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Sample records for share interspecies antigenic

  1. The effect of HLA mismatches, shared cross-reactive antigen groups, and shared HLA-DR antigens on the outcome after pediatric liver transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieders, E; Hepkema, BG; Peeters, PMJG; Ten Vergert, EM; De Jong, KP; Porte, RJ; Bijleveld, CMA; van den Berg, AP; Lems, SPM; Gouw, ASH; Slooff, MJH

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and HLA-DR mismatching, sharing cross-reactive antigen groups (CREGs), and sharing HLA-DR antigens on the outcome after pediatric liver transplantation. Outcome parameters were graft survival, acute rejection,

  2. Cancer-testis antigen expression is shared between epithelial ovarian cancer tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Soto, Arlene E; Schreiber, Taylor; Strbo, Natasa; Ganjei-Azar, Parvin; Miao, Feng; Koru-Sengul, Tulay; Simpkins, Fiona; Nieves-Neira, Wilberto; Lucci, Joseph; Podack, Eckhard R

    2017-06-01

    Cancer-testis (CT) antigens have been proposed as potential targets for cancer immunotherapy. Our objective was to evaluate the expression of a panel of CT antigens in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) tumor specimens, and to determine if antigen sharing occurs between tumors. RNA was isolated from EOC tumor specimens, EOC cell lines and benign ovarian tissue specimens. Real time-PCR analysis was performed to determine the expression level of 20 CT antigens. A total of 62 EOC specimens, 8 ovarian cancer cell lines and 3 benign ovarian tissues were evaluated for CT antigen expression. The majority of the specimens were: high grade (62%), serous (68%) and advanced stage (74%). 58 (95%) of the EOC tumors analyzed expressed at least one of the CT antigens evaluated. The mean number of CT antigen expressed was 4.5 (0-17). The most frequently expressed CT antigen was MAGE A4 (65%). Antigen sharing analysis showed the following: 9 tumors shared only one antigen with 62% of the evaluated specimens, while 37 tumors shared 4 or more antigens with 82%. 5 tumors expressed over 10 CT antigens, which were shared with 90% of the tumor panel. CT antigens are expressed in 95% of EOC tumor specimens. However, not a single antigen was universally expressed across all samples. The degree of antigen sharing between tumors increased with the total number of antigens expressed. These data suggest a multi-epitope approach for development of immunotherapy for ovarian cancer treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Recent Patterns in Shared Decision Making for Prostate-Specific Antigen Testing in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedewa, Stacey A; Gansler, Ted; Smith, Robert; Sauer, Ann Goding; Wender, Richard; Brawley, Otis W; Jemal, Ahmedin

    2018-03-01

    Previous studies report infrequent use of shared decision making for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing. It is unknown whether this pattern has changed recently considering increased emphasis on shared decision making in prostate cancer screening recommendations. Thus, the objective of this study is to examine recent changes in shared decision making. We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study among men aged 50 years and older in the United States using 2010 and 2015 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data (n = 9,598). Changes in receipt of shared decision making were expressed as adjusted prevalence ratios (aPR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Analyses were stratified on PSA testing (recent [in the past year] or no testing). Elements of shared decision making assessed included the patient being informed about the advantages only, advantages and disadvantages, and full shared decision making (advantages, disadvantages, and uncertainties). Among men with recent PSA testing, 58.5% and 62.6% reported having received ≥1 element of shared decision making in 2010 and 2015, respectively ( P = .054, aPR = 1.04; 95% CI, 0.98-1.11). Between 2010 and 2015, being told only about the advantages of PSA testing significantly declined (aPR = 0.82; 95% CI, 0.71-0.96) and full shared decision making prevalence significantly increased (aPR = 1.51; 95% CI, 1.28-1.79) in recently tested men. Among men without prior PSA testing, 10% reported ≥1 element of shared decision making, which did not change with time. Between 2010 and 2015, there was no increase in shared decision making among men with recent PSA testing though there was a shift away from only being told about the advantages of PSA testing towards full shared decision making. Many men receiving PSA testing did not receive shared decision making. © 2018 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  4. Shared decision making in prostate-specific antigen testing with men older than 70 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Berkowitz, Zahava; Richards, Thomas B; Richardson, Lisa C

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about how shared decision making (SDM) is being carried out between older men and their health care providers. Our study aimed to describe the use of SDM key elements and assess their associations with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing among older men. We conducted descriptive and logistic regression modeling analyses using the 2005 and 2010 National Health Interview Survey data. Age-specific prevalence of PSA testing was similar in 2005 and 2010. In 2010, 44.1% of men aged ≥70 years had PSA testing. Only 27.2% (95% confidence interval, 22.2-32.9) of them reported having discussions about both advantages and disadvantages of testing. Multiple regression analyses showed that PSA-based screening was positively associated with discussions of advantages only (P < .001) and with discussions of both advantages and disadvantages (P < .001) compared with no discussion. Discussion of scientific uncertainties was not associated with PSA testing. Efforts are needed to increase physicians' awareness of and adherence to PSA-based screening recommendations. Given that discussions of both advantages and disadvantages increased the uptake of PSA testing and discussion of scientific uncertainties has no effect, additional research about the nature, context, and extent of SDM and about patients' knowledge, values, and preferences regarding PSA-based screening is warranted.

  5. Interspecies correlations of toxicity to eight aquatic organisms: theoretical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu J; Qin, Hong W; Su, Li M; Qin, Wei C; Zou, Ming Y; Sheng, Lian X; Zhao, Yuan H; Abraham, Michael H

    2010-09-15

    Interspecies correlations allow the prediction of toxicity to a number of other species. However, little attention has been paid to the theoretical considerations of the interspecies relationship based on the differences of bio-uptake and toxic mechanism between species. This study examines the interspecies correlations of toxicity between species of Vibrio fischeri, river bacteria, algae, Daphnia magna, carp, Tetrahymena pyriformis, fathead minnow and guppy based on the theoretical background. The results show that there are good interspecies correlations between marine bacterium and fresh water bacteria or fish and fish. It is suggested that compounds share the same bio-uptake and toxic mechanism of action between the species. On the other hand, poor interspecies relationships were found between toxicities to algae and T. pyriformis or D. magna. It is suggested that compounds have different toxic mechanisms of action between these species. Interspecies relationships can be improved by inclusion of the octanol/water partition coefficient or the energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital. They reflect the difference of bio-uptake or toxic mechanism of action between species for organic compounds. Benzoic acids show very different toxicity contributions to the three species, V. fischeri, D. magna and carp. They can be easily absorbed into the unicellular bacteria, V. fischeri. On the contrary, the skin and lipid content of multicellular organisms, such as D. magna and fish, can strongly inhibit the bio-uptake for ionizable compounds, which results in the different toxic effect between V. fischeri and D. magna or carp. Good correlation coefficients were observed between toxicities to V. fischeri and D. magna or fishes by inclusion of hydrophobic and ionization parameters. V. fischeri or D. magna can serve as a surrogate of fish toxicity for hydrophobic and ionizable compounds studied. Toxic mechanisms of action are discussed based on the theoretical background

  6. Genetic considerations in human sex-mate selection: partners share human leukocyte antigen but not short-tandem-repeat identity markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israeli, Moshe; Kristt, Don; Nardi, Yuval; Klein, Tirza

    2014-05-01

    Previous studies support a role for MHC on mating preference, yet it remains unsettled as to whether mating occurs preferentially between individuals sharing human leukocyte antigen (HLA) determinants or not. Investigating sex-mate preferences in the contemporary Israeli population is of further curiosity being a population with distinct genetic characteristics, where multifaceted cultural considerations influence mate selection. Pairs of male-female sex partners were evaluated in three groups. Two groups represented unmarried (n = 1002) or married (n = 308) couples and a control group of fictitious male-female couples. HLA and short-tandem-repeat (STR) genetic identification markers were assessed for the frequency of shared antigens and alleles. Human leukocyte antigen results showed that Class I and/ or Class II single antigen as well as double antigen sharing was more common in sex partners than in control group couples (P < 0.001). Married versus unmarried pairs were not distinguishable. In contrast, STR-DNA markers failed to differentiate between sex-mates and controls (P = 0.78). Sex partnerships shared HLA determinants more frequently than randomly constituted male-female pairs. The observed phenomenon does not reflect a syngenetic background between sex-mates as STR markers were not selectively shared. Thus, sex-mate selection in man may contravene the evolutionary pressure for genetic diversity in regard to HLA. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Sharing of antigens between Plasmodium falciparum and Anopheles albimanus Antígenos compartidos entre Plasmodium falciparum y Anopheles albimanus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albina Wide

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The presence of common antigens between Plasmodium falciparum and Anopheles albimanus was demonstrated. Different groups of rabbits were immunized with: crude extract from female An. albimanus (EAaF, red blood cells infected with Plasmodium falciparum (EPfs, and the SPf66 synthetic malaria vaccine. The rabbit's polyclonal antibodies were evaluated by ELISA, Multiple Antigen Blot Assay (MABA, and immunoblotting. All extracts were immunogenic in rabbits according to these three techniques, when they were evaluated against the homologous antigens. Ten molecules were identified in female mosquitoes and also in P. falciparum antigens by the autologous sera. The electrophoretic pattern by SDS-PAGE was different for the three antigens evaluated. Cross-reactions between An. albimanus and P. falciparum were found by ELISA, MABA, and immunoblotting. Anti-P. falciparum and anti-SPf66 antibodies recognized ten and five components in the EAaF crude extract, respectively. Likewise, immune sera against female An. albimanus identified four molecules in the P. falciparum extract antigen. As far as we know, this is the first work that demonstrates shared antigens between anophelines and malaria parasites. This finding could be useful for diagnosis, vaccines, and the study of physiology of the immune response to malaria.Epítopes de antígenos compartidos entre Plasmodium falciparum y Anopheles albimanus fueron identificados. Diferentes grupos de conejos fueron inmunizados con: extracto crudo de mosquito hembra de An. albimanus (EAaH, glóbulos rojos infectados con P. falciparum (EPfs y la vacuna antimalárica sintética SPf66. Los anticuerpos policlonales producidos en conejos fueron evaluados por ELISA, inmunoensayo simultáneo de múltiples antígenos (MABA e Immunoblotting. Todos los extractos resultaron inmunogénicos cuando se evaluaron por ELISA, MABA e Immunoblotting. Diez moléculas fueron identificadas en los mosquitos hembras y diez en los antígenos de

  8. MutLα and Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen Share Binding Sites on MutSβ*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Ravi R.; Pluciennik, Anna; Genschel, Jochen; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Beese, Lorena S.; Modrich, Paul

    2010-01-01

    MutSβ (MSH2-MSH3) mediates repair of insertion-deletion heterologies but also triggers triplet repeat expansions that cause neurological diseases. Like other DNA metabolic activities, MutSβ interacts with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) via a conserved motif (QXX(L/I)XXFF). We demonstrate that MutSβ-PCNA complex formation occurs with an affinity of ∼0.1 μm and a preferred stoichiometry of 1:1. However, up to 20% of complexes are multivalent under conditions where MutSβ is in molar excess over PCNA. Conformational studies indicate that the two proteins associate in an end-to-end fashion in solution. Surprisingly, mutation of the PCNA-binding motif of MutSβ not only abolishes PCNA binding, but unlike MutSα, also dramatically attenuates MutSβ-MutLα interaction, MutLα endonuclease activation, and bidirectional mismatch repair. As predicted by these findings, PCNA competes with MutLα for binding to MutSβ, an effect that is blocked by the cell cycle regulator p21CIP1. We propose that MutSβ-MutLα interaction is mediated in part by residues ((L/I)SRFF) embedded within the MSH3 PCNA-binding motif. To our knowledge this is the first case where residues important for PCNA binding also mediate interaction with a second protein. These findings also indicate that MutSβ- and MutSα-initiated repair events differ in fundamental ways. PMID:20154325

  9. Interspecies embryo reconstruction in Tibetan antelope Pantholops ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-03-21

    Mar 21, 2011 ... improves the development of interspecies reconstructed giant panda. (Aluropoda melanoleuca) embryos. Chin. Sci. Bull. 47: 467-469. Li Y, Dai Y, Du W, Zhao C, Wang H, Wang L, Li R, Liu Y, Wan R, Li N. (2006). Cloned endangered species takin (Budorcas taxicolor) by inter-species nuclear transfer and ...

  10. Review of interspecies risk comparisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, S.L.; Brett, S.M.; Gough, M.; Rodricks, J.V.; Tardiff, R.G.; Turnbull, D.

    1988-01-01

    Use of laboratory animal data to make quantitative predictions of the risks of toxic effects in humans assumes that a relationship exists between the potencies in animals and humans and that its parameters can be estimated adequately. Such ''scaling rules'' have been used to predict the risks of carcinogenicity or other effects. A survey of the literature yielded only a modest number of papers devoted to the validity of these interspecies risk extrapolations, of which approximately 25 attempt quantitative comparisons for either radiation or chemical hazards. Some authors have investigated relatively large data sets in an attempt to identify the scaling rule that provides the best correlation of risks in two or more species. Others have selected a scaling rule and investigated whether its predictions from data in laboratory species match the risks found in humans. Opinion is divided on the validity of specific extrapolation rules and the utility of animal experiments for quantitative risk assessment. Correlations exist among risk levels in various species, but many factors appear to influence toxicity that are not captured in a simple scaling rule such as dose per unit weight or per unit surface area. Although scaling rules are useful, better projections will be made if case-specific factors such as pharmacokinetics can be considered. Further careful comparisons of quantitative risk estimates are needed. 38 references

  11. Autoantibodies from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus bind a shared sequence of SmD and Epstein-Barr virus-encoded nuclear antigen EBNA I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbatini, A; Bombardieri, S; Migliorini, P

    1993-05-01

    SmD is one of the small nuclear ribonucleoproteins frequently targeted by autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus. We isolated and characterized the antibodies present in lupus sera that are specific for the C-terminal region of SmD (sequence 95-119). This region is highly homologous to sequence 35-58 of the EBNA I antigen, one of the nuclear antigens induced by infection with Epstein-Barr virus. Antibodies affinity purified over a peptide 95-119 column were able to recognize this sequence in the context of the whole SmD molecule, as they reacted with blotted recombinant SmD. Anti-SmD 95-119 antibodies bound also the EBNA I 35-58 peptide and detected the EBNA I molecule in a total cell extract from Epstein-Barr virus-infected lines. A population of anti-SmD antibodies is, therefore, able to bind an epitope shared by the autoantigen and the viral antigen EBNA I. To investigate the involvement of this shared epitope in the generation of anti-SmD antibodies, we immunized mice with the EBNA I 35-58 peptide. Sera from immunized animals displayed the same pattern of reactivity of spontaneously produced anti-SmD antibodies. They reacted in fact with the EBNA peptide as well as with SmD 95-119 and recombinant SmD. These data suggest that molecular mimicry may play a role in the induction of anti-SmD autoantibodies.

  12. Identification of sugarcane interspecies hybrids with RAPDs

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-04-17

    Apr 17, 2008 ... There might be existence of female parent self-pollination in the sugarcane cross breeding program. Therefore, identification of real interspecies crossbreed or elimina- tion of self-cross offsprings is an important measure of improving efficiency of sugarcane breeding. There are a lot of studies on the facticity ...

  13. Interspecies embryo reconstruction in Tibetan antelope Pantholops ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-03-21

    Mar 21, 2011 ... These results show that somatic cell nuclei of Tibetan antelope can be reprogrammed by goat oocytes. We also demonstrate that ... Key words: Interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer, Tibetan antelope, chiru, handmade cloning. INTRODUCTION ..... Cloning Stem Cells, 9: 130-137. Kitiyanant Y, Saikhun J ...

  14. Interspecies embryo reconstruction in Tibetan antelope Pantholops ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) offers the possibility of preserving endangered species. Handmade cloning (HMC) has proved to be an efficient alternative to the traditional micromanipulator-based technique in some domestic animal species. This study investigates the possibility of reconstructing the ...

  15. Association analysis of anti-Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 antibodies, anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies, the shared epitope and smoking status in Brazilian patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Alexandre Yazbek

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Epstein-Barr virus exposure appears to be an environmental trigger for rheumatoid arthritis that interacts with other risk factors. Relationships among anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies, the shared epitope, and smoking status have been observed in patients with rheumatoid arthritis from different populations. OBJECTIVE: To perform an association analysis of anti-Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 antibodies, anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies, the shared epitope, and smoking status in Brazilian patients with rheumatoid arthritis. METHODS: In a case-control study, 140 rheumatoid arthritis patients and 143 healthy volunteers who were matched for age, sex, and ethnicity were recruited. Anti-Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 antibodies and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies were examined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and shared epitope alleles were identified by genotyping. Smoking information was collected from all subjects. A comparative analysis of anti-Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 antibodies, anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies, the shared epitope, and smoking status was performed in the patient group. Logistic regression analysis models were used to analyze the risk of rheumatoid arthritis. RESULTS: Anti-Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 antibodies were not associated with anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies, shared epitope alleles, or smoking status. Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody positivity was significantly higher in smoking patients with shared epitope alleles (OR = 3.82. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis using stepwise selection, only anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies were found to be independently associated with rheumatoid arthritis (OR = 247.9. CONCLUSION: Anti-Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 antibodies did not increase the risk of rheumatoid arthritis and were not associated with the rheumatoid arthritis risk factors studied. Smoking

  16. Multiparameter grouping delineates heterogeneous populations of human IL-17 and/or IL-22 T-cell producers that share antigen specificities with other T-cell subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Martin; Arnaud, Laurent; Hié, Miguel; Parizot, Christophe; Dorgham, Karim; Shoukry, Mohamed; Kemula, Mathilde; Barete, Stéphane; Derai, David; Sauce, Delphine; Amoura, Zahir; Pène, Jérôme; Yssel, Hans; Gorochov, Guy

    2011-09-01

    The ontogenic relationship between pro-inflammatory populations of interleukin-17 (IL-17A)- and/or IL-22-producing T cells and other T-cell subsets is currently unclear in humans. To appreciate T helper cell-lineage commitment, we combined cytokine production profiles of in vitro expanded T-cell clones with T-cell receptor (TCR) clonotypic signatures. Moreover, ex vivo cytokine production profiles at the single-cell level were analyzed using an original approach based on the hierarchical cluster analysis of multiparametric flow cytometry data. These combined approaches enabled the delineation of distinct functional T-cell subsets, including Th1, Th2, Tr1, Th17 cells and a highly polyfunctional IL-22-producing T-cell population. Cluster analysis highlighted that the IL-22-producing T-cell population should be considered independently from the Th17 and Th1 subsets, although it was more closely related to the former. In parallel, we observed extensive TCRαβ sharing across all five subsets defined. The strategy described here allows the objective definition of cellular subsets and an unbiased insight into their similarities. Together, our results underscore the ontogenic plasticity of CD4(+) T-cell progenitors, which can adopt a differentiation profile irrespective of antigen specificity. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Intra- and interspecies virus transfer in Aspergilli via protoplast fusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Diepeningen, A D; Debets, A J; Hoekstra, R F

    1998-01-01

    Intra- and interspecies transfer of dsRNA viruses between black Aspergilli and Aspergillus nidulans strains has been investigated using protoplast fusion. We found interspecies transfer of virus in all combinations of black Aspergillus and A. nidulans strains and vice versa. Using the same

  18. Interspecies Interactions within Oral Microbial Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuramitsu, Howard K.; He, Xuesong; Lux, Renate; Anderson, Maxwell H.; Shi, Wenyuan

    2007-01-01

    Summary: While reductionism has greatly advanced microbiology in the past 400 years, assembly of smaller pieces just could not explain the whole! Modern microbiologists are learning “system thinking” and “holism.” Such an approach is changing our understanding of microbial physiology and our ability to diagnose/treat microbial infections. This review uses oral microbial communities as a focal point to describe this new trend. With the common name “dental plaque,” oral microbial communities are some of the most complex microbial floras in the human body, consisting of more than 700 different bacterial species. For a very long time, oral microbiologists endeavored to use reductionism to identify the key genes or key pathogens responsible for oral microbial pathogenesis. The limitations of reductionism forced scientists to begin adopting new strategies using emerging concepts such as interspecies interaction, microbial community, biofilms, polymicrobial disease, etc. These new research directions indicate that the whole is much more than the simple sum of its parts, since the interactions between different parts resulted in many new physiological functions which cannot be observed with individual components. This review describes some of these interesting interspecies-interaction scenarios. PMID:18063722

  19. Promoting Interspecies Electron Transfer with Biochar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shanshan; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Malvankar, Nikhil S.; Liu, Fanghua; Fan, Wei; Nevin, Kelly P.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2014-01-01

    Biochar, a charcoal-like product of the incomplete combustion of organic materials, is an increasingly popular soil amendment designed to improve soil fertility. We investigated the possibility that biochar could promote direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) in a manner similar to that previously reported for granular activated carbon (GAC). Although the biochars investigated were 1000 times less conductive than GAC, they stimulated DIET in co-cultures of Geobacter metallireducens with Geobacter sulfurreducens or Methanosarcina barkeri in which ethanol was the electron donor. Cells were attached to the biochar, yet not in close contact, suggesting that electrons were likely conducted through the biochar, rather than biological electrical connections. The finding that biochar can stimulate DIET may be an important consideration when amending soils with biochar and can help explain why biochar may enhance methane production from organic wastes under anaerobic conditions. PMID:24846283

  20. Promoting interspecies electron transfer with biochar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Shanshan; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin Malla

    2014-01-01

    Biochar, a charcoal-like product of the incomplete combustion of organic materials, is an increasingly popular soil amendment designed to improve soil fertility. We investigated the possibility that biochar could promote direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) in a manner similar...... to that previously reported for granular activated carbon (GAC). Although the biochars investigated were 1000 times less conductive than GAC, they stimulated DIET in co-cultures of Geobacter metallireducens with Geobacter sulfurreducens or Methanosarcina barkeri in which ethanol was the electron donor. Cells were...... attached to the biochar, yet not in close contact, suggesting that electrons were likely conducted through the biochar, rather than biological electrical connections. The finding that biochar can stimulate DIET may be an important consideration when amending soils with biochar and can help explain why...

  1. Development of interspecies cloned embryos in yak and dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Masao; Otoi, Takeshige; Wongsrikeao, Pimprapar; Agung, Budiyanto; Sambuu, Rentsenkhand; Suzuki, Tatsuyuki

    2005-01-01

    Interspecies nuclear transfer (NT) could be an alternative to replicate animals when supply of recipient oocytes is limited or in vitro embryo production systems are incomplete. In the present study, embryonic development was assessed following interspecies NT of donor cumulus cells derived from yak and dog into the recipient ooplasm of domestic cow. The percentages of fusion and subsequent embryo development to the eight-cell stage of interspecies NT embryos were comparable to those of intraspecies NT embryos (cow-cow NT embryos). The percentage of development to blastocysts was significantly lower (p dog-cow NT embryos, only one embryo (0.4%) developed to the blastocyst stage. These results indicate that interspecies NT embryos possess equally developmental competence to the eight-cell stage as intraspecies NT embryos, but the development to blastocysts is very low when dog somatic cells are used as the donor nuclei.

  2. Phytomonas serpens, a tomato parasite, shares antigens with Trypanosoma cruzi that are recognized by human sera and induce protective immunity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breganó, José Wander; Picão, Renata Cristina; Graça, Viviane Krominski; Menolli, Rafael Andrade; Itow Jankevicius, Shiduca; Pinge Filho, P; Jankevicius, José Vítor

    2003-12-05

    The immune cross-reactivity between Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan that causes Chagas' disease, and Phytomonas serpens, a trypanosomatid that infects tomatoes, was studied. Sera from patients with Chagas' disease presented a strong reactivity with P. serpens antigens by conventional serological assays such as indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) and direct agglutination test (DAT), confirmed after cross-absorption experiments. The results show that this protozoan is highly immunogenic and that rabbit and mouse hyperimmune serum raised against T. cruzi or P. serpens was able to recognize both T. cruzi and P. serpens antigens in immunofluorescence and agglutination assays. The antigenic cross-reactivity between T. cruzi and P. serpens was also demonstrated in vivo. BALB/c mice immunized by the intraperitoneal or oral route with P. serpens and later challenged with a lethal inoculum of T. cruzi blood forms showed a significant decrease in parasitemia and increase in survival compared to controls. A practical implication of these findings is that the ingestion by humans or animals of living plant trypanosomatids present in naturally infected edible fruits could potentially prime the immune response to T. cruzi antigens and interfere with the development of T. cruzi infection.

  3. Empathy and Prosocial Behaviours. Insights from Intra- and Inter-species Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria elide Vanutelli

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that “sharing the same body” between the observer and the observed subject allows for a direct form of understanding and emotional attuning by a process of simulation. Then, what happens when we don’t share the same body? The aim of the present paper is to review available evidence of intra- and inter-species empathic and prosocial behaviours, with respect to within-human, within-animals and cross-specifies interactions. Similarities and differences will be evaluated using a comparative perspective, and some possible moral and ethical implications for human-animal interactions will be discussed. According to Charles Darwin’s work, the perceived differences between human and animal empathy could be more quantitative than qualitative, suggesting a common affective core which allows both categories to mirror and tune to conspecifics’ feelings, where in the case of humans it can be integrated with more complex cognitive processes.

  4. Antigens of Streptococcus sanguis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosan, Burton

    1973-01-01

    An antigenic analysis of the alpha-hemolytic streptococci isolated from dental plaque was performed by use of antisera against a strain of Streptococcus sanguis (M-5) which was isolated from dental plaque. Immunoelectrophoretic and Ouchterlony tests of Rantz and Randall extracts of 45 strains gave positive reactions with the M-5 antisera. These strains represented 60% of the strains tested. The number of antigens which could be identified in these extracts varied from one to five and were designated a to e. The a antigen was found in 36 of the strains tested, including reference strains of S. sanguis and the group H streptococci. The strains reacting with the M-5 antisera were divided into two majors types: type I consisted of 23 strains in which the a antigen was found alone or with one or more of the c, d, and e antigens; type II consisted of 13 strains in which both the a and b antigens were found with or without one or more of the c, d, and e antigens. The remaining strains contained, either singly or in combination, the b, c, d, and e antigens but not the a antigen. Biochemical tests of representatives of each serotype and reference strains indicated that strains reacting with M-5 antisera were S. sanguis. These findings suggest that S. sanguis strains share common physiological and serological properties. Images PMID:4633291

  5. Probabilistic derivation of the interspecies assessment factor for skin sensitization.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bil, W; Schuur, A G; Ezendam, J; Bokkers, B G H

    An interspecies sensitization assessment factor (SAF) is used in the quantitative risk assessment (QRA) for skin sensitization when a murine-based NESIL (No Expected Sensitization Induction Level) is taken as point of departure. Several studies showed that, on average, the murine sensitization

  6. Ultrastructural changes in goat interspecies and intraspecies reconstructed early embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tao, Yong; Gheng, Lizi; Zhang, Meiling

    2008-01-01

    The low efficiency of somatic cell nuclear transfer may be related to the ultrastructural deviations of reconstructed embryos. The present study investigated ultrastructural differences between in vivo-produced and cloned goat embryos, including intra- and interspecies embryos. Goat ear fibroblas...

  7. Antigenic profile of African horse sickness virus serotype 4 VP5 and identification of a neutralizing epitope shared with bluetongue virus and epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez-Torrecuadrada, J.L.; Langeveld, J.P.M.; Venteo, A.

    1999-01-01

    African horse sickness virus (AHSV) causes a fatal disease in horses. The virus capsid is composed of a double protein layer, the outermost of which is formed by two proteins: VP2 and VP5. VP2 is known to determine the serotype of the virus and to contain the neutralizing epitopes. The biological...... in a plaque reduction assay were generated. To dissect the antigenic structure of AHSV VP5, the protein was cloned in Escherichia coil using the pET3 system. The immunoreactivity of both MAbs, and horse and rabbit polyclonal antisera, with 17 overlapping fragments from VP5 was analyzed. The most....... Neutralizing epitopes were defined at positions 85-92 (PDPLSPGE) for MAb 10AE12 and at 179-185 (EEDLRTR) for MAb 10AC6. Epitope 10AE12 is highly conserved between the different orbiviruses. MAb 10AE12 was able to recognize bluetongue virus VP5 and epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus VP5 by several techniques...

  8. Explaining dehumanization among children: the interspecies model of prejudice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Kimberly; Hodson, Gordon

    2014-03-01

    Although many theoretical approaches have emerged to explain prejudices expressed by children, none incorporate outgroup dehumanization, a key predictor of prejudice among adults. According to the Interspecies Model of Prejudice, beliefs in the human-animal divide facilitate outgroup prejudice through fostering animalistic dehumanization (Costello & Hodson, 2010). In the present investigation, White children attributed Black children fewer 'uniquely human' characteristics, representing the first systematic evidence of racial dehumanization among children (Studies 1 and 2). In Study 2, path analyses supported the Interspecies Model of Prejudice: children's human-animal divide beliefs predicted greater racial prejudice, an effect explained by heightened racial dehumanization. Similar patterns emerged among parents. Furthermore, parent Social Dominance Orientation predicted child prejudice indirectly through children's endorsement of a hierarchical human-animal divide and subsequent dehumanizing tendencies. Encouragingly, children's human-animal divide perceptions were malleable to an experimental prime highlighting animal-human similarity. Implications for prejudice interventions are considered. © 2012 The British Psychological Society.

  9. Interpretation of interspecies differences in the biodistribution of radioactive agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McAfee, J.G.; Subramanian, G.

    1981-01-01

    The biodistribution of some radioactive agents is anomalous and unpredictable from one species to another. However, many agents follow a general pattern of rapid clearance from the blood and total body in small rodents, intermediate clearance in the dog and monkey and slower clearance in man. A major determinant of this interspecies difference is the shorter mean circulation time (blood volume/cardiac output) in smaller animals. To permit comparisons between mammals of varying size, many physiological and metabolic parameters, and stable drug effects have been expressed as power functions with exponents less than 1 (rather than linear functions) of body weight W, or body surface area. Frequency functions such as heart and respiratory rates have been correlated with negative power functions of body weight. The plasma clearances of chemotherapeutic agents in different species has been successfully normalized by altering the time dimension according to power functions of body weight. A similar procedure has been explored to normalize blood and total body clearances of various diagnostic radioactive agents in animals and man. Time equivalent units were derived from W 33 animal / W 33 man. The method failed, however for agents with a predominantly intracellular localization or undergoing active cellular transport (such as T1-201 or I-131 Hippuran). Nonetheless, this approach appears useful in distinguishing interspecies variability merely due to body size from interspecies metabolic variations

  10. Cloning Endangered Felids by Interspecies Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Martha C; Pope, C Earle

    2015-01-01

    In 2003, the first wild felid was produced by interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer. Since then other wild felid clone offspring have been produced by using the same technique with minor modifications. This chapter describes detailed protocols used in our laboratory for (1) the isolation, culture, and preparation of fibroblast cells as donor nucleus, and (2) embryo reconstruction with domestic cat enucleated oocytes to produce cloned embryos that develop to the blastocyst stage in vitro and, after transfer into synchronized recipients, establish successful pregnancies.

  11. Microbial interspecies interactions: recent findings in syntrophic consortia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi eKouzuma

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Microbes are ubiquitous in our biosphere, and inevitably live in communities. They excrete a variety of metabolites and support the growth of other microbes in a community. According to the law of chemical equilibrium, the consumption of excreted metabolites by recipient microbes can accelerate the metabolism of donor microbes. This is the concept of syntrophy, which is a type of mutualism and governs the metabolism and growth of diverse microbes in natural and engineered ecosystems. A representative example of syntrophy is found in methanogenic communities, where reducing equivalents, e.g., hydrogen and formate, transfer between syntrophic partners. Studies have revealed that microbes involved in syntrophy have evolved molecular mechanisms to establish specific partnerships and interspecies communication, resulting in efficient metabolic cooperation. In addition, recent studies have provided evidence suggesting that microbial interspecies transfer of reducing equivalents also occurs as electric current via biotic (e.g., pili and abiotic (e.g., conductive mineral and carbon particles electric conduits. In this review, we describe these findings as examples of sophisticated cooperative behavior between different microbial species. We suggest that these interactions have fundamental roles in shaping the structure and activity of microbial communities.

  12. Microbial interspecies interactions: recent findings in syntrophic consortia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouzuma, Atsushi; Kato, Souichiro; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2015-01-01

    Microbes are ubiquitous in our biosphere, and inevitably live in communities. They excrete a variety of metabolites and support the growth of other microbes in a community. According to the law of chemical equilibrium, the consumption of excreted metabolites by recipient microbes can accelerate the metabolism of donor microbes. This is the concept of syntrophy, which is a type of mutualism and governs the metabolism and growth of diverse microbes in natural and engineered ecosystems. A representative example of syntrophy is found in methanogenic communities, where reducing equivalents, e.g., hydrogen and formate, transfer between syntrophic partners. Studies have revealed that microbes involved in syntrophy have evolved molecular mechanisms to establish specific partnerships and interspecies communication, resulting in efficient metabolic cooperation. In addition, recent studies have provided evidence suggesting that microbial interspecies transfer of reducing equivalents also occurs as electric current via biotic (e.g., pili) and abiotic (e.g., conductive mineral and carbon particles) electric conduits. In this review, we describe these findings as examples of sophisticated cooperative behavior between different microbial species. We suggest that these interactions have fundamental roles in shaping the structure and activity of microbial communities.

  13. Sharing of quorum-sensing signals and role of interspecies communities in a bacterial plant disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosni, Taha; Moretti, Chiaraluce; Devescovi, Giulia; Suarez-Moreno, Zulma Rocio; Fatmi, M' Barek; Guarnaccia, Corrado; Pongor, Sandor; Onofri, Andrea; Buonaurio, Roberto; Venturi, Vittorio

    2011-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria interact not only with the host organism but most probably also with the resident microbial flora. In the knot disease of the olive tree (Olea europaea), the causative agent is the bacterium Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi (Psv). Two bacterial species, namely Pantoea agglomerans and Erwinia toletana, which are not pathogenic and are olive plant epiphytes and endophytes, have been found very often to be associated with the olive knot. We identified the chemical signals that are produced by strains of the three species isolated from olive knot and found that they belong to the N-acyl-homoserine lactone family of QS signals. The luxI/R family genes responsible for the production and response to these signals in all three bacterial species have been identified and characterized. Genomic knockout mutagenesis and in planta experiments showed that virulence of Psv critically depends on QS; however, the lack of signal production can be complemented by wild-type E. toletana or P. agglomerans. It is also apparent that the disease caused by Psv is aggravated by the presence of the two other bacterial species. In this paper we discuss the potential role of QS in establishing a stable consortia leading to a poly-bacterial disease. PMID:21677694

  14. Bacterioplankton assembly and interspecies interaction indicating increasing coastal eutrophication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Wenfang; Zhang, Jinjie; Tu, Qichao; Deng, Ye; Qiu, Qiongfen; Xiong, Jinbo

    2017-06-01

    Anthropogenic perturbations impose negative effects on coastal ecosystems, such as increasing levels of eutrophication. Given the biogeochemical significance of microorganisms, understanding the processes and mechanisms underlying their spatial distribution under changing environmental conditions is critical. To address this question, we examined how coastal bacterioplankton communities respond to increasing eutrophication levels created by anthropogenic perturbations. The results showed that the magnitude of changes in the bacterioplankton community compositions (BCCs) and the importance of deterministic processes that constrained bacterial assembly were closely associated with eutrophication levels. Moreover, increasing eutrophication significantly (P bacterioplankton community is limited, with disrupted interspecies interaction occurring under heavy eutrophication. As such, bacterial assemblages are sensitive to changes in environmental conditions and could thus potentially serve as bio-indicators for increasing eutrophication. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Global DNA methylation changes in Cucurbitaceae inter-species grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelia Avramidou

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Grafting has been used to improve yield, fruit quality and disease resistance in a range of tree and vegetable species. The molecular mechanisms underpinning grafting responses have only recently started to be delineated. One of those mechanisms involves long distance transfer of genetic material from rootstock to scion alluding to an epigenetic component to the grafting process. In the research presented herein we extended published work on heritable changes in the DNA methylation pattern of Solanaceae scion genomes, in Cucurbitaceae inter-species grafting. Specifically, we examined global DNA methylation changes in scions of cucumber, melon and watermelon heterografted onto pumpkin rootstocks using MSAP analysis. We observed a significant increase of global DNA methylation in cucumber and melon scions pointing to an epigenetic effect in Cucurbitaceae heterografting. Exploitation of differential epigenetic marking in different rootstock-scion combinations could lead to development of epi-molecular markers for generation and selection of superior quality grafted vegetables.

  16. Interspecies gene transfer provides soybean resistance to a fungal pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenbach, Caspar; Schultheiss, Holger; Rosendahl, Martin; Tresch, Nadine; Conrath, Uwe; Goellner, Katharina

    2016-02-01

    Fungal pathogens pose a major challenge to global crop production. Crop varieties that resist disease present the best defence and offer an alternative to chemical fungicides. Exploiting durable nonhost resistance (NHR) for crop protection often requires identification and transfer of NHR-linked genes to the target crop. Here, we identify genes associated with NHR of Arabidopsis thaliana to Phakopsora pachyrhizi, the causative agent of the devastating fungal disease called Asian soybean rust. We transfer selected Arabidopsis NHR-linked genes to the soybean host and discover enhanced resistance to rust disease in some transgenic soybean lines in the greenhouse. Interspecies NHR gene transfer thus presents a promising strategy for genetically engineered control of crop diseases. © 2015 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The oxidative environment: a mediator of interspecies communication that drives symbiosis evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moné, Yves; Monnin, David; Kremer, Natacha

    2014-01-01

    Symbiotic interactions are ubiquitous in nature and play a major role in driving the evolution of life. Interactions between partners are often mediated by shared signalling pathways, which strongly influence both partners' biology and the evolution of the association in various environments. As an example of ‘common language’, the regulation of the oxidative environment plays an important role in driving the evolution of symbiotic associations. Such processes have been occurring for billions of years, including the increase in Earth's atmospheric oxygen and the subsequent evolution of mitochondria. The effect of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species (RONS) has been characterized functionally, but the molecular dialogue between partners has not been integrated within a broader evolutionary context yet. Given the pleiotropic role of RONS in cell–cell communication, development and immunity, but also their associated physiological costs, we discuss here how their regulation can influence the establishment, the maintenance and the breakdown of various symbiotic associations. By synthesizing recent developments in redox biology, we aim to provide an interdisciplinary understanding of the influence of such mediators of interspecies communication on the evolution and stability of symbioses, which in turn can shape ecosystems and play a role in health and disease. PMID:24807248

  18. Interspecies and intraspecies transmission of triple reassortant H3N2 influenza A viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassine, Hadi M; Al-Natour, Mohammad Q; Lee, Chang-Won; Saif, Yehya M

    2007-11-28

    The triple reassortant H3N2 viruses were isolated for the first time from pigs in 1998 and are known to be endemic in swine and turkey populations in the United States. In 2004, we isolated two H3N2 triple reassortant viruses from two turkey breeder flocks in Ohio and Illinois. Infected hens showed no clinical signs, but experienced a complete cessation of egg production. In this study, we evaluated three triple reassortant H3N2 isolates of turkey origin and one isolate of swine origin for their transmission between swine and turkeys. Although all 4 viruses tested share high genetic similarity in all 8 genes, only the Ohio strain (A/turkey/Ohio/313053/04) was shown to transmit efficiently both ways between swine and turkeys. One isolate, A/turkey/North Carolina/03, was able to transmit from pigs to turkeys but not vice versa. Neither of the other two viruses transmitted either way. Sequence analysis of the HA1 gene of the Ohio strain showed one amino acid change (D to A) at residue 190 of the receptor binding domain upon transmission from turkeys to pigs. The Ohio virus was then tested for intraspecies transmission in three different avian species. The virus was shown to replicate and transmit among turkeys, replicate but does not transmit among chickens, and did not replicate in ducks. Identifying viruses with varying inter- and intra-species transmission potential should be useful for further studies on the molecular basis of interspecies transmission.

  19. On the distribution of interspecies correlation for Markov models of character evolution on Yule trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Willem H; Crawford, Forrest W

    2015-01-07

    Efforts to reconstruct phylogenetic trees and understand evolutionary processes depend fundamentally on stochastic models of speciation and mutation. The simplest continuous-time model for speciation in phylogenetic trees is the Yule process, in which new species are "born" from existing lineages at a constant rate. Recent work has illuminated some of the structural properties of Yule trees, but it remains mostly unknown how these properties affect sequence and trait patterns observed at the tips of the phylogenetic tree. Understanding the interplay between speciation and mutation under simple models of evolution is essential for deriving valid phylogenetic inference methods and gives insight into the optimal design of phylogenetic studies. In this work, we derive the probability distribution of interspecies covariance under Brownian motion and Ornstein-Uhlenbeck models of phenotypic change on a Yule tree. We compute the probability distribution of the number of mutations shared between two randomly chosen taxa in a Yule tree under discrete Markov mutation models. Our results suggest summary measures of phylogenetic information content, illuminate the correlation between site patterns in sequences or traits of related organisms, and provide heuristics for experimental design and reconstruction of phylogenetic trees. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A biological approach to the interspecies prediction of radiation-induced mortality risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnes, B.A.; Grahn, D.; Olshansky, S.J.

    1997-01-01

    Evolutionary explanations for why sexually reproducing organisms grow old suggest that the forces of natural selection affect the ages when diseases occur that are subject to a genetic influence (referred to here as intrinsic diseases). When extended to the population level for a species, this logic leads to the general prediction that age-specific death rates from intrinsic causes should begin to rise as the force of selection wanes once the characteristic age of sexual maturity is attained. Results consistent with these predictions have been found for laboratory mice, beagles, and humans where, after adjusting for differences in life span, it was demonstrated that these species share a common age pattern of mortality for intrinsic causes of death. In quantitative models used to predict radiation-induced mortality, risks are often expressed as multiples of those observed in a control population. A control population, however, is an aging population. As such, mortality risks related to exposure must be interpreted relative to the age-specific risk of death associated with aging. Given the previous success in making interspecies predictions of age-related mortality, the purpose of this study was to determine whether radiation-induced mortality observed in one species could also be predicted quantitatively from a model used to describe the mortality consequences of exposure to radiation in a different species. Mortality data for B6CF 1 mice and beagles exposed to 60 Co γ-rays for the duration of life were used for analysis

  1. Syntrophic Growth via Quinone-Mediated Interspecies Electron Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A Smith

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which microbial species exchange electrons are of interest because interspecies electron transfer can expand the metabolic capabilities of microbial communities. Previous studies with the humic substance analog anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS suggested that quinone-mediated interspecies electron transfer (QUIET is feasible, but it was not determined if sufficient energy is available from QUIET to support the growth of both species. Furthermore, there have been no previous studies on the mechanisms for the oxidation of anthrahydroquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AHQDS. A co-culture of Geobacter metallireducens and Geobacter sulfurreducens metabolized ethanol with the reduction of fumarate much faster in the presence of AQDS, and there was an increase in cell protein. G. sulfurreducens was more abundant, consistent with G. sulfurreducens obtaining electrons from acetate that G. metallireducens produced from ethanol, as well as from AHQDS. Cocultures initiated with a citrate synthase-deficient strain of G. sulfurreducens that was unable to use acetate as an electron donor also metabolized ethanol with the reduction of fumarate and cell growth, but acetate accumulated over time. G. sulfurreducens and G. metallireducens were equally abundant in these co-cultures reflecting the inability of the citrate synthase-deficient strain of G. sulfurreducens to metabolize acetate. Evaluation of the mechanisms by which G. sulfurreducens accepts electrons from AHQDS demonstrated that a strain deficient in outer-surface c-type cytochromes that are required for AQDS reduction was as effective at QUIET as the wild-type strain. Deletion of additional genes previously implicated in extracellular electron transfer also had no impact on QUIET. These results demonstrate that QUIET can yield sufficient energy to support the growth of both syntrophic partners, but that the mechanisms by which electrons are derived from extracellular hydroquinones require

  2. Immune events associated with protection in C57BL/6 mice immunized with anti-idiotypic antibodies mimicking protective antigens shared between gamma-irradiated cercariae vaccine and human resistance model of Schistosoma haematobium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdeen, Sherif H

    2010-01-01

    Immunoregulation is central for successful manipulation of schistosomiasis. Unlike schistosome vaccine development strategies that relied on direct selection of antigens from crude responses leading to selection of mildly protective antigens, the present study tested the utility of selection of potentially protective antigens encompassed rounds of immunoregulation via idiotypic network. Anti-idiotypic antibodies (Ab2) were purified from sera of New Zealand white rabbits multiply immunized with gamma-irradiated cercariae of S. haematobium, using adult worm specific idiotypes (Ab1) purified from sera of subjects resistant to reinfection. Ab2 was used for immunization of C57BL/6 mice and consequences of immunization were monitored before and after challenge infection with S. haematobium. Results showed an increase of splenic T cell expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) upon immunization (average % stimulated cells 54.9 vs. 20.4, P anti-anti-ids (Ab3) reactivity against antigens of approximate molecular weight 40, 80 and 160 kDa of adult worms, which were also recognized by Ab1. However, in contrast to Ab1, Ab3 showed no surface binding to 3 hr schistosomula. Strikingly, mice immunized with Ab2 showed strong resistance to challenge infection (approximately 82% reduction in worm burden, P vaccine development strategy appears to filter out non-protective antigens. Indeed Ab3 recognizes much fewer numbers of antigens, which passed through two rounds of immune regulation. These antigens appear to represent a significant proportion of the protective response in the gamma-irradiated cercariae vaccine and human resistance model as well, providing the basis for an alternative vaccine for schistosomiasis.

  3. Development of Species Sensitivity Distributions for Wildlife Using Interspecies Toxicity Correlation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Species sensitivity distributions (SSD) are cumulative distributions of chemical toxicity of multiple species and have had limited application in wildlife risk assessment because of relatively small datasets of wildlife toxicity values. Interspecies correlation estimation (ICE) m...

  4. Nicotine Enhances Interspecies Relationship between Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyu Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans are common microorganisms in the human oral cavity. The synergistic relationship between these two species has been deeply explored in many studies. In the present study, the effect of alkaloid nicotine on the interspecies between S. mutans and C. albicans is explored. We developed a dual-species biofilm model and studied biofilm biomass, biofilm structure, synthesis of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS, and expression of glucosyltransferases (Gtfs. Biofilm formation and bacterial and fungal cell numbers in dual-species biofilms increased in the presence of nicotine. More C. albicans cells were present in the dual-species biofilms in the nicotine-treated groups as determined by scanning electron microscopy. The synthesis of EPS was increased by 1 mg/ml of nicotine as detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The result of qRT-PCR showed gtfs expression was upregulated when 1 mg/ml of nicotine was used. We speculate that nicotine promoted the growth of S. mutans, and more S. mutans cells attracted more C. albicans cells due to the interaction between two species. Since S. mutans and C. albicans are putative pathogens for dental caries, the enhancement of the synergistic relationship by nicotine may contribute to caries development in smokers.

  5. Microbial interspecies electron transfer via electric currents through conductive minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Souichiro; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2012-01-01

    In anaerobic biota, reducing equivalents (electrons) are transferred between different species of microbes [interspecies electron transfer (IET)], establishing the basis of cooperative behaviors and community functions. IET mechanisms described so far are based on diffusion of redox chemical species and/or direct contact in cell aggregates. Here, we show another possibility that IET also occurs via electric currents through natural conductive minerals. Our investigation revealed that electrically conductive magnetite nanoparticles facilitated IET from Geobacter sulfurreducens to Thiobacillus denitrificans, accomplishing acetate oxidation coupled to nitrate reduction. This two-species cooperative catabolism also occurred, albeit one order of magnitude slower, in the presence of Fe ions that worked as diffusive redox species. Semiconductive and insulating iron-oxide nanoparticles did not accelerate the cooperative catabolism. Our results suggest that microbes use conductive mineral particles as conduits of electrons, resulting in efficient IET and cooperative catabolism. Furthermore, such natural mineral conduits are considered to provide ecological advantages for users, because their investments in IET can be reduced. Given that conductive minerals are ubiquitously and abundantly present in nature, electric interactions between microbes and conductive minerals may contribute greatly to the coupling of biogeochemical reactions. PMID:22665802

  6. Interspecies comparison of probiotics isolated from different animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr M. Abdou

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the current study was to isolate and identify naturally occurring probiotic Lactobacillus species in different animals with the different environmental background including fish, and farm animals to investigate interspecies differences in probiotics on the species level. Materials and Methods: A total of 44 fecal and milk samples were collected under aseptic conditions from cattle, buffalo, camel, sheep, goats, and fish. The samples were cultured, and the isolated strains were confirmed biochemically and molecularly using 16S rRNA multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR analysis following DNA extraction from the bacterial isolates. Results: A total of 31 isolates identified as lactobacilli were isolated from cattle milk, goat feces, sheep feces, fish feces, buffalo milk, camel milk, and goats' milk. Lactobacillus species were identified based on the size of the PCR product. The results showed that different species were different in their lactobacilli content. At the same time, there were some differences between individuals of the same species. Conclusion: The diversity of probiotic strains isolated from different animal species implies different types of benefits to the host. Although it would be both money - and time-consuming research, discovering the benefit of each of these strains may provide very important information for the health of both human and animal. Furthermore, transferring these beneficial effects either to individuals within the same species or between different species would be of great importance.

  7. Nutritional consequences of interspecies differences in arginine and lysine metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Ronald O; Urschel, Kristine L; Pencharz, Paul B

    2007-06-01

    Differences in lysine and arginine requirements among various species such as omnivores (humans, pigs, rats, dogs), carnivores (cats), herbivores (rabbits, horses), ruminants (cattle), poultry, and fish, are covered in detail in this article. Although lysine is classified as an indispensable amino acid across species, the classification of arginine as either an indispensable or dispensable amino acid is more ambiguous because of differences among species in rates of de novo arginine synthesis. Because lysine is most often the limiting amino acid in the diet, its requirement has been extensively studied. By use of the ideal protein concept, the requirements of the other indispensable amino acids can be extrapolated from the lysine requirement. The successful use of this concept in pigs is compared with potential application of the ideal protein concept in humans. The current dietary arginine requirement varies widely among species, with ruminants, rabbits, and rats having relatively low requirements and carnivores, fish, and poultry having high requirements. Interspecies differences in metabolic arginine utilization and reasons for different rates of de novo arginine synthesis are reviewed in detail, as these are the primary determinants of the dietary arginine requirement. There is presently no dietary requirement for humans of any age, although this needs to be reassessed, particularly in neonates. A thorough understanding of the factors contributing to the lysine and arginine requirements in different species will be useful in our understanding of human amino acid requirements.

  8. Nicotine Enhances Interspecies Relationship between Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shiyu; Qiu, Wei; Zhang, Keke; Zhou, Xuedong; Ren, Biao; He, Jinzhi; Xu, Xin; Cheng, Lei; Li, Mingyun

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans are common microorganisms in the human oral cavity. The synergistic relationship between these two species has been deeply explored in many studies. In the present study, the effect of alkaloid nicotine on the interspecies between S. mutans and C. albicans is explored. We developed a dual-species biofilm model and studied biofilm biomass, biofilm structure, synthesis of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS), and expression of glucosyltransferases (Gtfs). Biofilm formation and bacterial and fungal cell numbers in dual-species biofilms increased in the presence of nicotine. More C. albicans cells were present in the dual-species biofilms in the nicotine-treated groups as determined by scanning electron microscopy. The synthesis of EPS was increased by 1 mg/ml of nicotine as detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The result of qRT-PCR showed gtfs expression was upregulated when 1 mg/ml of nicotine was used. We speculate that nicotine promoted the growth of S. mutans , and more S. mutans cells attracted more C. albicans cells due to the interaction between two species. Since S. mutans and C. albicans are putative pathogens for dental caries, the enhancement of the synergistic relationship by nicotine may contribute to caries development in smokers.

  9. Interspecies variation in the risks of metals to bats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernout, Béatrice V.; Pietravalle, Stéphane; Arnold, Kathryn E.; McClean, Colin J.; Aegerter, James; Boxall, Alistair B.A.

    2015-01-01

    A modeling framework was used to assess the risk of four metals to UK bat species. Eight species of bats were predicted to be “at risk” from one or more of the metals in over 5% of their ranges. Species differed significantly in their predicted risk. Contamination by Pb was found to pose the greatest risk, followed by Cu, Cd and Zn. A sensitivity analysis identified the proportion of invertebrates ingested as most important in determining the risk. We then compared the model predictions with a large dataset of metals concentrations in the tissues (liver, kidney) of Pipistrellus sp. from across England and Wales. Bats found in areas predicted to be the most “at risk” contained higher metal concentrations in their tissues than those found in areas predicted “not at risk” by the model. Our spatially explicit modeling framework provides a useful tool for further environmental risk assessment studies for wildlife species. - Highlights: • Spatial variation in risk of exposure to metals was modeled for 14 UK bat species. • Interspecific differences in metal exposure across bat species were found. • Sensitivity analyses revealed that the bat diet data was important in driving risk. • Pb exposure poses the greatest risk, followed by Cu, Cd and Zn. • The model is able to partially predict areas where bats are the most exposed. - Modeling exposure to trace metals for bats: interspecies variation and model evaluation.

  10. Interspecies comparison of probiotics isolated from different animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdou, Amr M; Hedia, Riham H; Omara, Shimaa T; Mahmoud, Mohamed Abd El-Fatah; Kandil, Mai M; Bakry, M A

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the current study was to isolate and identify naturally occurring probiotic Lactobacillus species in different animals with the different environmental background including fish, and farm animals to investigate interspecies differences in probiotics on the species level. A total of 44 fecal and milk samples were collected under aseptic conditions from cattle, buffalo, camel, sheep, goats, and fish. The samples were cultured, and the isolated strains were confirmed biochemically and molecularly using 16S rRNA multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis following DNA extraction from the bacterial isolates. A total of 31 isolates identified as lactobacilli were isolated from cattle milk, goat feces, sheep feces, fish feces, buffalo milk, camel milk, and goats' milk. Lactobacillus species were identified based on the size of the PCR product. The results showed that different species were different in their lactobacilli content. At the same time, there were some differences between individuals of the same species. The diversity of probiotic strains isolated from different animal species implies different types of benefits to the host. Although it would be both money - and time-consuming research, discovering the benefit of each of these strains may provide very important information for the health of both human and animal. Furthermore, transferring these beneficial effects either to individuals within the same species or between different species would be of great importance.

  11. Diversity of Streptococcus mutans strains in bacterial interspecies interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaolan; Hoogenkamp, Michel A; Ling, Junqi; Crielaard, Wim; Deng, Dong Mei

    2014-02-01

    Biofilms are matrix-enclosed microbial population adhere to each other and to surfaces. Compared to planktonic bacterial cells, biofilm cells show much higher levels of antimicrobial resistance. We aimed to investigate Streptococcus mutans strain diversity in biofilm formation and chlorhexidine (CHX) resistance of single S. mutans and dual S. mutans-Enterococcus faecalis biofilms. Four clinical S. mutans strains (C180-2, C67-1, HG723 and UA159) formed 24-h biofilms with or without an E. faecalis strain. These biofilms were treated for 10 min with 0.025% CHX. Biofilm formation, CHX resistance and S.mutans-E. faecalis interactions were evaluated by biomass staining, resazurin metabolism, viable count and competition agar assays. The main finding is that the presence of E. faecalis generally reduced all dual-species biofilm formation, but the proportions of S. mutans in the dual-species biofilms as well as CHX resistance displayed a clear S. mutans strain dependence. In particular, decreased resistance against CHX was observed in dual S. mutans C67-1 biofilms, while increased resistance was found in dual S. mutans UA159 biofilms. In conclusion, the interaction of S. mutans with E. faecalis in biofilms varies between strains, which underlines the importance of studying strain diversity in inter-species virulence modulation and biofilm antimicrobial resistance. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Shared pledge shared vision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boussaha, Ali; Diatta, Christian Sina

    2005-01-01

    The New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD) is a pledge by African leaders to eradicate poverty and to promote sustainable growth and development. NEPAD is a 'new framework of interaction with the rest of the world, including the industrialised countries and multilateral organizations.' The agenda is based on regional priorities and development plans and its implementation relies on African ownership and management. As a UN system organisation, the IAEA strongly supports the priorities identified in the Millennium Declaration and the New Partnership for Africa's Development. As a technical agency, the IAEA shares its recognized core competencies and technical expertise in support of NEPAD goals. Efforts aim at strengthening institutional capacity building in nuclear sciences and technology and promoting the sustainable application of nuclear techniques for social and economic development. The IAEA has a membership of 34 African countries. The Agency supports them under its technical cooperation programme through provision of expertise, training opportunities and equipment in priority areas identified by the countries themselves. For many African Member States, meeting basic human needs through the implementation of poverty alleviation strategies remains the top priority on the agenda for national development plans and international cooperation programmes. In the context of sustainable development, special attention is being paid to enlarging the contribution of isotopes and nuclear techniques in major areas of economic and social significance and to promoting regional cooperation in nuclear science and technology related fields. As a partner in development, the Agency has promoted and undertaken programmes to support African countries' efforts to address priority development issues particularly in the areas of health care, food and agriculture and water resources development. The IAEA technical cooperation mechanism includes support to the African Regional

  13. Sharing Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marton, Attila; Constantiou, Ioanna; Thoma, Antonela

    De spite the hype the notion of the sharing economy is surrounded by, our understanding of sharing is surprisingly undertheorized. In this paper, we make a first step towards rem edying this state of affairs by analy sing sharing as a s ocial practice. Based on a multi ple - case study, we analys...

