WorldWideScience

Sample records for shear band evolution

  1. The brittle-viscous-plastic evolution of shear bands in the South Armorican Shear Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukovská, Zita; Jeřábek, Petr; Morales, Luiz F. G.; Lexa, Ondrej; Milke, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    Shear bands are microscale shear zones that obliquely crosscut an existing anisotropy such as a foliation. The resulting S-C fabrics are characterized by angles lower than 45° and the C plane parallel to shear zone boundaries. The S-C fabrics typically occur in granitoids deformed at greenschist facies conditions in the vicinity of major shear zones. Despite their long recognition, mechanical reasons for localization of deformation into shear bands and their evolution is still poorly understood. In this work we focus on microscale characterization of the shear bands in the South Armorican Shear Zone, where the S-C fabrics were first recognized by Berthé et al. (1979). The initiation of shear bands in the right-lateral South Armorican Shear Zone is associated with the occurrence of microcracks crosscutting the recrystallized quartz aggregates that define the S fabric. In more advanced stages of shear band evolution, newly formed dominant K-feldspar, together with plagioclase, muscovite and chlorite occur in the microcracks, and the shear bands start to widen. K-feldspar replaces quartz by progressively bulging into the grain boundaries of recrystallized quartz grains, leading to disintegration of quartz aggregates and formation of fine-grained multiphase matrix mixture. The late stages of shear band development are marked by interconnection of fine-grained white mica into a band that crosscuts the original shear band matrix. In its extremity, the shear band widening may lead to the formation of ultramylonites. With the increasing proportion of shear band matrix from ~1% to ~12%, the angular relationship between S and C fabrics increases from ~30° to ~40°. The matrix phases within shear bands show differences in chemical composition related to distinct evolutionary stages of shear band formation. The chemical evolution is well documented in K-feldspar, where the albite component is highest in porphyroclasts within S fabric, lower in the newly formed grains within

  2. Microstructural evolution of a model, shear-banding micellar solution during shear startup and cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Barrón, Carlos R; Gurnon, A Kate; Eberle, Aaron P R; Porcar, Lionel; Wagner, Norman J

    2014-04-01

    We present direct measurements of the evolution of the segmental-level microstructure of a stable shear-banding polymerlike micelle solution during flow startup and cessation in the plane of flow. These measurements provide a definitive, quantitative microstructural understanding of the stages observed during flow startup: an initial elastic response with limited alignment that yields with a large stress overshoot to a homogeneous flow with associated micellar alignment that persists for approximately three relaxation times. This transient is followed by a shear (kink) band formation with a flow-aligned low-viscosity band that exhibits shear-induced concentration fluctuations and coexists with a nearly isotropic band of homogenous, highly viscoelastic micellar solution. Stable, steady banding flow is achieved only after approximately two reptation times. Flow cessation from this shear-banded state is also found to be nontrivial, exhibiting an initial fast relaxation with only minor structural relaxation, followed by a slower relaxation of the aligned micellar fluid with the equilibrium fluid's characteristic relaxation time. These measurements resolve a controversy in the literature surrounding the mechanism of shear banding in entangled wormlike micelles and, by means of comparison to existing literature, provide further insights into the mechanisms driving shear-banding instabilities in related systems. The methods and instrumentation described should find broad use in exploring complex fluid rheology and testing microstructure-based constitutive equations.

  3. Microstructural evolution in adiabatic shear bands of copper at high strain rates: Electron backscatter diffraction characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Lin; Chen Zhiyong; Zhan Congkun; Yang Xuyue; Liu Chuming; Cai Hongnian

    2012-01-01

    The microstructural evolution of adiabatic shear bands in annealed copper with different large strains at high strain rates has been investigated by electron backscatter diffraction. The results show that mechanical twinning can occur with minimal contribution to shear localization under dynamic loading. Elongated ultrafine grains with widths of 100–300 nm are observed during the evolution of the adiabatic shear bands. A rotational dynamic recrystallization mechanism is proposed to explain the formation of the elongated ultrafine grains. - Highlights: ► The microstructural evolution of ASB is studied by electron backscatter diffraction. ► Twinning can occur in ASB while the contribution to shear localization is slight. ► Elongated ultrafine grains are observed during the evolution process of ASB. ► A possible mechanism is proposed to explain the microstructure evolution of ASB.

  4. The Formation and Evolution of Shear Bands in Plane Strain Compressed Nickel-Base Superalloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Tang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The formation and evolution of shear bands in Inconel 718 nickel-base superalloy under plane strain compression was investigated in the present work. It is found that the propagation of shear bands under plane strain compression is more intense in comparison with conventional uniaxial compression. The morphology of shear bands was identified to generally fall into two categories: in “S” shape at severe conditions (low temperatures and high strain rates and “X” shape at mild conditions (high temperatures and low strain rates. However, uniform deformation at the mesoscale without shear bands was also obtained by compressing at 1050 °C/0.001 s−1. By using the finite element method (FEM, the formation mechanism of the shear bands in the present study was explored for the special deformation mode of plane strain compression. Furthermore, the effect of processing parameters, i.e., strain rate and temperature, on the morphology and evolution of shear bands was discussed following a phenomenological approach. The plane strain compression attempt in the present work yields important information for processing parameters optimization and failure prediction under plane strain loading conditions of the Inconel 718 superalloy.

  5. Modeling of Metallic Glass Matrix Composites Under Compression: Microstructure Effect on Shear Band Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yunpeng; Qiu, Kun; Sun, Longgang; Wu, Qingqing

    2018-01-01

    The relationship among processing, microstructure, and mechanical performance is the most important for metallic glass matrix composites (MGCs). Numerical modeling was performed on the shear banding in MGCs, and the impacts of particle concentration, morphology, agglomerate, size, and thermal residual stress were revealed. Based on the shear damage criterion, the equivalent plastic strain acted as an internal state variable to depict the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of shear bands. The element deletion technique was employed to describe the process of transformation from shear band to micro-crack. The impedance effect of particle morphology on the propagation of shear bands was discussed, whereby the toughening mechanism was clearly interpreted. The present work contributes to the subsequent strengthening and toughening design of MGCs.

  6. Microstructure evolution associated with adiabatic shear bands and shear band failure in ballistic plug formation in Ti-6Al-4V targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murr, L.E.; Ramirez, A.C.; Gaytan, S.M.; Lopez, M.I.; Martinez, E.Y.; Hernandez, D.H.; Martinez, E.

    2009-01-01

    The microstructures and microstructure evolution associated with adiabatic shear band (ASB) formation in ballistic plugging in thick (2.5 cm) Ti-6Al-4V targets impacted by cylindrical, 4340 steel projectiles (2.0 cm in height) at impact velocities ranging from 633 m/s to 1027 m/s (just above the ballistic limit) were investigated by optical and transmission electron microscopy. ASB width increased from 10 μm to 21 μm as the velocity increased. ASB evolution was accompanied by the evolution of dark deformation bands composed of α' martensite platelets which increased in density with increasing impact velocity. The corresponding Vickers microindentation hardness also increased from HV 619 to HV 632 in contrast to the surrounding matrix microindentation hardness of HV 555. These deformation bands were not necessarily precursors to ASB formation. The ASB average Vickers microindentation hardness was essentially constant at HV 645, a 16% increase over the matrix. This constant microindentation hardness was characterized by a consistent DRX grain structure which varied from equiaxed, defect-free grains (∼2 μm diameter) to heavily dislocated, equiaxed grains. Cracks nucleating and propagating within the ABSs were observed to increase from 8% to 87% of the ASB length with increasing impact velocity.

  7. Development of shear bands in amorphous-crystalline metallic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozdnyakov, V.A.

    2004-01-01

    A theoretical study is made into conditions of shear band evolution in amorphous-crystalline alloys with various morphological types of structural constituents. The condition of shear band evolution in thin amorphous alloys in the interior of the crystalline matrix is obtained. It is shown that a scale effect exists which manifests itself in suppression of the process of localized plastic flow with amorphous alloy thickness decreasing down to the limit. The analysis of the condition for shear band evolution in an amorphous alloy with nanocrystalline inclusions is accomplished. The relationship of a critical stress of shear band evolution to a volume fraction of disperse crystal inclusions is obtained. A consideration is also given to the evolution of shear bands in the material containing amorphous and crystalline areas of micro meter size. For the alloy with the structure of this type conditions for propagation of localized flows by a relay race type mechanism are determined [ru

  8. The dynamics of a shear band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giarola, Diana; Capuani, Domenico; Bigoni, Davide

    2018-03-01

    A shear band of finite length, formed inside a ductile material at a certain stage of a continued homogeneous strain, provides a dynamic perturbation to an incident wave field, which strongly influences the dynamics of the material and affects its path to failure. The investigation of this perturbation is presented for a ductile metal, with reference to the incremental mechanics of a material obeying the J2-deformation theory of plasticity (a special form of prestressed, elastic, anisotropic, and incompressible solid). The treatment originates from the derivation of integral representations relating the incremental mechanical fields at every point of the medium to the incremental displacement jump across the shear band faces, generated by an impinging wave. The boundary integral equations (under the plane strain assumption) are numerically approached through a collocation technique, which keeps into account the singularity at the shear band tips and permits the analysis of an incident wave impinging a shear band. It is shown that the presence of the shear band induces a resonance, visible in the incremental displacement field and in the stress intensity factor at the shear band tips, which promotes shear band growth. Moreover, the waves scattered by the shear band are shown to generate a fine texture of vibrations, parallel to the shear band line and propagating at a long distance from it, but leaving a sort of conical shadow zone, which emanates from the tips of the shear band.

  9. Strain gradient drives shear banding in metallic glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhi-Li; Wang, Yun-Jiang; Chen, Yan; Dai, Lan-Hong

    2017-09-01

    Shear banding is a nucleation-controlled process in metallic glasses (MGs) involving multiple temporal-spatial scales, which hinders a concrete understanding of its structural origin down to the atomic scale. Here, inspired by the morphology of composite materials, we propose a different perspective of MGs as a hard particle-reinforced material based on atomic-scale structural heterogeneity. The local stable structures indicated by a high level of local fivefold symmetry (L5FS) act as hard "particles" which are embedded in the relatively soft matrix. We demonstrate this concept by performing atomistic simulations of shear banding in CuZr MG. A shear band is prone to form in a sample with a high degree of L5FS which is slowly quenched from the liquid. An atomic-scale analysis on strain and the structural evolution reveals that it is the strain gradient effect that has originated from structural heterogeneity that facilitates shear transformation zones (STZs) to mature shear bands. An artificial composite model with a high degree of strain gradient, generated by inserting hard MG strips into a soft MG matrix, demonstrates a great propensity for shear banding. It therefore confirms the critical role strain gradient plays in shear banding. The strain gradient effect on shear banding is further quantified with a continuum model and a mechanical instability analysis. These physical insights might highlight the strain gradient as the hidden driving force in transforming STZs into shear bands in MGs.

  10. Experimental study on the adiabatic shear bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Affouard, J.

    1984-07-01

    Four martensitic steels (Z50CDV5 steel, 28CND8 steel, 35NCDV16 steel and 4340 steel) with different hardness between 190 and 600 Hsub(B) (Brinell hardness), have been studied by means of dynamic compressive tests on split Hopkinson pressure bar. Microscopic observations show that the fracture are associated to the development of adiabatic shear bands (except 4340 steel with 190 Hsub(B) hardness). By means of tests for which the deformation is stopped at predetermined levels, the measurement of shear and hardness inside the band and the matrix indicates the chronology of this phenomenon: first the localization of shear, followed by the formation of adiabatic shear band and ultimatly crack initiation and propagation. These results correlated with few simulations by finite elements have permitted to suggest two mecanisms of deformation leading to the formation of adiabatic shear bands in this specific test [fr

  11. The effect of liquid phase separation on the Vickers microindentation shear bands evolution in a Fe-based bulk metallic glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Askari-Paykani, M. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, North Kargar Street, Tehran 11356-4563 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nili Ahmadabadi, M., E-mail: nili@ut.ac.ir [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, North Kargar Street, Tehran 11356-4563 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Center of Excellence for High Performance Materials, School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Seiffodini, A. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, North Kargar Street, Tehran 11356-4563 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Yazd University, Department of Material Science and Engineering, Yazd 84196 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    The Vickers microindentation experiments and associated plastic deformation in as-cast and annealed (Fe{sub 0.9}Ni{sub 0.1}){sub 77}Mo{sub 5}P{sub 9}C{sub 7.5}B{sub 1.5} bulk metallic glass was conducted. In addition to the bulk indentation behavior, the shear band morphology underneath the Vickers microindenter was examined by employing the bonded interface technique. Microstructural characterization revealed that a liquid phase separation occurred during melting process. Atomic force microscopy of the glassy matrix of the as-cast specimen reveals the composition inhomogeneity induced by the liquid phase separation. This effect generates shear band branching or deflection during the shear band propagation. For the bulk indentation, the trends in the hardness vs. indentation load were found related to the pressure sensitive index and the phase separation process simultaneously. The results show that the as-cast as well as the annealed specimens are deformed through semi-circular and radial shear bands. In addition, in the partially crystalized specimen, the change in the properties and microstructure of the BMG induced by the partial crystallization treatment and phase separation process resulted in tertiary shear bands formation.

  12. Dilatancy induced ductile-brittle transition of shear band in metallic glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, F.; Jiang, M. Q.; Dai, L. H.

    2018-04-01

    Dilatancy-generated structural disordering, an inherent feature of metallic glasses (MGs), has been widely accepted as the physical mechanism for the primary origin and structural evolution of shear banding, as well as the resultant shear failure. However, it remains a great challenge to determine, to what degree of dilatation, a shear banding will evolve into a runaway shear failure. In this work, using in situ acoustic emission monitoring, we probe the dilatancy evolution at the different stages of individual shear band in MGs that underwent severely plastic deformation by the controlled cutting technology. A scaling law is revealed that the dilatancy in a shear band is linearly related to its evolution degree. A transition from ductile-to-brittle shear bands is observed, where the formers dominate stable serrated flow, and the latter lead to a runaway instability (catastrophe failure) of serrated flow. To uncover the underlying mechanics, we develop a theoretical model of shear-band evolution dynamics taking into account an atomic-scale deformation process. Our theoretical results agree with the experimental observations, and demonstrate that the atomic-scale volume expansion arises from an intrinsic shear-band evolution dynamics. Importantly, the onset of the ductile-brittle transition of shear banding is controlled by a critical dilatation.

  13. A Shear Banding Model for Penetration Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-04-01

    mechanism of strength reduction to zero within a shear band in three different steels, includ- ing AISI 4340 with RHC 44, which is reasonably similar to RHA...TECH LIB CHINA LAKE CA 93555-6001 CDR NAVAL SUR WAR CTR C S COFFEY PPARK FZERILLI CODE 4140 R K GARRET JR JMCKIRGAN TECH LIB 101 STRAUSS AVE

  14. Dilatant shear band formation and diagenesis in calcareous, arkosic sandstones, Vienna Basin (Austria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lommatzsch, Marco; Exner, Ulrike; Gier, Susanne; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    The present study examines deformation bands in calcareous arkosic sands. The investigated units can be considered as an equivalent to the Matzen field in the Vienna Basin (Austria), which is one of the most productive oil reservoirs in central Europe. The outcrop exposes carbonate-free and carbonatic sediments of Badenian age separated by a normal fault. Carbonatic sediments in the hanging wall of the normal fault develop dilation bands with minor shear displacements (< 2 mm), whereas carbonate-free sediments in the footwall develop cataclastic shear bands with up to 70 cm displacement. The cataclastic shear bands show a permeability reduction up to 3 orders of magnitude and strong baffling effects in the vadose zone. Carbonatic dilation bands show a permeability reduction of 1-2 orders of magnitude and no baffling structures. We distinguished two types of deformation bands in the carbonatic units, which differ in deformation mechanisms, distribution and composition. Full-cemented bands form as dilation bands with an intense syn-kinematic calcite cementation, whereas the younger loose-cemented bands are dilatant shear bands cemented by patchy calcite and clay minerals. All analyzed bands are characterized by a porosity and permeability reduction caused by grain fracturing and cementation. The changed petrophysical properties and especially the porosity evolution are closely related to diagenetic processes driven by varying pore fluids in different diagenetic environments. The deformation band evolution and sealing capacity is controlled by the initial host rock composition. PMID:26300577

  15. Shear banding, discontinuous shear thickening, and rheological phase transitions in athermally sheared frictionless disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vâgberg, Daniel; Olsson, Peter; Teitel, S.

    2017-05-01

    We report on numerical simulations of simple models of athermal, bidisperse, soft-core, massive disks in two dimensions, as a function of packing fraction ϕ , inelasticity of collisions as measured by a parameter Q , and applied uniform shear strain rate γ ˙. Our particles have contact interactions consisting of normally directed elastic repulsion and viscous dissipation, as well as tangentially directed viscous dissipation, but no interparticle Coulombic friction. Mapping the phase diagram in the (ϕ ,Q ) plane for small γ ˙, we find a sharp first-order rheological phase transition from a region with Bagnoldian rheology to a region with Newtonian rheology, and show that the system is always Newtonian at jamming. We consider the rotational motion of particles and demonstrate the crucial importance that the coupling between rotational and translational degrees of freedom has on the phase structure at small Q (strongly inelastic collisions). At small Q , we show that, upon increasing γ ˙, the sharp Bagnoldian-to-Newtonian transition becomes a coexistence region of finite width in the (ϕ ,γ ˙) plane, with coexisting Bagnoldian and Newtonian shear bands. Crossing this coexistence region by increasing γ ˙ at fixed ϕ , we find that discontinuous shear thickening can result if γ ˙ is varied too rapidly for the system to relax to the shear-banded steady state corresponding to the instantaneous value of γ ˙.

  16. Focus: Nucleation kinetics of shear bands in metallic glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J Q; Perepezko, J H

    2016-12-07

    The development of shear bands is recognized as the primary mechanism in controlling the plastic deformability of metallic glasses. However, the kinetics of the nucleation of shear bands has received limited attention. The nucleation of shear bands in metallic glasses (MG) can be investigated using a nanoindentation method to monitor the development of the first pop-in event that is a signature of shear band nucleation. The analysis of a statistically significant number of first pop-in events demonstrates the stochastic behavior that is characteristic of nucleation and reveals a multimodal behavior associated with local spatial heterogeneities. The shear band nucleation rate of the two nucleation modes and the associated activation energy, activation volume, and site density were determined by loading rate experiments. The nucleation activation energy is very close to the value that is characteristic of the β relaxation in metallic glass. The identification of the rate controlling kinetics for shear band nucleation offers guidance for promoting plastic flow in metallic glass.

  17. Introduction to the viewpoint set on shear bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchinson, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    Recent work aimed at improving our understanding of shear banding and flow localization as modes of deformation and failure is summarized in the six viewpoint articles which follow. For the most part, the emphasis here is on the observation and analysis of shear banding in metals, but active efforts are also underway to understand the role of shear bands in the deformation and failure of soils and rocks. There is a tendency to regard shear bands as a failure mode, as indeed they often are. But extensive straining under highly constrained conditions such as rolling can give rise to profuse flow localization into shear bands which can be regarded as microscopic in the sense that their extent is on the scale of the grains rather than the overall dimensions of the block of material being deformed. Hatherly and Malin describe in detail the observation of such bands and emphasize that they should be considered as a mode of deformation under these circumstances. They relate the formation of the bands to microstructural aspects and discuss their role in the development of recrystallization textures. It will be clear from reading the articles in this viewpoint set that the beginnings of a quantitative theory of shear banding is in place. Continued progress will require parallel developments in constitutive theory and experimental observation. Moreover, basic questions remain to be explored related to the spatial development of the shear bands, their mutual interaction, their development into a failure mode, and how these are influenced by factors such as overall deformational constraint, rate of straining, and temperature

  18. Edge-Induced Shear Banding in Entangled Polymeric Fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemingway, Ewan J; Fielding, Suzanne M

    2018-03-30

    Despite decades of research, the question of whether solutions and melts of highly entangled polymers exhibit shear banding as their steady state response to a steadily imposed shear flow remains controversial. From a theoretical viewpoint, an important unanswered question is whether the underlying constitutive curve of shear stress σ as a function of shear rate γ[over ˙] (for states of homogeneous shear) is monotonic, or has a region of negative slope, dσ/dγ[over ˙]<0, which would trigger banding. Attempts to settle the question experimentally via velocimetry of the flow field inside the fluid are often confounded by an instability of the free surface where the sample meets the outside air, known as "edge fracture." Here we show by numerical simulation that in fact even only very modest edge disturbances-which are the precursor of full edge fracture but might well, in themselves, go unnoticed experimentally-can cause strong secondary flows in the form of shear bands that invade deep into the fluid bulk. Crucially, this is true even when the underlying constitutive curve is monotonically increasing, precluding true bulk shear banding in the absence of edge effects.

  19. Structural mechanisms of formation of adiabatic shear bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Sokovikov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the experimental and theoretical study of plastic deformation instability and localization in materials subjected to dynamic loading and high-velocity perforation. We investigate the behavior of samples dynamically loaded during Hopkinson-Kolsky pressure bar tests in a regime close to simple shear conditions. Experiments were carried out using samples of a special shape and appropriate test rigging, which allowed us to realize a plane strain state. Also, the shear-compression specimens proposed in were investigated. The lateral surface of the samples was investigated in a real-time mode with the aid of a high-speed infra-red camera CEDIP Silver 450M. The temperature field distribution obtained at different time made it possible to trace the evolution of plastic strain localization. Use of a transmission electron microscope for studying the surface of samples showed that in the regions of strain localization there are parts taking the shape of bands and honeycomb structure in the deformed layer. The process of target perforation involving plug formation and ejection was investigated using a high-speed infra-red camera. A specially designed ballistic set-up for studying perforation was used to test samples in different impulse loading regimes followed by plastic flow instability and plug ejection. Changes in the velocity of the rear surface at different time of plug ejection were analyzed by Doppler interferometry techniques. The microstructure of tested samples was analyzed using an optical interferometer-profilometer and a scanning electron microscope. The subsequent processing of 3D deformation relief data enabled estimation of the distribution of plastic strain gradients at different time of plug formation and ejection. It has been found that in strain localization areas the subgrains are elongated taking the shape of bands and undergo fragmentation leading to the formation of super-microcrystalline structure, in which the

  20. B(M1) values in the band-crossing of shears bands in 197Pb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krücken, R.; Cooper, J. R.; Beausang, C. W.; Novak, J. R.; Dewald, A.; Klug, T.; Kemper, G.; von Brentano, P.; Carpenter, M.; Wiedenhöver, I.

    We present details of the band crossing mechanism of shears bands using the example of 197Pb. Absolute reduced matrix elements B(M1) were determined by means of a RDM lifetime measurement in one of the shears bands in 197Pb. The experiment was performed using the New Yale Plunger Device (NYPD) in conjunction with the Gammasphere array. Band mixing calculations on the basis of the semi-classical model of the shears mechanism are used to describe the transition matrix elements B(M1) and energies throughout the band-crossing regions. Good agreement with the data was obtained and the detailed composition of the states in the shears band are discussed.

  1. Experimental study of shear bands formation in a granular material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Thai Binh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an experimental investigation of the formation of shear bands in a granular sample submitted to a biaxial test. Our principal result is the direct observation of the bifurcation at the origin of the localization process in the material. At the bifurcation, the shear band is spatially extended: we observe a breaking of symmetry without any sudden localization of the deformation in a narrow band. Our work thus allows to clearly distinguish different phenomena: bifurcation which is a ponctual event which occurs before the peak, localization which is a process that covers a range of deformation of several percents during which the peak occurs and finally stationary shear bands which are well-defined permanent structures that can be observed at the end of the localization process, after the peak.

  2. Shear bands as growing instabilities in viscoanelastic media with memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Dolfin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigate the critical conditions under which a small perturbation in an homogeneous continuum can possibly grows into a shear band instability. In particular, we analyze from a thermodynamical viewpoint the phenomenon of shear bands in viscoanelastic media with memory. It is emphasized, in the scientific literature, that the specific adopted rheology strongly affects the results so that a special attention has to be paid, also for engineering purposes, to the accuracy of the rheological model. Several well-known rheological model (for instance the so called Maxwell or Jeffreys media are particular cases of the general model we adopt in the paper to analyze shear bands. Instability conditions, giving rise to shear bands formation, are obtained by introducing small perturbations around an homogeneous deformation into the system of differential equations governing the problem of homogeneous deformations in the considered continuous medium; as a result a non-homogeneous linear dynamical system is obtained whose stability is analyzed. A research perspective in view of a possible comparison with experimental results is proposed; in particular the simple methodology proposed in the paper should be applied in view of using the phenomenon of the initiation of shear bands to calculate the thermomechanical coefficients of real materials.

  3. Adiabatic shear banding and scaling laws in chip formation with application to cutting of Ti-6Al-4V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, A.; Soldani, X.; Miguélez, M. H.

    2013-11-01

    The phenomenon of adiabatic shear banding is analyzed theoretically in the context of metal cutting. The mechanisms of material weakening that are accounted for are (i) thermal softening and (ii) material failure related to a critical value of the accumulated plastic strain. Orthogonal cutting is viewed as a unique configuration where adiabatic shear bands can be experimentally produced under well controlled loading conditions by individually tuning the cutting speed, the feed (uncut chip thickness) and the tool geometry. The role of cutting conditions on adiabatic shear banding and chip serration is investigated by combining finite element calculations and analytical modeling. This leads to the characterization and classification of different regimes of shear banding and the determination of scaling laws which involve dimensionless parameters representative of thermal and inertia effects. The analysis gives new insights into the physical aspects of plastic flow instability in chip formation. The originality with respect to classical works on adiabatic shear banding stems from the various facets of cutting conditions that influence shear banding and from the specific role exercised by convective flow on the evolution of shear bands. Shear bands are generated at the tool tip and propagate towards the chip free surface. They grow within the chip formation region while being convected away by chip flow. It is shown that important changes in the mechanism of shear banding take place when the characteristic time of shear band propagation becomes equal to a characteristic convection time. Application to Ti-6Al-4V titanium are considered and theoretical predictions are compared to available experimental data in a wide range of cutting speeds and feeds. The fundamental knowledge developed in this work is thought to be useful not only for the understanding of metal cutting processes but also, by analogy, to similar problems where convective flow is also interfering with

  4. Analyzing shear band formation with high resolution X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagan, Darren C.; Obstalecki, Mark; Park, Jun-Sang; Miller, Matthew P.

    2018-04-01

    Localization of crystallographic slip into shear bands during uniaxial compression of a copper single crystal is studied using very far-field high-energy diffraction microscopy (vff-HEDM). Diffracted intensity was collected in-situ as the crystal deformed using a unique mobile detector stage that provided access to multiple diffraction peaks with high-angular resolution. From the diffraction data, single crystal orientation pole figures (SCPFs) were generated and are used to track the evolution of the distribution of lattice orientation that develops as slip localizes. To aid the identification of 'signatures' of shear band formation and analyze the SCPF data, a model of slip-driven lattice reorientation within shear bands is introduced. Confidence is built in conclusions drawn from the SCPF data about the character of internal slip localization through comparisons with strain fields on the sample surface measured simultaneously using digital image correlation. From the diffraction data, we find that the active slip direction and slip plane are not directly aligned with the orientation of the shear bands that formed. In fact, by extracting the underlying slip system activity from the SCPF data, we show that intersecting shear bands measured on the surface of the sample arise from slip primarily on the same underlying single slip system. These new vff-HEDM results raise significant questions on the use of surface measurements for slip system activity estimation. (C) 2018 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The possible mass region for shears bands and chiral doublets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, J [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Frauendorf, S

    1998-03-01

    The Tilted Axis Cranking (TAC) theory is reviewed. The recent progress of TAC for triaxial deformed nuclei is reported. More emphasis has been paid to the new discovered phenomena - chiral doublets and their explanation. The possible mass region for the shears bands and chiral doublets and their experimental signature are discussed. (author)

  6. Discrete Analysis of Damage and Shear Banding in Argillaceous Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinç, Özge; Scholtès, Luc

    2018-05-01

    A discrete approach is proposed to study damage and failure processes taking place in argillaceous rocks which present a transversely isotropic behavior. More precisely, a dedicated discrete element method is utilized to provide a micromechanical description of the mechanisms involved. The purpose of the study is twofold: (1) presenting a three-dimensional discrete element model able to simulate the anisotropic macro-mechanical behavior of the Callovo-Oxfordian claystone as a particular case of argillaceous rocks; (2) studying how progressive failure develops in such material. Material anisotropy is explicitly taken into account in the numerical model through the introduction of weakness planes distributed at the interparticle scale following predefined orientation and intensity. Simulations of compression tests under plane-strain and triaxial conditions are performed to clarify the development of damage and the appearance of shear bands through micromechanical analyses. The overall mechanical behavior and shear banding patterns predicted by the numerical model are in good agreement with respect to experimental observations. Both tensile and shear microcracks emerging from the modeling also present characteristics compatible with microstructural observations. The numerical results confirm that the global failure of argillaceous rocks is well correlated with the mechanisms taking place at the local scale. Specifically, strain localization is shown to directly result from shear microcracking developing with a preferential orientation distribution related to the orientation of the shear band. In addition, localization events presenting characteristics similar to shear bands are observed from the early stages of the loading and might thus be considered as precursors of strain localization.

  7. Spontaneous formation of densely packed shear bands of rotating fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åström, J A; Timonen, J

    2012-05-01

    Appearance of self-similar space-filling ball bearings has been suggested to provide the explanation for seismic gaps, shear weakness, and lack of detectable frictional heat formation in mature tectonic faults (shear zones). As the material in a shear zone fractures and grinds, it could be thought to eventually form a conformation that allows fragments to largely roll against each other without much sliding. This type of space-filling "ball bearing" can be constructed artificially, but so far how such delicate structures may appear spontaneously has remained unexplained. It is demonstrated here that first-principles simulations of granular packing with fragmenting grains indeed display spontaneous formation of shear bands with fragment conformations very similar to those of densely packed ball bearings.

  8. The effects of buoyancy on shear-induced melt bands in a compacting porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, S. L.

    2009-03-01

    It has recently been shown [Holtzman, B., Groebner, N., Zimmerman, M., Ginsberg, S., Kohlstedt, D., 2003. Stress-driven melt segregation in partially molten rocks. Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst. 4, Art. No. 8607; Holtzman, B.K., Kohlstedt, D.L., 2007. Stress-driven melt segregation and strain partitioning in partially molten rocks: effects of stress and strain. J. Petrol. 48, 2379-2406] that when partially molten rock is subjected to simple shear, bands of high and low porosity are formed at a particular angle to the direction of instantaneous maximum extension. These have been modeled numerically and it has been speculated that high porosity bands may form an interconnected network with a bulk, effective permeability that is enhanced in a direction parallel to the bands. As a result, the bands may act to focus mantle melt towards the axis of mid-ocean ridges [Katz, R.F., Spiegelman, M., Holtzman, B., 2006. The dynamics of melt and shear localization in partially molten aggregates. Nature 442, 676-679]. In this contribution, we examine the combined effects of buoyancy and matrix shear on a deforming porous layer. The linear theory of Spiegelman [Spiegelman, M., 1993. Flow in deformable porous media. Part 1. Simple analysis. J. Fluid Mech. 247, 17-38; Spiegelman, M., 2003. Linear analysis of melt band formation by simple shear. Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst. 4, doi:10.1029/2002GC000499, Article 8615] and Katz et al. [Katz, R.F., Spiegelman, M., Holtzman, B., 2006. The dynamics of melt and shear localization in partially molten aggregates. Nature 442, 676-679] is generalized to include both the effects of buoyancy and matrix shear on a deformable porous layer with strain-rate dependent rheology. The predictions of linear theory are compared with the early time evolution of our 2D numerical model and they are found to be in excellent agreement. For conditions similar to the upper mantle, buoyancy forces can be similar to or much greater than matrix shear-induced forces. The

  9. Self-organization behaviors of shear bands in 7075 T73 and annealed aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Y.; Li, D.H.; Zheng, H.G.; Li, X.M.; Jiang, F.

    2009-01-01

    The self-organization behaviors of multiple adiabatic shear bands (ASBs) in the 7075 T73 aluminum alloy were investigated by means of the thick-walled cylinder (TWC) technique. Shear bands first nucleate at the inner boundary of the aluminum alloy tube and propagate along the maximum shear stress direction in the spiral trajectory. On the cross section of the specimen, shear bands distribute either in the clockwise or the anticlockwise direction. The number of ASBs in the clockwise direction is roughly twice that in the anticlockwise direction. However, the 7075 annealed alloy does not generate any shear band under the same experimental conditions. Numerical simulation with coupled thermo-mechanical analysis was carried out to investigate the evolution mechanism of adiabatic shear bands. Both uniform and non-uniform finite element models were created. The simulation results of the non-uniform model are in better agreement with those of the experiment. In the non-uniform case, the spacing between ASBs is larger than that of the uniform model, and most of the ASBs prefer to propagate in the clockwise direction. For the first time, two types of particles (second phase), hard particles and soft particles, are separately introduced into the metal matrix in the non-uniform model to simulate their effects on the self-organization of ASBs. The soft particles reduce the time required for ASBs nucleation. Stress collapse first occurs at the region where the soft particles are located and most of the ASBs pass through these soft particles. However, ASBs propagate along the paths that are adjacent to the hard particles instead of passing through them. As experimental observations, there is no shear band nucleating in the annealed alloy in simulation. Under the same conditions, the energy barrier for the formation of ASBs in the annealed aluminum alloy is about 2.5 times larger than that in the T73 alloy, which means that the adiabatic shearing is less likely to nucleate in the

  10. Analytical solution for shear bands in cold-rolled 1018 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voyiadjis, George Z.; Almasri, Amin H.; Faghihi, Danial; Palazotto, Anthony N.

    2012-06-01

    Cold-rolled 1018 (CR-1018) carbon steel has been well known for its susceptibility to adiabatic shear banding under dynamic loadings. Analysis of these localizations highly depends on the selection of the constitutive model. To deal with this issue, a constitutive model that takes temperature and strain rate effect into account is proposed. The model is motivated by two physical-based models: the Zerilli and Armstrong and the Voyiadjis and Abed models. This material model, however, incorporates a simple softening term that is capable of simulating the softening behavior of CR-1018 steel. Instability, localization, and evolution of adiabatic shear bands are discussed and presented graphically. In addition, the effect of hydrostatic pressure is illustrated.

  11. IR thermographic observation and shear bands plasticity analysis in Fe-based metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouzakher, B.; Benameur, T.; Sidhom, H.

    2009-01-01

    Infrared thermography observation and in situ atomic force microscopy characterization were carried out to investigate the mechanical damage processes at the edge-notch region of large ribbons of Fe 78 Si 10 B 12 metallic glass. An obvious thermoelastic and inelastic degradation phenomenon was observed ahead at the notched region of the specimens, which probably result from free volume accumulation process and shear band activity during plane stress solicitations. Moreover, AFM topographic and frictional analysis of changes in the crack path during stable crack propagation regime revealed a periodic morphology evolution, formation of nanoscale damage cavity in the range of 20-140 nm and a maximum temperature rise ahead of the pre-crack tip was found in the order of 1.5 deg. C. The nanometer scaled shear offset, discreteness and shear bands density were determined. While these key parameters play a role in observing a large plastic zone in front of the crack, however they are unable to explain the distinct intrinsic ductility of some monolithic metallic glasses. A general Mohr-Coulomb-type constitutive description was used to deduce analytic expressions for prediction of the variation of hydrostatic component of the applied stress to the shear stress ratio as function of Poisson's ratio.

  12. Shear banding in large strain plasticity - Influence of specimen dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucha, Marzena; Wcisło, Balbina; Pamin, Jerzy

    2018-01-01

    The paper deals with numerical analysis of shear banding which occurs in an elongated rectangular plate for a large strain elastic-plastic material model. It is focused on the influence of plate size proportions and finite element mesh density on numerical results. The discussion is limited to isothermal conditions and ideal plasticity. First a plain strain case is computed for different lengths of the plate, then simulations are repeated for plane stress for which different thicknesses of the plate are considered. Most of the computations are performed for three finite element meshes to verify discretization sensitivity of the results. The simulations are performed using AceGen and AceFEM packages for Wolfram Mathematica.

  13. On the appearance of vorticity and gradient shear bands in wormlike micellar solutions of different CPCl/salt systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mütze, Annekathrin, E-mail: muetzea@ethz.ch; Heunemann, Peggy; Fischer, Peter [ETH Zürich, Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, Schmelzbergstrasse 9, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2014-11-01

    Wormlike micellar salt/surfactant solutions (X-salicylate, cetylpyridinium chloride) are studied with respect to the applied shear stress, concentration, temperature, and composition of the counterions (X = lithium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium) of the salicylate salt solute to determine vorticity and gradient shear bands. A combination of rheological measurements, laser technique, video analysis, and rheo-small-angle neutron scattering allow for a detailed exploration of number and types of shear bands. Typical flow curves of the solutions show Newtonian, shear-thinning, and shear-thickening flow behavior. In the shear-thickening regime, the solutions show vorticity and gradient shear bands simultaneously, in which vorticity shear bands dominate the visual effect, while gradient shear bands always coexist and predominate the rheological response. It is shown that gradient shear bands change their phases (turbid, clear) with the same frequency as the shear rate oscillates, whereas vorticity shear bands change their phases with half the frequency of the shear rate. Furthermore, we show that with increasing molecular mass of the counterions the number of gradient shear bands increases, while the number of vorticity shear bands remains constant. The variation of temperature, shear stress, concentration, and counterions results in a predictable change in the rheological behavior and therefore allows adjustment of the number of vorticity shear bands in the shear band regime.

  14. Shear flows induced by nonlinear evolution of double tearing modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhengxiong; Kishimoto, Y.; Li, J. Q.; Wang Xiaogang; Dong, J. Q.

    2008-01-01

    Shear flows induced by nonlinear evolution of double tearing modes are investigated in a resistive magnetohydrodynamic model with slab geometry. It is found that intensive and thin poloidal shear flow layers are generated in the magnetic island region driven by coupled reconnection process at both rational surfaces. The structure of the flow layers keeps evolving after the merging of magnetic separatrices and forms a few narrow vortices along the open field lines in the final stage of magnetic reconnection. The effects of the distance between both rational surfaces and the initial magnetic shear on the nonlinear evolution of the plasma flows are also taken into consideration and the relevant mechanism is discussed

  15. Room Temperature Shear Band Development in Highly Twinned Wrought Magnesium AZ31B Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jon; Miles, Michael; Fullwood, David; Adams, Brent; Khosravani, Ali; Mishra, Raja K.

    2013-01-01

    Failure mechanisms were studied in wrought AZ31B magnesium alloy after forming under different strain paths. Optical micrographs were used to observe the shear band formation and regions of high twin density in samples strained under uniaxial, biaxial, and plane strain conditions. Interrupted testing at 4 pct effective strain increments, until failure, was used to observe the evolution of the microstructure. The results showed that shear bands, with a high percentage of twinned grains, appeared early in the samples strained under biaxial or plane strain tension. These bands are similar to those seen in uniaxial tension specimens just prior to failure where the uniaxial tensile ductility was much greater than that observed for plane strain or biaxial tension conditions. A forming limit diagram for AZ31B, which was developed from the strain data, showed that plane strain and biaxial tension had very similar limit strains; this contrasts with materials like steel or aluminum alloys, which typically have greater ductility in biaxial tension compared to plane strain tension.

  16. Density changes in shear bands of a metallic glass determined by correlative analytical transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rösner, Harald, E-mail: rosner@uni-muenster.de [Institut für Materialphysik, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Strasse 10, D-48149 Münster (Germany); Peterlechner, Martin [Institut für Materialphysik, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Strasse 10, D-48149 Münster (Germany); Kübel, Christian [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute of Nanotechnology (INT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Karlsruhe Nano Micro Facility (KNMF), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Schmidt, Vitalij [Institut für Materialphysik, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Strasse 10, D-48149 Münster (Germany); Wilde, Gerhard [Institut für Materialphysik, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Strasse 10, D-48149 Münster (Germany); Institute of Nanochemistry and Nanobiology, School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China)

    2014-07-01

    Density changes between sheared zones and their surrounding amorphous matrix as a result of plastic deformation in a cold-rolled metallic glass (melt-spun Al{sub 88}Y{sub 7}Fe{sub 5}) were determined using high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) detector intensities supplemented by electron-energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) and nano-beam diffraction analyses. Sheared zones or shear bands were observed as regions of bright or dark contrast arising from a higher or lower density relative to the matrix. Moreover, abrupt contrast changes from bright to dark and vice versa were found within individual shear bands. We associate the decrease in density mainly with an enhanced free volume in the shear bands and the increase in density with concomitant changes of the mass. This interpretation is further supported by changes in the zero loss and Plasmon signal originating from such sites. The limits of this new approach are discussed. - Highlights: • We describe a novel approach for measuring densities in shear bands of metallic glasses. • The linear relation of the dark-field intensity I/I{sub 0} and the mass thickness ρt was used. • Individual shear bands showed abrupt contrast changes from bright to dark and vice versa. • Density changes ranging from about −10% to +6% were found for such shear bands. • Mixtures of amorphous/medium range ordered domains were found within the shear bands.

  17. Experimental Investigation of Adiabatic Shear Banding at Different Impact Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    plasticity and ASB’s is the Double-notch Shear specimen, it has been decided to use this concept in shear testing at medium and high strain rates...is the Double-notch Shear specimen. it has been decided to use this concept in shear testing at medium and high strain rates. Originally, Campbell...7] C. Fressengeas, Analyse dynamique 61asto-viscoplastique de l’h6tdrogdndit6 de la ddforma- tion plastique de cisalllement, Proc. Int. Conf. on

  18. Atomistic simulation study of the shear-band deformation mechanism in Mg-Cu metallic glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, Nicholas; Schiøtz, Jakob; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    2006-01-01

    We have simulated plastic deformation of a model Mg-Cu metallic glass in order to study shear banding. In uniaxial tension, we find a necking instability occurs rather than shear banding. We can force the latter to occur by deforming in plane strain, forbidding the change of length in one...... of the transverse directions. Furthermore, in most of the simulations a notch is used to initiate shear bands, which lie at a 45 degrees angle to the tensile loading direction. The shear bands are characterized by the Falk and Langer local measure of plastic deformation D-min(2), averaged here over volumes...... observe a slight decrease in density, up to 1%, within the shear band, which is consistent with notions of increased free volume or disorder within a plastically deforming amorphous material....

  19. All you need is shape: Predicting shear banding in sand with LS-DEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Reid; Andò, Edward; Viggiani, Gioacchino; Andrade, José E.

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents discrete element method (DEM) simulations with experimental comparisons at multiple length scales-underscoring the crucial role of particle shape. The simulations build on technological advances in the DEM furnished by level sets (LS-DEM), which enable the mathematical representation of the surface of arbitrarily-shaped particles such as grains of sand. We show that this ability to model shape enables unprecedented capture of the mechanics of granular materials across scales ranging from macroscopic behavior to local behavior to particle behavior. Specifically, the model is able to predict the onset and evolution of shear banding in sands, replicating the most advanced high-fidelity experiments in triaxial compression equipped with sequential X-ray tomography imaging. We present comparisons of the model and experiment at an unprecedented level of quantitative agreement-building a one-to-one model where every particle in the more than 53,000-particle array has its own avatar or numerical twin. Furthermore, the boundary conditions of the experiment are faithfully captured by modeling the membrane effect as well as the platen displacement and tilting. The results show a computational tool that can give insight into the physics and mechanics of granular materials undergoing shear deformation and failure, with computational times comparable to those of the experiment. One quantitative measure that is extracted from the LS-DEM simulations that is currently not available experimentally is the evolution of three dimensional force chains inside and outside of the shear band. We show that the rotations on the force chains are correlated to the rotations in stress principal directions.

  20. Stent implantation influence wall shear stress evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernad, S. I.; Totorean, A. F.; Bosioc, A. I.; Petre, I.; Bernad, E. S.

    2016-06-01

    Local hemodynamic factors are known affect the natural history of the restenosis critically after coronary stenting of atherosclerosis. Stent-induced flows disturbance magnitude dependent directly on the strut design. The impact of flow alterations around struts vary as the strut geometrical parameters change. Our results provide data regarding the hemodynamic parameters for the blood flow in both stenosed and stented coronary artery under physiological conditions, namely wall shear stress and pressure drop.

  1. Ordering fluctuations in a shear-banding wormlike micellar system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelico, R.; Rossi, C. Oliviero; Ambrosone, L.

    2010-01-01

    We present a first investigation about the non-linear flow properties and transient orientational-order fluctuations observed in the shear-thinning lecithin–water–cyclohexane wormlike micellar system at a concentration near to the zero-shear isotropic–nematic phase transition. From rheological...

  2. Numerical simulation of systems of shear bands in ductile metal with inclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plohr, JeeYeon N., E-mail: jplohr@lanl.gov; Plohr, Bradley J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Theoretical Division, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    We develop a method for numerical simulations of high strain-rate loading of mesoscale samples of ductile metal with inclusions. Because of its small-scale inhomogeneity, the composite material is prone to localized shear deformation (adiabatic shear bands). This method employs the Generalized Method of Cells of Paley and Aboudi [Mech. Materials, vol. 14, pp. 127–139, 1992] to ensure that the micro mechanical behavior of the metal and inclusions is reflected properly in the behavior of the composite at the mesoscale. To find the effective plastic strain rate when shear bands are present, we extend and apply the analytic and numerical analysis of shear bands of Glimm, Plohr, and Sharp [Mech. Materials, vol. 24, pp. 31–41, 1996]. Our tests of the method focus on the stress/strain response in uniaxial-strain flow, both compressive and tensile, of depleted uranium metal containing silicon carbide inclusions. We use the Preston-Tonks-Wallace viscoplasticity model [J. Appl. Phys., vol. 93, pp. 211–220, 2003], which applies to the high strain-rate regime of an isotropic viscoplastic solid. In results, we verify the elevated temperature and thermal softening at shear bands in our simulations of pure DU and DU/SiC composites. We also note that in composites, due the asymmetry caused by the inclusions, shear band form at different times in different subcells. In particular, in the subcells near inclusions, shear band form much earlier than they do in pure DU.

  3. Numerical simulation of systems of shear bands in ductile metal with inclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JeeYeon N. Plohr

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We develop a method for numerical simulations of high strain-rate loading of mesoscale samples of ductile metal with inclusions. Because of its small-scale inhomogeneity, the composite material is prone to localized shear deformation (adiabatic shear bands. This method employs the Generalized Method of Cells of Paley and Aboudi [Mech. Materials, vol. 14, pp. 127–139, 1992] to ensure that the micro mechanical behavior of the metal and inclusions is reflected properly in the behavior of the composite at the mesoscale. To find the effective plastic strain rate when shear bands are present, we extend and apply the analytic and numerical analysis of shear bands of Glimm, Plohr, and Sharp [Mech. Materials, vol. 24, pp. 31–41, 1996]. Our tests of the method focus on the stress/strain response in uniaxial-strain flow, both compressive and tensile, of depleted uranium metal containing silicon carbide inclusions. We use the Preston-Tonks-Wallace viscoplasticity model [J. Appl. Phys., vol. 93, pp. 211–220, 2003], which applies to the high strain-rate regime of an isotropic viscoplastic solid. In results, we verify the elevated temperature and thermal softening at shear bands in our simulations of pure DU and DU/SiC composites. We also note that in composites, due the asymmetry caused by the inclusions, shear band form at different times in different subcells. In particular, in the subcells near inclusions, shear band form much earlier than they do in pure DU.

  4. Shear Strains, Strain Rates and Temperature Changes in Adiabatic Shear Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-01

    X14A. It has been found that when bainitic and martensitic steels are sheared adiabatically, a layer of material within ths shear zone is altezed and...Sooiety for Metals, Metals Park, Ohio, 1978, pp. 148-0. 21 TABLE II SOLID-STATE TRANSFORMATIONS IN BAINITIC STEEL TRANSFORMATION TRANSFORMATION...shear, thermoplastic, plasticity, plastic deformation, armor, steel IL AnSRACT ( -=nba asoa.tm a naeoesM iN faity by bleak n bet/2972 Experiments

  5. Evolution of thermal ion transport barriers in reversed shear/ optimised shear plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voitsekhovitch, I.; Garbet, X.; Moreau, D.; Bush, C.E.; Budny, R.V.; Gohil, P.; Kinsey, J.E.; Talyor, T.S.; Litaudon, X.

    2001-01-01

    The effects of the magnetic and ExB rotation shears on the thermal ion transport in advanced tokamak scenarios are analyzed through the predictive modelling of the evolution of internal transport barriers. Such a modelling is performed with an experimentally validated L-mode thermal diffusivity completed with a semi-empirical shear correction which is based on simple theoretical arguments from turbulence studies. A multi-machine test of the model on relevant discharges from the ITER Data Base (TFTR, DIII-D and JET) is presented. (author)

  6. Numerical simulation of systems of shear bands in ductile metal with inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plohr, Jeeyeon

    2017-06-01

    We develop a method for numerical simulations of high strain-rate loading of mesoscale samples of ductile metal with inclusions. Because of its small-scale inhomogeneity, the composite material is prone to localized shear deformation. This method employs the Generalized Method of Cells to ensure that the micro mechanical behavior of the metal and inclusions is reflected properly in the behavior of the composite at the mesoscale. To find the effective plastic strain rate when shear bands are present, we extend and apply the analytic and numerical analysis of shear bands of Glimm, Plohr, and Sharp. Our tests of the method focus on the stress/strain response in uniaxial-strain flow, both compressive and tensile, of depleted uranium metal containing silicon carbide inclusions. In results, we verify the elevated temperature and thermal softening at shear bands in our simulations of pure DU and DU/SiC composites. We also note that in composites, due the asymmetry caused by the inclusions, shear band form at different times in different subcells. In particular, in the subcells near inclusions, shear band form much earlier than they do in pure DU.

  7. Fourier band-power E/B-mode estimators for cosmic shear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Matthew R.; Rozo, Eduardo

    2016-01-20

    We introduce new Fourier band-power estimators for cosmic shear data analysis and E/B-mode separation. We consider both the case where one performs E/B-mode separation and the case where one does not. The resulting estimators have several nice properties which make them ideal for cosmic shear data analysis. First, they can be written as linear combinations of the binned cosmic shear correlation functions. Secondly, they account for the survey window function in real-space. Thirdly, they are unbiased by shape noise since they do not use correlation function data at zero separation. Fourthly, the band-power window functions in Fourier space are compact and largely non-oscillatory. Fifthly, they can be used to construct band-power estimators with very efficient data compression properties. In particular, we find that all of the information on the parameters Ωm, σ8 and ns in the shear correlation functions in the range of ~10–400 arcmin for single tomographic bin can be compressed into only three band-power estimates. Finally, we can achieve these rates of data compression while excluding small-scale information where the modelling of the shear correlation functions and power spectra is very difficult. Given these desirable properties, these estimators will be very useful for cosmic shear data analysis.

  8. Adiabatic shear bands as predictors of strain rate in high speed machining of ramax-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeb, M.A.; Irfan, M.A.; Velduis, A.C.

    2008-01-01

    Shear band formation was studied in the chips obtained by turning of stainless steel- Ramax-2 (AISI 420F). The machining was performed on a CNC lathe using a PVD (Physical Vapor Deposition) cutting tool insert. The cutting speeds ranged from 50 m/ min to 250 m/min. Dry cutting conditions were employed. At cutting speeds higher than 30 m/mill, the chip did not remain intact with the workpiece using quick stop device. It was difficult to get the chip root SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope) micrographs at further higher speeds. Therefore, the width of the shear bands was used as the predictor of the strain rates involved at various cutting speeds. The results showed that the strain rates are quite in agreement with the amount of strain rate found during machining of such types of stainless steels. It was also observed that shear band density increased with increasing cutting speed. (author)

  9. Effects of texture on shear band formation in plane strain tension/compression and bending

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuroda, M.; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2007-01-01

    In this study, effects of typical texture components observed in rolled aluminum alloy sheets on shear band formation in plane strain tension/compression and bending are systematically studied. The material response is described by a generalized Taylor-type polycrystal model, in which each grain ...... shear band formation in bent specimens is compared to that in the tension/compression problem. Finally, the present results are compared to previous related studies, and the efficiency of the present method for materials design in future is discussed....

  10. Studies of Shear Band Velocity Using Spatially and Temporally Resolved Measurements of Strain During Quasistatic Compression of Bulk Metallic Glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, W J; Samale, M; Hufnagel, T; LeBlanc, M; Florando, J

    2009-06-15

    We have made measurements of the temporal and spatial features of the evolution of strain during the serrated flow of Pd{sub 40}Ni{sub 40}P{sub 20} bulk metallic glass tested under quasistatic, room temperature, uniaxial compression. Strain and load data were acquired at rates of up to 400 kHz using strain gages affixed to all four sides of the specimen and a piezoelectric load cell located near the specimen. Calculation of the displacement rate requires an assumption about the nature of the shear displacement. If one assumes that the entire shear plane displaces simultaneously, the displacement rate is approximately 0.002 m/s. If instead one assumes that the displacement occurs as a localized propagating front, the velocity of the front is approximately 2.8 m/s. In either case, the velocity is orders of magnitude less than the shear wave speed ({approx}2000 m/s). The significance of these measurements for estimates of heating in shear bands is discussed.

  11. Characterization of adiabatic shear bands in the zirconium alloy impacted by split Hopkinson pressure bar at a strain rate of 6000 s−1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, D.L.; Luan, B.F.; Liu, Q.; Chai, L.J.; Chen, J.W.

    2012-01-01

    The adiabatic shear bands formed in the zirconium alloy impacted by split Hopkinson pressure bar at a strain rate of about 6000 s −1 were characterized systemically by means of a high resolution field emission scanning electron microscope equipped with electron backscatter diffraction probe. The results show that the transformed bands were distinguished on the cross-section view of the impacted specimens, and the ultrafine and equiaxed grains formed in the transformed bands were confirmed. The gradient variation of the grains across the transformed bands from the boundary to the center of the bands was observed, and the grains at the center of the transformed bands were finer than other zones. Based on the characterization of the deformed microstructure adjacent to the transformed bands, the formation mechanism of the ultrafine and equiaxed grains in the transformed bands was revealed, and the rotational dynamic recrystallization mechanism should be responsible for the formation of the ultrafine and equiaxed grains in the transformed bands. According to the collection of the cumulative misorientation at different strain levels, the formation and evolution process of the ultrafine and equiaxed grains in the transformed bands were speculated. The microhardness measurements show that high microhardness value in the transformed bands was obtained because of the grain refining, and the large standard deviation of the microhardness at the center of the transformed bands was confirmed due to the gradient microstructural distribution in the bands.

  12. Effect of pre-existing shear bands on the tensile mechanical properties of a bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Q.P.; Liu, J.W.; Yang, K.J.; Xu, F.; Yao, Z.Q.; Minkow, A.; Fecht, H.J.; Ivanisenko, J.; Chen, L.Y.; Wang, X.D.; Qu, S.X.; Jiang, J.Z.

    2010-01-01

    Bulk Zr 64.13 Cu 15.75 Ni 10.12 Al 10 metallic glass has been rolled at room temperature in two different directions, and the dependences of microstructure and tensile mechanical property on the degree of deformation and rolling directions have been investigated. No deformation-induced crystallization occurs except for shear bands. Shear band formation in conjugated directions is achieved in the specimen rolled in two directions, while rolling in one direction induces shear band formation only in a single direction. Pre-existing properly spaced soft inhomogeneities can stabilize shear bands and lead to tensile plastic strain, and the efficient intersection of shear bands in conjugated directions results in work-hardening behavior, which is further confirmed by in situ tensile scanning electron microscopic observation. Based on the experimental results obtained in two different specimen geometries and finite element analysis, it is deduced that a normal-stress-modified maximum shear stress criterion rather than a shear plane criterion can describe the conditions for the formation of shear bands in uniaxial tension.

  13. Evolution of allowable stresses in shear for lumber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert L. Ethington; William L. Galligan; Henry M. Montrey; Alan D. Freas

    1979-01-01

    This paper surveys research leading to allowable shear stress parallel to grain for lumber. In early flexure tests of lumber, some pieces failed in shear. The estimated shear stress at time of failure was generally lower than shear strength measured on small, clear, straight-grained specimens. This and other engineering observations gave rise to adjustments that...

  14. High-Strain Rate Failure Modeling Incorporating Shear Banding and Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-22

    High Strain Rate Failure Modeling Incorporating Shear Banding and Fracture The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 12. DISTRIBUTION AVAILIBILITY STATEMENT 6. AUTHORS...Report as of 05-Dec-2017 Agreement Number: W911NF-13-1-0238 Organization: Columbia University Title: High Strain Rate Failure Modeling Incorporating

  15. Numerical Simulation of Adiabatic Shear Bands in Ti-6Al-4V Alloy Due to Fragment Impact

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fermen-Coker, Muege

    2004-01-01

    ... and lethality technologies for the Army's Future Combat Systems. Onset and propagation of adiabatic shear bands are investigated both experimentally and computationally by studying the ballistic impact of 20-mm steel fragments against Ti-6Al-4V plates...

  16. Evolution of solar magnetic arcades. I. Ideal MHD evolution under footpoint shearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, G.S.; Lee, L.C.

    1996-01-01

    The ideal MHD evolution of a single magnetic arcade undergoing footpoint motions in a two-dimensional Cartesian geometry is investigated using numerical simulation. Also, force-free states of the same arcade are constructed with the use of a magnetofrictional method, which is formulated differently from those used in previous studies. In MHD simulations, no instability or nonequilibrium is found to the value of shear 100 times as large as the footprint separation in the potential field. The evolutionary sequence is composed of three distinct phases. The first phase is characterized by the increase of the toroidal field strength and the second phase by a sort of self-similar expansion. In the third phase, the formation and growth of a central current layer are conspicuous. With increasing shear, the maximum current density increases, the width of the current layer decreases, and the feet of the current layer, which bifurcates above the bottom boundary, get closer to each other. The field lines in the current layer tend to thread the bottom boundary nearly horizontally for a large shear. From our results, it is inductively inferred that the magnetic arcade in a two-dimensional Cartesian geometry approaches an open field as the shear increases indefinitely. copyright 1996 The American Astronomical Society

  17. Development of local shear bands and orientation gradients in fcc polycrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaudoin, A.J. Jr.; Mecking, H.; Kocks, U.F.

    1995-01-01

    A finite element formulation which derives constitutive response from crystal plasticity theory is used to examine localized deformation in fcc polycrystals. The polycrystals are simple, idealized arrangements of grains. Localized deformations within individual grains lead to the development of domains that are separated by boundaries of high misorientation. Shear banding is seen to occur on a microscopic scale of grain dimensions. The important consequences of these simulations are that the predicted local inhomogeneities are meeting various requirements which make them possible nucleation sites for recrystallization

  18. Compressive failure model for fiber composites by kink band initiation from obliquely aligned, shear-dislocated fiber breaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, J.; Phoenix, S.L. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States). Dept. of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics

    2005-04-01

    Predicting compressive failure of a unidirectional fibrous composite is a longstanding and challenging problem that we study from a new perspective. Motivated by previous modelling of tensile failure as well as experimental observations on compressive failures in single carbon fibers, we develop a new micromechanical model for the compressive failure process in unidirectional, planar composites. As the compressive load is increased, random fiber failures are assumed to occur due to statistically distributed flaws, analogous to what occurs in tension. These breaks are often shear-mode failures with slanted surfaces that induce shear dislocations, especially when they occur in small groups aligned obliquely. Our model includes interactions of dislocated and neighboring intact fibers through a system of fourth-order, differential equations governing transverse deformation, and also allows for local matrix plastic yielding and debonding from the fiber near and within the dislocation arrays. Using the Discrete Fourier Transform method, we find a 'building-block' analytical solution form, which naturally embodies local length scales of fiber microbuckling and instability. Based on the influence function, superposition approach, a computationally efficient scheme is developed to model the evolution of fiber and matrix stresses. Under increasing compressive strain the simulations show that matrix yielding and debonding crucially lead to large increases in bending strains in fibers next to small groups of obliquely aligned, dislocated breaks. From the paired locations of maximum fiber bending in flanking fibers, the triggering of an unstable kink band becomes realistic. The geometric features of the kink band, such as the fragment lengths and orientation angles, will depend on the fiber and matrix mechanical and geometric properties. In carbon fiber-polymer matrix systems our model predicts a much lower compressive failure stress than obtained from Rosen

  19. Texture evolution by shear on two planes during ECAP of a high-strength aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shuncai; Starink, Marco J.; Gao Nong; Qiao Xiaoguang; Xu Cheng; Langdon, Terence G.

    2008-01-01

    The evolution of texture was examined during equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) of an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy having a strong initial texture. An analysis of the local texture using electron backscatter diffraction demonstrates that shear occurs on two shear planes: the main shear plane (MSP) equivalent to the simple shear plane, and a secondary shear plane which is perpendicular to the MSP. Throughout most regions of the ECAP billet, the MSP is close to the intersection plane of the two channels but with a small (5 deg.) deviation. Only the {1 1 1} and {0 0 1} shear systems were activated and there was no experimental evidence for the existence of other shear systems. In a small region at the bottom edge of the billet that passed through the zone of intersection of the channels, the observed textures were fully consistent with the rolling textures of Copper and Goss

  20. Influence of shear and deviatoric stress on the evolution of permeability in fractured rock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faoro, Igor; Niemeijer, André; Marone, Chris; Elsworth, Derek

    The evolution of permeability in fractured rock as a function of effective normal stress, shear displacement, and damage remains a complex issue. In this contribution, we report on experiments in which rock surfaces were subject to direct shear under controlled pore pressure and true triaxial stress

  1. Dynamic evolution of shear - extensional tectonics in South China and uranium resource exploration strategic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Shiyi; Tao Zhijun; Han Qiming

    2012-01-01

    A variety of multi- types, multi-level, multi-era shear - extensional tectonics in south China is developed, the main form of shear-extensional tectonics, and developmental characteristics and metallogenic geodynamic evolution is discovered, and thus uranium resource exploration strategic analysis is conducted

  2. Effect of microstructure on the nucleation and initiation of adiabatic shear bands (ASBs) during impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boakye Yiadom, Solomon, E-mail: boakyeys@cc.umanitoba.ca; Khaliq Khan, Abdul, E-mail: abdulkhaliq.khan@umanitoba.ca; Bassim, Nabil, E-mail: nabil.bassim@ad.umanitoba.ca

    2014-10-06

    While instability may occur homogenously during plastic deformation, the formation of adiabatic shear band (ASBs) does not follow a homogenous instability during impact. Geometrical stress concentration sites and/or microstructural inhomogeneities result in the nucleation and initiation of shear strain localization. In this study, initial microstructural inhomogeneity was found to produce nucleation sites for the initiation of ASBs. It was observed that double misfit interfaces and boundary layers with random arrangement of atomic columns are formed around precipitated carbides and they increase the volume fraction of dislocation sources within the specimens. The AISI 4340 steel specimens which were tempered at the lowest temperature had smaller precipitated carbides with high aspect ratios densely distributed within the matrix and were easily susceptible to the formation of ASBs. As the tempering temperature increased, the relative sizes of the carbides increased with a corresponding reduction in their aspect ratios and their distribution density within the matrix and thus were more resistant to the formation of ASBs. In this study, it is demonstrated that the intersection of an activated dislocation source with the direction of maximum shear (regions of stress concentrations) within the specimens during impact, is a necessary condition for the point of intersection to act as a possible site for the nucleation of ASBs, depending on the rate of dislocation generation, local strain and strain rate. At a constant carbide volume fraction, the higher susceptibility of the tempered specimens to the initiation of ASBs is attributed to the volume fraction of the points of intersection between activated dislocation sources and direction of maximum shear during impact. Additionally, the smaller carbides, with their higher aspect ratios and distribution densities, accentuate the effect of strain gradients and the microstructural inhomogeneities associated with the tempered

  3. A numerical model for adiabatic shear bands with application to a thick-walled cylinder in 304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Mingtao; Li, Yongchi; Hu, Xiuzhang; Hu, Haibo

    2014-01-01

    The formation of an adiabatic shear band (ASB) experiences three stages: stable plastic flow, nucleation and a fluid-like stage. For different stages, the microstructures of the material undergo great changes. The mechanical behavior of the material in each stage has its own unique characteristics. To describe these characteristics, a multi-stage model for the shear band is proposed. For the stable plastic flow stage, a modified adiabatic J–C constitutive relationship is used. For the nucleation stage, the effects of work hardening and temperature softening are described by a power function of plastic strain. A Newtonian fluid model is used for the fluid-like stage. The formation of a shear band is an instability process. Various defects in the material are perturbation sources, which change the local yield stress. To describe the disturbances, a probability factor is introduced into the macroscopic constitutive relationship. The yield stress in the material is assumed to obey a Gaussian distribution. The multi-stage model combined with a probability factor is applied to simulate the rupture of thick-walled cylinder in 304 Stainless Steel (304SS). A close agreement is found between the simulation and experimental results, such as the failure mechanism, shear band spacing and propagating velocity of the shear band. By combining the experimental results with the simulation results, the importance of the nucleation stage is emphasized. (paper)

  4. Metallurgical analysis of a failed maraging steel shear screw used in the band separation system of a satellite launch vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V.S. Narayana Murty

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Maraging steels have excellent combination of strength and toughness and are extensively used for a variety of aerospace applications. In one such critical application, this steel was used to fabricate shear screws of a stage separation system in a satellite launch vehicle. During assembly preparations, one of the shear screws which connected the separation band and band end block has failed at the first thread. Microstructural analysis revealed that the crack originated from the root of the thread and propagated in an intergranular mode. The failure is attributed to combined effect of stress and corrosion leading to stress corrosion cracking.

