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Sample records for sexual dysfunctions psychological

  1. Sexual dysfunctions in MS in relation to neuropsychiatric aspects and its psychological treatment: A scoping review

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    Rose, Anita; van de Vis, Wim; Engelbrecht, Jannie; Pirard, Michelle; Lau, Stefanie; Heesen, Christoph; Köpke, Sascha

    2018-01-01

    Objective Sexual dysfunction in multiple sclerosis (MS) is a significant, but often underestimated and overlooked suffering. Interventions to treat sexual dysfunction in MS are rare. The relation between sexual dysfunction in MS and psychological as well as neuropsychological aspects is evident. However, this field of research remains markedly underdeveloped in this severe chronic illness. The aim of this scoping review is to describe the relevant knowledge in this area and to identify psychological interventions to treat sexual dysfunctions in MS. Methods A scoping review was conducted to answer the following questions: (1) Which psychological and neuropsychological factors impact on sexual dysfunction in MS and vice versa? (2) What kind of psychological interventions aiming to improve sexual dysfunctions in MS are available? A comprehensive search and review of MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and CINAHL was completed by using a recent methodological framework for scoping reviews. Results 23 publications covering a total of 13,259 people with MS and 532 healthy controls were identified. Sexual dysfunction was found to be very common in MS and there is an obvious relation to psychological disorders as e.g. depression and anxiety and also to psychological aspects as partner relationship and quality of life. The relation between sexual dysfunction in MS and neuropsychological impairment has only rarely been studied and no clear results were found. Only two studies were identified, assessing the effectiveness of psychological intervention studies on sexual dysfunction in people with MS, and a third study presenting a secondary analysis of a study targeting depression. All three studies reported significant improvements in sexual dysfunction as well as partly in psychological variables. Conclusions There is a pressing need for the development and adequate evaluation of psychological interventions for sexual dysfunctions in MS. In addition, sexual dysfunction and its impact on

  2. Female Sexual Dysfunction-Medical and Psychological Treatments, Committee 14.

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    Kingsberg, Sheryl A; Althof, Stanley; Simon, James A; Bradford, Andrea; Bitzer, Johannes; Carvalho, Joana; Flynn, Kathryn E; Nappi, Rossella E; Reese, Jennifer B; Rezaee, Roya L; Schover, Leslie; Shifrin, Jan L

    2017-12-01

    Since the millennium we have witnessed significant strides in the science and treatment of female sexual dysfunction (FSD). This forward progress has included (i) the development of new theoretical models to describe healthy and dysfunctional sexual responses in women; (ii) alternative classification strategies of female sexual disorders; (iii) major advances in brain, hormonal, psychological, and interpersonal research focusing on etiologic factors and treatment approaches; (iv) strong and effective public advocacy for FSD; and (v) greater educational awareness of the impact of FSD on the woman and her partner. To review the literature and describe the best practices for assessing and treating women with hypoactive sexual desire disorder, female sexual arousal disorder, and female orgasmic disorders. The committee undertook a comprehensive review of the literature and discussion among themselves to determine the best assessment and treatment methods. Using a biopsychosocial lens, the committee presents recommendations (with levels of evidence) for assessment and treatment of hypoactive sexual desire disorder, female sexual arousal disorder, and female orgasmic disorders. The numerous significant strides in FSD that have occurred since the previous International Consultation of Sexual Medicine publications are reviewed in this article. Although evidence supports an integrated biopsychosocial approach to assessment and treatment of these disorders, the biological and psychological factors are artificially separated for review purposes. We recognize that best outcomes are achieved when all relevant factors are identified and addressed by the clinician and patient working together in concert (the sum is greater than the whole of its parts). Kingsberg SA, Althof S, Simon JA, et al. Female Sexual Dysfunction-Medical and Psychological Treatments, Committee 14. J Sex Med 2017;14:1463-1491. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by

  3. Psychological and Interpersonal Dimensions of Sexual Function and Dysfunction.

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    Brotto, Lori; Atallah, Sandrine; Johnson-Agbakwu, Crista; Rosenbaum, Talli; Abdo, Carmita; Byers, E Sandra; Graham, Cynthia; Nobre, Pedro; Wylie, Kevan

    2016-04-01

    Psychological, interpersonal, and sociocultural factors play a significant role in making one vulnerable to developing a sexual concern, in triggering the onset of a sexual difficulty, and in maintaining sexual dysfunction in the long term. To focus on psychological and interpersonal aspects of sexual functioning in women and men after a critical review of the literature from 2010 to the present. This report is part 1 of 2 of our collaborative work during the 2015 International Consultation on Sexual Medicine for Committee 2. Systematic review of the literature with a focus on publications since 2010. Our work as sexual medicine clinicians is essentially transdisciplinary, which involves not only the collaboration of multidisciplinary professionals but also the integration and application of new knowledge and evaluation and subsequent revision of our practices to ensure the highest level of care provided. There is scant literature on gender non-conforming children and adolescents to clarify specific developmental factors that shape the development of gender identity, orientation, and sexuality. Conversely, studies consistently have demonstrated the interdependence of sexual function between partners, with dysfunction in one partner often contributing to problems in sexual functioning and/or sexual satisfaction for the other. We recommend that clinicians explore attachment styles of patients, childhood experiences (including sexual abuse), onset of sexual activity, personality, cognitive schemas, infertility concerns, and sexual expectations. Assessment of depression, anxiety, stress, substance use and post-traumatic stress (and their medical treatments) should be carried out as part of the initial evaluation. Clinicians should attempt to ascertain whether the anxiety and/or depression is a consequence or a cause of the sexual complaint, and treatment should be administered accordingly. Cognitive distraction is a significant contributor to sexual response problems

  4. Loneliness and Sexual Dysfunctions.

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    Mijuskovic, Ben

    1987-01-01

    Argues that sexual dysfunctions result from early childhood experiences which were originally nonsexual in nature. Contends that psychological difficulties centered around problems of loneliness tend to generate certain sexual dysfunctions. Extends and explores suggestion that genesis of sexual conflicts is in nonsexual infant separation anxiety…

  5. Psychological correlates of sexual dysfunction in female rectal and anal cancer survivors: analysis of baseline intervention data.

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    Philip, Errol J; Nelson, Christian; Temple, Larissa; Carter, Jeanne; Schover, Leslie; Jennings, Sabrina; Jandorf, Lina; Starr, Tatiana; Baser, Ray; DuHamel, Katherine

    2013-10-01

    Sexual dysfunction represents a complex and multifactorial construct that can affect both men and women and has been noted to often deteriorate significantly after treatment for rectal and anal cancer. Despite this, it remains an understudied, underreported, and undertreated issue in the field of cancer survivorship. This study examined the characteristics of women enrolled in an intervention trial to treat sexual dysfunction, and explored the relationship between sexual functioning and psychological well-being. There were 70 female posttreatment anal or rectal cancer survivors assessed as part of the current study. Participants were enrolled in a randomized intervention trial to treat sexual dysfunction and completed outcome measures prior to randomization. The main outcome measures are quality of life (QOL) (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Quality of Life Questionnaire [EORTC-QLQ-C30] and Colorectal Cancer-Specific Module [QLQ-CR38]), sexual functioning (Female Sexual Functioning Index), and psychological well-being (Brief Symptom Inventory Depression/Anxiety, Impact of Events Scale-Revised, CR-38 Body Image). Women enrolled in the study intervention were on average 55 years old, predominantly Caucasian (79%), married (57%), and a median of 4 years postprimary treatment. For those reporting sexual activity at baseline (N=41), sexual dysfunction was associated with a range of specific measures of psychological well-being, all in the hypothesized direction. The Sexual/Relationship Satisfaction subscale was associated with all measures of psychological well-being (r=-0.45 to -0.70, all Psexual functioning, while a global QOL measure was largely unrelated. For sexually active female rectal and anal cancer survivors enrolled in a sexual health intervention, sexual dysfunction was significantly and consistently associated with specific measures of psychological well-being, most notably Sexual/Relationship Satisfaction. These results

  6. Biology of Sexual Dysfunction

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    Anil Kumar Mysore Nagaraj

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Sexual activity is a multifaceted activity, involving complex interactions between the nervous system, the endocrine system, the vascular system and a variety of structures that are instrumental in sexual excitement, intercourse and satisfaction. Sexual function has three components i.e., desire, arousal and orgasm. Many sexual dysfunctions can be categorized according to the phase of sexual response that is affected. In actual clinical practice however, sexual desire, arousal and orgasmic difficulties more often than not coexist, suggesting an integration of phases. Sexual dysfunction can result from a wide variety of psychological and physiological causes including derangements in the levels of sex hormones and neurotrensmitters. This review deals with the biology of different phases of sexual function as well as implications of hormones and neurotransmitters in sexual dysfunction

  7. Female Sexual Dysfunctions and Urogynecological Disorders

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    Emillio Sacco

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Female sexual dysfunctions are a highly prevalent and often-underestimated health problem and include disorders of sexual desire, arousal, orgasm and sexual pain, associated with self-distress. Pathophysiology of female sexual dysfunctions is complex and still poorly understood, although it has been related to several biological, medical and psychological factors. Amongst women, urogynecological disorders such as urinary incontinence, overactive bladder syndrome, bladder pain syndrome and pelvic organ prolapse, have been found to be associated with sexual dysfunctions, although the biological and psychological bases of these associations are poorly investigated. Data on sexual function impact of these conditions come from several cross-sectional or community-based, epidemiological studies based on self-administered validated psychometric tools. This review focuses on the most relevant available evidence on the impact of urogynecological disorders and related surgical treatments on female sexual function.

  8. Burden of Sexual Dysfunction.

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    Balon, Richard

    2017-01-02

    Similar to the burden of other diseases, the burden of sexual dysfunction has not been systematically studied. However, there is growing evidence of various burdens (e.g., economic, symptomatic, humanistic) among patients suffering from sexual dysfunctions. The burden of sexual dysfunction has been studied a bit more often in men, namely the burden of erectile dysfunction (ED), premature ejaculation (PE) and testosterone deficiency syndrome (TDS). Erectile dysfunction is frequently associated with chronic conditions such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and depression. These conditions could go undiagnosed, and ED could be a marker of those diseases. The only available report from the United Kingdom estimated the total economic burden of ED at £53 million annually in terms of direct costs and lost productivity. The burden of PE includes significant psychological distress: anxiety, depression, lack of sexual confidence, poor self-esteem, impaired quality of life, and interpersonal difficulties. Some suggest that increase in female sexual dysfunction is associated with partner's PE, in addition to significant interpersonal difficulties. The burden of TDS includes depression, sexual dysfunction, mild cognitive impairment, and osteoporosis. One UK estimate of the economic burden of female sexual dysfunctions demonstrated that the average cost per patient was higher than the per annum cost of ED. There are no data on burden of paraphilic disorders. The burden of sexual dysfunctions is underappreciated and not well studied, yet it is significant for both the patients and the society.

  9. Sexual Dysfunction and Intimacy for Ostomates.

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    Albaugh, Jeffrey A; Tenfelde, Sandi; Hayden, Dana M

    2017-07-01

    Sex and intimacy presents special challenges for the ostomate. Since some colorectal surgery patients will require either temporary or permanent stomas, intimacy and sexuality is a common issue for ostomates. In addition to the stoma, nerve damage, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy are often used in conjunction with stoma creation for cancer patients, thereby adding physiological dysfunction to the personal psychological impact of the stoma, leading to sexual dysfunction. The purpose of this paper is to describe the prevalence, etiology, and the most common types of sexual dysfunction in men and women after colorectal surgery and particularly those patients with stomas. In addition, treatment strategies for sexual dysfunction will also be described.

  10. The Relationship between Psychological Dysfunction and Sexuality within a Marital Context. Report on a Literature Study.

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    Schonnesson, Lena Nilsson

    A literature study was conducted to highlight the relationship between psychological dysfunction and sexuality within a marital context. The research reviewed suggests that women report more psychological symptoms, in particular depression, than do men. The husband's personality and functioning appeared to determine the level of marital…

  11. History of the Treatment of Female Sexual Dysfunction(s).

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    Kleinplatz, Peggy J

    2018-01-22

    This article reviews the history of the treatment of women's sexual problems from the Victorian era to the twenty-first century. The contextual nature of determining what constitutes female sexual psychopathology is highlighted. Conceptions of normal sexuality are subject to cultural vagaries, making it difficult to identify female sexual dysfunctions. A survey of the inclusion, removal, and collapsing of women's sexual diagnoses in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders from 1952 to 2013 illuminates the biases in the various editions. Masters and Johnson's models of sexual response and dysfunction paved the way for the diagnosis and treatment of women's sexual dysfunctions. Their sex therapy paradigm is described. Conceptions of and treatments for anorgasmia, arousal difficulties, vaginismus, dyspareunia, and low desire are reviewed. The medicalization of human sexuality and the splintering of sex therapy are discussed, along with current trends and new directions in sexual health care for women. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Clinical Psychology Volume 14 is May 7, 2018. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  12. PTSD and Sexual Dysfunction in Men and Women.

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    Yehuda, Rachel; Lehrner, Amy; Rosenbaum, Talli Y

    2015-05-01

    Difficulties in sexual desire and function often occur in persons with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but many questions remain regarding the mechanisms underlying the occurrence of sexual problems in PTSD. The aim of this review was to present a model of sexual dysfunction in PTSD underpinned by an inability to regulate and redirect the physiological arousal needed for healthy sexual function away from aversive hyperarousal and intrusive memories. A literature review pertaining to PTSD and sexual function was conducted. Evidence for the comorbidity of sexual dysfunction and PTSD is presented, and biological and psychological mechanisms that may underlie this co-occurrence are proposed. This manuscript presents evidence of sexual dysfunction in conjunction with PTSD, and of the neurobiology and neuroendocrinology of PTSD and sexual function. Sexual dysfunction following trauma exposure may be mediated by PTSD-related biological, cognitive, and affective processes. The treatment of PTSD must include attention to sexual dysfunction and vice versa. © 2015 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  13. The Role of Somatic Symptoms in Sexual Medicine: Somatization as Important Contextual Factor in Male Sexual Dysfunction.

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    Fanni, Egidia; Castellini, Giovanni; Corona, Giovanni; Boddi, Valentina; Ricca, Valdo; Rastrelli, Giulia; Fisher, Alessandra Daphne; Cipriani, Sarah; Maggi, Mario

    2016-09-01

    An important feature of somatic symptom disorder is the subjective perception of the physical symptoms and its maladaptive interpretation. Considering that psychological distress is often expressed through somatic symptoms, it is possible that they underlie at least a part of the symptoms in subjects complaining of sexual dysfunction. Nevertheless, studies on the impact of somatoform disorders in sexual dysfunction are scanty. To define the psychological, relational, and organic correlates of somatic symptoms in a large sample of patients complaining of sexual problems. A consecutive series of 2833 men (mean age 50.2 ± 13.5 years) was retrospectively studied. Somatic symptoms were assessed using the "somatized anxiety symptoms" subscale of the Middlesex Hospital Questionnaire (MHQ-S). Several clinical, biochemical, psychological, and relational parameters were studied. Patients were interviewed with the previously validated Structured Interview on Erectile Dysfunction (SIEDY), and ANDROTEST (a structured interview for the screening of hypogonadism in patients with sexual dysfunction). Among the 2833 patients studied, subjects scoring higher on somatic symptoms were older, more obese, reporting unhealthy lifestyle (current smoking, alcohol consumption), and a lower education (all P sexuality more often, including erectile problems (spontaneous or sexual-related), low sexual desire, decreased frequency of intercourse, and perceived reduction of ejaculate volume (all P sexual dysfunction. High levels of somatic symptoms in subjects with sexual dysfunction can be related to the sexual symptom itself. The consequences of this pattern have great clinical relevance in a sexual medicine setting, considering their severe impact on sexuality. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Recent advances in female sexual dysfunction.

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    Davis, A R

    2000-06-01

    Female sexuality has received little scientific study. Recently, increased interest in this field has generated new research in the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and pharmacotherapy of female sexual dysfunction (FSD). A new FSD classification system has been proposed. Although sexual difficulties are highly prevalent among women, the degree of associated distress is unknown. Risk factors for FSD are probably both psychologic and physiologic. Aging or menopause is associated with lubrication difficulties, which can be treated with hormone replacement. Hysterectomy seems more likely to result in improvement rather then deterioration of sexual functioning. Depression may be a predictor of sexual dysfunction after hysterectomy. Vasoactive agents are currently being evaluated as treatment for female sexual arousal disorder. The most important advance in the study of female sexual function is the recent surge of interest in this relatively unexplored field.

  15. Neuroticism in child sex offenders and its association with sexual dysfunctions, cognitive distortions, and psychological complaints.

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    Boillat, Coralie; Deuring, Gunnar; Pflueger, Marlon O; Graf, Marc; Rosburg, Timm

    Studies in child sex offenders (CSO) often report deviant personality characteristics. In our study, we investigated neuroticism in CSO and tested the hypothesis that CSO with high neuroticism show more serious abuse behavior and are more likely to exhibit sexual dysfunction and cognitive distortions, as compared to CSO with low neuroticism. A sample of 40 CSO (both child sexual abusers and child sexual material users) was split into two subsamples based on their neuroticism scores, obtained by the NEO-Personality Inventory-Revised (NEO-PI-R) questionnaire. Subsequently, we compared their scores in the Multiphasic Sex Inventory (MSI) questionnaire and Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R). Our results show that CSO exhibited higher levels of neuroticism than controls, but were still in the normal range. In CSO, neuroticism was associated with sexual dysfunction and cognitive distortions, rather than with more severe abuse behavior. Moreover, neuroticism in this group was linked to a broad range of psychological problems and psychopathological symptoms, such as somatization or anxiety. Our findings suggest that neuroticism even below the level of personality disorder is associated with a broader range of psychological problems in CSO, which should be addressed in therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Sexual and gonadal dysfunction in chronic kidney disease: Pathophysiology

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    Manish Rathi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sexual and gonadal dysfunction/infertility are quite common in patients with chronic kidney disease. Forty percent of male and 55% of female dialysis patients do not achieve orgasm. The pathophysiology of gonadal dysfunction is multifactorial. It is usually a combination of psychological, physiological, and other comorbid factors. Erectile dysfunction in males is mainly due to arterial factors, venous leakage, psychological factors, neurogenic factors, endocrine factors, and drugs. Sexual dysfunction in females is mainly due to hormonal factors and manifests mainly as menstrual irregularities, amenorrhea, lack of vaginal lubrication, and failure to conceive. Treatment of gonadal dysfunction in chronic kidney disease is multipronged and an exact understanding of underlying pathology is essential in proper management of these patients.

  17. Psychological impact and sexual dysfunction in men with and without spinal cord injury.

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    Cobo Cuenca, Ana I; Sampietro-Crespo, Antonio; Virseda-Chamorro, Miguel; Martín-Espinosa, Noelia

    2015-02-01

    The World Health Organization recognizes sexual health as a fundamental right that should be guaranteed to all individuals. Sexual dysfunction affects various aspects in the lives (physical, psychic, and social) of affected persons. To assess the different types of sexual dysfunction, the quality of life (QOL), depression, anxiety, and levels of self-esteem observed in 165 men with sexual dysfunction, both with and without spinal cord injury (SCI). Case control study of 85 men with SCI and sexual dysfunction, and 80 men without SCI that have sexual dysfunction. The Sexual Health Evaluation Scale, the Fugl-Meyer Life Satisfaction Questionnaire scale, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Evaluation of the Sexual Health Scale, and Rosenberg's Self-esteem Scale were all used for data collection. Of the members in group A (with SCI), 89.4% (76) showed erectile dysfunction, and 75.2% (64) reported anejaculation. In group B (without SCI), 75 (96.8%) showed erectile dysfunction, and 58.7% (47) had disorders of sexual desire. In group A, 16.47 % (14) showed signs of depression, and 35.3% (30) had signs of anxiety. In group B, 30% (24) had elevated scores regarding depression, and 48.75% (39) had high scores for anxiety. All of the participants reported a high general QOL and a high satisfaction with their QOL but reported that their satisfaction with their sexual lives was only at the acceptable level. Social QOL is significantly higher in the SCI group (t Student P=0.031). The QOL, self-esteem, and anxiety and depression levels are significantly correlated. Men with sexual dysfunction strive to adapt to their situations, with the relationship between the type of sexual dysfunction and the QOL, mood (depression), and self-esteem all being important considerations. Sexuality and employment status are the areas where men with spinal cord injuries report less satisfaction. © 2014 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  18. The Evaluation of Relationship between Sexual Self-concept and Sexual Dysfunction in Individuals Undergoing Methadone Maintenance Treatment

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    Rajabizadeh, Ghodratolah; Yazdanpanah, Fatemeh; Ramezani, Mohammad Arash

    2017-01-01

    Background The present study was conducted with the aim of designing a causal model for the evaluation of sexual dysfunctions based on the variables of methadone dosage and sexual self-concept among individuals undergoing methadone maintenance treatment (MMT). Methods The study population of the present study consisted of married men of 20 to 45 years of age with sexual ýrelations and undergoing MMT for a minimum of 8 weeks referring to all MMT clinics of Kerman, Iran, in ýý2015-2016. ýThe subjects were selected through multi-stage cluster sampling (n = 250). Data were collected using the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28), Multi-Dimensional Sexual Self-concept Questionnaire (MSSQ), and Internal Index for Erectile Function (IIEF). Data were analyzed using path analysis method and Pearson correlation coefficient. The suggested model was evaluated using structural equation model (SEM), and indirect relationships were assessed using Bootstrap method. Findings The suggested model showed acceptable fitness with the data, and all routes, except methadone use route, to sexual function were significant. The result of the multiple ýindirect route showed that sexual function had a significant relationship with methadone use through ýsexual self-concept. In total, 60% of variance in sexual dysfunction was explained using the variables of the suggested model. Conclusion Further studies are suggested to be conducted regarding psychological factors effective on the sexual dysfunctions among individuals undergoing MMT, such as sexual self-concept. Moreover, more detailed evaluation of each subscale of positive and negative sexual self-concept is recommended to assess the psychological causes of sexual dysfunctions in these individuals and design psychological, behavioral, and cognitive-behavioral treatment interventions for them. PMID:29299211

  19. The Evaluation of Relationship between Sexual Self-concept and Sexual Dysfunction in Individuals Undergoing Methadone Maintenance Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabizadeh, Ghodratolah; Yazdanpanah, Fatemeh; Ramezani, Mohammad Arash

    2017-04-01

    The present study was conducted with the aim of designing a causal model for the evaluation of sexual dysfunctions based on the variables of methadone dosage and sexual self-concept among individuals undergoing methadone maintenance treatment (MMT). The study population of the present study consisted of married men of 20 to 45 years of age with sexual ýrelations and undergoing MMT for a minimum of 8 weeks referring to all MMT clinics of Kerman, Iran, in ýý2015-2016. ýThe subjects were selected through multi-stage cluster sampling (n = 250). Data were collected using the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28), Multi-Dimensional Sexual Self-concept Questionnaire (MSSQ), and Internal Index for Erectile Function (IIEF). Data were analyzed using path analysis method and Pearson correlation coefficient. The suggested model was evaluated using structural equation model (SEM), and indirect relationships were assessed using Bootstrap method. The suggested model showed acceptable fitness with the data, and all routes, except methadone use route, to sexual function were significant. The result of the multiple ýindirect route showed that sexual function had a significant relationship with methadone use through ýsexual self-concept. In total, 60% of variance in sexual dysfunction was explained using the variables of the suggested model. Further studies are suggested to be conducted regarding psychological factors effective on the sexual dysfunctions among individuals undergoing MMT, such as sexual self-concept. Moreover, more detailed evaluation of each subscale of positive and negative sexual self-concept is recommended to assess the psychological causes of sexual dysfunctions in these individuals and design psychological, behavioral, and cognitive-behavioral treatment interventions for them.

  20. "Don't Look Now": The Role of Self-Focus in Sexual Dysfunction.

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    Wiederman, Michael W.

    2001-01-01

    Couples and family counselors may aid in the remedy of sexual dysfunction when it has a cognitive or psychological basis. One important source of sexual dysfunction is cognitive distraction that results from certain forms of self-focus during sexual activity with a partner, a phenomenon sex therapists have labeled spectatoring. Introduces sensate…

  1. Differences in psychological health and family dysfunction by sexual victimization type in a clinical sample of African American adolescent women.

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    Cecil, Heather; Matson, Steven C

    2005-08-01

    We examined levels of sexual victimization among a sample of 249 14- to 19-year-old African American adolescent women. Victimization was common: 32.1% reported having been raped, 33.7% had experienced sexual coercion, and 10.8% reported an attempted rape. Only 23.4% had never been victimized. We investigated whether levels of psychological health and family dysfunction varied as a function of the type of sexual victimization. Girls who had been raped had lower levels of self-esteem and mastery and higher levels of depression compared to girls who reported no sexual victimization. Significantly higher levels of family cohesion and significantly lower levels of family support were reported by girls who had been raped versus girls who reported no sexual victimization. These findings are a starting point for future studies by providing evidence that levels of mental health and family dysfunction vary by the type of sexual victimization experienced.

  2. Pelvic radiotherapy and sexual dysfunction in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Tine; Froeding, Ligita Paskeviciute

    2015-01-01

    focus on late effects and an increasing awareness that patient reported outcomes (PROs) i.e., patient assessment of physical, social, psychological, and sexual functioning provides the most valid information on the effects of cancer treatment. Following cure of cancer allow survivors focus on quality...... of life (QOL) issues; sexual functioning has proved to be one of the most important aspects of concern in long-term survivors. METHODS: An updated literature search in PubMed was performed on pelvic radiotherapy and female sexual functioning/dysfunction. Studies on gynaecological, urological...... and gastrointestinal cancers were included. The focus was on the period from 2010 to 2014, on studies using PROs, on potential randomized controlled trials (RCTs) where female sexual dysfunction (FSD) at least constituted a secondary outcome, and on studies reporting from modern radiotherapy modalities. RESULTS...

  3. A biopsychosocial approach to women's sexual function and dysfunction at midlife: A narrative review.

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    Thomas, Holly N; Thurston, Rebecca C

    2016-05-01

    A satisfying sex life is an important component of overall well-being, but sexual dysfunction is common, especially in midlife women. The aim of this review is (a) to define sexual function and dysfunction, (b) to present theoretical models of female sexual response, (c) to examine longitudinal studies of how sexual function changes during midlife, and (d) to review treatment options. Four types of female sexual dysfunction are currently recognized: Female Orgasmic Disorder, Female Sexual Interest/Arousal Disorder, Genito-Pelvic Pain/Penetration Disorder, and Substance/Medication-Induced Sexual Dysfunction. However, optimal sexual function transcends the simple absence of dysfunction. A biopsychosocial approach that simultaneously considers physical, psychological, sociocultural, and interpersonal factors is necessary to guide research and clinical care regarding women's sexual function. Most longitudinal studies reveal an association between advancing menopause status and worsening sexual function. Psychosocial variables, such as availability of a partner, relationship quality, and psychological functioning, also play an integral role. Future directions for research should include deepening our understanding of how sexual function changes with aging and developing safe and effective approaches to optimizing women's sexual function with aging. Overall, holistic, biopsychosocial approaches to women's sexual function are necessary to fully understand and treat this key component of midlife women's well-being. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A biopsychosocial approach to women’s sexual function and dysfunction at midlife: A narrative review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Holly N.; Thurston, Rebecca C.

    2016-01-01

    A satisfying sex life is an important component of overall well-being, but sexual dysfunction is common, especially in midlife women. The aim of this review is (a) to define sexual function and dysfunction, (b) to present theoretical models of female sexual response, (c) to examine longitudinal studies of how sexual function changes during midlife, and (d) to review treatment options. Four types of female sexual dysfunction are currently recognized: Female Orgasmic Disorder, Female Sexual Interest/Arousal Disorder, Genito-Pelvic Pain/Penetration Disorder, and Substance/Medication-Induced Sexual Dysfunction. However, optimal sexual function transcends the simple absence of dysfunction. A biopsychosocial approach that simultaneously considers physical, psychological, sociocultural, and interpersonal factors is necessary to guide research and clinical care regarding women’s sexual function. Most longitudinal studies reveal an association between advancing menopause status and worsening sexual function. Psychosocial variables, such as availability of a partner, relationship quality, and psychological functioning, also play an integral role. Future directions for research should include deepening our understanding of how sexual function changes with aging and developing safe and effective approaches to optimizing women’s sexual function with aging. Overall, holistic, biopsychosocial approaches to women’s sexual function are necessary to fully understand and treat this key component of midlife women’s well-being. PMID:27013288

  5. Sexual dysfunction among youth: an overlooked sexual health concern.

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    Moreau, Caroline; Kågesten, Anna E; Blum, Robert Wm

    2016-11-18

    There is growing recognition that youth sexual health entails a broad range of physical, emotional and psychosocial responses to sexual interactions, yet little is known about sexual dysfunctions and well being in youth populations. This study explored sexual dysfunctions among youth and its associations with other domains of sexual health. Sexual dysfunctions were defined as: problems related to orgasm, pain during intercourse, lack of sexual desire or sexual pleasure. Data were drawn from the 2010 French national sexual and reproductive health survey comprising a random sample of 2309 respondents aged 15-24 years. The current analysis included 842 females and 642 males who had sexual intercourse in the last 12 months. Chi square tests were used to test for differences in sexual dysfunctions by sex and explore associations with other domains of sexual health. Half of females (48%) reported at least one sexual dysfunction versus 23% of males. However, over half (57%) of youth reporting at least one dysfunction did not consider this to hinder their sexuality. Altogether, 31% of females cited at least one sexual dysfunction hindering their sexuality-more than three times the 9% of males. Sexual dysfunction was strongly and inversely related to sexual satisfaction for both males and females and additionally to a recent diagnosis of STI or unintended pregnancy for females. Sexual dysfunctions hindering sexuality were also correlated with a history of unintended pregnancy among males. While most youth in France enjoy a satisfying sexual life, sexual dysfunction is common, especially among females. Public health programs and clinicians should screen for and address sexual dysfunction, which substantially reduce youth sexual wellbeing.

  6. Sexual dysfunction among youth: an overlooked sexual health concern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Moreau

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is growing recognition that youth sexual health entails a broad range of physical, emotional and psychosocial responses to sexual interactions, yet little is known about sexual dysfunctions and well being in youth populations. This study explored sexual dysfunctions among youth and its associations with other domains of sexual health. Sexual dysfunctions were defined as: problems related to orgasm, pain during intercourse, lack of sexual desire or sexual pleasure. Methods Data were drawn from the 2010 French national sexual and reproductive health survey comprising a random sample of 2309 respondents aged 15-24 years. The current analysis included 842 females and 642 males who had sexual intercourse in the last 12 months. Chi square tests were used to test for differences in sexual dysfunctions by sex and explore associations with other domains of sexual health. Results Half of females (48% reported at least one sexual dysfunction versus 23% of males. However, over half (57% of youth reporting at least one dysfunction did not consider this to hinder their sexuality. Altogether, 31% of females cited at least one sexual dysfunction hindering their sexuality—more than three times the 9% of males. Sexual dysfunction was strongly and inversely related to sexual satisfaction for both males and females and additionally to a recent diagnosis of STI or unintended pregnancy for females. Sexual dysfunctions hindering sexuality were also correlated with a history of unintended pregnancy among males. Conclusion While most youth in France enjoy a satisfying sexual life, sexual dysfunction is common, especially among females. Public health programs and clinicians should screen for and address sexual dysfunction, which substantially reduce youth sexual wellbeing.

