instances. There have been many previous studies investigating the behavior of jets and highly buoyant plumes in cross-flow. So far, however, very little attention has been paid to the role of shearing effects in the boundary layer on the plume trajectory, particularly on the rise height. Numerical simulations and dimensional analysis are conducted to characterize the near- and far-field behavior of a highly buoyant plume in a boundary layer cross-flow. The results show that shear in the cross-flow leads to large differences in the rise height of the plume in relation to a uniform cross-flow, especially at far-field. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No.1200560. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in the material are of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of NSF.

  3. Shear Flow Instabilities and Droplet Size Effects on Aerosol Jet Printing Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guang; Gu, Yuan; Hines, Daniel; Das, Siddhartha; LaboratoryPhysical Science Collaboration; Soft Matter, Interfaces, Energy Laboratory Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    Aerosol Jet printing (AJP) is an additive technology utilizing aerodynamic focusing to produce fine feature down to 10 micrometers that can be used in the manufacture of wearable electronics and biosensors. The main concern of the current technology is related to unstable printing resolution, which is usually assessed by effective line width, edge smoothness, overspray and connectivity. In this work, we perform a 3D CFD model to study the aerodynamic instabilities induced by the annular shear flow (sheath gas flow or ShGF) trapped with the aerosol jet (carried gas flow or CGF) with ink droplets. Extensive experiments on line morphology have shown that by increasing ShGF, one can first obtain thinner line width, and then massive overspray is witnessed at very large ShGF/ CGF ratio. Besides the fact that shear-layer instabilities usually trigger eddy currents at comparatively low Reynolds number 600, the tolerance of deposition components assembling will also propagate large offsets of the deposited feather. We also carried out detailed analysis on droplet size and deposition range on the printing resolution. This study is intended to come up with a solution on controlling the operating parameters for finer printed features, and offer an improvement strategy on next generation.

  4. Boundary Effects and Shear Thickening of Colloidal Suspensions: A study based on measurement of Suspension Microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, M. Tharanga D.

    Microstructure is key to understanding rheological behaviors of flowing particulate suspensions. During the past decade, Stokesian Dynamics simulations have been the dominant method of determining suspension microstructure. Structure results obtained numerically reveal that an anisotropic structure is formed under high Peclet (Pe) number conditions. Researchers have used various experimental techniques such as small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and light scattering methods to validate microstructure. This work outlines an experimental technique based on confocal microscopy to study microstructure of a colloidal suspension in an index-matched fluid flowing in a microchannel. High resolution scans determining individual particle locations in suspensions 30-50 vol % yield quantitative results of the local microstructure in the form of the pair distribution function, g(r). From these experimentally determined g(r), the effect of shear rate, quantified by the Peclet number as a ratio of shear and Brownian stress, on the suspension viscosity and normal stress follow that seen in macroscopic rheological measurements and simulations. It is generally believed that shear thickening behavior of colloidal suspensions is driven by the formation of hydroclusters. From measurements of particle locations, hydroclusters are identified. The number of hydroclusters grows exponentially with increasing Pe, and the onset of shear thickening is driven by the increase in formation of clusters having 5-8 particles. At higher Pe, we notice the emergence of 12 or more particle clusters. The internal structure of these hydroclusters has been investigated, and there is some evidence that particles internal to hydroclusters preferentially align along the 45° and 135° axis. Beyond observations of bulk suspension behavior, the influence of boundaries on suspension microstructure is also investigated. Experiments were performed for suspensions flowing over smooth walls, made of glass

  5. Determining the effect of turbulent shear on containment aerosol dynamics using microgravity experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, C.K.; Abdelbaky, M.

    1997-01-01

    Determining the characteristics of large aerosol aggregates 'clusters' under turbulent conditions is fundamental for predicting the behaviour of radioactive aerosols inside the reactor containment following a severe accident. Studying such rapidly settling clusters is extremely difficult in ground-based experiments due to the effect of the earth's gravity. In this study, the microgravity environment is exploited to investigate the effect of turbulent shear on the aggregation and breakage of clusters by examining their structure and measuring their strength parameters while suspended under weightlessness conditions. A parametric model is introduced to correlate the experimental results over into nuclear aerosol models. It was demonstrated that the cluster parameters depend mainly on the turbulent field intensity as well as initial powder conditions. (author)

  6. Carbon fiber/carbon nanotube reinforced hierarchical composites: Effect of CNT distribution on shearing strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, H. W.; Mishnaevsky, Leon; Yi, H. Y.

    2016-01-01

    The strength and fracture behavior of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites with carbon nanotube (CNT) secondary reinforcement are investigated experimentally and numerically. Short Beam Shearing tests have been carried out, with SEM observations of the damage evolution in the composites. 3D...... CNT nanoreinforcement into the matrix and/or the sizing of carbon fiber/reinforced composites ensures strong increase of the composite strength. The effect of secondary CNTs reinforcement is strongest when some small addition of CNTs in the polymer matrix is complemented by the fiber sizing with high...... multiscale computational (FE) models of the carbon/polymer composite with varied CNT distributions have been developed and employed to study the effect of the secondary CNT reinforcement, its distribution and content on the strength and fracture behavior of the composites. It is shown that adding secondary...

  7. Dynamic behavior of a rotating delaminated composite beam including rotary inertia and shear deformation effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan-Ali Jafari-Talookolaei

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A finite element (FE model is developed to study the free vibration of a rotating laminated composite beam with a single delamination. The rotary inertia and shear deformation effects, as well as the bending–extension, bending–twist and extension–twist coupling terms are taken into account in the FE model. Comparison between the numerical results of the present model and the results published in the literature verifies the validity of the present model. Furthermore, the effects of various parameters, such as delamination size and location, fiber orientation, hub radius, material anisotropy and rotating speed, on the vibration of the beam are studied in detail. These results provide useful information in the study of the free vibration of rotating delaminated composite beams.

  8. The effect of temperature, matrix alloying and substrate coatings on wettability and shear strength of Al/Al2O3 couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobczak, N.; Ksiazek, M.; Radziwill, W.; Asthana, R.; Mikulowski, B.

    2004-03-01

    A fresh approach has been advanced to examine in the Al/Al2O3 system the effects of temperature, alloying of Al with Ti or Sn, and Ti and Sn coatings on the substrate, on contact angles measured using a sessile-drop test, and on interface strength measured using a modified push-off test that allows shearing of solidified droplets with less than 90 deg contact angle. In the modified test, the solidified sessile-drop samples are bisected perpendicular to the drop/Al2O3 interface at the midplane of the contact circle to obtain samples that permit bond strength measurement by stress application to the flat surface of the bisected couple. The test results show that interface strength is strongly influenced by the wetting properties; low contact angles correspond to high interface strength, which also exhibits a strong temperature dependence. An increase in the wettability test temperature led to an increase in the interface strength in the low-temperature range where contact angles were large and wettability was poor. The room-temperature shear tests conducted on thermally cycled sessile-drop test specimens revealed the effect of chemically formed interfacial oxides; a weakening of the thermally cycled Al/Al2O3 interface was caused under the following conditions: (1) slow contact heating and short contact times in the wettability test, and (2) fast contact heating and longer contact times. The addition of 6 wt pct Ti or 7 wt pct Sn to Al only marginally influenced the contact angle and interfacial shear strength. However, Al2O3 substrates having thin (<1 µm) Ti coatings yielded relatively low contact angles and high bond strength, which appears to be related to the dissolution of the coating in Al and formation of a favorable interface structure.

  9. A Laboratory Investigation on Shear Strength Behavior of Sandy Soil: Effect of Glass Fiber and Clinker Residue Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouaricha Leyla

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A study was undertaken to investigate the shear strength parameters of treated sands reinforced with randomly distributed glass fibers by carrying out direct shear test after seven days curing periods. Firstly, we studied the fiber content and fiber length effect on the peak shear strength on samples. The second part gives a parametric analysis on the effect of glass fiber and clinker residue content on the shear strength parameters for two types of uniform Algerian sands having different particle sizes (Chlef sand and Rass sand with an average relative density Dr = 50%. Finally, the test results show that the combination of glass fiber and clinker residue content can effectively improve the shear strength parameters of soil in comparison with unreinforced soil. For instance, there is a significant gain for the cohesion and friction angle of reinforced sand of Chlef. Compared to unreinforced sand, the cohesion for sand reinforced with different ratios of clinker residue increased by 4.36 to 43.08 kPa for Chlef sand and by 3.1 to 28.64 kPa for Rass sand. The feature friction angles increased from 38.73° to 43.01° (+4.28°, and after the treatment, clinker residue content of soil evaluated to 5% (WRC = 5%.

  10. A Laboratory Investigation on Shear Strength Behavior of Sandy Soil: Effect of Glass Fiber and Clinker Residue Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouaricha, Leyla; Henni, Ahmed Djafar; Lancelot, Laurent

    2017-12-01

    A study was undertaken to investigate the shear strength parameters of treated sands reinforced with randomly distributed glass fibers by carrying out direct shear test after seven days curing periods. Firstly, we studied the fiber content and fiber length effect on the peak shear strength on samples. The second part gives a parametric analysis on the effect of glass fiber and clinker residue content on the shear strength parameters for two types of uniform Algerian sands having different particle sizes (Chlef sand and Rass sand) with an average relative density Dr = 50%. Finally, the test results show that the combination of glass fiber and clinker residue content can effectively improve the shear strength parameters of soil in comparison with unreinforced soil. For instance, there is a significant gain for the cohesion and friction angle of reinforced sand of Chlef. Compared to unreinforced sand, the cohesion for sand reinforced with different ratios of clinker residue increased by 4.36 to 43.08 kPa for Chlef sand and by 3.1 to 28.64 kPa for Rass sand. The feature friction angles increased from 38.73° to 43.01° (+4.28°), and after the treatment, clinker residue content of soil evaluated to 5% (WRC = 5%).

  11. The effect of sheared toroidal rotation on pressure driven magnetic islands in toroidal plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegna, C. C. [Departments of Engineering Physics and Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    The impact of sheared toroidal rotation on the evolution of pressure driven magnetic islands in tokamak plasmas is investigated using a resistive magnetohydrodynamics model augmented by a neoclassical Ohm's law. Particular attention is paid to the asymptotic matching data as the Mercier indices are altered in the presence of sheared flow. Analysis of the nonlinear island Grad-Shafranov equation shows that sheared flows tend to amplify the stabilizing pressure/curvature contribution to pressure driven islands in toroidal tokamaks relative to the island bootstrap current contribution. As such, sheared toroidal rotation tends to reduce saturated magnetic island widths.

  12. Macroscopic assessment of cartilage shear: effects of counter-surface roughness, synovial fluid lubricant, and compression offset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quynhhoa T; Wong, Benjamin L; Chun, June; Yoon, Yeoung C; Talke, Frank E; Sah, Robert L

    2010-06-18

    During joint articulation, cartilage is subjected to compression, shear, and sliding, mechanical factors that regulate and affect cartilage metabolism. The objective of this study was to use an in vitro material-on-cartilage shear test to elucidate the effects of counter-surface roughness (Polished, Mildly rough, and Rough), lubricants (phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and bovine synovial fluid (bSF)), and compression offset on the shearing and sliding of normal human talar cartilage under dynamic lateral displacement. Peak shear stress (sigma(xz,m)) and strain (E(xz,m)) increased with increasing platen roughness and compression offset, and were 30% higher with PBS than with bSF. Compared to PBS, bSF was more effective as a lubricant for P than for M and R platens as indicated by the higher reduction in kinetic friction coefficient (-60% vs. -20% and -19%, respectively), sigma(xz,m) (-50% vs. -14% and -17%) and E(xz,m) (-54% vs. -19% and -17%). Cartilage shear and sliding were evident for all counter-surfaces either at low compression offset (10%) or with high lateral displacement (70%), regardless of lubricant. An increase in tissue shear occurred with either increased compression offset or increased surface roughness. This material and biomechanical test system allow control of cartilage sigma(xz,m) and E(xz,m), and hence, sliding magnitude, for an imposed lateral displacement. It therefore can facilitate study of cartilage mechanobiological responses to distinct regimes of cartilage loading and articulation, such as shear with variable amounts of sliding. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of thin water film on tire/road friction

    OpenAIRE

    BEAUTRU, Yannick; KANE, Malal; CEREZO, Véronique; DO, Minh Tan

    2011-01-01

    Water film on pavement surfaces entails a decrease of friction between the tire and the road. Nevertheless, only effects of water films above 1mm depth were investigated until now, considering hydroplaning risk. From these investigations, formulae were derived to predict the so-called hydroplaning speed at which happen hazardous situations for the driver because there is no more contact between the tire and the road. However, a significant number of accidents occurs on very thin water film su...

  14. Effect of thin water film on tire/road friction

    OpenAIRE

    BEAUTRU, Yannick

    2011-01-01

    Water film on pavement surfaces entails a decrease of friction between the tire and the road. Nevertheless,only effects of water films above 1mm depth were investigated until now, considering hydroplaning risk. From these investigations, formulae were derived to predict the so-called hydroplaning speed at which happen hazardous situations for the driver because there is no more contact between the tire and the road. However, a significant number of accidents occurs on very thin water film suc...

  15. Magneto-optical effect in Mn-Sb thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attaran, E.; Sadabadi, M.

    2003-01-01

    The magneto-optic Kerr and Faraday effect of Mn-Sb thin films have been studied. The single and multilayer of this film have grown on glass substrate by evaporation. The optical rotation of linear polarized light has been measured by an optical hysteresis plotter in a I/O converter amplifier circuit. Our results indicate a polar Kerr rotation up to 0.5 degree and in a double Mn S b this rotation research to maximum

  16. Rheological Investigation on the Effect of Shear and Time Dependent Behavior of Waxy Crude Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Japper-Jaafar A.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Rheological measurements are essential in transporting crude oil, especially for waxy crude oil. Several rheological measurements have been conducted to determine various rheological properties of waxy crude oil including the viscosity, yield strength, wax appearance temperature (WAT, wax disappearance temperature (WDT, storage modulus and loss modulus, amongst others, by using controlled stress rheometers. However, a procedure to determine the correct parameters for rheological measurements is still unavailable in the literature. The paper aims to investigate the effect of shear and time dependent behaviours of waxy crude oil during rheological measurements. It is expected that the preliminary work could lead toward a proper rheological measurement guideline for reliable rheological measurement of waxy crude oil.

  17. Nonlinear panel flutter in a rarefied atmosphere - Aerodynamic shear stress effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resende, Hugo B.

    1991-01-01

    The panel flutter phenomenon is studied assuming free-molecule flow. This kind of analysis is relevant in the case of hypersonic flight vehicles traveling at high altitudes, especially in the leeward portion of the vehicle. In these conditions the aerodynamic shear can be expected to be considerably larger than the pressure at a given point, so that the effects of such a loading are incorporated into the structural model. This is accomplished by introducing distributed longitudinal and bending moment loads. The former can lead to buckling of the panel, with the second mode in the case of a simply-supported panel playing a important role, and becoming the dominant mode in the solution. The presence of equivalent springs in the longitudinal direction at the panel's ends also becomes of relative importance, even for the evaluation of the linear flutter parameter. Finally, the behavior of the system is studied in the presence of applied compressive forces, that is, classical buckling.

  18. The Effect of Displacement Mode of Rigid Retaining Walls on Shearing Bands by Active Earth Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sekkel

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This work treats the physical modeling of failure mechanisms by active earth pressure. This last is developed by retaining wall movement. A lot of research showed that wall displacement has a significant effect on active earth pressure. A good comprehension of active earth pressure phenomenon and its failure mechanisms help us to better conceive retaining walls. The conception of a small-scale model allowed the realization of active earth pressure tests, while displacing the mobile wall toward the outside of the massif. The studied material is that of Schneebeli; light two-dimensional material made of cylindrical plastic rollers, simulating granular non-cohesive soil. The evolution of shearing zones under continuous and discontinuous displacement modes of mobile walls by correlation pictures allows the investigation of the localization of deformations and failure mechanisms.

  19. DETECTION OF THE VELOCITY SHEAR EFFECT ON THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF THE GALACTIC SATELLITES IN ISOLATED SYSTEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jounghun; Choi, Yun-Young

    2015-01-01

    We report a detection of the effect of the large-scale velocity shear on the spatial distributions of the galactic satellites around the isolated hosts. Identifying the isolated galactic systems, each of which consists of a single host galaxy and its satellites, from the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and reconstructing linearly the velocity shear field in the local universe, we measure the alignments between the relative positions of the satellites from their isolated hosts and the principal axes of the local velocity shear tensors projected onto the plane of sky. We find a clear signal that the galactic satellites in isolated systems are located preferentially along the directions of the minor principal axes of the large-scale velocity shear field. Those galactic satellites that are spirals, are brighter, are located at distances larger than the projected virial radii of the hosts, and belong to the spiral hosts yield stronger alignment signals, which implies that the alignment strength depends on the formation and accretion epochs of the galactic satellites. It is also shown that the alignment strength is quite insensitive to the cosmic web environment, as well as the size and luminosity of the isolated hosts. Although this result is consistent with the numerical finding of Libeskind et al. based on an N-body experiment, owing to the very low significance of the observed signals, it remains inconclusive whether or not the velocity shear effect on the satellite distribution is truly universal

  20. Detection of the Velocity Shear Effect on the Spatial Distributions of the Galactic Satellites in Isolated Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jounghun; Choi, Yun-Young

    2015-02-01

    We report a detection of the effect of the large-scale velocity shear on the spatial distributions of the galactic satellites around the isolated hosts. Identifying the isolated galactic systems, each of which consists of a single host galaxy and its satellites, from the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and reconstructing linearly the velocity shear field in the local universe, we measure the alignments between the relative positions of the satellites from their isolated hosts and the principal axes of the local velocity shear tensors projected onto the plane of sky. We find a clear signal that the galactic satellites in isolated systems are located preferentially along the directions of the minor principal axes of the large-scale velocity shear field. Those galactic satellites that are spirals, are brighter, are located at distances larger than the projected virial radii of the hosts, and belong to the spiral hosts yield stronger alignment signals, which implies that the alignment strength depends on the formation and accretion epochs of the galactic satellites. It is also shown that the alignment strength is quite insensitive to the cosmic web environment, as well as the size and luminosity of the isolated hosts. Although this result is consistent with the numerical finding of Libeskind et al. based on an N-body experiment, owing to the very low significance of the observed signals, it remains inconclusive whether or not the velocity shear effect on the satellite distribution is truly universal.

  1. Effect of surface treatment of prefabricated teeth on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Cumerlato

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the effects of grinding, drilling, sandblasting, and ageing prefabricated teeth (PfT on the shear bond strength (SBS of orthodontic brackets, as well as the effects of surface treatments on the adhesive remnant index (ARI. Methods: One-hundred-ninety-two PfT were divided into four groups (n = 48: Group 1, no surface treatment was done; Group 2, grinding was performed with a cylindrical diamond bur; Group 3, two drillings were done with a spherical diamond bur; Group 4, sandblasting was performed with 50-µm aluminum oxide. Before the experiment, half of the samples stayed immersed in distilled water at 37oC for 90 days. Brackets were bonded with Transbond XT and shear strength tests were carried out using a universal testing machine. SBS were compared by surface treatment and by ageing with two-way ANOVA, followed by Tukey’s test. ARI scores were compared between surface treatments with Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Dunn’s test. Results: Surface treatments on PfT enhanced SBS of brackets (p< 0.01, result not observed with ageing (p= 0.45. Groups II, III, and IV showed higher SBS and greater ARI than the Group 1 (p< 0.05. SBS was greater in the groups 3 and 4 (drilling, sandblasting than in the Group 2 (grinding (p< 0.05. SBS and ARI showed a positive correlation (Spearman’s R2= 0.57; p< 0.05. Conclusion: Surface treatment on PfT enhanced SBS of brackets, however ageing did not show any relevance. Sandblasting and drilling showed greater SBS than grinding. There was a positive correlation between SBS and ARI.

  2. The Effect of Different Soft Drinks on the Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Omid Khoda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: It is proved that acidic soft drinks that are commonly used, have an adverse effect on dental structures, and may deteriorate oral heath of our patients and orthodontic appliances. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of yoghurt drink with other soft drinks on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.Materials and Methods: Seventy-five first premolar teeth extracted for orthodontic purposes were selected and standard twin metal brackets were bonded on the center of buccal surface with No-Mix composite. The teeth were thermocycled for 625 cycles and randomly divided into five groups of artificial saliva, carbonated yoghurt drink with lactic acid base, non-carbonated yoghurt drink with lactic acid base, 7 up with citric acid base and Pepsi with phosphoric acid base. In all groups, the teeth were immersed in liquid for five-minute sessions three times with equal intervening intervals for 3 months. SBS was measured by a universal testing machine with a speed of 0.5mm/min. Data was analyzed statistically by one-way ANOVA.Results: The results showed that mean values for the shear bond strength of carbonated yoghurt drinks, non-carbonated yoghurt drinks, 7up and Pepsi groups were 12.98(+_2.95, 13.26(+_4.00, 16.11(+_4.89, 14.73(+_5.10, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference among the groups (P-value= 0.238Conclusion: Soft drinks used in this study did not decrease the bond strength of the brackets bonded with this specific type of composite.

  3. The effect of different soft drinks on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omid Khoda, M; Heravi, F; Shafaee, H; Mollahassani, H

    2012-01-01

    It is proved that acidic soft drinks that are commonly used, have an adverse effect on dental structures, and may deteriorate oral heath of our patients and orthodontic appliances. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of yoghurt drink with other soft drinks on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets. Seventy-five first premolar teeth extracted for orthodontic purposes were selected and standard twin metal brackets were bonded on the center of buccal surface with No-Mix composite. The teeth were thermocycled for 625 cycles and randomly divided into five groups of artificial saliva, carbonated yoghurt drink with lactic acid base, non-carbonated yoghurt drink with lactic acid base, 7 up with citric acid base and Pepsi with phosphoric acid base. In all groups, the teeth were immersed in liquid for five-minute sessions three times with equal intervening intervals for 3 months. SBS was measured by a universal testing machine with a speed of 0.5mm/min. Data was analyzed statistically by one-way ANOVA. The results showed that mean values for the shear bond strength of carbonated yoghurt drinks, non-carbonated yoghurt drinks, 7up and Pepsi groups were 12.98(±2.95), 13.26(±4.00), 16.11(±4.89), 14.73(±5.10), respectively. There was no statistically significant difference among the groups (P-value= 0.238) Soft drinks used in this study did not decrease the bond strength of the brackets bonded with this specific type of composite.

  4. On the effectiveness of incorporating shear thickening fluid with fumed silica particles in hip protectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haris, A.; Goh, B. W. Y.; Tay, T. E.; Lee, H. P.; Rammohan, A. V.; Tan, V. B. C.

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop a smart hip protector by incorporating shear thickening fluid (STF) into conventional foam hip protectors. The shear thickening properties of fumed silica particles dispersed in liquid polyethylene glycol (PEG) were determined from rheological tests. Dynamic drop tests, using a 4 kg drop platen at 0.5 m drop height, were conducted to study how STF improves energy absorption as compared to unfilled foam and PEG filled foam. The results show that PEG filled foam reduces the mean peak force transmitted by a further 55% and mean peak displacement by 32.5% as compared to the unfilled foam; the STF filled foam further reduces mean peak force and displacement by 15% and 41% respectively when compared to the PEG filled foam. At a displacement of 22 mm, the STF filled foam absorbs 7.4 times more energy than the PEG filled foam. The results of varying the drop mass and drop height show that the energy absorbed per unit displacement for STF filled foam is always higher than that of PEG filled foam. Finally, the effectiveness of a prototype of hip protector made from 15 mm thick STF filled foam in preventing hip fractures was studied under two different loading conditions: distributed load (plate drop test) and concentrated load (ball drop test). The results of the plate and ball drop tests show that among all hip protectors tested in this study, only the prototype can reduce the mean peak impact force to be lower than the force required to fracture a hip bone (3.1 kN) regardless of the type of loading. Moreover, the peak force of the prototype is about half of this value, suggesting thinner prototype could have been used instead. These findings show that STF is effective in improving the performance of hip protectors.

  5. Effect of short-chain branching on interfacial polymer structure and dynamics under shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Sohdam; Kim, Jun Mo; Cho, Soowon; Baig, Chunggi

    2017-11-22

    We present a detailed analysis on the effect of short-chain branches on the structure and dynamics of interfacial chains using atomistic nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of confined polyethylene melts in a wide range of shear rates. The intrinsically fast random motions of the short branches constantly disturb the overall chain conformation, leading to a more compact and less deformed chain structure of the short-chain branched (SCB) polymer against the imposed flow field in comparison with the corresponding linear polymer. Moreover, such highly mobile short branches along the backbone of the SCB polymer lead to relatively weaker out-of-plane wagging dynamics of interfacial chains, with highly curvy backbone structures in the intermediate flow regime. In conjunction with the contribution of short branches (as opposed to that of the backbone) to the total interfacial friction between the chains and the wall, the SCB polymer shows a nearly constant behavior in the degree of slip (d s ) with respect to shear rate in the weak-to-intermediate flow regimes. On the contrary, in the strong flow regime where irregular chain rotation and tumbling dynamics occur via intensive dynamical collisions between interfacial chains and the wall, an enhancement effect on the chain detachment from the wall, caused by short branches, leads to a steeper increase in d s for the SCB polymer than for the linear polymer. Remarkably, the SCB chains at the interface exhibit two distinct types of rolling mechanisms along the backbone, with a half-dumbbell mesoscopic structure at strong flow fields, in addition to the typical hairpin-like tumbling behavior displayed by the linear chains.

  6. Effect of surface treatment of prefabricated teeth on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumerlato, Marina; de Lima, Eduardo Martinelli; Osorio, Leandro Berni; Mota, Eduardo Gonçalves; de Menezes, Luciane Macedo; Rizzatto, Susana Maria Deon

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the effects of grinding, drilling, sandblasting, and ageing prefabricated teeth (PfT) on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets, as well as the effects of surface treatments on the adhesive remnant index (ARI). Methods: One-hundred-ninety-two PfT were divided into four groups (n = 48): Group 1, no surface treatment was done; Group 2, grinding was performed with a cylindrical diamond bur; Group 3, two drillings were done with a spherical diamond bur; Group 4, sandblasting was performed with 50-µm aluminum oxide. Before the experiment, half of the samples stayed immersed in distilled water at 37oC for 90 days. Brackets were bonded with Transbond XT and shear strength tests were carried out using a universal testing machine. SBS were compared by surface treatment and by ageing with two-way ANOVA, followed by Tukey’s test. ARI scores were compared between surface treatments with Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Dunn’s test. Results: Surface treatments on PfT enhanced SBS of brackets (p< 0.01), result not observed with ageing (p= 0.45). Groups II, III, and IV showed higher SBS and greater ARI than the Group 1 (p< 0.05). SBS was greater in the groups 3 and 4 (drilling, sandblasting) than in the Group 2 (grinding) (p< 0.05). SBS and ARI showed a positive correlation (Spearman’s R2= 0.57; p< 0.05). Conclusion: Surface treatment on PfT enhanced SBS of brackets, however ageing did not show any relevance. Sandblasting and drilling showed greater SBS than grinding. There was a positive correlation between SBS and ARI. PMID:28902249

  7. The Effect of Different Soft Drinks on the Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omid Khoda, M.; Heravi, F.; Shafaee, H.; Mollahassani, H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: It is proved that acidic soft drinks that are commonly used, have an adverse effect on dental structures, and may deteriorate oral heath of our patients and orthodontic appliances. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of yoghurt drink with other soft drinks on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five first premolar teeth extracted for orthodontic purposes were selected and standard twin metal brackets were bonded on the center of buccal surface with No-Mix composite. The teeth were thermocycled for 625 cycles and randomly divided into five groups of artificial saliva, carbonated yoghurt drink with lactic acid base, non-carbonated yoghurt drink with lactic acid base, 7 up with citric acid base and Pepsi with phosphoric acid base. In all groups, the teeth were immersed in liquid for five-minute sessions three times with equal intervening intervals for 3 months. SBS was measured by a universal testing machine with a speed of 0.5mm/min. Data was analyzed statistically by one-way ANOVA. Results: The results showed that mean values for the shear bond strength of carbonated yoghurt drinks, non-carbonated yoghurt drinks, 7up and Pepsi groups were 12.98(±2.95), 13.26(±4.00), 16.11(±4.89), 14.73(±5.10), respectively. There was no statistically significant difference among the groups (P-value= 0.238) Conclusion: Soft drinks used in this study did not decrease the bond strength of the brackets bonded with this specific type of composite. PMID:23066479

  8. Effects of Toroidal Rotation Shear on Toroidicity-induced Alfven Eigenmodes in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podesta, M.; Bell, R.E.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Gorelenkov, N.N.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Crocker, N.A.; Kubota, S.; Yuh, H.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of a sheared toroidal rotation on the dynamics of bursting Toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes are investigated in neutral beam heated plasmas on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) (M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 557 (2000)). The modes have a global character, extending over most of the minor radius. A toroidal rotation shear layer is measured at the location of maximum drive for the modes. Contrary to results from other devices, no clear evidence of increased damping is found. Instead, experiments with simultaneous neutral beam and radio-frequency auxiliary heating show a strong correlation between the dynamics of the modes and the instability drive. It is argued that kinetic effects involving changes in the mode drive and damping mechanisms other than rotation shear, such as continuum damping, are mostly responsible for the bursting dynamics of the modes.

  9. Shear strength of non-shear reinforced concrete elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoang, Cao linh

    1997-01-01

    The paper deals with the plastic shear strength of non shear reinforced T-beams.The influence of an un-reinforced flange on the shear capacity is investigated by considering a failure mechanism involving crack sliding in the web and a kind of membrane action over an effective width of the flange...

  10. Effects of Shear Fracture on In-depth Profile Modification of Weak Gels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xianjie; Song Xinwang; Yue Xiang'an; Hou Jirui; Fang Lichun; Zhang Huazhen

    2007-01-01

    Two sand packs were filled with fine glass beads and quartz sand respectively. The characteristics of crosslinked polymer flowing through the sand packs as well as the influence of shear fracture of porous media on the in-depth profile modification of the weak gel generated from the crosslinked polymer were investigated. The results indicated that under the dynamic condition crosslinking reaction happened in both sand packs,and the weak gels in these two cases became small gel particles after water flooding. The differences were:the dynamic gelation time in the quartz sand pack was longer than that in the glass bead pack. Residual resistance factor (FRR) caused by the weak gel in the quartz sand pack was smaller than that in the glass bead pack. The weak gel became gel particles after being scoured by subsequent flood water. A weak gel with uniform apparent viscosity and sealing characteristics was generated in every part of the glass bead pack,which could not only move deeply into the sand pack but also seal the high capacity channels again when it reached the deep part. The weak gel performed in-depth profile modification in the glass bead pack,while in the quartz sand pack,the weak gel was concentrated with 100 cm from the entrance of the sand pack. When propelled by the subsequent flood water,the weak gel could move towards the deep part of the sand pack but then became tiny gel particles and could not effectively seal the high capacity channels there. The in-depth profile modification of the weak gel was very weak in the quartz sand pack. It was the shear fracture of porous media that mainly affected the properties and weakened the in-depth profile modification of the weak gel.

  11. Effects of age and pathology on shear wave speed of the human rotator cuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumer, Timothy G; Dischler, Jack; Davis, Leah; Labyed, Yassin; Siegal, Daniel S; van Holsbeeck, Marnix; Moutzouros, Vasilios; Bey, Michael J

    2018-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears are common and often repaired surgically, but post-operative repair tissue healing, and shoulder function can be unpredictable. Tear chronicity is believed to influence clinical outcomes, but conventional clinical approaches for assessing tear chronicity are subjective. Shear wave elastography (SWE) is a promising technique for assessing soft tissue via estimates of shear wave speed (SWS), but this technique has not been used extensively on the rotator cuff. Specifically, the effects of age and pathology on rotator cuff SWS are not well known. The objectives of this study were to assess the association between SWS and age in healthy, asymptomatic subjects, and to compare measures of SWS between patients with a rotator cuff tear and healthy, asymptomatic subjects. SWE images of the supraspinatus muscle and intramuscular tendon were acquired from 19 asymptomatic subjects and 11 patients with a rotator cuff tear. Images were acquired with the supraspinatus under passive and active (i.e., minimal activation) conditions. Mean SWS was positively associated with age in the supraspinatus muscle and tendon under passive and active conditions (p ≤ 0.049). Compared to asymptomatic subjects, patients had a lower mean SWS in their muscle and tendon under active conditions (p ≤ 0.024), but no differences were detected under passive conditions (p ≥ 0.783). These findings identify the influences of age and pathology on SWS in the rotator cuff. These preliminary findings are an important step toward evaluating the clinical utility of SWE for assessing rotator cuff pathology. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 36:282-288, 2018. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Local effects in flow-accelerated corrosion wall thinning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietralik, J.