  5. Strain localization band width evolution by electronic speckle pattern interferometry strain rate measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guelorget, Bruno [Institut Charles Delaunay-LASMIS, Universite de technologie de Troyes, FRE CNRS 2848, 12 rue Marie Curie, B.P. 2060, 10010 Troyes Cedex (France)], E-mail: bruno.guelorget@utt.fr; Francois, Manuel; Montay, Guillaume [Institut Charles Delaunay-LASMIS, Universite de technologie de Troyes, FRE CNRS 2848, 12 rue Marie Curie, B.P. 2060, 10010 Troyes Cedex (France)

    2009-04-15

    In this paper, electronic speckle pattern interferometry strain rate measurements are used to quantify the width of the strain localization band, which occurs when a sheet specimen is submitted to tension. It is shown that the width of this band decreases with increasing strain. Just before fracture, this measured width is about five times wider than the shear band and the initial sheet thickness.

  6. The Effect of Displacement Mode of Rigid Retaining Walls on Shearing Bands by Active Earth Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sekkel

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This work treats the physical modeling of failure mechanisms by active earth pressure. This last is developed by retaining wall movement. A lot of research showed that wall displacement has a significant effect on active earth pressure. A good comprehension of active earth pressure phenomenon and its failure mechanisms help us to better conceive retaining walls. The conception of a small-scale model allowed the realization of active earth pressure tests, while displacing the mobile wall toward the outside of the massif. The studied material is that of Schneebeli; light two-dimensional material made of cylindrical plastic rollers, simulating granular non-cohesive soil. The evolution of shearing zones under continuous and discontinuous displacement modes of mobile walls by correlation pictures allows the investigation of the localization of deformations and failure mechanisms.

  7. The formation of PSB-like shear bands in cyclically deformed ultrafine grained copper processed by ECAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, S.D.; Wang, Z.G.; Jiang, C.B.; Li, G.Y.; Alexandrov, I.V.; Valiev, R.Z

    2003-06-15

    Cyclic deformation was performed on ultrafine grained copper processed by ECAP. Shear bands (SBs) and adjacent microstructures were investigated using electron channeling contrast in scanning electron microscope. The possible formation mechanism of SB was discussed based on the characteristic distribution of defects introduced by ECAP.

  8. Computer-Automated Evolution of Spacecraft X-Band Antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohn, Jason D.; Homby, Gregory S.; Linden, Derek S.

    2010-01-01

    A document discusses the use of computer- aided evolution in arriving at a design for X-band communication antennas for NASA s three Space Technology 5 (ST5) satellites, which were launched on March 22, 2006. Two evolutionary algorithms, incorporating different representations of the antenna design and different fitness functions, were used to automatically design and optimize an X-band antenna design. A set of antenna designs satisfying initial ST5 mission requirements was evolved by use these algorithms. The two best antennas - one from each evolutionary algorithm - were built. During flight-qualification testing of these antennas, the mission requirements were changed. After minimal changes in the evolutionary algorithms - mostly in the fitness functions - new antenna designs satisfying the changed mission requirements were evolved and within one month of this change, two new antennas were designed and prototypes of the antennas were built and tested. One of these newly evolved antennas was approved for deployment on the ST5 mission, and flight-qualified versions of this design were built and installed on the spacecraft. At the time of writing the document, these antennas were the first computer-evolved hardware in outer space.

  9. Atomic structure of shear bands in Cu64Zr36 metallic glasses studied by molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Shidong; Qi, Li; Wang, Limin; Pan, Shaopeng; Ma, Mingzhen; Zhang, Xinyu; Li, Gong; Liu, Riping

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Figure shows that atoms in the shear band (SB) moved desultorily compared with those in the matrix. These atoms seriously interacted with each other similar to the grain boundary in crystalline materials. Figuratively, if these atoms wanted to “pass” the shear band, they should arrange their irritations. However, stress concentrations and high energy were observed in SB, which resulted in instability in the deformation process and finally led to a disastrously brittle fracture. - Abstract: Molecular dynamics simulations on the atomic structure of shear bands (SBs) in Cu 64 Zr 36 metallic glasses are presented. Results show that the atoms in the SB move desultorily, in contrast to those in the matrix. The saturated degree of bonded pairs considering the “liquid-like” character of SB quantitatively provides important details in extending earlier studies on SBs. Zr-centered 〈0, 2, 8, 5〉 clusters exhibit strong spatial correlations and tendency to connect with each other in short-range order. The 〈0, 2, 8, 5〉 cluster-type medium-range order is the main feature inside the SB relative to the matrix. The fractal results demonstrate the planar-like fashion of the 〈0, 2, 8, 5〉 network in SB, forming an interpenetrating solid-like backbone. Such heterogeneous structure provides a fundamental structural perspective of mechanical instability in SB

  10. Staircase bands in 105,107,109Ag: fingerprint of interplay between shears mechanism and collective rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, B.; Rather, Niyaz; Datta, P.

    2015-01-01

    Shears mechanism in weakly deformed nuclei has been firmly established by numerous experimental observations since its inception by S. Fruaendorf in early nineties. On the contrary, the scope of Shears mode of excitation in moderately deformed nuclei is a less explored territory. The Shears mechanism is primarily identified in bands having strong M1 transitions with increasing energies as well as falling B(M1) rates as a function of angular momentum. On the other hand, the presence of M1 energy staggering in odd and odd-odd nuclei indicates that the signature is a good quantum number which corresponds to collective rotation. It is interesting to note that nuclei near Z=50 shell closure are moderately deformed as well as Shears structure develop at higher excitation with quasi-particles alignment. To be specific, the moderately deformed Ag nuclei are good candidates for such study as the high spin states are predominantly generated by the valance neutrons in low-Ω orbitals of h 11/2 and the valance protons in high-Ω orbitals of g 9/2 which forms a Shears structure

  11. Structural Evolution of a Warm Frontal Precipitation Band During GCPEx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colle, Brian A.; Naeger, Aaron; Molthan, Andrew; Nesbitt, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    A warm frontal precipitation band developed over a few hours 50-100 km to the north of a surface warm front. The 3-km WRF was able to realistically simulate band development, although the model is somewhat too weak. Band genesis was associated with weak frontogenesis (deformation) in the presence of weak potential and conditional instability feeding into the band region, while it was closer to moist neutral within the band. As the band matured, frontogenesis increased, while the stability gradually increased in the banding region. Cloud top generating cells were prevalent, but not in WRF (too stable). The band decayed as the stability increased upstream and the frontogenesis (deformation) with the warm front weakened. The WRF may have been too weak and short-lived with the band because too stable and forcing too weak (some micro issues as well).

  12. The Effects of Shear Strain, Fabric, and Porosity Evolution on Elastic and Mechanical Properties of Clay-Rich Fault Gouge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenigsberg, A.; Saffer, D. M.; Riviere, J.; Marone, C.

    2017-12-01

    Ultrasonic/seismic waves are widely used for probing fault zone elastic and mechanical properties (gouge composition, frictional strength, density) and elastic properties (Vp, Vs, bulk and shear moduli), as it can provide insight into key processes and fault properties during shearing. These include fabric and force chain formation, porosity evolution, and fault zone stiffness, which are in turn factors in fault slip, damage, and healing. We report on a suite of direct shear experiments on synthetic fault gouge composed of 50% smectite /50% quartz at a normal stress of 25 MPa, in which we use ultrasonic wave transmission to continuously monitor compressional and shear wave velocities (Vp, Vs) up to shear strains of 25, while simultaneously measuring friction and monitoring the evolution of density and porosity. We find that wavespeeds vary with shear strain, due to fabric development and the evolution of density and porosity. The coefficient of friction peaks at μ .47 at a shear strain of .5 - 1, decreases to a steady state value of μ .43 by shear strains of 4.5- 6 and then remains rather constant to shear strains of 6 - 25, consistent with previous work. Density increases rapidly from 1.78 g/cm3 to 1.83 g/cm3 at shear strains from 0-2 (porosity decreases from 33% to 25% over that range), and then more gradually increases to a density of 2.08 g/cm3 (porosity of 21%) at a shear strain of 25. Vp increases from 2400 m/s to 2900 m/s during the onset of shear until a shear strain of 3, and then decreases to 2400-2500 by shear strain of 7-9. At shear strains above 9, Vp slowly increases as the layer becomes denser and less porous. We interpret the co-evolving changes in friction, porosity, and elastic moduli/wavespeed to reflect fabric development and alignment of clay particles as a function of shearing. More specifically, the decrease in Vp at a shear strain of 3 reflects the clay particles gradually aligning. Once the particles are aligned, the gradual increase of

  13. Microstructure evolution of pure copper during a single pass of simple shear extrusion (SSE): role of shear reversal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagherpour, E., E-mail: e.bagherpour@semnan.ac.ir [Faculty of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Semnan University, Semnan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610–0394 (Japan); Qods, F., E-mail: qods@semnan.ac.ir [Faculty of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Semnan University, Semnan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ebrahimi, R., E-mail: ebrahimy@shirazu.ac.ir [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Miyamoto, H., E-mail: hmiyamot@mail.doshisha.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610–0394 (Japan)

    2016-06-01

    In the present paper the role of shear reversal on microstructure, texture and mechanical properties of pure copper during a single pass of the simple shear extrusion (SSE) process was investigated. For SSE processing an appropriate die with a linear die profile was designed and constructed, which imposes forward shear in the first half and reverse shear in the second half channels. Electron back-scattering diffraction (EBSD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) were used to evaluate the microstructure of the deformed samples. The geometrical nature of this process imposes a distribution of strain results in the inhomogeneous microstructure and the hardness throughout the plane perpendicular to the extrusion direction. Strain reversal during the process results in a slight reduction in dislocation density, the hardness and mean disorientation angle of the samples, and an increase in the grain size. After a complete pass of SSE, dislocation density decreased by ~14% if compared to the middle of the process. This suggests that the dislocation annihilation occurred by the reversal of the shear strain. The simple shear textures were formed gradually and the strongest simple shear textures were observed on the middle of the SSE channel. The degree of the simple shear textures decreases with the distance from the middle plane where the shear is reversed, but the simple shear textures are still the major components after exit of the channel. Hardness variation was modeled by contributions from dislocation strengthening and grain boundary strengthening, where dislocation density is approximated by the misorientation angle of LAGBs which are regarded as dislocation cell boundaries. As a result, the hardness can be predicted successfully by the microstructural features, i.e. the low-angle boundaries, the mean misorientation angle and the fraction of high-angle grain boundaries.

  14. Microstructural Evolution in Intensively Melt Sheared Direct Chill Cast Al-Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, S.; Rao, A. K. Prasada; Patel, J. B.; Scamans, G. M.; Fan, Z.

    The work presented here introduces the novel melt conditioned direct chill casting (MC-DC) technology, where intensive melt shearing is applied to the conventional direct-chill casting process. MC-DC casting can successfully produce high quality Al-alloy billets. The results obtained from 80 mm diameter billets cast at speed of 200 mm/min show that MC-DC casting of Al-alloys, substantially refines the microstructure and reduces macro-segregation. In this paper, we present the preliminary results and discuss microstructural evolution during MC-DC casting of Al-alloys.

  15. Adiabatic shear localization in ultrafine grained 6061 aluminum alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Bingfeng, E-mail: biw009@ucsd.edu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego (United States); State Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan (China); Key Lab of Nonferrous Materials, Ministry of Education, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Ma, Rui; Zhou, Jindian [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Li, Zezhou; Zhao, Shiteng [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego (United States); Huang, Xiaoxia [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2016-10-15

    Localized shear is an important mode of deformation; it leads to catastrophic failure with low ductility, and occurs frequently during high strain-rate deformation. The hat-shaped specimen has been successfully used to generate shear bands under controlled shock-loading tests. The microstructure in the forced shear band was characterized by optical microscopy, microhardness, and transmission electron microscopy. The true flow stress in the shear region can reach 800 MPa where the strain is about 2.2. The whole shear localization process lasts for about 100 μs. The shear band is a long and straight band distinguished from the matrix by boundaries. It can be seen that the grains in the boundary of the shear band are highly elongated along the shear direction and form the elongated cell structures (0.2 µm in width), and the core of the shear band consists of a number of recrystallized equiaxed grains with 0.2−0.3 µm in diameters, and the second phase particles distribute in the boundary of the ultrafine equiaxed new grains. The calculated temperature in the shear band can reach about 667 K. Finally, the formation of the shear band in the ultrafine grained 6061 aluminum alloy and its microstructural evolution are proposed.

  16. Lifetimes near the bandhead of a shears band in 198Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruecken, R.; Kruecken, R.; Clark, R.M.; Deleplanque, M.A.; Diamond, R.M.; Fallon, P.; Lee, I.Y.; Macchiavelli, A.O.; Schmid, G.J.; Stephens, F.S.; Vetter, K.; Dewald, A.; Peusquens, R.; Brentano, P. von; Hauschild, K.

    1998-01-01

    Subpicosecond lifetimes of states near the bandhead of an M1 band in 198 Pb have been measured with the recoil-distance Doppler-shift technique using the Gammasphere array and the Cologne plunger. The deduced B(M1) values are in agreement with the predictions of the tilted axis cranking (TAC) model. Their spin dependence continues the trend set by recently published B(M1) values for the high spin states in this band. The emerging picture gives strong support to the concept of open-quotes magnetic rotation,close quotes an alternative mode for the generation of rotational spectra in nuclei. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  17. Evolution of microstructure at hot band annealing of ferritic FeSi steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Jürgen, E-mail: juergen.schneider@t-online.de [Institute of Metal Forming, Technische Universität Bergakademie Freiberg, Bernhard-von Cotta-Str. 4, D-09596 Freiberg (Germany); Stahlzentrum Freiberg e.V., Leipziger Straße 34, D-09599 Freiberg (Germany); Li, Guangqiang [State Key Lab. of Refractories and Metallurgy, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, No. 947 Heping Avenue, Qingshan District, Wuhan 430081 (China); Franke, Armin [Stahlzentrum Freiberg e.V., Leipziger Straße 34, D-09599 Freiberg (Germany); Zhou, Bowen [State Key Lab. of Refractories and Metallurgy, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, No. 947 Heping Avenue, Qingshan District, Wuhan 430081 (China)

    2017-02-15

    The magnetic properties of the finally fabricated nonoriented FeSi steels critically depend on the microstructure and on the occurring crystallographic texture. The fabrication route comprises hot rolling, coiling and cooling, hot band annealing before cold rolling (optional), cold rolling and the final thermal treatment. As well known there is an interplay between the microstructure and texture during the various processing steps. For that reason, it is of interest to know more on the evolution of the microstructure at hot band annealing of hot band prepared in different ways. In this paper we will summarize our recent results on the evolution of microstructure during thermal annealing of hot band: thermal treatment following immediately the last pass of hot rolling or a hot band annealing as a separate processing step before cold rolling.

  18. Shear-peel strength comparison of orthodontic band cements including novel calcium silicate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leo, Mariantonietta; Løvschall, Henrik

    calcium silicate with fluoride and fast-setting, Glass ionomer, and Zinc phosphate cement, used for luting of orthodontic bands on molars kept one month in phosphate buffering solution (PBS). Materials and methods: The roots of 35 extracted human molars were embedded in acryl. Three groups were allocated....... An orthodontic band (AO) was fitted on the free crown. Each group of the teeth (n>10) was cemented with novel calcium silicate (Protooth), Glass ionomer (Orthocem), or Zinc phosphate (DeTrey Zinc). The cements were mixed according to the manufacturers instructions. Samples were stored at 37ºC in humid chamber...... Silicate (Protooth) and Zinc phosphate cement (DeTrey Zinc) were significantly higher than Glass ionomer cement (Orthocem) when looking for the force (N, p

  19. Exact analytic expressions for the evolution of polarization for radiation propagating in a plasma with non uniformly sheared magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segre, S. E.

    2001-01-01

    The known analytic expressions for the evolution of the polarization of electromagnetic waves propagating in a plasma with uniformly sheared magnetic field are extended to the case where the shear is not constant. Exact analytic expressions are found for the case when the space variations of the medium are such that the magnetic field components and the plasma density satisfy a particular condition (eq. 13), possibly in a convenient reference frame of polarization space [it

  20. Pan-African tectonic evolution in central and southern Cameroon: transpression and transtension during sinistral shear movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngako, V.; Affaton, P.; Nnange, J. M.; Njanko, Th.

    2003-04-01

    Kinematic analysis of the central Cameroon shear zone (CCSZ) and its Sanaga fault relay, indicate early sinistral shear movement (phase D 2) that was later followed by a dextral shear movement (phase D 3) during the Pan-African orogeny. The correlation of tectonic events among the CCSZs, thrusting of the Yaounde Group and the deformation in the Lom Group indicate a diachronous deposition history of these groups, where the Yaounde Group is pre-kinematic while the sedimentary and magmatic rocks of the Lom basin are syn-kinematic. Sinistral shear movements along the CCSZ and Sanaga faults are correlated with metamorphism and thrusting of the Yaounde granulites onto the Congo craton, on one hand, and to the opening of the Lom pull-apart basin, oblique to the shear zone, on the other. Kinematic interactions between shear and thrust movements characterize transpression, whereas interactions between shear and oblique normal fault movements characterize transtension. Resulting kinematic indicators show that the Lom basin represents a sinistral transtensional relay of the Sanaga fault. Greenschist-facies metamorphism in the Lom Group rocks dominantly affected by a monophase tectonic evolution were achieved during the late dextral shear movements along the Sanaga fault.

  1. History and Evolution of Control Banding: A Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zalk, D; Nelson, D

    2006-07-19

    Control Banding (CB) strategies offer simplified solutions for controlling worker exposures to constituents often encountered in the workplace. The original CB model was developed within the pharmaceutical industry; however, the modern movement involves models developed for non-experts to input hazard and exposure potential information for bulk chemical processes, receiving control advice as a result. The CB approach utilizes these models for the dissemination of qualitative and semi-quantitative risk assessment tools being developed to complement the traditional industrial hygiene model of air sampling and analysis. It is being applied and tested in small and medium size enterprises (SMEs) within developed countries and industrially developing countries; however, large enterprises (LEs) have also incorporated these strategies within chemical safety programs. Existing research of the components of the most available CB model, the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) Essentials, has shown that exposure bands do not always provide adequate margins of safety, that there is a high rate of under-control errors, that it works better with dusts than with vapors, that there is an inherent inaccuracy in estimating variability, and that when taken together the outcomes of this model may lead to potentially inappropriate workplace confidence in chemical exposure reduction in some operations. Alternatively, large-scale comparisons of industry exposure data to this CB model's outcomes have indicated more promising results with a high correlation seen internationally. With the accuracy of the toxicological ratings and hazard band classification currently in question, their proper reevaluation will be of great benefit to the reliability of existing and future CB models. The need for a more complete analysis of CB model components and, most importantly, a more comprehensive prospective research process remains and will be important in understanding implications

  2. Shear bands and anisotropy of the mechanical properties of an MA2-1pch magnesium alloy after equal-channel angular pressing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebryany, V. N.; Khar'kova, M. A.; D'yakonov, G. S.; Kopylov, V. I.; Dobatkin, S. V.

    2017-10-01

    Effect of structure and texture on the anisotropy of the mechanical properties of the MA2-1pch magnesium alloy subjected to equal-channel angular pressing and subsequent annealing has been studied in two mutually perpendicular planes Y and X (along and across the pressing direction). The anisotropy of the mechanical properties is shown to be due to various orientations of shear bands and various types of texture inside the bands and outside them in planes X and Y.

  3. Shear-controlled evolution of the Red Sea: pull apart model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makris, J.; Rihm, R.

    1991-11-01

    Results of seismic and other geophysical investigations suggest that strike-slip processes controlled the break-up of the Arabian plate from Africa and initiated the Red Sea Rift. Early oceanisation was facilitated by nucleation of pull apart basins and massive intrusives. The evolution of the Red Sea has gone through different stages. It was a zone of structural weakness already during the Pan-African orogeny approximately 600 Ma. A major reactivation, however, that gradually led to the present-day configuration was initiated during the late Oligocene with intense magmatic activity and the development of a continental rift. Wrench faulting played a key role in the early evolution of the Red Sea, as it shaped most of its western flank as a sharp plate boundary and resulted in the generation and rapid oceanisation of linearly arranged pull apart basins. Spatial distribution of these basins reflects the geometry of the strike-slip zone, which was controlled by pre-existing fault systems like the Najd Shear System, the Central African Fault Zone or the Onib-Hamisana and Baraka suture zones. Strike-slip motion along the latter zones of weakness influenced mainly the Egyptian and Sudanese coastal areas. Arabia was therefore separated from Africa by oceanisation in those regions, where pull apart basins developed. They were still connected in the in-between segments by stretched continental crust. With Arabia as the "moving" and Africa as the "stable" plate the eastern Red Sea flank was formed by pure shear through stretching, thinning and diffuse extension. As a consequence, the eastern and western flanks of the Red Sea are asymmetrical. The acceleration of the movement of Arabia in early/middle Miocene could no longer be accommodated by the opening in the Gulf of Suez and consequently the Dead Sea strike-slip fault developed approximately 14 Ma ago. Since plate motion was still oblique to the major structural trends, the pull apart evolution on the western flank

  4. Neoproterozoic Evolution and Najd‒Related Transpressive Shear Deformations Along Nugrus Shear Zone, South Eastern Desert, Egypt (Implications from Field‒Structural Data and AMS‒Technique)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagag, W.; Moustafa, R.; Hamimi, Z.

    2018-01-01

    The tectonometamorphic evolution of Nugrus Shear Zone (NSZ) in the south Eastern Desert of Egypt was reevaluated through an integrated study including field-structural work and magnetofabric analysis using Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) technique, complemented by detailed microstructural investigation. Several lines of evidence indicate that the Neoproterozoic juvenile crust within this high strain zone suffered an impressive tectonic event of left-lateral transpressional regime, transposed the majority of the earlier formed structures into a NNW to NW-directed wrench corridor depicts the northwestern extension of the Najd Shear System (NSS) along the Eastern Desert of Egypt. The core of the southern Hafafit dome underwent a high metamorphic event ( M 1) developed during the end of the main collisional orogeny in the Arabian-Nubian Shield (ANS). The subsequent M 2 metamorphic event was retrogressive and depicts the tectonic evolution and exhumation of the Nugrus-Hafafit area including the Hafafit gneissic domes, during the origination of the left-lateral transpressive wrench corridor of the NSS. The early tectonic fabric within the NSZ and associated highly deformed rocks was successfully detected by the integration of AMS-technique and microstructural observations. Such fabric grain was checked through a field-structural work. The outcomes of the present contribution advocate a complex tectonic evolution with successive and overlapped deformation events for the NSZ.

  5. Neoproterozoic structural evolution of the NE-trending Ad-Damm Shear Zone, Arabian Shield, Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamimi, Zakaria; El-Sawy, El-Sawy K.; El-Fakharani, Abdelhamid; Matsah, Mohamed; Shujoon, Abdulrahman; El-Shafei, Mohamed K.

    2014-11-01

    The Ad-Damm Shear Zone (AdSZ) is a major NE- (to NNE-) trending fault zone separating Jiddah and Asir tectonic terranes in the Neoproterozoic Juvenile Arabian Shield (AS). AdSZ is characterized by the development of dextral transcurrent shear-sense indicators and moderately to steeply NW plunging stretching lineations. It is mainly developed under high amphibolite-to greenschist-facies conditions and extends ∼380 km, with an average width ∼2-4 km, from the conspicuous Ruwah Fault Zone in the eastern shield to the Red Sea Coastal plain. It was believed to be one of the conjugate shears of the NW- to NNW-trending sinistral Najd Shear System. This assumption is, based on the noteworthy dextral shear criteria recorded within the 620 Ma mylonitic granite of No'man Complex. A total shear-zone strike length exceeding 117 km is carefully investigated during this study to reconstruct its structural evolution. Shear-sense indicators and other field observations including overprinting relations clearly demonstrate a complicated Neoproterozoic history of AdSZ, involving at least three phases of deformations (D1-D3). Both D1 and D2 phases were of contractional regime. During D1 phase a NW-SE compression led to the formation of NE-oriented low-angle thrusts and tight-overturned folds. D2 is represented by a NE-SW stress oriented that led to the development of an open folding. D3 is expressed by the NE-SW intensive dextral transcurrent brittle-ductile shearing. It is overprinting the early formed fabrics and played a significant role in the creation of AdSZ and the mega-scale related folds. Such deformation history reflects the same Neoproterozoic deformation regime recognized in the NE-trending shear zones in the Arabian-Nubian Shield (ANS).

  6. Experimental Study of the Composition and Structure of Granular Media in the Shear Bands Based on the HHC-Granular Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-jin Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The researchers cannot control the composition and structure of coarse grained soil in the indoor experiment because the granular particles of different size have the characteristics of random distribution and no sorting. Therefore, on the basis of the laboratory tests with the coarse grained soil, the HHC-Granular model, which could simulate the no sorting and random distribution of different size particles in the coarse-grained soil, was developed by use of cellular automata method. Meanwhile, the triaxial numerical simulation experiments of coarse grained soil were finished with the different composition and structure soil, and the variation of shear strength was discussed. The results showed that the internal friction angle was likely to reduce with the increasing of gravel contents in the coarse-grained soil, but the mean internal friction angle significantly increased with the increment of gravel contents. It indicated that the gravel contents of shear bands were the major factor affecting the shear strength.

  7. A multi-layer bioinspired design with evolution of shish-kebab structures induced by controlled periodical shear field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zhang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The crystallization of polymers, caused by flow fields in the melt, has been the subject of extensive studies for many years. In this study, we use periodical shear to induce polypropylene to form multi-layer structure, which is usually observed in plants. Two interesting points were found: firstly, the quest of mimicking natural structures was achieved by controlled periodical shear field; secondly, the evolution from nano to shish-kebab-like cylindrite structure was obtained in the multi-layer structure, which can be clarified by nuclei competition model. This study can be used to better understand the shear-induced crystallization of polymer. Here our intention is to place this new observation on the map, leaving a fuller presentation and discussion of the work to a future publication.

  8. Magnetic structure of deformation-induced shear bands in amorphous Fe{sub 80}B{sub 16}Si{sub 4} observed by magnetic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, G.W. [Center for Materials Science, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Hawley, M.E. [Materials Science and Technology Division, (MST-8), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Markiewicz, D.J. [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Spaepen, F.; Barth, E.P. [Division of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

    1999-04-01

    Processing-induced magnetic structures in amorphous metallic alloys are of interest because of their impact on the performance of materials used in electric device applications. Plastic deformation associated with cutting or bending the material to the desired shape occurs through the formation of shear bands. The stress associated with these shear bands induces magnetic domains that can lead to power losses through interaction with the fields and currents involved in normal device operation. These domains have been studied previously using a variety of techniques capable of imaging magnetic domain structures. In an effort to better characterize and understand these issues, we have applied atomic and magnetic force microscopy to these materials to provide three-dimensional nanometer-scale topographic resolution and micrometer-scale magnetic resolution. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. The occurrence of shear banding in a millimeter scale (12-bar3)[634] grain of an Al-4.5% Mg alloy during plane strain compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapelle, David; Darrieulat, Michel

    2003-01-01

    The appearance of localization in shear bands during plane strain compression (PSC) of an Al-4.5% Mg alloy is investigated, with emphasis on a millimeter scale S-orientated grain in the longitudinal section of the specimen, upon which a gold microgrid was deposited. In order to justify this focus, attention is also paid on smaller grains of other areas. The microgrid technique allows the local strain field at various steps of deformation to be followed and in-plane components to be plotted over the selected region. Electron back scattered diffraction analysis was also used to gain an insight into the crystallography of local lattice rotations. One can then predict the potentially activated slip systems according to the Schmid law with Taylor's hypothesis, and assert the initial crystallographic feature of shear banding. This provides the opportunity to gain a more complete understanding, assuming a grain scale effect, of the mechanisms involved in the occurrence of shear banding in this alloy, and to reveal its influence on the rolling texture

  10. Domino structures evolution in strike-slip shear zones; the importance of the cataclastic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, N.; Dias, R.

    2018-05-01

    The Porto-Tomar-Ferreira do Alentejo dextral Shear Zone is one of the most important structures of the Iberian Variscides. In its vicinity, close to Abrantes (Central Portugal), a localized heterogeneous strain pattern developed in a decimetric metamorphic siliceous multilayer. This complex pattern was induced by the D2 dextral shearing of the early S0//S1 foliation in brittle-ductile conditions, giving rise to three main shear zone families. One of these families, with antithetic kinematics, delimits blocks with rigid clockwise rotation surrounded by coeval cataclasites, generating a local domino structure. The proposed geometrical and kinematic analysis, coupled with statistical studies, highlights the relation between subsidiary shear zones and the main shear zone. Despite the heterogeneous strain pattern, a quantitative approach of finite strain was applied based on the restoration of the initial fracture pattern. This approach shows the importance of the cataclastic flow coupled with the translational displacement of the domino domain in solving space problems related to the rigid block rotation. Such processes are key in allowing the rigid block rotation inside shear zones whenever the simple shear component is a fundamental mechanism.

  11. FLUID EVOLUTION AND MINERAL REACTIONS DURING SHEAR ZONE FORMATION AT NUSFJORD, LOFOTEN, NORWAY (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullerud, K.

    2009-12-01

    At Nusfjord in Lofoten, Norway, three 0.3 - 3 m thick shear zones occur in a gabbro-anorthosite. During deformation, the shear zones were infiltrated by a hydrous fluid enriched in Cl. In the central parts of the shear zones, fluid-rock interaction resulted in complete break-down of the primary mafic silicates. Complete hydration of these minerals to Cl-free amphibole and biotite suggests that the hydrous fluid was present in excess during deformation in these parts of the shear zones. Along the margins of the shear zones, however, the igneous mafic silicates (Cpx, Bt, Opx) were only partly overgrown by hydrous minerals. Here, Cl-enriched minerals (Amph, Bt, Scp, Ap) can be observed. Amphibole shows compositions covering the range 0.1 - 4.0 wt % Cl within single thin sections. Mineral textures and extreme compositional variations of the Cl-bearing minerals indicate large chemical gradients of the fluid phase. Relics of primary mafic silicates and compositionally zoned reaction coronas around primary mafic silicates suggest that the free fluid was totally consumed before the alteration of the primary phases were completed. The extreme variations in the Cl-content of amphibole are inferred to monitor a gradual desiccation of the Cl-bearing grain-boundary fluid during fluid-mineral reactions accordingly: 1) The first amphibole that formed during the reactions principally extracted water from the fluid, resulting in a slight increase in the Cl content of the fluid. 2) Continued amphibole-forming reactions resulted in gradual consumption of the free fluid phase, principally by extracting water from the fluid, resulting in an increase in its Cl-content. Higher Cl-content of the fluid resulted in higher Cl-content of the equilibrium amphibole. 3) The most Cl-enriched amphibole (4 wt % Cl) formed in equilibrium with the last volumes of the grain-boundary fluid, which had evolved to a highly saline solution. Mineral reactions within a 1-2 thick zone of the host rock along

  12. Thermal evolution of the band edges of 6H-SiC: X-ray methods compared to the optical band gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miedema, P.S.; Beye, M.; Könnecke, R.; Schiwietz, G.; Föhlisch, A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Conduction band minima (CBM) of 6H-SiC are estimated with Si 2p XAS. • Valence band maxima (VBM) of 6H-SiC are estimated with non-resonant Si 2p XES. • Temperature-dependent VBM and CBM of 6H-SiC show asymmetric band gap closing. • XAS, XES and RIXS band gap estimates are compared with the optical band gap. • XAS + XES versus optical band gap provides core-excitonic screening energies. - Abstract: The band gap of semiconductors like silicon and silicon carbide (SiC) is the key for their device properties. In this research, the band gap of 6H-SiC and its temperature dependence were analyzed with silicon 2p X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) allowing for a separate analysis of the conduction-band minimum (CBM) and valence-band maximum (VBM) components of the band gap. The temperature-dependent asymmetric band gap shrinking of 6H-SiC was determined with a valence-band slope of +2.45 × 10 −4 eV/K and a conduction-band slope of −1.334 × 10 −4 eV/K. The apparent asymmetry, e.g., that two thirds of the band-gap shrinking with increasing temperature is due to the VBM evolution in 6H-SiC, is similar to the asymmetry obtained for pure silicon before. The overall band gap temperature-dependence determined with XAS and non-resonant XES is compared to temperature-dependent optical studies. The core-excitonic binding energy appearing in the Si 2p XAS is extracted as the main difference. In addition, the energy loss of the onset of the first band in RIXS yields to values similar to the optical band gap over the tested temperature range

  13. Interface evolution and shear strength of Al/Ti bi-metals processed by a spark plasma sintering (SPS) apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miriyev, Aslan, E-mail: aslan.miriyev@columbia.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Columbia University in the City of New York, 500 W. 120th St., Mudd 220, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Levy, Asaf; Kalabukhov, Sergey; Frage, Nachum [Department of Materials Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, P.O.B. 653, Beer Sheva 8410501 (Israel)

    2016-09-05

    Microstructural evolution of the Al/Ti bi-metal interface during heat treatment in a spark plasma sintering (SPS) apparatus was investigated under various conditions for the first time. A mechanism of interfacial layer growth was suggested based on the results of SEM, TEM and X-ray diffraction analysis. A continuous TiAl{sub 3} intermetallic layer was formed at the Al/Ti interface even after a processing time as short as about a minute. The TiAl{sub 3} layer grew mainly into the Ti part, while only a few individual grains grew into the Al part. Evolution of the interlayer was determined by Al diffusion through the (TiAl{sub 3}/TiAl{sub 3}) grain boundary. The activation energy of the process was 140 kJ/mol. The shear strength of the interface in the Al/Ti bi-metal was determined after various heat treatments. The shear strength of the bi-metal was limited by the properties of aluminum, with no effect of interlayer thickness or current mode and pulse pattern of the SPS treatment being detected. - Highlights: • Spark plasma sintering apparatus was used for heat treatment of Al/Ti bi-metals. • Microstructural evolution of Al/Ti interface during SPS treatment was investigated. • A continuous TiAl{sub 3} intermetallic layer was formed at the Al/Ti interface. • The bi-metal shear strength was limited by the properties of pure aluminum. • No effect of TiAl{sub 3} thickness or SPS current mode and pulse pattern was detected.

  14. Structural evolution of the Irtysh Shear Zone: implication for the Late Paleozoic amalgamation of multiple arc systems in Central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengfei; Sun, Min; Rosenbaum, Gideon

    2015-04-01

    The NW-SE Irtysh Shear Zone represents a major tectonic boundary in the Central Asian Orogenic Belt, recording the amalgamation history between the peri-Siberian orogenic system and the Kazakhstan orogenic system. The structural evolution and geodynamics of this shear zone is still poorly documented. Here we present new structural data complemented by chronological data in an attempt to unravel the geodynamic significance of the Irtysh Shear Zone in the context of accretion history of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt. Our results show three episodes of deformation for the shear zone. D1 foliation is locally recognized in low strain area and recorded by garnet inclusions, whereas D2 is represented by a sub-horizontal fabric and related NW-SE lineation. D3 is characterized by a transpersonal deformation event, to form a series of NW-SE mylonitic belts with sinistral kinematics, and to overprint D2 fabric forming regional-scale NW-SE upright folds. A paragneiss sample from the shear zone yielded the youngest detrital zircon peaks in the late Carboniferous, placing a maximum age constraint on the deformation, which overlaps in time with the late Paleozoic collision between the Chinese Altai and the intraoceanic arc system of the East Junggar and West Junggar. We interpret three episodes of deformation to represent orogenic thickening (D1), collapse (D2) and thickening (D3) in response to this collisional event. Sinistral shearing (D3) together with the coeval dextral shearing in the Tianshan accommodate eastward extrusion of the Kazakhstan orogenic system during the late Paleozoic amalgamation of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt. Acknowledgements: This study was financially supported by the Major Basic Research Project of the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (Grant: 2014CB440801), Hong Kong Research Grant Council (HKU705311P and HKU704712P), National Science Foundation of China (41273048, 41273012) and a HKU CRCG grant. The work is a contribution of the Joint

  15. Evolution of optical properties and band structure from amorphous to crystalline Ga2O3 films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabi Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The optical properties and band structure evolution from amorphous to crystalline Ga2O3 films was investigated in this work. Amorphous and crystalline Ga2O3 films were obtained by changing the growth substrate temperatures of pulsed laser deposition and the crystallinity increase with the rising of substrate temperature. The bandgap value and ultraviolet emission intensity of the films increase with the rising of crystallinity as observed by means of spectrophotometer and cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. Abrupt bandgap value and CL emission variations were observed when amorphous to crystalline transition took place. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy core level spectra reveal that more oxygen vacancies and disorders exist in amorphous Ga2O3 film grown at lower substrate temperature. The valence band spectra of hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy present the main contribution from Ga 4sp for crystalline film deposited at substrate temperature of 500 oC, while extra subgap states has been observed in amorphous film deposited at 300 oC. The oxygen vacancy and the extra subgap density of states are suggested to be the parts of origin of bandgap and CL spectra variations. The experimental data above yields a realistic picture of optical properties and band structure variation for the amorphous to crystalline transition of Ga2O3 films.

  16. Evolution of optical properties and band structure from amorphous to crystalline Ga2O3 films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fabi; Li, Haiou; Cui, Yi-Tao; Li, Guo-Ling; Guo, Qixin

    2018-04-01

    The optical properties and band structure evolution from amorphous to crystalline Ga2O3 films was investigated in this work. Amorphous and crystalline Ga2O3 films were obtained by changing the growth substrate temperatures of pulsed laser deposition and the crystallinity increase with the rising of substrate temperature. The bandgap value and ultraviolet emission intensity of the films increase with the rising of crystallinity as observed by means of spectrophotometer and cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. Abrupt bandgap value and CL emission variations were observed when amorphous to crystalline transition took place. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy core level spectra reveal that more oxygen vacancies and disorders exist in amorphous Ga2O3 film grown at lower substrate temperature. The valence band spectra of hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy present the main contribution from Ga 4sp for crystalline film deposited at substrate temperature of 500 oC, while extra subgap states has been observed in amorphous film deposited at 300 oC. The oxygen vacancy and the extra subgap density of states are suggested to be the parts of origin of bandgap and CL spectra variations. The experimental data above yields a realistic picture of optical properties and band structure variation for the amorphous to crystalline transition of Ga2O3 films.

  17. Role of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the evolution of magnetized relativistic sheared plasma flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlin, Nathaniel D; Newman, William I

    2013-04-01

    We explore, via analytical and numerical methods, the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability in relativistic magnetized plasmas, with applications to astrophysical jets. We solve the single-fluid relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) equations in conservative form using a scheme which is fourth order in space and time. To recover the primitive RMHD variables, we use a highly accurate, rapidly convergent algorithm which improves upon such schemes as the Newton-Raphson method. Although the exact RMHD equations are marginally stable, numerical discretization renders them unstable. We include numerical viscosity to restore numerical stability. In relativistic flows, diffusion can lead to a mathematical anomaly associated with frame transformations. However, in our KH studies, we remain in the rest frame of the system, and therefore do not encounter this anomaly. We use a two-dimensional slab geometry with periodic boundary conditions in both directions. The initial unperturbed velocity peaks along the central axis and vanishes asymptotically at the transverse boundaries. Remaining unperturbed quantities are uniform, with a flow-aligned unperturbed magnetic field. The early evolution in the nonlinear regime corresponds to the formation of counter-rotating vortices, connected by filaments, which persist in the absence of a magnetic field. A magnetic field inhibits the vortices through a series of stages, namely, field amplification, vortex disruption, turbulent breakdown, and an approach to a flow-aligned equilibrium configuration. Similar stages have been discussed in MHD literature. We examine how and to what extent these stages manifest in RMHD for a set of representative field strengths. To characterize field strength, we define a relativistic extension of the Alfvénic Mach number M(A). We observe close complementarity between flow and magnetic field behavior. Weaker fields exhibit more vortex rotation, magnetic reconnection, jet broadening, and intermediate turbulence

  18. Banding patterns and chromosomal evolution in five species of neotropical Teiinae lizards (Squamata: Teiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Rodrigo Marques Lima; Pellegrino, Katia Cristina Machado; Rodrigues, Miguel Trefaut; Yonenaga-Yassuda, Yatiyo

    2007-11-01

    Karyotypes of five species of South American teiid lizards from subfamily Teiinae: Ameiva ameiva, Kentropyx calcarata, K. paulensis, K. vanzoi (2n = 50, all acrocentric), and Cnemidophorus ocellifer (2n = 50, all biarmed), are herein described and compared on the basis of conventional and silver staining, and CBG and RBG banding patterns. Meiotic data are also included. Karyotypes of K. paulensis, K. vanzoi, and C. ocellifer are reported here for the first time. Inter-generic variability in Ag-NORs location was detected with NORs occurring at the end of long arm of pair 1 in K. calcarata, K. paulensis, and K. vanzoi; pair 5 in C. ocellifer and pair 7 in A. ameiva. The location of NORs, along with the karyological differences between A. ameiva and the Central American species (A. auberi), corroboretes the molecular-based hypothesis that the genus Ameiva is paraphyletic. Inter-populational heteromorphism in Ag-NORs size was detected between populations of C. ocellifer. RBG and CBG banding data demonstrated that the biarmed condition of the C. ocellifer chromosomes is due to multiple pericentric inversion events instead of addition of constitutive heterochromatin. Differential-staining techniques used here revealed valuable information about Teiinae karyotypic diversity and made it possible to compare these species, contributing to both the better comprehension of their chromosomal evolution and issues on taxa systematics.

  19. Evolution of symmetric reconnection layer in the presence of parallel shear flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Haoyu [Space Science Institute, School of Astronautics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Sate Key Laboratory of Space Weather, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Cao Jinbin [Space Science Institute, School of Astronautics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2011-07-15

    The development of the structure of symmetric reconnection layer in the presence of a shear flow parallel to the antiparallel magnetic field component is studied by using a set of one-dimensional (1D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. The Riemann problem is simulated through a second-order conservative TVD (total variation diminishing) scheme, in conjunction with Roe's averages for the Riemann problem. The simulation results indicate that besides the MHD shocks and expansion waves, there exist some new small-scale structures in the reconnection layer. For the case of zero initial guide magnetic field (i.e., B{sub y0} = 0), a pair of intermediate shock and slow shock (SS) is formed in the presence of the parallel shear flow. The critical velocity of initial shear flow V{sub zc} is just the Alfven velocity in the inflow region. As V{sub z{infinity}} increases to the value larger than V{sub zc}, a new slow expansion wave appears in the position of SS in the case V{sub z{infinity}} < V{sub zc}, and one of the current densities drops to zero. As plasma {beta} increases, the out-flow region is widened. For B{sub y0} {ne} 0, a pair of SSs and an additional pair of time-dependent intermediate shocks (TDISs) are found to be present. Similar to the case of B{sub y0} = 0, there exists a critical velocity of initial shear flow V{sub zc}. The value of V{sub zc} is, however, smaller than the Alfven velocity of the inflow region. As plasma {beta} increases, the velocities of SS and TDIS increase, and the out-flow region is widened. However, the velocity of downstream SS increases even faster, making the distance between SS and TDIS smaller. Consequently, the interaction between SS and TDIS in the case of high plasma {beta} influences the property of direction rotation of magnetic field across TDIS. Thereby, a wedge in the hodogram of tangential magnetic field comes into being. When {beta}{yields}{infinity}, TDISs disappear and the guide magnetic field becomes constant.

  20. The Main Shear Zone in Sør Rondane: A key feature for reconstructing the geodynamic evolution of East Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Antonia; Läufer, Andreas; Lisker, Frank; Jacobs, Joachim; Elburg, Marlina; Damaske, Detlef; Lucka, Nicole

    2013-04-01

    systems. The latter point to a WNW-ESE respectively NW-SE oriented maximum paleostress direction and indicate the latest deformation event; they are possibly related to the break-up and fragmentation of Gondwana. Two contrasting models describe the configuration of East Gondwana during the Neoproterozoic and the final amalgamation of Gondwana. The first model proposes the existence of a Pan-African Orogen (East African/ Antarctic Orogen). The Main Shear Zone could represent the eastern extension of this orogen and may be related to a NE-directed lateral-escape tectonic model. Both published structural data from Sør Rondane and adjacent regions and the outcome of this study agree with this model and propose a suture of East- and West Gondwana located between Mühlig-Hofmann-Gebirge and Sør Rondane. The second model of an overlap of two orogens with different formation ages cannot be proved by structural data from the MSZ. Instead, tight test constraints of the second model may be provided by new magnetic anomaly maps based on a 2012/13 aerogeophysical survey. Shiraishi, K.; Dunkley, D.J.; Hokada, T.; Fanning, C.M.; Kagami, H.; and Hamamoto, T. (2008): Geochronological constraints on the Late Proterozoic to Cambrian crustal evolution of eastern Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica: a synthesis of SHRIMP U-Pb age and Nd model age data. Geological Society, 308(1):21-67. Shiraishi, K.; Osanai, Y.; Ishizuka, H.; and Asami, M. (1997): Geological map of the Sør Rondane Mountains, Antarctica. Antarctica Geological Map Series, sheet 35, scale 1 : 25 0000. National Institute of PolarResearch, Tokyo.

  1. Designing manufacturable filters for a 16-band plenoptic camera using differential evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doster, Timothy; Olson, Colin C.; Fleet, Erin; Yetzbacher, Michael; Kanaev, Andrey; Lebow, Paul; Leathers, Robert

    2017-05-01

    A 16-band plenoptic camera allows for the rapid exchange of filter sets via a 4x4 filter array on the lens's front aperture. This ability to change out filters allows for an operator to quickly adapt to different locales or threat intelligence. Typically, such a system incorporates a default set of 16 equally spaced at-topped filters. Knowing the operating theater or the likely targets of interest it becomes advantageous to tune the filters. We propose using a modified beta distribution to parameterize the different possible filters and differential evolution (DE) to search over the space of possible filter designs. The modified beta distribution allows us to jointly optimize the width, taper and wavelength center of each single- or multi-pass filter in the set over a number of evolutionary steps. Further, by constraining the function parameters we can develop solutions which are not just theoretical but manufacturable. We examine two independent tasks: general spectral sensing and target detection. In the general spectral sensing task we utilize the theory of compressive sensing (CS) and find filters that generate codings which minimize the CS reconstruction error based on a fixed spectral dictionary of endmembers. For the target detection task and a set of known targets, we train the filters to optimize the separation of the background and target signature. We compare our results to the default 16 at-topped non-overlapping filter set which comes with the plenoptic camera and full hyperspectral resolution data which was previously acquired.

  2. Evolution of real contact area under shear and the value of static friction of soft materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahli, R; Pallares, G; Ducottet, C; Ben Ali, I E; Al Akhrass, S; Guibert, M; Scheibert, J

    2018-01-16

    The frictional properties of a rough contact interface are controlled by its area of real contact, the dynamical variations of which underlie our modern understanding of the ubiquitous rate-and-state friction law. In particular, the real contact area is proportional to the normal load, slowly increases at rest through aging, and drops at slip inception. Here, through direct measurements on various contacts involving elastomers or human fingertips, we show that the real contact area also decreases under shear, with reductions as large as 30[Formula: see text], starting well before macroscopic sliding. All data are captured by a single reduction law enabling excellent predictions of the static friction force. In elastomers, the area-reduction rate of individual contacts obeys a scaling law valid from micrometer-sized junctions in rough contacts to millimeter-sized smooth sphere/plane contacts. For the class of soft materials used here, our results should motivate first-order improvements of current contact mechanics models and prompt reinterpretation of the rate-and-state parameters.

  3. Microstructure evolution and shear strength of vacuum brazed joint for super-Ni/NiCr laminated composite with Ni–Cr–Si–B amorphous interlayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Na; Li, Yajiang; Ma, Qunshuang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Divorced eutectic of γ-Ni and Ni 3 B formed in the brazed region. • The detailed isothermal solidification mechanism was proposed. • Borides formed at the interfaces at different temperatures were identified. • Effect of brazing temperatures on microstructure and shear strength was investigated. • Excellent joint with shear strength of 191 MPa was obtained at 1100 °C for 20 min. - Abstract: Vacuum brazing of super-Ni/NiCr laminated composite and Cr18–Ni8 steel was carried out with Ni–Cr–Si–B amorphous interlayer at different temperatures (1060–1150 °C). The effects of brazing temperature on the microstructure evolution and shear strength of the joints were investigated. Microstructure, chemical composition and microhardness of the joints were studied using field emission scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and microsclerometer. Shear strength of the joints were measured by the electromechanical universal testing machine. Diffusion of B was the controlling factor for microstructure evolution. The detailed isothermal solidification mechanism was proposed in this study. The fracture morphology of the joint made at 1100 °C exhibited plastic feature and the shear strength reached 191 MPa. Bulky Ni 3 B formed in super-Ni cover layer near the brazed region when performed at 1060–1100 °C while Ni–B eutectic formed instead at 1150 °C

  4. Microstructural characteristics of adiabatic shear localization in a metastable beta titanium alloy deformed at high strain rate and elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhan, Hongyi, E-mail: h.zhan@uq.edu.au [Centre for Advanced Materials Processing and Manufacture, School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Zeng, Weidong [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, School of Materials, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China); Wang, Gui [Centre for Advanced Materials Processing and Manufacture, School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Defence Material Technology Centre, Level 2, 24 Wakefield St, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Kent, Damon [School of Science and Engineering, University of the Sunshine Coast, Sippy Downs, Queensland 4575 (Australia); Dargusch, Matthew [Centre for Advanced Materials Processing and Manufacture, School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Defence Material Technology Centre, Level 2, 24 Wakefield St, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia)

    2015-04-15

    The microstructural evolution and grain refinement within adiabatic shear bands in the Ti6554 alloy deformed at high strain rates and elevated temperatures have been characterized using transmission electron microscopy. No stress drops were observed in the corresponding stress–strain curve, indicating that the initiation of adiabatic shear bands does not lead to the loss of load capacity for the Ti6554 alloy. The outer region of the shear bands mainly consists of cell structures bounded by dislocation clusters. Equiaxed subgrains in the core area of the shear band can be evolved from the subdivision of cell structures or reconstruction and transverse segmentation of dislocation clusters. It is proposed that dislocation activity dominates the grain refinement process. The rotational recrystallization mechanism may operate as the kinetic requirements for it are fulfilled. The coexistence of different substructures across the shear bands implies that the microstructural evolution inside the shear bands is not homogeneous and different grain refinement mechanisms may operate simultaneously to refine the structure. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • The microstructure within the adiabatic shear band was characterized by TEM. • No stress drops were observed in the corresponding stress–strain curve. • Dislocation activity dominated the grain refinement process. • The kinetic requirements for rotational recrystallization mechanism were fulfilled. • Different grain refinement mechanisms operated simultaneously to refine the structure.

  5. Karyotypic evolution in family Hipposideridae (Chiroptera, Mammalia) revealed by comparative chromosome painting, G- and C-banding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiu-Guang; Wang, Jin-Huan; Su, Wei-Ting; Wang, Ying-Xiang; Yang, Feng-Tang; Nie, Wen-Hui

    2010-10-01

    Comparing to its sister-family (Rhinolophidae), Hipposideridae was less studied by cytogenetic approaches. Only a few high-resolution G-banded karyotypes have been reported so far, and most of the conclusions on the karyotypic evolution in Hipposideridae were based on conventional Giemsa-staining. In this study, we applied comparative chromosome painting, a method of choice for genome-wide comparison at the molecular level, and G- and C-banding to establish comparative map between five hipposiderid species from China, using a whole set of chromosome-specific painting probes from one of them (Aselliscus stoliczkanus). G-band and C-band comparisons between homologous segments defined by chromosome painting revealed that Robertsonian translocations, paracentric inversions and heterochromatin addition could be the main mechanism of chromosome evolution in Hipposideridae. Comparative analysis of the conserved chromosomal segments among five hipposiderid species and outgroup species suggests that bi-armed chromosomes should be included into the ancestral karyotype of Hipposideridae, which was previously believed to be exclusively composed of acrocentric chromosomes.

  6. Dynamic Shear Deformation and Failure of Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-5Al-5Mo-5V-1Cr-1Fe Alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Chun; Chen, Pengwan

    2018-01-05

    To study the dynamic shear deformation and failure properties of Ti-6Al-4V (Ti-64) alloy and Ti-5Al-5Mo-5V-1Cr-1Fe (Ti-55511) alloy, a series of forced shear tests on flat hat shaped (FHS) specimens for the two investigated materials was performed using a split Hopkinson pressure bar setup. The evolution of shear deformation was monitored by an ultra-high-speed camera (Kirana-05M). Localized shear band is induced in the two investigated materials under forced shear tests. Our results indicate that severe strain localization (adiabatic shear) is accompanied by a loss in the load carrying capacity, i.e., by a sudden drop in loading. Three distinct stages can be identified using a digital image correlation technique for accurate shear strain measurement. The microstructural analysis reveals that the dynamic failure mechanisms for Ti-64 and Ti-55511 alloys within the shear band are of a cohesive and adhesive nature, respectively.

  7. NASA's Evolution to K(sub a)- Band Space Communications for Near-Earth Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Kevin P.; Stocklin, Frank J.; Geldzahler, Barry J.; Friedman, Daniel E.; Celeste, Peter B.

    2010-01-01

    Over the next several years, NASA plans to launch multiple earth-science missions which will send data from low-Earth orbits to ground stations at 1-3 Gbps, to achieve data throughputs of 5-40 terabits per day. These transmission rates exceed the capabilities of S-band and X-band frequency allocations used for science probe downlinks in the past. Accordingly, NASA is exploring enhancements to its space communication capabilities to provide the Agency's first Ka-band architecture solution for next generation missions in the near-earth regime. This paper describes the proposed Ka-band solution's drivers and concept, constraints and analyses which shaped that concept, and expansibility for future needs

  8. Pressure-Induced Structural Evolution and Band Gap Shifts of Organometal Halide Perovskite-Based Methylammonium Lead Chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lingrui; Wang, Kai; Xiao, Guanjun; Zeng, Qiaoshi; Zou, Bo

    2016-12-15

    Organometal halide perovskites are promising materials for optoelectronic devices. Further development of these devices requires a deep understanding of their fundamental structure-property relationships. The effect of pressure on the structural evolution and band gap shifts of methylammonium lead chloride (MAPbCl 3 ) was investigated systematically. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman experiments provided structural information on the shrinkage, tilting distortion, and amorphization of the primitive cubic unit cell. In situ high pressure optical absorption and photoluminescence spectra manifested that the band gap of MAPbCl 3 could be fine-tuned to the ultraviolet region by pressure. The optical changes are correlated with pressure-induced structural evolution of MAPbCl 3 , as evidenced by band gap shifts. Comparisons between Pb-hybrid perovskites and inorganic octahedra provided insights on the effects of halogens on pressure-induced transition sequences of these compounds. Our results improve the understanding of the structural and optical properties of organometal halide perovskites.

  9. Nucleation and thickening of shear bands in nano-scale twin/matrix lamellae of a Cu-Al alloy processed by dynamic plastic deformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hong, C.S.; Tao, N.R.; Huang, Xiaoxu

    2010-01-01

    dislocation structure (DDS) into a nano-sized (sub)grain structure (NGS). On the two sides of a core region, two transition layers (TRLs) exist where the T/M lamellae experienced much less shear strain. The interface boundaries separating the core region and the TRLs are characterized by very large shear...

  10. Structural evolution of regenerated silk fibroin under shear: Combined wide- and small-angle x-ray scattering experiments using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossle, Manfred; Panine, Pierre; Urban, Volker S.; Riekel, Christine

    2004-01-01

    The structural evolution of regenerated Bombyx mori silk fibroin during shearing with a Couette cell has been studied in situ by synchrotron radiation small- and wide-angle x-ray scattering techniques. An elongation of fibroin molecules was observed with increasing shear rate, followed by an aggregation phase. The aggregates were found to be amorphous with β-conformation according to infrared spectroscopy. Scanning x-ray microdiffraction with a 5 (micro)m beam on aggregated material, which had solidified in air, showed silk II reflections and a material with equatorial reflections close to the silk I structure reflections, but with strong differences in reflection intensities. This silk I type material shows up to two low-angle peaks suggesting the presence of water molecules that might be intercalated between hydrogen-bonded sheets.

  11. Structural evolution of regenerated silk fibroin under shear: Combined wide- and small-angle x-ray scattering experiments using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossle, Manfred [European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), France; Panine, Pierre [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF); Urban, Volker S [ORNL; Riekel, Christine [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF)

    2004-04-01

    The structural evolution of regenerated Bombyx mori silk fibroin during shearing with a Couette cell has been studied in situ by synchrotron radiation small- and wide-angle x-ray scattering techniques. An elongation of fibroin molecules was observed with increasing shear rate, followed by an aggregation phase. The aggregates were found to be amorphous with {beta}-conformation according to infrared spectroscopy. Scanning x-ray microdiffraction with a 5 {micro}m beam on aggregated material, which had solidified in air, showed silk II reflections and a material with equatorial reflections close to the silk I structure reflections, but with strong differences in reflection intensities. This silk I type material shows up to two low-angle peaks suggesting the presence of water molecules that might be intercalated between hydrogen-bonded sheets.

  12. Strain-dependent evolution of garnets in a high pressure ductile shear zone using Synchroton x-ray microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macente, Alice; Fusseis, Florian; Menegon, Luca; John, Timm

    2016-04-01

    Synkinematic reaction microfabrics carry important information on the kinetics, timing and rheology of tectonometamorphic processes. Despite being routinely interpreted in metamorphic and structural studies, reaction and deformation microfabrics are usually described in two dimensions. We applied Synchrotron-based x-ray microtomography to document the evolution of a pristine olivine gabbro into a deformed omphacite-garnet eclogite in 3D. In the investigated samples, which cover a strain gradient into a shear zone from the Western Gneiss Region (Norway) previously described by John et al., (2009), we focused on the spatial transformation of garnet coronas into elongated clusters of garnets. Our microtomographic data allowed us to quantify changes to the garnet volume, their shapes and their spatial arrangement. We combined microtomographic observations with light microscope- and backscatter electron images as well as electron microprobe- (EMPA) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analyses to correlate mineral composition and orientation data with the x-ray absorption signal of the same mineral grains. This allowed us to extrapolate our interpretation of the metamorphic microfabric evolution to the third dimension, effectively yielding a 4-dimensional dataset. We found that: - The x-ray absorption contrast between individual mineral phases in our microtomographic data is sufficient to allow the same petrographic observations than in light- and electron microscopy, but extended to 3D. - Amongst the major constituents of the synkinematic reactions, garnet is the only phase that can be segmented confidently from the microtomographic data. - With increasing deformation, the garnet volume increases from about 9% to 25%. - Garnet coronas in the gabbros never completely encapsulate olivine grains. This may indicate that the reaction progressed preferentially in some directions, but also leaves pathways for element transport to and from the olivines that are

  13. Statistically motivated model of mechanisms controlling evolution of deformation band substructure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kratochvíl, J.; Kružík, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 1 (2016), s. 196-208 ISSN 0749-6419 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GAP107/12/0121 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Crystal plastic ity * Microstructures * Deformation bands Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 5.702, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2016/MTR/kruzik-0457407.pdf

  14. Magnetic fabrics in characterization of magma emplacement and tectonic evolution of the Moyar Shear Zone, South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pratheesh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Moyar Shear Zone (MSZ of the South Indian granulite terrain hosts a prominent syenite pluton (∼560 Ma and associated NW-SE to NE-SW trending mafic dyke swarm (∼65 Ma and 95 Ma. Preliminary magnetic fabric studies in the mafic dykes, using Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibly (AMS studies at low-field, indicate successive emplacement and variable magma flow direction. Magnetic lineation and foliation in these dykes are identical to the mesoscopic fabrics in MSZ mylonites, indicating shear zone guided emplacement. Spatial distribution of magnetic lineation in the dykes suggests a common conduit from which the source magma has been migrated. The magnetic foliation trajectories have a sigmoidal shape to the north of the pluton and curve into the MSZ suggesting dextral sense of shear. Identical fabric conditions for magnetic fabrics in the syenite pluton and measured field fabrics in mylonite indicate syntectonic emplacement along the Proterozoic crustal scale dextral shear zone with repeated reactivation history.

  15. N-S crustal shear system in the Bundelkhand massif: A unique crustal evolution signature in the northern Indian peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S. P.; Bhattacharya, A. R.

    2017-12-01

    The Bundelkhand massif, located in the northern part of the Indian shield, is a poly-deformed and poly-metamorphic terrain. This paper reports a new shear system developed throughout the massif in the form of N-S trending quartz veins that are sometimes quartzo-feldspathic and rarely granitic in composition. The veins are vertical and commonly occur in conjugate sets. This tectono-magmatic event appears to represent the youngest shear system of the massif as it cross-cuts all the earlier shear systems (E-W, NE-SE and NW-SE). Emplacement of this N-S vein system may have taken place due to extensional processes that developed some cracks along which siliceous magma was vertically emplaced. The complete absence of signature of the N-S event from the surrounding sedimentary cover of Vindhyan Supergroup, Bijawar and Gwalior Groups suggests that this shear system is pre-tectonic to the nearly E-W trending passive basins developed at the margins of the Bundelkhand craton. Further, several workers have considered the Bundelkhand massif as a part of the Aravalli craton. However, due to the absence of N-S, as well as the other (i.e., E-W, NW-SE and NW-SE), tectonic fabrics of the Bundelkhand massif in other cratons of the Peninsular India, and vice versa, makes the Bundelkhand block a separate and unique craton of its own and is not part of the Aravalli craton.