  7. On Swedish women's distressing sexual dysfunctions: some concomitant conditions and life satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberg, Katarina; Sjögren Fugl-Meyer, Kerstin

    2005-03-01

    To explore the associations between women's distressing sexual dysfunctions and different aspects of life satisfaction together with women's concomitant socio-psychological characteristics. Thus, this descriptive article does not discuss causalities. A nationally representative sample of sexually active Swedish women aged 18-65 years in a heterosexual steady partner relationship participated in 1996 in a combined structured interview/questionnaire investigation. Personal sexual distress caused by low sexual interest, insufficient lubrication, orgasm dysfunction, dyspareunia, and vaginism was classified as manifest and mild. Concomitant conditions explored were perceived health, stability of domestic situation, perception of male partner's sexual functions/dysfunctions per se, and some socio-demographic factors. Satisfaction with life as a whole and with 10 different domains of life were reported by using the LiSat-11 checklist. Main results were that a multitude of the independent variables were univariately associated with manifest and, to a lesser extent, mild distressing sexual dysfunctions. This was particularly true for satisfaction with partner relationship and for male's sexual dysfunctions. By performing multiple logistic regressions, the numbers were markedly reduced. The resulting statistical models still contained sexual partner's sexual dysfunctions and satisfaction with partner relationship as dominant covariants of most distressing sexual dysfunctions. Reported low level of satisfaction with partner relationship and male sexual dysfunctions per se are likely to co-occur with manifest but, to a lesser extent, mild distressing sexual dysfunctions in Swedish women aged 18-65 years.

  8. Relationship between female pelvic floor dysfunction and sexual dysfunction: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolami, Arianna; Vanti, Carla; Banchelli, Federico; Guccione, Andrew A; Pillastrini, Paolo

    2015-05-01

    The ability to express one's sexuality and engage in sexual activity requires multisystemic coordination involving many psychological functions as well as the integrity of the nervous, hormonal, vascular, immune, and neuromuscular body structures and functions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the associations among pelvic floor function, sexual function, and demographic and clinical characteristics in a population of women initiating physical therapy evaluation and treatment for pelvic floor-related dysfunctions (urinary incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse, vulvodynia, vaginismus, and constipation). We consented and collected completed demographic data and data related to symptoms and clinical condition on 85 consecutive patients in an outpatient physical therapy clinic. Clinical and anthropometric characteristics were analyzed descriptively. Analysis of variance and linear regression analyses were used to analyze Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) scale ratings, whereas zero-inflated beta-binomial regression was applied to the pain subscale. Main outcome measure was FSFI score, whereas the secondary outcome measure was the FSFI subscale score related to pain. Women in our sample were 38 years old on average, 33% of whom had given birth and 82% of whom had high tone pelvic floor. Being in the middle-tercile age group and exhibiting low pelvic floor tone (Beta = 6.8; 95% confidence interval [CI] = [1.4; 12.0]) were significantly associated with lower levels of sexual dysfunction. Women with low tone pelvic floor also reported lower pain (odds ratio = 4.0; 95% CI = [1.6; 9.6]), whereas younger aged and physically unsatisfied subjects were more likely not to have sexual activity in the month prior to scale measurement. In female patients with pelvic floor muscle dysfunction undergoing physical therapy and rehabilitation, sexual dysfunction appears to be significantly correlated with age and high pelvic floor muscle tone. © 2015

  9. Sexual Dysfunction in Women Undergoing Fertility Treatment in Iran: Prevalence and Associated Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiari, Afsaneh; Basirat, Zahra; Nasiri-Amiri, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sexual dysfunctions are one of the most fundamental difficulties for infertile women, which can be as the cause of infertility. This study investigated the prevalence of this disorder and associated factors in order to improve infertility treatment process and the quality of life of women referring to infertility center. Methods: A cross sectional study was performed on 236 women who referred to Fatima Zahra infertility center of Babol, Iran. Data collection tool was a questionnaire contained two parts; demographic characteristics and infertility information. Also, data for sexual dysfunction was obtained through diagnostic interview based on the international classification DSM-IV. For data analysis, logistic and linear regression analysis were used. The pvaginismus in 15.2% (n=36) and lack of sexual stimulation in 13.6% (n=32). Binary logistic regression analysis showed that age, sexual satisfaction and history of mental illness had a significant effect on the probability of experiencing the sexual dysfunction. Conclusion: There is a high prevalence of sexual dysfunction among infertile women. Considering the interaction between sexual dysfunction and infertility, professional health care centers should be sensitive to this effect. Also, more attention must be paid on marital relationships, economic and social situation and infertility characteristics in order to prevent sexual dysfunction development through early screening and psychological interference. PMID:26962480

  10. Sexual dysfunction in Obsessive-Compulsive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firoozeh Raisi

    2015-05-01

    Conclusion: High prevalence of sexual dysfunction in OCD women and significant correlation between male sexual dysfunction and OCD (r= -481.0 between total score of OCI-R with erectile dysfunction and r= -458.0 between total score of OCI-R and sexual satisfaction could confirm a relation between OCD and sexual disorders. So, evaluation of sexual function in all patients with OCD is recommended.

  11. Sexual dysfunction in multiple myeloma: survivorship care plan of the International Myeloma Foundation Nurse Leadership Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Tiffany A; Bertolotti, Page A; Doss, Deborah; McCullagh, Emily J

    2011-08-01

    The World Health Organization describes sexuality as a "central aspect of being human throughout life and encompasses sex, gender identities and roles, sexual orientation, eroticism, pleasure, intimacy, and reproduction. Sexuality is influenced by the interaction of biological, psychological, social, economic, political, cultural, ethical, legal, historical, religious, and spiritual factors." Currently, no research has been conducted regarding sexual dysfunction in patients with multiple myeloma; therefore, information related to the assessment and evaluation of sexual dysfunction is gleaned from other malignancies and diseases. In this article, members of the International Myeloma Foundation's Nurse Leadership Board discuss the definition, presentation, and causes of sexual dysfunction; provide recommendations for sexual assessment practices; and promote discussion among patients with multiple myeloma, their healthcare providers, and their partners.

  12. Cognitive structures in women with sexual dysfunction: the role of early maladaptive schemas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Cátia; Nobre, Pedro J

    2013-07-01

    Cognitive schemas are often related to psychological problems. However, the role of these structures within sexual problems is not yet well established. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence and importance of early maladaptive schemas on women's sexual functioning and cognitive schemas activated in response to negative sexual events. A total of 228 women participated in the study: a control sample of 167 women without sexual problems, a subclinical sample of 37 women with low sexual functioning, and a clinical sample of 24 women with sexual dysfunction. Participants completed several self-reported measures: the Schema Questionnaire, the Questionnaire of Cognitive Schema Activation in Sexual Context, the Brief Symptom Inventory, the Beck Depression Inventory, and the Female Sexual Function Index. Findings indicated that women with sexual dysfunction presented significantly more early maladaptive schemas from the Impaired Autonomy and Performance domain, particularly failure (P depreciation (P < 0.01, η(2) = 0.05), and difference/loneliness (P < 0.01, η(2) = 0.05) schemas. Results supported differences between women with and without sexual problems regarding cognitive factors. This may have implications for the knowledge, assessment, and treatment of sexual dysfunction in women. © 2012 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  13. Female Sexual Dysfunction Among Muslim Women: Increasing Awareness to Improve Overall Evaluation and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Sameena

    2018-04-17

    Muslim women are an increasingly underserved population in the United States and worldwide. Diagnosis and treatment of female sexual dysfunction bring unique challenges because of the conservative nature of those practicing the religion. Several cultural and religious codes of conduct affect sexual behavior and the dysfunction that can ensue. To assess and describe the types of sexual dysfunction that have been found in Muslim women internationally and encourage a better understanding of their issues to enhance health care delivery. A comprehensive review of the literature through Ovid and PubMed was performed in search of articles reviewing female sexual dysfunction, Muslim women, and Islam. A brief explanation and review of the interpretations of sexuality within Islam are discussed. The link is made between conservative sexual relations and interpretations and the types of sexual dysfunction experienced. Female sexual dysfunction is explored in relation to how female chastity is extolled and how cultural procedures continue despite the ethical and health concerns related to them. Most Muslim women experience sexual dysfunction similar to other women, including arousal, desire, and orgasmic disorders related to organic and psychologic factors. Sexual pain disorders might be more prevalent in this population, particularly concerning unconsummated marriage. There are special concerns related to maintaining virginity and preserving the hymen until marriage. Female genital cutting, practiced by some Muslim countries, has potential sexual consequences. Understanding Islamic views on sexuality and how they can affect sexual dysfunction in Muslim women is critical in opening lines of communication with patients and approaching female sexual dysfunction impartially. Although some issues that arise might introduce ethical dilemmas for the provider, having the cultural competence to address these issues will facilitate improved health care delivery. Rahman S. Female Sexual

  14. The Relationship between Childhood Sexual Abuse and Adult Male Sexual Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwer, David B.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    A study of 359 men who sought sexual dysfunction treatment found that childhood sexual abuse did not predict sexual dysfunction in the men. Unemployment was the only significant predictor of male sexual dysfunction. Differences between the sexual abuse experiences of the male victims compared to female victims (n=73) are discussed. (Author/CR)

  15. Androgens and Psychosocial Factors Related to Sexual Dysfunctions in Premenopausal Women∗: ∗2016 ISSM Female Sexual Dysfunction Prize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wåhlin-Jacobsen, Sarah; Kristensen, Ellids; Pedersen, Anette Tønnes; Laessøe, Nanna Cassandra; Cohen, Arieh S; Hougaard, David M; Lundqvist, Marika; Giraldi, Annamaria

    2017-03-01

    The female sexual response is complex and influenced by several biological, psychological, and social factors. Testosterone is believed to modulate a woman's sexual response and desire, because low levels are considered a risk factor for impaired sexual function, but previous studies have been inconclusive. To investigate how androgen levels and psychosocial factors are associated with female sexual dysfunction (FSD), including hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD). The cross-sectional study included 428 premenopausal women 19 to 58 years old who completed a questionnaire on psychosocial factors and had blood sampled at days 6 to 10 in their menstrual cycle. Logistic regression models were built to test the association among hormone levels, psychosocial factors, and sexual end points. Five different sexual end points were measured using the Female Sexual Function Index and the Female Sexual Distress Scale: impaired sexual function, sexual distress, FSD, low sexual desire, and HSDD. Serum levels of total and free testosterone, androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, and androsterone glucuronide were analyzed using mass spectrometry. After adjusting for psychosocial factors, women with low sexual desire had significantly lower mean levels of free testosterone and androstenedione compared with women without low sexual desire. None of the androgens were associated with FSD in general or with HSDD in particular. Relationship duration longer than 2 years and mild depressive symptoms increased the risk of having all the sexual end points, including FSD in general and HSDD in particular in multivariate analyses. In this large cross-sectional study, low sexual desire was significantly associated with levels of free testosterone and androstenedione, but FSD in general and HSDD in particular were not associated with androgen levels. Length of relationship and depression were associated with FSD including HSDD. Wåhlin-Jacobsen S, Kristensen E, Tønnes Pedersen A

  16. Antipsychotics and Sexual Dysfunction: Sexual Dysfunction - Part III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar Mysore Nagaraj

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Satisfying sexual experience is an essential part of a healthy and enjoyable life for most people. Antipsychotic drugs are among the various factors that affect optimal sexual functioning. Both conventional and novel antipsychotics are associated with significant sexual side effects. This review has presented various studies comparing different antipsychotic drugs. Dopamine antagonism, increased serum prolactin, serotonergic, adrenergic and cholinergic mechanisms are all proposed to be the mechanisms for sexual dysfunction. Drug treatment for this has not given satisfactory long-term results. Knowledge of the receptor pharmacology of an individual antipsychotic will help to determine whether it is more or less likely to cause sexual side effects and its management.

  17. On the Etiology of Sexual Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apfelbaum, Bernard

    1977-01-01

    Lack of consideration of the sexually functional population has led to misconceptions about causes of sexual dysfunction functioning. Automatic functioning can mask effects of pathogenic influences on sexuality, making these effects appear random, confounding etiological issues and creating the belief that causes of sexual dysfunction and disorder…

  18. Is Internet Pornography Causing Sexual Dysfunctions? A Review with Clinical Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Brian Y.; Wilson, Gary; Berger, Jonathan; Christman, Matthew; Reina, Bryn; Bishop, Frank; Klam, Warren P.; Doan, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Traditional factors that once explained men’s sexual difficulties appear insufficient to account for the sharp rise in erectile dysfunction, delayed ejaculation, decreased sexual satisfaction, and diminished libido during partnered sex in men under 40. This review (1) considers data from multiple domains, e.g., clinical, biological (addiction/urology), psychological (sexual conditioning), sociological; and (2) presents a series of clinical reports, all with the aim of proposing a possible direction for future research of this phenomenon. Alterations to the brain's motivational system are explored as a possible etiology underlying pornography-related sexual dysfunctions. This review also considers evidence that Internet pornography’s unique properties (limitless novelty, potential for easy escalation to more extreme material, video format, etc.) may be potent enough to condition sexual arousal to aspects of Internet pornography use that do not readily transition to real-life partners, such that sex with desired partners may not register as meeting expectations and arousal declines. Clinical reports suggest that terminating Internet pornography use is sometimes sufficient to reverse negative effects, underscoring the need for extensive investigation using methodologies that have subjects remove the variable of Internet pornography use. In the interim, a simple diagnostic protocol for assessing patients with porn-induced sexual dysfunction is put forth. PMID:27527226

  19. Reduced Treatment-Emergent Sexual Dysfunction as a Potential Target in the Development of New Antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S. Baldwin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pleasurable sexual activity is an essential component of many human relationships, providing a sense of physical, psychological, and social well-being. Epidemiological and clinical studies show that depressive symptoms and depressive illness are associated with impairments in sexual function and satisfaction, both in untreated and treated patients. The findings of randomized placebo-controlled trials demonstrate that most of the currently available antidepressant drugs are associated with the development or worsening of sexual dysfunction, in a substantial proportion of patients. Sexual difficulties during antidepressant treatment often resolve as depression lifts but can endure over long periods and may reduce self-esteem and affect mood and relationships adversely. Sexual dysfunction during antidepressant treatment is typically associated with many possible causes, but the risk and type of dysfunction vary with differing compounds and should be considered when making decisions about the relative merits and drawbacks of differing antidepressants. A range of interventions can be considered when managing patients with sexual dysfunction associated with antidepressants, including the prescription of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, but none of these approaches can be considered “ideal.” As treatment-emergent sexual dysfunction is less frequent with certain drugs, presumably related to differences in their pharmacological properties, and because current management approaches are less than ideal, a reduced burden of treatment-emergent sexual dysfunction represents a tolerability target in the development of novel antidepressants.

  20. Sexual Dysfunction in Women: A Practical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faubion, Stephanie S; Rullo, Jordan E

    2015-08-15

    Sexual dysfunction in women is a common and often distressing problem that has a negative impact on quality of life and medication compliance. The problem is often multifactorial, necessitating a multidisciplinary evaluation and treatment approach that addresses biological, psychological, sociocultural, and relational factors. Criteria for sexual interest/arousal disorder require the presence of at least three specific symptoms lasting for at least six months. Lifelong anorgasmia may suggest the patient is unfamiliar or uncomfortable with self-stimulation or sexual communication with her partner. Delayed or less intense orgasms may be a natural process of aging due to decreased genital blood flow and dulled genital sensations. Genito-pelvic pain/penetration disorder includes fear or anxiety, marked tightening or tensing of the abdominal and pelvic muscles, or actual pain associated with attempts toward vaginal penetration that is persistent or recurrent for at least six months. Treatment depends on the etiology. Estrogen is effective for the treatment of dyspareunia associated with genitourinary syndrome of menopause. Testosterone, with and without concomitant use of estrogen, is associated with improvements in sexual functioning in naturally and surgically menopausal women, although data on long-term risks and benefits are lacking. Bupropion has been shown to improve the adverse sexual effects associated with antidepressant use; however, data are limited. Psychotherapy or sex therapy is useful for management of the psychological, relational, and sociocultural factors impacting a woman's sexual function. Clinicians can address many of these issues in addition to providing education and validating women's sexual health concerns.

  1. Sex therapy for female sexual dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Introduction About 45% of women suffer from some form of sexual dysfunction. Despite its high prevalence, there are few studies that have systematically evaluated sex therapy in comparison with other interventions. Objective Review randomized clinical trials that present psychotherapeutic interventions for female sexual dysfunctions. Method Through a search in three databases (Medline, Web of Science and PsycInfo), 1419 references were found. After an analysis of the abstracts, twenty-seven articles met the inclusion criteria and composed this review. Results Sex therapy, as proposed by Masters and Johnson and Heiman and LoPiccolo, is still the most commonly used form of therapy for sexual dysfunctions; although it has shown results, the results do not consistently support that this is the best alternative in the treatment of sexual dysfunctions. Conclusion There is a lack of systematic study of many female sexual dysfunctions. Orgasmic disorder and sexual pain (vaginismus and dyspaurenia) are the most extensively studied disorders and those in which sex therapy seems to have better outcomes. PMID:24066697

  2. Sexual dysfunction in women with ESRD requiring hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strippoli, Giovanni F M; Vecchio, Mariacristina; Palmer, Suetonia; De Berardis, Giorgia; Craig, Jonathan; Lucisano, Giuseppe; Johnson, David; Pellegrini, Fabio; Nicolucci, Antonio; Sciancalepore, Michela; Saglimbene, Valeria; Gargano, Letizia; Bonifati, Carmen; Ruospo, Marinella; Navaneethan, Sankar D; Montinaro, Vincenzo; Stroumza, Paul; Zsom, Marianna; Torok, Mariatta; Celia, Eduardo; Gelfman, Ruben; Bednarek-Skublewska, Anna; Dulawa, Jan; Graziano, Giusi; Gentile, Giorgio; Ferrari, Juan Nin; Santoro, Antonio; Zucchelli, Annalisa; Triolo, Giorgio; Maffei, Stefano; Hegbrant, Jörgen; Wollheim, Charlotta; De Cosmo, Salvatore; Manfreda, Valeria M

    2012-06-01

    The few existing studies of sexual dysfunction in women on hemodialysis are limited by small sample size. This large, cross-sectional study evaluated the prevalence and correlates of female sexual dysfunction in advanced kidney disease. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, METHODS: A total of 1472 women with ESRD undergoing hemodialysis were recruited to a multinational, cross-sectional study conducted within a collaborative dialysis network in Europe and South America. Sexual dysfunction was identified by the Female Sexual Function Index. Correlates of self-reported sexual dysfunction were identified by regression analyses. Of the 1472 women, 659 completed questionnaires (45%). More than half (362 of 659 [55%]) lived with a partner, and 232 of 659 (35%) reported being sexually active. Of these 659 respondents, 555 (84%) reported sexual dysfunction. Women with a partner (282 of 362 [78%]) were less likely to report sexual dysfunction than those without a partner (273 of 297 [92%]) (Psymptoms, less education, menopause, diabetes, and diuretic therapy. Nearly all women who were not wait-listed for a kidney transplant and were living without a partner (249 of 260 [96%]) reported sexual dysfunction. More than half (128 of 232 [55%]) of sexually active women reported sexual dysfunction, associated with age, depressive symptoms, menopause, low serum albumin, and diuretic therapy. This descriptive study suggests most women on hemodialysis experience sexual problems. Additional research on the relevance of sexual dysfunction to symptom burden and quality of life in these women is needed.

  3. The impact of mental illness on sexual dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemishlany, Zvi; Weizman, Abraham

    2008-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is prevalent among psychiatric patients and may be related to both the psychopathology and the pharmacotherapy. The negative symptoms of schizophrenia limit the capability for interpersonal and sexual relationships. The first-generation antipsychotics cause further deterioration in erectile and orgasmic function. Due to their weak antagonistic activity at D2 receptors, second-generation antipsychotics are associated with fewer sexual side effects, and thus may provide an option for schizophrenia patients with sexual dysfunction. Depression and anxiety are a cause for sexual dysfunction that may be aggravated by antidepressants, especially selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction may be overcome by lowering doses, switching to an antidepressant with low propensity to cause sexual dysfunction (bupropion, mirtazapine, nefazodone, reboxetine), addition of 5HT2 antagonists (mirtazapine, mianserin) or coadministration of 5-phosphodiesterase inhibitors. Eating disorders and personality disorders, mainly borderline personality disorder, are also associated with sexual dysfunction. Sexual dysfunction in these cases stems from impaired interpersonal relationships and may respond to adequate psychosexual therapy. It is mandatory to identify the specific sexual dysfunction and to treat the patients according to his/her individual psychopathology, current pharmacotherapy and interpersonal relationships.

  4. Associations of unhealthy lifestyle factors with sexual inactivity and sexual dysfunctions in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Birgitte S; Grønbaek, Morten; Pedersen, Bo V; Graugaard, Christian; Frisch, Morten

    2011-07-01

    Studies have linked obesity, a sedentary lifestyle, and tobacco smoking to erectile dysfunction, but the evidence linking unhealthy lifestyle factors to other sexual dysfunctions or to sexual inactivity is conflicting. To examine associations between unhealthy lifestyle factors and sexual inactivity with a partner and four specific sexual dysfunctions in each sex. We used nationally representative survey data from 5,552 Danish men and women aged 16-97 years in 2005. Cross-sectional associations of lifestyle factors with sexual inactivity and sexual dysfunctions were estimated by logistic regression-derived, confounder-adjusted odds ratios (ORs). We calculated ORs for sexual inactivity with a partner and for sexual dysfunction and sexual difficulties overall in both sexes, for erectile dysfunction, anorgasmia, premature ejaculation, and dyspareunia in men, and for lubrication insufficiency, anorgasmia, dyspareunia, and vaginismus in women. Obesity (body mass index [BMI]≥30 kg/m(2) ) or a substantially increased waist circumference (men ≥102 cm; women ≥88 cm), physical inactivity, and, among women, tobacco smoking were each significantly associated with sexual inactivity in the last year. Among sexually active men, both underweight (BMI 21 alcoholic beverages/week), tobacco smoking, and use of hard drugs were each significantly positively associated with one or more sexual dysfunctions (ORs between 1.71 and 22.0). Among sexually active women, the only significant positive association between an unhealthy lifestyle factor and sexual dysfunction was between hashish use and anorgasmia (OR 2.85). In both sexes, several unhealthy lifestyle factors were associated with sexual inactivity with a partner in the last year. Additionally, among sexually active participants, men with unhealthy lifestyles were significantly more likely to experience sexual dysfunctions. Considering the importance of a good sex life, our findings may be useful in attempts to promote healthier

  5. Sexual dysfunctions in psoriatic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Isabela Sarbu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a chronic, immune-mediated disorder with a worldwide occurrence characterized by well-defined infiltrated erythematous papules and plaques, covered by silvery white or yellowish scales. It is a physically, socially and emotionally invalidating disorder that affects 1-2% of the population. Sexual health is an important part of general health and sexual dysfunctions can negatively affect self-esteem, confidence, interpersonal relationships and the quality of life. Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI, Psoriasis Disability Index (PDI and the Impact of Psoriasis on Quality of Life (IPSO questionnaire are all questionnaires used to assess the quality of life of patients with psoriasis and each has one question regarding sexual dysfunction. Several scales were also designed to particularly assess sexual satisfaction in men and women. The aim of this paper is to perform an overview of the existing studies on sexual dysfunction in psoriatic patients.

  6. Associations of unhealthy lifestyle factors with sexual inactivity and sexual dysfunctions in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Birgitte S; Grønbaek, Morten; Pedersen, Bo V

    2011-01-01

    Studies have linked obesity, a sedentary lifestyle, and tobacco smoking to erectile dysfunction, but the evidence linking unhealthy lifestyle factors to other sexual dysfunctions or to sexual inactivity is conflicting.......Studies have linked obesity, a sedentary lifestyle, and tobacco smoking to erectile dysfunction, but the evidence linking unhealthy lifestyle factors to other sexual dysfunctions or to sexual inactivity is conflicting....

  7. Sexual dysfunctions after prostate cancer radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Droupy, S.

    2010-01-01

    Sexual dysfunctions are a quality of life main concern following prostate cancer treatment. After both radiotherapy and brachytherapy, sexual function declines progressively, the onset of occurrence of erectile dysfunction being 12-18 months after both treatments. The pathophysiological pathways by which radiotherapy and brachytherapy cause erectile dysfunction are multi-factorial, as patient co-morbidities, arterial damage, exposure of neurovascular bundle to high levels of radiation, and radiation dose received by the corpora cavernosa at the crurae of the penis may be important in the aetiology of erectile dysfunction. Diagnosis and treatment of postradiation sexual dysfunctions must integrate pre-therapeutic evaluation and information to provide to the patient and his partner a multidisciplinary sexual medicine management. (authors)

  8. [Female sexual dysfunction: Drug treatment options].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcántara Montero, A; Sánchez Carnerero, C I

    2016-01-01

    Many women will likely experience a sexual problem in their lifetime. Female sexual dysfunction is a broad term used to describe 3 categories of disorders of a multifactorial nature. Effective, but limited pharmacotherapeutic options exist to address female sexual dysfunction. The FDA recently approved the first agent for treatment of hypoactive sexual desire disorder in pre-menopausal women. Off-label use of hormonal therapies, particularly oestrogen and testosterone, are the most widely employed for female sexual dysfunction, particularly in post-menopausal women. Other drugs currently under investigation include phosphodiesterase inhibitors and agents that modulate dopamine or melanocortin receptors. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Etiology and Management of Sexual Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendra Kumar Muthugaduru Shivarudrappa

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Sexual dysfunction is the impairment or disruption of any of the three phases of normal sexual functioning, including loss of libido, impairment of physiological arousal and loss, delay or alteration of orgasm. Each one of these can be affected by an orchestra of factors like senility, medical and surgical illnesses, medications and drugs of abuse. Non-pharmacological therapy is the main stay in the treatment of sexual dysfunction and drugs are used as adjuncts for a quicker and better result. Management in many of the cases depends on the primary cause. Here is a review of the major etiological factors of sexual dysfunction and its management

  10. Contemporary treatment of sexual dysfunction: reexamining the biopsychosocial model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Michael D; Berry, Philip D

    2013-11-01

    The introduction of phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors has revolutionized the armamentarium of clinicians in the field of sexual medicine. However, pharmacotherapy as a stand-alone treatment option has been criticized, particularly by psychosocial therapists, as incomplete. Specifically, it is widely argued that drug treatment alone often does not meet the standards of biopsychosocial (BPS) therapy. A literature review was performed to explore the role of the biopsychosocial paradigm in the treatment of sexual dysfunction and outline some of the key challenges and possible shortcomings in the current application of biopsychosocial treatment. Published treatment outcomes of integrative biopsychosocial clinical practice, including medical outcomes, psychological and relational factors, treatment of comorbid conditions, cost of treatment, and treatment efficacy, were investigated. Using Medline, PubMed, and EMBASE databases, a literature search for articles published from January 1, 1980, to March 1, 2013, was performed, examining current approaches to the biopsychosocial model of sexual dysfunction and sexual medicine. Data were reviewed and combined, allowing characterization of current treatment approaches and recommendations for clinical practice and future research. The biopsychosocial model of treatment appears to have an intuitively obvious meaning (i.e., treatment of all three facets of the patient's biological-psychological-social condition). However, research suggests that clear treatment algorithms are still in development. By virtue of the ongoing development of biopsychosocial methods in sexual medicine, new models and research initiatives may be warranted. The evidence identified allows for characterization of some of the current clinical, professional, financial, and systemic challenges to biopsychosocial treatment, with the aim of helping identify possible directions for future research. Implementation of biopsychosocial treatment, though mandated by

  11. Pilot study of sexual dysfunction in patients with psoriasis: Influence of biologic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Ruiz-Villaverde

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psoriasis is a chronic skin disease that affects 1 to 3% of the population in most industrialized countries. It is commonly associated with a variety of psychological problems including low self-esteem, depression, suicidal thoughts, and sexual dysfunction. Materials and Methods : We have performed a pilot study in which we have tried to assess the impact on sexual dysfunction in patients with psoriasis who have started treatment with biological therapy using validated indexes in Spanish: International Index of Erectile Function for men and female sexual function index in women. Results : Considering the men and women from our study, an improvement in FSFI by an average of 9.5 and 6.3 points is observed, respectively. Conclusion: We considered our series as a first step for a more detailed approach to the study of sexual function in patients with psoriasis.

  12. Sexual dysfunction associated with infertility'

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1989-07-15

    Jul 15, 1989 ... incidence of sexual dysfunction during this phase; loss of libido was the ... association with decreased orgasmic response and diminished sexual satisfaction (Fig. 2). ..... Human Sexual Inadequacy. Boston: Little, Brown,.

  13. The use of monoamine pharmacological agents in the treatment of sexual dysfunction: evidence in the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Jennifer L; Brown, Candace S

    2011-04-01

    The monoamine neurotransmitters serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine play an important role in many medical and psychological conditions, including sexual responsiveness and behavior. Pharmacological agents that modulate monoamines may help alleviate sexual dysfunction. To provide an overview of pharmacological agents that modulate monoamines and their use in the treatment of sexual dysfunction. EMBASE and PubMed search for articles published between 1950 and 2010 using key words "sexual dysfunction,"monoamines,"monoaminergic receptors," and "generic names for pharmacological agents." To assess the literature evaluating the efficacy of monoamine pharmacologic agents used in the treatment of sexual dysfunction. The literature primarily cites the use of monoaminergic agents to treat sexual side effects from serotonergic reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), with bupropion, buspirone and ropinirole providing the most convincing evidence. Controlled trials have shown that bupropion improves overall sexual dysfunction, but not frequency of sexual activity in depressed and nondepressed patients. Nefazodone and apomorphine have been used to treat sexual dysfunction, but their use is limited by significant side effect and safety profiles. New research on pharmacologic agents with subtype selectivity at dopaminergic and serotonergic receptors and those that possess dual mechanisms of action are being investigated. There has been tremendous progress over the past 50 years in understanding the role of monoamines in sexual function and the effect of pharmacologic agents which stimulate or antagonize monoaminergic receptors on sexual dysfunction. Nevertheless, large, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies evaluating the efficacy of currently available agents in populations without comorbid disorders are limited, preventing adequate interpretation of data. Continued research on sexual function and specific receptor subtypes will result in the development of more selective

  14. Hormonal Changes and Sexual Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Eric S; Frederick, Natasha N; Bober, Sharon L

    2017-11-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common concern for many patients with cancer after treatment. Hormonal changes as a result of cancer-directed therapy can affect both male and female sexual health. This has the potential to significantly impact patients' quality of life, but is underreported and undertreated in the oncology setting. This review discusses commonly reported sexual issues and the role that hormonal changes play in this dysfunction. Although medical and psychosocial intervention strategies exist, there is a clear need for further research to formally develop programming that can assist people whose sexual health has been impacted by cancer treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Epidemiology of sexual dysfunction in the male population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutel, M E; Weidner, W; Brähler, E

    2006-08-01

    Sexual dysfunctions have found an increasing attention in recent epidemiological studies of the ageing male. The purpose of this paper is to review the prevalence of sexual dysfunctions and risk factors based on community samples. Studies have not only demonstrated a strong age-related incline of erectile dysfunction (ED), but also of ejaculatory and orgasmic disorders (particularly a reduced or absent ejaculation). Despite a declining sexual desire, sexual interest remains present in old age. Lower urinary tract symptoms have been identified as strong risk factors for ED along with cardiovascular, metabolic, psychiatric disorders and lifestyle factors. The wide range of prevalence rate estimates is likely because of different definitions and criteria of sexual dysfunctions. More research is needed on other dysfunctions besides ED and on the partner relationship as a major determinant of sexual activity and satisfaction. The interrelationship between risk factors calls for interdisciplinary prevention and treatment approaches. As disability-free life expectancy keeps increasing, the need to identify, adequately assess and treat male sexual dysfunction as an important impediment to quality of life most likely will become even more pressing.