  14. Simian Rotaviruses Possess Divergent Gene Constellations That Originated from Interspecies Transmission and Reassortment▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthijnssens, Jelle; Taraporewala, Zenobia F.; Yang, Hongyan; Rao, Shujing; Yuan, Lijuan; Cao, Dianjun; Hoshino, Yasutaka; Mertens, Peter P. C.; Carner, Gerry R.; McNeal, Monica; Sestak, Karol; Van Ranst, Marc; Patton, John T.

    2010-01-01

    Although few simian rotaviruses (RVs) have been isolated, such strains have been important for basic research and vaccine development. To explore the origins of simian RVs, the complete genome sequences of strains PTRV (G8P[1]), RRV (G3P[3]), and TUCH (G3P[24]) were determined. These data allowed the genotype constellations of each virus to be determined and the phylogenetic relationships of the simian strains with each other and with nonsimian RVs to be elucidated. The results indicate that PTRV was likely transmitted from a bovine or other ruminant into pig-tailed macaques (its host of origin), since its genes have genotypes and encode outer-capsid proteins similar to those of bovine RVs. In contrast, most of the genes of rhesus-macaque strains, RRV and TUCH, have genotypes more typical of canine-feline RVs. However, the sequences of the canine and/or feline (canine/feline)-like genes of RRV and TUCH are only distantly related to those of modern canine/feline RVs, indicating that any potential transmission of a progenitor of these viruses from a canine/feline host to a simian host was not recent. The remaining genes of RRV and TUCH appear to have originated through reassortment with bovine, human, or other RV strains. Finally, comparison of PTRV, RRV, and TUCH genes with those of the vervet-monkey RV SA11-H96 (G3P[2]) indicates that SA11-H96 shares little genetic similarity to other simian strains and likely has evolved independently. Collectively, our data indicate that simian RVs are of diverse ancestry with genome constellations that originated largely by interspecies transmission and reassortment with nonhuman animal RVs. PMID:19939934

  15. Simian rotaviruses possess divergent gene constellations that originated from interspecies transmission and reassortment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthijnssens, Jelle; Taraporewala, Zenobia F; Yang, Hongyan; Rao, Shujing; Yuan, Lijuan; Cao, Dianjun; Hoshino, Yasutaka; Mertens, Peter P C; Carner, Gerry R; McNeal, Monica; Sestak, Karol; Van Ranst, Marc; Patton, John T

    2010-02-01

    Although few simian rotaviruses (RVs) have been isolated, such strains have been important for basic research and vaccine development. To explore the origins of simian RVs, the complete genome sequences of strains PTRV (G8P[1]), RRV (G3P[3]), and TUCH (G3P[24]) were determined. These data allowed the genotype constellations of each virus to be determined and the phylogenetic relationships of the simian strains with each other and with nonsimian RVs to be elucidated. The results indicate that PTRV was likely transmitted from a bovine or other ruminant into pig-tailed macaques (its host of origin), since its genes have genotypes and encode outer-capsid proteins similar to those of bovine RVs. In contrast, most of the genes of rhesus-macaque strains, RRV and TUCH, have genotypes more typical of canine-feline RVs. However, the sequences of the canine and/or feline (canine/feline)-like genes of RRV and TUCH are only distantly related to those of modern canine/feline RVs, indicating that any potential transmission of a progenitor of these viruses from a canine/feline host to a simian host was not recent. The remaining genes of RRV and TUCH appear to have originated through reassortment with bovine, human, or other RV strains. Finally, comparison of PTRV, RRV, and TUCH genes with those of the vervet-monkey RV SA11-H96 (G3P[2]) indicates that SA11-H96 shares little genetic similarity to other simian strains and likely has evolved independently. Collectively, our data indicate that simian RVs are of diverse ancestry with genome constellations that originated largely by interspecies transmission and reassortment with nonhuman animal RVs.

  16. Interspecies and intraspecies transmission of triple reassortant H3N2 influenza A viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Chang-Won

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available 1. Abstract The triple reassortant H3N2 viruses were isolated for the first time from pigs in 1998 and are known to be endemic in swine and turkey populations in the United States. In 2004, we isolated two H3N2 triple reassortant viruses from two turkey breeder flocks in Ohio and Illinois. Infected hens showed no clinical signs, but experienced a complete cessation of egg production. In this study, we evaluated three triple reassortant H3N2 isolates of turkey origin and one isolate of swine origin for their transmission between swine and turkeys. Although all 4 viruses tested share high genetic similarity in all 8 genes, only the Ohio strain (A/turkey/Ohio/313053/04 was shown to transmit efficiently both ways between swine and turkeys. One isolate, A/turkey/North Carolina/03, was able to transmit from pigs to turkeys but not vice versa. Neither of the other two viruses transmitted either way. Sequence analysis of the HA1 gene of the Ohio strain showed one amino acid change (D to A at residue 190 of the receptor binding domain upon transmission from turkeys to pigs. The Ohio virus was then tested for intraspecies transmission in three different avian species. The virus was shown to replicate and transmit among turkeys, replicate but does not transmit among chickens, and did not replicate in ducks. Identifying viruses with varying inter- and intra-species transmission potential should be useful for further studies on the molecular basis of interspecies transmission.

  17. Sharing City

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This magazine offers an insight into the growing commercial innovation, civic movements, and political narratives surrounding sharing economy services, solutions and organisational types. It presents a cross-section of the manifold sharing economy services and solutions that can be found in Denmark....... Solutions of sharing that seeks to improve our cities and local communities in both urban and rural environments. 24 sharing economy organisations and businesses addressing urban and rural issues are being portrayed and seven Danish municipalities that have explored the potentials of sharing economy....... Moreover, 15 thought leading experts - professionals and academic - have been invited to give their perspective on sharing economy for cities. This magazine touches upon aspects of the sharing economy as mobility, communities, sustainability, business development, mobility, and urban-rural relation....

  18. Shared leadership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulhøi, John Parm; Müller, Sabine

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is twofold. First, this paper comprehensively will review the conceptual and empirical literature to identify such critical underlying mechanisms which enable shared or collective leadership. Second, this article identifies the antecedents and outcomes of shared leadership...... according to the literature review to develop a re-conceptualised and synthesized framework for managing the organizational issues associated with shared leadership on various organizational levels. The paper rectifies this by identifying the critical factors and mechanisms which enable shared leadership...... and its antecedents and outcomes, and to develop a re-conceptualized and synthesized framework of shared leadership. The paper closes with a brief discussion of avenues for future research and implications for managers....

  19. Carcinoma-associated antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartorelli, A.; Accinni, R.

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to novel antigens associated with breast carcinoma, anti-sera specific to said antigens, 125 I-labeled forms of said antigens and methods of detecting said antigens in serum or plasma. The invention also relates to a diagnostic kit containing standardised antigens or antisera or marked forms thereof for the detection of said antigens in human blood, serum or plasma. (author)

  20. Sharing Memories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodil, Kasper; Nielsen, Emil Byskov; Nielsen, Jonathan Bernstorff

    2018-01-01

    For people suffering from aphasia, everyday verbal and bodily interpersonal communication is challenging. To increase aphasics' ability to share memories, an assistive technology (the MemoryBook) was conceptualized based on explicit, observable and tacit knowledge gathered from the practices...

  1. Knowledge Sharing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holdt Christensen, Peter

    The concept of knowledge management has, indeed, become a buzzword that every single organization is expected to practice and live by. Knowledge management is about managing the organization's knowledge for the common good of the organization -but practicing knowledge management is not as simple...... as that. This article focuses on knowledge sharing as the process seeking to reduce the resources spent on reinventing the wheel.The article introduces the concept of time sensitiveness; i.e. that knowledge is either urgently needed, or not that urgently needed. Furthermore, knowledge sharing...... is considered as either a push or pull system. Four strategies for sharing knowledge - help, post-it, manuals and meeting, and advice are introduced. Each strategy requires different channels for sharing knowledge. An empirical analysis in a production facility highlights how the strategies can be practiced....

  2. ANTIGENIC PROMOTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chin-Yu; Cinader, Bernard

    1971-01-01

    Rabbits were immunized with p-azobenzene arsonic acid derivatives of human serum albumin (HA-As) or of dissociated keyhole limpet hemocyanin. The IgM response to the hapten was evaluated in terms of the number of hapten-specific plaque-forming cells in the lymph node draining the injection site. In some experiments, antibody was measured by agglutination of tanned and sensitized erythrocytes. The hapten response of animals immunized with HA-As was increased (promoting effect) when the animals were injected with one of several structurally unrelated macromolecules: keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), horse spleen ferritin (HSF), lysozyme (Lys), alum-precipitated human gamma globulin (alum-precipitated HGG). Different macromolecules differed in the magnitude of the promoting effect they induced, e.g., promotion by the associated form of KLH was greater than that by the dissociated form; alum-precipitated HGG was a better promoter than was soluble HGG. The relative magnitude of promotion by different macromolecules (associated vs. dissociated KLH, alum-precipitated vs. soluble HGG) correlated with the relative magnitude of the carrier effect, as judged by the hapten response induced by p-azobenzene arsonic acid conjugated to various proteins. Promotion was detected by agglutination assay of circulating antibody, by plaque assay of cells from the popliteal lymph node draining the site of preinjection, but not by plaque assay of cells from the contralateral lymph node. Promotion was dependent on the dose of the promoting macromolecule and on the dose of the hapten-protein conjugate. It was not observed in animals tolerant to the promoting macromolecule. Inhibition (i.e. antigenic competition), rather than promotion, was observed upon a secondary response to the preinjected macromolecule or when the hapten-protein conjugate was incorporated in Freund's adjuvant. PMID:15776570

  3. Acute toxicity prediction to threatened and endangered species using Interspecies Correlation Estimation (ICE) models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evaluating contaminant sensitivity of threatened and endangered (listed) species and protectiveness of chemical regulations often depends on toxicity data for commonly tested surrogate species. The U.S. EPA’s Internet application Web-ICE is a suite of Interspecies Correlati...

  4. Development of Algal Interspecies Correlation Estimation Models for Chemical Hazard Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Web-based Interspecies Correlation Estimation (ICE) is an application developed to predict the acute toxicity of a chemical from 1 species to another taxon. Web-ICE models use the acute toxicity value for a surrogate species to predict effect values for other species, thus potent...

  5. WEB-BASED INTERSPECIES CORRELATION ESTIMATION (WEB-ICE) FOR ACUTE TOXICITY: USER MANUAL V2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predictive toxicological models are integral to environmental risk Assessment where data for most species are limited. Web-based Interspecies Correlation Estimation (Web-ICE) models are least square regressions that predict acute toxicity (LC50/LD50) of a chemical to a species, ...

  6. Whole genome analysis provides evidence for porcine-to-simian interspecies transmission of rotavirus-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Ryan; Aung, Meiji Soe; Cruz, Katalina; Ketzis, Jennifer; Gallagher, Christa Ann; Beierschmitt, Amy; Malik, Yashpal Singh; Kobayashi, Nobumichi; Ghosh, Souvik

    2017-04-01

    We report here whole genome analysis of a porcine rotavirus-A (RVA) strain RVA/Pig-wt/KNA/ET8B/2015/G5P[13] detected in a diarrheic piglet, and nearly whole genome (except for VP4 gene) analysis of a simian RVA strain RVA/Simian-wt/KNA/08979/2015/G5P[X] detected in a non-diarrheic African green monkey (AGM) on the island of St. Kitts, Caribbean region. Strain ET8B exhibited a G5-P[13]-I5-R1-C1-M1-A8-N1-T7-E1-H1 genotype constellation that was identical to those of Brazilian porcine RVA G5P[13] strains RVA/Pig-wt/BRA/ROTA01/2013/G5P[13] and RVA/Pig-wt/BRA/ROTA07/2013/G5P[13], the only porcine G5P[13] RVAs that have been analyzed for the whole genome so far. Phylogenetically, all the 11 gene segments of ET8B were closely related to those of porcine and porcine-like human RVAs within the respective genotypes. Although the porcine G5P[13] RVAs exhibited identical genotype constellations, ET8B did not appear to share common evolutionary pathways with the Brazilian porcine G5P[13] RVAs. Interestingly, the VP2, VP3, VP6, VP7, and NSP1-NSP5 genes of simian RVA strain 08979 were closely related to those of porcine and porcine-like human RVA strains, exhibiting 99%-100% nucleotide sequence identities to cognate genes of co-circulating porcine RVA strain ET8B. On the other hand, the VP1 of 08979 appeared to be genetically divergent from porcine and human RVAs within the R1 genotype, and its exact origin could not be ascertained. Taken together, these observations suggested that simian strain 08979 might have been derived from interspecies transmission events involving transmission of ET8B-like RVAs from pigs to AGMs. In St. Kitts, AGMs often stray from the wild into livestock farms. Therefore, it may be possible that the AGM acquired the infection from a pig farm on the island. To our knowledge, this is the first report on detection of porcine-like RVAs in monkeys. Also, the present study is the first to report whole genomic analysis of a porcine RVA strain from the Caribbean

  7. Interspecies interactions and potential Influenza A virus risk in small swine farms in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCune Sarah

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent avian influenza epidemic in Asia and the H1N1 pandemic demonstrated that influenza A viruses pose a threat to global public health. The animal origins of the viruses confirmed the potential for interspecies transmission. Swine are hypothesized to be prime "mixing vessels" due to the dual receptivity of their trachea to human and avian strains. Additionally, avian and human influenza viruses have previously been isolated in swine. Therefore, understanding interspecies contact on smallholder swine farms and its potential role in the transmission of pathogens such as influenza virus is very important. Methods This qualitative study aimed to determine swine-associated interspecies contacts in two coastal areas of Peru. Direct observations were conducted at both small-scale confined and low-investment swine farms (n = 36 and in open areas where swine freely range during the day (n = 4. Interviews were also conducted with key stakeholders in swine farming. Results In both locations, the intermingling of swine and domestic birds was common. An unexpected contact with avian species was that swine were fed poultry mortality in 6/20 of the farms in Chancay. Human-swine contacts were common, with a higher frequency on the confined farms. Mixed farming of swine with chickens or ducks was observed in 36% of all farms. Human-avian interactions were less frequent overall. Use of adequate biosecurity and hygiene practices by farmers was suboptimal at both locations. Conclusions Close human-animal interaction, frequent interspecies contacts and suboptimal biosecurity and hygiene practices pose significant risks of interspecies influenza virus transmission. Farmers in small-scale swine production systems constitute a high-risk population and need to be recognized as key in preventing interspecies pathogen transfer. A two-pronged prevention approach, which offers educational activities for swine farmers about sound hygiene and

  8. [Antigenic relations of several strains of Naegleria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubiaur, E; Alonso, P

    1987-02-01

    In previous papers different aspects of one strain of Naegleria lovaniensis (Aq/9/1/45D) and two strains of N. gruberi (1518/le and 1518/lf) have been studied. From the results obtained it can be concluded that each strain behaves differently; no more similarities have been found between both N. gruberi strains, than between each of these and N. lovaniensis. Such an event has prompted us to characterize their antigenic relationships by means of an immunoprecipitation assay (double diffusion in plate). Each antiserum was tested against the different antigenic extracts. For N. lovaniensis, besides the whole extract, two fractions (particulate and soluble) and their respective antisera were assayed separately. No reaction occurred between any of the anti-N. lovaniensis sera and either of the two N. gruberi extracts. The antiserum to N. gruberi 1518/lf reacted only with its homologue and with N. lovaniensis antigens. Both N. lovaniensis fractions share some antigenic components being more complex the antigenic structure of the soluble fraction. Therefore no more similarities occur between both N. gruberi strains than between each one and N. lovaniensis, rather N. gruberi 1518/le exhibits more antigenic relationships with N. lovaniensis than with 1518/lf strains. In view of such results the species N. gruberi should be taxonomically reconsidered, criterium shared by other authors.

  9. Influence of Taxonomic Relatedness and Chemical Mode of Action in Acute Interspecies Estimation Models for Aquatic species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecological risks to aquatic organisms are typically assessed using toxicity data for relatively few species and with limited understanding of relative species sensitivity. We developed a comprehensive set of interspecies correlation estimation (ICE) models for aquatic organisms a...

  10. Syntrophic growth with direct interspecies electron transfer as the primary mechanism for energy exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Aklujkar, Muktak

    2013-01-01

    Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) through biological electrical connections is an alternative to interspecies H2 transfer as a mechanism for electron exchange in syntrophic cultures. However, it has not previously been determined whether electrons received via DIET yield energy....... The lack of acetate metabolism resulted in less fumarate reduction and lower cell abundance of G. sulfurreducens. RNAseq analysis of transcript abundance was consistent with a lack of acetate metabolism in G. sulfurreducens and revealed gene expression levels for the uptake hydrogenase, formate...... dehydrogenase, the pilus-associated c-type cytochrome OmcS and pili consistent with electron transfer via DIET. These results suggest that electrons transferred via DIET can serve as the sole energy source to support anaerobic respiration....

  11. Quantifying inter-species differences in contractile function through biophysical modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tøndel, Kristin; Land, Sander; Niederer, Steven A; Smith, Nicolas P

    2015-03-01

    Animal models and measurements are frequently used to guide and evaluate clinical interventions. In this context, knowledge of inter-species differences in physiology is crucial for understanding the limitations and relevance of animal experimental assays for informing clinical applications. Extensive effort has been put into studying the structure and function of cardiac contractile proteins and how differences in these translate into the functional properties of muscles. However, integrating this knowledge into a quantitative description, formalising and highlighting inter-species differences both in the kinetics and in the regulation of physiological mechanisms, remains challenging. In this study we propose and apply a novel approach for the quantification of inter-species differences between mouse, rat and human. Assuming conservation of the fundamental physiological mechanisms underpinning contraction, biophysically based computational models are fitted to simulate experimentally recorded phenotypes from multiple species. The phenotypic differences between species are then succinctly quantified as differences in the biophysical model parameter values. This provides the potential of quantitatively establishing the human relevance of both animal-based experimental and computational models for application in a clinical context. Our results indicate that the parameters related to the sensitivity and cooperativity of calcium binding to troponin C and the activation and relaxation rates of tropomyosin/crossbridge binding kinetics differ most significantly between mouse, rat and human, while for example the reference tension, as expected, shows only minor differences between the species. Hence, while confirming expected inter-species differences in calcium sensitivity due to large differences in the observed calcium transients, our results also indicate more unexpected differences in the cooperativity mechanism. Specifically, the decrease in the unbinding rate of

  12. Sharing Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Kjetil; Refslund Christensen, Dorthe

    allowing creating unique and editable profiles, adding personal content and sharing it with other people in your network(s) AND systems for publishing your own life: becoming visible to others, being connected and being observed. More and more sites turn up on the Internet that facilitates the process......, different social matrices and different levels of performativity. In the 1990'ies ‘new media' was seen as something separate, a new and strange world, a ‘cyberspace' situated somewhere else and of a completely different character than what we - using a very problematic term - call ‘real life'. Today...... cyberspace and real life is rather part of the same continuum (Castells, Gotved), the online world is not a totally new social sphere with a totally different set of social rules and matrices but displays the same wide range of performative, social and communicative aspects as do the offline world...

  13. Microwave treatment modify antigenicity properties of bovine milk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GRACE

    2006-07-03

    Jul 3, 2006 ... This work is aimed to assess the effect of a microwave heating on cow's milk protein antigenicity. The heating protocol is established on the power/time relationship. A first share of milk samples were treated at 300 and 400 watts for 10, 15 and 20 min. The second share of milk and whey samples were.

  14. Outer membrane protein antigens of Moraxella bovis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostle, A G; Rosenbusch, R F

    1986-07-01

    Outer membranes were isolated from bovine isolates and type strains of Moraxella bovis, M phenylpyruvica, M lacunata, and M ovis by sodium N lauroyl sarcosinate extraction and differential centrifugation. Analysis of outer membranes from these organisms by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis revealed that all M bovis isolates shared a common polypeptide pattern that was readily distinguishable from other Moraxella spp. Nine major outer membrane protein bands were identified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis analysis of M bovis. Immunoblotting of protein antigens of M bovis revealed several outer membrane proteins that seemed to be common antigens of all M bovis isolates.

  15. VaxiJen: a server for prediction of protective antigens, tumour antigens and subunit vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flower Darren R

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vaccine development in the post-genomic era often begins with the in silico screening of genome information, with the most probable protective antigens being predicted rather than requiring causative microorganisms to be grown. Despite the obvious advantages of this approach – such as speed and cost efficiency – its success remains dependent on the accuracy of antigen prediction. Most approaches use sequence alignment to identify antigens. This is problematic for several reasons. Some proteins lack obvious sequence similarity, although they may share similar structures and biological properties. The antigenicity of a sequence may be encoded in a subtle and recondite manner not amendable to direct identification by sequence alignment. The discovery of truly novel antigens will be frustrated by their lack of similarity to antigens of known provenance. To overcome the limitations of alignment-dependent methods, we propose a new alignment-free approach for antigen prediction, which is based on auto cross covariance (ACC transformation of protein sequences into uniform vectors of principal amino acid properties. Results Bacterial, viral and tumour protein datasets were used to derive models for prediction of whole protein antigenicity. Every set consisted of 100 known antigens and 100 non-antigens. The derived models were tested by internal leave-one-out cross-validation and external validation using test sets. An additional five training sets for each class of antigens were used to test the stability of the discrimination between antigens and non-antigens. The models performed well in both validations showing prediction accuracy of 70% to 89%. The models were implemented in a server, which we call VaxiJen. Conclusion VaxiJen is the first server for alignment-independent prediction of protective antigens. It was developed to allow antigen classification solely based on the physicochemical properties of proteins without

  16. Shared Memories?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wæhrens, Anne

    This paper analyses how the memory of the Holocaust has been addressed in the European Parliament from 1989 to 2009. I identify two major changes that occurred in the 1990s and after the 2004 enlargement of the European Union respectively. In the 1990s the war in Bosnia and the question of restit...... identifies what seems to be a political memory split between Left and Right; and it shows that the time might not be ripe for a shared European memory.......This paper analyses how the memory of the Holocaust has been addressed in the European Parliament from 1989 to 2009. I identify two major changes that occurred in the 1990s and after the 2004 enlargement of the European Union respectively. In the 1990s the war in Bosnia and the question...... of restitution universalised the memory of the Holocaust and made it present. The 2004 enlargement brought the memory of Soviet Communism into the Union and made it a central task to construct a community of memory that includes both the memory of the Holocaust and of Soviet Communism. The analysis also...

  17. AntigenMap 3D: an online antigenic cartography resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, J Lamar; Yang, Jialiang; Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2012-05-01

    Antigenic cartography is a useful technique to visualize and minimize errors in immunological data by projecting antigens to 2D or 3D cartography. However, a 2D cartography may not be sufficient to capture the antigenic relationship from high-dimensional immunological data. AntigenMap 3D presents an online, interactive, and robust 3D antigenic cartography construction and visualization resource. AntigenMap 3D can be applied to identify antigenic variants and vaccine strain candidates for pathogens with rapid antigenic variations, such as influenza A virus. http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap3D

  18. Design of custom oligonucleotide microarrays for single species or interspecies hybrids using Array Oligo Selector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudy, Amy A

    2011-01-01

    New technologies for DNA sequencing have made it feasible to determine the genome sequence of any organism of interest. This sequence is the resource required to create tools for downstream studies, including DNA microarrays. A number of vendors can produce DNA microarrays containing customer-specified sequences, allowing investigators to design and order arrays customized for any species of interest. Freely available, user-friendly computer programs are available for designing microarray probes. These design programs can be used to create probes that distinguish between two related genomes, allowing investigation of gene expression or gene representation in intra- or interspecies hybrids or in samples containing DNA from multiple species.

  19. Potential for direct interspecies electron transfer in methanogenic wastewater digester aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morita, Masahiko; Malvankar, Nikhil S; Franks, Ashley E

    2011-01-01

    no significant capacity for conversion of hydrogen to methane. The aggregates converted formate to methane but at rates too low to account for the rates at which that the aggregates syntrophically metabolized ethanol, an important component of the reactor influent. Geobacter species comprised 25% of 16S r......, with conductivities 3-fold higher than the conductivities previously reported for dual-species aggregates of Geobacter species in which the two species appeared to exchange electrons via interspecies electron transfer. The temperature dependence response of the aggregate conductance was characteristic of the organic...... for electron exchange in some methanogenic systems....

  20. Tracing Conformational Transition of Abnormal Prion Proteins during Interspecies Transmission by Using Novel Antibodies*

    OpenAIRE

    Ushiki-Kaku, Yuko; Endo, Ryo; Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Shimizu, Yoshihisa; Imamura, Morikazu; Masujin, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Takuji; Hattori, Shunji; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Irie, Shinkichi; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Conformational differences in abnormal prion proteins (PrPSc) have been postulated to produce different prion phenotypes. During the interspecies transmission of prions, the conformation of PrPSc may change with passage; however, little is known about the mechanism of PrPSc transition. In this study, novel PrPSc-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were developed that could detect the PrPSc of mouse but not that of sheep. By using these mAbs, we attempted to examine PrPSc accumulated in mice...

  1. Risk for interspecies transmission of zoonotic pathogens during poultry processing and pork production in Peru: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnero, A M; Kitayama, K; Diaz, D A; Garvich, M; Angulo, N; Cama, V A; Gilman, R H; Bayer, A M

    2018-03-30

    Interspecies transmission of pathogens is an unfrequent but naturally occurring event and human activities may favour opportunities not previously reported. Reassortment of zoonotic pathogens like influenza A virus can result from these activities. Recently, swine and birds have played a central role as "mixing vessels" for epidemic and pandemic events related to strains like H1N1 and H5N1. Unsafe practices in poultry markets and swine farms can lead to interspecies transmission, favouring the emergence of novel strains. Thus, understanding practices that lead to interspecies interactions is crucial. This qualitative study aimed to evaluate poultry processing practices in formal and informal markets and the use of leftovers by swine farmers in three Peruvian cities: Lima (capital), Tumbes (coastal) and Tarapoto (jungle). We conducted 80 direct observations at formal and informal markets and interviewed 15 swine farmers. Processors slaughter and pluck chickens and vendors and/or processors eviscerate chickens. Food safety and hygiene practices were suboptimal or absent, although some heterogeneity was observed between cities and chicken vendors versus processors. Both vendors (76%) and processors (100%) sold the chicken viscera leftovers to swine farmers, representing the main source of chicken viscera for swine farms (53%). Swine farmers fed the chicken viscera to their swine. Chicken viscera cooking times varied widely and were insufficient in some cases. Non-abattoired poultry leads to the sale of poultry leftovers to small-scale swine farms, resulting in indirect but frequent interspecies contacts that can lead to interspecies transmission of bacterial pathogens or the reassortment of influenza A viruses. These interactions are exacerbated by suboptimal safety and hygiene conditions. People involved in these activities constitute an at-risk population who could play a central role in preventing the transmission of pathogens between species. Educational

  2. Shared decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000877.htm Shared decision making To use the sharing features on this page, ... treatment you both support. When to use Shared Decision Making Shared decision making is often used when you ...

  3. Interspecies Recombination in Type II Topoisomerase Genes Is Not a Major Cause of Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Pletz, Mathias W. R.; McGee, Lesley; Beall, Bernard; Whitney, Cynthia G.; Klugman, Keith P.

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the topoisomerase type II enzymes account for fluoroquinolone resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae. These mutations can arise spontaneously or be transferred by intraspecies or interspecies recombination, primarily with viridans streptococci. We analyzed the nucleotide sequences of the quinolone resistance-determining regions of 49 invasive levofloxacin-resistant pneumococcal isolates and did not find any evidence for interspecies recombination.

  4. Eosinofil Sel Penyaji Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safari Wahyu Jatmiko

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sel eosinofil merupakan jenis sel lekosit yang terlibat dalam berbagai patogenesis penyakit. Sel eosinofil pada awalnya dikenal sebagai sel efektor  dari sistem imunitas alamiah. Akan tetapi, kemampuan sel eosinofil dalam memfagositosis patogen menimbulkan dugaan bahwa sel eosinofil ikut berperan sebagai sel penyaji antigen. Hal ini dianalogikan dengan sel makrofag dan sel dendritik yang bisa memfagositosis dan menyajikan antigen sebagai hasil dari degradasi patogen yang difagositosis. Untuk menjawab permasalahan ini, penulis melakukan penelusuran artikel tentang eosinofil sebagai sel penyaji antigen melalui US National Library of Medicine National Institute of Healthdengan kata kunci eoshinophil dan antigen presenting cell. Hasil penelusuran adalah ditemukannya 10 artikel yang relevan dengan topik. Hasil dari sintesis kesepuluh jurnal tersebut adalah sel eosinofil mampu berperan sebagai sel penyaji antigen yang profesional (professionalantigenpresentng cell

  5. Cloning of an endangered species (Bos gaurus) using interspecies nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, R P; Cibelli, J B; Diaz, F; Moraes, C T; Farin, P W; Farin, C E; Hammer, C J; West, M D; Damiani, P

    2000-01-01

    Approximately 100 species become extinct a day. Despite increasing interest in using cloning to rescue endangered species, successful interspecies nuclear transfer has not been previously described, and only a few reports of in vitro embryo formation exist. Here we show that interspecies nuclear transfer can be used to clone an endangered species with normal karyotypic and phenotypic development through implantation and the late stages of fetal growth. Somatic cells from a gaur bull (Bos gaurus), a large wild ox on the verge of extinction, (Species Survival Plan animals) were electrofused with enucleated oocytes from domestic cows. Twelve percent of the reconstructed oocytes developed to the blastocyst stage, and 18% of these embryos developed to the fetal stage when transferred to surrogate mothers. Three of the fetuses were electively removed at days 46 to 54 of gestation, and two continued gestation longer than 180 (ongoing) and 200 days, respectively. Microsatellite marker and cytogenetic analyses confirmed that the nuclear genome of the cloned animals was gaurus in origin. The gaur nuclei were shown to direct normal fetal development, with differentiation into complex tissue and organs, even though the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) within all the tissue types evaluated was derived exclusively from the recipient bovine oocytes. These results suggest that somatic cell cloning methods could be used to restore endangered, or even extinct, species and populations.

  6. Role and Potential of Direct Interspecies Electron Transfer in Anaerobic Digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gahyun Baek

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic digestion (AD is an effective biological treatment for stabilizing organic compounds in waste/wastewater and in simultaneously producing biogas. However, it is often limited by the slow reaction rates of different microorganisms’ syntrophic biological metabolisms. Stable and fast interspecies electron transfer (IET between volatile fatty acid-oxidizing bacteria and hydrogenotrophic methanogens is crucial for efficient methanogenesis. In this syntrophic interaction, electrons are exchanged via redox mediators such as hydrogen and formate. Recently, direct IET (DIET has been revealed as an important IET route for AD. Microorganisms undergoing DIET form interspecies electrical connections via membrane-associated cytochromes and conductive pili; thus, redox mediators are not required for electron exchange. This indicates that DIET is more thermodynamically favorable than indirect IET. Recent studies have shown that conductive materials (e.g., iron oxides, activated carbon, biochar, and carbon fibers can mediate direct electrical connections for DIET. Microorganisms attach to conductive materials’ surfaces or vice versa according to particle size, and form conductive biofilms or aggregates. Different conductive materials promote DIET and improve AD performance in digesters treating different feedstocks, potentially suggesting a new approach to enhancing AD performance. This review discusses the role and potential of DIET in methanogenic systems, especially with conductive materials for promoting DIET.

  7. Methyl-CpG binding domain proteins inhibit interspecies courtship and promote aggression in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Tarun; Morgan, Hannah R; Andrews, Jonathan C; Brewer, Edmond R; Certel, Sarah J

    2017-07-14

    Reproductive isolation and speciation are driven by the convergence of environmental and genetic variation. The integration of these variation sources is thought to occur through epigenetic marks including DNA methylation. Proteins containing a methyl-CpG-binding domain (MBD) bind methylated DNA and interpret epigenetic marks, providing a dynamic yet evolutionarily adapted cellular output. Here, we report the Drosophila MBD-containing proteins, dMBD-R2 and dMBD2/3, contribute to reproductive isolation and survival behavioral strategies. Drosophila melanogaster males with a reduction in dMBD-R2 specifically in octopamine (OA) neurons exhibit courtship toward divergent interspecies D. virilis and D. yakuba females and a decrease in conspecific mating success. Conspecific male-male courtship is increased between dMBD-R2-deficient males while aggression is reduced. These changes in adaptive behavior are separable as males with a hypermethylated OA neuronal genome exhibited a decrease in aggression without altering male-male courtship. These results suggest Drosophila MBD-containing proteins are required within the OA neural circuitry to inhibit interspecies and conspecific male-male courtship and indicate that the genetically hard-wired neural mechanisms enforcing behavioral reproductive isolation include the interpretation of the epigenome.

  8. Interspecies and spatial trends in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Atlantic and Mediterranean pelagic seabirds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roscales, Jose L.; Gonzalez-Solis, Jacob; Calabuig, Pascual; Jimenez, Begona

    2011-01-01

    PAHs were analyzed in the liver of 5 species of pelagic seabirds (Procellariiformes) from the northeast Atlantic and the Mediterranean. The main objective was to assess the trophic and geographic trends of PAHs in seabirds to evaluate their suitability as bioindicators of chronic marine pollution by these compounds. Although higher levels of PAHs have been described in the Mediterranean compared to other oceanic regions, we did not find significant spatial patterns and observed only minor effects of the geographic origin on seabird PAHs. However, we found significant higher PAH levels in petrel compared to shearwater species, which could be related to differences in their exploitation of mesopelagic and epipelagic resources, respectively, and the vertical dynamic of PAHs in the water column. Overall, although this study enhances the need of multi-species approaches to show a more comprehensive evaluation of marine pollution, seabirds emerged as poor indicators of pelagic chronic PAH levels. - Highlights: → PAHs in pelagic seabirds show specific inter-species patterns related to trophic ecology. → Geographic origin shows a minor effect over PAH levels in pelagic seabirds. → Pelagic seabirds seem to be poor indicators of chronic PAH levels. - PAH levels in Atlantic and Mediterranean pelagic seabirds show specific inter-species patterns related to trophic ecology but a minor influence of their geographic origin.

  9. Successful cloning of coyotes through interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer using domestic dog oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Insung; Jeong, Yeon Woo; Kim, Joung Joo; Lee, Hyo Jeong; Kang, Mina; Park, Kang Bae; Park, Jung Hwan; Kim, Yeun Wook; Kim, Woo Tae; Shin, Taeyoung; Hyun, Sang Hwan; Jeung, Eui-Bae; Hwang, Woo Suk

    2013-01-01

    Interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) is an emerging assisted reproductive technology (ART) for preserving Nature's diversity. The scarcity of oocytes from some species makes utilisation of readily available oocytes inevitable. In the present study, we describe the successful cloning of coyotes (Canis latrans) through iSCNT using oocytes from domestic dogs (Canis lupus familiaris or dingo). Transfer of 320 interspecies-reconstructed embryos into 22 domestic dog recipients resulted in six pregnancies, from which eight viable offspring were delivered. Fusion rate and cloning efficiency during iSCNT cloning of coyotes were not significantly different from those observed during intraspecies cloning of domestic dogs. Using neonatal fibroblasts as donor cells significantly improved the cloning efficiency compared with cloning using adult fibroblast donor cells (Pcloning of coyotes in the present study holds promise for cloning other endangered species in the Canidae family using similar techniques. However, there are still limitations of the iSCNT technology, as demonstrated by births of morphologically abnormal coyotes and the clones' inheritance of maternal domestic dog mitochondrial DNA.

  10. Interspecies Ion Diffusion Studies using DT, DT(3He), and DT(H) Implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y.; Herrmann, H. W.; Schmitt, M. J.; Kagan, G.; McEvoy, A. M.; Hoffman, N. M.; Gales, S.; Leatherland, A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J.; Glevov, V. Yu; Forrest, C.

    2015-11-01

    Anomalous ICF yield degradation has been observed from gas fills containing mixtures (i.e., D(3He), DT(3He), D(Ar), and even DT). Interspecies ion diffusion theory has been suggested as a possible cause resulting from gradient-driven diffusion (i.e., pressure, electric potential, and temperature) which forces lower mass ions away from core and higher mass ions toward core. The theory predicts hydrogen addition to deuterium or tritium should result in increased yield compared to expected yield, which is opposite to 3He addition. At Omega laser facility, we have tested hydro-equivalent fills of DT, DT(3He), and DT(H) with the assumption that same fuel mass and particle pressure will provide identical convergence. Preliminary results verify a factor of 2 yield reduction relative to scaling when 3He added to DT. At DT(H) case, however, no significant yield degradation or a slight yield enhancement was observed which agrees with the interspecies ion diffusion theory. Detailed experiment results and simulation are needed to confirm the initial observation.

  11. Interspecies transmission of emotional information via chemosignals: from humans to dogs (Canis lupus familiaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aniello, Biagio; Semin, Gün Refik; Alterisio, Alessandra; Aria, Massimo; Scandurra, Anna

    2018-01-01

    We report a study examining interspecies emotion transfer via body odors (chemosignals). Do human body odors (chemosignals) produced under emotional conditions of happiness and fear provide information that is detectable by pet dogs (Labrador and Golden retrievers)? The odor samples were collected from the axilla of male donors not involved in the main experiment. The experimental setup involved the co-presence of the dog's owner, a stranger and the odor dispenser in a space where the dogs could move freely. There were three odor conditions [fear, happiness, and control (no sweat)] to which the dogs were assigned randomly. The dependent variables were the relevant behaviors of the dogs (e.g., approaching, interacting and gazing) directed to the three targets (owner, stranger, sweat dispenser) aside from the dogs' stress and heart rate indicators. The results indicated with high accuracy that the dogs manifested the predicted behaviors in the three conditions. There were fewer and shorter owner directed behaviors and more stranger directed behaviors when they were in the "happy odor condition" compared to the fear odor and control conditions. In the fear odor condition, they displayed more stressful behaviors. The heart rate data in the control and happy conditions were significantly lower than in the fear condition. Our findings suggest that interspecies emotional communication is facilitated by chemosignals.

  12. Ecotoxicity interspecies QAAR models from Daphnia toxicity of pharmaceuticals and personal care products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangion, A; Gramatica, P

    2016-10-01

    Pharmaceutical and Personal Care Products (PPCPs) became a class of contaminants of emerging concern because are ubiquitously detected in surface water and soil, where they can affect wildlife. Ecotoxicological data are only available for a few PPCPs, thus modelling approaches are essential tools to maximize the information contained in the existing data. In silico methods may be helpful in filling data gaps for the toxicity of PPCPs towards various ecological indicator organisms. The good correlation between toxicity toward Daphnia magna and those on two fish species (Pimephales promelas and Oncorhynchus mykiss), improved by the addition of one theoretical molecular descriptor, allowed us to develop predictive models to investigate the relationship between toxicities in different species. The aim of this work is to propose quantitative activity-activity relationship (QAAR) models, developed in QSARINS and validated for their external predictivity. Such models can be used to predict the toxicity of PPCPs to a particular species using available experimental toxicity data from a different species, thus reducing the tests on organisms of higher trophic level. Similarly, good QAAR models, implemented by molecular descriptors to improve the quality, are proposed here for fish interspecies. We also comment on the relevance of autocorrelation descriptors in improving all studied interspecies correlations.

  13. Development of interspecies nuclear transfer embryos reconstructed with argali (Ovis ammon) somatic cells and sheep ooplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Yanli; Guo, Zhiqin; Wang, Feng

    2014-02-01

    Interspecies nuclear transfer has already achieved success in several species, which shows great potential in recovery and conservation of endangered animals. The study was conducted to establish an efficient system for in vitro argali (Ovis ammon)-sheep embryo reconstruction via interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT). The competence of domestic sheep cytoplasts to reprogram the adult argali fibroblast nuclei was evaluated, and the effects of enucleation methods and donor cell passage and cell state on the in vitro development of argali-sheep cloned embryos were also examined. Sheep oocytes could support argali and sheep fibroblast cell nuclei transfer and develop to blastocysts in vitro. Oocytes matured for 21–23 h and enucleated by chemically assisted enucleation (CAE) had a higher enucleation rate than blind enucleation (BE), but the development rate of iSCNTembryos was the same (P>0.05). Moreover, passage numbers of fibroblast cells embryos. Thus sheep cytoplasm successfully supports argali nucleus development to blastocyst stage after optimising the nuclear transfer procedure, which indicates that iSCNT can be used to conserve endangered argali in the near future.

  14. [Enterobacterial antigen in human peripheral blood lymphocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure-Fontenla, M A; García-Tamayo, F

    1989-11-01

    The following study has as prior history the research reports which have shown the existence of an antigenic tissue deposit in gram-negative enterobacteria. The antigens of the enterobacteria have also been found in the lymphocytic membranes and cytoplasm. Since intestinal lymphoid tissue cells can recirculate by means of the thoracic duct to the peripheral venous system, it was proposed that the circulating lymphocytes in healthy people could also contain small amounts of a common enterobacterial antigen. The study was carried out in 15 human venous blood samples, of which the lymphocytic population was separated to later be used in the preparation of 15 alcohol soluble extracts. This material was used for inhibiting the immuno-hemolysis assay in three occasions in order to show the presence of antigens shared by different enterobacterias, using as reference a fraction separated from the LPS of Escherichia coli 08. The results showed that the human lymphocytes also had antigenic determinants common to gram-negative bacteria.

  15. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ephraim, K.H.; Cox, P.H.; Hamer, C.J.A. v.d.; Berends, W.; Delhez, H.

    1977-01-01

    The carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a complex of antigen determinants and also the carrier of these determinants. Chemically it is a glycoprotein. Its occurrence in blood serum or urine is correlated with malignant disease. Several radioimmunoassays (RIA) have been developed, one by Hoffmann-Laroche and one by the Rotterdam Radiotherapeutic Institute. Both methods and the Hoffmann assay kit are tested. Specifications are given for isolation of the antigen, preparation of the antiserum, and the execution of the RIA. Biochemical and clinical aspects are discussed

  16. Trichinella spiralis shares epitopes with human autoantigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Radovic

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Like other helminths, Trichinella spiralis has evolved strategies to allow it to survive in the host organism, including the expression of epitopes similar to those present in either expressed or hidden host antigens. To identify T. spiralis-derived antigens that are evolutionarily conserved in the parasite and its host and that could be responsible for its evasion of the host immune response, we examined the reactivity of six different types of autoantibodies to T. spiralis larvae from muscle. T. spiralis antigens that share epitopes with human autoantigens were identified by assessing the cross-reactivity of autoantibody-containing serum samples with T. spiralis antigens in the absence of specific anti-parasite antibodies. Of the 55 autoantibody-containing human serum samples that we analysed by immunohistological screening, 24 (43.6% recognised T. spiralis muscle larvae structures such as the subcuticular region, the genital primordium or the midgut. Using Western blots, we demonstrated that the same sera reacted with 24 protein components of T. spiralis muscle larvae excretory-secretory L1 antigens. We found that the human autoantibodies predominantly bound antigens belonging to the TSL1 group; more specifically, the autoantibody-containing sera reacted most frequently with the 53-kDa component. Thus, this protein is a good candidate for further studies of the mechanisms of T. spiralis-mediated immunomodulation.

  17. Human and Rat ABC Transporter Efflux of Bisphenol A and Bisphenol A Glucuronide: Interspecies Comparison and Implications for Pharmacokinetic Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Significant interspecies differences exist between human and rodent with respect to absorption, distribution, and excretion of bisphenol A (BPA) and its primary metabolite, BPA-glucuronide (BPA-G). ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporter enzymes play important roles in these physi...

  18. Web-based Interspecies Correlation Estimation (Web-ICE) for Acute Toxicity: User Manual Version 3.1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predictive toxicological models are integral to ecological risk assessment because data for most species are limited. Web-based Interspecies Correlation Estimation (Web-ICE) models are least square regressions that predict acute toxicity (LC50/LD50) of a chemical to a species, ge...

  19. Function of donor cell centrosome in intraspecies and interspecies nuclear transfer embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Zhisheng; Zhang Gang; Meng Xiaoqian; Zhang Yanling; Chen Dayuan; Schatten, Heide; Sun Qingyuan

    2005-01-01

    Centrosomes, the main microtubule-organizing centers (MTOCs) in most animal cells, are important for many cellular activities such as assembly of the mitotic spindle, establishment of cell polarity, and cell movement. In nuclear transfer (NT), MTOCs that are located at the poles of the meiotic spindle are removed from the recipient oocyte, while the centrosome of the donor cell is introduced. We used mouse MII oocytes as recipients, mouse fibroblasts, rat fibroblasts, or pig granulosa cells as donor cells to construct intraspecies and interspecies nuclear transfer embryos in order to observe centrosome dynamics and functions. Three antibodies against centrin, γ-tubulin, and NuMA, respectively, were used to stain the centrosome. Centrin was not detected either at the poles of transient spindles or at the poles of first mitotic spindles. γ-tubulin translocated into the two poles of the transient spindles, while no accumulated γ-tubulin aggregates were detected in the area adjacent to the two pseudo-pronuclei. At first mitotic metaphase, γ-tubulin was translocated to the spindle poles. The distribution of γ-tubulin was similar in mouse intraspecies and rat-mouse interspecies embryos. The NuMA antibody that we used can recognize porcine but not murine NuMA protein, so it was used to trace the NuMA protein of donor cell in reconstructed embryos. In the pig-mouse interspecies reconstructed embryos, NuMA concentrated between the disarrayed chromosomes soon after activation and translocated to the transient spindle poles. NuMA then immigrated into pseudo-pronuclei. After pseudo-pronuclear envelope breakdown, NuMA was located between the chromosomes and then translocated to the spindle poles of first mitotic metaphase. γ-tubulin antibody microinjection resulted in spindle disorganization and retardation of the first cell division. NuMA antibody microinjection also resulted in spindle disorganization. Our findings indicate that (1) the donor cell centrosome, defined as

  20. Analysis of nuclear export using photoactivatable GFP fusion proteins and interspecies heterokaryons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakrieko, Kerry-Ann; Ivanova, Iordanka A; Dagnino, Lina

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter, we review protocols for the analysis of nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of transcription factors and nuclear proteins, using two different approaches. The first involves the use of photoactivatable forms of the protein of interest by fusion to photoactivatable green fluorescent protein to follow its movement out of the nucleus by live-cell confocal microscopy. This methodology allows for the kinetic characterization of protein movements as well as measurement of steady-state levels. In a second procedure to assess the ability of a nuclear protein to move into and out of the nucleus, we describe the use of interspecies heterokaryon assays, which provide a measurement of steady-state distribution. These technologies are directly applicable to the analysis of nucleocytoplasmic movements not only of transcription factors, but also other nuclear proteins.

  1. Cloning endangered felids using heterospecific donor oocytes and interspecies embryo transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Martha C; Pope, C Earle; Ricks, David M; Lyons, Justine; Dumas, Cherie; Dresser, Betsy L

    2009-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) offers the possibility of preserving endangered species. It is one of the few technologies that avoids the loss of genetic variation and provides the prospect of species continuance, rather than extinction. Nonetheless, there has been a debate over the use of SCNT for preserving endangered species because of abnormal nuclear reprogramming, low efficiency and the involvement of extra mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of a different species in live offspring produced by interspecies SCNT. Despite these limitations, live endangered cloned animals have been produced. In the present paper, we describe recent research on the production of cloned embryos derived by fusion of wild felid fibroblast cells with heterospecific domestic cat cytoplasts and their viability after transfer into domestic cat recipients. In addition, we discuss epigenetic events that take place in donor cells and felid cloned embryos and mtDNA inheritance in wild felid clones and their offspring.

  2. Eating for two: how metabolism establishes interspecies interactions in the gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischbach, Michael A; Sonnenburg, Justin L

    2011-10-20

    In bacterial communities, "tight economic times" are the norm. Of the many challenges bacteria face in making a living, perhaps none are more important than generating energy, maintaining redox balance, and acquiring carbon and nitrogen to synthesize primary metabolites. The ability of bacteria to meet these challenges depends heavily on the rest of their community. Indeed, the most fundamental way in which bacteria communicate is by importing the substrates for metabolism and exporting metabolic end products. As an illustration of this principle, we will travel down a carbohydrate catabolic pathway common to many species of Bacteroides, highlighting the interspecies interactions established (often inevitably) at its key steps. We also discuss the metabolic considerations in maintaining the stability of host-associated microbial communities. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Non-simian foamy viruses: molecular virology, tropism and prevalence and zoonotic/interspecies transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehl, Timo; Tan, Juan; Materniak, Magdalena

    2013-09-13

    Within the field of retrovirus, our knowledge of foamy viruses (FV) is still limited. Their unique replication strategy and mechanism of viral persistency needs further research to gain understanding of the virus-host interactions, especially in the light of the recent findings suggesting their ancient origin and long co-evolution with their nonhuman hosts. Unquestionably, the most studied member is the primate/prototype foamy virus (PFV) which was originally isolated from a human (designated as human foamy virus, HFV), but later identified as chimpanzee origin; phylogenetic analysis clearly places it among other Old World primates. Additionally, the study of non-simian animal FVs can contribute to a deeper understanding of FV-host interactions and development of other animal models. The review aims at highlighting areas of special interest regarding the structure, biology, virus-host interactions and interspecies transmission potential of primate as well as non-primate foamy viruses for gaining new insights into FV biology.

  4. Phenotypic and molecular characterization of intrauterine fetal growth restriction in interspecies sheep pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez-García, A; Vázquez-Martínez, E R; Murcia, C; Rodríguez, A; Cerbón, M; Mejía, O

    2015-10-01

    Interspecies pregnancies between closely related species are usually performed in livestock to obtain improved and enriched offspring. Indeed, different hybrids have been obtained for research purposes since many years ago, and the maternal-fetal interactions have been studied as a possible strategy for species preservation. The aim of this study was to characterize by physiological and molecular approaches the interspecies pregnancy between bighorn sheep () and domestic sheep (). Hybrids were obtained by artificial insemination; the blood pressure and protein urine levels were measured during the last two-thirds of gestation. After parturition, offspring and placentas were weighed and measured and cotyledons were counted and weighed and their surface area determined. Plasma samples were obtained between wk 8 and 21 of gestation to assess progesterone (P4), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and placental growth factor (PlGF) levels and cell-free RNA was isolated during the same period to assess hypoxia-inducible factor-1 α (α) gene expression. Hybrid and normal pregnancies were analyzed using physiological and molecular parameters during the last two-thirds of gestation (wk 8-21). The results show that during the measurement period, ewes with a hybrid pregnancy presented normal blood pressure and no alteration in urinary protein content. However, compared with sheep with a normal pregnancy, those with a hybrid pregnancy had a decrease in fetal and placental growth as well as in the cotyledonary surface area. Furthermore, in the hybrid group, there was placental insufficiency, characterized by a decrease in P4 production, as well as indications of endothelial dysfunction, characterized an increase in plasma levels of VEGF and PlGF as well as in plasma gene expression of α. Overall, the results indicate that hybrids of and presented intrauterine growth restriction, essentially due to altered endothelial function and chronic placental insufficiency

  5. Inter-species grafting caused extensive and heritable alterations of DNA methylation in Solanaceae plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Wu

    Full Text Available Grafting has been extensively used to enhance the performance of horticultural crops. Since Charles Darwin coined the term "graft hybrid" meaning that asexual combination of different plant species may generate products that are genetically distinct, highly discrepant opinions exist supporting or against the concept. Recent studies have documented that grafting enables exchanges of both RNA and DNA molecules between the grafting partners, thus providing a molecular basis for grafting-induced genetic variation. DNA methylation is known as prone to alterations as a result of perturbation of internal and external conditions. Given characteristics of grafting, it is interesting to test whether the process may cause an alteration of this epigenetic marker in the grafted organismal products.We analyzed relative global DNA methylation levels and locus-specific methylation patterns by the MSAP marker and locus-specific bisulfite-sequencing in the seed plants (wild-type controls, self- and hetero-grafted scions/rootstocks, selfed progenies of scions and their seed-plant controls, involving three Solanaceae species. We quantified expression of putative genes involved in establishing and/or maintaining DNA methylation by q-(RT-PCR. We found that (1 hetero-grafting caused extensive alteration of DNA methylation patterns in a locus-specific manner, especially in scions, although relative methylation levels remain largely unaltered; (2 the altered methylation patterns in the hetero-grafting-derived scions could be inherited to sexual progenies with some sites showing further alterations or revisions; (3 hetero-grafting caused dynamic changes in steady-state transcript abundance of genes encoding for a set of enzymes functionally relevant to DNA methylation.Our results demonstrate that inter-species grafting in plants could produce extensive and heritable alterations in DNA methylation. We suggest that these readily altered, yet heritable, epigenetic

  6. Discovering the Recondite Secondary Metabolome Spectrum of Salinispora Species: A Study of Inter-Species Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Utpal; Hewavitharana, Amitha K.; Vidgen, Miranda E.; Ng, Yi Kai; Shaw, P. Nicholas; Fuerst, John A.; Hodson, Mark P.

    2014-01-01

    Patterns of inter-species secondary metabolite production by bacteria can provide valuable information relating to species ecology and evolution. The complex nature of this chemical diversity has previously been probed via directed analyses of a small number of compounds, identified through targeted assays rather than more comprehensive biochemical profiling approaches such as metabolomics. Insights into ecological and evolutionary relationships within bacterial genera can be derived through comparative analysis of broader secondary metabolite patterns, and this can also eventually assist biodiscovery search strategies for new natural products. Here, we investigated the species-level chemical diversity of the two marine actinobacterial species Salinispora arenicola and Salinispora pacifica, isolated from sponges distributed across the Great Barrier Reef (GBR), via their secondary metabolite profiles using LC-MS-based metabolomics. The chemical profiles of these two species were obtained by UHPLC-QToF-MS based metabolic profiling. The resultant data were interrogated using multivariate data analysis methods to compare their (bio)chemical profiles. We found a high level of inter-species diversity in strains from these two bacterial species. We also found rifamycins and saliniketals were produced exclusively by S. arenicola species, as the main secondary metabolites differentiating the two species. Furthermore, the discovery of 57 candidate compounds greatly increases the small number of secondary metabolites previously known to be produced by these species. In addition, we report the production of rifamycin O and W, a key group of ansamycin compounds, in S. arenicola for the first time. Species of the marine actinobacteria harbour a much wider spectrum of secondary metabolites than suspected, and this knowledge may prove a rich field for biodiscovery as well as a database for understanding relationships between speciation, evolution and chemical ecology. PMID

  7. Inter-species grafting caused extensive and heritable alterations of DNA methylation in Solanaceae plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Rui; Wang, Xiaoran; Lin, Yan; Ma, Yiqiao; Liu, Gang; Yu, Xiaoming; Zhong, Silin; Liu, Bao

    2013-01-01

    Grafting has been extensively used to enhance the performance of horticultural crops. Since Charles Darwin coined the term "graft hybrid" meaning that asexual combination of different plant species may generate products that are genetically distinct, highly discrepant opinions exist supporting or against the concept. Recent studies have documented that grafting enables exchanges of both RNA and DNA molecules between the grafting partners, thus providing a molecular basis for grafting-induced genetic variation. DNA methylation is known as prone to alterations as a result of perturbation of internal and external conditions. Given characteristics of grafting, it is interesting to test whether the process may cause an alteration of this epigenetic marker in the grafted organismal products. We analyzed relative global DNA methylation levels and locus-specific methylation patterns by the MSAP marker and locus-specific bisulfite-sequencing in the seed plants (wild-type controls), self- and hetero-grafted scions/rootstocks, selfed progenies of scions and their seed-plant controls, involving three Solanaceae species. We quantified expression of putative genes involved in establishing and/or maintaining DNA methylation by q-(RT)-PCR. We found that (1) hetero-grafting caused extensive alteration of DNA methylation patterns in a locus-specific manner, especially in scions, although relative methylation levels remain largely unaltered; (2) the altered methylation patterns in the hetero-grafting-derived scions could be inherited to sexual progenies with some sites showing further alterations or revisions; (3) hetero-grafting caused dynamic changes in steady-state transcript abundance of genes encoding for a set of enzymes functionally relevant to DNA methylation. Our results demonstrate that inter-species grafting in plants could produce extensive and heritable alterations in DNA methylation. We suggest that these readily altered, yet heritable, epigenetic modifications due to

  8. Early Cenozoic benthic foraminiferal isotopes: Species reliability and interspecies correction factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Miriam E.; Katz, David R.; Wright, James D.; Miller, Kenneth G.; Pak, Dorothy K.; Shackleton, Nicholas J.; Thomas, Ellen

    2003-06-01

    Oxygen and carbon isotope records are important tools used to reconstruct past ocean and climate conditions, with those of benthic foraminifera providing information on the deep oceans. Reconstructions are complicated by interspecies isotopic offsets that result from microhabitat preferences (carbonate precipitation in isotopically distinct environments) and vital effects (species-specific metabolic variation in isotopic fractionation). We provide correction factors for early Cenozoic benthic foraminifera commonly used for isotopic measurements (Cibicidoides spp., Nuttallides truempyi, Oridorsalis spp., Stensioina beccariiformis, Hanzawaia ammophila, and Bulimina spp.), showing that most yield reliable isotopic proxies of environmental change. The statistical methods and larger data sets used in this study provide more robust correction factors than do previous studies. Interspecies isotopic offsets appear to have changed through the Cenozoic, either (1) as a result of evolutionary changes or (2) as an artifact of different statistical methods and data set sizes used to determine the offsets in different studies. Regardless of the reason, the assumption that isotopic offsets have remained constant through the Cenozoic has introduced an ˜1-2°C uncertainty into deep sea paleotemperature calculations. In addition, we compare multiple species isotopic data from a western North Atlantic section that includes the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum to determine the most reliable isotopic indicator for this event. We propose that Oridorsalis spp. was the most reliable deepwater isotopic recorder at this location because it was best able to withstand the harsh water conditions that existed at this time; it may be the best recorder at other locations and for other extreme events also.