    2006-01-01

    'Full text:' There is enough evidence that flow conditions play the dominant role locally in Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) under certain conditions, e.g., in CANDU feeders. While chemistry and materials set the overall potential for FAC, which can be low or high, flow conditions determine the local distribution of wall thinning. This relationship is not new and recent accurate measurements of FAC rate of a plant feeder bend confirm that the relationship between flow local conditions expressed by local mass transfer coefficient and FAC rate in CANDU feeder bends is close. There is also a lot of other direct and indirect, experimental and laboratory evidence about this relationship. This knowledge can be useful for minimizing inspection, predicting new locations for inspection, predicting the location with the highest FAC rate for a given piping component, e.g., feeder element, and determining what components or feeders and to what extent they should be replaced. It applies also to heat exchangers and steam generators. The objective of this paper is to examine the relationship between FAC rate and local flow parameters. For FAC, the most important flow parameter is mass transfer coefficient. The mass transfer coefficient describes the intensity of the transport of corrosion products from the oxide-water interface into the bulk water. Therefore, this parameter can be used for predicting the local distribution of FAC rate. It could also be used in planning experiments because time-varying surface roughness can explain the time-dependence of FAC rates. The paper presents plant and laboratory evidence about the relationship. In addition, it shows correlations for mass transfer coefficient in components that are highly susceptible to FAC. The role of surface roughness, wall shear stress, and local turbulence is also discussed. (author)

  13. Mutation-specific effects on thin filament length in thin filament myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Josine M de; Joureau, Barbara; Lee, Eun-Jeong; Kiss, Balázs; Yuen, Michaela; Gupta, Vandana A; Pappas, Christopher T; Gregorio, Carol C; Stienen, Ger J M; Edvardson, Simon; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina; Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Pelin, Katarina; Malfatti, Edoardo; Romero, Norma B; Engelen, Baziel G van; Voermans, Nicol C; Donkervoort, Sandra; Bönnemann, C G; Clarke, Nigel F; Beggs, Alan H; Granzier, Henk; Ottenheijm, Coen A C

    2016-06-01

    Thin filament myopathies are among the most common nondystrophic congenital muscular disorders, and are caused by mutations in genes encoding proteins that are associated with the skeletal muscle thin filament. Mechanisms underlying muscle weakness are poorly understood, but might involve the length of the thin filament, an important determinant of force generation. We investigated the sarcomere length-dependence of force, a functional assay that provides insights into the contractile strength of muscle fibers as well as the length of the thin filaments, in muscle fibers from 51 patients with thin filament myopathy caused by mutations in NEB, ACTA1, TPM2, TPM3, TNNT1, KBTBD13, KLHL40, and KLHL41. Lower force generation was observed in muscle fibers from patients of all genotypes. In a subset of patients who harbor mutations in NEB and ACTA1, the lower force was associated with downward shifted force-sarcomere length relations, indicative of shorter thin filaments. Confocal microscopy confirmed shorter thin filaments in muscle fibers of these patients. A conditional Neb knockout mouse model, which recapitulates thin filament myopathy, revealed a compensatory mechanism; the lower force generation that was associated with shorter thin filaments was compensated for by increasing the number of sarcomeres in series. This allowed muscle fibers to operate at a shorter sarcomere length and maintain optimal thin-thick filament overlap. These findings might provide a novel direction for the development of therapeutic strategies for thin filament myopathy patients with shortened thin filament lengths. Ann Neurol 2016;79:959-969. © 2016 American Neurological Association.

  14. Effects of cluster thinning on vine photosynthesis, berry ripeness and flavonoid composition of Cabernet Sauvignon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; He, Yan-Nan; Chen, Wei-Kai; He, Fei; Chen, Wu; Cai, Xiao-Dong; Duan, Chang-Qing; Wang, Jun

    2018-05-15

    Cluster thinning is a common practice for regulating vine yield and grape quality. The effects of cluster thinning on vine photosynthesis, berry ripeness and flavonoid composition of V. vinifera L. Cabernet Sauvignon were evaluated during two seasons. Half of the clusters were removed at pea-size and veraison relative to two controls, respectively. Both cluster thinning treatments significantly increased pruning weight and decreased yield. No effects of cluster thinning on berry growth, ripeness and flavonol composition were observed. Early cluster thinning decreased the photosynthetic rate at pea-size, but the effect diminished at post-veraison. Early cluster thinning significantly promoted the biosynthesis of anthocyanins but decreased the proportion of 3'5'-hydroxylated and acylated anthocyanins at veraison. Late cluster thinning decreased the proportions of 3'5'-hydroxylated and acylated anthocyanins. Additionally, Cluster thinning showed inconsistent effects on flavan-3-ol composition over the two seasons. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of hip and knee position on tensor fasciae latae elongation during stretching: An ultrasonic shear wave elastography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umehara, Jun; Ikezoe, Tome; Nishishita, Satoru; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Umegaki, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Takuya; Fujita, Kosuke; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2015-12-01

    Decreased flexibility of the tensor fasciae latae is one factor that causes iliotibial band syndrome. Stretching has been used to improve flexibility or tightness of the muscle. However, no studies have investigated the effective stretching position for the tensor fasciae latae using an index to quantify muscle elongation in vivo. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of hip rotation and knee angle on tensor fasciae latae elongation during stretching in vivo using ultrasonic shear wave elastography. Twenty healthy men participated in this study. The shear elastic modulus of the tensor fasciae latae was calculated using ultrasonic shear wave elastography. Stretching was performed at maximal hip adduction and maximal hip extension in 12 different positions with three hip rotation conditions (neutral, internal, and external rotations) and four knee angles (0°, 45°, 90°, and 135°). Two-way analysis of variance showed a significant main effect for knee angle, but not for hip rotation. The post-hoc test for knee angle indicated that the shear elastic modulus at 90° and 135° were significantly greater than those at 0° and 45°. Our results suggest that adding hip rotation to the stretching position with hip adduction and extension may have less effect on tensor fasciae latae elongation, and that stretching at >90° of knee flexion may effectively elongate the tensor fasciae latae. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Ion motion in the current sheet with sheared magnetic field – Part 2: Non-adiabatic effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Artemyev

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigate dynamics of charged particles in current sheets with the sheared magnetic field. In our previouspaper (Artemyev et al., 2013 we studied the particle motion in such magnetic field configurations on the basis of the quasi-adiabatic theory and conservation of the quasi-adiabatic invariant. In this paper we concentrate on violation of the adiabaticity due to jumps of this invariant and the corresponding effects of stochastization of a particle motion. We compare effects of geometrical and dynamical jumps, which occur due to the presence of the separatrix in the phase plane of charged particle motion. We show that due to the presence of the magnetic field shear, the average value of dynamical jumps is not equal to zero. This effect results in the decrease of the time interval necessary for stochastization of trapped particle motion. We investigate also the effect of the magnetic field shear on transient trajectories, which cross the current sheet boundaries. Presence of the magnetic field shear leads to the asymmetry of reflection and transition of particles in the current sheet. We discuss the possible influence of single-particle effects revealed in this paper on the current sheet structure and dynamics.

  17. Rheometry-PIV of shear-thickening wormlike micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-Santibañez, Benjamín M; Pérez-Gonzalez, José; de Vargas, Lourdes; Rodríguez-Gonzalez, Francisco; Huelsz, Guadalupe

    2006-04-25

    The shear-thickening behavior of an equimolar semidilute aqueous solution of 40 mM/L cetylpyridinium chloride and sodium salicylate was studied in this work by using a combined method of rheometry and particle image velocimetry (PIV). Experiments were conducted at 27.5 degrees C with Couette, vane-bob, and capillary rheometers in order to explore a wide shear stress range as well as the effect of boundary conditions and time of flow on the creation and destruction of shear-induced structures (SIS). The use of the combined method of capillary rheometry with PIV allowed the detection of fast spatial and temporal variations in the flow kinematics, which are related to the shear-thickening behavior and the dynamics of the SIS but are not distinguished by pure rheometrical measurements. A rich-in-details flow curve was found for this solution, which includes five different regimes. Namely, at very low shear rates a Newtonian behavior was found, followed by a shear thinning one in the second regime. In the third, shear banding was observed, which served as a precursor of the SIS and shear-thickening. The fourth and fifth regimes in the flow curve were separated by a spurtlike behavior, and they clearly evidenced the existence of shear-thickening accompanied by stick-slip oscillations at the wall of the rheometer, which subsequently produced variations in the shear rate under shear stress controlled flow. Such a stick-slip phenomenon prevailed up to the highest shear stresses used in this work and was reflected in asymmetric velocity profiles with spatial and temporal variations linked to the dynamics of creation and breakage of the SIS. The presence of apparent slip at the wall of the rheometer provides an energy release mechanism which leads to breakage of the SIS, followed by their further reformation during the stick part of the cycles. In addition, PIV measurements allowed the detection of apparent slip at the wall, as well as mechanical failures in the bulk of the

  18. Simulated Space Environmental Effects on Thin Film Solar Array Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finckenor, Miria; Carr, John; SanSoucie, Michael; Boyd, Darren; Phillips, Brandon

    2017-01-01

    The Lightweight Integrated Solar Array and Transceiver (LISA-T) experiment consists of thin-film, low mass, low volume solar panels. Given the variety of thin solar cells and cover materials and the lack of environmental protection typically afforded by thick coverglasses, a series of tests were conducted in Marshall Space Flight Center's Space Environmental Effects Facility to evaluate the performance of these materials. Candidate thin polymeric films and nitinol wires used for deployment were also exposed. Simulated space environment exposures were selected based on SSP 30425 rev. B, "Space Station Program Natural Environment Definition for Design" or AIAA Standard S-111A-2014, "Qualification and Quality Requirements for Space Solar Cells." One set of candidate materials were exposed to 5 eV atomic oxygen and concurrent vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation for low Earth orbit simulation. A second set of materials were exposed to 1 MeV electrons. A third set of samples were exposed to 50, 100, 500, and 700 keV energy protons, and a fourth set were exposed to >2,000 hours of near ultraviolet (NUV) radiation. A final set was rapidly thermal cycled between -55 and +125degC. This test series provides data on enhanced power generation, particularly for small satellites with reduced mass and volume resources. Performance versus mass and cost per Watt is discussed.

  19. Effect of FRP on the Energy Absorbed by Steel Shear Walls with Openings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Ghasemzadeh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It’s for more than three decades that Steel Shear Walls are being used as lateral load resisting system. Definitely,the actual behavior of steel shear walls can be assessed using experimental results. However, solve many of phenomenon like this one should be done using mathematical and theoretical methods due to their special characteristics such as high expenses, lack of laboratory facilities and time limitations. In this study, the behavior of steel plate shear walls with openings in a one-story frame were evaluated and compared in various conditions. For this purpose, different values ​​for the opening in shear wall was considered and exposed to lateral displacement in ABAQUS as a comprehensive finite element software. Then, the impact of FRP arrangement on shear wall was evaluated to represent the structural behavior under various conditions. Result shows that, use of FRP sheets as parallel layers on both sides of shear wall has the best response on energy absorption, so that performance of the model was better than shear wall fully covered with FRP.

  20. The effects of geometrical confinement and viscosity ratio on the coalescence of droplet pairs in shear flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruyn, De P.; Chen, Dongju; Moldenaers, P.; Cardinaels, R.M.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of geometrical confinement and viscosity ratio on droplet coalescence in shear flow are experimentally investigated by means of a counter rotating parallel plate device, equipped with a microscope. The ratio of droplet diameter to gap spacing is varied between 0.03 and 0.33 to study both

  1. Fracture permeability under effect of normal and shear stress: A preliminary experimental investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanty, S.; Manteufel, R.D.; Chowdhury, A.H.

    1995-01-01

    The change in fracture permeability under mechanical loads have been investigated. An apparatus has been developed to measure change in fracture permeability, when a single fracture is subjected to normal and shear stress. Both radial and linear flow experiments have been conducted by modifying a direct shear test apparatus. Preliminary results suggest a 35-percent change in fracture permeability under normal stress to 8 MPa and nearly 350 percent under shear displacement of 9.9254 m (1 in.) at 5 MPa normal stress. Effort is underway to separate the permeability change due to gouge material production from that of due to dilation

  2. Magneto-thermoelectric effects in NiFe thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, Maximilian

    2015-11-01

    In this thesis magneto-thermoelectric effects are investigated in a systematic way to separate the transverse spin Seebeck effect from other parasitic effects like the anomalous Nernst effect. In contrast to the first studies found in the literature, in NiFe thin films a contribution of the transverse spin Seebeck effect can be excluded. This surprising outcome was crosschecked in a variety of different sample layouts and collaborations with other universities to ensure the validity of these results. In general, this thesis solves a long time discussion about the existence of the transverse spin Seebeck effect in NiFe films and supports the importance of control measurements for the scientific community. Even if such ''negative'' results may not be the award winning ones, new discoveries should be treated with constructive criticism and be checked carefully by the scientific community.

  3. An accurate higher order displacement model with shear and normal deformations effects for functionally graded plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jha, D.K.; Kant, Tarun; Srinivas, K.; Singh, R.K.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • We model through-thickness variation of material properties in functionally graded (FG) plates. • Effect of material grading index on deformations, stresses and natural frequency of FG plates is studied. • Effect of higher order terms in displacement models is studied for plate statics. • The benchmark solutions for the static analysis and free vibration of thick FG plates are presented. -- Abstract: Functionally graded materials (FGMs) are the potential candidates under consideration for designing the first wall of fusion reactors with a view to make best use of potential properties of available materials under severe thermo-mechanical loading conditions. A higher order shear and normal deformations plate theory is employed for stress and free vibration analyses of functionally graded (FG) elastic, rectangular, and simply (diaphragm) supported plates. Although FGMs are highly heterogeneous in nature, they are generally idealized as continua with mechanical properties changing smoothly with respect to spatial coordinates. The material properties of FG plates are assumed here to vary through thickness of plate in a continuous manner. Young's modulii and material densities are considered to be varying continuously in thickness direction according to volume fraction of constituents which are mathematically modeled here as exponential and power law functions. The effects of variation of material properties in terms of material gradation index on deformations, stresses and natural frequency of FG plates are investigated. The accuracy of present numerical solutions has been established with respect to exact three-dimensional (3D) elasticity solutions and the other models’ solutions available in literature

  4. Relative viscosity of emulsions in simple shear flow: Temperature, shear rate, and interfacial tension dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Se Bin; Lee, Joon Sang [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei Unversity, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    We simulate an emulsion system under simple shear rates to analyze its rheological characteristics using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). We calculate the relative viscosity of an emulsion under a simple shear flow along with changes in temperature, shear rate, and surfactant concentration. The relative viscosity of emulsions decreased with an increase in temperature. We observed the shear-thinning phenomena, which is responsible for the inverse proportion between the shear rate and viscosity. An increase in the interfacial tension caused a decrease in the relative viscosity of the decane-in-water emulsion because the increased deformation caused by the decreased interfacial tension significantly influenced the wall shear stress.

  5. Metamorphism and Shear Localization in the Oceanic and Continental Lithosphere: A Local or Lithospheric-Scale Effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesi, L.

    2017-12-01

    Ductile rheologies are characterized by strain rate hardening, which favors deformation zones that are as wide as possible, thus minimizing strain rate and stress. By contrast, plate tectonics and the observation of ductile shear zones in the exposed middle to lower crust show that deformation is often localized, that is, strain (and likely strain rate) is locally very high. This behavior is most easily explained if the material in the shear zone is intrinsically weaker than the reference material forming the wall rocks. Many origins for that weakness have been proposed. They include higher temperature (shear heating), reduced grain size, and fabric. The latter two were shown to be the most effective in the middle crust and upper mantle (given observational limits restricting heating to 50K or less) but they were not very important in the lower crust. They are not sufficient to explain the generation of narrow plate boundaries in the oceans. We evaluate here the importance of metamorphism, especially related to hydration, in weakening the lithosphere. Serpentine is a major player in the dynamics of the oceanic lithosphere. Although its ductile behavior is poorly constrained, serpentine is likely to behave in a brittle or quasi-plastic manner with a reduced coefficient of friction, replacing stronger peridotite. Serpentinization sufficiently weakens the oceanic lithosphere to explain the generation of diffuse plate boundaries and, combined with grain size reduction, the development of narrow plate boundaries. Lower crust outcrops, especially in the Bergen Arc (Norway), display eclogite shear zones hosted in metastable granulites. The introduction of water triggered locally a metamorphic reaction that reduces rock strength and resulted in a ductile shear zone. The presence of these shear zones has been used to explain the weakness of the lower crust perceived from geodesy and seismic activity. We evaluate here how much strain rate may increase as a result of

  6. Effects of two soft drinks on shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index of orthodontic metal brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajadi, Soodabeh Sadat; Eslami Amirabadi, Gholamreza; Sajadi, Sepideh

    2014-07-01

    Bond failure of brackets during orthodontic treatment is a common problem; which results in treatment interference, increased treatment time and prolonged clinical time for rebonding of failed brackets. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of Coca-Cola and a non-alcoholic beer on the shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index (ARI) of orthodontic metal brackets in vitro. Eighty intact human premolars were divided into two experimental groups of Coca-Cola and non-alcoholic beer (Istak), and a control group of artificial saliva. Over a period of thirty days, the test groups were immersed in the respective soft drinks for 5 minutes, twice a day. For the remainder of the time, they were kept in artificial saliva at 37°C. The control group was stored in artificial saliva during the experiment. All samples were subjected to shearing forces using Universal Testing Machine. ARI was determined with a stereomicroscope at ×12 magnification. The data of shear bond strength were statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's Post-Hoc test and the data of ARI scores were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis test. No significant difference was observed in ARIs of the three groups (P≤ 0.552). The shear bond strength of Coke group was significantly lower than that of the two other groups (P≤ 0.035); but there was no significant difference between the shear bond strength of Istak and the control group (P≤ 0.999). Coca-Cola decreased the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

  7. Effect of high shear mixing parameters and degassing temperature on the morphology of epoxy-clay nanocomposites

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Qadhi, Muneer; Merah, N.; Mezghani, Khaled S.; Khan, Zafarullah; Gasem, Zuhair Mattoug Asad; Sougrat, Rachid

    2013-01-01

    Epoxy-clay nanocomposites were prepared by high shear mixing method using Nanomer I.30E nanoclay as nano-reinforcement in diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA). The effect of mixing speed and time on the nature and degree of clay dispersion were investigated by varying the mixing speed in the range of 500-8000 RPM and mixing time in the range of 15-90 minutes. The effect of degassing temperature on the morphology of the resultant nanocomposites was also studied. Scanning and transmission microscopy (SEM and TEM) along with x-ray diffraction (XRD) have been used to characterize the effect of shear mixing speed, mixing time and degassing temperature on the structure of the resultant nanocomposites. The SEM, TEM and XRD examinations demonstrated that the degree of clay dispersion was improved with increasing the high shear mixing speed and mixing time. The results showed that the optimum high shear mixing speed and mixing time were 6000 rpm and 60 min, respectively. It was observed that the structure of the nanocomposites that have been degassed at 65°C was dominated by ordered intercalated morphology while disordered intercalated with some exfoliated morphology was found for the sample degassed at 100°C for the first 2 hours of the degassing process. © (2013) Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland.

  8. Derivation of energy-based base shear force coefficient considering hysteretic behavior and P-delta effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucar, Taner; Merter, Onur

    2018-01-01

    A modified energy-balance equation accounting for P-delta effects and hysteretic behavior of reinforced concrete members is derived. Reduced hysteretic properties of structural components due to combined stiffness and strength degradation and pinching effects, and hysteretic damping are taken into account in a simple manner by utilizing plastic energy and seismic input energy modification factors. Having a pre-selected yield mechanism, energy balance of structure in inelastic range is considered. P-delta effects are included in derived equation by adding the external work of gravity loads to the work of equivalent inertia forces and equating the total external work to the modified plastic energy. Earthquake energy input to multi degree of freedom (MDOF) system is approximated by using the modal energy-decomposition. Energy-based base shear coefficients are verified by means of both pushover analysis and nonlinear time history (NLTH) analysis of several RC frames having different number of stories. NLTH analyses of frames are performed by using the time histories of ten scaled ground motions compatible with elastic design acceleration spectrum and fulfilling duration/amplitude related requirements of Turkish Seismic Design Code. The observed correlation between energy-based base shear force coefficients and the average base shear force coefficients of NLTH analyses provides a reasonable confidence in estimation of nonlinear base shear force capacity of frames by using the derived equation.

  9. The effect of sheared axial flow on nonlinear Z-pinch dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassapakis, N.

    2000-01-01

    A two dimensional Eulerian fluid code has been used to study three problems related to Z-pinch and laser produced plasmas. a) The nonlinear evolution of a localised m=0 MHD mode neck is studied in order to extract some scaling laws for the size and form of the artificial neck. We examine whether the ubiquitous m=0 instability could be beneficially used to assist in the formation of a transient localised dense plasma. The results obtained were in satisfactory agreement with experiments and other theoretical work where available. b) The development of the m=0 instability on a Z-pinch although beneficial in the previous case, is detrimental from a stability point of view and thus to the utilisation of the device as a fusion reactor by itself. This is because the timescales of the instability development are faster than the confinement time needed for fusion to occur. Sheared axial flow is a proposed mechanism for the non-linear saturation of this particular instability. Indeed the linear growth rate also can be substantially reduced. It is hoped that it can inhibit the growth of the instabilities or at least delay their development sufficiently for fusion to take place. The numerical study of the effect of sheared axial flow on the nonlinear dynamics of the Z-pinch carried out, demonstrates that sheared flow with velocity u z z >4 Alfven speed other modes, of the Kelvin-Helmholtz type, are excited which take over from the fastest growing mode in the static case. c) The expansion of the ablated plasma in laser-solid interactions is an important phenomenon for a plethora of reasons one of which is ICF. The simulations were in direct agreement with previous experimental work regarding the bulk properties of the ablation surface. They also provided justification for some assumptions made during the analysis of the observations and helped to confirm the calibration of the diagnostics timewise. The most striking feature of the experiments, namely the density dip on the

  10. Effect of Asymmetric Rolling on Plastic Anisotropy of Low Carbon Steels during Simple Shear Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gracio, J. J.; Vincze, G.; Panigrahi, B. B.; Kim, H. J.; Barlat, F.; Rauch, E. F.; Yoon, J. W.

    2010-01-01

    Simple shear tests are performed on low carbon steel pre-deformed in conventional, asymmetric and orthogonal-asymmetric rolling. The simple-shear tests were carried out at 0 deg. , 45 deg. and 135 deg. with respect to the previous rolling direction. For a reduction ratio of 15%, a transient stagnation in the hardening rate is observed at reloading for all changes in strain path. The shear stress level, the hardening rate and extent of the plateau appear to be insensitive to the preliminary applied rolling conditions. After a reduction ratio of 50%, plastic instability was detected at reloading for all the changes of strain path and rolling conditions studied. A specific heat treatment was then designed allowing the material to become ductile after rolling while retaining the fine microstructure and therefore the high strength. Promising results were obtained essentially for 45 deg. shear tests.

  11. Effect of tip clearance on wall shear stress of an axial LVAD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarath, S.; Vikas, R.

    2017-09-01

    Wall shear stress is a crucial parameter used for blood damage analysis, and typically a value of 400 Pa is set as a limit. Tip clearance is a major factor contributing to hemolysis and pump efficiency. In this study, different tip gap configurations are used to analyse the wall shear stress developed on the blade surface of a constant thickness blade design, and a varying thickness blade design using CFD analysis. It was found that, for a particular geometry, as the clearance gap reduces, flow rate over the high wall shear stress area decreases even though the high wall shear stress span is found to extend. For each design, the optimum clearance gap is iteratively attained, keeping the maximum WSS as a limiting factor. Thus a better pump designs is obtained, whose leakage flow patterns are lower than that of the initial design, hence also leading to higher pump efficiency.

  12. Elastic Metamaterials with Simultaneously Negative Effective Shear Modulus and Mass Density

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Ying; Lai, Yun; Zhang, Zhao-Qing

    2011-01-01

    We propose a type of elastic metamaterial comprising fluid-solid composite inclusions which can possess a negative shear modulus and negative mass density over a large frequency region. Such a material has the unique property that only transverse

  13. Effect of Low Shear Modeled Microgravity (LSMMG) on the Probiotic Lactobacillus Acidophilus ATCC 4356

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, S.; Voorhies, A.; Lorenzi, H.; Castro-Wallace, S.; Douglas, G.

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of generally recognized as safe (GRAS) probiotic microbes into the spaceflight food system has the potential for use as a safe, non-invasive, daily countermeasure to crew microbiome and immune dysregulation. However, the microgravity effects on the stress tolerances and genetic expression of probiotic bacteria must be determined to confirm translation of strain benefits and to identify potential for optimization of growth, survival, and strain selection for spaceflight. The work presented here demonstrates the translation of characteristics of a GRAS probiotic bacteria to a microgravity analog environment. Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 was grown in the low shear modeled microgravity (LSMMG) orientation and the control orientation in the rotating wall vessel (RWV) to determine the effect of LSMMG on the growth, survival through stress challenge, and gene expression of the strain. No differences were observed between the LSMMG and control grown L. acidophilus, suggesting that the strain will behave similarly in spaceflight and may be expected to confer Earth-based benefits.

  14. Effects of plasticization and shear stress on phase structure development and properties of soy protein blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng; Zhang, Jinwen

    2010-11-01

    In this study, soy protein concentrate (SPC) was used as a plastic component to blend with poly(butylene adipate-co-terephthalate) (PBAT). Effects of SPC plasticization and blend composition on its deformation during mixing were studied in detail. Influence of using water as the major plasticizer and glycerol as the co-plasticizer on the deformation of the SPC phase during mixing was explored. The effect of shear stress, as affected by SPC loading level, on the phase structure of SPC in the blends was also investigated. Quantitative analysis of the aspect ratio of SPC particles was conducted by using ImageJ software, and an empirical model predicting the formation of percolated structure was applied. The experimental results and the model prediction showed a fairly good agreement. The experimental results and statistic analysis suggest that both SPC loading level and its water content prior to compounding had significant influences on development of the SPC phase structure and were correlated in determining the morphological structures of the resulting blends. Consequently, physical and mechanical properties of the blends greatly depended on the phase morphology and PBAT/SPC ratio of the blends.

  15. Effects of Thermal Annealing Conditions on Cupric Oxide Thin Film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyo Seon; Oh, Hee-bong; Ryu, Hyukhyun [Inje University, Gimhae (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Won-Jae [Dong-Eui University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    In this study, cupric oxide (CuO) thin films were grown on fluorine doped tin oxide(FTO) substrate by using spin coating method. We investigated the effects of thermal annealing temperature and thermal annealing duration on the morphological, structural, optical and photoelectrochemical properties of the CuO film. From the results, we could find that the morphologies, grain sizes, crystallinity and photoelectrochemical properties were dependent on the annealing conditions. As a result, the maximum photocurrent density of -1.47 mA/cm{sup 2} (vs. SCE) was obtained from the sample with the thermal annealing conditions of 500 ℃ and 40 min.

  16. Experimental investigation of edge sheared flow development and configuration effects in the TJ-II stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedrosa, M. A.; Hidalgo, C.; Alonso, A.; Calderon, E.; Orozco, R. O.; Pablos, J. L. de

    2005-07-01

    It is well known the importance of the shear as a stabilizing mechanism to control plasma fluctuations in magnetically confined plasmas [1]. It has been clearly established that Ex B shear stabilization mechanisms are an important piece for the improvement of confinement on fusion devices. In particular both edge and core transport barriers are related to a large increase in the Ex B sheared flow. As a consequence clarifying the driving mechanisms of sheared flow in fusion plasmas is a main issue. The existence of parallel and perpendicular sheared flows at the plasma edge, and the interplay between them in different plasma conditions has been studied in the TJ-II [2]. Recent experiments carried out by means of different approaches in the TJ-II stellarator have shown that the generation of spontaneous edge perpendicular sheared flow can be externally controlled by means of plasma density with good reproducibility and reliability [3, 4]. Although experimentally the plasma density has been used as an external control knob, it would be more appropriate to characterize experimental results in terms of edge plasma gradient (e.g. ion saturation current gradient) [3]. It has also been found that there exists a coupling between the onset of sheared flow development and an increase in the level of plasma edge turbulence; once sheared flow is fully developed the level of fluctuations and turbulent transport slightly decreases whereas edge gradients and plasma density increase. It has been experimentally established that the minimum plasma density (or/and minimum level of plasma turbulence) essential for the development of the shear layer depends on the plasma magnetic configuration [5, 6]. For some plasma magnetic configurations with high iota value a sheared flow-induced regime with characteristics resembling those of an improved confinement one has been found. The similarity in the structure of the velocity shear layer and in the turbulence characteristics [7] in different

  17. Magnetoelectric effect in Cr2O3 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xi; Wang, Yi; Sahoo, Sarbeswar; Binek, Christian

    2008-03-01

    Magnetoelectric materials experienced a recent revival as promising components of novel spintronic devices [1, 2, 3]. Since the magnetoelectric (ME) effect is relativistically small in traditional antiferromagnetic compounds like Cr2O3 (max. αzz 4ps/m ) and also cross- coupling between ferroic order parameters is typically small in the modern multiferroics, it is a challenge to electrically induce sufficient magnetization required for the envisioned device applications. A straightforward approach is to increase the electric field at constant voltage by reducing the thickness of the ME material to thin films of a few nm. Since magnetism is known to be affected by geometrical confinement thickness dependence of the ME effect in thin film Cr2O3 is expected. We grow (111) textured Cr2O3 films with various thicknesses below 500 nm and study the ME effect for various ME annealing conditions as a function of temperature with the help of Kerr-magnetometry. [1] P. Borisov et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 117203 (2005). [2] Ch. Binek, B.Doudin, J. Phys. Condens. Matter 17, L39 (2005). [3] R. Ramesh and Nicola A. Spaldin 2007 Nature Materials 6 21.

  18. Effects of fracture surface roughness and shear displacement on geometrical and hydraulic properties of three-dimensional crossed rock fracture models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Na; Liu, Richeng; Jiang, Yujing; Li, Bo; Yu, Liyuan

    2018-03-01

    While shear-flow behavior through fractured media has been so far studied at single fracture scale, a numerical analysis of the shear effect on the hydraulic response of 3D crossed fracture model is presented. The analysis was based on a series of crossed fracture models, in which the effects of fracture surface roughness and shear displacement were considered. The rough fracture surfaces were generated using the modified successive random additions (SRA) algorithm. The shear displacement was applied on one fracture, and at the same time another fracture shifted along with the upper and lower surfaces of the sheared fracture. The simulation results reveal the development and variation of preferential flow paths through the model during the shear, accompanied by the change of the flow rate ratios between two flow planes at the outlet boundary. The average contact area accounts for approximately 5-27% of the fracture planes during shear, but the actual calculated flow area is about 38-55% of the fracture planes, which is much smaller than the noncontact area. The equivalent permeability will either increase or decrease as shear displacement increases from 0 to 4 mm, depending on the aperture distribution of intersection part between two fractures. When the shear displacement continuously increases by up to 20 mm, the equivalent permeability increases sharply first, and then keeps increasing with a lower gradient. The equivalent permeability of rough fractured model is about 26-80% of that calculated from the parallel plate model, and the equivalent permeability in the direction perpendicular to shear direction is approximately 1.31-3.67 times larger than that in the direction parallel to shear direction. These results can provide a fundamental understanding of fluid flow through crossed fracture model under shear.

  19. An analytical study of the effects of transverse shear deformation and anisotropy on buckling loads of laminated cylinders. M.S. Thesis - George Washington Univ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegley, Dawn C.