  16. Shear machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astill, M.; Sunderland, A.; Waine, M.G.

    1980-01-01

    A shear machine for irradiated nuclear fuel elements has a replaceable shear assembly comprising a fuel element support block, a shear blade support and a clamp assembly which hold the fuel element to be sheared in contact with the support block. A first clamp member contacts the fuel element remote from the shear blade and a second clamp member contacts the fuel element adjacent the shear blade and is advanced towards the support block during shearing to compensate for any compression of the fuel element caused by the shear blade (U.K.)

  17. Texture, microstructure and geochemistry of magnetite from the Banduhurang uranium mine, Singhbhum shear zone, India - implications for physico-chemical evolution of magnetite mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Dibakar; Dutta, Tusar; Samanta, Susanta K.; Pal, Dipak C.

    2013-01-01

    The Singhbhum Shear zone in eastern India is one of the largest repositories of uranium and copper in India. Besides uranium and copper, apatite-magnetite mineralization is widespread in this shear zone. This study aims at deciphering the physico-chemical evolution of magnetite mineralization in relation to progressive shearing integrating field relations, micro-textures, structures and compositions of magnetite in the Banduhurang uranium mine. Apatite-magnetite ores occur as discrete patches, tongues, and veins in the strongly deformed, fine grained quartz-chlorite schist. Textures and microstructures of magnetite indicate at least three stages of magnetite formation. Coarse-grained magnetite (magnetite-1) with long, rotational, and complex strain fringes, defined by fibrous and elongate quartz, is assigned to a stage of pre-/early-shearing magnetite formation. Medium grained magnetite (magnetite-2), characterized by single non-rotational strain fringe equivalent to the youngest fringe of magnetite-1, grew likely at the mid-/late-stage of shearing. Fine grained magnetite (magnetite-3) is generally devoid of any pressure shadow. This indicates even a much later stage of formation of this magnetite, presumably towards the closing stage of shearing. Some of the magnetite-1 grains are optically heterogeneous with a dark, pitted Cr-Ti-bearing core overgrown by lighter, fresh rim locally containing pyrite, chalcopyrite, and chlorite inclusions. The cores are also locally characterized by high AI and Si content. Homogeneous magnetite-1 is optically and compositionally similar to the overgrowth of heterogeneous magnetite-1. This homogeneous magnetite-1 that grew as separate phase is contemporaneous with the overgrowth on pitted core of heterogeneous magnetite-1. Magnetite-2 is compositionally very similar to homogeneous magnetite-1, but is devoid of sulfide inclusion. Magnetite-3 is generally devoid of any silicate or sulfide inclusion and is most pure with least

  18. Scalar evolution equations for shear waves in incompressible solids: a simple derivation of the Z, ZK, KZK and KP equations

    KAUST Repository

    Destrade, M.

    2010-12-08

    We study the propagation of two-dimensional finite-amplitude shear waves in a nonlinear pre-strained incompressible solid, and derive several asymptotic amplitude equations in a simple, consistent and rigorous manner. The scalar Zabolotskaya (Z) equation is shown to be the asymptotic limit of the equations of motion for all elastic generalized neo-Hookean solids (with strain energy depending only on the first principal invariant of Cauchy-Green strain). However, we show that the Z equation cannot be a scalar equation for the propagation of two-dimensional shear waves in general elastic materials (with strain energy depending on the first and second principal invariants of strain). Then, we introduce dispersive and dissipative terms to deduce the scalar Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP), Zabolotskaya-Khokhlov (ZK) and Khokhlov- Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov (KZK) equations of incompressible solid mechanics. © 2010 The Royal Society.

  19. Scalar evolution equations for shear waves in incompressible solids: a simple derivation of the Z, ZK, KZK and KP equations

    KAUST Repository

    Destrade, M.; Goriely, A.; Saccomandi, G.

    2010-01-01

    We study the propagation of two-dimensional finite-amplitude shear waves in a nonlinear pre-strained incompressible solid, and derive several asymptotic amplitude equations in a simple, consistent and rigorous manner. The scalar Zabolotskaya (Z) equation is shown to be the asymptotic limit of the equations of motion for all elastic generalized neo-Hookean solids (with strain energy depending only on the first principal invariant of Cauchy-Green strain). However, we show that the Z equation cannot be a scalar equation for the propagation of two-dimensional shear waves in general elastic materials (with strain energy depending on the first and second principal invariants of strain). Then, we introduce dispersive and dissipative terms to deduce the scalar Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP), Zabolotskaya-Khokhlov (ZK) and Khokhlov- Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov (KZK) equations of incompressible solid mechanics. © 2010 The Royal Society.

  20. Evolution of shear stress, protein expression, and vessel area in an animal model of arterial dilatation in hemodialysis grafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Sanjay; Fu, Alex A.; Misra, Khamal D.; Glockner, James F.; Mukhopadyay, Debabrata

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the wall shear stress, protein expression of matrix metalloproteinases-2 (MMP-2), -9 (MMP-9), and the inhibitors (tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1), and -2 (TIMP-2)), and vessel area over time in a porcine model for hemodialysis polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) grafts. Materials and methods In 21 pigs, subtotal renal infarction was performed and 28 days later, a PTFE graft was placed to connect the carotid artery to the ipsilateral jugular vein. Phase contrast MR was used to measure blood flow and vessel area at 1, 3, 7, and 14 days after graft placement. Wall shear stress was estimated from Poiseuille’s law. Animals were sacrificed at day 3 (N=7), day 7 (N=7), and day 14 (N=7) and expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 were determined at the grafted and control arteries. Results The mean wall shear stress of the grafted artery was higher than the control artery at all time points (P<0.05). It peaked by day 3 and decreased by days 7–14 as the vessel area nearly doubled. By days 7–14, there was a significant increase in active MMP-2 followed by a significant increase in pro and active MMP-9 by day 14 (P<0.05, grafted artery versus control). TIMP-1 expression peaked by day 7 and then decreased while TIMP-2 expression was decreased at days 7–14. Conclusions The wall shear stress of the grafted artery peaks by day 3 with increased MMP-2 activity by days 7–14 followed by pro and active MMP-9 by day 14 and the vessel area nearly doubled. PMID:20123196

  1. Scalar evolution equations for shear waves in incompressible solids: a simple derivation of the Z, ZK, KZK and KP equations

    OpenAIRE

    Destrade, Michel; Goriely, Alain; Saccomandi, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    We study the propagation of two-dimensional finite-amplitude shear waves in a nonlinear pre-strained incompressible solid, and derive several asymptotic amplitude equations in a simple, consistent, and rigorous manner. The scalar Zabolotskaya (Z) equation is shown to be the asymptotic limit of the equations of motion for all elastic generalized neo-Hookean solids (with strain energy depending only on the first principal invariant of Cauchy-Green strain). However, we show that the Z equation c...

  2. Karyotype evolution in Rhinolophus bats (Rhinolophidae, Chiroptera) illuminated by cross-species chromosome painting and G-banding comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiuguang; Nie, Wenhui; Wang, Jinhuan; Su, Weiting; Ao, Lei; Feng, Qing; Wang, Yingxiang; Volleth, Marianne; Yang, Fengtang

    2007-01-01

    Rhinolophus (Rhinolophidae) is the second most speciose genus in Chiroptera and has extensively diversified diploid chromosome numbers (from 2n = 28 to 62). In spite of many attempts to explore the karyotypic evolution of this genus, most studies have been based on conventional Giemsa staining rather than G-banding. Here we have made a whole set of chromosome-specific painting probes from flow-sorted chromosomes of Aselliscus stoliczkanus (Hipposideridae). These probes have been utilized to establish the first genome-wide homology maps among six Rhinolophus species with four different diploid chromosome numbers (2n = 36, 44, 58, and 62) and three species from other families: Rousettus leschenaulti (2n = 36, Pteropodidae), Hipposideros larvatus (2n = 32, Hipposideridae), and Myotis altarium (2n = 44, Vespertilionidae) by fluorescence in situ hybridization. To facilitate integration with published maps, human paints were also hybridized to A. stoliczkanus chromosomes. Our painting results substantiate the wide occurrence of whole-chromosome arm conservation in Rhinolophus bats and suggest that Robertsonian translocations of different combinations account for their karyotype differences. Parsimony analysis using chromosomal characters has provided some new insights into the Rhinolophus ancestral karyotype and phylogenetic relationships among these Rhinolophus species so far studied. In addition to Robertsonian translocations, our results suggest that whole-arm (reciprocal) translocations involving multiple non-homologous chromosomes as well could have been involved in the karyotypic evolution within Rhinolophus, in particular those bats with low and medium diploid numbers.

  3. Computer-automated evolution of an X-band antenna for NASA's Space Technology 5 mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornby, Gregory S; Lohn, Jason D; Linden, Derek S

    2011-01-01

    Whereas the current practice of designing antennas by hand is severely limited because it is both time and labor intensive and requires a significant amount of domain knowledge, evolutionary algorithms can be used to search the design space and automatically find novel antenna designs that are more effective than would otherwise be developed. Here we present our work in using evolutionary algorithms to automatically design an X-band antenna for NASA's Space Technology 5 (ST5) spacecraft. Two evolutionary algorithms were used: the first uses a vector of real-valued parameters and the second uses a tree-structured generative representation for constructing the antenna. The highest-performance antennas from both algorithms were fabricated and tested and both outperformed a hand-designed antenna produced by the antenna contractor for the mission. Subsequent changes to the spacecraft orbit resulted in a change in requirements for the spacecraft antenna. By adjusting our fitness function we were able to rapidly evolve a new set of antennas for this mission in less than a month. One of these new antenna designs was built, tested, and approved for deployment on the three ST5 spacecraft, which were successfully launched into space on March 22, 2006. This evolved antenna design is the first computer-evolved antenna to be deployed for any application and is the first computer-evolved hardware in space.

  4. The dependence of shear modulus on dynamic relaxation and evolution of local structural heterogeneity in a metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huo, L.S.; Zeng, J.F.; Wang, W.H.; Liu, C.T.; Yang, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Starting from the nanoscale structural heterogeneities intrinsic to metallic glasses (MGs), here we show that there are two concurrent contributions to their microscale quasi-static shear modulus G I : one (μ) is related to the atomic bonding strength of solid-like regions and the other (G II ) to the change in the possible configurations of liquid-like regions (dynamic relaxation). Through carefully designed high-rate nanoscale indentation tests, a simple constitutive relation (μ = G I + G II ) is experimentally verified. On a fundamental level, our current work provides a structure–property correlation that may be applicable to a wide range of glassy materials

  5. 16O+16O molecular nature of the superdeformed band of 32S and the evolution of the molecular structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Masaaki; Horiuchi, Hisashi

    2004-01-01

    The relation between the superdeformed band of 32 S and 16 O+ 16 O molecular bands is studied by the deformed-basis antisymmetrized molecular dynamics with the Gogny D1S force. It is found that the obtained superdeformed band members of S have a considerable amount of the 16 O+ 16 O component. Above the superdeformed band, we have obtained two excited rotational bands which have more prominent character of the 16 O+ 16 O molecular band. These three rotational bands are regarded as a series of 16 O+ 16 O molecular bands which were predicted by using the unique 16 O- 16 O optical potential. As the excitation energy and principal quantum number of the relative motion increase, the 16 O+ 16 O cluster structure becomes more prominent but at the same time, the band members are fragmented into several states

  6. Incipient Evolution of the Eastern California Shear Zone through a Transpressional Zone along the San Andreas Fault in the San Bernardino Mountains, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, W. J.; Spotila, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    Measuring long-term accumulation of strike-slip displacements and transpressional uplift is difficult where strain is accommodated across wide shear zones, as opposed to a single major fault. The Eastern California Shear Zone (ECSZ) in southern California accommodates dextral shear across several strike-slip faults, and is potentially migrating and cutting through a formerly convergent zone of the San Bernardino Mountains (SBM). The advection of crust along the San Andreas fault to the SE has forced these two tectonic regimes into creating a nexus of interacting strike-slip faults north of San Gorgonio Pass. These elements make this region ideal for studying complex fault interactions, evolving fault geometries, and deformational overprinting within a wide shear zone. Using high-resolution topography and field mapping, this study aims to test whether diffuse, poorly formed strike-slip faults within the uplifted SBM block are nascent elements of the ECSZ. Topographic resolution of ≤ 1m was achieved using both lidar and UAV surveys along two Quaternary strike-slip faults, namely the Lake Peak fault and Lone Valley faults. Although the Lone Valley fault cuts across Quaternary alluvium, the geomorphic expression is obscured, and may be the result of slow slip rates. In contrast, the Lake Peak fault is located high elevations north of San Gorgonio Peak in the SBM, and displaces Quaternary glacial deposits. The deposition of large boulders along the escarpment also obscures the apparent magnitude of slip along the fault. Although determining fault offset is difficult, the Lake Peak fault does display evidence for minor right-lateral displacement, where the magnitude of slip would be consistent with individual faults within the ECSZ (i.e. ≤ 1 mm/yr). Compared to the preservation of displacement along strike-slip faults located within the Mojave Desert, the upland region of the SBM adds complexity for measuring fault offset. The distribution of strain across the entire

  7. Microstructures and magnetic fabrics of the Ngaoundéré granite pluton (Cameroon): Implications to the late-Pan-African evolution of Central Cameroon Shear Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawaï, Daouda; Tchameni, Rigobert; Bascou, Jérome; Awe Wangmene, Salomon; Fosso Tchunte, Périclex Martial; Bouchez, Jean-Luc

    2017-05-01

    The Ngaoundéré granite pluton, in Central-North Cameroon, located near the Central Cameroon Shear zone (CCSZ), and previously studied for its petrography and geochemistry, is characterized by the absence of macroscopic markers of deformation. In this study, we report microstructures and magnetic fabrics (AMS) of this pluton and discuss the relationship with the Pan-African evolution of the CCSZ. The pluton consists of a porphyritic Hbl-Bt-monzogranite at its rim and a porphyritic biotite-granite at its core, a petrographic distribution denoting a normal zoning pattern, i.e. more silicic toward the centre. As expected, magnetic susceptibilities values also exhibit a zoning pattern in agreement with petrographic zonation. Thermomagnetic data indicate that this pluton is dominantly ferromagnetic in behaviour. As indicated by its microstructures, the pluton has suffered a continuum of deformation from the magmatic state to the high temperature solid-state during magma crystallization and solidification. The magnetic foliations dominantly strike NE-SW and dip moderately to steeply and the lineations mostly plunge shallowly to the NE or SW, roughly parallel to NE-to ENE-trending Central Cameroun Shear Zone (CCSZ). The foliation poles define a girdle pattern with a zone axis (52°/11°) rather close to the best line of the lineations (44°/21°). These fabrics correlate with the structures of the country rocks ascribed by several workers to a regional transpression. Toward the margins of the pluton, particularly the northern one, the lineations tend to rotate from NE to N in azimuth. This change is interpreted as due to strain partitioning, simple shearing with NE-SW extension being relayed by compression toward the northern pluton border. This new magnetic fabric study suggests that the Ngaoundéré pluton (poorly dated at c. 575 Ma) was emplaced during the late stages of the CCSZ dextral transpressive movement. It also provides some more constraints on the correlation

  8. Karyotypic evolution and phylogenetic relationships in the order Chiroptera as revealed by G-banding comparison and chromosome painting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Lei; Mao, Xiuguang; Nie, Wenhui; Gu, Xiaoming; Feng, Qing; Wang, Jinhuan; Su, Weiting; Wang, Yingxiang; Volleth, Marianne; Yang, Fengtang

    2007-01-01

    Bats are a unique but enigmatic group of mammals and have a world-wide distribution. The phylogenetic relationships of extant bats are far from being resolved. Here, we investigated the karyotypic relationships of representative species from four families of the order Chiroptera by comparative chromosome painting and banding. A complete set of painting probes derived from flow-sorted chromosomes of Myotis myotis (family Vespertilionidae) were hybridized onto metaphases of Cynopterus sphinx (2n = 34, family Pteropodidae), Rhinolophus sinicus (2n=36, family Rhinolophidae) and Aselliscus stoliczkanus (2n=30, family Hipposideridae) and delimited 27, 30 and 25 conserved chromosomal segments in the three genomes, respectively. The results substantiate that Robertsonian translocation is the main mode of chromosome evolution in the order Chiroptera, with extensive conservation of whole chromosomal arms. The use of M. myotis (2n=44) probes has enabled the integration of C. sphinx, R. sinicus and A. stoliczkanus chromosomes into the previously established comparative maps between human and Eonycteris spelaea (2n=36), Rhinolophus mehelyi (2n=58), Hipposideros larvatus (2n=32), and M. myotis. Our results provide the first cytogenetic signature rearrangement that supports the grouping of Pteropodidae and Rhinolophoidea in a common clade (i.e. Pteropodiformes or Yinpterochiroptera) and thus improve our understanding on the karyotypic relationships and genome phylogeny of these bat species.

  9. Long-Term Evolution Electromagnetic Fields Exposure Modulates the Resting State EEG on Alpha and Beta Bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Chen, Qinghua; Lv, Bin; Wu, Tongning

    2017-05-01

    Long-term evolution (LTE) wireless telecommunication systems are widely used globally, which has raised a concern that exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMF) emitted from LTE devices can change human neural function. To date, few studies have been conducted on the effect of exposure to LTE EMF. Here, we evaluated the changes in electroencephalogram (EEG) due to LTE EMF exposure. An LTE EMF exposure system with a stable power emission, which was equivalent to the maximum emission from an LTE mobile phone, was used to radiate the subjects. Numerical simulations were conducted to ensure that the specific absorption rate in the subject's head was below the safety limits. Exposure to LTE EMF reduced the spectral power and the interhemispheric coherence in the alpha and beta bands of the frontal and temporal brain regions. No significant change was observed in the spectral power and the inter-hemispheric coherence in different timeslots during and after the exposure. These findings also corroborated those of our previous study using functional magnetic resonant imaging.

  10. Karyotype evolution and phylogenetic relationships of hamsters (Cricetidae, Muroidea, Rodentia) inferred from chromosomal painting and banding comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanenko, Svetlana A; Volobouev, Vitaly T; Perelman, Polina L; Lebedev, Vladimir S; Serdukova, Natalya A; Trifonov, Vladimir A; Biltueva, Larisa S; Nie, Wenhui; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Bulatova, Nina Sh; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Yang, Fengtang; Graphodatsky, Alexander S

    2007-01-01

    The evolutionary success of rodents of the superfamily Muroidea makes this taxon the most interesting for evolution studies, including study at the chromosomal level. Chromosome-specific painting probes from the Chinese hamster and the Syrian (golden) hamster were used to delimit homologous chromosomal segments among 15 hamster species from eight genera: Allocricetulus, Calomyscus, Cricetulus, Cricetus, Mesocricetus, Peromyscus, Phodopus and Tscherskia (Cricetidae, Muroidea, Rodentia). Based on results of chromosome painting and G-banding, comparative maps between 20 rodent species have been established. The integrated maps demonstrate a high level of karyotype conservation among species in the Cricetus group (Cricetus, Cricetulus, Allocricetulus) with Tscherskia as its sister group. Species within the genera Mesocricetus and Phodopus also show a high degree of chromosomal conservation. Our results substantiate many of the conclusions suggested by other data and strengthen the topology of the Muroidea phylogenetic tree through the inclusion of genome-wide chromosome rearrangements. The derivation of the muroids karyotypes from the putative ancestral state involved centric fusions, fissions, addition of heterochromatic arms and a great number of inversions. Our results provide further insights into the karyotype relationships of all species investigated.

  11. Shear localization and microstructure in coarse grained beta titanium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Bingfeng, E-mail: biw009@ucsd.edu [State Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan (China); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, United States of America (United States); Key Lab of Nonferrous Materials, Ministry of Education, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan (China); Wang, Xiaoyan [State Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan (China); Li, Zezhou [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, United States of America (United States); Ma, Rui [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan (China); Zhao, Shiteng [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, United States of America (United States); Xie, Fangyu [State Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan (China); Zhang, Xiaoyong [State Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan (China)

    2016-01-15

    Adiabatic shear localization plays an important role in the deformation and failure of the coarse grained beta titanium alloy Ti-5 Al-5 Mo-5 V-1 Cr-1 Fe with grain size about 1 mm at high strain rate deformation. Hat shaped specimens with different nominal shear strains are used to induce the formation of shear bands under the controlled shock-loading experiments. The true stress in the specimens can reach about 1040 MPa where the strain is about 1.83. The whole shear localization process lasts about 35 μs. The microstructures within the shear band are investigated by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy / electron backscatter diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that the width of the shear bands decreases with increasing nominal shear strain, and the grains in the transition region near the shear band are elongated along the shear band, and the core of the shear band consists of the ultrafine deformed grains with width of 0.1 μm and heavy dislocations. With the aims of accommodating the imposed shear strain and maintaining neighboring grain compatibility, the grain subdivision continues to take place within the band. A fiber texture is formed in the core of the shear band. The calculated temperature rise in the shear band can reach about 722 K. Dynamic recovery is responsible for the formation of the microstructure in coarse grained beta titanium alloy.

  12. The evolution of the rest-frame J- and H-band luminosity function of galaxies to z=3.5

    OpenAIRE

    Stefanon, Mauro; Marchesini, Danilo

    2011-01-01

    We present the rest-frame J- and H-band luminosity function (LF) of field galaxies, based on a deep multi-wavelength composite sample from the MUSYC, FIRES and FIREWORKS survey public catalogues, covering a total area of 450 arcmin^2. The availability of flux measurements in the Spitzer IRAC 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 um channels allows us to compute absolute magnitudes in the rest-frame J and H bands up to z=3.5 minimizing the dependence on the stellar evolution models. We compute the LF in the fo...

  13. LOCAL BENCHMARKS FOR THE EVOLUTION OF MAJOR-MERGER GALAXIES-SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF A K-BAND SELECTED SAMPLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, C. Kevin; Cheng Yiwen; Lu Nanyao; Mazzarella, Joseph M.; Cutri, Roc; Domingue, Donovan; Huang Jiasheng; Gao Yu; Sun, W.-H.; Surace, Jason

    2010-01-01

    We present Spitzer observations for a sample of close major-merger galaxy pairs (KPAIR sample) selected from cross-matches between the Two Micron All Sky Survey and Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 3. The goals are to study the star formation activity in these galaxies and to set a local bench mark for the cosmic evolution of close major mergers. The Spitzer KPAIR sample (27 pairs, 54 galaxies) includes all spectroscopically confirmed spiral-spiral (S+S) and spiral-elliptical (S+E) pairs in a parent sample that is complete for primaries brighter than K = 12.5 mag, projected separations of 5 h -1 kpc ≤ s ≤ 20 h -1 kpc, and mass ratios ≤2.5. The Spitzer data, consisting of images in seven bands (3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8, 24, 70, 160 μm), show very diversified IR emission properties. Compared to single spiral galaxies in a control sample, only spiral galaxies in S+S pairs show significantly enhanced specific star formation rate (sSFR = SFR/M), whereas spiral galaxies in S+E pairs do not. Furthermore, the SFR enhancement of spiral galaxies in S+S pairs is highly mass-dependent. Only those with M ∼> 10 10.5 M sun show significant enhancement. Relatively low-mass (M ∼ 10 10 M sun ) spirals in S+S pairs have about the same SFR/M compared to their counterparts in the control sample, while those with 10 11 M sun have on average a ∼3 times higher SFR/M than single spirals. There is evidence for a correlation between the global star formation activities (but not the nuclear activities) of the component galaxies in massive S+S major-merger pairs (the H olmberg effect ) . There is no significant difference in the SFR/M between the primaries and the secondaries, nor between spirals of SEP KPAIR =2.54 x 10 -4 (M sun yr -1 Mpc -3 ).

  14. Fluid-induced transition from banded kyanite- to bimineralic eclogite and implications for the evolution of cratons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, H.; Jacob, D. E.; Stern, R. A.; Petts, D.; Mattey, D. P.; Pearson, D. G.

    2017-06-01

    Heterogeneous, modally banded kyanite-bearing and bimineralic eclogites from the lithospheric mantle, collected at the Roberts Victor Diamond mine (South Africa), show a reaction texture in which kyanite is consumed. Geothermobarometric calculations using measured mineral compositions in Perple_X allowed the construction of a P-T path showing a steep, cool prograde metamorphic gradient of 2 °C/km to reach peak conditions of 5.8 GPa and 890 °C for the kyanite eclogite. The kyanite-out reaction formed bimineralic eclogite and is probably an integral part of the mineralogical evolution of most archetypal bimineralic eclogites at Roberts Victor and potentially elsewhere. The kyanite-out reaction occured at close to peak pressure (5.3 GPa) and was associated with a rise in temperature to 1380 °C. Mass balance calculations show that upon breakdown, the kyanite component is fully accommodated in garnet and omphacite via a reaction system with low water fugacity that required restricted fluid influx from metasomatic sources. The δ18O values of garnets are consistently higher than normal mantle values. Each sample has its characteristic trend of δ18O variance between garnets in the kyanite-bearing sections and those in the bimineralic parts covering a range between 5.1‰ and 6.8‰. No systematic change in O-isotope signature exists across the sample population. Differences in garnet trace element signatures between differing lithologies in the eclogites are significant. Grossular-rich garnets coexisting with kyanite have strong positive Eu-anomalies and low Gd/Yb ratios, while more pyrope-rich garnets in the bimineralic sections have lost their positive Eu-anomaly, have higher Gd/Yb ratios and generally higher heavy rare earth element contents. Garnets in the original kyanite-bearing portions thus reflect the provenance of the rocks as metamorphosed gabbros/troctolites. The kyanite-out reaction was most likely triggered by a heating event in the subcratonic

  15. Neoproterozoic Structural Evolution of the NE-trending 620-540 Ma Ad-Damm Shear Zone, Arabian Shield, Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamimi, Z.; El-Sawy, E. K.; El-Fakharan, A. S.; Shujoon, A.; Matsah, M.; El-Shafei, M.

    2012-04-01

    Ad-Damm Shear Zone (ASZ) is a NE-trending fault zone separating Jeddah and Asir tectonostratigraphic terranes in the Neoproterozoic juvenile Arabian Shield. ASZ extends ~380 km, with an average width ~2-3 km, from the eye-catching Ruwah Fault Zone in the eastern shield to the Red Sea Coastal plain. It was believed to be one of the conjugate shears of the NW- to NNW- trending sinistral Najd Shear System based on noteworthy dextral shear criteria recorded within the 620 Ma sheared granites of Numan Complex, as well as right-lateral offsets within quartz veins and dikes transected by the shear zone. The present study is an integrated field-based structural analysis and remote sensing. We utilized the ASTER data for lithologic discrimination and automatic structural lineament extraction and analysis of the Neoproterozoic basement lithologies encountered along and within the vicinity of ASZ. Various false color composite images were generated and evaluated for lithological mapping and structural lineaments. The obtained map was analyzed using GIS techniques to interpret the behavior of the existing lineaments and their spatial distribution. Based on the results of the ASTER data, two significant areas; around Bir Ad-Damm and to the south of Wadi Numan, are selected for detailed field investigation. Shear-sense indicators and overprinting relations clearly show a complicated Neoproterozoic history of ASZ, involving at least three deformations: (1) an early attenuated NE-SW sinistral shearing; followed by (2) a SE-directed thrusting phase resulted in the formation SE-verging thrusts and associated thrust-related folds; and (3) late NE-SW intensive dextral transcurrent shearing played a significant role in the creation of mesoscopic shear-zone related folds, particularly in the area near Bir Ad-Damm. Such deformation history demonstrates the same episode of Neoproterozoic deformation exhibited in the NE-trending shear zones in the Arabian-Nubian Shield (ANS).

  16. The genesis of adiabatic shear bands

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Landau, P.; Osovski, S.; Venkert, A.; Gärtnerová, Viera; Rittel, D.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, Nov (2016), s. 1-6, č. článku 37226. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP108/12/G043 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : mechanical engineering * mechanical properties * metals and alloys * phase transitions and critical phenomena Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  17. Stress relaxation of shear in metals during shock loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glazyrin, V.P.; Platova, T.M.

    1988-01-01

    Constructed determining equation, taking into account stress relaxation of shear, was used to calculate the evolution of plane shock waves of primary and secondary compression in metals. Values of shear stress and viscosity coefficient were

  18. ARPES study of the evolution of band structure and charge density wave properties in RTe3 ( R=Y , La, Ce, Sm, Gd, Tb, and Dy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, Zahid; Brouet, Veronique; Yang, Wanli; Zhou, Xingjiang; Hussain, Zahid; Moore, R.G.; He, R.; Lu, D. H.; Shen, Z.X.; Laverock, J.; Dugdale, S.B.; Ru, N.; Fisher, R.

    2008-01-16

    We present a detailed angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) investigation of the RTe3 family, which sets this system as an ideal"textbook" example for the formation of a nesting driven charge density wave (CDW). This family indeed exhibits the full range of phenomena that can be associated to CDWinstabilities, from the opening of large gaps on the best nested parts of Fermi surface (up to 0.4 eV), to the existence of residual metallic pockets. ARPES is the best suited technique to characterize these features, thanks to its unique ability to resolve the electronic structure in k space. An additional advantage of RTe3 is that theband structure can be very accurately described by a simple two dimensional tight-binding (TB) model, which allows one to understand and easily reproduce many characteristics of the CDW. In this paper, we first establish the main features of the electronic structure by comparing our ARPES measurements with the linear muffin-tinorbital band calculations. We use this to define the validity and limits of the TB model. We then present a complete description of the CDW properties and of their strong evolution as a function of R. Using simple models, we are able to reproduce perfectly the evolution of gaps in k space, the evolution of the CDW wave vector with R, and the shape of the residual metallic pockets. Finally, we give an estimation of the CDWinteraction parameters and find that the change in the electronic density of states n (EF), due to lattice expansion when different R ions are inserted, has the correct order of magnitude to explain the evolution of the CDW properties.

  19. Interpretation of recent alpine landscape system evolution using geomorphic mapping and L-band InSAR analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaizumi, Fumitoshi; Nishiguchi, Takaki; Matsuoka, Norikazu; Trappmann, Daniel; Stoffel, Markus

    2018-06-01

    Alpine landscapes are typically characterized by inherited features of past glaciations and, for the more recent past, by the interplay of a multitude of types of geomorphic processes, including permafrost creep, rockfalls, debris flows, and landslides. These different processes usually exhibit large spatial and temporal variations in activity and velocity. The understanding of these processes in a wide alpine area is often hindered by difficulties in their surveying. In this study, we attempt to disentangle recent changes in an alpine landscape system using geomorphic mapping and L-band DInSAR analyses (ALOS-PALSAR) in the Zermatt Valley, Swiss Alps. Geomorphic mapping points to a preferential distribution of rock glaciers on north-facing slopes, whereas talus slopes are concentrated on south-facing slopes. Field-based interpretation of ground deformation in rock glaciers and movements in talus slopes correlates well with the ratio of InSAR images showing potential ground deformation. Moraines formed during the Little Ice Age, rock glaciers, and talus slopes on north-facing slopes are more active than landforms on south-facing slopes, implying that the presence of permafrost facilitates the deformation of these geomorphic units. Such deformations of geomorphic units prevail also at the elevation of glacier termini. For rock cliffs, the ratio of images indicating retreat is affected by slope orientation and elevation. Linkages between sediment supply from rock cliffs and sediment transport in torrents are different among tributaries, affected by relative locations between sediment supply areas and the channel network. We conclude that the combined use of field surveys and L-band DInSAR analyses can substantially improve process understanding in steep, high-mountain terrain.

  20. Localization in inelastic rate dependent shearing deformations

    KAUST Repository

    Katsaounis, Theodoros

    2016-09-18

    Metals deformed at high strain rates can exhibit failure through formation of shear bands, a phenomenon often attributed to Hadamard instability and localization of the strain into an emerging coherent structure. We verify formation of shear bands for a nonlinear model exhibiting strain softening and strain rate sensitivity. The effects of strain softening and strain rate sensitivity are first assessed by linearized analysis, indicating that the combined effect leads to Turing instability. For the nonlinear model a class of self-similar solutions is constructed, that depicts a coherent localizing structure and the formation of a shear band. This solution is associated to a heteroclinic orbit of a dynamical system. The orbit is constructed numerically and yields explicit shear localizing solutions. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd

  1. Localization in inelastic rate dependent shearing deformations

    KAUST Repository

    Katsaounis, Theodoros; Lee, Min-Gi; Tzavaras, Athanasios

    2016-01-01

    Metals deformed at high strain rates can exhibit failure through formation of shear bands, a phenomenon often attributed to Hadamard instability and localization of the strain into an emerging coherent structure. We verify formation of shear bands for a nonlinear model exhibiting strain softening and strain rate sensitivity. The effects of strain softening and strain rate sensitivity are first assessed by linearized analysis, indicating that the combined effect leads to Turing instability. For the nonlinear model a class of self-similar solutions is constructed, that depicts a coherent localizing structure and the formation of a shear band. This solution is associated to a heteroclinic orbit of a dynamical system. The orbit is constructed numerically and yields explicit shear localizing solutions. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd

  2. Galaxy Evolution in the Radio Band: The Role of Star-forming Galaxies and Active Galactic Nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancuso, C.; Prandoni, I. [INAF-IRA, Via P. Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Lapi, A.; Obi, I.; Perrotta, F.; Bressan, A.; Celotti, A.; Danese, L. [SISSA, Via Bonomea 265, I-34136 Trieste (Italy); Gonzalez-Nuevo, J. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, C. Calvo Sotelo s/n, E-33007 Oviedo (Spain)

    2017-06-20

    We investigate the astrophysics of radio-emitting star-forming galaxies and active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and elucidate their statistical properties in the radio band, including luminosity functions, redshift distributions, and number counts at sub-mJy flux levels, which will be crucially probed by next-generation radio continuum surveys. Specifically, we exploit the model-independent approach by Mancuso et al. to compute the star formation rate functions, the AGN duty cycles, and the conditional probability of a star-forming galaxy to host an AGN with given bolometric luminosity. Coupling these ingredients with the radio emission properties associated with star formation and nuclear activity, we compute relevant statistics at different radio frequencies and disentangle the relative contribution of star-forming galaxies and AGNs in different radio luminosity, radio flux, and redshift ranges. Finally, we highlight that radio-emitting star-forming galaxies and AGNs are expected to host supermassive black holes accreting with different Eddington ratio distributions and to occupy different loci in the galaxy main-sequence diagrams. These specific predictions are consistent with current data sets but need to be tested with larger statistics via future radio data with multiband coverage on wide areas, as will become routinely achievable with the advent of the Square Kilometre Array and its precursors.

  3. Effect of periodic fluctuation of soil particle rotation resistance on interface shear behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebrahimian, Babak; Noorzad, Asadollah

    2010-01-01

    The interface behaviour between infinite extended narrow granular layer and bounding structure is numerically investigated using finite element method. The micro-polar (Cosserat) continuum approach within the framework of elasto-plasticity is employed to remove the numerical difficulties caused by strain-softening of materials in classical continuum mechanics. Mechanical properties of cohesionless granular soil are described with Lade's model enhanced with polar terms including Cosserat rotations, curvatures and couple stresses via mean grain diameter as the internal length. The main attention of paper is laid on the influence of spatial periodic fluctuation of rotation resistance of soil particles interlocked with the surface of bounding structure on evolution and location of shear band developed inside granular body. The finite element results demonstrate that the location and evolution of shear localization in granular body is strongly affected by prescribed non-uniform micro-polar kinematic boundary conditions along the interface.

  4. Investigation of the microcrack evolution in a Ti-based bulk metallic glass matrix composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsheng Wang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The initiation and evolution behavior of the shear-bands and microcracks in a Ti-based metallic-glass–matrix composite (MGMC were investigated by using an in-situ tensile test under transmission electron microscopy (TEM. It was found that the plastic deformation of the Ti-based MGMC related with the generation of the plastic deformation zone in crystalline and shear deformation zone in glass phase near the crack tip. The dendrites can suppress the propagation of the shear band effectively. Before the rapid propagation of cracks, the extending of plastic deformation zone and shear deformation zone ahead of crack tip is the main pattern in the composite.

  5. Origin of shear thickening in semidilute wormlike micellar solutions and evidence of elastic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marín-Santibáñez, Benjamín M.; Pérez-González, José; Rodríguez-González, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    The origin of shear thickening in an equimolar semidilute wormlike micellar solution of cetylpyridinium chloride and sodium salicylate was investigated in this work by using Couette rheometry, flow visualization, and capillary Rheo-particle image velocimetry. The use of the combined methods allowed the discovery of gradient shear banding flow occurring from a critical shear stress and consisting of two main bands, one isotropic (transparent) of high viscosity and one structured (turbid) of low viscosity. Mechanical rheometry indicated macroscopic shear thinning behavior in the shear banding regime. However, local velocimetry showed that the turbid band increased its viscosity along with the shear stress, even though barely reached the value of the viscosity of the isotropic phase. This shear band is the precursor of shear induced structures that subsequently give rise to the average increase in viscosity or apparent shear thickening of the solution. Further increase in the shear stress promoted the growing of the turbid band across the flow region and led to destabilization of the shear banding flow independently of the type of rheometer used, as well as to vorticity banding in Couette flow. At last, vorticity banding disappeared and the flow developed elastic turbulence with chaotic dynamics

  6. Acoustic waves in unbounded shear flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chagelishvili, G.D.; Khujadze, G.R.; Lominadze, J.G.; Rogava, A.D.

    1996-05-01

    The linear evolution of acoustic waves in fluid flow with constant density and uniform shear of velocity is investigated. The process of the mean flow energy extraction by the three-dimensional acoustic waves which is due to the non-normality of linear dynamics in shear flows is analyzed. The thorough examination of the dynamics of different physical quantities, specifying the wave evolution, is outlined. The revealing of the behaviour becomes possible owing to the nonmodal approach that has been extensively used in the study of the perturbations evolution in shear flows since the beginning of the nineties. In addition, a detailed analyses of the physics of shear energy gain by vortex and acoustic perturbations is presented. (author). 28 refs, 7 figs

  7. Analysis of Fundus Fluorescein Angiogram Based on the Hessian Matrix of Directional Curvelet Sub-bands and Distance Regularized Level Set Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltanipour, Asieh; Sadri, Saeed; Rabbani, Hossein; Akhlaghi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new procedure for automatic extraction of the blood vessels and optic disk (OD) in fundus fluorescein angiogram (FFA). In order to extract blood vessel centerlines, the algorithm of vessel extraction starts with the analysis of directional images resulting from sub-bands of fast discrete curvelet transform (FDCT) in the similar directions and different scales. For this purpose, each directional image is processed by using information of the first order derivative and eigenvalues obtained from the Hessian matrix. The final vessel segmentation is obtained using a simple region growing algorithm iteratively, which merges centerline images with the contents of images resulting from modified top-hat transform followed by bit plane slicing. After extracting blood vessels from FFA image, candidates regions for OD are enhanced by removing blood vessels from the FFA image, using multi-structure elements morphology, and modification of FDCT coefficients. Then, canny edge detector and Hough transform are applied to the reconstructed image to extract the boundary of candidate regions. At the next step, the information of the main arc of the retinal vessels surrounding the OD region is used to extract the actual location of the OD. Finally, the OD boundary is detected by applying distance regularized level set evolution. The proposed method was tested on the FFA images from angiography unit of Isfahan Feiz Hospital, containing 70 FFA images from different diabetic retinopathy stages. The experimental results show the accuracy more than 93% for vessel segmentation and more than 87% for OD boundary extraction.

  8. Direct evidence for a systematic evolution of optical band gap and local disorder in Ag, in doped Sb{sub 2}Te phase change material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla, Krishna Dayal; Sahu, Smriti [Discipline of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Indore (India); Manivannan, Anbarasu [Discipline of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Indore (India); Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Indore, Indore (India); Deshpande, Uday Prabhakarrao [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Indore (India)

    2017-12-15

    Rapid and reversible switching properties of Ag, In doped Sb{sub 2}Te (AIST) phase change material is widely used in re-writable optical data storage applications. We report here a systematic evolution of optical band gap (E{sub g}), local disorder (Tauc parameter, β), and Urbach energy (E{sub U}) of AIST material during amorphous to crystalline transition using in situ UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy. Unlike GeTe-Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} (GST) family, AIST material is found to show unique characteristics as evidenced by the presence of direct forbidden transitions. Crystallization is accompanied by a systematic reduction in E{sub g} from 0.50 eV (as-deposited amorphous at 300 K) to 0.18 eV (crystalline at 300 K). Moreover, decrease in E{sub U} (from 272 to 212 meV) and β is also observed during increasing the temperature in the amorphous phase, revealing direct observation of enhancement of the medium-range order and distortion in short range order, respectively. These findings of optical transition would be helpful for distinguishing the unique behavior of AIST material from GST family. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Examining the evolution towards turbulence through spatio-temporal analysis of multi-dimensional structures formed by instability growth along a shear layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Elizabeth; Doss, Forrest; Loomis, Eric; Flippo, Kirk; Devolder, Barbara; Welser-Sherrill, Leslie; Fincke, James; Kline, John

    2014-10-01

    The counter-propagating shear campaign is examining instability growth and its transition to turbulence relevant to mix in ICF capsules. Experimental platforms on both OMEGA and NIF use anti-symmetric flows about a shear interface to examine isolated Kelvin-Helmholtz instability growth. Measurements of interface (an Al or Ti tracer layer) dynamics are used to benchmark the LANL RAGE hydrocode with BHR turbulence model. The tracer layer does not expand uniformly, but breaks up into multi-dimensional structures that are initially quasi-2D due to the target geometry. We are developing techniques to analyze the multi-D structure growth along the tracer surface with a focus on characterizing the time-dependent structures' spectrum of scales in order to appraise a transition to turbulence in the system and potentially provide tighter constraints on initialization schemes for the BHR model. To this end, we use a wavelet based analysis to diagnose single-time radiographs of the tracer layer surface (w/low and amplified roughness for random noise seeding) with observed spatially non-repetitive features, in order to identify spatial and temporal trends in radiographs taken at different times across several experimental shots. This work conducted under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LANL under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  10. Amphibious Shear Velocity Structure of the Cascadia Subduction Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janiszewski, H. A.; Gaherty, J. B.; Abers, G. A.; Gao, H.

    2017-12-01

    The amphibious Cascadia Initiative crosses the coastline of the Cascadia subduction zone (CSZ) deploying seismometers from the Juan de Fuca ridge offshore to beyond the volcanic arc onshore. This allows unprecedented seismic imaging of the CSZ, enabling examination of both the evolution of the Juan de Fuca plate prior to and during subduction as well as the along strike variability of the subduction system. Here we present new results from an amphibious shear velocity model for the crust and upper mantle across the Cascadia subduction zone. The primary data used in this inversion are surface-wave phase velocities derived from ambient-noise Rayleigh-wave data in the 10 - 20 s period band, and teleseismic earthquake Rayleigh wave phase velocities in the 20 - 160 s period band. Phase velocity maps from these data reflect major tectonic structures including the transition from oceanic to continental lithosphere, Juan de Fuca lithosphere that is faster than observations in the Pacific for oceanic crust of its age, slow velocities associated with the accretionary prism, the front of the fast subducting slab, and the Cascades volcanic arc which is associated with slower velocities in the south than in the north. Crustal structures are constrained by receiver functions in the offshore forearc and onshore regions, and by active source constraints on the Juan de Fuca plate prior to subduction. The shear-wave velocities are interpreted in their relationships to temperature, presence of melt or hydrous alteration, and compositional variation of the CSZ.

  11. Integration of remote sensing, geochemical and field data in the Qena-Safaga shear zone: Implications for structural evolution of the Eastern Desert, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Din, Gamal Kamal; Abdelkareem, Mohamed

    2018-05-01

    The Qena-Safaga shear zone (QSSZ) represents a significant structural characteristic in the Eastern Desert of Egypt. Remote Sensing, field and geochemical data were utilized in the present study. The results revealed that the QSSZ dominated by metamorphic complex (MC) that intruded by syn-tectonic granitoids. The low angle thrust fault brings calc-alkaline metavolcanics to overlie MC and its association. Subsequently, the area is dissected by strike-slip faults and the small elongated basins of Hammamat sediments of Precambrian were accumulated. The MC intruded by late-to post-tectonic granites (LPG) and Dokhan Volcanics which comprise felsic varieties forming distinctive columnar joints. Remote sensing analysis and field data revealed that major sub-vertical conspicuous strike-slip faults (SSF) including sinistral NW-SE and dextral ca. E-W shaped the study area. Various shear zones that accompanying the SSF are running NW-SE, NE-SW, E-W, N-S and ENE-WSW. The obtained shear sense presented a multiphase of deformation on each trend. i.e., the predominant NW-SE strike-slip fault trend started with sinistral displacement and is reactivated during later events to be right (dextral) strike slip cutting with dextral displacement the E-W trending faults; while NE-SW movements are cut by both the N-S and NNW - SSE trends. Remote sensing data revealed that the NW-SE direction that dominated the area is associated with hydrothermal alteration processes. This allowed modifying the major and trace elements of the highly deformed rocks that showed depletion in SiO2 and enrichments in Fe2O3, MnO, Al2O3, TiO2, Na2O, K2O, Cu, Zn and Pb contents. The geochemical signatures of major and trace elements revealed two types of granites including I-type calc-alkaline granites (late-to post-tectonic) that formed during an extensional regime. However, syn-tectonic granitoids are related to subduction-related environment.

  12. Evolution of Brasiliano-age granitoid types in a shear-zone environment, Umarizal-Caraubas region, Rio Grande do Norte, northeast Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, A. C.; Dall'Agnol, R.; McReath, I.; Lafon, J. M.; Teixeira, N.

    1995-01-01

    A sequence of Brasiliano-age granitoid types is exposed in a small area near the cities of Umarizal and Caraúbas in Rio Grande do Norte State, Northeast Brazil. Porphyritic K-alkali-calcic monzogranite is an important facies of the oldest Caraúbas intrusion (RbSr whole rock isochron age of ca. 630 Ma), which suffered solid-state deformation due to movements on a major NE-trending shear zone. The intrusion of the Prado and part of the Quixaba bodies was probably controlled by the shear zone. These two bodies include mafic/intermediate rocks, some of which contain two pyroxenes, and have hybrid, partly alkaline and partly shoshonitic geochemical characteristics. Rock types and ages are similar to those of some Pan-African occurrences in southwestern Nigeria. The Tourão body, intruded at ca. 590 Ma, presents preferred mineral orientations which are probably largely magmatic, since little evidence is found for widespread solid-state deformation. On the other hand, its intrusion may have been facilitated by the presence of the shear-zone faults. The rocks form a monomodal felsic K-alkali-calcic suite. With the exception of the Quixaba body, all these earlier granitoids are magmatic epidote- and magnetite-bearing porphyritic monzogranites with trace element geochemical characteristics of modern syn-collisional granites. The latest intrusion at ca. 545 Ma is mainly represented by potassic quartz syenites and related rocks, some of which contain fayalite or ferrohypersthene. These rocks possess neither well developed mineral orientations of magmatic origin nor signs of solid-state deformation. They are mineralogically similar to, but younger than some of the "bauchites" of central Nigeria. Geochemical signatures are comparable with those of modern within-plate granites. All granitoids present high ( 87Sr/ 86Sr)i ratios which range from 0.708 to 0.712, and increase with decreasing age. Such ratios are compatible with important or dominant crustal contributions. On the

  13. Friction of Shear-Fracture Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riikilä, T. I.; Pylväinen, J. I.; Åström, J.

    2017-12-01

    A shear fracture of brittle solids under compression undergoes a substantial evolution from the initial microcracking to a fully formed powder-filled shear zone. Experiments covering the entire process are relatively easy to conduct, but they are very difficult to investigate in detail. Numerically, the large strain limit has remained a challenge. An efficient simulation model and a custom-made experimental device are employed to test to what extent a shear fracture alone is sufficient to drive material to spontaneous self-lubrication. A "weak shear zone" is an important concept in geology, and a large number of explanations, specific for tectonic conditions, have been proposed. We demonstrate here that weak shear zones are far more general, and that their emergence only demands that a microscopic, i.e., fragment-scale, stress relaxation mechanism develops during the fracture process.

  14. The shear zone-related gold mineralization at the Turmalina deposit, Quadrilátero Ferrífero, Brazil: structural evolution and the two stages of mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabricio-Silva, Wendell; Rosière, Carlos Alberto; Bühn, Bernhard

    2018-05-01

    Turmalina is an important orogenic gold deposit located in the NW region of the Quadrilátero Ferrífero. The deposit is hosted in an Archean greenstone belt composed of ortho-amphibolites and pelites with interleaved tuffs metamorphosed under amphibolite facies conditions and intruded by a granite stock. The orebodies are controlled by WNW-ESE-trending shear zones, associated with hydrothermal alteration. Three deformation events are recognized in the Turmalina gold deposit: D1 and D2 are the result of a progressive Archean deformation under ductile conditions between 2749 ± 7 and 2664 ± 35 Ma; D3 is characterized by a transpressional event under ductile-brittle conditions with the age still unclear. The three generations of garnet observed show that Grt1 blastesis is pre- to syn-D1 and Grt2 growth during the late to post-deformation stages of the D2 event. The initial temperature (Grt1 core) is around 548-600 °C, whereas during late D2, the temperatures reached 633 °C (metamorphic peak-Grt2 rim), likely as a result of granite intrusion. The Grt3 resulted from re-equilibration under retrograde conditions. Two gold-bearing sulfide stages were identified: pyrrhotite-arsenopyrite ± löllingite ± chalcopyrite ± gold stage I precipitated below a metamorphic peak temperature of 598 ± 19 °C associated with S1 foliation (D1), and pyrrhotite-pyrite-arsenopyrite ± chalcopyrite ± gold stage II is located commonly along V3 quartz-carbonate veinlets with a temperature range between 442 ± 9 and 510 ± 30 °C. We suggest that the granite intrusion imposed an additional thermal effect that promoted further dehydration of country rocks. The Au derived mainly from a metamorphic fluid source but potentially mixed with magmatic fluids from the granite.

  15. Flow behavior at different shear rates for dry powders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh, A.; Singh, A.; Luding, Stefan; Nürnberg Messe GmbH,

    2010-01-01

    Using Discrete Element Simulations (DEM), an effort is made to study the so called “Split bottom ring shear cell” where a slow, quasi-static deformation leads to wide shear bands. Density, velocity and deformation gradients as well as structure and stress tensors, can be computed by a single

  16. High Resolution Shear Profile Measurements in Entangled Polymers

    KAUST Repository

    Hayes, Keesha A.; Buckley, Mark R.; Cohen, Itai; Archer, Lynden A.

    2008-01-01

    spanning a wide range of molecular weights and number of entanglements (8≤Z≤56), but reveal large differences between the imposed and measured shear rates. These findings disagree with recent reports that shear banding is a characteristic flow response

  17. Instabilities of convection patterns in a shear-thinning fluid between plates of finite conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varé, Thomas; Nouar, Chérif; Métivier, Christel

    2017-10-01

    Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a horizontal layer of a non-Newtonian fluid between slabs of arbitrary thickness and finite thermal conductivity is considered. The first part of the paper deals with the primary bifurcation and the relative stability of convective patterns at threshold. Weakly nonlinear analysis combined with Stuart-Landau equation is used. The competition between squares and rolls, as a function of the shear-thinning degree of the fluid, the slabs' thickness, and the ratio of the thermal conductivity of the slabs to that of the fluid is investigated. Computations of heat transfer coefficients are in agreement with the maximum heat transfer principle. The second part of the paper concerns the stability of the convective patterns toward spatial perturbations and the determination of the band width of the stable wave number in the neighborhood of the critical Rayleigh number. The approach used is based on the Ginzburg-Landau equations. The study of rolls stability shows that: (i) for low shear-thinning effects, the band of stable wave numbers is bounded by zigzag instability and cross-roll instability. Furthermore, the marginal cross-roll stability boundary enlarges with increasing shear-thinning properties; (ii) for high shear-thinning effects, Eckhaus instability becomes more dangerous than cross-roll instability. For square patterns, the wave number selection is always restricted by zigzag instability and by "rectangular Eckhaus" instability. In addition, the width of the stable wave number decreases with increasing shear-thinning effects. Numerical simulations of the planform evolution are also presented to illustrate the different instabilities considered in the paper.

  18. The 3 micron ice band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberg, J.M.; Bult, C.E.P.M. van de

    1984-01-01

    Ever since it was proposed that H 2 O could be a dominant constituent of interstellar grains, its detection, or lack thereof, has played a large role in theories of grains and their evolution. It now appears possible to provide a basic theoretical structure for the evolution of grains in molecular clouds based on current observational evidence and laboratory experiments on the ice band. Both band strengths and shapes can be reasonably predicted by grain models. (U.K.)

  19. Semiconductor laser shearing interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ming Hai; Li Ming; Chen Nong; Xie Jiaping

    1988-03-01

    The application of semiconductor laser on grating shearing interferometry is studied experimentally in the present paper. The method measuring the coherence of semiconductor laser beam by ion etching double frequency grating is proposed. The experimental result of lens aberration with semiconductor laser shearing interferometer is given. Talbot shearing interferometry of semiconductor laser is also described. (author). 2 refs, 9 figs

  20. Non-homogeneous flow profiles in sheared bacterial suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Devranjan; Cheng, Xiang

    Bacterial suspensions under shear exhibit interesting rheological behaviors including the remarkable ``superfluidic'' state with vanishing viscosity at low shear rates. Theoretical studies have shown that such ``superfluidic'' state is linked with non-homogeneous shear flows, which are induced by coupling between nematic order of active fluids and hydrodynamics of shear flows. However, although bulk rheology of bacterial suspensions has been experimentally studied, shear profiles within bacterial suspensions have not been explored so far. Here, we experimentally investigate the flow behaviors of E. coli suspensions under planar oscillatory shear. Using confocal microscopy and PIV, we measure velocity profiles across gap between two shear plates. We find that with increasing shear rates, high-concentration bacterial suspensions exhibit an array of non-homogeneous flow behaviors like yield-stress flows and shear banding. We show that these non-homogeneous flows are due to collective motion of bacterial suspensions. The phase diagram of sheared bacterial suspensions is systematically mapped as functions of shear rates an bacterial concentrations. Our experiments provide new insights into rheology of bacterial suspensions and shed light on shear induced dynamics of active fluids. Chemical Engineering and Material Science department.

  1. Probing the Electronic Structure and Band Gap Evolution of Titanium Oxide Clusters (TiO2)n- (n=1-10) Using Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai, Hua-jin; Wang, Lai S.

    2007-01-01

    TiO2 is a wide-band gap semiconductor and it is an important material for photocatalysis. Here we report an experimental investigation of the electronic structure of (TiO2)n clusters and how their band gap evolves as a function of size using anion photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). PES spectra of (TiO2)n- clusters for n = 1-10 have been obtained at 193 (6.424 eV) and 157 nm (7.866 eV). The high photon energy at 157 nm allows the band gap of the TiO2 clusters to be clearly revealed up to n = 10. The band gap is observed to be strongly size-dependent for n 1 appears to be localized in a tricoordinated Ti atom, creating a single Ti3+ site and making these clusters ideal molecular models for mechanistic understanding of TiO2 surface defects and photocatalytic properties

  2. Modeling combined tension-shear failure of ductile materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partom, Y

    2014-01-01

    Failure of ductile materials is usually expressed in terms of effective plastic strain. Ductile materials can fail by two different failure modes, shear failure and tensile failure. Under dynamic loading shear failure has to do with shear localization and formation of adiabatic shear bands. In these bands plastic strain rate is very high, dissipative heating is extensive, and shear strength is lost. Shear localization starts at a certain value of effective plastic strain, when thermal softening overcomes strain hardening. Shear failure is therefore represented in terms of effective plastic strain. On the other hand, tensile failure comes about by void growth under tension. For voids in a tension field there is a threshold state of the remote field for which voids grow spontaneously (cavitation), and the material there fails. Cavitation depends on the remote field stress components and on the flow stress. In this way failure in tension is related to shear strength and to failure in shear. Here we first evaluate the cavitation threshold for different remote field situations, using 2D numerical simulations with a hydro code. We then use the results to compute examples of rate dependent tension-shear failure of a ductile material.

  3. Experimental study of shear rate dependence in perpetually sheared granular matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sophie Yang; Guillard, François; Marks, Benjy; Rognon, Pierre; Einav, Itai

    2017-06-01

    We study the shear behaviour of various granular materials by conducting novel perpetual simple shear experiments over four orders of magnitude of relatively low shear rates. The newly developed experimental apparatus employed is called "3D Stadium Shear Device" which is an extended version of the 2D Stadium Shear Device [1]. This device is able to provide a non-radial dependent perpetual shear flow and a nearly linear velocity profile between two oppositely moving shear walls. Using this device, we are able to test a large variety of granular materials. Here, we demonstrate the applicability of the device on glass beads (diameter 1 mm, 3 mm, and 14 mm) and rice. We particularly focus on studying these materials at very low inertial number I ranging from 10-6 to 10-2. We find that, within this range of I, the friction coefficient μ of glass beads has no shear rate dependence. A particularly appealing observation comes from testing rice, where the attainment of critical state develops under much longer duration than in other materials. Initially during shear we find a value of μ similar to that found for glass beads, but with time this value decreases gradually towards the asymptotic critical state value. The reason, we believe, lies in the fact that rice grains are strongly elongated; hence the time to achieve the stable μ is primarily controlled by the time for particles to align themselves with respect to the shear walls. Furthermore, the initial packing conditions of samples also plays a role in the evolution of μ when the shear strain is small, but that impact will eventually be erased after sufficient shear strain.

  4. Experimental study of shear rate dependence in perpetually sheared granular matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Sophie Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the shear behaviour of various granular materials by conducting novel perpetual simple shear experiments over four orders of magnitude of relatively low shear rates. The newly developed experimental apparatus employed is called “3D Stadium Shear Device” which is an extended version of the 2D Stadium Shear Device [1]. This device is able to provide a non-radial dependent perpetual shear flow and a nearly linear velocity profile between two oppositely moving shear walls. Using this device, we are able to test a large variety of granular materials. Here, we demonstrate the applicability of the device on glass beads (diameter 1 mm, 3 mm, and 14 mm and rice. We particularly focus on studying these materials at very low inertial number I ranging from 10−6 to 10−2. We find that, within this range of I, the friction coefficient μ of glass beads has no shear rate dependence. A particularly appealing observation comes from testing rice, where the attainment of critical state develops under much longer duration than in other materials. Initially during shear we find a value of μ similar to that found for glass beads, but with time this value decreases gradually towards the asymptotic critical state value. The reason, we believe, lies in the fact that rice grains are strongly elongated; hence the time to achieve the stable μ is primarily controlled by the time for particles to align themselves with respect to the shear walls. Furthermore, the initial packing conditions of samples also plays a role in the evolution of μ when the shear strain is small, but that impact will eventually be erased after sufficient shear strain.

  5. Texture evolution in thin-sheets on AISI 301 metastable stainless steel under dynamic loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K.Y. [Posco Steels, Pohan, South Korea (Korea, Republic of); Kozaczek, K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kulkarni, S.M. [TRW Vehicle Safety Systems, Mesa, AZ (United States); Bastias, P.C.; Hahn, G.T. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)

    1995-05-08

    The evolution of texture in thin sheets of metastable austenitic stainless steel AISI 301 is affected by external conditions such as loading rate and temperature, by inhomogeneous deformation phenomena such as twinning and shear band formation, and by the concurent strain induced phase transformation of the retained austenitc ({gamma}) into martensite ({alpha}). The present paper describes texture measurements on different gauges of AISI 301 prior and after uniaxial stretching under different conditions.

  6. Formation of structural steady states in lamellar/sponge phase-separating fluids under shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panizza, P.; Courbin, L.; Cristobal, G.; Rouch, J.; Narayanan, T.

    2003-05-01

    We investigate the effect of shear flow on a lamellar-sponge phase-separating fluid when subjected to shear flow. We show the existence of two different steady states (droplets and ribbons structures) whose nature does not depend on the way to reach the two-phase unstable region of the phase diagram (temperature quench or stirring). The transition between ribbons and droplets is shear thickening and its nature strongly depends on what dynamical variable is imposed. If the stress is fixed, flow visualization shows the existence of shear bands at the transition, characteristic of coexistence in the cell between ribbons and droplets. In this shear-banding region, the viscosity oscillates. When the shear rate is fixed, no shear bands are observed. Instead, the transition exhibits a hysteretic behavior leading to a structural bi-stability of the phase-separating fluid under flow.

  7. The strain-dependent spatial evolution of garnet in a high- P ductile shear zone from the Western Gneiss Region (Norway): a synchrotron X-ray microtomography study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macente, A. [School of Geosciences, University of Edinburgh, The King' s Building James Hutton Road Edinburgh EH9 3FE UK; Fusseis, F. [School of Geosciences, University of Edinburgh, The King' s Building James Hutton Road Edinburgh EH9 3FE UK; Menegon, L. [School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Plymouth University, Fitzroy Drake Circus Plymouth Devon PL4 8AA UK; Xianghui, X. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave Building 431-B003 Argonne IL USA; John, T. [Institut für Geologische Wissenschaften, Freie Universität Berlin, Malteserstr. 74-100 12249 Berlin Germany

    2017-03-27

    Reaction and deformation microfabrics provide key information to understand the thermodynamic and kinetic controls of tectono-metamorphic processes, however they are usually analysed in two dimensions, omitting important information regarding the third spatial dimension. We applied synchrotron-based X-ray microtomography to document the evolution of a pristine olivine gabbro into a deformed omphacite-garnet eclogite in four dimensions, where the 4th dimension is represented by the degree of strain. In the investigated samples, which cover a strain gradient into a shear zone from the Western Gneiss Region (Norway), we focused on the spatial transformation of garnet coronas into elongated clusters of garnets with increasing strain. Our microtomographic data allowed quantification of garnet volume, shape and spatial arrangement evolution with increasing strain. We combined microtomographic observations with light microscope- and backscatter electron images as well as electron microprobe- (EMPA) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis to correlate mineral composition and orientation data with the X-ray absorption signal of the same mineral grains. With increasing deformation, the garnet volume almost triples. In the low strain domain, garnets form a well interconnected large garnet aggregate that develops throughout the entire Page 1 of 52 sample. We also observed that garnet coronas in the gabbros never completely encapsulate olivine grains. In the most highly deformed eclogites, the oblate shapes of garnet clusters reflect a deformational origin of the microfabrics. We interpret the aligned garnet aggregates to direct synkinematic fluid flow and consequently influence the transport of dissolved chemical components. EBSD analyses reveal that garnet show a near-random crystal preferred orientation that testifies no evidence for crystal plasticity. There is, however evidence for minor fracturing, neo-nucleation and overgrowth. Microprobe chemical analysis

  8. Design and implementation of a shearing apparatus for the experimental study of shear displacement in rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Johnathan; Crandall, Dustin; Gill, Magdalena; Brown, Sarah; Tennant, Bryan

    2018-04-01

    Fluid flow in the subsurface is not well understood in the context of "impermeable" geologic media. This is especially true of formations that have undergone significant stress fluctuations due to injection or withdrawal of fluids that alters the localized pressure regime. When the pressure regime is altered, these formations, which are often already fractured, move via shear to reduce the imbalance in the stress state. While this process is known to happen, the evolution of these fractures and their effects on fluid transport are still relatively unknown. Numerous simulation and several experimental studies have been performed that characterize the relationship between shearing and permeability in fractures; while many of these studies utilize measurements of fluid flow or the starting and ending geometries of the fracture to characterize shear, they do not characterize the intermediate stages during shear. We present an experimental apparatus based on slight modifications to a commonly available Hassler core holder that allows for shearing of rocks, while measuring the hydraulic and mechanical changes to geomaterials during intermediate steps. The core holder modification employs the use of semi-circular end caps and structural supports for the confining membrane that allow for free movement of the sheared material while preventing membrane collapse. By integrating this modified core holder with a computed tomography scanner, we show a new methodology for understanding the interdependent behavior between fracture structure and flow properties during intermediate steps in shearing. We include a case study of this device function which is shown here through shearing of a fractured shale core and simultaneous observation of the mechanical changes and evolution of the hydraulic properties during shearing.