  9. Alanine racemase is essential for the growth and interspecies competitiveness of Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yuan; Qiu, Wei; Zhou, Xue-Dong; Zheng, Xin; Zhang, Ke-Ke; Wang, Shi-Da; Li, Yu-Qing; Cheng, Lei; Li, Ji-Yao; Xu, Xin; Li, Ming-Yun

    2016-12-16

    D-alanine (D-Ala) is an essential amino acid that has a key role in bacterial cell wall synthesis. Alanine racemase (Alr) is a unique enzyme that interconverts L-alanine and D-alanine in most bacteria, making this enzyme a potential target for antimicrobial drug development. Streptococcus mutans is a major causative factor of dental caries. The factors involved in the survival, virulence and interspecies interactions of S. mutans could be exploited as potential targets for caries control. The current study aimed to investigate the physiological role of Alr in S. mutans. We constructed alr mutant strain of S. mutans and evaluated its phenotypic traits and interspecies competitiveness compared with the wild-type strain. We found that alr deletion was lethal to S. mutans. A minimal supplement of D-Ala (150 μg·mL -1 ) was required for the optimal growth of the alr mutant. The depletion of D-alanine in the growth medium resulted in cell wall perforation and cell lysis in the alr mutant strain. We also determined the compromised competitiveness of the alr mutant strain relative to the wild-type S. mutans against other oral streptococci (S. sanguinis or S. gordonii), demonstrated using either conditioned medium assays or dual-species fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis. Given the importance and necessity of alr to the growth and competitiveness of S. mutans, Alr may represent a promising target to modulate the cariogenicity of oral biofilms and to benefit the management of dental caries.

  10. Discovering the recondite secondary metabolome spectrum of Salinispora species: a study of inter-species diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utpal Bose

    Full Text Available Patterns of inter-species secondary metabolite production by bacteria can provide valuable information relating to species ecology and evolution. The complex nature of this chemical diversity has previously been probed via directed analyses of a small number of compounds, identified through targeted assays rather than more comprehensive biochemical profiling approaches such as metabolomics. Insights into ecological and evolutionary relationships within bacterial genera can be derived through comparative analysis of broader secondary metabolite patterns, and this can also eventually assist biodiscovery search strategies for new natural products. Here, we investigated the species-level chemical diversity of the two marine actinobacterial species Salinispora arenicola and Salinispora pacifica, isolated from sponges distributed across the Great Barrier Reef (GBR, via their secondary metabolite profiles using LC-MS-based metabolomics. The chemical profiles of these two species were obtained by UHPLC-QToF-MS based metabolic profiling. The resultant data were interrogated using multivariate data analysis methods to compare their (biochemical profiles. We found a high level of inter-species diversity in strains from these two bacterial species. We also found rifamycins and saliniketals were produced exclusively by S. arenicola species, as the main secondary metabolites differentiating the two species. Furthermore, the discovery of 57 candidate compounds greatly increases the small number of secondary metabolites previously known to be produced by these species. In addition, we report the production of rifamycin O and W, a key group of ansamycin compounds, in S. arenicola for the first time. Species of the marine actinobacteria harbour a much wider spectrum of secondary metabolites than suspected, and this knowledge may prove a rich field for biodiscovery as well as a database for understanding relationships between speciation, evolution and chemical

  11. Share your Sweets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byrnit, Jill; Høgh-Olesen, Henrik; Makransky, Guido

    2015-01-01

    All over the world, humans (Homo sapiens) display resource-sharing behavior, and common patterns of sharing seem to exist across cultures. Humans are not the only primates to share, and observations from the wild have long documented food sharing behavior in our closest phylogenetic relatives, ch...

  12. Application of the Web-based Interspecies Correlation Estimation (Web-ICE) tool to assess risks of national pesticide registrations to federally listed (threatened and endangered) species

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Academy of Science (NAS) recently recommended exploration of predictive tools, such as interspecies correlation estimation (ICE), to estimate acute toxicity values for listed species and support development of species sensitivity distributions (SSDs). We explored the...

  13. [Mechanisms of viral emergence and interspecies transmission: the exemple of simian foamy viruses in Central Africa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessain, Antoine

    2013-12-01

    A large proportion of viral pathogens that have emerged during the last decades in humans are considered to have originated from various animal species. This is well exemplified by several recent epidemics such as those of Nipah, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, Avian flu, Ebola, Monkeypox, and Hantaviruses. After the initial interspecies transmission per se, the viruses can disseminate into the human population through various and distinct mechanisms. Some of them are well characterized and understood, thus allowing a certain level of risk control and prevention. Surprisingly and in contrast, the initial steps that lead to the emergence of several viruses, and of their associated diseases, remain still poorly understood. Epidemiological field studies conducted in certain specific high-risk populations are thus necessary to obtain new insights into the early events of this emergence process. Human infections by simian viruses represent increasing public health concerns. Indeed, by virtue of their genetic andphysiological similarities, non-human primates (NHPs) are considered to be likely the sources of viruses that can infect humans and thus may pose a significant threat to human population. This is well illustrated by retroviruses, which have the ability to cross species, adapt to a new host and sometimes spread within these new species. Sequence comparison and phylogenetic studies have thus clearly showed that the emergence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2 in humans have resulted from several independent interspecies transmissions of different SIV types from Chimpanzees and African monkeys (including sooty mangabeys), respectively, probably during the first part of the last century. The situation for Human T cell Lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is, for certain aspects, quite comparable. Indeed, the origin of most HTLV-1 subtypes appears to be linked to interspecies transmission between STLV-1-infected monkeys and humans, followed by

  14. A monkey antigen crossreacting with carcinoembryonic antigen, CEA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engvall, E.; Vuento, M.; Ruoslahti, E.

    1976-01-01

    Normal monkey tissues were found to contain an antigen which crossreacts immunologically with the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) of the human digestive tract. The monkey antigen reacted with complete or partial identity to the normal crossreacting antigen (NCA) in humans when tested in immunodiffusion against anti-CEA or anti-NCA. Extracts of monkey tissues inhibited in radioimmunoassays measuring human NCA. It is possible that monkey foetuses and colonic tumours contain CEA. Images Fig. 1 PMID:823952

  15. Canine distemper outbreak in raccoons suggests pathogen interspecies transmission amongst alien and native carnivores in urban areas from Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentería-Solís, Zaida; Förster, Christine; Aue, Angelika; Wittstatt, Ulrich; Wibbelt, Gudrun; König, Matthias

    2014-11-07

    From December 2012 to May 2013, an outbreak occurred among urban wild carnivores from Berlin. We collected 97 free-ranging raccoons from the city area. PCR assays, histopathology and immunohistochemistry confirmed canine distemper virus (CDV) infection in 74 raccoons. Phylogenetic analysis of haemagglutinin gene fragments (1767 nucleotides) of CDV isolated from four raccoons showed close relation to CDV isolates from foxes from Germany and a domestic dog from Hungary; all belonging to the "Europe" lineage of CDV. These study results suggest an inter-species transmission of CDV as the origin for the outbreak among the raccoon population. Implications for domestic pets and suggested interspecies transmission between urban wildlife and raccoons are discussed. This is the first major outbreak of CDV amongst free-ranging raccoons in Europe. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Antigen smuggling in tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudrisier, Denis; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2014-06-11

    The importance of CD4 T lymphocytes in immunity to M. tuberculosis is well established; however, how dendritic cells activate T cells in vivo remains obscure. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Srivastava and Ernst (2014) report a mechanism of antigen transfer for efficient activation of antimycobacterial T cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 6 (2001), s. 425-430 ISSN 0001-2815. [Conference on Human leucocyte differentiation antigens /7./. Harrogate, 20.06.2000-25.06.2000] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD molecules, HLDA Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 2.864, year: 2001

  18. CD antigens 2002

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 99, č. 10 (2002), s. 3877-3880 ISSN 0006-4971. [Conference on Human leucocyte differentiation antigens /7./. Harrogate, 20.06.2000-25.06.2000] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD molecules, HLDA Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 9.631, year: 2002

  19. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 168, č. 5 (2002), s. 2083-2086 ISSN 0022-1767. [Conference on Human leucocyte differentiation antigens /7./. Harrogate, 20.06.2000-25.06.2000] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD molecules, HLDA Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 7.014, year: 2002

  20. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 103, č. 4 (2001), s. 401-406 ISSN 0019-2805 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/99/0349 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : antigen * CD * leukocyte Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.656, year: 2001

  1. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 6 (2001), s. 556-562 ISSN 1066-5099 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA7052904 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD * leukocyte antigens Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.689, year: 2001

  2. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 10 (2001), s. 2841-2847 ISSN 0014-2980 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA7052904 Keywords : CD * leukocyte antigens Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.990, year: 2001

  3. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 211, č. 2 (2001), s. 81-85 ISSN 0008-8749 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/99/0349 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : antigen * CD * leukocyte Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.604, year: 2001

  4. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 1 (2002), s. 71-76 ISSN 0893-3952. [Conference on Human leucocyte differentiation antigens /7./. Harrogate, 20.06.2000-25.06.2000] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD molecules, HLDA Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 3.821, year: 2002

  5. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 5 (2001), s. 685-690 ISSN 0741-5400 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA7052904 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD * leukocyte antigens Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.516, year: 2001

  6. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 9 (2001), s. 1095-1098 ISSN 0953-8178 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/99/0349 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : antigen * CD * leukocyte Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.611, year: 2001

  7. β-endorphin antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to the production of antigens comprising β-endorphin, βsub(h)-endorphin, or βsub(c)-endorphin, in covalent conjugation with human gammaglobulin as immunogenic carrier material, and an antibody having the property of specifically binding β-endorphin or fragments thereof, containing the (6-15) residue sequence. (U.K.)

  8. Interspecies and seasonal differences of retinol in dairy ruminant´s milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Hodulová

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Milk is an essential source of macronutrients and among lipophilic vitamins is significant source of retinol. The contribution of milk to the reference daily intake for retinol varies from 11% to 16%, worldwide. The most consumed dairy products are fresh, dehydrated and condensed milk in which the amonuts of retinol are not modified to those of in whole milk. Retinol is essential to ensure a good functionality of the immune system and plays a critical role in vision, reproduction, cell differentiation as well as growth and development and is found only in animal tissues. The aim of our study was to evaluate the interspecies differences in the retinol concentration of whole raw bovine, caprine and ovine milk and to observe seasonal variation of retinol in bulk tank milk samples. Samples of raw milk were colleceted on different farms in the Czech Republic between 2013 and 2014. Retinol was measured by ultra high performance liquid chromatography with UV detection (325 nm in isocratic mode after alkaline saponification with methanolic potassium hydroxide solution and liquid-liquid extraction into non polar organic solvent of whole raw milk. To avoid vitamin losses or degradation during the procedure, antioxidants were added to the sample extraction media. Our results indicate significant interspecies differences between bovine and ovine milk and caprine and ovine milk. Concentration of retinol is very similar in bovine and caprine milk 0.96 ±0.11 mg/L, 0.94 ±0.25 mg/L, respectively. The mean concentration in sheep´s milk is 1.75 ±0.24 mg/L. The seasonal variation of retinol in raw bovine milk was detected as high significant, with the highest concentration during winter. These results contribute to the nutrition evaluation of milk in the Czech Republic and indicate, that the sheep´s milk is the best source of retinol among the milks of ruminants kept in the Czech Republic, however it is not used in its fluid form for human consumption.

  9. Identitag, a relational database for SAGE tag identification and interspecies comparison of SAGE libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duret Laurent

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE is a method of large-scale gene expression analysis that has the potential to generate the full list of mRNAs present within a cell population at a given time and their frequency. An essential step in SAGE library analysis is the unambiguous assignment of each 14 bp tag to the transcript from which it was derived. This process, called tag-to-gene mapping, represents a step that has to be improved in the analysis of SAGE libraries. Indeed, the existing web sites providing correspondence between tags and transcripts do not concern all species for which numerous EST and cDNA have already been sequenced. Results This is the reason why we designed and implemented a freely available tool called Identitag for tag identification that can be used in any species for which transcript sequences are available. Identitag is based on a relational database structure in order to allow rapid and easy storage and updating of data and, most importantly, in order to be able to precisely define identification parameters. This structure can be seen like three interconnected modules : the first one stores virtual tags extracted from a given list of transcript sequences, the second stores experimental tags observed in SAGE experiments, and the third allows the annotation of the transcript sequences used for virtual tag extraction. It therefore connects an observed tag to a virtual tag and to the sequence it comes from, and then to its functional annotation when available. Databases made from different species can be connected according to orthology relationship thus allowing the comparison of SAGE libraries between species. We successfully used Identitag to identify tags from our chicken SAGE libraries and for chicken to human SAGE tags interspecies comparison. Identitag sources are freely available on http://pbil.univ-lyon1.fr/software/identitag/ web site. Conclusions Identitag is a flexible and powerful tool

  10. Inter-Species Grafting Caused Extensive and Heritable Alterations of DNA Methylation in Solanaceae Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yan; Ma, Yiqiao; Liu, Gang; Yu, Xiaoming; Zhong, Silin; Liu, Bao

    2013-01-01

    Background Grafting has been extensively used to enhance the performance of horticultural crops. Since Charles Darwin coined the term “graft hybrid” meaning that asexual combination of different plant species may generate products that are genetically distinct, highly discrepant opinions exist supporting or against the concept. Recent studies have documented that grafting enables exchanges of both RNA and DNA molecules between the grafting partners, thus providing a molecular basis for grafting-induced genetic variation. DNA methylation is known as prone to alterations as a result of perturbation of internal and external conditions. Given characteristics of grafting, it is interesting to test whether the process may cause an alteration of this epigenetic marker in the grafted organismal products. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed relative global DNA methylation levels and locus-specific methylation patterns by the MSAP marker and locus-specific bisulfite-sequencing in the seed plants (wild-type controls), self- and hetero-grafted scions/rootstocks, selfed progenies of scions and their seed-plant controls, involving three Solanaceae species. We quantified expression of putative genes involved in establishing and/or maintaining DNA methylation by q-(RT)-PCR. We found that (1) hetero-grafting caused extensive alteration of DNA methylation patterns in a locus-specific manner, especially in scions, although relative methylation levels remain largely unaltered; (2) the altered methylation patterns in the hetero-grafting-derived scions could be inherited to sexual progenies with some sites showing further alterations or revisions; (3) hetero-grafting caused dynamic changes in steady-state transcript abundance of genes encoding for a set of enzymes functionally relevant to DNA methylation. Conclusions/Significance Our results demonstrate that inter-species grafting in plants could produce extensive and heritable alterations in DNA methylation. We suggest that

  11. Two-staged nuclear transfer can enhance the developmental ability of goat-sheep interspecies nuclear transfer embryos in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li-Bing; Cai, Lu; Li, Jia-Jia; Chen, Xiu-Li; Ji, Feng-Yu

    2011-02-01

    The technique of interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer, in which interspecies cloned embryos can be reconstructed by using domestic animal oocytes as nuclear recipients and endangered animal or human somatic cells as nuclear donors, can afford more opportunities in endangered animal rescue and human tissue transplantation, but the application of this technique is limited by extremely low efficiency which may be attributed to donor nucleus not fully reprogrammed by xenogenic cytoplasm. In this study, goat fetal fibroblasts (GFFs) were used as nuclear donors, in vitro-matured sheep oocytes were used as nuclear recipients, and a two-stage nuclear transfer procedure was performed to improve the developmental ability of goat-sheep interspecies clone embryos. In the first stage nuclear transfer (FSNT), GFFs were injected into the ooplasm of enucleated sheep metaphase-II oocytes, then non-activated reconstructed embryos were cultured in vitro, so that the donor nucleus could be exposed to the ooplasm for a period of time. Subsequently, in the second stage nuclear transfer, FSNT-derived non-activated reconstructed embryo was centrifuged, and the donor nucleus was then transferred into another freshly enucleated sheep oocyte. Compared with the one-stage nuclear transfer, two-stage nuclear transfer could significantly enhance the blastocyst rate of goat-sheep interspecies clone embryos, and this result indicated that longtime exposure to xenogenic ooplasm benefits the donor nucleus to be reprogrammed. The two-stage nuclear transfer procedure has two advantages, one is that the donor nucleus can be exposed to the ooplasm for a long time, the other is that the problem of oocyte aging can be solved.

  12. Use of comparative genomics approaches to characterize interspecies differences in response to environmental chemicals: Challenges, opportunities, and research needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess-Herbert, Sarah L.; Euling, Susan Y.

    2013-01-01

    A critical challenge for environmental chemical risk assessment is the characterization and reduction of uncertainties introduced when extrapolating inferences from one species to another. The purpose of this article is to explore the challenges, opportunities, and research needs surrounding the issue of how genomics data and computational and systems level approaches can be applied to inform differences in response to environmental chemical exposure across species. We propose that the data, tools, and evolutionary framework of comparative genomics be adapted to inform interspecies differences in chemical mechanisms of action. We compare and contrast existing approaches, from disciplines as varied as evolutionary biology, systems biology, mathematics, and computer science, that can be used, modified, and combined in new ways to discover and characterize interspecies differences in chemical mechanism of action which, in turn, can be explored for application to risk assessment. We consider how genetic, protein, pathway, and network information can be interrogated from an evolutionary biology perspective to effectively characterize variations in biological processes of toxicological relevance among organisms. We conclude that comparative genomics approaches show promise for characterizing interspecies differences in mechanisms of action, and further, for improving our understanding of the uncertainties inherent in extrapolating inferences across species in both ecological and human health risk assessment. To achieve long-term relevance and consistent use in environmental chemical risk assessment, improved bioinformatics tools, computational methods robust to data gaps, and quantitative approaches for conducting extrapolations across species are critically needed. Specific areas ripe for research to address these needs are recommended

  13. Interspecies variability of Dioxin-like PCBs accumulation in five plants from the modern Yellow River delta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan Guolan [Environmental Research Institute, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong Province 250100 (China); Cui Zhaojie [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong Province 250100 (China)], E-mail: cuizj@sdu.edu.cn; Liu Jing [School of City Planning and Environmental Engineering, Shandong Jianzhu University, Jinan, Shandong Province 250101 (China)

    2009-04-30

    To investigate the interspecies variance of Dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (DL-PCBs) in the plants from modern Yellow River delta, the concentrations of 12 DL-PCBs congeners were examined in five plant species and their associated soils. The DL-PCBs concentrations in plants (2.32-287.60 ng/kg dry weight) were low compared to most published literature, and the concentrations and ratios of DL-PCBs congeners in plants varied greatly among species. The properties of plants and PCBs were then studied to explore the factors affecting the interspecies variance of DL-PCBs accumulation. The plants with the smallest variance of morphological and physiological characteristics (Imperata cylindrical var. Major and Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steud) had the most similar accumulation patterns of DL-PCBs among the species tested. As the octanol-air partitioning coefficient (K{sub oa}) of the DL-PCBs increased, interspecies variance decreased on the whole plant level. Interestingly, the correlation between the DL-PCBs concentrations in plants and log K{sub oa} of congeners was found to be significant for annual plants, but for perennial plants it was not significant. Thus the patterns of uptake of DL-PCBs are different between annual and perennial plants.

  14. Interspecies hormonal interactions between man and the domestic dog (Canis familiaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Amanda C; Josephs, Robert A

    2006-09-01

    To date, hormonal influence in interspecies interaction has not been examined. In a study of a dog agility competition among human/dog teams, men's pre-competition basal testosterone (T) levels were positively related to changes in dogs' cortisol levels from pre- to post-competition, but only among losing teams. Furthermore, pre-competition basal T in men on losing teams predicted more than half of the variance in dogs' cortisol change. This relationship was mediated through men's punitive and affiliative behaviors towards their dogs immediately after competition. Men's T change was also a significant predictor of dogs' change in cortisol such that men who experienced greater decreases in T after a loss were associated with dogs that experienced greater increases in cortisol. In winning teams, men's pre-competition T and T changes were unrelated to dogs' cortisol changes. These results are discussed in light of T as a proxy for dominance motivation as well as T's relation to stress across the species boundary.

  15. Evaluation on direct interspecies electron transfer in anaerobic sludge digestion of microbial electrolysis cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zisheng; Zhang, Yaobin; Quan, Xie; Zhao, Huimin

    2016-01-01

    Increase of methanogenesis in methane-producing microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) is frequently believed as a result of cathodic reduction of CO2. Recent studies indicated that this electromethanogenesis only accounted for a little part of methane production during anaerobic sludge digestion. Instead, direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) possibly plays an important role in methane production. In this study, anaerobic digestion of sludge were investigated in a single-chamber MEC reactor, a carbon-felt supplemented reactor and a common anaerobic reactor to evaluate the effects of DIET on the sludge digestion. The results showed that adding carbon felt into the reactor increased 12.9% of methane production and 17.2% of sludge reduction. Imposing a voltage on the carbon felt further improved the digestion. Current calculation showed that the cathodic reduction only contributed to 27.5% of increased methane production. Microbial analysis indicated that DIET played an important role in the anaerobic sludge digestion in the MEC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Genomic Regions Associated With Interspecies Communication in Dogs Contain Genes Related to Human Social Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Mia E; Wright, Dominic; Roth, Lina S V; Batakis, Petros; Jensen, Per

    2016-09-29

    Unlike their wolf ancestors, dogs have unique social skills for communicating and cooperating with humans. Previously, significant heritabilities for human-directed social behaviors have been found in laboratory beagles. Here, a Genome-Wide Association Study identified two genomic regions associated with dog's human-directed social behaviors. We recorded the propensity of laboratory beagles, bred, kept and handled under standardized conditions, to initiate physical interactions with a human during an unsolvable problem-task, and 190 individuals were genotyped with an HD Canine SNP-chip. One genetic marker on chromosome 26 within the SEZ6L gene was significantly associated with time spent close to, and in physical contact with, the human. Two suggestive markers on chromosome 26, located within the ARVCF gene, were also associated with human contact seeking. Strikingly, four additional genes present in the same linkage blocks affect social abilities in humans, e.g., SEZ6L has been associated with autism and COMT affects aggression in adolescents with ADHD. This is, to our knowledge, the first genome-wide study presenting candidate genomic regions for dog sociability and inter-species communication. These results advance our understanding of dog domestication and raise the use of the dog as a novel model system for human social disorders.

  17. The multifaceted roles of the interspecies signalling molecule indole in Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Yong-Guy; Baek, Kwang-Hyun; Cho, Moo Hwan; Lee, Jintae

    2015-04-01

    Bacteria utilize signal molecules to ensure their survival in environmental niches, and indole is an interspecies and interkingdom signalling molecule, which is widespread in the natural environment. In this study, we sought to identify novel roles of indole in soil-borne bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Agrobacterium tumefaciens was found not to synthesize indole and to degrade it rapidly. The addition of exogenous indole dose-dependently inhibited A. tumefaciens growth and decreased its motility. Surprisingly, indole markedly increased A. tumefaciens biofilm formation on polystyrene, glass and nylon membrane surfaces and enhanced its antibiotic tolerance. Transcriptional analysis showed that indole markedly up-regulated several biofilm-related (celA, cheA, exoR, phoB, flgE, fliR and motA), stress-related genes (clpB, dnaK, gsp, gyrB, marR and soxR) and efflux genes (emrA, norM, and Atu2551) in A. tumefaciens, which partially explained the increased biofilm formation and antibiotic tolerance. In contrast, the plant auxin indole-3-acetic acid did not affect biofilm formation, antibiotic tolerance or gene expression. Interestingly, indole was found to exhibit several similarities with antibiotics, as it inhibited the growth of non-indole-producing bacteria, whereas these bacteria countered its effects by rapidly degrading indole, and by enhancing biofilm formation and antibiotic tolerance. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Phenotypic responses to interspecies competition and commensalism in a naturally-derived microbial co-culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Nymul; Maezato, Yukari; McClure, Ryan S.; Brislawn, Colin J.; Mobberley, Jennifer M.; Isern, Nancy; Chrisler, William B.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Barney, Brett M.; Song, Hyun-Seob; Nelson, William C.; Bernstein, Hans C.

    2018-01-10

    The fundamental question of whether different microbial species will co-exist or compete in a given environment depends on context, composition and environmental constraints. Model microbial systems can yield some general principles related to this question. In this study we employed a naturally occurring co-culture composed of heterotrophic bacteria, Halomonas sp. HL-48 and Marinobacter sp. HL-58, to ask two fundamental scientific questions: 1) how do the phenotypes of two naturally co-existing species respond to partnership as compared to axenic growth? and 2) how do growth and molecular phenotypes of these species change with respect to competitive and commensal interactions? We hypothesized – and confirmed – that co-cultivation under glucose as the sole carbon source would result in a competitive interactions. Similarly, when glucose was swapped with xylose, the interactions became commensal because Marinobacter HL-58 was supported by metabolites derived from Halomonas HL-48. Each species responded to partnership by changing both its growth and molecular phenotype as assayed via batch growth kinetics and global transcriptomics. These phenotypic responses depended nutrient availability and so the environment ultimately controlled how they responded to each other. This simplified model community revealed that microbial interactions are context-specific and different environmental conditions dictate how interspecies partnerships will unfold.

  19. Inter-species competition-facilitation in stochastic riparian vegetation dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tealdi, Stefano; Camporeale, Carlo; Ridolfi, Luca

    2013-02-07

    Riparian vegetation is a highly dynamic community that lives on river banks and which depends to a great extent on the fluvial hydrology. The stochasticity of the discharge and erosion/deposition processes in fact play a key role in determining the distribution of vegetation along a riparian transect. These abiotic processes interact with biotic competition/facilitation mechanisms, such as plant competition for light, water, and nutrients. In this work, we focus on the dynamics of plants characterized by three components: (1) stochastic forcing due to river discharges, (2) competition for resources, and (3) inter-species facilitation due to the interplay between vegetation and fluid dynamics processes. A minimalist stochastic bio-hydrological model is proposed for the dynamics of the biomass of two vegetation species: one species is assumed dominant and slow-growing, the other is subdominant, but fast-growing. The stochastic model is solved analytically and the probability density function of the plant biomasses is obtained as a function of both the hydrologic and biologic parameters. The impact of the competition/facilitation processes on the distribution of vegetation species along the riparian transect is investigated and remarkable effects are observed. Finally, a good qualitative agreement is found between the model results and field data. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Small Luggage for a Long Journey: Transfer of Vesicle-Enclosed Small RNA in Interspecies Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Fabio A; Lécuyer, Eric

    2017-01-01

    In the evolutionary arms race, symbionts have evolved means to modulate each other's physiology, oftentimes through the dissemination of biological signals. Beyond small molecules and proteins, recent evidence shows that small RNA molecules are transferred between organisms and transmit functional RNA interference signals across biological species. However, the mechanisms through which specific RNAs involved in cross-species communication are sorted for secretion and protected from degradation in the environment remain largely enigmatic. Over the last decade, extracellular vesicles have emerged as prominent vehicles of biological signals. They can stabilize specific RNA transcripts in biological fluids and selectively deliver them to recipient cells. Here, we review examples of small RNA transfers between plants and bacterial, fungal, and animal symbionts. We also discuss the transmission of RNA interference signals from intestinal cells to populations of the gut microbiota, along with its roles in intestinal homeostasis. We suggest that extracellular vesicles may contribute to inter-species crosstalk mediated by small RNA. We review the mechanisms of RNA sorting to extracellular vesicles and evaluate their relevance in cross-species communication by discussing conservation, stability, stoichiometry, and co-occurrence of vesicles with alternative communication vehicles.

  1. Interspecies sexual behaviour between a male Japanese macaque and female sika deer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelé, Marie; Bonnefoy, Alexandre; Shimada, Masaki; Sueur, Cédric

    2017-04-01

    Interspecies sexual behaviour or 'reproductive interference' has been reported across a wide range of animal taxa. However, most of these occurrences were observed in phylogenetically close species and were mainly discussed in terms of their effect on fitness, hybridization and species survival. The few cases of heterospecific mating in distant species occurred between animals that were bred and maintained in captivity. Only one scientific study has reported this phenomenon, describing sexual harassment of king penguins by an Antarctic fur seal. This is the first article to report mating behaviour between a male Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata yakui) and female sika deer (Cervus nippon yakushimae) on Yakushima Island, Japan. Although Japanese macaques are known to ride deer, this individual showed clearly sexual behaviour towards several female deer, some of which tried to escape whilst others accepted the mount. This male seems to belong to a group of peripheral males. Although this phenomenon may be explained as copulation learning, this is highly unlikely. The most realistic hypothesis would be that of mate deprivation, which states that males with limited access to females are more likely to display this behaviour. Whatever the cause for this event may be, the observation of highly unusual animal behaviour may be a key to understanding the evolution of heterospecific mating behaviour in the animal kingdom.

  2. Repeated embryo collection and interspecies transfer in alpacas and llamas during non-breeding season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacheco J

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Sexual behavior evaluation was evaluated, collecting and interspecies embryo transfer inter species in llamas and alpacas during non-breeding season, 10 and 10 donor alpacas llamas, alpacas and 20 receiving 20 llamas, 5 alpacas and 5 llamas males were used. Sexual behavior by libido in males and acceptance of female to male in the presence of a dominant follicle was evaluated, the collection of embryos simple ovulation by non-surgical technique was performed and the fresh embryos are transferred directly into the horn left. It was observed that only 40% of alpaca accept the male and female in all cases had to use two males for mating, but all llama males mounted on the first attempt and accepted all females breeding. Embryos were collected at 25 and 60% of alpacas and llamas washes respectively, all were grade 1 embryos transferable; the embryo transfer fertility evaluated by ultrasound at 25 days was 100 and 41.6% respectively for donor alpaca and llama, however ultrasound evaluation at 60 days fertility was 50 and 25% respectively for donor alpaca and llama. We conclude that there is greater reproductive seasonality in alpaca regard to llamas, all were grade 1 embryos collected, fertility evaluated by ultrasound 25 days down to 60 days, demonstrating embryonic mortality, possibly due to the non-breeding season of both species.

  3. Alternative Saccharomyces interspecies hybrid combinations and their potential for low‐temperature wort fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikulin, Jarkko; Krogerus, Kristoffer

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The lager yeast hybrid (Saccharomyces cerevisiae × Saccharomyces eubayanus) possesses two key characteristics that are essential for lager brewing: efficient sugar utilization and cold tolerance. Here we explore the possibility that the lager yeast phenotype can be recreated by hybridizing S. cerevisiae ale yeast with a number of cold‐tolerant Saccharomyces species including Saccharomyces arboricola, Saccharomyces eubayanus, Saccharomyces mikatae and Saccharomyces uvarum. Interspecies hybrids performed better than parental strains in lager brewing conditions (12°C and 12°P wort), with the S. mikatae hybrid performing as well as the S. eubayanus hybrid. Where the S. cerevisiae parent was capable of utilizing maltotriose, this trait was inherited by the hybrids. A greater production of higher alcohols and esters by the hybrids resulted in the production of more aromatic beers relative to the parents. Strong fermentation performance relative to the parents was dependent on ploidy, with polyploid hybrids (3n, 4n) performing better than diploid hybrids. All hybrids produced 4‐vinyl guaiacol, a smoke/clove aroma generally considered an off flavour in lager beer. This characteristic could however be eliminated by isolating spore clones from a fertile hybrid of S. cerevisiae and S. mikatae. The results suggest that S. eubayanus is dispensable when constructing yeast hybrids that express the typical lager yeast phenotype. © 2017 The Authors. Yeast published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:28755430

  4. Alternative Saccharomyces interspecies hybrid combinations and their potential for low-temperature wort fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikulin, Jarkko; Krogerus, Kristoffer; Gibson, Brian

    2018-01-01

    The lager yeast hybrid (Saccharomyces cerevisiae × Saccharomyces eubayanus) possesses two key characteristics that are essential for lager brewing: efficient sugar utilization and cold tolerance. Here we explore the possibility that the lager yeast phenotype can be recreated by hybridizing S. cerevisiae ale yeast with a number of cold-tolerant Saccharomyces species including Saccharomyces arboricola, Saccharomyces eubayanus, Saccharomyces mikatae and Saccharomyces uvarum. Interspecies hybrids performed better than parental strains in lager brewing conditions (12°C and 12°P wort), with the S. mikatae hybrid performing as well as the S. eubayanus hybrid. Where the S. cerevisiae parent was capable of utilizing maltotriose, this trait was inherited by the hybrids. A greater production of higher alcohols and esters by the hybrids resulted in the production of more aromatic beers relative to the parents. Strong fermentation performance relative to the parents was dependent on ploidy, with polyploid hybrids (3n, 4n) performing better than diploid hybrids. All hybrids produced 4-vinyl guaiacol, a smoke/clove aroma generally considered an off flavour in lager beer. This characteristic could however be eliminated by isolating spore clones from a fertile hybrid of S. cerevisiae and S. mikatae. The results suggest that S. eubayanus is dispensable when constructing yeast hybrids that express the typical lager yeast phenotype. © 2017 The Authors. Yeast published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2017 The Authors. Yeast published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Evidence for the robustness of protein complexes to inter-species hybridization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Baptiste Leducq

    Full Text Available Despite the tremendous efforts devoted to the identification of genetic incompatibilities underlying hybrid sterility and inviability, little is known about the effect of inter-species hybridization at the protein interactome level. Here, we develop a screening platform for the comparison of protein-protein interactions (PPIs among closely related species and their hybrids. We examine in vivo the architecture of protein complexes in two yeast species (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces kudriavzevii that diverged 5-20 million years ago and in their F1 hybrids. We focus on 24 proteins of two large complexes: the RNA polymerase II and the nuclear pore complex (NPC, which show contrasting patterns of molecular evolution. We found that, with the exception of one PPI in the NPC sub-complex, PPIs were highly conserved between species, regardless of protein divergence. Unexpectedly, we found that the architecture of the complexes in F1 hybrids could not be distinguished from that of the parental species. Our results suggest that the conservation of PPIs in hybrids likely results from the slow evolution taking place on the very few protein residues involved in the interaction or that protein complexes are inherently robust and may accommodate protein divergence up to the level that is observed among closely related species.

  6. An in vitro approach for comparative interspecies metabolism of agrochemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalley, Paul M; Bartels, Michael; Bentley, Karin S; Corvaro, Marco; Funk, Dorothee; Himmelstein, Matthew W; Neumann, Birgit; Strupp, Christian; Zhang, Fagen; Mehta, Jyotigna

    2017-08-01

    The metabolism and elimination of a xenobiotic has a direct bearing on its potential to cause toxicity in an organism. The confidence with which data from safety studies can be extrapolated to humans depends, among other factors, upon knowing whether humans are systemically exposed to the same chemical entities (i.e. a parent compound and its metabolites) as the laboratory animals used to study toxicity. Ideally, to understand a metabolite in terms of safety, both the chemical structure and the systemic exposure would need to be determined. However, as systemic exposure data (i.e. blood concentration/time data of test material or metabolites) in humans will not be available for agrochemicals, an in vitro approach must be taken. This paper outlines an in vitro experimental approach for evaluating interspecies metabolic comparisons between humans and animal species used in safety studies. The aim is to ensure, where possible, that all potential human metabolites are also present in the species used in the safety studies. If a metabolite is only observed in human in vitro samples and is not present in a metabolic pathway defined in the toxicological species already, the toxicological relevance of this metabolite must be evaluated. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Octopus lipid and vitamin E composition: interspecies, interorigin, and nutritional variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrinha, Alvaro; Cruz, Rebeca; Gomes, Filipa; Mendes, Eulália; Casal, Susana; Morais, Simone

    2014-08-20

    Octopus vulgaris, Octopus maya, and Eledone cirrhosa from distinct marine environments [Northeast Atlantic (NEA), Northwest Atlantic (NWA), Eastern Central Atlantic, Western Central Atlantic (WCA), Pacific Ocean, and Mediterranean Sea] were characterized regarding their lipid and vitamin E composition. These species are those commercially more relevant worldwide. Significant interspecies and interorigin differences were observed. Unsaturated fatty acids account for more than 65% of total fatty acids, mostly ω-3 PUFA due to docosahexaenoic (18.4-29.3%) and eicosapentanoic acid (11.4-23.9%) contributions. The highest ω-3 PUFA amounts and ω-3/ω-6 ratios were quantified in the heaviest specimens, O. vulgaris from NWA, with high market price, and simultaneously in the lowest graded samples, E. cirrhosa from NEA, of reduced dimensions. Although having the highest cholesterol contents, E. cirrhosa from NEA and O. maya from WCA have also higher protective fatty acid indexes. Chemometric discrimination allowed clustering the selected species and several origins based on lipid and vitamin E profiles.

  8. Interspecies comparison of the tissue distribution of WR-2721, a radioprotective drug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washburn, L.C.; Rafter, J.J.; Hayes, R.L.; Yuhas, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    Pre-irradiation intravenous administration of the radioprotective drug S-2-[3-aminopropylamino]ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721) has potential value in radiotherapy because it doubles the radiation resistance of normal mouse tissues while affording only minimal protection to tumors. Deficient deposition of WR- 2721 in tumor tissue has recently been demonstrated and this is thought to be a major reason for the preferential protection of normal tissues by the drug. Data originally obtained in studies using the mouse and rat indicated that the tissue distribution of WR-2721 was possibly more closely related to dose per unit surface area than to dose per unit weight. To test this hypothesis an interspecies comparison of the tissue distribution of 35 S-labeled WR-2721 was carried out in normal mice, rats, rabbits, and dogs at 15 and 30 minutes after intravenous administration. Results suggest that the surface area and body weight exert equal effects on the tissue concentration of WR-2721. The results further suggest that lower absolute doses of WR-2721 in the human, possibly as low as 20 mg/kg, may provide a radioprotective effect equivalent to that produced from 100 mg/kg in the mouse, i.e., a 50 to 80 percent increase in radiation resistance (CH)

  9. Effects of an applied voltage on direct interspecies electron transfer via conductive materials for methane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Yeol; Park, Jeong-Hoon; Park, Hee-Deung

    2017-10-01

    Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) between exoelectrogenic bacteria and methanogenic archaea via conductive materials is reported as an efficient method to produce methane in anaerobic organic waste digestion. A voltage can be applied to the conductive materials to accelerate the DIET between two groups of microorganisms to produce methane. To evaluate this hypothesis, two sets of anaerobic serum bottles with and without applied voltage were used with a pair of graphite rods as conductive materials to facilitate DIET. Initially, the methane production rate was similar between the two sets of serum bottles, and later the serum bottles with an applied voltage of 0.39V showed a 168% higher methane production rate than serum bottles without an applied voltage. In cyclic voltammograms, the characteristic redox peaks for hydrogen and acetate oxidation were identified in the serum bottles with an applied voltage. In the microbial community analyses, hydrogenotrophic methanogens (e.g. Methanobacterium) were observed to be abundant in serum bottles with an applied voltage, while methanogens utilizing carbon dioxide (e.g., Methanosaeta and Methanosarcina) were dominant in serum bottles without an applied voltage. Taken together, the applied voltage on conductive materials might not be effective to promote DIET in methane production. Instead, it appeared to generate a condition for hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. On being a (modern) scientist: risks of public engagement in the UK interspecies embryo debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, James; Williams, Clare; Wainwright, Steven; Cribb, Alan

    2012-12-01

    In 2006, a small group of UK academic scientists made headlines when they proposed the creation of interspecies embryos - mixing human and animal genetic material. A public campaign was fought to mobilize support for the research. Drawing on interviews with the key scientists involved, this paper argues that engaging the public through communicating their ideas via the media can result in tensions between the necessity of, and inherent dangers in, scientists campaigning on controversial issues. Some scientists believed that communicating science had damaged their professional standing in the eyes of their peers, who, in turn, policed the boundaries around what they believed constituted a "good" scientist. Tensions between promoting "science" versus promotion of the "scientist;" engaging the public versus publishing peer-reviewed articles and winning grants; and building expectations versus overhyping the science reveal the difficult choices scientists in the modern world have to make over the potential gains and risks of communicating science. We conclude that although scientists' participation in public debates is often encouraged, the rewards of such engagement remain. Moreover, this participation can detrimentally affect scientists' careers.

  11. Characterizing interspecies uncertainty using data from studies of anti-neoplastic agents in animals and humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, Paul S.; Keenan, Russell E.; Swartout, Jeffrey C.

    2008-01-01

    For most chemicals, the Reference Dose (RfD) is based on data from animal testing. The uncertainty introduced by the use of animal models has been termed interspecies uncertainty. The magnitude of the differences between the toxicity of a chemical in humans and test animals and its uncertainty can be investigated by evaluating the inter-chemical variation in the ratios of the doses associated with similar toxicological endpoints in test animals and humans. This study performs such an evaluation on a data set of 64 anti-neoplastic drugs. The data set provides matched responses in humans and four species of test animals: mice, rats, monkeys, and dogs. While the data have a number of limitations, the data show that when the drugs are evaluated on a body weight basis: 1) toxicity generally increases with a species' body weight; however, humans are not always more sensitive than test animals; 2) the animal to human dose ratios were less than 10 for most, but not all, drugs; 3) the current practice of using data from multiple species when setting RfDs lowers the probability of having a large value for the ratio. These findings provide insight into inter-chemical variation in animal to human extrapolations and suggest the need for additional collection and analysis of matched toxicity data in humans and test animals

  12. Job Sharing in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Wilma; Kline, Susan

    1979-01-01

    The author presents the advantages of job sharing for all school personnel, saying that education is particularly adaptable to this new form of employment. Current job sharing programs in Massachusetts, California, and New Jersey schools are briefly discussed. (SJL)

  13. Urban sharing culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjalland, Emmy Laura Perez

    In urban areas sharing cultures, services and economies are rising. People share, rent and recycle their homes, cars, bikes, rides, tools, cloths, working space, knowhow and so on. The sharing culture can be understood as mobilities (Kesselring and Vogl 2013) of goods, values and ideas reshaping...... our cities. The sharing economy has the power to democratise access the urban space, resources and raw materials (Steen Nielsen 2008; Harvey 2000); it holds the ability to change the current dominant understandings and structures of economy and growth (Steen Nielsen 2008); solve emerging environmental...... and trust. (Thomsen 2013; Bauman 2000; Beck 1992; Giddens 1991). The sharing economy is currently hyper trendy but before claiming capitalism as dead we need to understand the basics of the sharing economies and cultures asking who can share and what will we share. Furthermore it is crucial to study what...

  14. Satisfaction and 'comparison sharing'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amilon, Anna

    2009-01-01

    the probability of satisfaction. Results show that comparison sharing impacts satisfaction for women, and that those women who share more equally than their peers are more likely to be satisfied, whereas comparison sharing has no influence on satisfaction for men. Also, parents are less likely to be satisfied...

  15. Human platelet antigens - 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, B R; McFarland, J G

    2014-02-01

    To date, 33 human platelet alloantigens (HPAs) have been identified on six functionally important platelet glycoprotein (GP) complexes and have been implicated in alloimmune platelet disorders including foetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT), posttransfusion purpura (PTP) and multitransfusion platelet refractoriness (MPR). The greatest number of recognized HPA (20 of 33) resides on the GPIIb/IIIa complex, which serves as the receptor for ligands important in mediating haemostasis and inflammation. These include HPA-1a, the most commonly implicated HPA in FNAIT and PTP in Caucasian populations. Other platelet GP complexes, GPIb/V/IX, GPIa/IIa and CD109, express the remaining 13 HPAs. Of the recognized HPAs, 12 occur as six serologically and genetically defined biallelic 'systems' where the -a form designates the higher frequency allele and the -b form, the lower. Twenty-one other HPAs are low-frequency or rare antigens for which postulated higher frequency -a alleles have not yet been identified as antibody specificities. In addition to the HPA markers, platelets also express ABO and human leucocyte antigen (HLA) antigens; antibodies directed at the former are occasionally important in FNAIT, and to the latter, in MPR. © 2013 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  16. Rethinking the Sharing Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornberger, Martin; Leixnering, Stephan; Meyer, Renate

    2017-01-01

    Our paper focuses on a non-standard sharing example that harbors the potential to disrupt received wisdom on the sharing economy. While originally entering the field to analyze, broadly from a governance perspective, how the 2015 refugee crisis was handled in Vienna, Austria, we found that the non...... the phenomenon as part of the ‘sharing economy’. Continuing this innovative line of thought, we argue that our unusual case is in fact an excellent opportunity to discover important aspects about both the nature and organization of sharing. First, we uncover an additional dimension of sharing beyond the material...... arguments. Second, we hold that a particular form of organizing facilitates the sharing economy: the sharing economy organization. This particular organizational form is distinctive – at the same time selectively borrowing and skillfully combining features from platform organizations (e.g., use...

  17. Data sharing in psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martone, Maryann E; Garcia-Castro, Alexander; VandenBos, Gary R

    2018-01-01

    Routine data sharing, defined here as the publication of the primary data and any supporting materials required to interpret the data acquired as part of a research study, is still in its infancy in psychology, as in many domains. Nevertheless, with increased scrutiny on reproducibility and more funder mandates requiring sharing of data, the issues surrounding data sharing are moving beyond whether data sharing is a benefit or a bane to science, to what data should be shared and how. Here, we present an overview of these issues, specifically focusing on the sharing of so-called "long tail" data, that is, data generated by individual laboratories as part of largely hypothesis-driven research. We draw on experiences in other domains to discuss attitudes toward data sharing, cost-benefits, best practices and infrastructure. We argue that the publishing of data sets is an integral component of 21st-century scholarship. Moreover, although not all issues around how and what to share have been resolved, a consensus on principles and best practices for effective data sharing and the infrastructure for sharing many types of data are largely in place. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Dynamic quantum secret sharing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Heng-Yue; Wen, Qiao-Yan; Gao, Fei; Qin, Su-Juan; Guo, Fen-Zhuo

    2012-01-01

    In this Letter we consider quantum secret sharing (QSS) between a sender and a dynamic agent group, called dynamic quantum secret sharing (DQSS). In the DQSS, the change of the agent group is allowable during the procedure of sharing classical and quantum information. Two DQSS schemes are proposed based on a special kind of entangled state, starlike cluster states. Without redistributing all the shares, the changed agent group can reconstruct the sender's secret by their cooperation. Compared with the previous quantum secret sharing scheme, our schemes are more flexible and suitable for practical applications. -- Highlights: ► We consider quantum secret sharing between a sender and a dynamic agent group, called dynamic quantum secret sharing (DQSS). ► In the DQSS, the change of the agent group is allowable during the procedure of sharing classical and quantum information. ► Two DQSS schemes are proposed based on a special kind of entangled state, starlike cluster states. ► Without redistributing all the shares, the changed agent group can reconstruct the sender's secret by their cooperation. ► Compared with the previous quantum secret sharing scheme, our schemes are more flexible and suitable for practical applications.

  19. Phase-II conjugation ability for PAH metabolism in amphibians: characteristics and inter-species differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Haruki; Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Nakayama, Shouta M M; Tanaka-Ueno, Tomoko; Ishizuka, Mayumi

    2011-10-01

    The present study examines amphibian metabolic activity - particularly conjugation - by analysis of pyrene (a four ring, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon) metabolites using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detector (FD), a mass spectrometry detector (MS) system and kinetic analysis of conjugation enzymes. Six amphibian species were exposed to pyrene (dissolved in water): African claw frog (Xenopus laevis); Tago's brown frog (Rana tagoi); Montane brown frog (Rana ornativentris); Wrinkled frog (Rana rugosa); Japanese newt (Cynops pyrrhogaster); and Clouded salamander (Hynobius nebulosus); plus one fish species, medaka (Oryzias latipes); and a fresh water snail (Clithon retropictus), and the resultant metabolites were collected. Identification of pyrene metabolites by HPLC and ion-trap MS system indicated that medaka mainly excreted pyrene-1-glucuronide (PYOG), while pyrene-1-sulfate (PYOS) was the main metabolite in all amphibian species. Pyrene metabolites in amphibians were different from those in invertebrate fresh water snails. Inter-species differences were also observed in pyrene metabolism among amphibians. Metabolite analysis showed that frogs relied more strongly on sulfate conjugation than did Japanese newts and clouded salamanders. Furthermore, urodelan amphibians, newts and salamanders, excreted glucose conjugates of pyrene that were not detected in the anuran amphibians. Kinetic analysis of conjugation by hepatic microsomes and cytosols indicated that differences in excreted metabolites reflected differences in enzymatic activities. Furthermore, pyrenediol (PYDOH) glucoside sulfate was detected in the Japanese newt sample. This novel metabolite has not been reported previously to this report, in which we have identified unique characteristics of amphibians in phase II pyrene metabolism. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Reprogrammed transcriptome in rhesus-bovine interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Wang

    Full Text Available Global activation of the embryonic genome (EGA, one of the most critical steps in early mammalian embryo development, is recognized as the time when interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT embryos fail to thrive.In this study, we analyzed the EGA-related transcriptome of rhesus-bovine iSCNT 8- to 16-cell embryos and dissected the reprogramming process in terms of embryonic gene activation, somatic gene silencing, and maternal RNA degradation. Compared with fibroblast donor cells, two thousand and seven genes were activated in iSCNT embryos, one quarter of them reaching expression levels comparable to those found in in vitro fertilized (IVF rhesus embryos. This suggested that EGA in iSCNT embryos had partially recapitulated rhesus embryonic development. Eight hundred and sixty somatic genes were not silenced properly and continued to be expressed in iSCNT embryos, which indicated incomplete nuclear reprogramming. We compared maternal RNA degradation in bovine oocytes between bovine-bovine SCNT and iSCNT embryos. While maternal RNA degradation occurred in both SCNT and iSCNT embryos, we saw more limited overall degradation of maternal RNA in iSCNT embryos than in SCNT embryos. Several important maternal RNAs, like GPF9, were not properly processed in SCNT embryos.Our data suggested that iSCNT embryos are capable of triggering EGA, while a portion of somatic cell-associated genes maintain their expression. Maternal RNA degradation seems to be impaired in iSCNT embryos. Further understanding of the biological roles of these genes, networks, and pathways revealed by iSCNT may expand our knowledge about cell reprogramming, pluripotency, and differentiation.

  1. Peptide-based communication system enables Escherichia coli to Bacillus megaterium interspecies signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Nicholas; Collins, Cynthia H

    2013-11-01

    The use of mixtures of microorganisms, or microbial consortia, has the potential to improve the productivity and efficiency of increasingly complex bioprocesses. However, the use of microbial consortia has been limited by our ability to control and coordinate the behaviors of microorganisms in synthetic communities. Synthetic biologists have previously engineered cell-cell communication systems that employ machinery from bacterial quorum-sensing (QS) networks to enable population-level control of gene expression. However, additional communication systems, such as those that enable communication between different species of bacteria, are needed to enable the use of diverse species in microbial consortia for bioprocessing. Here, we use the agr QS system from Staphylococcus aureus to generate an orthogonal synthetic communication system between Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Bacillus megaterium that is based on the production and recognition of autoinducing peptides (AIPs). We describe the construction and characterization of two types of B. megaterium "receiver" cells, capable of AIP-dependent gene expression in response to AIPs that differ by a single amino acid. Further, we observed interspecies communication when these receiver cells were co-cultured with AIP-producing E. coli. We show that the two AIP-based systems exhibit differences in sensitivity and specificity that may be advantageous in tuning communication-dependent networks in synthetic consortia. These peptide-based communication systems will enable the coordination of gene expression, metabolic pathways and growth between diverse microbial species, and represent a key step towards the use of microbial consortia in bioprocessing and biomanufacturing. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Processing the Interspecies Quorum-sensing Signal Autoinducer-2 (AI-2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J Marques; P Lamosa; C Russell; R Ventura; C Maycock; M Semmelhack; S Miller; K Xavier

    2011-12-31

    The molecule (S)-4,5-dihydroxy-2,3-pentanedione (DPD) is produced by many different species of bacteria and is the precursor of the signal molecule autoinducer-2 (AI-2). AI-2 mediates interspecies communication and facilitates regulation of bacterial behaviors such as biofilm formation and virulence. A variety of bacterial species have the ability to sequester and process the AI-2 present in their environment, thereby interfering with the cell-cell communication of other bacteria. This process involves the AI-2-regulated lsr operon, comprised of the Lsr transport system that facilitates uptake of the signal, a kinase that phosphorylates the signal to phospho-DPD (P-DPD), and enzymes (like LsrG) that are responsible for processing the phosphorylated signal. Because P-DPD is the intracellular inducer of the lsr operon, enzymes involved in P-DPD processing impact the levels of Lsr expression. Here we show that LsrG catalyzes isomerization of P-DPD into 3,4,4-trihydroxy-2-pentanone-5-phosphate. We present the crystal structure of LsrG, identify potential catalytic residues, and determine which of these residues affects P-DPD processing in vivo and in vitro. We also show that an lsrG deletion mutant accumulates at least 10 times more P-DPD than wild type cells. Consistent with this result, we find that the lsrG mutant has increased expression of the lsr operon and an altered profile of AI-2 accumulation and removal. Understanding of the biochemical mechanisms employed by bacteria to quench signaling of other species can be of great utility in the development of therapies to control bacterial behavior.

  3. Characterization of aid1, a novel gene involved in Fusobacterium nucleatum interspecies interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Aida; Kaplan, Christopher W; He, Xuesong; McHardy, Ian; Shi, Wenyuan; Lux, Renate

    2014-08-01

    The oral opportunistic pathogen Fusobacterium nucleatum is known to interact with a large number of different bacterial species residing in the oral cavity. It adheres to a variety of Gram-positive bacteria, including oral streptococci via the arginine-inhibitable adhesin RadD. In this study, we describe a novel protein encoded by the predicted open reading frame FN1253 that appears to play a role in interspecies interactions of F. nucleatum, particularly with oral streptococci and related Gram-positive species. We designated FN1253 as aid1 (Adherence Inducing Determinant 1). Expression analyses demonstrated that this gene was induced in F. nucleatum single species biofilms, while the presence of representative members of the oral microbiota known to adhere to F. nucleatum triggered its suppression. Inactivation as well as overexpression of aid1 affected the ability of F. nucleatum to coaggregate with oral streptococci and the closely related Enterococcus faecalis, but not other Gram-positive oral species tested. Furthermore, overexpression of aid1 led to a drastic change in the structure of dual species biofilms of F. nucleatum with oral streptococci. Aid1 function was abolished in the presence of arginine and found to be dependent on RadD. Interestingly, differential expression of aid1 did not affect messenger RNA and protein levels of RadD. These findings indicate that RadD-mediated adhesion to oral streptococci involves more complex cellular processes than the simple interaction of adhesins on the surface of partner strains. Aid1 could potentially play an important role in facilitating RadD-mediated interaction with oral streptococci by increasing binding specificity of F. nucleatum to other microbial species.

  4. Evolutionary restoration of fertility in an interspecies hybrid yeast, by whole-genome duplication after a failed mating-type switch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl A Ortiz-Merino

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Many interspecies hybrids have been discovered in yeasts, but most of these hybrids are asexual and can replicate only mitotically. Whole-genome duplication has been proposed as a mechanism by which interspecies hybrids can regain fertility, restoring their ability to perform meiosis and sporulate. Here, we show that this process occurred naturally during the evolution of Zygosaccharomyces parabailii, an interspecies hybrid that was formed by mating between 2 parents that differed by 7% in genome sequence and by many interchromosomal rearrangements. Surprisingly, Z. parabailii has a full sexual cycle and is genetically haploid. It goes through mating-type switching and autodiploidization, followed by immediate sporulation. We identified the key evolutionary event that enabled Z. parabailii to regain fertility, which was breakage of 1 of the 2 homeologous copies of the mating-type (MAT locus in the hybrid, resulting in a chromosomal rearrangement and irreparable damage to 1 MAT locus. This rearrangement was caused by HO endonuclease, which normally functions in mating-type switching. With 1 copy of MAT inactivated, the interspecies hybrid now behaves as a haploid. Our results provide the first demonstration that MAT locus damage is a naturally occurring evolutionary mechanism for whole-genome duplication and restoration of fertility to interspecies hybrids. The events that occurred in Z. parabailii strongly resemble those postulated to have caused ancient whole-genome duplication in an ancestor of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  5. Proactive quantum secret sharing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Huawang; Dai, Yuewei

    2015-11-01

    A proactive quantum secret sharing scheme is proposed, in which the participants can update their key shares periodically. In an updating period, one participant randomly generates the EPR pairs, and the other participants update their key shares and perform the corresponding unitary operations on the particles of the EPR pairs. Then, the participant who generated the EPR pairs performs the Bell-state measurement and updates his key share according to the result of the Bell-state measurement. After an updating period, each participant can change his key share, but the secret is changeless, and the old key shares will be useless even if they have been stolen by the attacker. The proactive property of our scheme is very useful to resist the mobile attacker.

  6. The Sharing Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avital, Michel; Carroll, John M.; Hjalmarsson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The sharing economy is spreading rapidly worldwide in a number of industries and markets. The disruptive nature of this phenomenon has drawn mixed responses ranging from active conflict to adoption and assimilation. Yet, in spite of the growing attention to the sharing economy, we still do not know...... much about it. With the abundant enthusiasm about the benefits that the sharing economy can unleash and the weekly reminders about its dark side, further examination is required to determine the potential of the sharing economy while mitigating its undesirable side effects. The panel will join...... the ongoing debate about the sharing economy and contribute to the discourse with insights about how digital technologies are critical in shaping this turbulent ecosystem. Furthermore, we will define an agenda for future research on the sharing economy as it becomes part of the mainstream society as well...

  7. Facilitating Knowledge Sharing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holdt Christensen, Peter

    Abstract This paper argues that knowledge sharing can be conceptualized as different situations of exchange in which individuals relate to each other in different ways, involving different rules, norms and traditions of reciprocity regulating the exchange. The main challenge for facilitating...... and the intermediaries regulating the exchange, and facilitating knowledge sharing should therefore be viewed as a continuum of practices under the influence of opportunistic behaviour, obedience or organizational citizenship behaviour. Keywords: Knowledge sharing, motivation, organizational settings, situations...