  16. Antidepressant-Induced Female Sexual Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Tierney; Rullo, Jordan; Faubion, Stephanie

    2016-09-01

    Because 1 in 6 women in the United States takes antidepressants and a substantial proportion of patients report some disturbance of sexual function while taking these medications, it is a near certainty that the practicing clinician will need to know how to assess and manage antidepressant-related female sexual dysfunction. Adverse sexual effects can be complex because there are several potentially overlapping etiologies, including sexual dysfunction associated with the underlying mood disorder. As such, careful assessment of sexual function at the premedication visit followed by monitoring at subsequent visits is critical. Treatment of adverse sexual effects can be pharmacological (dose reduction, drug discontinuation or switching, augmentation, or using medications with lower adverse effect profiles), behavioral (exercising before sexual activity, scheduling sexual activity, vibratory stimulation, psychotherapy), complementary and integrative (acupuncture, nutraceuticals), or some combination of these modalities. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Emotions during sexual activity: differences between sexually functional and dysfunctional men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobre, Pedro J; Pinto-Gouveia, José

    2006-08-01

    The present study investigated the differences in emotional response to automatic thoughts presented during sexual activity between sexually functional and dysfunctional men and women. A total of 376 participants (160 women and 120 men without sexual problems and 47 women and 49 men with a DSM-IV-TR diagnosis of sexual dysfunction) completed the Sexual Modes Questionnaire (SMQ male and female versions; P. J. Nobre & J. Pinto-Gouveia, 2000) and measures of sexual functioning: The International Index of Sexual Function (IIEF; R. C. Rosen et al., 1997), and The Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI; R. C. Rosen et al., 2000). The SMQ is a combined measure constituted by three interdependent subscales: Automatic Thought subscale (AT), Emotional Response subscale (ER), and Sexual Response subscale (SR). Emotions were assessed by the ER subscale, where participants endorsed emotional reactions (worry, sadness, disillusion, fear, guilt, shame, anger, hurt, pleasure, satisfaction) to a list of automatic thoughts (AT subscale) that may occur during sexual activity. Results showed that both men and women with sexual dysfunction had significantly less positive emotional reactions to automatic thoughts during sexual activity. Sexually dysfunctional men had significantly more emotions of sadness, disillusion, and fear, and less pleasure and satisfaction, compared to men without sexual problems. Women with sexual dysfunction had significantly less pleasure and satisfaction, and more sadness, disillusion, guilt, and anger. Findings were congruent with recent studies indicating that emotions related to depressed affect (sadness, disillusion, lack of pleasure) as opposed to negative emotions (mostly related to anxiety) were stronger correlates of sexual dysfunction.

  18. Sexual dysfunction associated with infertility' A comparison of sexual ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In a study of 40 couples with primary infertility, the 'need to perform' over the fertile phase of the menstrual cycle was assessed. In 50% of women there was a statistically increased incidence of sexual dysfunction during this phase; loss of libido was the commonest dysfunction. In 30% of men a decrease in sexual function ...

  19. Psychologic and sexual dysfunction in primary and secondary infertile male patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aytac Sahin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to compare depression and sexual dysfunctions observed in primary and secondary infertile patients. Material and method: The study was performed in 39 primary and 31 secondary infertile male patients. Male sexual health was evaluated using the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF score and depression with Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Results: Mean age of the participants and their partners were 31.54 ± 5.37 (range, 24-48 yrs, and 28.16 ± 5.58 (range, 20- 46 yrs years, respectively. Mean duration of their marriage ranged between 1 and 17 years (mean, 5.06 ± 4.15 yrs. A statistically significant intergroup difference was detected between groups as for BDI scores (p = 0.015; p < 0. 05. BDI scores of the primary group were significantly lower than those of the secondary group. A statistically and extremely significant difference was detected between IIEF scores of the groups (p = 0.006; p < 0.01. IIEF scores of the primary infertile group were higher than those of the secondary group. Conclusion: Our study, frequency of the depression and erectile dysfunction seen in the patients with secondary infertility was seen significantly higher than the patients with primary infertility.

  20. Childhood sexual abuse: long-term effects on psychological and sexual functioning in a nonclinical and nonstudent sample of adult women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, E; Leitenberg, H; Cado, S; Tarran, M J

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how the experience of childhood sexual abuse is related to long-term psychological and sexual functioning in a nonclinical and nonstudent community sample of women. Questionnaires were distributed to 1,500 nurses and returned anonymously. Fifty-four women who had been sexually abused as children (age 15 or younger) responded. These subjects were then matched with 54 nonabused control subjects. Although there was no difference on a measure of self-esteem, the abused group reported more symptoms of distress on the Global Severity Index and on seven out of nine subscales of the Derogatis Brief Symptom Inventory. They also reported more disturbance on a scale which examined psychological symptoms that have been commonly reported in the literature to be particularly associated with sexual abuse. These differences between the abused and nonabused groups were evident even after controlling for differences in subjects' perceptions of parental emotional support. Unlike the results for psychological adjustment, however, the abused subjects did not differ from the control subjects on self-reported levels of sexual satisfaction or sexual dysfunction.

  1. Association Between Infertility and Sexual Dysfunction in Men and Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Michael H; Messore, Marisa; Pastuszak, Alexander W; Ramasamy, Ranjith

    2016-10-01

    The relation between infertility and sexual dysfunction can be reciprocal. Causes of sexual dysfunction that affect fertility include erectile dysfunction, Peyronie's disease (abnormal penile curvature), low libido, ejaculatory disorders in men, and genito-pelvic pain/penetration disorder (GPPPD) and low sexual desire in women. To review the association between infertility and sexual dysfunction and discuss current management strategies to address sexual disorders in couples with infertility. Peer-reviewed publications from PubMed published from 1980 through February 2016 were identified that related to sexual dysfunction and infertility in men and women. Pathophysiology and management approach of erectile dysfunction, Peyronie's disease, low libido, ejaculatory disorders in men, and GPPPD and low sexual desire in women and how each etiology contributes to sexual dysfunction and infertility in the couple. Treating the infertile couple with sexual dysfunction involves addressing underlying conditions such as psychogenic erectile dysfunction, low testosterone, Peyronie's disease in men, and GPPPD and low sexual desire in women. Psychogenic erectile dysfunction can be successfully treated with phosphodiesterase inhibitors. Low testosterone is often identified in men with infertility, but testosterone therapy is contraindicated in men attempting conception. Men with Peyronie's disease have a new treatment option to address their penile curvature-collagenase Clostridium histolyticum injection directly into the penile plaque. GPPPD is a broad disorder that includes vulvodynia and vaginismus and can be treated with topical lubricants and moisturizers. We must address psychosocial factors in women with low sexual desire. Flibanserin and transdermal testosterone (off-label) are novel therapies for women with low sexual desire. Sexual dysfunction in a couple with infertility is a complex issue. Management of infertility and sexual dysfunction should involve appropriate

  2. Sexual activity and sexual dysfunction of women in the perinatal period: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallwiener, Stephanie; Müller, Mitho; Doster, Anne; Kuon, Ruben Jeremias; Plewniok, Katharina; Feller, Sandra; Wallwiener, Markus; Reck, Corinna; Matthies, Lina Maria; Wallwiener, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Reduced sexual activity and dysfunctional problems are highly prevalent in the perinatal period, and there is a lack of data regarding the degree of normality during pregnancy. Several risk factors have been independently associated with a greater extent of Female Sexual Dysfunction (FSD). Therefore, this study aimed to assess the prevalence of sexual inactivity and sexual dysfunctions in German women during the perinatal period and the verification of potential risk factors. Questionnaires were administered to 315 women prenatally (TI 3rd trimester) and postpartum (TII 1 week, TIII 4 months), including the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI), the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), and the Questionnaire of Partnership (PFB). The frequency of sexual inactivity was 24% (TI), 40.5% (TII), and 19.9% (TIII). Overall, 26.5-34.8% of women were at risk of sexual dysfunction (FSFI score Sexual desire disorder was the most prevalent form of Female sexual dysfunction. Furthermore, especially breastfeeding and low partnership quality were revealed as significant risk factors for sexual dysfunctional problems postpartum. Depressive symptoms having a cesarean section and high maternal education were correlated with dysfunctional problems in several subdomains. Findings indicated that women at risk of FSD differed significantly in aspects of partnership quality, breastfeeding, mode of delivery, maternal education, and depressive symptoms. Aspects of perinatal sexuality should be routinely implemented in the counseling of couples in prenatal classes.

  3. Effect of normative masculinity on males' dysfunctional sexual beliefs, sexual attitudes, and perceptions of sexual functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Michael J; Marks, Anthony D G; Lykins, Amy D

    2015-01-01

    Male sexual dysfunction is a prevalent and distressing condition, which may be exacerbated by the sufferer's perceptions of masculinity and normative sexual behavior. This study sought to investigate the effect of social context on males' beliefs regarding sexual behavior. The research examined the effect of male role modeling and masculine cues on males' dysfunctional sexual beliefs, sexual attitudes, and self-perceptions of sexual functioning. A sample of 140 male participants, with a mean age of 29 years, was exposed to pictorial and verbal cues that presented different versions of male behavior across three conditions. Results indicated that males exposed to models and cues of traditional masculinity showed significantly increased levels of dysfunctional sexual beliefs and traditional sexual attitudes relative to males exposed to models of modern masculinity. Results also indicated that males exposed to traditional masculine stimuli reported lower levels of sexual inhibition due to fear of performance failure than males exposed to models of modern masculinity. The potential role of social context is discussed in the development and maintenance of male sexual dysfunction and its implications for treatment.

  4. Sexual Dysfunction and Sexual Behaviors in a Sample of Brazilian Male Substance Misusers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Alessandra; Pillon, Sandra Cristina; Dos Santos, Manoel Antônio; Rassool, G Hussein; Laranjeira, Ronaldo

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential relationship between self-reported sexual dysfunction, sexual behavior, and severity of addiction of drug users. A cross-sectional design study was conducted at an inpatient addiction treatment unit in Sao Paulo, Brazil, with a sample of 508 male drug users. Sociodemographic data, sexual behavior, and severity of dependence were evaluated.The prevalence of sexual dysfunction was 37.2% and premature ejaculation was 63.8%. Men with sexual dysfunction presented from moderate to severe level of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs of dependence. The findings from this study are particularly relevant identifying those sociodemographic factors, severity of drug use, and sexual behavior are related to men who experience sexual dysfunction. Health promotion and motivational interventions on sexual health targeted to male drug users can contribute in reducing these at-risk behaviors. More interdisciplinary research is desirable in future in considering men's sexual health. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Psychological model of adolescent dysfunctionality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvetkov A. V.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available teenage dysfunctionality could be caused by a number of factors, which are an integral part of modern life. Particularly, in this work we considered such factors as uncertainty, frustration, and a mismatch of sexual behavior setting. The path analysis based on using structural equations. The results proved that teenage dysfunctionality is a consequence of the direct effect of the interconnection between moral reflection and moral and ethical responsibility on the perception level of social frustration, corporeality and sexual mismatch.

  6. Sexual dysfunction within an adult developmental perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, P J; Meyer, J K; Schmidt, C W

    1986-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on the adult who has adequately mastered the oedipal stage of psychosexual development and who presents with a sexual dysfunction. Drawing on the developmental sequence of Erik Erikson, the authors suggest that failure to address adequately an adult psychosocial crisis may result in sexual dysfunction. There may be both adult developmental deficits and regression to adolescent and adult stages previously negotiated. Both may be symptomatically represented by sexual dysfunction. The authors urge that the sexual and marital problems be evaluated within an adult developmental framework and that the therapy address the psychosocial issues which are appropriate to the developmental stage of the patient.

  7. Testicular prosthesis: Patient satisfaction and sexual dysfunctions in testis cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catanzariti, Francesco; Polito, Benedetta; Polito, Massimo

    2016-10-05

    We studied patient satisfaction about sexual activity after prosthesis implantation using validated questionnaires with the aim to discover if testicular prosthesis could be responsible of sexual dysfunctions (erectile dysfunction or premature ejaculation). We evaluated a total of 67 men who underwent radical orchiectomy for testicular cancer and a silicon testicular prosthesis implantation from January 2008 to June 2014 at our Hospital. These patients completed 5 validated questionnaires the day before orchiectomy and 6 months after surgery: the International Index of Erectile Function 5 (IIEF5), the Premature Ejaculation Diagnostic Tool (PEDT), the Body Exposure during Sexual Activities Questionnaire (BESAQ), the Body-Esteem Scale and the Rosenberg Self- Esteem Scale. We also evaluated 6 months after surgery any defects of the prosthesis complained by the patients. The questionnaires completed by patients didn't show statistically significant changes for erectile dysfunction (p > 0.05) and premature ejaculation (p > 0.05). On the contrary the psychological questionnaires showed statistically significant change for the BESAQ (p < 0.001) and the Body Esteem Scale (p < 0.001), but not for the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (p > 0,05). A total of 15 patients (22.37%) were dissatisfied about the prosthesis: the most frequent complaint (8 patients; 11.94%) was that the prosthesis was firmer than the normal testis. Testicular prosthesis implantation is a safe surgical procedure that should be always proposed before orchiectomy for cancer of the testis. The defects complained by patients with testicular prosthesis are few, they don't influence sexual activity and they aren't able to cause erectile dysfunction or premature ejaculation.

  8. Incidence of sexual dysfunction: a prospective survey in Ghanaian females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amidu Nafiu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sexuality is a complex phenomenon that is being influenced by psychological as well as physiological factors. Its dysfunction includes desire, arousal, orgasmic and sex pain disorders. The present study aimed to assess the incidence of sexual dysfunction (SD and related risk factors in a cohort of Ghanaian women. Method The Golombok Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction (GRISS was administered to 400 healthy women between 18 and 58 years old (mean +/- SD: 30.1 +/- 7.9 domiciled in the Kumasi metropolis. Results The response rate was 75.3% after 99 were excluded. Of the remaining 301 women, 50% were engaged in exercise, 26.7% indulge in alcoholic beverages and only 2% were smokers. A total of 62.1% of the women had attained high education, whilst, 28.9% were married. After logistic regression analysis, alcohol emerged (OR: 2.0; CI: 1.0 - 3.8; p = 0.04 as the main risk factor for SD. The overall prevalence of SD in these subjects was 72.8%. Severe difficulties with sexual function were identified in 3.3% of the studied population. The most prevalent areas of difficulty were anorgasmia (72.4%, sexual infrequency (71.4%, dissatisfaction (77.7%, vaginismus (68.1%, avoidance of sexual intercourse (62.5%, non-sensuality (61.5% and non-communication (54.2%. Whereas 8% had severe difficulties with anorgasmia, only 6% had severe difficulties with vaginismus. Conclusion SD affects more than 70% of Ghanaian women who are sexually active. Alcohol significantly influences sexual activity.

  9. Incidence of sexual dysfunction: a prospective survey in Ghanaian females

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Sexuality is a complex phenomenon that is being influenced by psychological as well as physiological factors. Its dysfunction includes desire, arousal, orgasmic and sex pain disorders. The present study aimed to assess the incidence of sexual dysfunction (SD) and related risk factors in a cohort of Ghanaian women. Method The Golombok Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction (GRISS) was administered to 400 healthy women between 18 and 58 years old (mean +/- SD: 30.1 +/- 7.9) domiciled in the Kumasi metropolis. Results The response rate was 75.3% after 99 were excluded. Of the remaining 301 women, 50% were engaged in exercise, 26.7% indulge in alcoholic beverages and only 2% were smokers. A total of 62.1% of the women had attained high education, whilst, 28.9% were married. After logistic regression analysis, alcohol emerged (OR: 2.0; CI: 1.0 - 3.8; p = 0.04) as the main risk factor for SD. The overall prevalence of SD in these subjects was 72.8%. Severe difficulties with sexual function were identified in 3.3% of the studied population. The most prevalent areas of difficulty were anorgasmia (72.4%), sexual infrequency (71.4%), dissatisfaction (77.7%), vaginismus (68.1%), avoidance of sexual intercourse (62.5%), non-sensuality (61.5%) and non-communication (54.2%). Whereas 8% had severe difficulties with anorgasmia, only 6% had severe difficulties with vaginismus. Conclusion SD affects more than 70% of Ghanaian women who are sexually active. Alcohol significantly influences sexual activity. PMID:20809943

  10. Sexual dysfunction in men with alcoholic liver cirrhosis. A comparative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, S B; Gluud, C

    1985-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction in men with alcoholic cirrhosis was investigated in young (less than 56 years) outpatients with steady female partners. Sixty-one per cent (11/18) claimed sexual dysfunction, with erectile dysfunction and/or reduced sexual desire being the most common symptoms. Comparing patien...... less than 0.025) raised prevalence of sexual dysfunction when compared to men without chronic disease (matched for age and duration of partnership).......Sexual dysfunction in men with alcoholic cirrhosis was investigated in young (less than 56 years) outpatients with steady female partners. Sixty-one per cent (11/18) claimed sexual dysfunction, with erectile dysfunction and/or reduced sexual desire being the most common symptoms. Comparing patients...... with (n = 11) and without (n = 7) sexual dysfunction, no significant differences were found concerning a number of pertinent clinical variables. This should be interpreted with caution, however, owing to the small number of patients in each group. The prevalence and type of sexual dysfunction were...

  11. Incidence and prevalence of sexual dysfunction in infertile females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohina S. Aggarwal

    2013-09-01

    Results: In our study 170 (63.67% patients in the infertile group (n = 267 had female sexual dysfunction as compared to108 (46.35% in the fertile group (n = 233, which is statistically significant (P 0.0001. Most common dysfunction observed was arousal (70% in infertile patients. Common dysfunctions observed in fertile females were desire (40% and orgasm (40%. FSD was significantly higher in infertile females of the 31–37 years age group (P 0.002, while more common in fertile females of >42 years of age (P < 0.0001. Higher female sexual dysfunction was observed in illiterate infertile females (P 0.039. Among the pathological factors endometriosis was the statistically significant factor associated with female sexual dysfunction and infertility (P < 0.0001. No significant correlation in duration of infertility or type of infertility was observed with female sexual dysfunction. Female sexual dysfunction as the cause or the effect should be ascertained in infertility.

  12. Female sexual dysfunction in patients with endometriosis: Indian scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineet V Mishra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Female sexual dysfunction (FSD in Indian women is often overlooked due to cultural beliefs and considered as social taboos. Sexuality is an important and integral part of life. There are many causes of sexual dysfunction, but the prevalence of FSD in endometriotic patients is still underdiagnosed. Materials and Methods: Study design - Cross-sectional observational study conducted at tertiary care center, from June 2015 to March 2016. Sample size - Fifty-one patients in reproductive age group (18-47 years who were diagnosed with endometriosis on diagnostic laparoscopy were included. Methods - FSD was assessed with a detailed 19-item female sexual function index questionnaire. All six domains of sexual dysfunction, i.e., desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction, and pain were studied. Exclusion - Patients with other gynecological, medical or surgical history were excluded. Results: Out of 51 patients with endometriosis, 47.06% of patients had sexual dysfunction. With the increase in staging of endometriosis, sexual dysfunction prevalence is also rising. FSD was 100% in patients with severe endometriosis as compared to 33.33% in minimal endometriosis. Conclusion: Every individual deserves good sexual life. The sexual dysfunction associated with endometriosis should also be taken into consideration while managing these patients.

  13. [Psychosocial aspects of patients with sexual dysfunction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambreva, E; Klaghofer, R; Buddeberg, C

    2006-02-15

    Sexual dysfunctions are common among the general population. An essential part of the assignments to specialized sexual medicine care units are from primary care physicians. In 2002 to 2004 for a period of 18 months questionnaires were given to all patients, who attended the special sexual medicine care unit at the University Hospital of Zurich for the first time. At the beginning of their treatment, the patients were questioned about different psychosocial characteristics and aspects of their sexuality. We studied 43 women (48.3%) and 46 men (51.7%). Women were with an average age of 33.8 years 10 years younger than men, 43.5 years. The most common sexual dysfunction in women was lack or loss of sexual desire (51.2%), followed by nonorganic vaginism (20.9%) and orgasm disorders (11.6%), in men erectile dysfunction (50.0%), followed by premature ejaculation (26.1%) and lack or loss of sexual desire (15.2%). The studied subjects showed distinctively lower values in their sense of coherence than men and women in the general population. The patients were much more anxious than people in the average population. The questioned men were also much more depressive than men in the general population and than the examined women. The examined men reported sexual wishes, needs and sexual activities significant more frequently than the examined women. As men and women with sexual dysfunctions are much more anxious than people from the general population, physicians should address sexual themes in the conversations with their patients carefully but actively.

  14. Sociodemographic and clinical correlates of sexual dysfunction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Sexual dysfunction is common in patients receiving psychotropic medications and may reduce their quality of life and medication adherence with resultant negative impact on treatment outcomes. Objectives: In this study, we described the various types of sexual dysfunction among psychiatric outpatients ...

  15. The Role of Sexual Assault and Sexual Dysfunction in Alcohol and Other Drug Use Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjuan, Pilar M.; Langenbucher, James W.; Labouvie, Erich

    2006-01-01

    Many women with sexual assault histories receive care in alcohol and other drug treatment programs. Affected women frequently suffer from sexual dysfunction, leading investigators to suggest self-medication may be one path to alcohol and other drug use disorders and relapse. This preliminary study examined sexual dysfunction and sexual assault in 71 women receiving treatment for addiction. Women with prior sexual assault scored higher than non-assaulted women on sexual dysfunction overall, a ...

  16. A Comparative study on sexual dysfunctions before and after menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigi, Marjan; Fahami, Fariba

    2012-01-01

    Background: Sexual instinct which is the cause of numerous changes in an individual’s life could be influenced by different factors such as menopause and ageing. This study was designed to compare sexual dysfunction before and after menopause. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. Participants were 174 menopausal women who referred to medical health centers of Isfahan, Iran. Data were collected through self constructed sexual dysfunctions questionnaire in relation to their sexual activities before and after menopause. The reliability and validity of this questionnaire was determined by content validity and Cronbach’s alpha coefficient. Findings: Findings showed that the relative frequency of sexual dysfunctions was 38% in the productive period and 72.4% in the menopause period. There was a significant association between sexual dysfunctions before and after the menopause period (p vaginismus, respectively. Conclusions: A considerable percentage of women experienced sexual dysfunctions in productive and menopause periods, and menopause could be a factor to maintain or intensify sexual dysfunctions. PMID:23833604

  17. Pain related sexual dysfunction after inguinal herniorrhaphy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasvang, EK; Møhl, Bo; Bay-Nielsen, M

    2006-01-01

    , and sexual dysfunction have only been described sporadically. The aim was therefore to describe these symptoms in a questionnaire study. A nationwide detailed questionnaire study in September 2004 of pain related sexual dysfunction in all men aged 18-40 years undergoing inguinal herniorrhaphy between October......To determine the incidence of pain related sexual dysfunction 1 year after inguinal herniorrhaphy and to assess the impact pain has on sexual function. In contrast to the well-described about 10% risk of chronic wound related pain after inguinal herniorrhaphy, chronic genital pain, dysejaculation...... 2002 and June 2003 (n=1015) based upon the nationwide Danish Hernia Database collaboration. The response rate was 68.4%. Combined frequent and moderate or severe pain from the previous hernia site during activity was reported by 187 patients (18.4%). Pain during sexual activity was reported by 224...

  18. Sexual Dysfunction before and after Cardiac Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Schumann

    2010-01-01

    variables. Methods. Analysis of patients participating in a 12-week exercise-based outpatient cardiac rehabilitation program (OCR between April 1999 and December 2007. Exercise capacity (ExC and quality of life including sexual function were assessed before and after OCR. Results. Complete data were available in 896 male patients. No sexual activity at all was indicated by 23.1% at baseline and 21.8% after OCR, no problems with sexual activity by 40.8% at baseline and 38.6% after OCR. Patients showed an increase in specific problems (erectile dysfunction and lack of orgasm from 18% to 23% (<.0001 during OCR. We found the following independent positive and negative predictors of sexual problems after OCR: hyperlipidemia, age, CABG, baseline ExC and improvement of ExC, subjective physical and mental capacity, and sense of affiliation. Conclusions. Sexual dysfunction is present in over half of the patients undergoing OCR with no overall improvement during OCR. Age, CABG, low exercise capacity are independent predictors of sexual dysfunction after OCR.

  19. Testicular prosthesis: Patient satisfaction and sexual dysfunctions in testis cancer survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Catanzariti

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We studied patient satisfaction about sexual activity after prosthesis implantation using validated questionnaires with the aim to discover if testicular prosthesis could be responsible of sexual dysfunctions (erectile dysfunction or premature ejaculation. Materials and Methods: We evaluated a total of 67 men who underwent radical orchiectomy for testicular cancer and a silicon testicular prosthesis implantation from January 2008 to June 2014 at our Hospital. These patients completed 5 validated questionnaires the day before orchiectomy and 6 months after surgery: the International Index of Erectile Function 5 (IIEF5, the Premature Ejaculation Diagnostic Tool (PEDT, the Body Exposure during Sexual Activities Questionnaire (BESAQ, the Body-Esteem Scale and the Rosenberg Self- Esteem Scale. We also evaluated 6 months after surgery any defects of the prosthesis complained by the patients. Results: The questionnaires completed by patients didn’t show statistically significant changes for erectile dysfunction (p > 0.05 and premature ejaculation (p > 0.05. On the contrary the psychological questionnaires showed statistically significant change for the BESAQ (p < 0.001 and the Body Esteem Scale (p < 0.001, but not for the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (p > 0,05. A total of 15 patients (22.37% were dissatisfied about the prosthesis: the most frequent complaint (8 patients; 11.94% was that the prosthesis was firmer than the normal testis. Conclusions: Testicular prosthesis implantation is a safe surgical procedure that should be always proposed before orchiectomy for cancer of the testis. The defects complained by patients with testicular prosthesis are few, they don’t influence sexual activity and they aren’t able to cause erectile dysfunction or premature ejaculation.

  20. Sexual dysfunction, depression, and the impact of antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Sidney H; Rizvi, Sakina

    2009-04-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common symptom of depression. Although decreased libido is most often reported, difficulties with arousal, resulting in vaginal dryness in women and erectile dysfunction in men, and absent or delayed orgasm are also prevalent. Sexual dysfunction is also a frequent adverse effect of treatment with most antidepressants and is one of the predominant reasons for premature drug discontinuation. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are the most widely prescribed antidepressants and have significant effects on arousal and orgasm compared with antidepressants that target norepinephrine, dopamine, and melatonin systems. The availability of an antidepressant that does not cause or exacerbate sexual dysfunction represents an advance in pharmacotherapy for mood disorders and should reduce treatment noncompliance and decrease the need for switching antidepressants or adding antidotes. The purpose of this review was to provide an update on the prevalence, psychobiology, and relative adverse effect burden of sexual dysfunction associated with different antidepressants.

  1. Female sexual dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giraldi, Annamaria; Wåhlin-Jacobsen, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Female sexual dysfunction (FSD) is a controversial condition, which has prompted much debate regarding its aetiology, components, and even its existence. Our inability to work together as clinicians, psychologists, patients, and advocates hinders our understanding of FSD, and we will only improve...

  2. Advances in pharmacotherapy for treating female sexual dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nappi, Rossella E; Cucinella, Laura

    2015-04-01

    'Female sexual dysfunction' (FSD) is an umbrella term comprising a range of common disorders, including hypoactive sexual desire, reduced subjective and/or physical genital arousal (poor sensation, vasocongestion, lubrication), sexual pain and inability to achieve orgasm/satisfaction, which are multidimensional by nature and often coexisting. Psychological and contextual factors have a significant influence on organic components of sexual response and behavior and a tailored medical approach to sexual symptoms is inevitably limited. The paper reports the most recent advances in pharmacotherapy for women taking into account the biopsychosocial model. Hormone therapy, including estrogens, testosterone, tibolone and dehydroepiandrosterone, are discussed in term of efficacy and safety in postmenopausal women both for female sexual interest/arousal disorder (FSIAD) and genito-pelvic pain/penetration disorder. Ospemifene, a selective estrogen receptor modulator, approved to treat dyspareunia at menopause, is also discussed. Data on psychoactive agents for treatment of FSIAD in premenopausal women are discussed, including the potential use of on-demand combined hormonal (testosterone) and non-hormonal (buspirone or sildenafil) treatments to address possible neurophysiological profiles of women. We are still waiting for an approved pharmacotherapy for FSD. This is not the result of gender inequality in sexual medicine, but it reflects the need of balancing benefits and risks in order to provide effective and safe treatments to women of any age.

  3. Quality of life, depression, and sexual dysfunction in spouses of female patients with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutoglu, Ahmet; Boyaci, Ahmet; Koca, Irfan; Celen, Esra; Korkmaz, Nurdan

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the quality of life and psychological condition of female patients with fibromyalgia and their spouses on sexual function. A total of 32 female patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia and their spouses were analyzed. Thirty married couples were included in the study as the control group. The demographic data of the fibromyalgia patients were recorded, a visual analog scale was used to evaluate the level of pain, and the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire was used to evaluate the impact of the symptoms on the quality of life of the patients. The quality of life of both the patients and the control group were evaluated using the Short Form 36 (SF-36), and psychological variables were evaluated using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Beck Anxiety Inventory. Sexual function was assessed using the Female Sexual Function Index for female participants and the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) for male participants. The IIEF erectile dysfunction scores were significantly lower in the spouses of female patients with fibromyalgia than in the control group (p fibromyalgia (p fibromyalgia (p = 0.003 and p = 0.004, respectively). In all spouses of FMS patients and controls, there was a significantly negative correlation between erectile function, the BDI score, and to be married with FMS patient and positive correlations between erectile function and emotional role, social function, mental health, SF-36 pain score, and general health (p fibromyalgia might significantly interfere with quality of life and lead to a high rate of sexual dysfunction. Spouses of patients with fibromyalgia might also be investigated for sexual dysfunction and quality of life. Treatment programs for this group should be considered.