  9. Thermal evolution of the CO stretching band in carboxy-myoglobin in the light of neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordone, Lorenzo [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche ed Astronomiche, Universita di Palermo and CNISM, Via Archirafi 36, I-90123 Palermo (Italy)], E-mail: cordone@fisica.unipa.it; Cottone, Grazia; Giuffrida, Sergio; Librizzi, Fabio [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche ed Astronomiche, Universita di Palermo and CNISM, Via Archirafi 36, I-90123 Palermo (Italy)

    2008-04-18

    As it is well known, the thermal behaviour of the CO stretching band in MbCO reflects the interconversion among protein's taxonomic and lower tier substates. We compare here FTIR data on the thermal behaviour of the CO stretching band in MbCO embedded in non-liquid, water-trehalose matrixes, and neutron scattering data on dry and hydrated proteins and nucleic acids. The comparison, also in the light of simulative data, gives relevant information on the relationship between the mean square displacements of hydrogen atoms and the heme pocket thermal rearrangements in MbCO, as experienced by the bound CO, in the temperature region 100-200 K, and at higher temperature when large scale protein motions take place, following the so-called dynamic transition. The reported results point out how FTIR is a useful tool to study the protein internal dynamics, and complement information from neutron scattering measurements.

  10. Cosmology with cosmic shear observations: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbinger, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Cosmic shear is the distortion of images of distant galaxies due to weak gravitational lensing by the large-scale structure in the Universe. Such images are coherently deformed by the tidal field of matter inhomogeneities along the line of sight. By measuring galaxy shape correlations, we can study the properties and evolution of structure on large scales as well as the geometry of the Universe. Thus, cosmic shear has become a powerful probe into the nature of dark matter and the origin of the current accelerated expansion of the Universe. Over the last years, cosmic shear has evolved into a reliable and robust cosmological probe, providing measurements of the expansion history of the Universe and the growth of its structure. We review here the principles of weak gravitational lensing and show how cosmic shear is interpreted in a cosmological context. Then we give an overview of weak-lensing measurements, and present the main observational cosmic-shear results since it was discovered 15 years ago, as well as the implications for cosmology. We then conclude with an outlook on the various future surveys and missions, for which cosmic shear is one of the main science drivers, and discuss promising new weak cosmological lensing techniques for future observations.

  11. Shear localization in a mature mylonitic rock analog during fast slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, M.; van den Ende, M. P. A.; Niemeijer, A. R.; Spiers, C. J.

    2017-02-01

    Highly localized slip zones developed within ductile shear zones, such as pseudotachylyte bands occurring within mylonitic fabric rocks, are frequently interpreted as evidence for earthquake nucleation and/or propagation within the ductile regime. To understand brittle/frictional shear localization processes in ductile shear zones and to relate these to earthquake nucleation and propagation, we performed tests with large changes in velocity on a brine-saturated, 80:20 (wt %) mixture of halite and muscovite gouge after forming a mature mylonitic structure through frictional-viscous flow. The direct effect a on shear strength that occurs in response to an instantaneous upward velocity-step is an important parameter in determining the nature of seismic rupture nucleation and propagation. We obtained reproducible results regarding low-velocity mechanical behavior compared with previous work, but also obtained new insights into effects of sudden increases in slip velocity on localization and strength evolution, at velocities above a critical velocity Vc (˜20 μm/s). We found that once a ductile, mylonitic structure has developed in a shear zone, subsequent cataclastic deformation is consistently localized in a narrow zone. This switch to localized deformation is controlled by the imposed velocity and becomes most apparent at velocities above Vc. In addition, the direct effect drops rapidly when the velocity exceeds Vc. This implies that slip can accelerate toward seismic velocities almost instantly and without much loss of fracture energy, once Vc is exceeded. Obtaining a measure for Vc in natural faults is therefore of key importance for understanding earthquake nucleation and propagation in the brittle-ductile transitional regime.

  12. Evolution with Composition of the d-Band Density of States at the Fermi Level in Highly Spin Polarized Co1-xFexS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhns, P. L.; Hoch, M. J. R.; Reyes, A. P.; Moulton, W. G.; Wang, L.; Leighton, C.

    2006-04-01

    Highly spin polarized (SP) and half-metallic ferromagnetic systems are of considerable current interest and of potential importance for spintronic applications. Recent work has demonstrated that Co1-xFexS2 is a highly polarized ferromagnet (FM) where the spin polarization can be tuned by alloy composition. Using Co59 FM-NMR as a probe, we have measured the low-temperature spin relaxation in this system in magnetic fields from 0 to 1.0 T for 0≤x≤0.3. The Co59 spin-lattice relaxation rates follow a linear T dependence. Analysis of the data, using expressions for a FM system, permits information to be obtained on the d-band density of states at the Fermi level. The results are compared with independent density of states values inferred from electronic specific heat measurements and band structure calculations. It is shown that FM-NMR can be an important method for investigating highly SP systems.

  13. Shear-Velocity Structure and Azimuthal and Radial Anisotropy Beneath the Kaapvaal Craton From Bayesian Inversion of Surface-Wave Data: Inferences for the Architecture and Early Evolution of Cratons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, S.; Ravenna, M.; Adam, J.

    2017-12-01

    Seismic anisotropy provides essential information on the deformation of the lithosphere. Knowledge of anisotropy also allows us to isolate the isotropic-average seismic velocities, relatable to the lithospheric temperature and composition. We use Rayleigh and Love-wave phase velocities and their azimuthal anisotropy measured in broad period ranges across the footprint of the Southern Africa Seismic Experiment (SASE), from the Kaapvaal Craton to the Limpopo Belt. We invert the data using our recently developed, fully non-linear Markov Chain Monte Carlo method and determine, for the first time, both the isotropic-average S velocity and its radial and azimuthal anisotropy as a function of depth from the upper crust down to the asthenosphere. The probabilistic inversion provides a way to quantify non-uniqueness, using direct parameter-space sampling, and assess model uncertainties. The high-velocity anomaly indicative of the cold cratonic lithosphere bottoms at 200-250 km beneath the central and western Kaapvaal Craton, underlain by a low-velocity zone. Beneath northern Kaapvaal and Limpopo, by contrast, high velocities extend down to 300-350 km. Although this does not require a lithosphere that has maintained this thickness over a geologically long time, the data does require the mantle to be anomalously cold down to 300-350 km. Interestingly, topography correlates with the thickness of this high-velocity layer, with lower elevations where the lid is thicker. Radial shear-wave anisotropy is in the 2-5 percent range (Vsh > Vsv) from the lower crust down to 200 km, below which depth it decreases gradually. Radial variations in the amplitude of radial anisotropy show no clear relationship with those in the amplitude of azimuthal anisotropy or isotropic-average Vs anomalies. Azimuthal anisotropy changes the fast-propagation direction near the base of the lithosphere (200-300 km depth), from the laterally varying fast azimuths in the lower lithosphere to a spatially

  14. Analytical study of dispersion relations for shear horizontal wave propagation in plates with periodic stubs

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Yanlong

    2015-08-01

    The coupled mode theory with coupling of diffraction modes and waveguide modes is usually used on the calculations of transmission and reflection coefficients for electromagnetic waves traveling through periodic sub-wavelength structures. In this paper, I extend this method to derive analytical solutions of high-order dispersion relations for shear horizontal (SH) wave propagation in elastic plates with periodic stubs. In the long wavelength regime, the explicit expression is obtained by this theory and derived specially by employing an effective medium. This indicates that the periodical stubs are equivalent to an effective homogenous layer in the long wavelength. Notably, in the short wavelength regime, high-order diffraction modes in the plate and high-order waveguide modes in the stubs are considered with modes coupling to compute the band structures. Numerical results of the coupled mode theory fit pretty well with the results of the finite element method (FEM). In addition, the band structures\\' evolution with the height of the stubs and the thickness of the plate shows clearly that the method can predict well the Bragg band gaps, locally resonant band gaps and high-order symmetric and anti-symmetric thickness-twist modes for the periodically structured plates. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.

  15. Room Temperature Optical Constants and Band Gap Evolution of Phase Pure M1-VO2 Thin Films Deposited at Different Oxygen Partial Pressures by Reactive Magnetron Sputtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spectroscopic ellipsometry study was employed for phase pure VO2(M1 thin films grown at different oxygen partial pressures by reactive magnetron sputtering. The optical constants of the VO2(M1 thin films have been determined in a photon energy range between 0.73 and 5.05 eV. The near-infrared extinction coefficient and optical conductivity of VO2(M1 thin films rapidly increase with decreasing O2-Ar ratios. Moreover, two electronic transitions can be uniquely assigned. The energy gaps correlated with absorption edge (E1 at varied O2-Ar ratios are almost the same (~2.0 eV; consequently, the absorption edge is not significantly changed. However, the optical band gap corresponding to semiconductor-to-metal phase transition (E2 decreases from 0.53 to 0.18 eV with decreasing O2-Ar ratios.

  16. Coexistence and transition between shear zones in slow granular flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavi, Robabeh; Shaebani, M Reza; Maleki, Maniya; Török, János; Wolf, Dietrich E; Losert, Wolfgang

    2013-10-04

    We report experiments on slow granular flows in a split-bottom Couette cell that show novel strain localization features. Nontrivial flow profiles have been observed which are shown to be the consequence of simultaneous formation of shear zones in the bulk and at the boundaries. The fluctuating band model based on a minimization principle can be fitted to the experiments over a large variation of morphology and filling height with one single fit parameter, the relative friction coefficient μ(rel) between wall and bulk. The possibility of multiple shear zone formation is controlled by μ(rel). Moreover, we observe that the symmetry of an initial state, with coexisting shear zones at both side walls, breaks spontaneously below a threshold value of the shear velocity. A dynamical transition between two asymmetric flow states happens over a characteristic time scale which depends on the shear strength.

  17. Microstructure quantification of ultrafine grained pure copper fabricated by simple shear extrusion (SSE) technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagherpour, E.; Qods, F.; Ebrahimi, R.; Miyamoto, H.

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper commercially pure copper was processed by simple shear extrusion (SSE) technique up to 12 passes using the so-called route C. For SSE processing an appropriate die with a linear die profile was designed and constructed. Effect of SSE passes on isotropy and uniformity of microstructures are focused. Electron back-scattering diffraction (EBSD) was used to evaluate the microstructure of the deformed samples in three orthogonal planes. To investigate the microstructural uniformity EBSD maps were taken from center to periphery of the extrusion direction plane (ED-plane) samples. Significant evolution in grain refinement was achieved down to sub-micron grain size in all planes. Hardness measurements show a considerable increase in hardness of the material after the processing, which confirms the microstructural evolutions. EBSD scans revealed a homogeneous ultrafine grained microstructure after 12 passes. Micro-shear bands were found as potential sites for accelerating the formation of new grains by fragmentation of the initial grains. The total frequency of coincidence site lattice (CSL) boundaries including Σ3 boundaries increased by the increasing of SSE passes. The higher fraction of low to high angle grain boundaries of SSE compared to equal channel angular pressing is an evidence for the cyclic behavior of SSE technique.

  18. Microstructure quantification of ultrafine grained pure copper fabricated by simple shear extrusion (SSE) technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagherpour, E., E-mail: e.bagherpour@semnan.ac.ir [Faculty of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Semnan University, Semnan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0394 (Japan); Qods, F., E-mail: qods@semnan.ac.ir [Faculty of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Semnan University, Semnan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ebrahimi, R., E-mail: ebrahimy@shirazu.ac.ir [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Miyamoto, H., E-mail: hmiyamot@mail.doshisha.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0394 (Japan)

    2016-09-30

    In the present paper commercially pure copper was processed by simple shear extrusion (SSE) technique up to 12 passes using the so-called route C. For SSE processing an appropriate die with a linear die profile was designed and constructed. Effect of SSE passes on isotropy and uniformity of microstructures are focused. Electron back-scattering diffraction (EBSD) was used to evaluate the microstructure of the deformed samples in three orthogonal planes. To investigate the microstructural uniformity EBSD maps were taken from center to periphery of the extrusion direction plane (ED-plane) samples. Significant evolution in grain refinement was achieved down to sub-micron grain size in all planes. Hardness measurements show a considerable increase in hardness of the material after the processing, which confirms the microstructural evolutions. EBSD scans revealed a homogeneous ultrafine grained microstructure after 12 passes. Micro-shear bands were found as potential sites for accelerating the formation of new grains by fragmentation of the initial grains. The total frequency of coincidence site lattice (CSL) boundaries including Σ3 boundaries increased by the increasing of SSE passes. The higher fraction of low to high angle grain boundaries of SSE compared to equal channel angular pressing is an evidence for the cyclic behavior of SSE technique.

  19. High Resolution Shear Profile Measurements in Entangled Polymers

    KAUST Repository

    Hayes, Keesha A.

    2008-11-17

    We use confocal microscopy and particle image velocimetry to visualize motion of 250-300 nm. fluorescent tracer particles in entangled polymers subject to a rectilinear shear flow. Our results show linear velocity profiles in polymer solutions spanning a wide range of molecular weights and number of entanglements (8≤Z≤56), but reveal large differences between the imposed and measured shear rates. These findings disagree with recent reports that shear banding is a characteristic flow response of entangled polymers, and instead point to interfacial slip as an important source of strain loss. © 2008 The American Physical Society.

  20. Quasi-static and dynamic forced shear deformation behaviors of Ti-5Mo-5V-8Cr-3Al alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhiming; Chen, Zhiyong, E-mail: czysh@netease.com; Zhan, Congkun; Kuang, Lianjun; Shao, Jianbo; Wang, Renke; Liu, Chuming

    2017-04-13

    The mechanical behavior and microstructure characteristics of Ti-5Mo-5V-8Cr-3Al alloy were investigated with hat-shaped samples compressed under quasi-static and dynamic loading. Compared with the quasi-static loading, a higher shear stress peak and a shear instability stage were observed during the dynamic shear response. The results showed that an adiabatic shear band consisting of ultrafine equiaxed grains was only developed in the dynamic specimen, while a wider shear region was formed in the quasi-static specimen. The microhardness measurements revealed that shear region in the quasi-static specimen and adiabatic shear band in the dynamic specimen exhibited higher hardness than that of adjacent regions due to the strain hardening and grain refining, respectively. A stable orientation, in which the crystallographic {110} planes and <111> directions were respectively parallel to the shear plane and shear direction, developed in both specimens. And the microtexture of the adiabatic shear band was more well-defined than that of the shear region in the quasi-static specimen. Rotational dynamic recrystallization mechanism was suggested to explain the formation of ultrafine equiaxed grains within the adiabatic shear band by thermodynamic and kinetic calculations.

  1. Shear Elasticity and Shear Viscosity Imaging in Soft Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yiqun

    In this thesis, a new approach is introduced that provides estimates of shear elasticity and shear viscosity using time-domain measurements of shear waves in viscoelastic media. Simulations of shear wave particle displacements induced by an acoustic radiation force are accelerated significantly by a GPU. The acoustic radiation force is first calculated using the fast near field method (FNM) and the angular spectrum approach (ASA). The shear waves induced by the acoustic radiation force are then simulated in elastic and viscoelastic media using Green's functions. A parallel algorithm is developed to perform these calculations on a GPU, where the shear wave particle displacements at different observation points are calculated in parallel. The resulting speed increase enables rapid evaluation of shear waves at discrete points, in 2D planes, and for push beams with different spatial samplings and for different values of the f-number (f/#). The results of these simulations show that push beams with smaller f/# require a higher spatial sampling rate. The significant amount of acceleration achieved by this approach suggests that shear wave simulations with the Green's function approach are ideally suited for high-performance GPUs. Shear wave elasticity imaging determines the mechanical parameters of soft tissue by analyzing measured shear waves induced by an acoustic radiation force. To estimate the shear elasticity value, the widely used time-of-flight method calculates the correlation between shear wave particle velocities at adjacent lateral observation points. Although this method provides accurate estimates of the shear elasticity in purely elastic media, our experience suggests that the time-of-flight (TOF) method consistently overestimates the shear elasticity values in viscoelastic media because the combined effects of diffraction, attenuation, and dispersion are not considered. To address this problem, we have developed an approach that directly accounts for all

  2. Compaction bands in shale revealed through digital volume correlation of time-resolved X-ray tomography scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBeck, J.; Kobchenko, M.; Hall, S.; Tudisco, E.; Cordonnier, B.; Renard, F.

    2017-12-01

    Previous studies have identified compaction bands primarily within sandstones, and in fewer instances, within other porous rocks and sediments. Using Digital Volume Correlation (DVC) of X-ray microtomography scans, we find evidence of localized zones of high axial contraction that form tabular structures sub-perpendicular to maximum compression, σ1, in Green River shale. To capture in situ strain localization throughout loading, two shale cores were deformed in the HADES triaxial deformation apparatus installed on the X-ray microtomography beamline ID19 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. In these experiments, we increase σ1 in increments of two MPa, with constant confining pressure (20 MPa), until the sample fails in macroscopic shear. After each stress step, a 3D image of the sample inside the rig is acquired at a voxel resolution of 6.5 μm. The evolution of lower density regions within 3D reconstructions of linear attenuation coefficients reveal the development of fractures that fail with some opening. If a fracture produces negligible dilation, it may remain undetected in image segmentation of the reconstructions. We use the DVC software TomoWarp2 to identify undetected fractures and capture the 3D incremental displacement field between each successive pair of microtomography scans acquired in each experiment. The corresponding strain fields reveal localized bands of high axial contraction that host minimal shear strain, and thus match the kinematic definition of compaction bands. The bands develop sub-perpendicular to σ1 in the two samples in which pre-existing bedding laminations were oriented parallel and perpendicular to σ1. As the shales deform plastically toward macroscopic shear failure, the number of bands and axial contraction within the bands increase, while the spacing between the bands decreases. Compaction band development accelerates the rate of overall axial contraction, increasing the mean axial contraction throughout the sample

  3. Kink bands in thrust regime: Examples from Srinagar–Garhwal area ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srinagar–Garhwal; kink bands; paleostress; shearing along kink planes; Himalaya; North Almora Thrust. J. Earth Syst. Sci. 120, No. 5, October 2011, pp. 939–948 ..... The α>β geometry observed in kink bands suggest towards shearing as a common phenomenon along the kink planes. (Anderson 1964). Since considerable ...

  4. Shear melting and high temperature embrittlement: theory and application to machining titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Con; Koch, Sascha; Siemers, Carsten; Mukherji, Debashis; Ackland, Graeme J

    2015-04-24

    We describe a dynamical phase transition occurring within a shear band at high temperature and under extremely high shear rates. With increasing temperature, dislocation deformation and grain boundary sliding are supplanted by amorphization in a highly localized nanoscale band, which allows for massive strain and fracture. The mechanism is similar to shear melting and leads to liquid metal embrittlement at high temperature. From simulation, we find that the necessary conditions are lack of dislocation slip systems, low thermal conduction, and temperature near the melting point. The first two are exhibited by bcc titanium alloys, and we show that the final one can be achieved experimentally by adding low-melting-point elements: specifically, we use insoluble rare earth metals (REMs). Under high shear, the REM becomes mixed with the titanium, lowering the melting point within the shear band and triggering the shear-melting transition. This in turn generates heat which remains localized in the shear band due to poor heat conduction. The material fractures along the shear band. We show how to utilize this transition in the creation of new titanium-based alloys with improved machinability.

  5. Localization and Instability in Sheared Granular Materials: Role of Pore Fluids and Non-monotonic Rate Dependent Rheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, X.; Elbanna, A. E.; Kothari, K.

    2017-12-01

    Fault zone dynamics hold the key to resolving many outstanding geophysical problems including the heat flow paradox, discrepancy between fault static and dynamic strength, and energy partitioning. Most fault zones that generate tectonic events are gouge filled and fluid saturated posing the need for formulating gouge-specific constitutive models that capture spatially heterogeneous compaction and dilation, non-monotonic rate dependence, and transition between localized and distributed deformation. In this presentation, we focus primarily on elucidating microscopic underpinnings for shear banding and stick-slip instabilities in sheared saturated granular materials and explore their implications for earthquake dynamics. We use a non-equilibrium thermodynamics model, the Shear Transformation Zone theory, to investigate the dynamics of strain localization and its connection to stability of sliding in the presence and absence of pore fluids. We also consider the possible influence of self-induced mechanical vibrations as well as the role of external acoustic vibrations as analogue for triggering by a distant event. For the dry case, our results suggest that at low and intermediate strain rates, persistent shear bands develop only in the absence of vibrations. Vibrations tend to fluidize the granular network and de-localize slip at these rates. Stick-slip is only observed for rough grains and it is confined to the shear band. At high strain rates, stick-slip disappears and the different systems exhibit similar stress-slip response. Changing the vibration intensity, duration or time of application alters the system response and may cause long-lasting rheological changes. The presence of pore fluids modifies the stick slip pattern and may lead to both loss and development of slip instability depending on the value of the confining pressure, imposed strain rate and hydraulic parameters. We analyze these observations in terms of possible transitions between rate

  6. Shear thinning behaviors in magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetere, F. P.; Cassetta, M.; Perugini, D.

    2017-12-01

    Studies on magma rheology are of fundamental importance to understanding magmatic processes from depth to surface. Since viscosity is one of the most important parameter controlling eruption mechanisms, as well as lava flow emplacement, a comprehensive knowledge on the evolution of magma viscosities during crystallization is required. We present new viscosity data on partly crystalized basalt, andesite and analogue lavas comparable to those erupted on Mercury's northern volcanic plains. High-temperature viscosity measurements were performed using a rotational Anton Paar RheolabQC viscometer head at the PVRG labs, in Perugia (Italy) (http://pvrg.unipg.it). The relative proportion of phases in each experimental run were determined by image analysis on BS-SEM images at different magnifications; phases are glasses, clinopyroxene, spinel, plagioclase for the basalt, plagioclase and spinel for the andesite and pure enstatite and clinopyroxenes, for the analogue Mercury's composition. Glass and crystalline fractions determined by image analysis well correlate with compositions of residual melts. In order to constrain the viscosity (η) variations as a function of crystallinity, shear rate (γ) was varied from 0.1 to 5 s-1. Viscosity vs. time at constant temperature shows a typical S-shape curve. In particular, for basaltic composition η vary from 3.1-3.8 Pa s [log η] at 1493 K and crystallinity of 19 area % as γ vary from 1.0 to 0.1 s-1; the andesite viscosity evolution is 3.2 and 3.7 Pa s [log η] as γ varies from 1 to 0.1 at 1493 K and crystal content of 17 area %; finally, Mercury's analogue composition was investigated at different temperature ranging from 1533 to 1502 K (Vetere et al., 2017). Results, for γ = 0.1, 1.0 and 5.0 s-1, show viscosity variation between 2.7-4.0, 2.5-3.4 and 2.0-3.0 [log η inPa s] respectively while crystallinity vary from 9 to 27 (area %). As viscosity decreases as shear rate increases, these data points to a shear thinning behaviour

  7. Analysis of shear band instabilities in sintered metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Redanz, Pia; Tvergaard, Viggo

    1999-01-01

    of a material instability. The elastic plastic behaviour of the material is represented by a material model, which combines the Gurson model, relevant to rather low porosities, with the FKM model, developed for high porosity powder compacts. Predictions are shown for various levels of initial porosity...

  8. Adiabatic Shear Bands in Simple and Dipolar Viscoplastic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-01

    d Engineering Mechanics. University of Missouri-Holla. Holla. MO 65401-0249. C S.A Mace -r. Germam .Maxirr. Cork. - DrucK GmbH Carl-i -0&sset7«v...iaxirn Gorki - Druck GmoH Car:- -Ossietzk^ -Str 30 11 7400 Auenöurs I _LL 1+ Xf . . M „ .,Mqon ACTA MECHANICA Acta Mechamca 86, .31—.1...points 13, 14, 15 and 17 becomes clear from the results plotted in Fig. 3d . The plots of the temperature rise at other points con- sidered are not

  9. Yielding and shear banding in soft glassy materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fall, A.; Paredes, J.; Bonn, D.

    2010-01-01

    Yield stress fluids have proven difficult to characterize, and a reproducible determination of the yield stress is difficult. We study two types of yield stress fluids (YSF) in a single system: simple and thixotropic ones. This allows us to show that simple YSF are simply a special case of

  10. Adiabatic shear localization in a near beta Ti–5Al–5Mo–5 V–1Cr–1Fe alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Bingfeng, E-mail: biw009@ucsd.edu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083, Hunan (China); Key Lab of Nonferrous Materials, Ministry of Education, Central South University, Changsha 410083, Hunan (China); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego (United States); Sun, Jieying; Wang, Xiaoyan; Fu, Ao [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083, Hunan (China)

    2015-07-15

    Adiabatic shear localization plays an important role in the deformation and failure of near beta Ti–5Al–5Mo–5 V–1Cr–1Fe alloy used in aircraft's gear at high rate deformation. Hat shaped specimens with different nominal shear strains are used to induce the formation of an adiabatic shear band under controlled shock-loading experiments. When the nominal shear strain is about 0.68, unstable shear deformation of the alloy emerges after the true flow stress reaches 1100 MPa, the first vibration peak during the split Hopkinson pressure bar testing, and the whole process lasts about 62 μs. The microstructures within the shear band in the Ti–5Al–5Mo–5V–1Cr–1Fe alloy are investigated by means of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Phase transformation occurs in the shear band when the nominal shear strain increases to 0.68. A number of equiaxed grains with sizes 50–200 nm and alpha″-phase are in the center of the shear band. Kinetic calculations indicate that during the deformation process, the recrystallized nanosized grains can be formed in the shear band by way of the subgrain boundaries rotation, and the alpha″ phase transformation start after the subgrain boundaries rotated to 30°.

  11. Inflation in a shear-or curvature-dominated universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steigman, G.; Turner, M.S.

    1983-01-01

    We show that new inflation occurs even if the universe is shear-or (negative) curvature-dominated when the phase transition begins. In such situations the size of a causally coherent region, after inflation, is only slightly smaller (by powers, but not by exponential factors) than the usual result. The creation and evolution of density perturbations is unaffected. This result is marked contrast to 'old' inflation, where shear- or curvature-domination could quench inflation. (orig.)

  12. Observation of neoclassical transport in reverse shear plasmas on TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efthimion, P.C.; Goeler, S. von; Houlberg, W.A.

    1999-01-01

    Perturbative experiments on TFTR have investigated the transport of multiple ion species in reverse shear (RS) plasmas. The profile evolutions of trace tritium and helium and intrinsic carbon indicate the formation of core particle transport barriers in enhanced reverse shear (ERS) plasmas. There is an order of magnitude reduction in the particle diffusivity inside the RS region. The diffusivities for these species in ERS plasmas agree with neoclassical theory. (author)

  13. Influences of Shear History and Infilling on the Mechanical Characteristics and Acoustic Emissions of Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fanzhen; Zhou, Hui; Wang, Zaiquan; Zhang, Liming; Kong, Liang; Li, Shaojun; Zhang, Chuanqing

    2017-08-01

    Filled joints, which are characterized by high deformability and low shear strength, are among the most critical discontinuities in rock mass and may be sheared repeatedly when subject to cyclic loading. Shear tests were carried out on tension splitting joints, with soil and granular cement mortar particles used as infillings, and the effects of the shear history on the mechanical behavior and acoustic emission (AE) of clean and filled joints were studied. The maximum strength in the subsequent shears was approximately 60% of the peak strength of the first shear for a clean joint, and the friction angle degraded from 63° to 45° after the first shear. The maximum shear strength of the filled joints was lower than 35% of the peak strength of the clean joint under the same normal stress. The change in the shear strength of filled joints with the number of shearing cycles was closely related to the transformation of the shear medium. Rolling friction occurred and the shear strength was low for the granular particle-filled joint, but the strength was elevated when the particles were crushed and sliding friction occurred. The AEs were significantly reduced during the second shear for the clean joint, and the peak AEs were mainly obtained at or near the turning point of the shear stress curve for the filled joint. The AEs were the highest for the cement particle-filled joint and lowest for the dry soil-filled joint; when subjected to repeated shears, the AEs were more complex because of the continuous changes to the shear medium. The evolution of the AEs with the shear displacement can accurately reflect the shear failure mechanism during a single shear process.

  14. Deformation bands in porous carbonate grainstones: Field and laboratory observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cilona, A.; Baud, P.; Tondi, E.; Agosta, F.; Vinciguerra, S.; Rustichelli, A.; Spiers, C.J.

    2012-01-01

    Recent field-based studies documented deformation bands in porous carbonates; these structures accommodate volumetric and/or shear strain by means of pore collapse, grain rotation and/or sliding. Microstructural observations of natural deformation bands in carbonates showed that, at advanced stages

  15. Latest Rate, Extent, and Temporal Evolution of Growth Faulting over Greater Houston Region Revealed by Multi- Band InSAR Time-Series Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, F.; Lu, Z.; Kim, J. W.

    2017-12-01

    Growth faults are common and continue to evolve throughout the unconsolidated sediments of Greater Houston (GH) region in Texas. Presence of faults can induce localized surface displacements, aggravate localized subsidence, and discontinue the integrity of ground water flow. Property damages due to fault creep have become more evident during the past few years over the GH area, portraying the necessity of further study of these faults. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) has been proven to be effective in mapping creep along and/or across faults. However, extracting a short wavelength, as well as small amplitude of the creep signal (about 10-20 mm/year) from long time span interferograms is extremely difficult, especially in agricultural or vegetated areas. This paper aims to map and monitor the latest rate, extent, and temporal evolution of faulting at a highest spatial density over GH region using an improved Multi-temporal InSAR (MTI) technique. The method, with maximized usable signal and correlation, has the ability to identify and monitor the active faults to provide an accurate and elaborate image of the faults. In this study, two neighboring ALOS tracks and Sentinel-1A datasets are used. Many zones of steep phase gradients and/or discontinuities have been recognized from the long term velocity maps by both ALOS (2007-2011) and Sentinei-1A (2015-2017) imagery. Not only those previously known faults position but also the new fault traces that have not been mapped by other techniques are imaged by our MTI technique. Fault damage and visible cracking of ground were evident at most locations through our field survey. The discovery of new fault activation, or faults moved from earlier locations is a part of the Big Barn Fault and Conroe fault system, trending from southwest to northeast between Hockley and Conroe. The location of area of subsidence over GH is also shrinking and migrating toward the northeast (Montgomery County) after 2000. The

  16. Confocal microscopy of colloidal dispersions in shear flow using a counter-rotating cone-plate shear cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derks, Didi; Wisman, Hans; Blaaderen, Alfons van; Imhof, Arnout

    2004-01-01

    We report on novel possibilities for studying colloidal suspensions in a steady shear field in real space. Fluorescence confocal microscopy is combined with the use of a counter-rotating cone-plate shear cell. This allows imaging of individual particles in the bulk of a sheared suspension in a stationary plane. Moreover, this plane of zero velocity can be moved in the velocity gradient direction while keeping the shear rate constant. The colloidal system under study consists of rhodamine labelled PMMA spheres in a nearly density and refractive index matched mixture of cyclohexylbromide and cis-decalin. We show measured flow profiles in both the fluid and the crystalline phase and find indications for shear banding in the case of a sheared crystal. Furthermore, we show that, thanks to the counter-rotating principle of the cone-plate shear cell, a layer of particles in the bulk of a sheared crystalline suspension can be imaged for a prolonged time, with the result that their positions can be tracked

  17. On the self-organizing process of large scale shear flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newton, Andrew P. L. [Department of Applied Maths, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, Yorkshire S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Kim, Eun-jin [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, Yorkshire S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Liu, Han-Li [High Altitude Observatory, National Centre for Atmospheric Research, P. O. BOX 3000, Boulder, Colorado 80303-3000 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Self organization is invoked as a paradigm to explore the processes governing the evolution of shear flows. By examining the probability density function (PDF) of the local flow gradient (shear), we show that shear flows reach a quasi-equilibrium state as its growth of shear is balanced by shear relaxation. Specifically, the PDFs of the local shear are calculated numerically and analytically in reduced 1D and 0D models, where the PDFs are shown to converge to a bimodal distribution in the case of finite correlated temporal forcing. This bimodal PDF is then shown to be reproduced in nonlinear simulation of 2D hydrodynamic turbulence. Furthermore, the bimodal PDF is demonstrated to result from a self-organizing shear flow with linear profile. Similar bimodal structure and linear profile of the shear flow are observed in gulf stream, suggesting self-organization.

  18. Keyed shear joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus

    This report gives a summary of the present information on the behaviour of vertical keyed shear joints in large panel structures. An attemp is made to outline the implications which this information might have on the analysis and design of a complete wall. The publications also gives a short...

  19. Sheared Electroconvective Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Rhokyun; Pham, Van Sang; Lim, Kiang Meng; Han, Jongyoon

    2012-11-01

    Recently, ion concentration polarization (ICP) and related phenomena draw attention from physicists, due to its importance in understanding electrochemical systems. Researchers have been actively studying, but the complexity of this multiscale, multiphysics phenomenon has been limitation for gaining a detailed picture. Here, we consider electroconvective(EC) instability initiated by ICP under pressure-driven flow, a scenario often found in electrochemical desalinations. Combining scaling analysis, experiment, and numerical modeling, we reveal unique behaviors of sheared EC: unidirectional vortex structures, its size selection and vortex propagation. Selected by balancing the external pressure gradient and the electric body force, which generates Hagen-Poiseuille(HP) flow and vortical EC, the dimensionless EC thickness scales as (φ2 /UHP)1/3. The pressure-driven flow(or shear) suppresses unfavorably-directed vortices, and simultaneously pushes favorably-directed vortices with constant speed, which is linearly proportional to the total shear of HP flow. This is the first systematic characterization of sheared EC, which has significant implications on the optimization of electrodialysis and other electrochemical systems.

  20. An underwater shear compactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biver, E.; Sims, J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper, originally presented at the WM'96 Conference in Tucson Arizona, describes a concept of a specialised decommissioning tool designed to operate underwater and to reduce the volume of radioactive components by shearing and compacting. The shear compactor was originally conceived to manage the size reduction of a variety of decommissioned stainless steel tubes stored within a reactor fuel cooling pond and which were consuming a substantial volume of the pond. The main objective of this tool was to cut the long tubes into shorter lengths and to compact them into a flat rectangular form which could be stacked on the pond floor, thus saving valuable space. The development programme, undertaken on this project, investigated a wide range of factors which could contribute to an extended cutting blade performance, ie: materials of construction, cutting blade shape and cutting loads required, shock effects, etc. The second phase was to review other aspects of the design, such as radiological protection, cutting blade replacement, maintenance, pond installation and resultant wall loads, water hydraulics, collection of products of shearing/compacting operations, corrosion of the equipment, control system, operational safety and the ability of the equipment to operate in dry environments. The paper summarises the extended work programme involved with this shear compactor tool. (author)

  1. Rheometry-PIV of shear-thickening wormlike micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-Santibañez, Benjamín M; Pérez-Gonzalez, José; de Vargas, Lourdes; Rodríguez-Gonzalez, Francisco; Huelsz, Guadalupe

    2006-04-25

    The shear-thickening behavior of an equimolar semidilute aqueous solution of 40 mM/L cetylpyridinium chloride and sodium salicylate was studied in this work by using a combined method of rheometry and particle image velocimetry (PIV). Experiments were conducted at 27.5 degrees C with Couette, vane-bob, and capillary rheometers in order to explore a wide shear stress range as well as the effect of boundary conditions and time of flow on the creation and destruction of shear-induced structures (SIS). The use of the combined method of capillary rheometry with PIV allowed the detection of fast spatial and temporal variations in the flow kinematics, which are related to the shear-thickening behavior and the dynamics of the SIS but are not distinguished by pure rheometrical measurements. A rich-in-details flow curve was found for this solution, which includes five different regimes. Namely, at very low shear rates a Newtonian behavior was found, followed by a shear thinning one in the second regime. In the third, shear banding was observed, which served as a precursor of the SIS and shear-thickening. The fourth and fifth regimes in the flow curve were separated by a spurtlike behavior, and they clearly evidenced the existence of shear-thickening accompanied by stick-slip oscillations at the wall of the rheometer, which subsequently produced variations in the shear rate under shear stress controlled flow. Such a stick-slip phenomenon prevailed up to the highest shear stresses used in this work and was reflected in asymmetric velocity profiles with spatial and temporal variations linked to the dynamics of creation and breakage of the SIS. The presence of apparent slip at the wall of the rheometer provides an energy release mechanism which leads to breakage of the SIS, followed by their further reformation during the stick part of the cycles. In addition, PIV measurements allowed the detection of apparent slip at the wall, as well as mechanical failures in the bulk of the

  2. Absorption band Q model for the earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.L.; Given, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    Body wave, surface wave, and normal mode data are used to place constraints on the frequency dependence of Q in the mantle. With a simple absorption band model it is possible to satisfy the shear sensitive data over a broad frequency range. The quality factor Q/sub s/(ω) is proportional to ω/sup α/ in the band and to ω and ω -1 at higher and lower frequencies, respectively, as appropriate for a relaxation mechanism with a spectrum of relaxation time. The parameters of the band are Q(min) = 80, α = 0.15, and width, 5 decades. The center of the band varies from 10 1 seconds in the upper mantle, to 1.6 x 10 3 seconds in the lower mantle. The shift of the band with depth is consistent with the expected effects of temperature, pressure and stress. High Q, regions of the mantle are attributed to a shift of the absorption band to longer periods. To satisfy the gravest fundamental spheroidal modes and the ScS data, the absorption band must shift back into the short-period seismic band at the base of the mantle. This may be due to a high temperature gradient or high shear stresses. A preliminary attempt is also made to specify bulk dissipation in the mantle and core. Specific features of the absorption band model are low Q in the body wave band at both the top and the base of the mantle, low Q for long-period body waves in the outer core, an inner core Q 2 that increases with period, and low Q/sub p//Q/sub s/ at short periods in the middle mantel. The short-period Q/sub s/ increases rapidly at 400 km and is relatively constant from this depth to 2400 km. The deformational Q of the earth at a period of 14 months is predicted to be 463

  3. Adiabatic shear behaviors in rolled and annealed pure titanium subjected to dynamic impact loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuang, Lianjun; Chen, Zhiyong, E-mail: czysh@netease.com; Jiang, Yanghui; Wang, Zhiming; Wang, Renke; Liu, Chuming

    2017-02-08

    The hat-shaped samples cut from rolled and annealed titanium plates were prepared to explore the adiabatic shear behaviors subjected to high-strain-rate deformation operated via Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar. The dynamic shear response calculation reveals that dynamic deformation processes of both state samples can be divided in similar three stages but rolled sample shows a higher susceptibility of adiabatic shear localization compared with the annealed one. Optical microscopy and electronic backscatter diffraction technique (EBSD) were used to systematically analyze the microstructure and texture characteristics. The results show that adiabatic shear bands form in both state samples and rotational dynamic recrystallization (RDRX) occurs within shear area and results in the formation of ultrafine equiaxed grains. Furthermore, ultrafine equiaxed grains within adiabatic shear bands have the same texture feature that <11–20> direction and {10-10} plane parallel to macro local shear direction and shear plane respectively. In the deformation region around the shear band, {10–12} <–1011> tensile and {11–22} <11-2-3> compressive two types twins are observed in both state samples and {10–12} <–1011> tensile twins are more frequently observed in rolled sample. In the rolled sample, {10–12} <–1011> tensile twins are more likely to happen in the hat-brim side than the hat-body side due to the difference of stress state in two sides.

  4. Shear strength of non-shear reinforced concrete elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoang, Cao linh

    1997-01-01

    The paper deals with the plastic shear strength of non shear reinforced T-beams.The influence of an un-reinforced flange on the shear capacity is investigated by considering a failure mechanism involving crack sliding in the web and a kind of membrane action over an effective width of the flange...

  5. Spurious Shear in Weak Lensing with LSST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, C.; Kahn, S.M.; Jernigan, J.G.; Peterson, J.R.; AlSayyad, Y.; Ahmad, Z.; Bankert, J.; Bard, D.; Connolly, A.; Gibson, R.R.; Gilmore, K.; Grace, E.; Hannel, M.; Hodge, M.A.; Jee, M.J.; Jones, L.; Krughoff, S.; Lorenz, S.; Marshall, P.J.; Marshall, S.; Meert, A.

    2012-09-19

    The complete 10-year survey from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will image {approx} 20,000 square degrees of sky in six filter bands every few nights, bringing the final survey depth to r {approx} 27.5, with over 4 billion well measured galaxies. To take full advantage of this unprecedented statistical power, the systematic errors associated with weak lensing measurements need to be controlled to a level similar to the statistical errors. This work is the first attempt to quantitatively estimate the absolute level and statistical properties of the systematic errors on weak lensing shear measurements due to the most important physical effects in the LSST system via high fidelity ray-tracing simulations. We identify and isolate the different sources of algorithm-independent, additive systematic errors on shear measurements for LSST and predict their impact on the final cosmic shear measurements using conventional weak lensing analysis techniques. We find that the main source of the errors comes from an inability to adequately characterise the atmospheric point spread function (PSF) due to its high frequency spatial variation on angular scales smaller than {approx} 10{prime} in the single short exposures, which propagates into a spurious shear correlation function at the 10{sup -4}-10{sup -3} level on these scales. With the large multi-epoch dataset that will be acquired by LSST, the stochastic errors average out, bringing the final spurious shear correlation function to a level very close to the statistical errors. Our results imply that the cosmological constraints from LSST will not be severely limited by these algorithm-independent, additive systematic effects.

  6. Structure in sheared supercooled liquids: Dynamical rearrangements of an effective system of icosahedra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinney, Rhiannon; Liverpool, Tanniemola B; Royall, C Patrick

    2016-12-21

    We consider a binary Lennard-Jones glassformer whose super-Arrhenius dynamics are correlated with the formation of particles organized into icosahedra under simple steady state shear. We recast this glassformer as an effective system of icosahedra [Pinney et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 244507 (2015)]. From the observed population of icosahedra in each steady state, we obtain an effective temperature which is linearly dependent on the shear rate in the range considered. Upon shear banding, the system separates into a region of high shear rate and a region of low shear rate. The effective temperatures obtained in each case show that the low shear regions correspond to a significantly lower temperature than the high shear regions. Taking a weighted average of the effective temperature of these regions (weight determined by region size) yields an estimate of the effective temperature which compares well with an effective temperature based on the global mesocluster population of the whole system.

  7. Experiments on sheet metal shearing

    OpenAIRE

    Gustafsson, Emil

    2013-01-01

    Within the sheet metal industry, different shear cutting technologies are commonly used in several processing steps, e.g. in cut to length lines, slitting lines, end cropping etc. Shearing has speed and cost advantages over competing cutting methods like laser and plasma cutting, but involves large forces on the equipment and large strains in the sheet material.Numerical models to predict forces and sheared edge geometry for different sheet metal grades and different shear parameter set-ups a...

  8. CAT LIDAR wind shear studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    The studies considered the major meteorological factors producing wind shear, methods to define and classify wind shear in terms significant from an aircraft perturbation standpoint, the significance of sensor location and scan geometry on the detection and measurement of wind shear, and the tradeoffs involved in sensor performance such as range/velocity resolution, update frequency and data averaging interval.

  9. Shear viscosity, cavitation and hydrodynamics at LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatt, Jitesh R.; Mishra, Hiranmaya; Sreekanth, V.

    2011-01-01

    We study evolution of quark-gluon matter in the ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions within the frame work of relativistic second-order viscous hydrodynamics. In particular, by using the various prescriptions of a temperature-dependent shear viscosity to the entropy ratio, we show that the hydrodynamic description of the relativistic fluid becomes invalid due to the phenomenon of cavitation. For most of the initial conditions relevant for LHC, the cavitation sets in very early stage. The cavitation in this case is entirely driven by the large values of shear viscosity. Moreover we also demonstrate that the conformal terms used in equations of the relativistic dissipative hydrodynamic can influence the cavitation time.

  10. Gelation under shear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, B.D.; Hanley, H.J.M.; Straty, G.C. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO (United States); Muzny, C.D. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1995-12-31

    An experimental small angle neutron scattering (SANS) study of dense silica gels, prepared from suspensions of 24 nm colloidal silica particles at several volume fractions {theta} is discussed. Provided that {theta}{approx_lt}0.18, the scattered intensity at small wave vectors q increases as the gelation proceeds, and the structure factor S(q, t {yields} {infinity}) of the gel exhibits apparent power law behavior. Power law behavior is also observed, even for samples with {theta}>0.18, when the gel is formed under an applied shear. Shear also enhances the diffraction maximum corresponding to the inter-particle contact distance of the gel. Difficulties encountered when trying to interpret SANS data from these dense systems are outlined. Results of computer simulations intended to mimic gel formation, including computations of S(q, t), are discussed. Comments on a method to extract a fractal dimension characterizing the gel are included.

  11. Forflytning: shear og friktion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2005-01-01

    friktion). Formålet med filmprojektet er: At give personalet i Apopleksiafsnittet viden om shear og friktion, så det motiveres til forebyggelse. Mål At udarbejde et enkelt undervisningsmateriale til bed-side-brug Projektbeskrivelse (resume) Patienter med apopleksi er særligt udsatte for tryksår, fordi de...... ofte er immobile, har svært ved at opretholde en god siddestilling eller ligger tungt i sengen som følger efter apopleksien Hvis personalet bruger forkert lejrings-og forflytningsteknik, udsættes patienterne for shear og friktion. Målgruppen i projektet er de personer, der omgås patienterne, dvs...

  12. Shear Roll Mill Reactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-13

    pneumatically operated paste dumper and belt conveyor system, the loss in weight feeder system, the hydraulically operated shear roll mill, the pellet...out feed belt conveyor , and the pack out system comprised of the metal detector, scale, and pack out empty and full drum roller conveyors . Page | 4...feed hopper and conveyor supplying the loss in weight feeder were turned on, and it was verified that these items functioned as designed . The

  13. Plasticity Approach to Shear Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoang, Cao Linh; Nielsen, Mogens Peter

    1998-01-01

    The paper presents some plastic models for shear design of reinforced concrete beams. Distinction is made between two shear failure modes, namely web crushing and crack sliding. The first mentioned mode is met in beams with large shear reinforcement degrees. The mode of crack sliding is met in non......-shear reinforced beams as well as in lightly shear reinforced beams. For such beams the shear strength is determined by the recently developed crack sliding model. This model is based upon the hypothesis that cracks can be transformed into yield lines, which have lower sliding resistance than yield lines formed...... in uncracked concrete. Good agree between theory and tests has been found.Keywords: dsign, plasticity, reinforced concrete, reinforcement, shear, web crushing....

  14. Interaction of equal-size bubbles in shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Jai; Lavrenteva, Olga M; Byk, Leonid; Nir, Avinoam

    2013-04-01

    The inertia-induced forces on two identical spherical bubbles in a simple shear flow at small but finite Reynolds number, for the case when the bubbles are within each other's inner viscous region, are calculated making use of the reciprocal theorem. This interaction force is further employed to model the dynamics of air bubbles injected to a viscous fluid sheared in a Couette device at the first shear flow instability where the bubbles are trapped inside the stable Taylor vortex. It was shown that, during a long time scale, the inertial interaction between the bubbles in the primary shear flow drives them away from each other and, as a result, equal-size bubbles eventually assume an ordered string with equal separation distances between all neighbors. We report on experiments showing the dynamic evolution of various numbers of bubbles. The results of the theory are in good agreement with the experimental observations.

  15. Velocity shear generated Alfven waves in electron-positron plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogava, A.D.; Berezhiani, V.I.; Mahajan, S.M.

    1996-01-01

    Linear MHD modes in cold, nonrelativistic electron-positron plasma shear flow are considered. The general set of differential equations, describing the evolution of perturbations in the framework of the nonmodal approach is derived. It is found, that under certain circumstances, the compressional and shear Alfven perturbations may exhibit large transient growth fuelled by the mean kinetic energy of the shear flow. The velocity shear also induces mode coupling allowing the exchange of energy as well as the possibility of a strong mutual transformation of these modes into each other. The compressional Alfven mode may extract the energy of the mean flow and transfer it to the shear Alfven mode via this coupling. The relevance of these new physical effects to provide a better understanding of the laboratory e + e - plasma is emphasized. It is speculated that the shear-induced effects in the electron-positron plasmas could also help solve some astrophysical puzzles (e.g., the generation of pulsar radio emission). Since most astrophysical plasma are relativistic, it is shown that the major results of the study remain valid for weakly sheared relativistic plasmas. (author). 21 refs, 4 figs

  16. Shear-Rate-Dependent Behavior of Clayey Bimaterial Interfaces at Landslide Stress Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaringi, Gianvito; Hu, Wei; Xu, Qiang; Huang, Runqiu

    2018-01-01

    The behavior of reactivated and first-failure landslides after large displacements is controlled by the available shear resistance in a shear zone and/or along slip surfaces, such as a soil-bedrock interface. Among the factors influencing the resistance parameter, the dependence on the shear rate can trigger catastrophic evolution (rate-weakening) or exert a slow-down feedback (rate-strengthening) upon stress perturbation. We present ring-shear test results, performed under various normal stresses and shear rates, on clayey soils from a landslide shear zone, on its parent lithology and other lithologies, and on clay-rock interface samples. We find that depending on the materials in contact, the normal stress, and the stress history, the shear-rate-dependent behaviors differ. We discuss possible models and underlying mechanisms for the time-dependent behavior of landslides in clay soils.

  17. Effect of sheared flows on neoclassical tearing modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, A [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar (India); Chandra, D; Kaw, P [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar (India); Bora, M P [Physics Dept., Gauhati University, Guwahati (India); Kruger, S [Tech-X, Boulder, CO (United States); Ramos, J [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The influence of toroidal sheared equilibrium flows on the nonlinear evolution of classical and neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) is studied through numerical solutions of a set of reduced generalized MHD equations that include viscous force effects based on neoclassical closures. In general, differential flow is found to have a strong stabilizing influence leading to lower saturated island widths for the classical (m/n = 2/1) mode and reduced growth rates for the (m/n = 3/1) neoclassical mode. Velocity shear on the other hand is seen to make a destabilizing contribution. An analytic model calculation, consisting of a generalized Rutherford island evolution equation that includes shear flow effects is also presented and the numerical results are discussed in the context of this model. (author)

  18. Shear Resistance Variations in Experimentally Sheared Mudstone Granules: A Possible Shear-Thinning and Thixotropic Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei; Xu, Qiang; Wang, Gonghui; Scaringi, Gianvito; Mcsaveney, Mauri; Hicher, Pierre-Yves

    2017-11-01

    We present results of ring shear frictional resistance for mudstone granules of different size obtained from a landslide shear zone. Little rate dependency of shear resistance was observed in sand-sized granules in any wet or dry test, while saturated gravel-sized granules exhibited significant and abrupt reversible rate-weakening (from μ = 0.6 to 0.05) at about 2 mm/s. Repeating resistance variations occurred also under constant shear displacement rate. Mudstone granules generate mud as they are crushed and softened. Shear-thinning and thixotropic behavior of the mud can explain the observed behavior: with the viscosity decreasing, the mud can flow through the coarser soil pores and migrate out from the shear zone. This brings new granules into contact which produces new mud. Thus, the process can start over. Similarities between experimental shear zones and those of some landslides in mudstone suggest that the observed behavior may play a role in some landslide kinematics.

  19. Shear-induced chaos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Kevin K; Young, Lai-Sang

    2008-01-01

    Guided by a geometric understanding developed in earlier works of Wang and Young, we carry out numerical studies of shear-induced chaos in several parallel but different situations. The settings considered include periodic kicking of limit cycles, random kicks at Poisson times and continuous-time driving by white noise. The forcing of a quasi-periodic model describing two coupled oscillators is also investigated. In all cases, positive Lyapunov exponents are found in suitable parameter ranges when the forcing is suitably directed

  20. Shear-induced chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kevin K.; Young, Lai-Sang

    2008-05-01

    Guided by a geometric understanding developed in earlier works of Wang and Young, we carry out numerical studies of shear-induced chaos in several parallel but different situations. The settings considered include periodic kicking of limit cycles, random kicks at Poisson times and continuous-time driving by white noise. The forcing of a quasi-periodic model describing two coupled oscillators is also investigated. In all cases, positive Lyapunov exponents are found in suitable parameter ranges when the forcing is suitably directed.

  1. Bolt Shear Force Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-12

    0030] FIG. 7 is an isometric view of a deformable ring of the bolt shear force sensor of the present invention with an optical Attorney Docket No...102587 9 of 19 fiber having Bragg gratings wound around the ring; [0031] FIG. 8 is an isometric view of the deformable ring with wire strain... strength . [0047] Once the joint is subjected to an external load (see force arrows “F” and “F/2”); any frictional resistance to slip is overcome and

  2. Orientation-dependent microstructure and shear flow behavior of extruded Mg–Li–Zn alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karami, M.; Mahmudi, R., E-mail: mahmudi@ut.ac.ir

    2015-06-11

    The microstructural and textural evolutions together with the orientation dependencies of mechanical properties of the extruded Mg–6Li–1Zn (LZ61), Mg–8Li–1Zn (LZ81) and Mg–12Li–1Zn (LZ121) alloys were investigated. The shear punch testing (SPT) method was employed to evaluate the room- and high-temperature (200–300 °C) mechanical anisotropy of the extruded materials. Microstructural analysis revealed that, despite a great discontinuous dynamic recrystallization (DDRX) occurred in the extrusion direction (ED) and normal direction (ND), the microstructural anisotropy was observed in all extruded materials, the effect which was more pronounced in the LZ81 alloy by developing banded structure in the ND condition. Textural studies in both hcp LZ61 and LZ81-α phase showed a fiber-type texture with the basal planes being parallel to the ED after extrusion. For the LZ81 alloy, however, the interfering presence of β phase affects the LZ81-α-phase texture by reducing the intensity of the maximum orientations of the basal and prismatic planes. Similar weakened bimodal type texture was formed in the bcc-structured LZ81-β phase, where some <110> poles were located parallel to the ED along with developing some other poles of a fiber-type character. It was also found that the abnormal grain growth might have been encouraged by the strong texture developed in the extruded LZ121 alloy. The SPT results indicated that the texture-dependent hcp LZ61 alloy showed higher shear strength in the ND condition than the ED condition, caused by the texture strengthening effect. As the Li content and deformation temperature increase, the texture dependence of strength properties, and thus, the mechanical anisotropy, decrease so that the LZ121-ND sample showed lower shear strength than the ED specimen due to the greater grain sizes achieved in the ND condition.

  3. Critical Velocity for Shear Localization in A Mature Mylonitic Rock Analogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, M.; van den Ende, M.; Niemeijer, A. R.; Spiers, C. J.

    2016-12-01

    Highly localized slip zones, seen within ductile shear zones developed in nature, such as pseudotachylite bands occurring within mylonites, are widely recognized as evidence for earthquake nucleation and/or propagation within and overprinting the ductile regime. To understand brittle/frictional localization processes in ductile shear zones and to connect these to earthquake nucleation and propagation processes, we performed large velocity step-change tests on a brine-saturated, 80:20 (wt. %) halite and muscovite gouge mixture, after forming a mature mylonitic structure through pressure solution creep at low-velocity. The sharp increase in sliding strength that occurs in response to an instantaneous upward velocity-step (direct effect) is an important parameter in determining the potential for and nature of seismic rupture nucleation. We obtained reproducible results regarding low velocity mechanical behavior compared with previous work of Niemeijer and Spiers, [2006], but also obtained new insights into the effects of sudden increases in slip velocity on localization and strength evolution, at velocities above a specific critical velocity Vc ( 20 μm/sec). We found that once a ductile, mylonitic structure has developed in a shear zone, subsequent cataclastic deformation at high velocity (> Vc) is consistently localized in a narrow zone characterized by fine grains of halite aligned in arrays between foliated muscovite Due to this intense localization, structures presumably developed under low velocity conditions were still preserved in large parts of the gouge body. This switch to localized deformation is controlled by the imposed velocity, and becomes most apparent at velocities over Vc. In addition, the direct effect a decreases rapidly when the velocity exceeds Vc. This implies that slip can localize and accelerate towards seismic velocities more or less instantly once Vc is exceeded. Obtaining a measure for Vc in natural faults is therefore of key importance

  4. Congenital Constriction Band Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Rajesh Gupta, Fareed Malik, Rishabh Gupta, M.A.Basit, Dara Singh

    2008-01-01

    Congenital constriction bands are anomalous bands that encircle a digit or an extremity. Congenitalconstriction band syndrome is rare condition and is mostly associated with other musculoskeletaldisorders.We report such a rare experience.

  5. Excited waves in shear layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechert, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    The generation of instability waves in free shear layers is investigated. The model assumes an infinitesimally thin shear layer shed from a semi-infinite plate which is exposed to sound excitation. The acoustical shear layer excitation by a source further away from the plate edge in the downstream direction is very weak while upstream from the plate edge the excitation is relatively efficient. A special solution is given for the source at the plate edge. The theory is then extended to two streams on both sides of the shear layer having different velocities and densities. Furthermore, the excitation of a shear layer in a channel is calculated. A reference quantity is found for the magnitude of the excited instability waves. For a comparison with measurements, numerical computations of the velocity field outside the shear layer were carried out.

  6. Designing shear-thinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Arif Z.; Ewoldt, Randy H.

    2017-11-01

    Design in fluid mechanics often focuses on optimizing geometry (airfoils, surface textures, microfluid channels), but here we focus on designing fluids themselves. The dramatically shear-thinning ``yield-stress fluid'' is currently the most utilized non-Newtonian fluid phenomenon. These rheologically complex materials, which undergo a reversible transition from solid-like to liquid-like fluid flow, are utilized in pedestrian products such as paint and toothpaste, but also in emerging applications like direct-write 3D printing. We present a paradigm for yield-stress fluid design that considers constitutive model representation, material property databases, available predictive scaling laws, and the many ways to achieve a yield stress fluid, flipping the typical structure-to-rheology analysis to become the inverse: rheology-to-structure with multiple possible materials as solutions. We describe case studies of 3D printing inks and other flow scenarios where designed shear-thinning enables performance remarkably beyond that of Newtonian fluids. This work was supported by Wm. Wrigley Jr. Company and the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CMMI-1463203.

  7. Alfven eigenmodes in shear reversed plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breizman, B.N.; Berk, H.L.; Pekker, M.S.; Sharapov, S.E.; Hawkes, N.C.; Borba, D.N.; Pinches, S.D.

    2003-01-01

    Experiments on JT-60U and JET have shown that plasma configurations with shear reversal are prone to the excitation of unusual Alfven Eigenmodes by energetic particles. These modes emerge outside the TAE frequency gap, where one might expect them to be strongly damped. The modes often appear in bunches and they exhibit a quasi-periodic pattern of predominantly upward frequency sweeping (Alfven Cascades) as the safety factor q changes in time. This work presents a theory that explains the key features of the observed unusual modes including their connection to TAE's as well as the modifications of TAE's themselves near the shear reversal point. The developed theory has been incorporated into a reduced numerical model and verified with full geometry codes. JET experimental data on Alfven spectroscopy have been simulated to infer the mode numbers and the evolution of q min in the discharge. This analysis confirms the values of q that characterize the internal transport barrier triggering in reversed shear plasmas. (author)

  8. Shear viscosity and out of equilibrium dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El, Andrej; Xu Zhe; Greiner, Carsten; Muronga, Azwinndini

    2009-01-01

    Using Grad's method, we calculate the entropy production and derive a formula for the second-order shear viscosity coefficient in a one-dimensionally expanding particle system, which can also be considered out of chemical equilibrium. For a one-dimensional expansion of gluon matter with Bjorken boost invariance, the shear tensor and the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio η/s are numerically calculated by an iterative and self-consistent prescription within the second-order Israel-Stewart hydrodynamics and by a microscopic parton cascade transport theory. Compared with η/s obtained using the Navier-Stokes approximation, the present result is about 20% larger at a QCD coupling α s ∼0.3 (with η/s≅0.18) and is a factor of 2-3 larger at a small coupling α s ∼0.01. We demonstrate an agreement between the viscous hydrodynamic calculations and the microscopic transport results on η/s, except when employing a small α s . On the other hand, we demonstrate that for such small α s , the gluon system is far from kinetic and chemical equilibrium, which indicates the break down of second-order hydrodynamics because of the strong nonequilibrium evolution. In addition, for large α s (0.3-0.6), the Israel-Stewart hydrodynamics formally breaks down at large momentum p T > or approx. 3 GeV but is still a reasonably good approximation.

  9. Inductive shearing of drilling pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludtka, Gerard M.; Wilgen, John; Kisner, Roger; Mcintyre, Timothy

    2016-04-19

    Induction shearing may be used to cut a drillpipe at an undersea well. Electromagnetic rings may be built into a blow-out preventer (BOP) at the seafloor. The electromagnetic rings create a magnetic field through the drillpipe and may transfer sufficient energy to change the state of the metal drillpipe to shear the drillpipe. After shearing the drillpipe, the drillpipe may be sealed to prevent further leakage of well contents.

  10. The Relationship between Elastic Properties and Shear Fabric in Clay-Rich Fault Gouge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenigsberg, A.; Saffer, D. M.; Riviere, J.; Ryan, K. L.; Marone, C.

    2016-12-01

    The low mechanical strength of major crustal faults remains a fundamental problem in geophysics and earthquake mechanics. Although both clay abundance and shear fabric are known as key controls on the frictional weakening of faults, the detailed links between fabric, elastic properties, composition, and fault strength remain poorly understood. This gap in information is in part because data are lacking to fully characterize the evolution of gouge microstructures and elastic properties during shearing. Here, we use seismic wave propagation to probe gouge ultrasonic and elastic properties, as a proxy for the development of shear fabrics. We report on a suite of direct shear experiments that include ultrasonic wave transmission to monitor compressional and shear wave velocities (Vp, Vs), during progressive shear of synthetic, clay-rich fault gouge. In order to better understand when and how clay grain alignment and nano-coatings begin to dominate the affect of shear fabric and local gouge density on elastic properties and shear strength, we studied a suite of synthetic gouges composed of Ca-montmorillonite and quartz ranging from 0-100% clay. Our laboratory experiments document friction coefficients (μ) ranging from 0.21 for gouges composed of 100% smectite to 0.62 for 100% quartz, with μ decreasing as clay content increases. We find that Vp and Vs increases as shear progresses and porosity decreases. Ongoing analyses of ultrasonic waves will assess variations of Vp, Vs, and elastic moduli throughout shear and as a function of gouge composition. We anticipate that these variations will be linked to formation of fabric elements observed via microstructural analysis, and will be indicative of whether quartz or clay is dominating how the fabrics form. Finally, we expect that clay content will be the dominant factor controlling shear fabric evolution and, consequently, the key control on the evolution of elastic properties with shear.