  8. Facilitating Knowledge Sharing

    OpenAIRE

    Holdt Christensen, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Abstract This paper argues that knowledge sharing can be conceptualized as different situations of exchange in which individuals relate to each other in different ways, involving different rules, norms and traditions of reciprocity regulating the exchange. The main challenge for facilitating knowledge sharing is to ensure that the exchange is seen as equitable for the parties involved, and by viewing the problems of knowledge sharing as motivational problems situated in different organization...

  9. Cancer testis antigen and immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnadas DK

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Deepa Kolaseri Krishnadas, Fanqi Bai, Kenneth G Lucas Department of Pediatrics, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Louisville, KY, USA Abstract: The identification of cancer testis (CT antigens has been an important advance in determining potential targets for cancer immunotherapy. Multiple previous studies have shown that CT antigen vaccines, using both peptides and dendritic cell vaccines, can elicit clinical and immunologic responses in several different tumors. This review details the expression of melanoma antigen family A, 1 (MAGE-A1, melanoma antigen family A, 3 (MAGE-A3, and New York esophageal squamous cell carcinoma-1 (NY-ESO-1 in various malignancies, and presents our current understanding of CT antigen based immunotherapy. Keywords: cancer testis antigens, immunotherapy, vaccine

  10. Phenomenology of experiential sharing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    León, Felipe; Zahavi, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The chapter explores the topic of experiential sharing by drawing on the early contributions of the phenomenologists Alfred Schutz and Gerda Walther. It is argued that both Schutz and Walther support, from complementary perspectives, an approach to experiential sharing that has tended to be overl...... to the sharing of experiences describes the latter as a pre-reflective interlocking of individual streams of experiences, arising from a reciprocal Thou-orientation, Walther provides a textured account of different types of sharing and correlated forms of communities....

  11. A Data Sharing Story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercè Crosas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available From the early days of modern science through this century of Big Data, data sharing has enabled some of the greatest advances in science. In the digital age, technology can facilitate more effective and efficient data sharing and preservation practices, and provide incentives for making data easily accessible among researchers. At the Institute for Quantitative Social Science at Harvard University, we have developed an open-source software to share, cite, preserve, discover and analyze data, named the Dataverse Network. We share here the project’s motivation, its growth and successes, and likely evolution.

  12. Interspecies Transmission of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus from the Domestic Cat to the Tsushima Cat (Felis bengalensis euptilura) in the Wild

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Yoshiaki; Goto, Yuko; Yoneda, Kumiko; Endo, Yasuyuki; Mizuno, Takuya; Hamachi, Masaharu; Maruyama, Hiroyuki; Kinoshita, Hirotoshi; Koga, Susumu; Komori, Mitsuru; Fushuku, Seigo; Ushinohama, Kanji; Akuzawa, Masao; Watari, Toshihiro; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    1999-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) was isolated from a wild-caught Tsushima cat (Felis bengalensis euptilura), an endangered Japanese nondomestic subspecies of leopard cat (F. bengalensis). Phylogenetic analysis of the env gene sequences indicated that the FIV from the Tsushima cat belonged to a cluster of subtype D FIVs from domestic cats. FIVs from both the Tsushima cat and the domestic cat showed similar levels of replication and cytopathicity in lymphoid cell lines derived from these two species. The results indicated the occurrence of interspecies transmission of FIV from the domestic cat to the Tsushima cat in the wild. PMID:10438892

  13. Photographic evidence of interspecies mating in geckos of the Lepidodactylus lugubris unisexual-bisexual complex (Squamata: Gekkonidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buden, Donald W.; Cianchini, Carlos; Taborosi, Danko; Fisher, Robert N.; Bauer, Aaron; Ineich, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    An interspecies mating between unisexual Lepidodactylus lugubris and a male of the bisexual Lepidodactylus moestus was photographed by Carlos Cianchini on Kosrae [Island], FSM, at 18:15 h on 22 August 2013 (Figure 1). The mating pair was on a window frame inside a house at Pukusruk Wan village (05°21'01" N, 163°00'41" E, elev. 28 m a.s.l.) on the northeastern side of the island. This is the first direct evidence of mating between these two species.

  14. Facilitating Knowledge Sharing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holdt Christensen, Peter

    knowledge sharing is to ensure that the exchange is seen as equitable for the parties involved, and by viewing the problems of knowledge sharing as motivational problems situated in different organizational settings, the paper explores how knowledge exchange can be conceptualized as going on in four...

  15. 'An Arena for Sharing'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Karen; Ledderer, Loni; Hansen, Helle Ploug

    2015-01-01

    relatives). In-depth interviews were conducted in the participants' homes 1 month after the rehabilitation course. Data were analyzed by a constant comparative method. Results: Residential rehabilitation course was identified to serve as an "arena for sharing," underpinned by 3 dimensions of sharing...

  16. Millennials and the Sharing Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranzini, Giulia; Newlands, Gemma; Anselmi, Guido

    Report from the EU H2020 Research Project Ps2Share: Participation, Privacy, and Power in the Sharing Economy......Report from the EU H2020 Research Project Ps2Share: Participation, Privacy, and Power in the Sharing Economy...

  17. Sharing Rare Attitudes Attracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Hans

    2018-04-01

    People like others who share their attitudes. Online dating platforms as well as other social media platforms regularly rely on the social bonding power of their users' shared attitudes. However, little is known about moderating variables. In the present work, I argue that sharing rare compared with sharing common attitudes should evoke stronger interpersonal attraction among people. In five studies, I tested this prediction for the case of shared interests from different domains. I found converging evidence that people's rare compared with their common interests are especially potent to elicit interpersonal attraction. I discuss the current framework's theoretical implications for impression formation and impression management as well as its practical implications for improving online dating services.

  18. Exploring the Sharing Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Netter, Sarah

    Despite the growing interest on the part of proponents and opponents - ranging from business, civil society, media, to policy-makers alike - there is still limited knowledge about the working mechanisms of the sharing economy. The thesis is dedicated to explore this understudied phenomenon...... and to provide a more nuanced understanding of the micro- and macro-level tensions that characterize the sharing economy. This thesis consists of four research papers, each using different literature, methodology, and data sets. The first paper investigates how the sharing economy is diffused and is ‘talked......-level tensions experience by sharing platforms by looking at the case of mobile fashion reselling and swapping markets. The final paper combines the perspectives of different sharing economy stakeholders and outlines some of the micro and macro tensions arising in and influencing the organization of these multi...

  19. Production of transgenic canine embryos using interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, So Gun; Oh, Hyun Ju; Park, Jung Eun; Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Geon A; Koo, Ok Jae; Jang, Goo; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2012-02-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has emerged as an important tool for producing transgenic animals and deriving transgenic embryonic stem cells. The process of SCNT involves fusion of in vitro matured oocytes with somatic cells to make embryos that are transgenic when the nuclear donor somatic cells carry 'foreign' DNA and are clones when all the donor cells are genetically identical. However, in canines, it is difficult to obtain enough mature oocytes for successful SCNT due to the very low efficiency of in vitro oocyte maturation in this species that hinders canine transgenic cloning. One solution is to use oocytes from a different species or even a different genus, such as bovine oocytes, that can be matured easily in vitro. Accordingly, the aim of this study was: (1) to establish a canine fetal fibroblast line transfected with the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene; and (2) to investigate in vitro embryonic development of canine cloned embryos derived from transgenic and non-transgenic cell lines using bovine in vitro matured oocytes. Canine fetal fibroblasts were transfected with constructs containing the GFP and puromycin resistance genes using FuGENE 6®. Viability levels of these cells were determined by the MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide] assay. Interspecies SCNT (iSCNT) embryos from normal or transfected cells were produced and cultured in vitro. The MTT measurement of GFP-transfected fetal fibroblasts (mean OD = 0.25) was not significantly different from non-transfected fetal fibroblasts (mean OD = 0.35). There was no difference between transgenic iSCNT versus non-transgenic iSCNT embryos in terms of fusion rates (73.1% and 75.7%, respectively), cleavage rates (69.7% vs. 73.8%) and development to the 8-16-cell stage (40.1% vs. 42.7%). Embryos derived from the transfected cells completely expressed GFP at the 2-cell, 4-cell, and 8-16-cell stages without mosaicism. In summary, our results demonstrated that

  20. Mixed-effects modelling of the interspecies pharmacokinetic scaling of pegylated human erythropoietin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolling, Koen; Perez Ruixo, Juan Jose; Hemeryck, Alex; Vermeulen, An; Greway, Tony

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic model for interspecies allometric scaling of pegylated r-HuEPO (PEG-EPO) pharmacokinetics to man. A total of 927 serum concentrations from 193 rats, 6 rabbits, 34 monkeys, and 9 dogs obtained after a single dose of PEG-EPO, administered by the i.v. (dose range: 12.5-550 microg/kg) and s.c. (dose range: 12.5-500 microg/kg) routes, were pooled in this analysis. An open two-compartment model with first-order absorption and lag time (Tlag) and linear elimination from the central compartment was fitted to the data using the NONMEM V software. Body weight (WT) was used as a scaling factor and the effect of brain weight (BW), sex, and pregnancy status on the pharmacokinetic parameters was investigated. The final model was evaluated by means of a non-parametric bootstrap analysis and used to predict the PEG-EPO pharmacokinetic parameters in healthy male subjects. The systemic clearance (CL) in males was estimated to be 4.08WT1.030xBW-0.345 ml/h. In females, the CL was 90.7% of the CL in males. The volumes of the central (Vc) and the peripheral (Vp) compartment were characterized as 57.8WT0.959 ml, and 48.1WT1.150 ml, respectively. Intercompartmental flow was estimated at 2.32WT0.930 ml/h. Absorption rate constant (Ka) was estimated at 0.0538WT-0.149. The absolute s.c. bioavailability F was calculated at 52.5, 80.2, and 49.4% in rat, monkey, and dog, respectively. The interindividual variability in the population pharmacokinetic parameters was fairly low (parametric bootstrap confirmed the accuracy of the NONMEM estimates. The mean model predicted pharmacokinetic parameters in healthy male subjects of 70 kg were estimated at: CL: 26.2 ml/h; Vc: 3.6l; Q: 286 l/h; Vp: 6.9l, and Ka: 0.031 h-1. The population pharmacokinetic model developed was appropriate to describe the time course of PEG-EPO serum concentrations and their variability in different species. The model predicted pharmacokinetics of PEG-EPO in

  1. Indole is an inter-species biofilm signal mediated by SdiA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wood Thomas K

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a stationary phase signal, indole is secreted in large quantities into rich medium by Escherichia coli and has been shown to control several genes (e.g., astD, tnaB, gabT, multi-drug exporters, and the pathogenicity island of E. coli; however, its impact on biofilm formation has not been well-studied. Results Through a series of global transcriptome analyses, confocal microscopy, isogenic mutants, and dual-species biofilms, we show here that indole is a non-toxic signal that controls E. coli biofilms by repressing motility, inducing the sensor of the quorum sensing signal autoinducer-1 (SdiA, and influencing acid resistance (e.g., hdeABD, gadABCEX. Isogenic mutants showed these associated proteins are directly related to biofilm formation (e.g., the sdiA mutation increased biofilm formation 50-fold, and SdiA-mediated transcription was shown to be influenced by indole. The reduction in motility due to indole addition results in the biofilm architecture changing from scattered towers to flat colonies. Additionally, there are 12-fold more E. coli cells in dual-species biofilms grown in the presence of Pseudomonas cells engineered to express toluene o-monooxygenase (TOM, which converts indole to an insoluble indigoid than in biofilms with pseudomonads that do not express TOM due to a 22-fold reduction in extracellular indole. Also, indole stimulates biofilm formation in pseudomonads. Further evidence that the indole effects are mediated by SdiA and homoserine lactone quorum sensing is that the addition of N-butyryl-, N-hexanoyl-, and N-octanoyl-L-homoserine lactones repress E. coli biofilm formation in the wild-type strain but not with the sdiA mutant. Conclusion Indole is an interspecies signal that decreases E. coli biofilms through SdiA and increases those of pseudomonads. Indole may be manipulated to control biofilm formation by oxygenases of bacteria that do not synthesize it in a dual-species biofilm. Furthermore, E

  2. Identification and interspecies transmission of a novel bocaparvovirus among different bat species in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Susanna K P; Ahmed, Syed Shakeel; Yeung, Hazel C; Li, Kenneth S M; Fan, Rachel Y Y; Cheng, Toni Y C; Cai, Jian-Piao; Wang, Ming; Zheng, Bo-Jian; Wong, Samson S Y; Woo, Patrick C Y; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2016-12-01

    We report the discovery of a novel bocaparvovirus, bat bocaparvovirus (BtBoV), in one spleen, four respiratory and 61 alimentary samples from bats of six different species belonging to three families, Hipposideridae, Rhinolophidae and Vespertilionidae. BtBoV showed a higher detection rate in alimentary samples of Rhinolophus sinicus (5.7 %) than those of other bat species (0.43-1.59 %), supporting R. sinicus as the primary reservoir and virus spillover to accidental bat species. BtBoV peaked during the lactating season of R. sinicus, and it was more frequently detected among female than male adult bats (P<0.05), and among lactating than non-lactating female bats (P<0.0001). Positive BtBoV detection was associated with lower body weight in lactating bats (P<0.05). Ten nearly complete BtBoV genomes from three bat species revealed a unique large ORF1 spanning NS1 and NP1 in eight genomes and conserved splicing signals leading to multiple proteins, as well as a unique substitution in the conserved replication initiator motif within NS1. BtBoV was phylogenetically distantly related to known bocaparvoviruses with ≤57.3 % genome identities, supporting BtBoV as a novel species. Ms-BtBoV from Miniopterus schreibersii and Hp-BtBoV from Hipposideros pomona demonstrated 97.2-99.9 % genome identities with Rs-BtBoVs from R. sinicus, supporting infection of different bat species by a single BtBoV species. Rs-BtBoV_str15 represents the first bat parvovirus genome with non-coding regions sequenced, which suggested the presence of head-to-tail genomic concatamers or episomal forms of the genome. This study represents the first to describe interspecies transmission in BoVs. The high detection rates in lactating female and juvenile bats suggest possible vertical transmission of BtBoV.

  3. Diversity of Integrative and Conjugative Elements of Streptococcus salivarius and Their Intra- and Interspecies Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmane, Narimane; Libante, Virginie; Charron-Bourgoin, Florence; Guédon, Eric; Guédon, Gérard; Leblond-Bourget, Nathalie; Payot, Sophie

    2017-07-01

    -modification systems. In this study, intra- and interspecies transfer was demonstrated for 2 ICEs of S. salivarius Closely related ICEs were also detected in silico in other Streptococcus species ( S. pneumoniae and S. parasanguinis ), thus indicating that diffusion of ICE St3 -related elements probably plays a significant role in horizontal gene transfer (HGT) occurring in the oral cavity but also in the digestive tract, where S. salivarius is present. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  4. Antigenic and structural conservation of herpesvirus DNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littler, E; Yeo, J; Killington, R A; Purifoy, D J; Powell, K L

    1981-10-01

    Previously, we have shown a common antigen of several herpesviruses (pseudorabies virus, equine abortion virus and bovine mammillitis virus) to be antigenically related to the major DNA-binding proteins of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2. In this study we have purified the cross-reacting polypeptide from cells infected with pseudorabies virus, equine abortion virus and bovine mammillitis virus and shown the cross-reacting protein to be a major DNA-binding protein for each virus. Tryptic peptide analysis of the cross-reacting DNA-binding proteins of all five viruses has shown structural similarities. The proteins thus were shown to share common antigenic sites, to have similar biological properties and to have a highly conserved amino acid sequence. This unexpected similarity between proteins from diverse herpes viruses suggests an essential and fundamental role of the major DNA-binding protein in herpes virus replication.

  5. Antigen antibody interactions

    CERN Document Server

    DeLisi, Charles

    1976-01-01

    1. 1 Organization of the Immune System One of the most important survival mechanisms of vertebrates is their ability to recognize and respond to the onslaught of pathogenic microbes to which they are conti- ously exposed. The collection of host cells and molecules involved in this recognition­ 12 response function constitutes its immune system. In man, it comprises about 10 cells 20 (lymphocytes) and 10 molecules (immunoglobulins). Its ontogenic development is c- strained by the requirement that it be capable of responding to an almost limitless variety of molecular configurations on foreign substances, while simultaneously remaining inert to those on self components. It has thus evolved to discriminate, with exquisite precision, between molecular patterns. The foreign substances which induce a response, called antigens, are typically large molecules such as proteins and polysaccharides. The portions of these with which immunoglobulins interact are called epitopes or determinants. A typical protein epitope m...

  6. Cancer antigen 125 and prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgdall, Estrid Vilma Solyom

    2008-01-01

    cancer antigen 125 determination may be implemented into clinical practice, cut-off levels must be evaluated and internationally defined. Studies examining serum cancer antigen 125 levels after surgery but before, during, or after treatment confirmed that changes in serum levels are of prognostic value...

  7. Detecting and correcting the binding-affinity bias in ChIP-seq data using inter-species information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettling, Martin; Treutler, Hendrik; Cerquides, Jesus; Grosse, Ivo

    2016-05-10

    Transcriptional gene regulation is a fundamental process in nature, and the experimental and computational investigation of DNA binding motifs and their binding sites is a prerequisite for elucidating this process. ChIP-seq has become the major technology to uncover genomic regions containing those binding sites, but motifs predicted by traditional computational approaches using these data are distorted by a ubiquitous binding-affinity bias. Here, we present an approach for detecting and correcting this bias using inter-species information. We find that the binding-affinity bias caused by the ChIP-seq experiment in the reference species is stronger than the indirect binding-affinity bias in orthologous regions from phylogenetically related species. We use this difference to develop a phylogenetic footprinting model that is capable of detecting and correcting the binding-affinity bias. We find that this model improves motif prediction and that the corrected motifs are typically softer than those predicted by traditional approaches. These findings indicate that motifs published in databases and in the literature are artificially sharpened compared to the native motifs. These findings also indicate that our current understanding of transcriptional gene regulation might be blurred, but that it is possible to advance this understanding by taking into account inter-species information available today and even more in the future.

  8. Radioimmunoassays of hidden viral antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neurath, A.R.; Strick, N.; Baker, L.; Krugman, S.

    1982-01-01

    Antigens corresponding to infectious agents may be present in biological specimens only in a cryptic form bound to antibodies and, thus, may elude detection. We describe a solid-phase technique for separation of antigens from antibodies. Immune complexes are precipitated from serum by polyethylene glycol, dissociated with NaSCN, and adsorbed onto nitrocellulose or polystyrene supports. Antigens remain topographically separated from antibodies after removal of NaSCN and can be detected with radiolabeled antibodies. Genomes from viruses immobilized on nitrocellulose can be identified by nucleic acid hybridization. Nanogram quantities of sequestered hepatitis B surface and core antigens and picogram amounts of hepatitis B virus DNA were detected. Antibody-bound adenovirus, herpesvirus, and measles virus antigens were discerned by the procedure

  9. Sharing (and) familiarities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jon Dag; Winther, Ida Wentzel; Davies, Hayley

    are given other opportunities to work with both bloodline and non-bloodline relationships and linkages. This includes questions such as: how do we share households, family and lives? How does the sharing of households amongst siblings or in intergenerational living arrangements affect, enrich and complicate...... but not exclusive to lifestories/biographies, travels, times, spaces and material items, bodies and intimate knowledge of one another, surnames - in the subjective lives of family members? Sociology has traditionally been preoccupied with notions and logics of sharing in homely contexts (e.g. Simmel’s work...

  10. Too Much Information Sharing?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganuza, Juan José; Jansen, Jos

    2013-01-01

    By using general information structures and precision criteria based on the dispersion of conditional expectations, we study how oligopolists’ information acquisition decisions may change the effects of information sharing on the consumer surplus. Sharing information about individual cost...... parameters gives the following trade-off in Cournot oligopoly. On the one hand, it decreases the expected consumer surplus for a given information precision, as the literature shows. On the other hand, information sharing increases the firms’ incentives to acquire information, and the consumer surplus...... increases in the precision of the firms’ information. Interestingly, the latter effect may dominate the former effect....

  11. Global resource sharing

    CERN Document Server

    Frederiksen, Linda; Nance, Heidi

    2011-01-01

    Written from a global perspective, this book reviews sharing of library resources on a global scale. With expanded discovery tools and massive digitization projects, the rich and extensive holdings of the world's libraries are more visible now than at any time in the past. Advanced communication and transmission technologies, along with improved international standards, present a means for the sharing of library resources around the globe. Despite these significant improvements, a number of challenges remain. Global Resource Sharing provides librarians and library managers with a comprehensive

  12. Share Your Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Foster Care Communication & Discipline Types of Families Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community Healthy Children > Family Life > Family Dynamics > Communication & Discipline > Share Your Values Family Life Listen Español Text Size Email Print ...

  13. Pricing Shared Appreciation Mortgages

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Yina

    2006-01-01

    This paper develops a model for the valuation of shared appreciation mortgage (SAM) and examines the effect of reduction in interest rate on the mortgage duration and share of property appreciation lender charges. The recent rise in SAM availability, as a result of some secondary market financial support and prerequisite standardization, motivates a more careful consideration of the underlying SAM value. The primary difference between the SAM model and the model for general traditional mor...

  14. Does Knowledge Sharing Pay?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahnke, Volker; Pedersen, Torben; Venzin, Markus

    are developed using a simultaneous equation model applied to a unique dataset encompassing a German MNC, HeidelbergCement. Enablers and impediments of knowledge outflows are assessed in order to explain why subsidiaries share their knowledge with other MNC units. Implications are examined by studying the link...... between knowledge outflows and subsidiary performance. Our findings suggest that knowledge outflows increase a subsidiary's performance only up to a certain point and that too much knowledge sharing may be detrimental to the contributing subsidiary's performance....

  15. Information partnerships--shared data, shared scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konsynski, B R; McFarlan, F W

    1990-01-01

    How can one company gain access to another's resources or customers without merging ownership, management, or plotting a takeover? The answer is found in new information partnerships, enabling diverse companies to develop strategic coalitions through the sharing of data. The key to cooperation is a quantum improvement in the hardware and software supporting relational databases: new computer speeds, cheaper mass-storage devices, the proliferation of fiber-optic networks, and networking architectures. Information partnerships mean that companies can distribute the technological and financial exposure that comes with huge investments. For the customer's part, partnerships inevitably lead to greater simplification on the desktop and more common standards around which vendors have to compete. The most common types of partnership are: joint marketing partnerships, such as American Airline's award of frequent flyer miles to customers who use Citibank's credit card; intraindustry partnerships, such as the insurance value-added network service (which links insurance and casualty companies to independent agents); customer-supplier partnerships, such as Baxter Healthcare's electronic channel to hospitals for medical and other equipment; and IT vendor-driven partnerships, exemplified by ESAB (a European welding supplies and equipment company), whose expansion strategy was premised on a technology platform offered by an IT vendor. Partnerships that succeed have shared vision at the top, reciprocal skills in information technology, concrete plans for an early success, persistence in the development of usable information for all partners, coordination on business policy, and a new and imaginative business architecture.

  16. COLONOSCOPY AND CARCINOEMBRYONIC ANTIGEN VARIATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita G SOUSA

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Context Colonoscopy is essential for synchronous and metachronous cancer detection. Carcinoembryonic antigen is a colorectal cancer tumor marker, important as a follow-up tool in patients with previous colorectal cancer. False-positive carcinoembryonic antigen elevation results in multiples exams and in patient anxiety. In literature, there is reference to transient carcinoembryonic antigen increase with colonoscopy. Objective To evaluate the influence of bowel preparation and colonoscopy in carcinoembryonic antigen blood levels. Methods We prospectively studied subjects that underwent routine colonoscopy in our institution. Blood samples were collected (1 before bowel cleaning, (2 before colonoscopy and (3 immediately after colonoscopy. Blood carcinoembryonic antigen levels were determined by “Sandwich” immunoassay. The statistical methods used were the paired t-test and ANOVA. Results Thirty-seven patients (22M/15F were included; age range 28-84 (mean 56 years. Mean carcinoembryonic antigen values were 1.9, 2 and 1.8 for (1, (2 and (3, respectively. An increase in value (2 compared with (1 was observed in 20/37 patients (P = 0.018, mainly in younger patients and in patients requiring more endoluminal interventions. In 29/37 patients, the CEA value decreased from (2 to (3 (P = 1.3x10-7. Conclusions A trend for carcinoembryonic antigen increase after bowel cleaning was observed, especially in younger patients and in patients with more endoluminal interventions, but without clinical meaning.

  17. Colonoscopy and carcinoembryonic antigen variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Rita G; Nunes, Ana; Meira, Tânia; Carreira, Olga; Pires, Ana M; Freitas, João

    2014-01-01

    Colonoscopy is essential for synchronous and metachronous cancer detection. Carcinoembryonic antigen is a colorectal cancer tumor marker, important as a follow-up tool in patients with previous colorectal cancer. False-positive carcinoembryonic antigen elevation results in multiples exams and in patient anxiety. In literature, there is reference to transient carcinoembryonic antigen increase with colonoscopy. To evaluate the influence of bowel preparation and colonoscopy in carcinoembryonic antigen blood levels. We prospectively studied subjects that underwent routine colonoscopy in our institution. Blood samples were collected (1) before bowel cleaning, (2) before colonoscopy and (3) immediately after colonoscopy. Blood carcinoembryonic antigen levels were determined by "Sandwich" immunoassay. The statistical methods used were the paired t-test and ANOVA. Thirty-seven patients (22M/15F) were included; age range 28-84 (mean 56 years). Mean carcinoembryonic antigen values were 1.9, 2 and 1.8 for (1), (2) and (3), respectively. An increase in value (2) compared with (1) was observed in 20/37 patients (P = 0.018), mainly in younger patients and in patients requiring more endoluminal interventions. In 29/37 patients, the CEA value decreased from (2) to (3) (P = 1.3x10-7). A trend for carcinoembryonic antigen increase after bowel cleaning was observed, especially in younger patients and in patients with more endoluminal interventions, but without clinical meaning.

  18. Glycoconjugates as target antigens in peripheral neuropathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubica Suturkova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Identification and characterization of antigens present at the human peripheral nerve is a great challenge in the field of neuroimmunology. The latest investigations are focused on the understanding of the biology of glycoconjugates present at the peripheral nerve, and their immunological reactivity. Increased titers of antibodies that recognize carbohydrate determinants of glycoconjugates (glycolipids and glycoproteins are associated with distinct neuropathic syndromes. There is considerable cross-reactivity among anti-ganglioside antibodies, resulting from shared oligosaccharide epitopes, possibly explaining the overlap in syndromes observed in many affected patients. Sera from patients with neuropathies (GBS, chronic inflammatory demielynating polyneuropathy - CIDP, multifocal motor neuropathy - MMN, cross-react with glycoproteins isolated from human peripheral nerve and from Campylobacter jejuni O:19. The frequency of occurrence of antibodies against these glycoproteins is different, depending of the type of neuropathy. Identification of the cross-reactive glycoproteins and possible additional auto antigens could be useful in laboratory evaluation of peripheral neuropathies and help to develop a more effective therapeutic approach.

  19. Mapping the antigenicity of the parasites in Leishmania donovani infection by proteome serology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Forgber

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leishmaniasis defines a cluster of protozoal diseases with diverse clinical manifestations. The visceral form caused by Leishmania donovani is the most severe. So far, no vaccines exist for visceral leishmaniasis despite indications of naturally developing immunity, and sensitive immunodiagnostics are still at early stages of development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: Establishing a proteome-serological methodology, we mapped the antigenicity of the parasites and the specificities of the immune responses in human leishmaniasis. Using 2-dimensional Western blot analyses with sera and parasites isolated from patients in India, we detected immune responses with widely divergent specificities for up to 330 different leishmanial antigens. 68 antigens were assigned to proteins in silver- and fluorochrome-stained gels. The antigenicity of these proteins did not correlate with the expression levels of the proteins. Although some antigens are shared among different parasite isolates, there are extensive differences and no immunodominant antigens, but indications of antigenic drift in the parasites. Six antigens were identified by mass spectrometry. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Proteomics-based dissection of the serospecificities of leishmaniasis patients provides a comprehensive inventory of the complexity and interindividual heterogeneity of the host-responses to and variations in the antigenicity of the Leishmania parasites. This information can be instrumental in the development of vaccines and new immune monitoring and diagnostic devices.

  20. Comprehensive mollusk acute toxicity database improves the use of Interspecies Correlation Estimation (ICE) models to predict toxicity of untested freshwater and endangered mussel species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interspecies correlation estimation (ICE) models extrapolate acute toxicity data from surrogate test species to untested taxa. A suite of ICE models developed from a comprehensive database is available on the US Environmental Protection Agency’s web-based application, Web-I...

  1. Interspecies Interactions in Relation to Root Distribution Across the Rooting Profile in Wheat-Maize Intercropping Under Different Plant Densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifan Wang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In wheat-maize intercropping systems, the maize is often disadvantageous over the wheat during the co-growth period. It is unknown whether the impaired growth of maize can be recovered through the enhancement of the belowground interspecies interactions. In this study, we (i determined the mechanism of the belowground interaction in relation to root growth and distribution under different maize plant densities, and (ii quantified the “recovery effect” of maize after wheat harvest. The three-year (2014–2016 field experiment was conducted at the Oasis Agriculture Research Station of Gansu Agricultural University, Wuwei, Northwest China. Root weight density (RWD, root length density (RLD, and root surface area density (RSAD, were measured in single-cropped maize (M, single-cropped wheat (W, and three intercropping systems (i wheat-maize intercropping with no root barrier (i.e., complete belowground interaction, IC, (ii nylon mesh root barrier (partial belowground interaction, IC-PRI, and (iii plastic sheet root barrier (no belowground interaction, IC-NRI. The intercropped maize was planted at low (45,000 plants ha−1 and high (52,000 plants ha−1 densities. During the wheat/maize co-growth period, the IC treatment increased the RWD, RLD, and RSAD of the intercropped wheat in the 20–100 cm soil depth compared to the IC-PRI and IC-NRI systems; intercropped maize had 53% lower RWD, 81% lower RLD, and 70% lower RSAD than single-cropped maize. After wheat harvest, the intercropped maize recovered the growth with the increase of RWD by 40%, RLD by 44% and RSAD by 11%, compared to the single-cropped maize. Comparisons among the three intercropping systems revealed that the “recovery effect” of the intercropped maize was attributable to complete belowground interspecies interaction by 143%, the compensational effect due to root overlap by 35%, and the compensational effect due to water and nutrient exchange (CWN by 80%. The higher maize plant

  2. Coordinating Shared Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Bradley

    2004-01-01

    Shared Activity Coordination (ShAC) is a computer program for planning and scheduling the activities of an autonomous team of interacting spacecraft and exploratory robots. ShAC could also be adapted to such terrestrial uses as helping multiple factory managers work toward competing goals while sharing such common resources as floor space, raw materials, and transports. ShAC iteratively invokes the Continuous Activity Scheduling Planning Execution and Replanning (CASPER) program to replan and propagate changes to other planning programs in an effort to resolve conflicts. A domain-expert specifies which activities and parameters thereof are shared and reports the expected conditions and effects of these activities on the environment. By specifying these conditions and effects differently for each planning program, the domain-expert subprogram defines roles that each spacecraft plays in a coordinated activity. The domain-expert subprogram also specifies which planning program has scheduling control over each shared activity. ShAC enables sharing of information, consensus over the scheduling of collaborative activities, and distributed conflict resolution. As the other planning programs incorporate new goals and alter their schedules in the changing environment, ShAC continually coordinates to respond to unexpected events.

  3. Antigen 43 from Escherichia coli induces inter- and intraspecies cell aggregation and changes in colony morphology of Pseudomonas fluorescens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Kristian; Schembri, Mark; Hasman, Henrik

    2000-01-01

    with a distinct frizzy colony morphology in E. coli. Here we show that Ag43 can be expressed in a functional form on the surface of the environmentally important Pseudomonas fluorescens strain SBW25 with ensuing cell aggregation and frizzy colony types. Using green fluorescence protein-tagged cells, we......Antigen 43 (Ag43) is a surface-displayed autotransporter protein of Escherichia coli. By virtue of its self-association characteristics, this protein is able to mediate autoaggregation and flocculation off. coli cells in static cultures. Additionally, surface display of Ag43 is associated...... demonstrate that Ag43 can be used as a tool to provide interspecies cell aggregation between E. coli and P. fluorescens. Furthermore, Ag43 expression enhances biofilm formation in P. fluorescens to glass surfaces. The versatility of this protein was also reflected in Ag43 surface display in a variety of other...

  4. Antigenic relationships among four herpesviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, W T; Plummer, G

    1973-06-01

    Common viral antigens were detected, by fluorescent-antibody studies, in cells infected with herpes simplex virus 1, squirrel monkey herpesvirus 1, bovine rhinotracheitis, and equine abortion viruses. The two primate viruses showed slight cross-neutralization.

  5. HLA-B27 antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human leukocyte antigen B27; Ankylosing spondylitis-HLA; Psoriatic arthritis-HLA; Reactive arthritis-HLA ... Erythrocyte sedimentation rate ( ESR ) Rheumatoid factor X-rays HLA testing is also used to match donated tissue ...

  6. Natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Christopher J; Ros, Vera I D; Stevenson, Brian; Sniegowski, Paul D; Brisson, Dustin

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide an experimentally tractable system to test whether natural selection has favored mechanisms that increase evolvability. Many antigenic variation systems consist of paralogous unexpressed 'cassettes' that recombine into an expression site to rapidly alter the expressed protein. Importantly, the magnitude of antigenic change is a function of the genetic diversity among the unexpressed cassettes. Thus, evidence that selection favors among-cassette diversity is direct evidence that natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability. We used the Lyme disease bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, as a model to test the prediction that natural selection favors amino acid diversity among unexpressed vls cassettes and thereby promotes evolvability in a primary surface antigen, VlsE. The hypothesis that diversity among vls cassettes is favored by natural selection was supported in each B. burgdorferi strain analyzed using both classical (dN/dS ratios) and Bayesian population genetic analyses of genetic sequence data. This hypothesis was also supported by the conservation of highly mutable tandem-repeat structures across B. burgdorferi strains despite a near complete absence of sequence conservation. Diversification among vls cassettes due to natural selection and mutable repeat structures promotes long-term antigenic evolvability of VlsE. These findings provide a direct demonstration that molecular mechanisms that enhance evolvability of surface antigens are an evolutionary adaptation. The molecular evolutionary processes identified here can serve as a model for the evolution of antigenic evolvability in many pathogens which utilize similar strategies to establish chronic infections.

  7. Epicutaneous sensitization with protein antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Lin Liu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the past few decades there has been a progressive understanding that epicutaneous sensitization with protein antigen is an important sensitization route in patients with atopic dermatitis. A murine protein-patch model has been established, and an abundance of data has been obtained from experiments using this model. This review discusses the characteristics of epicutaneous sensitization with protein antigen, the induced immune responses, the underlying mechanisms, and the therapeutic potential.

  8. Interspecies signalling via the Stenotrophomonas maltophilia diffusible signal factor influences biofilm formation and polymyxin tolerance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryan, R.P.; Fouhy, Y.; Garcia, B.F.

    2008-01-01

    Interspecies signalling through the action of diffusible signal molecules can influence the behaviour of organisms growing in polymicrobial communities. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa occur ubiquitously in the environment and can be found together in diverse niches....... maltophilia and could be mimicked by the addition of synthetic DSF. This response of P. aeruginosa to DSF required PA1396, a sensor kinase with an input domain of related amino acid sequence to the sensory input domain of RpfC, which is responsible for DSF perception in xanthomonads. Mutation of PA1396...... or addition of DSF to P. aeruginosa led to increased levels of a number of proteins with roles in bacterial stress tolerance, including those implicated in resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides. This effect was associated with increased tolerance to polymyxins. Homologues of PA1396 occur in a number...

  9. Sharing Residual Liability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carbonara, Emanuela; Guerra, Alice; Parisi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Economic models of tort law evaluate the efficiency of liability rules in terms of care and activity levels. A liability regime is optimal when it creates incentives to maximize the value of risky activities net of accident and precaution costs. The allocation of primary and residual liability...... the virtues and limits of loss-sharing rules in generating optimal (second-best) incentives and allocations of risk. We find that loss sharing may be optimal in the presence of countervailing policy objectives, homogeneous risk avoiders, and subadditive risk, which potentially offers a valuable tool...

  10. Sharing the dance -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Jing; Ravn, Susanne

    2018-01-01

    . In this sense, moving together, in sports dance, is a practical way of understanding each other. In agreement with Zahavi, our analysis emphasizes the bi-directed nature of sharing. However, at the same time, we contribute to Zahavi’s ongoing endeavour as the special case of sports dance reveals how reciprocity...... to the highly specialized field of elite sports dance, we aim at exploring the way in which reciprocity unfolds in intensive deliberate practices of movement. In our analysis, we specifically argue that the ongoing dynamics of two separate flows of movement constitute a shared experience of dancing together...

  11. Communities stimulated with ethanol to perform direct interspecies electron transfer for syntrophic metabolism of propionate and butyrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Yaobin; Yu, Qilin; Dang, Yan; Li, Yang; Quan, Xie

    2016-10-01

    Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) has been considered as an alternative to interspecies H2 transfer (IHT) for syntrophic metabolism, but the microorganisms capable of metabolizing the key intermediates, such as propionate and butyrate, via DIET have yet to be described. A strategy of culturing the enrichments with ethanol as a DIET substrate to stimulate the communities for the syntrophic metabolism of propionate and/or butyrate was proposed in this study. The results showed that the syntrophic propionate and/or butyrate degradation was significantly improved in the ethanol-stimulated reactor when propionate/butyrate was the sole carbon source. The conductivity of the ethanol-stimulated enrichments was as 5 folds (for propionate)/76 folds (for butyrate) as that of the traditional enrichments (never ethanol fed). Microbial community analysis revealed that Geobacter species known to proceed DIET were only detected in the ethanol-stimulated enrichments. Together with the significant increase of Methanosaeta and Methanosarcina species in these enrichments, the potential DIET between Geobacter and Methanosaeta or Methanosarcina species might be established to improve the syntrophic propionate and/or butyrate degradation. Further experiments demonstrated that granular activated carbon (GAC) could improve the syntrophic metabolism of propionate and/or butyrate of the ethanol-stimulated enrichments, while almost no effects on the traditional enrichments. Also, the high H2 partial pressure could inhibit the syntrophic propionate and/or butyrate degradation of the traditional enrichments, but its effect on that of the ethanol-stimulated enrichments was negligible. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Isolation of rhamnolipids-producing cultures from faeces: Influence of interspecies communication on the yield of rhamnolipid congeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woźniak-Karczewska, Marta; Myszka, Kamila; Sznajdrowska, Agata; Szulc, Alicja; Zgoła-Grześkowiak, Agnieszka; Ławniczak, Łukasz; Corvini, Philippe F-X; Chrzanowski, Łukasz

    2017-05-25

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of bacterial cultures isolated from cattle, poultry or pig faeces and manure to produce rhamnolipids, as well as to investigate the influence of interspecies communication on possible quantitative differences in the production of rhamnolipid congeners. Initial screening methods (oil spreading, drop collapse, haemolytic activity and emulsification activity) showed that approximately 36% of the 51 isolated cultures exhibited the ability to produce biosurfactants. Subsequent studies using a selected culturable mixed culture (which included Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli) revealed that only P. aeruginosa was able to produce this biosurfactant. HPLC-MS analysis showed that the surface active compounds were rhamnolipids. Further comparative studies confirmed that the total yield of rhamnolipids was notably higher in the bioreactor inoculated with the selected mixed culture (940.58±1.10mg/L) compared to the bioreactor inoculated with the axenic strain of P. aeruginosa (108.47±0.41mg/L). Twelve rhamnolipid congeners were identified during cultivation of the selected mixed culture, whereas six congeners were detected during cultivation of the sole axenic strain of P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, increased production of rhamnolipids was observed when the concentration of autoinducer molecules (AI-2) responsible for interspecies signaling increased, suggesting the influence of quorum-sensing communication on biosynthesis efficiency. This observation may be of importance for large-scale production of this biosurfactant, as it opens new possible solutions based on the use of mixed cultures or external addition of stimulating autoinducers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. In vitro identification and in silico utilization of interspecies sequence similarities using GeneChip® technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Shui Q

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic approaches in large animal models (canine, ovine etc are challenging due to insufficient genomic information for these species and the lack of availability of corresponding microarray platforms. To address this problem, we speculated that conserved interspecies genetic sequences can be experimentally detected by cross-species hybridization. The Affymetrix platform probe redundancy offers flexibility in selecting individual probes with high sequence similarities between related species for gene expression analysis. Results Gene expression profiles of 40 canine samples were generated using the human HG-U133A GeneChip (U133A. Due to interspecies genetic differences, only 14 ± 2% of canine transcripts were detected by U133A probe sets whereas profiling of 40 human samples detected 49 ± 6% of human transcripts. However, when these probe sets were deconstructed into individual probes and examined performance of each probe, we found that 47% of human probes were able to find their targets in canine tissues and generate a detectable hybridization signal. Therefore, we restricted gene expression analysis to these probes and observed the 60% increase in the number of identified canine transcripts. These results were validated by comparison of transcripts identified by our restricted analysis of cross-species hybridization with transcripts identified by hybridization of total lung canine mRNA to new Affymetrix Canine GeneChip®. Conclusion The experimental identification and restriction of gene expression analysis to probes with detectable hybridization signal drastically increases transcript detection of canine-human hybridization suggesting the possibility of broad utilization of cross-hybridizations of related species using GeneChip technology.

  14. Shared care and boundaries:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winthereik, Brit Ross

    2008-01-01

    Purpose – The paper seeks to examine how an online maternity record involving pregnant women worked as a means to create shared maternity care. Design/methodology/approach – Ethnographic techniques have been used. The paper adopts a theoretical/methodological framework based on science and techno......Purpose – The paper seeks to examine how an online maternity record involving pregnant women worked as a means to create shared maternity care. Design/methodology/approach – Ethnographic techniques have been used. The paper adopts a theoretical/methodological framework based on science...... and technology studies. Findings – The paper shows how a version of “the responsible patient” emerges from the project which is different from the version envisioned by the project organisation. The emerging one is concerned with the boundary between primary and secondary sector care, and not with the boundary...... of responsibilities entailed in shared care projects. Rather than seeking to connect all actors in an unbounded space, shared care might instead suggest a space for patients and professionals to experiment with new roles and responsibilities. Practical implications – When designing coordination tools for health care...

  15. Urban sharing culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjalland, Emmy Laura Perez

    our cities. The sharing economy has the power to democratise access the urban space, resources and raw materials (Steen Nielsen 2008; Harvey 2000); it holds the ability to change the current dominant understandings and structures of economy and growth (Steen Nielsen 2008); solve emerging environmental...

  16. Promoting teachers’ knowledge sharing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Runhaar, P.R.; Sanders, K.

    2016-01-01

    Teachers’ professional development is nowadays seen as key in efforts to improve education. Knowledge sharing is a learning activity with which teachers not only professionalize themselves, but contribute to the professional development of their colleagues as well. This paper presents two studies,

  17. Shared goals and development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, Olle

    2015-01-01

    undemanding for children to engage in, and therefore has the potential to play a part in fostering their understanding of other minds. Part of the functional role of shared goals is to enable agents to choose means that are appropriate to realising a goal with others rather than individually. By offering...

  18. Shared Care in Diabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Keld

    2006-01-01

    The Danish National Board of Health has recently released a report that is intended to mark the start of a new project to establish it support for shared care in diabetes. In this paper I raise a number of concerns where lack of attention towards participation from prospective users constitute...

  19. Towards A Shared Mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunstrup, Jørgen; Orth Gaarn-Larsen, Carsten

    A mission shared by stakeholders, management and employees is a prerequisite for an engaging dialog about the many and substantial changes and challenges currently facing universities. Too often this essen-tial dialog reveals mistrust and misunderstandings about the role and outcome of the univer...

  20. Factors Impacting Knowledge Sharing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulzmann, David; Slepniov, Dmitrij

    The purpose of this paper is to examine various factors affecting knowledge sharing at the R&D center of a Western MNE in China. The paper employs qualitative methodology and is based on the action research and case study research techniques. The findings of the paper advance our understanding ab...

  1. Shared Oral Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hede, Børge; Elmelund Poulsen,, Johan; Christophersen, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    Shared Oral Care - Forebyggelse af orale sygdomme på plejecentre Introduktion og formål: Mangelfuld mundhygiejne hos plejekrævende ældre er et alment og veldokumenteret sundhedsproblem, der kan føre til massiv udvikling af tandsygdomme, og som yderligere kan være medvirkende årsag til alvorlige...

  2. The Sharing Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamari, Juho; Sjöklint, Mimmi; Ukkonen, Antti

    2016-01-01

    Information and communications technologies (ICTs) have enabled the rise of so-called “Collaborative Consumption” (CC): the peer-to-peer-based activity of obtaining, giving, or sharing the access to goods and services, coordinated through community-based online services. CC has been expected...

  3. Beyond processor sharing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Aalto; U. Ayesta (Urtzi); S.C. Borst (Sem); V. Misra; R. Núñez Queija (Rudesindo)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractWhile the (Egalitarian) Processor-Sharing (PS) discipline offers crucial insights in the performance of fair resource allocation mechanisms, it is inherently limited in analyzing and designing differentiated scheduling algorithms such as Weighted Fair Queueing and Weighted Round-Robin.

  4. Information Sharing and Knowledge Sharing as Communicative Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savolainen, Reijo

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: This paper elaborates the picture of information sharing and knowledge sharing as forms of communicative activity. Method: A conceptual analysis was made to find out how researchers have approached information sharing and knowledge sharing from the perspectives of transmission and ritual. The findings are based on the analysis of one…

  5. The molecular relationship between antigenic domains and epitopes on hCG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Peter; Lapthorn, Adrian J

    2016-08-01

    Antigenic domains are defined to contain a limited number of neighboring epitopes recognized by antibodies (Abs) but their molecular relationship remains rather elusive. We thoroughly analyzed the antigenic surface of the important pregnancy and tumor marker human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), a cystine knot (ck) growth factor, and set antigenic domains and epitopes in molecular relationships to each other. Antigenic domains on hCG, its free hCGα and hCGβ subunits are dependent on appropriate inherent molecular features such as molecular accessibility and protrusion indices that determine bulging structures accessible to Abs. The banana-shaped intact hCG comprises ∼7500Å(2) of antigenic surface with minimally five antigenic domains that encompass a continuum of overlapping non-linear composite epitopes, not taking into account the C-terminal peptide extension of hCGβ (hCGβCTP). Epitopes within an antigenic domain are defined by specific Abs, that bury nearly 1000Å(2) of surface accessible area on the antigen and recognize a few up to 15 amino acid (aa) residues, whereby between 2 and 5 of these provide the essential binding energy. Variability in Ab binding modes to the contact aa residues are responsible for the variation in affinity and intra- and inter-species specificity, e.g. cross-reactions with luteinizing hormone (LH). Each genetically distinct fragment antigen binding (Fab) defines its own epitope. Consequently, recognition of the same epitope by different Abs is only possible in cases of genetically identical sequences of its binding sites. Due to combinatorial V(D)J gene segment variability of heavy and light chains, Abs defining numerous epitopes within an antigenic domain can be generated by different individuals and species. Far more than hundred Abs against the immuno-dominant antigenic domains of either subunit at both ends of the hCG-molecule, the tips of peptide loops one and three (Ł1+3) protruding from the central ck, encompassing h

  6. Human sensitization to Ganoderma antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarlo, S M; Bell, B; Srinivasan, J; Dolovich, J; Hargreave, F E

    1979-07-01

    Continuous air sampling with a Hirst volumetric spore trap over 3 yr has identified basidiospores of Ganoderma applanatum, a bracket fungus, as the most numerous fungal spores in two southern Ontario locations. The particle size is small and the calculated total spore mass approximates that of the spores of Cladosporium and Alternaria. Extracts of Ganoderma applanatum bracket fungus and spores in w/v, 1:10 concentration were prepared after collection of samples of the fungus from local woods. Skin prick tests with the extracts were performed in 294 consecutive children and adults attending two chest/allergy clinics. Of these patients, 182 (61.9%) reacted to 1 or more of the common inhalant allergen extracts and 24 (8.2%) reacted to Ganoderma antigen. There was no consistent relationship between reactivity to Ganoderma antigen and any of the common inhaled allergens. IgE-dependent sensitization to Ganoderma was confirmed by the radioallergosorbent test (RAST). Rabbit antisera to Ganoderma antigen preparations did not appear to cross-react with preparations of the various clinically important allergens. The findings indicate that Ganoderma antigen is commonly encountered, can induce human sensitization, and has unique antigenicity among common allergens of clinical importance.

  7. Genetic mapping identifies novel highly protective antigens for an apicomplexan parasite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damer P Blake

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Apicomplexan parasites are responsible for a myriad of diseases in humans and livestock; yet despite intensive effort, development of effective sub-unit vaccines remains a long-term goal. Antigenic complexity and our inability to identify protective antigens from the pool that induce response are serious challenges in the development of new vaccines. Using a combination of parasite genetics and selective barriers with population-based genetic fingerprinting, we have identified that immunity against the most important apicomplexan parasite of livestock (Eimeria spp. was targeted against a few discrete regions of the genome. Herein we report the identification of six genomic regions and, within two of those loci, the identification of true protective antigens that confer immunity as sub-unit vaccines. The first of these is an Eimeria maxima homologue of apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1 and the second is a previously uncharacterised gene that we have termed 'immune mapped protein-1' (IMP-1. Significantly, homologues of the AMA-1 antigen are protective with a range of apicomplexan parasites including Plasmodium spp., which suggest that there may be some characteristic(s of protective antigens shared across this diverse group of parasites. Interestingly, homologues of the IMP-1 antigen, which is protective against E. maxima infection, can be identified in Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum. Overall, this study documents the discovery of novel protective antigens using a population-based genetic mapping approach allied with a protection-based screen of candidate genes. The identification of AMA-1 and IMP-1 represents a substantial step towards development of an effective anti-eimerian sub-unit vaccine and raises the possibility of identification of novel antigens for other apicomplexan parasites. Moreover, validation of the parasite genetics approach to identify effective antigens supports its adoption in other parasite systems where legitimate

  8. T-cell target antigens across major gynecologic cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Garcia, Alba; Minutolo, Nicholas G; Robinson, John M; Powell, Daniel J

    2017-06-01

    Immunotherapies have achieved remarkable success in treating different forms of cancer including melanoma, non-small cell lung carcinoma, bladder cancer, synovial cell sarcoma, and multiple myeloma using immune checkpoint blockade or gene-engineered T-cells. Although gynecologic cancers have not been historically classified as immunogenic tumors, growing evidence has shown that they are in fact able to elicit endogenous antitumor immune responses suggesting that patients with these cancers may benefit from immunotherapy. Modest clinical success has been accomplished in early trials using immunotherapeutic modalities for major gynecologic cancers including ovarian, cervical, and endometrial cancer. Unlike solid cancers with high mutational burdens, or hematologic malignancies where target antigens are expressed homogenously and exclusively by tumor cells, identifying tumor-restricted antigens has been challenging when designing a T-cell targeted therapy for gynecologic tumors. Nevertheless, mounting preclinical and clinical evidence suggests that targeting shared, viral or patient-specific mutated antigens expressed by gynecologic tumors with T-cells may improve patient outcome. Here we review the strengths and weaknesses of targeting these various antigens, as well as provide insight into the future of immunotherapy for gynecologic cancers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Decreasing serial cost sharing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Østerdal, Lars Peter Raahave

    2009-01-01

    The increasing serial cost sharing rule of Moulin and Shenker (Econometrica 60:1009-1037, 1992) and the decreasing serial rule of de Frutos (J Econ Theory 79:245-275, 1998) are known by their intuitive appeal and striking incentive properties. An axiomatic characterization of the increasing serial...... rule was provided by Moulin and Shenker (J Econ Theory 64:178-201, 1994). This paper gives an axiomatic characterization of the decreasing serial rule....

  10. Decreasing Serial Cost Sharing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Østerdal, Lars Peter

    The increasing serial cost sharing rule of Moulin and Shenker [Econometrica 60 (1992) 1009] and the decreasing serial rule of de Frutos [Journal of Economic Theory 79 (1998) 245] have attracted attention due to their intuitive appeal and striking incentive properties. An axiomatic characterization...... of the increasing serial rule was provided by Moulin and Shenker [Journal of Economic Theory 64 (1994) 178]. This paper gives an axiomatic characterization of the decreasing serial rule...

  11. Sharing data increases citations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drachen, Thea Marie; Ellegaard, Ole; Larsen, Asger Væring

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents some indications to the existence of a citation advantage related to sharing data using astrophysics as a case. Through bibliometric analyses we find a citation advantage for astrophysical papers in core journals. The advantage arises as indexed papers are associated with data...... by bibliographical links, and consists of papers receiving on average significantly more citations per paper per year, than do papers not associated with links to data....

  12. Sharing resources@CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The library is launching a 'sharing resources@CERN' campaign, aiming to increase the library's utility by including the thousands of books bought by individual groups at CERN. This will improve sharing of information among CERN staff and users. Until now many people were unaware that copies of the same book (or standard, or journal) are often held not only by the library but by different divisions. (Here Eduardo Aldaz, from the PS division, and Isabel Bejar, from the ST division, read their divisional copies of the same book.) The idea behind the library's new sharing resources@CERN' initiative is not at all to collect the books in individual collections at the CERN library, but simply to register them in the Library database. Those not belonging to the library will in principle be unavailable for loan, but should be able to be consulted by anybody at CERN who is interested. "When you need a book urgently and it is not available in the library,' said PS Division engineer Eduardo Aldaz Carroll, it is a sham...

  13. Bonobos share with strangers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingzhi Tan

    Full Text Available Humans are thought to possess a unique proclivity to share with others--including strangers. This puzzling phenomenon has led many to suggest that sharing with strangers originates from human-unique language, social norms, warfare and/or cooperative breeding. However, bonobos, our closest living relative, are highly tolerant and, in the wild, are capable of having affiliative interactions with strangers. In four experiments, we therefore examined whether bonobos will voluntarily donate food to strangers. We show that bonobos will forego their own food for the benefit of interacting with a stranger. Their prosociality is in part driven by unselfish motivation, because bonobos will even help strangers acquire out-of-reach food when no desirable social interaction is possible. However, this prosociality has its limitations because bonobos will not donate food in their possession when a social interaction is not possible. These results indicate that other-regarding preferences toward strangers are not uniquely human. Moreover, language, social norms, warfare and cooperative breeding are unnecessary for the evolution of xenophilic sharing. Instead, we propose that prosociality toward strangers initially evolves due to selection for social tolerance, allowing the expansion of individual social networks. Human social norms and language may subsequently extend this ape-like social preference to the most costly contexts.

  14. Characterisation of Sarcoptes scabiei antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejduk, Gloria; Hofstätter, Katja; Löwenstein, Michael; Peschke, Roman; Miller, Ingrid; Joachim, Anja

    2011-02-01

    In pig herds, the status of Sarcoptes scabiei infections is routinely monitored by serodiagnosis. Crude antigen for ELISA is usually prepared from S. scabiei var. canis or other variations and may lead to variations in the outcome of different tests, making assay standardisation difficult. This study was performed to investigate the antigen profiles of S. scabiei, including differences between hydrophilic and more hydrophobic protein fractions, by Western blotting with sera from pigs with defined infection status. Potential cross-reactivity among S. scabiei (var. canis, suis and bovis), Dermatophagoides farinae and Tyrophagus putrescentiae was also analysed. Hydrophobic S. scabiei antigens were detectable in the range of 40-50 kDa, whilst the hydrophilic fraction showed no specific antigenicity. In the hydrophobic fractions of D. farinae and T. putrescentiae, two major protein fractions in a similar size range could be identified, but no cross-reactivity with Sarcoptes-positive sera was detectable. However, examination of the hydrophilic fractions revealed cross-reactivity between Sarcoptes-positive sera and both the house dust mite and the storage mite in the range of 115 and 28/38 kDa. Specific bands in the same range (42 and 48 kDa) could be detected in blots from hydrophobic fractions of all three tested variations of S. scabiei (var. canis, bovis and suis). These results show that there are considerable differences in mange antibody reactivity, including reactions with proteins from free-living mites, which may interfere with tests based on hydrophilic antigens. Further refinement of antigen and the use of specific hydrophobic proteins could improve ELISA performance and standardisation.

  15. [Farmer's lung antigens in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennekamp, J; Joest, M; Sander, I; Engelhart, S; Raulf-Heimsoth, M

    2012-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that besides the long-known farmer's lung antigen sources Saccharopolyspora rectivirgula (Micropolyspora faeni), Thermoactinomyces vulgaris, and Aspergillus fumigatus, additionally the mold Absidia (Lichtheimia) corymbifera as well as the bacteria Erwinia herbicola (Pantoea agglomerans) and Streptomyces albus may cause farmer's lung in Germany. In this study the sera of 64 farmers with a suspicion of farmer's lung were examined for the following further antigens: Wallemia sebi, Cladosporium herbarum, Aspergillus versicolor, and Eurotium amstelodami. Our results indicate that these molds are not frequent causes of farmer's lung in Germany. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Privacy in the Sharing Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranzini, Giulia; Etter, Michael; Lutz, Christoph

    Report from the EU H2020 Research Project Ps2Share:Participation, Privacy, and Power in the Sharing Economy. This paper gives an in-depth overview of the topic of power in the sharing economy. It forms one part of a European Union Horizon 2020 Research Project on the sharing economy: "Ps2Share...... Participation, Privacy, and Power in the Sharing Economy". We aim to foster better awareness of the consequences which the sharing economy has on the way people behave, think, interact, and socialize across Europe. Our overarching objective is to identify key challenges of the sharing economy and improve Europe......’s digital services through providing recommendations to Europe’s institutions. The initial stage of this research project involves a set of three literature reviews of the state of research on three core topics in relation to the sharing economy: participation (1), privacy (2), and power (3). This piece...