  4. Sexual behavior and sexual dysfunctions after age 40: the global study of sexual attitudes and behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolosi, Alfredo; Laumann, Edward O; Glasser, Dale B; Moreira, Edson D; Paik, Anthony; Gingell, Clive

    2004-11-01

    To assess the importance of sex and the prevalence of sexual dysfunction among middle-aged and older adults throughout the world. Increasing life expectancy has been accompanied by improvements in the health of the middle-aged and elderly, but little is known about how this has affected their sexual experience. Data were collected in 29 countries from 27,500 men and women aged 40 to 80 years using a standardized questionnaire (self-completed or by interview). Sexual dysfunction was defined as frequent and persistent problems. They included early ejaculation and erectile difficulties in men, lubrication difficulties and pain during intercourse in women, and a lack of sexual interest, an inability to achieve orgasm, and a feeling of unpleasurable sex in both. More than 80% of the men and 65% of the women had had sexual intercourse during the past year. Of these subjects, the most common dysfunctions were early ejaculation (14%) and erectile difficulties (10%) among the men and a lack of sexual interest (21%), inability to reach orgasm (16%), and lubrication difficulties (16%) among the women. Overall, 28% of the men and 39% of the women said that they were affected by at least one sexual dysfunction. The results of our study indicate that sexual desire and activity are widespread among middle-aged and elderly men and women worldwide and persist into old age. The prevalence of sexual dysfunctions was quite high and tended to increase with age, especially in men. Although major between-country differences were noted, this global study revealed some clear and consistent patterns.

  5. Sexuality and sexual dysfunction in spinal cord-injured men in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman, Ramazan Yavuz; Coşkun Çelik, Evrim; Karataş, Metin

    2015-01-01

    To provide a comprehensive evaluation of sexual function and dysfunction in spinal cord-injured men based on self-reports of patients. Forty-seven spinal cord-injured men who completed the spinal shock and rehabilitation period were included. Patients were asked to complete a questionnaire developed to assess social status, sexual activities, abilities, and sexuality education after injury. Neurologic levels of patients were classified according to American Spinal Cord Injury Association protocol. Erectile function was evaluated by International Index of Erectile Function-5 (IIEF-5) questionnaire. Patients were aged between 20 and 62 years (mean: 35.2). Twenty-eight patients had T10 and above, 15 between T11 and L2, and 4 cauda conus injury. While 61.7% of the patients declared sexual activity, 93.6% declared some degree of erection. Mean IIEF-5 score was 5.3 and 87.3% of the patients had moderate to severe erectile dysfunction. Continuation of sexual activity after injury is very important and has a great impact on quality of life and interpersonal relationships for spinal cord-injured men. More attention must be given to sexuality after spinal cord injury. A very high rate of sexual dysfunction in spinal cord-injured patients was found and the importance of sexual education was emphasized in this study.

  6. Sensory Dysfunction and Sexuality in the U.S. Population of Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Selena; Pinto, Jayant M; Wroblewski, Kristen E; McClintock, Martha K

    2018-04-01

    The sexual experience is shaped by sensory function; with aging, sensory dysfunction may interfere with sexuality and sexual behavior between partners. Specifically, older adults with age-related sensory dysfunction may have less sexual activity than those with better sensory function. In addition, since sexual desire and attraction rests in part upon sensory function, sensory dysfunction may also be associated with less sexual motivation. To test the association between sexual activity and motivation in older adults and their sensory dysfunction. Sensory dysfunction was measured both by global sensory impairment (a validated measure of dysfunction shared among the 5 classic senses: olfaction, vision, taste, touch, hearing) and by total sensory burden (cumulative sensory loss). Sexual activity was quantified by frequency and type of sexual behavior. Sexual motivation was measured by the frequency of sexual ideation and the importance of sex to the respondent. We used cross-sectional data from a nationally representative sample of community-dwelling older adults (aged 57-85 years) in the United States (National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project, N = 3,005) in logistic regression analyses. Sexual activity, sexual motivation, and satisfaction with the sexual relationship were self-reported. Older adults with sensory dysfunction were less likely to be sexually active-an association that persisted when accounting for other factors that also affected sexual activity (age, gender, partnered status, mental and physical health, and relationship satisfaction). Nonetheless, sensory dysfunction did not impair sexual motivation, nor affect the physical and emotional satisfaction with the sexual relationship. Among currently sexually active older adults, sensory dysfunction did not affect the frequency of sex or the type of sexual activity (foreplay, vaginal intercourse, or oral sex). These results were the same for 2 different measures of sensory dysfunction. This is the

  7. Sexual Dysfunction in Males: Significance of Adverse Childhood Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzl, Johann F.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A survey of 301 male college students found that occasional sexual dysfunction was frequent in young male adults, and long-lasting adverse familial relationships to attachment figures were more influential in later sexual dysfunction than were childhood sexual abuse experiences. (Author/DB)

  8. Sexual dysfunction in women with ESRD requiring hemodialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strippoli, G.F.; Vecchio, M.; Palmer, S.; De Berardis, G.; Craig, J.; Lucisano, G.; Johnson, D.; Pellegrini, F.; Nicolucci, A.; Sciancalepore, M.; Saglimbene, V.; Gargano, L.; Bonifati, C.; Ruospo, M.; Navaneethan, S.D.; Montinaro, V.; Stroumza, P.; Zsom, M.; Torok, M.; Celia, E.; Gelfman, R.; Bednarek-Skublewska, A.; Dulawa, J.; Graziano, G.; Gentile, G.; Ferrari, J.N.; Santoro, A.; Zucchelli, A.; Triolo, G.; Maffei, S.; Hegbrant, J.; Wollheim, C.; De Cosmo, S.; Manfreda, V.M.; Steiner, K.; et al.,

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The few existing studies of sexual dysfunction in women on hemodialysis are limited by small sample size. This large, cross-sectional study evaluated the prevalence and correlates of female sexual dysfunction in advanced kidney disease. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS,

  9. Bladder, Bowel, and Sexual Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuji Sakakibara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bladder dysfunction (urinary urgency/frequency, bowel dysfunction (constipation, and sexual dysfunction (erectile dysfunction (also called “pelvic organ” dysfunctions are common nonmotor disorders in Parkinson's disease (PD. In contrast to motor disorders, pelvic organ autonomic dysfunctions are often nonresponsive to levodopa treatment. The brain pathology causing the bladder dysfunction (appearance of overactivity involves an altered dopamine-basal ganglia circuit, which normally suppresses the micturition reflex. By contrast, peripheral myenteric pathology causing slowed colonic transit (loss of rectal contractions and central pathology causing weak strain and paradoxical anal sphincter contraction on defecation (PSD, also called as anismus are responsible for the bowel dysfunction. In addition, hypothalamic dysfunction is mostly responsible for the sexual dysfunction (decrease in libido and erection in PD, via altered dopamine-oxytocin pathways, which normally promote libido and erection. The pathophysiology of the pelvic organ dysfunction in PD differs from that in multiple system atrophy; therefore, it might aid in differential diagnosis. Anticholinergic agents are used to treat bladder dysfunction in PD, although these drugs should be used with caution particularly in elderly patients who have cognitive decline. Dietary fibers, laxatives, and “prokinetic” drugs such as serotonergic agonists are used to treat bowel dysfunction in PD. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors are used to treat sexual dysfunction in PD. These treatments might be beneficial in maximizing the patients' quality of life.

  10. Bladder, bowel, and sexual dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakibara, Ryuji; Kishi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Emina; Tateno, Fuyuki; Uchiyama, Tomoyuki; Yamamoto, Tatsuya; Yamanishi, Tomonori

    2011-01-01

    Bladder dysfunction (urinary urgency/frequency), bowel dysfunction (constipation), and sexual dysfunction (erectile dysfunction) (also called "pelvic organ" dysfunctions) are common nonmotor disorders in Parkinson's disease (PD). In contrast to motor disorders, pelvic organ autonomic dysfunctions are often nonresponsive to levodopa treatment. The brain pathology causing the bladder dysfunction (appearance of overactivity) involves an altered dopamine-basal ganglia circuit, which normally suppresses the micturition reflex. By contrast, peripheral myenteric pathology causing slowed colonic transit (loss of rectal contractions) and central pathology causing weak strain and paradoxical anal sphincter contraction on defecation (PSD, also called as anismus) are responsible for the bowel dysfunction. In addition, hypothalamic dysfunction is mostly responsible for the sexual dysfunction (decrease in libido and erection) in PD, via altered dopamine-oxytocin pathways, which normally promote libido and erection. The pathophysiology of the pelvic organ dysfunction in PD differs from that in multiple system atrophy; therefore, it might aid in differential diagnosis. Anticholinergic agents are used to treat bladder dysfunction in PD, although these drugs should be used with caution particularly in elderly patients who have cognitive decline. Dietary fibers, laxatives, and "prokinetic" drugs such as serotonergic agonists are used to treat bowel dysfunction in PD. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors are used to treat sexual dysfunction in PD. These treatments might be beneficial in maximizing the patients' quality of life.

  11. Female sexual dysfunction: a focus on flibanserin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lodise NM

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Nicole M Lodise Department of Pharmacy Practice, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Albany, NY, USA Abstract: Flibanserin is the first US Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved option for sexual dysfunction, specifically low sexual desire. Until recently, there were no FDA-approved medication options to assist the ~40% of women affected by female sexual dysfunction (FSD. Often, patients report feeling uncomfortable discussing sexual health, identifying a strong need for health care professionals (HCPs to proactively reach out to patients to identify concerns and initiate a discussion about sexual health and the available treatment options. Within the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition (DMS-5, the criteria of female sexual interest/arousal disorder (FSIAD are outlined, encompassing one of the most common sexual concerns, formerly in its own category defined as hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD or low sexual desire. HSDD is the absence or deficiency of sexual interest and/or desire leading to significant distress and interpersonal difficulties. HCPs offer an important service in assessing their patients and providing information about treatment considerations while ensuring patient comfort with this topic. This article provides an overview of the types and potential causes associated with FSD and the role of flibanserin in practice as a treatment option. Despite a need for additional study in diverse populations, flibanserin has demonstrated efficacy with increased female sexual function index (FSFI total and desire domain scores in clinical studies indicating benefit in sexual desire. Common patient or provider-administered assessment tools to assist in identifying affected patients and patient counseling strategies are reviewed. Keywords: female sexual dysfunction, low sexual desire, hypoactive sexual desire disorder, pharmacotherapy, flibanserin

  12. Facilitating Sexual Health: Intimacy Enhancement Techniques for Sexual Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern, Stephen

    1999-01-01

    Asserts that, although technological advances afford opportunities for reclaiming sexual functioning, even among individuals with chronic illness or devastating injury, they cannot ensure that sexual outlet will facilitate intimacy in a committed relationship. Explains how sex therapy addresses dysfunction in an essential relational context, and…

  13. Sexual dysfunction in young women with breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kedde, H.; van de Wiel, H. B. M.; Schultz, W. C. M. Weijmar; Wijsen, C.

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of sexual dysfunction in young women with breast cancer in the Netherlands, and to assess the relationship between sexual dysfunction, treatment methods and treatment-related complaints. Also, the interest among women with breast cancer in

  14. Idade e distúrbios psicológicos: variáveis associadas à disfunção sexual no período pós-infarto Age and psychologic disorders: variables associated to post-infarction sexual dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Janussi Vacanti

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: As informações sobre a disfunção sexual (DS após o infarto do miocárdio (IM são esparsas, principalmente em nosso meio e em relação aos seus preditores. Avaliamos pacientes de ambos os sexos, com vida sexual ativa e sem disfunção sexual prévia ao IM, para estudar a incidência de DS após o IM, e identificar as possíveis variáveis associadas às mesmas. MÉTODOS: Estudamos consecutivamente 43 pacientes, utilizando questionários estruturados para diagnóstico das DS e dos distúrbios psicológicos (DP. Analisamos a influência dos fatores de risco clássicos para aterosclerose, dos DP e do uso de medicamentos na ocorrência de DS até o sexto mês após o IM. RESULTADOS: Após o IM, 91% dos pacientes reiniciaram a atividade sexual. Vinte e seis pacientes (60% apresentaram disfunção sexual até o 6º mês da alta hospitalar (9 com ejaculação precoce, 15 com disfunção erétil e 20 com desejo sexual hipoativo. Os pacientes com DP apresentaram disfunção sexual em maior freqüência que aqueles sem DP (100%x47%, p=0,001. O grupo com disfunção sexual era significativamente mais velho que o grupo sem disfunção sexual: 53±8,9 anos versus 47±8,7 anos (p=0,04. CONCLUSÃO: Os pacientes apresentaram significativa redução da freqüência da atividade sexual e elevada incidência de DS após o infarto agudo do miocárdio. A presença de DP e a idade mais elevada estiveram associadas à maior incidência de DS após o infarto.OBJECTIVE: Data on sexual disfunction (SD after myocardial infarction (MI are sketchy, especially in our community and in regard to predictors. Both males and females, with active sexual life and no sexual dysfunction prior to MI were evaluated in order to investigate SD incidence after MI, as well as to identify the possible variables associated. METHODS: Forty-three patients were studied consecutively, through structured questionnaires for SD and psychological disorders (PD diagnosis. The

  15. Childhood Sexual Abuse as a Predictor of Adult Female Sexual Dysfunction: A Study of Couples Seeking Sex Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwer, David B.; Durlak, Joseph A.

    1996-01-01

    A study of 359 married women who sought sex therapy with their spouses found a connection between adult female sexual dysfunction and childhood sexual abuse. Abuse involving sexual penetration was specifically associated with adult sexual dysfunction. Future research on additional variables that contribute to sexual dysfunction is urged. (CR)

  16. Drug addiction and sexual dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaazaa, Adham; Bella, Anthony J; Shamloul, Rany

    2013-09-01

    This article attempts to review the most current and the well-established facts concerning drug addiction and sexual dysfunction. Surprisingly, even though alcohol is prevalent in many societies with many myths surrounding its sexual-enhancing effects, current scientific research cannot provide a solid conclusion on its effect on sexual function. Unfortunately, the same concept applies to tobacco smoking; however, most of the current knowledge tends to support the notion that it, indeed, can negatively affect sexual function. Similar ambiguities also prevail with substances of abuse. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Associations between physical and mental health problems and sexual dysfunctions in sexually active Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Birgitte Schütt; Grønbaek, Morten; Osler, Merete

    2011-01-01

    Studies have shown a high prevalence of sexual dysfunctions among individuals with a variety of health problems.......Studies have shown a high prevalence of sexual dysfunctions among individuals with a variety of health problems....

  18. The psychological impact of aging on sexuality and relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsberg, S A

    2000-01-01

    Aging has a powerful impact on the quality of relationships and sexual functioning. The psychological impact of aging after midlife is a particularly timely topic given improved medical and psychological understanding of sexuality in both women and men, as well as more effective treatment for age-related sexual dysfunctions. It is time to dispel the stereotype of the midlife relationship as the continuation of a traditional heterosexual marriage with grown or almost grown children in order to more effectively address emotional and sexual issues arising in relationships. Regardless of the length or nature of the relationship, however, its quality is enhanced by emotional intimacy, autonomy without too much distance, an ability to manage stress and distractions by external factors, and achieving a satisfying sexual equilibrium. Perception of the quality of the primary relationship and sexuality is influenced by the other factors in a person's life. Thus, the relationship must be examined and issues must be addressed taking these external factors into consideration. Among the most powerful external factors is one's occupation or avocation, as it tends to strongly influence one's sense of identity, self-esteem, and self-worth in all areas of life. To understand and treat effects of aging on sexuality, it is important to address the three components of sexual desire: drive, beliefs/values, and motivation, as well as the sexual equilibrium within the primary relationship. It is also essential to understand how the physiological changes in male and female sexual functioning affect desire and equilibrium. Other health-related changes that occur with aging must be recognized and addressed, including the fact that the oldest of old women will outlive their corresponding male cohort. Treatment implications for these issues are discussed.

  19. Vaginismus and accompanying sexual dysfunctions in a Turkish clinical sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Sultan

    2009-01-01

    Although vaginismus is a common sexual dysfunction in Turkey, there are only limited data about sexual behavior characteristics and comorbidity with other sexual dysfunctions in vaginismic patients. To investigate the frequency of female sexual dysfunctions (FSDs) in a Turkish clinical sample and to determine the comorbidity of other FSDs in women diagnosed with lifelong vaginismus. The study included 54 female patients who presented to a psychiatry department with sexual problems/complaints. The subjects were evaluated using a semi-structured questionnaire. The questionnaire was developed by the researchers in order to assess sexually dysfunctional patients and included detailed questions about socio-demographic variables, and general medical and sexual history. All participants were also assessed using the Golombok Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction. The most common primary FSD in our sample was vaginismus (75.9%), followed by hypoactive sexual desire (9.2%). Regarding comorbidity, in 36 female patients with lifelong vaginismus, we found dyspareunia in 17 women (47.2%), orgasmic disorder in eight women (22.2%), and sexual desire disorder in six women (16.6%) as a second sexual dysfunction, based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fourth Edition, Text Revision criteria. With respect to FSDs within the Turkish clinical population, vaginismic patients constitute the largest group and cultural factors may play a role in the occurrence of this condition. Additionally, our data indicated that there was a strong correlation between vaginismus and dyspareunia. There was also a high frequency of hypoactive desire and orgasm disorder in vaginismic patients. These results suggest that multidimensional assessment of sexual dysfunction in female patients is of great importance.

  20. Sexual dysfunction in infertile couples: evaluation and treatment of infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayar, U.; Arikan, I.I.; Barut, A.; Harma, M.; Harma, M.; Atasoy, N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic and the predictive value of Arizona Sexual Experience Scale among primary infertile couples regarding sexual dysfunction. Methods: The cross-sectional and prospective pre, post study comprising primary infertile patients was carried out at Bulent Ecevit University Hospital, Zonguldak, Turkey. Fifty consecutive primary infertile couples not treated previously were investigated between 2003 and 2007 for the presence of sexual dysfunction by a psychiatrist. Arizona Sexual Experience Scale scoring was self-administered to determine sexual dysfunction among couples before treatment and also 3 months after the initiation of the treatment. Results: Pretreatment mean values of the index parametres in both women and men were significantly increased after treatment. Statistically significant positive correlation was observed between pre- and post-treatment total scores in both women (r=0.83; p 14 (Sensitivity: 57%; Specificity: 90%) and >13 (Sensitivity: 83%; Specificity: 93%), respectively. Pre- and post-treatment scores in men were >10 (Sensitivity: 65%; Specificity: 61%), >11 (Sensitivity: 83%; Specificity: 62%), respectively. Binary logistic regression analyses revealed women's pre-treatment and post-treatment scores as a significant factor for prediction of sexual dysfunction independent of sociodemographic factors (p=0.001 and p=0.001, respectively). Conclusion: Evaluation and treatment of infertility is an important risk factor for sexual dysfunction. Pre- and post-treatment Arizona Sexual Experience Scale score could be used as a screening test for sexual dysfunction and might be used to decide pre/post-treatment consultation of couples with a specialist. (author)

  1. Sexual dysfunction risk and quality of life among women with a history of sexual abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreiro, Andrea V; Micelli, Ligia P; Sousa, Maria H; Bahamondes, Luis; Fernandes, Arlete

    2016-09-01

    To assess scores for sexual dysfunction risk and quality of life in a cohort of women in Brazil who had a history of sexual abuse. The present study was a secondary analysis of a cross-sectional study conducted between February 1, 2011 and May 31, 2012. Women aged 18-49years attending a family planning clinic at the University of Campinas, Brazil, who were in a heterosexual relationship and reported engaging in sexual intercourse in the 4weeks prior to the study were enrolled. Participants were asked to complete the World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire, Abbreviated Version, and the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) questionnaire. Data were grouped based on a history of sexual abuse. An FSFI score of no higher than 26.55 was considered the cut off for sexual dysfunction. The prevalence of FSFI-defined sexual dysfunction was higher in participants with a history of sexual abuse (Phistory of sexual abuse had significantly lower scores across all quality of life domains. Increased risk of sexual dysfunction among women with a history of sexual abuse suggests potential problems in the sex lives of individuals in this population. Healthcare professionals should be alert to this diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Perceptions of female sexual health and sexual dysfunction in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Questions asked ranged from sexual activity in the preceding 6 months, menopausal status, if they thought they had sexual dysfunction to their willingness to discuss an FSD with a sexual health physician if they had access to one. Results: Over 50% (n=28) of the respondents had an idea about what FSD was before the ...

  3. Factors influencing fluoxetine-induced sexual dysfunction in female rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Sarah; Heckard, Danyeal; Hassell, James; Uphouse, Lynda

    2012-01-01

    Treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, such as fluoxetine, produces sexual side effects with low sexual desire being the most prevalent effect in females. In few studies have preclinical models for such antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction been fruitful. In the current manuscript, the effects of fluoxetine on multiple measures of female sexual motivation and sexual receptivity were examined. Ovariectomized, Fischer rats were primed with 10 μg estradiol benzoate and 500 μg progesterone. Partner preference, active investigation of the male, and measures of sexual behavior were examined after injection with 15 mg/kg fluoxetine. Factors (pretesting for sexual behavior, size of the test arena, non-contact time with a male) that differ among experiments designed to study antidepressant-induced female rat sexual dysfunction were studied. The male preference ratio was not affected by fluoxetine treatment but active investigation of the male was reduced; lordosis behavior was inhibited and pretesting for sexual receptivity amplified fluoxetine's inhibition; size of the testing arena or non-contact experience with the male had no effect. Regardless of test condition, when given the opportunity to escape from the male, fluoxetine-treated females displayed escape behavior. Measures of male preference and active investigation, but not lordosis behavior, appeared to be affected by fluoxetine's impact on activity. The collective data provided a behavioral profile of fluoxetine-induced sexual dysfunction. These findings reinforce the value of multiple measures when attempting to model antidepressant-induced female sexual dysfunction. PMID:22835821

  4. Characteristics of compensated hypogonadism in patients with sexual dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona, Giovanni; Maseroli, Elisa; Rastrelli, Giulia; Sforza, Alessandra; Forti, Gianni; Mannucci, Edoardo; Maggi, Mario

    2014-07-01

    In the last few years, a view that subclinical endocrine disorders represent milder forms of the clinically overt disease has emerged. Accordingly, it has been proposed that compensated hypogonadism represents a genuine clinical subset of late-onset hypogonadism. The aim of the present study is to investigate the associations of compensated hypogonadism with particular clinical and psychological characteristics of male subjects complaining of sexual dysfunction. After excluding documented genetic causes of hypogonadism, an unselected consecutive series of 4,173 patients consulting our unit for sexual dysfunction was studied. Compensated hypogonadism was identified according to the European Male Ageing study criteria: total testosterone ≥10.5 nmol/L and luteinizing hormone >9.4 U/L. Several hormonal, biochemical, and instrumental (penile Doppler ultrasound) parameters were studied, along with results of the Structured Interview on Erectile Dysfunction (SIEDY) and ANDROTEST. One hundred seventy (4.1%) subjects had compensated hypogonadism, whereas 827 (19.8%) had overt hypogonadism. After adjustment for confounding factors, no specific sexual symptoms were associated with compensated hypogonadism. However, compensated hypogonadism individuals more often reported psychiatric symptoms, as detected by Middlesex Hospital Questionnaire score, when compared with both eugonadal and overt hypogonadal subjects (adjusted odds ratios = 1.018 [1.005;1.031] and 1.014 [1.001;1.028], respectively; both P hypogonadism had an increased predicted risk of cardiovascular events (as assessed by Progetto Cuore risk algorithm) when compared with eugonadal individuals. Accordingly, mortality related to major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs), but not MACE incidence, was significantly higher in subjects with both compensated and overt hypogonadism when compared with eugonadal subjects. The present data do not support the concept that compensated (subclinical) hypogonadism

  5. Assessing the role of relationship conflict in sexual dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Michael E; Epstein, Norman

    2002-01-01

    Relationship conflict has long been thought to cause, maintain, and influence the therapeutic outcome of sexual problems in the absence of a physical cause. The results of conflict can influence partners' relationship satisfaction, and relationship satisfaction can influence sexual satisfaction. General relationship deficiencies, such as unresolved conflict, undermine the mutual acceptance that is important to healthy sexual functioning. The purpose of this article is to summarize some of the basic empirical findings of studies of conflict patterns in relationships and their role in sex dysfunction and to suggest a model for assessing relationship conflict as a feature of sexual dysfunction. Results from several studies indicate that couples with sexual problems may have conflict-management issues and employ distinct conflict-resolution styles compared to satisfied couples. Dysfunctional conflict resolution may be a cause or result of some sexual problems, whereas constructive interaction concerning conflict can add to emotional and sexual intimacy in a couple's relationship. These patterns warrant systematic attention in assessment and intervention in sex therapy.

  6. On categorization and quantification of women's sexual dysfunctions: an epidemiological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberg, K; Fugl-Meyer, A R; Fugl-Meyer, K S

    2004-06-01

    The objectives of this study are to compare the two definitions of female sexual dysfunction, namely dysfunction per se (A category) and personal distress caused by dysfunction (B category), and to gauge their associations with some sociodemographic aspects and level of sexual well-being. The subjects were a nationally representative sample of sexually active Swedish women (n: 1056) aged 18-65 y, who participated in a combined structured interview/questionnaire investigation. The functions analysed were: self-reported sexual desire, interest, lubrication, orgasm, genital pain and vaginism, which were subclassified for the A and B categories into no, mild (sporadically occurring) and manifest dysfunction. Sexual well-being was reported along a six-grade scale ranging from very satisfied to very dissatisfied. The sociodemographic items registered were: education, occupation, financial situation, social group, immigrant status, location of domicile and church-going. Aggregated mild and manifest dysfunction per se of sexual interest, orgasm and vaginal lubrication were reported by about 60-90%. More than one-third had dyspareunia, but few reported vaginism. Mild dysfunctions were clearly more common than manifest dysfunctions. Not fully 45% of those with manifest low interest and orgasm perceived these dysfunctions as manifestly distressing, while in 60-70% lubricational insufficiency of dyspareunia led to manifest distress. Age and the included sociodemographic variables had marginal or no influence on sexual functions. A four-factor sexual function pattern was identified, closely linking A and B categories in a pairwise manner. Three factors, labelled sexual desire, orgasm and genital function were powerful classifiers (discriminant analysis) of level of sexual well-being. Hence, it is a matter of taste whether to use the A or the B category. Together, they can explain the gross level of satisfaction with sexual life to an adequate extent.

  7. High prevalence of sexual dysfunction in a vulvovaginal specialty clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Dina; Gardella, Carolyn; Eschenbach, David; Mitchell, Caroline M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Our study evaluated the presence and predictors of sexual dysfunction in a vulvovaginal specialty clinic population. Materials & Methods Women who presented to a vulvovaginal specialty clinic were eligible to enroll. Participants completed a questionnaire, including Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) to assess sexual dysfunction and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ)-9 depression screen, and underwent a standardized physical exam, with vaginal swabs collected for wet mount and culture. Logistic regression assessed the relationship between sexual dysfunction and clinical diagnosis. Results We enrolled 161 women, aged 18–80 years (median = 36), presenting with vulvovaginal complaints. Median symptom duration was 24 months; 131 women (81%) reported chronic symptoms (≥12 months). By PHQ-9, 28 (17%) women met depression criteria. In the month prior to assessment, 86 (53%) women experienced sexual dysfunction. Women were primarily diagnosed with vaginitis (n = 46, 29%), vestibulodynia/vulvitis (n = 70; 43%), lichen planus or lichen sclerosus (n = 24; 15%). Controlling for age, sexual dysfunction did not correlate with chronic symptoms (IRR 0.86, 95% CI 0.50–1.48), depression (IRR 1.24; 95% CI 0.59, 2.58), or presence of any of the three main diagnoses (IRR 1.16, 95% CI 0.47, 2.88). Discussion Sexual dysfunction is present in over half of women presenting to a vulvovaginitis referral clinic, more than twice the rate in the wider population. PMID:25259664

  8. SEXUAL DYSFUNCTION ASSOCIATION WITH THE CHRONIC BACTERIAL PROSTATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. Ibishev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study involved 230 patients aged 20 to 45 years with a diagnosis of chronic bacterial prostatitis. The study found that in patients with chronic bacterial prostatitis clinical picture, in addition to pain, is a lower urinary tract symptoms, neuro-vegetative and sexual dysfunction. In patients with chronic bacterial prostatitis, recorded various sexual disorders, most of which are normalized after antibiotic therapy. Erectile dysfunction, which are recorded in patients with chronic bacterial prostatitis is psychogenic in nature dysfunction.

  9. Sexual (dys)function after radiotherapy for prostate cancer: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incrocci, Luca; Slob, A. Koos; Levendag, Peter C.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Prostate cancer has become the most common nonskin malignant neoplasm in older men in Western countries. As treatment efficacy has improved, issues related to posttherapy quality of life and sexual functioning have become more important. Methods and materials: We discuss the various methods used to evaluate erectile and sexual dysfunction and the definition of potency. The etiologies of erectile dysfunction after external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy for prostate cancer are also reviewed. The literature is summarized, and comparative studies of radiation and surgery are surveyed briefly. Results: Rates of erectile dysfunction vary from 6 to 84% after external beam radiotherapy and from 0 to 51% after brachytherapy. In most of the studies, the analysis is retrospective, the definition of erectile dysfunction is not clear, only one question about sexual functioning is asked, and nonvalidated instruments are used. The etiology of erectile dysfunction after radiation for prostate cancer is not completely understood. Conclusions: Because erectile function is only one component of sexual function, it is necessary to assess sexual desire, satisfaction, frequency of intercourse, and other such factors when evaluating the effects of therapy. Patients should be offered sexual counseling and informed about the availability of effective treatments for erectile dysfunction, such as sildenafil, intracavernosal injection, and vacuum devices

  10. Sexual (dys)function after radiotherapy for prostate cancer: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incrocci, Luca; Slob, A Koos; Levendag, Peter C

    2002-03-01

    Prostate cancer has become the most common nonskin malignant neoplasm in older men in Western countries. As treatment efficacy has improved, issues related to posttherapy quality of life and sexual functioning have become more important. We discuss the various methods used to evaluate erectile and sexual dysfunction and the definition of potency. The etiologies of erectile dysfunction after external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy for prostate cancer are also reviewed. The literature is summarized, and comparative studies of radiation and surgery are surveyed briefly. Rates of erectile dysfunction vary from 6 to 84% after external beam radiotherapy and from 0 to 51% after brachytherapy. In most of the studies, the analysis is retrospective, the definition of erectile dysfunction is not clear, only one question about sexual functioning is asked, and nonvalidated instruments are used. The etiology of erectile dysfunction after radiation for prostate cancer is not completely understood. Because erectile function is only one component of sexual function, it is necessary to assess sexual desire, satisfaction, frequency of intercourse, and other such factors when evaluating the effects of therapy. Patients should be offered sexual counseling and informed about the availability of effective treatments for erectile dysfunction, such as sildenafil, intracavernosal injection, and vacuum devices.

  11. Evaluation the Frequency of Sexual Dysfunction in Infertile Men, Fatemieh Hospital, Hamadan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Babolhavaeji

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Sexual dysfunction is called to inability to get or keep a successful sexual intercourse. The term “sexual dysfunction” may also be used to describe other problems that interfere with sexual intercourse, such as inability to achieve erection and problems with ejaculation or orgasm. Damage to nerves, arteries, smooth muscles and fibrous tissues, often as a result of a disease, are the most common cause of erectile dysfunction. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the frequency of sexual dysfunction in patients referred to Fatemieh infertility clinic, Hamadan.Materials & Methods: In this cross-sectional study all males referred to Fatemieh infertility center in 2005, were entered the study. All patients were clinically examined and their medical histories were obtained. Data such as age, accusation, education, history of smoking and opioid abusing, sexual dysfunction, inability to achieve orgasm, premature ejaculation and the frequency of intercourse were entered in the questionnaires. Data was analyzed using SPSS 13 and 2 statistical test.Results: The mean age of patients studied was 32.37.4 years (20-65 years. From 245 cases, 135 (55.1% had sexual dysfunction. The most common sexual dysfunction was premature ejaculation(38.8%. Other sexual dysfunctions were impotence with 16.3% , lack of sexual desire with 12.2% and orgasm disorder with 10.6% respectively. 65.9% patients were uneducated or had elementary education , 27.4% had diploma , and 6.7% had academic education. 23.7% of patients had addiction and 34.1% were smoker.Conclusion : This study showed that most common etiology of sexual dysfunction was premature ejaculation. Other sexual dysfunctions were: impotence, sexual desire disorder and orgasm disorder respectively.