    1987-01-01

    Buckling loads of thick-walled orthotropic and anisotropic simply supported circular cylinders are predicted using a higher-order transverse-shear deformation theory. A comparison of buckling loads predicted by the conventional first-order transverse-shear deformation theory and the higher-order theory show that the additional allowance for transverse shear deformation has a negligible effect on the predicted buckling loads of medium-thick metallic isotropic cylinders. However, the higher-order theory predicts buckling loads which are significantly lower than those predicted by the first-order transverse-shear deformation theory for certain short, thick-walled cylinders which have low through-the-thickness shear moduli. A parametric study of the effects of ply orientation on the buckling load of axially compressed cylinders indicates that laminates containing 45 degree plies are most sensitive to transverse-shear deformation effects. Interaction curves for buckling loads of cylinders subjected to axial compressive and external pressure loadings indicate that buckling loads due to external pressure loadings are as sensitive to transverse-shear deformation effects as buckling loads due to axial compressive loadings. The effects of anisotropy are important over a much wider range of cylinder geometries than the effects of transverse shear deformation.

  20. The effect of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength of luting cements to titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi-Rached, Filipe de Oliveira; Fonseca, Renata Garcia; Haneda, Isabella Gagliardi; de Almeida-Júnior, Antonio Alves; Adabo, Gelson Luis

    2012-12-01

    Although titanium presents attractive physical and mechanical properties, there is a need for improving the bond at the titanium/luting cement interface for the longevity of metal ceramic restorations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of surface treatments on the shear bond strength (SBS) of resin-modified glass ionomer and resin cements to commercially pure titanium (CP Ti). Two hundred and forty CP Ti cast disks (9.0 × 3.0 mm) were divided into 8 surface treatment groups (n=30): 1) 50 µm Al(2)O(3) particles; 2) 120 µm Al(2)O(3) particles; 3) 250 µm Al(2)O(3) particles; 4) 50 µm Al(2)O(3) particles + silane (RelyX Ceramic Primer); 5) 120 µm Al(2)O(3) particles + silane; 6) 250 µm Al(2)O(3) particles + silane; 7) 30 µm silica-modified Al(2)O(3) particles (Cojet Sand) + silane; and 8) 120 µm Al(2)O(3) particles, followed by 110 µm silica-modified Al(2)O(3) particles (Rocatec). The luting cements 1) RelyX Luting 2; 2) RelyX ARC; or 3) RelyX U100 were applied to the treated CP Ti surfaces (n=10). Shear bond strength (SBS) was tested after thermal cycling (5000 cycles, 5°C to 55°C). Data were analyzed by 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey HSD post hoc test (α=.05). Failure mode was determined with a stereomicroscope (×20). The surface treatments, cements, and their interaction significantly affected the SBS (Pbehavior for all surface treatments. For both cements, only the group abraded with 50 μm Al(2)O(3) particles had lower SBS than the other groups (P<.05). For RelyX ARC, regardless of silane application, abrasion with 50 μm Al(2)O(3) particles resulted in significantly lower SBS than abrasion with 120 μm and 250 μm particles, which exhibited statistically similar SBS values to each other. Rocatec + silane promoted the highest SBS for RelyX ARC. RelyX U100 presented the highest SBS mean values (P<.001). All groups showed a predominance of adhesive failure mode. The adhesive capability of RelyX Luting 2 and RelyX U

  1. Intrinsic torque reversals induced by magnetic shear effects on the turbulence spectrum in tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Z. X.; Tynan, G. [Center for Energy Research and Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization and Center for Astrophysics and Space Science, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Wang, W. X.; Ethier, S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Diamond, P. H. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization and Center for Astrophysics and Space Science, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Gao, C.; Rice, J. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Intrinsic torque, which can be generated by turbulent stresses, can induce toroidal rotation in a tokamak plasma at rest without direct momentum injection. Reversals in intrinsic torque have been inferred from the observation of toroidal velocity changes in recent lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) experiments. This work focuses on understanding the cause of LHCD-induced intrinsic torque reversal using gyrokinetic simulations and theoretical analyses. A new mechanism for the intrinsic torque reversal linked to magnetic shear (s{sup ^}) effects on the turbulence spectrum is identified. This reversal is a consequence of the ballooning structure at weak s{sup ^}. Based on realistic profiles from the Alcator C-Mod LHCD experiments, simulations demonstrate that the intrinsic torque reverses for weak s{sup ^} discharges and that the value of s{sup ^}{sub crit} is consistent with the experimental results s{sup ^}{sub crit}{sup exp}≈0.2∼0.3 [Rice et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 125003 (2013)]. The consideration of this intrinsic torque feature in our work is important for the understanding of rotation profile generation at weak s{sup ^} and its consequent impact on macro-instability stabilization and micro-turbulence reduction, which is crucial for ITER. It is also relevant to internal transport barrier formation at negative or weakly positive s{sup ^}.

  2. Effect of provisional cements on shear bond strength of porcelain laminate veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Subutay Han; Tak, Onjen; Secilmis, Asli; Usumez, Aslihan

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of three provisional cements and two cleaning techniques on the final bond strength of porcelain laminate veneers. The occlusal third of the crowns of forty molar teeth were sectioned and embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin. Dentin surfaces were polished and specimens were randomly divided into four groups (n=10). Provisional restorations were fabricated and two provisional restorations were cemented onto each tooth. Restorations were fixed with one of three different provisional cements: eugenol-free provisional cement (Cavex), calcium hydroxide (Dycal), and light-cured provisional cement (Tempond Clear). Provisional restorations were removed with either a dental explorer and air-water spray, or a cleaning bur (Opticlean). In the control group, provisional restorations were not used on the surfaces of specimens. IPS Empress 2 ceramic discs were luted with a dual-cured resin cement (Panavia F). Shear bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine. Data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA, Tukey's HSD and Dunnett tests. Surfaces were examined by scanning electronic microscopy. Significant differences were found between the control group and both the light-cured provisional cement groups and the eugenol-free provisional cement-cleaning bur group (Pprovisional cement showed the lowest bond strength values. Selection of the provisional cement is an important factor in the ultimate bond strength of the final restoration. Calcium hydroxide provisional cement and cleaning with a dental explorer are advisable.

  3. The finite-size effect in thin liquid crystal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śliwa, I.

    2018-05-01

    Effects of surface ordering in liquid crystal systems confined between cell plates are of great theoretical and experimental interest. Liquid crystals introduced in thin cells are known to be strongly stabilized and ordered by cell plates. We introduce a new theoretical method for analyzing the effect of surfaces on local molecular ordering in thin liquid crystal systems with planar geometry of the smectic layers. Our results show that, due to the interplay between pair long-range intermolecular forces and nonlocal, relatively short-range, surface interactions, both orientational and translational orders of liquid crystal molecules across confining cells are very complex. In particular, it is demonstrated that the SmA, nematic, and isotropic phases can coexist. The phase transitions from SmA to nematic, as well as from nematic to isotropic phases, occur not simultaneously in the whole volume of the system but begin to appear locally in some regions of the LC sample. Phase transition temperatures are demonstrated to be strongly affected by the thickness of the LC system. The dependence of the corresponding shifts of phase transition temperatures on the layer number is shown to exhibit a power law character. This new type of scaling behavior is concerned with the coexistence of local phases in finite systems. The influence of a specific character of interactions of molecules with surfaces and other molecules on values of the resulting critical exponents is also analyzed.

  4. A potential model for drug screening by simulating the effect of shear stress in vivo on endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yingqian; Wang, Bochu; Deng, Jia; Liu, Zerong; Zhu, Liancai

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to research the potential of a dynamic cell model in drug screening by studying the influence of microvascular wall shear stress on the drug absorption of endothelial cells compared to that in the static state. The cells were grown and seeded on gelatin-coated glass slides and were pretreated with extracts of Salviae miltiorrhizae (200 μg/ml) for 1 h. Then oxidative stress damage was produced by H2O2 (300 μmol/l) for 0.5 h under the 1.5 dyn/cm2 shear stress incorporated in a parallel plate flow chamber. Morphological analysis was conducted with an inverted microscope and image analysis software, and high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was used for the detection of active compounds. We compared the drug absorption in the dynamic group with that in the static group. In the dynamic model, five compounds and two new metabolite peaks were detected. However, in the static model, four compounds were absorbed by cells, and one metabolite peak was found. This study indicated that there were some effects on the absorption and metabolism of drugs under the microvascular shear stress compared to that under stasis. We infer that shear stress in the microcirculation situation in vivo played a role in causing the differences between drug screening in vitro and in vivo.

  5. Effect of Surface Treatment on Shear Bond Strength between Resin Cement and Ce-TZP/Al2O3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Eun Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Although several studies evaluating the mechanical properties of Ce-TZP/Al2O3 have been published, to date, no study has been published investigating the bonding protocol between Ce-TZP/Al2O3 and resin cement. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength to air-abraded Ce-TZP/Al2O3 when primers and two different cement types were used. Materials and Methods. Two types of zirconia (Y-TZP and Ce-TZP/Al2O3 specimens were further divided into four subgroups according to primer application and the cement used. Shear bond strength was measured after water storage for 3 days or 5,000 times thermocycling for artificial aging. Results. The Y-TZP block showed significantly higher shear bond strength than the Ce-TZP/Al2O3 block generally. Primer application promoted high bond strength and less effect on bond strength reduction after thermocycling, regardless of the type of cement, zirconia block, or aging time. Conclusions. Depending on the type of the primer or resin cement used after air-abrasion, different wettability of the zirconia surface can be observed. Application of primer affected the values of shear bond strength after the thermocycling procedure. In the case of using the same bonding protocol, Y-TZP could obtain significantly higher bond strength compared with Ce-TZP/Al2O3.

  6. Effect on Shear Strength of Machining Methods in Pinus nigra Arnold Bonded with Polyurethane and Polyvinyl Acetate Adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Kılıç

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Specimens taken from Pinus nigra Arnold were subject to surfacing techniques by being cut with a circular saw, planed with a thickness machine, and sanded with a calibrating sanding machine (with P80 grit sandpaper. First, their surface roughness values were measured; then, the specimens were processed in the machines in a radial and tangential process. Afterwards, the change in shear strength (adhesiveness resistance was analyzed as a result of bonding with various adhesive types (PVAc, PU and pressure applications (0.45 N/mm² or 0.9 N/mm². Approximately 600 specimens were prepared with the purpose of identifying the effect of variables on the bonding performance, and they were subjected to shear testing. The greatest shear strength achieved for both the tangential and radial surfaces in terms of cutting was observed in specimens processed in the thickness machine, on which polyvinyl acetate adhesive and 0.9 N/mm². pressure were applied. Specimens bonded with polyvinyl acetate adhesive displayed higher shear strength in general in comparison to those bonded with polyurethane for both tangential and radial surfaces.

  7. Effect of cutter tip angle on cutting characteristics of acrylic worksheet subjected to punch/die shearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masami Kojima

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to describe the effect of tool geometry on cutting characteristics of a 1.0 mm thickness acrylic worksheet subjected to a punch/die shearing. A set of side-wedge punch and side-wedge die which had the edge angle of 30°, 60° and/or 90° was prepared and used for cutting off the worksheet. A load cell and a CCD camera were installed in the cutting system to investigate the cutting load resistance and the side-view deformation of the worksheet. From experimental results, it was revealed that a cracking pattern at a sheared zone was remarkably affected by the edge angle of cutting tool. A cracking direction was almost coincident to the edge angle when considering the punch/die edge angle of 30°, while any matching of them was not observed in case of the punch/die edge angle of 60°, 90°. By using the 30° side-wedge tool, a flat-smooth sheared surface was generated. When combing the punch edge angle of 90° and the die edge angle of 60°, the cracking profile was characterized by the both edge angles for each part (die and punch. Carrying out an elasto-plastic finite element method analysis of cutter indentation with a few of symmetric and asymmetric punch/die edges, the stress distribution and deformation flow at the sheared zone were discussed with the initiation of surface cracks

  8. Coalescence in PLA-PBAT blends under shear flow: Effects of blend preparation and PLA molecular weight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nofar, M.; Heuzey, M. C.; Carreau, P. J.; Kamal, M. R.; Randall, J.

    2016-01-01

    Blends containing 75 wt. % of an amorphous polylactide (PLA) with two different molecular weights and 25 wt. % of a poly[(butylene adipate)-co-terephthalate] (PBAT) were prepared using either a Brabender batch mixer or a twin-screw extruder. These compounds were selected because blending PLA with PBAT can overcome various drawbacks of PLA such as its brittleness and processability limitations. In this study, we investigated the effects of varying the molecular weight of the PLA matrix and of two different mixing processes on the blend morphology and, further, on droplet coalescence during shearing. The rheological properties of these blends were investigated and the interfacial properties were analyzed using the Palierne emulsion model. Droplet coalescence was investigated by applying shear flows of 0.05 and 0.20 s"−"1 at a fixed strain of 60. Subsequently, small amplitude oscillatory shear tests were conducted to investigate changes in the viscoelastic properties. The morphology of the blends was also examined using scanning electron microscope (SEM) micrographs. It was observed that the PBAT droplets were much smaller when twin-screw extrusion was used for the blend preparation. Shearing at 0.05 s"−"1 induced significant droplet coalescence in all blends, but coalescence and changes in the viscoelastic properties were much more pronounced for the PLA-PBAT blend based on a lower molecular weight PLA. The viscoelastic responses were also somehow affected by the thermal degradation of the PLA matrix during the experiments.

  9. Effect of various commercially available mouthrinses on shear bond strength of orthodontic metal brackets: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeran, Nazeer Ahmed; George, Ashwin Mathew

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol is known to degrade and dissolve the bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate present in the composite resin. The effect of alcohol containing mouthrinses on the shear bond strength of orthodontic metal brackets bonded with composite resin has not been verified until date and is the purpose of this study. The aims and objectives of the present study were to evaluate (1) Whether there is a significant difference in the shear bond strength of metal orthodontic brackets after the 1 year (12 h) and 2 years simulation (24 h) of mouth rinsing with 4 different commercially available mouthrinses (2 alcoholic and 2 alcohol-free mouthrinses) when compared to the control. (2) Whether alcohol containing mouthrinses have more adverse effect on the shear bond strength when compared with alcohol-free mouthrinses. (3) To assess the site of bond failure using adhesive remnant index. Experimental - laboratory based. A total of 100 upper premolars extracted for orthodontic purpose were collected immediately after extraction, cleared soft-tissue debris and blood and immediately stored in distilled water with 0.1% thymol crystals added to inhibit bacterial growth. Two alcohol containing mouthrinses and two alcohol-free mouthrinses were used and the bonded teeth were placed in the mouthrinses for a stipulated period of time (1 year simulation and 2 years simulation) and shear bond strength were tested using Lloyd Universal Testing Machine. The data were analyzed using analysis of variance and paired samples t-test. After the 1 year and 2 years simulation time, samples stored in alcohol containing mouthrinses showed lower bond strength (P orthodontic brackets bonded with composite resin (Transbond XT in the present study), more when compared with alcohol-free mouthrinses. It is, therefore, highly advisable to avoid alcohol containing mouthrinses in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment and use alcohol-free mouthrinses as adjuncts to regular oral hygiene procedures for maintaining

  10. Crystallinity and mechanical effects from annealing Parylene thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Nathan, E-mail: Nathan.Jackson@tyndall.ie [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Stam, Frank; O' Brien, Joe [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Kailas, Lekshmi [University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Mathewson, Alan; O' Murchu, Cian [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland)

    2016-03-31

    Parylene is commonly used as thin film polymer for MEMS devices and smart materials. This paper investigates the impact on bulk properties due to annealing various types of Parylene films. A thin film of Parylene N, C and a hybrid material consisting of Parylene N and C were deposited using a standard Gorham process. The thin film samples were annealed at varying temperatures from room temperature up to 300 °C. The films were analyzed to determine the mechanical and crystallinity effects due to different annealing temperatures. The results demonstrate that the percentage of crystallinity and the full-width-half-maximum value on the 2θ X-ray diffraction scan increases as the annealing temperature increases until the melting temperature of the Parylene films was achieved. Highly crystalline films of 85% and 92% crystallinity were achieved for Parylene C and N respectively. Investigation of the hybrid film showed that the individual Parylene films behave independently to each other, and the crystallinity of one film had no significant impact to the other film. Mechanical testing showed that the elastic modulus and yield strength increase as a function of annealing, whereas the elongation-to-break parameter decreases. The change in elastic modulus was more significant for Parylene C than Parylene N and this is attributed to the larger change in crystallinity that was observed. Parylene C had a 112% increase in crystallinity compared to a 61% increase for Parylene N, because the original Parylene N material was more crystalline than Parylene C so the change of crystallinity was greater for Parylene C. - Highlights: • A hybrid material consisting of Parylene N and C was developed. • Parylene N has greater crystallinity than Parylene C. • Phase transition of Parylene N due to annealing results in increased crystallinity. • Annealing caused increased crystallinity and elastic modulus in Parylene films. • Annealed hybrid Parylene films crystallinity behave

  11. An accurate higher order displacement model with shear and normal deformations effects for functionally graded plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jha, D.K., E-mail: dkjha@barc.gov.in [Civil Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kant, Tarun [Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400 076 (India); Srinivas, K. [Civil Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Singh, R.K. [Reactor Safety Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • We model through-thickness variation of material properties in functionally graded (FG) plates. • Effect of material grading index on deformations, stresses and natural frequency of FG plates is studied. • Effect of higher order terms in displacement models is studied for plate statics. • The benchmark solutions for the static analysis and free vibration of thick FG plates are presented. -- Abstract: Functionally graded materials (FGMs) are the potential candidates under consideration for designing the first wall of fusion reactors with a view to make best use of potential properties of available materials under severe thermo-mechanical loading conditions. A higher order shear and normal deformations plate theory is employed for stress and free vibration analyses of functionally graded (FG) elastic, rectangular, and simply (diaphragm) supported plates. Although FGMs are highly heterogeneous in nature, they are generally idealized as continua with mechanical properties changing smoothly with respect to spatial coordinates. The material properties of FG plates are assumed here to vary through thickness of plate in a continuous manner. Young's modulii and material densities are considered to be varying continuously in thickness direction according to volume fraction of constituents which are mathematically modeled here as exponential and power law functions. The effects of variation of material properties in terms of material gradation index on deformations, stresses and natural frequency of FG plates are investigated. The accuracy of present numerical solutions has been established with respect to exact three-dimensional (3D) elasticity solutions and the other models’ solutions available in literature.

  12. Augmentative effect of pulsatility on the wall shear stress in tube flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, M; Tatsumi, E; Tsukiya, T; Taenaka, Y; Nishimura, T; Nishinaka, T; Takano, H; Masuzawa, T; Ohba, K

    1999-08-01

    Wall shear stress (WSS) has been considered to play an important role in the physiological and metabolic functions of the vascular endothelial cells. We investigated the effects of the pulse rate and the maximum flow rate on the WSS to clarify the influence of pulsatility. Water was perfused in a 1/2 inch transparent straight cylinder with a nonpulsatile centrifugal pump and a pulsatile pneumatic ventricular assist device (VAD). In nonpulsatile flow (NF), the flow rate was changed 1 to 6 L/min by 1 L/min increments to obtain standard values of WSS at each flow rate. In pulsatile flow (PF), the pulse rate was controlled at 40, 60, and 80 bpm, and the maximum flow rate was varied from 3.3 to 12.0 L/min while the mean flow rate was kept at 3 L/min. The WSS was estimated from the velocity profile at measuring points using the laser illuminated fluorescence method. In NF, the WSS was 12.0 dyne/cm2 at 3 L/min and 33.0 dyne/cm2 at 6 L/min. In PF, the pulse rate change with the same mean, and the maximum flow rate did not affect WSS. On the other hand, the increase in the maximum flow rate at the constant mean flow rate of 3 L/min augmented the mean WSS from 13.1 to 32.9 dyne/cm2. We concluded that the maximum flow rate exerted a substantial augmentative effect on WSS, and the maximum flow rate was a dominant factor of pulsatility in this effect.

  13. Effects of Shear on the Smectic A Phase of Thermotropic Liquid Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panizza, Pascal; Archambault, Pascal; Roux, Didier

    1995-02-01

    The rheological behaviour of the smectic A phase of the thermotropic liquid crystal 4-cyano-4'-octylbiphenyl (8CB) is examined. X-ray scattering studies under shear flow were performed to probe changes of structures. We found that in a certain range of temperatures two states of orientation of lamellae exist. These two steady states of orientation are separated by a first order dynamic transition that becomes continuous at T_c (a temperature different from that of the smectic/nematic transition). At low shear rates, the smectic A phase is non-Newtonian: its viscosity η varies as (T_c-T)^{1/2}.dot{γ}^{-1/2} (where dot{γ} is the shear rate and T the temperature). In this regime, the structure of the system is compatible with multilamellar cylinders oriented along the flow direction. At high shear rates, the system becomes Newtonian, its layers are then oriented perpendicular to the shearing plates (as already noticed by Safinya et al. [1]).

  14. The effect of shear flow on the rotational diffusivity of a single axisymmetric particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, Brian; Koch, Donald; Cohen, Itai

    2014-11-01

    Colloidal suspensions of nonspherical particles abound in the world around us, from red blood cells in arteries to kaolinite discs in clay. Understanding the orientation dynamics of these particles is important for suspension rheology and particle self-assembly. However, even for the simplest case of dilute suspensions in simple shear flow, the orientation dynamics of Brownian nonspherical particles are poorly understood at large shear rates. Here, we analytically calculate the time-dependent orientation distributions of particles confined to the flow-gradient plane when the rotary diffusion is small but nonzero. For both startup and oscillatory shear flows, we find a coordinate change that maps the convection-diffusion equation to a simple diffusion equation with an enhanced diffusion constant, simplifying the orientation dynamics. For oscillatory shear, this enhanced diffusion drastically alters the quasi-steady orientation distributions. Our theory of the unsteady orientation dynamics provides an understanding of a nonspherical particle suspension's rheology for a large class of unsteady flows. For particles with aspect ratio 10 under oscillatory shear, the rotary diffusion and intrinsic viscosity vary with amplitude by a factor of ~ 40 and ~ 2 , respectively.

  15. Influence of Magnetron Effect on Barium Hexaferrite Thin Layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassane, H.; Chatelon, J.P.; Rousseau, J.J; Siblini, A.; Kriga, A.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we study the effects of a magnet, located in the cathode, on barium hexaferrite thin films deposited by RF magnetron sputtering technique. During the process, these effects can modify thickness, roughness and stress of coatings. The characteristics of the deposited layers depend on the substrate position that is located opposite of magnetron cathode. In the m agnetron area , one can observe that the high stress can produce cracks or detachment of layers and the increasing of both depositing rate and surface roughness. After sputtering elaboration, barium hexaferrite films are in a compressive stress mode. But, after the post-deposition heat treatment these films are in a tensile stress mode. To improve the quality of BaM films, the subsrtate has to be set outside the magnetron area. (author)

  16. Effect of addition of different nano-clays on the fumed silica-polyethylene glycol based shear-thickening fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mansi; Mehta, Rajeev; Verma, Sanjeev K.; Biswas, Ipsita

    2018-01-01

    A comparative study of the rheology of shear thickening suspensions of 20% fumed silica in polyethylene glycol (PEG200) with different nano clays as additives has been done. The nano-clays used are montmorillonite (MMT), Closite15A, Kaolin and Halloysite clay. The objective was to study the effect of relatively cost-effective clays as a partial substitute of silica. Specifically, the effect of type, concentration, temperature and frequency were considered. The results indicate that the shear thickening properties of Closite15A as additive in temperature ranges of 25 °C-45 °C performs the best and Halloysite performs best at higher (55 °C) and lower temperatures (5, 15 °C). The elasticity effects in dynamic experiments were markedly enhanced by Halloysite clay addition. Addition of MMT, however, led to insignificant enhancement in critical viscosity in steady-state as well as dynamic state-rheology. Interestingly, shear thickening fluid (STF) with all clay except MMT was stable after storing for more than a month. These findings indicate that the introduction of nano-clay as additives is a promising and cost effective method for enhancing the STF behavior which can be utilized in high impact resistant (about 3000% strain and 300 rad s-1 frequency) applications.

  17. The Effects of Low-Shear Mechanical Stress on Yersinia pestis Virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawal, Abidat; Jejelowo, Olufisayo A.; Rosenzweig, Jason A.

    2010-11-01

    Manned space exploration has created a need to evaluate the effects of spacelike stress on pathogenic and opportunistic microbes astronauts could carry with them to the International Space Station and beyond. Yersinia pestis (YP) causes bubonic, septicemic, and pneumonic plague and is capable of killing infected patients within 3-7 days. In this study, low-shear modeled microgravity (LSMMG), a spacelike stress, was used to physically stress YP; and its effects on proliferation, cold growth, and type III secretion system (T3SS) function were evaluated. YP was grown to saturation in either LSMMG or normal gravity (NG) conditions prior to being used for RAW 246.7 cell infections, HeLa cell infections, and Yop secretion assays. A mutant strain of YP (ΔyopB) that lacks the ability to inject Yersinia outer membrane proteins (Yops) into the host cell was used as a negative control in cell infection experiments. Our experimental results indicate that YP cultivated under LSMMG resulted in reduced YopM production and secretion compared to its NG-grown counterpart. Similarly, NG-grown YP induced more cell rounding in HeLa cells than did the LSMMG-grown YP, which suggests that LSMMG somehow impairs T3SS optimum function. Also, LSMMG-grown YP used to infect cultured RAW 246.7 cells showed a similar pattern of dysfunction in that it proliferated less than did its NG-grown counterpart during an 8-hour infection period. This study suggests that LSMMG can attenuate bacterial virulence contrary to previously published data that have demonstrated LSMMG-induced hypervirulence of other Gram-negative enterics.

  18. Effect of salivary contamination on shear bond strength of two adhesives: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti B Patil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Composite material used with bonding system are technique sensitive and contamination of an etched surface by saliva or blood plays a key role in bonding efficacy. Achieving good moisture control is a common problem encountered and is of importance while treating a pediatric age group since rubber dam in dental office is commonly applied in fewer than 10% of restorative treatment. Despite the advantage of rubber dam application, usage of rubber dam depends on child′s behavior and its level of co-operation for which pediatric dentists compromise with its usage. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of salivary contamination of enamel and dentin on bond strength of two adhesives. Materials and Methods: An in vitro study comprised of test group of 112 central incisors divided into 4 groups for testing on enamel and dentin separately. These are Group I: Control group without salivary contamination; Group II: Contaminated with saliva and air-dried; Group III: Contaminated with saliva, rinsed and air-dried; Group IV: Coated with adhesive, light cured and then contaminated. Shear bond strength was calculated using universal testing machine. Results: For testing on enamel and dentin, significantly decreased bond strength was seen with Group II (P 0.05, when compared with control Group I. Conclusion: The decontamination method used in this study by rinsing the contaminated cured adhesive layer that did not reverse the harmful effect of salivary contamination. As most of the children are active and restless with swinging mood, it is important not to negotiate with the procedural steps during treatment.

  19. Effects of shear during the cooling on the rheology and morphology of immiscible polymer blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammani, S; Moulai-Mostefa, N; Benyahia, L; Tassin, J F

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was the generation of a microfibrillar structure in immiscible polymer blends using a new technique. The blend polymer model is the emulsion formed by a mixture of polypropylene (PP) with polystyrene (PS) in the proportion of PP10/PS90. In the first case the pellets of polystyrene and polypropylene were blended on the twin-screw mini extruder in the classical manner with different shear rates. In the second case, the same blend was prepared in the same way followed by a dynamic cooling at different shear rates. The phase morphologies of PP in the blend were determined by Scanning Electron Microscopy on two directions (transversal and longitudinal direction to the flow). In the two cases, the dispersed phase size decreased with the increase of the shear rate in the extruder. An anomaly was registered in the classical method at 200 rpm, where the size of the dispersed phase increases with the increase of the shear rate. The dynamic cooling technique recorded smaller diameters (4 to 5 times) of the dispersed phase compared to the conventional technique. In addition, the reappearance of the microfilaments at 200rpm was observed. The rheological properties were determined by RS100 (Thermo Scientific Haake). Using this new technique, it was noticed that he elastic modulus increases with one decade compared to the classical method and the complex viscosity decreases with the increase of the shear rate. An anomaly was registered in the classical technique, where the dynamic viscosity at 200rpm increases with increasing the shear rate in the extruder

  20. Negotiated media effects. Peer feedback modifies effects of media's thin-body ideal on adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhuis, Jolanda; Konijn, Elly A; Seidell, Jacob C

    2014-02-01

    The present study introduces a theoretical framework on negotiated media effects. Specifically, we argue that feedback of peers on thin-body ideal media images and individual dispositions guide effects on adolescent girls' psychosocial responses to media exposure. Therefore, we examined the thin-body ideal as portrayed in media and peers' feedback on such thin-ideal images in their combined effects on adolescent girls' body dissatisfaction, objectified body consciousness, and social comparison with media models. Hence, media models and peer comments were systematically combined as incorporated entities in YouTube-formats. Hypotheses were tested in a 3 (media models: extremely thin vs. thin vs. normal weight)×3 (peer comments: 6kg-underweight vs. 3kg-underweight vs. normal-weight)×2 (appearance schematicity: lower vs. higher) between-subjects design (N=216). Results showed that peer comments indicating that a media model was 'only 3kg-underweight' exerted most negative responses, particularly in girls who strongly process appearance relevant information. Peer feedback interacts with media models in guiding perceptions of what is considered an 'ideal' body shape. Results highlight the important role of peers as well as individual predispositions in view of understanding how thin-ideal media images may impact adolescent girls' body image concerns. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Numerical simulation of shear and the Poynting effects by the finite element method: An application of the generalised empirical inequalities in non-linear elasticity

    KAUST Repository

    Angela Mihai, L.; Goriely, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Finite element simulations of different shear deformations in non-linear elasticity are presented. We pay particular attention to the Poynting effects in hyperelastic materials, complementing recent theoretical findings by showing these effects

  2. Impact of Wind Shear and Tower Shadow Effects on Power System with Large Scale Wind Power Penetration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Weihao; Su, Chi; Chen, Zhe

    2011-01-01

    presents a simulation model of a variable speed wind farm with permanent magnet synchronous generators (PMSGs) and fullscale back-to-back converters in the simulation tool of DIgSILENT/PowerFactory. In this paper, the impacts of wind shear and tower shadow effects on the small signal stability of power......Grid connected wind turbines are fluctuating power sources due to wind speed variations, the wind shear and the tower shadow effects. The fluctuating power may be able to excite the power system oscillation at a frequency close to the natural oscillation frequency of a power system. This paper...... systems with large scale wind power penetrations are investigated during continuous operation based on the wind turbine model and the power system model....

  3. Effect of three porcelain etchants type (HF-APF-PHA on porcelain- composite shear bond strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kermanshah H.