  11. Magnetorheological dampers in shear mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wereley, N M; Cho, J U; Choi, Y T; Choi, S B

    2008-01-01

    In this study, three types of shear mode damper using magnetorheological (MR) fluids are theoretically analyzed: linear, rotary drum, and rotary disk dampers. The damping performance of these shear mode MR dampers is characterized in terms of the damping coefficient, which is the ratio of the equivalent viscous damping at field-on status to the damping at field-off status. For these three types of shear mode MR damper, the damping coefficient or dynamic range is derived using three different constitutive models: the Bingham–plastic, biviscous, and Herschel–Bulkley models. The impact of constitutive behavior on shear mode MR dampers is theoretically presented and compared

  12. Periodic Viscous Shear Heating Instability in Fine-Grained Shear Zones: Possible Mechanism for Intermediate Depth Earthquakes and Slow Earthquakes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelemen, P. B.; Hirth, G.

    2004-12-01

    Localized ductile shear zones with widths of cm to m are observed in exposures of Earth's shallow mantle (e.g., Kelemen & Dick JGR 95; Vissers et al. Tectonophys 95) and dredged from oceanic fracture zones (e.g., Jaroslow et al. Tectonophys 96). These are mylonitic (grain size 10 to 100 microns) and record mineral cooling temperatures from 1100 to 600 C. Pseudotachylites in a mantle shear zone show that shear heating temperatures can exceed the mantle solidus (e.g., Obata & Karato Tectonophys 95). Simple shear, recrystallization, and grain boundary sliding all decrease the spacing between pyroxenes, so olivine grain growth at lower stress is inhibited; thus, once formed, these shear zones do not "heal" on geological time scales. Reasoning that grain-size sensitive creep will be localized within these shear zones, rather than host rocks (grain size 1 to 10 mm), and inspired by the work of Whitehead & Gans (GJRAS 74), we thought these might undergo repeated shear heating instabilities. In this view, as elastic stress increases, the shear zone weakens via shear heating; rapid deformation of the weak shear zone releases most stored elastic stress; lower stress and strain rate coupled with diffusion of heat into host rocks leads to cooling and strengthening, after which the cycle repeats. We constructed a simple numerical model incorporating olivine flow laws for dislocation creep, diffusion creep, grain boundary sliding, and low T plasticity. We assumed that viscous deformation remains localized in shear zones, surrounded by host rocks undergoing elastic deformation. We fixed the velocity along one side of an elastic half space, and calculated stress due to elastic strain. This stress drives viscous deformation in a shear zone of specified width. Shear heating and thermal diffusion control temperature evolution in the shear zone and host rocks. A maximum of 1400 C (where substantial melting of peridotite would occur) is imposed. Grain size evolves during dislocation

  13. Shear strength of non-shear reinforced concrete elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoang, Cao linh

    1997-01-01

    The paper deals with the shear strength of prestressed hollow-core slabs determined by the theory of plasticity. Two failure mechanisms are considered in order to derive the solutions.In the case of sliding failure in a diagonal crack, the shear strength is determined by means of the crack sliding...

  14. Mechanical behavior and high-resolution EBSD investigation of the microstructural evolution in AISI 321 stainless steel under dynamic loading condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiamiyu, A.A.; Eskandari, M.; Sanayei, Mohsen; Odeshi, A.G.; Szpunar, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    The impact response of three regions (top, mid and center) across the thickness of AISI 321 austenitic stainless steel plate at high strain rates (>6000 s −1 ) was studied using the split Hopkinson pressure bar system. The result shows that texture and stored energy heterogeneity across plate thickness influenced the mechanical responses of the investigated steel in these regions. Microstructural evaluation using high-resolution electron backscattered diffraction (HR-EBSD) analysis showed that strengthening in AISI 321 steel originates from the evolution of strain-induced martensite and formation of nano-carbides in addition to plastic deformation by mechanical twinning and slip. This resulted in a desirable combination of high strength and good ductility (approx. 2000 MPa at 0.42 true strain). Phase transformation, dynamic recrystallization and formation of nano-carbides were confirmed within the adiabatic shear band (ASB) region. The average dynamic recrystallized (DRX) grain size in the shear band region is 0.28 µm in comparison to grain size of 15 µm outside the shear bands. The nano-sized grain inside the shear bands is proposed to form by rotational dynamic recrystallization. A comparative study of the alloy's behavior under dynamic and quasi-static compression shows that the stability of austenite is higher at high strain rates and lower at a low strain rate. The strength in the dynamically impacted specimen is compromised as a result of the suppressed evolution of strain-induced martensite and mechanical twin. Martensitic transformation under both loading conditions follows the FCC É£-austenite→BCC ά-martensite kinetic path and both phases obey the Kurdjumov-Sachs' {(111)É£||(110)ά and <−101>É£||<1–11>ά} orientation relationship.

  15. Mechanical behavior and high-resolution EBSD investigation of the microstructural evolution in AISI 321 stainless steel under dynamic loading condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiamiyu, A.A., E-mail: ahmed.tiamiyu@usask.ca [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Sask. (Canada); Eskandari, M. [Department of Materials Science & Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, Ahvaz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sanayei, Mohsen; Odeshi, A.G.; Szpunar, J.A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Sask. (Canada)

    2016-09-15

    The impact response of three regions (top, mid and center) across the thickness of AISI 321 austenitic stainless steel plate at high strain rates (>6000 s{sup −1}) was studied using the split Hopkinson pressure bar system. The result shows that texture and stored energy heterogeneity across plate thickness influenced the mechanical responses of the investigated steel in these regions. Microstructural evaluation using high-resolution electron backscattered diffraction (HR-EBSD) analysis showed that strengthening in AISI 321 steel originates from the evolution of strain-induced martensite and formation of nano-carbides in addition to plastic deformation by mechanical twinning and slip. This resulted in a desirable combination of high strength and good ductility (approx. 2000 MPa at 0.42 true strain). Phase transformation, dynamic recrystallization and formation of nano-carbides were confirmed within the adiabatic shear band (ASB) region. The average dynamic recrystallized (DRX) grain size in the shear band region is 0.28 µm in comparison to grain size of 15 µm outside the shear bands. The nano-sized grain inside the shear bands is proposed to form by rotational dynamic recrystallization. A comparative study of the alloy's behavior under dynamic and quasi-static compression shows that the stability of austenite is higher at high strain rates and lower at a low strain rate. The strength in the dynamically impacted specimen is compromised as a result of the suppressed evolution of strain-induced martensite and mechanical twin. Martensitic transformation under both loading conditions follows the FCC É£-austenite→BCC ά-martensite kinetic path and both phases obey the Kurdjumov-Sachs' {(111)É£||(110)ά and <−101>É£||<1–11>ά} orientation relationship.

  16. The effect of sheared toroidal rotation on pressure driven magnetic islands in toroidal plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegna, C. C. [Departments of Engineering Physics and Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    The impact of sheared toroidal rotation on the evolution of pressure driven magnetic islands in tokamak plasmas is investigated using a resistive magnetohydrodynamics model augmented by a neoclassical Ohm's law. Particular attention is paid to the asymptotic matching data as the Mercier indices are altered in the presence of sheared flow. Analysis of the nonlinear island Grad-Shafranov equation shows that sheared flows tend to amplify the stabilizing pressure/curvature contribution to pressure driven islands in toroidal tokamaks relative to the island bootstrap current contribution. As such, sheared toroidal rotation tends to reduce saturated magnetic island widths.

  17. Origin of Shear Stability and Compressive Ductility Enhancement of Metallic Glasses by Metal Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, B. A.; Chen, S. H.; Lu, Y. M.; Zhu, Z. G.; Zhao, Y. L.; Yang, Y.; Chan, K. C.; Liu, C. T.

    2016-01-01

    Metallic glasses (MGs) are notorious for the poor macroscopic ductility and to overcome the weakness various intrinsic and extrinsic strategies have been proposed in past decades. Among them, the metal coating is regarded as a flexible and facile approach, yet the physical origin is poorly understood due to the complex nature of shear banding process. Here, we studied the origin of ductile enhancement in the Cu-coating both experimentally and theoretically. By examining serrated shear events and their stability of MGs, we revealed that the thin coating layer plays a key role in stopping the final catastrophic failure of MGs by slowing down shear band dynamics and thus retarding its attainment to a critical instable state. The mechanical analysis on interplay between the coating layer and shear banding process showed the enhanced shear stability mainly comes from the lateral tension of coating layer induced by the surface shear step and the bonding between the coating layer and MGs rather than the layer thickness is found to play a key role in contributing to the shear stability. PMID:27271435

  18. The importance of strain localisation in shear zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bons, Paul D.; Finch, Melanie; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Griera, Albert; Llorens, Maria-Gema; Steinbach, Florian; Weikusat, Ilka

    2016-04-01

    The occurrence of various types of shear bands (C, C', C'') in shear zones indicate that heterogeneity of strain is common in strongly deformed rocks. However, the importance of strain localisation is difficult to ascertain if suitable strain markers are lacking, which is usually the case. Numerical modelling with the finite-element method has so far not given much insight in the development of shear bands. We suggest that this is not only because the modelled strains are often not high enough, but also because this technique (that usually assumes isotropic material properties within elements) does not properly incorporate mineral deformation behaviour. We simulated high-strain, simple-shear deformation in single- and polyphase materials with a full-field theory (FFT) model coupled to the Elle modelling platform (www.elle.ws; Lebensohn 2001; Bons et al. 2008). The FFT-approach simulates visco-plastic deformation by dislocation glide, taking into account the different available slip systems and their critical resolved shear stresses in relations to the applied stresses. Griera et al. (2011; 2013) have shown that this approach is particularly well suited for strongly anisotropic minerals, such as mica and ice Ih (Llorens 2015). We modelled single- and polyphase composites of minerals with different anisotropies and strengths, roughly equivalent to minerals such as ice Ih, mica, quartz and feldspar. Single-phase polycrystalline aggregates show distinct heterogeneity of strain rate, especially in case of ice Ih, which is mechanically close to mica (see also Griera et al. 2015). Finite strain distributions are heterogeneous as well, but the patterns may differ from that of the strain rate distribution. Dynamic recrystallisation, however, usually masks any strain and strain rate localisation (Llorens 2015). In case of polyphase aggregates, equivalent to e.g. a granite, we observe extensive localisation in both syn- and antithetic shear bands. The antithetic shear bands

  19. Shear-driven phase transformation in silicon nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, L; Djomani, D; Fakfakh, M; Renard, C; Belier, B; Bouchier, D; Patriarche, G

    2018-03-23

    We report on an unprecedented formation of allotrope heterostructured Si nanowires by plastic deformation based on applied radial compressive stresses inside a surrounding matrix. Si nanowires with a standard diamond structure (3C) undergo a phase transformation toward the hexagonal 2H-allotrope. The transformation is thermally activated above 500 °C and is clearly driven by a shear-stress relief occurring in parallel shear bands lying on {115} planes. We have studied the influence of temperature and axial orientation of nanowires. The observations are consistent with a martensitic phase transformation, but the finding leads to clear evidence of a different mechanism of deformation-induced phase transformation in Si nanowires with respect to their bulk counterpart. Our process provides a route to study shear-driven phase transformation at the nanoscale in Si.

  20. Electrostatic and magnetic fluctuations in the proximity of the velocity shear layer in the TJ-I Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Cortes, I.; Pedrosa, M.A.; Hidalgo, C.

    1992-01-01

    The structure of the electrostatic and magnetic turbulence changes in the proximity of the naturally velocity shear layer in the TJ-I tokamak. A decorrelation in the broad-band magnetic fluctuations and a decreasing in the density fluctuation levels have been observed in the proximity (scrape-off layer side) of the shear layer. The results are interpreted in terms of turbulence characteristics modified by sheared poloidal flows or/and magnetic configuration. (author) 8 fig. 16 ref

  1. A Piezoelectric Shear Stress Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taeyang; Saini, Aditya; Kim, Jinwook; Gopalarathnam, Ashok; Zhu, Yong; Palmieri, Frank L.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a piezoelectric sensor with a floating element was developed for shear stress measurement. The piezoelectric sensor was designed to detect the pure shear stress suppressing effects of normal stress generated from the vortex lift-up by applying opposite poling vectors to the: piezoelectric elements. The sensor was first calibrated in the lab by applying shear forces and it showed high sensitivity to shear stress (=91.3 +/- 2.1 pC/Pa) due to the high piezoelectric coefficients of PMN-33%PT (d31=-1330 pC/N). The sensor also showed almost no sensitivity to normal stress (less than 1.2 pC/Pa) because of the electromechanical symmetry of the device. The usable frequency range of the sensor is 0-800 Hz. Keywords: Piezoelectric sensor, shear stress, floating element, electromechanical symmetry

  2. Synergistic effects of the safety factor and shear flows on development of internal transport barriers in reversed shear plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, A.K.; Dong, J.Q.; Qu, W.X.; Qiu, X.M.

    2002-01-01

    A new suppression mechanism of turbulent transport, characteristic of the synergism between safety factor and shear flows, is proposed to explain the internal transport barriers (ITBs) observed in neutral-beam-heated tokamak discharges with reversed magnetic shear. It is shown that the evolution of turbulent transport with the strength of the suppression mechanism reproduces the basic features of the formation and development of ITBs observed in experiments. In addition, the present analyses predict the possibility of global ion and electron heat transport barriers

  3. Deformation bands in porous sandstones their microstructure and petrophysical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torabi, Anita

    2007-12-15

    Deformation bands are commonly thin tabular zones of crushed or reorganized grains that form in highly porous rocks and sediments. Unlike a fault, typically the slip is negligible in deformation bands. In this dissertation the microstructure and petrophysical properties of deformation bands have been investigated through microscopy and numerical analysis of experimental and natural examples. The experimental work consists of a series of ring-shear experiments performed on porous sand at 5 and 20 MPa normal stresses and followed by microscopic examination of thin sections from the sheared samples. The results of the ring-shear experiments and comparison of them to natural deformation bands reveals that burial depth (level of normal stress in the experiments) and the amount of shear displacement during deformation are the two significant factors influencing the mode in which grains break and the type of shear zone that forms. Two end-member types of experimental shear zones were identified: (a) Shear zones with diffuse boundaries, which formed at low levels of normal stress and/or shear displacement; and (b) Shear zones with sharp boundaries, which formed at higher levels of normal stress and/or shear displacement. Our interpretation is that with increasing burial depth (approximately more than one kilometer, simulated in the experiments by higher levels of normal stress), the predominant mode of grain fracturing changes from flaking to splitting; which facilitates the formation of sharp-boundary shear zones. This change to grain splitting increases the power law dimension of the grain size distribution (D is about 1.5 in sharp boundary shear zones). Based on our observations, initial grain size has no influence in the deformation behavior of the sand at 5 MPa normal stresses. A new type of cataclastic deformation band is described through outcrop and microscopic studies; here termed a 'slipped deformation band'. Whereas previously reported cataclastic

  4. Effects of different aging statuses and strain rate on the adiabatic shear susceptibility of 2195 aluminum–lithium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Y.; Tan, G.Y.; Chen, P.X.; Zhang, Q.M.

    2012-01-01

    The adiabatic shear susceptibility of 2195 aluminum–lithium alloy was investigated by means of split Hopkinson pressure bar. The stress collapse in true stress–true strain curves and true stress–time curves was observed. The adiabatic shear susceptibility of different aging statuses and strain rate were discussed by means of metallography observation. The critical strain, stress collapse time and formation energy of adiabatic shear bands were compared. The results show that different aging statuses and strain rate have significant influences on adiabatic shear behaviors of 2195 aluminum–lithium alloy. The peak-aged specimen has the highest adiabatic shearing susceptibility, while the under-aged specimen has the least adiabatic shear susceptibility. The susceptibility of adiabatic shearing increases with the increases of strain rate.

  5. Effects of different aging statuses and strain rate on the adiabatic shear susceptibility of 2195 aluminum-lithium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Y. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083, Hunan (China); State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Tan, G.Y., E-mail: yangyanggroup@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083, Hunan (China); Chen, P.X. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083, Hunan (China); Zhang, Q.M. [State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2012-06-01

    The adiabatic shear susceptibility of 2195 aluminum-lithium alloy was investigated by means of split Hopkinson pressure bar. The stress collapse in true stress-true strain curves and true stress-time curves was observed. The adiabatic shear susceptibility of different aging statuses and strain rate were discussed by means of metallography observation. The critical strain, stress collapse time and formation energy of adiabatic shear bands were compared. The results show that different aging statuses and strain rate have significant influences on adiabatic shear behaviors of 2195 aluminum-lithium alloy. The peak-aged specimen has the highest adiabatic shearing susceptibility, while the under-aged specimen has the least adiabatic shear susceptibility. The susceptibility of adiabatic shearing increases with the increases of strain rate.

  6. Band structure of semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Tsidilkovski, I M

    2013-01-01

    Band Structure of Semiconductors provides a review of the theoretical and experimental methods of investigating band structure and an analysis of the results of the developments in this field. The book presents the problems, methods, and applications in the study of band structure. Topics on the computational methods of band structure; band structures of important semiconducting materials; behavior of an electron in a perturbed periodic field; effective masses and g-factors for the most commonly encountered band structures; and the treatment of cyclotron resonance, Shubnikov-de Haas oscillatio

  7. Band Structure Characteristics of Nacreous Composite Materials with Various Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, H. W.; Chen, B. S.

    2016-06-01

    Nacreous composite materials have excellent mechanical properties, such as high strength, high toughness, and wide phononic band gap. In order to research band structure characteristics of nacreous composite materials with various defects, supercell models with the Brick-and-Mortar microstructure are considered. An efficient multi-level substructure algorithm is employed to discuss the band structure. Furthermore, two common systems with point and line defects and varied material parameters are discussed. In addition, band structures concerning straight and deflected crack defects are calculated by changing the shear modulus of the mortar. Finally, the sensitivity of band structures to the random material distribution is presented by considering different volume ratios of the brick. The results reveal that the first band gap of a nacreous composite material is insensitive to defects under certain conditions. It will be of great value to the design and synthesis of new nacreous composite materials for better dynamic properties.

  8. Fifty years of shear zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Rodney

    2017-04-01

    We are here, of course, because 1967 saw the publication of John Ramsay's famous book. Two years later a memorable field trip from Imperial College to the Outer Hebrides saw John on a bleak headland on the coast of North Uist where a relatively undeformed metadolerite within Lewisian (Precambrian) gneisses contained ductile shear zones with metamorphic fabrics in amphibolite facies. One particular outcrop was very special - a shear zone cutting otherwise completely isotropic, undeformed metadolerite, with an incremental foliation starting to develop at 45° to the deformation zone, and increasing in intensity as it approached the shear direction. Here was proof of the process of simple shear under ductile metamorphic conditions - the principles of simple shear outlined in John Ramsay's 1967 book clearly visible in nature, and verified by Ramsay's mathematical proofs in the eventual paper (Ramsay and Graham, 1970). Later work on the Lewisian on the mainland of Scotland, in South Harris, in Africa, and elsewhere applied Ramsay's simple shear principles more liberally, more imprecisely and on larger scale than at Caisteal Odair, but in retrospect it documented what seems now to be the generality of mid and lower crustal deformation. Deep seismic reflection data show us that on passive margins hyper-stretched continental crust (whether or not cloaked by Seaward Dipping Reflectors) seems to have collapsed onto the mantle. Crustal faults mostly sole out at or above the mantle - so the Moho is a detachment- an 'outer marginal detachment', if you like, and, of course, it must be a ductile shear. On non-volcanic margins this shear zone forms the first formed ocean floor before true sea floor spreading gets going to create real oceanic crust. Gianreto Manatschal, Marcel Lemoine and others realised that the serpentinites described in parts of the Alps are exposed remnants of this ductile shear zone. Associated ophicalcite breccias tell of sea floor exposure, while high

  9. Estimation of shear viscosity based on transverse momentum correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Monika

    2009-01-01

    Event anisotropy measurements at RHIC suggest the strongly interacting matter created in heavy ion collisions flows with very little shear viscosity. Precise determination of 'shear viscosity-to-entropy' ratio is currently a subject of extensive study [S. Gavin and M. Abdel-Aziz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97 (2006) 162302]. We present preliminary results of measurements of the evolution of transverse momentum correlation function with collision centrality of Au+Au interactions at √(s NN )=200 GeV. We compare two differential correlation functions, namely inclusive [J. Adams et al. (STAR Collaboration), Phys. Rev. C 72 (2005) 044902] and a differential version of the correlation measure C introduced by Gavin et al. [S. Gavin and M. Abdel-Aziz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97 (2006) 162302; M. Sharma and C. A. Pruneau, Phys. Rev. C 79 (2009) 024905.]. These observables can be used for the experimental study of the shear viscosity per unit entropy.

  10. Estimation of shear viscosity based on transverse momentum correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    STAR Collaboration; Sharma, Monika; STAR Collaboration

    2009-11-01

    Event anisotropy measurements at RHIC suggest the strongly interacting matter created in heavy ion collisions flows with very little shear viscosity. Precise determination of “shear viscosity-to-entropy” ratio is currently a subject of extensive study [S. Gavin and M. Abdel-Aziz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97 (2006) 162302]. We present preliminary results of measurements of the evolution of transverse momentum correlation function with collision centrality of Au+Au interactions at s=200 GeV. We compare two differential correlation functions, namely inclusive [J. Adams et al. (STAR Collaboration), Phys. Rev. C 72 (2005) 044902] and a differential version of the correlation measure C˜ introduced by Gavin et al. [S. Gavin and M. Abdel-Aziz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97 (2006) 162302; M. Sharma and C. A. Pruneau, Phys. Rev. C 79 (2009) 024905.]. These observables can be used for the experimental study of the shear viscosity per unit entropy.

  11. Particle transport across a circular shear layer with coherent structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, A.H.; Lynov, J.P.; Juul Rasmussen, J.

    1998-01-01

    In the study of the dynamics of coherent structures, forced circular shear flows offer many desirable features. The inherent quantisation of circular geometries due to the periodic boundary conditions makes it possible to design experiments in which the spatial and temporal complexity of the coherent structures can be accurately controlled. Experiments on circular shear flows demonstrating the formation of coherent structures have been performed in different physical systems, including quasi-neutral plasmas, non-neutral plasmas and rotating fluids. In this paper we investigate the evolution of such coherent structures by solving the forced incompressible Navier-Stokes equations numerically using a spectral code. The model is formulated in the context of a rotating fluid but apply equally well to low frequency electrostatic oscillations in a homogeneous magnetized plasma. In order to reveal the Lagrangian properties of the flow and in particular to investigate the transport capacity in the shear layer, passive particles are traced by the velocity field. (orig.)

  12. SEDflume - High Shear Stress Flume

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers High Shear Stress flume (SEDflume) is designed for estimating erosion rates of fine-grained and mixed fine/coarse grained sediments...

  13. Size effects in shear interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    GARNIER, J

    2001-01-01

    In physical modelling (centrifuge tests, calibration chambers, laboratory tests), the size of the soil particles may not be negligible when compared to the dimensions of the models. Size effects may so disturb the response of the models and the experimental data obtained on these cannot be extended to true scale conditions. Different tests have been performed to study and quantify the size effects that may happen in shear interfaces between soils and structures : modified shear box tests, pul...

  14. Multifractal spectra in shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, L. R.; Deane, Anil E.

    1989-01-01

    Numerical simulations of three-dimensional homogeneous shear flow and fully developed channel flow, are used to calculate the associated multifractal spectra of the energy dissipation field. Only weak parameterization of the results with the nondimensional shear is found, and this only if the flow has reached its asymptotic development state. Multifractal spectra of these flows coincide with those from experiments only at the range alpha less than 1.

  15. Shear Alfven waves in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kieras, C.E.

    1982-12-01

    Shear Alfven waves in an axisymmetric tokamak are examined within the framework of the linearized ideal MHD equations. Properties of the shear Alfven continuous spectrum are studied both analytically and numerically. Implications of these results in regards to low frequency rf heating of toroidally confined plasmas are discussed. The structure of the spatial singularities associated with these waves is determined. A reduced set of ideal MHD equations is derived to describe these waves in a very low beta plasma

  16. Weak lensing Study in VOICE Survey I: Shear Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Liping; Liu, Dezi; Radovich, Mario; Liu, Xiangkun; Pan, Chuzhong; Fan, Zuhui; Covone, Giovanni; Vaccari, Mattia; Amaro, Valeria; Brescia, Massimo; Capaccioli, Massimo; De Cicco, Demetra; Grado, Aniello; Limatola, Luca; Miller, Lance; Napolitano, Nicola R.; Paolillo, Maurizio; Pignata, Giuliano

    2018-06-01

    The VST Optical Imaging of the CDFS and ES1 Fields (VOICE) Survey is a Guaranteed Time program carried out with the ESO/VST telescope to provide deep optical imaging over two 4 deg2 patches of the sky centred on the CDFS and ES1 pointings. We present the cosmic shear measurement over the 4 deg2 covering the CDFS region in the r-band using LensFit. Each of the four tiles of 1 deg2 has more than one hundred exposures, of which more than 50 exposures passed a series of image quality selection criteria for weak lensing study. The 5σ limiting magnitude in r- band is 26.1 for point sources, which is ≳1 mag deeper than other weak lensing survey in the literature (e.g. the Kilo Degree Survey, KiDS, at VST). The photometric redshifts are estimated using the VOICE u, g, r, i together with near-infrared VIDEO data Y, J, H, Ks. The mean redshift of the shear catalogue is 0.87, considering the shear weight. The effective galaxy number density is 16.35 gal/arcmin2, which is nearly twice the one of KiDS. The performance of LensFit on such a deep dataset was calibrated using VOICE-like mock image simulations. Furthermore, we have analyzed the reliability of the shear catalogue by calculating the star-galaxy cross-correlations, the tomographic shear correlations of two redshift bins and the contaminations of the blended galaxies. As a further sanity check, we have constrained cosmological parameters by exploring the parameter space with Population Monte Carlo sampling. For a flat ΛCDM model we have obtained Σ _8 = σ _8(Ω _m/0.3)^{0.5} = 0.68^{+0.11}_{-0.15}.

  17. Instabilities and vortex dynamics in shear flow of magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, T.; Horton, W.; Morrison, P.J.; Schutkeker, J.; Kamimura, T.; Mima, K.; Abe, Y.

    1990-03-01

    Gradient-driven instabilities and the subsequent nonlinear evolution of generated vortices in sheared E x B flows are investigated for magnetized plasmas with and without gravity (magnetic curvature) and magnetic shear by using theory and implicit particle simulations. In the linear eigenmode analysis, the instabilities considered are the Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instability and the resistive interchange instability. The presence of the shear flow can stabilize these instabilities. The dynamics of the K-H instability and the vortex dynamics can be uniformly described by the initial flow pattern with a vorticity localization parameter ε. The observed growth of the K-H modes is exponential in time for linearly unstable modes, secular for marginal mode, and absent until driven nonlinearly for linearly stable modes. The distance between two vortex centers experiences rapid merging while the angle θ between the axis of vortices and the external shear flow increases. These vortices proceed toward their overall coalescence, while shedding small-scale vortices and waves. The main features of vortex dynamics of the nonlinear coalescence and the tilt or the rotational instabilities of vortices are shown to be given by using a low dimension Hamiltonian representation for interacting vortex cores in the shear flow. 24 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab

  18. A new confined high pressure rotary shear apparatus: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, D.; Coughlan, G.; Bedford, J. D.

    2017-12-01

    The frictional properties of fault zone materials, and their evolution during slip, are of paramount importance for determining the earthquake mechanics of large tectonic faults. Friction is a parameter that is difficult to determine from seismological methods so much of our understanding comes from experiment. Rotary shear apparatuses have been widely used in experimental studies to elucidate the frictional properties of faults under realistic earthquake slip velocities (0.1-10 m/s) and displacements (>20 m). However one technical limitation of rotary shear experiments at seismic slip rates has been the lack of confinement. This has led to a limit on the normal stress (due to the strength of the forcing blocks) and also a lack of control of measurements of the pore fluid pressure. Here we present the first preliminary results from a rotary shear apparatus that has been developed to attempt to address this issue. The new fully confined ring shear apparatus has a fast-acting servo-hydraulic confining pressure system of up to 200 MPa and a servo-controlled upstream and downstream pore pressure system of up to 200 MPa. Displacement rates of 0.01μ/s to 2 m/s can be achieved. Fault gouge samples can therefore be sheared at earthquake speed whilst being subject to pressures typically associated with the depth of earthquake nucleation.

  19. Shear viscosity coefficient from microscopic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muronga, Azwinndini

    2004-01-01

    The transport coefficient of shear viscosity is studied for a hadron matter through microscopic transport model, the ultrarelativistic quantum molecular dynamics (UrQMD), using the Green-Kubo formulas. Molecular-dynamical simulations are performed for a system of light mesons in a box with periodic boundary conditions. Starting from an initial state composed of π,η,ω,ρ,φ with a uniform phase-space distribution, the evolution takes place through elastic collisions, production, and annihilation. The system approaches a stationary state of mesons and their resonances, which is characterized by common temperature. After equilibration, thermodynamic quantities such as the energy density, particle density, and pressure are calculated. From such an equilibrated state the shear viscosity coefficient is calculated from the fluctuations of stress tensor around equilibrium using Green-Kubo relations. We do our simulations here at zero net baryon density so that the equilibration times depend on the energy density. We do not include hadron strings as degrees of freedom so as to maintain detailed balance. Hence we do not get the saturation of temperature but this leads to longer equilibration times

  20. Illuminating magma shearing processes via synchrotron imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavallée, Yan; Cai, Biao; Coats, Rebecca; Kendrick, Jackie E.; von Aulock, Felix W.; Wallace, Paul A.; Le Gall, Nolwenn; Godinho, Jose; Dobson, Katherine; Atwood, Robert; Holness, Marian; Lee, Peter D.

    2017-04-01

    Our understanding of geomaterial behaviour and processes has long fallen short due to inaccessibility into material as "something" happens. In volcanology, research strategies have increasingly sought to illuminate the subsurface of materials at all scales, from the use of muon tomography to image the inside of volcanoes to the use of seismic tomography to image magmatic bodies in the crust, and most recently, we have added synchrotron-based x-ray tomography to image the inside of material as we test it under controlled conditions. Here, we will explore some of the novel findings made on the evolution of magma during shearing. These will include observations and discussions of magma flow and failure as well as petrological reaction kinetics.

  1. Do populismo às bandas cambiais: a evolução da política cambial no Chile de 1970 a 1999 From populism to exchange rate bands: the evolution of exchange rate policy in Chile from 1970 to 1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Helena F. Cunha

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available We discuss in this paper the evolution of exchange rate policy in Chile since the seventies, with special attention to overvaluation and undervaluation cycles. Following a recent literature that argues in favor of competitive currencies as part of a development strategy, we argue that the Chilean exchange rate policy in the years that go from 1984 until 1999 were very important to its growth results. Chile even managed to go through the nineties without a major external crisis, especially when compared to its Latin American neighbors. We argue here that the exchange rate crawling band adopted in the middle eighties and nineties was important for its growth strategy.

  2. Shear dilatancy and acoustic emission in dry and saturated granular materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, E. E.; Siman-Tov, S.

    2017-12-01

    Shearing of granular materials plays a strong role in naturally sheared systems as landslides and faults. Many works on granular flows have concentrated on dry materials, but relatively little work has been done on water saturated sands. Here we experimentally investigate dry versus saturated quartz-rich sand to understand the effect of the fluid medium on the rheology and acoustic waves emission of the sheared sand. The sand was sheared in a rotary shear rheometer under applied constant normal stress boundary at low (100 µm/s) to high (1 m/s) velocities. Mechanical, acoustic data and deformation were continuously recorded and imaged. For dry and water saturated experiments the granular volume remains constant for low shear velocities ( 10-3 m/s) and increases during shearing at higher velocities ( 1 m/s). Continuous imaging of the sheared sand show that the steady state shear band thickness is thicker during the high velocity steps. No significant change observed in the shear band thickness between dry and water saturated experiments. In contrast, the amount of dilation during water saturated experiments is about half the value measured for dry material. The measured decrease cannot be explained by shear band thickness change as such is not exist. However, the reduced dilation is supported by our acoustic measurements. In general, the event rate and acoustic event amplitudes increase with shear velocity. While isolated events are clearly detected during low velocities at higher the events overlap, resulting in a noisy signal. Although detection is better for saturated experiments, during the high velocity steps the acoustic energy measured from the signal is lower compared to that recorded for dry experiments. We suggest that the presence of fluid suppresses grain motion and particles impacts leading to mild increase in the internal pressure and therefore for the reduced dilation. In addition, the viscosity of fluids may influence the internal pressure via

  3. Experimental observation of shear thickening oscillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagahiro, Shin-ichiro; Nakanishi, Hiizu; Mitarai, Namiko

    2013-01-01

    We report experimental observations of the shear thickening oscillation, i.e. the spontaneous macroscopic oscillation in the shear flow of severe shear thickening fluid. Using a density-matched starch-water mixture, in the cylindrical shear flow of a few centimeters flow width, we observed...

  4. Microstructural evolution of AZ31 magnesium alloy subjected to sliding friction treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Lu, Jinwen; Huo, Wangtu; Zhang, Yusheng; Wei, Q.

    2018-06-01

    Microstructural evolution and grain refinement mechanism in AZ31 magnesium alloy subjected to sliding friction treatment were investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy. The process of grain refinement was found to involve the following stages: (I) coarse grains were divided into fine twin plates through mechanical twinning; then the twin plates were transformed to lamellae with the accumulation of residual dislocations at the twin boundaries; (II) the lamellae were separated into subgrains with increasing grain boundary misorientation and evolution of high angle boundaries into random boundaries by continuous dynamic recrystallisation (cDRX); (III) the formation of nanograins. The mechanisms for the final stage, the formation of nanograins, can be classified into three types: (i) cDRX; (ii) discontinuous dynamic recrystallisation (dDRX); (iii) a combined mechanism of prior shear-band and subsequent dDRX. Stored strain energy plays an important role in determining deformation mechanisms during plastic deformation.

  5. Self-contained pipe cutting shear. Innovative technology summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DO) is in the process of decontaminating and decommissioning (D and D) many of its nuclear facilities throughout the country. Facilities have to be dismantled and demolition waste must be sized into manageable pieces for handling and disposal. Typically, the facilities undergoing D and D are contaminated, either chemically, radiologically, or both. In its D and D work, the DOE was in need of a tool capable of cutting steel and stainless steel pipe up to 6.4 cm in diameter. The self-contained pipe cutting shear was developed by Lukas Hydraulic GmbH and Co. KG to cut pipes up to 6.4 cm (2.5 in.) in diameter. This tool is a portable, hand-held hydraulic shear that is powered by a built-in rechargeable battery or a portable auxiliary rechargeable battery. Adding to its portability, it contains no hydraulic fluid lines or electrical cords, making it useful in congested areas or in areas with no power. Both curved and straight blades can be attached, making it adaptable to a variety of conditions. This tool is easy to set up, operates quietly, and cuts through pipes quickly. It is especially useful on contaminated pipes, as it crimps the ends while cutting and produces no residual cuttings. This shear is a valuable alternative to baseline technologies such as portable band saws, electric hacksaws, and other hydraulic shears. Costs using the innovative shear for cutting 2.5 cm (1-in.) pipe, for example, are comparable to costs using a conventional shear, approximately 80% of portable bandsaw costs and half of electric hacksaw costs

  6. Shear strength of non-shear reinforced concrete elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoang, Cao linh

    1997-01-01

    is based upon the hypothesis that cracks can be transformed into yield lines, which have lower sliding resistance than yield lines formed in uncracked concrete.Proposals have been made on how the derived standard solutions may be applied to more complicated cases, such as continuous beams, beams......The report deals with the shear strength of statically indeterminate reinforced concrete beams without shear reinforcement. Solutions for a number of beams with different load and support conditions have been derived by means of the crack sliding model developed by Jin- Ping Zhang.This model...

  7. Focusing of Shear Shock Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giammarinaro, Bruno; Espíndola, David; Coulouvrat, François; Pinton, Gianmarco

    2018-01-01

    Focusing is a ubiquitous way to transform waves. Recently, a new type of shock wave has been observed experimentally with high-frame-rate ultrasound: shear shock waves in soft solids. These strongly nonlinear waves are characterized by a high Mach number, because the shear wave velocity is much slower, by 3 orders of magnitude, than the longitudinal wave velocity. Furthermore, these waves have a unique cubic nonlinearity which generates only odd harmonics. Unlike longitudinal waves for which only compressional shocks are possible, shear waves exhibit cubic nonlinearities which can generate positive and negative shocks. Here we present the experimental observation of shear shock wave focusing, generated by the vertical motion of a solid cylinder section embedded in a soft gelatin-graphite phantom to induce linearly vertically polarized motion. Raw ultrasound data from high-frame-rate (7692 images per second) acquisitions in combination with algorithms that are tuned to detect small displacements (approximately 1 μ m ) are used to generate quantitative movies of gel motion. The features of shear shock wave focusing are analyzed by comparing experimental observations with numerical simulations of a retarded-time elastodynamic equation with cubic nonlinearities and empirical attenuation laws for soft solids.

  8. Modeling of shear wall buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, A K [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh (USA). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1984-05-01

    Many nuclear power plant buildings, for example, the auxiliary building, have reinforced concrete shear walls as the primary lateral load resisting system. Typically, these walls have low height to length ratio, often less than unity. Such walls exhibit marked shear lag phenomenon which would affect their bending stiffness and the overall stress distribution in the building. The deformation and the stress distribution in walls have been studied which is applicable to both the short and the tall buildings. The behavior of the wall is divided into two parts: the symmetric flange action and the antisymmetry web action. The latter has two parts: the web shear and the web bending. Appropriate stiffness equations have been derived for all the three actions. These actions can be synthesized to solve any nonlinear cross-section. Two specific problems, that of lateral and torsional loadings of a rectangular box, have been studied. It is found that in short buildings shear lag plays a very important role. Any beam type formulation which either ignores shear lag or includes it in an idealized form is likely to lead to erroneous results. On the other hand a rigidity type approach with some modifications to the standard procedures would yield nearly accurate answers.

  9. Structural state diagram of concentrated suspensions of jammed soft particles in oscillatory shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabaz, Fardin; Cloitre, Michel; Bonnecaze, Roger T.

    2018-03-01

    In a recent study [Khabaz et al., Phys. Rev. Fluids 2, 093301 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevFluids.2.093301], we showed that jammed soft particle glasses (SPGs) crystallize and order in steady shear flow. Here we investigate the rheology and microstructures of these suspensions in oscillatory shear flow using particle-dynamics simulations. The microstructures in both types of flows are similar, but their evolutions are very different. In both cases the monodisperse and polydisperse suspensions form crystalline and layered structures, respectively, at high shear rates. The crystals obtained in the oscillatory shear flow show fewer defects compared to those in the steady shear. SPGs remain glassy for maximum oscillatory strains less than about the yield strain of the material. For maximum strains greater than the yield strain, microstructural and rheological transitions occur for SPGs. Polydisperse SPGs rearrange into a layered structure parallel to the flow-vorticity plane for sufficiently high maximum shear rates and maximum strains about 10 times greater than the yield strain. Monodisperse suspensions form a face-centered cubic (FCC) structure when the maximum shear rate is low and hexagonal close-packed (HCP) structure when the maximum shear rate is high. In steady shear, the transition from a glassy state to a layered one for polydisperse suspensions included a significant induction strain before the transformation. In oscillatory shear, the transformation begins to occur immediately and with different microstructural changes. A state diagram for suspensions in large amplitude oscillatory shear flow is found to be in close but not exact agreement with the state diagram for steady shear flow. For more modest amplitudes of around one to five times the yield strain, there is a transition from a glassy structure to FCC and HCP crystals, at low and high frequencies, respectively, for monodisperse suspensions. At moderate frequencies, the transition is from glassy to HCP via

  10. Large-Amplitude Long-Wave Instability of a Supersonic Shear Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messiter, A. F.

    1995-01-01

    For sufficiently high Mach numbers, small disturbances on a supersonic vortex sheet are known to grow in amplitude because of slow nonlinear wave steepening. Under the same external conditions, linear theory predicts slow growth of long-wave disturbances to a thin supersonic shear layer. An asymptotic formulation is given here which adds nonzero shear-layer thickness to the weakly nonlinear formulation for a vortex sheet. Spatial evolution is considered, for a spatially periodic disturbance having amplitude of the same order, in Reynolds number, as the shear-layer thickness. A quasi-equilibrium inviscid nonlinear critical layer is found, with effects of diffusion and slow growth appearing through nonsecularity condition. Other limiting cases are also considered, in an attempt to determine a relationship between the vortex-sheet limit and the long-wave limit for a thin shear layer; there appear to be three special limits, corresponding to disturbances of different amplitudes at different locations along the shear layer.

  11. Influence of equilibrium shear flow in the parallel magnetic direction on edge localized mode crash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Y.; Xiong, Y. Y. [College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, 610064 Chengdu (China); Chen, S. Y., E-mail: sychen531@163.com [College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, 610064 Chengdu (China); Key Laboratory of High Energy Density Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu 610041 (China); Huang, J.; Tang, C. J. [College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, 610064 Chengdu (China); Key Laboratory of High Energy Density Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China)

    2016-04-15

    The influence of the parallel shear flow on the evolution of peeling-ballooning (P-B) modes is studied with the BOUT++ four-field code in this paper. The parallel shear flow has different effects in linear simulation and nonlinear simulation. In the linear simulations, the growth rate of edge localized mode (ELM) can be increased by Kelvin-Helmholtz term, which can be caused by the parallel shear flow. In the nonlinear simulations, the results accord with the linear simulations in the linear phase. However, the ELM size is reduced by the parallel shear flow in the beginning of the turbulence phase, which is recognized as the P-B filaments' structure. Then during the turbulence phase, the ELM size is decreased by the shear flow.

  12. Shear-induced aggregation or disaggregation in edible oils: Models, computer simulation, and USAXS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, B.; Peyronel, F.; Callaghan-Patrachar, N.; Quinn, B.; Marangoni, A. G.; Pink, D. A.

    2017-12-01

    The effects of shear upon the aggregation of solid objects formed from solid triacylglycerols (TAGs) immersed in liquid TAG oils were modeled using Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) and the predictions compared to experimental data using Ultra-Small Angle X-ray Scattering (USAXS). The solid components were represented by spheres interacting via attractive van der Waals forces and short range repulsive forces. A velocity was applied to the liquid particles nearest to the boundary, and Lees-Edwards boundary conditions were used to transmit this motion to non-boundary layers via dissipative interactions. The shear was created through the dissipative forces acting between liquid particles. Translational diffusion was simulated, and the Stokes-Einstein equation was used to relate DPD length and time scales to SI units for comparison with USAXS results. The SI values depended on how large the spherical particles were (250 nm vs. 25 nm). Aggregation was studied by (a) computing the Structure Function and (b) quantifying the number of pairs of solid spheres formed. Solid aggregation was found to be enhanced by low shear rates. As the shear rate was increased, a transition shear region was manifested in which aggregation was inhibited and shear banding was observed. Aggregation was inhibited, and eventually eliminated, by further increases in the shear rate. The magnitude of the transition region shear, γ˙ t, depended on the size of the solid particles, which was confirmed experimentally.

  13. Constitutive Curve and Velocity Profile in Entangled Polymers during Start-Up of Steady Shear Flow

    KAUST Repository

    Hayes, Keesha A.

    2010-05-11

    Time-dependent shear stress versus shear rate, constitutive curve, and velocity profile measurements are reported in entangled polymer solutions during start-up of steady shear flow. By combining confocal microscopy and particle image velocimetry (PIV), we determine the time-dependent velocity profile in polybutadiene and polystyrene solutions seeded with fluorescent 150 nm silica and 7.5 μm melamine particles. By comparing these profiles with time-dependent constitutive curves obtained from experiment and theory, we explore the connection between transient nonmonotonic regions in the constitutive curve for an entangled polymer and its susceptibility to unstable flow by shear banding [Adams et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2009, 102, 067801-4]. Surprisingly, we find that even polymer systems which exhibit transient, nonmonotonic shear stress-shear rate relationships in bulk rheology experiments manifest time-dependent velocity profiles that are decidedly linear and show no evidence of unstable flow. We also report that interfacial slip plays an important role in the steady shear flow behavior of entangled polymers at shear rates above the reciprocal terminal relaxation time but has little, if any, effect on the shape of the velocity profile. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  14. Nonlinear coupling of the resistive tearing modes under the unperturbed shear flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urata, Kazuhiro

    1990-01-01

    The influence of the unperturbed shear flow on the nonlinear evolution of the tearing mode is studied. In the case of single helicity, the shear flow activates the unstable mode which finally saturates to a rigid rotor state. In the case of multiple helicity, a variety of flow patterns is created depending on parameters, and always forms the current bubble soon after the collapse of the 3/2 magnetic island. (author)

  15. Observation of neoclassical transport in reverse shear plasmas on the tokamak fusion test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efthimion, P.C.; Goeler, S. von; Houlberg, W.A.

    2001-01-01

    Perturbative experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have investigated the transport of multiple ion species in reverse shear plasmas. The profile evolution of trace tritium and helium, and intrinsic carbon indicate the formation of core particle transport barriers in ERS plasmas. There is an order of magnitude reduction in the particle diffusivity inside the reverse shear region. The diffusivities for these species in ERS plasmas agree with neoclassical theory. (author)

  16. Observation of neoclassical transport in reverse shear plasmas on the tokamak fusion test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efthimion, P.C.; Von Goeler, S.; Houlberg, W.A.

    1999-01-01

    Perturbative experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have investigated the transport of multiple ion species in reverse shear plasmas. The profile evolution of trace tritium and helium, and intrinsic carbon indicate the formation of core particle transport barriers in ERS plasmas. There is an order of magnitude reduction in the particle diffusivity inside the reverse shear region. The diffusivities for these species in ERS plasmas agree with neoclassical theory. (author)

  17. FEM Simulation of Incremental Shear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosochowski, Andrzej; Olejnik, Lech

    2007-01-01

    A popular way of producing ultrafine grained metals on a laboratory scale is severe plastic deformation. This paper introduces a new severe plastic deformation process of incremental shear. A finite element method simulation is carried out for various tool geometries and process kinematics. It has been established that for the successful realisation of the process the inner radius of the channel as well as the feeding increment should be approximately 30% of the billet thickness. The angle at which the reciprocating die works the material can be 30 deg. . When compared to equal channel angular pressing, incremental shear shows basic similarities in the mode of material flow and a few technological advantages which make it an attractive alternative to the known severe plastic deformation processes. The most promising characteristic of incremental shear is the possibility of processing very long billets in a continuous way which makes the process more industrially relevant

  18. SHEAR ACCELERATION IN EXPANDING FLOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieger, F. M. [ZAH, Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Universität Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 12, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Duffy, P., E-mail: frank.rieger@mpi-hd.mpg.de, E-mail: peter.duffy@ucd.ie [University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2016-12-10

    Shear flows are naturally expected to occur in astrophysical environments and potential sites of continuous non-thermal Fermi-type particle acceleration. Here we investigate the efficiency of expanding relativistic outflows to facilitate the acceleration of energetic charged particles to higher energies. To this end, the gradual shear acceleration coefficient is derived based on an analytical treatment. The results are applied to the context of the relativistic jets from active galactic nuclei. The inferred acceleration timescale is investigated for a variety of conical flow profiles (i.e., power law, Gaussian, Fermi–Dirac) and compared to the relevant radiative and non-radiative loss timescales. The results exemplify that relativistic shear flows are capable of boosting cosmic-rays to extreme energies. Efficient electron acceleration, on the other hand, requires weak magnetic fields and may thus be accompanied by a delayed onset of particle energization and affect the overall jet appearance (e.g., core, ridge line, and limb-brightening).

  19. Computerized lateral-shear interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegan, Sorin A.; Jianu, Angela; Vlad, Valentin I.

    1998-07-01

    A lateral-shear interferometer, coupled with a computer for laser wavefront analysis, is described. A CCD camera is used to transfer the fringe images through a frame-grabber into a PC. 3D phase maps are obtained by fringe pattern processing using a new algorithm for direct spatial reconstruction of the optical phase. The program describes phase maps by Zernike polynomials yielding an analytical description of the wavefront aberration. A compact lateral-shear interferometer has been built using a laser diode as light source, a CCD camera and a rechargeable battery supply, which allows measurements in-situ, if necessary.

  20. Wide Band to ''Double Band'' upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasper, P.; Currier, R.; Garbincius, P.; Butler, J.

    1988-06-01

    The Wide Band beam currently uses electrons obtained from secondary photon conversions to produce the photon beam incident on the experimental targets. By transporting the positrons produced in these conversions as well as the electrons it is possible to almost double the number of photons delivered to the experiments per primary beam proton. 11 figs

  1. Self-oscillations of a two-dimensional shear flow with forcing and dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Zazueta, A.; Zavala Sansón, L.

    2018-04-01

    Two-dimensional shear flows continuously forced in the presence of dissipative effects are studied by means of numerical simulations. In contrast with most previous studies, the forcing is confined in a finite region, so the behavior of the system is characterized by the long-term evolution of the global kinetic energy. We consider regimes with 1 limited to develop only one vortical instability by choosing an appropriate width of the forcing band. The most relevant regime is found for Reλ > 36, in which the energy maintains a regular oscillation around a reference value. The flow configuration is an elliptical vortex tilted with respect to the forcing axis, which oscillates steadily also. Second, the flow is allowed to develop two Kelvin-Helmholtz billows and eventually more complicated structures. The regimes of the one-vortex case are observed again, except for Reλ > 135. At these values, the energy oscillates chaotically as the two vortices merge, form dipolar structures, and split again, with irregular periodicity. The self-oscillations are explained as a result of the alternate competition between forcing and dissipation, which is verified by calculating the budget terms in the energy equation. The relevance of the forcing-vs.-dissipation competition is discussed for more general flow systems.

  2. Mesoscale modeling of amorphous metals by shear transformation zone dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homer, Eric R.; Schuh, Christopher A.

    2009-01-01

    A new mesoscale modeling technique for the thermo-mechanical behavior of metallic glasses is proposed. The modeling framework considers the shear transformation zone (STZ) as the fundamental unit of deformation, and coarse-grains an amorphous collection of atoms into an ensemble of STZs on a mesh. By employing finite element analysis and a kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm, the modeling technique is capable of simulating glass processing and deformation on time and length scales greater than those usually attainable by atomistic modeling. A thorough explanation of the framework is presented, along with a specific two-dimensional implementation for a model metallic glass. The model is shown to capture the basic behaviors of metallic glasses, including high-temperature homogeneous flow following the expected constitutive law, and low-temperature strain localization into shear bands. Details of the effects of processing and thermal history on the glass structure and properties are also discussed.

  3. Prompt and delayed spectroscopy of At203 : Observation of a shears band and a 29/2+ isomeric state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auranen, K.; Uusitalo, J.; Juutinen, S.; Badran, H.; Defranchi Bisso, F.; Cox, D.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P. T.; Herzáň, A.; Jakobsson, U.; Julin, R.; Konki, J.; Leino, M.; Lightfoot, A.; Mallaburn, M. J.; Neuvonen, O.; Pakarinen, J.; Papadakis, P.; Partanen, J.; Rahkila, P.; Sandzelius, M.; Sarén, J.; Scholey, C.; Sorri, J.; Stolze, S.; Wang, Y. K.

    2018-02-01

    Using fusion-evaporation reactions, a gas-filled recoil separator, recoil-gating technique and recoil-isomer decay tagging technique we have extended the level scheme of At-203 (N = 118) significantly. We have observed an isomeric [tau = 14.1(3) mu s] state with a spin and parity of 29/2(+). The isomeric state is suggested to originate from the pi(h(9/2)) circle times |Po-202; 11(-)> coupling, and it is depopulated through 286 keV E2 and 366 keV E3 transitions. In addition, we have observed a cascade of magnetic-dipole transitions which is suggested to be generated by the shears mechanism.

  4. Microstructure evolution and mechanical properties of a Ti-35Nb-3Zr-2Ta biomedical alloy processed by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhengjie; Wang, Liqiang; Xue, Xiaobing; Lu, Weijie; Qin, Jining; Zhang, Di

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, an equal channel angular pressing method is employed to refine grains and enhance mechanical properties of a new β Ti-35Nb-3Zr-2Ta biomedical alloy. After the 4th pass, the ultrafine equiaxed grains of approximately 300 nm and 600 nm are obtained at pressing temperatures of 500 and 600°C respectively. The SEM images of billets pressed at 500°C reveal the evolution of shear bands and finally at the 4th pass intersectant networks of shear bands, involving initial band propagation and new band broadening, are formed with the purpose of accommodating large plastic strain. Furthermore, a unique herringbone microstructure of twinned martensitic variants is observed in TEM images. The results of microhardness measurements and uniaxial tensile tests show a significant improvement in microhardness and tensile strength from 534 MPa to 765 MPa, while keeping a good level of ductility (~16%) and low elastic modulus (~59 GPa). The maximum superelastic strain of 1.4% and maximum recovered strain of 2.7% are obtained in the billets pressed at 500°C via the 4th pass, which exhibits an excellent superelastic behavior. Meanwhile, the effects of different accumulative deformations and pressing temperatures on superelasticity of the ECAP-processed alloys are investigated. © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Atomic mechanism of shear localization during indentation of a nanostructured metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sansoz, F.; Dupont, V.

    2007-01-01

    Shear localization is an important mode of deformation in nanocrystalline metals. However, it is very difficult to verify the existence of local shear planes in nanocrystalline metals experimentally. Sharp indentation techniques may provide novel opportunities to investigate the effect of shear localization at different length scales, but the relationship between indentation response and atomic-level shear band formation has not been fully addressed. This paper describes an effort to provide direct insight on the mechanism of shear localization during indentation of nanocrystalline metals from atomistic simulations. Molecular statics is performed with the quasi-continuum method to simulate the indentation of single crystal and nanocrystalline Al with a sharp cylindrical probe. In the nanocrystalline regime, two grain sizes are investigated, 5 nm and 10 nm. We find that the indentation of nanocrystalline metals is characterized by serrated plastic flow. This effect seems to be independent of the grain size. Serration in nanocrystalline metals is found to be associated with the formation of shear bands by sliding of aligned interfaces and intragranular slip, which results in deformation twinning

  6. Amniotic constriction bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Amniotic band sequence URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/ ... birth. The baby should be delivered in a medical center that has specialists experienced in caring for babies ... or partial loss of function of a body part. Congenital bands affecting large parts of the body cause the ...

  7. Grouted Connections with Shear Keys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ronnie; Jørgensen, M. B.; Damkilde, Lars

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a finite element model in the software package ABAQUS in which a reliable analysis of grouted pile-to-sleeve connections with shear keys is the particular purpose. The model is calibrated to experimental results and a consistent set of input parameters is estimated so that dif...... that different structural problems can be reproduced successfully....

  8. Meniscal shear stress for punching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuijthof, Gabrielle J M; Meulman, Hubert N; Herder, Just L; van Dijk, C Niek

    2009-01-01

    Experimental determination of the shear stress for punching meniscal tissue. Meniscectomy (surgical treatment of a lesion of one of the menisci) is the most frequently performed arthroscopic procedure. The performance of a meniscectomy is not optimal with the currently available instruments. To design new instruments, the punching force of meniscal tissue is an important parameter. Quantitative data are unavailable. The meniscal punching process was simulated by pushing a rod through meniscal tissue at constant speed. Three punching rods were tested: a solid rod of Oslash; 3.00 mm, and two hollow tubes (Oslash; 3.00-2.60 mm) with sharpened cutting edges of 0.15 mm and 0.125 mm thick, respectively. Nineteen menisci acquired from 10 human cadaveric knee joints were punched (30 tests). The force and displacement were recorded from which the maximum shear stress was determined (average added with three times the standard deviation). The maximum shear stress for the solid rod was determined at 10.2 N/mm2. This rod required a significantly lower punch force in comparison with the hollow tube having a 0.15 mm cutting edge (plt;0.01). The maximum shear stress for punching can be applied to design instruments, and virtual reality training environments. This type of experiment is suitable to form a database with material properties of human tissue similar to databases for the manufacturing industry.

  9. Centrifuges and inertial shear forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, van J.J.W.A.; Folgering, H.T.E.; Bouten, C.V.C.; Smit, T.H.

    2004-01-01

    Centrifuges are often used in biological studies for 1xg control samples in space flight microgravity experiments as well as in ground based research. Using centrifugation as a tool to generate an Earth like acceleration introduces unwanted inertial shear forces to the sample. Depending on the

  10. Imaging off-plane shear waves with a two-dimensional phononic crystal lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiang Chenyu; Luan Pigang

    2010-01-01

    A two-dimensional flat phononic crystal (PC) lens for focusing off-plane shear waves is proposed. The lens consists of a triangular lattice hole-array, embedded in a solid matrix. The self-collimation effect is employed to guide the shear waves propagating through the lens along specific directions. The Dirichlet-to-Neumann maps (DtN) method is employed to calculate the band structure of the PC, which can avoid the problems of bad convergence and fake bands automatically in the void-solid PC structure. When the lens is illuminated by the off-plane shear waves emanating from a point source, a subwavelength image appears in the far-field zone. The imaging characteristics are investigated by calculating the displacement fields explicitly using the multiple scattering method, and the results are in good agreement with the ray-trace predictions. Our results may provide insights for designing new phononic devices.

  11. Impact of magnetic shear modification on confinement and turbulent fluctuations in LHD plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, T.; Tamura, N.; Ida, K.

    2008-10-01

    For the comprehensive understandings of transport phenomena in toroidal confinement systems and improvement of the predictive capability of burning plasmas in ITER, the impact of magnetic shear has been extensively investigated in the Large Helical Device (LHD) for comparison with tokamaks. Consequently, it was heuristically documented that the pronounced effect of magnetic shear, which has been hitherto considered to be ubiquitous and strongly impacts the core transport in the tokamak experiments, is not quite obvious. Namely, the kinetic profiles respond little under extensive modification of the magnetic shear in the core, although the local transport analysis indicates the sign of improvement in confinement transiently when the magnetic shear is reduced. It was thereby concluded that the magnetic shear in the core strongly influences the MHD activity, but it may only be one of the necessary conditions for the transport reduction, and some other crucial knobs, such as the density gradient or T e /T i ratio, would have to be simultaneously controlled. The low wavenumber turbulence seems to be suppressed under the weak shear, and the turbulent fluctuation intensity behaves in a consistent manner as a whole, following the conventional paradigm accumulated in the negative shear experiments in tokamaks. However, vigorous dynamics of turbulent fluctuations have occasionally been observed under the magnetic shear modification, which respond in much faster time scale than the characteristic time scale for either the magnetic diffusion or the profile evolution. (author)

  12. Nonlinear dynamics and anisotropic structure of rotating sheared turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salhi, A; Jacobitz, F G; Schneider, K; Cambon, C

    2014-01-01

    Homogeneous turbulence in rotating shear flows is studied by means of pseudospectral direct numerical simulation and analytical spectral linear theory (SLT). The ratio of the Coriolis parameter to shear rate is varied over a wide range by changing the rotation strength, while a constant moderate shear rate is used to enable significant contributions to the nonlinear interscale energy transfer and to the nonlinear intercomponental redistribution terms. In the destabilized and neutral cases, in the sense of kinetic energy evolution, nonlinearity cannot saturate the growth of the largest scales. It permits the smallest scale to stabilize by a scale-by-scale quasibalance between the nonlinear energy transfer and the dissipation spectrum. In the stabilized cases, the role of rotation is mainly nonlinear, and interacting inertial waves can affect almost all scales as in purely rotating flows. In order to isolate the nonlinear effect of rotation, the two-dimensional manifold with vanishing spanwise wave number is revisited and both two-component spectra and single-point two-dimensional energy components exhibit an important effect of rotation, whereas the SLT as well as the purely two-dimensional nonlinear analysis are unaffected by rotation as stated by the Proudman theorem. The other two-dimensional manifold with vanishing streamwise wave number is analyzed with similar tools because it is essential for any shear flow. Finally, the spectral approach is used to disentangle, in an analytical way, the linear and nonlinear terms in the dynamical equations.

  13. Modeling of Mesoscale Variability in Biofilm Shear Behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallab Barai

    Full Text Available Formation of bacterial colonies as biofilm on the surface/interface of various objects has the potential to impact not only human health and disease but also energy and environmental considerations. Biofilms can be regarded as soft materials, and comprehension of their shear response to external forces is a key element to the fundamental understanding. A mesoscale model has been presented in this article based on digitization of a biofilm microstructure. Its response under externally applied shear load is analyzed. Strain stiffening type behavior is readily observed under high strain loads due to the unfolding of chains within soft polymeric substrate. Sustained shear loading of the biofilm network results in strain localization along the diagonal direction. Rupture of the soft polymeric matrix can potentially reduce the intercellular interaction between the bacterial cells. Evolution of stiffness within the biofilm network under shear reveals two regimes: a initial increase in stiffness due to strain stiffening of polymer matrix, and b eventual reduction in stiffness because of tear in polymeric substrate.

  14. Deformation localization at the tips of shear fractures: An analytical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Santanu

    2011-04-01

    Mechanical heterogeneities are important features in rocks which trigger deformation localization in brittle, ductile or brittle-ductile modes during deformation. In a recent study Misra et al. (2009) have investigated these different processes of deformation localization at the tips of pre-existing planar shear fractures. The authors identified four mechanisms of deformation, ranging from brittle to ductile, operating at the crack tips. Mechanism A: brittle deformation is the dominant process that forms a pair of long tensile fractures at the two crack tips. Mechanism B: nature of deformation is mixed where the tensile fractures grow to a finite length with incipient plastic deformation at the tips. Mechanism C: mixed mode deformation characterized by dominating macro-scale shear bands, and short, opened-out tensile fissures. Mechanism D: localization of plastic bands in the form of a pair of shear bands at each tip without any discernible brittle fracturing. The transition of the mechanisms is a function of orientation ( α) of the crack with respect to the bulk compression direction and the finite length ( l) of the crack. The aim of this study is to present a theoretical analysis to account for the variability of deformation localization in the vicinity of pre-existing shear cracks considering an elastic-plastic rheological model. The analysis calculates the principal tensile stress ( σ1) and the second stress invariant ( I2) of the stress field at the fracture tip to explain the transition from Mechanism A (tensile fracturing) to Mechanism D (ductile strain). The results show that σ1 at the fracture tip increases non-linearly with increasing α and Ar (aspect ratio of the shear crack), and assumes a large value when α > 50 o, promoting tensile fractures. On the other hand, I2 is a maximum at α < 45°, resulting in nucleation of ductile shear bands.

  15. Effect of Re on stacking fault nucleation under shear strain in Ni by atomistic simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zheng-Guang; Wang Chong-Yu; Yu Tao

    2014-01-01

    The effect of Re on stacking fault (SF) nucleation under shear strain in Ni is investigated using the climbing image nudged elastic band method with a Ni—Al—Re embedded-atom-method potential. A parameter (ΔE sf b ), the activation energy of SF nucleation under shear strain, is introduced to evaluate the effect of Re on SF nucleation under shear strain. Calculation results show that ΔE sf b decreases with Re addition, which means that SF nucleation under shear strain in Ni may be enhanced by Re. The atomic structure observation shows that the decrease of ΔE sf b may be due to the expansion of local structure around the Re atom when SF goes through the Re atom. (rapid communication)

  16. Ideal MHD stability properties of pressure-driven modes in low shear tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manickam, J.; Pomphrey, N.; Todd, A.M.M.