  12. Sexual dysfunction during primiparous and multiparous women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Normal sexual functioning comprises of sexual activity together with transition through the phases from arousal to relaxation with no problem. Delivery has different effects on body organs, especially, on genitalia the disorder of which can cause sexual dysfunctions. In this study, an attempt is made to compare postpartum ...

  13. Sexual dysfunction following surgery for rectal cancer - a clinical and neurophysiological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sperduti Isabella

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sexual dysfunction following surgery for rectal cancer may be frequent and often severe. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the occurrence of this complication from both a clinical point of view and by means of neurophysiological tests. Methods We studied a group of 57 patients submitted to rectal resection for adenocarcinoma. All the patients underwent neurological, psychological and the following neurophysiological tests: sacral reflex (SR, pudendal somatosensory evoked potentials (PEPs, motor evoked potential (MEPs and sympathetic skin responses (SSRs. The results were compared with a control group of 67 rectal cancer patients studied before surgery. Only 10 of these patients could be studied both pre- and postoperatively. 10 patients submitted to high dose preoperative chemoradiation were studied to evaluate the effect of this treatment on sexual function. Statistical analysis was performed by means of the two-tailed Student's t test for paired observations and k concordance test. Results 59.6% of patients operated reported sexual dysfunction, while this symptom occurred in 16.4% in the control group. Moreover, a significantly higher rate of alterations of the neurophysiological tests and longer mean latencies of the SR, PEPs, MEPs and SSRs were observed in the patients who had undergone resection. In the 10 patients studied both pre and post-surgery impotence occurred in 6 of them and the mean latencies of SSRs were longer after operation. In the 10 patients studied pre and post chemoradiation impotence occurred in 1 patient only, showing the mild effect of these treatments on sexual function. Conclusion Patients operated showed severe sexual dysfunctions. The neurophysiological test may be a useful tool to investigate this complication. The neurological damage could be monitored to decide the rehabilitation strategy.

  14. Male Pseudoheterosexuality and Minimal Sexual Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutstadt, Joseph P.

    1976-01-01

    There is often a correlation between "pseudoheterosexuality" and minor sexual dysfunction. Insight alone is not sufficient to provide relief, but when the patient can be helped to a comfortable acceptance of his homosexual feelings as a normal and healthy facet of his personality, very often the dysfunction is relieved. (Author)

  15. Diagnosing Sexual Dysfunction in Men and Women: Sexual History Taking and the Role of Symptom Scales and Questionnaires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzichristou, Dimitris; Kirana, Paraskevi-Sofia; Banner, Linda; Althof, Stanley E; Lonnee-Hoffmann, Risa A M; Dennerstein, Lorraine; Rosen, Raymond C

    2016-08-01

    A detailed sexual history is the cornerstone for all sexual problem assessments and sexual dysfunction diagnoses. Diagnostic evaluation is based on an in-depth sexual history, including sexual and gender identity and orientation, sexual activity and function, current level of sexual function, overall health and comorbidities, partner relationship and interpersonal factors, and the role of cultural and personal expectations and attitudes. To propose key steps in the diagnostic evaluation of sexual dysfunctions, with special focus on the use of symptom scales and questionnaires. Critical assessment of the current literature by the International Consultation on Sexual Medicine committee. A revised algorithm for the management of sexual dysfunctions, level of evidence, and recommendation for scales and questionnaires. The International Consultation on Sexual Medicine proposes an updated algorithm for diagnostic evaluation of sexual dysfunction in men and women, with specific recommendations for sexual history taking and diagnostic evaluation. Standardized scales, checklists, and validated questionnaires are additional adjuncts that should be used routinely in sexual problem evaluation. Scales developed for specific patient groups are included. Results of this evaluation are presented with recommendations for clinical and research uses. Defined principles, an algorithm and a range of scales may provide coherent and evidence based management for sexual dysfunctions. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Sexual dysfunction in women with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elyasi, Forouzan; Kashi, Zahra; Tasfieh, Bentolhoda; Bahar, Adele; Khademloo, Mohammad

    2015-05-01

    Sexual dysfunction (SD) is one of the important problems in diabetic patients. The present study aimed to determine the prevalence of sexual problems in Iranian women with type 2 diabetes mellitus. A cross-sectional study was conducted among type 2 diabetic women who visited two outpatient endocrine clinics, namely Imam Hospital and Tuba clinic (Sari, Iran) in 2012. Patients were asked to complete two validated questionnaires: Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) and The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) as well as a demographic questionnaire. Analysis was performed using descriptive and analytical tests. Pdiabetes were investigated. Most of the cases aged 40-44 years old. The mean of the total score of the FSFI questionnaire was 22. The prevalence of sexual dysfunction was 78.7% (CI: 71.4-84.4); among these, 58% (CI: 50.0-65.6) reported problems in lubrication, 50% (CI: 42.1-57.9) complained of decreased sexual desire, 50% (CI: 42.1-57.9) had problems with arousal, 47.3% (CI: 39.5-55.3) had dyspareunia, 32.7% (CI: 25.7-40.5) complained of orgasmic dysfunction and 42.7% (CI: 35.0-50.7) reported problems in sexual satisfaction. With regard to the results of the HADS questionnaire, 58.7% (CI: 50.7-66.2) of the patients had depression and 96.7% (CI: 92.4-98.6) had anxiety. This study showed the high prevalence of sexual dysfunction in diabetic women, especially among those complaining of depression. Health care professionals dealing with diabetic patients should be aware of possible presence of sexual dysfunction in female patients.

  17. Beneficial effects of Lepidium meyenii (Maca) on psychological symptoms and measures of sexual dysfunction in postmenopausal women are not related to estrogen or androgen content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Nicole A; Wilcox, Gisela; Walker, Karen Z; Ashton, John F; Cox, Marc B; Stojanovska, Lily

    2008-01-01

    To examine the estrogenic and androgenic activity of Lepidium meyenii (Maca) and its effect on the hormonal profile and symptoms in postmenopausal women. Fourteen postmenopausal women completed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial. They received 3.5 g/day of powered Maca for 6 weeks and matching placebo for 6 weeks, in either order, over a total of 12 weeks. At baseline and weeks 6 and 12 blood samples were collected for the measurement of estradiol, follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, and sex hormone-binding globulin, and the women completed the Greene Climacteric Scale to assess the severity of menopausal symptoms. In addition, aqueous and methanolic Maca extracts were tested for androgenic and estrogenic activity using a yeast-based hormone-dependent reporter assay. No differences were seen in serum concentrations of estradiol, follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, and sex hormone-binding globulin between baseline, Maca treatment, and placebo (P > 0.05). The Greene Climacteric Scale revealed a significant reduction in scores in the areas of psychological symptoms, including the subscales for anxiety and depression and sexual dysfunction after Maca consumption compared with both baseline and placebo (P Maca as no physiologically significant activity was observed in yeast-based assays employing up to 4 mg/mL Maca extract (equivalent to 200 mg/mL Maca). Preliminary findings show that Lepidium meyenii (Maca) (3.5 g/d) reduces psychological symptoms, including anxiety and depression, and lowers measures of sexual dysfunction in postmenopausal women independent of estrogenic and androgenic activity.

  18. Sexual dysfunction in hypertensive patients: implications for therapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recent evidence suggests that losartan, an angiotensin II antagonist, is not typically associated with development of sexual dysfunction and may actually positively impact several indices of sexual function (erectile function, sexual satisfaction, and frequency of sexual activity) as well as perceived quality of life. Thus ...

  19. Dysfunctional sexual beliefs: a comparative study of heterosexual men and women, gay men, and lesbian women with and without sexual problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Maria Manuela; Nobre, Pedro

    2014-11-01

    Conservative and dysfunctional sexual beliefs are commonly associated with sexual problems among heterosexual men and women. However, little is known about the role of sexual beliefs in sexual problems in gay men and lesbians. The present study aimed at analyzing the role of sexual beliefs in sexual dysfunction in a sample of heterosexual and homosexual men and women. Participants answered questions about self-perceived sexual problems and completed the Sexual Dysfunctional Beliefs Questionnaire. Two hundred twelve men (106 gay) and 192 women (96 lesbian) completed a Web survey. Findings indicated that men with sexual dysfunction (regardless of sexual orientation) reported significantly more conservative beliefs and more erroneous beliefs related to partner's sexual satisfaction compared with sexually healthy men. Also, gay men with sexual dysfunction (but not heterosexual men) scored higher on belief in sex as an abuse of men's power compared with healthy controls. In addition, heterosexual men scored higher on "macho" beliefs, beliefs regarding partner's sexual satisfaction, and partner's power, compared with gay men. For women, a main effect was found for sexual orientation, with lesbian women scoring higher on sexual desire as a sin, age-related beliefs, and affection primacy and lower on beliefs related to motherhood primacy. Overall, findings suggest that dysfunctional sexual beliefs may play a role as vulnerability factors for sexual dysfunction regardless of sexual orientation, particularly in men. © 2014 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  20. Sexual dysfunctions and difficulties in denmark: prevalence and associated sociodemographic factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Birgitte S; Grønbaek, Morten; Osler, Merete

    2011-01-01

    Sexual dysfunctions and difficulties are common experiences that may impact importantly on the perceived quality of life, but prevalence estimates are highly sensitive to the definitions used. We used questionnaire data for 4415 sexually active Danes aged 16-95 years who participated in a national......%), and dyspareunia (0.1%); among women: lubrication insufficiency (7%), anorgasmia (6%), dyspareunia (3%), and vaginismus (0.4%). Highest frequencies of sexual dysfunction were seen in men above age 60 years and women below age 30 years or above age 50 years. In logistic regression analysis, indicators of economic...... health and morbidity survey in 2005 to estimate the prevalence of sexual dysfunctions and difficulties and to identify associated sociodemographic factors. Overall, 11% (95% CI, 10-13%) of men and 11% (10-13%) of women reported at least one sexual dysfunction (i.e., a frequent sexual difficulty...

  1. Sex Offenders Seeking Treatment for Sexual Dysfunction--Ethics, Medicine, and the Law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Elizabeth A; Rajender, Archana; Douglas, Thomas; Brandon, Ashley F; Munarriz, Ricardo

    2015-07-01

    The treatment of sexual dysfunction in patients with prior sexual offenses poses ethical and legal dilemmas. Sex offenders are not obligated by law to disclose this history to medical professionals. Over 20% of sex offenders experience sexual dysfunction; however, the number of sex offenders seeking evaluation for sexual dysfunction is unknown. The aims of this study were to determine the incidence and characteristics of sex offenders seeking treatment in our clinic; and to review data regarding sex offender recidivism and ethics pertaining to the issue as it relates to treating physicians. Sex offenders were identified via three methods: new patient screening in a dedicated sexual medicine clinic, chart review of those on intracavernosal injection (ICI) therapy for erectile dysfunction (ED), and review of patient's status-post placement of penile prosthesis. Charts were cross-referenced with the U.S. Department of Justice National Sex Offender Public Website. Patient characteristics and details of offenses were collected. The main outcome measures used were a self-reported sexual offense and national registry data. Eighteen male sex offenders were identified: 13 via new patient screening; 3 by review of ICI patients; 1 by review of penile prosthesis data; and 1 prior to penile prosthesis placement. All were primarily referred for ED. Of those with known offenses, 64% were level 3 offenders (most likely to re-offend). The same number had committed crimes against children. All those with complete data had multiple counts of misconduct (average 3.6). Ninety-four percent (17/18) had publicly funded health care. Twelve (67%) were previously treated for sexual dysfunction. Registered sex offenders are seeking and receiving treatment for sexual dysfunction. It is unknown whether treatment of sexual dysfunction increases the risk of recidivism of sexual offenses. Physicians currently face a difficult choice in deciding whether to treat sexual dysfunction in sex

  2. Persistent sexual dysfunction after early exposure to SSRIs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Anders Lykkemark; Danborg, Pia Brandt; Gøtzsche, Peter Christian

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sexual dysfunction is a common adverse effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and there is a concern that the sexual harms might persist after discontinuation of therapy. OBJECTIVE: To assess whether the use of SSRIs in animals can lead to persistent sexual...... dysfunction. METHODS: Systematic review of animal studies measuring sexual behaviour after end of treatment with SSRIs or serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors. DATA SOURCES: We searched PubMed and EMBASE. RESULTS: We included 14 studies. The general quality of the studies was poor. Only four studies.......74; 95% CI = 0.60-0.92) and no ejaculation behaviour (RR = 0.49, 95% CI = 0.24-1.00). CONCLUSION: Our results showed substantial and lasting effects on sexual behaviour in rats after exposure to an SSRI early in life on important sexual outcomes....

  3. Risk Factors for Sexual Dysfunction Among Women and Men: A Consensus Statement From the Fourth International Consultation on Sexual Medicine 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Marita P; Sharlip, Ira D; Lewis, Ron; Atalla, Elham; Balon, Richard; Fisher, Alessandra D; Laumann, Edward; Lee, Sun Won; Segraves, Robert T

    2016-02-01

    This article presents a review of previous research concerning risk factors for sexual dysfunction in women and men. The aim is to evaluate past research studies to determine the contribution of all risk factors to the development and maintenance of sexual dysfunction among women and men. Studies were organized under a biopsychosocial framework, with the bulk of studies of women and men having investigated the role of biological factors. The outcome measures were the data on factors for sexual dysfunction. Many more studies investigated risk factors for sexual dysfunction in men than in women. For women and men, diabetes, heart disease, urinary tract disorders, and chronic illness were significant risk factors for sexual dysfunction. Depression and anxiety and the medications used to treat these disorders also were risk factors for sexual dysfunction in women and men. In addition, substance abuse was associated with sexual dysfunction. Many other social and cultural factors were related to sexual dysfunction in women and men. Psychosocial factors are clearly risk factors for sexual dysfunction. Women and men with sexual dysfunction should be offered psychosocial evaluation and treatment, if available, in addition to medical evaluation and treatment. The impact of social and cultural factors on sexual function requires substantially more research. The evidence that erectile dysfunction is a harbinger of other forms of cardiovascular disease is strong enough to recommend that clinical evaluation for occult cardiovascular disease should be undertaken in men who do not have known cardiovascular disease but who develop organic erectile dysfunction, especially in men younger than 70 years. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Methods and methodology of sexual dysfunctions with males. Chapter 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Examination of patients (liquidators of Chernobyl accident) was carried out in Republican Hospital for Great War Invalids. Sexual function of patients was estimated with help G.V. Vasilenko's questionnaire 'Men's sexual function'. For consideration of sexual dysfunctions the scale for qualitative estimation of potention dysfunction level was used. For revealing of vegetative nervous system dysfunction with examined patients the Ashner effect was studied. The functional status of pituitary gland - gonad system was studied by content of hormones in blood (follicle stimulating and luteinizing hormones). Results of investigations of both the sexual function and hormone level in blood were processed by method of variation statistics. For determination of each factors influence from all acting factors on sexual function the multifactorial dispersion analysis was carried out

  5. Sexual Dysfunction in Breast Cancer: A Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandana Ebrahimi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sexual dysfunction in breast cancer patients is considered as a common and distressing problem. Considering the increasing number of breast cancer survivors living for longer periods of time with the disease and the importance of their quality of life, we conducted the present study to compare the sexual functioning in breast cancer patients with their healthy counterparts.Methods: In this case-control study, breast cancer patients who completed their treatment protocol and were followed up for at least six months were included. The controls were healthy women with normal clinical breast examinations. All subjects filled-in the Persian version of Female Sexual Function Index questionnaire.Results: A total of 165 subjects including 71 breast cancer patients and 94 healthy women were studied. The frequency of sexual dysfunction in cases and controls was 52.6% and 47.4%, respectively (P = 0.09. There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding domain scores, except for vaginal lubrication (P = 0.045. Logistic regression analysis indicated that significant determinants of sexual dysfunction in breast cancer group was patients' age (OR = 4.0, 95%CI: 1.3 – 11.5, P = 0.01 and age of the spouse (OR= 9.8, 95% CI: 1.8-51.9, P= 0.007, while in controls, only emotional relationship with the husband was the significant predictive factor (OR = 6.3, 95%CI: 1.9 – 20.5, P = 0.002.Conclusions: Our findings indicated that sexual dysfunction is prevalent in Iranian women regardless of their physical health status. The frequency of vaginal dryness in breast cancer patients was significantly higher than controls. Age of the patient and the spouse (>40 were the only significant predictors of sexual dysfunction among women with breast cancer. Preventive strategies, sexual education and access to effective treatment should be planned in supportive care of breast cancer patients.

  6. Sexual Dysfunction in Women with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forouzan Elyasi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sexual dysfunction (SD is one of the important problems in diabetic patients. The present study aimed to determine the prevalence of sexual problems in Iranian women with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among type 2 diabetic women who visited two outpatient endocrine clinics, namely Imam Hospital and Tuba clinic (Sari, Iran in 2012. Patients were asked to complete two validated questionnaires: Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI and The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS as well as a demographic questionnaire. Analysis was performed using descriptive and analytical tests. P<0.05 was considered to be significant. Results: One hundred and fifty women with type 2 diabetes were investigated. Most of the cases aged 40-44 years old. The mean of the total score of the FSFI questionnaire was 22. The prevalence of sexual dysfunction was 78.7% (CI: 71.4-84.4; among these, 58% (CI: 50.0-65.6 reported problems in lubrication, 50% (CI: 42.1-57.9 complained of decreased sexual desire, 50% (CI: 42.1-57.9 had problems with arousal, 47.3% (CI: 39.5-55.3 had dyspareunia, 32.7% (CI: 25.7-40.5 complained of orgasmic dysfunction and 42.7% (CI: 35.0-50.7 reported problems in sexual satisfaction. With regard to the results of the HADS questionnaire, 58.7% (CI: 50.7-66.2 of the patients had depression and 96.7% (CI: 92.4-98.6 had anxiety. Conclusion: This study showed the high prevalence of sexual dysfunction in diabetic women, especially among those complaining of depression. Health care professionals dealing with diabetic patients should be aware of possible presence of sexual dysfunction in female patients.

  7. Psychological determinants of erectile dysfunction: testing a cognitive-emotional model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobre, Pedro J

    2010-04-01

    Recent studies have shown the impact of sexual dysfunctional beliefs, negative cognitive schemas, negative automatic thoughts, and depressed affect on male erectile dysfunction. Despite this fact, there are only few conceptual models that try to integrate these findings, and more importantly, there is a lack of studies that test the validity of those conceptual models. The aim of the present article was to test a cognitive-emotional model for erectile dysfunction. Taking previous research findings into account, we developed a cognitive-emotional model for erectile disorder (ED) and used path analysis to test it. A total of 352 men (303 participants from the general population and 49 participants with a DSM-IV diagnosis of sexual dysfunction) answered a set of questionnaires assessing cognitive and emotional variables. Erectile Function measured by the EF subscale of the International Index of Erectile Function, cognitive schemas measured by the Questionnaire of Cognitive Schema Activation in Sexual Context, sexual beliefs measured by the Sexual Dysfunctional Beliefs Questionnaire, thoughts and emotions measured by the Sexual Modes Questionnaire. The effects of the main proposed direct predictors explained 55% of the erectile function variance (R = 0.74). Most remaining direct effects proposed in the model were also statistically significant. The analysis of the absolute residuals showed that most of the implied correlations were close to the observed zero order correlations, indicated the adjustment of the model to the observed data. These findings support the role played by cognitive and emotional factors on the predisposition and maintenance of male erectile dysfunction and suggest important implications for assessment and treatment of ED.

  8. The Relationship between Childhood Sexual Abuse and Sexual Dysfunction in Jamaican Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaby, Antoneal N.; Morgan, Kai A. D.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the associations between early traumatic sexualization and later sexual dysfunction in a sample of 100 Jamaican adults while identifying the linkages between age, frequency of abuse, and gender on sexual functioning. Participants were selected via purposive and convenience sampling and divided equally into comparison and…

  9. Sexual dysfunction prevalence in a group of pre- and postmenopausal Mexican women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Flor de Durazno Casillas

    2018-01-01

    Introduction To determine the prevalence of sexual dysfunction in pre and postmenopausal women. Material and methods A cross-sectional, descriptive, comparative study was done in climacteric women from 40 to 59 years of age. Female sexual function was evaluated with the female sexual function index (FSFI) on the day of consultation. The comparison between pre and postmenopausal women and between those with or without sexual dysfunction was done with Mann Whitney U test, χ2, and Spearman’s correlation analysis was done. Results One hundred and ten women were studied, 55 were premenopausal (group 1) and 55 postmenopausal (group 2). The median of age in group 1 was 46 (40-58) years and in group 2 it was 53 (45-60) years. Premenopausal women had higher education level than postmenopausal women (p < 0.023). From those sexually active, 62.1% had sexual dysfunction. No statistically significant difference was found in education level, religion and marital status between women with or without sexual dysfunction. No difference in sexual dysfunction was found between premenopausal (62.1%) and postmenopausal (62.5%) women, but greater sexual dysfunction was found starting from 50 years age. Age negatively correlated with FSFI score (ρ = –0.324, p < 0.001). Conclusion In postmenopausal women, those older had a greater impairment in sexual function.

  10. Life after prostate cancer treatment: a mixed methods study of the experiences of men with sexual dysfunction and their partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albaugh, Jeffrey A; Sufrin, Nat; Lapin, Brittany R; Petkewicz, Jacqueline; Tenfelde, Sandi

    2017-06-15

    Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin cancer in men and sexual dysfunction is the most frequently reported long-term side effect of prostate cancer surgery or radiation. The aim of this study was to examine the experiences of men with sexual dysfunction and their partners following prostate cancer treatment. Men with sexual dysfunction from either surgical removal or radiation therapy 1-5 years after treatment were interviewed, as well as their partners. A mixed method design was used to determine the lived experience of men with sexual dysfunction. Open-ended questions guided the interviews. Twenty seven men completed the study with a mean age of 61 years (SD = 8.0; range = 44-77 years). Nine partners also participated. The majority of men (92.6%) had surgery. The average time from treatment to the interview was 23.5 months (SD = 11.7). Themes were frustration with sexual dysfunction, importance of support and understanding from others, depression and anxiety related to sexual dysfunction, importance of intimacy with partner, factors that impact treatment satisfaction, and education and comprehensive information about sex. Prostate cancer survivors and partners need accurate information about sexual side effects before during and after treatment. Men and partners required individualized help and guidance to manage sexual dysfunction. Support and understanding from partners, family, and others was also identified as an important aspect of healing and adjustment after prostate cancer treatment. Prostate cancer education/support groups played a key role in helping men and partners gain advocacy, education, and support. Psychological problems such as depression and anxiety need to be identified and addressed in men after prostate cancer treatment. Men and partners need assistance in understanding and navigating their way through intimacy to move forward with connectedness in their relationship. Satisfaction with treatment and with providers is

  11. Associations Between Personality Disorder Characteristics, Psychological Symptoms, and Sexual Functioning in Young Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauvogl, Andrea; Pelzer, Britt; Radder, Veerle; van Lankveld, Jacques

    2018-02-01

    Recently, the etiology of sexual dysfunctions in women has been approached from different angles. In clinical practice and in previous studies, it has been observed that women with sexual problems experience anxiety problems and express more rigid and perfectionistic personality traits than women without these problems. To investigate whether personality disorder characteristics according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) and psychological symptoms are associated with sexual problems in women. 188 women 18 to 25 years old participated in this cross-sectional study. Questionnaires measuring sexual functioning (Female Sexual Function Index), personality disorder characteristics (Assessment of DSM-IV-TR Personality Disorders Questionnaire), and psychological symptoms (Brief Symptom Inventory and Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale) were used. The main outcome measure used was sexual functioning assessed by self-report. Results, using analysis of variance, indicated that women with sexual problems report significantly more cluster A (specifically schizoid) and C (specifically avoidant and obsessive-compulsive) personality disorder characteristics than women without sexual problems. Furthermore, using multiple regression analyses, higher cluster A (specifically schizoid) and lower cluster B (specifically borderline and antisocial) personality disorder characteristics indicated lower levels of sexual functioning. Psychological symptoms partly mediated the effect of cluster A personality disorder characteristics on sexual functioning. The results of this study indicate that clinical practice should extend its scope by focusing more on improving adaptive personality characteristics, such as extraversion and individualism seen in cluster B personality characteristics, and decreasing the perfectionistic, introvert, and self-doubting characteristics seen in cluster C personality characteristics

  12. The Role of Pelvic Floor Muscles in Male Sexual Dysfunction and Pelvic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Deborah; Gonzalez, Joshua; Goldstein, Irwin

    2016-01-01

    Sexual function is essential to good health and well-being in men. The relationship between male sexual function, pelvic floor function, and pelvic pain is complex and only beginning to be appreciated. The objectives of the current review are to examine these complex relationships, and to demonstrate how pelvic floor physical therapy can potentially improve the treatment of various male sexual dysfunctions, including erectile dysfunction and dysfunction of ejaculation and orgasm. Contemporary data on pelvic floor anatomy and function as they relate to the treatment of various male sexual dysfunctions were reviewed. Examination of evidence supporting the association between the male pelvic floor and erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory/orgasmic dysfunction, and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome, respectively. Evidence suggests a close relationship between the pelvic floor and male sexual dysfunction and a potential therapeutic benefit from pelvic floor therapy for men who suffer from these conditions. Pelvic floor physical therapy is a necessary tool in a more comprehensive bio-neuromusculoskeletal-psychosocial approach to the treatment of male sexual dysfunction and pelvic pain. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Co-relationship between sexual dysfunction and high-risk sexual behavior in patients receiving buprenorphine and naltrexone maintenance therapy for opioid dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramdurg, Santosh; Ambekar, Atul; Lal, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    People suffering from substance dependence suffer from various sexual dysfunctions and are at risk for indulging in various high-risk sexual behaviors and thus are vulnerable to acquire various infections such as HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted infections. The aim of the study was to evaluate the correlation between sexual dysfunction and high-risk sexual behavior in opioid-dependent men receiving buprenorphine and naltrexone maintenance therapy. Semi-structured questionnaire, brief male sexual functioning inventory and HIV-risk taking behavior scale was administered to a sample of 60 sexually active men, receiving buprenorphine (n = 30) and naltrexone (n = 30) maintenance therapy for opioid dependence. The main outcomes are correlation between severity of sexual dysfunction and HIV-risk taking behavior. The study results showed 83% of the men on buprenorphine and 90% on naltrexone reported at least one of the sexual dysfunction symptoms. There was a negative correlation between sexual dysfunction and HIV-risk taking behavior that suggest severe the dysfunction, higher the risk taking behavior. Significant correlation was present with overall sexual dysfunction and HIV-risk taking behavior (P = 0.028 and in naltrexone receiving group premature ejaculation versus HIV-risk taking behavior however, (P = 0.022, P sexual dysfunctions and HIV-risk taking behavior, which has clinical implication. Future research should explore this further using biochemical analyses.

  14. Male sexual dysfunctions: immersive virtual reality and multimedia therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Optale, Gabriele; Pastore, Massimiliano; Marin, Silvia; Bordin, Diego; Nasta, Alberto; Pianon, Carlo

    2004-01-01

    The study describes a therapeutic approach using psycho-dynamic psychotherapy integrating virtual environment (VE) for resolving impotence or better erectile dysfunction (ED) of presumably psychological or mixed origin and premature ejaculation (PE). The plan for therapy consists of 12 sessions (15 if a sexual partner was involved) over a 25-week period on the ontogenetic development of male sexual identity, and the methods involved the use of a laptop PC, joystick, Virtual Reality (VR) helmet with miniature television screen showing a new specially-designed CD-ROM programs using Virtools with Windows 2000 and an audio CD. This study was composed of 30 patients, 15 (10 suffering from ED and 5 PE) plus 15 control patients (10 ED and 5 PE), that underwent the same therapeutic protocol but used an old VR helmet to interact with the old VE using a PC Pentium 133 16 Mb RAM. We also compared this study with another study we carried out on 160 men affected by sexual disorders, underwent the same therapeutic protocol, but treated using a VE created (in Superscape VRT 5.6) using always Windows 2000 with portable tools. Comparing the groups of patients affected by ED and PE, there emerged a significant positive results value without any important differences among the different VE used. However, we had a % increase of undesirable physical reactions during the more realistic 15-minute VR experience using Virtools development kit. Psychotherapy alone normally requires long periods of treatment in order to resolve sexual dysfunctions. Considering the particular way in which full-immersion VR involves the subject who experiences it (he is totally unobserved and in complete privacy), we hypothesise that this methodological approach might speed up the therapeutic psycho-dynamic process, which eludes cognitive defences and directly stimulates the subconscious, and that better results could be obtained in the treatment of these sexual disorders. This method can be used by any

  15. Bem Sex Role Inventory Undifferentiated Score: A Comparison of Sexual Dysfunction Patients with Sexual Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Margretta; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Examined Bem Sex Role undifferentiated scores on 93 male sex offenders as compared with 50 male sexually dysfunctional patients. Chi-square analyses revealed significant difference: offenders obtained undifferentiated scores more often than did sexual dysfunctional population. Concluded that Bem Sex Role Inventory is useful in identifying sexual…

  16. Prevalence and types of sexual dysfunction amongst female with diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unadike, B.C.; Eregie, A.; Ohwovoriole, A.E.

    2009-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and types of sexual dysfunction (SD) amongst female with Diabetes Mellitus (DM) in Benin City, Nigeria. This is a cross sectional study. A total of 225 female with DM and 225 female without DM who served as controls were studied. Data obtained included age, anthropometric indexes, presence and type of sexual dysfunction. Fifteen (6.6%) subjects with DM had sexual dysfunction and four (1.7%) in the control group had SD with sexual pain disorder being the commonest SD, seen in both groups. Other SD seen was lubrication disorder and sexual arousal disorder. The prevalence of SD in diabetic female was significantly higher than in the control group (6.6% vs. 1.7% p < 0.05). Sexual Dysfunction appears to be relatively uncommon amongst Nigerian women with Diabetes Mellitus. However diabetes care providets should address this issue during consultations with patients and provide treatment as this is a treatable condition. (author)

  17. metal content determination of some sexual dysfunction medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    userpc

    METAL CONTENT DETERMINATION OF SOME SEXUAL DYSFUNCTION. MEDICINE ... motivation for sexual desire, functioning and response .... generated and optimization of the equipment ... by the users' have to be moderate otherwise it.

  18. Sexual Dysfunction in Premenopausal Women Treated for Breast ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    affect the woman's self-esteem, sexuality and intimate relationships. ... The psychological effects thereof may impair the man's ability to offer emotional support to the woman .... functional, psychological, social and sexual well- ..... effects on interpersonal and family relations. J .... Comprehensive Cancer Network Experience.