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Porcelain restorations are susceptible to fracture and a common method for repairing is the use of silane and composite on etched porcelain. Although HF is very effective in porcelain etching but has detrimental effects on tissues. Purpose: In this study, the effect of APF and PHA was compared with HF in porcelain etching. Also the role of silane, unfilled resin and dentin bonding in bond strength of composite- porcelain was evaluated. Methods and Materials: In this experimental in-vitro study, one-hundred twenty porcelain square blocks (552 mm were prepared and bonding surfaces of each sandblasted. Samples were divided into three groups. The first group (n=40 were etched with buffered HF 9.5% (Ultradent for 1 min., the second group (n=40 were etched with Iranian APF 1.23% (Kimia for 10 minutes and the third group (n=40 were etched with Iranian PHA 37% (Kimia for 1 min. Ultradent silane was applied on the surfaces of half of cases in each group. On the surfaces of half of silane-treated samples unfilled resin was applied and dentin bonding was used on the surfaces of the remaining. Samples without silane were treated in a similar manner. Composite cylinder with 4mm diameter and 2 mm height was bonded to porcelain. Specimens were stored in 37°C distilled water for 24 hours and subjected to 500 cycles. Shear bond strength was measured with an Instron machine and type of fracture was evaluated using a stereomicroscope. Results were analyzed using 3 way ANOVA, Kaplan- Maier and Tukey HSD tests. Results: Findings showed that PHA and APF roughened the porcelain surface without creating retentive micro undercuts but HF etches porcelain and creates retentive microundercuts. Ultradent silane had no significant effect on bond strength of porcelain- composite. Unfilled resin with Ultradent silane compared with dentin bonding with the same silane is more effective in bond strength of composite- porcelain. Conclusion: Based on

  4. Effect of Four Methods of Surface Treatment on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets to Zirconium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soghra Yassaei

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Providing reliable attachment between bracket base and zirconia surface is a prerequisite for exertion of orthodontic force. The purpose of the present study was to eval- uate the effect of four zirconium surface treatment methods on shear bond strength (SBS of orthodontic brackets.Materials and Methods: One block of zirconium was trimmed into four zirconium sur- faces, which served as our four study groups and each had 18 metal brackets bonded to them. Once the glazed layer was removed, the first group was etched with 9.6% hydrofluoric acid (HF, and the other three groups were prepared by means of sandblasting and 1 W, and 2 W Er: YAG laser, respectively. After application of silane, central incisor brackets were bonded to the zirconium surfaces. The SBS values were measured by a Dartec testing ma- chine with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min.Results: The highest SBS was achieved in the sandblasted group (7.81±1.02 MPa followed in a descending order by 2 W laser group (6.95±0.87 MPa, 1 W laser group (6.87±0.92MPa and HF acid etched group (5.84±0.78 MPa. The differences between the study groups, were statistically significant except between the laser groups (P < 0.05. Conclusion: In terms of higher bond strength and safety, sandblasting and Er: YAG laser irradiation with power output of 1 W and 2 W can be considered more appropriate alterna- tives to HF acid etching for zirconium surface treatment prior to bracket bonding.

  5. Numerical Simulations of the Effects of a Tidal Turbine Array on Near-Bed Velocity and Local Bed Shear Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip A. Gillibrand

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We apply a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model to consider the potential effects of energy extraction by an array of tidal turbines on the ambient near-bed velocity field and local bed shear stress in a coastal channel with strong tidal currents. Local bed shear stress plays a key role in local sediment dynamics. The model solves the Reynold-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS equations on an unstructured mesh using mixed finite element and finite volume techniques. Tidal turbines are represented through an additional form drag in the momentum balance equation, with the thrust imparted and power generated by the turbines being velocity dependent with appropriate cut-in and cut-out velocities. Arrays of 1, 4 and 57 tidal turbines, each of 1.5 MW capacity, were simulated. Effects due to a single turbine and an array of four turbines were negligible. The main effect of the array of 57 turbines was to cause a shift in position of the jet through the tidal channel, as the flow was diverted around the tidal array. The net effect of this shift was to increase near-bed velocities and bed shear stress along the northern perimeter of the array by up to 0.8 m·s−1 and 5 Pa respectively. Within the array and directly downstream, near-bed velocities and bed shear stress were reduced by similar amounts. Changes of this magnitude have the potential to modify the known sand and shell banks in the region. Continued monitoring of the sediment distributions in the region will provide a valuable dataset on the impacts of tidal energy extraction on local sediment dynamics. Finally, the mean power generated per turbine is shown to decrease as the turbine array increased in size.

  6. Effect of different provisional cement remnant cleaning procedures including Er:YAG laser on shear bond strength of ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Zortuk, Mustafa; Gumus, Hasan Onder; Kilinc, Halil Ibrahim; Tuncdemir, Ali Riza

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of provisional cement removal by different dentin cleaning protocols (dental explorer, pumice, cleaning bur, Er:YAG laser) on the shear bond strength between ceramic and dentin. MATERIALS AND METHODS In total, 36 caries-free unrestored human third molars were selected as tooth specimens. Provisional restorations were fabricated and cemented with eugenol-free provisional cement. Then, disc-shaped ceramic specimens were fabricated and...

  7. Effect of nanotechnology in self-etch bonding systems on the shear bond strength of stainless steel orthodontic brackets

    OpenAIRE

    Hammad, Shaza M.; El-Wassefy, Noha; Maher, Ahmed; Fawakerji, Shafik M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the effect of silica dioxide (SiO2) nanofillers in different bonding systems on shear bond strength (SBS) and mode of failure of orthodontic brackets at two experimental times. Methods: Ninety-six intact premolars were divided into four groups: A) Conventional acid-etch and primer Transbond XT; B) Transbond Plus self-etch primer; and two self-etch bonding systems reinforced with silica dioxide nanofiller at different concentrations: C) Futurabond DC at 1%; D...

  8. Stress effects in ferroelectric perovskite thin-films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zednik, Ricardo Johann

    The exciting class of ferroelectric materials presents the engineer with an array of unique properties that offer promise in a variety of applications; these applications include infra-red detectors ("night-vision imaging", pyroelectricity), micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS, piezoelectricity), and non-volatile memory (NVM, ferroelectricity). Realizing these modern devices often requires perovskite-based ferroelectric films thinner than 100 nm. Two such technologically important material systems are (Ba,Sr)TiO3 (BST), for tunable dielectric devices employed in wireless communications, and Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT), for ferroelectric non-volatile memory (FeRAM). In general, the material behavior is strongly influenced by the mechanical boundary conditions imposed by the substrate and surrounding layers and may vary considerably from the known bulk behavior. A better mechanistic understanding of these effects is essential for harnessing the full potential of ferroelectric thin-films and further optimizing existing devices. Both materials share a common crystal structure and similar properties, but face unique challenges due to the design parameters of these different applications. Tunable devices often require very low dielectric loss as well as large dielectric tunability. Present results show that the dielectric response of BST thin-films can either resemble a dipole-relaxor or follow the accepted empirical Universal Relaxation Law (Curie-von Schweidler), depending on temperature. These behaviors in a single ferroelectric thin-film system are often thought to be mutually exclusive. In state-of-the-art high density FeRAM, the ferroelectric polarization is at least as important as the dielectric response. It was found that these properties are significantly affected by moderate biaxial tensile and compressive stresses which reversibly alter the ferroelastic domain populations of PZT at room temperature. The 90-degree domain wall motion observed by high resolution

  9. Rheokinetics and effect of shear rate on the kinetics of linear polyurethane formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Navarchian, AH; Picchioni, F; Janssen, LPBM

    In this article, the rheokinetics of polyurethane formation and the influence of shear rate on its kinetics have been studied. Two different linear polyurethane systems with 0% and 100% hard segments are examined in a cone and plate rheometer. The isothermal increase of viscosity during polyurethane

  10. Effects of the shear layer growth rate on the supersonic jet noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Yuta; Nonomura, Taku; Oyama, Akira; Mamori, Hiroya; Fukushima, Naoya; Yamamoto, Makoto

    2017-11-01

    Strong acoustic waves emitted from rocket plume might damage to rocket payloads because their payloads consist of fragile structure. Therefore, understanding and prediction of acoustic wave generation are of importance not only in science, but also in engineering. The present study makes experiments of a supersonic jet flow at the Mach number of 2.0 and investigates a relationship between growth rate of a shear layer and noise generation of the supersonic jet. We conducted particle image velocimetry (PIV) and acoustic measurements for three different shaped nozzles. These nozzles were employed to control the condition of a shear layer of the supersonic jet flow. We applied single-pixel ensemble correlation method (Westerweel et al., 2004) for the PIV images to obtain high-resolution averaged velocity profiles. This correlation method enabled us to obtain detailed data of the shear layer. For all cases, acoustic measurements clearly shows the noise source position at the end of a potential core of the jet. In the case where laminar to turbulent transition occurred in the shear layer, the sound pressure level increased by 4 dB at the maximum. This research is partially supported by Presto, JST (JPMJPR1678) and KAKENHI (25709009 and 17H03473).

  11. Effects of extreme wind shear on aeroelastic modal damping of wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjoldan, P.F.; Hansen, Morten Hartvig

    2013-01-01

    Wind shear is an important contributor to fatigue loads on wind turbines. Because it causes an azimuthal variation in angle of attack, it can also affect aerodynamic damping. In this paper, a linearized model of a wind turbine, based on the nonlinear aeroelastic code BHawC, is used to investigate...

  12. Effects of flow shear and Alfven waves on two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, Jamie; Kim, Eun-jin; Thyagaraja, A.

    2008-01-01

    The suppression of turbulent transport by large scale mean shear flows and uniform magnetic fields is investigated in two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence driven by a small-scale forcing with finite correlation time. By numerical integration the turbulent magnetic diffusivity D T is shown to be significantly quenched, with a scaling D T ∝B -2 Ω 0 -5/4 , which is much more severe than in the case of a short or delta correlated forcing typified by white noise, studied in E. Kim and B. Dubrulle [Phys. Plasmas 8, 813 (2001)]. Here B and Ω 0 are magnetic field strength and flow shear rate, respectively. The forcing with finite correlation time also leads to much stronger suppression of momentum transport through the cancellation of the Reynolds stress by the Maxwell stress with a positive small value of turbulent viscosity, ν T >0. While fluctuating kinetic and magnetic energies are unaffected by the magnetic field just as in the case of a delta correlated forcing, they are much more severely quenched by flow shear than in that of a delta correlated forcing. Underlying physical mechanisms for the reduction of turbulent transport and turbulence level by flow shear and magnetic field are discussed

  13. Interaction between drug delivery vehicles and cells under the effect of shear stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godoy-Gallardo, Maria; Ek, Pramod Kumar; Jansman, M. M. T.

    2015-01-01

    models. An important factor within the complex and dynamic human in vivo environment is the shear flow observed within our circulatory system and many other tissues. Within this review, recent advances to leverage microfluidic devices to better mimic these conditions through novel in vitro assays...

  14. The effect of toroidal plasma rotation on low-frequency reversed shear Alfven eigenmodes in tokamaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverkort, J. W.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of toroidal plasma rotation on the existence of reversed shear Alfven eigenmodes (RSAEs) near their minimum frequency is investigated analytically. An existence condition is derived showing that a radially decreasing kinetic energy density is unfavourable for the existence of RSAEs.

  15. Effects of annealing on evaporated SnS thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakrani, Samsudi; Ismail, Bakar [Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Skudai, Johor Bahru (Malaysia). Dept. of Physics

    1994-12-31

    The effects of annealing of evaporated tin sulphide thin films (SnS) are described. The films were initially deposited onto glass substrate, followed by annealing in an encapsulated carbon block under the running argon gas at 310 degree Celsius. Short time annealing of the films results in a slight change of the compositions to a mix SnS/SnS sub 2 compound, and the tendency of increasing SnS sub 2 formation was observed on the films annealed for longer periods up to 20 hours. X-ray results showed the transformation of SnS peaks (040) and (080) to predominantly SnS sub 2 peaks - (001), (100), (101), and (110). The associated absorption coefficients measured on the films were found to be greater than 10 sup 5 cm sup -1, with indication of higher photon energy leading to the formation of SnS sub 2 compound.

  16. Effects of annealing on evaporated SnS thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samsudi Sakrani; Bakar Ismail

    1994-01-01

    The effects of annealing of evaporated tin sulphide thin films (SnS) are described. The films were initially deposited onto glass substrate, followed by annealing in an encapsulated carbon block under the running argon gas at 310 degree Celsius. Short time annealing of the films results in a slight change of the compositions to a mix SnS/SnS sub 2 compound, and the tendency of increasing SnS sub 2 formation was observed on the films annealed for longer periods up to 20 hours. X-ray results showed the transformation of SnS peaks (040) and (080) to predominantly SnS sub 2 peaks - (001), (100), (101), and (110). The associated absorption coefficients measured on the films were found to be greater than 10 sup 5 cm sup -1, with indication of higher photon energy leading to the formation of SnS sub 2 compound

  17. Effect of ion implantation on thin hard coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auner, G.; Hsieh, Y.F.; Padmanabhan, K.R.; Chevallier, J.; Soerensen, G.

    1983-01-01

    The surface mechanical properties of thin hard coatings of carbides, nitrides and borides deposited by r.f. sputtering were improved after deposition by ion implantation. The thickness and the stoichiometry of the films were measured by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and nuclear reaction analysis before and after ion bombardment. The post ion bombardment was achieved with heavy inert ions such as Kr + and Xe + with an energy sufficient to penetrate the film and to reach the substrate. Both the film adhesion and the microhardness were consistently improved. In order to achieve a more detailed understanding, Rb + and Ni + ions were also used as projectiles, and it was found that these ions were more effective than the inert gas ions. (Auth.)

  18. Anomalous Hall effect scaling in ferromagnetic thin films

    KAUST Repository

    Grigoryan, Vahram L.

    2017-10-23

    We propose a scaling law for anomalous Hall effect in ferromagnetic thin films. Our approach distinguishes multiple scattering sources, namely, bulk impurity, phonon for Hall resistivity, and most importantly the rough surface contribution to longitudinal resistivity. In stark contrast to earlier laws that rely on temperature- and thickness-dependent fitting coefficients, this scaling law fits the recent experimental data excellently with constant parameters that are independent of temperature and film thickness, strongly indicating that this law captures the underlying physical processes. Based on a few data points, this scaling law can even fit all experimental data in full temperature and thickness range. We apply this law to interpret the experimental data for Fe, Co, and Ni and conclude that (i) the phonon-induced skew scattering is unimportant as expected; (ii) contribution from the impurity-induced skew scattering is negative; (iii) the intrinsic (extrinsic) mechanism dominates in Fe (Co), and both the extrinsic and intrinsic contributions are important in Ni.

  19. Anomalous Hall effect scaling in ferromagnetic thin films

    KAUST Repository

    Grigoryan, Vahram L.; Xiao, Jiang; Wang, Xuhui; Xia, Ke

    2017-01-01

    We propose a scaling law for anomalous Hall effect in ferromagnetic thin films. Our approach distinguishes multiple scattering sources, namely, bulk impurity, phonon for Hall resistivity, and most importantly the rough surface contribution to longitudinal resistivity. In stark contrast to earlier laws that rely on temperature- and thickness-dependent fitting coefficients, this scaling law fits the recent experimental data excellently with constant parameters that are independent of temperature and film thickness, strongly indicating that this law captures the underlying physical processes. Based on a few data points, this scaling law can even fit all experimental data in full temperature and thickness range. We apply this law to interpret the experimental data for Fe, Co, and Ni and conclude that (i) the phonon-induced skew scattering is unimportant as expected; (ii) contribution from the impurity-induced skew scattering is negative; (iii) the intrinsic (extrinsic) mechanism dominates in Fe (Co), and both the extrinsic and intrinsic contributions are important in Ni.

  20. Effect of tack coat application on interlayer shear strength of asphalt pavement: A state-of-the-art review based on application in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiguang Zhang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of tack coat application on pavement interlayer shear strength attracts strong interest during asphalt paving. Given its extensive use, tack coat is known to behave as a bond material to reduce pavement distresses such as slippage crack. The effectiveness of tack coat in increasing shear strength may be affected by multiple factors, such as tack coat material, test condition, pavement surface condition, and moisture. This article is a literature review focus on how the interlayer shear strength varied when relevant influential factors are changing. Review results indicate that the interlayer shear strength increased with the decreased test temperature, increased traffic load (within design limit, and increased test confinement pressure. Additionally, the milled pavement surface always has higher shear strength then the non-milled pavement surface. It is also found that laboratory-prepared specimens resulted in higher interlayer shear strength than field pavement cores. The effect of other factors on tack coat application may follow different trends depending on mix type and existing pavement condition. For instance, optimum tack coat rate that corresponds to peak shear strength is widely reported, while it is also found that tack coat does not greatly affect shear strength on dry, clean and milled pavement surface. Furthermore, shear strength reduced when mixture is designed with high percentage of air voids or coarse aggregate structure, such as porous asphalt and stone mastic asphalt (SMA mixtures. More findings and recommendations can be found in this paper. Keywords: Tack coat, Interlayer shear strength, Asphalt pavement, Temperature, Milling, Mixture type

  1. Effect of shear strain on the α-ε phase transition of iron: a new approach in the rotational diamond anvil cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Yanzhang; Selvi, Emre; Levitas, Valery I; Hashemi, Javad

    2006-01-01

    The effect of shear strain on the iron α-ε phase transformation has been studied using a rotational diamond anvil cell (RDAC). The initial transition is observed to take place at the reduced pressure of 10.8 GPa under pressure and shear operation. Complete phase transformation was observed at 15.4 GPa. The rotation of an anvil causes limited pressure elevation and makes the pressure distribution symmetric in the sample chamber before the phase transition. However, it causes a significant pressure increase at the centre of the sample and brings about a large pressure gradient during the phase transformation. The resistance to the phase interface motion is enhanced due to strain hardening during the pressure and shear operations on iron and this further increases the transition pressure. The work of macroscopic shear stress and the work of the pressure and shear stress at the defect tips account for the pressure reduction of the iron phase transition

  2. Numerical analyses of the effect of SG-interlayer shear stiffness on the structural performance of reinforced glass beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Louter, C.; Nielsen, Jens Henrik

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the numerical modelling of SentryGlas-laminated reinforced glass beams. In these beams, which have been experimentally investigated in preceding research, a stainless steel reinforcement section is laminated at the inner recessed edge of a triple-layer glass beam by means...... of SentryGlas (SG) interlayer sheets. The current contribution numerically investigates the effect of the SG-interlayer shear stiffness on the overall structural response of the beams. This is done by means of a 3D finite element model in which the individual glass layers, the SG......-interlayers and the reinforcement are incorporated. In the model, the glass parts are allowed to crack, but all other parts are assumed linear elastic throughout the analyses. By changing the shear modulus of the SG-interlayer in multiple analyses, its contribution to the overall structural performance of the beams - especially...

  3. Research of Effective Width of FRP U-shaped Hoop Reinforcement Properties of Concrete Beams by Shear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Baokun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paste fiber reinforced composite material (hereinafter referred to as FRP U-shaped hoop of reinforced concrete beams interfacial debonding is an important reinforcement technology research. For the effective width of the CFRP U-shaped hoop reinforcement, it is still a lack of in-depth research, only relying on the test research huge workload, this article (ANSYS and the numerical simulation in the whole process of the shear load release properties of finite element calculation software. According to the results of finite element analysis, the author studied the CFRP U-shaped hoop to increase the width of the shear capacity of reinforced concrete beams by the impact.

  4. The interaction of two spheres in a simple-shear flow of complex fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firouznia, Mohammadhossein; Metzger, Bloen; Ovarlez, Guillaume; Hormozi, Sarah

    2017-11-01

    We study the interaction of two small freely-moving spheres in a linear flow field of Newtonian, shear thinning and yield stress fluids. We perform a series of experiments over a range of shear rates as well as different shear histories using an original apparatus and with the aid of conventional rheometry, Particle Image Velocimetry and Particle Tracking Velocimetry. Showing that the non-Newtonian nature of the suspending fluid strongly affects the shape of particle trajectories and the irreversibility. An important point is that non-Newtonian effects can be varied and unusual. Depending on the shear rate, nonideal shear thinning and yield stress suspending fluids might show elasticity that needs to be taken into account. The flow field around one particle is studied in different fluids when subjected to shear. Then using these results to explain the two particle interactions in a simple-shear flow we show how particle-particle contact and non-Newtonian behaviors result in relative trajectories with fore-aft asymmetry. Well-resolved velocity and stress fields around the particles are presented here. Finally, we discuss how the relative particle trajectories may affect the microstructure of complex suspensions and consequently the bulk rheology. NSF (Grant No. CBET-1554044-CAREER).

  5. Effects of the cooling rate on the shear behavior of continuous glass fiber/impact polypropylene composites (GF-IPP)

    KAUST Repository

    Wafai, Husam

    2016-09-20

    Fiber-reinforced composites with improved dissipation of energy during impact loading have recently been developed based on a polypropylene copolymer commonly called impact polypropylene (IPP). Composites made of IPP reinforced with glass fibers (GF) are particularly attractive to the automotive industry due to their low cost and good impact resistance. In such composites, the cooling rate varies depending on processing techniques and manufacturing choices. Here, we study the effects of the cooling rate of GF-IPP composites on shear behavior, which is critical in impact applications, using [±45]s monotonic and cyclic (load/unload) tensile specimens. The specimens were manufactured under a wide range of cooling rates (3 °C/min, 22 °C/min, 500–1000 °C/min). Mainly dominated by the properties of the matrix, the global shear behavior of GF-IPP composites differed considerably with respect to the cooling rate. However, the performance of the fiber-matrix interface (chemically modified) appeared to be unaffected by the range of cooling rates used in this study. We found that the cooling rate has a minor effect on the rate of damage accumulation, while it strongly modifies the shear-activated rate-dependant viscoelastic behavior. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd

  6. The effect of chlorination and hydrodynamic shear stress on the persistence of bacteriophages associated with drinking water biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelleieux, S; Mathieu, L; Block, J-C; Gantzer, C; Bertrand, I

    2016-10-01

    This work aimed to assess at pilot scale the effect of chlorination and water flushing on 2-month-old drinking water biofilms and, above all, on biofilm-associated F-specific RNA bacteriophages MS2, GA and Qβ. Chlorination (4 mg l(-1) ) was applied first with a hydrodynamic shear stress of 1 Pa and second with an increase in hydrodynamic shear stress to 10 Pa. Despite a rapid decrease in the number of biofilm bacteria and associated phages, infectious phages were still detected on surfaces after completion of the 150 min cleaning procedure. The resulting sequence of phage removal was: GA > Qβ ≫ MS2. The effect of chlorine on biofilm bacteria and biofilm-associated phages was limited to the upper layers of the biofilm and was not enhanced by an increase in hydrodynamic shear stress. A smaller decrease was observed for MS2 than for GA or Qβ after completion of the cleaning procedure. The differences observed between the three phages suggest that the location of the viral particles in the biofilm, which is related to their surface properties, affects the efficiency of chlorine disinfection. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. Predicting wind shear effects: A study of Minnesota wind data collected at heights up to 70 meters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artig, R. [Minnesota Dept. of Public Service, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The Minnesota Department of Public Service (DPS) collects wind data at carefully selected sites around the state and analyzes the data to determine Minnesota`s wind power potential. DPS recently installed advanced new monitoring equipment at these sites and began to collect wind data at 30, 50, and 70 meters above ground level, with two anemometers at each level. Previously, the Department had not collected data at heights above ground level higher than 30 meters. DPS also, with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), installed four sophisticated monitoring sites as part of a Tall Tower Wind Shear Study that is assessing the effects of wind shear on wind power potential. At these sites, wind data are being collected at the 10, 30, 40, 50, 60, and 70 meter heights. This paper presents the preliminary results of the analysis of wind data from all sites. These preliminary results indicate that the traditional 1/7 power law does not effectively predict wind shear in Minnesota, and the result is an underestimation of Minnesota`s wind power potential at higher heights. Using a power factor of 1/5 or 1/4 may be more accurate and provide sound justification for installing wind turbines on taller towers in Minnesota.

  8. The effect of shear flow and the density gradient on the Weibel instability growth rate in the dense plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amininasab, S.; Sadighi-Bonabi, R.; Khodadadi Azadboni, F.

    2018-02-01

    Shear stress effect has been often neglected in calculation of the Weibel instability growth rate in laser-plasma interactions. In the present work, the role of the shear stress in the Weibel instability growth rate in the dense plasma with density gradient is explored. By increasing the density gradient, the shear stress threshold is increasing and the range of the propagation angles of growing modes is limited. Therefore, by increasing steps of the density gradient plasma near the relativistic electron beam-emitting region, the Weibel instability occurs at a higher stress flow. Calculations show that the minimum value of the stress rate threshold for linear polarization is greater than that of circular polarization. The Wiebel instability growth rate for linear polarization is 18.3 times circular polarization. One sees that for increasing stress and density gradient effects, there are smaller maximal growth rates for the range of the propagation angles of growing modes /π 2 propagation angles of growing modes /π 2 < θ m i n < π and /3 π 2 < θ m i n < 2 π in circular polarized plasma.

  9. Numerical simulation of bubble induced shear in membrane bioreactors: effects of mixed liquor rheology and membrane configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuefei; Wang, Yuan; Waite, T David; Leslie, Greg

    2015-05-15

    A CFD model, incorporating an empirically determined rheology model and a porous media model, was developed to simulate bubble induced surface shear in membrane bioreactors configured with hollow fibre membranes with outer diameters ranging from 1.3 to 2.4 mm, arranged in vertically orientated modules with packing density from 200 to 560 m(2)/m(3). The rheology model was developed for mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) concentrations of 3 to 16 gL(-1) in the presence and absence of coagulant (generated by addition of a ferrous salt) for shear rates ranging from 0 to 500 s(-1). Experimentally determined particle relaxation times for the biological flocs in the mixed liquor, both in the absence and presence of iron, were negligible, consistent with an environment where positive buoyancy forces were greater than negative settling forces thereby allowing the sludge mixture to be modelled as a single continuous phase. The non-Newtonian behaviour of the mixed liquor was incorporated into the CFD simulations using an Ostwald-de Waele rheology model. Interactions between mixed liquor and hollow fibre membranes of different fibre size and packing density were described using a porous media model that was calibrated by empirical measurement of inertial loss coefficients over a range of viscosities (0.8 × 10(-3) to 2.1 × 10(-3) Pa.s) and velocities (0 to 0.35 m/s) typically encountered in full scale MBRs. Experimental results indicated that addition of iron salts resulted in an increase in MLSS and sludge viscosity. Shear stress is affected by both velocity and viscosity. The increase in sludge viscosity resulted in an increase in resistance to flow through the hollow fibre membrane bundles and, as a result, decreased the liquid flow velocities. CFD simulations provided insight on the effects of point of coagulant addition and MLSS concentration on bubble-induced shear over a range of industrially relevant conditions. A 12% increase in shear stress was observed when

  10. Negotiated media effects. Peer feedback modifies effects of media's thin-body ideal on adolescent girls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuis, Jolanda; Konijn, Elly A; Seidell, Jacob C

    The present study introduces a theoretical framework on negotiated media effects. Specifically, we argue that feedback of peers on thin-body ideal media images and individual dispositions guide effects on adolescent girls' psychosocial responses to media exposure. Therefore, we examined the

  11. The Effect of Shear Wall Distribution on the Dynamics of Reinforced Concrete Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helou, S. H.; Touqan, A. R.

    2008-07-01

    The inclusion of a soft storey in multistory concrete buildings is a feature gaining popularity in urban areas where land is of exorbitant cost. In earthquake prone zones, this feature has been observed in post earthquake investigations. Although engineers are prepared to accept the notion that a soft storey poses a weak link in Seismic Design, yet the idea demands better understanding. The following study illustrates the importance of the judicious distribution of shear walls. The selected building is analyzed through nine numerical models which address the behavior of framed structures. The parameters discussed include, inter alias, the fundamental period of vibration, lateral displacements, axial and shear forces. It is noticed that an abrupt change in stiffness between the soft storey and the level above is responsible for increasing the strength demand on first storey columns. Extending the elevator shafts throughout the soft storey is strongly recommended.

  12. The Effect of Shear Wall Distribution on the Dynamics of Reinforced Concrete Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helou, S. H.; Touqan, A. R.

    2008-01-01

    The inclusion of a soft storey in multistory concrete buildings is a feature gaining popularity in urban areas where land is of exorbitant cost. In earthquake prone zones, this feature has been observed in post earthquake investigations. Although engineers are prepared to accept the notion that a soft storey poses a weak link in Seismic Design, yet the idea demands better understanding. The following study illustrates the importance of the judicious distribution of shear walls. The selected building is analyzed through nine numerical models which address the behavior of framed structures. The parameters discussed include, inter alias, the fundamental period of vibration, lateral displacements, axial and shear forces. It is noticed that an abrupt change in stiffness between the soft storey and the level above is responsible for increasing the strength demand on first storey columns. Extending the elevator shafts throughout the soft storey is strongly recommended

  13. Effect of flocculating agent dosages on the performance of red mud flocculation under shear conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagnon, M.J.; Simard, G.; Leclerc, A.; Peloquin, G.

    2002-01-01

    The performance of different polymers used to flocculate red mud particulate materials in the Bayer process can be evaluated on the basis of their efficiency to achieve adequate settling velocities and turbidity levels. In this study, three commercially available flocculants are evaluated under typical conditions found in the last washer of a Bayer plant. The different shear levels are produced by using a modified Couette flow system. Great differences are noticed in the performance of the polymers when they are compared at different dosages and at different shear rate levels. The data collected also suggests that conventional cylinder settling tests may not be adequate to measure the performance of certain types of polymers. (author)

  14. Effect of periodic fluctuation of soil particle rotation resistance on interface shear behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebrahimian, Babak; Noorzad, Asadollah

    2010-01-01

    The interface behaviour between infinite extended narrow granular layer and bounding structure is numerically investigated using finite element method. The micro-polar (Cosserat) continuum approach within the framework of elasto-plasticity is employed to remove the numerical difficulties caused by strain-softening of materials in classical continuum mechanics. Mechanical properties of cohesionless granular soil are described with Lade's model enhanced with polar terms including Cosserat rotations, curvatures and couple stresses via mean grain diameter as the internal length. The main attention of paper is laid on the influence of spatial periodic fluctuation of rotation resistance of soil particles interlocked with the surface of bounding structure on evolution and location of shear band developed inside granular body. The finite element results demonstrate that the location and evolution of shear localization in granular body is strongly affected by prescribed non-uniform micro-polar kinematic boundary conditions along the interface.

  15. Effects of external environments on the short beam shear strength of filament wound graphite/epoxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, B. G.; Clemons, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    Filament wound graphite/epoxy samples were immersed in seawater, deionized water, and toluene at room temperature and 80 deg C for 5, 15, and 43 days, and in methanol at room temperature for 15 and 43 days. The percent weight gains and short beam shear strengths were determined after environmental exposure. Samples immersed in deionized water and seawater had higher percent weight gains than those immersed in toluene at room temperature and 80 deg C. The percent weight gains for samples immersed in methanol at room temperature were comparable to those of deionized water and seawater immersed samples. A comparison of percent decreases in short beam shear strengths could not be made due to a large scatter in data. This may indicate defects in samples due to machining or variations in material properties due to processing.

  16. Effects of muscle activation on shear between human soleus and gastrocnemius muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finni, T; Cronin, N J; Mayfield, D; Lichtwark, G A; Cresswell, A G

    2017-01-01

    Lateral connections between muscles provide pathways for myofascial force transmission. To elucidate whether these pathways have functional roles in vivo, we examined whether activation could alter the shear between the soleus (SOL) and lateral gastrocnemius (LG) muscles. We hypothesized that selective activation of LG would decrease the stretch-induced shear between LG and SOL. Eleven volunteers underwent a series of knee joint manipulations where plantar flexion force, LG, and SOL muscle fascicle lengths and relative displacement of aponeuroses between the muscles were obtained. Data during a passive full range of motion were recorded, followed by 20° knee extension stretches in both passive conditions and with selective electrical stimulation of LG. During active stretch, plantar flexion force was 22% greater (P stronger (stiffer) connectivity between the two muscles, at least at flexed knee joint angles, which may serve to facilitate myofascial force transmission. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Giant magneto-optical Kerr effect and universal Faraday effect in thin-film topological insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Wang-Kong; MacDonald, A H

    2010-07-30

    Topological insulators can exhibit strong magneto-electric effects when their time-reversal symmetry is broken. In this Letter we consider the magneto-optical Kerr and Faraday effects of a topological insulator thin film weakly exchange coupled to a ferromagnet. We find that its Faraday rotation has a universal value at low frequencies θF=tan(-1)α, where α is the vacuum fine structure constant, and that it has a giant Kerr rotation θK=π/2. These properties follow from a delicate interplay between thin-film cavity confinement and the surface Hall conductivity of a topological insulator's helical quasiparticles.

  18. The Effect of Binder and Waste Granular Materials (WGM on the Shear Strength and Shear Resistance of Dredged Marine Soils (DMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosman Mohammad Zawawi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dredged marine soil (DMS is considered as weak and soft problematic soil. It is possible to give this type of soil a second life if only its geotechnical properties are improved. Infusing soil with solidification agent is the common practice of soil improvement. This study uses binder and waste granular material (WGM such as cement, bottom ash (BA and palm oil clinker (POC. The aforementioned materials are capable to fortify the poor features of the soil. Series numbers of soil bed samples were tested for its shear strength and shear resistance. Test results show that the mentioned soil parameters were corresponded with each other. In short, geo-waste and biomass materials are possible to be reused instead of being discarded.