  17. Locus-specific detection of HLA-DQ and -DR antigens by antibodies against synthetic N-terminal octapeptides of the beta chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deufel, T; Grove, A; Kofod, Hans

    1985-01-01

    Antibodies against synthetic peptides representing the class-II antigen HLA-DR and -DQ beta chain N-terminal sequences were prepared in rabbits. The two octapeptides only share two amino acids and enzyme-linked immuno-assays showed the antisera only to bind to its own antigen. Both peptide antisera...

  18. Genetic-and-epigenetic Interspecies Networks for Cross-talk Mechanisms in Human Macrophages and Dendritic Cells During MTB Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Wei Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb infection. Mtb is one of the oldest human pathogens, and evolves mechanisms implied in human evolution. The lungs are the first organ exposed to aerosol-transmitted Mtb during gaseous exchange. Therefore, the guards of the immune system in the lungs, such as macrophages (Mϕs and dendritic cells (DCs, are the most important defense against Mtb infection. There have been several studies discussing the functions of Mϕs and DCs during Mtb infection, but the genome-wide pathways and networks are still incomplete. Furthermore, the immune response induced by Mϕs and DCs varies. Therefore, we analyzed the cross-talk genome-wide genetic-and-epigenetic interspecies networks (GWGEINs between Mϕs vs. Mtb and DCs vs. Mtb to determine the varying mechanisms of both the host and pathogen as it relates to Mϕs and DCs during early Mtb infection.First, we performed database mining to construct candidate cross-talk GWGEIN between human cells and Mtb. Then we constructed dynamic models to characterize the molecular mechanisms, including intraspecies gene/microRNA (miRNA regulation networks (GRNs, intraspecies protein-protein interaction networks (PPINs, and the interspecies PPIN of the cross-talk GWGEIN. We applied a system identification method and a system order detection scheme to dynamic models to identify the real cross-talk GWGEINs using the microarray data of Mϕs, DCs and Mtb.After identifying the real cross-talk GWGEINs, the principal network projection (PNP method was employed to construct host-pathogen core networks (HPCNs between Mϕs vs. Mtb and DCs vs. Mtb during infection process. Thus, we investigated the underlying cross-talk mechanisms between the host and the pathogen to determine how the pathogen counteracts host defense mechanisms in Mϕs and DCs during Mtb H37Rv early infection. Based on our findings, we propose Rv1675c as a potential drug target because of its important defensive

  19. Production of rhesus monkey cloned embryos expressing monomeric red fluorescent protein by interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Hai-Ying; Kang, Jin-Dan; Li, Suo; Jin, Jun-Xue; Hong, Yu; Jin, Long; Guo, Qing; Gao, Qing-Shan; Yan, Chang-Guo; Yin, Xi-Jun, E-mail: yinxj33@msn.com

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • Rhesus monkey cells were electroporated with a plasmid containing mRFP1, and an mRFP1-expressing cell line was generated. • For the first time, mRFP1-expressing rhesus monkey cells were used as donor cells for iSCNT. • The effect of VPA on the development of embryos cloned using iSCNT was determined. - Abstract: Interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) is a promising method to clone endangered animals from which oocytes are difficult to obtain. Monomeric red fluorescent protein 1 (mRFP1) is an excellent selection marker for transgenically modified cloned embryos during somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). In this study, mRFP-expressing rhesus monkey cells or porcine cells were transferred into enucleated porcine oocytes to generate iSCNT and SCNT embryos, respectively. The development of these embryos was studied in vitro. The percentage of embryos that underwent cleavage did not significantly differ between iSCNT and SCNT embryos (P > 0.05; 71.53% vs. 80.30%). However, significantly fewer iSCNT embryos than SCNT embryos reached the blastocyst stage (2.04% vs. 10.19%, P < 0.05). Valproic acid was used in an attempt to increase the percentage of iSCNT embryos that developed to the blastocyst stage. However, the percentages of embryos that underwent cleavage and reached the blastocyst stage were similar between untreated iSCNT embryos and iSCNT embryos treated with 2 mM valproic acid for 24 h (72.12% vs. 70.83% and 2.67% vs. 2.35%, respectively). These data suggest that porcine-rhesus monkey interspecies embryos can be generated that efficiently express mRFP1. However, a significantly lower proportion of iSCNT embryos than SCNT embryos reach the blastocyst stage. Valproic acid does not increase the percentage of porcine-rhesus monkey iSCNT embryos that reach the blastocyst stage. The mechanisms underling nuclear reprogramming and epigenetic modifications in iSCNT need to be investigated further.

  20. Shared clinical decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlHaqwi, Ali I.; AlDrees, Turki M.; AlRumayyan, Ahmad; AlFarhan, Ali I.; Alotaibi, Sultan S.; AlKhashan, Hesham I.; Badri, Motasim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine preferences of patients regarding their involvement in the clinical decision making process and the related factors in Saudi Arabia. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in a major family practice center in King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, between March and May 2012. Multivariate multinomial regression models were fitted to identify factors associated with patients preferences. Results: The study included 236 participants. The most preferred decision-making style was shared decision-making (57%), followed by paternalistic (28%), and informed consumerism (14%). The preference for shared clinical decision making was significantly higher among male patients and those with higher level of education, whereas paternalism was significantly higher among older patients and those with chronic health conditions, and consumerism was significantly higher in younger age groups. In multivariate multinomial regression analysis, compared with the shared group, the consumerism group were more likely to be female [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) =2.87, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.31-6.27, p=0.008] and non-dyslipidemic (AOR=2.90, 95% CI: 1.03-8.09, p=0.04), and the paternalism group were more likely to be older (AOR=1.03, 95% CI: 1.01-1.05, p=0.04), and female (AOR=2.47, 95% CI: 1.32-4.06, p=0.008). Conclusion: Preferences of patients for involvement in the clinical decision-making varied considerably. In our setting, underlying factors that influence these preferences identified in this study should be considered and tailored individually to achieve optimal treatment outcomes. PMID:26620990

  1. Fixed Access Network Sharing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornaglia, Bruno; Young, Gavin; Marchetta, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    Fixed broadband network deployments are moving inexorably to the use of Next Generation Access (NGA) technologies and architectures. These NGA deployments involve building fiber infrastructure increasingly closer to the customer in order to increase the proportion of fiber on the customer's access connection (Fibre-To-The-Home/Building/Door/Cabinet… i.e. FTTx). This increases the speed of services that can be sold and will be increasingly required to meet the demands of new generations of video services as we evolve from HDTV to "Ultra-HD TV" with 4k and 8k lines of video resolution. However, building fiber access networks is a costly endeavor. It requires significant capital in order to cover any significant geographic coverage. Hence many companies are forming partnerships and joint-ventures in order to share the NGA network construction costs. One form of such a partnership involves two companies agreeing to each build to cover a certain geographic area and then "cross-selling" NGA products to each other in order to access customers within their partner's footprint (NGA coverage area). This is tantamount to a bi-lateral wholesale partnership. The concept of Fixed Access Network Sharing (FANS) is to address the possibility of sharing infrastructure with a high degree of flexibility for all network operators involved. By providing greater configuration control over the NGA network infrastructure, the service provider has a greater ability to define the network and hence to define their product capabilities at the active layer. This gives the service provider partners greater product development autonomy plus the ability to differentiate from each other at the active network layer.

  2. Natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graves, C.J.; Ros, V.I.D.; Stevenson, B.; Sniegowski, P.D.; Brisson, D.

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide

  3. Mobile energy sharing futures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worgan, Paul; Knibbe, Jarrod; Plasencia, Diego Martinez

    2016-01-01

    We foresee a future where energy in our mobile devices can be shared and redistributed to suit our current task needs. Many of us are beginning to carry multiple mobile devices and we seek to re-evaluate the traditional view of a mobile device as only accepting energy. In our vision, we can...... leverage the energy stored in our devices to wirelessly distribute energy between our friends, family, colleagues and strangers devices. In this paper we explore the opportunities and interactions presented by such spontaneous energy transfer interactions and present some envisaged collaborative energy...

  4. Sharing Keynote Slideshows

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, Josh

    2010-01-01

    Slideshows have come a long way since overhead projectors were your only option. You can show share your ideas with the world via email, DVD, PDF, YouTube, iPhone, or kiosk. Once your show is polished to perfection, this thorough, accessible guide shows you how to export and deliver it all possible ways-even as a PowerPoint file, QuickTime movie, or web site. As a bonus, you'll find advice on setting up your equipment and delivering an effective presentation.

  5. Shared consultant physician posts.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cooke, J

    2012-01-31

    Our aim was to assess the acceptability and cost-efficiency of shared consultancy posts. Two consultant physicians worked alternate fortnights for a period of twelve months. Questionnaires were distributed to general practitioners, nurses, consultants and junior doctors affected by the arrangement. Patients or their next of kin were contacted by telephone. 1\\/17 of consultants described the experience as negative. 14\\/19 junior doctors reported a positive experience. 11 felt that training had been improved while 2 felt that it had been adversely affected. 17\\/17 GPs were satisfied with the arrangement. 1\\/86 nurses surveyed reported a negative experience. 1\\/48 patients were unhappy with the arrangement. An extra 2.2 (p<0.001) patients were seen per clinic. Length of stay was shortened by 2.49 days (p<0.001). A saving of 69,212 was made due to decreased locum requirements. We present data suggesting structured shared consultancy posts can be broadly acceptable and cost efficient in Ireland.

  6. Vaccines, our shared responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliusi, Sonia; Jain, Rishabh; Suri, Rajinder Kumar

    2015-05-05

    The Developing Countries Vaccine Manufacturers' Network (DCVMN) held its fifteenth annual meeting from October 27-29, 2014, New Delhi, India. The DCVMN, together with the co-organizing institution Panacea Biotec, welcomed over 240 delegates representing high-profile governmental and nongovernmental global health organizations from 36 countries. Over the three-day meeting, attendees exchanged information about their efforts to achieve their shared goal of preventing death and disability from known and emerging infectious diseases. Special praise was extended to all stakeholders involved in the success of polio eradication in South East Asia and highlighted challenges in vaccine supply for measles-rubella immunization over the coming decades. Innovative vaccines and vaccine delivery technologies indicated creative solutions for achieving global immunization goals. Discussions were focused on three major themes including regulatory challenges for developing countries that may be overcome with better communication; global collaborations and partnerships for leveraging investments and enable uninterrupted supply of affordable and suitable vaccines; and leading innovation in vaccines difficult to develop, such as dengue, Chikungunya, typhoid-conjugated and EV71, and needle-free technologies that may speed up vaccine delivery. Moving further into the Decade of Vaccines, participants renewed their commitment to shared responsibility toward a world free of vaccine-preventable diseases. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Reconceptualising Shared Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter McKinlay

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Endeavours to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of local government have been a persistent theme both of politicians in higher tiers of government and of interest groups, especially business. The two contenders for improvement which receive most coverage both in the research literature and in popular discussion are amalgamation and shared services. Arguments from the literature have generally favoured shared services over amalgamation. Bish (2001 in a comprehensive review of North American research dismisses the argument for amalgamation as a product of flawed nineteenth-century thinking and a bureaucratic urge for centralized control. He does so making the very reasonable point that the presumed economies of scale which will result from amalgamation are a function not of the size and scale of individual local authorities, but of the services for which those local authorities are responsible, and the point at which economies of scale will be optimised will be very different for different services. The case against amalgamation is also reinforced by the absence of any significant post-facto evidence that amalgamation achieves either the promised savings or the anticipated efficiency gains (McKinlay 2006.

  8. Concepts and applications for influenza antigenic cartography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Influenza antigenic cartography projects influenza antigens into a two or three dimensional map based on immunological datasets, such as hemagglutination inhibition and microneutralization assays. A robust antigenic cartography can facilitate influenza vaccine strain selection since the antigenic map can simplify data interpretation through intuitive antigenic map. However, antigenic cartography construction is not trivial due to the challenging features embedded in the immunological data, such as data incompleteness, high noises, and low reactors. To overcome these challenges, we developed a computational method, temporal Matrix Completion-Multidimensional Scaling (MC-MDS), by adapting the low rank MC concept from the movie recommendation system in Netflix and the MDS method from geographic cartography construction. The application on H3N2 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza A viruses demonstrates that temporal MC-MDS is effective and efficient in constructing influenza antigenic cartography. The web sever is available at http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap. PMID:21761589

  9. VHA Data Sharing Agreement Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The VHA Data Sharing Agreement Repository serves as a centralized location to collect and report on agreements that share VHA data with entities outside of VA. It...

  10. Inter-species and intra-annual variations of moss nitrogen utilization: Implications for nitrogen deposition assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yu-Ping; Liu, Xue-Yan; Sun, Xin-Chao; Song, Wei; Zheng, Xu-Dong; Li, Rui; Liu, Cong-Qiang

    2017-11-01

    Moss nitrogen (N) concentrations and natural 15 N abundance (δ 15 N values) have been widely employed to evaluate annual levels and major sources of atmospheric N deposition. However, different moss species and one-off sampling were often used among extant studies, it remains unclear whether moss N parameters differ with species and different samplings, which prevented more accurate assessment of N deposition via moss survey. Here concentrations, isotopic ratios of bulk carbon (C) and bulk N in natural epilithic mosses (Bryum argenteum, Eurohypnum leptothallum, Haplocladium microphyllum and Hypnum plumaeforme) were measured monthly from August 2006 to August 2007 at Guiyang, SW China. The H. plumaeforme had significantly (P < 0.05) lower bulk N concentrations and higher δ 13 C values than other species. Moss N concentrations were significantly (P < 0.05) lower in warmer months than in cooler months, while moss δ 13 C values exhibited an opposite pattern. The variance component analyses showed that different species contributed more variations of moss N concentrations and δ 13 C values than different samplings. Differently, δ 15 N values did not differ significantly between moss species, and its variance mainly reflected variations of assimilated N sources, with ammonium as the dominant contributor. These results unambiguously reveal the influence of inter-species and intra-annual variations of moss N utilization on N deposition assessment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The olive knot disease as a model to study the role of interspecies bacterial communities in plant disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonaurio, Roberto; Moretti, Chiaraluce; da Silva, Daniel Passos; Cortese, Chiara; Ramos, Cayo; Venturi, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in studying interspecies bacterial interactions in diseases of animals and plants as it is believed that the great majority of bacteria found in nature live in complex communities. Plant pathologists have thus far mainly focused on studies involving single species or on their interactions with antagonistic competitors. A bacterial disease used as model to study multispecies interactions is the olive knot disease, caused by Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi (Psv). Knots caused by Psv in branches and other aerial parts of the olive trees are an ideal niche not only for the pathogen but also for many other plant-associated bacterial species, mainly belonging to the genera Pantoea, Pectobacterium, Erwinia, and Curtobacterium. The non-pathogenic bacterial species Erwinia toletana, Pantoea agglomerans, and Erwinia oleae, which are frequently isolated inside the olive knots, cooperate with Psv in modulating the disease severity. Co-inoculations of these species with Psv result in bigger knots and better bacterial colonization when compared to single inoculations. Moreover, harmless bacteria co-localize with the pathogen inside the knots, indicating the formation of stable bacterial consortia that may facilitate the exchange of quorum sensing signals and metabolites. Here we discuss the possible role of bacterial communities in the establishment and development of olive knot disease, which we believe could be taking place in many other bacterial plant diseases. PMID:26113855

  12. Components of variability and heritability of phenological phases in interspecies progenies of F1 generation in grapevine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Dragan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In four interspecies crossing combinations of grapevine (Seedling 108 x Muscat Hamburg, Muscat Hamburg x Seedling 108, S.V. 18315 x Muscat Hamburg and Muscat Hamburg x S.V. 12375 during three years period, important phenological phases (bud burst, blooming time, veraison and ripening time were examined. Based on results of analysis of variance, for all investigated characteristics, components of variability, coefficients of genetic and phenotypic variation and coefficient of heritability in a broader sense were calculated. Values of these parameters depended a lot on examined crossing combination. In majority of all investigated characteristics and almost for ail crossing combinations, genetic variability took the biggest part in total variability. Only for blooming time, in crossing combinations Seedling 108 x Muscat Hamburg and Muscat Hamburg x S.V. 12375, year variability participated the most in total variability. The lowest coefficients of genetic and phenotypic variation were established for blooming time (4.01%; 4.86%, and the largest for veraison (36.43%; 38.81%. Considering examined crossing combination, coefficient of heritability was from 63.08% up to 70.76% for bud burst, from 60.61% up to 87.71% for blooming time, from 84.58% up to 88.14% for verasion and from 56.86% up to 89.29% for ripening time.

  13. Interspecies competition and inhibition within the oral microbial flora: environmental factors influence the inhibition of Streptococcus mutans by Streptococcus oligofermentans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Wu, Ligeng; Wu, Fei; Chu, Lei; Liu, Xinxin; Xia, Keke; Wang, Yinghui

    2012-06-01

    Dental caries is a bacterial infectious disease. Streptococcus mutans is the primary pathogen that causes dental caries. Streptococcus oligofermentans is a new oral streptococcal species that can inhibit the growth of S. mutans specifically. The study aimed to assess the inhibition of S. mutans by S. oligofermentans under different oral environmental conditions. The inhibition under different carbohydrate and oxygen conditions was investigated in vitro using an interspecies interaction assay. The 4-aminoantipyine (4-ATTP) method was used to measure the yield and the initial production rate of H(2) O(2) in S. oligofermentans. The inhibitory effect was enhanced when the bacteria were cultured with carbohydrates and under aerobic conditions, or when S. oligofermentans was inoculated earlier than S. mutans. The initial synthesis rates of H(2) O(2) by S. oligofermentans were higher in the presence of carbohydrates and in aerobic culture conditions. In terms of the total H(2) O(2) yield, the effect of the environmental conditions was as follows: no carbohydrates > sucrose> glucose, and aerobic conditions > anaerobic conditions. We conclude that the presence of carbohydrate and oxygen significantly affect the ability of S. oligofermentans to inhibit the growth of S. mutans. The difference in inhibitory effect may be attributed to changes in the capacity of S. oligofermentans to produce H(2) O(2) . © 2012 Eur J Oral Sci.

  14. The olive-knot disease as a model to study the role of interspecies bacterial communities in plant disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto eBuonaurio

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing interest in studying interspecies bacterial interactions in diseases of animals and plants as it is believed that the great majority of bacteria found in nature live in complex communities. Plant pathologists have thus far mainly focused on studies involving single species or on their interactions with antagonistic competitors. A bacterial disease used as model to study multispecies interactions is the olive knot disease, caused by Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi (Psv. Knots caused by Psv in branches and other aerial parts of the olive trees are an ideal niche not only for the pathogen but also for many other plant-associated bacterial species, mainly belonging to the genera Pantoea, Pectobacterium, Erwinia and Curtobacterium. The non-pathogenic bacterial species Erwinia toletana, Pantoea agglomerans and Erwinia oleae, which are frequently isolated inside the olive knots, cooperate with Psv in modulating the disease severity. Co-inoculations of these species with Psv result in bigger knots and better bacterial colonization when compared to single inoculations. Moreover, harmless bacteria co-localize with the pathogen inside the knots, indicating the formation of stable bacterial consortia that may facilitate the exchange of quorum sensing signals and metabolites. Here we discuss the possible role of bacterial communities in the establishment and development of olive knot disease, which we believe could be taking place in many other bacterial plant diseases.

  15. Molecular interactions between prions as seeds and recombinant prion proteins as substrates resemble the biological interspecies barrier in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannantonio Panza

    Full Text Available Prion diseases like Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, Scrapie in sheep or bovine spongiform encephalopathy are fatal neurodegenerative diseases, which can be of sporadic, genetic, or infectious origin. Prion diseases are transmissible between different species, however, with a variable species barrier. The key event of prion amplification is the conversion of the cellular isoform of the prion protein (PrP(C into the pathogenic isoform (PrP(Sc. We developed a sodiumdodecylsulfate-based PrP conversion system that induces amyloid fibril formation from soluble α-helical structured recombinant PrP (recPrP. This approach was extended applying pre-purified PrP(Sc as seeds which accelerate fibrillization of recPrP. In the present study we investigated the interspecies coherence of prion disease. Therefore we used PrP(Sc from different species like Syrian hamster, cattle, mouse and sheep and seeded fibrillization of recPrP from the same or other species to mimic in vitro the natural species barrier. We could show that the in vitro system of seeded fibrillization is in accordance with what is known from the naturally occurring species barriers.

  16. A novel computational method identifies intra- and inter-species recombination events in Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Sanguinetti

    Full Text Available Advances in high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies have determined an explosion in the number of sequenced bacterial genomes. Comparative sequence analysis frequently reveals evidences of homologous recombination occurring with different mechanisms and rates in different species, but the large-scale use of computational methods to identify recombination events is hampered by their high computational costs. Here, we propose a new method to identify recombination events in large datasets of whole genome sequences. Using a filtering procedure of the gene conservation profiles of a test genome against a panel of strains, this algorithm identifies sets of contiguous genes acquired by homologous recombination. The locations of the recombination breakpoints are determined using a statistical test that is able to account for the differences in the natural rate of evolution between different genes. The algorithm was tested on a dataset of 75 genomes of Staphylococcus aureus and 50 genomes comprising different streptococcal species, and was able to detect intra-species recombination events in S. aureus and in Streptococcus pneumoniae. Furthermore, we found evidences of an inter-species exchange of genetic material between S. pneumoniae and Streptococcus mitis, a closely related commensal species that colonizes the same ecological niche. The method has been implemented in an R package, Reco, which is freely available from supplementary material, and provides a rapid screening tool to investigate recombination on a genome-wide scale from sequence data.

  17. Daphnia and fish toxicity of (benzo)triazoles: validated QSAR models, and interspecies quantitative activity-activity modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassani, Stefano; Kovarich, Simona; Papa, Ester; Roy, Partha Pratim; van der Wal, Leon; Gramatica, Paola

    2013-08-15

    Due to their chemical properties synthetic triazoles and benzo-triazoles ((B)TAZs) are mainly distributed to the water compartments in the environment, and because of their wide use the potential effects on aquatic organisms are cause of concern. Non testing approaches like those based on quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) are valuable tools to maximize the information contained in existing experimental data and predict missing information while minimizing animal testing. In the present study, externally validated QSAR models for the prediction of acute (B)TAZs toxicity in Daphnia magna and Oncorhynchus mykiss have been developed according to the principles for the validation of QSARs and their acceptability for regulatory purposes, proposed by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). These models are based on theoretical molecular descriptors, and are statistically robust, externally predictive and characterized by a verifiable structural applicability domain. They have been applied to predict acute toxicity for over 300 (B)TAZs without experimental data, many of which are in the pre-registration list of the REACH regulation. Additionally, a model based on quantitative activity-activity relationships (QAAR) has been developed, which allows for interspecies extrapolation from daphnids to fish. The importance of QSAR/QAAR, especially when dealing with specific chemical classes like (B)TAZs, for screening and prioritization of pollutants under REACH, has been highlighted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Interspecies gene transfer as a method for understanding the genetic basis for evolutionary change: Progress, Pitfalls and Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lachezar A. Nikolov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent revolution in high throughput sequencing and associated applications provides excellent opportunities to catalogue variation in DNA sequences and gene expression between species. However, understanding the astonishing diversity of the Tree of Life requires understanding the phenotypic consequences of such variation and identification of those rare genetic changes that are causal to diversity. One way to study the genetic basis for trait diversity is to apply a transgenic approach and introduce genes of interest from a donor into a recipient species. Such interspecies gene transfer (IGT is based on the premise that if a gene is causal to the morphological divergence of the two species, the transfer will endow the recipient with properties of the donor. Extensions of this approach further allow identifying novel loci for the diversification of form and investigating cis- and trans-contributions to morphological evolution. Here we review recent examples from both plant and animal systems that have employed IGT to provide insight into the genetic basis of evolutionary change. We outline the practice of IGT, its methodological strengths and weaknesses, and consider guidelines for its application, emphasizing the importance of phylogenetic distance, character polarity, and life history. We also discuss future perspectives for exploiting IGT in the context of expanding genomic resources in emerging experimental systems and advances in genome editing.

  19. Staphylococcus sciuri bacteriophages double-convert for staphylokinase and phospholipase, mediate interspecies plasmid transduction, and package mecA gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeman, M; Mašlaňová, I; Indráková, A; Šiborová, M; Mikulášek, K; Bendíčková, K; Plevka, P; Vrbovská, V; Zdráhal, Z; Doškař, J; Pantůček, R

    2017-04-13

    Staphylococcus sciuri is a bacterial pathogen associated with infections in animals and humans, and represents a reservoir for the mecA gene encoding methicillin-resistance in staphylococci. No S. sciuri siphophages were known. Here the identification and characterization of two temperate S. sciuri phages from the Siphoviridae family designated ϕ575 and ϕ879 are presented. The phages have icosahedral heads and flexible noncontractile tails that end with a tail spike. The genomes of the phages are 42,160 and 41,448 bp long and encode 58 and 55 ORFs, respectively, arranged in functional modules. Their head-tail morphogenesis modules are similar to those of Staphylococcus aureus ϕ13-like serogroup F phages, suggesting their common evolutionary origin. The genome of phage ϕ575 harbours genes for staphylokinase and phospholipase that might enhance the virulence of the bacterial hosts. In addition both of the phages package a homologue of the mecA gene, which is a requirement for its lateral transfer. Phage ϕ879 transduces tetracycline and aminoglycoside pSTS7-like resistance plasmids from its host to other S. sciuri strains and to S. aureus. Furthermore, both of the phages efficiently adsorb to numerous staphylococcal species, indicating that they may contribute to interspecies horizontal gene transfer.

  20. Mini-review: Strategies for Variation and Evolution of Bacterial Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Foley

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Across the eubacteria, antigenic variation has emerged as a strategy to evade host immunity. However, phenotypic variation in some of these antigens also allows the bacteria to exploit variable host niches as well. The specific mechanisms are not shared-derived characters although there is considerable convergent evolution and numerous commonalities reflecting considerations of natural selection and biochemical restraints. Unlike in viruses, mechanisms of antigenic variation in most bacteria involve larger DNA movement such as gene conversion or DNA rearrangement, although some antigens vary due to point mutations or modified transcriptional regulation. The convergent evolution that promotes antigenic variation integrates various evolutionary forces: these include mutations underlying variant production; drift which could remove alleles especially early in infection or during life history phases in arthropod vectors (when the bacterial population size goes through a bottleneck; selection not only for any particular variant but also for the mechanism for the production of variants (i.e., selection for mutability; and overcoming negative selection against variant production. This review highlights the complexities of drivers of antigenic variation, in particular extending evaluation beyond the commonly cited theory of immune evasion. A deeper understanding of the diversity of purpose and mechanisms of antigenic variation in bacteria will contribute to greater insight into bacterial pathogenesis, ecology and coevolution with hosts.

  1. Screening Donors for Rare Antigen Constellations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Franz F

    2009-01-01

    SCREENING BLOOD DONORS FOR RARE ANTIGEN CONSTELLATIONS HAS BEEN IMPLEMENTED USING SIMPLE PCR METHODS: PCR with enzyme digestion has been used to type donor cohorts for Dombrock antigens, and PCR with sequence-specific priming to identify donors negative for antigens of high frequency. The advantages and disadvantages of the methods as well as their current state is discussed.

  2. Model Sharing and Collaboration using HydroShare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodall, J. L.; Morsy, M. M.; Castronova, A. M.; Miles, B.; Merwade, V.; Tarboton, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    HydroShare is a web-based system funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) for sharing hydrologic data and models as resources. Resources in HydroShare can either be assigned a generic type, meaning the resource only has Dublin Core metadata properties, or one of a growing number of specific resource types with enhanced metadata profiles defined by the HydroShare development team. Examples of specific resource types in the current release of HydroShare (http://www.hydroshare.org) include time series, geographic raster, Multidimensional (NetCDF), model program, and model instance. Here we describe research and development efforts in HydroShare project for model-related resources types. This work has included efforts to define metadata profiles for common modeling resources, execute models directly through the HydroShare user interface using Docker containers, and interoperate with the 3rd party application SWATShare for model execution and visualization. These examples demonstrate the benefit of HydroShare to support model sharing and address collaborative problems involving modeling. The presentation will conclude with plans for future modeling-related development in HydroShare including supporting the publication of workflow resources, enhanced metadata for additional hydrologic models, and linking model resources with other resources in HydroShare to capture model provenance.

  3. Fractions: How to Fair Share

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, P. Holt; Edgington, Cynthia P.; Nguyen, Kenny H.; Pescosolido, Ryan S.; Confrey, Jere

    2011-01-01

    Children learn from a very early age what it means to get their "fair share." Whether it is candy or birthday cake, many children successfully create equal-size groups or parts of a collection or whole but later struggle to create fair shares of multiple wholes, such as fairly sharing four pies among a family of seven. Recent research suggests…

  4. School Nurses Share a Job.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merwin, Elizabeth G.; Voss, Sondra

    1981-01-01

    Job sharing is a relatively new idea in which two or more people share the hours, the work, and the responsibilities of one job. Advantages and disadvantages to this situation are discussed in relation to the experiences of two nurses who shared a position as district nurse. (JN)

  5. SHARED TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GRIFFIN, JOHN M. HAUT, RICHARD C.

    2008-03-07

    The program established a collaborative process with domestic industries for the purpose of sharing Navy-developed technology. Private sector businesses were educated so as to increase their awareness of the vast amount of technologies that are available, with an initial focus on technology applications that are related to the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies (Hydrogen) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. Specifically, the project worked to increase industry awareness of the vast technology resources available to them that have been developed with taxpayer funding. NAVSEA-Carderock and the Houston Advanced Research Center teamed with Nicholls State University to catalog NAVSEA-Carderock unclassified technologies, rated the level of readiness of the technologies and established a web based catalog of the technologies. In particular, the catalog contains technology descriptions, including testing summaries and overviews of related presentations.

  6. Borrowing brainpower - sharing insecurities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Charlotte; Meier, Ninna; Ingerslev, Karen

    2016-01-01

    of structure and writing style along with wider issues of researcher identity. Thus, peer learning is demonstrated as a process of simultaneously building a text and an identity as scholarly researcher. The paper advocates ‘borrowing brainpower’ from peers in order to write better texts and, at the same time......Academic writing is a vital, yet complex skill that must be developed within a doctoral training process. In addition, becoming an academic researcher is a journey of changing sense of self and identity. Through analysis of a group session, we show how the feedback of peers addresses questions......, ‘share insecurities’ during the development of the researcher identity. Based on a distributed notion of peer learning and identity, we point to the need for further research into the everyday activities of doctoral writing groups in order to understand the dynamic relationship between production of text...

  7. Thermodynamical quantum information sharing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesniak, M.; Vedral, V.; Brukner, C.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Thermodynamical properties fully originate from classical physics and can be easily measured for macroscopic systems. On the other hand, entanglement is a widely spoken feature of quantum physics, which allows to perform certain task with efficiency unavailable with any classical resource. Therefore an interesting question is whether we can witness entanglement in a state of a macroscopic sample. We show, that some macroscopic properties, in particular magnetic susceptibility, can serve as an entanglement witnesses. We also study a mutual relation between magnetic susceptibility and magnetisation. Such a complementarity exhibits quantum information sharing between these two thermodynamical quantities. Magnetization expresses properties of individual spins, while susceptibility might reveal non-classical correlations as a witness. Therefore, a rapid change of one of these two quantities may mean a phase transition also in terms of entanglement. The complementarity relation is demonstrated by an analytical solution of an exemplary model. (author)

  8. University Reactor Sharing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reese, W.D.

    2004-01-01

    Research projects supported by the program include items such as dating geological material and producing high current super conducting magnets. The funding continues to give small colleges and universities the valuable opportunity to use the NSC for teaching courses in nuclear processes; specifically neutron activation analysis and gamma spectroscopy. The Reactor Sharing Program has supported the construction of a Fast Neutron Flux Irradiator for users at New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology and the University of Houston. This device has been characterized and has been found to have near optimum neutron fluxes for A39/Ar 40 dating. Institution final reports and publications resulting from the use of these funds are on file at the Nuclear Science Center

  9. Effects of Digested Onion Extracts on Intestinal Gene Expression: An Interspecies Comparison Using Different Intestine Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole J W de Wit

    Full Text Available Human intestinal tissue samples are barely accessible to study potential health benefits of nutritional compounds. Numbers of animals used in animal trials, however, need to be minimalized. Therefore, we explored the applicability of in vitro (human Caco-2 cells and ex vivo intestine models (rat precision cut intestine slices and the pig in-situ small intestinal segment perfusion (SISP technique to study the effect of food compounds. In vitro digested yellow (YOd and white onion extracts (WOd were used as model food compounds and transcriptomics was applied to obtain more insight into which extent mode of actions depend on the model. The three intestine models shared 9,140 genes which were used to compare the responses to digested onions between the models. Unsupervised clustering analysis showed that genes up- or down-regulated by WOd in human Caco-2 cells and rat intestine slices were similarly regulated by YOd, indicating comparable modes of action for the two onion species. Highly variable responses to onion were found in the pig SISP model. By focussing only on genes with significant differential expression, in combination with a fold change > 1.5, 15 genes showed similar onion-induced expression in human Caco-2 cells and rat intestine slices and 2 overlapping genes were found between the human Caco-2 and pig SISP model. Pathway analyses revealed that mainly processes related to oxidative stress, and especially the Keap1-Nrf2 pathway, were affected by onions in all three models. Our data fit with previous in vivo studies showing that the beneficial effects of onions are mostly linked to their antioxidant properties. Taken together, our data indicate that each of the in vitro and ex vivo intestine models used in this study, taking into account their limitations, can be used to determine modes of action of nutritional compounds and can thereby reduce the number of animals used in conventional nutritional intervention studies.

  10. Effects of Digested Onion Extracts on Intestinal Gene Expression: An Interspecies Comparison Using Different Intestine Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, Nicole J W; Hulst, Marcel; Govers, Coen; van der Meulen, Jan; van Hoef, Angeline; Stoopen, Geert; Hamers, Astrid; Hoekman, Arjan; de Vos, Ric; Bovee, Toine F H; Smits, Mari; Mes, Jurriaan J; Hendriksen, Peter J M

    2016-01-01

    Human intestinal tissue samples are barely accessible to study potential health benefits of nutritional compounds. Numbers of animals used in animal trials, however, need to be minimalized. Therefore, we explored the applicability of in vitro (human Caco-2 cells) and ex vivo intestine models (rat precision cut intestine slices and the pig in-situ small intestinal segment perfusion (SISP) technique) to study the effect of food compounds. In vitro digested yellow (YOd) and white onion extracts (WOd) were used as model food compounds and transcriptomics was applied to obtain more insight into which extent mode of actions depend on the model. The three intestine models shared 9,140 genes which were used to compare the responses to digested onions between the models. Unsupervised clustering analysis showed that genes up- or down-regulated by WOd in human Caco-2 cells and rat intestine slices were similarly regulated by YOd, indicating comparable modes of action for the two onion species. Highly variable responses to onion were found in the pig SISP model. By focussing only on genes with significant differential expression, in combination with a fold change > 1.5, 15 genes showed similar onion-induced expression in human Caco-2 cells and rat intestine slices and 2 overlapping genes were found between the human Caco-2 and pig SISP model. Pathway analyses revealed that mainly processes related to oxidative stress, and especially the Keap1-Nrf2 pathway, were affected by onions in all three models. Our data fit with previous in vivo studies showing that the beneficial effects of onions are mostly linked to their antioxidant properties. Taken together, our data indicate that each of the in vitro and ex vivo intestine models used in this study, taking into account their limitations, can be used to determine modes of action of nutritional compounds and can thereby reduce the number of animals used in conventional nutritional intervention studies.

  11. Identification of an Antigen from Normal Human Tissue That Crossreacts with the Carcinoembryonic Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleist, S. Von; Chavanel, G.; Burtin, P.

    1972-01-01

    A glycoprotein present in normal human tissue is characterized that is neither organ- nor tumor-specific (nonspecific crossreacting antigen) and that crossreacts (by the Ouchterlony double-diffusion technique) with the carcinoembryonic antigen. This immunological relationship indicates common determinants on the molecules of both antigens. We demonstrate that the nonspecific crossreacting antigen is not a fragment of the carcinoembryonic antigen molecule. Images PMID:4115954

  12. Cell surface antigens of radiation leukemia virus-induced BALB/c leukemias defined by syngeneic cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Yukio; Oettgen, H.F.; Obata, Yuichi; Nakayama, Eiichi.

    1989-01-01

    Two cell surface antigens of mouse leukemias were defined by BALB/c cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) generated against syngeneic radiation leukemia virus (RadLV)-induced leukemia, BALBRV1 or BALBRVD. Hyperimmunization of BALB/c mice with irradiated leukemias followed by in vitro sensitization of primed spleen cells resulted in the generation of CTL with high killing activity. The specificity of CTL was examined by direct cytotoxicity assays and competitive inhibition assays. A shared cell surface antigen, designated as BALBRV1 antigen, was detected by BALB/c anti-BALBRV1 CTL. BALBRV1 antigen was expressed not only on RadLV-induced BALB/c leukemias except for BALBRVD, but also on spontaneous or X-ray-induced BALB/c leukemias, chemically-induced leukemias with the H-2 d haplotype and some chemically-induced BALB/c sarcomas. In contrast, a unique cell surface antigen, designated as BALBRVD antigen, was detected by BALB/c anti-BALBRVD CTL. BALBRVD antigen was expressed only on BALBRVD, but not on thirty-nine normal lymphoid or tumor cells. These two antigens could be distinguished from those previously defined on Friend, Moloney, Rauscher or Gross murine leukemia virus (MuLV) leukemias, or MuLV-related antigens. Both cytotoxic responses were blocked by antisera against H-2K d , but not H-2D d . The relationship of BALBRV1 antigen and BALBRVD antigen to endogenous MuLV is discussed with regard to the antigenic distribution on tumor cell lines. (author)

  13. Identification and characterization of Neospora caninum tachyzoite antigens useful for diagnosis of neosporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerkas, I; Jenkins, M C; Dubey, J P

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify antigens of the protozoan Neospora caninum that could be useful for the diagnosis of neosporosis in domestic animals. As revealed by immunoblotting, immune sera from a wide range of animal species exhibited a similar recognition pattern of four major and several minor N. caninum antigens. In contrast to preinoculation sera, all tested immune sera recognized nonreduced immunodominant 17-, 29-, 30-, and 27-kDa antigens. A 46-kDa protein which showed faint recognition by preimmune sera also exhibited a strong response by immune sera. Immunolocalization of the four immunodominant N. caninum antigens was investigated by immunogold electron microscopy using monospecific polyclonal antisera. The 17-kDa antigen appears to be associated with the body part of the rhoptries, while the 29- and 30-kDa antigens were associated with the dense granules, network, and limiting membrane of the parasitophorous vacuole. Studies were also conducted to compare antibody responses to N. caninum and the related protozoan Toxoplasma gondii. Although N. caninum and T. gondii (RH strain) tachyzoites shared a few cross-reacting antigens, the immunodominant antigens of both parasites were not recognized by heterologous sera. Also, immunogold staining with rabbit anti-Neospora hyperimmune serum exhibited almost no labeling of external membranes of Neospora tachyzoites compared with the very marked labeling seen when Toxoplasma tachyzoites (RH strain) were incubated with rabbit anti-Toxoplasma hyperimmune serum. These unique antigenic differences should be useful in developing a diagnostic assay for N. caninum. Images PMID:7496948

  14. Coeliac disease and rheumatoid arthritis: similar mechanisms, different antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koning, Frits; Thomas, Ranjeny; Rossjohn, Jamie; Toes, Rene E

    2015-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and coeliac disease are inflammatory diseases that both have a strong association with class II HLAs: individuals carrying HLA-DQ2.5 and/or HLA-DQ8 alleles have an increased risk of developing coeliac disease, whereas those carrying HLA-DR shared epitope alleles exhibit an increased risk of developing RA. Although the molecular basis of the association with specific HLA molecules in RA remains poorly defined, an immune response against post-translationally modified protein antigens is a hallmark of each disease. In RA, understanding of the pathogenetic role of B-cell responses to citrullinated antigens, including vimentin, fibrinogen and α-enolase, is rapidly growing. Moreover, insight into the role of HLAs in the pathogenesis of coeliac disease has been considerably advanced by the identification of T-cell responses to deamidated gluten antigens presented in conjunction with predisposing HLA-DQ2.5 molecules. This article briefly reviews these advances and draws parallels between the immune mechanisms leading to RA and coeliac disease, which point to a crucial role for T-cell-B-cell cooperation in the development of full-blown disease. Finally, the ways in which these novel insights are being exploited therapeutically to re-establish tolerance in patients with RA and coeliac disease are described.

  15. Data sharing in neuroimaging research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Baptiste ePoline

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Significant resources around the world have been invested in neuroimaging studies of brain function and disease. Easier access to this large body of work should have profound impact on research in cognitive neuroscience and psychiatry, leading to advances in the diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric and neurological disease. A trend toward increased sharing of neuroimaging data has emerged in recent years. Nevertheless, a number of barriers continue to impede momentum. Many researchers and institutions remain uncertain about how to share data or lack the tools and expertise to participate in data sharing. The use of electronic data capture methods for neuroimaging greatly simplifies the task of data collection and has the potential to help standardize many aspects of data sharing. We review here the motivations for sharing neuroimaging data, the current data sharing landscape, and the sociological or technical barriers that still need to be addressed. The INCF Task Force on Neuroimaging Datasharing, in conjunction with several collaborative groups around the world, has started work on several tools to ease and eventually automate the practice of data sharing. It is hoped that such tools will allow researchers to easily share raw, processed, and derived neuroimaging data, with appropriate metadata and provenance records, and will improve the reproducibility of neuroimaging studies. By providing seamless integration of data sharing and analysis tools within a commodity research environment, the Task Force seeks to identify and minimize barriers to data sharing in the field of neuroimaging.

  16. To share or not to share is the question

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald R.C. Chalmers

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Data sharing is increasingly becoming an essential component of clinical practice and biomedical research. The debate has shifted from whether or not to exchange data to how best to achieve optimal sharing. This raises new ethical and legal challenges, particularly with regard to consent and privacy. This article discusses recent developments in the formulation of best practice guidelines for data sharing. Particular attention is focused on the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health (GA4GH draft Framework of Conduct for Data Sharing.

  17. Comparative BAC-based mapping in the white-throated sparrow, a novel behavioral genomics model, using interspecies overgo hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonser Rusty A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genomics era has produced an arsenal of resources from sequenced organisms allowing researchers to target species that do not have comparable mapping and sequence information. These new "non-model" organisms offer unique opportunities to examine environmental effects on genomic patterns and processes. Here we use comparative mapping as a first step in characterizing the genome organization of a novel animal model, the white-throated sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis, which occurs as white or tan morphs that exhibit alternative behaviors and physiology. Morph is determined by the presence or absence of a complex chromosomal rearrangement. This species is an ideal model for behavioral genomics because the association between genotype and phenotype is absolute, making it possible to identify the genomic bases of phenotypic variation. Findings We initiated a genomic study in this species by characterizing the white-throated sparrow BAC library via filter hybridization with overgo probes designed for the chicken, turkey, and zebra finch. Cross-species hybridization resulted in 640 positive sparrow BACs assigned to 77 chicken loci across almost all macro-and microchromosomes, with a focus on the chromosomes associated with morph. Out of 216 overgos, 36% of the probes hybridized successfully, with an average number of 3.0 positive sparrow BACs per overgo. Conclusions These data will be utilized for determining chromosomal architecture and for fine-scale mapping of candidate genes associated with phenotypic differences. Our research confirms the utility of interspecies hybridization for developing comparative maps in other non-model organisms.

  18. Full-term development of gaur-bovine interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos: effect of trichostatin A treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srirattana, Kanokwan; Imsoonthornruksa, Sumeth; Laowtammathron, Chuti; Sangmalee, Anawat; Tunwattana, Wanchai; Thongprapai, Thamnoon; Chaimongkol, Chockchai; Ketudat-Cairns, Mariena; Parnpai, Rangsun

    2012-06-01

    Trichostatin A (TSA) has previously been used in somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) to improve the cloning efficiency in several species, which led our team to investigate the effects of TSA on the full-term development of bovine SCNT and gaur-bovine interspecies SCNT (gaur iSCNT; gaur somatic cells as donors and bovine oocytes as recipients) embryos. Treatment with 50 nM TSA for 10 h after fusion had no positive effects on the rates of fusion, cleavage, or the development to eight-cell or morula stages in both bovine SCNT and gaur iSCNT embryos. However, TSA treatment significantly enhanced the blastocyst formation rate in bovine SCNT embryos (44 vs. 32-34% in the TSA-treated and TSA-untreated groups, respectively), but had no effects on gaur iSCNT embryos. The fresh blastocysts derived from bovine SCNT and gaur iSCNT embryos (fresh groups), as well as vitrified bovine SCNT blastocysts (vitrified group), were transferred to bovine recipients. We found that TSA treatment increased the pregnancy rates only in recipients receiving fresh bovine SCNT embryos. In recipients receiving TSA-treated bovine SCNT embryos, three cloned calves from the fresh group and twin cloned calves from the vitrified group were delivered; however, no calf was born from the TSA-untreated bovine SCNT embryos. In contrast, one gaur iSCNT calf was born from a recipient receiving blastocysts from the TSA-untreated group. In summary, TSA improved the preimplantation development and pregnancy rates of bovine SCNT embryos, but did not have any beneficial effect on gaur iSCNT embryos. However, one gaur iSCNT calf reached full-term development.

  19. Bats host diverse parvoviruses as possible origin of mammalian dependoparvoviruses and source for bat-swine interspecies transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Susanna K P; Ahmed, Syed Shakeel; Tsoi, Hoi-Wah; Yeung, Hazel C; Li, Kenneth S M; Fan, Rachel Y Y; Zhao, Pyrear S H; Lau, Candy C C; Lam, Carol S F; Choi, Kelvin K F; Chan, Ben C H; Cai, Jian-Piao; Wong, Samson S Y; Chen, Honglin; Zhang, Hai-Lin; Zhang, Libiao; Wang, Ming; Woo, Patrick C Y; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2017-11-06

    Compared to the enormous species diversity of bats, relatively few parvoviruses have been reported. We detected diverse and potentially novel parvoviruses from bats in Hong Kong and mainland China. Parvoviruses belonging to Amdoparvovirus, Bocaparvovirus and Dependoparvovirus were detected in alimentary, liver and spleen samples from 16 different chiropteran species of five families by PCR. Phylogenetic analysis of partial helicase sequences showed that they potentially belonged to 25 bocaparvovirus, three dependoparvovirus and one amdoparvovirus species. Nearly complete genome sequencing confirmed the existence of at least four novel bat bocaparvovirus species (Rp-BtBoV1 and Rp-BtBoV2 from Rhinolophus pusillus, Rs-BtBoV2 from Rhinolophus sinicus and Rol-BtBoV1 from Rousettus leschenaultii) and two novel bat dependoparvovirus species (Rp-BtAAV1 from Rhinolophus pusillus and Rs-BtAAV1 from Rhinolophus sinicus). Rs-BtBoV2 was closely related to Ungulate bocaparvovirus 5 with 93, 72.1 and 78.7 % amino acid identities in the NS1, NP1 and VP1/VP2 genes, respectively. The detection of bat bocaparvoviruses, including Rs-BtBoV2, closely related to porcine bocaparvoviruses, suggests recent interspecies transmission of bocaparvoviruses between bats and swine. Moreover, Rp-BtAAV1 and Rs-BtAAV1 were most closely related to human AAV1 with 48.7 and 57.5 % amino acid identities in the rep gene. The phylogenetic relationship between BtAAVs and other mammalian AAVs suggests bats as the ancestral origin of mammalian AAVs. Furthermore, parvoviruses of the same species were detected from multiple bat species or families, supporting the ability of bat parvoviruses to cross species barriers. The results extend our knowledge on the diversity of bat parvoviruses and the role of bats in parvovirus evolution and emergence in humans and animals.

  20. Interspecies variation in yolk selenium concentrations among eggs of free-living birds: The effect of phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Athanasios C; Karadas, Filiz; Surai, Peter F; Wood, Nicholas A R; Cassey, Phillip; Bortolotti, Gary R; Speake, Brian K

    2006-01-01

    Birds deposit the trace element selenium (Se) into their eggs because an adequate supply of this micronutrient is essential for embryonic development. Although there is considerable interest in egg Se with regard to topics as diverse as poultry nutrition and environmental pollution, data on the natural levels of Se in eggs of free-living avian species are currently very limited. To address this lack of information, we measured the yolk Se concentrations in eggs of 14 avian species collected in the wild. The concentrations (ng/g wet yolk) varied from 394 to 2238, with a mean value of 1040. Values (means+/-SD) for eggs from the UK, Canada and New Zealand were, respectively, 522+/-192 (3 species), 1194+/-584 (8 species) and 1147+/-200 (3 species). However, analysis by appropriate statistical models indicates that the effect of phylogenetic relatedness among these species is so significant that it removes any effect of geographical location. In particular, species belonging to the order Passeriformes displayed significantly higher yolk Se levels than Non-Passeriforme species. In marked contrast to the free-living species, our previously published data indicate that the Se concentration in egg yolk of the domestic chicken is only about 100 ng/g wet yolk when the birds are maintained on a basal commercial diet without supplementary Se. The results reveal an extensive interspecies variation in yolk Se (across a 6-fold range) for eggs collected from the wild. Nevertheless, the Se concentrations in the yolks of all the free-living species were far higher (4-21-fold) than that achieved in the yolk of the domestic chicken consuming a standard basal diet.

  1. Estimated emissions of chlorofluorocarbons, hydrochlorofluorocarbons, and hydrofluorocarbons based on an interspecies correlation method in the Pearl River Delta region, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Fang, Xuekun; Martin, Jonathan W; Zhai, Zihan; Su, Shenshen; Hu, Xia; Han, Jiarui; Lu, Sihua; Wang, Chen; Zhang, Jianbo; Hu, Jianxin

    2014-02-01

    Although many studies have been conducted in recent years on the emissions of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) at the large regional (such as East Asia) and national scales, relatively few studies have been conducted for cities or metropolitan areas. In this study, 192 air samples were collected in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region of China in November 2010. The atmospheric mixing ratios of six halocarbons were analyzed, including trichlorofluoromethane (CFC-11, CCl3F), dichlorodifluoromethane (CFC-12, CCl2F2), monochlorodifluoromethane (HCFC-22, CHClF2), 1,1-dichloro-1-fluoroethane (HCFC-141b, CH3CCl2F), 1-dichloro-1,1-fluoroethane (HCFC-142b, CH3CClF2), and 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a, CH2FCF3), and their emissions were estimated based on an interspecies correlation method using HCFC-22 as the reference species. The results showed no significant change in the regional concentration and emission of CFC in the past 10years, suggesting that the continuous regional emission of CFC has had no significant effect on the CFC regional concentration in the PRD region. Concentrations and emissions of HCFCs and HFCs are significantly higher compared to previous research in the PRD region (P<0.05). The largest emission was for HCFC-22, most likely due to its substitution for CFC-12 in the industrial and commercial refrigeration subsector, and the rapid development of the room air-conditioner and extruded polystyrene subsectors. The PRD's ODP-weighted emissions of the target HCFCs provided 9% (7-12%) of the national emissions for the corresponding species. The PRD's GWP-weighted emissions of the target HCFCs and HFC-134a account for 10% (7-12%) and 8% (7-9%), respectively, of the national emissions for the corresponding species, and thus are important contributions to China's total emissions. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Governing Individual Knowledge Sharing Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minbaeva, Dana; Pedersen, Torben

    2010-01-01

    The emerging Knowledge Governance Approach asserts the need to build microfoundations grounded in individual action. Toward this goal, using the Theory of Planned Behavior, we aim to explain individual knowledge sharing behavior as being determined by the intention to share knowledge and its...... antecedents: attitude toward knowledge sharing, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control. In addition, we consider managerial interventions (governance mechanisms) that managers can employ to influence the identified antecedents and thereby govern individual knowledge sharing behavior. We test...... the model arrived at on a dataset collected among individuals engaged in knowledge sharing in two competing firms. Results of the LISREL analysis show that the use of rewards affects attitudes toward knowledge sharing negatively, while the use of reciprocal schemes and communication mechanisms have...

  3. SharePoint User's Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Corporation, Infusion Development

    2009-01-01

    This straightforward guide shows SharePoint users how to create and use web sites for sharing and collaboration. Learn to use the document and picture libraries for adding and editing content, add discussion boards and surveys, receive alerts when documents and information have been added or changed, and enhance security. Designed to help you find answers quickly, the book shows how to make the most of SharePoint for productivity and collaboration.

  4. 2012 Information Sharing Environment Performance Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Information Sharing Environment — This is a survey of federal departments and agencies who share terrorism information and are therefore considered part of the Information Sharing Environment. The...

  5. 2013 Information Sharing Environment Performance Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Information Sharing Environment — This is a survey of federal departments and agencies who share terrorism information and are therefore considered part of the Information Sharing Environment. The...

  6. Governing Individual Knowledge Sharing Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minbaeva, Dana; Pedersen, Torben

    2010-01-01

    The emerging Knowledge Governance Approach asserts the need to build microfoundations grounded in individual action. Toward this goal, using the Theory of Planned Behavior, we aim to explain individual knowledge sharing behavior as being determined by the intention to share knowledge and its...... antecedents: attitude toward knowledge sharing, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control. In addition, we consider managerial interventions (governance mechanisms) that managers can employ to influence the identified antecedents and thereby govern individual knowledge sharing behavior. We test...... a positive effect on subjective norms and perceived behavioral control, respectively....

  7. Modeling Shared Variables in VHDL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan; Brage, Jens P.

    1994-01-01

    A set of concurrent processes communicating through shared variables is an often used model for hardware systems. This paper presents three modeling techniques for representing such shared variables in VHDL, depending on the acceptable constraints on accesses to the variables. Also a set of guide......A set of concurrent processes communicating through shared variables is an often used model for hardware systems. This paper presents three modeling techniques for representing such shared variables in VHDL, depending on the acceptable constraints on accesses to the variables. Also a set...

  8. Challenges in sharing information effectively

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    2006-01-01

    types of battlefield training simulations were observed and open-ended interviews with military personnel were conducted. Analysis. Observation notes and interview transcripts were analysed to identify incidents when group members erroneously believed they had shared information effectively and were...... to other high stress, unique and complex situations, such as natural disasters. Recommendations for more effective information behaviour techniques in dynamic group work situations are presented.......Introduction. The goal of information sharing is to change a person's image of the world and to develop a shared working understanding. It is an essential component of collaboration. This paper examines barriers to sharing information effectively in dynamic group work situations. Method. Three...

  9. Technology Mediated Information Sharing (Monitor Sharing) in Primary Care Encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asan, Onur

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this dissertation study was to identify and describe the use of electronic health records (EHRs) for information sharing between patients and clinicians in primary-care encounters and to understand work system factors influencing information sharing. Ultimately, this will promote better design of EHR technologies and effective training…

  10. Antigenicity of Dermatophilus congolensis hemolysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalka, B; Pospísil, L

    1993-05-01

    The separated cell-free form of hemolytic exosubstance was obtained from five strains of Dermatophilus congolensis. Three strains produced exosubstance with high activity, two strains produced exosubstance with lower intensity of activity. The separated forms exhibited the same hemolytic interactions as the native forms produced by growing strains, namely the antagonism with staphylococcal beta hemolysin and the synergism with staphylococcal delta hemolysin, streptococcal CAMP factor and rhodococcal equi factor. Rabbit sera obtained after intravenous or intraperitoneal application of the separated forms contained precipitation and neutralization antibodies. Cross tests of precipitation and neutralization proved antigen identity of hemolysins of different D. congolensis, strains which makes the serodiagnostics of this species possible.

  11. Purification of human seminal plasma no. 7 antigen by immunoaffinity chromatography on bound monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isojima, S; Koyama, K; Fujiwara, N

    1982-08-01

    Human seminal plasma (HSP) No. 7 antigen was purified by immunoaffinity chromatography on bound 1C4 monoclonal antibody (Moab) (Shigeta et al., 1980b). The pooled HSP protein was applied to a CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B column of bound 1C4 Moab gamma globulin and the antibody bound fraction (fr) eluted was further purified by rechromatography in the same way. The purified antigen in the antibody bound fr obtained by rechromatography gave a single band on SDS-PAGE in a position corresponding to a molecular weight of 15,000 daltons. This preparation was 196.2 times more effective than the original HSP protein in neutralizing the sperm immobilizing activity of 1C4 Moab. The purified HSP No. 7 antigen contained iron, but was different from lactoferrin and transferrin. It did not show any enzymatic activities, such as those of acid phosphatase, LDH or trypsin inhibitor, and shared antigenicity with human milk protein. It was present in seminal plasma as a molecule with a higher molecular weight but seemed to be cleaved to a monomer of 15,000 daltons during purification procedures. This antigen is present on spermatozoa as sperm-coating antigen and the corresponding antibody can immobilize spermatozoa with complement.