  19. Prevalence and risk factors for female sexual dysfunction among Egyptian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Zakia Mahdy; Ahmed, Magdy Refaat; Sayed Ahmed, Waleed Ali

    2013-06-01

    To assess sexual function among married women and determine associated risk factors for sexual dysfunction. Cross-sectional hospital-based study involving 509 non-pregnant married females 20-59 years old who were enrolled into the study after approval of the ethics committee. The study population was recruited among women attending gynecology outpatient clinic or their relatives visiting inpatients of obstetrics and gynecology department at Suez Canal University Hospital. Female and male partner-related data were collected using an interview questionnaire. Sexual dysfunction was assessed using female sexual function index (FSFI). Mean female age was 39.5 years. About half of the participants were premenopausal (48.7 %). Most of the females were circumcised (71.7 %). Desire and Orgasm domains were the most affected with 52.8 % of the participants having sexual dysfunction. Total FSFI score of ≤26.55 was the cutoff value for diagnosis of FSD and female age, postmenopausal status, duration of marriage, circumcision, partner's age, and the presence of male sexual dysfunction were found to be significant associated factors with FSD. FSD is highly prevalent in Egypt and orgasm and desire scores were the most affected domains. Several personal (female age, postmenopausal status, duration of marriage and circumcision) and male partner (age, and the presence of sexual dysfunction) factors were significantly associated.

  20. The effects of state and trait self-focused attention on sexual arousal in sexually functional and dysfunctional women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meston, Cindy M.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effects of state self-focused attention on sexual arousal and trait self-consciousness on sexual arousal and function in sexually functional (n = 16) and dysfunctional (n = 16) women. Self-focused attention was induced using a 50% reflectant television screen in one of two counterbalanced sessions during which self-report and physiological sexual responses to erotic films were measured. Self-focused attention significantly decreased vaginal pulse amplitude (VPA) responses among sexually functional but not dysfunctional women, and substantially decreased correlations between self-report and VPA measures of sexual arousal. Self-focused attention did not significantly impact subjective sexual arousal in sexually functional or dysfunctional women. Trait private self-consciousness was positively related to sexual desire, orgasm, compatibility, contentment and sexual satisfaction. Public self-consciousness was correlated with sexual pain. The findings are discussed in terms of Masters and Johnson’s [Masters, W. H. & Johnson, V. E. (1970). Human sexual inadequacy. Boston: Little, Brown) concepts of “spectatoring” and “sensate focus.” PMID:15927143

  1. Prevalence and risk factors of sexual dysfunction in postpartum Australian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajehei, Marjan; Doherty, Maryanne; Tilley, P J Matt; Sauer, Kay

    2015-06-01

    Female sexual dysfunction is highly prevalent and reportedly has adverse impacts on quality of life. Although it is prevalent after childbirth, women rarely seek advice or treatment from health care professionals. The aim of this study was to assess the sexual functioning of Australian women during the first year after childbirth. Postpartum women who had given birth during the previous 12 months were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study. A multidimensional online questionnaire was designed for this study. This questionnaire included a background section, the Female Sexual Function Index, the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-8), and the Relationship Assessment Scale. Responses from 325 women were analyzed. Almost two-thirds of women (64.3%) reported that they had experienced sexual dysfunction during the first year after childbirth, and almost three-quarters reported they experienced sexual dissatisfaction (70.5 %). The most prevalent types of sexual dysfunction reported by the affected women were sexual desire disorder (81.2%), orgasmic problems (53.5%), and sexual arousal disorder (52.3%). The following were significant risk factors for sexual dysfunction: fortnightly or less frequent sexual activity, not being the initiator of sexual activity with a partner, late resumption of postnatal sexual activity (at 9 or more weeks), the first 5 months after childbirth, primiparity, depression, and relationship dissatisfaction. Sexual satisfaction is important for maintaining quality of life for postpartum women. Health care providers and postpartum women need to be encouraged to include sexual problems in their discussions. © 2015 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  2. Prevalence of sexual dysfunction among women using contraceptive methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Hamadiyan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The world health organization defines sexual health as a coordination and integration between mind, body and feelings which leads an individual towards personality improvement, relationship and love. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of sexual dysfunction among women referring health centers of Bandar Abbas in 2013 who used contraceptive methods. Method: In this descriptive study, 385 women aged between 16-45 years were included. A questionnaire was used for data collection. This questionnaire consisted of two sections; demographic data and Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI. The questionnaire was equally distributed among all health centers. Data were entered SPSS v. 19 and were analyzed using descriptive statistics (mean and standard deviation and ANOVA. Results: There was no significant difference between contraceptive methods and questionnaire aspects. Significant associations were found between level of education and sexual function such as libido, orgasm, sexual satisfaction and age groups with libido, orgasm and vaginal lubrication. Conclusion: The participants of this study might have referred their sexual dysfunctions to other reasons other than contraception which needs further research. According to the results, it is suggested to increase couple knowledge using consultation and sex education and guide them into finding treatments for their sexual dysfunction.

  3. SIEDY scale 3, a new instrument to detect psychological component in subjects with erectile dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona, Giovanni; Ricca, Valdo; Bandini, Elisa; Rastrelli, Giulia; Casale, Helen; Jannini, Emmanuele A; Sforza, Alessandra; Forti, Gianni; Mannucci, Edoardo; Maggi, Mario

    2012-08-01

    We previously developed and validated a structured interview (SIEDY) dealing with the organic (Scale 1), relational (Scale 2), and psychological (Scale 3) components of erectile dysfunction (ED). To identify a pathological threshold for SIEDY Scale 3 and to analyze Scale 3 score with biological and psychological correlates in subjects with sexual dysfunction. A pathological threshold of SIEDY Scale 3 score in predicting subjects with a medical history of psychopathology and using psychiatric drugs was identified through receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis in a sample of 484 patients (Sample A). Sensitivity and specificity, along with possible interactions with biological and psychological (Middlesex Hospital Questionnaire, MHQ-score) correlates were verified in a further sample of 1,275 patients (Sample B). In sample A, 39 (8%) and 60 (12.4%) subjects reported a positive medical history for psychiatric disturbances or for the use of psychotropic medication, respectively. The association with both conditions was present in 28 (5.8%) subjects. ROC curve showed that SIEDY Scale 3 score predicts psychopathology with an accuracy of 69.5 ± 5.9% (Pfloating anxiety), MHQ-S (somatized anxiety) and MHQ-D (depressive symptoms) subscales, even after adjustment for age and Σ-MHQ (a broader index of general psychopathology). In the same sample, we also confirmed that pathological Scale 3 score was related to a higher risk of psychopathology at medical history or to the use of psychotropic drugs as well as with risky lifestyle behaviors, including smoking and alcohol abuse, and elevated BMI. SIEDY represents an easy tool for the identification of patients with a relevant intra-psychic component who should be considered for psychological/psychiatric treatment. © 2012 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  4. Co-relationship between sexual dysfunction and high-risk sexual behavior in patients receiving buprenorphine and naltrexone maintenance therapy for opioid dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Ramdurg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: People suffering from substance dependence suffer from various sexual dysfunctions and are at risk for indulging in various high-risk sexual behaviors and thus are vulnerable to acquire various infections such as HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted infections. AIM: The aim of the study was to evaluate the correlation between sexual dysfunction and high-risk sexual behavior in opioid-dependent men receiving buprenorphine and naltrexone maintenance therapy. Materials and Methods: Semi-structured questionnaire, brief male sexual functioning inventory and HIV-risk taking behavior scale was administered to a sample of 60 sexually active men, receiving buprenorphine (n = 30 and naltrexone (n = 30 maintenance therapy for opioid dependence. Results: The main outcomes are correlation between severity of sexual dysfunction and HIV-risk taking behavior. The study results showed 83% of the men on buprenorphine and 90% on naltrexone reported at least one of the sexual dysfunction symptoms. There was a negative correlation between sexual dysfunction and HIV-risk taking behavior that suggest severe the dysfunction, higher the risk taking behavior. Significant correlation was present with overall sexual dysfunction and HIV-risk taking behavior (P = 0.028 and in naltrexone receiving group premature ejaculation versus HIV-risk taking behavior however, (P = 0.022, P < 0.05 there were no significant differences among both the groups except above findings. Conclusion: Conclusion was treatment is associated with sexual dysfunctions and HIV-risk taking behavior, which has clinical implication. Future research should explore this further using biochemical analyses.

  5. Sexual dysfunction in premenopausal women could be related to hormonal profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Fabiene Bernardes Castro; Coimbra, Bruna Barbosa; Lopes, Gerson Pereira; Geber, Selmo

    2017-02-01

    Female sexual dysfunction (FSD) is a public health problem that affects women's quality of life. Although the relationship between some hormones and the FSD has been described, it is not well established for all hormones. Therefore, the aim of our study was to evaluate the association between hormonal dysfunction and sexual dysfunction in premenopausal women. We performed a cross-sectional study with 60 patients with regular menstrual cycles, with age ranging from 18 to 44 years, with previous diagnosis of FSD. All patients were evaluated using the female sexual function index (FSFI) questionnaire and had the levels of total testosterone, prolactin (PRL), thyroid-releasing hormone and free testosterone index measured. Among the 60 patients, 43 (71.7%) were diagnosed with hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD), 9 (15%) had anorgasmy and 8 (3.3%) had sexual pain dysfunction. Hormonal evaluation, demonstrated that 79.1% of patients with HSDD, 78.4% of patients with anorgasmy and 50% of patients with sexual pain dysfunction had female androgen insensitivity. We can conclude that there is an important association between low levels of total and free testosterone and FSD. This finding offers a new alternative for diagnosis and treatment of HSDD. Moreover, given the potential role of androgens in sexual function, randomized controlled trials with adequate long-term follow-up are essential to confirm its possible effect.

  6. Sexual functioning, beliefs about sexual functioning and quality of life of women with infertility problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prathibha Agustus

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The study was conducted in the background of paucity of studies examining the sexual and psychosocial functioning of women with infertility. Aims: The study explored sexual functioning in women with infertility problems, their beliefs about sexuality and their quality of life. Settings and Design: A single group exploratory design with non-probability purposive sampling was used. A total of 30 participants diagnosed with primary infertility were included in the study. Materials and Methods: The data were obtained by individual administration of the following tools: Semi-structured interview schedule, Female Sexual Functioning Inventory, Sexual Dysfunctional Beliefs Questionnaire, World Health Organization Quality of Life Scale − BREF Version and General Health Questionnaire-12. The data obtained were analyzed using descriptive statistics and non-parametric tests. Results: About half of the participants had sexual dysfunction. Pain-related problems were most commonly reported (50%. Factors contributing to dysfunction included inadequate knowledge about sex, sexual stimulation and sexual communication. Along with inadequate self-image, negative childhood experiences, financial difficulties and marital discord in parents influenced the perception of self. Majority of the women had dysfunctional beliefs about sexuality (56%, and greater beliefs were found to be in the domain of sexual conservatism. The overall quality of life was poor, and 56% of women experienced psychological distress. There was significant positive correlation between sexual conservatism and experience of pain and overall sexual functioning. Conclusion: Women with infertility bear dysfunctional beliefs and suffer from problems in sexual functioning, have low quality of life and high psychological distress.

  7. Incidence and Prevalence of Sexual Dysfunction in Women and Men: A Consensus Statement from the Fourth International Consultation on Sexual Medicine 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Marita P; Sharlip, Ira D; Lewis, Ron; Atalla, Elham; Balon, Richard; Fisher, Alessandra D; Laumann, Edward; Lee, Sun Won; Segraves, Robert T

    2016-02-01

    The incidence and prevalence of various sexual dysfunctions in women and men are important to understand to designate priorities for epidemiologic and clinical research. This manuscript was designed to conduct a review of the literature to determine the incidence and prevalence of sexual dysfunction in women and men. Members of Committee 1 of the Fourth International Consultation on Sexual Medicine (2015) searched and reviewed epidemiologic literature on the incidence and prevalence of sexual dysfunctions. Key older studies and most studies published after 2009 were included in the text of this article. The outcome measures were the reports in the various studies of the incidence and prevalence of sexual dysfunction among women and men. There are more studies on incidence and prevalence for men than for women and many more studies on prevalence than incidence for women and men. The data indicate that the most frequent sexual dysfunctions for women are desire and arousal dysfunctions. In addition, there is a large proportion of women who experience multiple sexual dysfunctions. For men, premature ejaculation and erectile dysfunction are the most common sexual dysfunctions, with less comorbidity across sexual dysfunctions for men compared with women. These data need to be treated with caution, because there is a high level of variability across studies caused by methodologic differences in the instruments used to assess presence of sexual dysfunction, ages of samples, nature of samples, methodology used to gather the data, and cultural differences. Future research needs to use well-validated tools to gather data and ensure that the data collection strategy is clearly described. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Sexual Disgust Questionnaire; a Psychometric Study and a First Exploration in Patients with Sexual Dysfunctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Overveld, Mark; de Jong, Peter J.; Peters, Madelon L.; van Lankveld, Jacques; Melles, Reinhilde; ter Kuile, Moniek M.

    Introduction. Disgust may be involved in sexual problems by disrupting sexual arousal and motivating avoidance of sexual intercourse. To test whether heightened disgust for sexual contaminants is related to sexual dysfunctions, the Sexual Disgust Questionnaire (SDQ) has recently been developed.

  9. Health-Related Lifestyle Factors and Sexual Dysfunction: A Meta-Analysis of Population-Based Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Mark S; Walter, Emma E

    2018-04-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common problem among men and women and is associated with negative individual functioning, relationship difficulties, and lower quality of life. To determine the magnitude of associations between 6 health-related lifestyle factors (cigarette smoking, alcohol intake, physical activity, diet, caffeine, and cannabis use) and 3 common sexual dysfunctions (erectile dysfunction, premature ejaculation, and female sexual dysfunction). A comprehensive literature search of 10 electronic databases identified 89 studies that met the inclusion criteria (452 effect sizes; N = 348,865). Pooled mean effects (for univariate, age-adjusted, and multivariable-adjusted estimates) were computed using inverse-variance weighted random-effects meta-analysis and moderation by study and population characteristics were tested using random-effects meta-regression. Mean effect sizes from 92 separate meta-analyses provided evidence that health-related lifestyle factors are important for sexual dysfunction. Cigarette smoking (past and current), alcohol intake, and physical activity had dose-dependent associations with erectile dysfunction. Risk of erectile dysfunction increased with greater cigarette smoking and decreased with greater physical activity. Alcohol had a curvilinear association such that moderate intake was associated with a lower risk of erectile dysfunction. Participation in physical activity was associated with a lower risk of female sexual dysfunction. There was some evidence that a healthy diet was related to a lower risk of erectile dysfunction and female sexual dysfunction, and caffeine intake was unrelated to erectile dysfunction. Publication bias appeared minimal and findings were similar for clinical and non-clinical samples. Modification of lifestyle factors would appear to be a useful low-risk approach to decreasing the risk of erectile dysfunction and female sexual dysfunction. Strengths include the testing of age-adjusted and multivariable

  10. Translational Perspective on the Role of Testosterone in Sexual Function and Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlasek, Carol A; Mulhall, John; Davies, Kelvin; Wingard, Christopher J; Hannan, Johanna L; Bivalacqua, Trinity J; Musicki, Biljana; Khera, Mohit; González-Cadavid, Nestor F; Burnett, Arthur L

    2016-08-01

    The biological importance of testosterone is generally accepted by the medical community; however, controversy focuses on its relevance to sexual function and the sexual response, and our understanding of the extent of its role in this area is evolving. To provide scientific evidence examining the role of testosterone at the cellular and molecular levels as it pertains to normal erectile physiology and the development of erectile dysfunction and to assist in guiding successful therapeutic interventions for androgen-dependent sexual dysfunction. In this White Paper, the Basic Science Committee of the Sexual Medicine Society of North America assessed the current basic science literature examining the role of testosterone in sexual function and dysfunction. Testosterone plays an important role in sexual function through multiple processes: physiologic (stimulates activity of nitric oxide synthase), developmental (establishes and maintains the structural and functional integrity of the penis), neural (development, maintenance, function, and plasticity of the cavernous nerve and pelvic ganglia), therapeutically for dysfunctional regulation (beneficial effect on aging, diabetes, and prostatectomy), and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibition (testosterone supplement to counteract phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor resistance). Despite controversies concerning testosterone with regard to sexual function, basic science studies provide incontrovertible evidence for a significant role of testosterone in sexual function and suggest that properly administered testosterone therapy is potentially advantageous for treating male sexual dysfunction. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. No effect of oral testosterone treatment on sexual dysfunction in alcoholic cirrhotic men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, C; Wantzin, P; Eriksen, J

    1988-01-01

    -binding globulin-bound testosterone concentrations disappeared, however, when age, ethanol consumption, and severity of liver disease were included as covariates in the analysis. During follow-up (median 30 mo, range 1-48 mo) sexual dysfunction improved significantly (p less than 0.05) at 6, 12, and 24 mo......The prevalence and course of sexual dysfunction was evaluated in 221 alcoholic cirrhotic men participating in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study on the effect of oral testosterone treatment on liver disease. At entry, 67% (95% confidence limits, 61%-74%) complained of sexual dysfunction....... Sexual dysfunction was significantly (p less than 0.05) associated with lower serum concentrations of testosterone, non-protein-bound testosterone, and non-sex hormone-binding globulin-bound testosterone. The significant associations between sexual dysfunction and non-protein-bound and non-sex hormone...

  12. Sexual dysfunctions in men treated for testicular cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendal, Susanne; Kristensen, Ellids; Giraldi, Annamaria G E

    2008-01-01

    Patients treated for testicular cancer have increased risk of ejaculatory, orgasmic and erectile dysfunction compared with healthy men. The underlying relations are unclear. This review describes sexual dysfunctions that are associated with various treatment modalities. One meta-analysis and 11...

  13. The Physiology of Female Sexual Function and the Pathophysiology of Female Sexual Dysfunction (Committee 13A).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Roy J; Both, Stephanie; Georgiadis, Janniko; Kukkonen, Tuuli; Park, Kwangsung; Yang, Claire C

    2016-05-01

    The article consists of six sections written by separate authors that review female genital anatomy, the physiology of female sexual function, and the pathophysiology of female sexual dysfunction but excluding hormonal aspects. To review the physiology of female sexual function and the pathophysiology of female sexual dysfunction especially since 2010 and to make specific recommendations according to the Oxford Centre for evidence based medicine (2009) "levels of evidence" wherever relevant. Recommendations were made for particular studies to be undertaken especially in controversial aspects in all six sections of the reviewed topics. Despite numerous laboratory assessments of female sexual function, genital assessments alone appear insufficient to characterise fully the complete sexual response. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Why is impaired sexual function distressing to women? The primacy of pleasure in female sexual dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Kyle R; Meston, Cindy M

    2015-03-01

    Recent research has highlighted a complex association between female sexual function and subjective distress regarding sexual activity. These findings are difficult to explain given limited knowledge as to the mechanisms through which impaired sexual function causes distress. The current study assessed whether a number of specific consequences of impaired sexual function, including decreased physical pleasure, disruption of sexual activity, and negative partner responses, mediated the association between sexual function and distress. Eighty-seven women in sexually active relationships reporting impairments in sexual function completed validated self-report measures and daily online assessments of sexual experiences. Participants completed the Sexual Satisfaction Scale for Women, the Female Sexual Function Index, and the Measure of Sexual Consequences. Results suggested that decreased physical pleasure and disruption of sexual activity, but not partner responses, statistically mediated the association between sexual function and distress. Sexual consequences represent potential maintaining factors of sexual dysfunction that are highly distressing to women. Results are discussed in the context of theoretical models of sexual dysfunction and related treatments. © 2014 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  15. Animal Models for the Study of Female Sexual Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marson, Lesley; Giamberardino, Maria Adele; Costantini, Raffaele; Czakanski, Peter; Wesselmann, Ursula

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Significant progress has been made in elucidating the physiological and pharmacological mechanisms of female sexual function through preclinical animal research. The continued development of animal models is vital for the understanding and treatment of the many diverse disorders that occur in women. Aim To provide an updated review of the experimental models evaluating female sexual function that may be useful for clinical translation. Methods Review of English written, peer-reviewed literature, primarily from 2000 to 2012, that described studies on female sexual behavior related to motivation, arousal, physiological monitoring of genital function and urogenital pain. Main Outcomes Measures Analysis of supporting evidence for the suitability of the animal model to provide measurable indices related to desire, arousal, reward, orgasm, and pelvic pain. Results The development of female animal models has provided important insights in the peripheral and central processes regulating sexual function. Behavioral models of sexual desire, motivation, and reward are well developed. Central arousal and orgasmic responses are less well understood, compared with the physiological changes associated with genital arousal. Models of nociception are useful for replicating symptoms and identifying the neurobiological pathways involved. While in some cases translation to women correlates with the findings in animals, the requirement of circulating hormones for sexual receptivity in rodents and the multifactorial nature of women’s sexual function requires better designed studies and careful analysis. The current models have studied sexual dysfunction or pelvic pain in isolation; combining these aspects would help to elucidate interactions of the pathophysiology of pain and sexual dysfunction. Conclusions Basic research in animals has been vital for understanding the anatomy, neurobiology, and physiological mechanisms underlying sexual function and urogenital pain

  16. Sigmund Freud and his impact on our understanding of male sexual dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Uwe

    2009-08-01

    Sigmund Freud was one of the most influential thinkers and theorists of the 20th century. His groundbreaking work laid the foundation to many concepts and theories relevant to modern sexual medicine. To evaluate Freud's approaches to the understanding of male sexual dysfunction both in their historical context and with respect to their significance for contemporary research and therapy of sexual problems. After a brief biographical sketch, two of Freud's writings, the widely acclaimed "Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality" from 1905, and a short article entitled "The Most Prevalent Form of Degradation in Erotic Life" from 1912, were analyzed, especially for their relevance to present treatment concepts of male sexual dysfunction. In Freud's clinical practice "psychical impotence" was a highly prevalent complaint. In his view, this dysfunction was caused by an inhibition due to an unresolved neurotic fixation leading to an arrest of the libidinal development. The result is a splitting of the tender and the sensual dimension of sexuality, most notably in the so-called madonna-whore complex. The degree of this dissociation (total or partial) determines the severity of the ensuing sexual dysfunction. In Freud's rather pessimistic view, the erotic life of civilized people tends to be characterized by some degree of this condition. While some of Freud's theories are obsolete today, many parts of his work appear to be astonishingly modern, even in the light of current neurobiological research and recent models of sexual dysfunction. Above all, Freud was an extremely gifted observer of human behavior who shows us that in many cases, sexual dysfunctions are no isolated phenomena, but have their roots in biographically based intrapsychic or interpersonal conflicts.

  17. The Sexual Disgust Questionnaire; a psychometric study and a first exploration in patients with sexual dysfunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Overveld, Mark; de Jong, Peter J; Peters, Madelon L; van Lankveld, Jacques; Melles, Reinhilde; ter Kuile, Moniek M

    2013-02-01

    Disgust may be involved in sexual problems by disrupting sexual arousal and motivating avoidance of sexual intercourse. To test whether heightened disgust for sexual contaminants is related to sexual dysfunctions, the Sexual Disgust Questionnaire (SDQ) has recently been developed. Previous research showed that particularly women with vaginismus display a generally heightened dispositional disgust propensity and heightened disgust toward stimuli depicting sexual intercourse. To determine the psychometric properties of the SDQ and test whether heightened disgust toward sexual stimuli is specific to vaginismus or can be observed in other sexual dysfunctions as well. First, a large sample of undergraduates and university employees completed the SDQ (N = 762) and several trait disgust indices. Next, women with vaginismus (N = 39), dyspareunia (N = 45), and men with erectile disorder (N = 28) completed the SDQ and were compared to participants without sexual problems (N = 70). SDQ to index sexual disgust. The SDQ proved a valid and reliable index to establish disgust propensity for sexual stimuli. Supporting construct validity of the SDQ, sexual disgust correlated with established trait indices. Furthermore, sexual disgust and willingness to handle sexually contaminated stimuli were associated with sexual functioning in women, but not in men. Specifically women with vaginismus displayed heightened sexual disgust compared to women without sexual problems, while men with erectile disorders demonstrated a lower willingness to handle sexually contaminated stimuli compared to men without sexual problems. The SDQ appears a valid and reliable measure of sexual disgust. The pattern of SDQ-scores across males and females with and without sexual dysfunctions corroborates earlier research suggesting that disgust appraisals are involved especially in vaginismus and supports the view that the difficulty with vaginal penetration experienced by women in vaginismus may partly be due to

  18. Sexual dysfunction improved in heroin-dependent men after methadone maintenance treatment in Tianjin, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minying Zhang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether methadone maintenance treatment (MMT is correlated with sexual dysfunction in heroin-dependent men and to determine the prevalence and risk factors of sexual dysfunction among men on MMT. METHODS: The study included a retrospective survey and a cross-sectional survey which contained interviews of 293 men who are currently engaged in MMT. The results of the two surveys were compared. For a subset of 43 participants, radioimmunoassay was additionally conducted using retrospective and prospective blood samples to test the levels of plasma testosterone and luteinizing hormone. Other study evaluations were the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-15, and Self-rating Depression Scale. RESULTS: Sexual dysfunction in all five IIEF-15 domains (erectile function, orgasmic function, sexual desire, intercourse satisfaction, and overall satisfaction was strongly associated with long-term use of heroin. A decrease in the severity of sexual dysfunction was associated with MMT initiation. Erectile dysfunction, lack of sexual desire, inability to orgasm, and lack of intercourse satisfaction were significantly correlated with increasing age of the participants. Methadone dose and duration of methadone treatment were not found to be associated with sexual dysfunction. The level of plasma testosterone significantly declined during methadone treatment, but results from multivariate analysis indicated low levels of testosterone were not the main cause of sexual dysfunction. No correlation between reported depression status and sexual function was found. CONCLUSIONS: While high levels of sexual dysfunction were reported by heroin-dependent men in our study before and after MMT initiation, MMT appears to be correlated with improved sexual function in the population of the study.

  19. Sexual dysfunction and cardiovascular diseases: a systematic review of prevalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabete Rodrigues Nascimento

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review of the literature regarding the prevalence of sexual dysfunction in patients with cardiovascular diseases. An article search of the ISI Web of Science and PubMed databases using the search terms "sexual dysfunction”, “cardiovascular diseases”, “coronary artery disease", “myocardial infarct" and “prevalence” was performed. In total, 893 references were found. Non-English-language and repeated references were excluded. After an abstract analysis, 91 references were included for full-text reading, and 24 articles that evaluated sexual function using validated instruments were selected for this review. This research was conducted in October 2012, and no time restrictions were placed on any of the database searches. Reviews and theoretical articles were excluded; only clinical trials and epidemiological studies were selected for this review. The studies were mostly cross-sectional, observational and case-control in nature; other studies used prospective cohort or randomized clinical designs. In women, all domains of sexual function (desire, arousal, vaginal lubrication, orgasm, sexual dissatisfaction and pain were affected. The domains prevalent in men included erectile dysfunction and premature ejaculation and orgasm. Sexual dysfunction was related to the severity of cardiovascular disease. When they resumed sexual activity, patients with heart disease reported significant difficulty, including a lack of interest in sex, sexual dissatisfaction and a decrease in the frequency of sexual activity.

  20. The incidence of sexual dysfunction in patients attending Dutch general practitioners.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kedde, H.; Donker, G.; Leusink, P.; Kruijer, H.

    2011-01-01

    Data on patients with a sexual dysfunction were collected in 45 Dutch general practices between 2003 and 2008. The aim of the study was to determine the incidence of patients with a sexual dysfunction, associated health problems, and related interventions performed by their general practitioners

  1. The relationship between hydration status, male sexual dysfunction and depression in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Kamal; Elimeleh, Yotam; Shehadeh, Mona; Fadi, Hassan; Rubinchik, Irina

    2018-01-01

    Disturbances in sexual function are common among dialysis patients. Normal erections require a complex balance of physiological, psychological, emotional, hormonal, neurological and vascular factors. This study examined a possible association of overhydration (OH) with male sexual dysfunction and depression in hemodialysis (HD) patients. This cross-sectional study assessed hydration status by whole-body bioimpedance spectroscopy in patients on maintenance HD for more than 12 months. Patients were categorized according to OH to extracellular water (ECW) ratio: OH/ECW ratio >0.15 and OH/ECW ratio ≤0.15. Sexual function was assessed using the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) score. Psychological status was evaluated using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) score. Serum sex hormones were determined. Of 39 stable participants on HD, 53.8% were overhydrated (OH/ECW ratio >0.15) and 46.2% not overhydrated (OH/ECW ratio ≤0.15). Of participants with OH/ECW ratio >0.15, 85.7% had mild to severe ED, and 71.4% had abnormal BDI scores, ranging from mild mood disturbance to severe depression. Compared to patients with OH/ECW ratio ≤0.15, BDI scores, serum estradiol and plasma hsCRP were higher (18.48±8.34 vs 10.61±5.46, p 0.15, while their IIEF score, serum total testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) were lower (12.81±7.31 vs 41.44±23.79, p <0.001; 8.97±5.43 vs 14.10±8.30, p =0.013; and 85.31±55.14 vs 133.3±95.48, p =0.029; respectively). The OH/ECW ratio correlated inversely with the IIEF score ( r =-0.69, p <0.001) and positively with BDI scores ( r =0.64, p <0.001). IIEF scores were inversely correlated with BDI scores ( r =-0.54, p <0.001). OH in HD patients was found to be associated with a higher prevalence of sexual dysfunction and depression, lower serum levels of total testosterone and DHEA, and higher levels of serum estradiol.

  2. Assessment of Sexual Dysfunction in Patients with Fibromyalgia Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahime Nur Ülker

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of our study is to determine the presence, quality of sexual dysfunction in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome and to compare with normal population. Material and Methods: A total of 55 sexually active women who were admitted to Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation of Antalya Research and Training Hospital and diagnosed with fibromyalgia syndrome according to 1990 and 2010 American College of Rheumatology (ACR criteria. A control group composed of 50 sexually active women who were admitted to our clinic with various musculoskeletal system complaints were also included in the study in order to compare the parameters used for clinical assessment of patients and to determine whether the patients differ from normal population. Patients and controls who met inclusion criteria were applied Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI for assessment of sexual function. This test was developed by Rosen and colleagues in 2000, it is composed of 19 questions and inquires six different dimensions including desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, sexual satisfaction and pain. Turkish validation test was done by Turkish Society Of Andrology in 2003, answers are multiplied with a coefficient and each section is evaluated on six scores. Minimum score is 2.4 and maximum is 36 and standardly used for assessment of female sexual dysfunction in Turkey. Results: Subscale and total score of Female Sexual Function Index of Fibromyalgia syndrome patients were found statistically significantly lower than those of control group (p<0.05. Conclusion: Disorders of sexual function or its quality are one of the problems seen in fibromyalgia syndrome patients. It should be noticed that sexual function assessment must be a part of treatment of fibromyalgia syndrome. It is quite difficult to determine the mechanism between sexual dysfunction and fibromyalgia syndrome and new and larger studies are needed to determine this mechanism. (Turkish Journal of

  3. Sexual Dysfunctions: Relationship to Childhood Sexual Abuse and Early Family Experiences in a Nonclinical Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzl, Johann F.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This study evaluated 202 female university students for early familial experience and childhood sexual abuse (CSA) in relation to adult sexual disorders: (1) victims of multiple CSA more frequently reported sexual desire disorders; and (2) single-incident victims and nonvictims reported no significantly different rates of sexual dysfunction.…

  4. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor-Induced Sexual Dysfunction in Adolescents: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharko, Alexander M.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To review the existing literature on selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)-induced sexual dysfunction in adolescents. Method: A literature review of SSRI-induced adverse effects in adolescents focusing on sexual dysfunction was done. Nonsexual SSRI-induced adverse effects were compared in adult and pediatric populations.…

  5. Development of a sexual function questionnaire for clinical trials of female sexual dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quirk, Frances H.; Heiman, Julia R.; Rosen, Raymond C.; Laan, Ellen; Smith, Michael D.; Boolell, Mitra

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To better evaluate efficacy in clinical trials of drugs as potential treatments for female sexual dysfunctions (FSD), a brief, multidimensional measure of female sexual function was developed. METHODS: Data from semistructured interviews with 82 women with or without FSD, aged 19-65

  6. Sexuality, intimacy, and gynecological cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijmar Schultz, W.C.M.; van de Wiel, H.B.M.