  19. EFFECT OF GAMMA RAY IRRADIATION ON INTERLAMINAR SHEAR STRENGTH OF GLASS FIBER REINFORCED PLASTICS AT 77 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, A.; Nishijima, S.; Izumi, Y.

    2008-01-01

    It is known that an organic material is damaged by gamma ray irradiation, and the strength after irradiation has dependence on the gamma ray dose. These issues are important not only to make global understanding of electric insulating performance of glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) under irradiation condition but also to develop new insulation materials. This paper presents the dependence of fracture mode and interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) on the material and the gamma ray irradiation effect on the fracture mode and the ILSS. 6 mm radius loading nose and supports were used to prompt ILS fracture for a short beam test. A 2.5 mm thick small specimen machined out of a 13 mm thick G-10CR GFRP plate (sliced specimen) showed lower ILSS and translaminar shear (TLS) fracture, although the same size specimen prepared from a 2.5 mm G-10CR GFRP plate (non-sliced specimen) showed ILS fracture and the higher ILSS. Both type of specimens showed the degradation of ILSS after gamma ray irradiation. The fracture mode of the non-sliced specimen changed from ILS to TLS fracture and no bending fracture was observed. The resistance to shear deformation of glass cloth/epoxy laminate structure would be damaged by the irradiation

  20. Effect of nitrogen concentration and temperature on the critical resolved shear stress and strain rate sensitivity of vanadium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehbein, D.K.

    1980-08-01

    The critical resolved shear stress and strain rate sensitivity were measured over the temperature range from 77 to 400 0 K for vanadium-nitrogen alloys containing from 0.0004 to 0.184 atom percent nitrogen. These properties were found to be strongly dependent on both the nitrogen concentration and temperature. The following observations were seen in this investigation: the overall behavior of the alloys for the temperature and concentration range studied follows a form similar to that predicted; the concentration dependence of the critical resolved shear stress after subtracting the hardening due to the pure vanadium lattice obeys Labusch's c/sup 2/3/ relationship above 200 0 K and Fleischer's c/sup 1/2/ relationship below 200 0 K; the theoretical predictions of Fleischer's model for the temperature dependence of the critical resolved shear stress are in marked disagreement with the behavior found; and the strain rate sensitivity, par. delta tau/par. deltaln γ, exhibits a peak at approximately 100 0 K that decreases in height as the nitrogen concentration increases. A similar peak has been observed in niobium by other investigators but the effect of concentration on the peak height is quite different

  1. The effect of prior sandblasting of the wire on the shear bond strength of two different types of lingual retainers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilinç, Delal Dara; Sayar, Gülşilay

    2018-04-07

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of total surface sandblasting on the shear bond strength of two different retainer wires. The null hypothesis was that there is no difference in the bond strength of the two types of lingual retainer wires when they are sandblasted. One hundred and sixty human premolar teeth were equally divided into four groups (n=40). A pair of teeth was embedded in self-curing acrylic resin and polished. Retainer wires were applied on the etched and rinsed surfaces of the teeth. Four retainers were used: group 1: braided retainer (0.010×0.028″, Ortho Technology); group 2: sandblasted braided retainer (0.010×0.028″, Ortho Technology); group 3: coaxial retainer (0.0215″ Coaxial, 3M) and group 4: sandblasted coaxial retainer (0.0215″ Coaxial, 3M). The specimens were tested using a universal test machine in shear mode with a crosshead speed of one mm/min. One-way analysis of variance (Anova) was used to determine the significant differences among the groups. There was no significant difference (P=0.117) among the groups according to this test. The null hypothesis was accepted. There was no statistically significant difference among the shear bond strength values of the four groups. Copyright © 2018 CEO. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of bidirectional internal flow on fluid–structure interaction dynamics of conveying marine riser model subject to shear current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-Shou Chen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a numerical investigation concerning the effect of two kinds of axially progressing internal flows (namely, upward and downward on fluid–structure interaction (FSI dynamics about a marine riser model which is subject to external shear current. The CAE technology behind the current research is a proposed FSI solution, which combines structural analysis software with CFD technology together. Efficiency validation for the CFD software was carried out first. It has been proved that the result from numerical simulations agrees well with the observation from relating model test cases in which the fluidity of internal flow is ignorable. After verifying the numerical code accuracy, simulations are conducted to study the vibration response that attributes to the internal progressive flow. It is found that the existence of internal flow does play an important role in determining the vibration mode (/dominant frequency and the magnitude of instantaneous vibration amplitude. Since asymmetric curvature along the riser span emerges in the case of external shear current, the centrifugal and Coriolis accelerations owing to up- and downward internal progressive flows play different roles in determining the fluid–structure interaction response. The discrepancy between them becomes distinct, when the velocity ratio of internal flow against external shear current is relatively high.

  3. Effect of surfactants on the deformation of single droplet in shear flow studied by dissipative particle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuzhou; Xu, Junbo; He, Xianfeng

    2018-07-01

    The behaviour of a single droplet in shear flow is a fundamental problem in immiscible liquid-liquid multiphase fluid systems. In this article, the deformation and inclination angle of single droplet covered with surfactants in shear flow at moderate Reynolds number, when both the inertial effects and interfacial tension are the key governing factors, were simulated by dissipative particle dynamics (DPD). Weber number We was adopted to indicate the force state of the droplet and a linear relationship between the deformation parameter D and We was found when Reynolds number Re is about 1-10, which is similar to the relation of D and Capillary number Ca when Re ≪ 1. When the surfactant concentration is lower than the critical micelle concentration (CMC), the distribution of surfactants, the droplet inclination angle θ and the droplet deformation parameter D were investigated at different surfactant density at interface ds and shear rate ?. When the droplet size is close to the characteristic size of surfactant molecules, phase interfaces of water in oil (W/O) and oil in water (O/W) systems have different microstructures, which result in differences in the surfactant distribution, the droplet inclination angle and deformation of the two systems.

  4. Effect of Adhesive Type on the Shear Bond Strength of Metal Brackets to Two Ceramic Substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Sadegh Ahmad Akhoundi; Farzaneh Aghajani; Javad Chalipa; Amir Hooman Sadrhaghighi

    2014-01-01

    Increased number of adult patients requesting orthodontic treatment result in bonding bracket to ceramic restorations more than before. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded to two types of ceramic bases with conventional orthodontic bonding resin and a new nano-filled composite resin.Twenty four feldespathic porcelain and 24 lithium disilicate ceramic disks were fabricated. All of the samples were conditioned by sandblasting,...

  5. Effect of Ti:sapphire laser on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets to ceramic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdur, Emire Aybuke; Basciftci, Faruk Ayhan

    2015-08-01

    With increasing demand for orthodontic treatments in adults, orthodontists continue to debate the optimal way to prepare ceramic surfaces for bonding. This study evaluated the effects of a Ti:sapphire laser on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets bonded to two ceramic surfaces (feldspathic and IPS Empress e-Max) and the results were compared with those using two other lasers (Er:YAG and Nd:YAG) and 'conventional' techniques, i.e., sandblasting (50 µm) and hydrofluoric (HF) acid. In total, 150 ceramic discs were prepared and divided into two groups. In each group, the following five subgroups were prepared: Ti:sapphire laser, Nd:YAG laser, Er:YAG laser, sandblasting, and HF acid. Mandibular incisor brackets were bonded using a light-cured adhesive. The samples were stored in distilled water for 24 hours at 37°C and then thermocycled. Extra samples were prepared and examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SBS testing was performed and failure modes were classified. ANOVA and Tukey's HSD tests were used to compare SBS among the five subgroups (P < 0.05). Feldspathic and IPS Empress e-Max ceramics had similar SBS values. The Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser (16.76 ± 1.37 MPa) produced the highest mean bond strength, followed by sandblasting (12.79 ± 1.42 MPa) and HF acid (11.28 ± 1.26 MPa). The Er:YAG (5.43 ± 1.21 MPa) and Nd:YAG laser (5.36 ± 1.04 MPa) groups were similar and had the lowest SBS values. More homogeneous and regular surfaces were observed in the ablation pattern with the Ti:sapphire laser than with the other treatments by SEM analysis. Within the limitations of this in vitro study, Ti:sapphire laser- treated surfaces had the highest SBS values. Therefore, this technique may be useful for the pretreatment of ceramic surfaces as an alternative to 'conventional' techniques. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Coalescence in PLA-PBAT blends under shear flow: Effects of blend preparation and PLA molecular weight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nofar, M. [Center for High Performance Polymer and Composite Systems (CREPEC), Chemical Engineering Department, Polytechnique Montreal, Montreal, Quebec H3T 1J4, Canada and CREPEC, Department of Chemical Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2B2 (Canada); Heuzey, M. C.; Carreau, P. J., E-mail: pierre.carreau@polymtl.ca [Center for High Performance Polymer and Composite Systems (CREPEC), Chemical Engineering Department, Polytechnique Montreal, Montreal, Quebec H3T 1J4 (Canada); Kamal, M. R. [CREPEC, Department of Chemical Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2B2 (Canada); Randall, J. [NatureWorks LLC, 15305 Minnetonka Boulevard, Minnetonka, Minnesota 55345 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Blends containing 75 wt. % of an amorphous polylactide (PLA) with two different molecular weights and 25 wt. % of a poly[(butylene adipate)-co-terephthalate] (PBAT) were prepared using either a Brabender batch mixer or a twin-screw extruder. These compounds were selected because blending PLA with PBAT can overcome various drawbacks of PLA such as its brittleness and processability limitations. In this study, we investigated the effects of varying the molecular weight of the PLA matrix and of two different mixing processes on the blend morphology and, further, on droplet coalescence during shearing. The rheological properties of these blends were investigated and the interfacial properties were analyzed using the Palierne emulsion model. Droplet coalescence was investigated by applying shear flows of 0.05 and 0.20 s{sup −1} at a fixed strain of 60. Subsequently, small amplitude oscillatory shear tests were conducted to investigate changes in the viscoelastic properties. The morphology of the blends was also examined using scanning electron microscope (SEM) micrographs. It was observed that the PBAT droplets were much smaller when twin-screw extrusion was used for the blend preparation. Shearing at 0.05 s{sup −1} induced significant droplet coalescence in all blends, but coalescence and changes in the viscoelastic properties were much more pronounced for the PLA-PBAT blend based on a lower molecular weight PLA. The viscoelastic responses were also somehow affected by the thermal degradation of the PLA matrix during the experiments.

  7. The Effect of Laser Irradiation on Shear Bond Strength of GI to Dentin After CPP-ACP Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moezizadeh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Dentin sensitivity is one of the most important problems in dentistry. Enamel loss due to root exposure is serious issue and common exposure is one of the reasons for dentin hypersensitivity. There are different methods for solving this problem. One of the most conservative and least expensive methods is use of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP paste. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate shear bond strength of GIC to dentin, with or without laser, CPP-ACP paste and polyacrylic acid treatments. Materials and Methods Fifty sound human third molars were bisected in a mesiodistal direction using a diamond disk. Using 400, 600 and 800 grit silicon carbide paper, dentin surfaces were exposed. The teeth were divided into five groups. In groups A, B, D and H, CPP-ACP (GC tooth mousse Itabashi-Ku, Tokyo, Japan was applied for one hour the first day and repeated at the same time of day for a total of five days. In groups B, C, D and E, the specimens were subjected to laser for 10 seconds using Er, Cr: YSGG laser. In groups B, C, H and G, specimens were treated with 10% polyacrylic acid for 20 seconds. A plastic tube containing GI was positioned over the tooth. Samples were loaded in shear bond using a Universal Testing Machine (Zwick/Roell, Germany, at a 0.5 mm/minute crosshead speed. Results Despite the failing of groups A and D, group analysis showed that there were no significant differences between the groups. The predominant type of fracture in all groups was adhesive. Conclusions Application of CPP-ACP, without preconditioning with polyacrylic acid, can decrease shear bond strength. Laser irradiation has no effect on shear bond strength of GIC to dentin in this condition.

  8. Effect of ac electric field on the dynamics of a vesicle under shear flow in the small deformation regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Kumari Priti; Thaokar, Rochish M.

    2018-03-01

    Vesicles or biological cells under simultaneous shear and electric field can be encountered in dielectrophoretic devices or designs used for continuous flow electrofusion or electroporation. In this work, the dynamics of a vesicle subjected to simultaneous shear and uniform alternating current (ac) electric field is investigated in the small deformation limit. The coupled equations for vesicle orientation and shape evolution are derived theoretically, and the resulting nonlinear equations are handled numerically to generate relevant phase diagrams that demonstrate the effect of electrical parameters on the different dynamical regimes such as tank treading (TT), vacillating breathing (VB) [called trembling (TR) in this work], and tumbling (TU). It is found that while the electric Mason number (Mn), which represents the relative strength of the electrical forces to the shear forces, promotes the TT regime, the response itself is found to be sensitive to the applied frequency as well as the conductivity ratio. While higher outer conductivity promotes orientation along the flow axis, orientation along the electric field is favored when the inner conductivity is higher. Similarly a switch of orientation from the direction of the electric field to the direction of flow is possible by a mere change of frequency when the outer conductivity is higher. Interestingly, in some cases, a coupling between electric field-induced deformation and shear can result in the system admitting an intermediate TU regime while attaining the TT regime at high Mn. The results could enable designing better dielectrophoretic devices wherein the residence time as well as the dynamical states of the vesicular suspension can be controlled as per the application.

  9. Effects of iodinated contrast media on common carotid and brachial artery blood flow and wall shear stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irace, C.; Tamburini, S.; Bertucci, B.; Franceschi, M.S. de; Gnasso, A.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of the intravenous contrast media iomeprol on wall shear stress, blood flow and vascular parameters in the common carotid and brachial artery. Thirty outpatients undergoing thoracic or abdominal spiral CT scans were studied. The internal diameter and flow velocity of the common carotid and brachial artery were evaluated by ultrasound, and blood viscosity was measured before and after low osmolality iomeprol (Iomeron 350) injection. The wall shear stress, blood flow and pulsatility index were calculated. To test the differences between groups, the Wilcoxon rank test and Mann Whitney U test were applied. Blood viscosity decreased slightly, but significantly after contrast media (4.6±0.7 vs. 4.5±0.7 mPa.s, P=0.02). Contrarily, blood flow and wall shear stress did not change in the common carotid artery, but significantly decreased in the brachial artery (0.9±0.4 vs. 0.6±0.3 ml/s, P<0.0001, and 41.5±13.9 vs. 35.3±11.0 dynes/cm2, P<0.002, respectively), whereas the pulsatility index significantly increased in the brachial artery (5.0±3.3 vs. 7.5±5.3, P<0.001). Iomeprol injection causes blood flow and wall shear stress reduction of the brachial artery; the rise in the pulsatility index suggests an increase in peripheral vascular resistance. Further investigation is needed to evaluate whether these modifications can be clinically relevant. (orig.)

  10. Effect of Different Anti-Oxidants on Shear Bond Strength of Composite Resins to Bleached Human Enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saladi, Hari Krishna; Bollu, Indira Priyadarshini; Burla, Devipriya; Ballullaya, Srinidhi Vishnu; Devalla, Srihari; Maroli, Sohani; Jayaprakash, Thumu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The bond strength of the composite to the bleached enamel plays a very important role in the success and longevity of an aesthetic restoration. Aim The aim of this study was to compare and evaluate the effect of Aloe Vera with 10% Sodium Ascorbate on the Shear bond strength of composite resin to bleached human enamel. Materials and Methods Fifty freshly extracted human maxillary central incisors were selected and divided into 5 groups. Group I and V are unbleached and bleached controls groups respectively. Group II, III, IV served as experimental groups. The labial surfaces of groups II, III, IV, V were treated with 35% Carbamide Peroxide for 30mins. Group II specimens were subjected to delayed composite bonding. Group III and IV specimens were subjected to application of 10% Sodium Ascorbate and leaf extract of Aloe Vera following the Carbamide Peroxide bleaching respectively. Specimens were subjected to shear bond strength using universal testing machine and the results were statistically analysed using ANOVA test. Tukey (HSD) Honest Significant Difference test was used to comparatively analyse statistical differences between the groups. A p-value <0.05 is taken as statistically significant. Results The mean shear bond strength values of Group V showed significantly lower bond strengths than Groups I, II, III, IV (p-value <0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between the shear bond strength values of groups I, II, III, IV. Conclusion Treatment of the bleached enamel surface with Aloe Vera and 10% Sodium Ascorbate provided consistently better bond strength. Aloe Vera may be used as an alternative to 10% Sodium Ascorbate. PMID:26674656

  11. Effect of percentage of low plastic fines on the unsaturated shear strength of compacted gravel soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Mohamed Hafez Ismail Ibrahim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Low plastic fines in gravel soils affect its unsaturated shear strength due to the contribution of matric suction that arises in micro and macro pores found within and between aggregates. The shear strength of five different types of prepared gravel soils is measured and is compared with a theoretical model (Fredlund et al., 1978 to predict the unsaturated shear strength. The results are consistent to a great extent except the case of dry clayey gravel soil. It is also found that on inundation of gravel soils containing plastic fines greater than 12% a considerable reduction in both the strength and the stiffness modulus is noticed. This 12% percentage is close to the accepted 15% percentage of fines given by ASTM D4318 (American society for testing material. The angle of internal friction that arises due to matric suction decreases with the increase of degree of saturation of soil. The hysteresis of some tested gravel soils is measured and found that it increases by increasing the percentage of fines.

  12. Mass transfer effects in feeder flow-accelerated corrosion wall thinning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietralik, J.

    2008-01-01

    Flow conditions play a dominant role in Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) under certain conditions, e.g., in CANDU feeders. While chemistry and materials set the overall potential for FAC, flow conditions determine the local distribution of wall thinning. Recent plant data of feeders and laboratory tests confirms that there is a close relationship between local flow conditions, expressed by mass transfer coefficient, and FAC rate in CANDU feeder bends. The knowledge of local effects can be useful for minimizing the number of inspected components, predicting the location of the highest FAC rate for a given piping component, and determining what components or feeders should be replaced. A similar evaluation applies also to FAC in heat transfer equipment such as heat exchangers and steam generators. The objective of this paper is to examine the relationship between FAC rate and local mass transfer parameters. For FAC where the flow is dominant, the FAC rate is proportional to mass flux of ferrous ions. The mass flux is the product of the mass transfer coefficient and the concentration difference, or degree of saturation. The mass transfer coefficient describes the intensity of the transport of corrosion products (ferrous ions) from the oxide-water interface into the bulk water. Therefore, this parameter can be used for predicting the local distribution of FAC rate in the mass-transfer controlled FAC. The degree of saturation reduces the mass flux, thus reducing the FAC rate. This effect can be significant in long piping, e.g., in outlet feeders. The paper presents plant and laboratory evidence for the relationship between local mass transfer conditions and the FAC rate. It shows correlations for mass transfer coefficient in components that are highly susceptible to FAC and most important flow parameters that affect mass transfer coefficient. The role of surface roughness, wall shear stress, and local turbulence is also discussed. (author)

  13. Effect of Various Treatment Modalities on Surface Characteristics and Shear Bond Strengths of Polyetheretherketone-Based Core Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çulhaoğlu, Ahmet Kürşat; Özkır, Serhat Emre; Şahin, Volkan; Yılmaz, Burak; Kılıçarslan, Mehmet Ali

    2017-11-13

    To investigate the effect of different surface treatments on the surface roughness (Ra), wettability, and shear bond strength of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) to composite resin. One hundred ninety eight PEEK specimens were divided into six groups (n = 33). Specimen surfaces were treated with the following surface treatment modalities: silicoating (CoJet), acetone treatment, acid etching (H 2 SO 4 ), airborne particle abrasion (Al 2 O 3 ), laser irradiation (Yb:PL laser), and the nontreated surface serving as the control. Surface roughness was measured with an profilometer (n = 11) and a goniometer was used to measure the surface wettability through contact angle (θ)(n = 11). PEEK surfaces were veneered with a composite resin (n = 11). The specimens were then thermocycled for 10,000 cycles at 5 to 55°C. Shear bond strengths between the PEEK and composite resin were measured with an universal test machine. One-way ANOVA was used to analyze the data. Tukey's post-hoc test was used to determine significant differences between groups (α = 0.05). Surface roughness and wettability of PEEK surfaces along with shear bond strength of PEEK to composite resin were influenced by the surface treatments. (p PEEK surfaces treated by laser irradiation (2.85 ± 0.2 µm) followed by airborne particle abrasion (2.26 ± 0.33 µm), whereas other surface treatment modalities provided similar Ra values, with the acid-etched PEEK surfaces having the lowest mean Ra values (0.35 ± 0.14 µm). Silicoating provided the most wettable PEEK surfaces (48.04 ± 6.28º), followed by either acetone treatment (70.19 ± 4.49º) or acid treatment (76.07 ± 6.61º). Decreased wettability was observed for airborne particle abraded (84.83 ± 4.56º) and laser-treated PEEK surfaces (103.06 ± 4.88º). The highest mean shear bond strength values were observed for acid-etched PEEK surfaces (15.82 ± 4.23 MPa) followed by laser irradiated (11.46 ± 1.97 MPa), airborne particle abraded (10.81 ± 3.06 MPa

  14. Numerical simulation of shear and the Poynting effects by the finite element method: An application of the generalised empirical inequalities in non-linear elasticity

    KAUST Repository

    Angela Mihai, L.

    2013-03-01

    Finite element simulations of different shear deformations in non-linear elasticity are presented. We pay particular attention to the Poynting effects in hyperelastic materials, complementing recent theoretical findings by showing these effects manifested by specific models. As the finite element method computes uniform deformations exactly, for simple shear deformation and pure shear stress, the Poynting effect is represented exactly, while for the generalised shear and simple torsion, where the deformation is non-uniform, the solution is approximated efficiently and guaranteed computational bounds on the magnitude of the Poynting effect are obtained. The numerical results further indicate that, for a given elastic material, the same sign effect occurs under different shearing mechanisms, showing the genericity of the Poynting effect under a variety of shearing loads. In order to derive numerical models that exhibit either the positive or the negative Poynting effect, the so-called generalised empirical inequalities, which are less restrictive than the usual empirical inequalities involving material parameters, are assumed. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Switching, storage, and erasure effects in a superconducting thin film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Testardi, L.R.

    1976-01-01

    Thin niobium films can be switched from a superconducting to a resistive state permanently by application of a short electrical pulse. Application of a short pulse of opposite polarity returns the film to the superconducting state

  16. Effect of solution concentration on MEH-PPV thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affendi, I. H. H.; Sarah, M. S. P.; Alrokayan, Salman A. H.; Khan, Haseeb A.; Rusop, M.

    2018-05-01

    MEH-PPV thin films were prepared with a mixture of THF (tetrahydrofuran) solution deposited by spin coating method. The surface topology of MEH-PPV thin film were characterize by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical properties of absorption spectra were characterized by using Ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared (UV-Vis-NIR). The MEH-PPV concentration variation affects the surface and optical properties of the thin film where 0.5 mg/ml MEH-PPV concentration have a good surface topology provided the same film also gives the highest absorption coefficient were then deposited to a TiO2 thin film forming composite layer. The composite layer then shows low current flow of short circuit current of Isc = -5.313E-7 A.

  17. Effect of collagen fibrils removal on shear bond strength of total etch and self etch adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pishevar L.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Sodium hypochlorite can remove the organic phase of the demineralized dentin and it produces direct resin bonding with hydroxyapatite crystals. Therefore, the hydrolytic degradation of collagen fibrils which might affect the bonding durability is removed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of collagen fibrils removal by 10% NaOCl on dentin shear bond strength of two total etch and self etch adhesive systems."nMaterials and Methods: Sixty extracted human premolar teeth were used in this study. Buccal surface of teeth were grounded until dentin was exposed. Then teeth were divided into four groups. According to dentin surface treatment, experimental groups were as follows: Group I: Single Bond (3M according to manufacture instruction, Group II: 10% NaOCl+Single bond (3M, Group III: Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray according to manufacture instruction, and Group IV: Clearfil SE Bond primer. After that, the specimens were immersed in 50% acetone solution for removing extra monomer. Then the specimens were rinsed and dried. 10% NaOCl was applied and finally adhesive was used. Then composite was bonded to the treated surfaces using a 4 2 mm cylindrical plastic mold. Specimens were thermocycled for 500 cycles (5-55ºC. A shear load was employed by a universal testing machine with a cross head speed of 1mm/min. The data were analyzed for statistical significance with One-way ANOVA, Two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD post-hoc tests."nResults: The mean shear bond strengths of groups were as follows: Single Bond=16.8±4.2, Clearfil SE Bond=23.7±4.07, Single Bond+NaOCl=10.5±4.34, Clearfil SE Bond+NaOCl=23.3±3.65 MPa. Statistical analysis revealed that using 10% NaOCl significantly decreased the shear bond strength in Single Bond group (P=0.00, but caused no significant difference in the shear bond strength in Clearfil SE Bond group (P=0.99."nConclusion: Based on the results of this study, NaOCl treatment did not improve the bond

  18. Thinning effect on plant growth of pruned eucalypt clone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Correa Ramos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A pruned stand of eucalypt clone underwent five thinning treatments with the removal of different proportion of the planted trees, at different ages: a 0% - unthinned, b 35% at 55 months, c 35% at 81 months, d 70% at 81 months, removing sprouts in the thinned plant stumps and, e 70% at 81 months, without coppice sprouts removal. By the age of 141 months, the Weibull distribution showed higher number of trees in the smallest diameter classes for the unthinned treatment. The 70% thinning, with thinned coppice sprouts removal, presented higher number of individuals in the largest diameter classes. Height and yield were the smallest with the removal of 70% of the trees at 81 months, maintaining coppice sprouts. The afterthinning periodic annual increment was greater by thinning 35% of the trees at 55 months resulting in greater number of trees in the largest diameter classes as compared to the other treatments. Yield was higher for the unthinned treatment. The results of this study indicated that thinning 70% of the trees at the age of 81 months, with coppice sprout removal, could be recommended to obtain trees of larger diameter for multiproduct.

  19. Percolation effects in supercapacitors with thin, transparent carbon nanotube electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Paul J; Higgins, Thomas M; De, Sukanta; Nicoloso, Norbert; Coleman, Jonathan N

    2012-02-28

    We have explored the effects of percolation on the properties of supercapacitors with thin nanotube networks as electrodes. We find the equivalent series resistance, R(ESR), and volumetric capacitance, C(V), to be thickness independent for relatively thick electrodes. However, once the electrode thickness falls below a threshold thickness (∼100 nm for R(ESR) and ∼20 nm for C(V)), the properties of the electrode become thickness dependent. We show the thickness dependence of both R(ESR) and C(V) to be consistent with percolation theory. While this is expected for R(ESR), that the capacitance follows a percolation scaling law is not. This occurs because, for sparse networks, the capacitance is proportional to the fraction of nanotubes connected to the main network. This fraction, in turn, follows a percolation scaling law. This allows us to understand and quantify the limitations on the achievable capacitance for transparent supercapacitors. We find that supercapacitors with thickness independent R(ESR) and C(V) occupy a well-defined region of the Ragone plot. However, supercapacitors whose electrodes are limited by percolation occupy a long tail to lower values of energy and power density. For example, replacing electrodes with transparency of T = 80% with thinner networks displaying T = 97% will result in a 20-fold reduction of both power and energy density.

  20. Gas Hydrate Formation Probability Distributions: The Effect of Shear and Comparisons with Nucleation Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Eric F; Lim, Vincent W; Metaxas, Peter J; Du, Jianwei; Stanwix, Paul L; Rowland, Darren; Johns, Michael L; Haandrikman, Gert; Crosby, Daniel; Aman, Zachary M

    2018-03-13

    Gas hydrate formation is a stochastic phenomenon of considerable significance for any risk-based approach to flow assurance in the oil and gas industry. In principle, well-established results from nucleation theory offer the prospect of predictive models for hydrate formation probability in industrial production systems. In practice, however, heuristics are relied on when estimating formation risk for a given flowline subcooling or when quantifying kinetic hydrate inhibitor (KHI) performance. Here, we present statistically significant measurements of formation probability distributions for natural gas hydrate systems under shear, which are quantitatively compared with theoretical predictions. Distributions with over 100 points were generated using low-mass, Peltier-cooled pressure cells, cycled in temperature between 40 and -5 °C at up to 2 K·min -1 and analyzed with robust algorithms that automatically identify hydrate formation and initial growth rates from dynamic pressure data. The application of shear had a significant influence on the measured distributions: at 700 rpm mass-transfer limitations were minimal, as demonstrated by the kinetic growth rates observed. The formation probability distributions measured at this shear rate had mean subcoolings consistent with theoretical predictions and steel-hydrate-water contact angles of 14-26°. However, the experimental distributions were substantially wider than predicted, suggesting that phenomena acting on macroscopic length scales are responsible for much of the observed stochastic formation. Performance tests of a KHI provided new insights into how such chemicals can reduce the risk of hydrate blockage in flowlines. Our data demonstrate that the KHI not only reduces the probability of formation (by both shifting and sharpening the distribution) but also reduces hydrate growth rates by a factor of 2.

  1. Steady shear flow properties of Cordia myxa leaf gum as a function of concentration and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaharlang, Mahmood; Samavati, Vahid

    2015-08-01

    The steady shear flow properties of dispersions of Cordia myxa leaf gum (CMLG) were determined as a function of concentration (0.5-2.5%, w/w), and temperature (10-50 °C). The CMLG dispersions exhibited strong shear-thinning behavior at all concentrations and temperatures. The Power-law (Ostwald-Waele's) and Herschel-Bulkley models were employed to characterize flow behavior of CMLG solutions at 0.1-100 s(-1) shear rate. Non-Newtonian shear-thinning behavior was observed at all temperatures and concentrations. While increase in temperature decreased the viscosity and increased the flow behavior indices, adverse effect was obtained by increasing the concentration. The Power-law model was found the best model to describe steady shear flow behavior of CMLG. The pseudoplasticity of CMLG increased markedly with concentration. An Arrhenius-type model was also used to describe the effect of temperature. The activation energy (Ea) appeared in the range of 5.972-18.104 kJ/mol, as concentration increased from 0.5% to 2.5%, at a shear rate of 10 s(-1). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of ozone gas on the shear bond strength to enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Teixeira Pires

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Ozone is an important disinfecting agent, however its influence on enamel adhesion has not yet been clarified. Objective: Evaluate the influence of ozone pretreatment on the shear strength of an etch-and-rinse and a self-etch system to enamel and analyze the respective failure modes. Material and Methods: Sixty sound bovine incisors were used. Specimens were randomly assigned to four experimental groups (n=15: Group G1 (Excite® with ozone and group G3 (AdheSE® with ozone were prepared with ozone gas from the HealOzone unit (Kavo® for 20 s prior to adhesion, and groups G2 (Excite® and G4 (AdheSE® were used as control. Teeth were bisected and polished to simulate a smear layer just before the application of the adhesive systems. The adhesives were applied according to the manufacturer's instructions to a standardized 3 mm diameter surface, and a composite (Synergy D6, Coltene Whaledent cylinder with 2 mm increments was build. Specimens were stored in 100% humidity for 24 h at 37°C and then subjected to a thermal cycling regimen of 500 cycles. Shear bond tests were performed with a Watanabe device in a universal testing machine at 5 mm/min. The failure mode was analyzed under scanning electron microscope. Means and standard deviation of shear bond strength (SBS were calculated and difference between the groups was analyzed using ANOVA, Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Levene and Bonferroni. Chi-squared statistical tests were used to evaluate the failure modes. Results: Mean bond strength values and failure modes were as follows: G1- 26.85±6.18 MPa (33.3% of adhesive cohesive failure; G2 - 27.95±5.58 MPa (53.8% of adhesive failures between enamel and adhesive; G3 - 15.0±3.84 MPa (77.8% of adhesive failures between enamel and adhesive and G4 - 13.1±3.68 MPa (36.4% of adhesive failures between enamel and adhesive. Conclusions: Shear bond strength values of both adhesives tested on enamel were not influenced by the previous application of ozone gas.

  3. Elastic Metamaterials with Simultaneously Negative Effective Shear Modulus and Mass Density

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Ying

    2011-09-02

    We propose a type of elastic metamaterial comprising fluid-solid composite inclusions which can possess a negative shear modulus and negative mass density over a large frequency region. Such a material has the unique property that only transverse waves can propagate with a negative dispersion while longitudinal waves are forbidden. This leads to many interesting phenomena such as negative refraction, which is demonstrated by using a wedge sample and a significant amount of mode conversion from transverse waves to longitudinal waves that cannot occur on the interface of two natural solids.