    1987-03-01

    The role of shear in determining the ideal MHD stability properties of tokamaks is discussed. In particular, we assess the effects of low shear within the plasma upon pressure-driven modes. The standard ballooning theory is shown to break down, as the shear is reduced and the growth rate is shown to be an oscillatory function of n, the toroidal mode number, treated as a continuous parameter. The oscillations are shown to depend on both the pressure and safety-factor profiles. When the shear is sufficiently weak, the oscillations can result in bands of unstable n values which are present even when the standard ballooning theory predicts complete stability. These instabilities are named ''infernal modes.'' The occurrence of these instabilities at integer n is shown to be a sensitive function of q-axis, raising the possibility of a sharp onset as plasma parameters evolve. 20 refs., 31 figs

  17. C/NOFS Satellite Electric Field and Plasma Density Observations of Plasma Instabilities Below the Equatorial F-Peak -- Evidence for Approximately 500 km-Scale Spread-F "Precursor" Waves Driven by Zonal Shear Flow and km-Scale, Narrow-Banded Irregularities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, R.; Freudenreich, H.; Klenzing, J.; Liebrecht, C.; Valladares, C.

    2011-01-01

    As solar activity has increased, the ionosphere F-peak has been elevated on numerous occasions above the C/NOFS satellite perigee of 400km. In particular, during the month of April, 2011, the satellite consistently journeyed below the F-peak whenever the orbit was in the region of the South Atlantic anomaly after sunset. During these passes, data from the electric field and plasma density probes on the satellite have revealed two types of instabilities which had not previously been observed in the C/NOFS data set (to our knowledge): The first is evidence for 400-500km-scale bottomside "undulations" that appear in the density and electric field data. In one case, these large scale waves are associated with a strong shear in the zonal E x B flow, as evidenced by variations in the meridional (outward) electric fields observed above and below the F-peak. These undulations are devoid of smaller scale structures in the early evening, yet appear at later local times along the same orbit associated with fully-developed spread-F with smaller scale structures. This suggests that they may be precursor waves for spread-F, driven by a collisional shear instability, following ideas advanced previously by researchers using data from the Jicamarca radar. A second new result (for C/NOFS) is the appearance of km-scale irregularities that are a common feature in the electric field and plasma density data that also appear when the satellite is below the F -peak at night. The vector electric field instrument on C/NOFS clearly shows that the electric field component of these waves is strongest in the zonal direction. These waves are strongly correlated with simultaneous observations of plasma density oscillations and appear both with, and without, evidence of larger-scale spread-F depletions. These km-scale, quasi-coherent waves strongly resemble the bottomside, sinusoidal irregularities reported in the Atmosphere Explorer satellite data set by Valladares et al. [JGR, 88, 8025, 1983

  18. Shear behaviour of reinforced phyllite concrete beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adom-Asamoah, Mark; Owusu Afrifa, Russell

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Phyllite concrete beams often exhibited shear with anchorage bond failure. ► Different shear design provisions for reinforced phyllite beams are compared. ► Predicted shear capacity of phyllite beams must be modified by a reduction factor. -- Abstract: The shear behaviour of concrete beams made from phyllite aggregates subjected to monotonic and cyclic loading is reported. First diagonal shear crack load of beams with and without shear reinforcement was between 42–58% and 42–92% of the failure loads respectively. The phyllite concrete beams without shear links had lower post-diagonal cracking shear resistance compared to corresponding phyllite beams with shear links. As a result of hysteretic energy dissipation, limited cyclic loading affected the stiffness, strength and deformation of the phyllite beams with shear reinforcement. Generally, beams with and without shear reinforcement showed anchorage bond failure in addition to the shear failure due to high stress concentration near the supports. The ACI, BS and EC codes are conservative for the prediction of phyllite concrete beams without shear reinforcement but they all overestimate the shear strength of phyllite concrete beams with shear reinforcement. It is recommended that the predicted shear capacity of phyllite beams reinforced with steel stirrups be modified by a reduction factor of 0.7 in order to specify a high enough safety factor on their ultimate strength. It is also recommended that susceptibility of phyllite concrete beams to undergo anchorage bond failure is averted in design by the provision of greater anchorage lengths than usually permitted.

  19. Band parameters of phosphorene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lew Yan Voon, L C; Wang, J; Zhang, Y; Willatzen, M

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorene is a two-dimensional nanomaterial with a direct band-gap at the Brillouin zone center. In this paper, we present a recently derived effective-mass theory of the band structure in the presence of strain and electric field, based upon group theory. Band parameters for this theory are computed using a first-principles theory based upon the generalized-gradient approximation to the density-functional theory. These parameters and Hamiltonian will be useful for modeling physical properties of phosphorene. (paper)

  20. Infrared diffuse interstellar bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galazutdinov, G. A.; Lee, Jae-Joon; Han, Inwoo; Lee, Byeong-Cheol; Valyavin, G.; Krełowski, J.

    2017-05-01

    We present high-resolution (R ˜ 45 000) profiles of 14 diffuse interstellar bands in the ˜1.45 to ˜2.45 μm range based on spectra obtained with the Immersion Grating INfrared Spectrograph at the McDonald Observatory. The revised list of diffuse bands with accurately estimated rest wavelengths includes six new features. The diffuse band at 15 268.2 Å demonstrates a very symmetric profile shape and thus can serve as a reference for finding the 'interstellar correction' to the rest wavelength frame in the H range, which suffers from a lack of known atomic/molecular lines.

  1. Band parameters of phosphorene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lew Yan Voon, L. C.; Wang, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorene is a two-dimensional nanomaterial with a direct band-gap at the Brillouin zone center. In this paper, we present a recently derived effective-mass theory of the band structure in the presence of strain and electric field, based upon group theory. Band parameters for this theory...... are computed using a first-principles theory based upon the generalized-gradient approximation to the density-functional theory. These parameters and Hamiltonian will be useful for modeling physical properties of phosphorene....

  2. Spatial bandwidth enlargement and field enhancement of shear horizontal waves in finite graded piezoelectric layered media

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Yanlong

    2015-09-01

    Shear horizontal (SH) wave propagation in finite graded piezoelectric layered media is investigated by transfer matrix method. Different from the previous studies on SH wave propagation in completely periodic layered media, calculations on band structure and transmission in this paper show that the graded layered media possess very large band gaps. Harmonic wave simulation by finite element method (FEM) confirms that the reason of bandwidth enlargement is that waves within the band gap ranges are spatially enhanced and stopped by the corresponding graded units. The study suggests that the graded structure possesses the property of manipulating elastic waves spatially, which shows potential applications in strengthening energy trapping and harvesting. © 2015.

  3. Band engineering in twisted molybdenum disulfide bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yipeng; Liao, Chengwei; Ouyang, Gang

    2018-05-01

    In order to explore the theoretical relationship between interlayer spacing, interaction and band offset at the atomic level in vertically stacked two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals (vdW) structures, we propose an analytical model to address the evolution of interlayer vdW coupling with random stacking configurations in MoS2 bilayers based on the atomic-bond-relaxation correlation mechanism. We found that interlayer spacing changes substantially with respect to the orientations, and the bandgap increases from 1.53 eV (AB stacking) to 1.68 eV (AA stacking). Our results reveal that the evolution of interlayer vdW coupling originates from the interlayer interaction, leading to interlayer separations and electronic properties changing with stacking configurations. Our predictions constitute a demonstration of twist engineering the band shift in the emergent class of 2D crystals, transition-metal dichalcogenides.

  4. Shear instability of a gyroid diblock copolymer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskimergen, Rüya; Mortensen, Kell; Vigild, Martin Etchells

    2005-01-01

    -induced destabilization is discussed in relation to analogous observations on shear-induced order-to-order and disorder-to-order transitions observed in related block copolymer systems and in microemulsions. It is discussed whether these phenomena originate in shear-reduced fluctuations or shear-induced dislocations....

  5. Study on shear properties of coral sand under cyclic simple shear condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Wendong; Zhang, Yuting; Jin, Yafei

    2018-05-01

    In recent years, the ocean development in our country urgently needs to be accelerated. The construction of artificial coral reefs has become an important development direction. In this paper, experimental studies of simple shear and cyclic simple shear of coral sand are carried out, and the shear properties and particle breakage of coral sand are analyzed. The results show that the coral sand samples show an overall shear failure in the simple shear test, which is more accurate and effective for studying the particle breakage. The shear displacement corresponding to the peak shear stress of the simple shear test is significantly larger than that corresponding to the peak shear stress of the direct shear test. The degree of particle breakage caused by the simple shear test is significantly related to the normal stress level. The particle breakage of coral sand after the cyclic simple shear test obviously increases compared with that of the simple shear test, and universal particle breakage occurs within the whole particle size range. The increasing of the cycle-index under cyclic simple shear test results in continuous compacting of the sample, so that the envelope curve of peak shearing force increases with the accumulated shear displacement.

  6. The effect of existing turbulence on stratified shear instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Alexis; Smyth, William

    2017-11-01

    Ocean turbulence is an essential process governing, for example, heat uptake by the ocean. In the stably-stratified ocean interior, this turbulence occurs in discrete events driven by vertical variations of the horizontal velocity. Typically, these events have been modelled by assuming an initially laminar stratified shear flow which develops wavelike instabilities, becomes fully turbulent, and then relaminarizes into a stable state. However, in the real ocean there is always some level of turbulence left over from previous events, and it is not yet understood how this turbulence impacts the evolution of future mixing events. Here, we perform a series of direct numerical simulations of turbulent events developing in stratified shear flows that are already at least weakly turbulent. We do so by varying the amplitude of the initial perturbations, and examine the subsequent development of the instability and the impact on the resulting turbulent fluxes. This work is supported by NSF Grant OCE1537173.

  7. 3D Progressive Damage Modeling for Laminated Composite Based on Crack Band Theory and Continuum Damage Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, John T.; Pineda, Evan J.; Ranatunga, Vipul; Smeltzer, Stanley S.

    2015-01-01

    A simple continuum damage mechanics (CDM) based 3D progressive damage analysis (PDA) tool for laminated composites was developed and implemented as a user defined material subroutine to link with a commercially available explicit finite element code. This PDA tool uses linear lamina properties from standard tests, predicts damage initiation with an easy-to-implement Hashin-Rotem failure criteria, and in the damage evolution phase, evaluates the degradation of material properties based on the crack band theory and traction-separation cohesive laws. It follows Matzenmiller et al.'s formulation to incorporate the degrading material properties into the damaged stiffness matrix. Since nonlinear shear and matrix stress-strain relations are not implemented, correction factors are used for slowing the reduction of the damaged shear stiffness terms to reflect the effect of these nonlinearities on the laminate strength predictions. This CDM based PDA tool is implemented as a user defined material (VUMAT) to link with the Abaqus/Explicit code. Strength predictions obtained, using this VUMAT, are correlated with test data for a set of notched specimens under tension and compression loads.

  8. CSF oligoclonal banding - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100145.htm CSF oligoclonal banding - series—Normal anatomy To use the ... 5 out of 5 Overview The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) serves to supply nutrients to the central nervous ...

  9. Decay of superdeformed bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, M.P.; Khoo, T.L.; Lauritsen, T.

    1995-01-01

    One of the major challenges in the study of superdeformation is to directly connect the large number of superdeformed bands now known to the yrast states. In this way, excitation energies, spins and parities can be assigned to the levels in the second well which is essential to establish the collective and single-particle components of these bands. This paper will review some of the progress which has been made to understand the decay of superdeformed bands using the new arrays including the measurement of the total decay spectrum and the establishment of direct one-step decays from the superdeformed band to the yrast line in 194 Hg. 42 refs., 5 figs

  10. Laparoscopic gastric banding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eat by making you feel full after eating small amounts of food. After surgery, your doctor can adjust the band ... You will feel full after eating just a small amount of food. The food in the small upper pouch will ...

  11. Statistical Model of Extreme Shear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose

    2004-01-01

    In order to continue cost-optimisation of modern large wind turbines, it is important to continously increase the knowledge on wind field parameters relevant to design loads. This paper presents a general statistical model that offers site-specific prediction of the probability density function...... by a model that, on a statistically consistent basis, describe the most likely spatial shape of an extreme wind shear event. Predictions from the model have been compared with results from an extreme value data analysis, based on a large number of high-sampled full-scale time series measurements...... are consistent, given the inevitabel uncertainties associated with model as well as with the extreme value data analysis. Keywords: Statistical model, extreme wind conditions, statistical analysis, turbulence, wind loading, statistical analysis, turbulence, wind loading, wind shear, wind turbines....

  12. Shear failure of granular materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degiuli, Eric; Balmforth, Neil; McElwaine, Jim; Schoof, Christian; Hewitt, Ian

    2012-02-01

    Connecting the macroscopic behavior of granular materials with the microstructure remains a great challenge. Recent work connects these scales with a discrete calculus [1]. In this work we generalize this formalism from monodisperse packings of disks to 2D assemblies of arbitrarily shaped grains. In particular, we derive Airy's expression for a symmetric, divergence-free stress tensor. Using these tools, we derive, from first-principles and in a mean-field approximation, the entropy of frictional force configurations in the Force Network Ensemble. As a macroscopic consequence of the Coulomb friction condition at contacts, we predict shear failure at a critical shear stress, in accordance with the Mohr-Coulomb failure condition well known in engineering. Results are compared with numerical simulations, and the dependence on the microscopic geometric configuration is discussed. [4pt] [1] E. DeGiuli & J. McElwaine, PRE 2011. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevE.84.041310

  13. Haptic Edge Detection Through Shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platkiewicz, Jonathan; Lipson, Hod; Hayward, Vincent

    2016-03-01

    Most tactile sensors are based on the assumption that touch depends on measuring pressure. However, the pressure distribution at the surface of a tactile sensor cannot be acquired directly and must be inferred from the deformation field induced by the touched object in the sensor medium. Currently, there is no consensus as to which components of strain are most informative for tactile sensing. Here, we propose that shape-related tactile information is more suitably recovered from shear strain than normal strain. Based on a contact mechanics analysis, we demonstrate that the elastic behavior of a haptic probe provides a robust edge detection mechanism when shear strain is sensed. We used a jamming-based robot gripper as a tactile sensor to empirically validate that shear strain processing gives accurate edge information that is invariant to changes in pressure, as predicted by the contact mechanics study. This result has implications for the design of effective tactile sensors as well as for the understanding of the early somatosensory processing in mammals.

  14. CFD simulation of estimating critical shear stress for cleaning flat ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sumit Kawale

    2017-11-22

    Nov 22, 2017 ... Jet impingement; wall shear stress; cleaning of flat plate; turbulence model; critical shear stress; ... On comparing the theoretical predictions with wall shear ... distance and Reynolds number on peak value of local shear stress ...

  15. Continuous shear - a method for studying material elements passing a stationary shear plane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegren, Maria; Wiwe, Birgitte; Wanheim, Tarras

    2003-01-01

    circumferential groove. Normally shear in metal forming processes is of another nature, namely where the material elements move through a stationary shear zone, often of small width. In this paper a method enabling the simulation of this situation is presented. A tool for continuous shear has beeen manufactured...... and tested with AlMgSil and copper. The sheared material has thereafter been tested n plane strain compression with different orientation concerning the angle between the shear plane and the compression direction....

  16. Simulations of Granular Particles Under Cyclic Shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, John; Chaikin, Paul

    2012-02-01

    We perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of spherical grains subjected to cyclic, quasi-static shear in a 3D parallelepiped shear cell. This virtual shear cell is constructed out of rough, bumpy walls in order to minimize wall-induced ordering and has an open top surface to allow the packing to readily dilate or compact. Using a standard routine for MD simulations of frictional grains, we simulate over 1000 shear cycles, measuring grain displacements, the local packing density and changes in the contact network. Varying the shear amplitude and the friction coefficient between grains, we map out a phase diagram for the different types of behavior exhibited by these sheared grains. With low friction and high enough shear, the grains can spontaneously order into densely packed crystals. With low shear and increasing friction the packing remains disordered, yet the grains arrange themselves into configurations which exhibit limit cycles where all grains return to the same position after each full shear cycle. At higher shear and friction there is a transition to a diffusive state, where grains continue rearrange and move throughout the shear cell.

  17. Effective Heuristics for Capacitated Production Planning with Multiperiod Production and Demand with Forecast Band Refinement

    OpenAIRE

    Philip Kaminsky; Jayashankar M. Swaminathan

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we extend forecast band evolution and capacitated production modelling to the multiperiod demand case. In this model, forecasts of discrete demand for any period are modelled as bands and defined by lower and upper bounds on demand, such that future forecasts lie within the current band. We develop heuristics that utilize knowledge of demand forecast evolution to make production decisions in capacitated production planning environments. In our computational study we explore the ...

  18. Analytical study of dispersion relations for shear horizontal wave propagation in plates with periodic stubs

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Yanlong

    2015-01-01

    structures' evolution with the height of the stubs and the thickness of the plate shows clearly that the method can predict well the Bragg band gaps, locally resonant band gaps and high-order symmetric and anti-symmetric thickness-twist modes

  19. Use of the shearing interferometry for dense inhomogeneous plasma diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakharenkov, Yu.A.; Sklizkov, G.V.; Shikanov, A.S.

    1980-01-01

    Investigated is a possibility of applying the shearing interferometry for diagnostics of a dense inhomogeneous laser plasma which makes it possible to measure the electron density without losses in accuracy near the critical surface. A shearing interferogram is formed upon interference of two identical images of the object under study shifted at some fixed distance. The value of the interference band deflection inside phase inhomogeneity depends on the gradient of the index of refraction in the direction of shift. It has been found that for studying the inner region of the laser plasma a small shift should be used, and for the external one - a large one. The version of a radial shift interferometry is shown to be optimum. For the inner region of the interferogram the error of the electron density restoration does not exceed 10%, and for the external one the error is comparable with that for the version of standard interferometry. A systematic analysis of the optimum type interferometers shows advantages of shearing interferometers. The maximum electron density recorded in experiments makes up approximately equal to 10 20 cm -3 , which is 3-5 times higher than the corresponding value obtained by a standard double-slit type interferometer at equal limiting parameters of the optical system applied

  20. Thermal conductivity of graphene nanoribbons under shear deformation: A molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Hao, Xiao-Li; Wang, Cui-Xia; Wei, Ning; Rabczuk, Timon

    2017-01-01

    Tensile strain and compress strain can greatly affect the thermal conductivity of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs). However, the effect of GNRs under shear strain, which is also one of the main strain effect, has not been studied systematically yet. In this work, we employ reverse nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (RNEMD) to the systematical study of the thermal conductivity of GNRs (with model size of 4 nm × 15 nm) under the shear strain. Our studies show that the thermal conductivity of GNRs is not sensitive to the shear strain, and the thermal conductivity decreases only 12–16% before the pristine structure is broken. Furthermore, the phonon frequency and the change of the micro-structure of GNRs, such as band angel and bond length, are analyzed to explore the tendency of thermal conductivity. The results show that the main influence of shear strain is on the in-plane phonon density of states (PDOS), whose G band (higher frequency peaks) moved to the low frequency, thus the thermal conductivity is decreased. The unique thermal properties of GNRs under shear strains suggest their great potentials for graphene nanodevices and great potentials in the thermal managements and thermoelectric applications. PMID:28120921

  1. The Influence of Forming Directions and Strain Rate on Dynamic Shear Properties of Aerial Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Meng

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic shear properties under high strain rate are an important basis for studying the dynamic mechanical properties and microscopic mechanisms of materials. Dynamic impact shear tests of aerial aluminum alloy 7050-T7451 in rolling direction (RD, transverse direction (TD and normal direction (ND were performed at a range of strain rates from 2.5 × 104 s−1 to 4.5 × 104 s−1 by High Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB. The influence of different forming directions and strain rates on the dynamic shear properties of material and the microstructure evolution under dynamic shear were emphatically analyzed. The results showed that aluminum alloy 7050-T7451 had a certain strain rate sensitivity and positive strain rate strengthening effect, and also the material had no obvious strain strengthening effect. Different forming directions had a great influence on dynamic shear properties. The shear stress in ND was the largest, followed by that in RD, and the lowest was that in TD. The microstructure observation showed that the size and orientation of the grain structure were different in three directions, which led to the preferred orientation of the material. All of those were the main reasons for the difference of dynamic shear properties of the material.

  2. Modelling of shear effects on thermal and particle transport in advanced Tokamak scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, D.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Baker, D.R.

    1999-01-01

    Evolution of thermal and particle internal transport barriers (ITBs) is studied by modelling the time-dependent energy and particle balance in DIII-D plasmas with reversed magnetic shear configurations and in JET discharges with monotonic or slightly reversed q-profiles and large ExB rotation shear. Simulations are performed with semi-empirical models for anomalous diffusion and particle pinch. Stabilizing effects of magnetic and ExB rotation shears are included in anomalous particle and heat diffusivity. Shear effects on particle and thermal transport are compared. Improved particle and energy confinement with the formation of an internal transport barrier (ITB) has been produced in DIII-D plasmas during current ramp-up accompanied with neutral beam injection (NBI). These plasmas are characterized by strong reversed magnetic shear and large ExB rotation shear which provide the reduction of anomalous fluxes. The formation of ITB's in the optimized shear (OS) JET scenario starts with strong NBI heating in a target plasma with a flat or slightly reversed q-profile pre-formed during current ramp-up with ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH). Our paper presents the modelling of particle and thermal transport for these scenarios. (authors)

  3. Shear deformation-induced anisotropic thermal conductivity of graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Liu; Shi, Sanqiang; Wei, Gaosheng; Du, Xiaoze

    2018-01-03

    Graphene-based materials exhibit intriguing phononic and thermal properties. In this paper, we have investigated the heat conductance in graphene sheets under shear-strain-induced wrinkling deformation, using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. A significant orientation dependence of the thermal conductivity of graphene wrinkles (GWs) is observed. The directional dependence of the thermal conductivity of GWs stems from the anisotropy of phonon group velocities as revealed by the G-band broadening of the phonon density of states (DOS), the anisotropy of thermal resistance as evidenced by the G-band peak mismatch of the phonon DOS, and the anisotropy of phonon relaxation times as a direct result of the double-exponential-fitting of the heat current autocorrelation function. By analyzing the relative contributions of different lattice vibrations to the heat flux, we have shown that the contributions of different lattice vibrations to the heat flux of GWs are sensitive to the heat flux direction, which further indicates the orientation-dependent thermal conductivity of GWs. Moreover, we have found that, in the strain range of 0-0.1, the anisotropy ratio of GWs increases monotonously with increasing shear strain. This is induced by the change in the number of wrinkles, which is more influential in the direction perpendicular to the wrinkle texture. The findings elucidated here emphasize the utility of wrinkle engineering for manipulation of nanoscale heat transport, which offers opportunities for the development of thermal channeling devices.

  4. Magnetic Shear and Transport in ECRH Discharges of the TJ-II under Ohmic Induction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Bruna, D.; Castejon, F.; Romero, J. A.; Estrada, T.; Medina, F.; Ochando, M.; Lopez-Fraguas, A.; Ascasibar, E.; Herranz, J.; Sanchez, E.; Luna, E. de la; Pastor, I.

    2006-07-01

    TJ-II is ha heliac type stellarator characterised by high, but almost constant, vacuum rotational transform throughout the confining volume. In ECRH plasmas, moderate induced ohmic currents (negligible heating and modification of the magnetic field nodules) are enough to disregard the bootstrap contribution, which allows us performing a fair calculation of the evolution of the rotational transform. We use the loop voltage diagnostic to estimate the plasma electrical conductivity. Then the evolution of the rotational transform and shear is related to changes in the profiles of electron and thermal diffusivities: negative shear correlates with decreasing diffusivities in the region of steepest density gradient; transport increases toward zero shear but the achieved positive values are too small to draw conclusions. The radial sweeping of lowest order rational magnetic surfaces does not determine the observed trends in transport. (Author)43 refs.

  5. Magnetic Shear and Transport in ECRH Discharges of the TJ-II under Ohmic Induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Bruna, D.; Castejon, F.; Romero, J. A.; Estrada, T.; Medina, F.; Ochando, M.; Lopez-Fraguas, A.; Ascasibar, E.; Herranz, J.; Sanchez, E.; Luna, E. de la; Pastor, I.

    2006-01-01

    TJ-II is ha heliac type stellarator characterised by high, but almost constant, vacuum rotational transform throughout the confining volume. In ECRH plasmas, moderate induced ohmic currents (negligible heating and modification of the magnetic field nodules) are enough to disregard the bootstrap contribution, which allows us performing a fair calculation of the evolution of the rotational transform. We use the loop voltage diagnostic to estimate the plasma electrical conductivity. Then the evolution of the rotational transform and shear is related to changes in the profiles of electron and thermal diffusivities: negative shear correlates with decreasing diffusivities in the region of steepest density gradient; transport increases toward zero shear but the achieved positive values are too small to draw conclusions. The radial sweeping of lowest order rational magnetic surfaces does not determine the observed trends in transport. (Author)43 refs

  6. Steady-state shear characteristics of Aspergillus niger broths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svihla, C.K.; Dronawat, S.N.; Hanley, T.R. [Univ. of Louisville, KY (United States)

    1995-12-31

    It can be difficult to obtain reliable rheological data for filamentous fermentation broths using conventional instruments. One common approach is to measure the torque drawn by an impeller rotating in the suspension. Many previous workers have assumed that the applicable shear rate in such a device is related to the impeller speed by a fluid-independent constant determined by calibration with Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. The rheology of Aspergillus niger broths have been characterized using the impeller viscometer approach. The changes in the broth rheology were measured, and used to interpret the growth of biomass and the evolution of the microorganism morphology.

  7. Magma shearing and friction in the volcanic conduit: A crystal constraint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, P. A.; Kendrick, J. E.; Henton De Angelis, S.; Ashworth, J. D.; Coats, R.; Miwa, T.; Mariani, E.; Lavallée, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Magma shearing and friction processes in the shallow volcanic conduit are typical manifestations of strain localisation, which in turn can have an influential role on magma ascent dynamics. The thermal consequences of such events could drive the destabilisation of magma and thus dictate the style of activity at the surface. Shear heating and fault friction are prime candidates for the generation of significant quantities of heat. Here we use a combination of field and experimental evidence to investigate how crystals can act as sensitive recorders of both physical and chemical processes occurring in the shallow volcanic conduit. Spine extrusion during the closing of the 1991-95 eruption at Unzen volcano, Japan, provided the unique opportunity to investigate marginal shear zone formation, which preserves a relic of the deformation during magma ascent. Our results show that crystals can effectively act as a deformation marker during magma ascent through the viscous-brittle transition by accommodating strain in the form of crystal plasticity before fracturing (comminution). Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) reveals up to 40° lattice distortion of biotite phenocrysts in zones of high shear, with negligible plasticity further away. Plagioclase microlites display a systematic plastic response to an increase in shear intensity, as recorded by an increase in lattice distortion towards the spine margin of up to 9°. This localisation of strain within the shear zone is also accompanied by the destabilisation of hydrous mineral phases (i.e. amphibole), compaction of pores (23-13% Φ), glass devitrification and magnetic anomalies. The narrow zone of disequilibrium textures suggests the likely effect of a thermal input due to strain localisation being the contributing factor. These observations are complimented by high-temperature high-velocity rotary shear experiments which simulate the deformation evolution during shear. Hence, understanding these shallow volcanic

  8. Shear Modulus of Sintered 'House of Cards'-Like Assemblies of Crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaink, H.M.; Malssen, van K.

    2007-01-01

    A cell model of a 'house of cards'-like assembly of crystals is used for the study of the evolution of the shear modulus during sintering. The crystals are assumed to have a lozenge shape. The cell model takes different crystal-crystal contacts into account. The force needed to separate two sintered

  9. The mechanical stability of retained austenite in low-alloyed TRIP steel under shear loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blondé, R., E-mail: r.j.p.blonde@tudelft.nl [Fundamental Aspects of Materials and Energy, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Materials Innovation Institute, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Jimenez-Melero, E., E-mail: enrique.jimenez-melero@manchester.ac.uk [Dalton Cumbrian Facility, The University of Manchester, Westlakes Science and Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3HA (United Kingdom); Zhao, L., E-mail: lie.zhao@tudelft.nl [Materials Innovation Institute, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Schell, N., E-mail: norbert.schell@hzg.de [Institute of Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Max Planck Strasse 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Brück, E., E-mail: e.h.bruck@tudelft.nl [Fundamental Aspects of Materials and Energy, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Zwaag, S. van der, E-mail: s.vanderzwaag@tudelft.nl [Novel Aerospace Materials Group, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS Delft (Netherlands); Dijk, N.H. van, E-mail: n.h.vandijk@tudelft.nl [Fundamental Aspects of Materials and Energy, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-01-31

    The microstructure evolution during shear loading of a low-alloyed TRIP steel with different amounts of the metastable austenite phase and its equivalent DP grade has been studied by in-situ high-energy X-ray diffraction. A detailed powder diffraction analysis has been performed to probe the austenite-to-martensite transformation by characterizing simultaneously the evolution of the austenite phase fraction and its carbon concentration, the load partitioning between the austenite and the ferritic matrix and the texture evolution of the constituent phases. Our results show that for shear deformation the TRIP effect extends over a significantly wider deformation range than for simple uniaxial loading. A clear increase in average carbon content during the mechanically-induced transformation indicates that austenite grains with a low carbon concentration are least stable during shear loading. The observed texture evolution indicates that under shear loading the orientation dependence of the austenite stability is relatively weak, while it has previously been found that under tensile load the {110}〈001〉 component transforms preferentially. The mechanical stability of retained austenite in TRIP steel is found to be a complex interplay between the interstitial carbon concentration in the austenite, the grain orientation and the load partitioning.

  10. Influence of shear flow on the specific volume and the crystalline morphology of isotactic polypropylene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Beek, M.H.E.; Peters, G.W.M.; Meijer, H.E.H.

    2006-01-01

    The influence of shear flow on the temperature evolution of the specific volume and the crystalline morphology of two iPP's, differing in weight-averaged molar mass w, was investigated at nonisothermal conditions and elevated pressures, using a custom-designed dilatometer. These conditions are

  11. Ultra wide band antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Begaud, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Ultra Wide Band Technology (UWB) has reached a level of maturity that allows us to offer wireless links with either high or low data rates. These wireless links are frequently associated with a location capability for which ultimate accuracy varies with the inverse of the frequency bandwidth. Using time or frequency domain waveforms, they are currently the subject of international standards facilitating their commercial implementation. Drawing up a complete state of the art, Ultra Wide Band Antennas is aimed at students, engineers and researchers and presents a summary of internationally recog

  12. Statistical Model of Extreme Shear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose; Larsen, Gunner Chr.

    2005-01-01

    In order to continue cost-optimisation of modern large wind turbines, it is important to continuously increase the knowledge of wind field parameters relevant to design loads. This paper presents a general statistical model that offers site-specific prediction of the probability density function...... by a model that, on a statistically consistent basis, describes the most likely spatial shape of an extreme wind shear event. Predictions from the model have been compared with results from an extreme value data analysis, based on a large number of full-scale measurements recorded with a high sampling rate...

  13. Influence of macroscopic shear deformation on polygonization and recrystallization of molybdenum crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larikov, L.N.; Belyakova, M.N.; Maksimenko, E.A.; Mudruk, P.V.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of shear bands on polygonization and recrystallization is studied on molybdenum monocrystals deformed by compression. A sharp bend of the lattice is shown to be a structural condition necessary for arising the shear step. Internal stress relaxation strongly changes kinetics of softening processes in compressed molybdenum crystals: it slows down polygonization under low-temperature heating (below 700 deg C) and accelerates it under high-temperature heating (higher 1000 deg C). Under the effect of relaxation of internal streses recrystallization in the investigated crystals is similar to dynamical: recrystallized grains are distorted and they have a developed substructure

  14. Relative viscosity of emulsions in simple shear flow: Temperature, shear rate, and interfacial tension dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Se Bin; Lee, Joon Sang [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei Unversity, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    We simulate an emulsion system under simple shear rates to analyze its rheological characteristics using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). We calculate the relative viscosity of an emulsion under a simple shear flow along with changes in temperature, shear rate, and surfactant concentration. The relative viscosity of emulsions decreased with an increase in temperature. We observed the shear-thinning phenomena, which is responsible for the inverse proportion between the shear rate and viscosity. An increase in the interfacial tension caused a decrease in the relative viscosity of the decane-in-water emulsion because the increased deformation caused by the decreased interfacial tension significantly influenced the wall shear stress.

  15. Spatial bandwidth enlargement and field enhancement of shear horizontal waves in finite graded piezoelectric layered media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Yanlong

    2015-01-01

    Shear horizontal (SH) wave propagation in finite graded piezoelectric layered media is investigated by transfer matrix method. Different from the previous studies on SH wave propagation in completely periodic layered media, calculations on band structure and transmission in this paper show that the graded layered media possess very large band gaps. Harmonic wave simulation by finite element method (FEM) confirms that the reason of bandwidth enlargement is that waves within the band gap ranges are spatially enhanced and stopped by the corresponding graded units. The study suggests that the graded structure possesses the property of manipulating elastic waves spatially, which shows potential applications in strengthening energy trapping and harvesting. - Highlights: • Shear horizontal wave propagation in finite graded piezoelectric layered media is investigated by transfer matrix method. • Calculations on band structure and transmission show that the graded layered media possess very large band gaps. • Finite element method confirms that waves in band gaps are spatially enhanced and stopped by the graded units. • The study suggests that the graded structure possesses the property of manipulating elastic waves spatially

  16. Suppression of plasma turbulence during optimised shear configurations in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conway, G.D.; Borba, D.N.; Alper, B.

    1999-08-01

    throughout the plasma as the radial location of the cutoff layer depends on the launched microwave frequency, the toroidal magnetic field B T , plasma current I p , and plasma density n e . Reflectometers are primarily sensitive to long wavelength transverse fluctuations, i.e. wavelengths greater than the beam radius w. For the JET reflectometers the w ∼ 5 cm and so are predominately sensitive to wavenumbers k perpendicular -1 . Spatially, the turbulence in optimised shear discharges can be separated into three regions: outside the ITB (edge), within the ITB gradient, and inside the ITB (core). The turbulence behaves differently in each region. The core turbulence (ITB and within) evolves through four distinct phases. (1) Ohmic breakdown. (2) L-mode pre-heat, using Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) to slow the current penetration and control the q profile evolution. (3) Main heating using combined co-injected (parallel to I p ) Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) and ICRH, and (4) the ITB formation. The edge turbulence by contrast shows little variation as the discharge evolves. (author)

  17. Structure-rheology relationship in a sheared lamellar fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaju, S J; Kumaran, V

    2016-03-01

    The structure-rheology relationship in the shear alignment of a lamellar fluid is studied using a mesoscale model which provides access to the lamellar configurations and the rheology. Based on the equations and free energy functional, the complete set of dimensionless groups that characterize the system are the Reynolds number (ργL(2)/μ), the Schmidt number (μ/ρD), the Ericksen number (μγ/B), the interface sharpness parameter r, the ratio of the viscosities of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic parts μ(r), and the ratio of the system size and layer spacing (L/λ). Here, ρ and μ are the fluid density and average viscosity, γ is the applied strain rate, D is the coefficient of diffusion, B is the compression modulus, μ(r) is the maximum difference in the viscosity of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic parts divided by the average viscosity, and L is the system size in the cross-stream direction. The lattice Boltzmann method is used to solve the concentration and momentum equations for a two dimensional system of moderate size (L/λ=32) and for a low Reynolds number, and the other parameters are systematically varied to examine the qualitative features of the structure and viscosity evolution in different regimes. At low Schmidt numbers where mass diffusion is faster than momentum diffusion, there is fast local formation of randomly aligned domains with "grain boundaries," which are rotated by the shear flow to align along the extensional axis as time increases. This configuration offers a high resistance to flow, and the layers do not align in the flow direction even after 1000 strain units, resulting in a viscosity higher than that for an aligned lamellar phase. At high Schmidt numbers where momentum diffusion is fast, the shear flow disrupts layers before they are fully formed by diffusion, and alignment takes place by the breakage and reformation of layers by shear, resulting in defects (edge dislocations) embedded in a background of nearly aligned layers

  18. Shear-coupled grain-boundary migration dependence on normal strain/stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combe, N.; Mompiou, F.; Legros, M.

    2017-08-01

    In specific conditions, grain-boundary (GB) migration occurs in polycrystalline materials as an alternative vector of plasticity compared to the usual dislocation activity. The shear-coupled GB migration, the expected most efficient GB based mechanism, couples the GB motion to an applied shear stress. Stresses on GB in polycrystalline materials seldom have, however, a unique pure shear component. This work investigates the influence of a normal strain on the shear coupled migration of a Σ 13 (320 )[001 ] GB in a copper bicrystal using atomistic simulations. We show that the yield shear stress inducing the GB migration strongly depends on the applied normal stress. Beyond, the application of a normal stress on this GB qualitatively modifies the GB migration: while the Σ 13 (320 )[001 ] GB shear couples following the 〈110 〉 migration mode without normal stress, we report the observation of the 〈010 〉 mode under a sufficiently high tensile normal stress. Using the nudge elastic band method, we uncover the atomistic mechanism of this 〈010 〉 migration mode and energetically characterize it.

  19. Influence of enamel conditioning on the shear bond strength of different adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauchli, Lorenz; Muscillo, Teodoro; Steineck, Markus; Wichelhaus, Andrea

    2010-11-01

    Phosphoric acid etching is the gold standard for enamel conditioning. However, it is possible that air abrasion or a combination of air abrasion and etching might result in enhanced adhesion. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different enamel conditioning methods on the bond strength of six adhesives. Three different enamel conditioning procedures (phosphoric acid etching, air abrasion, air abrasion + phosphoric acid etching) were evaluated for their influence on the shear bond strength of six different adhesives (Transbond™ XT, Cool-Bond™, Fuji Ortho LC, Ultra Band-Lok, Tetric(®) Flow, Light-Bond™). Each group consisted of 15 specimens. Shear forces were measured with a universal testing machine. The scores of the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) were also analyzed. There were no significant differences between phosphoric acid etching and air abrasion + phosphoric acid etching. Air abrasion as a single conditioning technique led to significantly lower shear forces. The ARI scores did not correlate with the shear strengths measured. There were greater variations in shear forces for the different adhesives than for the conditioning techniques. The highest shear forces were found for the conventional composites Transbond™ XT and Cool- Bond™ in combination with conventional etching. Air abrasion alone and in combination with phosphoric acid etching showed no advantages compared with phosphoric acid etching alone and, therefore, cannot be recommended.

  20. Predicting Shear Transformation Events in Metallic Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bin; Falk, Michael L.; Li, J. F.; Kong, L. T.

    2018-03-01

    Shear transformation is the elementary process for plastic deformation of metallic glasses, the prediction of the occurrence of the shear transformation events is therefore of vital importance to understand the mechanical behavior of metallic glasses. In this Letter, from the view of the potential energy landscape, we find that the protocol-dependent behavior of shear transformation is governed by the stress gradient along its minimum energy path and we propose a framework as well as an atomistic approach to predict the triggering strains, locations, and structural transformations of the shear transformation events under different shear protocols in metallic glasses. Verification with a model Cu64 Zr36 metallic glass reveals that the prediction agrees well with athermal quasistatic shear simulations. The proposed framework is believed to provide an important tool for developing a quantitative understanding of the deformation processes that control mechanical behavior of metallic glasses.

  1. Shear wall ultimate drift limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffey, T.A.; Goldman, A.; Farrar, C.R.

    1994-04-01

    Drift limits for reinforced-concrete shear walls are investigated by reviewing the open literature for appropriate experimental data. Drift values at ultimate are determined for walls with aspect ratios ranging up to a maximum of 3.53 and undergoing different types of lateral loading (cyclic static, monotonic static, and dynamic). Based on the geometry of actual nuclear power plant structures exclusive of containments and concerns regarding their response during seismic (i.e.,cyclic) loading, data are obtained from pertinent references for which the wall aspect ratio is less than or equal to approximately 1, and for which testing is cyclic in nature (typically displacement controlled). In particular, lateral deflections at ultimate load, and at points in the softening region beyond ultimate for which the load has dropped to 90, 80, 70, 60, and 50 percent of its ultimate value, are obtained and converted to drift information. The statistical nature of the data is also investigated. These data are shown to be lognormally distributed, and an analysis of variance is performed. The use of statistics to estimate Probability of Failure for a shear wall structure is illustrated

  2. MAGNETIC HELICITY FLUX IN THE PRESENCE OF SHEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbard, Alexander; Brandenburg, Axel

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic helicity has risen to be a major player in dynamo theory, with the helicity of the small-scale field being linked to the dynamo saturation process for the large-scale field. It is a nearly conserved quantity, which allows its evolution equation to be written in terms of production and flux terms. The flux term can be decomposed in a variety of fashions. One particular contribution that has been expected to play a significant role in dynamos in the presence of mean shear was isolated by Vishniac and Cho. Magnetic helicity fluxes are explicitly gauge dependent however, and the correlations that have come to be called the Vishniac-Cho flux were determined in the Coulomb gauge, which turns out to be fraught with complications in shearing systems. While the fluxes of small-scale helicity are explicitly gauge dependent, their divergences can be gauge independent. We use this property to investigate magnetic helicity fluxes of the small-scale field through direct numerical simulations in a shearing-box system and find that in a numerically usable gauge the divergence of the small-scale helicity flux vanishes, while the divergence of the Vishniac-Cho flux remains finite. We attribute this seeming contradiction to the existence of horizontal fluxes of small-scale magnetic helicity with finite divergences.

  3. Magnetic Helicity Flux in the Presence of Shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Alexander; Brandenburg, Axel

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic helicity has risen to be a major player in dynamo theory, with the helicity of the small-scale field being linked to the dynamo saturation process for the large-scale field. It is a nearly conserved quantity, which allows its evolution equation to be written in terms of production and flux terms. The flux term can be decomposed in a variety of fashions. One particular contribution that has been expected to play a significant role in dynamos in the presence of mean shear was isolated by Vishniac & Cho. Magnetic helicity fluxes are explicitly gauge dependent however, and the correlations that have come to be called the Vishniac-Cho flux were determined in the Coulomb gauge, which turns out to be fraught with complications in shearing systems. While the fluxes of small-scale helicity are explicitly gauge dependent, their divergences can be gauge independent. We use this property to investigate magnetic helicity fluxes of the small-scale field through direct numerical simulations in a shearing-box system and find that in a numerically usable gauge the divergence of the small-scale helicity flux vanishes, while the divergence of the Vishniac-Cho flux remains finite. We attribute this seeming contradiction to the existence of horizontal fluxes of small-scale magnetic helicity with finite divergences.

  4. Evolution of cementite morphology in pearlitic steel wire during wet wire drawing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiaodan; Godfrey, Andrew; Hansen, Niels; Huang Xiaoxu; Liu Wei; Liu Qing

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of the cementite phase during wet wire drawing of a pearlitic steel wire has been followed as a function of strain. Particular attention has been given to a quantitative characterization of changes in the alignment and in the dimensions of the cementite phase. Scanning electron microscope observations show that cementite plates become increasingly aligned with the wire axis as the drawing strain is increased. Measurements in the transmission electron microscope show that the cementite deforms plastically during wire drawing , with the average thickness of the cementite plates decreasing from 19 nm (ε = 0) to 2 nm (ε = 3.7) in correspondence with the reduction in wire diameter. The deformation of the cementite is strongly related to plastic deformation in the ferrite, with coarse slip steps, shear bands and cracks in the cementite plates/particles observed parallel to either {110} α or {112} α slip plane traces in the ferrite.

  5. Evolution of cementite morphology in pearlitic steel wire during wet wire drawing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xiaodan; Godfrey, Andrew; Hansen, Niels

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of the cementite phase during wet wire drawing of a pearlitic steel wire has been followed as a function of strain. Particular attention has been given to a quantitative characterization of changes in the alignment and in the dimensions of the cementite phase. Scanning electron...... microscope observations show that cementite plates become increasingly aligned with the wire axis as the drawing strain is increased. Measurements in the transmission electron microscope show that the cementite deforms plastically during wire drawing , with the average thickness of the cementite plates...... decreasing from 19 nm (ε = 0) to 2 nm (ε = 3.7) in correspondence with the reduction in wire diameter. The deformation of the cementite is strongly related to plastic deformation in the ferrite, with coarse slip steps, shear bands and cracks in the cementite plates/particles observed parallel to either {110...

  6. Test of Magnetic Rotation near the band head in ^197,198Pb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krücken, R.; Clark, R. M.; Deleplanque, M. A.; Diamond, R. M.; Fallon, P.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Lee, I. Y.; Schmid, G. J.; Stephens, F. S.; Vetter, K.; Dewald, A.; Peusquens, R.; von Brentano, P.; Baldsiefen, G.; Chmel, S.; Hübel, H.; Becker, J. A.; Bernstein, L. A.; Hauschild, K.

    1998-04-01

    The concept of magnetic rotation is tested near the band head of shears-bands in ^197,198Pb by means of a lifetime experiment with the recoil distance method (RDM). The experiment was performed using the Gammasphere array in conjunction with the Cologne Plunger. The B(M1) values extracted from the measured lifetimes can prove the applicability of the concept of magnetic rotation for the states near the band head of these shears bands. The RDM results are compared with tilted axis cranking and shell model calculations. Furthermore the results will be used to test earlier DSAM lifetime measurements for states at higher spins. Preliminary results of this topic will be presented. This work is supported by DOE grant numbers DE-AC03-76SF00098 (LBNL), DE-FG02-91ER40609 (Yale), W-7405-ENG-48 (LLNL) and by the German BMBF for Cologne (No. 06 OK 668) and Bonn.

  7. Band-notched spiral antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jae; Chang, John

    2018-03-13

    A band-notched spiral antenna having one or more spiral arms extending from a radially inner end to a radially outer end for transmitting or receiving electromagnetic radiation over a frequency range, and one or more resonance structures positioned adjacent one or more segments of the spiral arm associated with a notch frequency band or bands of the frequency range so as to resonate and suppress the transmission or reception of electromagnetic radiation over said notch frequency band or bands.

  8. THE EVOLUTION OF THE REST-FRAME V-BAND LUMINOSITY FUNCTION FROM z = 4: A CONSTANT FAINT-END SLOPE OVER THE LAST 12 Gyr OF COSMIC HISTORY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchesini, Danilo; Stefanon, Mauro; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Whitaker, Katherine E.

    2012-01-01

    We present the rest-frame V-band luminosity function (LF) of galaxies at 0.4 ≤ z < 4.0, measured from a near-infrared selected sample constructed from the NMBS, the FIRES, the FIREWORKS, and the ultra-deep NICMOS and WFC3 observations in the HDFN, HUDF, and GOODS-CDFS, all having high-quality optical-to-mid-infrared data. This unique sample combines data from surveys with a large range of depths and areas in a self-consistent way, allowing us to (1) minimize the uncertainties due to cosmic variance; and (2) simultaneously constrain the bright and faint ends with unprecedented accuracy over the targeted redshift range, probing the LF down to 0.1L* at z ∼ 3.9. We find that (1) the faint end is fairly flat and with a constant slope from z = 4, with α = –1.27 ± 0.05; (2) the characteristic magnitude has dimmed by 1.3 mag from z ∼ 3.7 to z = 0.1; (3) the characteristic density has increased by a factor of ∼8 from z ∼ 3.7 to z = 0.1, with 50% of this increase from z ∼ 4 to z ∼ 1.8; and (4) the luminosity density peaks at z ≈ 1-1.5, increasing by a factor of ∼4 from z = 4.0 to z ≈ 1-1.5, and subsequently decreasing by a factor of ∼1.5 by z = 0.1. We find no evidence for a steepening of the faint-end slope with redshift out to z = 4, in contrast with previous observational claims and theoretical predictions. The constant faint-end slope suggests that the efficiency of stellar feedback may evolve with redshift. Alternative interpretations are discussed, such as different masses of the halos hosting faint galaxies at low and high redshifts and/or environmental effects.

  9. Origins of Shear Jamming for Frictional Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Zheng, Hu; Ren, Jie; Dijksman, Joshua; Bares, Jonathan; Behringer, Robert

    2016-11-01

    Granular systems have been shown to be able to behave like solids, under shear, even when their densities are below the critical packing fraction for frictionless isotropic jamming. To understand such a phenomena, called shear jamming, the question we address here is: how does shear bring a system from a unjammed state to a jammed state, where the coordination number, Z, is no less than 3, the isotropic jamming point for frictional grains? Since Z can be used to distinguish jammed states from unjammed ones, it is vital to understand how shear increases Z. We here propose a set of three particles in contact, denoted as a trimer, as the basic unit to characterize the deformation of the system. Trimers, stabilized by inter-grain friction, fail under a certain amount of shear and bend to make extra contacts to regain stability. By defining a projection operator of the opening angle of the trimer to the compression direction in the shear, O, we see a systematically linear decrease of this quantity with respect to shear strain, demonstrating the bending of trimers as expected. In addition, the average change of O from one shear step to the next shows a good collapse when plotted against Z, indicating a universal behavior in the process of shear jamming. We acknowledge support from NSF DMR1206351, NASA NNX15AD38G, the William M. Keck Foundation and a RT-MRSEC Fellowship.

  10. Low-rise shear wall failure modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrar, C.R.; Hashimoto, P.S.; Reed, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    A summary of the data that are available concerning the structural response of low-rise shear walls is presented. This data will be used to address two failure modes associated with the shear wall structures. First, data concerning the seismic capacity of the shear walls with emphasis on excessive deformations that can cause equipment failure are examined. Second, data concerning the dynamic properties of shear walls (stiffness and damping) that are necessary to compute the seismic inputs to attached equipment are summarized. This case addresses the failure of equipment when the structure remains functional. 23 refs

  11. Visco-instability of shear viscoelastic collisional dusty plasma systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi-Gharavi, M.; Hajisharifi, K.; Mehidan, H.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, the stability of Newtonian and non-Newtonian viscoelastic collisional shear-velocity dusty plasmas is studied, using the framework of a generalized hydrodynamic (GH) model. Motivated by Banerjee et al.'s work (Banerjee et al., New J. Phys., vol. 12 (12), 2010, p. 123031), employing linear perturbation theory as well as the local approximation method in the inhomogeneous direction, the dispersion relations of the Fourier modes are obtained for Newtonian and non-Newtonian dusty plasma systems in the presence of a dust-neutral friction term. The analysis of the obtained dispersion relation in the non-Newtonian case shows that the inhomogeneous viscosity force depending on the velocity shear profile can be the genesis of a free energy source which leads the shear system to be unstable. Study of the dust-neutral friction effect on the instability of the considered systems using numerical analysis of the dispersion relation in the Newtonian case demonstrates that the maximum growth rate decreases considerably by increasing the collision frequency in the hydrodynamic regime, while this reduction can be neglected in the kinetic regime. Results show a more significant stabilization role of the dust-neutral friction term in the non-Newtonian cases, through decreasing the maximum growth rate at any fixed wavenumber and construction of the instable wavenumber region. The results of the present investigation will greatly contribute to study of the time evolution of viscoelastic laboratory environments with externally applied shear; where in these experiments the dust-neutral friction process can play a considerable role.

  12. Non-gyrotropic pressure anisotropy induced by velocity shear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenerani, A.; Del Sarto, D.; Pegoraro, F.; Califano, F.

    2015-12-01

    We discuss how, in a collisionless magnetized plasma, a sheared velocity field may lead to the anisotropization of an initial Maxwellian state. By including the full pressure tensor dynamics in a fluid plasma model, we show, analytically and numerically, that a sheared velocity field makes an initial isotropic state anisotropic and non-gyrotropic [1], i.e., makes the plasma pressure tensor anisotropic also in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. The propagation of transverse magneto-elastic waves in the anisotropic plasma affects the process of formation of a non-gyrotropic pressure and can lead to its spatial filamentation. This plasma dynamics implies in particular that isotropic MHD equilibria cease to be equilibria in presence of a stationary sheared flow. Similarly, in the case of turbulence, where small-scale spatial inhomogeneities are naturally developed during the direct cascade, we may expect that isotropic turbulent states are not likely to exist whenever a full pressure tensor evolution is accounted for. These results may be relevant to understanding the agyrotropic pressure configurations which are well documented in solar wind measurements and possibly correlated to plasma flows (see e.g. Refs.[2,3]), and which have also been measured in Vlasov simulations of Alfvenic turbulence [4]. [1] D. Del Sarto, F. Pegoraro, F. Califano, "Pressure anisotropy and small spatial scales induced by a velocity shear", http://arxiv.org/abs/1507.04895 [2] H.F. Astudillo, E. Marsch, S. Livi, H. Rosenbauer, "TAUS measurements of non-gyrotropic distribution functions of solar wind alpha particles", AIP Conf. Proc. 328, 289 (1996). [3] A. Posner, M.W. Liemhon, T.H. Zurbuchen, "Upstream magnetospheric ion flux tube within a magnetic cloud: Wind/STICS", Geophys. Res. Lett. 30, (2003). [4] S. Servidio, F. Valentini, F. Califano, P. Veltri, "Local kinetic effects in Two-Dimensional Plasma Turbulence", Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 045001 (2012).

  13. Rheo-SAXS investigation of shear-thinning behaviour of very anisometric repulsive disc-like clay suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, A M; Baravian, C; Imperor-Clerc, M; De Silva, J; Paineau, E; Bihannic, I; Davidson, P; Meneau, F; Levitz, P; Michot, L J

    2011-05-18

    Aqueous suspensions of swelling clay minerals exhibit a rich and complex rheological behaviour. In particular, these repulsive systems display strong shear-thinning at very low volume fractions in both the isotropic and gel states. In this paper, we investigate the evolution with shear of the orientational distribution of aqueous clay suspensions by synchrotron-based rheo-SAXS experiments using a Couette device. Measurements in radial and tangential configurations were carried out for two swelling clay minerals of similar morphology and size, Wyoming montmorillonite and Idaho beidellite. The shear evolution of the small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) patterns displays significantly different features for these two minerals. The detailed analysis of the angular dependence of the SAXS patterns in both directions provides the average Euler angles of the statistical effective particle in the shear plane. We show that for both samples, the average orientation is fully controlled by the local shear stress around the particle. We then apply an effective approach to take into account multiple hydrodynamic interactions in the system. Using such an approach, it is possible to calculate the evolution of viscosity as a function of shear rate from the knowledge of the average orientation of the particles. The viscosity thus recalculated almost perfectly matches the measured values as long as collective effects are not too important in the system.

  14. Rheo-SAXS investigation of shear-thinning behaviour of very anisometric repulsive disc-like clay suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippe, A M; Baravian, C; Imperor-Clerc, M; De Silva, J; Davidson, P; Paineau, E; Bihannic, I; Michot, L J; Meneau, F; Levitz, P

    2011-01-01

    Aqueous suspensions of swelling clay minerals exhibit a rich and complex rheological behaviour. In particular, these repulsive systems display strong shear-thinning at very low volume fractions in both the isotropic and gel states. In this paper, we investigate the evolution with shear of the orientational distribution of aqueous clay suspensions by synchrotron-based rheo-SAXS experiments using a Couette device. Measurements in radial and tangential configurations were carried out for two swelling clay minerals of similar morphology and size, Wyoming montmorillonite and Idaho beidellite. The shear evolution of the small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) patterns displays significantly different features for these two minerals. The detailed analysis of the angular dependence of the SAXS patterns in both directions provides the average Euler angles of the statistical effective particle in the shear plane. We show that for both samples, the average orientation is fully controlled by the local shear stress around the particle. We then apply an effective approach to take into account multiple hydrodynamic interactions in the system. Using such an approach, it is possible to calculate the evolution of viscosity as a function of shear rate from the knowledge of the average orientation of the particles. The viscosity thus recalculated almost perfectly matches the measured values as long as collective effects are not too important in the system.

  15. Transport in bilayer and trilayer graphene: band gap engineering and band structure tuning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jun

    2014-03-01

    Controlling the stacking order of atomically thin 2D materials offers a powerful tool to control their properties. Linearly dispersed bands become hyperbolic in Bernal (AB) stacked bilayer graphene (BLG). Both Bernal (ABA) and rhombohedral (ABC) stacking occur in trilayer graphene (TLG), producing distinct band structures and electronic properties. A symmetry-breaking electric field perpendicular to the sample plane can further modify the band structures of BLG and TLG. In this talk, I will describe our experimental effort in these directions using dual-gated devices. Using thin HfO2 film deposited by ALD as gate dielectric, we are able to apply large displacement fields D > 6 V/nm and observe the opening and saturation of the field-induced band gap Eg in bilayer and ABC-stacked trilayer graphene, where the conduction in the mid gap changes by more than six decades. Its field and temperature dependence highlights the crucial role played by Coulomb disorder in facilitating hopping conduction and suppressing the effect of Eg in the tens of meV regime. In contrast, mid-gap conduction decreases with increasing D much more rapidly in clean h-BN dual-gated devices. Our studies also show the evolution of the band structure in ABA-stacked TLG, in particular the splitting of the Dirac-like bands in large D field and the signatures of two-band transport at high carrier densities. Comparison to theory reveals the need for more sophisticated treatment of electronic screening beyond self-consistent Hartree calculations to accurately predict the band structures of trilayer graphene and graphenic materials in general.

  16. Multi Resonance Shear Mode Transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-21

    force and effect as if they were given in full text . Upon request the awarding office contact named in block 22 will make their full text available, or...34scissoring" motion. The response is very broad band, but as the impedance and phase curves in Figure 22 illustrate , the effect is largely reactive, and...contact (block 22) will make their full text available. Please direct questions to the contacts @: http: //www.onr .navy .mil / Contracts-Gr ants

  17. Comparison of direct shear and simple shear responses of municipal solid waste in USA

    KAUST Repository

    Fei, Xunchang; Zekkos, Dimitrios

    2017-01-01

    Although large-size simple shear (SS) testing of municipal solid waste (MSW) may arguably provide a more realistic estimate of the shear strength (τ ) of MSW than the most commonly used direct shear (DS) testing, a systematic comparison between

  18. Turbulence suppression by E x B shear in JET optimized shear pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beer, M.A.; Budny, R.V.; Challis, C.D.; Conway, G.

    2000-01-01

    The authors calculate microinstability growth rates in JET optimized shear plasmas with a comprehensive gyrofluid model, including sheared E x B flows, trapped electrons, and all dominant ion species in realistic magnetic geometry. They find good correlation between E x B shear suppression of microinstabilities and both the formation and collapse of the internal transport barrier

  19. Ultrawide low frequency band gap of phononic crystal in nacreous composite material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, J.; Huang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, H.W.; Chen, B.S.

    2014-01-01

    The band structure of a nacreous composite material is studied by two proposed models, where an ultrawide low frequency band gap is observed. The first model (tension-shear chain model) with two phases including brick and mortar is investigated to describe the wave propagation in the nacreous composite material, and the dispersion relation is calculated by transfer matrix method and Bloch theorem. The results show that the frequency ranges of the pass bands are quite narrow, because a special tension-shear chain motion in the nacreous composite material is formed by some very slow modes. Furthermore, the second model (two-dimensional finite element model) is presented to investigate its band gap by a multi-level substructure scheme. Our findings will be of great value to the design and synthesis of vibration isolation materials in a wide and low frequency range. Finally, the transmission characteristics are calculated to verify the results. - Highlights: • A Brick-and-Mortar structure is used to discuss wave propagation through nacreous materials. • A 1D Bloch wave solution of nacreous materials with a tension-shear chain model is obtained. • The band structure and transmission characteristics of nacreous materials with the FE model are examined. • An ultrawide low frequency band gap is found in nacreous materials with both theory and FE model

  20. The hierarchically organized splitting of chromosome bands into sub-bands analyzed by multicolor banding (MCB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrer, H; Weise, A; Michel, S; Starke, H; Mrasek, K; Heller, A; Kuechler, A; Claussen, U; Liehr, T

    2004-01-01

    To clarify the nature of chromosome sub-bands in more detail, the multicolor banding (MCB) probe-set for chromosome 5 was hybridized to normal metaphase spreads of GTG band levels at approximately 850, approximately 550, approximately 400 and approximately 300. It could be observed that as the chromosomes became shorter, more of the initial 39 MCB pseudo-colors disappeared, ending with 18 MCB pseudo-colored bands at the approximately 300-band level. The hierarchically organized splitting of bands into sub-bands was analyzed by comparing the disappearance or appearance of pseudo-color bands of the four different band levels. The regions to split first are telomere-near, centromere-near and in 5q23-->q31, followed by 5p15, 5p14, and all GTG dark bands in 5q apart from 5q12 and 5q32 and finalized by sub-band building in 5p15.2, 5q21.2-->q21.3, 5q23.1 and 5q34. The direction of band splitting towards the centromere or the telomere could be assigned to each band separately. Pseudo-colors assigned to GTG-light bands were resistant to band splitting. These observations are in concordance with the recently proposed concept of chromosome region-specific protein swelling. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  1. Electron band theory 1952-1962

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomer, W.M.

    1980-01-01

    Work undertaken by the Theoretical Physics Division between 1952 and 1965 to obtain an understanding of electrons in metals, with uranium and the actinides and the structurally-important transition metals as the main targets is examined. A main result of that period was a conviction that the majority of the physical properties of all metals, except the 4f rare-earth series and the actinides beyond uranium, were dominated by band effects which could be described well enough for most purposes by simple one-electron calculations with simple self-consistent fields. The period from 1960 on showed increasingly clearly the necessity of incorporating relativistic spin-orbit coupling terms in the heavy metals, and some 'local exchange field' correction to the fields close to nuclei. The problems of the non-local interaction of spins - highly important for alloy theory and for antiferromagnetic instability -required the evolution of computers large enough to produce wave-functions at all wave-vectors for all bands so that the susceptibility at arbitrary wave-vector could be computed. This work has not proved to be very illuminating so far, and much interest again focusses today on heuristic arguments that give qualitative descriptions of band structures, such as canonical d-bands to account for crystal structure. (UK)

  2. Triaxial slide-hold-slide shear experiment of sedimentary rock under drain condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishida, Kiyoshi; Yano, Takao; Elsworth, Derek; Yasuhara, Hideaki; Nakashima, Shinichiro

    2011-01-01

    When discussing the mechanical and hydro-mechanical properties of rock masses under the long-term holding, the variation of rock structure and the change of shear band condition should be discussed in considering the effect of thermal and chemical influences. In this research, the triaxial shear experiment under drain condition was conducted through sedimentary rock, and in the residual stress state, the slide-hold-slide processes were applied to these triaxial experiments. The experiments were carried out in 3 kinds of confining conditions and 2 kinds of thermal conditions. Consequently, the healing phenomena can be observed and the shear strength recovery is also confirmed in process of the holding time. (author)

  3. Tensile and shear strength of adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stibolt, Kenneth A.

    1990-01-01

    This experiment is conducted in a freshman-level course: Introduction to Engineering Materials. There are no prerequisites for the course although students should have some knowledge of basic algebra. The objectives are to tension and shear test adhesives and to determine the tensile and shear properties of adhesives. Details of equipment of procedure are given.