  12. Interspecies nuclear transfer using fibroblasts from leopard, tiger, and lion ear piece collected postmortem as donor cells and rabbit oocytes as recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelisetti, Uma Mahesh; Komjeti, Suman; Katari, Venu Charan; Sisinthy, Shivaji; Brahmasani, Sambasiva Rao

    2016-06-01

    Skin fibroblast cells were obtained from a small piece of an ear of leopard, lion, and tiger collected postmortem and attempts were made to synchronize the skin fibroblasts at G0/G1 of cell cycle using three different approaches. Efficiency of the approaches was tested following interspecies nuclear transfer with rabbit oocytes as recipient cytoplasm. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting revealed that the proportion of G0/G1 cells increased significantly (P lion, and tiger were successfully synchronized and used for the development of blastocysts using rabbit oocytes as recipient cytoplasm.

  13. Probable Interspecies Transfer of the bla(VIM-4) Gene between Enterobacter cloacae and Klebsiella pneumoniae in a Single Infant Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piekarska, Katarzyna; Zacharczuk, Katarzyna; Rzeczkowska, Magdalena; Wołkowicz, Tomasz; Januszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Podsiadły, Edyta; Demkow, Urszula; Gierczyński, Rafał

    2015-01-01

    We report the interspecies transfer of the bla(VLM-4) gene in MBL-producing Enterobacter cloacae and Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates from a newborn patient who had received meropenem therapy. We show evidence that gene bla(VIM-4) was transmitted as a part of the class-1 integron on a ca. -90 kb conjugative plasmid. High homology of nucleotide sequence was observed between the integron found in VIM-4 producing E. cloacae and K. pneumoniae strains tested and class-1 integrons previously reporteded in Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Hungary and Poland. This finding may suggest P. aeruginosa as a potential source of acquired VIM-4 in Enterobacteriaceae.

  14. Isolation of Fasciola hepatica tegument antigens.

    OpenAIRE

    Hillyer, G V

    1980-01-01

    Fasciola hepatica tegument antigens were isolated from intact worms in the cold by using Nonidet P-40. Proof of the tegumental nature of the antigens was shown by the peroxidase-antiperoxidase immunocytochemical technique at the light microscope level. The potential of F. hepatica tegument antigens for the immunodiagnosis of rabbit and human fascioliasis was shown by Ouchterlony immunodiffusion, although cross-reactivity was evident in one of six serum samples from patients infected with Schi...

  15. Unveiling the Knowledge Sharing Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, P.H.J.

    2009-01-01

    It is generally acknowledged that organisation culture affects how knowledge processes such as knowledge-sharing evolve. Despite the growing attention to the aspects of culture, the knowledge management debate has not paid systematic attention to the assessment or measurement of a knowledge-sharing

  16. Work sharing in Kerela's fisheries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den M.M.; Lensing, B.J.

    2007-01-01

    Earlier studies suggest that once population growth and market integration reach a certain critical level, traditional practices of work sharing tend to degenerate or disappear altogether. Work sharing has, however, survived to date in small-scale fisheries in Kerala, India. Artisanal fishermen

  17. Benefit sharing in health research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-08-02

    Aug 2, 2015 ... meaning in the context of genetic research; and outline some South African and international perspectives on the sharing of benefits. While this paper .... 'both monetary and nonmonetary returns'.[14]. Therefore, local .... Article 12(a) of the 1997 Declaration embraces the theory of sharing benefits on.

  18. Panorama 2014 - Car-sharing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinot, Simon

    2013-10-01

    Car-sharing is a new mode of transportation that consists of multiple users sharing the same vehicle. This type of service is expanding with the arrival of larger players, such as traditional car rental companies, automotive manufacturers, and large firms specializing in transportation. This new mode of transportation offers real potential and is currently finding its users, in France and worldwide. (author)

  19. Shared Contract-Obedient Endpoints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Étienne Lozes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Most of the existing verification techniques for message-passing programs suppose either that channel endpoints are used in a linear fashion, where at most one thread may send or receive from an endpoint at any given time, or that endpoints may be used arbitrarily by any number of threads. The former approach usually forbids the sharing of channels while the latter limits what is provable about programs. In this paper we propose a midpoint between these techniques by extending a proof system based on separation logic to allow sharing of endpoints. We identify two independent mechanisms for supporting sharing: an extension of fractional shares to endpoints, and a new technique based on what we call reflexive ownership transfer. We demonstrate on a number of examples that a linear treatment of sharing is possible.

  20. Knowledge Sharing and National Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michailova, Snejina; Hutchings, Kate

    2004-01-01

    Much of the knowledge management literature tends to assume a rather universalistunderstanding of knowledge sharing. Yet, attitudes to knowledge sharing as well as actualknowledge-sharing behaviour depend on conditions that vary across institutional and culturalenvironments. This paper contributes...... to the knowledge-sharing literature by specificallydiscussing the interplay between knowledge-sharing and national cultural factors in the context oftransition countries. The paper engages in a comparative examination of two major transitionsocieties, China and Russia, and contributes to understanding...... the complexity of differencesbetween transition economies. The paper is written as a set of theoretical arguments andpropositions that is designed to elucidate more nuanced ways of thinking about knowledgesharing in China and Russia. We argue that in the case of China and Russia, verticalindividualism...

  1. Blastogenic response of human lymphocytes to early antigen(s) of human cytomegalovirus.

    OpenAIRE

    Waner, J L; Kong, N; Biano, S

    1983-01-01

    The lymphocytes of asymptomatic, seropositive donors demonstrated blastogenic responses to early antigens of human cytomegalovirus whether or not antibodies to early antigens were detectable. The lymphocytes of six of nine patients with active cytomegalovirus infections gave stimulation indexes of greater than or equal to 2.00 with antigens of productively infected cells, whereas only two patients demonstrated comparable stimulation indexes with early antigens. Four patients with stimulation ...

  2. Antigenic cartography of H1N1 influenza viruses using sequence-based antigenic distance calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Christopher S; McCall, Patrick R; Stern, Harry A; Yang, Hongmei; Topham, David J

    2018-02-12

    The ease at which influenza virus sequence data can be used to estimate antigenic relationships between strains and the existence of databases containing sequence data for hundreds of thousands influenza strains make sequence-based antigenic distance estimates an attractive approach to researchers. Antigenic mismatch between circulating strains and vaccine strains results in significantly decreased vaccine effectiveness. Furthermore, antigenic relatedness between the vaccine strain and the strains an individual was originally primed with can affect the cross-reactivity of the antibody response. Thus, understanding the antigenic relationships between influenza viruses that have circulated is important to both vaccinologists and immunologists. Here we develop a method of mapping antigenic relationships between influenza virus stains using a sequence-based antigenic distance approach (SBM). We used a modified version of the p-all-epitope sequence-based antigenic distance calculation, which determines the antigenic relatedness between strains using influenza hemagglutinin (HA) genetic coding sequence data and provide experimental validation of the p-all-epitope calculation. We calculated the antigenic distance between 4838 H1N1 viruses isolated from infected humans between 1918 and 2016. We demonstrate, for the first time, that sequence-based antigenic distances of H1N1 Influenza viruses can be accurately represented in 2-dimenstional antigenic cartography using classic multidimensional scaling. Additionally, the model correctly predicted decreases in cross-reactive antibody levels with 87% accuracy and was highly reproducible with even when small numbers of sequences were used. This work provides a highly accurate and precise bioinformatics tool that can be used to assess immune risk as well as design optimized vaccination strategies. SBM accurately estimated the antigenic relationship between strains using HA sequence data. Antigenic maps of H1N1 virus strains reveal

  3. Purification of nonlipopolysaccharide antigen from Brucella abortus during preparation of antigen used for indirect hemolysis test.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffmann, E M; Houle, J J

    1986-01-01

    The indirect hemolysis test (IHLT) for the diagnosis of brucellosis uses a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antigen obtained by dimethyl sulfoxide extraction of Brucella abortus. We showed that a non-LPS antigen can be obtained as a by-product of the IHLT antigen preparation. The antigen was purified to homogeneity by a combination of gel-filtration chromatography and ion-exchange chromatography. The substance contained 8% protein and about 65% carbohydrate. The molecular weight of the primary unit w...

  4. Combination of cancer antigen 125 and carcinoembryonic antigen can improve ovarian cancer diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Sofie Sølvsten; Mosgaard, Berit Jul

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the ability of the tumour marker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in combination with cancer antigen 125 (CA-125) to differentiate between malignant ovarian and malignant non-ovarian disease.......The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the ability of the tumour marker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in combination with cancer antigen 125 (CA-125) to differentiate between malignant ovarian and malignant non-ovarian disease....

  5. Embryo aggregation does not improve the development of interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos in the horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambini, Andrés; De Stéfano, Adrián; Jarazo, Javier; Buemo, Carla; Karlanian, Florencia; Salamone, Daniel Felipe

    2016-09-01

    The low efficiency of interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) makes it necessary to investigate new strategies to improve embryonic developmental competence. Embryo aggregation has been successfully applied to improve cloning efficiency in mammals, but it remains unclear whether it could also be beneficial for iSCNT. In this study, we first compared the effect of embryo aggregation over in vitro development and blastocyst quality of porcine, bovine, and feline zona-free (ZF) parthenogenetic (PA) embryos to test the effects of embryo aggregation on species that were later used as enucleated oocytes donors in our iSCNT study. We then assessed whether embryo aggregation could improve the in vitro development of ZF equine iSCNT embryos after reconstruction with porcine, bovine, and feline ooplasm. Bovine- and porcine-aggregated PA blastocysts had significantly larger diameters compared with nonaggregated embryos. On the other hand, feline- and bovine-aggregated PA embryos had higher blastocyst cell number. Embryo aggregation of equine-equine SCNT was found to be beneficial for embryo development as we have previously reported, but the aggregation of three ZF reconstructed embryos did not improve embryo developmental rates on iSCNT. In vitro embryo development of nonaggregated iSCNT was predominantly arrested around the stage when transcriptional activation of the embryonic genome is reported to start on the embryo of the donor species. Nevertheless, independent of embryo aggregation, equine blastocyst-like structures could be obtained in our study using domestic feline-enucleated oocytes. Taken together, these results reported that embryo aggregation enhance in vitro PA embryo development and embryo quality but effects vary depending on the species. Embryo aggregation also improves, as expected, the in vitro embryo development of equine-equine SCNT embryos; however, we did not observe positive effects on equine iSCNT embryo development. Among oocytes

  6. A computational framework for influenza antigenic cartography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2010-10-07

    Influenza viruses have been responsible for large losses of lives around the world and continue to present a great public health challenge. Antigenic characterization based on hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay is one of the routine procedures for influenza vaccine strain selection. However, HI assay is only a crude experiment reflecting the antigenic correlations among testing antigens (viruses) and reference antisera (antibodies). Moreover, antigenic characterization is usually based on more than one HI dataset. The combination of multiple datasets results in an incomplete HI matrix with many unobserved entries. This paper proposes a new computational framework for constructing an influenza antigenic cartography from this incomplete matrix, which we refer to as Matrix Completion-Multidimensional Scaling (MC-MDS). In this approach, we first reconstruct the HI matrices with viruses and antibodies using low-rank matrix completion, and then generate the two-dimensional antigenic cartography using multidimensional scaling. Moreover, for influenza HI tables with herd immunity effect (such as those from Human influenza viruses), we propose a temporal model to reduce the inherent temporal bias of HI tables caused by herd immunity. By applying our method in HI datasets containing H3N2 influenza A viruses isolated from 1968 to 2003, we identified eleven clusters of antigenic variants, representing all major antigenic drift events in these 36 years. Our results showed that both the completed HI matrix and the antigenic cartography obtained via MC-MDS are useful in identifying influenza antigenic variants and thus can be used to facilitate influenza vaccine strain selection. The webserver is available at http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap.

  7. Suicide Gene Therapy to Increase the Safety of Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Redirected T Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Casucci, Attilio Bondanza

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs are generated by fusing the antigen-binding motif of a monoclonal antibody (mAb with the signal transduction machinery of the T-cell receptor (TCR. The genetic modification of T lymphocytes with chimeric receptors specific for tumor-associated antigens (TAAs allows for the redirection towards tumor cells. Clinical experience with CAR-redirected T cells suggests that antitumor efficacy associates with some degree of toxicity, especially when TAA expression is shared with healthy tissues. This situation closely resembles the case of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT, wherein allorecognition causes both the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL effect and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD. Suicide gene therapy, i.e. the genetic induction of a conditional suicide phenotype into donor T cells, enables dissociating the GVL effect from GVHD. Applying suicide gene modification to CAR-redirected T cells may therefore greatly increase their safety profile and facilitate their clinical development.

  8. Not so simple, not so subtle: the interspecies competition between Bacillus simplex and Bacillus subtilis and its impact on the evolution of biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Gili; Steinberg, Nitai; Oppenheimer-Shaanan, Yaara; Olender, Tsvia; Doron, Shany; Ben-Ari, Julius; Sirota-Madi, Alexandra; Bloom-Ackermann, Zohar; Kolodkin-Gal, Ilana

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis biofilms have a fundamental role in shaping the soil ecosystem. During this process, they unavoidably interact with neighbour bacterial species. We studied the interspecies interactions between biofilms of the soil-residing bacteria B. subtilis and related Bacillus species. We found that proximity between the biofilms triggered recruitment of motile B. subtilis cells, which engulfed the competing Bacillus simplex colony. Upon interaction, B. subtilis secreted surfactin and cannibalism toxins, at concentrations that were inert to B. subtilis itself, which eliminated the B. simplex colony, as well as colonies of Bacillus toyonensis. Surfactin toxicity was correlated with the presence of short carbon-tail length isomers, and synergistic with the cannibalism toxins. Importantly, during biofilm development and interspecies interactions a subpopulation in B. subtilis biofilm lost its native plasmid, leading to increased virulence against the competing Bacillus species. Overall, these findings indicate that genetic programs and traits that have little effect on biofilm development when each species is grown in isolation have a dramatic impact when different bacterial species interact. PMID:28721238

  9. Effect of inter-species selective interactions on the thermodynamics and nucleation free-energy barriers of a tessellating polyhedral compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobedo, Fernando A.

    2016-01-01

    The phase behavior and the homogeneous nucleation of an equimolar mixture of octahedra and cuboctahedra are studied using thermodynamic integration, Gibbs-Duhem integration, and umbrella sampling simulations. The components of this mixture are modeled as polybead objects of equal edge lengths so that they can assemble into a space-filling compound with the CsCl crystal structure. Taking as reference the hard-core system where the compound crystal does not spontaneously nucleate, we quantified the effect of inter-species selective interactions on facilitating the disorder-to-order transition. Facet selective and facet non-selective inter-species attractions were considered, and while the former was expectedly more favorable toward the target tessellating structure, the latter was found to be similarly effective in nucleating the crystal compound. Ranges for the strength of attractions and degree of supersaturation were identified where the nucleation free-energy barrier was small enough to foretell a fast process but large enough to prevent spinodal fluctuations that can trap the system in dense metastable states lacking long-range order. At those favorable conditions, the tendency toward the local orientational order favored by packing entropy is amplified and found to play a key role seeding nuclei with the CsCl structure.

  10. Diagnostic Values of Carcinoembryonic Antigen, Cancer Antigen 15-3 and Cancer Antigen 125 Levels in Nipple Discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Song; Gai, Xiaodong; Wang, Yongmei; Liang, Weili; Gao, Haidong; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Huimin; Liu, Yanhong; Wang, Jianli; Ma, Rong

    2015-12-31

    An expedient and cost-effective diagnostic tool is needed to complement galactography and exfoliative cytology for detection of benign or malignant breast diseases with nipple discharge. The aim of this prospective study is to explore the utility of carcinoembryonic antigen, cancer antigen 15-3 and cancer antigen 125 levels in nipple discharge for the diagnosis of various breast diseases. We evaluated the pre-operative tumor marker levels in 153 nipple discharge samples collected from one or both breasts of 142 women undergoing surgery. Patients with nipple discharge underwent auxiliary examination (ultrasonography, exfoliative cytology, ductoscopy and galactography). Statistically higher levels of carcinoembryonic antigen and cancer antigen 15-3 were found in patients in the malignant group as compared to those in the benign group. No statistically significant difference in the level of cancer antigen 125 (P = 0.895). Sensitivities of carcinoembryonic antigen and cancer antigen 15-3 for diagnosing breast cancer were 74.42% and 58.14%, and specificities were 87.27% and 80.00% where as the cutoff values with max-sum of sensitivity and specificity were 224.3 ng/ml and 1368.2 U/ml, respectively. The following sensitivities for telling malignant from benign could be determined: exfoliative cytology 46.67%, ultrasonography 76.74%, galactography 75.00%, and ductoscopy 0%. Exfoliative cytology was found to be a valuable alternative method for differentiating benign from malignancy. Thus, tumor marker analysis of nipple discharge fluid for carcinoembryonic antigen and cancer antigen 15-3 would enhance the accurate assessment and treatment planning for patients with nipple discharge.

  11. On Converting Secret Sharing Scheme to Visual Secret Sharing Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Daoshun

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Traditional Secret Sharing (SS schemes reconstruct secret exactly the same as the original one but involve complex computation. Visual Secret Sharing (VSS schemes decode the secret without computation, but each share is m times as big as the original and the quality of the reconstructed secret image is reduced. Probabilistic visual secret sharing (Prob.VSS schemes for a binary image use only one subpixel to share the secret image; however the probability of white pixels in a white area is higher than that in a black area in the reconstructed secret image. SS schemes, VSS schemes, and Prob. VSS schemes have various construction methods and advantages. This paper first presents an approach to convert (transform a -SS scheme to a -VSS scheme for greyscale images. The generation of the shadow images (shares is based on Boolean XOR operation. The secret image can be reconstructed directly by performing Boolean OR operation, as in most conventional VSS schemes. Its pixel expansion is significantly smaller than that of VSS schemes. The quality of the reconstructed images, measured by average contrast, is the same as VSS schemes. Then a novel matrix-concatenation approach is used to extend the greyscale -SS scheme to a more general case of greyscale -VSS scheme.

  12. Monoclonal antibodies against rat leukocyte surface antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, T. K.; Puklavec, M. J.; Barclay, A. N.; Dijkstra, C. D.

    2001-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have proven to be powerful tools for studying the properties of leukocyte surface antigens and the cells that express them. In the past decades many monoclonal antibodies (mAb) for identifying the different rat leukocyte surface antigens have been described. A list of mAb is

  13. Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... antigen level New England Journal of Medicine 2004;350(22):2239-2246. [PubMed Abstract] Barry ... antigen testing for early diagnosis of prostate cancer. New England Journal of Medicine 2001;344(18):1373-1377. [PubMed Abstract] Pinsky ...

  14. Evaluation of an Antigen-Antibody

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    1. ABSTRACT. BACKGROUND: Development of “combination” assays detecting in parallel, within a single test,. Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) antigens and antibodies, not ... considered above threshold of detection for antigen proteins suggested a lack of sensitivity by this assay ..... Hepatic veno-occlusive disease (sinusoidal.

  15. Virosomes for antigen and DNA delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daemen, T; de Mare, A; Bungener, L; de Jonge, J; Huckriede, A; Wilschut, J

    2005-01-01

    Specific targeting and delivery as well as the display of antigens on the surface of professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are key issues in the design and development of new-generation vaccines aimed at the induction of both humoral and cell-mediated immunity. Prophylactic vaccination

  16. Vaccination and antigenic drift in influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boni, Maciej F

    2008-07-18

    The relationship between influenza antigenic drift and vaccination lies at the intersection of evolutionary biology and public health, and it must be viewed and analyzed in both contexts simultaneously. In this paper, 1 review what is known about the effects of antigenic drift on vaccination and the effects of vaccination on antigenic drift, and I suggest some simple ways to detect the presence of antigenic drift in seasonal influenza data. If antigenic drift occurs on the time scale of a single influenza season, it may be associated with the presence of herd immunity at the beginning of the season and may indicate a need to monitor for vaccine updates at the end of the season. The relationship between antigenic drift and vaccination must also be viewed in the context of the global circulation of influenza strains and the seeding of local and regional epidemics. In the data sets I consider--from New Zealand, New York, and France--antigenic drift can be statistically detected during some seasons, and seeding of epidemics appears to be endogenous sometimes and exogenous at other times. Improved detection of short-term antigenic drift and epidemic seeding would significantly benefit influenza monitoring efforts and vaccine selection.

  17. Antigenic Cross-reactivity among Haemonchus contortus, Oesophagostomum columbianum and Trichuris ovis of Goat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruma JAS

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cross antigenicity is the major problem in developing a reliable tool for immunodiagnosis and immunoprophylaxis of parasitic diseases. Mixed infection due to different types of gastrointestinal parasites is more common than single species infection under field condition.Methods: The present study was undertaken to detect antigenic cross-reactivity among Haemonchus contortus, Oesophagostomum columbianum and Trichuris ovis of goats by SDS-PAGE and western blot analysis using hyperimmune sera (HIS rose in rabbit separately against the antigens of the three nematode species.Results: Thirteen, 16 and 14 polypeptides in crude somatic antigen (CSAg of H. contortus (CSAg-Hc, O. columbianum (CSAg-Oc and T. ovis (CSAg-To, respectively, were resolved in SDS PAGE analyses. It was revealed that 54 kDa peptide was shared by H.contortus and O. columbianum, whereas 47 kDa peptide was shared by O. columbianum and T. ovis. Western blot analyses revealed that three immunogenic polypeptides (MW 54, 49 and 42 kDa in CSAg-Hc, five in CSAg-Oc (54, 47, 44, 38 and 35.5 kDa and CSAg-To and five polypeptides (90, 51, 47, 39.5 and 31 kDa in CSAg-To cross-reacted with the heterologous HIS. Four species-specific immunoreactive polypeptides (92, 85, 65 and 39 kDa of H. contortus and two (72 & 26 kDa in O. columbianum were also identified in the study. Conclusion: The shared polypeptides and species-specific polypeptides might be evaluated as protective antigen and subsequently exploitation for developing immunodiagnostic and for immunoprophylactic tools of for these common nematode species. 

  18. Protein antigen delivery by gene gun-mediated epidermal antigen incorporation (EAI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiblhofer, Sandra; Ritter, Uwe; Thalhamer, Josef; Weiss, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The gene gun technology can not only be employed for efficient transfer of gene vaccines into upper layers of the skin, but also for application of protein antigens. As a tissue rich in professional antigen presenting cells, the skin represents an attractive target for immunizations. In this chapter we present a method for delivery of the model antigen ovalbumin into the skin of mice termed epidermal antigen incorporation and describe in detail how antigen-specific proliferation in draining lymph nodes can be followed by flow cytometry.

  19. Cytotoxic T cells in chronic idiopathic neutropenia express restricted antigen receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrodemou, Semeli; Stalika, Evangelia; Vardi, Anna; Gemenetzi, Katerina; Spanoudakis, Michalis; Karypidou, Maria; Mavroudi, Irene; Hadzidimitriou, Anastasia; Stavropoulos-Giokas, Catherine; Papadaki, Helen A; Stamatopoulos, Kostas

    2017-12-01

    Chronic idiopathic neutropenia (CIN) is an acquired disorder of granulopoiesis characterized by female predominance and mostly uncomplicated course. Crucial to CIN pathophysiology is the presence of activated T lymphocytes with myelosuppressive properties in both peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM). We systematically profiled the T cell receptor beta chain (TRB) gene repertoire in CD8 + cells of 34 CIN patients through subcloning/Sanger sequencing analysis of TRBV-TRBD-TRBJ gene rearrangements. Remarkable repertoire skewing and oligoclonality were observed, along with shared clonotypes between different patients, alluding to antigen selection. Cross-comparison of our sequence dataset with public TRB sequence databases revealed that CIN may rarely share common immunogenetic features with other entities, however, the CIN TRB repertoire is largely disease-biased. Overall, these findings suggest that CIN may be driven by long-term exposure to a restricted set of specific CIN-associated antigens.

  20. Los espacios compartidos ("Shared Space"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateus Porto Schettino

    2008-07-01

    The "Shared Space" concept was formally defined when the European Project with this title took place, as part of the Interreg IIIB, North Sea Program. "Shared Space" initiated at 2004 and it's time as a project partly financed by the European Union finish at 2008, after having promoted seven "pilot projects" at Germany, Belgium, Denmark, Holland and England. Nevertheless, Shared Space, it's just a new name for a technique with decades of history, developed fundamentally in Holland and which implemented new criteria for traffic regulation and public space design, were based on all traffic signs elimination and on the spatial integration of all different street users. To analyze Shared Space's projects construction and operation experience, and evaluate their possible application in some Spanish city centres is this paper main objective.

  1. Medicaid Disproportionate Share Hospital Payments

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Medicaid Disproportionate Share Hospital (DSH) Payments This link provides you with information about Medicaid DSH Payments. You can find information on DSH Audit...

  2. Share capitalism and worker wellbeing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryson, Alex; Clark, Andrew E; Freeman, Richard B; Green, Colin P

    2016-10-01

    We show that worker wellbeing is determined not only by the amount of compensation workers receive but also by how compensation is determined. While previous theoretical and empirical work has often been preoccupied with individual performance-related pay, we find that the receipt of a range of group-performance schemes (profit shares, group bonuses and share ownership) is associated with higher job satisfaction. This holds conditional on wage levels, so that pay methods are associated with greater job satisfaction in addition to that coming from higher wages. We use a variety of methods to control for unobserved individual and job-specific characteristics. We suggest that half of the share-capitalism effect is accounted for by employees reciprocating for the "gift"; we also show that share capitalism helps dampen the negative wellbeing effects of what we typically think of as "bad" aspects of job quality.

  3. Network node for peripheral sharing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobbitt, J.; Johnson, M.

    1977-01-01

    A module which enables several independent computer systems to share the peripherals (graphics display and line printer) of a PDP-11 computer is described. The module requires no software support in the PDP-11

  4. Positive train control shared network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The Interoperable Train Control (ITC) Positive : Train Control (PTC) Shared Network (IPSN) : project investigated anticipated industry benefits : and the level of support for the development of : a hosted technological platform for PTC : messaging ac...

  5. Information Sharing and Environmental Policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikos Tsakiris

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Based on the assumption that in a standard eco-dumping model governments are uncertain about future product demand and allowing governments to obtain information from firms, we examine governments’ and firms’ incentives to share information. We show that when governments regulate polluting firms through emission standards, then governments and firms will reach an agreement concerning information sharing. The opposite holds when governments regulate pollution through emission taxes.

  6. Developing SharePoint applications

    OpenAIRE

    Rupnik, Gašper

    2011-01-01

    The thesis includes a research on SharePoint 2010 programming capabilities and a display of products created by this knowledge. The introduction part includes background information on how the topic was chosen and how the thesis was developed. The second chapter presents the SharePoint platform, which includes a description of its structure, function and usability. The third chapter focuses solely on the programming of the platform. First, some of the most useful software tools for i...

  7. Shared Year Exchange in Nursing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedsegaard, Helle Wendner; Wederkinck, Elisabeth

    2010-01-01

    Beskrivelse af Shared Year Exchange in Nursing, et udviklingsporjekt omhandlende udvikling, beskrivelse og implementering af et fælles studieår for sygeplejerskestuderende ved Metropol og La Trobe University Australien.......Beskrivelse af Shared Year Exchange in Nursing, et udviklingsporjekt omhandlende udvikling, beskrivelse og implementering af et fælles studieår for sygeplejerskestuderende ved Metropol og La Trobe University Australien....

  8. Genomic donor cassette sharing during VLRA and VLRC assembly in jawless vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sabyasachi; Li, Jianxu; Holland, Stephen J; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Hirano, Masayuki; Schorpp, Michael; Aravind, L; Cooper, Max D; Boehm, Thomas

    2014-10-14

    Lampreys possess two T-like lymphocyte lineages that express either variable lymphocyte receptor (VLR) A or VLRC antigen receptors. VLRA(+) and VLRC(+) lymphocytes share many similarities with the two principal T-cell lineages of jawed vertebrates expressing the αβ and γδ T-cell receptors (TCRs). During the assembly of VLR genes, several types of genomic cassettes are inserted, in step-wise fashion, into incomplete germ-line genes to generate the mature forms of antigen receptor genes. Unexpectedly, the structurally variable components of VLRA and VLRC receptors often possess partially identical sequences; this phenomenon of module sharing between these two VLR isotypes occurs in both lampreys and hagfishes. By contrast, VLRA and VLRC molecules typically do not share their building blocks with the structurally analogous VLRB receptors that are expressed by B-like lymphocytes. Our studies reveal that VLRA and VLRC germ-line genes are situated in close proximity to each other in the lamprey genome and indicate the interspersed arrangement of isotype-specific and shared genomic donor cassettes; these features may facilitate the shared cassette use. The genomic structure of the VLRA/VLRC locus in lampreys is reminiscent of the interspersed nature of the TCRA/TCRD locus in jawed vertebrates that also allows the sharing of some variable gene segments during the recombinatorial assembly of TCR genes.

  9. Study of the antigenic cross reactivity between carcinoembryonic antigen and "nonspecific cross reacting antigens" (NCA and NCA 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neveu, T.; Staebler, D.; Chavanel, G.; Burtin, P.

    1975-01-01

    The immunochemical relationship between CEA, NCA and NCA 2 was studied in guinea-pigs. Strong cross reactions were found between these antigens, either in delayed or anaphylactic reactions. Some specific determinants for each antigen could still be demonstrated. Delayed hypersensitivity is likely to be due to the protein moiety of the molecules while anaphylactic reactivity could probably be related to their glucidic parts. Consequently, CEA and NCA have common antigenic determinants on their glucidic and peptidic moieties, perhaps more on the latter ones. PMID:50854

  10. Antigenic variation: Molecular and genetic mechanisms of relapsing disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruse, J.M.; Lewis, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. They are: Contemporary Concepts of Antigenic Variation; Antigenic Variation in the Influenza Viruses; Mechanisms of Escape of Visna Lentiviruses from Immunological Control; A Review of Antigenic Variation by the Equine Infectious Anemia Virus; Biologic and Molecular Variations in AIDS Retrovirus Isolates; Rabies Virus Infection: Genetic Mutations and the Impact on Viral Pathogenicity and Immunity; Immunobiology of Relapsing Fever; Antigenic Variation in African Trypanosomes; Antigenic Variation and Antigenic Diversity in Malaria; and Mechanisms of Immune Evasion in Schistosomiasis.

  11. 12 CFR 701.35 - Share, share draft, and share certificate accounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., and share certificate accounts in all advertising, disclosures, or agreements, whether written or oral..., other federal law, and its contractual obligations, determine the types of fees or charges and other...

  12. Display Sharing: An Alternative Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    The current Johnson Space Center (JSC) Mission Control Center (MCC) Video Transport System (VTS) provides flight controllers and management the ability to meld raw video from various sources with telemetry to improve situational awareness. However, maintaining a separate infrastructure for video delivery and integration of video content with data adds significant complexity and cost to the system. When considering alternative architectures for a VTS, the current system's ability to share specific computer displays in their entirety to other locations, such as large projector systems, flight control rooms, and back supporting rooms throughout the facilities and centers must be incorporated into any new architecture. Internet Protocol (IP)-based systems also support video delivery and integration. IP-based systems generally have an advantage in terms of cost and maintainability. Although IP-based systems are versatile, the task of sharing a computer display from one workstation to another can be time consuming for an end-user and inconvenient to administer at a system level. The objective of this paper is to present a prototype display sharing enterprise solution. Display sharing is a system which delivers image sharing across the LAN while simultaneously managing bandwidth, supporting encryption, enabling recovery and resynchronization following a loss of signal, and, minimizing latency. Additional critical elements will include image scaling support, multi -sharing, ease of initial integration and configuration, integration with desktop window managers, collaboration tools, host and recipient controls. This goal of this paper is to summarize the various elements of an IP-based display sharing system that can be used in today's control center environment.

  13. Pharmacological characterization of the bradykinin B2 receptor: inter-species variability and dissociation between binding and functional responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquet, J L; Luccarini, J M; Fouchet, C; Defrêne, E; Loillier, B; Robert, C; Bélichard, P; Cremers, B; Pruneau, D

    1999-03-01

    and native bradykinin B2 receptor in human (pKi of 8.66 and 8.59, respectively) and in rat (pKi 9.67 and 9.81, respectively). 6. In conclusion, we suggest that the binding buffer composition has to be taken into account when screening new compounds and that inter-species differences should be considered when setting up animal models with the aim of developing bradykinin B2 receptor antagonists as therapeutic agents.

  14. Share Opportunity Sets and Cooperative Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caprari, E.; Patrone, F.; Pusillo, L.; Tijs, S.H.; Torre, A.

    2006-01-01

    In many share problems there is a priori given a natural set of possible divisions to solve the sharing problem.Cooperative games related to such share sets are introduced, which may be helpful in solving share problems.Relations between properties of share sets and properties of games are

  15. The analysis of chromatin remodeling and the staining for DNA methylation and histone acetylation do not provide definitive indicators of the developmental ability of inter-species cloned embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eugine; Kim, Ji Hye; Park, Seon Mi; Jeong, Yeon Ik; Lee, Jong Yun; Park, Sun Woo; Choi, Jiho; Kim, Huen Suk; Jeong, Yeon Woo; Kim, Sue; Hyun, Sang Hwan; Hwang, Woo Suk

    2008-05-01

    The restricted supply of oocytes in the domestic dog limits the development of reproductive biotechnologies in this species. Inter-species somatic cell nuclear transfer could be an alternative for cloning animals whose oocytes are difficult to obtain. In this study, the possibility of cloning dog embryos using pig oocytes was investigated by evaluating nuclear remodeling. Chromatin remodeling, assessed by premature chromosome condensation, pseudo-pronuclei formation, DNA methylation and histone acetylation, along with the developmental ability was compared between intra- and inter-species cloned embryos. The incidence of premature chromosome condensation was significantly higher in intra-species cloned embryos relative to inter-species cloned embryos (87.2% vs. 61.7%; Pcloned embryos developed beyond the 8-cell stage while 18.3% of intra-species cloned embryos developed to the blastocyst stage. The relative level of both DNA methylation and histone acetylation was similar between intra- and inter-species cloned embryos at all times examined. These results suggest that although partial chromatin remodeling occurs, further investigation is needed to be able to use pig oocytes as recipient oocytes in dog cloning.

  16. Conserved host-pathogen PPIs. Globally conserved inter-species bacterial PPIs based conserved host-pathogen interactome derived novel target in C. pseudotuberculosis, C. diphtheriae, M. tuberculosis, C. ulcerans, Y. pestis, and E. coli targeted by Piper betel compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barh, Debmalya; Gupta, Krishnakant; Jain, Neha

    2013-01-01

    -species bacterial PPI using conserved proteins in multiple pathogens (Y. pestis, M. tuberculosis, C. diphtheriae, C. ulcerans, E. coli, and all four Cp strains) and E. Coli based experimentally validated PPI data. Furthermore, the interacting proteins in the common conserved inter-species bacterial PPI were used...

  17. Posttransplant chimeric antigen receptor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Melody; Zakrzewski, Johannes; James, Scott; Sadelain, Michel

    2018-03-08

    Therapeutic T-cell engineering is emerging as a powerful approach to treat refractory hematological malignancies. Its most successful embodiment to date is based on the use of second-generation chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) targeting CD19, a cell surface molecule found in most B-cell leukemias and lymphomas. Remarkable complete remissions have been obtained with autologous T cells expressing CD19 CARs in patients with relapsed, chemo-refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Allogeneic CAR T cells may also be harnessed to treat relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. However, the use of donor T cells poses unique challenges owing to potential alloreactivity. We review different approaches to mitigate the risk of causing or aggravating graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), including CAR therapies based on donor leukocyte infusion, virus-specific T cells, T-cell receptor-deficient T cells, lymphoid progenitor cells, and regulatory T cells. Advances in CAR design, T-cell selection and gene editing are poised to enable the safe use of allogeneic CAR T cells without incurring GVHD. © 2018 by The American Society of Hematology.

  18. Demonstration of Antigenic Identity Between Purified Equine Infectious Anemia Virus and an Antigen Extracted from Infected Horse Spleen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hideo; Norcross, Neil L.; Coggins, Leroy

    1972-01-01

    Antigenic relationship between purified equine infectious anemia (EIA) virus and spleen-derived antigen from EIA-infected horses was examined by immunodiffusion. Identical antigenicity of these two antigens has been proven because precipitation lines formed between the two antigens and EIA antiserum connected with each other. The results indicate that the antigenic substance derived from infected spleen is a component of EIA virus. Images PMID:4629262

  19. Identification and utilization of inter-species conserved (ISC probesets on Affymetrix human GeneChip® platforms for the optimization of the assessment of expression patterns in non human primate (NHP samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnold Alma

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While researchers have utilized versions of the Affymetrix human GeneChip® for the assessment of expression patterns in non human primate (NHP samples, there has been no comprehensive sequence analysis study undertaken to demonstrate that the probe sequences designed to detect human transcripts are reliably hybridizing with their orthologs in NHP. By aligning probe sequences with expressed sequence tags (ESTs in NHP, inter-species conserved (ISC probesets, which have two or more probes complementary to ESTs in NHP, were identified on human GeneChip® platforms. The utility of human GeneChips® for the assessment of NHP expression patterns can be effectively evaluated by analyzing the hybridization behaviour of ISC probesets. Appropriate normalization methods were identified that further improve the reliability of human GeneChips® for interspecies (human vs NHP comparisons. Results ISC probesets in each of the seven Affymetrix GeneChip® platforms (U133Plus2.0, U133A, U133B, U95Av2, U95B, Focus and HuGeneFL were identified for both monkey and chimpanzee. Expression data was generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs of 12 human and 8 monkey (Indian origin Rhesus macaque samples using the Focus GeneChip®. Analysis of both qualitative detection calls and quantitative signal intensities showed that intra-species reproducibility (human vs. human or monkey vs. monkey was much higher than interspecies reproducibility (human vs. monkey. ISC probesets exhibited higher interspecies reproducibility than the overall expressed probesets. Importantly, appropriate normalization methods could be leveraged to greatly improve interspecies correlations. The correlation coefficients between human (average of 12 samples and monkey (average of 8 Rhesus macaque samples are 0.725, 0.821 and 0.893 for MAS5.0 (Microarray Suite version 5.0, dChip and RMA (Robust Multi-chip Average normalization method, respectively. Conclusion It is

  20. Indirect haemagglutination reaction with Sarcocystis dispersa antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerva, L; Cerná, Z

    1982-01-01

    A description is given of the preparation of antigen from Sarcocystis dispersa cystozoites and the procedure of the indirect haemagglutination test (IHA). The antibodies against this antigen were detected in experimentally infected mice from day 20 p.i. (1: 640). In the following weeks the antibody titres reached the value of 1: 40,960. The sera of pigs, sheep and horses spontaneously infected with other Sarcocystis species reacted with this antigen in low titres only. The bovine sera gave negative reactions even in cases when Sarcocystis cysts were present in the muscles of the examined animals. A possible application of IHA for the research and diagnostic purposes is discussed.

  1. Akuisisi dan Budaya Knowledge Sharing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuril Kusumawardhani Soeprapto Putri

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Large companies which are experiencing barriers in innovation often take a radical step to acquire knowledge, namely acquisition. Though innovation is not the only reason, acquisition will result in the company wishes to achieve competitive advantage affected by the creation of ideas, creativity and innovation. The three points can be achieved more easily when the knowledge sharing within the organization / company runs well. However, the acquisition maybe impacts as a counter-attack for the knowledge sharing culture both in the acquisitor and and company which obtains the acquisition. Therefore, a key to succeed the acquisition is a sharing culture among individuals within a company that runs well or even better. Individuals from the acquisitor and those of the company that obtains the acquisition can adapt to each other and have confidence in order not to hinder them to share knowledge. This study discusses in detail the potential impacts of an acquisition upon a knowledge sharing culture in a company. 

  2. How to Create Shared Symbols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Nicolas; Walker, Bradley; Swoboda, Nik; Garrod, Simon

    2018-02-19

    Human cognition and behavior are dominated by symbol use. This paper examines the social learning strategies that give rise to symbolic communication. Experiment 1 contrasts an individual-level account, based on observational learning and cognitive bias, with an inter-individual account, based on social coordinative learning. Participants played a referential communication game in which they tried to communicate a range of recurring meanings to a partner by drawing, but without using their conventional language. Individual-level learning, via observation and cognitive bias, was sufficient to produce signs that became increasingly effective, efficient, and shared over games. However, breaking a referential precedent eliminated these benefits. The most effective, most efficient, and most shared signs arose when participants could directly interact with their partner, indicating that social coordinative learning is important to the creation of shared symbols. Experiment 2 investigated the contribution of two distinct aspects of social interaction: behavior alignment and concurrent partner feedback. Each played a complementary role in the creation of shared symbols: Behavior alignment primarily drove communication effectiveness, and partner feedback primarily drove the efficiency of the evolved signs. In conclusion, inter-individual social coordinative learning is important to the evolution of effective, efficient, and shared symbols. Copyright © 2018 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  3. Knowledge Sharing is Knowledge Creation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge sharing and knowledge transfer are important to knowledge communication. However when groups of knowledge workers engage in knowledge communication activities, it easily turns into mere mechanical information processing despite other ambitions. This article relates literature of knowledge...... communication and knowledge creation to an intervention study in a large Danish food production company. For some time a specific group of employees uttered a wish for knowledge sharing, but it never really happened. The group was observed and submitted to metaphor analysis as well as analysis of co......-creation strategies. Confronted with the results, the group completely altered their approach to knowledge sharing and let it become knowledge co-creation. The conclusions are, that knowledge is and can only be a diverse and differentiated concept, and that groups are able to embrace this complexity. Thus rather than...

  4. Availability Cascades & the Sharing Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Netter, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    In search of a new concept that will provide answers to as to how modern societies should not only make sense but also resolve the social and environmental problems linked with our modes of production and consumption, collaborative consumption and the sharing economy are increasingly attracting...... attention. This conceptual paper attempts to explain the emergent focus on the sharing economy and associated business and consumption models by applying cascade theory. Risks associated with this behavior will be especially examined with regard to the sustainability claim of collaborative consumption....... With academics, practitioners, and civil society alike having a shared history in being rather fast in accepting new concepts that will not only provide business opportunities but also a good conscience, this study proposes a critical study of the implications of collaborative consumption, before engaging...

  5. Shared Interests, Shared Costs: Student Contributions in Dutch Higher Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossensteyn, Johan J.

    Students now have to contribute more to the costs of higher education than in the past. The Netherlands provides an interesting example of the global trend towards 'cost sharing'. Tuition fees are going up; general subsidies to students have gone down and/or have been replaced by means-tested grants

  6. Availability Cascades & the Sharing Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Netter, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    attention. This conceptual paper attempts to explain the emergent focus on the sharing economy and associated business and consumption models by applying cascade theory. Risks associated with this behavior will be especially examined with regard to the sustainability claim of collaborative consumption....... With academics, practitioners, and civil society alike having a shared history in being rather fast in accepting new concepts that will not only provide business opportunities but also a good conscience, this study proposes a critical study of the implications of collaborative consumption, before engaging...

  7. Tissue polypeptide antigen activity in cerebrospinal fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, F; Söletormos, Georg; Dombernowsky, P

    1991-01-01

    Tissue polypeptide antigen (TPpA) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was measured in 59 consecutive breast cancer patients with suspected central nervous system (CNS) metastases. Subsequently, we determined that 13 patients had parenchymal brain metastases, 10 had leptomeningeal carcinomatosis...

  8. HLA antigens in three populations of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papiha, S S; Wentzel, J; Shah, K C; Roberts, D F

    1989-01-01

    In blood samples from a Hindu population of Uttar Pradesh (North India) and from two Muslim groups, one from Andhra Pradesh (South India) and the other from Gujurat (West India), frequencies of 38 HLA-A, -B and -C antigens were investigated. Eight antigens - A23, A25, A29, A32, Bw45, B21, Bw22 and Bw53 - were absent in the Hindu population, four different antigens - A29, Bw52, B14 and Bw42 - were absent in Hyderabad Muslims, two antigens - A31 and Bw45 - were lacking in Surat Muslims. The three populations showed considerable genetic heterogeneity. The genetic difference between the two Muslim groups was small, but the Hindu population showed pronounced differences from each of the Muslim groups.

  9. 9 CFR 113.407 - Pullorum antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... determined by a colorimetric method. (2) The phenol content for Pullorum Tube Antigen shall be 0.55 ±0.05 percent as determined by direct titration with a standardized bromide-bromate solution. (d) Sensitivity...

  10. Carcinoembryonic antigen in thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissel, M.; Hoefer, R.

    1982-01-01

    In order to investigate the usefulness of determining the serum concentrations of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as a specific tumor marker in thyroid cancer, CEA serum levels were measured (enzymeimmunoassay, Abbott-Kit) repeatedly at the routine followup checks performed at various intervals after total thyroidectomy, in 65 patients with papillary, 82 with follicular, 25 with mixed type (papillary/follicular), 8 with anaplastic, and in 18 patients with medullary thyroid cancer. The postoperative observation period of these patients ranged from 2 to 36 months. Calcitonin serum levels were additionally determined in patients with medullary carcinoma (radioimmunoassay kit of Immuno-Nuclear Corp.). In the family of one patient with medullary carcinoma we also had an opportunity to investigate, within the framework of family screening (pentagastrin tests, etc.), the value of preoperative CEA determination. In the patients with ''non-medullary'' histological types of thyroid cancer, the maximum CEA serum concentration was 9.8 ng/ml. 6% of the patients with papillary, 9% of the patients with follicular, and 8% of those with mixed type thyroid cancer had serum levels above the upper limit of our normal range (5 ng/ml). All patients with anaplastic carcinoma had values below 3 ng/ml. The values quoted represent maximal values and were confirmed at various follow-up checks. However, 1 year after thyroidectomy, a female patient with follicular thyroid carcinoma developed an adenocarcinoma of the rectum: The CEA levels measured in this patient were: 4.2 ng/ml 3 weeks after thyroidectomy, 8.4 ng/ml 6 months later, and 37 ng/ml 1 week before operation on the rectum. In none of the other patients with elevated CEA levels were metastases of thyroid cancer, or any other malignancy, detected. (orig.) [de

  11. Antigenic variation in vector-borne pathogens.

    OpenAIRE

    Barbour, A. G.; Restrepo, B. I.

    2000-01-01

    Several pathogens of humans and domestic animals depend on hematophagous arthropods to transmit them from one vertebrate reservoir host to another and maintain them in an environment. These pathogens use antigenic variation to prolong their circulation in the blood and thus increase the likelihood of transmission. By convergent evolution, bacterial and protozoal vector-borne pathogens have acquired similar genetic mechanisms for successful antigenic variation. Borrelia spp. and Anaplasma marg...

  12. The type-specific polysaccharide and the R protein antigens of the L-phase from a group B, type III Streptococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, A E; Ferrieri, P

    1985-04-01

    The type-specific polysaccharide and the R protein antigens from filtered culture supernatants of the bacterial phase and L-phase of the group B, type III streptococcal strain 76-043 were studied by several immunological methods. In the L-phase of growth, the two antigens were separate and distinct molecules which were found principally in the culture supernatant even on the 254th serial subculture in the cell-wall-defective state. Only trace amounts of these antigens were detected in extracts of L-phase cells. The type III polysaccharide antigens in the supernatant of cultures of the parent bacterium and the L-phase gave reactions of identity in immunodiffusion. Precipitin bands obtained by immunoelectrophoresis (IEP) revealed that the type-specific antigen of the bacterial phase of growth migrated toward the anode, whereas that of the L-phase remained near the antigen well. The R protein antigen in the L-phase supernatant was immunologically identical to the R protein of the supernatant and 1% trypsin-extracted antigens from whole cells of the parent bacterial strain, and other groups A, B and C streptococcal strains sharing a common R antigen. Immunologically, the R antigen appeared to be the species R4. The R protein of the L-phase and bacterial phase cultures was resistant to 5% trypsin but sensitive to 0.5% pepsin at 37 degrees C/2hr. Antiserum prepared in rabbits against L-phase cells contained an antibody reactive with the R protein antigens of the bacterial and L-phase cultures. The soluble, naturally released type III and R protein streptococcal antigens of the L-phase of growth permitted immunological confirmation of its bacterial origin.

  13. Integrating multiple vegetation indices via an artificial neural network model for estimating the leaf chlorophyll content of Spartina alterniflora under interspecies competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pudong; Shi, Runhe; Zhang, Chao; Zeng, Yuyan; Wang, Jiapeng; Tao, Zhu; Gao, Wei

    2017-10-31

    The invasive species Spartina alterniflora and native species Phragmites australis display a significant co-occurrence zonation pattern and this co-exist region exerts most competitive situations between these two species, competing for the limited space, directly influencing the co-exist distribution in the future. However, these two species have different growth ratios in this area, which increase the difficulty to detect the distribution situation directly by remote sensing. As chlorophyll content is a key indicator of plant growth and physiological status, the objective of this study was to reduce the effect of interspecies competition when estimating Cab content; we evaluated 79 published representative indices to determine the optimal indices for estimating the chlorophyll a and b (Cab) content. After performing a sensitivity analysis for all 79 spectral indices, five spectral indices were selected and integrated using an artificial neural network (ANN) to estimate the Cab content of different competition ratios: the Gitelson ratio green index, the transformed chlorophyll absorption ratio index/optimized soil-adjusted vegetation index, the modified normalized difference vegetation index, the chlorophyll fluorescence index, and the Vogelmann chlorophyll index. The ANN method yielded better results (R 2  = 0.7110 and RMSE = 8.3829 μg cm -2 ) on average than the best single spectral index (R 2  = 0.6319 and RMSE = 9.3535 μg cm -2 ), representing an increase of 10.78% in R 2 and a decrease of 10.38% in RMSE. Our results indicated that integrating multiple vegetation indices with an ANN can alleviate the impact of interspecies competition and achieve higher estimation accuracy than the traditional approach using a single index.

  14. Bridging the gap between the human and macaque connectome: a quantitative comparison of global interspecies structure-function relationships and network topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda-Dominguez, Oscar; Mills, Brian D; Grayson, David; Woodall, Andrew; Grant, Kathleen A; Kroenke, Christopher D; Fair, Damien A

    2014-04-16

    Resting state functional connectivity MRI (rs-fcMRI) may provide a powerful and noninvasive "bridge" for comparing brain function between patients and experimental animal models; however, the relationship between human and macaque rs-fcMRI remains poorly understood. Here, using a novel surface deformation process for species comparisons in the same anatomical space (Van Essen, 2004, 2005), we found high correspondence, but also unique hub topology, between human and macaque functional connectomes. The global functional connectivity match between species was moderate to strong (r = 0.41) and increased when considering the top 15% strongest connections (r = 0.54). Analysis of the match between functional connectivity and the underlying anatomical connectivity, derived from a previous retrograde tracer study done in macaques (Markov et al., 2012), showed impressive structure-function correspondence in both the macaque and human. When examining the strongest structural connections, we found a 70-80% match between structural and functional connectivity matrices in both species. Finally, we compare species on two widely used metrics for studying hub topology: degree and betweenness centrality. The data showed topological agreement across the species, with nodes of the posterior cingulate showing high degree and betweenness centrality. In contrast, nodes in medial frontal and parietal cortices were identified as having high degree and betweenness in the human as opposed to the macaque. Our results provide: (1) a thorough examination and validation for a surface-based interspecies deformation process, (2) a strong theoretical foundation for making interspecies comparisons of rs-fcMRI, and (3) a unique look at topological distinctions between the species.

  15. In Search of the E. coli Compounds that Change the Antibiotic Production Pattern of Streptomyces coelicolor During Inter-species Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavituna, Ferda; Luti, Khalid Jaber Kadhum; Gu, Lixing

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the interaction between E.coli and Streptomyces coelicolor A3 (2) for the increased production of undecylprodigiosin and identify the E. coli actives mediating this inter-species interaction. The antibiotics of interest were the red-pigmented undecylprodigiosin and blue-pigmented actinorhodin. Pure cultures of S. coelicolor in a defined medium produced higher concentrations of actinorhodin compared to those of undecylprodigiosin. The latter however, is more important due to its immunosuppressive and antitumor properties. As a strategy to increase undecylprodigiosin production, we added separately, live cells and heat-killed cells of E. coli C600, and the cell-free supernatant of E. coli culture to S. coelicolor cultures in shake flasks. The interaction with live cells of E. coli altered the antibiotic production pattern and undecylprodigiosin production was enhanced by 3.5-fold compared to the pure cultures of S. coelicolor and actinorhodin decreased by 15-fold. The heat-killed cells of E. coli however, had no effect on antibiotic production. In all cases, growth and glucose consumption of S. coelicolor remained almost the same as those observed in the pure culture indicating that the changes in antibiotic production were not due to nutritional stress. Results with cell-free supernatant of E. coli culture indicated that the interaction between S. coelicolor and E. coli was mediated via diffusible molecule(s). Using a set of extraction procedures and agar-well diffusion bioassays, we isolated and preliminarily identified a class of compounds. For the preliminary verification, we added the compound which was the common chemical structural moiety in this class of compounds to the pure S. coelicolor cultures. We observed similar effects on antibiotic production as with the live E. coli cells and their supernatant indicating that this class of compounds secreted by E. coli indeed could act as actives during interspecies

  16. Allosensibilisation to erythrocyte antigens (literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Mineeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article literature review of the causes of allosensibilisation to erythrocyte antigens are presented. It is shown that the ability to produce antierythrocyte antibodies is affected by many factors, principal of whom it is difficult to identify. For the allosensibilisation development requires genetically determined differences in erythrocyte antigens phenotypes of donor and recipient, mother and fetus, which can lead to immune response and antibodies production. The biochemical nature of erythrocyte antigens, antigen dose (the amount of transfused doses, the number of antigens determinants on donor and fetus erythrocytes, the number of pregnancies are important. Individual patient characteristics: age, gender, diseases, the use of immunosuppressive therapy and the presence of inflammatory processes, are also relevant. Note that antibody to one erythrocyte antigens have clinical value, and to the other – have no. The actual data about frequency of clinically significant antibodies contribute to the development of post-transfusion hemolytic complications prophylaxis as well as the improvement of laboratory diagnosis of hemolytic disease of the newborn in the presence of maternal antierythrocyte antibodies.

  17. The structure and significance of enterobacterial common antigen (ECA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Kasper Goździewicz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The enterobacterial common antigen (ECA is a carbohydrate-derived cell surface antigen present in all Gram-negative bacteria belonging to Enterobacteriaceae family. Biosynthetic pathways shared by ECA and LPS (endotoxin suggest close connections between these antigens. ECA occurs in three different forms: a phosphatidyl-linked linear polysaccharide anchored on the cell surface (ECAPG, a cyclic form built of 4-6 repeating units localized in the periplasm (ECACYC and as a linear polysaccharide covalently linked to LPS core oligosaccharide (ECALPS. Regardless of ECA form, poly- and oligosaccharides of ECA consist of the biological trisaccharide repeating units: →3-α-d-Fucp4NAc-(1→4-β-d-ManpNAcA-(1→4-α-d-GlcpNAc-(1→, where Fucp4NAc refers to 4-acetamido-2,4-dideoxygalactose, ManpNAcA to N-acetyl-mannosaminuronic acid and GlcpNAc to N-acetylglucosamine. ECAPG and ECALPS consisting of one unit with Fucp4NAc as a terminal sugar were also identified. The number of the studies shows its occurrence in all members of enteric bacteria with a few exceptions such as Erwinia chrysanthemi. The presence of ECA was also shown for such genera as Plesiomonas [4] and Yersinia [36], previously belonging to the Vibrionaceae and Pasteurellaceae families, respectively. It was one of the reasons to include these two taxa in the Enterobacteriaceae family. The function of ECA is not fully understood, but it was reported that its occurrence is important in resistance of bacterial cells to environmental conditions, such as bile salts in the human digestive tract. The immunogenicity of ECA seems very interesting in the fact that only sparse rough Gram-negative strains, such as Shigella sonnei phase II, Escherichia coli R1, R2, R4, K-12, and Yersinia enterocolitica O:3 are able to induce the production of specific anti-ECA antibodies. It is the effect of the ECALPS, and the evidence for the existence of such covalent linkage was provided by structural analysis of S

  18. Development of a double-antibody radioimmunoassay for detecting ovarian tumor-associated antigen fraction OCA in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knauf, S.; Urbach, G.I.

    1978-01-01

    Ovarian tumor-associated antigen isolated from human tumor tissue was shown to have a different mobility from that of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in both acrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoelectrophoresis in agarose. The ovarian tumor antigen is composed of six species with different electrophoretic mobility in acrylamide gel electrophoresis. Three of these species were detected in Sephadex G-100 ovarian fraction OCA (from the void volume peak) and the other three species of lower apparent molecular weight were detected in fraction OCD (from the second peak). Fractions OCA and OCD did not share common antigenic determinants as determined by immunodiffusion. CEA was shown to share antigenic determinants with both OCA and OCD. A double-antibody radioimmunoassay capable of detecting nanogram quantities of plasma OCA was developed. In a preliminary study of ovarian cancer patients, OCA appeared to be a more sensitive marker for ovarian cancer than CEA. There was virtually no correlation (r 2 = 0.1) between OCA and CEA levels in these patients, as determined by radioimmunoassay

  19. Shared breastfeeding in central Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramharter, Michael; Chai, Sanders K.; Adegnika, Ayola A.; Klöpfer, Anna; Längin, Matthias; Agnandji, Selidji T.; Oyakhirome, Sunny; Schwarz, Norbert G.; Grobusch, Martin P.; Issifou, Saadon; Kremsner, Peter G.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, shared breastfeeding is described asa novel risk factor for vertical HIV transmission. This cross-sectional survey conducted in the central African country Gabon found that 40% of lactating mothers also breastfed other children than their own, and as many children were additionally

  20. Knowledge sharing in knowledge communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooff, B. van den; Elving, W.; Meeuwsen, J.M.; Dumoulin, C.