    2003-01-01

    On a psychological level, not all changes in sexual functioning following gynecological cancer treatment automatically lead to sexual problems or dysfunctions. Whether sexual dissatisfaction occurs will also depend on personal factors, social factors, and the context in which these negative changes

  7. Sexual Dysfunction among HIV Patients: Three Case Reports and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    young (< 30 years old) and in long-term heterosexual relationships. With increased ... HAART, the prevalence and potential impact of sexual dysfunction are certain to be significant. There is ..... dysfunction among HIV infected men and women.

  8. Prevalence of sexual dysfunction among females in a university ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-29

    Jun 29, 2014 ... A self-administered structured pretested questionnaire on sexual activity was administered (the Female ... Results: The prevalence of female sexual dysfunction (FSFI score ≤ 26.50) was 53.3%. ..... Sample size determination.

  9. Breast cancer treatment and sexual dysfunction: Moroccan women's perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismaili Nabil

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This exploratory prospective study evaluated women's responses to questions that asked them to describe how their body image and sexual functioning had changed since their breast cancer diagnosis to treatment. Methods A questionnaire concerning body image scale and various sexual problems experienced after diagnosis and treatment was anonymously completed by 120 women in the outpatient clinic of our hospital's Division of medical Oncology. To be eligible, subjects had to be sexually active and had histology proven breast cancer. They also had to have received treatment for breast cancer. Results 100% of participants have never spoken with their doctor about this subject. 84% of the participants continued sexual activity after treatment, but there was an increase in the incidence of sexual functioning problems which resulted in a slight reduction in the quality of their sex lives. 65% of the women experienced dyspareunia followed by lubrication difficulties (54% and the absence or reduction of sexual desire (48% and 64%, respectively while, 37% had lack of satisfaction (37%. Female orgasmic disorder and brief intercourse and arousal were reported respectively by 40% and 38% of the subjects. The sexual dysfunctions were absent before diagnosis and management of breast cancer in 91.5% subjects and of these 100% subjects complained of a deterioration of the symptomatology after the various treatments. 90% of the dysfunctions were observed after chemotherapy, 9% after surgery and 3% after radiotherapy; none of the subjects indicated the onset of dysfunctions to have been associated with hormonotherapy. 100% expressed not having received sufficient information about how the disease and treatment (including surgery might affect their sexual life. Conclusion Breast cancer and its treatment may result in significant difficulties with sexual functioning and sexual life. Addressing these problems is essential to improve the quality of

  10. An Overview of Vulvovaginal Atrophy‑Related Sexual Dysfunction in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sexual dysfunction is a common problem in postmenopausal women, often underdiagnosed, inadequately ... with age, and the majority of women older than 60 years ..... A study of sexuality and health among adults in the United. States.

  11. A biopsychosocial approach to women’s sexual function and dysfunction at midlife: A narrative review

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Holly N.; Thurston, Rebecca C.

    2016-01-01

    A satisfying sex life is an important component of overall well-being, but sexual dysfunction is common, especially in midlife women. The aim of this review is (a) to define sexual function and dysfunction, (b) to present theoretical models of female sexual response, (c) to examine longitudinal studies of how sexual function changes during midlife, and (d) to review treatment options. Four types of female sexual dysfunction are currently recognized: Female Orgasmic Disorder, Female Sexual Int...

  12. Sexual dysfunction after radiotherapy for cancer of the cervix uteri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohkawa, R.; Takamizawa, H. (Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine); Arai, T.; Morita, S.

    1981-03-01

    Investigations of sexual consciousness and sexual dysfunction after radiotherapy for cancer of the cervix uteri were performed on patients of middle and old ages by questionnaires and questioning by doctors, and the following results were obtained. 1. Before radiotherapy, sexual activity was most prominent in their twenties and thirties. However, patients who were in fifties when this study was performed had most active sexual lives during the ages from 35 to 50 years. 2. Frequencies of sexual intercourse decreased markedly just before radiotherapy, and many patients received radiotherapy when sexual activity fell. 3. 32% of the patients have not experienced sexual intercourse after radiotherapy. 4. Decreases in the sex urge, sexuality, vaginal discharge, and frequency of sexual intercourse after radiotherapy were recognized in 77%, 77%, 70%, and 93% respectively. 5. Patients who became unwilling to maintain sexual lives after radiotherapy because of fear about recurrence or aggravation of cancer were 38% by questionaires and 49% by questioning by doctors. 6. Pains on sexual intercourse were found in 69% by questionaires and 49% by questionning by doctors. Most pains occurred at penis insertion and was thought to be due to atrophy and inflammation of vagina and external genitalia in most cases. 7. Both vaginal damage and sexual dysfunction in patients with radiotherapy following surgery for cancer of the cervix uteri, in patients with radiotherapy alone for cancer of the cervix uteri, and in patients with radiotherapy following surgery for cancer of the ovary and corpus uteri were marked, modest and mild, respectively. 8. Vaginal damage score was higher in patients treated more than 5 years before than those less than 2 years ago, but there were no differences in sexual dysfunction score between both groups.

  13. Sexual dysfunction after radiotherapy for cancer of the cervix uteri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkawa, Reiko; Takamizawa, Hiroyoshi; Arai, Tatsuo; Morita, Shinroku.

    1981-01-01

    Investigations of sexual consciousness and sexual dysfunction after radiotherapy for cancer of the cervix uteri were performed on patients of middle and old ages by questionnaires and questionning by doctors, and the following results were obtained. 1. Before radiotherapy, sexual activity was most prominent in their twenties and thirties. However, patients who were in fifties when this study was performed had most active sexual lives during the ages from 35 to 50 years. 2. Frequencies of sexual intercourse decreased markedly just before radiotherapy, and many patients received radiotherapy when sexual activity fell. 3. 32% of the patients have not experienced sexual intercourse after radiotherapy. 4. Decreases in the sex urge, sexuality, vaginal dicharge, and frequency of sexual intercourse after radiotherapy were recognized in 77%, 77%, 70%, and 93% respectively. 5. Patients who became unwilling to maintain sexual lives after radiotherapy because of fear about recurrence or aggravation of cancer were 38% by questionnaires and 49% by questionning by doctors. 6. Pains on sexual intercourse were found in 69% by questionnaires and 49% by questionning by doctors. Most pains occurred at pennis insertion and was thought to be due to atrophy and inflammation of vagina and external genitalia in most cases. 7. Both vaginal damages and sexual dysfunction in patients with radiotherapy following surgery for cancer of the cervix uteri, in patients with radiotherapy alone for cancer of the cervix uteri, and in patients with radiotherapy following surgery for cancer of the ovary and corpus uteri were marked, modest and mild, respectively. 8. Vaginal damage score was higher in patients treated more than 5 years before than those less than 2 years ago, but there were no differences in sexual dysfunction score between both groups. (Tsunoda, M.)

  14. Sexual dysfunction in females with depression: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnankutty Sreelakshmy

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Female sexual dysfunction (FSD in depression albeit common is strikingly understudied. The condition, if addressed properly, can be readily cured, improving the quality of life of the patient. Methods A consecutive sample of drug-naïve married female patients with depression was assessed. Depression was diagnosed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID-I. Depression severity was assessed using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D, and sexual dysfunction, the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI. Results Sexual dysfunction was found in 90% of the patients in our study. Patients with medical comorbidities showed a significant decrease in the desire subset of the FSFI (Mann-Whitney U=11.0, p=0.009, however there was no significant association with other subsets. Patients who expressed passive death wishes had higher scores on all indicators of sexual function and a significantly higher score in the orgasm subset of the FSFI (Mann-Whitney U=11.0, p=0.009. Conclusion The study showed a high prevalence of FSD in depressed females regardless of type and severity of depression. Depression with medical comorbidities was associated with a significant decrease in desire. Patients who expressed passive death wishes showed improved sexual function and significantly better orgasm.

  15. A Place for Sexual Dysfunctions in an Empirical Taxonomy of Psychopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Miriam K.; Baillie, Andrew J.; Eaton, Nicholas R.; Krueger, Robert F.

    2017-01-01

    Sexual dysfunctions commonly co-occur with various depressive and anxiety disorders. An emerging framework for understanding the classification of mental disorders suggests that such comorbidity is a manifestation of underlying dimensions of psychopathology (or “spectra”). In this review, we synthesize the evidence that sexual dysfunctions should be included in the empirical taxonomy of psychopathology as part of the internalizing spectrum, which accounts for comorbidity among the depressive and anxiety disorders. The review has four parts. Part 1 summarizes the empirical basis and utility of the empirical taxonomy of psychopathology. Part 2 reviews the prima facie evidence for the hypothesis that sexual dysfunctions are part of the internalizing spectrum (i.e., high rates of comorbidity; shared cognitive, affective, and temperament characteristics; common neural substrates and biomarkers; shared course and treatment response; and the lack of causal relationships between them). Part 3 critically analyzes and integrates the results of the eight studies that have addressed this hypothesis. Finally, Part 4 examines the implications of reconceptualizing sexual dysfunctions as part of the internalizing spectrum, and explores avenues for future research. PMID:28121167

  16. Differences in Perceived and Physiologic Genital Arousal Between Women With and Without Sexual Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handy, Ariel B; Stanton, Amelia M; Pulverman, Carey S; Meston, Cindy M

    2018-01-01

    Many sexual psychophysiologic studies have failed to find differences in physiologic genital arousal between women with and those without sexual dysfunction. However, differences in self-reported (ie, perceived) measures of genital responses between these 2 groups of women have been noted. To determine whether women with and without sexual dysfunction differ on measures of physiologic and perceived genital arousal based on type of analytic technique used, to explore differences in perceived genital arousal, and to assess the relation between physiologic and perceived genital arousal. Data from 5 studies (N = 214) were used in this analysis. Women were categorized into 3 groups: women with arousal-specific sexual dysfunction (n = 40), women with decreased sexual function (n = 72), and women who were sexually functional (n = 102). Women viewed an erotic film while their physiologic genital arousal was measured using a vaginal photoplethysmograph. After watching the film, women completed a self-report measure of perceived genital arousal. There were differences in vaginal pulse amplitude (VPA) levels and association of VPA with perceived genital sensations based on level of sexual function. Commonly used methods of analysis failed to identify significant differences in VPA among these groups of women. When VPA data were analyzed with hierarchical linear modeling, significant differences emerged. Notably, women with arousal-specific dysfunction exhibited lower VPA than sexually functional women at the beginning of the assessment. As the erotic film progressed, women with arousal-specific dysfunction became aroused at a faster rate than sexually functional women, and these 2 groups ultimately reached a similar level of VPA. Sexually functional women reported the highest levels of perceived genital responses among the 3 groups of women. No significant relation between VPA and perceived genital arousal emerged. Women's perception of their genital responses could play

  17. Antidepressant induced sexual dysfunction Part 1: epidemiology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    Abstract. Sexual dysfunction is a common side effect of treatment with antidepressants, particularly those with a predominantly .... free of serotonergic effects or have highly selective receptor .... received little attention in the current literature.

  18. A Population-Based Epidemiologic Study of Female Sexual Dysfunction Risk in Mainland China: Prevalence and Predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunni; Tong, Jiali; Zhu, Lan; Zhang, Lei; Xu, Tao; Lang, Jinghe; Xie, Yu

    2017-11-01

    Epidemiologic data on female sexual dysfunction in China are sparse. To assess the prevalence of risk of female sexual dysfunction in mainland China and its regional and sociodemographic variations and physiologic, pathologic, and behavioral risk factors. A survey of the general female population was conducted in mainland China from February 2014 through January 2016. Women were randomly selected using multistage, stratified, cluster sampling. The prevalence rate of sexual dysfunction, as measured by the Female Sexual Function Index and a score lower than 23.45 as the cutoff threshold, was determined. Multivariate logistical regression models were used to examine the effects of sociodemographic, physiologic, pathologic, and behavioral factors on women's risk of experiencing sexual dysfunction and domain-specific sexual problems. The questionnaire on sexual dysfunction was completed by 25,446 women 20 to 70 years old. The prevalence of sexual dysfunction in women 20 to 70 years old in mainland China was estimated at 29.7% (99% CI = 28.9-30.4), with large regional variations. The prevalence rates of potential domain-specific sexual problems were 21.6% (99% CI = 20.9-22.2) for low desire, 21.5 (99% CI = 20.8-22.2) for arousal disorder, 18.9% (99% CI = 18.3-19.6) for lubrication disorder, 27.9% (99% CI = 27.2-28.7) for orgasm disorder, and 14.1% (99% CI = 13.6-14.7) for sexual pain. Higher educational attainment and urban residency were associated with a decreased risk of sexual dysfunction. Women of ethnic minorities (or non-Han ethnicity) had fewer reports of sexual dysfunction than women of Han ethnicity (odds ratio = 0.67, 99% CI = 0.47-0.97). Diabetes, cancers, pelvic inflammatory disease, and pelvic organ prolapse significantly increased the reports of sexual dysfunction. This survey provided the prevalence and risk factors of female sexual dysfunction in China, information that could be useful for potential prevention and clinical treatment. This is

  19. Family Trauma and Dysfunction in Sexually Abused Female Adolescent Psychiatric Control Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wherry, Jeffrey N.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Differences in family trauma, stressors, and dysfunction among adolescent psychiatric inpatients grouped by sexual abuse self-reports were investigated. Family trauma/dysfunction was determined from a composite score derived from the Traumatic Antecedents Scale. The results indicated that sexually abused adolescents reported more family…

  20. Pelvic floor and sexual male dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Pischedda

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The pelvic floor is a complex multifunctional structure that corresponds to the genito- urinary-anal area and consists of muscle and connective tissue. It supports the urinary, fecal, sexual and reproductive functions and pelvic statics. The symptoms caused by pelvic floor dysfunction often affect the quality of life of those who are afflicted, worsening significantly more aspects of daily life. In fact, in addition to providing support to the pelvic organs, the deep floor muscles support urinary continence and intestinal emptying whereas the superficial floor muscles are involved in the mechanism of erection and ejaculation. So, conditions of muscle hypotonia or hypertonicity may affect the efficiency of the pelvic floor, altering both the functionality of the deep and superficial floor muscles. In this evolution of knowledge it is possible imagine how the rehabilitation techniques of pelvic floor muscles, if altered and able to support a voiding or evacuative or sexual dysfunction, may have a role in improving the health and the quality of life.

  1. Report of the international consensus development conference on female sexual dysfunction: definitions and classifications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basson, R.; Berman, J.; Burnett, A.; Derogatis, L.; Ferguson, D.; Fourcroy, J.; Goldstein, I.; Graziottin, A.; Heiman, J.; Laan, E.; Leiblum, S.; Padma-Nathan, H.; Rosen, R.; Segraves, K.; Segraves, R. T.; Shabsigh, R.; Sipski, M.; Wagner, G.; Whipple, B.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: Female sexual dysfunction is highly prevalent but not well defined or understood. We evaluated and revised existing definitions and classifications of female sexual dysfunction. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An interdisciplinary consensus conference panel consisting of 19 experts in female sexual

  2. Sexual dysfunction after simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jürgensen, J S; Ulrich, C; Hörstrup, J H

    2008-01-01

    such as quality of life (QoL) have recently received increased attention among transplant recipients. However, the impact of erectile dysfunction on patient QoL has not been investigated in this high-risk group with a history of diabetes and uremia. We applied the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF...... their sexual function to be worse than before, and 51% did not note any change. The QWB index was highest among the group of patients without erectile dysfunction, decreasing gradually but significantly with increasing severity. A direct impact of erectile dysfunction on QoL, as well as a confounding effect...

  3. Post-SSRI Sexual Dysfunction: Preclinical to Clinical. Is It Fact or Fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coskuner, Enis Rauf; Culha, Mehmet Gokhan; Ozkan, Burak; Kaleagasi, Elcin Orhan

    2018-04-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are a widely used class of drug for various psychiatric disorders during the lifespan, including pregnancy, lactation, childhood, and adolescence. Deterioration in sexual functioning is a major and serious adverse effect of SSRIs. There is emerging evidence that SSRIs can have long-lasting effects on sexuality. To summarize the long-lasting effects of SSRIs on sexuality, starting with animal models and continuing with the clinical experience of different investigators. A literature review of relevant publications in PubMed. To assess the long-lasting effects of SSRIs on sexuality. Although the persistent effects of SSRIs on sexuality have been little studied in humans, animal studies suggest that SSRIs might cause permanent sexual dysfunction after ending SSRI exposure at a young age but not in adulthood in rats. There are no prospective randomized controlled trials in humans and the present evidence is derived from case reports, incidental research findings, and experiences of some internet communities. There is some preclinical evidence from animal studies for enduring SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction, but the available clinical information could prevent a clear decision about the existence of post-SSRI sexual dysfunction, its pathophysiology, and its management. We need more research to fill in the gaps in our knowledge. Coskuner ER, Culha MG, Ozkan B, Kaleagasi EO. Post-SSRI Sexual Dysfunction: Preclinical to Clinical. Is It Fact or Fiction? Sex Med Rev 2018;6:217-223. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Associations of Body Mass Index and Physical Activity With Sexual Dysfunction in Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Carlos Eduardo; Rezende, Fabiana Faria; Paiva, Bianca Sakamoto Ribeiro; Mauad, Edmundo Carvalho; Zucca-Matthes, Gustavo; Carneseca, Estela Cristina; Syrjänen, Kari Juhani; Schover, Leslie R

    2016-11-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common and distressing consequence of breast cancer (BC) treatment. In the present study, we investigated the sexual functioning of BC patients and its association with women's personal characteristics and cancer treatments. In this cross-sectional study, sexual function was assessed using the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI). The health-related quality of life (HRQOL) was measured using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30 and its breast module BR-23. Of the 235 participants approached, 216 participants were included in the study. Of these, 63 patients reported no sexual activity in the last month and thus were analyzed only in relation to the sexual desire domain of FSFI. A total of 154 (71.3 %) patients were classified with hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD). From those patients reporting sexual activity in the last month, 63.3 % (97 out of 153) were classified with sexual dysfunction. Using hierarchical logistic regression, the variance explained (change in R 2 ) by the addition of body mass index (BMI) and mild to moderate physical activity in the prediction models of sexual dysfunction and HSDD were 6.8 and 7.2 %, respectively. Age, BMI, and physical activity were independently associated with sexual dysfunction and HSDD. Additionally, BC patients with sexual dysfunction reported lower scores on global HRQOL, role functioning, and fatigue. Based on our findings, BC survivors should be encouraged to practice regular physical activity and to lose weight in order to avoid sexual dysfunction. However, future clinical trials are needed to confirm these findings.

  5. Trichotillomania In A Patient With Sexual Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aswathi Krishna

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Trichotillomania is a chronic psychiatric disorder characterized by pulling out one's own hair, which results in an obvious loss of hair. Hair pulling was first described in Henri Allopeau in 1889. The term "trichotillomania" comes from the Greek words "thrix" - hair, "tillein" - to pull and "Mania" madness or frenzy. 30 year old man presented with complaints of hairpulling behavior and associated erectile dysfunction. His hairpulling behavior improved on treating his sexual dysfunction.

  6. Sociodemographic and clinical correlates of sexual dysfunction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-02-09

    Feb 9, 2016 ... Objectives: In this study, we described the various types of sexual dysfunction ... Index of Erectile Function Questionnaire for the male participants and the Female ... dopamine, arousal by acetylcholine and nitric oxide, and.

  7. Male sexual dysfunction and infertility associated with neurological disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Krogh-Jespersen, Sheila; Brackett, Nancy L

    2012-01-01

    Normal sexual and reproductive functions depend largely on neurological mechanisms. Neurological defects in men can cause infertility through erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory dysfunction and semen abnormalities. Among the major conditions contributing to these symptoms are pelvic and retroperito...... December 2011; doi:10.1038/aja.2011.70....

  8. The Physiology of Female Sexual Function and the Pathophysiology of Female Sexual Dysfunction (Committee 13A)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levin, Roy J.; Both, Stephanie; Georgiadis, Janniko; Kukkonen, Tuuli; Park, Kwangsung; Yang, Claire C.

    Introduction: The article consists of six sections written by separate authors that review female genital anatomy, the physiology of female sexual function, and the pathophysiology of female sexual dysfunction but excluding hormonal aspects. Aim: To review the physiology of female sexual function

  9. THE CHANGES OF PHYSICAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL SEXUAL COMPLAINS IN WOMEN WITH POST TREATMENT CERVICAL CANCER AFTER SEXUAL NURSING INTERVENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afiyanti Afiyanti

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite increasing awareness related to sexual health for cervical cancer survivors, health care providers are passive in addressing their sexual issues. The objectives were to develop and investigate the effect of a sexual nursing intervention packet to mitigate sexual dysfunction among cervical cancer survivors. Method: A sample of 104 survivors were participated consecutively based on required inclusive criteria in this quasi-experimental study. The sexual nursing intervention packet focused on the physical, psychological, and care of relational aspects of sexual health elements. The packet consisted of 6 weekly 2-hour sessions. Results: The participants reported poor sexual satisfaction and sexual function. There were no statistically signi fi cant differences in sexual interest, sexual arousal, orgasm, and vaginal lubrication improvement following the intervention, although all the variables in the intervention group were improved clinically. The sexual nursing intervention packet was effective in increasing sexual satisfaction and decreasing dispareunia among cervical cancer survivors. Discussion: This study suggests that the quality of life in cervical cancer survivors could be improved with the sexual nursing intervention packet provided as part of supportive group care. This program may be more effective if delivered earlier and for a longer period. Implications for Practice: The sexual nursing intervention packet offers an opportunity to facilitate small-group dynamics that lay the ground for further contacts leading to earlier recognition of sexual problems and active involvement for sexual health improvement for cervical cancer survivors and nurses. It could be utilized for survivor education or support groups to increase sexual satisfaction following cancer treatment.

  10. Assessment of sexual dysfunction and associated factors among patients with schizophrenia in Ethiopia, 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanta, Tolesa; Haile, Kibrom; Abebaw, Dessie; Assefa, Dawit; Hibdye, Getahun

    2018-05-29

    Sexual dysfunction is remarkably prevalent amongst psychiatric patients than general population. This might be due to either the nature of the illness itself or the unwanted effect of the medication they are taking for the illness which limits the capability of forming interpersonal and sexual relationships. This issue is rarely raised in developing countries, and the aim of this study was to assess magnitude and factors contributing to sexual dysfunction among patients with Schizophrenia. Hospital based cross sectional study was conducted at Amanuel Mental Specialized Hospital from January to June 2017. The sample required for this study was determined by using single population proportion formula and the final sample size was 423; and systematic random sampling was used to select participants. We used Change in Sexual Functioning Questionnaire to measure sexual dysfunction. The collected data was cleaned, interred in to Epi data and transferred to SPSS version 20 for farther analysis. The OR with 95% CI was used to measure association and P-value < 0.05 was used as statistically significant. A total of 422 patients with Schizophrenia were involved in the study. The prevalence of General Sexual dysfunction was 82.7%; and in male and female patients the prevalence was 84.5 and 78.6% respectively. Marital status (Unmarried, Divorced and widowed, history of relapse and poor quality of life were associated significantly to global sexual dysfunction. The magnitude of Sexual dysfunction was found to be high among patients with schizophrenia and it is associated with different factors like unmarried, divorced, widowed, relapse and poor quality of life. Treating physicians should be conscious to sexual dysfunction during evaluation and treatment of patients with Schizophrenia. Special attention should be given to single, divorced, widowed patients and patients with history of relapse to improve quality of life of this patients.

  11. Hypoactive sexual desire dysfunction in community-dwelling older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeleke, Berihun M; Bell, Robin J; Billah, Baki; Davis, Susan R

    2017-04-01

    To determine the prevalence of hypoactive sexual desire dysfunction (HSDD) and its associated factors in women aged 65 to 79 years. A questionnaire-based, cross-sectional study was conducted amongst community-dwelling older women. Participants were recruited between April and August 2014 from a national database based on electoral rolls. Sexual function and sexual distress were assessed by the Female Sexual Function Index and the Female Sexual Distress Scale-Revised, respectively. HSDD was defined as the presence of both low sexual desire and sexually related personal distress. The mean ± SD age of the 1,548 women was 71 ± 3.4 years and 52.6% were partnered. Among the participants, 88.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 86.3%-89.6%) had low sexual desire, 15.5% (95% CI, 13.8%-17.4%) had sexually related personal distress, and 13.6% (95% CI, 11.9%-15.4%) had HSDD. The HSDD was more common among partnered than among unpartnered women (23.7% vs 5.9%; P dysfunction (AOR = 1.92; 95% CI, 1.29-2.92), and having moderate-to-severe depressive symptoms (AOR = 4.15; 95% CI, 2.16-7.96) were independently associated with having HSDD. In a subanalysis, HSDD was more common among sexually active than sexually inactive women (31.5% vs 17.3%; P sexually active women had HSDD, as did 22% (95% CI, 11.5%-37.8%) of unpartnered sexually active women. HSDD is common and associated with potentially modifiable risk factors in older women. It should not be assumed that unpartnered older women are sexually inactive or are not distressed by low sexual desire.

  12. The relationship between hydration status, male sexual dysfunction and depression in hemodialysis patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Kamal; Elimeleh, Yotam; Shehadeh, Mona; Fadi, Hassan; Rubinchik, Irina

    2018-01-01

    Background Disturbances in sexual function are common among dialysis patients. Normal erections require a complex balance of physiological, psychological, emotional, hormonal, neurological and vascular factors. This study examined a possible association of overhydration (OH) with male sexual dysfunction and depression in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Patients and methods This cross-sectional study assessed hydration status by whole-body bioimpedance spectroscopy in patients on maintenance HD for more than 12 months. Patients were categorized according to OH to extracellular water (ECW) ratio: OH/ECW ratio >0.15 and OH/ECW ratio ≤0.15. Sexual function was assessed using the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) score. Psychological status was evaluated using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) score. Serum sex hormones were determined. Results Of 39 stable participants on HD, 53.8% were overhydrated (OH/ECW ratio >0.15) and 46.2% not overhydrated (OH/ECW ratio ≤0.15). Of participants with OH/ECW ratio >0.15, 85.7% had mild to severe ED, and 71.4% had abnormal BDI scores, ranging from mild mood disturbance to severe depression. Compared to patients with OH/ECW ratio ≤0.15, BDI scores, serum estradiol and plasma hsCRP were higher (18.48±8.34 vs 10.61±5.46, p0.15, while their IIEF score, serum total testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) were lower (12.81±7.31 vs 41.44±23.79, p<0.001; 8.97±5.43 vs 14.10±8.30, p=0.013; and 85.31±55.14 vs 133.3±95.48, p=0.029; respectively). The OH/ECW ratio correlated inversely with the IIEF score (r=−0.69, p<0.001) and positively with BDI scores (r=0.64, p<0.001). IIEF scores were inversely correlated with BDI scores (r=−0.54, p<0.001). Conclusion OH in HD patients was found to be associated with a higher prevalence of sexual dysfunction and depression, lower serum levels of total testosterone and DHEA, and higher levels of serum estradiol. PMID:29559788

  13. Questionnaires for assessment of female sexual dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giraldi, Annamaria; Rellini, Alessandra; Pfaus, James G

    2011-01-01

    There are many methods to evaluate female sexual function and dysfunction (FSD) in clinical and research settings, including questionnaires, structured interviews, and detailed case histories. Of these, questionnaires have become an easy first choice to screen individuals into different categories...

  14. The role of sexual self-schema in a diathesis-stress model of sexual dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyranowski, Jill M; Aarestad, Susan L; Andersen, Barbara L

    1999-01-01

    Sexual self-schemas are cognitive generalizations regarding sexual aspects of the self that represent a core component of one's sexuality. We contend that individual differences in the sexual self-view represent an important cognitive diathesis for predicting sexual difficulty or dysfunction. We illustrate the role of sexual self-schemas on sexual behavior and responsiveness in healthy female and male samples. Next, we describe how diathesis-stress models of psychopathology have been applied to the sexual arena, and discuss the critical features of clinically useful diathesis variables. Drawing from these criteria, we examine the diathetic properties of sexual self-schemas. Finally, we discuss an empirical test of the proposed diathesis-stress interaction, reviewing the role of women's sexual self-views on sexual morbidity following diagnosis and treatment for gynecologic cancer.

  15. The role of sexual self-schema in a diathesis–stress model of sexual dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    CYRANOWSKI, JILL M.; AARESTAD, SUSAN L.; ANDERSEN, BARBARA L.

    2009-01-01

    Sexual self-schemas are cognitive generalizations regarding sexual aspects of the self that represent a core component of one’s sexuality. We contend that individual differences in the sexual self-view represent an important cognitive diathesis for predicting sexual difficulty or dysfunction. We illustrate the role of sexual self-schemas on sexual behavior and responsiveness in healthy female and male samples. Next, we describe how diathesis–stress models of psychopathology have been applied to the sexual arena, and discuss the critical features of clinically useful diathesis variables. Drawing from these criteria, we examine the diathetic properties of sexual self-schemas. Finally, we discuss an empirical test of the proposed diathesis–stress interaction, reviewing the role of women’s sexual self-views on sexual morbidity following diagnosis and treatment for gynecologic cancer. PMID:19587834

  16. Treatment of antidepressant-associated sexual dysfunction with sildenafil: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurnberg, H George; Hensley, Paula L; Gelenberg, Alan J; Fava, Maurizio; Lauriello, John; Paine, Susan

    2003-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common adverse effect of antidepressants that frequently results in treatment noncompliance. To assess the efficacy of sildenafil citrate in men with sexual dysfunction associated with the use of selective and nonselective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI) antidepressants. Prospective, parallel-group, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted between November 1, 2000, and January 1, 2001, at 3 US university medical centers among 90 male outpatients (mean [SD] age, 45 [8] years) with major depression in remission and sexual dysfunction associated with SRI antidepressant treatment. Patients were randomly assigned to take sildenafil (n = 45) or placebo (n = 45) at a flexible dose starting at 50 mg and adjustable to 100 mg before sexual activity for 6 weeks. The primary outcome measure was score on the Clinical Global Impression-Sexual Function (CGI-SF); secondary measures were scores on the International Index of Erectile Function, Arizona Sexual Experience Scale, Massachusetts General Hospital-Sexual Functioning Questionnaire, and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D). Among the 90 randomized patients, 93% (83/89) of patients treated per protocol took at least 1 dose of study drug and 85% (76/89) completed week 6 end-point assessments with last observation carried forward analyses. At a CGI-SF score of 2 or lower, 54.5% (24/44) of sildenafil compared with 4.4% (2/45) of placebo patients were much or very much improved (Psatisfaction domain measures improved significantly in sildenafil compared with placebo patients. Mean depression scores remained consistent with remission (HAM-D score sexual function in men with sexual dysfunction associated with the use of SRI antidepressants. These improvements may allow patients to maintain adherence with effective antidepressant treatment.