  4. Crosswind Shear Gradient Affect on Wake Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Fred H.; Ahmad, Nashat N.

    2011-01-01

    Parametric simulations with a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model are used to explore the influence of crosswind shear on aircraft wake vortices. Previous studies based on field measurements, laboratory experiments, as well as LES, have shown that the vertical gradient of crosswind shear, i.e. the second vertical derivative of the environmental crosswind, can influence wake vortex transport. The presence of nonlinear vertical shear of the crosswind velocity can reduce the descent rate, causing a wake vortex pair to tilt and change in its lateral separation. The LES parametric studies confirm that the vertical gradient of crosswind shear does influence vortex trajectories. The parametric results also show that vortex decay from the effects of shear are complex since the crosswind shear, along with the vertical gradient of crosswind shear, can affect whether the lateral separation between wake vortices is increased or decreased. If the separation is decreased, the vortex linking time is decreased, and a more rapid decay of wake vortex circulation occurs. If the separation is increased, the time to link is increased, and at least one of the vortices of the vortex pair may have a longer life time than in the case without shear. In some cases, the wake vortices may never link.

  5. Shear stresses around circular cylindrical openings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogenboom, P.C.J.; Van Weelden, C.; Blom, C.M.B.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper stress concentrations are studied around circular cylindrical openings or voids in a linear elastic continuum. The loading is such that a uniform shear stress occurs in the continuum, which is disturbed by the opening. The shear stress is in the direction of the centre axis of the

  6. Simulations of biopolymer networks under shear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, Elisabeth Margaretha

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis we present a new method to simulate realistic three-dimensional networks of biopolymers under shear. These biopolymer networks are important for the structural functions of cells and tissues. We use the method to analyze these networks under shear, and consider the elastic modulus,

  7. Rating precast prestressed concrete bridges for shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Shear capacity of real-world prestressed concrete girders designed in the 1960s and 1970s is a concern because : AASHTO Standard Specifications (AASHTO-STD) employed the quarter-point rule for shear design, which is less : conservative for shea...

  8. Precessing rotating flows with additional shear: stability analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salhi, A; Cambon, C

    2009-03-01

    We consider unbounded precessing rotating flows in which vertical or horizontal shear is induced by the interaction between the solid-body rotation (with angular velocity Omega(0)) and the additional "precessing" Coriolis force (with angular velocity -epsilonOmega(0)), normal to it. A "weak" shear flow, with rate 2epsilon of the same order of the Poincaré "small" ratio epsilon , is needed for balancing the gyroscopic torque, so that the whole flow satisfies Euler's equations in the precessing frame (the so-called admissibility conditions). The base flow case with vertical shear (its cross-gradient direction is aligned with the main angular velocity) corresponds to Mahalov's [Phys. Fluids A 5, 891 (1993)] precessing infinite cylinder base flow (ignoring boundary conditions), while the base flow case with horizontal shear (its cross-gradient direction is normal to both main and precessing angular velocities) corresponds to the unbounded precessing rotating shear flow considered by Kerswell [Geophys. Astrophys. Fluid Dyn. 72, 107 (1993)]. We show that both these base flows satisfy the admissibility conditions and can support disturbances in terms of advected Fourier modes. Because the admissibility conditions cannot select one case with respect to the other, a more physical derivation is sought: Both flows are deduced from Poincaré's [Bull. Astron. 27, 321 (1910)] basic state of a precessing spheroidal container, in the limit of small epsilon . A Rapid distortion theory (RDT) type of stability analysis is then performed for the previously mentioned disturbances, for both base flows. The stability analysis of the Kerswell base flow, using Floquet's theory, is recovered, and its counterpart for the Mahalov base flow is presented. Typical growth rates are found to be the same for both flows at very small epsilon , but significant differences are obtained regarding growth rates and widths of instability bands, if larger epsilon values, up to 0.2, are considered. Finally

  9. Imaging Shear Strength Along Subduction Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bletery, Quentin; Thomas, Amanda M.; Rempel, Alan W.; Hardebeck, Jeanne L.

    2017-11-01

    Subduction faults accumulate stress during long periods of time and release this stress suddenly, during earthquakes, when it reaches a threshold. This threshold, the shear strength, controls the occurrence and magnitude of earthquakes. We consider a 3-D model to derive an analytical expression for how the shear strength depends on the fault geometry, the convergence obliquity, frictional properties, and the stress field orientation. We then use estimates of these different parameters in Japan to infer the distribution of shear strength along a subduction fault. We show that the 2011 Mw9.0 Tohoku earthquake ruptured a fault portion characterized by unusually small variations in static shear strength. This observation is consistent with the hypothesis that large earthquakes preferentially rupture regions with relatively homogeneous shear strength. With increasing constraints on the different parameters at play, our approach could, in the future, help identify favorable locations for large earthquakes.

  10. Thrombus Formation at High Shear Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casa, Lauren D C; Ku, David N

    2017-06-21

    The final common pathway in myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke is occlusion of blood flow from a thrombus forming under high shear rates in arteries. A high-shear thrombus forms rapidly and is distinct from the slow formation of coagulation that occurs in stagnant blood. Thrombosis at high shear rates depends primarily on the long protein von Willebrand factor (vWF) and platelets, with hemodynamics playing an important role in each stage of thrombus formation, including vWF binding, platelet adhesion, platelet activation, and rapid thrombus growth. The prediction of high-shear thrombosis is a major area of biofluid mechanics in which point-of-care testing and computational modeling are promising future directions for clinically relevant research. Further research in this area will enable identification of patients at high risk for arterial thrombosis, improve prevention and treatment based on shear-dependent biological mechanisms, and improve blood-contacting device design to reduce thrombosis risk.

  11. Imaging shear strength along subduction faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bletery, Quentin; Thomas, Amanda M.; Rempel, Alan W.; Hardebeck, Jeanne L.

    2017-01-01

    Subduction faults accumulate stress during long periods of time and release this stress suddenly, during earthquakes, when it reaches a threshold. This threshold, the shear strength, controls the occurrence and magnitude of earthquakes. We consider a 3-D model to derive an analytical expression for how the shear strength depends on the fault geometry, the convergence obliquity, frictional properties, and the stress field orientation. We then use estimates of these different parameters in Japan to infer the distribution of shear strength along a subduction fault. We show that the 2011 Mw9.0 Tohoku earthquake ruptured a fault portion characterized by unusually small variations in static shear strength. This observation is consistent with the hypothesis that large earthquakes preferentially rupture regions with relatively homogeneous shear strength. With increasing constraints on the different parameters at play, our approach could, in the future, help identify favorable locations for large earthquakes.

  12. Effect of stress-state and spacing on voids in a shear-field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2012-01-01

    in the overall average stress state can be prescribed. This also allows for studies of the effect of different initial void spacing in the two in-plane coordinate directions. The stress states considered are essentially simple shear, with various levels of tensile stresses or compressive stresses superposed, i.......e. low positive stress triaxiality or even negative stress triaxiality. For high aspect ratio unit cells a clear localization band is found inside the cell, which actually represents several parallel bands, due to periodicity. In the materials represented by a low aspect ratio unit cell localization...

  13. Viscosity evolution of anaerobic granular sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pevere, A.; Guibaud, G.; Hullebusch, van E.D.; Lens, P.N.L.; Baudu, M.

    2006-01-01

    The evolution of the apparent viscosity at steady shear rate of sieved anaerobic granular sludge (20¿315 ¿m diameter) sampled from different full-scale anaerobic reactors was recorded using rotation tests. The ¿limit viscosity¿ of sieved anaerobic granular sludge was determined from the apparent

  14. Noise exposure in marching bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Joseph

    2005-09-01

    Previous studies involving orchestras have shown that music ensembles can produce hazardous noise levels. There are no similar data for marching bands and pep bands. In order to evaluate the noise levels produced by marching and pep bands, 1/3-octave-band sound-pressure levels were measured while these groups rehearsed and performed. Data were collected while marching with the bands to ensure a realistic environment. Comparing these data to OSHA and NIOSH criteria, marching and pep band exposures often exceed safe values. For typical exposures, OSHA doses range from 11% to 295%, while NIOSH doses range from 35% to 3055%. Exposures that would be considered hazardous in the workplace are common in marching and pep bands; students and band directors should take steps to recognize the risk posed by various instruments and various locations, and should implement hearing conservation efforts.

  15. Semiconductors bonds and bands

    CERN Document Server

    Ferry, David K

    2013-01-01

    As we settle into this second decade of the twenty-first century, it is evident that the advances in micro-electronics have truly revolutionized our day-to-day lifestyle. The technology is built upon semiconductors, materials in which the band gap has been engineered for special values suitable to the particular application. This book, written specifically for a one semester course for graduate students, provides a thorough understanding of the key solid state physics of semiconductors. It describes how quantum mechanics gives semiconductors unique properties that enabled the micro-electronics revolution, and sustain the ever-growing importance of this revolution.

  16. Simulation study of the high intensity S-Band photoinjector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiongwei; Nakajima, Kazuhisa [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-10-01

    In this paper, we report the results of simulation study of the high intensity S-Band photoinjector. The aim of the simulation study is to transport high bunch charge with low emittance evolution. The simulation result shows that 7nC bunch with rms emittance 22.3 {pi} mm mrad can be outputted at the exit of photoinjector. (author)

  17. Simulation study of the high intensity S-Band photoinjector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Xiongwei; Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we report the results of simulation study of the high intensity S-Band photoinjector. The aim of the simulation study is to transport high bunch charge with low emittance evolution. The simulation result shows that 7nC bunch with rms emittance 22.3 π mm mrad can be outputted at the exit of photoinjector. (author)

  18. IMAGE ANALYSIS FOR MODELLING SHEAR BEHAVIOUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Lopez

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Through laboratory research performed over the past ten years, many of the critical links between fracture characteristics and hydromechanical and mechanical behaviour have been made for individual fractures. One of the remaining challenges at the laboratory scale is to directly link fracture morphology of shear behaviour with changes in stress and shear direction. A series of laboratory experiments were performed on cement mortar replicas of a granite sample with a natural fracture perpendicular to the axis of the core. Results show that there is a strong relationship between the fracture's geometry and its mechanical behaviour under shear stress and the resulting damage. Image analysis, geostatistical, stereological and directional data techniques are applied in combination to experimental data. The results highlight the role of geometric characteristics of the fracture surfaces (surface roughness, size, shape, locations and orientations of asperities to be damaged in shear behaviour. A notable improvement in shear understanding is that shear behaviour is controlled by the apparent dip in the shear direction of elementary facets forming the fracture.

  19. Experimental Constraints of the Exotic Shearing of Space-Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, Jonathan William [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-08-01

    The Holometer program is a search for rst experimental evidence that space-time has quantum structure. The detector consists of a pair of co-located 40-m power-recycled interferometers whose outputs are read out synchronously at 50 MHz, achieving sensitivity to spatiallycorrelated uctuations in dierential position on time scales shorter than the light-crossing time of the instruments. Unlike gravitational wave interferometers, which time-resolve transient geometrical disturbances in the spatial background, the Holometer is searching for a universal, stationary quantization noise of the background itself. This dissertation presents the nal results of the Holometer Phase I search, an experiment congured for sensitivity to exotic coherent shearing uctuations of space-time. Measurements of high-frequency cross-spectra of the interferometer signals obtain sensitivity to spatially-correlated eects far exceeding any previous measurement, in a broad frequency band extending to 7.6 MHz, twice the inverse light-crossing time of the apparatus. This measurement is the statistical aggregation of 2.1 petabytes of 2-byte dierential position measurements obtained over a month-long exposure time. At 3 signicance, it places an upper limit on the coherence scale of spatial shear two orders of magnitude below the Planck length. The result demonstrates the viability of this novel spatially-correlated interferometric detection technique to reach unprecedented sensitivity to coherent deviations of space-time from classicality, opening the door for direct experimental tests of theories of relational quantum gravity.

  20. Interferometric constraints on quantum geometrical shear noise correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Aaron; Glass, Henry; Richard Gustafson, H.; Hogan, Craig J.; Kamai, Brittany L.; Kwon, Ohkyung; Lanza, Robert; McCuller, Lee; Meyer, Stephan S.; Richardson, Jonathan W.; Stoughton, Chris; Tomlin, Ray; Weiss, Rainer

    2017-07-20

    Final measurements and analysis are reported from the first-generation Holometer, the first instrument capable of measuring correlated variations in space-time position at strain noise power spectral densities smaller than a Planck time. The apparatus consists of two co-located, but independent and isolated, 40 m power-recycled Michelson interferometers, whose outputs are cross-correlated to 25 MHz. The data are sensitive to correlations of differential position across the apparatus over a broad band of frequencies up to and exceeding the inverse light crossing time, 7.6 MHz. By measuring with Planck precision the correlation of position variations at spacelike separations, the Holometer searches for faint, irreducible correlated position noise backgrounds predicted by some models of quantum space-time geometry. The first-generation optical layout is sensitive to quantum geometrical noise correlations with shear symmetry---those that can be interpreted as a fundamental noncommutativity of space-time position in orthogonal directions. General experimental constraints are placed on parameters of a set of models of spatial shear noise correlations, with a sensitivity that exceeds the Planck-scale holographic information bound on position states by a large factor. This result significantly extends the upper limits placed on models of directional noncommutativity by currently operating gravitational wave observatories.

  1. Degenerate band edge laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veysi, Mehdi; Othman, Mohamed A. K.; Figotin, Alexander; Capolino, Filippo

    2018-05-01

    We propose a class of lasers based on a fourth-order exceptional point of degeneracy (EPD) referred to as the degenerate band edge (DBE). EPDs have been found in parity-time-symmetric photonic structures that require loss and/or gain; here we show that the DBE is a different kind of EPD since it occurs in periodic structures that are lossless and gainless. Because of this property, a small level of gain is sufficient to induce single-frequency lasing based on a synchronous operation of four degenerate Floquet-Bloch eigenwaves. This lasing scheme constitutes a light-matter interaction mechanism that leads also to a unique scaling law of the laser threshold with the inverse of the fifth power of the laser-cavity length. The DBE laser has the lowest lasing threshold in comparison to a regular band edge laser and to a conventional laser in cavities with the same loaded quality (Q ) factor and length. In particular, even without mirror reflectors the DBE laser exhibits a lasing threshold which is an order of magnitude lower than that of a uniform cavity laser of the same length and with very high mirror reflectivity. Importantly, this novel DBE lasing regime enforces mode selectivity and coherent single-frequency operation even for pumping rates well beyond the lasing threshold, in contrast to the multifrequency nature of conventional uniform cavity lasers.

  2. Problems pilots face involving wind shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvin, W. W.

    1977-01-01

    Educating pilots and the aviation industry about wind shears presents a major problem associated with this meteorological phenomenon. The pilot's second most pressing problem is the need for a language to discuss wind shear encounters with other pilots so that the reaction of the aircraft to the wind shear encounter can be accurately described. Another problem is the flight director which gives a centered pitch command for a given angular displacement from the glide slope. It was suggested that they should instead be called flight path command and should not center unless the aircraft is actually correcting to the flight path.

  3. Shear viscosity of liquid mixtures: Mass dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushal, Rohan; Tankeshwar, K.

    2002-06-01

    Expressions for zeroth, second, and fourth sum rules of transverse stress autocorrelation function of two component fluid have been derived. These sum rules and Mori's memory function formalism have been used to study shear viscosity of Ar-Kr and isotopic mixtures. It has been found that theoretical result is in good agreement with the computer simulation result for the Ar-Kr mixture. The mass dependence of shear viscosity for different mole fraction shows that deviation from ideal linear model comes even from mass difference in two species of fluid mixture. At higher mass ratio shear viscosity of mixture is not explained by any of the emperical model. (author)

  4. Shear Melting of a Colloidal Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenmann, Christoph; Kim, Chanjoong; Mattsson, Johan; Weitz, David A.

    2010-01-01

    We use confocal microscopy to explore shear melting of colloidal glasses, which occurs at strains of ˜0.08, coinciding with a strongly non-Gaussian step size distribution. For larger strains, the particle mean square displacement increases linearly with strain and the step size distribution becomes Gaussian. The effective diffusion coefficient varies approximately linearly with shear rate, consistent with a modified Stokes-Einstein relationship in which thermal energy is replaced by shear energy and the length scale is set by the size of cooperatively moving regions consisting of ˜3 particles.

  5. Shear viscosity of liquid mixtures Mass dependence

    CERN Document Server

    Kaushal, R

    2002-01-01

    Expressions for zeroth, second, and fourth sum rules of transverse stress autocorrelation function of two component fluid have been derived. These sum rules and Mori's memory function formalism have been used to study shear viscosity of Ar-Kr and isotopic mixtures. It has been found that theoretical result is in good agreement with the computer simulation result for the Ar-Kr mixture. The mass dependence of shear viscosity for different mole fraction shows that deviation from ideal linear model comes even from mass difference in two species of fluid mixture. At higher mass ratio shear viscosity of mixture is not explained by any of the emperical model.

  6. Collapse and coalescence of spherical voids subject to intense shearing: studied in full 3D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim Lau; Dahl, Jonas; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2012-01-01

    the numerical analysis, which is also reflected in published literature. Rather than moving towards very low triaxiality shearing, work has focused on extracting wide-ranging results for moderate stress triaxiality (T ~ 1), in order to achieve sufficient understanding of the influence of initial porosity, void...... significant straining of the matrix material located on the axis of rotation. In particular, the void surface material is severely deformed during shearing and void surface contact is established early in the deformation process. This 3D effect intensifies with decreasing stress triaxiality and complicates...... shape, void orientation etc. The objective of this work is to expand the range of stress triaxiality usually faced in 3D cell model studies, such that intense shearing is covered, and to bring forward details on the porosity and void shape evolution. The overall material response is presented...

  7. Dynamic mortar finite element method for modeling of shear rupture on frictional rough surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal, Yuval; Hager, Bradford H.

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents a mortar-based finite element formulation for modeling the dynamics of shear rupture on rough interfaces governed by slip-weakening and rate and state (RS) friction laws, focusing on the dynamics of earthquakes. The method utilizes the dual Lagrange multipliers and the primal-dual active set strategy concepts, together with a consistent discretization and linearization of the contact forces and constraints, and the friction laws to obtain a semi-smooth Newton method. The discretization of the RS friction law involves a procedure to condense out the state variables, thus eliminating the addition of another set of unknowns into the system. Several numerical examples of shear rupture on frictional rough interfaces demonstrate the efficiency of the method and examine the effects of the different time discretization schemes on the convergence, energy conservation, and the time evolution of shear traction and slip rate.

  8. Shear-induced breaking of cages in colloidal glasses: Scattering experiments and mode coupling theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amann, Christian P., E-mail: Christian.2.Amann@uni-konstanz.de; Fuchs, Matthias, E-mail: Matthias.Fuchs@uni-konstanz.de [Fachbereich Physik, Universität Konstanz, 78457 Konstanz (Germany); Denisov, Dmitry; Dang, Minh Triet; Schall, Peter [Van der Waals-Zeeman Institute, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Struth, Bernd [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-07-21

    We employ x-ray scattering on sheared colloidal suspensions and mode coupling theory to study structure factor distortions of glass-forming systems under shear. We find a transition from quadrupolar elastic distortion at small strains to quadrupolar and hexadecupolar modes in the stationary state. The latter are interpreted as signatures of plastic rearrangements in homogeneous, thermalized systems. From their transient evolution with strain, we identify characteristic strain and length-scale values where these plastic rearrangements dominate. This characteristic strain coincides with the maximum of the shear stress versus strain curve, indicating the proliferation of plastic flow. The hexadecupolar modes dominate at the wavevector of the principal peak of the equilibrium structure factor that is related to the cage-effect in mode coupling theory. We hence identify the structural signature of plastic flow of glasses.

  9. Shear-induced breaking of cages in colloidal glasses: Scattering experiments and mode coupling theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amann, Christian P.; Fuchs, Matthias; Denisov, Dmitry; Dang, Minh Triet; Schall, Peter; Struth, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    We employ x-ray scattering on sheared colloidal suspensions and mode coupling theory to study structure factor distortions of glass-forming systems under shear. We find a transition from quadrupolar elastic distortion at small strains to quadrupolar and hexadecupolar modes in the stationary state. The latter are interpreted as signatures of plastic rearrangements in homogeneous, thermalized systems. From their transient evolution with strain, we identify characteristic strain and length-scale values where these plastic rearrangements dominate. This characteristic strain coincides with the maximum of the shear stress versus strain curve, indicating the proliferation of plastic flow. The hexadecupolar modes dominate at the wavevector of the principal peak of the equilibrium structure factor that is related to the cage-effect in mode coupling theory. We hence identify the structural signature of plastic flow of glasses

  10. A Shear Strain Route Dependency of Martensite Formation in 316L Stainless Steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Suk Hoon; Kim, Tae Kyu; Jang, Jinsung; Oh, Kyu Hwan

    2015-06-01

    In this study, the effect of simple shearing on microstructure evolution and mechanical properties of 316L austenitic stainless steel were investigated. Two different shear strain routes were obtained by twisting cylindrical specimens in the forward and backward directions. The strain-induced martensite phase was effectively obtained by alteration of the routes. Formation of the martensite phase clearly resulted in significant hardening of the steel. Grain-size reduction and strain-induced martensitic transformation within the deformed structures of the strained specimens were characterized by scanning electron microscopy - electron back-scattered diffraction, X-ray diffraction, and the TEM-ASTAR (transmission electron microscopy - analytical scanning transmission atomic resolution, automatic crystal orientation/phase mapping for TEM) system. Significant numbers of twin networks were formed by alteration of the shear strain routes, and the martensite phases were nucleated at the twin interfaces.

  11. Shear-induced breaking of cages in colloidal glasses: Scattering experiments and mode coupling theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, Christian P; Denisov, Dmitry; Dang, Minh Triet; Struth, Bernd; Schall, Peter; Fuchs, Matthias

    2015-07-21

    We employ x-ray scattering on sheared colloidal suspensions and mode coupling theory to study structure factor distortions of glass-forming systems under shear. We find a transition from quadrupolar elastic distortion at small strains to quadrupolar and hexadecupolar modes in the stationary state. The latter are interpreted as signatures of plastic rearrangements in homogeneous, thermalized systems. From their transient evolution with strain, we identify characteristic strain and length-scale values where these plastic rearrangements dominate. This characteristic strain coincides with the maximum of the shear stress versus strain curve, indicating the proliferation of plastic flow. The hexadecupolar modes dominate at the wavevector of the principal peak of the equilibrium structure factor that is related to the cage-effect in mode coupling theory. We hence identify the structural signature of plastic flow of glasses.

  12. Healing of shear strength and its time dependency in a single rock fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, Yuta; Nakashima, Shinichiro; Yasuhara, Hideaki; Kishida, Kiyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Evolution of the long-term mechanical, hydraulic, and transport characteristics of rock fractures should be, in advance, predicted in considering an issue on entombment of energy byproducts of high level radioactive wastes. Under stressed and temperature conditions, those behaviors of the rock fractures of interest may be evolved in time and space likely due to the change in topographical aperture distributions. This irreversible process may be induced by pure mechanical and/or chemo-mechanical creeps such as water-rock reactions like stress corrosion and pressure solution, and chemical effects including mineral dissolution and reprecipitation in the free-walls of fractures. Specifically, the chemo-mechanical processes active at the contacting asperities within rock fractures may exert a significant influence on the mechanical, hydraulic, and transport behaviors throughout a long period, and thus, should be vigorously examined theoretically and experimentally. This paper presents the slide-hold-slide shear test results for fully saturated, single-jointed mortar specimens so as to investigate the effects of load holding on mechanical properties of rock joints. From the test results, it was confirmed that shear strength increased for mortar specimens in both short and long time holding cases. However, the evolution of shear strength recovery in two cases is different. This is because a dominant factor of shear strength recovery during the short time holding may be attributed to a pure mechanical process like creep deformation at contacting asperities, while the one during long time holding is affected by both mechanical and chemical processes like pressure solution. Moreover, to reproduce the shear strength recovery during short time holding we develop a direct shear model by including temporal variation of dilation during holding. The model predictions are in relatively good agreement with the test measurements. (author)

  13. Wide band ENDOR spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendonca Filho, C.

    1973-01-01

    The construction of an ENDOR spectrometer operating from 0,5 to 75 MHz within a single band, with ore Klystron and homodine detection, and no fundamental changes on the electron spin resonance spectrometer was described. The ENDOR signal can be detected both by amplitude modulation of the frequency field, or direct detection of the ESR output, which is taken to a signal analyser. The signal-to-noise ratio is raised by averaging rather than filtering avoiding the use of long time constants, providing natural line widths. The experimental apparatus and the spectra obtained are described. A discussion, relating the ENDOR line amplitudes with the experimental conditions is done and ENDOR mechanism, in which there is a relevant presence of cross relaxation is proposed

  14. Electronic band structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosso, G.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is to present, in detail, some theoretical methods used to calculate electronic band structures in crystals. The basic strategies employed to attack the problem of electronic-structure calculations are presented. Successive sections present the basic formulations of the tight-binding, orthogonalized-plane-wave, Green'sfunction, and pseudopotential methods with a discussion of their application to perfect solids. Exemplifications in the case of a few selected problems provide further insight by the author into the physical aspects of the different methods and are a guide to the use of their mathematical techniques. A discussion is offered of completely a priori Hartree-Fock calculations and attempts to extend them. Special aspects of the different methods are also discussed in light of recently published related work

  15. Shear strength of clay and silt embankments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    Highway embankment is one of the most common large-scale geotechnical facilities constructed in Ohio. In the past, the design of these embankments was largely based on soil shear strength properties that had been estimated from previously published e...

  16. Recent progress in shear punch testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, M.L.; Toloczko, M.B.; Lucas, G.E.

    1994-09-01

    The shear punch test was developed in response to the needs of the materials development community for small-scale mechanical properties tests. Such tests will be of great importance when a fusion neutron simulation device is built, since such a device is expected to have a limited irradiation volume. The shear punch test blanks a circular disk from a fixed sheet metal specimen, specifically a TEM disk. Load-displacement data generated during the test can be related to uniaxial tensile properties such as yield and ultimate strength. Shear punch and tensile tests were performed at room temperature on a number of unirradiated aluminum, copper, vanadium, and stainless steel alloys and on several irradiated aluminum alloys. Recent results discussed here suggest that the relationship between shear punch strength and tensile strength varies with alloy class, although the relationship determined for the unirradiated condition remains valid for the irradiated aluminum alloys

  17. Enhancing Rotational Diffusion Using Oscillatory Shear

    KAUST Repository

    Leahy, Brian D.; Cheng, Xiang; Ong, Desmond C.; Liddell-Watson, Chekesha; Cohen, Itai

    2013-01-01

    Taylor dispersion - shear-induced enhancement of translational diffusion - is an important phenomenon with applications ranging from pharmacology to geology. Through experiments and simulations, we show that rotational diffusion is also enhanced

  18. Remote Sensing Wind and Wind Shear System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contents: Remote sensing of wind shear and the theory and development of acoustic doppler; Wind studies; A comparison of methods for the remote detection of winds in the airport environment; Acoustic doppler system development; System calibration; Airport operational tests.

  19. Shear-induced phase changes in mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romig, K.D.; Hanley, H.J.M.

    1986-01-01

    A thermodynamic theory to account for the behavior of liquid mixtures exposed to a shear is developed. One consequence of the theory is that shear-induced phase changes are predicted. The theory is based on a thermodynamics that includes specifically the shear rate in the formalism and is applied to mixtures by a straightforward modification of the corresponding states, conformalsolution approach. The approach is general but is used here for a mixture of Lennard-Jones particles with a Lennard-Jones equation of state as a reference fluid. The results are discussed in the context of the Scott and Van Konynenberg phase classification. It is shown that the influence of a shear does affect substantially the type of the phase behavior. Results from the model mixture are equated loosely with those from real polymeric liquids

  20. Evaluating interfacial shear stresses in composite hollo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiham Adawi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Analytical evaluation of the interfacial shear stresses for composite hollowcore slabs with concrete topping is rare in the literature. Adawi et al. (2014 estimated the interfacial shear stiffness coefficient (ks that governs the behavior of the interface between hollowcore slabs and the concrete topping using push-off tests. This parameter is utilized in this paper to provide closed form solutions for the differential equations governing the behavior of simply supported composite hollowcore slabs. An analytical solution based on the deformation compatibility of the composite section and elastic beam theory, is developed to evaluate the shear stresses along the interface. Linear finite element modeling of the full-scale tests presented in Adawi et al. (2015 is also conducted to validate the developed analytical solution. The proposed analytical solution was found to be adequate in estimating the magnitude of horizontal shear stress in the studied composite hollowcore slabs.

  1. Stress analysis of shear/compression test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishijima, S.; Okada, T.; Ueno, S.

    1997-01-01

    Stress analysis has been made on the glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) subjected to the combined shear and compression stresses by means of finite element method. The two types of experimental set up were analyzed, that is parallel and series method where the specimen were compressed by tilted jigs which enable to apply the combined stresses, to the specimen. Modified Tsai-Hill criterion was employed to judge the failure under the combined stresses that is the shear strength under the compressive stress. The different failure envelopes were obtained between the two set ups. In the parallel system the shear strength once increased with compressive stress then decreased. On the contrary in the series system the shear strength decreased monotonicly with compressive stress. The difference is caused by the different stress distribution due to the different constraint conditions. The basic parameters which control the failure under the combined stresses will be discussed

  2. Modeling and implementation of wind shear data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Walter

    1987-01-01

    The problems of implementing the JAWS wind shear data are discussed. The data sets are described from the view of utilizing them in an aircraft performance computer program. Then, some of the problems of nonstandard procedures are described in terms of programming the equations of aircraft motion when the effects of temporal and spatially variable winds are included. Finally, some of the computed effects of the various wind shear terms are shown.

  3. Hydrodynamical fluctuations in smooth shear flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chagelishvili, G.D.; Khujadze, G.R.; Lominadze, J.G.

    1999-11-01

    Background of hydrodynamical fluctuations in a intrinsically/stochastically forced, laminar, uniform shear flow is studied. The employment of so-called nonmodal mathematical analysis makes it possible to represent the background of fluctuations in a new light and to get more insight into the physics of its formation. The basic physical processes responsible for the formation of vortex and acoustic wave fluctuation backgrounds are analyzed. Interplay of the processes at low and moderate shear rates is described. Three-dimensional vortex fluctuations around a given macroscopic state are numerically calculated. The correlation functions of the fluctuations of physical quantities are analyzed. It is shown that there exists subspace D k in the wave-number space (k-space) that is limited externally by spherical surface with radius k ν ≡ A/ν (where A is the velocity shear parameter, ν - the kinematic viscosity) in the nonequilibrium open system under study. The spatial Fourier harmonics of vortex as well as acoustic wave fluctuations are strongly subjected by flow shear (by the open character of the system) at wave-numbers satisfying the condition k ν . Specifically it is shown that in D k : The fluctuations are non-Markovian; the spatial spectral density of energy of the vortex fluctuations by far exceeds the white-noise; the term of a new type associated to the hydrodynamical fluctuation of velocity appears in the correlation function of pressure; the fluctuation background of the acoustic waves is completely different at low and moderate shear rates (at low shear rates it is reduced in D k in comparison to the uniform (non-shear) flow; at moderate shear rates it it comparable to the background of the vortex fluctuations). The fluctuation background of both the vortex and the acoustic wave modes is anisotropic. The possible significance of the fluctuation background of vortices for the subcritical transition to turbulence and Brownian motion of small macroscopic

  4. Line Crack Subject to Antiplane Shear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-07-01

    shear is obtained for the initiation of fracture. If the concept of the surface tension is usedone is able to calculate the cohesive stress for brittle ...Expression of the Griffith -racture criterion for brittle fracture. We have arrived at this result via the maximum shear-stress hypothesis, rather than...Crescent Beach Road, Glen Cove Prof. G.S. Heller Long Island, New York 11542 Division of Engineering Brown University Prof. Daniel

  5. Shear flow effect on ion temperature gradient vortices in plasmas with sheared magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakrabarti, N.; Juul Rasmussen, J.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of velocity shear on ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven vortices in a nonuniform plasma in a curved, sheared magnetic field is investigated. In absence of parallel ion dynamics, vortex solutions for the ITG mode are studied analytically. It is shown that under certain conditions...... and ultimately lead to a dominating monopolar form. The effects of magnetic shear indicate it may destroy these structures. (C) 1999 American Institute of Physics....

  6. 2017 GTO Project review Laboratory Evaluation of EGS Shear Stimulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Stephen J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-10-01

    The objectives and purpose of this research has been to produce laboratory-based experimental and numerical analyses to provide a physics-based understanding of shear stimulation phenomena (hydroshearing) and its evolution during stimulation. Water was flowed along fractures in hot and stressed fractured rock, to promote slip. The controlled laboratory experiments provide a high resolution/high quality data resource for evaluation of analysis methods developed by DOE to assess EGS “behavior” during this stimulation process. Segments of the experimental program will provide data sets for model input parameters, i.e., material properties, and other segments of the experimental program will represent small scale physical models of an EGS system, which may be modeled. The coupled lab/analysis project has been a study of the response of a fracture in hot, water-saturated fractured rock to shear stress experiencing fluid flow. Under this condition, the fracture experiences a combination of potential pore pressure changes and fracture surface cooling, resulting in slip along the fracture. The laboratory work provides a means to assess the role of “hydroshearing” on permeability enhancement in reservoir stimulation. Using the laboratory experiments and results to define boundary and input/output conditions of pore pressure, thermal stress, fracture shear deformation and fluid flow, and models were developed and simulations completed by the University of Oklahoma team. The analysis methods are ones used on field scale problems. The sophisticated numerical models developed contain parameters present in the field. The analysis results provide insight into the role of fracture slip on permeability enhancement-“hydroshear” is to be obtained. The work will provide valuable input data to evaluate stimulation models, thus helping design effective EGS.

  7. Resolution of axial shear strain elastography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thitaikumar, Arun; Righetti, Raffaella; Krouskop, Thomas A; Ophir, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    The technique of mapping the local axial component of the shear strain due to quasi-static axial compression is defined as axial shear strain elastography. In this paper, the spatial resolution of axial shear strain elastography is investigated through simulations, using an elastically stiff cylindrical lesion embedded in a homogeneously softer background. Resolution was defined as the smallest size of the inclusion for which the strain value at the inclusion/background interface was greater than the average of the axial shear strain values at the interface and inside the inclusion. The resolution was measured from the axial shear strain profile oriented at 45 0 to the axis of beam propagation, due to the absence of axial shear strain along the normal directions. The effects of the ultrasound system parameters such as bandwidth, beamwidth and transducer element pitch along with signal processing parameters such as correlation window length (W) and axial shift (ΔW) on the estimated resolution were investigated. The results show that the resolution (at 45 0 orientation) is determined by the bandwidth and the beamwidth. However, the upper bound on the resolution is limited by the larger of the beamwidth and the window length, which is scaled inversely to the bandwidth. The results also show that the resolution is proportional to the pitch and not significantly affected by the axial window shift

  8. Accurate shear measurement with faint sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jun; Foucaud, Sebastien; Luo, Wentao

    2015-01-01

    For cosmic shear to become an accurate cosmological probe, systematic errors in the shear measurement method must be unambiguously identified and corrected for. Previous work of this series has demonstrated that cosmic shears can be measured accurately in Fourier space in the presence of background noise and finite pixel size, without assumptions on the morphologies of galaxy and PSF. The remaining major source of error is source Poisson noise, due to the finiteness of source photon number. This problem is particularly important for faint galaxies in space-based weak lensing measurements, and for ground-based images of short exposure times. In this work, we propose a simple and rigorous way of removing the shear bias from the source Poisson noise. Our noise treatment can be generalized for images made of multiple exposures through MultiDrizzle. This is demonstrated with the SDSS and COSMOS/ACS data. With a large ensemble of mock galaxy images of unrestricted morphologies, we show that our shear measurement method can achieve sub-percent level accuracy even for images of signal-to-noise ratio less than 5 in general, making it the most promising technique for cosmic shear measurement in the ongoing and upcoming large scale galaxy surveys

  9. Behavior of Tilted Angle Shear Connectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorramian, Koosha; Maleki, Shervin; Shariati, Mahdi; Ramli Sulong, N. H.

    2015-01-01

    According to recent researches, angle shear connectors are appropriate to transfer longitudinal shear forces across the steel-concrete interface. Angle steel profile has been used in different positions as L-shaped or C-shaped shear connectors. The application of angle shear connectors in tilted positions is of interest in this study. This study investigates the behaviour of tilted-shaped angle shear connectors under monotonic loading using experimental push out tests. Eight push-out specimens are tested to investigate the effects of different angle parameters on the ultimate load capacity of connectors. Two different tilted angles of 112.5 and 135 degrees between the angle leg and steel beam are considered. In addition, angle sizes and lengths are varied. Two different failure modes were observed consisting of concrete crushing-splitting and connector fracture. By increasing the size of connector, the maximum load increased for most cases. In general, the 135 degrees tilted angle shear connectors have a higher strength and stiffness than the 112.5 degrees type. PMID:26642193

  10. Behavior of Tilted Angle Shear Connectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koosha Khorramian

    Full Text Available According to recent researches, angle shear connectors are appropriate to transfer longitudinal shear forces across the steel-concrete interface. Angle steel profile has been used in different positions as L-shaped or C-shaped shear connectors. The application of angle shear connectors in tilted positions is of interest in this study. This study investigates the behaviour of tilted-shaped angle shear connectors under monotonic loading using experimental push out tests. Eight push-out specimens are tested to investigate the effects of different angle parameters on the ultimate load capacity of connectors. Two different tilted angles of 112.5 and 135 degrees between the angle leg and steel beam are considered. In addition, angle sizes and lengths are varied. Two different failure modes were observed consisting of concrete crushing-splitting and connector fracture. By increasing the size of connector, the maximum load increased for most cases. In general, the 135 degrees tilted angle shear connectors have a higher strength and stiffness than the 112.5 degrees type.

  11. Edge Sheared Flows and Blob Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myra, J.; D' Ippolito, D.; Russell, D., E-mail: jrmyra@lodestar.com [Lodestar Research Corporation, Boulder (United States); Davis, W. M.; Zweben, S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton (United States); Terry, J.; LaBombard, B. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Full text: A study of sheared flows in the edge and scrape-off layer (SOL) and their interaction with blob-filaments is presented. Edge sheared flows are believed to be important for the L-H, and H-L transitions. Blob generation and dynamics impacts both the (near-separatrix) scrape-off-layer (SOL) width critical for power handling in the divertor, and the interaction of plasma in the far SOL with plasma-facing components. These topics are critical for ITER and future devices. A fluid-based 2D curvature-interchange model embedded in the SOLT code is employed to study these issues. Sheared binormal flows both regulate the power flux crossing the separatrix and control the character of emitted turbulence structures such as blob-filaments. At a critical power level (depending on parameters) the laminar flows containing intermittent, but bound, structures give way to full-blown blob emissions signifying a transition from quasi-diffusive to convective transport. In order to diagnose sheared flows in experiments and assess their interaction with blobs, a blob-tracking algorithm has been developed and applied to both NSTX and Alcator C-Mod data. Blob motion and ellipticity can be affected by sheared flows, and are diagnosed and compared with seeded blob simulations. A picture of the interaction of blobs and sheared flows is emerging from advances in the theory and simulation of edge turbulence, combined with ever-improving capabilities for edge diagnostics and their analysis. (author)

  12. Vesicle dynamics in shear and capillary flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi; Gompper, Gerhard

    2005-01-01

    The deformation of vesicles in flow is studied by a mesoscopic simulation technique, which combines multi-particle collision dynamics for the solvent with a dynamically triangulated surface model for the membrane. Shape transitions are investigated both in simple shear flows and in cylindrical capillary flows. We focus on reduced volumes, where the discocyte shape of fluid vesicles is stable, and the prolate shape is metastable. In simple shear flow at low membrane viscosity, the shear induces a transformation from discocyte to prolate with increasing shear rate, while at high membrane viscosity, the shear induces a transformation from prolate to discocyte, or tumbling motion accompanied by oscillations between these two morphologies. In capillary flow, at small flow velocities the symmetry axis of the discocyte is found not to be oriented perpendicular to the cylinder axis. With increasing flow velocity, a transition to a prolate shape occurs for fluid vesicles, while vesicles with shear-elastic membranes (like red blood cells) transform into a coaxial parachute-like shape

  13. Shear induced structures in crystallizing cocoa butter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzanti, Gianfranco; Guthrie, Sarah E.; Sirota, Eric B.; Marangoni, Alejandro G.; Idziak, Stefan H. J.

    2004-03-01

    Cocoa butter is the main structural component of chocolate and many cosmetics. It crystallizes in several polymorphs, called phases I to VI. We used Synchrotron X-ray diffraction to study the effect of shear on its crystallization. A previously unreported phase (phase X) was found and a crystallization path through phase IV under shear was observed. Samples were crystallized under shear from the melt in temperature controlled Couette cells, at final crystallization temperatures of 17.5^oC, 20^oC and 22.5^oC in Beamline X10A of NSLS. The formation of phase X was observed at low shear rates (90 s-1) and low crystallization temperature (17.5^oC), but was absent at high shear (720 s-1) and high temperature (20^oC). The d-spacing and melting point suggest that this new phase is a mixture rich on two of the three major components of cocoa butter. We also found that, contrary to previous reports, the transition from phase II to phase V can happen through the intermediate phase IV, at high shear rates and temperature.

  14. Scratch test induced shear banding in high power laser remelted metallic glass layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matthews, D. T. A.; Ocelik, V.; de Hosson, J. Th. M.

    Laser remelted surface layers of a Cu-based metallic glass forming alloy have been produced with fully amorphous depths up to 350 mu m for single track widths of around 1.3 mm and have been checked by transmission of synchrotron radiation. They have been subjected to indentation hardness and scratch

  15. From Particles in Steady State Shear Bands via Micro-Macro to Macroscopic Rheology Laws

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luding, S.; Singh, A.; Roy, S.; Vescovi, D.; Weinhart, T.; Magnanimo, V.; Li, Xikui; Feng, Yuntian; Mustoe, Graham

    2017-01-01

    Particulate systems and granular matter are discrete systems made of many particles; they display interesting dynamic or static, fluid- or solid-like states, respectively, or both together. The challenge of bridging the gap between the particulate, microscopic picture towards their continuum

  16. Long-term Evolution of the Aerosol Debris Cloud Produced by the 2009 Impact of an Object with Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Lavega, Agustin; Orton, G. S.; Hueso, R.; Pérez-Hoyos, S.; Fletcher, L. N.; Garcia-Melendo, E.; Gomez, J. M.; de Pater, I.; Wong, M.; Hammel, H. B.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P.; Simon-Miller, M.; Barrado-Izagirre, N.; Marchis, F.; Mousis, O.; Ortiz, J. L.; Garcia, J.; Cecconi, M.; Clarke, J. T.; Noll, K.; Pedraz, S.; Wesley, A.; McConnel, N.; Kalas, P.; Graham, J.; McKenzie, L.; Reddy, V.; Golisch, W.; Griep, D.; Sears, P.; International Outer PLanet Watch (IOPW)

    2010-10-01

    We report the evolution of the cloud of aerosols produced in the atmosphere of Jupiter by the impact of an object in 19 July 2009 (Sánchez-Lavega et al., Astrophys. J. Lett, Vol. 715, L155. 2010). This study is based on images obtained with a battery of ground-based telescopes and the Hubble Space Telescope in the visible and in the deep near infrared absorption bands at 2.1-2.3 microns from the impact date to 31 December 2009. The impact cloud expanded zonally from 5000 km (July 19) to 225,000 km (about 180 deg in longitude by 29 October) and it was meridionally localized within a latitude band from -53.5 deg to -61.5 deg. During the first two months it showed a heterogeneous structure with embedded spots of a size of 500 - 1000 km. The cloud was mainly dispersed in longitude by the dominant zonal winds and their meridional shear and, during the initial stages, by the action of local motions perhaps originated by the thermal perturbation produced at the impact site. The tracking of individual spots within the impact cloud showed that the winds increase their eastward velocity with altitude above the tropopause by 5-10 m/s. We found evidence of discrete localized meridional motions in the equatorward direction with speeds of 1 - 2 m/s. Measurements of the cloud reflectivity evolution during the whole period showed that it followed an exponential decrease with a characteristic time of 15 days, shorter than the 45 - 200 days sedimentation time for the small aerosol particles in the stratosphere. A radiative transfer model of the cloud optical depth coupled to an advection model of the cloud dispersion by the wind shears, reproduces this behavior. Acknowledgements: ASL, RH, SPH, NBI are supported by the Spanish MICIIN AYA2009-10701 with FEDER and Grupos Gobierno Vasco IT-464-07.

  17. "Virtual shear box" experiments of stress and slip cycling within a subduction interface mélange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Sam; Ellis, Susan; Fagereng, Åke

    2018-04-01

    What role does the progressive geometric evolution of subduction-related mélange shear zones play in the development of strain transients? We use a "virtual shear box" experiment, based on outcrop-scale observations from an ancient exhumed subduction interface - the Chrystalls Beach Complex (CBC), New Zealand - to constrain numerical models of slip processes within a meters-thick shear zone. The CBC is dominated by large, competent clasts surrounded by interconnected weak matrix. Under constant slip velocity boundary conditions, models of the CBC produce stress cycling behavior, accompanied by mixed brittle-viscous deformation. This occurs as a consequence of the reorganization of competent clasts, and the progressive development and breakdown of stress bridges as clasts mutually obstruct one another. Under constant shear stress boundary conditions, the models show periods of relative inactivity punctuated by aseismic episodic slip at rapid rates (meters per year). Such a process may contribute to the development of strain transients such as slow slip.

  18. Experimental study of ΔI=1 bands in 111In

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, P.; Pradhan, M. K.; Ganguly, S.; Sharma, H. P.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R. P.; Bhowmik, R. K.

    2011-01-01

    The two ΔI=1 bands in 111 In, built upon the 3461.0 and 4931.8 keV states, have been studied. The bands were populated in the reaction 100 Mo( 19 F, α4nγ) at a beam energy of 105 MeV. Mean lifetimes of nine states, four in the first and five in the second band, have been determined for the first time from Doppler shift attenuation data. The deduced B(M1) rates and their behavior as a function of level spin support the interpretation of these bands within the framework of the shears mechanism. The geometrical model of Machiavelli et al. has been used to derive the effective gyromagnetic ratios for the two bands.

  19. Experimental study of ΔI=1 bands in In111

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, P.; Ganguly, S.; Pradhan, M. K.; Sharma, H. P.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R. P.; Bhowmik, R. K.

    2011-02-01

    The two ΔI=1 bands in In111, built upon the 3461.0 and 4931.8 keV states, have been studied. The bands were populated in the reaction Mo100(F19,α4nγ) at a beam energy of 105 MeV. Mean lifetimes of nine states, four in the first and five in the second band, have been determined for the first time from Doppler shift attenuation data. The deduced B(M1) rates and their behavior as a function of level spin support the interpretation of these bands within the framework of the shears mechanism. The geometrical model of Machiavelli has been used to derive the effective gyromagnetic ratios for the two bands.

  20. Correlation between vortices and wall shear stress in a curved artery model under pulsatile flow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Christopher; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2017-11-01

    One of the most physiologically relevant factors within the cardiovascular system is the wall shear stress. The wall shear stress affects endothelial cells via mechanotransduction and atherosclerotic regions are strongly correlated with curvature and branching in the human vasculature, where the shear stress is both oscillatory and multidirectional. Also, the combined effect of curvature and pulsatility in cardiovascular flows produces unsteady vortices. In this work, our goal is to assess the correlation between multiple vortex pairs and wall shear stress. To accomplish this, we use an in-house high-order flux reconstruction Navier-Stokes solver to simulate pulsatile flow of a Newtonian blood-analog fluid through a rigid 180° curved artery model. We use a physiologically relevant flow rate and generate results using both fully developed and uniform entrance conditions, the latter motivated by the fact that flow upstream to a curved artery may not be fully developed. Under these two inflow conditions, we characterize the evolution of various vortex pairs and their subsequent effect on several wall shear stress metrics. Supported by GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering.

  1. a Predictive Model of Permeability for Fractal-Based Rough Rock Fractures during Shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Na; Jiang, Yujing; Liu, Richeng; Li, Bo; Zhang, Zhenyu

    This study investigates the roles of fracture roughness, normal stress and shear displacement on the fluid flow characteristics through three-dimensional (3D) self-affine fractal rock fractures, whose surfaces are generated using the modified successive random additions (SRA) algorithm. A series of numerical shear-flow tests under different normal stresses were conducted on rough rock fractures to calculate the evolutions of fracture aperture and permeability. The results show that the rough surfaces of fractal-based fractures can be described using the scaling parameter Hurst exponent (H), in which H = 3 - Df, where Df is the fractal dimension of 3D single fractures. The joint roughness coefficient (JRC) distribution of fracture profiles follows a Gauss function with a negative linear relationship between H and average JRC. The frequency curves of aperture distributions change from sharp to flat with increasing shear displacement, indicating a more anisotropic and heterogeneous flow pattern. Both the mean aperture and permeability of fracture increase with the increment of surface roughness and decrement of normal stress. At the beginning of shear, the permeability increases remarkably and then gradually becomes steady. A predictive model of permeability using the mean mechanical aperture is proposed and the validity is verified by comparisons with the experimental results reported in literature. The proposed model provides a simple method to approximate permeability of fractal-based rough rock fractures during shear using fracture aperture distribution that can be easily obtained from digitized fracture surface information.

  2. Local transport barrier formation and relaxation in reverse-shear plasmas on the TFTR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synakowski, E.J.; Beer, M.A.

    1997-02-01

    The roles of turbulence stabilization by sheared E x B flow and Shafranov-shift gradients are examined for TFTR. Enhanced Reverse-Shear plasmas. Both effects in combination provide the basis of a positive-feedback model that predicts reinforced turbulence suppression with increasing pressure gradient. Local fluctuation behavior at the onset of ERS confinement is consistent with this framework. The power required for transitions into the ERS regime are lower when high power neutral beams are applied earlier in the current profile evolution, consistent with the suggestion that both effects play a role. Separation of the roles of E x B and Shafranov shift effects was performed by varying the E x B shear through changes in the toroidal velocity with nearly-steady-state pressure profiles. Transport and fluctuation levels increase only when E x B shearing rates are driven below a critical value that is comparable to the fastest linear growth rates of the dominant instabilities. While a turbulence suppression criterion that involves the ratio of shearing to linear growth rates is in accord with many of these results, the existence of hidden dependencies of the criterion is suggested in experiments where the toroidal field was varied. The forward transition into the ERS regime has also been examined in strongly rotating plasmas. The power threshold is higher with unidirectional injection than with balanced injection

  3. Application of MMC model on simulation of shearing process of thick hot-rolled high strength steel plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Liang; Li, Shuhui [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacture for Thin-walled Structures, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Yang, Bing; Gao, Yongsheng [Automotive Steel Research Institute, R and D Center, BaoShan Iron and Steel Co.,Ltd, Shanghai 201900 (China)

    2013-12-16

    Shear operation is widely used as the first step in sheet metal forming to cut the sheet or plate into the required size. The shear of thick hot-rolled High Strength Steel (HSS) requires large shearing force and the sheared edge quality is relatively poor because of the large thickness and high strength compared with the traditional low carbon steel. Bad sheared edge quality will easily lead to edge cracking during the post-forming process. This study investigates the shearing process of thick hot-rolled HSS plate metal, which is generally exploited as the beam of heavy trucks. The Modified Mohr-Coulomb fracture criterion (MMC) is employed in numerical simulation to calculate the initiation and propagation of cracks during the process evolution. Tensile specimens are designed to obtain various stress states in tension. Equivalent fracture strains are measured with Digital Image Correlation (DIC) equipment to constitute the fracture locus. Simulation of the tension test is carried out to check the fracture model. Then the MMC model is applied to the simulation of the shearing process, and the simulation results show that the MMC model predicts the ductile fracture successfully.

  4. Application of MMC model on simulation of shearing process of thick hot-rolled high strength steel plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Liang; Li, Shuhui; Yang, Bing; Gao, Yongsheng

    2013-01-01

    Shear operation is widely used as the first step in sheet metal forming to cut the sheet or plate into the required size. The shear of thick hot-rolled High Strength Steel (HSS) requires large shearing force and the sheared edge quality is relatively poor because of the large thickness and high strength compared with the traditional low carbon steel. Bad sheared edge quality will easily lead to edge cracking during the post-forming process. This study investigates the shearing process of thick hot-rolled HSS plate metal, which is generally exploited as the beam of heavy trucks. The Modified Mohr-Coulomb fracture criterion (MMC) is employed in numerical simulation to calculate the initiation and propagation of cracks during the process evolution. Tensile specimens are designed to obtain various stress states in tension. Equivalent fracture strains are measured with Digital Image Correlation (DIC) equipment to constitute the fracture locus. Simulation of the tension test is carried out to check the fracture model. Then the MMC model is applied to the simulation of the shearing process, and the simulation results show that the MMC model predicts the ductile fracture successfully

  5. Halo shapes, initial shear field, and cosmic web

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, G

    2014-01-01

    The ellipsoidal collapse model, combined with the excursion set theory, allows one to estimate the shapes of dark matter halos as seen in high-resolution numerical simulations. The same theoretical framework predicts a quasi-universal behaviour for the conditional axis ratio distributions at later times, set by initial conditions and unaltered by non-linear evolution. The formalism for halo shapes is also useful in making the connection with the initial shear field of the cosmic web, which plays a crucial role in the formation of large-scale structures. The author has briefly discussed the basic aspects of the modelling, as well as the implications of a new formula for the constrained eigenvalues of the initial shear field, given the fact that positions are peaks or dips in the corresponding density field – and not random locations. This formula leads to a new generalized excursion set algorithm for peaks in Gaussian random fields. The results highlighted, here, are relevant for a number of applications, especially for weak lensing studies and for devising algorithms to find and classify structures in the cosmic web

  6. Shear test on viscoelastic granular material using Contact Dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quezada, Juan Carlos; Sagnol, Loba; Chazallon, Cyrille

    2017-06-01

    By means of 3D contact dynamic simulations, the behavior of a viscoelastic granular material under shear loading is investigated. A viscoelastic fluid phase surrounding the solid particles is simulated by a contact model acting between them. This contact law was implemented in the LMGC90 software, based on the Burgers model. This model is able to simulate also the effect of creep relaxation. To validate the proposed contact model, several direct shear tests were performed, experimentally and numerically using the Leutner device. The numerical samples were created using spheres with two particle size distribution, each one identified for two layers from a road structure. Our results show a reasonable agreement between experimental and numerical data regarding the strain-stress evolution curves and the stress levels measured at failure. The proposed model can be used to simulate the mechanical behavior of multi-layer road structure and to study the influence of traffic on road deformation, cracking and particles pull-out induced by traffic loading.

  7. Study of cement pastes rheological behavior using dynamic shear rheometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. S. L. Teixeira

    Full Text Available Concrete, in its fresh state, has flow characteristics that are crucial to its proper launch and densification. These characteristics are usually measured through empirical testing as the slump test, but this test does not quantify completely the material behavior. Since this material is characterized as a Bingham fluid, it is essential the study of its rheological behavior to verify its properties even in fresh state. The use of classical rheology has been employed by the scientific community to obtain rheological parameters determinants to characterize this material, such as yield stress, plastic viscosity and evolution of shear stress to shear rate. Thus, this present study aims to determine the rheological behavior of different cement pastes produced with cement CP III 40 RS, varying between them the hydration periods (20 and 60 min, the water-cement ratio (0.40, 0.45 and 0.50 and the use or not of additive. Samples were assayed by flow test to determine the rheological parameters showing the effect of the variables mentioned above in these parameters.

  8. Optimal energy growth in a stably stratified shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Sharath; Roy, Anubhab; Bale, Rahul; Iyer, Krithika; Govindarajan, Rama

    2018-02-01

    Transient growth of perturbations by a linear non-modal evolution is studied here in a stably stratified bounded Couette flow. The density stratification is linear. Classical inviscid stability theory states that a parallel shear flow is stable to exponentially growing disturbances if the Richardson number (Ri) is greater than 1/4 everywhere in the flow. Experiments and numerical simulations at higher Ri show however that algebraically growing disturbances can lead to transient amplification. The complexity of a stably stratified shear flow stems from its ability to combine this transient amplification with propagating internal gravity waves (IGWs). The optimal perturbations associated with maximum energy amplification are numerically obtained at intermediate Reynolds numbers. It is shown that in this wall-bounded flow, the three-dimensional optimal perturbations are oblique, unlike in unstratified flow. A partitioning of energy into kinetic and potential helps in understanding the exchange of energies and how it modifies the transient growth. We show that the apportionment between potential and kinetic energy depends, in an interesting manner, on the Richardson number, and on time, as the transient growth proceeds from an optimal perturbation. The oft-quoted stabilizing role of stratification is also probed in the non-diffusive limit in the context of disturbance energy amplification.

  9. Microstructure evolution and deformation mechanism change in 0.98C-8.3Mn-0.04N steel during compressive deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, T.S.; Hou, R.J.; Lv, B.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, F.C.

    2007-01-01

    The microstructure evolution and the deformation mechanism change in 0.98C-8.3Mn-0.04N steel during compressive deformation at room temperature have been studied as a function of the reduction in the range of 20-60%. Experimental results show that with the reduction increasing the microstructure of the deformed sample changes from dislocation substructures into the dominant twins plus dislocations. This suggests that the plastic deformation mechanism changes from the dislocation slip to the dominant deformation twinning. The minimum reduction for deformation twins starting is estimated to be at between 30 and 40%. With the reduction further increases to more than 40%, the deformation twinning is operative and the thickness of deformation twins gradually decreases to nanoscale and shear bands occur. These high-density twins can be curved by the formation of shear bands. In addition, both transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction examinations confirm the inexistence of deformation-induced martensites in these deformed samples

  10. Permeability and 3-D melt geometry in shear-induced high melt fraction conduits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W.; Cordonnier, B.; Qi, C.; Kohlstedt, D. L.

    2017-12-01

    Observations of dunite channels in ophiolites and uranium-series disequilibria in mid-ocean ridge basalt suggest that melt transport in the upper mantle beneath mid-ocean ridges is strongly channelized. Formation of high melt fraction conduits could result from mechanical shear, pyroxene dissolution, and lithological partitioning. Deformation experiments (e.g. Holtzman et al., 2003) demonstrate that shear stress causes initially homogeneously distributed melt to segregate into an array of melt-rich bands, flanked by melt-depleted regions. At the same average melt fraction, the permeability of high melt fraction conduits could be orders of magnitude higher than that of their homogenous counterparts. However, it is difficult to determine the permeability of melt-rich bands. Using X-ray synchrotron microtomography, we obtained high-resolution images of 3-dimensional (3-D) melt distribution in a partially molten rock containing shear-induced high melt fraction conduits. Sample CQ0705, an olivine-alkali basalt aggregate with a nominal melt fraction of 4%, was deformed in torsion at a temperature of 1473 K and a confining pressure of 300 MPa to a shear strain of 13.3. A sub-volume of CQ0705 encompassing 3-4 melt-rich bands was imaged. Microtomography data were reduced to binary form so that solid olivine is distinguishable from basalt glass. At a spatial resolution of 160 nm, the 3-D images reveal the shape and connectedness of melt pockets in the melt-rich bands. Thin melt channels formed at grain edges are connected at large melt nodes at grain corners. Initial data analysis shows a clear preferred orientation of melt pockets alignment subparallel to the melt-rich band. We use the experimentally determined geometrical parameters of melt topology to create a digital rock with identical 3-D microstructures. Stokes flow simulations are conducted on the digital rock to obtain the permeability tensor. Using this digital rock physics approach, we determine how deformation

  11. Engineering the hypersonic phononic band gap of hybrid Bragg stacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Dirk; Liaqat, Faroha; El Boudouti, El Houssaine; El Hassouani, Youssef; Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram; Tremel, Wolfgang; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Fytas, George

    2012-06-13

    We report on the full control of phononic band diagrams for periodic stacks of alternating layers of poly(methyl methacrylate) and porous silica combining Brillouin light scattering spectroscopy and theoretical calculations. These structures exhibit large and robust on-axis band gaps determined by the longitudinal sound velocities, densities, and spacing ratio. A facile tuning of the gap width is realized at oblique incidence utilizing the vector nature of the elastic wave propagation. Off-axis propagation involves sagittal waves in the individual layers, allowing access to shear moduli at nanoscale. The full theoretical description discerns the most important features of the hypersonic one-dimensional crystals forward to a detailed understanding, a precondition to engineer dispersion relations in such structures.

  12. Effect of shear rate on aggregate size and structure in the process of aggregation and at steady state

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubáková, Petra; Pivokonský, Martin; Filip, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 235, February (2013), s. 540-549 ISSN 0032-5910 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP105/11/0247 Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : aggregation * aggregate size * fractal dimension * shear rate * steady state * time evolution Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 2.269, year: 2013

  13. Dynamics of zonal shear collapse with hydrodynamic electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajjar, R. J.; Diamond, P. H.; Malkov, M. A.

    2018-06-01

    This paper presents a theory for the collapse of the edge zonal shear layer, as observed at the density limit at low β. This paper investigates the scaling of the transport and mean profiles with the adiabaticity parameter α, with special emphasizes on fluxes relevant to zonal flow (ZF) generation. We show that the adiabaticity parameter characterizes the strength of production of zonal flows and so determines the state of turbulence. A 1D reduced model that self-consistently describes the spatiotemporal evolution of the mean density n ¯ , the azimuthal flow v¯ y , and the turbulent potential enstrophy ɛ=⟨(n˜ -∇2ϕ˜ ) 2/2 ⟩ —related to fluctuation intensity—is presented. Quasi-linear analysis determines how the particle flux Γn and vorticity flux Π=-χy∇2vy+Πre s scale with α, in both hydrodynamic and adiabatic regimes. As the plasma response passes from adiabatic (α > 1) to hydrodynamic (α y=Πre s/χy —representative of the strength of the shear—also drops. The shear layer then collapses and turbulence is enhanced. The collapse is due to a decrease in ZF production, not an increase in damping. A physical picture for the onset of collapse is presented. The findings of this paper are used to motivate an explanation of the phenomenology of low β density limit evolution. A change from adiabatic ( α=kz2vth 2/(|ω|νei)>1 ) to hydrodynamic (α < 1) electron dynamics is associated with the density limit.

  14. Exponential Shear Flow of Linear, Entangled Polymeric Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Jesper; Park, Kyungho; Venerus, David C.

    2000-01-01

    A previously proposed reptation model is used to interpret exponential shear flow data taken on an entangled polystyrenesolution. Both shear and normal stress measurements are made during exponential shear using mechanical means. The model iscapable of explaining all trends seen in the data......, and suggests a novel analysis of the data. This analysis demonstrates thatexponential shearing flow is no more capable of stretching polymer chains than is inception of steady shear at comparableinstantaneous shear rates. In fact, all exponential shear flow stresses measured are bounded quantitatively...

  15. Measuring Local Strain Rates In Ductile Shear Zones: A New Approach From Deformed Syntectonic Dykes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassier, C.; Leloup, P.; Rubatto, D.; Galland, O.; Yue, Y.; Ding, L.