    2003-01-01

    In this chapter of the book ‘Communities and Technologies’ (M. Huysman et al. (eds.), Kluwer 2003) the contribution of ICT to knowledge sharing in communities of practice is investigated. A theoretical model is built that identifies the possible influence of ICT on the extent to which knowledge is

  1. Scalable shared-memory multiprocessing

    CERN Document Server

    Lenoski, Daniel E

    1995-01-01

    Dr. Lenoski and Dr. Weber have experience with leading-edge research and practical issues involved in implementing large-scale parallel systems. They were key contributors to the architecture and design of the DASH multiprocessor. Currently, they are involved with commercializing scalable shared-memory technology.

  2. Knowledge sharing in diverse organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauring, Jakob; Selmer, Jan

    2012-01-01

    It has been argued that both strengths and weaknesses of diversity in organisations stem from the different demographic, national, linguistic, social and cultural backgrounds of their members. However, few attempts have been made to link different types of diversity to knowledge sharing despite t...... of these findings for the management of knowledge in intensive diverse organisations are discussed in detail....

  3. Information Sharing and International Taxation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keen, M.; Ligthart, J.E.

    2004-01-01

    The sharing between national tax authorities of taxpayer-specific information has emerged over the last few years as a-probably "the"-central issue in the formation of international tax policy.Yet this refocusing of the debate on international taxation-away from parametric tax coordination and

  4. GENERALIZED PROCESSOR SHARING (GPS) TECHNIQUES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Olumide

    popular technique, Generalized Processor Sharing (GPS), provided an effective and efficient utilization of the available resources at the face of stringent and varied QoS requirements. This paper, therefore, presents the comparison of two GPS techniques –. PGPS and CDGPS – based on performance with limited resources ...

  5. DOE/university reactor sharing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, H.H.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of the US Department of Energy's program of reactor sharing is to strengthen nuclear science and engineering instruction and nuclear research opportunities in non-reactor-owning colleges and universities. The benefits of the program and need for the continuation of the program in the future are discussed

  6. Car sharing à la carte

    CERN Document Server

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    Do you want to make your commute to CERN easier, while saving money at the same time? Would you prefer not to spend a quarter of an hour crawling round the CERN car parks looking for a space? If so, read on: this article might well be of great interest to you.   We would like to draw your attention to a well established, albeit sadly under-used, method of transport: car sharing. To promote car-sharing, the GS Department has stepped in to call on the services of the Swiss firm Green Monkeys which specialises in this user-friendly and intelligent transport scheme. The company’s slogan is:  “Car-sharing as you want, when you want and as much as you want”. The principle is very straightforward. To use this car-sharing facility, you simply complete your free online registration with Green Monkeys, providing the following details: your journey, departure time, arrival time and days of the week, and indicating whether you are a passenger or driver or both. &a...

  7. Shared reality in interpersonal relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Susan M; Przybylinski, Elizabeth

    2017-11-24

    Close relationships afford us opportunities to create and maintain meaning systems as shared perceptions of ourselves and the world. Establishing a sense of mutual understanding allows for creating and maintaining lasting social bonds, and as such, is important in human relations. In a related vein, it has long been known that knowledge of significant others in one's life is stored in memory and evoked with new persons-in the social-cognitive process of 'transference'-imbuing new encounters with significance and leading to predictable cognitive, evaluative, motivational, and behavioral consequences, as well as shifts in the self and self-regulation, depending on the particular significant other evoked. In these pages, we briefly review the literature on meaning as interpersonally defined and then selectively review research on transference in interpersonal perception. Based on this, we then highlight a recent series of studies focused on shared meaning systems in transference. The highlighted studies show that values and beliefs that develop in close relationships (as shared reality) are linked in memory to significant-other knowledge, and thus, are indirectly activated (made accessible) when cues in a new person implicitly activate that significant-other knowledge (in transference), with these shared beliefs then actively pursued with the new person and even protected against threat. This also confers a sense of mutual understanding, and all told, serves both relational and epistemic functions. In concluding, we consider as well the relevance of co-construction of shared reality n such processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. From shared data to sharing workflow: Merging PACS and teleradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benjamin, Menashe; Aradi, Yinon; Shreiber, Reuven

    2010-01-01

    Due to a host of technological, interface, operational and workflow limitations, teleradiology and PACS/RIS were historically developed as separate systems serving different purposes. PACS/RIS handled local radiology storage and workflow management while teleradiology addressed remote access to images. Today advanced PACS/RIS support complete site radiology workflow for attending physicians, whether on-site or remote. In parallel, teleradiology has emerged into a service of providing remote, off-hours, coverage for emergency radiology and to a lesser extent subspecialty reading to subscribing sites and radiology groups. When attending radiologists use teleradiology for remote access to a site, they may share all relevant patient data and participate in the site's workflow like their on-site peers. The operation gets cumbersome and time consuming when these radiologists serve multi-sites, each requiring a different remote access, or when the sites do not employ the same PACS/RIS/Reporting Systems and do not share the same ownership. The least efficient operation is of teleradiology companies engaged in reading for multiple facilities. As these services typically employ non-local radiologists, they are allowed to share some of the available patient data necessary to provide an emergency report but, by enlarge, they do not share the workflow of the sites they serve. Radiology stakeholders usually prefer to have their own radiologists perform all radiology tasks including interpretation of off-hour examinations. It is possible with current technology to create a system that combines the benefits of local radiology services to multiple sites with the advantages offered by adding subspecialty and off-hours emergency services through teleradiology. Such a system increases efficiency for the radiology groups by enabling all users, regardless of location, to work 'local' and fully participate in the workflow of every site. We refer to such a system as SuperPACS.

  9. Digital music and subculture: Sharing files, sharing styles

    OpenAIRE

    Ebare, Sean

    2004-01-01

    In this paper I propose a new approach for the study of online music sharing communities, drawing from popular music studies and cyberethnography. I describe how issues familiar to popular music scholars — identity and difference, subculture and genre hybridity, and the political economy of technology and music production and consumption — find homologues in the dynamics of online communication, centering around issues of anonymity and trust, identity experimentation, and online communication...

  10. Expression and Antigenic Evaluation of VacA Antigenic Fragment of Helicobacter Pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanzadeh, Leila; Ghaznavi-Rad, Ehsanollah; Soufian, Safieh; Farjadi, Vahideh; Abtahi, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s) : Helicobacter pylori, a human specific gastric pathogen is a causative agent of chronic active gastritis. The vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA) is an effective virulence factor involved in gastric injury. The aim of this study was to construct a recombinant protein containing antigenic region of VacA gene and determine its antigenicity. Materials and Methods: The antigenic region of VacA gene was detected by bioinformatics methods. The polymerase chain reaction method was used to amplify a highly antigenic region of VacA gene from chromosomal DNA of H. pylori. The eluted product was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pET32a. The target protein was expressed in the Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) pLysS. The bacteria including pET32a-VacA plasmids were induced by IPTG. The antigenicity was finally studied by western blotting using sera of 15 H. pylori infected patients after purification. Results: Enzyme digestion analysis, PCR and DNA sequencing results showed that the target gene was inserted correctly into the recombinant vector. The expressed protein was purified successfully via affinity chromatography. Data indicated that antigenic region of VacA protein from Helicobacter pylori was recognized by all 15 patient’s sera. Conclusion : Our data showed that antigenic region of VacA protein can be expressed by in E. co.li. This protein was recognized by sera patients suffering from H. pylori infection. the recombinant protein has similar epitopes and close antigenic properties to the natural form of this antigen. Recombinant antigenic region of VacA protein also seems to be a promising antigen for protective and serologic diagnosis . PMID:23997913

  11. Expression and Antigenic Evaluation of VacA Antigenic Fragment of Helicobacter Pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Hasanzadeh

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Helicobacter pylori, a human specific gastric pathogen is a causative agent of chronic active gastritis. The vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA is an effective virulence factor involved in gastric injury. The aim of this study was to construct a recombinant protein containing antigenic region of VacA gene and determine its antigenicity.   Materials and Methods: The antigenic region of VacA gene was detected by bioinformatics methods. The polymerase chain reaction method was used to amplify a highly antigenic region of VacA gene from chromosomal DNA of H. pylori. The eluted product was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pET32a. The target protein was expressed in the Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3 pLysS. The bacteria including pET32a-VacA plasmids were induced by IPTG. The antigenicity was finally studied by western blotting using sera of 15 H. pylori infected patients after purification. Results: Enzyme digestion analysis, PCR and DNA sequencing results showed that the target gene was inserted correctly into the recombinant vector. The expressed protein was purified successfully via affinity chromatography. Data indicated that antigenic region of VacA protein from Helicobacter pylori was recognized by all 15 patient’s sera. Conclusion : Our data showed that antigenic region of VacA protein can be expressed by in E. co.li. This protein was recognized by sera patients suffering from H. pylori infection. the recombinant protein has similar epitopes and close antigenic properties to the natural form of this antigen. Recombinant antigenic region of VacA protein also seems to be a promising antigen for protective and serologic diagnosis .

  12. To share or not to share? Business aspects of network sharing for Mobile Network Operators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkers, F.T.H.M.; Hendrix, G.; Chatzicharistou, I.; Haas, T. de; Hamera, D.

    2010-01-01

    Radio spectrum and network infrastructure are two essential resources for mobile service delivery, which are both costly and increasingly scarce. In this paper we consider drivers and barriers of network sharing, which is seen as a potential solution for scarcity in these resources. We considered a

  13. To share or not to share? Expected pros and cons of data sharing in radiological research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardanelli, Francesco; Alì, Marco; Hunink, Myriam G; Houssami, Nehmat; Sconfienza, Luca M; Di Leo, Giovanni

    2018-01-18

    The aims of this paper are to illustrate the trend towards data sharing, i.e. the regulated availability of the original patient-level data obtained during a study, and to discuss the expected advantages (pros) and disadvantages (cons) of data sharing in radiological research. Expected pros include the potential for verification of original results with alternative or supplementary analyses (including estimation of reproducibility), advancement of knowledge by providing new results by testing new hypotheses (not explored by the original authors) on pre-existing databases, larger scale analyses based on individual-patient data, enhanced multidisciplinary cooperation, reduced publication of false studies, improved clinical practice, and reduced cost and time for clinical research. Expected cons are outlined as the risk that the original authors could not exploit the entire potential of the data they obtained, possible failures in patients' privacy protection, technical barriers such as the lack of standard formats, and possible data misinterpretation. Finally, open issues regarding data ownership, the role of individual patients, advocacy groups and funding institutions in decision making about sharing of data and images are discussed. • Regulated availability of patient-level data of published clinical studies (data-sharing) is expected. • Expected benefits include verification/advancement of knowledge, reduced cost/time of research, clinical improvement. • Potential drawbacks include faults in patients' identity protection and data misinterpretation.

  14. Functional role of BK virus tumor antigens in transformation.

    OpenAIRE

    Nakshatri, H; Pater, M M; Pater, A

    1988-01-01

    We have examined the role of the human papovavirus BK virus (BKV) tumor (T) antigen(s) in the maintenance of transformation and have identified the domain of T antigen essential for transformation. BKV-transformed BHK 21 and NIH 3T3 cells expressing antisense T-antigen RNA lose their ability to grow in soft agar, indicating the need for the continued expression of T antigen for the maintenance of the transformed phenotype. Experiments using translation termination linker insertion and deletio...

  15. Professional SharePoint 2010 Development

    CERN Document Server

    Rizzo, Tom; Fried, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Learn to leverage the features of the newest version of SharePoint, in this update to the bestseller. More than simply a portal, SharePoint is Microsoft's popular content management solution for building intranets and Web sites or hosting wikis and blogs. Offering broad coverage on all aspects of development for the SharePoint platform, this comprehensive book shows you exactly what SharePoint does, how to build solutions, and what features are accessible within SharePoint. Written by one of the most recognized names in SharePoint development, Professional SharePoint 2010 Development offers an

  16. Professional SharePoint 2013 administration

    CERN Document Server

    Young, Shane; Klindt, Todd

    2013-01-01

    SharePoint admin author gurus return to prepare you for working with the new features of SharePoint 2013! The new iteration of SharePoint boasts exciting new features. However, any new version also comes with its fair share of challenges and that's where this book comes in. The team of SharePoint admin gurus returns to presents a fully updated resource that prepares you for making all the new SharePoint 2013 features work right. They cover all of the administration components of SharePoint 2013 in detail, and present a clear understanding of how they affect the role of the adminis

  17. SECTORAL SHARES AND ECONOMIC GROWTH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmad, Nisar; Naveed, Amjad; Naz, Amber

    2013-01-01

    believe that structural change is an unimportant side effect of the economic development. On the contrary, economists associated with the World Bank and some others posit that growth is brought about by the changes in sectoral composition. The objective of this study is to empirically test...... the relationship between sectoral shares and economic growth by using the panel data for 20 developed countries. The results of the granger causality suggest that both services and agriculture sectors do granger cause economic growth, whereas industrial sector does not granger cause growth. Reverse causality does...... not hold for any of the three sectors. The results of Barro and Non-Barro regressions along with the set of control variables have suggested that services sector is negatively affecting growth, whereas both industrial and agriculture shares are positively affect economic growth....

  18. Employee share ownership in Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ortlieb, Renate; Matiaske, Wenzel; Fietze, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Politicians and scholars alike praise the significant benefits associated with employee share ownership (ESO). However, little is known about the concrete motives of firms to provide ESO to their employees. In particular, it is unknown how these motives correlate with firms’ contexts. Drawing...... on an institutional theoretical framework, this article examines what aims firms pursue through the provision of ESO. The data originate from a survey of firms in Germany. The cluster analytic findings indicate distinctive patterns of relationships between aims and firm characteristics. Aims related to employee...... performance are most important to foreign-owned firms, financial aims are most important to non-public small and medium-sized firms and aims related to corporate image are most important to big firms and to firms that do not provide profit sharing. Aims related to employee attraction and retention are almost...

  19. Knowledge Sharing on Wikimedia Embassies

    OpenAIRE

    Fichman, Pnina; Hara, Noriko

    2013-01-01

    Introduction With the proliferation of the social web, online knowledge sharing across cultural boundaries has become a norm. For example, the English Wikipedia attracts users from all over the world, and much of Wikipedia is written in languages other than English. Intercultural collaboration occurs daily on Wikipedia with users from all over the world making valued contributions. Online intercultural collaboration on Wikipedia is intriguing but under-studied, as the majority of research...

  20. Producing citizenship as shared meaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Coelho Liberali

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the Creative Chain (Liberali, 2006a for citizenship education in the “Citizenship Action Project: Reading in Different Areas”(PAC-LDA. It approaches the concepts of sense, meaning, and answerability-responsibility (Bakhtin, 1992 as the basis for citizenship production. The analysis of data collected in the 2006 activities of the project suggests that shared meanings contribute to the view of citizenship in the Creative Chain of Activities as a desirable attitude (Kymlicka & Norman, 1997.

  1. Project SHARE - An interim report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouck, Gail P.; Stevenson, Jim; Gillick, David

    1987-05-01

    Project SHARE, a program sponsored jointly by the International Institute of Communications and Intersat, has been undertaken to foster telecommunications development in rural and remote areas of the world. Completed projects such as Teleeducation in the People's Republic of China and The American Society of Microbiology in Africa are discussed as well as projects currently in progress. Projects under active planning include Education in Pakistan through the Pakistan Space and Upper Atmosphere Research Commission and The Sky Channel of the Pacific.

  2. GLOBALIZATION IMPACT ON UKRAINIAN MARKET OF SHARES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Zotsenko

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the impact of globalization on the Ukrainian market of shares. Main trends of globalization of world share market are analyzed. The study highlights key elements of the operating share markets of the world leading countries. The research investigates main factors that affect on the level of national market of shares. The findings trace out a number of problems that hinder and distort the role of the Ukrainian share market in capital allocation.

  3. Designing for Sharing in Local Communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmborg, Lone; Light, Ann; Fitzpatrick, Geraldine

    2015-01-01

    The Sharing Economy has brought new attention to the everyday practice of sharing. Digital tools are changing both what we can do together across neighbourhoods and how we think about sharing our time, materials and skills. It is possible to design to boost resource management, economic wellbeing...... and social resilience by fostering sharing practices, but do different designs speak to different priorities in design for sharing?...

  4. Antigenic determinant of the Lancefield group H antigen of Streptococcus sanguis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosan, B; Argenbright, L

    1982-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that the teichoic acid isolated from strains of Streptococcus sanguis was group specific and defined the Lancefield group H streptococci. To determine the specific antigenic determinants, the antigen was extracted from a group H streptococcus (ATCC 903) by the phenol-water method and purified by column chromatography. The isolated antigen had a glycerol/phosphate/glucose molar ratio of 1:0.9:0.3; the lipid concentration was 7.6% of its dry weight. No nucleic acids were detected, and amino acids constituted approximately 2% of the dry weight. The minimum concentration of antigen required to sensitize erythrocytes for hemagglutination with a 1:1,000 dilution of either group H antiserum or antiteichoic acid serum was 0.02 microgram/ml. Hemagglutination inhibition studies suggested that the major antigenic determinant consisted of an alpha-glucose linked to the glycerol phosphate backbone. Images PMID:6185428

  5. State cost sharing of training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, J.M.; Flater, D.A.; Hughes, D.R. Sr.; Lubenau, J.O.; Merges, P.J.; Mobley, M.H.; Raglin, K.A.

    1989-08-01

    In March 1988, The Office of Governmental and Public Affairs (GPA) completed a report (NUREG-1311) entitled, ''Funding the NRC Training Program for States.'' This report responded to a Commission's request for study of NRC's long-standing practice of paying the travel and per diem of state personnel who attend NRC sponsored training. In May 1988, the Chairman endorsed the report in most respects but asked for further study of a cost sharing of travel and per diem costs. As a result, the Director of GPA's State, Local and Indian Tribe Programs (SLITP) established a Task Force comprised of representatives from the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors, Inc., the Agreement States and the NRC to look at ways that the states can share the costs of NRC training, particularly travel and per diem. At the request of the Director, GPA, the Task Force also looked at related cost and quantity issues associated with the NRC training program for state personnel. This report includes a discussion of NRC and state perspectives on the issue of sharing travel and per diem costs, a discussion of options, and recommendations for likely cost savings and quality of training improvement. 1 ref., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  6. HLA antigens, epilepsy and cytomegalovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannetti, P; Morellini, M; Raucci, U; Cappellacci, S

    1988-01-01

    Thirty-one epileptic patients, selected from among 900 children with previous febrile convulsions and subsequent epilepsy, were typed for HLA antigens. In 16 of the 31 patients CMV was isolated from the urine shortly after the appearance of spontaneous fits; in the remaining 15 patients the virus was never detected. All the examined children were typed for 14 HLA-A, 23 HLA-B, 7 HLA-C and 9 HLA-DR specificities, and compared with a group of healthy subjects. The HLA-A11 antigen was present in 25% of the children with chronic CMV infection and epilepsy, and absent in patients with epilepsy but without CMV infection (p less than 0.02). The possibility that the A11 antigen is a marker of the predisposing genes for CMV infection in children with epilepsy following FC is proposed.

  7. Antigenic typing Polish isolates of canine parvovirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizak, B. [National Veterinary Research Institute, Pulawy (Poland); Plucienniczak, A. [Polish Academy ofd Sciences. Microbiology and Virology Center, Lodz (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    Polish strains of canine parvovirus isolated between 1982 and 1993 were examined to determine the extent to which the virus has evolved antigenically and genetically over eleven years. Two CPV isolates obtained in Warsaw in 1982 and Pulawy in 1993, were examined using monoclonal antibody typing, restriction analysis and sequencing VP-2 protein gene. Five other isolates from Warsaw and Pulawy were tested with the panel of monoclonal antibodies specific to CPV-2, CPV-2a and common for canine parvovirus, feline panleukopenia virus and milk enteritis virus. Results of the studies demonstrated that all isolates tested represented CPV-2a antigenic type. Rapid antigenic strain replacement recorded by Parrish and Senda in the U.S.A and Japan was not confirmed in Poland. (author). 30 refs, 2 tabs.

  8. Idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and HLA antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gerbase-DeLima

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate a possible association between HLA class II antigens and idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS. HLA-A, -B, -DR and -DQ antigens were determined in 19 Brazilian patients (16 white subjects and three subjects of Japanese origin with biopsy-proven FSGS. Comparison of the HLA antigen frequencies between white patients and white local controls showed a significant increase in HLA-DR4 frequency among FSGS patients (37.7 vs 17.2%, P<0.05. In addition, the three patients of Japanese extraction, not included in the statistical analysis, also presented HLA-DR4. In conclusion, our data confirm the association of FSGS with HLA-DR4 previously reported by others, thus providing further evidence for a role of genes of the HLA complex in the susceptibility to this disease

  9. Harnessing Dendritic Cells for Tumor Antigen Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nierkens, Stefan [Department of Tumor Immunology, Nijmegen Centre for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Geert Grooteplein 28, Nijmegen 6525 GA (Netherlands); Janssen, Edith M., E-mail: edith.janssen@cchmc.org [Division of Molecular Immunology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Research Foundation, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States)

    2011-04-26

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen presenting cells that are crucial for the induction of anti-tumor T cell responses. As a consequence, research has focused on the harnessing of DCs for therapeutic interventions. Although current strategies employing ex vivo-generated and tumor-antigen loaded DCs have been proven feasible, there are still many obstacles to overcome in order to improve clinical trial successes and offset the cost and complexity of customized cell therapy. This review focuses on one of these obstacles and a pivotal step for the priming of tumor-specific CD8{sup +} and CD4{sup +} T cells; the in vitro loading of DCs with tumor antigens.

  10. Heat shock protein-90 inhibitors enhance antigen expression on melanomas and increase T cell recognition of tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J Haggerty

    Full Text Available In an effort to enhance antigen-specific T cell recognition of cancer cells, we have examined numerous modulators of antigen-expression. In this report we demonstrate that twelve different Hsp90 inhibitors (iHsp90 share the ability to increase the expression of differentiation antigens and MHC Class I antigens. These iHsp90 are active in several molecular and cellular assays on a series of tumor cell lines, including eleven human melanomas, a murine B16 melanoma, and two human glioma-derived cell lines. Intra-cytoplasmic antibody staining showed that all of the tested iHsp90 increased expression of the melanocyte differentiation antigens Melan-A/MART-1, gp100, and TRP-2, as well as MHC Class I. The gliomas showed enhanced gp100 and MHC staining. Quantitative analysis of mRNA levels showed a parallel increase in message transcription, and a reporter assay shows induction of promoter activity for Melan-A/MART-1 gene. In addition, iHsp90 increased recognition of tumor cells by T cells specific for Melan-A/MART-1. In contrast to direct Hsp90 client proteins, the increased levels of full-length differentiation antigens that result from iHsp90 treatment are most likely the result of transcriptional activation of their encoding genes. In combination, these results suggest that iHsp90 improve recognition of tumor cells by T cells specific for a melanoma-associated antigen as a result of increasing the expressed intracellular antigen pool available for processing and presentation by MHC Class I, along with increased levels of MHC Class I itself. As these Hsp90 inhibitors do not interfere with T cell function, they could have potential for use in immunotherapy of cancer.

  11. Original antigenic sin: A comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatti, Anup; Monsalve, Diana M; Pacheco, Yovana; Chang, Christopher; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Gershwin, M Eric

    2017-09-01

    The concept of "original antigenic sin" was first proposed by Thomas Francis, Jr. in 1960. This phenomenon has the potential to rewrite what we understand about how the immune system responds to infections and its mechanistic implications on how vaccines should be designed. Antigenic sin has been demonstrated to occur in several infectious diseases in both animals and humans, including human influenza infection and dengue fever. The basis of "original antigenic sin" requires immunological memory, and our immune system ability to autocorrect. In the context of viral infections, it is expected that if we are exposed to a native strain of a pathogen, we should be able to mount a secondary immune response on subsequent exposure to the same pathogen. "Original antigenic sin" will not contradict this well-established immunological process, as long as the subsequent infectious antigen is identical to the original one. But "original antigenic sin" implies that when the epitope varies slightly, then the immune system relies on memory of the earlier infection, rather than mount another primary or secondary response to the new epitope which would allow faster and stronger responses. The result is that the immunological response may be inadequate against the new strain, because the immune system does not adapt and instead relies on its memory to mount a response. In the case of vaccines, if we only immunize to a single strain or epitope, and if that strain/epitope changes over time, then the immune system is unable to mount an accurate secondary response. In addition, depending of the first viral exposure the secondary immune response can result in an antibody-dependent enhancement of the disease or at the opposite, it could induce anergy. Both of them triggering loss of pathogen control and inducing aberrant clinical consequences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Carbohydrate-functionalized nanovaccines preserve HIV-1 antigen stability and activate antigen presenting cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela Ramirez, J.E.; Roychoudhury, R.; Habte, H.H.; Cho, M. W.; Pohl, N. L. B.; Narasimhan, B.

    2015-01-01

    The functionalization of polymeric nanoparticles with ligands that target specific receptors on immune cells offers the opportunity to tailor adjuvant properties by conferring pathogen mimicking attributes to the particles. Polyanhydride nanoparticles are promising vaccine adjuvants with desirable characteristics such as immunomodulation, sustained antigen release, activation of antigen presenting cells, and stabilization of protein antigens. These capabilities can be exploited to design nanovaccines against viral pathogens, such as HIV-1, due to the important role of dendritic cells and macrophages in viral spread. In this work, an optimized process was developed for carbohydrate functionalization of HIV-1 antigen-loaded polyanhydride nanoparticles. The carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles preserved antigenic properties upon release and also enabled sustained antigen release kinetics. Particle internalization was observed to be chemistry-dependent with positively charged nanoparticles being taken up more efficiently by dendritic cells. Up-regulation of the activation makers CD40 and CD206 was demonstrated with carboxymethyl-α-d-mannopyranosyl-(1,2)-d-mannopyranoside functionalized nanoparticles. The secretion of the cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α was shown to be chemistry-dependent upon stimulation with carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles. These results offer important new insights upon the interactions between carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles and antigen presenting cells and provide foundational information for the rational design of targeted nanovaccines against HIV-1. PMID:25068589

  13. Cell-free antigens of Sporothrix brasiliensis: antigenic diversity and application in an immunoblot assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida-Paes, Rodrigo; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; Pizzini, Cláudia Vera; Reis, Rosani Santos; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida; Peralta, José Mauro; Gutierrez-Galhardo, Maria Clara; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2012-11-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subcutaneous mycosis diagnosed by isolation of the fungus in culture. Serological tests for help in diagnosis in general do not use purified or recombinant antigens, because there is a paucity of described immunoreactive proteins, especially for the new described Sporothrix species, such as Sporothrix brasiliensis. This study aims to characterise antigens from S. brasiliensis and verify their application in serodiagnosis of sporotrichosis. An immunoblot assay allied with computer-based analysis was used to identify putative antigenic molecules in a cell-free extracts of both morphological phases of this fungus, and to delineate antigenic polymorphism among seven S. brasiliensis isolates and one S. schenckii Brazilian strain. The mycelial and yeast phase of the fungus originated 14 and 23 reactive bands, respectively, which were variable in intensity. An 85 kDa antigen, verified in the yeast phase of the fungus, was observed in all strains used and the immunodominant protein was identified. This protein, however, cross-react with serum samples from patients infected with other pathogens. The results show that the S. brasiliensis cell-free antigen extract is a single and inexpensive source of antigens, and can be applied on the sporotrichosis serodiagnosis. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  14. Antigen processing and remodeling of the endosomal pathway: requirements for antigen cross-presentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewoud Bernardus Compeer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The cross-presentation of endocytosed antigen as peptide/class I MHC complexes plays a central role in the elicitation of CD8+ T cell clones that mediate anti-viral and anti-tumor immune responses. While it has been clear that there are specific subsets of professional antigen presenting cells (APC capable of antigen cross-presentation, description of mechanisms involved is still ongoing. Especially amongst dendritic cells (DC, there are specialized subsets that are highly proficient at antigen cross-presentation. We here present a focused survey on the cell biological processes in the endosomal pathway that support antigen cross-presentation. This review highlight DC-intrinsic mechanisms that facilitate the cross-presentation of endocytosed antigen, including receptor-mediated uptake, recycling and maturation including the sorting of membrane proteins, dynamic remodeling of endosomal structures and cell-surface directed endosomal trafficking. We will conclude with description of pathogen-induced deviation of endosomal processing, and discuss how immune evasion strategies pertaining endosomal trafficking may preclude antigen cross-presentation.

  15. Shared care in prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anette Svarre; Lund, Lars; Jønler, Morten

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate 3 year follow-up in patients with stable prostate cancer (PCa) managed in a shared care program by general practitioners (GPs) in collaboration with urological departments. PCa patients who have undergone curative treatment or endocrine therapy...... require long-term follow-up. Until recently, follow-up has primarily been managed by urologists at hospital-based outpatient clinics. However, new organizational strategies are needed to meet the needs of the growing number of elderly, comorbid cancer patients. These new organizational strategies target...

  16. Sharing best practice in partnerships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosgaard, Mette; Remmen, Arne; Pedersen, Claus Stig

    creation for the different stakeholders and closer collaboration and communication between manufacturers, suppliers, consumers, and retailers. Supply Chain Management can be divided into two main categories with rather different focus areas: ”risk minimization” related to environmental and social impacts...... upstream in the supply chain, and “business development” of sustainable products and product service systems. Sharing best practice in partnerships is an example of the latter, but Supply Chain Management goes beyond product chains and into partnerships where the focus is not on one main company...

  17. Professional SharePoint 2010 Development

    CERN Document Server

    Rizzo, Tom; Fried, Jeff; Swider, Paul J; Hillier, Scot; Schaefer, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Updated guidance on how to take advantage of the newest features of SharePoint programmability More than simply a portal, SharePoint is Microsoft's popular content management solution for building intranets and websites or hosting wikis and blogs. Offering broad coverage on all aspects of development for the SharePoint platform, this comprehensive book shows you exactly what SharePoint does, how to build solutions, and what features are accessible within SharePoint. Written by a team of SharePoint experts, this new edition offers an extensive selection of field-tested best practices that shows

  18. Professional SharePoint 2013 development

    CERN Document Server

    Alirezaei, Reza; Ranlett, Matt; Hillier, Scot; Wilson, Brian; Fried, Jeff; Swider, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Thorough coverage of development in SharePoint 2013 A team of well-known Microsoft MVPs joins forces in this fully updated resource, providing you with in-depth coverage of development tools in the latest iteration of the immensely popular SharePoint. From building solutions to building custom workflow and content management applications, this book shares field-tested best practices on all aspect of SharePoint 2013 development. Offers a thorough look at Windows Azure and SharePoint 2013Includes new chapters on Application Life Cycle Management, developing apps in ShareP

  19. SharePoint 2010 Field Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Mann, Steven; Gazmuri, Pablo; Caravajal, Steve; Wheeler, Christina

    2012-01-01

    Hands-on solutions for common SharePoint 2010 challenges Aimed at the more than 100 million licensed SharePoint 2010 users, this indispensable field guide addresses an abundance of common SharePoint 2010 problems and offers proven solutions. A team of authors encourages you to customize SharePoint beyond the out-of-the-box functionality so that you can build more complex solutions to these challenges. You?ll discover intricate details and specific full-scale solutions that you can then implement to your own SharePoint 2010 solutions.Tackles a variety of SharePoint 2010 problems ranging from si

  20. Professional SharePoint 2010 Administration

    CERN Document Server

    Klindt, Todd; Caravajal, Steve

    2010-01-01

    Thorough coverage of the improvements and changes to SharePoint 2010. SharePoint 2010 boasts a variety of incredible new features that will challenge even the most experienced administrator who is upgrading from SharePoint 2007. Written by a team of SharePoint experts, this book places a takes aim at showing you how to make these new features work right for you. Offering an in-depth look at SharePoint 2010, the authors focus on how SharePoint functionality has changed from its earliest version to its newest, and they provide you with detailed coverage of all the new features and capabilities.:

  1. SharePoint 2010 For Dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Vanessa L

    2012-01-01

    Here's the bestselling guide on SharePoint 2010, updated to cover Office 365 SharePoint Portal Server is an essential part of the enterprise infrastructure for many businesses. The Office 365 version includes significantly enhanced cloud capabilities. This second edition of the bestselling guide to SharePoint covers getting a SharePoint site up and running, branded, populated with content, and more. It explains ongoing site management and offers plenty of advice for administrators who want to leverage SharePoint and Office 365 in various ways.Many businesses today rely on SharePoint Portal Ser

  2. Interspecies scaling of excretory amounts using allometry - retrospective analysis with rifapentine, aztreonam, carumonam, pefloxacin, miloxacin, trovafloxacin, doripenem, imipenem, cefozopran, ceftazidime, linezolid for urinary excretion and rifapentine, cabotegravir, and dolutegravir for fecal excretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, Nuggehally R

    2016-09-01

    1. Interspecies allometry scaling for prediction of human excretory amounts in urine or feces was performed for numerous antibacterials. Antibacterials used for urinary scaling were: rifapentine, pefloxacin, trovafloxacin (Gr1/low; 50%). Rifapentine, cabotegravir, and dolutegravir was used for fecal scaling (high; >50%). 2. The employment of allometry equation: Y = aW(b) enabled scaling of urine/fecal amounts from animal species. Corresponding predicted amounts were converted into % recovery by considering the respective human dose. Comparison of predicted/observed values enabled fold difference and error calculations (mean absolute error [MAE] and root mean square error [RMSE]). Comparisons were made for urinary/fecal data; and qualitative assessment was made amongst Gr1/Gr2/Gr3 for urine. 3. Average correlation coefficient for the allometry scaling was >0.995. Excretory amount predictions were largely within 0.75- to 1.5-fold differences. Average MAE and RMSE were within ±22% and 23%, respectively. Although robust predictions were achieved for higher urinary/fecal excretion (>50%), interspecies scaling was applicable for low/medium excretory drugs. 4. Based on the data, interspecies scaling of urine or fecal excretory amounts may be potentially used as a tool to understand the significance of either urinary or fecal routes of elimination in humans in early development.

  3. Analysing lawyers’ attitude towards knowledge sharing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wole M. Olatokun

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The study examined and identified the factors that affect lawyers’ attitudes to knowledge sharing, and their knowledge sharing behaviour. Specifically, it investigated the relationship between the salient beliefs affecting the knowledge sharing attitude of lawyers’, and applied a modified version of the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA in the knowledge sharing context, to predict how these factors affect their knowledge sharing behaviour.Method: A field survey of 273 lawyers was carried out, using questionnaire for data collection. Collected data on all variables were structured into grouped frequency distributions. Principal Component Factor Analysis was applied to reduce the constructs and Simple Regression was applied to test the hypotheses. These were tested at 0.05% level of significance.Results: Results showed that expected associations and contributions were the major determinants of lawyers’ attitudes towards knowledge sharing. Expected reward was not significantly related to lawyers’ attitudes towards knowledge sharing. A positive attitude towards knowledge sharing was found to lead to a positive intention to share knowledge, although a positive intention to share knowledge did not significantly predict a positive knowledge sharing behaviour. The level of Information Technology (IT usage was also found to significantly affect the knowledge sharing behaviour of lawyers’.Conclusion: It was recommended that law firms in the study area should deploy more IT infrastructure and services that encourage effective knowledge sharing amongst lawyers. 

  4. The role of MHC class II antigenic determinants in the function of human antigen binding T8+ cells, monocytes and helper and suppressor factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehner, T; Jones, T

    1984-06-01

    The role of MHC class II antigens was investigated in the process of antigen binding by T8+ cells and monocytes (Mo) and in the functions of helper factor (HF) and suppressor factor (SF). Monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) to HLA-DR, DC and SB determinants were used in immunofluorescence, inhibition of antigen binding and affinity chromatography of HF and SF. Indirect immunofluorescence studies suggest that T lymphocytes from peripheral blood of healthy subjects have a small proportion of cells expressing HLA-DR, beta chain determinants (1.4-3.8%). These belong predominantly to the T8+ subset of cells (4.6-8.8%), with only a very small proportion in the T4+ cells (0.1-1.8%). However, DC1 on DRw6+ T cells and SB2,3 on any HLA typed cells were found in significantly greater proportion than the DR antigens in both T8+ and T4+ cells, though this was again greater on T8+ (30 and 25%) than T4+ (8.3 and 14.4%) cells. Although Mo had a greatly increased proportion of cells with DR-beta chain determinants (27-45%) than the T8+ cells, the converse was found with DC1 and SB2,3 determinants (13.9 and 11.4%). Inhibition of 125I-streptococcal antigen (SA) binding to T8+ cells and to Mo by MoAbs to the class II antigens showed that DR-beta chain monomorphic or polymorphic antibodies and DC1 antibodies inhibited binding to both cell types by 66-94%. However, MoAbs to DR-alpha chains or to the SB2,3 determinant failed to yield significant inhibition. Affinity chromatography studies of HF and SF revealed that the DR-beta chain monomorphic and DC1 antibodies bound HF and SF activities and that this was not found with the DR-beta chain polymorphic or SB2,3 antibodies. The results of inhibition of 125I-SA binding to T8+ cells and Mo, and absorption of HF and SF by affinity chromatography with MoAbs suggest four categories of recognition of human MHC class II antigenic determinants. (1) Class II determinants shared by the T8+ cells, Mo, HF and SF and recognized by MoAbs to monomorphic beta

  5. Lectin binding patterns and immunohistochemical antigen detection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ibrahim Eldaghayes

    2018-02-09

    Feb 9, 2018 ... examined by histological, lectin-histochemical, immunohistochemical and cultural techniques. B. abortus antigens were immunohistochemically detected in fetal lungs and placenta. An increase in the labeling with UEA-1, DBA,. PNA, RCA-1 and SBA was found in the lungs and an increase in the labeling ...

  6. Lea blood group antigen on human platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunstan, R.A.; Simpson, M.B.; Rosse, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    One- and two-stage radioligand assays were used to determine if human platelets possess the Lea antigen. Goat IgG anti-Lea antibody was purified by multiple adsorptions with Le(a-b-) human red blood cells, followed by affinity chromatography with synthetic Lea substance and labeling with /sup 125/I. Human IgG anti-Lea antibody was used either in a two stage radioassay with /sup 125/I-labeled mouse monoclonal IgG anti-human IgG as the second antibody or, alternatively, purified by Staph protein A chromatography, labeled with /sup 125/I, and used in a one-stage radioassay. Platelets from donors of appropriate red blood cell phenotypes were incubated with the antisera, centrifuged through phthalate esters, and assayed in a gamma scintillation counter. Dose response and saturation curve analysis demonstrate the presence of Lewis a antigen on platelets from Lea+ donors. Furthermore, platelets from an Le(a-b-) donor incubated in Le (a+b-) plasma adsorb Lea antigen in a similar manner to red blood cells. The clinical significance of these antigens in platelet transfusion remains undefined.

  7. A NEW SYNTHETIC FUNCTIONALIZED ANTIGEN CARRIER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DRIJFHOUT, JW; BLOEMHOFF, W

    A new synthetic functionalized antigen carrier is described. It consists of a core of seven branched lysine residues, of which each of the four N-terminal lysine residues contains two N-(S-acetylmercaptoacetyl)-glutamyl residues. After removal of the protecting S-acetyl groups affording eight thiol

  8. Non-lineage antigens: section report

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horváth, Ondřej; Drbal, Karel; Angelisová, Pavla; Hilgert, Ivan; Hořejší, Václav

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 236, 1-2 (2005), s. 42-47 ISSN 0008-8749 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0506 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : non-lineage antigens * cytofluorometry * CD molecules Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 1.558, year: 2005

  9. Carcinoembryonic antigen and head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laarman, D. A.; van Kamp, G. J.; Balm, A. J.; Braakhuis, B. J.; Snow, G. B.

    1991-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) concentrations were determined in the sera of 45 patients with a head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and of 13 controls. In 13 patients serial CEA measurements were made during the follow-up period. In 38% of the patients the serum CEA level was slightly elevated

  10. Antigen dynamics of follicular dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesters, B.A.

    2015-01-01

    Stromal-derived follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) are a major depot for antigen that are essential for formation of germinal centers, the site where memory and effector B cells differentiate and high-affinity antibody production takes place. Historically, FDCs have been characterized as ‘accessory’

  11. Cloning, expression, purification and antigenic evaluation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Streptococcus pyogenes produce an extracellular hyaluronidase which is associated with the spread of the organism during infection. Enzyme hyaluronidase is capable of degrading hyaluronic acid. The aim of the present study was to clone and express antigenic regions of the hylA of S.pyogenes in Escherichia coli.

  12. Antigenic and genetic variability of human metapneumoviruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Herfst (Sander); L. Sprong; P.A. Cane; E. Forleo-Neto; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); R.L. de Swart (Rik); B.G. van den Hoogen (Bernadette)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractHuman metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a member of the subfamily Pneumovirinae within the family Paramyxo- viridae. Other members of this subfamily, respiratory syncytial virus and avian pneumovirus, can be divided into subgroups on the basis of genetic or antigenic differences or both. For

  13. Defined carriers for synthetic antigens: Hinge Peptides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlaváček, Jan; Niederhafner, Petr; Gut, Vladimír; Hulačová, Hana; Maloň, Petr

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 1 (2005), s. 68 ISSN 0939-4451. [International Congress on Amino Acids and Proteins /9./. 08.08.2005-12.08.2005, Gert Lubec] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/03/1362 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : synthetic carrier * antigen * hinge peptide Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  14. Antigenic characterisation of lyssaviruses in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Ngoepe

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available There are at least six Lyssavirus species that have been isolated in Africa, which include classical rabies virus, Lagos bat virus, Mokola virus, Duvenhage virus, Shimoni bat virus and Ikoma lyssavirus. In this retrospective study, an analysis of the antigenic reactivity patterns of lyssaviruses in South Africa against a panel of 15 anti-nucleoprotein monoclonal antibodies was undertaken. A total of 624 brain specimens, collected between 2005 and 2009, confirmed as containing lyssavirus antigen by direct fluorescent antibody test, were subjected to antigenic differentiation. The lyssaviruses were differentiated into two species, namely rabies virus (99.5% and Mokola virus (0.5%. Furthermore, rabies virus was further delineated into two common rabies biotypes in South Africa: canid and mongoose. Initially, it was found that the canid rabies biotype had two reactivity patterns; differential staining was observed with just one monoclonal antibody. This difference was likely to have been an artefact related to sample quality, as passage in cell culture restored staining. Mongoose rabies viruses were more heterogeneous, with seven antigenic reactivity patterns detected. Although Mokola viruses were identified in this study, prevalence and reservoir host species are yet to be established. These data demonstrate the usefulness of monoclonal antibody typing panels in lyssavirus surveillance with reference to emergence of new species or spread of rabies biotypes to new geographic zones.

  15. Evaluation of an Antigen-Antibody

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    replication would lead to the production of various antigens. Today with BMT history of over 30 years, infection ... Study design: The study involved both retrospective and prospective laboratory-based analysis of ..... core protein of a molecular mass 19 x 103 Da, one picogram (pg) of virus core corresponds to 1.3 x. 105 HCV ...

  16. Lysine acetylation of major Chlamydia trachomatis antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Mihailovic

    2016-03-01

    Our data show that important Ct antigens could be post-translationally modified by acetylation of lysine residues at multiple sites. Further studies are needed to investigate total acetylome of Ct and the impact PTMs might have on Ct biology and pathogenicity.

  17. Quantum strongly secure ramp secret sharing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Paul; Matsumoto, Rytaro Yamashita

    2015-01-01

    Quantum secret sharing is a scheme for encoding a quantum state (the secret) into multiple shares and distributing them among several participants. If a sufficient number of shares are put together, then the secret can be fully reconstructed. If an insufficient number of shares are put together...... however, no information about the secret can be revealed. In quantum ramp secret sharing, partial information about the secret is allowed to leak to a set of participants, called an unqualified set, that cannot fully reconstruct the secret. By allowing this, the size of a share can be drastically reduced....... This paper introduces a quantum analog of classical strong security in ramp secret sharing schemes. While the ramp secret sharing scheme still leaks partial information about the secret to unqualified sets of participants, the strong security condition ensures that qudits with critical information can...

  18. Motorcycle lane-sharing : literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    This report examines the use of lane-sharing (also sometimes referred to as lane-splitting and filtering) nationally and internationally and includes discussions on motorcycle and driver (auto) safety, and the potential benefits of lane-sharing.

  19. The Cross-Cultural Knowledge Sharing Challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, John Stouby

    2013-01-01

    Cross-cultural offshoring in software development challenges effective knowledge sharing. While research has suggested temporarily co-locating participants to address this challenge, few studies are available on what knowledge sharing practices emerge over time when co-locating cross-cultural....... The study supports previous studies’ suggestion of co-location in offshoring for helping cross-cultural knowledge sharing. However, the short initial period of co-location suggested in these studies, was insufficient for achieving knowledge sharing practices indicating a CoP. In conjunction with a longer...... period of colocation four facilitators of cross-cultural knowledge sharing were shared office, shared responsibility for tasks and problems, shared prioritization of team spirit, and a champion of social integration....

  20. Introduction: Power-sharing in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Mehler, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Introduction to the Featured Topic "Power-Sharing in Africa", Africa Spectrum, Vol. 44, No. 3 (2009). Einführung in den Themenschwerpunkt "Power-Sharing in Africa" in Heft 3, Jahrgang 44 (2009) der Zeitschrift "Africa Spectrum".

  1. Indirect Medical Education and Disproportionate Share Adj...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Indirect Medical Education and Disproportionate Share Adjustments to Medicare Inpatient Payment Rates The indirect medical education (IME) and disproportionate share...

  2. Increasing vaccine potency through exosome antigen targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Zachary C; Wei, Junping; Glass, Oliver K; Guo, Hongtao; Lei, Gangjun; Yang, Xiao-Yi; Osada, Takuya; Hobeika, Amy; Delcayre, Alain; Le Pecq, Jean-Bernard; Morse, Michael A; Clay, Timothy M; Lyerly, Herbert K

    2011-11-21

    While many tumor associated antigens (TAAs) have been identified in human cancers, efforts to develop efficient TAA "cancer vaccines" using classical vaccine approaches have been largely ineffective. Recently, a process to specifically target proteins to exosomes has been established which takes advantage of the ability of the factor V like C1C2 domain of lactadherin to specifically address proteins to exosomes. Using this approach, we hypothesized that TAAs could be targeted to exosomes to potentially increase their immunogenicity, as exosomes have been demonstrated to traffic to antigen presenting cells (APC). To investigate this possibility, we created adenoviral vectors expressing the extracellular domain (ECD) of two non-mutated TAAs often found in tumors of cancer patients, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and HER2, and coupled them to the C1C2 domain of lactadherin. We found that these C1C2 fusion proteins had enhanced expression in exosomes in vitro. We saw significant improvement in antigen specific immune responses to each of these antigens in naïve and tolerant transgenic animal models and could further demonstrate significantly enhanced therapeutic anti-tumor effects in a human HER2+ transgenic animal model. These findings demonstrate that the mode of secretion and trafficking can influence the immunogenicity of different human TAAs, and may explain the lack of immunogenicity of non-mutated TAAs found in cancer patients. They suggest that exosomal targeting could enhance future anti-tumor vaccination protocols. This targeting exosome process could also be adapted for the development of more potent vaccines in some viral and parasitic diseases where the classical vaccine approach has demonstrated limitations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Knowledge Sharing in Workplace: Motivators and Demotivators

    OpenAIRE

    Oye.N.D; Mazleena Salleh; Noorminshah.A

    2011-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of knowledge sharing in workplace. Based on the review of critical literaturesby the authors, they infer that knowledge sharing in workplace can be influenced by motivators anddemotivators. Activities of knowledge sharing in organizations may be on organization level or individuallevel. Knowledge sharing of both levels is critical to the success or failure of knowledge management insideand outside of organizations. Age, culture, and industry were all found to affe...

  4. Identification, characterization and antigenicity of the Plasmodium vivax rhoptry neck protein 1 (PvRON1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patarroyo Manuel E

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium vivax malaria remains a major health problem in tropical and sub-tropical regions worldwide. Several rhoptry proteins which are important for interaction with and/or invasion of red blood cells, such as PfRONs, Pf92, Pf38, Pf12 and Pf34, have been described during the last few years and are being considered as potential anti-malarial vaccine candidates. This study describes the identification and characterization of the P. vivax rhoptry neck protein 1 (PvRON1 and examine its antigenicity in natural P. vivax infections. Methods The PvRON1 encoding gene, which is homologous to that encoding the P. falciparum apical sushi protein (ASP according to the plasmoDB database, was selected as our study target. The pvron1 gene transcription was evaluated by RT-PCR using RNA obtained from the P. vivax VCG-1 strain. Two peptides derived from the deduced P. vivax Sal-I PvRON1 sequence were synthesized and inoculated in rabbits for obtaining anti-PvRON1 antibodies which were used to confirm the protein expression in VCG-1 strain schizonts along with its association with detergent-resistant microdomains (DRMs by Western blot, and its localization by immunofluorescence assays. The antigenicity of the PvRON1 protein was assessed using human sera from individuals previously exposed to P. vivax malaria by ELISA. Results In the P. vivax VCG-1 strain, RON1 is a 764 amino acid-long protein. In silico analysis has revealed that PvRON1 shares essential characteristics with different antigens involved in invasion, such as the presence of a secretory signal, a GPI-anchor sequence and a putative sushi domain. The PvRON1 protein is expressed in parasite's schizont stage, localized in rhoptry necks and it is associated with DRMs. Recombinant protein recognition by human sera indicates that this antigen can trigger an immune response during a natural infection with P. vivax. Conclusions This study shows the identification and characterization of

  5. Influenza A virus infection of healthy piglets in an abattoir in Brazil: animal-human interface and risk for interspecies transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariane Ribeiro Amorim

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Asymptomatic influenza virus infections in pigs are frequent and the lack of measures for controlling viral spread facilitates the circulation of different virus strains between pigs. The goal of this study was to demonstrate the circulation of influenza A virus strains among asymptomatic piglets in an abattoir in Brazil and discuss the potential public health impacts. Tracheal samples (n = 330 were collected from asymptomatic animals by a veterinarian that also performed visual lung tissue examinations. No slaughtered animals presented with any noticeable macroscopic signs of influenza infection following examination of lung tissues. Samples were then analysed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction that resulted in the identification of 30 (9% influenza A positive samples. The presence of asymptomatic pig infections suggested that these animals could facilitate virus dissemination and act as a source of infection for the herd, thereby enabling the emergence of influenza outbreaks associated with significant economic losses. Furthermore, the continuous exposure of the farm and abattoir workers to the virus increases the risk for interspecies transmission. Monitoring measures of swine influenza virus infections and vaccination and monitoring of employees for influenza infection should also be considered. In addition regulatory agencies should consider the public health ramifications regarding the potential zoonotic viral transmission between humans and pigs.

  6. Interspecies Chemical Signals Released into the Environment May Create Xenohormetic, Hormetic and Cytostatic Selective Forces that Drive the Ecosystemic Evolution of Longevity Regulation Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burstein, Michelle T; Beach, Adam; Richard, Vincent R; Koupaki, Olivia; Gomez-Perez, Alejandra; Goldberg, Alexander A; Kyryakov, Pavlo; Bourque, Simon D; Glebov, Anastasia; Titorenko, Vladimir I

    2012-01-01

    Various organisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, plants and animals) within an ecosystem can synthesize and release into the environment certain longevity-extending small molecules. Here we hypothesize that these interspecies chemical signals can create xenohormetic, hormetic and cytostatic selective forces driving the ecosystemic evolution of longevity regulation mechanisms. In our hypothesis, following their release into the environment by one species of the organisms composing an ecosystem, such small molecules can activate anti-aging processes and/or inhibit pro-aging processes in other species within the ecosystem. The organisms that possess the most effective (as compared to their counterparts of the same species) mechanisms for sensing the chemical signals produced and released by other species and for responding to such signals by undergoing certain hormetic and/or cytostatic life-extending changes to their metabolism and physiology are expected to live longer then their counterparts within the ecosystem. Thus, the ability of a species of the organisms composing an ecosystem to undergo life-extending metabolic or physiological changes in response to hormetic or cytostatic chemical compounds released to the ecosystem by other species: 1) increases its chances of survival; 2) creates selective forces aimed at maintaining such ability; and 3) enables the evolution of longevity regulation mechanisms.

  7. Evidence of distinct pathways for bacterial degradation of the steroid compound cholate suggests the potential for metabolic interactions by interspecies cross-feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holert, Johannes; Yücel, Onur; Suvekbala, Vemparthan; Kulić, Zarko; Möller, Heiko; Philipp, Bodo

    2014-05-01

    The distribution and the metabolic pathways of bacteria degrading steroid compounds released by eukaryotic organisms were investigated using the bile salt cholate as model substrate. Cholate-degrading bacteria could be readily isolated from freshwater environments. All isolated strains transiently released steroid degradation intermediates into culture supernatants before their further degradation. Cholate degradation could be initiated via two different reaction sequences. Most strains degraded cholate via a reaction sequence known from the model organism Pseudomonas sp. strain Chol1 releasing intermediates with a 3-keto-Δ(1,4) -diene structure of the steroid skeleton. The actinobacterium Dietzia sp. strain Chol2 degraded cholate via a different and yet unexplored reaction sequence releasing intermediates with a 3-keto-Δ(4,6) -diene-7-deoxy structure of the steroid skeleton such as 3,12-dioxo-4,6-choldienoic acid (DOCDA). Using DOCDA as substrate, two Alphaproteobacteria, strains Chol10-11, were isolated that produced the same cholate degradation intermediates as strain Chol2. With DOCDA as substrate for Pseudomonas sp. strain Chol1 only the side chain was degraded while the ring system was transformed into novel steroid compounds accumulating as dead-end metabolites. These metabolites could be degraded by the DOCDA-producing strains Chol10-11. These results indicate that bacteria with potentially different pathways for cholate degradation coexist in natural habitats and may interact via interspecies cross-feeding. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Team Learning: Building Shared Mental Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Bossche, Piet; Gijselaers, Wim; Segers, Mien; Woltjer, Geert; Kirschner, Paul

    2011-01-01

    To gain insight in the social processes that underlie knowledge sharing in teams, this article questions which team learning behaviors lead to the construction of a shared mental model. Additionally, it explores how the development of shared mental models mediates the relation between team learning behaviors and team effectiveness. Analyses were…

  9. 50 CFR 85.40 - Cost sharing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE-WILDLIFE SPORT FISH RESTORATION PROGRAM CLEAN VESSEL ACT GRANT PROGRAM Conditions on Use/Acceptance of Funds § 85.40 Cost sharing. (a) The Federal share shall not exceed 75% of total... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cost sharing. 85.40 Section 85.40 Wildlife...

  10. Qualitative Data Sharing Practices in Social Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Social scientists have been sharing data for a long time. Sharing qualitative data, however, has not become a common practice, despite the context of e-Research, information growth, and funding agencies' mandates on research data archiving and sharing. Since most systematic and comprehensive studies are based on quantitative data practices, little…

  11. Team learning: building shared mental models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bossche, van den P.; Gijselaers, W.; Segers, M.; Woltjer, G.B.; Kirschner, P.

    2011-01-01

    To gain insight in the social processes that underlie knowledge sharing in teams, this article questions which team learning behaviors lead to the construction of a shared mental model. Additionally, it explores how the development of shared mental models mediates the relation between team learning

  12. Sharing best practice in stoma care nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willams, Julia

    A problem shared is a problem halved; a very poignant proverb that forms the essence of this year's World Council of Enterostomal Therapists (WCET) UK conference in Coventry. Sharing experiences from practice is invalid if clinical practice is to grow and develop. It raises awareness, offering the opportunity to question and review practice. Sharing practice offers opportunities to enquiring minds.

  13. Nash Equilibria in Shared Effort Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polevoy, G.; Trajanovski, S.; De Weerdt, M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Shared effort games model people's contribution to projects and sharing the obtained profits. Those games generalize both public projects like writing for Wikipedia, where everybody shares the resulting benefits, and all-pay auctions such as contests and political campaigns, where only the winner

  14. Testing for Unit Roots in Market Shares

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franses, P.H.B.F.; Srinivasan, S.; Boswijk, H.P.

    2001-01-01

    A unique characteristic of marketing data sets is the logical consistency requirement in market share models that market shares are bounded by 0 and 1, and they sum to unity. To take account of this logical consistency requirement, we propose to test for unit roots in individual market share series

  15. Demographic Variables predicting Employees Willingness to share ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Review of literature on tacit knowledge sharing revealed a dearth of empirical research on the connection between demographic variables and willingness to share tacit knowledge. This study therefore extend tacit knowledge sharing literature by exploring the influence of age, gender, job tenure, and educational level on ...

  16. 47 CFR 73.1715 - Share time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Share time. 73.1715 Section 73.1715... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1715 Share time. Operation is permitted by two or more... considered part of their licenses. (a) If the licenses of stations authorized to share time do not specify...

  17. Recommendations for the Sharing Economy: Safeguarding Privacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ranzini, G.; Kusber, Nina; Vermeulen, I.E.; Etter, Michael

    2018-01-01

    his report, ‘Recommendations: Privacy’, forms one element of a European Union Horizon 2020 Research Project on the sharing economy: Ps2Share ‘Participation, Privacy, and Power in the Sharing Economy’. The study is undertaken within the scope of the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and

  18. Identification of Novel Breast Cancer Antigens Using Phage Antibody Libraries

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marks, James

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to use phage antibody libraries to identify novel breast tumor antigens The antibodies could be used for breast cancer immunotherapy and the antigens could be used as cancer vaccines...

  19. Cysteine proteases as potential antigens in antiparasitic DNA vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Louise von Gersdorff; Buchmann, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    En litteraturgennemgang af muligheder for at bruge cystein proteaser som antigener i antiparasitære vacciner.......En litteraturgennemgang af muligheder for at bruge cystein proteaser som antigener i antiparasitære vacciner....