  4. Effect of ozone gas on the shear bond strength to enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Patrícia Teixeira; Ferreira, João Cardoso; Oliveira, Sofia Arantes; Silva, Mário Jorge; Melo, Paulo Ribeiro

    2013-01-01

    Ozone is an important disinfecting agent, however its influence on enamel adhesion has not yet been clarified. Evaluate the influence of ozone pretreatment on the shear strength of an etch-and-rinse and a self-etch system to enamel and analyze the respective failure modes. Sixty sound bovine incisors were used. Specimens were randomly assigned to four experimental groups (n=15): Group G1 (Excite® with ozone) and group G3 (AdheSE® with ozone) were prepared with ozone gas from the HealOzone unit (Kavo®) for 20 s prior to adhesion, and groups G2 (Excite®) and G4 (AdheSE®) were used as control. Teeth were bisected and polished to simulate a smear layer just before the application of the adhesive systems. The adhesives were applied according to the manufacturer's instructions to a standardized 3 mm diameter surface, and a composite (Synergy D6, Coltene Whaledent) cylinder with 2 mm increments was build. Specimens were stored in 100% humidity for 24 h at 37°C and then subjected to a thermal cycling regimen of 500 cycles. Shear bond tests were performed with a Watanabe device in a universal testing machine at 5 mm/min. The failure mode was analyzed under scanning electron microscope. Means and standard deviation of shear bond strength (SBS) were calculated and difference between the groups was analyzed using ANOVA, Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Levene and Bonferroni. Chi-squared statistical tests were used to evaluate the failure modes. Mean bond strength values and failure modes were as follows: G1--26.85±6.18 MPa (33.3% of adhesive cohesive failure); G2--27.95±5.58 MPa (53.8% of adhesive failures between enamel and adhesive); G3--15.0±3.84 MPa (77.8% of adhesive failures between enamel and adhesive) and G4--13.1±3.68 MPa (36.4% of adhesive failures between enamel and adhesive). Shear bond strength values of both adhesives tested on enamel were not influenced by the previous application of ozone gas.

  5. Effects of thinning intensity and crown class on cherrybark oak epicormic branching five years after treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luben D. Dimov; Erika Stelzer; Kristi Wharton; James S. Meadows; Jim L. Chambers; Kenny Ribbeck; E. Barry Moser

    2006-01-01

    Thinning in oak-dominated stands may have many desirable consequences, including increases in tree growth and mast production. One of the potential disadvantages, however, is the proliferation of epicormic branches, which leads to reduction in lumber quality and value. We assessed the effects of thinning intensity and initial crown class on cherrybark oak (...

  6. Electroresistance Effect in Gold Thin Film Induced by Ionic-Liquid-Gated Electric Double Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nakayama, Hiroyasu; Ye, Jianting; Ohtani, Takashi; Fujikawa, Yasunori; Ando, Kazuya; Iwasa, Yoshihiro; Saitoh, Eiji

    Electroresistance effect was detected in a metallic thin film using ionic-liquid-gated electric-double-layer transistors (EDLTs). We observed reversible modulation of the electric resistance of a Au thin film. In this system, we found that an electric double layer works as a nanogap capacitor with

  7. The effect of ZnS thin film's electrical conductivity on electromagnetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of electrical conductivity on an electromagnetic wave propagating through ZnS thin film is analyzed using electromagnetic wave equation with relevant boundary condition. The solution of this equation enabled us to obtain a parameter known as the skin depth that relates to the conductivity of the thin film. This was ...

  8. The effect of transverse shear on the face sheets failure modes of sandwich beams loaded in three points bending

    OpenAIRE

    BOUROUIS FAIROUZ; MILI FAYCAL

    2012-01-01

    Sandwich beams loaded in three points bending may fail in several ways including tension or compression failure of facings. In this paper , The effect of the transverse shear on the face yielding and face wrinkling failure modes of sandwich beams loaded in three points bending have been studied, the beams were made of various composites materials carbon/epoxy, kevlar/epoxy, glass/epoxy at sequence [+θ/-θ]3s, [0°/90°]3s. . The stresses in the face were calculated using maximum stress criterion...

  9. Earthquake induced rock shear through a deposition hole when creep is considered - first model. Effect on the canister and the buffer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernelind, Jan [5T Engineering AB, Vaesteraas (Sweden)

    2006-08-15

    March, 2000, a study regarding 'Earthquake induced rock shear through a deposition hole' was performed. Existing fractures crossing a deposition hole may be activated and sheared by an earthquake. The effect of such a rock shear has been investigated in a project that includes both laboratory tests and finite element calculations. The buffer material in a deposition hole acts as a cushion between the canister and the rock, which reduces the effect of a rock shear substantially. Lower density of the buffer yields softer material and reduced effect on the canister. However, at the high density that is suggested for a repository the stiffness of the buffer is rather high. The stiffness is also a function of the rate of shear, which means that there may be a substantial damage on the canister at very high shear rates. The rock shear has been modeled with finite element calculations with the code ABAQUS. A three-dimensional finite element mesh of the buffer and the canister has been created and simulation of a rock shear has been performed. The rock shear has been assumed to take place perpendicular to the canister at the quarter point. The shear calculations have been driven to a total shear of 20 cm. This report summarizes the effect of considering creep in the canister for one of the previous cases. Two different creep models have been used - the first one has been suggested by K Pettersson and the second one has been suggested by R Sandstroem. Both have been implemented in the FE-code ABAQUS as a user supplied subroutine CREEP. This report summarizes results obtained by using the first model suggested by K Pettersson. As can be seen from the obtained results using the first creep model (in the following named creep{sub k}p) the effect of creep in copper doesn't affect stresses and strains in the buffer and the steel part very much. However, especially the stresses in the canister are highly affected.

  10. Effect of Vertically Propagating Shear Waves on Seismic Behavior of Circular Tunnels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tohid Akhlaghi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Seismic design loads for tunnels are characterized in terms of the deformations imposed on the structure by surrounding ground. The free-field ground deformations due to a seismic event are estimated, and the tunnel is designed to accommodate these deformations. Vertically propagating shear waves are the predominant form of earthquake loading that causes the ovaling deformations of circular tunnels to develop, resulting in a distortion of the cross sectional shape of the tunnel lining. In this paper, seismic behavior of circular tunnels has been investigated due to propagation of shear waves in the vertical direction using quasi-static analytical approaches as well as numerical methods. Analytical approaches are based on the closed-form solutions which compute the forces in the lining due to equivalent static ovaling deformations, while the numerical method carries out dynamic, nonlinear soil-structure interaction analysis. Based on comparisons made, the accuracy and reliability of the analytical solutions are evaluated and discussed. The results show that the axial forces determined using the analytical approaches are in acceptable agreement with numerical analysis results, while the computed bending moments are less comparable and show significant discrepancies. The differences between the analytical approaches are also investigated and addressed.

  11. Effect of Adhesive Type on the Shear Bond Strength of Metal Brackets to Two Ceramic Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sadegh Ahmad Akhoundi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Increased number of adult patients requesting orthodontic treatment result in bonding bracket to ceramic restorations more than before. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded to two types of ceramic bases with conventional orthodontic bonding resin and a new nano-filled composite resin.Twenty four feldespathic porcelain and 24 lithium disilicate ceramic disks were fabricated. All of the samples were conditioned by sandblasting, hydrofluoric acid and silane. Maxillary incisor metal brackets were bonded to half of the disks in each group by conventional orthodontic bonding resin and the other half bonded with a nano-filled composite. The samples then were thermocycled for 2000 cycle between 5-55° C. Shear bond strength was measured and the mode of failure was examined. Randomly selected samples were also evaluated by SEM.The lowest bond strength value was found infeldespathic ceramic bonded by nano-filled composite (p<0.05. There was not any statistically significant difference between other groups regarding bond strength. The mode of failure in the all groups except group 1 was cohesive and porcelain damages were detected.Since less damages to feldspathic porcelain was observed when the nano-filled composite was used to bond brackets, the use of nano-filled composite resins can be suggested for bonding brackets to feldspathic porcelain restorations.

  12. Effect of collisional elasticity on the Bagnold rheology of sheared frictionless two-dimensional disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vâgberg, Daniel; Olsson, Peter; Teitel, S.

    2017-01-01

    We carry out constant volume simulations of steady-state, shear-driven flow in a simple model of athermal, bidisperse, soft-core, frictionless disks in two dimensions, using a dissipation law that gives rise to Bagnoldian rheology. Focusing on the small strain rate limit, we map out the rheological behavior as a function of particle packing fraction ϕ and a parameter Q that measures the elasticity of binary particle collisions. We find a Q*(ϕ ) that marks the clear crossover from a region characteristic of strongly inelastic collisions, Q Q* , and give evidence that Q*(ϕ ) diverges as ϕ →ϕJ , the shear-driven jamming transition. We thus conclude that the jamming transition at any value of Q behaves the same as the strongly inelastic case, provided one is sufficiently close to ϕJ. We further characterize the differing nature of collisions in the strongly inelastic vs weakly inelastic regions, and recast our results into the constitutive equation form commonly used in discussions of hard granular matter.

  13. In-Vitro Evaluation of the Effect of Herbal Antioxidants on Shear Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Bleached Enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Khamverdi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: A reduction in bond strength of composite to bleached enamel has been reported immediately after bleaching treatment. Application of some antioxidant agents may decrease the adverse effects of whitening agents on bond strength and enhance composite bond to enamel. This study aimed to assess the effect of green tea, sodium ascorbate, sage and grape seed extract on bond strength of composite to bleached enamel.Materials and Methods: In this in-vitro study, 90 human enamel surfaces were randomly divided into six groups as follows (n=15: G1, no bleaching; G2, bleaching with 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP; G3, HP+1000 μmol epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG for 10 minutes; G4, HP+10% sodium ascorbate for 10 minutes; G5, HP+10% sage for 10 minutes and G6, HP+5% grape seed extract for 10 minutes. The specimens were bonded to composite in all groups. The shear bond strength of specimens was measured in Megapascals (MPa. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD test (α=0.05.Results: The highest and the lowest mean shear bond strength values were observed in group 1 (22.61±3.29MPa and group 2 (5.87±1.80MPa, respectively. The reduction in bond strength in group 2 was greater than that in other groups (P<0.001. No significant difference was found among groups 1, 3, 4, 5 and 6 (P>0.05. Conclusions: All the herbal antioxidants used in this study equally compensated for the reduced bond strength of composite to bleached enamel.Keywords: Antioxidants; Tooth Bleaching; Composite Resins; Shear Strength 

  14. The Effects of Realistic Geological Heterogeneity on Seismic Modeling: Applications in Shear Wave Generation and Near-Surface Tunnel Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Christopher Scott

    Naturally occurring geologic heterogeneity is an important, but often overlooked, aspect of seismic wave propagation. This dissertation presents a strategy for modeling the effects of heterogeneity using a combination of geostatistics and Finite Difference simulation. In the first chapter, I discuss my motivations for studying geologic heterogeneity and seis- mic wave propagation. Models based upon fractal statistics are powerful tools in geophysics for modeling heterogeneity. The important features of these fractal models are illustrated using borehole log data from an oil well and geomorphological observations from a site in Death Valley, California. A large part of the computational work presented in this disserta- tion was completed using the Finite Difference Code E3D. I discuss the Python-based user interface for E3D and the computational strategies for working with heterogeneous models developed over the course of this research. The second chapter explores a phenomenon observed for wave propagation in heteroge- neous media - the generation of unexpected shear wave phases in the near-source region. In spite of their popularity amongst seismic researchers, approximate methods for modeling wave propagation in these media, such as the Born and Rytov methods or Radiative Trans- fer Theory, are incapable of explaining these shear waves. This is primarily due to these method's assumptions regarding the coupling of near-source terms with the heterogeneities and mode conversion. To determine the source of these shear waves, I generate a suite of 3D synthetic heterogeneous fractal geologic models and use E3D to simulate the wave propaga- tion for a vertical point force on the surface of the models. I also present a methodology for calculating the effective source radiation patterns from the models. The numerical results show that, due to a combination of mode conversion and coupling with near-source hetero- geneity, shear wave energy on the order of 10% of the

  15. Evaluation of space environmental effects on metals and optical thin films on EOIM-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughn, J.A.; Linton, R.C.; Finckenor, M.M.; Kamenetzky, R.R.

    1995-02-01

    Metals and optical thin films exposed to the space environment on the Third Flight of the Evaluation of Oxygen Interactions with Materials (EOIM-3) payload, onboard Space Shuttle mission STS-46 were evaluated. The materials effects described in this paper include the effects of space exposure on various pure metals, optical thin films, and optical thin film metals. The changes induced by exposure to the space environment in the material properties were evaluated using bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF), specular reflectance (250 nm to 2500 nm), ESCA, VUV reflectance (120 nm to 200 nm), ellipsometry, FTIR and optical properties. Using these analysis techniques gold optically thin film metal mirrors with nickel undercoats were observed to darken due to nickel diffusion through the gold to the surface. Also, thin film nickel mirrors formed nickel oxide due to exposure to both the atmosphere and space.

  16. Evaluation of space environmental effects on metals and optical thin films on EOIM-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Jason A.; Linton, Roger C.; Finckenor, Miria M.; Kamenetzky, Rachel R.

    1995-01-01

    Metals and optical thin films exposed to the space environment on the Third Flight of the Evaluation of Oxygen Interactions with Materials (EOIM-3) payload, onboard Space Shuttle mission STS-46 were evaluated. The materials effects described in this paper include the effects of space exposure on various pure metals, optical thin films, and optical thin film metals. The changes induced by exposure to the space environment in the material properties were evaluated using bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF), specular reflectance (250 nm to 2500 nm), ESCA, VUV reflectance (120 nm to 200 nm), ellipsometry, FTIR and optical properties. Using these analysis techniques gold optically thin film metal mirrors with nickel undercoats were observed to darken due to nickel diffusion through the gold to the surface. Also, thin film nickel mirrors formed nickel oxide due to exposure to both the atmosphere and space.

  17. Quantum effects on propagation of bulk and surface waves in a thin quantum plasma film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moradi, Afshin

    2015-01-01

    The propagation of bulk and surface plasma waves in a thin quantum plasma film is investigated, taking into account the quantum effects. The generalized bulk and surface plasma dispersion relation due to quantum effects is derived, using the quantum hydrodynamic dielectric function and applying appropriate additional boundary conditions. The quantum mechanical and film geometric effects on the bulk and surface modes are discussed. It is found that quantum effects become important for a thin film of small thickness. - Highlights: • New bulk and surface plasma dispersion relations due to quantum effects are derived, in a thin quantum plasma film. • It is found that quantum effects become important for a thin quantum film of small thickness

  18. The Effect of Fracture Filler Composition on the Parameters of Shear Deformation Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, D.; Ostapchuk, A.; Batuhtin, I.

    2015-12-01

    Geomechanical models of different slip mode nucleation and transformation can be developed basing on laboratory experiments, in which regularities of shear deformation of gouge-filled faults are studied. It's known that the spectrum of possible slip modes is defined by both macroscopic deformation characteristics of the fault and mesoscale structure of fault filler. Small variations of structural parameters of the filler may lead to a radical change of slip mode [1, 2]. This study presents results of laboratory experiments investigating regularities of shear deformation of discontinuities filled with multicomponent granular material. Qualitative correspondence between experimental results and natural phenomena is detected. The experiments were carried out in the classical "slider model" statement. A granite block slides under shear load on a granite substrate. The contact gap between rough surfaces was filled with a discrete material, which simulated the principal slip zone of a fault. The filler components were quartz sand, salt, glass beads, granite crumb, corundum, clay and pyrophyllite. An entire spectrum of possible slip modes was obtained - from stable slip to slow-slip events and to regular stick-slip with various coseismic displacements realized per one act of instability. Mixing several components in different proportions, it became possible to trace the gradual transition from stable slip to regular stick-slip, from slow-slip events to fast-slip events. Depending on specific filler component content, increasing the portion of one of the components may lead to both a linear and a non-linear change of slip event moment (a laboratory equivalent of the seismic moment). For different filler compositions durations of equal-moment events may differ by more than two orders of magnitude. The findings can be very useful for developing geomechnical models of nucleation and transformation of different slip modes observed at natural faults. The work was supported by

  19. Effects of Ti addition on LFZ Bi-2212 thin rods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angurel, L. A.

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to reproduce previous results in Bi-2212 single crystals, the effects associated with the addition of Ti to the precursors of Laser Floating Zone textured Bi-2212 thin rods have been analyzed. It has been found that Ti induces a great number of nucleation centers in the molten zone and, in consequence, it reduces the grain size one order of magnitude. In addition, using the same growth conditions, the texture of the sample is strongly degraded. These microstructural changes strongly affect the superconducting properties showing that Ti addition destroys the network of low angle grain boundaries that are responsible for the high critical currents in these materials.

    Se ha analizado el efecto de la introducción de Ti en precursores de Bi-2212 para ser texturados mediante láser a través del método de zona flotante, todo ello debido a los resultados esperanzadores obtenidos en monocristales. Se ha encontrado que el Ti introduce un gran número de centros de nucleación en la zona fundida, por lo que se reducen las dimensiones de los granos en un orden de magnitud aproximadamente. Por otra parte, y utilizando las mismas condiciones de crecimiento, se observa que la textura de la muestra se degrada severamente, Estos cambios microestructurales afectan en gran medida a las propiedades superconductoras, demostrándose que la introducción de Ti destruye la red de fronteras de grano de bajo ángulo, que son las responsables en estos materiales de las altas corrientes criticas.

  20. The effect of creep ratchetting on thin shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hibbeler, R.C.; Wang, P.Y.

    1975-01-01

    The behavior of thin shells, in particular, cylindrical and spherical shells, which are subjected to a long-time cyclic thermal gradient is discussed. Like many reactor components (shells) which are subjected to start-up and shut-down conditions, provided the temperature is high enough, the shell will exhibit a progressive growth with each cycle of temperature. This phenomena is often referred to as ratchetting and is caused by inelastic strains developed by creep. Although the thermal stress distribution is biaxial it is possible to represent the material behavior using a simple uniaxial-stress model. Assuming thermal stress interaction occurs, the equations which determine the solution of the strain growth and stress per cycle are presented. The flexibility of the analysis provides a means for including the effects of an arbitrary temperature-cycle time and temperature dependence of material properties. A step temperature variation is considered. During each part of the temperature cycle it is necessary to satisfy the equilibrium and compatibility conditions for the model. At any instant, the total strain will depend upon elastic, thermal, and creep strain components in addition to prior inelastic creep strains accumulated during previous temperature cycles. Accounting for all these conditions, the relations describing the behavior of the material can be determined during an arbitrary jth cycle of temperature. In particular, the cases of material properties are considered which are used for reactor components. Where possible, a closed form solution is given for appropriate values of the creep law exponents n and m. For the general case, an algorithm for the computer-solution to the problem is given. Using the general solution, the analysis appears to offer a suitable compromise between accurate behavior description and analytical complexity

  1. Effect of mode of polymerization of bonding agent on shear bond strength of autocured resin composite luting cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Cecilia C S; McComb, Dorothy; Anderson, James D; Tam, Laura E

    2003-04-01

    There have been anecdotal reports of low bond strength with autocured resin composite materials, particularly when light-cured bonding agents that combine primer and adhesive in a 1-bottle preparation are used. The objective of this study was to determine if the mode of polymerization of the bonding agent influences the strength of the attachment of autocured resin composite luting cements to dentin. The shear bond strength of 2 resin luting cements, Calibra and RelyX ARC, polymerized by autocuring, in combination with 4 different bonding agents, Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus, Prime & Bond NT, IntegraBond and Single Bond, polymerized to bovine dentin by light-curing, autocuring or dual-curing, was determined. The pH of each bonding agent and its components was measured. Two-way analysis of variance was used to test the effect of cement and adhesive on shear bond strength. For each bonding agent, the adhesive variable combined the factors product brand and mode of polymerization. With significant interaction among the above variables, the least square means of the 16 combinations of resin cement and adhesive were compared. There was no consistent relationship between shear bond strength and mode of polymerization of the bonding agent. Significant differences in bond strength were specific to the proprietary brand of bonding agent. The pH of the bonding agent depends on the manufacturer's formulation, and low pH may contribute to low bond strength. The low in vitro bond strength occurring with some combinations of bonding agent and resin cement could be clinically significant.

  2. Effects of different aging statuses and strain rate on the adiabatic shear susceptibility of 2195 aluminum–lithium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Y.; Tan, G.Y.; Chen, P.X.; Zhang, Q.M.

    2012-01-01

    The adiabatic shear susceptibility of 2195 aluminum–lithium alloy was investigated by means of split Hopkinson pressure bar. The stress collapse in true stress–true strain curves and true stress–time curves was observed. The adiabatic shear susceptibility of different aging statuses and strain rate were discussed by means of metallography observation. The critical strain, stress collapse time and formation energy of adiabatic shear bands were compared. The results show that different aging statuses and strain rate have significant influences on adiabatic shear behaviors of 2195 aluminum–lithium alloy. The peak-aged specimen has the highest adiabatic shearing susceptibility, while the under-aged specimen has the least adiabatic shear susceptibility. The susceptibility of adiabatic shearing increases with the increases of strain rate.

  3. Effects of different aging statuses and strain rate on the adiabatic shear susceptibility of 2195 aluminum-lithium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Y. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083, Hunan (China); State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Tan, G.Y., E-mail: yangyanggroup@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083, Hunan (China); Chen, P.X. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083, Hunan (China); Zhang, Q.M. [State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2012-06-01

    The adiabatic shear susceptibility of 2195 aluminum-lithium alloy was investigated by means of split Hopkinson pressure bar. The stress collapse in true stress-true strain curves and true stress-time curves was observed. The adiabatic shear susceptibility of different aging statuses and strain rate were discussed by means of metallography observation. The critical strain, stress collapse time and formation energy of adiabatic shear bands were compared. The results show that different aging statuses and strain rate have significant influences on adiabatic shear behaviors of 2195 aluminum-lithium alloy. The peak-aged specimen has the highest adiabatic shearing susceptibility, while the under-aged specimen has the least adiabatic shear susceptibility. The susceptibility of adiabatic shearing increases with the increases of strain rate.

  4. Determination of PVB interlayer’s shear modulus and its effect on normal stress distribution in laminated glass panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hána, T.; Eliášová, M.; Machalická, K.; Vokáč, M.

    2017-10-01

    Noticing the current architecture, there are many examples of glass bearing members such as beams, panes, ribs stairs or even columns. Most of these elements are made of laminated glass from panes bonded by polymer interlayer so the task of transferring shear forces between the glass panes needs to be investigated due to the lack of knowledge. This transfer depends on stiffness of polymer material, which is affected by temperature and load duration. It is essential to catch the safe side with limit cases when designing these members if the exact material behaviour is not specified. There are lots of interlayers for structural laminated glass applications available on a market. Most of them exhibit different properties, which need to be experimentally verified. This paper is focused on tangent shear modulus of PVB (polyvinyl-buthyral) interlayer and its effect on the stress distribution in glass panes when loaded. This distribution may be determined experimentally or numerically, respectively. This enables to design structural laminated glass members more effectively regarding price and safety. Furthermore, this is the way, how to extend the use of laminated glass in architectural design.

  5. Effects of a sheared toroidal rotation on the stability boundary of the MHD modes in the tokamak edge pedestal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aiba, N.; Tokuda, S.; Oyama, N.; Ozeki, T.; Furukawa, M.

    2009-01-01

    Effects of a sheared toroidal rotation are investigated numerically on the stability of the MHD modes in the tokamak edge pedestal, which relate to the type-I edge-localized mode. A linear MHD stability code MINERVA is newly developed for solving the Frieman-Rotenberg equation that is the linear ideal MHD equation with flow. Numerical stability analyses with this code reveal that the sheared toroidal rotation destabilizes edge localized MHD modes for rotation frequencies which are experimentally achievable, though the ballooning mode stability changes little by rotation. This rotation effect on the edge MHD stability becomes stronger as the toroidal mode number of the unstable MHD mode increases when the stability analysis was performed for MHD modes with toroidal mode numbers smaller than 40. The toroidal mode number of the unstable MHD mode depends on the stabilization of the current-driven mode and the ballooning mode by increasing the safety factor. This dependence of the toroidal mode number of the unstable mode on the safety factor is considered to be the reason that the destabilization by toroidal rotation is stronger for smaller edge safety factors.

  6. The effect of plasma beta on high-n ballooning stability at low magnetic shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, J. W.; Ham, C. J.; Hastie, R. J.

    2016-08-01

    An explanation of the observed improvement in H-mode pedestal characteristics with increasing core plasma pressure or poloidal beta, {β\\text{pol}} , as observed in MAST and JET, is sought in terms of the impact of the Shafranov shift, {{Δ }\\prime} , on ideal ballooning MHD stability. To illustrate this succinctly, a self-consistent treatment of the low magnetic shear region of the ‘s-α ’ stability diagram is presented using the large aspect ratio Shafranov equilibrium, but enhancing both α and {{Δ }\\prime} so that they compete with each other. The method of averaging, valid at low s, is used to simplify the calculation and demonstrates how α , {{Δ }\\prime} , plasma shaping and ‘average favourable curvature’ all contribute to stability.

  7. [Effects of different resin removal methods on shear bond strength of rebonded orthodontic brackets].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hai-miao; Zhao, Bin-jiao; Chen, Dong

    2015-06-01

    To compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of rebonded orthodontic metal brackets with different resin removal methods. Forty extracted premolars were chosen as samples and divided into 4 experimental groups. The teeth were bonded with brackets. The brackets from 3 groups were debonded while adhesive remnants were removed from bracket bases by methods of grinding, sandblasting, and direct flaming, respectively and then rebonded. The SBS values of all rebonded brackets were determined after pH cycling experiment for 30 days. Some rebonded bracket bases were selected and observed under scanning electron microscope (SEM). The data was analyzed by one-way ANOVA test using SPSS 13.0 software package. Statistical analysis revealed a significant difference of SBS values among the 4 experimental groups (Pbrackets after resin removal by grinding and sandblasting have a similar SBS compared to the initial brackets adhesive.

  8. Effectiveness of Ultrasound Shear for Clipless Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy Versus Conventional Unipolar Electrocautery in Patients with Cholelithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanawan, Ejaz; Qureshi, Ahmad Uzair; Qureshi, Sidra Shoaib; Cheema, Khalid M; Cheema, Muhammad Arshad

    2017-10-01

    To determine the efficacy of ultrasound shear in laparoscopic cholecystectomy in terms of total operative time, postoperative bile leaks, gall bladder perforation rate, and postoperative bleeding from cystic artery and collateral injury to bowel and duodenum. Comparative study. Mayo Hospital, Lahore, from June 2013 to May 2014. 150 cases (75 in each group) were randomized into two groups, i.e. harmonic scalpel clipless group (HSG) versus conventional laparoscopic cholecystectomy (CLC) with electrocautery group. The above stated variables were documented. The data for age, blood loss, and drain output were positively skewed as calculated using the Shapiro-Wilk test. The histograms, Q-Q plots and box plots were analyzed for all the dependent variables. Skewed qualitative continuous data was analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U-Test. Operative time was significantly lower in HSG as compared to CLC. Median operative times were 30 minutes (IQR 10) versus 35 minutes (IQR 10) (pelectrocautery.

  9. Study on shear properties of coral sand under cyclic simple shear condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Wendong; Zhang, Yuting; Jin, Yafei

    2018-05-01

    In recent years, the ocean development in our country urgently needs to be accelerated. The construction of artificial coral reefs has become an important development direction. In this paper, experimental studies of simple shear and cyclic simple shear of coral sand are carried out, and the shear properties and particle breakage of coral sand are analyzed. The results show that the coral sand samples show an overall shear failure in the simple shear test, which is more accurate and effective for studying the particle breakage. The shear displacement corresponding to the peak shear stress of the simple shear test is significantly larger than that corresponding to the peak shear stress of the direct shear test. The degree of particle breakage caused by the simple shear test is significantly related to the normal stress level. The particle breakage of coral sand after the cyclic simple shear test obviously increases compared with that of the simple shear test, and universal particle breakage occurs within the whole particle size range. The increasing of the cycle-index under cyclic simple shear test results in continuous compacting of the sample, so that the envelope curve of peak shearing force increases with the accumulated shear displacement.

  10. The Effects of Shear Strain, Fabric, and Porosity Evolution on Elastic and Mechanical Properties of Clay-Rich Fault Gouge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenigsberg, A.; Saffer, D. M.; Riviere, J.; Marone, C.

    2017-12-01

    Ultrasonic/seismic waves are widely used for probing fault zone elastic and mechanical properties (gouge composition, frictional strength, density) and elastic properties (Vp, Vs, bulk and shear moduli), as it can provide insight into key processes and fault properties during shearing. These include fabric and force chain formation, porosity evolution, and fault zone stiffness, which are in turn factors in fault slip, damage, and healing. We report on a suite of direct shear experiments on synthetic fault gouge composed of 50% smectite /50% quartz at a normal stress of 25 MPa, in which we use ultrasonic wave transmission to continuously monitor compressional and shear wave velocities (Vp, Vs) up to shear strains of 25, while simultaneously measuring friction and monitoring the evolution of density and porosity. We find that wavespeeds vary with shear strain, due to fabric development and the evolution of density and porosity. The coefficient of friction peaks at μ .47 at a shear strain of .5 - 1, decreases to a steady state value of μ .43 by shear strains of 4.5- 6 and then remains rather constant to shear strains of 6 - 25, consistent with previous work. Density increases rapidly from 1.78 g/cm3 to 1.83 g/cm3 at shear strains from 0-2 (porosity decreases from 33% to 25% over that range), and then more gradually increases to a density of 2.08 g/cm3 (porosity of 21%) at a shear strain of 25. Vp increases from 2400 m/s to 2900 m/s during the onset of shear until a shear strain of 3, and then decreases to 2400-2500 by shear strain of 7-9. At shear strains above 9, Vp slowly increases as the layer becomes denser and less porous. We interpret the co-evolving changes in friction, porosity, and elastic moduli/wavespeed to reflect fabric development and alignment of clay particles as a function of shearing. More specifically, the decrease in Vp at a shear strain of 3 reflects the clay particles gradually aligning. Once the particles are aligned, the gradual increase of

  11. Computer Simulation Study of Collective Phenomena in Dense Suspensions of Red Blood Cells under Shear

    CERN Document Server

    Krüger, Timm

    2012-01-01

    The rheology of dense red blood cell suspensions is investigated via computer simulations based on the lattice Boltzmann, the immersed boundary, and the finite element methods. The red blood cells are treated as extended and deformable particles immersed in the ambient fluid. In the first part of the work, the numerical model and strategies for stress evaluation are discussed. In the second part, the behavior of the suspensions in simple shear flow is studied for different volume fractions, particle deformabilities, and shear rates. Shear thinning behavior is recovered. The existence of a shear-induced transition from a tumbling to a tank-treading motion is demonstrated. The transition can be parameterized by a single quantity, namely the effective capillary number. It is the ratio of the suspension stress and the characteristic particle membrane stress. At the transition point, a strong increase in the orientational order of the red blood cells and a significant decrease of the particle diffusivity are obser...

  12. Early effect of two successive thinnings in western hemlock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George R. Staebler

    1957-01-01

    The Hemlock Experimental Forest near Grays Harbor in western Washington was established in 1949 in cooperation with the St. Regis Paper Company. A major effort in this cooperative research program is a study of commercial thinning in a stand of nearly pure, well stocked, even-aged western hemlock that originated in 1903, after logging.

  13. Bauschinger effect in thin metal films on compliant substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoefnagels, J.P.M.; Vlassak, J.J.; Gdoutos, E.E.

    2007-01-01

    Flexible electronic devices such as flexible displays and solar cells draw more and more attention from the industry. In these devices, the functionality is delivered by small-scale structures consisting of thin metal lines and other materials that are integrated on a compliant (e.g. polymer)

  14. Thin Layer Drying Kinetics of Pineapple: Effect of Blanching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four thin-layer drying models were fitted to the experimental drying data. The .... MATLAB software package (version 6.5). The correlation ... to evaluate the goodness of fit of the simulation ... during the oven-drying process of pineapple slices.