    2006-12-01

    previous methods. From the less to the most deformed dykes, minimum γ values vary between 0.2 to ~10, respectively. Second, we determined the ages of emplacement of each dyke by ion microprobe U-Pb dating of monazites. We obtained three groups of ages at 22Ma, 24-26Ma and 30Ma. Our geochronological data are in good agreement with our structural data, the most deformed dykes being the oldest. The strain rates deduced from these measurements are on the order of 10^{-14}s-1, that is slower than values previously deduced from indirect methods. However, this value only corresponds to a minimum local strain rate. That new method developed to estimate local minimum strain rates in a major ductile shear zone seems to be reliable and could be applied to other shear zones. Such an approach applied at several locations along a single shear zone could also provide new opportunities to understand the evolution of a whole shear system.

  16. Study of shear thickening behavior in colloidal suspensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Maleki Jirsaraee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the shear thickening behavior of the nano silica suspension (silica nanoparticles 12 nm in size suspended in ethylene glycol under steady shear. The critical shear rate for transition into shear thickening phase was determined at different concentrations and temperatures. The effect of temperature and concentration was studied on the shear thickening behavior. In silica suspension, it was observed that all the samples had a transition into shear thickening phase and also by increasing the temperature, critical shear rate increased and viscosity decreased. Our observations showed that movement in silica suspension was Brownian and temperature could cause a delay in transition into shear thickening phase. Yet, we observed that increasing the concentration would decrease critical shear rate and increase viscosity. Increasing temperature increased Brownian forces and increasing concentration increased hydrodynamic forces, confirming the contrast between these two forces for transition into shear thickening phase for the suspensions containing nano particles

  17. Evolution of collectivity in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muralithar, S.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear structure studies provide opportunity to understand various modes of excitations and shapes of nucleus as a function of angular momentum, excitation energy and iso-spin. Single particle and collective excitations keep competing and give rise to interesting structures. Phenomena namely back bending, band termination, shape co-existence, rotational bands with different configurations and octupole correlation were reported using gamma ray spectroscopy method. Above nuclear phenomena were studied using Gamma detector array (GDA), Plunger, Heavy Ion Recoil Analyser GDA, Indian National Gamma Array - HlRA at IUAC by various users. Some examples of evolution of collectivity in nuclear structure studies carried out will be presented. (author)

  18. Comparison of direct shear and simple shear responses of municipal solid waste in USA

    KAUST Repository

    Fei, Xunchang

    2017-10-25

    Although large-size simple shear (SS) testing of municipal solid waste (MSW) may arguably provide a more realistic estimate of the shear strength (τ ) of MSW than the most commonly used direct shear (DS) testing, a systematic comparison between the shear responses of MSW obtained from the two testing methods is lacking. In this study, a large-size shear device was used to test identical MSW specimens sampled in USA in DS and SS. Eight DS tests and 11 SS tests were conducted at vertical effective stresses of 50–500 kPa. The stress–displacement response of MSW in SS testing was hyperbolic and a maximum shear stress was reached, whereas a maximum shear stress was not reached in most DS tests. The τ, effective friction angle (ϕ ′) and cohesion (c ′) of MSW were obtained from DS and SS tests by using a displacement failure criterion of 40 mm. τ in SS testing was found to be equal to or lower than τ in DS testing with ratios of τ between 73 and 101%. SS testing resulted in higher ϕ ′ but lower c ′ than DS testing. The shear strength parameters were lower than those obtained in previous studies from DS tests at 55 mm displacement.

  19. Effect of Different Loading Conditions on the Nucleation and Development of Shear Zones Around Material Heterogeneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybacki, E.; Nardini, L.; Morales, L. F.; Dresen, G.

    2017-12-01

    Rock deformation at depths in the Earth's crust is often localized in high temperature shear zones, which occur in the field at different scales and in a variety of lithologies. The presence of material heterogeneities has long been recognized to be an important cause for shear zones evolution, but the mechanisms controlling initiation and development of localization are not fully understood, and the question of which loading conditions (constant stress or constant deformation rate) are most favourable is still open. To better understand the effect of boundary conditions on shear zone nucleation around heterogeneities, we performed a series of torsion experiments under constant twist rate (CTR) and constant torque (CT) conditions in a Paterson-type deformation apparatus. The sample assemblage consisted of copper-jacketed Carrara marble hollow cylinders with one weak inclusion of Solnhofen limestone. The CTR experiments were performed at maximum bulk strain rates of 1.8-1.9*10-4 s-1, yielding shear stresses of 19-20 MPa. CT tests were conducted at shear stresses between 18.4 and 19.8 MPa resulting in shear strain rates of 1-2*10-4 s-1. All experiments were run at 900 °C temperature and 400 MPa confining pressure. Maximum bulk shear strains (γ) were ca. 0.3 and 1. Strain localized within the host marble in front of the inclusion in an area termed process zone. Here grain size reduction is intense and local shear strain (estimated from markers on the jackets) is up to 8 times higher than the applied bulk strain, rapidly dropping to 2 times higher at larger distance from the inclusion. The evolution of key microstructural parameters such as average grain size and average grain orientation spread (GOS, a measure of lattice distortion) within the process zone, determined by electron backscatter diffraction analysis, differs significantly as a function of loading conditions. Both parameters indicate that, independent of bulk strain and distance from the inclusion, the

  20. Microstructure and texture evolution of ultra-thin grain-oriented silicon steel sheet fabricated using strip casting and three-stage cold rolling method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hong-Yu; Liu, Hai-Tao, E-mail: liuht@ral.neu.edu.cn; Wang, Yin-Ping; Wang, Guo-Dong

    2017-03-15

    A 0.1 mm-thick grain-oriented silicon steel sheet was successfully produced using strip casting and three-stage cold rolling method. The microstructure, texture and inhibitor evolution during the processing was briefly analyzed. It was found that Goss texture was absent in the hot rolled sheet because of the lack of shear deformation. After normalizing, a large number of dispersed MnS precipitates with the size range of 15–90 nm were produced. During first cold rolling, dense shear bands were generated in the deformed ferrite grains, resulting in the intense Goss texture after first intermediate annealing. The microstructure was further refined and homogenized during the subsequent cold rolling and annealing processes. After primary recrystallization annealing, a homogeneous microstructure consisting of fine and equiaxed grains was produced while the associated texture was characterized by a strong γ-fiber texture. Finally, a complete secondary recrystallization microstructure consisting of entirely large Goss grains was produced. The magnetic induction B{sub 8} and iron loss P{sub 10/400} was 1.79 T and 6.9 W/kg, respectively. - Highlights: • Ultra-thin grain-oriented silicon steel was produced by strip casting process. • Microstructure, texture and inhibitor evolution was briefly investigated. • Goss texture was absent in primary recrystallization annealed sheet. • MnS precipitates with a size range of 15–90 nm formed after normalizing. • A complete secondary recrystallization microstructure was produced.

  1. Piezoelectric energy harvesting through shear mode operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malakooti, Mohammad H; Sodano, Henry A

    2015-01-01

    Piezoelectric materials are excellent candidates for use in energy harvesting applications due to their high electromechanical coupling properties that enable them to convert input mechanical energy into useful electric power. The electromechanical coupling coefficient of the piezoelectric material is one of the most significant parameters affecting energy conversion and is dependent on the piezoelectric mode of operation. In most piezoceramics, the d 15 piezoelectric shear coefficient is the highest coefficient compared to the commonly used axial and transverse modes that utilize the d 33 and the d 31 piezoelectric strain coefficients. However, complicated electroding methods and challenges in evaluating the performance of energy harvesting devices operating in the shear mode have slowed research in this area. The shear deformation of a piezoelectric layer can be induced in a vibrating sandwich beam with a piezoelectric core. Here, a model based on Timoshenko beam theory is developed to predict the electric power output from a cantilever piezoelectric sandwich beam under base excitations. It is shown that the energy harvester operating in the shear mode is able to generate ∼50% more power compared to the transverse mode for a numerical case study. Reduced models of both shear and transverse energy harvesters are obtained to determine the optimal load resistance in the system and perform an efficiency comparison between two models with fixed and adaptive resistances. (paper)

  2. Evaluation of shear mounted elastomeric damper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, E.; Walton, J.

    1982-01-01

    Viton-70 elastomeric shear mounted damper was built and tested on a T-55 power turbine spool in the rotor's high speed balancing rig. This application of a shear mounted elastomeric damper demonstrated for the first time, the feasibility of using elastomers as the primary rotor damping source in production turbine engine hardware. The shear damper design was selected because it was compatible with actual gas turbine engine radial space constraints, could accommodate both the radial and axial thrust loads present in gas turbine engines, and was capable of controlled axial preload. The shear damper was interchangeable with the production T-55 power turbine roller bearing support so that a direct comparison between the shear damper and the production support structure could be made. Test results show that the Viton-70 elastomer damper operated successfully and provided excellent control of both synchronous and nonsynchronous vibrations through all phases of testing up to the maximum rotor speed of 16,000 rpm. Excellent correlation between the predicted and experienced critical speeds, mode shapes and log decrements for the power turbine rotor and elastomer damper assembly was also achieved.

  3. Ballooning mode stabilization by moderate sheared rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hameiri, E.

    1996-01-01

    Sheared toroidal plasma rotation has been known for some time to have a stabilizing effect on the ballooning modes. A recent calculation showed that a large flow shear, with dΩ/dq of the order of the Alfven toroidal frequency, can stabilize the ballooning modes. This latest result is, in fact, not so optimistic. For observed flows with Mach number of order unity one gets dΩ/dq smaller by a factor O(√β) from the required level (if the flow shear length is of the same order as the magnetic shear length). Moreover, the calculation does not take into account a possibly large transient growth of the mode amplitude due to its Floquet structures We show here that, in fact, there is a general tendency of the ballooning mode to stabilize as soon as the flow shear dΩ/dq exceeds the (O√β smaller) open-quotes slowclose quotes magnetosonic wave frequency. Our analysis is perturbative, where the small parameter is related to the small coupling between the slow and Alfven waves-as is the case in a high aspect-ratio tokamak. (In the perturbation it is important to take the Hamiltonian nature of the governing equations into account.) Moreover, our results apply to the relevant transient growth of the mode amplitude

  4. Delayed shear enhancement in mesoscale atmospheric dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, M.D. [Atmospheric Environment Service, Ontario (Canada); Pielke, R.A. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Mesoscale atmospheric dispersion (MAD) is more complicated than smaller-scale dispersion because the mean wind field can no longer be considered steady or horizontally homogeneous over mesoscale time and space scales. Wind shear also plays a much more important role on the mesoscale: horizontal dispersion can be enhanced and often dominated by vertical wind shear on these scales through the interaction of horizontal differential advection and vertical mixing. Just over 30 years ago, Pasquill suggested that this interaction need not be simultaneous and that the combination of differential horizontal advection with delayed or subsequent vertical mixing could maintain effective horizontal diffusion in spite of temporal or spatial reductions in boundary-layer turbulence intensity. This two-step mechanism has not received much attention since then, but a recent analysis of observations from and numerical simulations of two mesoscale tracer experiments suggests that delayed shear enhancement can play an important role in MAD. This paper presents an overview of this analysis, with particular emphasis on the influence of resolvable vertical shear on MAD in these two case studies and the contributions made by delayed shear enhancement.

  5. Examining shear processes during magma ascent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, J. E.; Wallace, P. A.; Coats, R.; Lamur, A.; Lavallée, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Lava dome eruptions are prone to rapid shifts from effusive to explosive behaviour which reflects the rheology of magma. Magma rheology is governed by composition, porosity and crystal content, which during ascent evolves to yield a rock-like, viscous suspension in the upper conduit. Geophysical monitoring, laboratory experiments and detailed field studies offer the opportunity to explore the complexities associated with the ascent and eruption of such magmas, which rest at a pivotal position with regard to the glass transition, allowing them to either flow or fracture. Crystal interaction during flow results in strain-partitioning and shear-thinning behaviour of the suspension. In a conduit, such characteristics favour the formation of localised shear zones as strain is concentrated along conduit margins, where magma can rupture and heal in repetitive cycles. Sheared magmas often record a history of deformation in the form of: grain size reduction; anisotropic permeable fluid pathways; mineral reactions; injection features; recrystallisation; and magnetic anomalies, providing a signature of the repetitive earthquakes often observed during lava dome eruptions. The repetitive fracture of magma at ( fixed) depth in the conduit and the fault-like products exhumed at spine surfaces indicate that the last hundreds of meters of ascent may be controlled by frictional slip. Experiments on a low-to-high velocity rotary shear apparatus indicate that shear stress on a slip plane is highly velocity dependent, and here we examine how this influences magma ascent and its characteristic geophysical signals.

  6. Shear modulation experiments with ECCD on TCV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cirant, S.; Alberti, S.; Gandini, F.; Behn, R.; Goodman, T.P.; Nikkola, P.

    2006-01-01

    Anomalous electron transport is determined by turbulence, which in turn is affected by magnetic shear. A novel application of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD), aiming at localized shear modulation, has been applied on the TCV tokamak for experiments on shear-dependent electron transport. Pairs of EC beams, absorbed at the same radius, with one oriented for co- and the other for counter-injection, are modulated out of phase in order to force a local modulation of current-density at constant input power. Off-axis deposition (ρ dep = 0.24) is performed to avoid the central region, where the low heat flux would make transport analysis difficult. In addition some sawteeth control is achieved in this way. A significant impact on local shear is achieved with I ECCD ∼ 0.1I OH , even when the modulation period is much shorter than the current diffusion time across the whole plasma radius. The main result is that although source (heat and particle) terms are constant, both electron density and temperature are modulated during alternated ECCD. Once equilibrium effects are taken into account for appropriate mapping of Thomson scattering measurements onto flux coordinates, modulation of T e and electron pressure, peaked on-axis, is confirmed at all radii internal to EC deposition. The best confinement occurs for co-injection, in which case a local decrease (∼55%) in the magnetic shear causes a decrease in the electron thermal diffusivity of a similar amount (∼65%)

  7. Report from the banding lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tautin, J.

    1995-01-01

    Mr. Tautin reported on the seemingly everchanging structure of biological science units within the Interior Department. Current Congressional proposals would either change the name of the Bird Banding Lab's parent agency or make it part of the Geological Survey. The current Congress has not looked favorably on science budgets within the Interior Department, and the Banding Lab's budget is being squeezed ever tighter.

  8. 3D shear wave velocity structure revealed with ambient noise tomography on a DAS array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, X.; Thurber, C. H.; Wang, H. F.; Fratta, D.

    2017-12-01

    An 8700-m Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) cable was deployed at Brady's Hot Springs, Nevada in March 2016 in a 1.5 by 0.5 km study area. The layout of the DAS array was designed with a zig-zag geometry to obtain relatively uniform areal and varied angular coverage, providing very dense coverage with a one-meter channel spacing. This array continuously recorded signals of a vibroseis truck, earthquakes, and traffic noise during the 15-day deployment. As shown in a previous study (Zeng et al., 2017), ambient noise tomography can be applied to DAS continuous records to image shear wave velocity structure in the near surface. To avoid effects of the vibroseis truck operation, only continuous data recorded during the nighttime was used to compute noise cross-correlation functions for channel pairs within a given linear segment. The frequency band of whitening was set at 5 to 15 Hz and the length of the cross-correlation time window was set to 60 second. The phase velocities were determined using the multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) methodology. The phase velocity dispersion curve was then used to invert for shear wave velocity profiles. A preliminarily velocity model at Brady's Hot Springs (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 2015) was used as the starting model and the sensitivity kernels of Rayleigh wave group and phase velocities were computed with this model. As the sensitivity kernel shows, shear wave velocity in the top 200 m can be constrained with Rayleigh wave group and phase velocities in our frequency band. With the picked phase velocity data, the shear wave velocity structure can be obtained via Occam's inversion (Constable et al., 1987; Lai 1998). Shear wave velocity gradually increases with depth and it is generally faster than the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (2015) model. Furthermore, that model has limiting constraints at shallow depth. The strong spatial variation is interpreted to reflect the different sediments and

  9. Thermodynamic modeling of phase relations and metasomatism in shear zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalves, P.; Oliot, E.; Marquer, D.

    2009-04-01

    granodiorite (Swiss Alps). Fourteen samples have been taken along a 80 meter-wide strain gradient from the undeformed granodiorite protolith to the ultramylonitic zone. The metastable magmatic assemblage consists of oligoclase (50 vol%), quartz ( 20 vol%), K-feldspar (17 vol%), and biotite (13 %). With increasing strain, K-feldspar and oligoclase rapidly disappear to produce albite and epidote porphyroblast (up to 45 and 5 vol% respectively) with phengite in shear planes (15 vol%). In the mylonite and ultramylonite, magmatic phases have been completely recrystallized and the metamorphic albite volume decreases down to 25 vol% whereas phengite constitutes up to 30 vol% of the rock. Epidote is absent in the ultramylonite. In localized shear bands, the metamorphic assemblage consists of phengite, chlorite, biotite and quartz. Mass balance calculations show that the ultramylonite is enriched in MgO (up to 130%) while CaO and Na2O are remove (80% and 45% respectively). However, mass transfer is even stronger in the chlorite-bearing shear bands, where CaO and Na2O have been completely leached out. Chemical potential pseudosections are constructed using the bulk composition of the unaltered granodiorite, with K2O, FeO, Al2O3 and SiO2 content remaining constant. Deformation occurred under water-saturated conditions at 6 kbar and 450°C. MgO, CaO and Na2O are considered as "perfectly mobile" components and therefore their chemical potentials, which is fixed by the externally-derived fluid, control the stability of the phases. μMgO vs μCaO and μMgO vs μNa2O diagrams, show that the breakdown of a Kf-ab-ep assemblage into phengite and the subsequent crystallization of chlorite require the introduction of a fluid with a μCaO and μNa2O significantly lower than in the unaltered metamorphic assemblage (Kf-ab-ep-Kf-Bio-q). Equalizing the chemical potential gradient of CaO and Na2O, established between the fluid and the metamorphic assemblage, is achieved by the complete removal of Ca

  10. Dual-band infrared camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, H.; Schlemmer, H.

    2005-10-01

    Every year, numerous accidents happen on European roads due to bad visibility (fog, night, heavy rain). Similarly, the dramatic aviation accidents of year 2001 in Milan and Zurich have reminded us that aviation safety is equally affected by reduced visibility. A dual-band thermal imager was developed in order to raise human situation awareness under conditions of reduced visibility especially in the automotive and aeronautical context but also for all transportation or surveillance tasks. The chosen wavelength bands are the Short Wave Infrared SWIR and the Long Wave Infrared LWIR band which are less obscured by reduced visibility conditions than the visible band. Furthermore, our field tests clearly show that the two different spectral bands very often contain complementary information. Pyramidal fusion is used to integrate complementary and redundant features of the multi-spectral images into a fused image which can be displayed on a monitor to provide more and better information for the driver or pilot.

  11. 2D micromechanical analysis of SiC/Al metal matrix composites under tensile, shear and combined tensile/shear loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qing, Hai

    2013-01-01

    The influence of interface strength and loading conditions on the mechanical behavior of the metal-matrix composites is investigated in this paper. A program is developed to generate automatically 2D micromechanical Finite element (FE) models including interface, in which both the locations...... and dimensions of Silicon-Carbide (SiC) particles are randomly distributed. Finite element simulations of the deformation and damage evolution of SiC particle reinforced Aluminum (Al) alloy composite are carried out for different microstructures and interphase strengths under tensile, shear and combined tensile....../shear loads. 2D cohesive element is applied to describe the fracture and failure process of interphase, while the damage models based on maximum principal stress criterion and the stress triaxial indicator are developed within Abaqus/Standard Subroutine USDFLD to simulate the failure process of SiC particles...

  12. Schumpeter's Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Esben Sloth

    reworking of his basic theory of economic evolution in Development from 1934, and this reworking was continued in Cycles from 1939. Here Schumpeter also tried to handle the statistical and historical evidence on the waveform evolution of the capitalist economy. Capitalism from 1942 modified the model...

  13. Galactic evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagel, B.

    1979-01-01

    Ideas are considered concerning the evolution of galaxies which are closely related to those of stellar evolution and the origin of elements. Using information obtained from stellar spectra, astronomers are now able to consider an underlying process to explain the distribution of various elements in the stars, gas and dust clouds of the galaxies. (U.K.)

  14. Darwinian evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jagers op Akkerhuis, Gerard A.J.M.; Spijkerboer, Hendrik Pieter; Koelewijn, Hans Peter

    2016-01-01

    Darwinian evolution is a central tenet in biology. Conventionally, the defi nition of Darwinian evolution is linked to a population-based process that can be measured by focusing on changes in DNA/allele frequencies. However, in some publications it has been suggested that selection represents a

  15. Three-dimensional shear transformation zone dynamics model for amorphous metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homer, Eric R; Schuh, Christopher A

    2010-01-01

    A fully three-dimensional (3D) mesoscale modeling framework for the mechanical behavior of amorphous metals is proposed. The model considers the coarse-grained action of shear transformation zones (STZs) as the fundamental deformation event. The simulations are controlled through the kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm and the mechanical response of the system is captured through finite-element analysis, where STZs are mapped onto a 3D finite-element mesh and are allowed to shear in any direction in three dimensions. Implementation of the technique in uniaxial creep tests over a wide range of conditions validates the model's ability to capture the expected behaviors of an amorphous metal, including high temperature flow conforming to the expected constitutive law and low temperature localization in the form of a nascent shear band. The simulation results are combined to construct a deformation map that is comparable to experimental deformation maps. The flexibility of the modeling framework is illustrated by performing a contact test (simulated nanoindentation) in which the model deforms through STZ activity in the region experiencing the highest shear stress

  16. Microstructural evolution of cold-sprayed Inconel 625 superalloy coatings on low alloy steel substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhuri, Atanu; Raghupathy, Y.; Srinivasan, Dheepa; Suwas, Satyam; Srivastava, Chandan

    2017-01-01

    This study illustrates microstructural evolution of INCONEL 625 superalloy coatings cold-sprayed on a 4130 chrome alloy steel with medium carbon content. INCONEL 625 powder (5–25 μm) were successfully cold sprayed without any oxidation. The comprehensive microstructure analysis of the as-sprayed coatings and of the substrate-coating interface was carried out using EBSD, TEM, and XRD. The coating microstructure at the substrate-coating interface was markedly different from the microstructure away from the interface. The coating microstructure at steel-coating interface consisted of a fine layer of small grains. The microstructure beyond this fine layer can be divided into splats, inter splat and intra splat boundaries. Both splat and splat boundaries exhibited deformation induced dislocations. Dynamic recovery of dislocations-ridden regions inside the splat was responsible for the development of sub grain structure inside a splat with both low and high angle grain boundaries. Splat-splat (inter splat) boundary consisted of a relatively high density of dislocations and shear bands as a result of adiabatic shear flow localisation. This flow instability is believed to enhance the microstructural integrity by eliminating porosity at splat-splat boundaries. Based on the microstructural analysis using electron microscopy, a plausible mechanism for the development of microstructure has been proposed in this work. Cold spray technique can thus be deployed to develop high quality coatings of commercial importance. - Graphical abstract: Schematics of the evolution of microstructure at the 4130 steel substrate close to interface. i) initial deformation close to interface. ii) Accumulation of dislocation in the substrate. iii) Formation of cell structure due to dislocation tangling and arrangement. iv) Dislocation rearrangement and subgrain formation. v.a) Formation HAGB from dislocation accumulation into LAGB. v.b) HAGB formation through DRX by progressive lattice rotation

  17. Shear and extensional properties of kefiran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piermaría, Judith; Bengoechea, Carlos; Abraham, Analía Graciela; Guerrero, Antonio

    2016-11-05

    Kefiran is a neutral polysaccharide constituted by glucose and galactose produced by Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens. It is included into kefir grains and has several health promoting properties. In the present work, shear and extensional properties of different kefiran aqueous dispersions (0.5, 1 and 2% wt.) were assessed and compared to other neutral gums commonly used in food, cosmetic and pharmaceutics industries (methylcellulose, locust bean gum and guar gum). Kefiran showed shear flow characteristics similar to that displayed by other representative neutral gums, although it always yielded lower viscosities at a given concentration. For each gum system it was possible to find a correlation between dynamic and steady shear properties by a master curve including both the apparent and complex viscosities. When studying extensional properties of selected gums at 2% wt. by means of a capillary break-up rheometer, kefiran solutions did not show important extensional properties, displaying a behaviour close the Newtonian. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. On transformation shear of precipitated zirconia particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J.M.; Lam, K.Y.

    1993-01-01

    A model is proposed to investigate the transformation shear of the precipitated zirconia particles which undergo a stress-induced lattice transformation from tetragonal to monoclinic symmetry. Kinematically admissible twinning planes and the corresponding twinning elements are determined according to the continuum theory of dispacive phase transformation. It is postulated that only one twinning mode prevails in each transformed particle and that the minimization of elastic strain energy change dictates the morphology of the transformed variants. The transformation shear is determined by the twinning mode and the volume fraction of the corresponding variant. Numerical calculations show that each of the six kinematically admissible twinning modes may be kinematically favorable and therefore operate in constrained particle. The actual transformation shear in a transformed particle is shown to be dependent on the transformation stress, on the particle shape as well as on the lattice orientation relative to the principal axes of the ellipsoidal particle

  19. On shear rheology of gel propellants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahimi, Shai; Peretz, Arie [RAFAEL, MANOR Propulsion and Explosive Systems Division, Haifa (Israel); Natan, Benveniste [Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel)

    2007-04-15

    Selected fuel, oxidizer and simulant gels were prepared and rheologically characterized using a rotational rheometer. For fuel gelation both organic and inorganic gellants were utilized, whereas oxidizers and simulants were gelled with addition of silica and polysaccharides, respectively. The generalized Herschel-Bulkley constitutive model was found to most adequately represent the gels studied. Hydrazine-based fuels, gelled with polysaccharides, were characterized as shear-thinning pseudoplastic fluids with low shear yield stress, whereas inhibited red-fuming nitric acid (IRFNA) and hydrogen peroxide oxidizers, gelled with silica, were characterized as yield thixotropic fluids with significant shear yield stress. Creep tests were conducted on two rheological types of gels with different gellant content and the results were fitted by Burgers-Kelvin viscoelastic constitutive model. The effect of temperature on the rheological properties of gel propellant simulants was also investigated. A general rheological classification of gel propellants and simulants is proposed. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  20. Combined shearing interferometer and hartmann wavefront sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchin, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    A sensitive wavefront sensor combining attributes of both a Hartmann type of wavefront sensor and an AC shearing interferometer type of wavefront sensor. An incident wavefront, the slope of which is to be detected, is focussed to first and second focal points at which first and second diffraction gratings are positioned to shear and modulate the wavefront, which then diverges therefrom. The diffraction patterns of the first and second gratings are positioned substantially orthogonal to each other to shear the wavefront in two directions to produce two dimensional wavefront slope data for the AC shearing interferometer portion of the wavefront sensor. First and second dividing optical systems are positioned in the two diverging wavefronts to divide the sheared wavefront into an array of subapertures and also to focus the wavefront in each subaperture to a focal point. A quadrant detector is provided for each subaperture to detect the position of the focal point therein, which provides a first indication, in the manner of a Hartmann wavefront sensor, of the local wavefront slope in each subaperture. The total radiation in each subaperture, as modulated by the diffraction grating, is also detected by the quadrant detector which produces a modulated output signal representative thereof, the phase of which relative to modulation by the diffraction grating provides a second indication of the local wavefront slope in each subaperture, in the manner of an AC shearing interferometer wavefront sensor. The data from both types of sensors is then combined by long term averaging thereof to provide an extremely sensitive wavefront sensor

  1. A viscoplastic shear-zone model for episodic slow slip events in oceanic subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, A.; Meng, L.

    2016-12-01

    Episodic slow slip events occur widely along oceanic subduction zones at the brittle-ductile transition depths ( 20-50 km). Although efforts have been devoted to unravel their mechanical origins, it remains unclear about the physical controls on the wide range of their recurrence intervals and slip durations. In this study we present a simple mechanical model that attempts to account for the observed temporal evolution of slow slip events. In our model we assume that slow slip events occur in a viscoplastic shear zone (i.e., Bingham material), which has an upper static and a lower dynamic plastic yield strength. We further assume that the hanging wall deformation is approximated as an elastic spring. We envision the shear zone to be initially locked during forward/landward motion but is subsequently unlocked when the elastic and gravity-induced stress exceeds the static yield strength of the shear zone. This leads to backward/trenchward motion damped by viscous shear-zone deformation. As the elastic spring progressively loosens, the hanging wall velocity evolves with time and the viscous shear stress eventually reaches the dynamic yield strength. This is followed by the termination of the trenchward motion when the elastic stress is balanced by the dynamic yield strength of the shear zone and the gravity. In order to account for the zig-saw slip-history pattern of typical repeated slow slip events, we assume that the shear zone progressively strengthens after each slow slip cycle, possibly caused by dilatancy as commonly assumed or by progressive fault healing through solution-transport mechanisms. We quantify our conceptual model by obtaining simple analytical solutions. Our model results suggest that the duration of the landward motion increases with the down-dip length and the static yield strength of the shear zone, but decreases with the ambient loading velocity and the elastic modulus of the hanging wall. The duration of the backward/trenchward motion depends

  2. SINGLE-BAND, TRIPLE-BAND, OR MULTIPLE-BAND HUBBARD MODELS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ESKES, H; SAWATZKY, GA

    1991-01-01

    The relevance of different models, such as the one-band t-J model and the three-band Emery model, as a realistic description of the electronic structure of high-T(c) materials is discussed. Starting from a multiband approach using cluster calculations and an impurity approach, the following

  3. Enhancing Rotational Diffusion Using Oscillatory Shear

    KAUST Repository

    Leahy, Brian D.

    2013-05-29

    Taylor dispersion - shear-induced enhancement of translational diffusion - is an important phenomenon with applications ranging from pharmacology to geology. Through experiments and simulations, we show that rotational diffusion is also enhanced for anisotropic particles in oscillatory shear. This enhancement arises from variations in the particle\\'s rotation (Jeffery orbit) and depends on the strain amplitude, rate, and particle aspect ratio in a manner that is distinct from the translational diffusion. This separate tunability of translational and rotational diffusion opens the door to new techniques for controlling positions and orientations of suspended anisotropic colloids. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  4. Seismic behavior of reinforced concrete shear walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, F.; Gantenbein, F.

    1989-01-01

    Reinforced concrete shear walls have an important contribution to building stiffness. So, it is necessary to know their behavior under seismic loads. The ultimate behavior study of shear walls subjected to dynamic loadings includes: - a description of the nonlinear global model based on cyclic static tests, - nonlinear time history calculations for various forcing functions. The comparison of linear and nonlinear results shows important margins related to the ductility when the bandwidth of the forcing function is narrow and centred on the wall natural frequency

  5. Shear reinforced beams in autoclaved aerated concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornelius, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Shear behaviour in concrete materials is very well documented, for normal density concrete materials. In this paper results of various tests on low density concrete materials like aerated autoclaved concrete (in the following denoted aircrete) will be presented and analyzed for different combinat....... Codes for designing prefabricated reinforced components of aircrete structures have adopted these recently developed approaches.......Shear behaviour in concrete materials is very well documented, for normal density concrete materials. In this paper results of various tests on low density concrete materials like aerated autoclaved concrete (in the following denoted aircrete) will be presented and analyzed for different...

  6. Shear zones between rock units with no relative movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koyi, Hemin; Schmeling, Harro; Burchardt, Steffi

    2013-01-01

    Shear zones are normally viewed as relatively narrow deformation zones that accommodate relative displacement between two "blocks" that have moved past each other in opposite directions. This study reports localized zones of shear between adjacent blocks that have not moved past each other. Such ...... given credit for and may be responsible for some reverse kinematics reported in shear zones....... or wakes, elongated bodies (vertical plates or horizontal rod-like bodies) produce tabular shear zones or wakes. Unlike conventional shear zones across which shear indicators usually display consistent symmetries, shear indicators on either side of the shear zone or wake reported here show reverse...... kinematics. Thus profiles exhibit shear zones with opposed senses of movement across their center-lines or -planes.We have used field observations and results from analytical and numerical models to suggest that examples of wakes are the transit paths that develop where denser blocks sink within salt...

  7. Tolerance Evaluation of Poloidal Shear Keys for ITER TF Coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Youkun; Neil, M.; Cees Jong

    2006-01-01

    There are 18 ITER Toroidal Field (TF) Coils. Unlike the other ITER coils, these coils are structurally linked. These links consist of friction between the coil legs in the central vault formed by the inner straight legs of the coils, four outer inter-coil structures (OIS) and one inner inter-coil structure (IIS). The OIS consists essentially of bands around all 18 coils to provide shear support by forming shear panels with the coil case, and the IIS consists of poloidal circular keys placed directly between the coil cases. Global analysis of the 'perfect' coil shape has shown high stresses in the IIS, in the poloidal keyways. Optimization has successfully reduced these stresses to acceptable values as regards the expected fatigue resistance. However it is necessary to confirm that the stresses are still acceptable when realistic values of geometry variations are included (i.e. the effect of coil and case tolerances). Because of the extensive mechanical links between coils the poloidal key stresses can also be affected by tolerances elsewhere in the case. As the first step in assessment of the possible variations in stresses, a substructure technique is being used to develop a local model of the key region. The result of geometry variations between individual coils is a loss in the 18 fold symmetry used to simplify previous analyses. With the new and optimized model it should be possible to relax the 18-fold symmetry, but a full analysis of all 18 coils is still not possible. Systematic ways of representing the tolerance variation in the finite element model have been developed so that parametric studies can be undertaken without a full reconstruction of the model. (author)

  8. Shear thinning and shear thickening of a confined suspension of vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nait Ouhra, A.; Farutin, A.; Aouane, O.; Ez-Zahraouy, H.; Benyoussef, A.; Misbah, C.

    2018-01-01

    Widely regarded as an interesting model system for studying flow properties of blood, vesicles are closed membranes of phospholipids that mimic the cytoplasmic membranes of red blood cells. In this study we analyze the rheology of a suspension of vesicles in a confined geometry: the suspension, bound by two planar rigid walls on each side, is subject to a shear flow. Flow properties are then analyzed as a function of shear rate γ ˙, the concentration of the suspension ϕ , and the viscosity contrast λ =ηin/ηout , where ηin and ηout are the fluid viscosities of the inner and outer fluids, respectively. We find that the apparent (or effective viscosity) of the suspension exhibits both shear thinning (decreasing viscosity with shear rate) or shear thickening (increasing viscosity with shear rate) in the same concentration range. The shear thinning or thickening behaviors appear as subtle phenomena, dependant on viscosity contrast λ . We provide physical arguments on the origins of these behaviors.

  9. Effect of Boundary Condition on the Shear Behaviour of Rock Joints in the Direct Shear Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahaaddini, M.

    2017-05-01

    The common method for determination of the mechanical properties of the rock joints is the direct shear test. This paper aims to study the effect of boundary condition on the results of direct shear tests. Experimental studies undertaken in this research showed that the peak shear strength is mostly overestimated. This problem is more pronounced for steep asperities and under high normal stresses. Investigation of the failure mode of these samples showed that tensile cracks are generated at the boundary of sample close to the specimen holders and propagated inside the intact materials. In order to discover the reason of observed failure mechanism in experiments, the direct shear test was simulated using PFC2D. Results of numerical models showed that the gap zone size between the upper and lower specimen holders has a significant effect on the shear mechanism. For the high gap size, stresses concentrate at the vicinity of the tips of specimen holders and result in generation and propagation of tensile cracks inside the intact material. However, by reducing the gap size, stresses are concentrated on asperities, and damage of specimen at its boundary is not observed. Results of this paper show that understanding the shear mechanism of rock joints is an essential step prior to interpreting the results of direct shear tests.

  10. In-Band Interference Effects on UTRA LTE Uplink Resource Block Allocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Priyanto, Basuki Endah; Sørensen, Troels Bundgaard; Jensen, Ole Kiel

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the impact of in-band interference on the uplink multiple access of UMTS Terrestrial Radio Access, long term evolution (UTRA LTE). In- band and out-of-band interference arise as a result of transmitter imperfections. Out-of- band, or adjacent channel, interference can......, and when the interfering signal is received at higher power spectral density (PSD). The effect of frequency offset and different PSD level from the UE interferers to a victim UE is studied. The impact on different UE resource block size allocation is also investigated. The results are obtained from an LTE...

  11. Quadrupole collective correlations and termination of the superdeformed bands in mercury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonche, P.; Heenen, P.H.; Krieger, S.J.; Weiss, M.S.; Meyer, J.

    1990-03-01

    Fully self-consistent Generator Coordinate Method calculations have been performed on a basis of quadrupole constrained Hartree-Fock plus BCS wave functions for the five even mercury isotopes 190-198 Hg. The GCM results support conclusions drawn from previous HF+BCS calculations. The predicted evolution of superdeformed band head (shape isomer) properties as a function of the neutron number is consistent with the data. Using calculated transition matrix elements, we evaluate in-band versus out-of-band quadrupole decay and explain the sudden termination of the superdeformed band

  12. Theory of high-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmode in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, G.Y.; Cheng, C.Z.; Princeton Univ., NJ

    1989-07-01

    High-n WKB-ballooning mode equation is employed to study toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) in the δ - α space, where δ = (r/q)(dq/dr) is the magnetic shear, and α = -(2Rq 2 /B 2 )(dp/dr) is the normalized pressure gradient for tokamak plasmas. In the ballooning mode first stability region, TAE modes are found to exist only for α less than some critical value α c . We also find that these TAE modes reappear in the ballooning mode second stability region for bands of α values. The global envelope structures of these TAE modes are studied by WKB method and are found to be bounded radially if the local mode frequency has a maximum in radius. 15 refs., 14 figs

  13. Application of Story-wise Shear Building Identification Method to Actual Ambient Vibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei eFujita

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A sophisticated and smart story stiffness System Identification (SI method for a shear building model is applied to a full-scale building frame subjected to micro-tremors. The advantageous and novel feature is that not only the modal parameters, such as natural frequencies and damping ratios, but also the physical model parameters, such as story stiffnesses and damping coefficients, can be identified using micro-tremors. While the building responses to earthquake ground motions are necessary in the previous SI method, it is shown in this paper that the micro-tremor measurements in a full-scale 5 story building frame can be used for identification within the same framework. The SI using micro-tremor measurements leads to the enhanced usability of the previously proposed story-wise shear building identification method. The degree of ARX models and cut-off frequencies of band-pass filter are determined to derive reliable results.

  14. On Using a Space Telescope to Detect Weak-lensing Shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Nathan; Wright, Edward

    2017-11-01

    Ignoring redshift dependence, the statistical performance of a weak-lensing survey is set by two numbers: the effective shape noise of the sources, which includes the intrinsic ellipticity dispersion and the measurement noise, and the density of sources that are useful for weak-lensing measurements. In this paper, we provide some general guidance for weak-lensing shear measurements from a “generic” space telescope by looking for the optimum wavelength bands to maximize the galaxy flux signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) and minimize ellipticity measurement error. We also calculate an effective galaxy number per square degree across different wavelength bands, taking into account the density of sources that are useful for weak-lensing measurements and the effective shape noise of sources. Galaxy data collected from the ultra-deep UltraVISTA Ks-selected and R-selected photometric catalogs (Muzzin et al. 2013) are fitted to radially symmetric Sérsic galaxy light profiles. The Sérsic galaxy profiles are then stretched to impose an artificial weak-lensing shear, and then convolved with a pure Airy Disk PSF to simulate imaging of weak gravitationally lensed galaxies from a hypothetical diffraction-limited space telescope. For our model calculations and sets of galaxies, our results show that the peak in the average galaxy flux S/N, the minimum average ellipticity measurement error, and the highest effective galaxy number counts all lie around the K-band near 2.2 μm.

  15. Damage Evolution in Complex-Phase and Dual-Phase Steels during Edge Stretching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikky Pathak

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The role of microstructural damage in controlling the edge stretchability of Complex-Phase (CP and Dual-Phase (DP steels was evaluated using hole tension experiments. The experiments considered a tensile specimen with a hole at the center of specimen that is either sheared (sheared edge condition or drilled and then reamed (reamed edge condition. The damage mechanism and accumulation in the CP and DP steels were systematically characterized by interrupting the hole tension tests at different strain levels using scanning electron microscope (SEM analysis and optical microscopy. Martensite cracking and decohesion of ferrite-martensite interfaces are the dominant nucleation mechanisms in the DP780. The primary source of void nucleation in the CP800 is nucleation at TiN particles, with secondary void formation at martensite/bainite interfaces near the failure strain. The rate of damage evolution is considerably higher for the sheared edge in contrast with the reamed edge since the shearing process alters the microstructure in the shear affected zone (SAZ by introducing work-hardening and initial damage behind the sheared edge. The CP microstructures were shown to be less prone to shear-induced damage than the DP materials resulting in much higher sheared edge formability. Microstructural damage in the CP and DP steels was characterized to understand the interaction between microstructure, damage evolution and edge formability during edge stretching. An analytical model for void evolution and coalescence was developed and applied to predict the damage rate in these rather diverse microstructures.

  16. Damage Evolution in Complex-Phase and Dual-Phase Steels during Edge Stretching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Nikky; Butcher, Cliff; Worswick, Michael James; Bellhouse, Erika; Gao, Jeff

    2017-03-27

    The role of microstructural damage in controlling the edge stretchability of Complex-Phase (CP) and Dual-Phase (DP) steels was evaluated using hole tension experiments. The experiments considered a tensile specimen with a hole at the center of specimen that is either sheared (sheared edge condition) or drilled and then reamed (reamed edge condition). The damage mechanism and accumulation in the CP and DP steels were systematically characterized by interrupting the hole tension tests at different strain levels using scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis and optical microscopy. Martensite cracking and decohesion of ferrite-martensite interfaces are the dominant nucleation mechanisms in the DP780. The primary source of void nucleation in the CP800 is nucleation at TiN particles, with secondary void formation at martensite/bainite interfaces near the failure strain. The rate of damage evolution is considerably higher for the sheared edge in contrast with the reamed edge since the shearing process alters the microstructure in the shear affected zone (SAZ) by introducing work-hardening and initial damage behind the sheared edge. The CP microstructures were shown to be less prone to shear-induced damage than the DP materials resulting in much higher sheared edge formability. Microstructural damage in the CP and DP steels was characterized to understand the interaction between microstructure, damage evolution and edge formability during edge stretching. An analytical model for void evolution and coalescence was developed and applied to predict the damage rate in these rather diverse microstructures.

  17. Stellar evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Meadows, A J

    2013-01-01

    Stellar Evolution, Second Edition covers the significant advances in the understanding of birth, life, and death of stars.This book is divided into nine chapters and begins with a description of the characteristics of stars according to their brightness, distance, size, mass, age, and chemical composition. The next chapters deal with the families, structure, and birth of stars. These topics are followed by discussions of the chemical composition and the evolution of main-sequence stars. A chapter focuses on the unique features of the sun as a star, including its evolution, magnetic fields, act

  18. Phase Field Theory and Analysis of Pressure-Shear Induced Amorphization and Failure in Boron Carbide Ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D. Clayton

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A nonlinear continuum phase field theory is developed to describe amorphization of crystalline elastic solids under shear and/or pressure loading. An order parameter describes the local degree of crystallinity. Elastic coefficients can depend on the order parameter, inelastic volume change may accompany the transition from crystal to amorphous phase, and transitional regions parallel to bands of amorphous material are penalized by interfacial surface energy. Analytical and simple numerical solutions are obtained for an idealized isotropic version of the general theory, for an element of material subjected to compressive and/or shear loading. Solutions compare favorably with experimental evidence and atomic simulations of amorphization in boron carbide, demonstrating the tendency for structural collapse and strength loss with increasing shear deformation and superposed pressure.

  19. Chirality-specific lift forces of helix under shear flows: Helix perpendicular to shear plane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi-Yi

    2017-02-01

    Chiral objects in shear flow experience a chirality-specific lift force. Shear flows past helices in a low Reynolds number regime were studied using slender-body theory. The chirality-specific lift forces in the vorticity direction experienced by helices are dominated by a set of helix geometry parameters: helix radius, pitch length, number of turns, and helix phase angle. Its analytical formula is given. The chirality-specific forces are the physical reasons for the chiral separation of helices in shear flow. Our results are well supported by the latest experimental observations. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Shear zones between rock units with no relative movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koyi, H.; Schmeling, H.; Burchardt, S.

    2012-01-01

    , elongated bodies (vertical plates or horizontal rod-like bodies) produce tabular shear zones. Unlike conventional shear zones across which shear indicators ideally display consistent symmetries, shear indicators on either sides of the shear zone reported here show reverse kinematics. Thus profiles exhibit...... by progressive extension and (perhaps) where slabs of subducted oceanic lithosphere delaminate from the continental crust and sink into the asthenosphere. We also argue that such shear zones may be more common than they have been given the credit for and may be responsible for some of the kinematic reversals...

  1. Late extensional shear zones and associated recumbent folds in the Alpujarride subduction complex, Betic Cordillera, southern Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orozco, M.; Alonso-Chaves, F.; Platt, J.

    2017-11-01

    The existence in the Alpujarride Complex (Betic Cordillera, southern Spain) of a relatively continuous extensional event (following crustal thickening) is based on detailed structural studies and is consistent with the P-T paths and geochronological data established for the Alpujarride rocks. According to our research, the Alpujarride Complex contains two large-scale shear zones accommodating early Miocene extension. The shear zones contain km-scale recumbent folds, some with sheath fold geometry, and megaboudinage structures, and are closely associated with detachment faults. Large-scale folds and boudins cause dome-like undulations in the detachments, which are inferred to overlap in time with the deformation in the shear zones. One shear zone in the eastern part of the orogen is top-N; the other, in the western part, is top-E. The change in the shear direction may represent a temporal evolution in the direction of shear, possibly related to a change in the subduction direction in space and time.

  2. Late extensional shear zones and associated recumbent folds in the Alpujarride subduction complex, Betic Cordillera, southern Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orozco, M.; Alonso-Chaves, F.; Platt, J.

    2017-01-01

    The existence in the Alpujarride Complex (Betic Cordillera, southern Spain) of a relatively continuous extensional event (following crustal thickening) is based on detailed structural studies and is consistent with the P-T paths and geochronological data established for the Alpujarride rocks. According to our research, the Alpujarride Complex contains two large-scale shear zones accommodating early Miocene extension. The shear zones contain km-scale recumbent folds, some with sheath fold geometry, and megaboudinage structures, and are closely associated with detachment faults. Large-scale folds and boudins cause dome-like undulations in the detachments, which are inferred to overlap in time with the deformation in the shear zones. One shear zone in the eastern part of the orogen is top-N; the other, in the western part, is top-E. The change in the shear direction may represent a temporal evolution in the direction of shear, possibly related to a change in the subduction direction in space and time.

  3. Analysis of the Shear Behavior of Stubby Y-Type Perfobond Rib Shear Connectors for a Composite Frame Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Hyo; Kim, Kun-Soo; Lee, Do-Hoon; Park, Jun-Seung; Han, Oneil

    2017-11-22

    Shear connectors are used in steel beam-concrete slabs of composite frame and bridge structures to transfer shear force according to design loads. The existing Y-type perfobond rib shear connectors are designed for girder slabs of composite bridges. Therefore, the rib and transverse rebars of the conventional Y-type perfobond rib shear connectors are extremely large for the composite frames of building structures. Thus, this paper proposes stubby Y-type perfobond rib shear connectors, redefining the existing connectors, for composite frames of building structures; these were used to perform push-out tests. These shear connectors have relatively small ribs compared to the conventional Y-type perfobond rib shear connectors. To confirm the shear resistance of these stubby shear connectors, we performed an experiment by using transverse rebars D13 and D16. The results indicate that these shear connectors have suitable shear strength and ductility for application in composite frame structures. The shear strengths obtained using D13 and D16 were not significantly different. However, the ductility of the shear connectors with D16 was 45.1% higher than that of the shear connectors with D13.

  4. The Physiology and pathophysiology of laparoscopic adjustable gastric bands

    OpenAIRE

    Burton, Paul Robert

    2017-01-01

    The laparoscopic adjustable gastric band (LAGB) has rapidly emerged as one of the most powerful medical interventions available. Originally a physically restrictive operation, evolution of the technique has resulted in what is now hypothesised to be a satiety inducing procedure. There is limited understanding of associated physiological processes; including oesophageal motility, transit and gastric emptying. Intraluminal pressure effects of the LAGB have not been identified. Recently, a ...

  5. Lightweight concrete modification factor for shear friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    This report describes the results of a study initiated to examine the influence of concrete unit weight on the direct shear transfer across an interface of concretes cast at different times. This type of interface is common with structural precast co...

  6. Falling balls and simple shearing strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brun, J L; Pacheco, A F

    2006-01-01

    The problem of particles falling under gravity allows us to relate Hamiltonian mechanics to such different subjects as elasticity and fluid mechanics. It is with this in mind that mechanics gives us the opportunity of introducing, in a rather simple and unusual form, some concepts such as vorticity, the incompressibility condition or simple shear strain to physics students at the undergraduate level

  7. Shear of ordinary and elongated granular mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Alexander; Kern, Matthew; Marschall, Theodore; Teitel, Stephen; Franklin, Scott

    2015-03-01

    We present an experimental and computational study of a mixture of discs and moderate aspect-ratio ellipses under two-dimensional annular planar Couette shear. Experimental particles are cut from acrylic sheet, are essentially incompressible, and constrained in the thin gap between two concentric cylinders. The annular radius of curvature is much larger than the particles, and so the experiment is quasi-2d and allows for arbitrarily large pure-shear strains. Synchronized video cameras and software identify all particles and track them as they move from the field of view of one camera to another. We are particularly interested in the global and local properties as the mixture ratio of discs to ellipses varies. Global quantities include average shear rate and distribution of particle species as functions of height, while locally we investigate the orientation of the ellipses and non-affine events that can be characterized as shear transformational zones or possess a quadrupole signature observed previously in systems of purely circular particles. Discrete Element Method simulations on mixtures of circles and spherocylinders extend the study to the dynamics of the force network and energy dissipated as the system evolves. Supported by NSF CBET #1243571 and PRF #51438-UR10.

  8. Shear Adhesion of Tapered Nanopillar Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Younghyun; Minsky, Helen K; Jiang, Yijie; Yin, Kaiyang; Turner, Kevin T; Yang, Shu

    2018-04-04

    Tapered nanopillars with various cross sections, including cone-shaped, stepwise, and pencil-like structures (300 nm in diameter at the base of the pillars and 1.1 μm in height), are prepared from epoxy resin templated by nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes. The effect of pillar geometry on the shear adhesion behavior of these nanopillar arrays is investigated via sliding experiments in a nanoindentation system. In a previous study of arrays with the same geometry, it was shown that cone-shaped nanopillars exhibit the highest adhesion under normal loading while stepwise and pencil-like nanopillars exhibit lower normal adhesion strength due to significant deformation of the pillars that occurs with increasing indentation depth. Contrary to the previous studies, here, we show that pencil-like nanopillars exhibit the highest shear adhesion strength at all indentation depths among three types of nanopillar arrays and that the shear adhesion increases with greater indentation depth due to the higher bending stiffness and closer packing of the pencil-like nanopillar array. Finite element simulations are used to elucidate the deformation of the pillars during the sliding experiments and agree with the nanoindentation-based sliding measurements. The experiments and finite element simulations together demonstrate that the shape of the nanopillars plays a key role in shear adhesion and that the mechanism is quite different from that of adhesion under normal loading.

  9. Prediction of turbulent shear layers in turbomachines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, P.

    1974-01-01

    The characteristics of turbulent shear layers in turbomachines are compared with the turbulent boundary layers on airfoils. Seven different aspects are examined. The limits of boundary layer theory are investigated. Boundary layer prediction methods are applied to analysis of the flow in turbomachines.

  10. Structural relaxation monitored by instantaneous shear modulus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Niels Boye; Dyre, Jeppe; Christensen, Tage Emil

    1998-01-01

    time definition based on a recently proposed expression for the relaxation time, where G [infinity] reflects the fictive temperature. All parameters entering the reduced time were determined from independent measurements of the frequency-dependent shear modulus of the equilibrium liquid....

  11. Skin-friction drag reduction in turbulent channel flow based on streamwise shear control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung Hoon; Lee, Jae Hwa

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • We perform DNSs of fully developed turbulent channel flows to explore an active flow control concept using streamwise velocity shear control at the wall. • The structural spacing and wall amplitude parameters are systematically changed to achieve a high-efficient drag reduction rate for longitudinal control surface. • Significant drag reduction is observed with an increase in the two parameters with an accompanying reduction of the Reynolds stresses and vorticity fluctuations. • The generation and evolution of the turbulent vortices in the absence of velocity shear and how they contribute to DR have been examined. - Abstract: It is known that stretching and intensification of a hairpin vortex by mean shear play an important role to create a hairpin vortex packet, which generates the large Reynolds shear stress associated with skin-friction drag in wall-bounded turbulent flows. In order to suppress the mean shear at the wall for high efficient drag reduction (DR), in the present study, we explore an active flow control concept using streamwise shear control (SSC) at the wall. The longitudinal control surface is periodically spanwise-arranged with no-control surface while varying the structural spacing, and an amplitude parameter for imposing the strength of the actuating streamwise velocity at the wall is introduced to further enhance the skin-friction DR. Significant DR is observed with an increase in the two parameters with an accompanying reduction of the Reynolds stresses and vorticity fluctuations, although a further increase in the parameters amplifies the turbulence activity in the near-wall region. In order to study the direct relationship between turbulent vortical structures and DR under the SSC, temporal evolution with initial eddies extracted by conditional averages for Reynolds-stress-maximizing Q2 events are examined. It is shown that the generation of new vortices is dramatically inhibited with an increase in the parameters

  12. Local Turbulence Suppression and Shear Flow Dynamics During qmin-Triggered Internal Transport Barriers on DIII-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, M. W.; McKee, G. R.; Schlossberg, D. J.; Austin, M. E.; Burrell, K. H.

    2008-11-01

    Long-wavelength turbulence (kρiITBs) may form. Application of off-axis ECH slows the q-profile evolution and increases ρqmin, both of which enhance turbulence measurements using a new high-sensitivity large-area (8x,8) 2D BES array. The measured transient turbulence suppression is localized to the low-order rational surface (qmin= 2, 5/2, 3, etc.). Measured poloidal flow shear transiently exceeds the turbulence decorrelation rate, which is consistent with shear suppression. The localized suppression zone propagates radially outward, nearly coincident with the low-order surface.

  13. Superdeformed bands in 130Ce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, E.S.; Semple, A.T.; Boston, A.J.; Joss, D.T.; Nolan, P.J.; Shepherd, S.L.

    1997-01-01

    Four superdeformed bands have been assigned to 130 Ce following a high-statistics γ-ray study using the EUROGAM II spectrometer. The strongest band exhibits two distinct backbends which, in one scenario, may be interpreted as crossings between high-j N = 6 neutron orbitals (νi 13/2 ) and low-j N = 4 orbitals (νd 3/2 ) in an unpaired system. (author)

  14. Dipole Bands in 196Hg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrie, J. J.; Lawrie, E. A.; Newman, R. T.; Sharpey-Schafer, J. F.; Smit, F. D.; Msezane, B.; Benatar, M.; Mabala, G. K.; Mutshena, K. P.; Federke, M.; Mullins, S. M.; Ncapayi, N. J.; Vymers, P.

    2011-01-01

    High spin states in 196 Hg have been populated in the 198 Pt(α,6n) reaction at 65 MeV and the level scheme has been extended. A new dipole band has been observed and a previously observed dipole has been confirmed. Excitation energies, spins and parities of these bands were determined from DCO ratio and linear polarization measurements. Possible quasiparticle excitations responsible for these structures are discussed.

  15. Cargo Release from Polymeric Vesicles under Shear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Guo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study the release of cargo from polymeric nano-carriers under shear. Vesicles formed by two star block polymers— A 12 B 6 C 2 ( A B C and A 12 B 6 A 2 ( A B A —and one linear block copolymer— A 14 B 6 ( A B , are investigated using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD simulations. A - and C -blocks are solvophobic and B -block is solvophilic. The three polymers form vesicles of different structures. The vesicles are subjected to shear both in bulk and between solvophobic walls. In bulk shear, the mechanisms of cargo release are similar for all vesicles, with cargo travelling through vesicle membrane with no preferential release location. When sheared between walls, high cargo release rate is only observed with A B C vesicle after it touches the wall. For A B C vesicle, the critical condition for high cargo release rate is the formation of wall-polymersome interface after which the effect of shear rate in promoting cargo release is secondary. High release rate is achieved by the formation of solvophilic pathway allowing cargo to travel from the vesicle cavity to the vesicle exterior. The results in this paper show that well controlled target cargo release using polymersomes can be achieved with polymers of suitable design and can potentially be very useful for engineering applications. As an example, polymersomes can be used as carriers for surface active friction reducing additives which are only released at rubbing surfaces where the additives are needed most.

  16. Shear resonance mode decoupling to determine the characteristic matrix of piezoceramics for 3-D modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, Lorena; García, Alvaro; de Espinosa, Francisco Montero; Brebøl, Klaus

    2011-03-01

    The determination of the characteristic frequencies of an electromechanical resonance does not provide enough data to obtain the material properties of piezoceramics, including all losses, from complex impedance measurements. Values of impedance around resonance and antiresonance frequencies are also required to calculate the material losses. Uncoupled resonances are needed for this purpose. The shear plates used for the material characterization present unavoidable mode coupling of the shear mode and other modes of the plate. A study of the evolution of the complex material coefficients as the coupling of modes evolves with the change in the aspect ratio (lateral dimension/thickness) of the plate is presented here. These are obtained using software. A soft commercial PZT ceramic was used in this study and several shear plates amenable to material characterization were obtained in the range of aspect ratios below 15. The validity of the material properties for 3-D modeling of piezoceramics is assessed by means of finite element analysis, which shows that uncoupled resonances are virtually pure thickness-driven shear modes.

  17. Three-Dimensional Geostatistical Analysis of Rock Fracture Roughness and Its Degradation with Shearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Babanouri

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional surface geometry of rock discontinuities and its evolution with shearing are of great importance in understanding the deformability and hydro-mechanical behavior of rock masses. In the present research, surfaces of three natural rock fractures were digitized and studied before and after the direct shear test. The variography analysis of the surfaces indicated a strong non-linear trend in the data. Therefore, the spatial variability of rock fracture surfaces was decomposed to one deterministic component characterized by a base polynomial function, and one stochastic component described by the variogram of residuals. By using an image-processing technique, 343 damaged zones with different sizes, shapes, initial roughness characteristics, local stress fields, and asperity strength values were spatially located and clustered. In order to characterize the overall spatial structure of the degraded zones, the concept of ‘pseudo-zonal variogram’ was introduced. The results showed that the spatial continuity at the damage locations increased due to asperity degradation. The increase in the variogram range was anisotropic and tended to be higher in the shear direction; thus, the direction of maximum continuity rotated towards the shear direction. Finally, the regression-kriging method was used to reconstruct the morphology of the intact surfaces and degraded areas. The cross-validation error of interpolation for the damaged zones was found smaller than that obtained for the intact surface.

  18. The modal density of composite beams incorporating the effects of shear deformation and rotary inertia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachoo, Richard; Bridge, Jacqueline

    2018-06-01

    Engineers and designers are often faced with the task of selecting materials that minimizes structural weight whilst meeting the required strength and stiffness. In many cases fibre reinforced composites (FRCs) are the materials of choice since they possess a combination of high strength and low density. Depending on the application, composites are frequently constructed to form long slender beam-like structures or flat thin plate-like structures. Such structures when subjected to random excitation have the potential to excite higher order vibratory modes which can contribute significantly to structure-borne sound. Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) is a framework for modeling the high frequency vibration of structures. The modal density, which is typically defined as the number of modes per unit Hertz in a frequency band, is a fundamental parameter when applying SEA. This study derives formulas for the modal density of a fibre reinforced composite beam coupled in bending and torsion. The effects of shear deformation and rotary inertia are accounted for in the formulation. The modal density is shown to be insensitive to boundary conditions. Numerical analyses were carried out to investigate the variation of modal density with fibre orientation including and excluding the effects of shear deformation and rotary inertia. It was observed that neglecting such effects leads to underestimating the mode count in a particular frequency band. In each frequency band there exists a fibre orientation for which the modal density is minimized. This angular orientation is shown to be dependent on the shear rigidity as well as the bending, torsional and coupling rigidities. The foregoing observation becomes more pronounced with increasing frequency. The paper also addresses the modal density beyond the wave-mode transition frequency where the beam supports three propagating waves.

  19. High strength semi-active energy absorbers using shear- and mixedmode operation at high shear rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becnel, Andrew C.

    This body of research expands the design space of semi-active energy absorbers for shock isolation and crash safety by investigating and characterizing magnetorheological fluids (MRFs) at high shear rates ( > 25,000 1/s) under shear and mixed-mode operation. Magnetorheological energy absorbers (MREAs) work well as adaptive isolators due to their ability to quickly and controllably adjust to changes in system mass or impact speed while providing fail-safe operation. However, typical linear stroking MREAs using pressure-driven flows have been shown to exhibit reduced controllability as impact speed (shear rate) increases. The objective of this work is to develop MREAs that improve controllability at high shear rates by using pure shear and mixed shear-squeeze modes of operation, and to present the fundamental theory and models of MR fluids under these conditions. A proof of concept instrument verified that the MR effect persists in shear mode devices at shear rates corresponding to low speed impacts. This instrument, a concentric cylinder Searle cell magnetorheometer, was then used to characterize three commercially available MRFs across a wide range of shear rates, applied magnetic fields, and temperatures. Characterization results are presented both as flow curves according to established practice, and as an alternate nondimensionalized analysis based on Mason number. The Mason number plots show that, with appropriate correction coefficients for operating temperature, the varied flow curve data can be collapsed to a single master curve. This work represents the first shear mode characterization of MRFs at shear rates over 10 times greater than available with commercial rheometers, as well as the first validation of Mason number analysis to high shear rate flows in MRFs. Using the results from the magnetorheometer, a full scale rotary vane MREA was developed as part of the Lightweight Magnetorheological Energy Absorber System (LMEAS) for an SH-60 Seahawk helicopter

  20. Shear-free axial model in massive Brans–Dicke gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharif, M., E-mail: msharif.math@pu.edu.pk [Department of Mathematics, University of the Punjab, Quaid-e-Azam Campus, Lahore-54590 (Pakistan); Manzoor, Rubab, E-mail: rubab.manzoor@umt.edu.pk [Department of Mathematics, University of the Punjab, Quaid-e-Azam Campus, Lahore-54590 (Pakistan); Department of Mathematics, University of Management and Technology, Johar Town Campus, Lahore-54782 (Pakistan)

    2017-01-15

    This paper explores the influences of dark energy on the shear-free axially symmetric evolution by considering self-interacting Brans–Dicke gravity as a dark energy candidate. We describe energy source of the model and derive all the effective dynamical variables as well as effective structure scalars. It is found that scalar field is one of the sources of anisotropy and dissipation. The resulting effective structure scalars help to study the dynamics associated with dark energy in any axial configuration. In order to investigate shear-free evolution, we formulate a set of governing equations along with heat transport equation. We discuss consequences of shear-free condition upon different SBD fluid models like dissipative non-geodesic and geodesic models. For dissipative non-geodesic case, the rotational distribution turns out to be the necessary and sufficient condition for radiating model. The dissipation depends upon inhomogeneous expansion. The geodesic model is found to be irrotational and non-radiating. The non-dissipative geodesic model leads to FRW model for positive values of the expansion parameter.