  20. Dengue viruses cluster antigenically but not as discrete serotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Katzelnick (Leah); J.M. Fonville (Judith); G.D. Gromowski (Gregory D.); J.B. Arriaga (Jose Bustos); A. Green (Angela); S.L. James (Sarah ); L. Lau (Louis); M. Montoya (Magelda); C. Wang (Chunling); L.A. Van Blargan (Laura A.); C.A. Russell (Colin); H.M. Thu (Hlaing Myat); T.C. Pierson (Theodore C.); P. Buchy (Philippe); J.G. Aaskov (John G.); J.L. Muñoz-Jordán (Jorge L.); N. Vasilakis (Nikos); R.V. Gibbons (Robert V.); R.B. Tesh (Robert B.); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); A. Durbin (Anna); C.P. Simmons (Cameron P.); E.C. Holmes (Edward C.); E. Harris (Eva); S.S. Whitehead (Stephen S.); D.J. Smith (Derek James)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThe four genetically divergent dengue virus (DENV) types are traditionally classified as serotypes. Antigenic and genetic differences among the DENV types influence disease outcome, vaccine-induced protection, epidemic magnitude, and viral evolution.We scharacterized antigenic diversity

  1. Immunolocalization and immunodetection of the excretory/secretory (ES antigens of Fasciola gigantica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M A Hannan Khan

    Full Text Available The digenetic trematode Fasciola gigantica is a parasite of great agricultural and economic importance. Along with Fasciola hepatica, F. gigantica incurs huge economic losses to the agricultural sector. Because of unavailability of an effective and commercial vaccine, the earliest diagnosis of the disease is the only way to control the disease. The conventional coprological techniques are able to detect the disease only after the parasites get matured and starts releasing their eggs with the faeces of host, therefore prepatent infection remain undiagnosed. The alternative method is by serological tests that uses circulatory antigens. Despite high sensitivity, their reliability is quite low because of the common antigens shared between different helminth parasites. To overcome this, investigation was shifted to identify the copro-antigens which could be more sensitive and reliable. In the present study, we tried to identify some of the immunodominant proteins from the Excretory Secretory (ES product of F. gigantica which can be further characterized and used for early detection of infection and also as drug and vaccine candidates. The ES products of F. gigantica were collected and used for raising the polyclonal antibody in rabbit. The polypeptide profile was generated as well as immunogenic polypeptides were identified. The Source of ES antigen was immunolocalized using confocal microscopy and dot blot assay was performed to diagnose field infection. The polypeptide profile of ES products revealed a total of 24 polypeptides out of which 12 immunogenic polypeptides were identified by western blotting. Confocal micrographs showed the immunolocalization of antigens in the intestinal caecae, vitalline glands, gonads as well as in the tegument of the worm. The dot blot assay confirmed the utility of ES products for the detection of field infection. Subsequently, cross reactivity was found negative with Gigantocotyle explanatum; an amphitome parasite

  2. Genetic distribution of noncapsular meningococcal group B vaccine antigens in Neisseria lactamica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucidarme, Jay; Gilchrist, Stefanie; Newbold, Lynne S; Gray, Stephen J; Kaczmarski, Edward B; Richardson, Lynne; Bennett, Julia S; Maiden, Martin C J; Findlow, Jamie; Borrow, Ray

    2013-09-01

    The poor immunogenicity of the meningococcal serogroup B (MenB) capsule has led to the development of vaccines targeting subcapsular antigens, in particular the immunodominant and diverse outer membrane porin, PorA. These vaccines are largely strain specific; however, they offer limited protection against the diverse MenB-associated diseases observed in many industrialized nations. To broaden the scope of its protection, the multicomponent vaccine (4CMenB) incorporates a PorA-containing outer membrane vesicle (OMV) alongside relatively conserved recombinant protein components, including factor H-binding protein (fHbp), Neisseria adhesin A (NadA), and neisserial heparin-binding antigen (NHBA). The expression of PorA is unique to meningococci (Neisseria meningitidis); however, many subcapsular antigens are shared with nonpathogenic members of the genus Neisseria that also inhabit the nasopharynx. These organisms may elicit cross-protective immunity against meningococci and/or occupy a niche that might otherwise accommodate pathogens. The potential for 4CMenB responses to impact such species (and vice versa) was investigated by determining the genetic distribution of the primary 4CMenB antigens among diverse members of the common childhood commensal, Neisseria lactamica. All the isolates possessed nhba but were devoid of fhbp and nadA. The nhba alleles were mainly distinct from but closely related to those observed among a representative panel of invasive MenB isolates from the same broad geographic region. We made similar findings for the immunogenic typing antigen, FetA, which constitutes a major part of the 4CMenB OMV. Thus, 4CMenB vaccine responses may impact or be impacted by nasopharyngeal carriage of commensal neisseriae. This highlights an area for further research and surveillance should the vaccine be routinely implemented.

  3. Watermelon and ragweed share allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enberg, R N; Leickly, F E; McCullough, J; Bailey, J; Ownby, D R

    1987-06-01

    A biotin-avidin amplified ELISA was used to measure antigen-specific IgE for ragweed, representative members of the gourd family (watermelon, cantaloupe, honeydew melon, zucchini, and cucumber), and banana in the sera of 192 allergic patients, each with an IgE greater than or equal to 180 microns/ml. Sixty-three percent (120/192) of the sera contained antiragweed IgE, and of these patients, 28% to 50% contained IgE specific for any single gourd family member. In contrast, no greater than 11% of the sera positive for a given gourd or banana were negative for ragweed. Correlations between ragweed and gourd-specific IgE levels were significant (p less than 0.001), and correlation coefficients between any two gourds exceeded 0.79. In an ELISA system, the extracts of watermelon and ragweed inhibited each other in a dose-dependent manner; the resulting nonparallel inhibition curves indicate that some, but not all, of the allergens in the two extracts are cross-reactive. Isoelectric focusing of watermelon and ragweed extracts in narrow range gel (pH 4 to 6) followed by immunoblotting demonstrated six watermelon allergen bands with isoelectric points identical to those of ragweed allergens. Several remaining bands in the two extracts had differing isoelectric points, however. Six of 26 patients interviewed with watermelon-specific IgE reported developing oropharyngeal symptoms (itching and/or swelling of the lips, tongue, or throat) after ingesting at least one of the study foods, whereas only one of 25 patients interviewed without detectable watermelon-specific IgE reported similar symptoms (p = 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Sharing Knowledge across the Mediterranean

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    On the occasion of CERN's 50th anniversary, the French Association for the Advancement of Science (AFAS) is organising a conference at CERN on 6 - 7 May on the subject of "Sharing Knowledge across the Mediterranean". The full program can be found at http://www.avancement-sciences.org. For those wishing to attend, advanced registration is mandatory. Follow the instructions at: http://lpsc.in2p3.fr/congres/CERN/index.htm The conference fee is 50 euro. It includes attendance at the official dinner on Thursday 6 May and a copy of the conference proceedings. Special conditions for CERN: registration is free, but does not include the dinner. CERN people wishing to receive the proceedings will be charged 10 euro.

  5. "Sharing Knowledge across the Mediterranean"

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    On the occasion of CERN's 50th anniversary, the French Association for the Advancement of Science (AFAS) is organising a conference at CERN on 6 - 7 May on the subject of "Sharing Knowledge across the Mediterranean". The full program can be found at http://www.avancement-sciences.org. For those wishing to attend, advanced registration is mandatory. Follow the instructions at: http://lpsc.in2p3.fr/congres/CERN/index.htm The conference fee is 50 euro. It includes attendance at the official dinner on Thursday 6 May and a copy of the conference proceedings. Special conditions for CERN: registration is free, but does not include the dinner. CERN people wishing to receive the proceedings will be charged 10 euro.

  6. Universal algorithm of time sharing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silin, I.N.; Fedyun'kin, E.D.

    1979-01-01

    Timesharing system algorithm is proposed for the wide class of one- and multiprocessor computer configurations. Dynamical priority is the piece constant function of the channel characteristic and system time quantum. The interactive job quantum has variable length. Characteristic recurrent formula is received. The concept of the background job is introduced. Background job loads processor if high priority jobs are inactive. Background quality function is given on the base of the statistical data received in the timesharing process. Algorithm includes optimal trashing off procedure for the jobs replacements in the memory. Sharing of the system time in proportion to the external priorities is guaranteed for the all active enough computing channels (back-ground too). The fast answer is guaranteed for the interactive jobs, which use small time and memory. The external priority control is saved for the high level scheduler. The experience of the algorithm realization on the BESM-6 computer in JINR is discussed

  7. Some thoughts on sharing science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Ivan; Kumar, Alok

    2000-07-01

    Sustaining and upgrading the national interest in science requires breaking through some of the barriers that separate science from the academy's other disciplines and interests, and from society as a whole. This article reviews some of the difficulties and prospects of sharing science within the academy and the ripple effect that such activities may have on the larger social context of attitudes toward science. We recognize that crossing into other disciplines for any purpose raises special communication problems. We also argue that much of the apprehension concerning such discourse rests on a fallacy. Some relief is anticipated through an ongoing critical and reflexive examination of ourselves and our activities with respect to the ways science touches our collective lives, and by conscientiously developing new relationships for teaching scientific thinking and values on the premise that science is inherently a form of public knowledge that relies heavily on cultural values and society.

  8. Neither invented nor shared here

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Ana Luiza de Araújo; Knudsen, M. P.; Søndergaard, Helle Alsted

    2014-01-01

    against the sourcing of external knowledge (the Not-invented-here (NIH) syndrome) and against the external exploitation of knowledge assets (the Not-shared-here (NSH) syndrome). Using survey data collected from 331 firms, this article empirically assesses the theoretical assertion that the NIH and NSH......Despite the massive interest in open innovation, limited attention has been expressed concerning the intra-organizational challenges in implementing it. An exemplary issue is the unwillingness of employees to undertake extra-organizational knowledge transactions in the form of negative attitudes...... an explanation for the problems that firms face in benefiting from inflows and outflows of knowledge and possible guidance as to how managers can disengage such attitudes....

  9. Sharing Space Situational Awareness Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, D.

    2010-09-01

    The Commander, United States Strategic Command (CDRUSSTRATCOM) accepted responsibility for sharing space situational awareness (SSA) information/services with commercial & foreign entities from the US Air Force on 22 Dec 09 (formerly the Commercial & Foreign Entities Pilot Program). The requirement to share SSA services with non-US Government (USG) entities is derived from Title 10, United States Code, Section 2274 (2010) and is consistent with the new National Space Policy. US Strategic Command’s (USSTRATCOM’s) sharing of SSA services consists of basic services (Two-Line Elements, decay data and satellite catalog details) available on www.space-track.org and advanced services (conjunction assessment, launch support, etc) available with a signed agreement. USSTRATCOM has requested USG permission to enter into international agreements to enable SSA data exchange with our foreign partners. USSTRATCOM recently authorized Joint Functional Component Command for Space (JFCC SPACE) to share Conjunction Summary Messages (CSMs) with satellite owner/operators whose satellites have been identified as closely approaching another space object. CSMs contain vector and covariance data computed using Special Perturbations theory. To facilitate the utility of the CSMs, USSTRATCOM has and is hosting CSM Workshops to ensure satellite operators fully understand the data contained in the CSM in order to provide an informed recommendation to their leadership. As JFCC SPACE matures its ability to accept ephemeris data from a satellite operator, it will be necessary to automatically transfer that data from one security level to another. USSTRATCOM and Air Force Space Command are coordinating the integration of a cross domain solution that will allow JFCC SPACE to do just that. Finally, USSTRATCOM is also working with commercial and governmental organizations to develop an internationally-accepted conjunction assessment message. The United States Government (USG), specifically the

  10. Hadron therapy information sharing prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Roman, Faustin Laurentiu; Kanellopoulos, Vassiliki; Amoros, Gabriel; Davies, Jim; Dosanjh, Manjit; Jena, Raj; Kirkby, Norman; Peach, Ken; Salt, Jose

    2013-01-01

    The European PARTNER project developed a prototypical system for sharing hadron therapy data. This system allows doctors and patients to record and report treatment-related events during and after hadron therapy. It presents doctors and statisticians with an integrated view of adverse events across institutions, using open-source components for data federation, semantics, and analysis. There is a particular emphasis upon semantic consistency, achieved through intelligent, annotated form designs. The system as presented is ready for use in a clinical setting, and amenable to further customization. The essential contribution of the work reported here lies in the novel data integration and reporting methods, as well as the approach to software sustainability achieved through the use of community-supported open-source components.

  11. Organisational Diversity and Knowledge Sharing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauring, Jakob; Jonasson, Charlotte

    The last years' focus on diversity management has gone from social responsibility to arguments for the competitive advantages, called the business case. It has been argued that diversity management can increase organisational efficiency, improve on moral, and give better access to new market...... segments. But a substantial critique has recently been launched at the arguments for the business case for diversity, especially in the employment of knowledge synergies. Most studies that support or reject the business case argument have limited their research to establish a link between organisational...... productivity and diversity management - that is not engaging in a discussion of how and why there could be potential benefits or difficulties. In this paper we will describe and analyse some of the complications multicultural organisations can experience in regard to knowledge sharing...

  12. Financial Assets [share, bonds] & Ancylia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksoed, Wh-

    2016-11-01

    Instead Elaine Scarry: "Thermonuclear monarchy" reinvent Carry Nation since Aug 17, 1965 the Republic of Indonesia's President speech: "Reach to the Star", for "cancellation" usually found in External Debt herewith retrieved from "the Window of theWorld": Ancylia, feast in March, a month named after Mars, the god of war. "On March 19 they used to put on their biggest performance of gymnastics in order to "bribe" their god for another good year", further we have vacancy & "vacuum tube"- Bulat Air karena Pembuluh, Bulat Kata karena Mufakat" proverb from Minangkabau, West Sumatra. Follows March 19, 1984 are first prototype flight of IAI Astra Jet as well as March 19, 2012 invoice accompanies Electric car Kujang-193, Fainancial Assets [share, bonds] are the answer for "infrastructure" & state owned enterprises assets to be hedged first initial debt per capita accordances. Heartfelt gratitudes to HE. Mr. Ir. Sarwono Kusumaatmadja/PT. Smartfren INDONESIA.

  13. Formaldehyde scavengers function as novel antigen retrieval agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollert, Craig T.; Moree, Wilna J.; Gregory, Steven; Bark, Steven J.; Eriksen, Jason L.

    2015-01-01

    Antigen retrieval agents improve the detection of formaldehyde-fixed proteins, but how they work is not well understood. We demonstrate that formaldehyde scavenging represents a key characteristic associated with effective antigen retrieval; under controlled temperature and pH conditions, scavenging improves the typical antigen retrieval process through reversal of formaldehyde-protein adduct formation. This approach provides a rational framework for the identification and development of more effective antigen retrieval agents. PMID:26612041

  14. Tamper-proof secret image-sharing scheme for identifying cheated secret keys and shared images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Chang; Liu, Chong-An

    2013-01-01

    A (t,n) secret image-sharing scheme shares a secret image to n participants, and the t users recover the image. During the recovery procedure of a conventional secret image-sharing scheme, cheaters may use counterfeit secret keys or modified shared images to cheat other users' secret keys and shared images. A cheated secret key or shared image leads to an incorrect secret image. Unfortunately, the cheater cannot be identified. We present an exponent and modulus-based scheme to provide a tamper-proof secret image-sharing scheme for identifying cheaters on secret keys or shared images. The proposed scheme allows users to securely select their secret key. This assignment can be performed over networks. Modulus results of each shared image is calculated to recognize cheaters of a shared image. Experimental results indicate that the proposed scheme is excellent at identifying cheated secret keys and shared images.

  15. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product...

  16. Antigen-specific active immunotherapy for ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leffers, Ninke; Daemen, Toos; Helfrich, Wijnand; Boezen, H. Marike; Cohlen, Ben J.; Melief, Cornelis J. M.; Nijman, Hans W.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite advances in chemotherapy, prognosis of ovarian cancer remains poor. Antigen-specific active immunotherapy aims to induce tumour-antigen-specific anti-tumour immune responses as an alternative treatment for ovarian cancer. OBJECTIVES: To assess the feasibility of antigen-specific

  17. Antigen-specific active immunotherapy for ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leffers, N.; Daemen, T.; Helfrich, W.; Boezen, H. M.; Cohlen, B. J.; Melief, Cornelis; Nijman, H. W.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite advances in chemotherapy, prognosis of ovarian cancer remains poor. Antigen-specific active immunotherapy aims to induce a tumour-antigen-specific anti-tumour immune responses as an alternative treatment for ovarian cancer. OBJECTIVES: To assess feasibility of antigen-specific

  18. Role of HLA antigens in Rh (D) alloimmunized pregnant women ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Immunogenetic studies in various diseases provide potential genetic markers. We have studied the incidence of HLA A, B, C, DR and DQ loci antigen in Rh (D) antigen isoimmunized mothers compared to those nonimmunized isoimmunized Rh negative mothers. Seventy six mothers who were immunized to Rh (D) antigen ...

  19. Use of magnetic nanobeads to study intracellular antigen processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrin-Cocon, Laure A.; Chesne, Serge; Pignot-Paintrand, Isabelle; Marche, Patrice N.; Villiers, Christian L. E-mail: christian.villiers@cea.fr

    2001-07-01

    Magnetic nanobeads were covalently linked to antigens and used as a tool to simultaneously follow their intracellular transport into the cells and specifically purify the intracellular compartments implicated in antigen processing. The protein content of these vesicles was analysed by 2D-electrophoresis. Furthermore, nanobeads allowed intracellular localisation of the antigen in electron and fluorescence microscopy.

  20. Use of magnetic nanobeads to study intracellular antigen processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrin-Cocon, Laure A.; Chesne, Serge; Pignot-Paintrand, Isabelle; Marche, Patrice N.; Villiers, Christian L.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic nanobeads were covalently linked to antigens and used as a tool to simultaneously follow their intracellular transport into the cells and specifically purify the intracellular compartments implicated in antigen processing. The protein content of these vesicles was analysed by 2D-electrophoresis. Furthermore, nanobeads allowed intracellular localisation of the antigen in electron and fluorescence microscopy

  1. Pro SharePoint 2010 Search

    CERN Document Server

    Noble, J; Bakman-Mikalski, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Pro SharePoint 2010 Search gives you expert advice on planning, deploying and customizing searches in SharePoint 2010. Drawing on the authors' extensive experience of working with real-world SharePoint deployments, this book teaches everything you'll need to know to create well-designed SharePoint solutions that always keep the end-user's experience in mind. Increase your search efficiency with SharePoint 2010's search functionality: extend the search user interface using third-party tools, and utilize analytics to improve relevancy. This practical hands-on book is a must-have resource for any

  2. Pro SharePoint 2013 administration

    CERN Document Server

    Garrett, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Pro SharePoint 2013 Administration is a practical guide to SharePoint 2013 for intermediate to advanced SharePoint administrators and power users, covering the out-of-the-box feature set and capabilities of Microsoft's collaboration and business productivity platform. SharePoint 2013 is an incredibly complex product, with many moving parts, new features, best practices, and 'gotchas.' Author Rob Garrett distills SharePoint's portfolio of features, capabilities, and utilities into an in-depth professional guide-with no fluff and copious advice-that is designed from scratch to be the manual Micr

  3. Sharing dreams: sex and other sociodemographic variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schredl, Michael

    2009-08-01

    Dream sharing is a common experience for most people. Factors which might be related to dream sharing in a representative German sample were investigated in the present study. As expected, the frequency of positively toned and neutral dreams and the frequency of negatively toned dreams were related to dream sharing. In addition, an effect of sex was found: women shared their dreams more often than men. Dream sharing differing by social class and education might point to class-specific attitudes toward dreams which have not yet been studied in detail.

  4. Payoff Shares in Two-Player Contests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Häfner

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In imperfectly discriminating contests with symmetric valuations, equilibrium payoffs are positive shares of the value of the prize. In contrast to a bargaining situation, players’ shares sum to less than one because a residual share of the value is lost due to rent dissipation. In this paper, we consider contests with two players and investigate the relationship between these equilibrium shares and the parameters of a class of asymmetric Tullock contest success functions. Our main finding is that any players’ shares that sum up to less than one can arise as the unique outcome of a pure-strategy Nash equilibrium for appropriate parameters.

  5. SharePoint 2013 for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Withee, Ken

    2013-01-01

    The bestselling guide on running SharePoint, now updated to cover all the new features of SharePoint 2013 SharePoint Portal Server is an essential part of the enterprise infrastructure for many businesses. Building on the success of previous versions of SharePoint For Dummies, this new edition covers all the latest features of SharePoint 2013 and provides you with an easy-to-understand resource for making the most of all that this version has to offer. You'll learn how to get a site up and running, branded, and populated with content, workflow, and management. In addition, t

  6. Four Models of Sharing Economy Platforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Constantiou, Ioanna; Marton, Attila; Tuunainen, Virpi Kristiina

    2017-01-01

    Sharing economy platforms combine organizational and market mechanisms in innovative ways to gain competitive advantages over incumbents. These mechanisms are combined on two key dimensions: tight or loose control over participants, and high or low rivalry between participants. We call...... the resulting four sharing economy models "Franchiser," "Principal," "Chaperone" and "Gardener." Each model focuses on a different value proposition and strategic intent, but they all exploit the growing fluidity of organizational boundaries. Understanding the sharing economy in these terms enables businesses...... to identify, and respond to, the threats and opportunities provided by sharing economy platforms. The lessons learned from our research will help businesses to engage with the sharing economy....

  7. Provider collaboration: cohesion, constellations, and shared patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandl, Kenneth D; Olson, Karen L; Mines, Daniel; Liu, Chunfu; Tian, Fang

    2014-11-01

    There is a natural assumption that quality and efficiency are optimized when providers consistently work together and share patients. Diversity in composition and recurrence of groups that provide face-to-face care to the same patients has not previously been studied. Claims data enable identification of the constellation of providers caring for a single patient. To indirectly measure teamwork and provider collaboration, we measure recurrence of provider constellations and cohesion among providers. Retrospective analysis of commercial healthcare claims from a single insurer. Patients with claims for office visits and their outpatient providers. To maximize capture of provider panels, the cohort was drawn from the four regions with the highest plan coverage. Regional outpatient provider networks were constructed with providers as nodes and number of shared patients as links. Measures of cohesion and stability of provider constellations derived from the networks of providers to quantify patient sharing. For 10,325 providers and their 521,145 patients, there were 2,641,933 collaborative provider pairs sharing at least one patient. Fifty-four percent only shared a single patient, and 19 % shared two. Of 15,449,835 unique collaborative triads, 92 % shared one patient, 5 % shared two, and 0.2 % shared ten or more. Patient constellations had a median of four providers. Any precise constellation recurred rarely-89 % with exactly two providers shared just one patient and only 4 % shared over two; 97 % of constellations with exactly three providers shared just one patient. Four percent of constellations with 2+ providers were not at all cohesive, sharing only the hub patient. In the remaining constellations, a median of 93 % of provider pairs shared at least one additional patient beyond the hub patient. Stunning variability in the constellations of providers caring for patients may challenge underlying assumptions about the current state of teamwork in healthcare.

  8. Share Conversion, Pseudorandom Secret-Sharing and Applications to Secure Computation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J.F. Cramer (Ronald); I.B. Damgård (Ivan); Y. Ishai

    2005-01-01

    htmlabstractWe present a method for converting shares of a secret into shares of the same secret in a different secret-sharing scheme using only local computation and no communication between players. In particular, shares in a replicated scheme based on a CNF representation of the access structure

  9. The chicken erythrocyte-specific MHC antigen. Characterization and purification of the B-G antigen by monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, J; Skjødt, K; Crone, M

    1987-01-01

    Mouse monoclonal antibodies with B-G antigen (major histocompatibility complex class IV) specificity were obtained after immunization with erythrocytes or partially purified B-G antigen. The specificities of the hybridoma antibodies were determined by precipitation of B-G antigens from 125I-label...

  10. Classification of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) supertypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Mingjun; Claesson, Mogens H

    2014-01-01

    Identification of new antigenic peptides, derived from infectious agents or cancer cells, which bind to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II molecules, is of importance for the development of new effective vaccines capable of activating the cellular arm of the immune response. However......, the barrier to the development of peptide-based vaccines with maximum population coverage is that the restricting HLA genes are extremely polymorphic resulting in a vast diversity of peptide-binding HLA specificities and a low population coverage for any given peptide-HLA specificity. One way to reduce...... this complexity is to group thousands of different HLA molecules into several so-called HLA supertypes: a classification that refers to a group of HLA alleles with largely overlapping peptide binding specificities. In this chapter, we focus on the state-of-the-art classification of HLA supertypes including HLA...

  11. Radionuclide-labelled antigens in serological epidemiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felsenfeld, O.; Parrott, M.W.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of tests using radionuclide-labelled antigens in serological surveys was studied, with particular attention to the likely availability of facilities and personnel in the tropics and arctics, where measurements may be disturbed by climatic influences. The methodology required was to be simple, rapid and suitable for examining large numbers of sera, as for epidemological surveys. In the introduction, limitations of labelled antigen tests are discussed, the choice of radionuclide and measurement methods, test procedures and evaluation of results. Collection, preservation and shipment of speciments (serum, faeces, cerebrospinal fluid, sputum, etc.) are described. Experiments with bacteria and bacterial toxins (Enterobacteriaceae, vibrios, staphylococci, meningococci, etc.), with protozoa and metazoa (Entamoeba hystolytica, Schistosoma mansoni, Trypanosoma cruzi, Plasmodia and other parasites), with viruses (vaccinia, adeno-, polio-, and influenza viruses, etc.), and with fungi are discussed

  12. Methamphetamine inhibits antigen processing, presentation, and phagocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsolt Tallóczy

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine (Meth is abused by over 35 million people worldwide. Chronic Meth abuse may be particularly devastating in individuals who engage in unprotected sex with multiple partners because it is associated with a 2-fold higher risk for obtaining HIV and associated secondary infections. We report the first specific evidence that Meth at pharmacological concentrations exerts a direct immunosuppressive effect on dendritic cells and macrophages. As a weak base, Meth collapses the pH gradient across acidic organelles, including lysosomes and associated autophagic organelles. This in turn inhibits receptor-mediated phagocytosis of antibody-coated particles, MHC class II antigen processing by the endosomal-lysosomal pathway, and antigen presentation to splenic T cells by dendritic cells. More importantly Meth facilitates intracellular replication and inhibits intracellular killing of Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans, two major AIDS-related pathogens. Meth exerts previously unreported direct immunosuppressive effects that contribute to increased risk of infection and exacerbate AIDS pathology.

  13. Compulsory acquisition of shares buyer, other shareholders, abuse of right of compulsory acquisition of shares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsić Zoran V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Company Act of Republic of Serbia includes mechanism for the compulsory acquisition of the shareholdings of minority shareholders. Technically this procedure is effected on the basis of the shareholders assembly resolution. Buyer is shareholder who has at least 90% of share capital and at least 90% of votes. Shares owned by entity under his dominant influence will be treated as shares of that shareholder provided that dominant influence exists at least one year. Company's own shares, and shares subject o a pledge do not represent shares of other shareholders. There are several actions which may be treated as abuse of right of compulsory acquisition of shares.

  14. Therapeutic Antibodies against Intracellular Tumor Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Trenevska

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies are among the most clinically effective drugs used to treat cancer. However, their target repertoire is limited as there are relatively few tumor-specific or tumor-associated cell surface or soluble antigens. Intracellular molecules represent nearly half of the human proteome and provide an untapped reservoir of potential therapeutic targets. Antibodies have been developed to target externalized antigens, have also been engineered to enter into cells or may be expressed intracellularly with the aim of binding intracellular antigens. Furthermore, intracellular proteins can be degraded by the proteasome into short, commonly 8–10 amino acid long, peptides that are presented on the cell surface in the context of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I molecules. These tumor-associated peptide–MHC-I complexes can then be targeted by antibodies known as T-cell receptor mimic (TCRm or T-cell receptor (TCR-like antibodies, which recognize epitopes comprising both the peptide and the MHC-I molecule, similar to the recognition of such complexes by the TCR on T cells. Advances in the production of TCRm antibodies have enabled the generation of multiple TCRm antibodies, which have been tested in vitro and in vivo, expanding our understanding of their mechanisms of action and the importance of target epitope selection and expression. This review will summarize multiple approaches to targeting intracellular antigens with therapeutic antibodies, in particular describing the production and characterization of TCRm antibodies, the factors influencing their target identification, their advantages and disadvantages in the context of TCR therapies, and the potential to advance TCRm-based therapies into the clinic.

  15. ABO blood group antigens in oral mucosa. What is new?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabelsteen, Erik

    2002-01-01

    Histo-blood group ABH (O) antigens are major alloantigens in humans. These antigens are widely distributed in human tissues and undergo changes in expression during cellular differentiation and malignant development. The ABH antigens have been characterized as terminal disaccharide determinants...... healing show similarly decreased expression of A/B antigens on migrating epithelial cells. Some studies suggest that the relationship between expression of blood group antigens and cell motility can be explained by different degrees of glycosylation of integrins. Changes in ABO expression in tumours have...

  16. The Antigenic Structure Characterization of Oestrus Ovis Larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Moţ

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available With the aim of proteic components definition from Oestrus ovis larvae, endowed with antigenic properties, able to induce immune responses in vivo and to react in vitro with induced molecular effectors were been performed: electrophoresis in poliacrilamid gel, western blot technique preceded by immunotransfer, immunoassay test. Total soluble larval antigens of O. ovis were been prepared through ultrasonic disintegration, from all three larval stages. Western blot technique allowed and emphasized the specific antigens with a superior sensitivity in comparison with SDS-PAGE electrophoresis. After antigenic characteristics demonstration of investigated larval antigens were been performed the immunoassay test to emphasized the antibodies dozes for O. ovis infestation diagnosis.

  17. Semiotes: a semantics for sharing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazic, T

    2000-12-01

    Reliable, automated communication of biological information requires methods to declare the information's semantics. In this paper I describe an approach to semantic declaration intended to permit independent, distributed databases, algorithms, and servers to exchange and process requests for information and computations without requiring coordination or agreement among them on universe of discourse, data model, schema, or implementation. This approach uses Glossa, a formal language defining the semantics of biological ideas, information, and algorithms, to executably define the semantics of complex ideas and computations by constructs of semiotes, terms which axiomatically define very simple notions. A database or algorithm wishing to exchange information or computations maintains a set of mappings between its particular notions and semiotes, and a parser to translate between its indigenous ideas and implementation and the semiotes. Requests from other databases or algorithms are issued as semiotic messages, locally interpreted and processed, and the results returned as semiotes to the requesting entity. Thus, semiotes serve as a shared, abstract layer of definitions which can be computably combined by each database or algorithm according to its own needs and ideas. By combining the explicit declaration of semantics with the computation of the semantics of complex ideas, Glossa and its semiotes permit independent computational entities to lightly federate their capabilities as desired while maintaining their unique perspectives on both scientific and technical questions.

  18. ALASKA: Applet and Library Augmented Shared Knowledge Areas (Shared Workspace Project or Shared Spaces with Agents and Actors)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-20

    to explore where the ALASKA system could be used to improve teacher and student performance . 7. Advised on a formative interaction and engagement...ALASKA: Applet and Library Augmented Shared Knowledge Areas (Shared Workspace Project or Shared Spaces with Agents and Actors . 5. FUNDING...NUMBERS FA9550-05-1-0128 6. AUTHOR(S) Phil Vahey 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER

  19. How to Share Secret Efficiently over Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lein Harn

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In a secret-sharing scheme, the secret is shared among a set of shareholders, and it can be reconstructed if a quorum of these shareholders work together by releasing their secret shares. However, in many applications, it is undesirable for nonshareholders to learn the secret. In these cases, pairwise secure channels are needed among shareholders to exchange the shares. In other words, a shared key needs to be established between every pair of shareholders. But employing an additional key establishment protocol may make the secret-sharing schemes significantly more complicated. To solve this problem, we introduce a new type of secret-sharing, called protected secret-sharing (PSS, in which the shares possessed by shareholders not only can be used to reconstruct the original secret but also can be used to establish the shared keys between every pair of shareholders. Therefore, in the secret reconstruction phase, the recovered secret is only available to shareholders but not to nonshareholders. In this paper, an information theoretically secure PSS scheme is proposed, its security properties are analyzed, and its computational complexity is evaluated. Moreover, our proposed PSS scheme also can be applied to threshold cryptosystems to prevent nonshareholders from learning the output of the protocols.

  20. Polyclonal antibodies for the detection of Trypanosoma cruzi circulating antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith S Málaga-Machaca

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Detection of Trypanosoma cruzi antigens in clinical samples is considered an important diagnostic tool for Chagas disease. The production and use of polyclonal antibodies may contribute to an increase in the sensitivity of immunodiagnosis of Chagas disease.Polyclonal antibodies were raised in alpacas, rabbits, and hens immunized with trypomastigote excreted-secreted antigen, membrane proteins, trypomastigote lysate antigen and recombinant 1F8 to produce polyclonal antibodies. Western blot analysis was performed to determine specificity of the developed antibodies. An antigen capture ELISA of circulating antigens in serum, plasma and urine samples was developed using IgY polyclonal antibodies against T. cruzi membrane antigens (capture antibody and IgG from alpaca raised against TESA. A total of 33 serum, 23 plasma and 9 urine samples were analyzed using the developed test. Among serum samples, compared to serology, the antigen capture ELISA tested positive in 55% of samples. All plasma samples from serology positive subjects were positive in the antigen capture ELISA. All urine positive samples had corresponding plasma samples that were also positive when tested by the antigen capture ELISA.Polyclonal antibodies are useful for detection of circulating antigens in both the plasma and urine of infected individuals. Detection of antigens is direct evidence of the presence of the parasite, and could be a better surrogate of current infection status.

  1. Association of Pneumococcal Protein Antigen Serology With Age and Antigenic Profile of Colonizing Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarian, Taj; Grant, Lindsay R; Georgieva, Maria; Hammitt, Laura L; Reid, Raymond; Bentley, Stephen D; Goldblatt, David; Santosham, Mathuran; Weatherholtz, Robert; Burbidge, Paula; Goklish, Novalene; Thompson, Claudette M; Hanage, William P; O'Brien, Kate L; Lipsitch, Marc

    2017-03-01

    Several Streptococcus pneumoniae proteins play a role in pathogenesis and are being investigated as vaccine targets. It is largely unknown whether naturally acquired antibodies reduce the risk of colonization with strains expressing a particular antigenic variant. Serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) titers to 28 pneumococcal protein antigens were measured among 242 individuals aged - 30 days after serum collection, and the antigen variant in each pneumococcal isolate was determined using genomic data. We assessed the association between preexisting variant-specific antibody titers and subsequent carriage of pneumococcus expressing a particular antigen variant. Antibody titers often increased across pediatric groups before decreasing among adults. Individuals with low titers against group 3 pneumococcal surface protein C (PspC) variants were more likely to be colonized with pneumococci expressing those variants. For other antigens, variant-specific IgG titers do not predict colonization. We observed an inverse association between variant-specific antibody concentration and homologous pneumococcal colonization for only 1 protein. Further assessment of antibody repertoires may elucidate the nature of antipneumococcal antibody-mediated mucosal immunity while informing vaccine development. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Monoclonal Antibodies 13A4 and AC133 Do Not Recognize the Canine Ortholog of Mouse and Human Stem Cell Antigen Prominin-1 (CD133.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Thamm

    Full Text Available The pentaspan membrane glycoprotein prominin-1 (CD133 is widely used in medicine as a cell surface marker of stem and cancer stem cells. It has opened new avenues in stem cell-based regenerative therapy and oncology. This molecule is largely used with human samples or the mouse model, and consequently most biological tools including antibodies are directed against human and murine prominin-1. Although the general structure of prominin-1 including its membrane topology is conserved throughout the animal kingdom, its primary sequence is poorly conserved. Thus, it is unclear if anti-human and -mouse prominin-1 antibodies cross-react with their orthologs in other species, especially dog. Answering this issue is imperative in light of the growing number of studies using canine prominin-1 as an antigenic marker. Here, we address this issue by cloning the canine prominin-1 and use its overexpression as a green fluorescent protein fusion protein in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells to determine its immunoreactivity with antibodies against human or mouse prominin-1. We used immunocytochemistry, flow cytometry and immunoblotting techniques and surprisingly found no cross-species immunoreactivity. These results raise some caution in data interpretation when anti-prominin-1 antibodies are used in interspecies studies.

  3. Physiological level production of antigen-specific human immunoglobulin in cloned transchromosomic cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Akiko; Matsushita, Hiroaki; Wu, Hua; Jiao, Jin-An; Kasinathan, Poothappillai; Sullivan, Eddie J; Wang, Zhongde; Kuroiwa, Yoshimi

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic human polyclonal antibodies (hpAbs) derived from pooled plasma from human donors are Food and Drug Administration approved biologics used in the treatment of a variety of human diseases. Powered by the natural diversity of immune response, hpAbs are effective in treating diseases caused by complex or quickly-evolving antigens such as viruses. We previously showed that transchromosomic (Tc) cattle carrying a human artificial chromosome (HAC) comprising the entire unrearranged human immunoglobulin heavy-chain (hIGH) and kappa-chain (hIGK) germline loci (named as κHAC) are capable of producing functional hpAbs when both of the bovine immunoglobulin mu heavy-chains, bIGHM and bIGHML1, are homozygously inactivated (double knockouts or DKO). However, B lymphocyte development in these Tc cattle is compromised, and the overall production of hpAbs is low. Here, we report the construction of an improved HAC, designated as cKSL-HACΔ, by incorporating all of the human immunoglobulin germline loci into the HAC. Furthermore, for avoiding the possible human-bovine interspecies incompatibility between the human immunoglobulin mu chain protein (hIgM) and bovine transmembrane α and β immunoglobulins (bIgα and bIgβ) in the pre-B cell receptor (pre-BCR) complex, we partially replaced (bovinized) the hIgM constant domain with the counterpart of bovine IgM (bIgM) that is involved in the interaction between bIgM and bIgα/Igβ; human IgM bovinization would also improve the functionality of hIgM in supporting B cell activation and proliferation. We also report the successful production of DKO Tc cattle carrying the cKSL-HACΔ (cKSL-HACΔ/DKO), the dramatic improvement of B cell development in these cattle and the high level production of hpAbs (as measured for the human IgG isotype) in the plasma. We further demonstrate that, upon immunization by tumor immunogens, high titer tumor immunogen-specific human IgG (hIgG) can be produced from such Tc cattle.

  4. Physiological level production of antigen-specific human immunoglobulin in cloned transchromosomic cattle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiko Sano

    Full Text Available Therapeutic human polyclonal antibodies (hpAbs derived from pooled plasma from human donors are Food and Drug Administration approved biologics used in the treatment of a variety of human diseases. Powered by the natural diversity of immune response, hpAbs are effective in treating diseases caused by complex or quickly-evolving antigens such as viruses. We previously showed that transchromosomic (Tc cattle carrying a human artificial chromosome (HAC comprising the entire unrearranged human immunoglobulin heavy-chain (hIGH and kappa-chain (hIGK germline loci (named as κHAC are capable of producing functional hpAbs when both of the bovine immunoglobulin mu heavy-chains, bIGHM and bIGHML1, are homozygously inactivated (double knockouts or DKO. However, B lymphocyte development in these Tc cattle is compromised, and the overall production of hpAbs is low. Here, we report the construction of an improved HAC, designated as cKSL-HACΔ, by incorporating all of the human immunoglobulin germline loci into the HAC. Furthermore, for avoiding the possible human-bovine interspecies incompatibility between the human immunoglobulin mu chain protein (hIgM and bovine transmembrane α and β immunoglobulins (bIgα and bIgβ in the pre-B cell receptor (pre-BCR complex, we partially replaced (bovinized the hIgM constant domain with the counterpart of bovine IgM (bIgM that is involved in the interaction between bIgM and bIgα/Igβ; human IgM bovinization would also improve the functionality of hIgM in supporting B cell activation and proliferation. We also report the successful production of DKO Tc cattle carrying the cKSL-HACΔ (cKSL-HACΔ/DKO, the dramatic improvement of B cell development in these cattle and the high level production of hpAbs (as measured for the human IgG isotype in the plasma. We further demonstrate that, upon immunization by tumor immunogens, high titer tumor immunogen-specific human IgG (hIgG can be produced from such Tc cattle.

  5. The genome sequence of the highly acetic acid-tolerant Zygosaccharomyces bailii-derived interspecies hybrid strain ISA1307, isolated from a sparkling wine plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mira, Nuno P; Münsterkötter, Martin; Dias-Valada, Filipa; Santos, Júlia; Palma, Margarida; Roque, Filipa C; Guerreiro, Joana F; Rodrigues, Fernando; Sousa, Maria João; Leão, Cecília; Güldener, Ulrich; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2014-06-01

    In this work, it is described the sequencing and annotation of the genome of the yeast strain ISA1307, isolated from a sparkling wine continuous production plant. This strain, formerly considered of the Zygosaccharomyces bailii species, has been used to study Z. bailii physiology, in particular, its extreme tolerance to acetic acid stress at low pH. The analysis of the genome sequence described in this work indicates that strain ISA1307 is an interspecies hybrid between Z. bailii and a closely related species. The genome sequence of ISA1307 is distributed through 154 scaffolds and has a size of around 21.2 Mb, corresponding to 96% of the genome size estimated by flow cytometry. Annotation of ISA1307 genome includes 4385 duplicated genes (∼ 90% of the total number of predicted genes) and 1155 predicted single-copy genes. The functional categories including a higher number of genes are 'Metabolism and generation of energy', 'Protein folding, modification and targeting' and 'Biogenesis of cellular components'. The knowledge of the genome sequence of the ISA1307 strain is expected to contribute to accelerate systems-level understanding of stress resistance mechanisms in Z. bailii and to inspire and guide novel biotechnological applications of this yeast species/strain in fermentation processes, given its high resilience to acidic stress. The availability of the ISA1307 genome sequence also paves the way to a better understanding of the genetic mechanisms underlying the generation and selection of more robust hybrid yeast strains in the stressful environment of wine fermentations. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  6. Effect of epigenetic modification with trichostatin A and S-adenosylhomocysteine on developmental competence and POU5F1-EGFP expression of interspecies cloned embryos in dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousai, M; Hosseini, S M; Hajian, M; Jafarpour, F; Asgari, V; Forouzanfar, M; Nasr-Esfahani, M H

    2015-10-01

    Adult canine fibroblasts stably transfected with either cytomegalovirus (CMV) or POU5F1 promoter-driven enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were used to investigate if pre-treatment of these donor cells with two epigenetic drugs [trichostatin A (TSA), or S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH)] can improve the efficiency of interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT). Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), analyses revealed that TSA, but not SAH, treatment of both transgenic and non-transgenic fibroblasts significantly increased acetylation levels compared with untreated relatives. The expression levels of Bcl2 and P53 were significantly affected in TSA-treated cells compared with untreated cells, whereas SAH treatment had no significant effect on cell apoptosis. Irrespective of epigenetic modification, dog/bovine iSCNT embryos had overall similar rates of cleavage and development to 8-16-cell and morula stages in non-transgenic groups. For transgenic reconstructed embryos, however, TSA and SAH could significantly improve development to 8-16-cell and morula stages compared with control. Even though, irrespective of cell transgenesis and epigenetic modification, none of the iSCNT embryos developed to the blastocyst stage. The iSCNT embryos carrying CMV-EGFP expressed EGFP at all developmental stages (2-cell, 4-cell, 8-16-cell, and morula) without mosaicism, while no POU5F1-EGFP signal was observed in any stage of developing iSCNT embryos irrespective of TSA/SAH epigenetic modifications. These results indicated that bovine oocytes partially remodel canine fibroblasts and that TSA and SAH have marginal beneficial effects on this process.

  7. Evolution and Emergence of Enteroviruses through Intra- and Inter-species Recombination: Plasticity and Phenotypic Impact of Modular Genetic Exchanges in the 5' Untranslated Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muslin, Claire; Joffret, Marie-Line; Pelletier, Isabelle; Blondel, Bruno; Delpeyroux, Francis

    2015-01-01

    Genetic recombination shapes the diversity of RNA viruses, including enteroviruses (EVs), which frequently have mosaic genomes. Pathogenic circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus (cVDPV) genomes consist of mutated vaccine poliovirus (PV) sequences encoding capsid proteins, and sequences encoding nonstructural proteins derived from other species' C EVs, including certain coxsackieviruses A (CV-A) in particular. Many cVDPV genomes also have an exogenous 5' untranslated region (5' UTR). This region is involved in virulence and includes the cloverleaf (CL) and the internal ribosomal entry site, which play major roles in replication and the initiation of translation, respectively. We investigated the plasticity of the PV genome in terms of recombination in the 5' UTR, by developing an experimental model involving the rescue of a bipartite PV/CV-A cVDPV genome rendered defective by mutations in the CL, following the co-transfection of cells with 5' UTR RNAs from each of the four human EV species (EV-A to -D). The defective cVDPV was rescued by recombination with 5' UTR sequences from the four EV species. Homologous and nonhomologous recombinants with large deletions or insertions in three hotspots were isolated, revealing a striking plasticity of the 5' UTR. By contrast to the recombination of the cVDPV with the 5' UTR of group II (EV-A and -B), which can decrease viral replication and virulence, recombination with the 5' UTRs of group I (EV-C and -D) appeared to be evolutionarily neutral or associated with a gain in fitness. This study illustrates how the genomes of positive-strand RNA viruses can evolve into mosaic recombinant genomes through intra- or inter-species modular genetic exchanges, favoring the emergence of new recombinant lineages.

  8. An Interspecies Signaling System Mediated by Fusaric Acid Has Parallel Effects on Antifungal Metabolite Production by Pseudomonas protegens Strain Pf-5 and Antibiosis of Fusarium spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quecine, Maria Carolina; Kidarsa, Teresa A; Goebel, Neal C; Shaffer, Brenda T; Henkels, Marcella D; Zabriskie, T Mark; Loper, Joyce E

    2015-12-11

    Pseudomonas protegens strain Pf-5 is a rhizosphere bacterium that suppresses soilborne plant diseases and produces at least seven different secondary metabolites with antifungal properties. We derived mutants of Pf-5 with single and multiple mutations in biosynthesis genes for seven antifungal metabolites: 2,4-diacetylphoroglucinol (DAPG), pyrrolnitrin, pyoluteorin, hydrogen cyanide, rhizoxin, orfamide A, and toxoflavin. These mutants were tested for inhibition of the pathogens Fusarium verticillioides and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. pisi. Rhizoxin, pyrrolnitrin, and DAPG were found to be primarily responsible for fungal antagonism by Pf-5. Previously, other workers showed that the mycotoxin fusaric acid, which is produced by many Fusarium species, including F. verticillioides, inhibited the production of DAPG by Pseudomonas spp. In this study, amendment of culture media with fusaric acid decreased DAPG production, increased pyoluteorin production, and had no consistent influence on pyrrolnitrin or orfamide A production by Pf-5. Fusaric acid also altered the transcription of biosynthetic genes, indicating that the mycotoxin influenced antibiotic production by Pf-5 at the transcriptional level. Addition of fusaric acid to the culture medium reduced antibiosis of F. verticillioides by Pf-5 and derivative strains that produce DAPG but had no effect on antibiosis by Pf-5 derivatives that suppressed F. verticillioides due to pyrrolnitrin or rhizoxin production. Our results demonstrated the importance of three compounds, rhizoxin, pyrrolnitrin, and DAPG, in suppression of Fusarium spp. by Pf-5 and confirmed that an interspecies signaling system mediated by fusaric acid had parallel effects on antifungal metabolite production and antibiosis by the bacterial biological control organism. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Is autoinducer-2 a universal signal for interspecies communication: a comparative genomic and phylogenetic analysis of the synthesis and signal transduction pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner-Döbler Irene

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quorum sensing is a process of bacterial cell-to-cell communication involving the production and detection of extracellular signaling molecules called autoinducers. Recently, it has been proposed that autoinducer-2 (AI-2, a furanosyl borate diester derived from the recycling of S-adenosyl-homocysteine (SAH to homocysteine, serves as a universal signal for interspecies communication. Results In this study, 138 completed genomes were examined for the genes involved in the synthesis and detection of AI-2. Except for some symbionts and parasites, all organisms have a pathway to recycle SAH, either using a two-step enzymatic conversion by the Pfs and LuxS enzymes or a one-step conversion using SAH-hydrolase (SahH. 51 organisms including most Gamma-, Beta-, and Epsilonproteobacteria, and Firmicutes possess the Pfs-LuxS pathway, while Archaea, Eukarya, Alphaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Cyanobacteria prefer the SahH pathway. In all 138 organisms, only the three Vibrio strains had strong, bidirectional matches to the periplasmic AI-2 binding protein LuxP and the central signal relay protein LuxU. The initial two-component sensor kinase protein LuxQ, and the terminal response regulator luxO are found in most Proteobacteria, as well as in some Firmicutes, often in several copies. Conclusions The genomic analysis indicates that the LuxS enzyme required for AI-2 synthesis is widespread in bacteria, while the periplasmic binding protein LuxP is only present in Vibrio strains. Thus, other organisms may either use components different from the AI-2 signal transduction system of Vibrio strains to sense the signal of AI-2, or they do not have such a quorum sensing system at all.

  10. The Genome Sequence of the Highly Acetic Acid-Tolerant Zygosaccharomyces bailii-Derived Interspecies Hybrid Strain ISA1307, Isolated From a Sparkling Wine Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mira, Nuno P.; Münsterkötter, Martin; Dias-Valada, Filipa; Santos, Júlia; Palma, Margarida; Roque, Filipa C.; Guerreiro, Joana F.; Rodrigues, Fernando; Sousa, Maria João; Leão, Cecília; Güldener, Ulrich; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    In this work, it is described the sequencing and annotation of the genome of the yeast strain ISA1307, isolated from a sparkling wine continuous production plant. This strain, formerly considered of the Zygosaccharomyces bailii species, has been used to study Z. bailii physiology, in particular, its extreme tolerance to acetic acid stress at low pH. The analysis of the genome sequence described in this work indicates that strain ISA1307 is an interspecies hybrid between Z. bailii and a closely related species. The genome sequence of ISA1307 is distributed through 154 scaffolds and has a size of around 21.2 Mb, corresponding to 96% of the genome size estimated by flow cytometry. Annotation of ISA1307 genome includes 4385 duplicated genes (∼90% of the total number of predicted genes) and 1155 predicted single-copy genes. The functional categories including a higher number of genes are ‘Metabolism and generation of energy’, ‘Protein folding, modification and targeting’ and ‘Biogenesis of cellular components’. The knowledge of the genome sequence of the ISA1307 strain is expected to contribute to accelerate systems-level understanding of stress resistance mechanisms in Z. bailii and to inspire and guide novel biotechnological applications of this yeast species/strain in fermentation processes, given its high resilience to acidic stress. The availability of the ISA1307 genome sequence also paves the way to a better understanding of the genetic mechanisms underlying the generation and selection of more robust hybrid yeast strains in the stressful environment of wine fermentations. PMID:24453040

  11. Sera of Chagasic patients react with antigens from the tomato parasite Phytomonas serpens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane K Graça-de Souza

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The genus Phytomonas comprises trypanosomatids that can parasitize a broad range of plant species. These fagellates can cause diseases in some plant families with a wide geographic distribution, which can result in great economic losses. We have demonstrated previously that Phytomonas serpens 15T, a tomato trypanosomatid, shares antigens with Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of human Chagas disease. Herein, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE and mass spectrometry (MS were used to identify proteins of P. serpens 15T that are recognized by sera from patients with Chagas disease. After 2D-electrophoresis of whole-cell lysates, 31 peptides were selected and analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry. Twenty-eight polypeptides were identifed, resulting in 22 different putative proteins. The identifed proteins were classifed into 8 groups according to biological process, most of which were clustered into a cellular metabolic process category. These results generated a collection of proteins that can provide a starting point to obtain insights into antigenic cross reactivity among trypanosomatids and to explore P. serpens antigens as candidates for vaccine and immunologic diagnosis studies.

  12. Sera of chagasic patients react with antigens from the tomato parasite Phytomonas serpens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graça-de Souza, Viviane K; Monteiro-Góes, Viviane; Manque, Patrício; Souza, Tatiana A C B; Corrêa, Paulo R C; Buck, Gregory A; Ávila, Andréa R; Yamauchi, Lucy M; Pinge-Filho, Phileno; Goldenberg, Samuel; Krieger, Marco A; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli F

    2010-01-01

    The genus Phytomonas comprises trypanosomatids that can parasitize a broad range of plant species. These flagellates can cause diseases in some plant families with a wide geographic distribution, which can result in great economic losses. We have demonstrated previously that Phytomonas serpens 15T, a tomato trypanosomatid, shares antigens with Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of human Chagas disease. Herein, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry (MS) were used to identify proteins of P. serpens 15T that are recognized by sera from patients with Chagas disease. After 2D-electrophoresis of whole-cell lysates, 31 peptides were selected and analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry. Twenty-eight polypeptides were identified, resulting in 22 different putative proteins. The identified proteins were classified into 8 groups according to biological process, most of which were clustered into a cellular metabolic process category. These results generated a collection of proteins that can provide a starting point to obtain insights into antigenic cross reactivity among trypanosomatids and to explore P. serpens antigens as candidates for vaccine and immunologic diagnosis studies.

  13. CD1a presentation of endogenous antigens by group 2 innate lymphoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardman, Clare S; Chen, Yi-Ling; Salimi, Maryam; Jarrett, Rachael; Johnson, David; Järvinen, Valtteri J; Owens, Raymond J; Repapi, Emmanouela; Cousins, David J; Barlow, Jillian L; McKenzie, Andrew N J; Ogg, Graham

    2017-12-22

    Group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2) are effectors of barrier immunity, with roles in infection, wound healing, and allergy. A proportion of ILC2 express MHCII (major histocompatibility complex II) and are capable of presenting peptide antigens to T cells and amplifying the subsequent adaptive immune response. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of CD1a-reactive T cells in allergy and infection, activated by the presentation of endogenous neolipid antigens and bacterial components. Using a human skin challenge model, we unexpectedly show that human skin-derived ILC2 can express CD1a and are capable of presenting endogenous antigens to T cells. CD1a expression is up-regulated by TSLP (thymic stromal lymphopoietin) at levels observed in the skin of patients with atopic dermatitis, and the response is dependent on PLA2G4A. Furthermore, this pathway is used to sense Staphylococcus aureus by promoting Toll-like receptor-dependent CD1a-reactive T cell responses to endogenous ligands. These findings define a previously unrecognized role for ILC2 in lipid surveillance and identify shared pathways of CD1a- and PLA2G4A-dependent ILC2 inflammation amenable to therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  14. SharePoint 2007 Collaboration For Dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Harvey, Greg

    2009-01-01

    If you're looking for a way to help your teams access what they need to know, work together, and get the job done, SharePoint can do just that. SharePoint 2007 Collaboration For Dummies shows you the easiest way to set up and customize SharePoint, manage your data, interact using SharePoint blogs and wikis, integrate Office programs, and make your office more productive. You'll learn what SharePoint can do and how to make it work for your business, understand the technical terms, and enable your people to collaborate on documents and spreadsheets. You'll even discover how to get SharePoint hel

  15. Managing inter-organizational knowledge sharing

    OpenAIRE

    Loebbecke, C.; van Fenema, P.C.; Powell, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Corporate knowledge is considered a crucial determinant of sustainable competitive advantages. Recent resource-leveraging strategies emphasize inter-firm collaboration and knowledge sharing across firm boundaries, however. This strategic paradox of protecting versus sharing knowledge suggests the need for new paradigms that reconcile intra- and inter-organizational knowledge sharing. Building on organizational collaboration and control theory, this paper investigates contingencies of inter-or...

  16. Secret Sharing Schemes and Advanced Encryption Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Secret Sharing Scheme, they have only been better under certain parameters; there is always a trade -off with some parameter of the scheme. xiv...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS SECRET SHARING SCHEMES AND ADVANCED ENCRYPTION STANDARD by Bing Yong Lim September 2015 Thesis...AND SUBTITLE SECRET SHARING SCHEMES AND ADVANCED ENCRYPTION STANDARD 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Lim, Bin Yong 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S

  17. Mapping the landscape of shared leadership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulhøi, John Parm; Müller, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    and management scholars, although there has been surprisingly little focus on the key structuring processes and mechanisms that enable shared leadership. The aim of this paper is to rectify this by identifying the critical factors and mechanisms which enable shared leadership and its antecedents and outcomes......, and to develop synthesized framework of shared leadership. The paper closes with a brief discussion of avenues for future research and implications for managers....

  18. Public-Private Partnerships for Data Sharing: A Dynamic Environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lachman, Beth

    2000-01-01

    .... Many different practical case studies, models of data sharing partnering, were analyzed to understand differences and similarities in the practical approaches to data sharing, especially geospatial data sharing...

  19. Comparing Security Notions of Secret Sharing Schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songsong Dai

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Different security notions of secret sharing schemes have been proposed by different information measures. Entropies, such as Shannon entropy and min entropy, are frequently used in the setting security notions for secret sharing schemes. Different to the entropies, Kolmogorov complexity was also defined and used in study the security of individual instances for secret sharing schemes. This paper is concerned with these security notions for secret sharing schemes defined by the variational measures, including Shannon entropy, guessing probability, min entropy and Kolmogorov complexity.

  20. Communications and Information Sharing (CIS) Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — TheCommunications and Information Sharing (CIS) Laboratory is a Public Safety interoperable communications technology laboratory with analog and digital radios, and...