  15. Interaction between depolarization effects, interface layer, and fatigue behavior in PZT thin film capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttger, U.; Waser, R.

    2017-07-01

    The existence of non-ferroelectric regions in ferroelectric thin films evokes depolarization effects leading to a tilt of the P(E) hysteresis loop. The analysis of measured hysteresis of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin films is used to determine a depolarization factor which contains quantitative information about interfacial layers as well as ferroelectrically passive zones in the bulk. The derived interfacial capacitance is smaller than that estimated from conventional extrapolation techniques. In addition, the concept of depolarization is used for the investigation of fatigue behavior of PZT thin films indicating that the mechanism of seed inhibition, which is responsible for the effect, occurs in the entire film.

  16. Materials science in microelectronics II the effects of structure on properties in thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Machlin, Eugene

    2005-01-01

    The subject matter of thin-films - which play a key role in microelectronics - divides naturally into two headings: the processing / structure relationship, and the structure / properties relationship. Part II of 'Materials Science in Microelectronics' focuses on the latter of these relationships, examining the effect of structure on the following: Electrical properties Magnetic properties Optical properties Mechanical properties Mass transport properties Interface and junction properties Defects and properties Captures the importance of thin films to microelectronic development Examines the cause / effect relationship of structure on thin film properties.

  17. A Piezoelectric Shear Stress Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taeyang; Saini, Aditya; Kim, Jinwook; Gopalarathnam, Ashok; Zhu, Yong; Palmieri, Frank L.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a piezoelectric sensor with a floating element was developed for shear stress measurement. The piezoelectric sensor was designed to detect the pure shear stress suppressing effects of normal stress generated from the vortex lift-up by applying opposite poling vectors to the: piezoelectric elements. The sensor was first calibrated in the lab by applying shear forces and it showed high sensitivity to shear stress (=91.3 +/- 2.1 pC/Pa) due to the high piezoelectric coefficients of PMN-33%PT (d31=-1330 pC/N). The sensor also showed almost no sensitivity to normal stress (less than 1.2 pC/Pa) because of the electromechanical symmetry of the device. The usable frequency range of the sensor is 0-800 Hz. Keywords: Piezoelectric sensor, shear stress, floating element, electromechanical symmetry

  18. Water and saliva contamination effect on shear bond strength of brackets bonded with a moisture-tolerant light cure system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Ascensión; Mena, Ana; Ortiz, Antonio José; Bravo, Luis Alberto

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of water and saliva contamination on shear bond strength of brackets bonded with a moisture-tolerant light cure system. Brackets were bonded to 240 bovine lower incisors divided into 12 groups. Four bonding procedures were evaluated, including (1) TSEP/Transbond XT, (2) TMIP/ Transbond XT, (3) TSEP/Transbond PLUS, and (4) TMIP/Transbond PLUS, each under three different bonding conditions: without contamination, with water contamination, and with saliva contamination. Shear bond strength was measured with a universal testing machine. The adhesive remnant on the teeth was quantified with the use of image analyzing equipment. Without contamination, bond strengths for the four procedures were similar (P > .05). TSEP/Tranbond PLUS and TMIP/Transbond PLUS left significantly less adhesive on the teeth after debonding than TSEP/Transbond XT and TMIP/Transbond XT (P .017), although for TMIP/ Transbond XT, both variables showed significant reductions after contamination (P < .017). TSEP/Transbond PLUS, TMIP/Transbond PLUS, and TSEP/Transbond XT showed greater tolerance to wet conditions than was shown by TMIP/Transbond XT.

  19. Study of the Arrangement Effect of Units on the Shear Strength Masonry Walls in Meso-Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sepehrinia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Masonry is one of the oldest building materials which have been used in most heritage structures and new construction. In this study by using a meso-scale finite element model, the behavior of masonry walls is investigated under monotonic loading by Abaqus software. The most important factor in determining the behavior of masonry structures is discontinuity joints which are interface between unit and mortar. In most previous studies cohesive element is used for modeling of interface element. But in this study, by ignoring cohesive elements that represents the interface element between unit and mortar in masonry structures, it can be seen that while reducing the computational requirements, the results are in good agreement with experimental studies. Another important factor in the behavior of masonry walls is the arrangement of masonry units. In this study the overlapping effect of rows of units on the shear strength and failure mode of masonry walls have been investigated. As a result, it was observed that by increasing overlap, shear resistance of masonry walls increased.

  20. Experimental and numerical investigations of higher mode effects on seismic inelastic response of reinforced concrete shear walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbanirenani, Iman

    This thesis presents two experimental programs together with companion numerical studies that were carried out on reinforced concrete shear walls: static tests and dynamic (shake table) tests. The first series of experiments were monotonic and cyclic quasi-static testing on ductile reinforced concrete shear wall specimens designed and detailed according to the seismic provisions of NBCC 2005 and CSA-A23.3-04 standard. The tests were carried out on full-scale and 1:2.37 reduced scale wall specimens to evaluate the seismic design provisions and similitude law and determine the appropriate scaling factor that could be applied for further studies such as dynamic tests. The second series of experiments were shake table tests conducted on two identical 1:2.33 scaled, 8-storey moderately ductile reinforced concrete shear wall specimens to investigate the effects of higher modes on the inelastic response of slender walls under high frequency ground motions expected in Eastern North America. The walls were designed and detailed according to the seismic provisions of NBCC 2005 and CSA-A23.3-04 standard. The objectives were to validate and understand the inelastic response and interaction of shear, flexure and axial loads in plastic hinge zones of the walls considering the higher mode effects and to investigate the formation of second hinge in upper part of the wall due to higher mode responses. Second mode response significantly affected the response of the walls. This caused inelastic flexural response to develop at the 6th level with approximately the same rotation ductility compared to that observed at the base. Dynamic amplification of the base shear forces was also observed in both walls. Numerical modeling of these two shake table tests was performed to evaluate the test results and validate current modeling approaches. Nonlinear time history analyses were carried out by the reinforced concrete fibre element (OpenSees program) and finite element (VecTor2 program

  1. Effects of physical properties of powder particles on binder liquid requirement and agglomerate growth mechanisms in a high shear mixer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, A; Schaefer, T

    2001-09-01

    A study was performed in order to elucidate the effects of the physical properties of small powder particles on binder liquid requirement and agglomerate growth mechanisms. Three grades of calcium carbonate having different particle size distribution, surface area, and particle shape but approximately the same median particle size (4-5 microm), were melt agglomerated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3000 or 20,000 in an 8-l high shear mixer at three impeller speeds. The binder liquid requirement was found to be very dependent on the packing properties of the powder, a denser packing resulting in a lower binder liquid requirement. The densification of the agglomerates in the high shear mixer could be approximately predicted by compressing a powder sample in a compaction simulator. With the PEG having the highest viscosity (PEG 20,000), the agglomerate formation and growth occurred primarily by the immersion mechanism, whereas PEG 3000 gave rise to agglomerate growth by coalescence. Powder particles with a rounded shape and a narrow size distribution resulted in breakage of agglomerates with PEG 3000, whereas no breakage was seen with PEG 20,000. Powder particles having an irregular shape and surface structure could be agglomerated with PEG 20,000, whereas agglomerate growth became uncontrollable with PEG 3000. When PEG 20,000 was added as a powder instead of flakes, the resultant agglomerates became rounder and the size distribution narrower.

  2. In vitro Effects of a Neutral Fluoride Agent on Shear Bond Strength and Microleakage of Orthodontic Brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Ahrari

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of pretreatment with a neutral fluoride agent on shear bond strength (SBS and microleakage of orthodontic brackets, and to investigate any significant relationship between SBS and microleakage. Methods: Forty intact premolars were selected and randomly divided into 2 groups. Group 1 served as the control, while group 2 underwent treatment with a 2% sodium fluoride (NaF gel, which was applied on the enamel surface for 4 minutes before etching. After bonding orthodontic brackets, the teeth were immersed for 12 hours in methylen blue dye, followed by mounting in acrylic resin. Shear bond strength was determined using an Instron Universal Testing Machine and the amount of microleakage and the adhesive remnant index (ARI were assessed under a stereomicroscope. Results: The mean SBS and microleakage beneath metal brackets were not significantly different among the control and NaF-treated groups (P>0.05. Furthermore, no significant correlation was found between SBS and microleakage (r=-0.04, P=0.796. The ARI scores revealed that in both groups, most of the adhesive remained on the enamel surface after debonding. Conclusions: It may be concluded that pretreatment of enamel with 2% NaF prior to the bonding procedure does not significantly affect microleakage and SBS of orthodontic brackets and thus, it can be recommended as a suitable approach to reduce the incidence of white spot lesions in orthodontically treated patients, especially those at high risk of caries formation.  

  3. Effect of different provisional cement remnant cleaning procedures including Er:YAG laser on shear bond strength of ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zortuk, Mustafa; Gumus, Hasan Onder; Kilinc, Halil Ibrahim; Tuncdemir, Ali Riza

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of provisional cement removal by different dentin cleaning protocols (dental explorer, pumice, cleaning bur, Er:YAG laser) on the shear bond strength between ceramic and dentin. In total, 36 caries-free unrestored human third molars were selected as tooth specimens. Provisional restorations were fabricated and cemented with eugenol-free provisional cement. Then, disc-shaped ceramic specimens were fabricated and randomly assigned to four groups of dentin cleaning protocols (n = 9). Group 1 (control): Provisional cements were mechanically removed with a dental explorer. Group 2: The dentin surfaces were treated with a cleaning brush with pumice Group 3: The dentin surfaces were treated with a cleaning bur. Group 4: The provisional cements were removed by an Er:YAG laser. Self-adhesive luting cement was used to bond ceramic discs to dentin surfaces. Shear bond strength (SBS) was measured using a universal testing machine at a 0.05 mm/min crosshead speed. The data were analyzed using a Kolmogorov Smirnov, One-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests to perform multiple comparisons (α=0.05). THE DENTIN CLEANING METHODS DID NOT SIGNIFICANTLY AFFECT THE SBS OF CERAMIC DISCS TO DENTIN AS FOLLOWS: dental explorer, pumice, cleaning bur, and Er:YAG laser. The use of different cleaning protocols did not affect the SBS between dentin and ceramic surfaces.

  4. When thinking is beneficial and when it is not : The effects of thin and round advertising models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Häfner, M.; Trampe, D.

    2009-01-01

    This study addresses the advertising effectiveness of round and thin models. Integrating previous findings and theories, the authors predict and find that impulsive and reflective product evaluations as responses to thin and round advertisement models diverge. Specifically, four experiments indicate

  5. An underwater shear compactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biver, E.; Sims, J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper, originally presented at the WM'96 Conference in Tucson Arizona, describes a concept of a specialised decommissioning tool designed to operate underwater and to reduce the volume of radioactive components by shearing and compacting. The shear compactor was originally conceived to manage the size reduction of a variety of decommissioned stainless steel tubes stored within a reactor fuel cooling pond and which were consuming a substantial volume of the pond. The main objective of this tool was to cut the long tubes into shorter lengths and to compact them into a flat rectangular form which could be stacked on the pond floor, thus saving valuable space. The development programme, undertaken on this project, investigated a wide range of factors which could contribute to an extended cutting blade performance, ie: materials of construction, cutting blade shape and cutting loads required, shock effects, etc. The second phase was to review other aspects of the design, such as radiological protection, cutting blade replacement, maintenance, pond installation and resultant wall loads, water hydraulics, collection of products of shearing/compacting operations, corrosion of the equipment, control system, operational safety and the ability of the equipment to operate in dry environments. The paper summarises the extended work programme involved with this shear compactor tool. (author)

  6. The Effect of Mechanical Anisotropy and Heterogeneity of Shear Strength Parameters of Soils on Drained Bearing Capacity of Shallow Foundations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Jamshidi Chenari

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Natural formation of soil deposits causes heterogeneity and anisotropy in their strength and stiffness properties. However, most soils in their natural states exhibit some anisotropy with respect to shear strength and heterogeneity with respect to the depth. In this paper, the standard Mohr- Coulomb constitutive law is generalized to anisotropic version in order to consider the effect of cohesion anisotropy of soil. Random field theory coupled with finite difference method was utilized in Monte Carlo simulations with considering the effect of auto-correlation and cross correlation between strength parameters of soil, in order to calculate the bearing capacity of shallow foundation in a strain controlled scheme. The results showed that the bearing capacity of shallow foundation decreases with increasing in variability of strength parameters and increases with increasing in anisotropy ratio.

  7. Efeito da temperatura e taxa de cisalhamento nas propriedades de escoamento da polpa de Cupuaçu (T. grandiflorum Schum integral Effect of temperature and shear rate in the properties of whole flow Cupuassu pulp (Theobroma grandiflorum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilvanete Maria Ferreira

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available O comportamento reológico da polpa de cupuaçu integral foi determinado na faixa de temperatura de 10 a 60ºC. Os efeitos da temperatura e da taxa de deformação foram avaliados por meio de testes em cisalhamento estacionário. As análises reológicas foram conduzidas num reômetro Thermo Haake RheoStress 1. Os reogramas foram descritos pelos modelos reológicos de Ostwald-de-Waelle e o de Herschel-Bulkley. As curvas de escoamento mais bem ajustadas pelo modelo de Ostwald-de-Waelle. O produto apresentou comportamento pseudoplástico, e o índice de comportamento de fluxo (n decresceu com o aumento da temperatura. O efeito da temperatura sobre a viscosidade aparente foi descrita por uma equação tipo Arrhenius e discutida em termos de energia de ativação. Essa energia aumentou com o aumento da taxa de deformação, sendo obtidos valores na faixa de 1 a 2 kcal/gmol.The rheological behavior of the entire cupuassu pulp was determined in the temperature range 10 - 60ºC. The effects of temperature and deformation rate were evaluated by means of shear flow tests. Rheometry analyses were conducted with a Thermo Haake RheoStress 1 system. Rheograms were described by models by Ostwald-of-Waelle and Herschel-Bulkley. The Ostwald-of-Waelle model successfully represented pulp flow behavior. The product presented shear-thinning behavior and the flow behavior index (n decreased with the increase of temperature. The effect of temperature on the apparent viscosity in cupuassu pulp was described by an Arrhenius equation and discussed in terms of activation energy. The increase in shear rate caused an energy increase, and values were obtained in the range of a line from 1 to 2 kcal/gmol.

  8. Effects of Gamma Irradiation on Polyvinylidene Fluoride Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madivalappa, Shivaraj; Jali, V. M.

    2018-02-01

    Polyvinylidene fluoride thin films were synthesized by Sol-Gel method with spin rate of 3000 rpm for 30 sec on ITO glass substrates and were annealed at 170 C. The films were irradiated by Gamma radiation with different doses (10, 30, 40 and 50 kGy). XRD and FTIR spectra have been obtained to identify the presence of α / β phases. Mean crystallite size was calculated by Scherer’s equation. Different vibrational bands were identified and percentage of β phase was determined by FTIR analysis. Optical properties like band gap, refractive index, optical activation energy have been determined. Surface morphology and compositions of pristine and gamma irradiated PVDF thin films were confirmed respectively, by SEM and Energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The comparison of the structural and optical optical properties of pristine PVDF polymer film has been made with those of the Gamma irradiated films.

  9. The effect of various primers on shear bond strength of zirconia ceramic and resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanohkan, Sasiwimol; Kukiattrakoon, Boonlert; Larpboonphol, Narongrit; Sae-Yib, Taewalit; Jampa, Thibet; Manoppan, Satawat

    2013-11-01

    To determine the in vitro shear bond strengths (SBS) of zirconia ceramic to resin composite after various primer treatments. Forty zirconia ceramic (Zeno, Wieland Dental) specimens (10 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick) were prepared, sandblasted with 50 μm alumina, and divided into four groups (n = 10). Three experimental groups were surface treated with three primers; CP (RelyX Ceramic Primer, 3M ESPE), AP (Alloy Primer, Kuraray Medical), and MP (Monobond Plus, Ivoclar Vivadent AG). One group was not treated and served as the control. All specimens were bonded to a resin composite (Filtek Supreme XT, 3M ESPE) cylinder with an adhesive system (Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus Adhesive, 3M ESPE) and then stored in 100% humidity at 37°C for 24 h before SBS testing in a universal testing machine. Mean SBS (MPa) were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey's Honestly Significant Difference (HSD) test (α = 0.05). Group AP yielded the highest mean and standard deviation (SD) value of SBS (16.8 ± 2.5 MPa) and Group C presented the lowest mean and SD value (15.4 ± 1.6 MPa). The SBS did not differ significantly among the groups (P = 0.079). Within the limitations of this study, the SBS values between zirconia ceramic to resin composite using various primers and untreated surface were not significantly different.

  10. Effect of various bleaching treatments on shear bond strength of different universal adhesives and application modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the bond strength of 2 universal adhesives used in different application modes to bleached enamel. Materials and Methods Extracted 160 sound human incisors were used for the study. Teeth were divided into 4 treatment groups: No treatment, 35% hydrogen peroxide, 16% carbamid peroxide, 7.5% carbamid peroxide. After bleaching treatments, groups were divided into subgroups according to the adhesive systems used and application modes (n = 10): 1) Single Bond Universal, etch and rinse mode; 2) Single Bond Universal, self-etch mode; 3) Gluma Universal, etch and rinse mode; 4) Gluma Universal, self-etch mode. After adhesive procedures nanohybrid composite resin cylinders were bonded to the enamel surfaces. All specimens were subjected to shear bond strength (SBS) test after thermocycling. Data were analyzed using a 3-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey post hoc test. Results No significant difference were found among bleaching groups (35% hydrogen peroxide, 16% carbamid peroxide, 7.5% carbamid peroxide, and no treatment groups) in the mean SBS values. There was also no difference in SBS values between Single Bond Universal and Gluma Universal at same application modes, whereas self-etch mode showed significantly lower SBS values than etch and rinse mode (p adhesives was enhanced with the etch and rinse mode application to bleached enamel and non-bleached enamel. PMID:29765900

  11. Directionality and Orientation Effects on the Resistance to Propagating Shear Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leis, B. N.; Barbaro, F. J.; Gray, J. M.

    Hydrocarbon pipelines transporting compressible products like methane or high-vapor-pressure (HVP) liquids under supercritical conditions can be susceptible to long-propagating failures. As the unplanned release of such hydrocarbons can lead to significant pollution and/or the horrific potential of explosion and/or a very large fire, design criteria to preclude such failures were essential to environmental and public safety. Thus, technology was developed to establish the minimum arrest requirements to avoid such failures shortly after this design concern was evident. Soon after this technology emerged in the early 1970sit became evident that its predictions were increasinglynon-conservative as the toughness of line-pipe steel increased. A second potentially critical factor for what was a one-dimensional technology was that changes in steel processing led to directional dependence in both the flow and fracture properties. While recognized, this dependence was tacitly ignored in quantifying arrest, as were early observations that indicated propagating shear failure was controlled by plastic collapse rather than by fracture processes.

  12. Effect of CFRP and TRM Strengthening of RC Slabs on Punching Shear Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husain Abbas

    Full Text Available Abstract The paper presents experiments involving punching of RC slabs strengthened using externally bonded carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP sheet and textile reinforced mortar (TRM. Twelve RC slab specimens of two concrete grades (39.9 and 63.2 MPa and employing two strengthening schemes (CFRP and TRM were tested. Specimens were supported on two opposite edges. Experimental load-displacement variations show two peak loads in strengthened slabs and one peak followed by a plateau in control. Second peak or the plateau corresponds to the combined action of aggregate interlock and the dowel action of back face rebars and strengthening layers. The dowel action of back face rebars and strengthening layers had no role in ultimate punching load (i.e. first peak. Strengthened slabs showed 9-18% increase in ultimate punching load (i.e. first peak whereas there was significant increase in the second peak load (190-276% for CFRP; 55-136% for TRM and energy absorption (~66% for CFRP and 22-56% for TRM. An analytical model was also developed for predicting the punching shear strength (first and second peaks of strengthened slabs showing good comparison with experiments.

  13. Effect of shear stress and free radicals induced by ultrasound on erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, T.; Fukushima, Y.; Kon, H.; Riesz, P.

    1989-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to elucidate the mechanism of hemolysis induced by ultrasound. Ar or N2O gas was used to distinguish between cavitation with or without free radical formation (hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen atoms). Free radical formation was examined by the method of spin trapping combined with ESR. After sonication of erythrocyte suspensions, several structural and functional parameters of the erythrocyte membrane--hemolysis, membrane fluidity, membrane permeability, and membrane deformability--were examined. Although free radical formation was observed in the erythrocyte suspensions sonicated in the presence of Ar, no free radical formation was observed in the presence of N2O. However, the hemolysis behavior induced by ultrasound was similar in the presence of Ar or N2O. The membrane fluidity, permeability, and deformability of the remaining unlysed erythrocytes after sonication in the presence of Ar or N2O were unchanged and identical to those of the control cells. On the other hand, after gamma irradiation (700 Gy), the hemolysis behavior was quite different from that after sonication, and the membrane properties were significantly changed. These results suggest that hemolysis induced by sonication was due to mechanical shearing stress arising from cavitation, and that the membrane integrity of the remaining erythrocytes after sonication was the same as that of control cells without sonication. The triatomic gas, N2O, may be useful for ultrasonically disrupting cells without accompanying free radical formation

  14. Effects of auditory information on self-motion perception during simultaneous presentation of visual shearing motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanahashi, Shigehito; Ashihara, Kaoru; Ujike, Hiroyasu

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have found that self-motion perception induced by simultaneous presentation of visual and auditory motion is facilitated when the directions of visual and auditory motion stimuli are identical. They did not, however, examine possible contributions of auditory motion information for determining direction of self-motion perception. To examine this, a visual stimulus projected on a hemisphere screen and an auditory stimulus presented through headphones were presented separately or simultaneously, depending on experimental conditions. The participant continuously indicated the direction and strength of self-motion during the 130-s experimental trial. When the visual stimulus with a horizontal shearing rotation and the auditory stimulus with a horizontal one-directional rotation were presented simultaneously, the duration and strength of self-motion perceived in the opposite direction of the auditory rotation stimulus were significantly longer and stronger than those perceived in the same direction of the auditory rotation stimulus. However, the auditory stimulus alone could not sufficiently induce self-motion perception, and if it did, its direction was not consistent within each experimental trial. We concluded that auditory motion information can determine perceived direction of self-motion during simultaneous presentation of visual and auditory motion information, at least when visual stimuli moved in opposing directions (around the yaw-axis). We speculate that the contribution of auditory information depends on the plausibility and information balance of visual and auditory information. PMID:26113828

  15. Effect of surfactant on kinetics of thinning of capillary bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Emilia; Kovalchuk, Nina; Simmons, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Kinetics of thinning of capillary bridges is of great scientific and industrial interest being of vital importance for example in various emulsification and microfluidic processes. It is well known that the rate of bridge thinning is proportional to the interfacial tension. Therefore it is expected that the process should slow down by addition of surfactant. The kinetics of capillary bridges in the presence of surfactant was studied by the dripping of liquid from a capillary tip under conditions of nearly zero flow rate (We personal care products. The viscosity, surfactant activity and adsorption kinetics have been controlled by addition of glycerol and sodium chloride. The study has shown that the kinetics of capillary bridges are determined by dynamic surface tension rather than by its equilibrium value. In particular, the kinetics of the bridge thinning for the 0.1 g L-1 aqueous SLES solution is practically the same as that of pure water despite twice lower equilibrium surface tension. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  16. Effect of Target Density on Microstructural, Electrical, and Optical Properties of Indium Tin Oxide Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guisheng; Zhi, Li; Yang, Huijuan; Xu, Huarui; Yu, Aibing

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, indium tin oxide (ITO) targets with different densities were used to deposit ITO thin films. The thin films were deposited from these targets at room temperature and annealed at 750°C. Microstructural, electrical, and optical properties of the as-prepared films were studied. It was found that the target density had no effect on the properties or deposition rate of radiofrequency (RF)-sputtered ITO thin films, different from the findings for direct current (DC)-sputtered films. Therefore, when using RF sputtering, the target does not require a high density and may be reused.

  17. Annealing Effect on the Photoelectrochemical Properties of BiVO_4 Thin Film Electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siti Nur Farhana Mohd Nasir; Mohd Asri Mat Teridi; Mehdi Ebadi; Sagu, J.S.

    2015-01-01

    Monoclinic bismuth vanadate (BiVO_4) thin film electrodes were fabricated on fluorine-doped tin oxide via aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD). Annealing and without annealing effect of thin films were analysed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry (UV-Vis) and current voltage measurement. All BiVO_4 thin films showed an anodic photocurrent. The sample of BiVO_4 annealed at 400 degree Celsius exhibited the highest photocurrent density of 0.44 mAcm"-"2 vs. Ag/ AgCl at 1.23 V. (author)

  18. Effects of excitation intensity on the photocurrent response of thin film silicon solar modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Q.; Shumka, A.; Trask, J.

    1986-01-01

    Photocurrent responses of amorphous thin film silicon solar modules at room temperature were studied at different excitation intensities using various monochromatic light sources. Photocurrent imaging techniques have been effectively used to locate rapidly, and non-destructively, failure and defect sites in the multilayer thin film device. Differences observed in the photocurrent response characteristics for two different cells in the same amorphous thin film silicon solar module suggest the possibility of the formation of dissimilarly active devices, even though the module is processed in the same fabrication process. Possible mechanisms are discussed.

  19. Effect of extrapolation length on the phase transformation of epitaxial ferroelectric thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Z.S.; Tang, M.H.; Wang, J.B.; Zheng, X.J.; Zhou, Y.C.

    2008-01-01

    Effects of extrapolation length on the phase transformation of epitaxial ferroelectric thin films on dissimilar cubic substrates have been studied on the basis of the mean-field Landau-Ginzburg-Devonshire (LGD) thermodynamic theory by taking an uneven distribution of the interior stress with thickness into account. It was found that the polarization of epitaxial ferroelectric thin films is strongly dependent on the extrapolation length of films. The physical origin of the extrapolation length during the phase transformation from paraelectric to ferroelectric was revealed in the case of ferroelectric thin films

  20. Gas bubble retention and its effect on waste properties: Retention mechanisms, viscosity, and tensile and shear strengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauglitz, P.A.; Rassat, S.D.; Powell, M.R.

    1995-08-01

    Several of the underground nuclear storage tanks at Hanford have been placed on a flammable gas watch list, because the waste is either known or suspected to generate, store, and episodically release flammable gases. Because retention and episodic release of flammable gases from these tanks containing radioactive waste slurries are critical safety concerns, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is studying physical mechanisms and waste properties that contribute to the episodic gas release from these storage tanks. This study is being conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company as part of the PNL Flammable Gas project. Previous investigations have concluded that gas bubbles are retained by the slurry or sludge that has settled at the bottom of the tanks; however, the mechanisms responsible for the retention of these bubbles are not well understood. Understanding the rheological behavior of the waste, particularly of the settled sludge, is critical to characterizing the tendency of the waste to retain gas bubbles and the dynamics of how these bubbles are released from the waste. The presence of gas bubbles is expected to affect the rheology of the sludge, specifically its viscosity and tensile and shear strengths, but essentially no literature data are available to assess the effect of bubbles. The objectives of this study were to conduct experiments and develop theories to understand better how bubbles are retained by slurries and sludges, to measure the effect of gas bubbles on the viscosity of simulated slurries, and to measure the effect of gas bubbles on the tensile and shear strengths of simulated slurries and sludges. In addition to accomplishing these objectives, this study developed correlations, based on the new experimental data, that can be used in large-scale computations of waste tank physical phenomena

  1. Gas bubble retention and its effect on waste properties: Retention mechanisms, viscosity, and tensile and shear strengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauglitz, P.A.; Rassat, S.D.; Powell, M.R. [and others

    1995-08-01

    Several of the underground nuclear storage tanks at Hanford have been placed on a flammable gas watch list, because the waste is either known or suspected to generate, store, and episodically release flammable gases. Because retention and episodic release of flammable gases from these tanks containing radioactive waste slurries are critical safety concerns, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is studying physical mechanisms and waste properties that contribute to the episodic gas release from these storage tanks. This study is being conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company as part of the PNL Flammable Gas project. Previous investigations have concluded that gas bubbles are retained by the slurry or sludge that has settled at the bottom of the tanks; however, the mechanisms responsible for the retention of these bubbles are not well understood. Understanding the rheological behavior of the waste, particularly of the settled sludge, is critical to characterizing the tendency of the waste to retain gas bubbles and the dynamics of how these bubbles are released from the waste. The presence of gas bubbles is expected to affect the rheology of the sludge, specifically its viscosity and tensile and shear strengths, but essentially no literature data are available to assess the effect of bubbles. The objectives of this study were to conduct experiments and develop theories to understand better how bubbles are retained by slurries and sludges, to measure the effect of gas bubbles on the viscosity of simulated slurries, and to measure the effect of gas bubbles on the tensile and shear strengths of simulated slurries and sludges. In addition to accomplishing these objectives, this study developed correlations, based on the new experimental data, that can be used in large-scale computations of waste tank physical phenomena.

  2. Effect of shear stress on 86Rb+ efflux and cytosolic Ca2+ of calf pulmonary artery endothelial cells (CPAEs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alevriadou, B.R.; Mo, M.; Rickman, D.S.; Eskin, S.G.; McIntire, L.V.; Schilling, W.P.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of flow-induced shear stress (SS) on membrane K + permeability and cytosolic free Ca 2+ , [Ca 2+ ] i , was investigated by measuring 86 Rb + efflux and fura-2 fluorescence in CPAEs using a parallel plate flow chamber. Increasing SS from 1 to 2.4, 4.8 or 10 dyn/cm 2 produced a graded, transient increase in 86 Rb + efflux which peaked within 1 min and subsequently declined rapidly towards pre-stimulus levels. Mathematical modeling confirmed that the transient increase in 86 Rb + efflux did not reflect a washout phenomenon. Upon returning SS to 1 dyn/cm 2 , 86 Rb + efflux initially decreased, but returned slowly to basal values. In contrast, application of bradykinin (BK) at a constant SS of either 0.33 or 1 dyn/cm 2 produced a transient increase in 86 Rb + efflux that was followed by a sustained elevated phase during which time efflux gradually returned to pre-stimulus levels. To determine the mechanism by which shear stress increases K + permeability, the effect of tetrabutylammonium ion (TBA), a selective inhibitor of Ca 2+ -dependent K + channels (K Ca ), on both the BK- and SS-induced increases in 86 Rb + efflux, was examined. TBA inhibited the BK-stimulated increase in 86 Rb + efflux >90% under both stationary and flow conditions and significantly reduced SS-dependent 86 Rb + efflux 38.3%. These results suggest that increased 86 Rb + efflux from CPAEs with SS occurs, at least in part, via K Ca and suggests that SS increases cytosolic Ca 2+ . However, when measured using fura-2-loaded CPAEs, SS was without significant effect on [Ca 2+ ] i

  3. Post-annealing effects on pulsed laser deposition-grown GaN thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Yu-Wen; Wu, Hao-Yu; Lin, Yu-Zhong; Lee, Cheng-Che; Lin, Ching-Fuh

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the post-annealing effects on gallium nitride (GaN) thin films grown from pulsed laser deposition (PLD) are investigated. The as-deposited GaN thin films grown from PLD are annealed at different temperatures in nitrogen ambient. Significant changes of the GaN crystal properties are observed. Raman spectroscopy is used to observe the crystallinity, the change of residual stress, and the thermal decomposition of the annealed GaN thin films. X-ray diffraction is also applied to identify the crystal phase of GaN thin films, and the surface morphology of GaN thin films annealed at different temperatures is observed by scanning electron microscopy. Through the above analyses, the GaN thin films grown by PLD undergo three stages: phase transition, stress alteration, and thermal decomposition. At a low annealing temperature, the rock salt GaN in GaN films is transformed into wurtzite. The rock salt GaN diminishes with increasing annealing temperature. At a medium annealing temperature, the residual stress of the film changes significantly from compressive strain to tensile strain. As the annealing temperature further increases, the GaN undergoes thermal decomposition and the surface becomes granular. By investigating the annealing temperature effects and controlling the optimized annealing temperature of the GaN thin films, we are able to obtain highly crystalline and strain-free GaN thin films by PLD. - Highlights: • The GaN thin film is grown on sapphire by pulsed laser deposition. • The GaN film undergoes three stages with increasing annealing temperature. • In the first stage, the film transfers from rock salt to wurtzite phase. • In the second stage, the stress in film changes from compressive to tensile. • In the final stage, the film thermally decomposes and becomes granular

  4. Relining effects on the push-out shear bond strength of glass fiber posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Rosado Valente ANDRIOLI

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The correct use of glass fiber posts in endodontically treated teeth is essential for the clinical success of restorative treatment. Objective This study evaluated the push-out shear bond strength of relined (R or non-relined (NR glass fiber posts, cemented with self-adhesive resin cement [RelyXTM U100 (U100] and conventional resin cement [RelyXTM ARC (ARC]. Material and method Sixty human single-rooted teeth were endodontically treated and divided into ARC-NR; U100-NR; ARC-R; U100-R groups. The teeth were sectioned into cervical, middle and apical thirds, and subjected to the push-out test. Bond strength was analyzed by the Friedman test; cement and post types were compared by the Mann Whitney test. The pattern of failures was evaluated with digital camera through images at 200x magnification, and was classified as adhesive (at the cement/dentin or cement/post interface, cohesive (cement or post, and mixed failures. Result In ARC-NR, bond strength values were higher in the cervical third; in U100-NR and ARC-R they were similar between the thirds. In U100-R, in the cervical and middle thirds the bond strength values were similar, and there was lower value in the apical third. For non-relined glass fiber posts, the highest mean bond strength values were observed with self-adhesive resin cement. Whereas, relined posts cemented with conventional resin cement had stronger cement layer in comparison with non-relined fiber posts. Conclusion The post relining technique was efficient in ARC-R. ARC-NR and U100-R showed improved bond strength in the cervical region of canal walls. The main failures were adhesive at the cement-post interface.

  5. Blanking Clearance and Punch Velocity Effects on The Sheared Edge Characteristic in Micro-Blanking of Commercially Pure Copper Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didin Zakaria Lubis

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to identify the influences between clearance and punch velocity on the part edge quality of blanked parts. Experiments have been conducted using material copper, punch-die clearance and punch velocity variations. In order to determine the reachable punch-die clearance and punch velocity required for blanking. The quality of the part-edge characteristics shows that higher punch velocity and decreases clearance value can improve the part-edge quality, resulting in smaller burr height and rollover, and a larger shear zone. Furthermore, it could be observed that the part-edge quality improvement when blanking with high punch velocity is much more distinct for stele than for copper. According to blanking theory, this improvement was expected because copper have much higher heat conduction coefficients. Therefore, the heat dissipates faster and the desired stress relief effect does not take place to the same degree as for stele.

  6. Effects of low central fuelling on density and ion temperature profiles in reversed shear plasmas on JT-60U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takenaga, H; Ide, S; Sakamoto, Y; Fujita, T [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan)], E-mail: takenaga.hidenobu@jaea.go.jp

    2008-07-15

    Effects of low central fuelling on density and ion temperature profiles have been investigated using negative ion based neutral beam injection and electron cyclotron heating (ECH) in reversed shear plasmas on JT-60U. Strong internal transport barrier (ITB) was maintained in density and ion temperature profiles, when central fuelling was decreased by switching positive ion based neutral beam injection to ECH after the strong ITB formation. Similar density and ion temperature ITBs were formed for the low and high central fuelling cases during the plasma current ramp-up phase. Strong correlation between the density gradient and the ion temperature gradient was observed, indicating that particle transport and ion thermal transport are strongly coupled or the density gradient assists the ion temperature ITB formation through suppression of drift wave instabilities such as ion temperature gradient mode. These results support that the density and ion temperature ITBs can be formed under reactor relevant conditions.

  7. Effects of low central fuelling on density and ion temperature profiles in reversed shear plasmas on JT-60U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaga, H.; Ide, S.; Sakamoto, Y.; Fujita, T.; JT-60 Team

    2008-07-01

    Effects of low central fuelling on density and ion temperature profiles have been investigated using negative ion based neutral beam injection and electron cyclotron heating (ECH) in reversed shear plasmas on JT-60U. Strong internal transport barrier (ITB) was maintained in density and ion temperature profiles, when central fuelling was decreased by switching positive ion based neutral beam injection to ECH after the strong ITB formation. Similar density and ion temperature ITBs were formed for the low and high central fuelling cases during the plasma current ramp-up phase. Strong correlation between the density gradient and the ion temperature gradient was observed, indicating that particle transport and ion thermal transport are strongly coupled or the density gradient assists the ion temperature ITB formation through suppression of drift wave instabilities such as ion temperature gradient mode. These results support that the density and ion temperature ITBs can be formed under reactor relevant conditions.

  8. Effect of electrical stimulation and cooking temperature on the within-sample variation of cooking loss and shear force of lamb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, P K; Babiker, S A

    1983-01-01

    Electrical stimulation decreased the shear force and increased the cooking loss in seven paired lamb Longissimus dorsi (LD) muscles. This treatment did not have any effect on the within-sample variation. Cooking in 55°, 65° and 75°C water baths for 90 min caused a linear increase in the cooking loss and shear force. There was no stimulation-cooking temperature interaction observed. Cooking temperature also had no effect on the within-sample variation. A possible explanation as to why electrical stimulation did not affect the within-sample variation is given. Copyright © 1983. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Effects of bacteria on CdS thin films used in technological devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpdoğan, S.; Adıgüzel, A. O.; Sahan, B.; Tunçer, M.; Metin Gubur, H.

    2017-04-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) thin films were fabricated on glass substrates by the chemical bath deposition method at 70 {}^\\circ \\text{C} considering deposition times ranging from 2 h to 5 h. The optical band gaps of CdS thin films were found to be in the 2.42-2.37 eV range. CdS thin films had uniform spherical nano-size grains which had polycrystalline, hexagonal and cubic phases. The films had a characteristic electrical resistivity of the order of {{10}5} Ω \\text{cm} and n-type conductivity at room condition. CdS thin films were incubated in cultures of B.domonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, which exist abundantly in the environment, and form biofilms. SEM images showed that S. aureus and K. pneumonia were detected significantly on the film surfaces with a few of P. aeruginosa and B. subtilis cells attached. CdS thin film surface exhibits relatively good resistance to the colonization of P. aeruginosa and B. subtilis. Optical results showed that the band gap of CdS thin films which interacted with the bacteria is 2.42 \\text{eV} . The crystal structure and electrical properties of CdS thin films were not affected by bacterial adhesion. The antimicrobial effect of CdS nanoparticles was different for different bacterial strains.

  10. Effect of shear strength on Hugoniot-compression curve and the equation of state of tungsten (W)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mashimo, Tsutomu, E-mail: mashimo@gpo.kumamoto-u.ac.jp; Liu, Xun [Institute of Pulsed Power Science, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Kodama, Masao [Sojo University, Kumamoto 860-0082 (Japan); Zaretsky, Eugene [Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Katayama, Masahide [Itochu Techno-Solutions Corporation, Tokyo 100-6080 (Japan); Nagayama, Kunihiko [Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan)

    2016-01-21

    The Hugoniot data for highly dense polycrystalline tungsten were obtained for pressures above 200 GPa, and the equation of state (EOS) was determined taking into account shear strength effects. For this study, we have made some improvements in measurement system and analyses of the shock wave data. Symmetric-impact Hugoniot measurements were performed using the high-time resolution streak camera system equipped on a one-stage powder gun and two-stage light gas gun, where the effects of tilting and bowing of flyer plate on the Hugoniot data were carefully considered. The shock velocity–particle velocity (U{sub S}–U{sub P}) Hugoniot relation in the plastic regime was determined to be U{sub S} = 4.137 + 1.242U{sub P} km/s (U{sub P} < 2 km/s). Ultrasonic and Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector measurements were also performed in this study. The zero-intercept value of the U{sub S}–U{sub P} Hugoniot relation was found to be slightly larger than the ultrasonic bulk sound velocity (4.023 km/s). The hypothetical hydrostatic isothermal U{sub s}–U{sub p} Hugoniot curve, which corresponds to the hydrostatic isothermal compression curve derived from the Hugoniot data using the strength data, converged to the bulk sound velocity, clearly showing shear strength dependence in the Hugoniot data. The EOS for tungsten is derived from the hydrostatic isothermal compression curve using the strength data.

  11. Effect of shear strength on Hugoniot-compression curve and the equation of state of tungsten (W)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashimo, Tsutomu; Liu, Xun; Kodama, Masao; Zaretsky, Eugene; Katayama, Masahide; Nagayama, Kunihiko

    2016-01-01

    The Hugoniot data for highly dense polycrystalline tungsten were obtained for pressures above 200 GPa, and the equation of state (EOS) was determined taking into account shear strength effects. For this study, we have made some improvements in measurement system and analyses of the shock wave data. Symmetric-impact Hugoniot measurements were performed using the high-time resolution streak camera system equipped on a one-stage powder gun and two-stage light gas gun, where the effects of tilting and bowing of flyer plate on the Hugoniot data were carefully considered. The shock velocity–particle velocity (U S –U P ) Hugoniot relation in the plastic regime was determined to be U S  = 4.137 + 1.242U P km/s (U P  < 2 km/s). Ultrasonic and Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector measurements were also performed in this study. The zero-intercept value of the U S –U P Hugoniot relation was found to be slightly larger than the ultrasonic bulk sound velocity (4.023 km/s). The hypothetical hydrostatic isothermal U s –U p Hugoniot curve, which corresponds to the hydrostatic isothermal compression curve derived from the Hugoniot data using the strength data, converged to the bulk sound velocity, clearly showing shear strength dependence in the Hugoniot data. The EOS for tungsten is derived from the hydrostatic isothermal compression curve using the strength data

  12. Effect of Addition of Curcumin Nanoparticles on Antimicrobial Property and Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Composite to Bovine Enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedram Baghaeian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study sought to assess the effect of curcumin nanoparticles (curcNPs on antimicrobial property and shear bond strength (SBS of orthodontic composite to bovine enamel.Materials and Methods: In this in vitro, experimental study, 1%, 5% and 10% curcNPs were added to Transbond XT composite. Stainless steel brackets were bonded to 48 sound bovine incisors in four groups (n=12 using composite containing 0% (control, 1%, 5% and 10% curcNPs. The bracket-tooth SBS was measured by a universal testing machine. The adhesive remnant index (ARI score was calculated after debonding using a stereomicroscope. Also, 180 discs were fabricated of the four composites; 108 were subjected to eluted component test, 36 were used for disc diffusion test and 36 were used for biofilm test to assess their antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguinis and Lactobacillus acidophilus.Results: The highest and lowest SBS belonged to control and 10% curcNP groups, respectively. The difference in SBS was significant among the four groups (P=0.008. The SBS of control group was significantly higher than that of 10% curcNPs (P=0.006. The four groups were not significantly different in terms of ARI score (P>0.05. Growth inhibition zones were not seen in any group. In biofilm test, the colony counts of all bacteria significantly decreased by an increase in percentage of curcNPs. Colony count significantly decreased only at 30 days.Conclusions: At 1% concentration, curcNPs have significant antimicrobial activity against cariogenic bacteria with no adverse effect on SBS. However, insolubility of curcNPs remains a major drawback.Keywords: Curcumin; Nanoparticles; Shear Strength; Composite Resins; Orthodontic Brackets; Anti-Bacterial Agents

  13. Effects of thinning, residue mastication, and prescribed fire on soil and nutrient budgets in a Sierra Nevada mixed conifer forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of thinning followed by residue mastication (THIN), prescribed fire (BURN), and thinning plus residue mastication plus burning (T+B) on nutrient budgets and resin-based (plant root simulator [PRS] probe) measurements of soil nutrient availability in a mixed-conifer forest were measured. ...

  14. The effect of slight thinning of managed coniferous forest on landscape appreciation and psychological restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Norimasa; Saito, Haruo; Fujiwara, Akio; Horiuchi, Masahiro

    2017-12-01

    We investigated the influence of slight thinning (percentage of woods: 16.6%, basal area: 9.3%) on landscape appreciation and the psychological restorative effect of an on-site setting by exposing respondents to an ordinarily managed coniferous woodland. The experiments were conducted in an experimental plot in the same coniferous woodland in May (unthinned) and October 2013 (thinned). The respondents were the same 15 individuals for both experiments. Respondents were individually exposed to the enclosed plot and the forest-view plot within the same tent for 15 min. In both sessions, respondents were required to answer three questionnaires measuring their mood (Profile of Mood States), emotion (Positive and Negative Affect Schedule), and feeling of restoration (Restorative Outcome Scale) to investigate the psychological restorative effect before and after the experiment. They completed two other questionnaires measuring appreciation for the environment (Semantic Differential) and the restorative properties of the environment (Perceived Restorativeness Scale) following the experiments. We first analyzed the difference in landscape appreciation between the unthinned and thinned conditions. We did not find any statistical difference in appreciation for the environment (Semantic Differential) or the restorative properties of the environment (Perceived Restorativeness Scale); rather, we found that weather conditions had a primary influence on landscape appreciation. With respect to the psychological restorative effect, a two-way repeated analysis of valiance (ANOVA) revealed significant main effects for a selection of indices, depending on the presence or absence of thinning. However, multiple comparison analyses revealed that these effects seemed to be due to the difference in the experimental experience rather than the presence or absence of thinning. In conclusion, the effect of the slight thinning of the managed coniferous forest was too weak to be reflected in the

  15. Effect of pre-existing shear bands on the tensile mechanical properties of a bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Q.P.; Liu, J.W.; Yang, K.J.; Xu, F.; Yao, Z.Q.; Minkow, A.; Fecht, H.J.; Ivanisenko, J.; Chen, L.Y.; Wang, X.D.; Qu, S.X.; Jiang, J.Z.

    2010-01-01

    Bulk Zr 64.13 Cu 15.75 Ni 10.12 Al 10 metallic glass has been rolled at room temperature in two different directions, and the dependences of microstructure and tensile mechanical property on the degree of deformation and rolling directions have been investigated. No deformation-induced crystallization occurs except for shear bands. Shear band formation in conjugated directions is achieved in the specimen rolled in two directions, while rolling in one direction induces shear band formation only in a single direction. Pre-existing properly spaced soft inhomogeneities can stabilize shear bands and lead to tensile plastic strain, and the efficient intersection of shear bands in conjugated directions results in work-hardening behavior, which is further confirmed by in situ tensile scanning electron microscopic observation. Based on the experimental results obtained in two different specimen geometries and finite element analysis, it is deduced that a normal-stress-modified maximum shear stress criterion rather than a shear plane criterion can describe the conditions for the formation of shear bands in uniaxial tension.

  16. Effect of pathological heterogeneity on shear wave elasticity imaging in the staging of deep venous thrombosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaona Liu

    Full Text Available We aimed to observe the relationship between the pathological components of a deep venous thrombus (DVT, which was divided into three parts, and the findings on quantitative ultrasonic shear wave elastography (SWE to increase the accuracy of thrombus staging in a rabbit model.A flow stenosis-induced vein thrombosis model was used, and the thrombus was divided into three parts (head, body and tail, which were associated with corresponding observation points. Elasticity was quantified in vivo using SWE over a 2-week period. A quantitative pathologic image analysis (QPIA was performed to obtain the relative percentages of the components of the main clots.DVT maturity occurred at 2 weeks, and the elasticity of the whole thrombus and the three parts (head, body and tail showed an increasing trend, with the Young's modulus values varying from 2.36 ± 0.41 kPa to 13.24 ± 1.71 kPa; 2.01 ± 0.28 kPa to 13.29 ± 1.48 kPa; 3.27 ± 0.57 kPa to 15.91 ± 2.05 kPa; and 1.79 ± 0.36 kPa to 10.51 ± 1.61 kPa, respectively. Significant increases occurred on different days for the different parts: the head showed significant increases on days 4 and 6; the body showed significant increases on days 4 and 7; and the tail showed significant increases on days 3 and 6. The QPIA showed that the thrombus composition changed dynamically as the thrombus matured, with the fibrin and calcium salt deposition gradually increasing and the red blood cells (RBCs and platelet trabecula gradually decreasing. Significant changes were observed on days 4 and 7, which may represent the transition points for acute, sub-acute and chronic thrombi. Significant heterogeneity was observed between and within the thrombi.Variations in the thrombus components were generally consistent between the SWE and QPIA. Days 4 and 7 after thrombus induction may represent the transition points for acute, sub-acute and chronic thrombi in rabbit models. A dynamic examination of the same part of the thrombus

  17. Effect of pathological heterogeneity on shear wave elasticity imaging in the staging of deep venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaona; Li, Na; Wen, Chaoyang

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to observe the relationship between the pathological components of a deep venous thrombus (DVT), which was divided into three parts, and the findings on quantitative ultrasonic shear wave elastography (SWE) to increase the accuracy of thrombus staging in a rabbit model. A flow stenosis-induced vein thrombosis model was used, and the thrombus was divided into three parts (head, body and tail), which were associated with corresponding observation points. Elasticity was quantified in vivo using SWE over a 2-week period. A quantitative pathologic image analysis (QPIA) was performed to obtain the relative percentages of the components of the main clots. DVT maturity occurred at 2 weeks, and the elasticity of the whole thrombus and the three parts (head, body and tail) showed an increasing trend, with the Young's modulus values varying from 2.36 ± 0.41 kPa to 13.24 ± 1.71 kPa; 2.01 ± 0.28 kPa to 13.29 ± 1.48 kPa; 3.27 ± 0.57 kPa to 15.91 ± 2.05 kPa; and 1.79 ± 0.36 kPa to 10.51 ± 1.61 kPa, respectively. Significant increases occurred on different days for the different parts: the head showed significant increases on days 4 and 6; the body showed significant increases on days 4 and 7; and the tail showed significant increases on days 3 and 6. The QPIA showed that the thrombus composition changed dynamically as the thrombus matured, with the fibrin and calcium salt deposition gradually increasing and the red blood cells (RBCs) and platelet trabecula gradually decreasing. Significant changes were observed on days 4 and 7, which may represent the transition points for acute, sub-acute and chronic thrombi. Significant heterogeneity was observed between and within the thrombi. Variations in the thrombus components were generally consistent between the SWE and QPIA. Days 4 and 7 after thrombus induction may represent the transition points for acute, sub-acute and chronic thrombi in rabbit models. A dynamic examination of the same part of the thrombus may be

  18. Effects of atomic oxygen on titanium dioxide thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimosako, Naoki; Hara, Yukihiro; Shimazaki, Kazunori; Miyazaki, Eiji; Sakama, Hiroshi

    2018-05-01

    In low earth orbit (LEO), atomic oxygen (AO) has shown to cause degradation of organic materials used in spacecrafts. Similar to other metal oxides such as SiO2, Al2O3 and ITO, TiO2 has potential to protect organic materials. In this study, the anatese-type TiO2 thin films were fabricated by a sol-gel method and irradiated with AO. The properties of TiO2 were compared using mass change, scanning electron microscope (SEM), atomic force microscope (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmittance spectra and photocatalytic activity before and after AO irradiation. The results indicate that TiO2 film was hardly eroded and resistant against AO degradation. AO was shown to affects only the surface of a TiO2 film and not the bulk. Upon AO irradiation, the TiO2 films were slightly oxidized. However, these changes were very small. Photocatalytic activity of TiO2 was still maintained in spite of slight decrease upon AO irradiation, which demonstrated that TiO2 thin films are promising for elimination of contaminations outgassed from a spacecraft's materials.

  19. Size and dimensionality effects in superconducting Mo thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrega, L; Gil, O; Camon, A; Parra-BorderIas, M; Fernandez-MartInez, I; Costa-Kraemer, J L; Briones, F; Sese, J; Gonzalez-Arrabal, R

    2011-01-01

    Molybdenum is a low T c , type I superconductor whose fundamental properties are poorly known. Its importance as an essential constituent of new high performance radiation detectors, the so-called transition edge sensors (TESs) calls for better characterization of this superconductor, especially in thin film form. Here we report on a study of the basic superconducting features of Mo thin films as a function of their thickness. The resistivity is found to rise and the critical temperature decreases on decreasing film thickness, as expected. More relevant, the critical fields along and perpendicular to the film plane are markedly different, thickness dependent and much larger than the thermodynamic critical field of Mo bulk. These results are consistent with a picture of type II 2D superconducting films, and allow estimates of the fundamental superconducting lengths of Mo. The role of morphology in determining the 2D and type II character of the otherwise type I molybdenum is discussed. The possible consequences of this behaviour on the performance of radiation detectors are also addressed.

  20. Effects of self-calibration of intrinsic alignment on cosmological parameter constraints from future cosmic shear surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Ji; Ishak, Mustapha; Lin, Weikang; Troxel, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Intrinsic alignments (IA) of galaxies have been recognized as one of the most serious contaminants to weak lensing. These systematics need to be isolated and mitigated in order for ongoing and future lensing surveys to reach their full potential. The IA self-calibration (SC) method was shown in previous studies to be able to reduce the GI contamination by up to a factor of 10 for the 2-point and 3-point correlations. The SC method does not require the assumption of an IA model in its working and can extract the GI signal from the same photo-z survey offering the possibility to test and understand structure formation scenarios and their relationship to IA models. In this paper, we study the effects of the IA SC mitigation method on the precision and accuracy of cosmological parameter constraints from future cosmic shear surveys LSST, WFIRST and Euclid. We perform analytical and numerical calculations to estimate the loss of precision and the residual bias in the best fit cosmological parameters after the self-calibration is performed. We take into account uncertainties from photometric redshifts and the galaxy bias. We find that the confidence contours are slightly inflated from applying the SC method itself while a significant increase is due to the inclusion of the photo-z uncertainties. The bias of cosmological parameters is reduced from several-σ, when IA is not corrected for, to below 1-σ after SC is applied. These numbers are comparable to those resulting from applying the method of marginalizing over IA model parameters despite the fact that the two methods operate very differently. We conclude that implementing the SC for these future cosmic-shear surveys will not only allow one to efficiently mitigate the GI contaminant but also help to understand their modeling and link to structure formation.

  1. Effects of long-term repeated topical fluoride applications and adhesion promoter on shear bond strengths of orthodontic brackets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Toshiya; Ishida, Rieko; Komatsuzaki, Akira; Sanpei, Shinya; Tanaka, Satoshi; Sekimoto, Tsuneo

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of long-term repeated topical application of fluoride before bonding and an adhesion promoter on the bond strength of orthodontic brackets. Materials and Methods: A total of 76 bovine incisors were collected and divided equally into four groups. In group 1, the brackets were bonded without topical fluoride application or adhesion promoter. In group 2, before bonding, the adhesion promoter was applied to nonfluoridated enamel. In group 3, the brackets were bonded without the application of the adhesion promoter to enamel, which had undergone long-term repeated topical fluoride treatments. Teeth in group 4 received the long-term repeated topical applications of fluoride, and the brackets were bonded using the adhesion promoter. All the brackets were bonded using BeautyOrtho Bond self-etching adhesive. The shear bond strength was measured and the bond failure modes were evaluated with the use of the adhesive remnant index (ARI) after debonding. Results: The mean shear bond strength was significantly lower in group 3 than in groups 1, 2, and 4, and there were no significant differences between the groups except for group 3. There were significant differences in the distribution of ARI scores between groups 2 and 3, and between groups 3 and 4. Conclusions: The adhesion promoter can recover the bond strength reduced by the long-term repeated topical applications of fluoride to the prefluoridation level and had a significantly great amount of adhesives left on either fluoridated or nonfluoridated enamel. PMID:25512720

  2. Effects of self-calibration of intrinsic alignment on cosmological parameter constraints from future cosmic shear surveys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Ji; Ishak, Mustapha; Lin, Weikang [Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Dallas, Dallas, TX 75080 (United States); Troxel, Michael, E-mail: jxy131230@utdallas.edu, E-mail: mxi054000@utdallas.edu, E-mail: wxl123830@utdallas.edu, E-mail: michael.a.troxel@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Intrinsic alignments (IA) of galaxies have been recognized as one of the most serious contaminants to weak lensing. These systematics need to be isolated and mitigated in order for ongoing and future lensing surveys to reach their full potential. The IA self-calibration (SC) method was shown in previous studies to be able to reduce the GI contamination by up to a factor of 10 for the 2-point and 3-point correlations. The SC method does not require the assumption of an IA model in its working and can extract the GI signal from the same photo-z survey offering the possibility to test and understand structure formation scenarios and their relationship to IA models. In this paper, we study the effects of the IA SC mitigation method on the precision and accuracy of cosmological parameter constraints from future cosmic shear surveys LSST, WFIRST and Euclid. We perform analytical and numerical calculations to estimate the loss of precision and the residual bias in the best fit cosmological parameters after the self-calibration is performed. We take into account uncertainties from photometric redshifts and the galaxy bias. We find that the confidence contours are slightly inflated from applying the SC method itself while a significant increase is due to the inclusion of the photo-z uncertainties. The bias of cosmological parameters is reduced from several-σ, when IA is not corrected for, to below 1-σ after SC is applied. These numbers are comparable to those resulting from applying the method of marginalizing over IA model parameters despite the fact that the two methods operate very differently. We conclude that implementing the SC for these future cosmic-shear surveys will not only allow one to efficiently mitigate the GI contaminant but also help to understand their modeling and link to structure formation.

  3. Effects of Coating Materials and Processing Conditions on Flow Enhancement of Cohesive Acetaminophen Powders by High-Shear Processing With Pharmaceutical Lubricants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Guoguang; Mangal, Sharad; Denman, John; Gengenbach, Thomas; Lee Bonar, Kevin; Khan, Rubayat I; Qu, Li; Li, Tonglei; Zhou, Qi Tony

    2017-10-01

    This study has investigated the surface coating efficiency and powder flow improvement of a model cohesive acetaminophen powder by high-shear processing with pharmaceutical lubricants through 2 common equipment, conical comil and high-shear mixer. Effects of coating materials and processing parameters on powder flow and surface coating coverage were evaluated. Both Carr's index and shear cell data indicated that processing with the lubricants using comil or high-shear mixer substantially improved the flow of the cohesive acetaminophen powder. Flow improvement was most pronounced for those processed with 1% wt/wt magnesium stearate, from "cohesive" for the V-blended sample to "easy flowing" for the optimally coated sample. Qualitative and quantitative characterizations demonstrated a greater degree of surface coverage for high-shear mixing compared with comilling; nevertheless, flow properties of the samples at the corresponding optimized conditions were comparable between 2 techniques. Scanning electron microscopy images demonstrated different coating mechanisms with magnesium stearate or l-leucine (magnesium stearate forms a coating layer and leucine coating increases surface roughness). Furthermore, surface coating with hydrophobic magnesium stearate did not retard the dissolution kinetics of acetaminophen. Future studies are warranted to evaluate tableting behavior of such dry-coated pharmaceutical powders. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Particle Acceleration in Mildly Relativistic Shearing Flows: The Interplay of Systematic and Stochastic Effects, and the Origin of the Extended High-energy Emission in AGN Jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ruo-Yu; Rieger, F. M.; Aharonian, F. A., E-mail: ruoyu@mpi-hd.mpg.de, E-mail: frank.rieger@mpi-hd.mpg.de, E-mail: aharon@mpi-hd.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-06-10

    The origin of the extended X-ray emission in the large-scale jets of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) poses challenges to conventional models of acceleration and emission. Although electron synchrotron radiation is considered the most feasible radiation mechanism, the formation of the continuous large-scale X-ray structure remains an open issue. As astrophysical jets are expected to exhibit some turbulence and shearing motion, we here investigate the potential of shearing flows to facilitate an extended acceleration of particles and evaluate its impact on the resultant particle distribution. Our treatment incorporates systematic shear and stochastic second-order Fermi effects. We show that for typical parameters applicable to large-scale AGN jets, stochastic second-order Fermi acceleration, which always accompanies shear particle acceleration, can play an important role in facilitating the whole process of particle energization. We study the time-dependent evolution of the resultant particle distribution in the presence of second-order Fermi acceleration, shear acceleration, and synchrotron losses using a simple Fokker–Planck approach and provide illustrations for the possible emergence of a complex (multicomponent) particle energy distribution with different spectral branches. We present examples for typical parameters applicable to large-scale AGN jets, indicating the relevance of the underlying processes for understanding the extended X-ray emission and the origin of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays.

  5. The effect of liquid phase separation on the Vickers microindentation shear bands evolution in a Fe-based bulk metallic glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Askari-Paykani, M. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, North Kargar Street, Tehran 11356-4563 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nili Ahmadabadi, M., E-mail: nili@ut.ac.ir [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, North Kargar Street, Tehran 11356-4563 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Center of Excellence for High Performance Materials, School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Seiffodini, A. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, North Kargar Street, Tehran 11356-4563 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Yazd University, Department of Material Science and Engineering, Yazd 84196 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    The Vickers microindentation experiments and associated plastic deformation in as-cast and annealed (Fe{sub 0.9}Ni{sub 0.1}){sub 77}Mo{sub 5}P{sub 9}C{sub 7.5}B{sub 1.5} bulk metallic glass was conducted. In addition to the bulk indentation behavior, the shear band morphology underneath the Vickers microindenter was examined by employing the bonded interface technique. Microstructural characterization revealed that a liquid phase separation occurred during melting process. Atomic force microscopy of the glassy matrix of the as-cast specimen reveals the composition inhomogeneity induced by the liquid phase separation. This effect generates shear band branching or deflection during the shear band propagation. For the bulk indentation, the trends in the hardness vs. indentation load were found related to the pressure sensitive index and the phase separation process simultaneously. The results show that the as-cast as well as the annealed specimens are deformed through semi-circular and radial shear bands. In addition, in the partially crystalized specimen, the change in the properties and microstructure of the BMG induced by the partial crystallization treatment and phase separation process resulted in tertiary shear bands formation.

  6. In vivo effects of two acidic soft drinks on shear bond strength of metal orthodontic brackets with and without resin infiltration treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, Shaza M; Enan, Enas T

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the in vivo effects of two acidic soft drinks (Coca-Cola and Sprite) on the shear bond strength of metal orthodontic brackets with and without resin infiltration treatment. In addition, the enamel surface was evaluated, after debonding, using a scanning electron microscope. Sixty noncarious maxillary premolars, scheduled for extraction in 30 orthodontic patients, were used. Patients were randomly divided into two groups according to the soft drink tested (Coca-Cola or Sprite). In each group, application of resin infiltration (Icon. DMG, Hamburg, Germany) was done on one side only before bonding of brackets. Patients were told to rinse their mouth with their respective soft drink at room temperature for 5 minutes, three times a day for 3 months. Shear bond strength was tested with a universal testing machine. After shearing test, a scanning electron microscope was used to evaluate enamel erosion. Statistical analysis was performed by twoway analysis of variance followed by the least significant difference test. The Coca-Cola group without resin infiltration showed the lowest resistance to shearing forces. Scanning electron micrographs of both groups after resin application showed a significant improvement compared with results without resin use, as the enamel appeared smoother and less erosive. Pretreatment with the infiltrating resin has proved to result in a significant improvement in shear bond strength, regardless of the type of soft drink consumed.

  7. Advances in potential formation and findings in sheared radial electric-field effects on turbulence and loss suppression in GAMMA 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, T.; Higaki, H.; Hirata, M.; Hojo, H.; Ichimura, M.; Ishii, K.; Islam, M.K.; Itakura, A.; Katanuma, I.; Kohagura, J.; Nakashima, Y.; Numakura, T.; Saito, T.; Tatematsu, Y.; Yoshikawa, M.; Yoshida, M.; Imai, T.; Pastukhov, V.P.; Miyoshi, S.

    2005-01-01

    Following the Lyon IAEA Conference, (1) a factor of three progress up to 2.1 kV in the formation of ion-confining potential heights in comparison to those attained 1992-2002 is achieved for tandem-mirror plasmas in the hot-ion mode with ion temperatures of several keV. (2) The advance in the potential formation gives bases for a finding of the remarkable effects of radially produced shear of electric fields E r , or non-uniform sheared plasma rotation Ω r =E r /(r c B) on the suppression of turbulent fluctuations for the first time in GAMMA 10. (Here, r c denotes a radius mapped to the central-cell.) (2-i) Such a shear effect on the central-cell plasmas is highlighted visually by x-ray tomography diagnostics; that is, spatially and temporally fluctuated vortex-like structures are clearly observed in plasmas produced by ICH alone [having a quite weak