  17. Androgens and Female Sexual Function and Dysfunction--Findings From the Fourth International Consultation of Sexual Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Susan R; Worsley, Roisin; Miller, Karen K; Parish, Sharon J; Santoro, Nanette

    2016-02-01

    Androgens have been implicated as important for female sexual function and dysfunction. To review the role of androgens in the physiology and pathophysiology of female sexual functioning and the evidence for efficacy of androgen therapy for female sexual dysfunction (FSD). We searched the literature using online databases for studies pertaining to androgens and female sexual function. Major reviews were included and their findings were summarized to avoid replicating their content. Quality of data published in the literature and recommendations were based on the GRADES system. The literature supports an important role for androgens in female sexual function. There is no blood androgen level below which women can be classified as having androgen deficiency. Clinical trials have consistently demonstrated that transdermal testosterone (T) therapy improves sexual function and sexual satisfaction in women who have been assessed as having hypoactive sexual desire disorder. The use of T therapy is limited by the lack of approved formulations for women and long-term safety data. Most studies do not support the use of systemic dehydroepiandrosterone therapy for the treatment of FSD in women with normally functioning adrenals or adrenal insufficiency. Studies evaluating the efficacy and safety of vaginal testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone for the treatment of vulvovaginal atrophy are ongoing. Available data support an important role of androgens in female sexual function and dysfunction and efficacy of transdermal T therapy for the treatment of some women with FSD. Approved T formulations for women are generally unavailable. In consequence, the prescribing of T mostly involves off-label use of T products formulated for men and individually compounded T formulations. Long-term studies to determine the safety of T therapy for women and possible benefits beyond that of sexual function are greatly needed. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Sexual Dysfunction and Help Seeking Behaviors in Newly Married Men in Sari City: a Descriptive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakineh Mohammad-Alizadeh Charandabi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Sexual dysfunction is a major concern for people's general health. The aim of this study was to determine the status of sexual function and help-seeking behaviors in newly married men. Methods: This descriptive study was conducted on 363 newly married men. Simple random sampling was used according to premarital counseling offices in the health center of Sari city. Data collection instruments included personal and social characteristics, Arizona Sexual Experience Scale (ASEX, and help-seeking behaviors questionnaires. In order to determine the relationship between characteristics and sexual function, general linear model and also between socio-demographic characteristics and receiving or lack of receiving help, multivariate logistic regression test were used. Results: The mean of sexual function score was 21.3 (2.7 out of possible 5-30, and 26% of men suffered sexual dysfunction. The highest prevalence (27.2% of dysfunction was in the dimension of sexual stimulation, and the lowest (15.7% in maintaining erection. For the treatment of sexual dysfunction, only 32% men had sought help, and 40% of them had visited specialists. The most frequent reasons for not seeking help were feeling uncomfortable with doctor, and their belief that doctor is not able to do much. 65% of men desired to be treated. Conclusion: The results demonstrated relatively high prevalence of sexual dysfunction among men, and unfortunately, most of them did not seek help for their sexual problem. Since Sexual dysfunction can leave damaging effects on the quality of life and marital relationship, interventions to deal with these challenges and screening to identify such problems appear necessary.

  19. Sexual dysfunction and relationship stress: how does this association vary for men and women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Marita P; Connaughton, Catherine

    2017-02-01

    This paper examines the association between relationship stress and sexual dysfunction. The results demonstrated a strong association between female sexual dysfunction (FSD) and relationship stress, and between male sexual dysfunction (MSD) and relationship stress among their female partners. No studies examined the association between FSD and relationship stress of male partners. Treatment for MSD was associated with improved relationship stress for female partners, but no studies were located that examined this association for treatment of FSD. These findings suggest that FSD and relationship stress are strongly related, but the association does not seem to be so strong for men. The review highlights the need for further research in this field to inform therapy for both sexual dysfunction and relationship problems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Is the age at menopause a cause of sexual dysfunction? A Brazilian population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lett, Caio; Valadares, Ana L R; Baccaro, Luiz F; Pedro, Adriana O; Filho, Jeffrey L; Lima, Marcelo; Costa-Paiva, Lucia

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the association between age at menopause and sexual dysfunction and the components of sexual function in postmenopausal women. In this cross-sectional population-based study, data of 540 women aged 45 to 60 years regarding the age they were when they achieved menopause and its association with sexual dysfunction (evaluated using the Short Personal Experiences Questionnaire) were obtained through interviews. We assessed the data for associations between age at menopause and sexual dysfunction and demographic, behavioral, and clinical characteristics. Age at menopause was not associated with sexual dysfunction. Arousal (dysfunction) was the only component of sexual function that was associated with premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) and early menopause (P = 0.01). It was reported by 64.2% of women with POI (women 45 years, respectively (P = 0.04). In women with POI or early menopause, Poisson regression analysis showed that having a partner with sexual problems (prevalence ratio [PR] = 6.6; 95% CI: 3.3-13,2; P POI. The major factors affecting this association were having a partner with sexual problems, dyspareunia, and no satisfaction with the partner as a lover. These findings highlight the importance of evaluating partner problems and improving lubrication in these groups of women.

  1. Standards for Clinical Trials in Male and Female Sexual Dysfunction: II. Patient-Reported Outcome Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, William A; Gruenwald, Ilan; Jannini, Emmanuele A; Lev-Sagie, Ahinoam; Lowenstein, Lior; Pyke, Robert E; Reisman, Yakov; Revicki, Dennis A; Rubio-Aurioles, Eusebio

    2016-12-01

    The second article in this series, Standards for Clinical Trials in Male and Female Sexual Dysfunction, focuses on measurement of patient-reported outcomes (PROs). Together with the design of appropriate phase I to phase IV clinical trials, the development, validation, choice, and implementation of valid PRO measurements-the focus of the present article-form the foundation of research on treatments for male and female sexual dysfunctions. PRO measurements are assessments of any aspect of a patient's health status that come directly from the patient (ie, without the interpretation of the patient's responses by a physician or anyone else). PROs are essential for assessing male and female sexual dysfunction and treatment response, including symptom frequency and severity, personal distress, satisfaction, and other measurements of sexual and general health-related quality of life. Although there are some relatively objective measurements of sexual dysfunction (ie, intravaginal ejaculatory latency time, frequency of sexual activity, etc), these measurements do not comprehensively assess the occurrence and extent of sexual dysfunction or treatment on the patient's symptoms, functioning, and well-being. Data generated by a PRO instrument can provide evidence of a treatment benefit from the patient's perspective. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Implicit and Explicit Associations with Erotic Stimuli in Sexually Functional and Dysfunctional Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lankveld, Jacques; Odekerken, Ingrid; Kok-Verhoeven, Lydia; van Hooren, Susan; de Vries, Peter; van den Hout, Anja; Verboon, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Although conceptual models of sexual functioning have suggested a major role for implicit cognitive processing in sexual functioning, this has thus far, only been investigated in women. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of implicit cognition in sexual functioning in men. Men with (N = 29) and without sexual dysfunction (N = 31) were compared. Participants performed two single-target implicit association tests (ST-IAT), measuring the implicit association of visual erotic stimuli with attributes representing, respectively, valence ('liking') and motivation ('wanting'). Participants also rated the erotic pictures that were shown in the ST-IAT on the dimensions of valence, attractiveness, and sexual excitement to assess their explicit associations with these erotic stimuli. Participants completed the International Index of Erectile Functioning for a continuous measure of sexual functioning. Unexpectedly, compared with sexually functional men, sexually dysfunctional men were found to show stronger implicit associations of erotic stimuli with positive valence than with negative valence. Level of sexual functioning, however, was not predicted by explicit nor implicit associations. Level of sexual distress was predicted by explicit valence ratings, with positive ratings predicting higher levels of sexual distress. Men with and without sexual dysfunction differed significantly with regard to implicit liking. Research recommendations and implications are discussed. © 2015 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  3. Assessment of sexually related personal distress accompanying premenopausal sexual dysfunction with an Arabic version of the Female Sexual Distress Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Magdy R; Shaaban, Mohamed M; Meky, Heba K

    2017-10-01

    To assess sexually related personal distress among premenopausal women with female sexual dysfunction (FSD) via a validated Arabic version of the Female Sexual Distress Scale (FSDS). A cross-sectional study was conducted among women attending Suez Canal University Hospital, Egypt, between May 2015 and July 2016. In a pilot study to evaluate test-retest reliability and internal consistency, 42 sexually active premenopausal women (aged ≥20 years) completed the Arabic FSDS at recruitment and 2 weeks later. Subsequently, premenopausal sexually active women (aged 20-45 years) were asked to complete the female sexual function index (FSFI) questionnaire; those with FSD (FSFI score ≤26.55) were invited to return to complete the validated version of the Arabic FSDS. The Arabic FSDS showed good test-retest reliability (Pearson correlation coefficient 0.93-0.98) and internal consistency (Cronbach α 0.83-0.92). Overall, 140 (58.1%) of 241 women who completed the FSFI had sexual dysfunction, of whom 51 (36.4%) had sexually related personal distress. Marriage duration was significantly increased among women with FSD (P<0.001). All FSFI sexual domains except lubrication were negatively correlated with FSDS. FSD and sexually related personal distress were highly interrelated and prevalent. An Arabic version of the FSDS was found to be valid and reliable for evaluation of sexually related personal distress. © 2017 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  4. Sexual dysfnction in Iranian pregnant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safieh Jamali

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sexuality is an important part of women’s health, quality of life, and general well-being. There are many factors influencing the female sexual function, including psychological, physiological, couple relationship, and socio-cultural factors. Pregnancy plays an important role in the sexual function and behavior of women. Objective: This study aims to evaluate the sexual function and determine the prevalence of sexual dysfunction among women during pregnancy. Materials and Methods: The present cross-sectional study was conducted on 257 healthy pregnant women aging between18-40 years who had attended the antenatal clinic, Paymaneh Hospital, Jahrom, Iran between April and October 2011 Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI questionnaire was used for assessing the sexual function Results: The mean age of the participants was reported as 26.45±4.49 years. In addition, 143, 69, and 45 subjects were in their 1st, 2nd, and 3rd trimesters, respectively. Comparison of the second and the third trimesters revealed a significant difference in the scores of all FSFI domains and the mean total FSFI score was reported as 19.9±22.45. Among the study subjects, 197 ones (79.1% had sexual dysfunction (FSFI score <26.5, while only 52 (20.9% had normal sexual function (FSFI score ≥26.5. The sexual dysfunction among pregnant women was rated as 23.4%, 30.5%, and 46.2% in the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd trimesters, respectively. Conclusion: The prevalence of sexual dysfunction is high during pregnancy and reaches higher levels in the third trimester. Therefore, pregnant women and their partners need counseling about physical and psychological changes in pregnancy

  5. Sexual dysfunctions after prostate cancer radiation therapy; Dysfonctions sexuelles apres irradiation pour cancer de la prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Droupy, S. [Service d' urologie-andrologie, CHU Caremeau, 30 - Nimes (France)

    2010-10-15

    Sexual dysfunctions are a quality of life main concern following prostate cancer treatment. After both radiotherapy and brachytherapy, sexual function declines progressively, the onset of occurrence of erectile dysfunction being 12-18 months after both treatments. The pathophysiological pathways by which radiotherapy and brachytherapy cause erectile dysfunction are multi-factorial, as patient co-morbidities, arterial damage, exposure of neurovascular bundle to high levels of radiation, and radiation dose received by the corpora cavernosa at the crurae of the penis may be important in the aetiology of erectile dysfunction. Diagnosis and treatment of postradiation sexual dysfunctions must integrate pre-therapeutic evaluation and information to provide to the patient and his partner a multidisciplinary sexual medicine management. (authors)

  6. Komorbidnost depresije in spolne disfunkcije pri pacientih ambulante za zdravljenje spolnih motenj: Comorbidity of depression and sexual dysfunction among patients of outpatient clinic for sexual disorders' treatment:

    OpenAIRE

    Lučovnik, Miha; Prokšelj, Tatjana

    2006-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction and depression often occur together, however the causal relation is unclear and has not been studied enough. Sexual dysfunction secondary to depression has been well studied, but less is known about prevalence of depressive symptoms among patients with sexual dysfunction. The aim of our study was to find out whether the depression was more common among young people with psychogenic sexual dysfunction waiting to be treated at the clinic for sexual disorders than among young ...

  7. Fibromyalgia and sexual problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Scarpellini

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review was to describe the recent literature concerning sexual dysfunction in fibromyalgic patients. To this end, we used the common online databases PubMed, MEDLINE and EMBASE (up to June 2012 and searched for the key words fibromyalgia (FM and sexual dysfunction. All the studies examined underlined that FM is strictly associated with sexual dysfunction in women. The major findings observed were related to a decreased sexual desire and arousal, decreased experience of orgasm, and in some studies an increase in genital pain. The psychological aspects, together with the stress related to the constant presence of chronic widespread pain, fatigue and sleep disturbances, are certainly a major factor that adversely affects the sexuality of the patient with FM. Moreover, the drugs most commonly used in these cases may interfere negatively on the sexuality and sexual function of these patients. Therefore, the therapeutic intervention should be targeted and the side effects should be weighed up against the positive effects. It is of the utmost importance to recognise the problem of sexuality and sexual dysfunction in a more complex form of its expression and undertake a multidisciplinary therapeutic intervention to improve the quality of FM patients’ life.

  8. The Effect of Cognitive-Behavioral Counseling on Anxiety and Aggression Women with Sexual Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Nemati

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and aim: According to the American Psychiatric Association female sexual dysfunction are classified in four categories: sexual desire disorders, arousal, orgasm and pain. Having chronic Sexual dysfunction can lead to anxiety, depression, aggression and create problems in other aspects of life. The aim of this study was to Investigate the effect of cognitive-behavior counseling on anxiety and aggression in women with sexual dysfunction. Methods: In this clinical trial, 20 women were referred to Taleghani Hospital in Tehran with anxiety and aggression of sexual problems selected to measure sexual satisfaction. Glombok Rust questionnaire was used to measured the sexual satisfaction and Spielberger Questionnaire 40-item for Anxiety and Buss and Mark Perry questionnaire for aggression. Data were statistically analyzed by t test. Results: in general, the mean total of sexual satisfaction decreased from 79.05 at pretest to 7.35 at posttest p <0.05. the mean pretest of physical aggression from 28.2 and verbal aggression from 17.3 and nervous aggression from 28.95 followed by the aggression of the enemy from 29.95, have declined in post test to 12. 55 , 7.8, 12.3, and 3/12 respectively ( p <0.05. the results of Spielberger questionnaire showed that the mean pre-test state and trait anxiety were decreased from 63 and 62.5 to 35.1 and 34.15 respectively (p <0.05. Conclusion: Cognitive-behavioral counseling may not only have a significant effect in reducing sexual dysfunction in women, but also a significant role in reducing anxiety and aggression as reactions with this disorder. Key words: Sexual Dysfunction, Anxiety, Aggression, Women

  9. Animal models of female sexual dysfunction: basic considerations on drugs, arousal, motivation and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ågmo, Anders

    2014-06-01

    Female sexual dysfunctions are a heterogeneous group of symptoms with unknown but probably varying etiology. Social factors may contribute both to the prevalence and to the origin of these dysfunctions. The present review focuses on female hypoactive sexual desire disorder, sexual arousal disorder and orgasmic disorder. These disorders are generally the most common, according to epidemiological studies, and they can all be considered as disorders of motivation. An incentive motivational model of sexual behavior, applicable to humans as well as to non-human animals, is described and the dysfunctions placed into the context of this model. It is shown that endocrine alterations as well as observable alterations in neurotransmitter activity are unlikely causes of the disorders. A potential role of learning is stressed. Nevertheless, the role of some transmitters in female rodent sexual behavior is analyzed, and compared to data from women, whenever such data are available. The conclusion is that there is no direct coincidence between effects on rodent copulatory behavior and sexual behavior in women. Based on these and other considerations, it is suggested that sexual approach behaviors rather than copulatory reflexes in rodents might be of some relevance for human sexual behavior, and perhaps even for predicting the effects of interventions, perhaps even the effects of drugs. Female copulatory behaviors, including the proceptive behaviors, are less appropriate. The common sexual dysfunctions in women are not problems with the performance of copulatory acts, but with the desire for such acts, by feeling aroused by such acts and experiencing the pleasure expected to be caused by such acts. Finally, it is questioned whether female sexual dysfunctions are appropriate targets for pharmacological treatment. © 2013.

  10. Asexuality: Sexual Orientation, Paraphilia, Sexual Dysfunction, or None of the Above?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotto, Lori A; Yule, Morag

    2017-04-01

    Although lack of sexual attraction was first quantified by Kinsey, large-scale and systematic research on the prevalence and correlates of asexuality has only emerged over the past decade. Several theories have been posited to account for the nature of asexuality. The goal of this review was to consider the evidence for whether asexuality is best classified as a psychiatric syndrome (or a symptom of one), a sexual dysfunction, or a paraphilia. Based on the available science, we believe there is not sufficient evidence to support the categorization of asexuality as a psychiatric condition (or symptom of one) or as a disorder of sexual desire. There is some evidence that a subset of self-identified asexuals have a paraphilia. We also considered evidence supporting the classification of asexuality as a unique sexual orientation. We conclude that asexuality is a heterogeneous entity that likely meets conditions for a sexual orientation, and that researchers should further explore evidence for such a categorization.

  11. Pharmacological therapy for female sexual dysfunction - Has progress been made?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davis, Susan R.; Nijland, Esme A.

    2008-01-01

    The investigation of female sexual dysfunction (FSD) is an evolving area in which definitions and models for female sexual functioning are being continually reviewed and revised. The lack of consensus amongst experts in the field and regulating authorities regarding appropriate inclusion and

  12. Ethical and Sociocultural Aspects of Sexual Function and Dysfunction in Both Sexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atallah, Sandrine; Johnson-Agbakwu, Crista; Rosenbaum, Talli; Abdo, Carmita; Byers, E Sandra; Graham, Cynthia; Nobre, Pedro; Wylie, Kevan; Brotto, Lori

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to highlight the salient sociocultural factors contributing to sexual health and dysfunction and to offer recommendations for culturally sensitive clinical management and research as well for an ethically sound sexual health care, counseling and medical decision-making. There are limited data on the impact of sociocultural factors on male and female sexual function as well as on ethical principles to follow when clinical care falls outside of traditional realms of medically indicated interventions. This study reviewed the current literature on sociocultural and ethical considerations with regard to male and female sexual dysfunction as well as cultural and cosmetic female and male genital modification procedures. It is recommended that clinicians evaluate their patients and their partners in the context of culture and assess distressing sexual symptoms regardless of whether they are a recognized dysfunction. Both clinicians and researchers should develop culturally sensitive assessment skills and instruments. There are a number of practices with complex ethical issues (eg, female genital cutting, female and male cosmetic genital surgery). Future International Committee of Sexual Medicine meetings should seek to develop guidelines and associated recommendations for a separate, broader chapter on ethics. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The frequency of sexual dysfunctions in male partners of women with vaginismus in a Turkish sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, S; Dogan, M

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this investigation is to determine the sexual history traits, sexual satisfaction level and frequency of sexual dysfunctions in men whose partners have vaginismus. The study included 32 male partners of vaginismic patients, who presented at a psychiatry department. Subjects were evaluated by a semi-structured questionnaire. The questionnaire was developed by researchers for assessing sexually dysfunctional patients and included detailed questions with regard to socio-demographic variables, general medical and sexual history. All participants also received the Golombok Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction (GRISS). According to DSM-IV-TR criteria, 65.6% of the investigated males were diagnosed with one or more sexual dysfunctions. The most common problem was premature ejaculation (50%) and the second one was erectile dysfunction (28%). The transformed GRISS subscale scores provided similar data. It is concluded that the assessment of sexual functions of males who have vaginismic partners should be an integral part of the management procedure of vaginismus for optimal outcome.

  14. Post-finasteride syndrome and post-SSRI sexual dysfunction: two sides of the same coin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giatti, Silvia; Diviccaro, Silvia; Panzica, Giancarlo; Melcangi, Roberto Cosimo

    2018-04-19

    Sexual dysfunction is a clinical condition due to different causes including the iatrogenic origin. For instance, it is well known that sexual dysfunction may occur in patients treated with antidepressants like selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI). A similar side effect has been also reported during treatment with finasteride, an inhibitor of the enzyme 5alpha-reductase, for androgenetic alopecia. Interestingly, sexual dysfunction persists in both cases after drug discontinuation. These conditions have been named post-SSRI sexual dysfunction (PSSD) and post-finasteride syndrome (PFS). In particular, feeling of a lack of connection between the brain and penis, loss of libido and sex drive, difficulty in achieving an erection and genital paresthesia have been reported by patients of both conditions. It is interesting to note that the incidence of these diseases is probably so far underestimated and their etiopathogenesis is not sufficiently explored. To this aim, the present review will report the state of art of these two different pathologies and discuss, on the basis of the role exerted by three different neuromodulators such as dopamine, serotonin and neuroactive steroids, whether the persistent sexual dysfunction observed could be determined by common mechanisms.

  15. Sexual dysfunctions in alcohol-dependent men: A study from north India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreyas Pendharkar

    2016-01-01

    Results: Overall, 58.4 per cent of patients in the AD group had sexual dysfunction. Among the domains, the highest frequency was seen for dysfunction for arousal (57.4%, followed by problems in desire (54.4%, erection (36.6%, satisfaction with orgasm (34.6% and ability to reach orgasm was least affected (12.87%. The patient and control groups differed significantly in overall dyadic adjustment, in the domains of dyadic satisfaction and affective expression. Interpretation & conclusions: The finding of this study showed that a significant proportion of patients with AD has sexual dysfunction. Longitudinal studies using validated assessment tools should be done to confirm these findings.

  16. Psychosocial profile of male patients presenting with sexual dysfunction in a psychiatric outpatient department in Mumbai, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Gurvinder; Kamath, Ravindra; Subramanyam, Alka; Shah, Henal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Sexual dysfunction can occur due to biological problems, relationship problems, lack of proper sexual knowledge or a combination of these. India is often known as the land of Kamasutra. But as far as sexuality research is concerned, there is a paucity of relevant data from India. In view of this, we conducted a study to assess the psychosocial profile of males presenting with sexual dysfunction to psychiatry out-patient department of a tertiary medical hospital. Materials and Methods: Hundred consecutive male patients presenting with sexual dysfunction were screened using Arizona Sexual Experiences Scale for clinical sexual dysfunction and after obtaining their informed consent were included in this study. They were assessed using a semi-structured proforma, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition, Text Revision criteria, Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview, and Dyadic Adjustment Scale. Results: Majority of our respondents were in the 18–30 years age group and were married. The main source of sex knowledge for 69% of them was peer group. Age of onset of masturbation was 11–13 years for 43% of them. Premature ejaculation was the most common sexual dysfunction seen in the respondents. Marital discord was seen in significantly lesser number of respondents (32.35%) as also major depressive disorder that was seen in only 16%. Discussion: Premature ejaculation was the most common sexual dysfunction in our sample. Despite the sexual dysfunction, marital discord and depression were seen less commonly in our respondents. PMID:25657457

  17. Psychosocial profile of male patients presenting with sexual dysfunction in a psychiatric outpatient department in Mumbai, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Gurvinder; Kamath, Ravindra; Subramanyam, Alka; Shah, Henal

    2015-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction can occur due to biological problems, relationship problems, lack of proper sexual knowledge or a combination of these. India is often known as the land of Kamasutra. But as far as sexuality research is concerned, there is a paucity of relevant data from India. In view of this, we conducted a study to assess the psychosocial profile of males presenting with sexual dysfunction to psychiatry out-patient department of a tertiary medical hospital. Hundred consecutive male patients presenting with sexual dysfunction were screened using Arizona Sexual Experiences Scale for clinical sexual dysfunction and after obtaining their informed consent were included in this study. They were assessed using a semi-structured proforma, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4(th) Edition, Text Revision criteria, Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview, and Dyadic Adjustment Scale. Majority of our respondents were in the 18-30 years age group and were married. The main source of sex knowledge for 69% of them was peer group. Age of onset of masturbation was 11-13 years for 43% of them. Premature ejaculation was the most common sexual dysfunction seen in the respondents. Marital discord was seen in significantly lesser number of respondents (32.35%) as also major depressive disorder that was seen in only 16%. Premature ejaculation was the most common sexual dysfunction in our sample. Despite the sexual dysfunction, marital discord and depression were seen less commonly in our respondents.

  18. Sexual and urinary dysfunction following laparoscopic total mesorectal excision in male patients: A prospective study

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    Deepak George

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Even with the use of nerve-sparing techniques, there is a risk of bladder and sexual dysfunction after total mesorectal excision (TME. Laparoscopic TME is believed to improve this autonomic nerve dysfunction, but this is not demonstrated conclusively in the literature. In Indian patients generally, the stage at which the patients present is late and presumably the risk of autonomic nerve injury is more; however, there is no published data in this respect. Materials and Methods: This prospective study in male patients who underwent laparoscopic TME evaluated the bladder and sexual dysfunction using objective standardised scores, measuring residual urine and post-voided volume. The International Prostatic Symptom Score (IPSS and International Index of Erectile Function score were used respectively to assess the bladder and sexual dysfunction preoperatively at 1, 3, 6 months and at 1 year. Results: Mean age of the study group was 58 years. After laparoscopic TME in male patients, the moderate to severe bladder dysfunction (IPSS <8 is observed in 20.4% of patients at 3 months, and at mean follow-up of 9.2 months, it was seen only in 2.9%. There is more bladder and sexual dysfunction in low rectal tumours compared to mid-rectal tumours. At 3 months, 75% had sexual dysfunction, 55% at median follow-up of the group at 9.2 months. Conclusion: After laparoscopic TME, bladder dysfunction is seen in one-fifth of the patients, which recovers in the next 6 months to 1 year. Sexual dysfunction is observed in 75% of patients immediately after TME which improves to 55% over 9.2 months.

  19. The Facts About Sexual (Dys)function in Schizophrenia: An Overview of Clinically Relevant Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Marrit K.; Castelein, Stynke; Wiersma, Durk; Schoevers, Robert A.; Knegtering, Henderikus

    2015-01-01

    A limited number of studies have evaluated sexual functioning in patients with schizophrenia. Most patients show an interest in sex that differs little from the general population. By contrast, psychiatric symptoms, institutionalization, and psychotropic medication contribute to frequently occurring impairments in sexual functioning. Women with schizophrenia have a better social outcome, longer lasting (sexual) relationships, and more offspring than men with schizophrenia. Still, in both sexes social and interpersonal impairments limit the development of stable sexual relationships. Although patients consider sexual problems to be highly relevant, patients and clinicians not easily discuss these spontaneously, leading to an underestimation of their prevalence and contributing to decreased adherence to treatment. Studies using structured interviews or questionnaires result in many more patients reporting sexual dysfunctions. Although sexual functioning can be impaired by different factors, the use of antipsychotic medication seems to be an important factor. A comparison of different antipsychotics showed high frequencies of sexual dysfunction for risperidone and classical antipsychotics, and lower frequencies for clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, and aripiprazole. Postsynaptic dopamine antagonism, prolactin elevation, and α1-receptor blockade may be the most relevant factors in the pathogenesis of antipsychotic-induced sexual dysfunction. Psychosocial strategies to treat antipsychotic-induced sexual dysfunction include psychoeducation and relationship counseling. Pharmacological strategies include lowering the dose or switching to a prolactin sparing antipsychotic. Also, the addition of a dopamine agonist, aripiprazole, or a phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor has shown some promising results, but evidence is currently scarce. PMID:25721311

  20. Male partners of women with provoked vestibulodynia: attributions for pain and their implications for dyadic adjustment, sexual satisfaction, and psychological distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jodoin, Mélanie; Bergeron, Sophie; Khalifé, Samir; Dupuis, Marie-José; Desrochers, Geneviève; Leclerc, Bianca

    2008-12-01

    Provoked vestibulodynia is a female genital pain condition that results in sexual dysfunction and impacts negatively on the couple. Although patients' causal attributions have been linked to worse psychosexual outcomes, no study has documented the male partners' perspective of this distressing problem and its potential influence on their psychosexual adaptation. To identify whether male partners' attributions for vestibulodynia are possible predictors of their dyadic adjustment, sexual functioning, sexual satisfaction, and psychological distress, as well as of women's pain and sexual functioning. Thirty-eight women with vestibulodynia first completed measures of pain intensity and sexual functioning. Male partners responded to mailed questionnaires assessing their own attributions for genital pain as well as their psychological distress, relationship adjustment, sexual functioning, and sexual satisfaction. Women completed the McGill-Melzack Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) and the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI). Attributions of male partners were measured using an adapted version of the Attributional Style Questionnaire (ASQ)-Partner Version. Men also filled out the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI), the Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS), the Sexual History Form (SHF), and the Global Measure of Sexual Satisfaction (GMSEX). All four negative attribution dimensions and higher levels of women's pain intensity successfully predicted increased psychological distress in male partners. Higher levels of both internal and global attributions were associated with men's poorer dyadic adjustment, whereas global and stable attributions were related to their lower sexual satisfaction. Attributions failed to significantly predict sexual functioning in male partners and women's pain and sexual functioning. Evaluation and treatment of sexual pain problems should involve both partners and should explore the role of negative attributions.

  1. Parental Psychological Control and Dysfunctional Separation--Individuation: A Tale of Two Different Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kins, Evie; Soenens, Bart; Beyers, Wim

    2012-01-01

    This study examined associations between psychologically controlling parenting and two possible manifestations of problematic separation--individuation (i.e., dysfunctional dependence and dysfunctional independence). To explain these associations, it has been argued that psychological control is an inherently independence-stifling parenting…

  2. Psychological Violence and Sexual Risk Behavior Among Predominantly African American Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Bina; Mittal, Mona; Schroder, Allison; Ishman, Najah; Quinton, Sylvia; Boekeloo, Bradley

    2017-07-01

    Physical and sexual violence are commonly researched as risk factors for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). However, psychological violence and its relationship with HIV risk behaviors have received limited attention among African American/Black (Black) women. This study examined (a) the frequency of recent (past 3 months) psychological violence, physical violence, and sexual violence and (b) the association of HIV risk behaviors, including unprotected sex, sex under the influence of alcohol/drugs, and sex exchange for money/drugs/shelter, with psychological violence. Participants included 191 women (89.2% Black), who were recruited through information sessions held at community centers, Parent Teacher Association meetings, substance use and HIV counseling centers, radio public service announcements, and word of mouth. Interested women participated in a multisession HIV and substance use prevention program and completed a self-reported assessment at program baseline. The current study utilized baseline data collected for a longitudinal study. Results from descriptive analysis indicated that the rate of psychological violence was higher than physical violence or sexual violence, and it was strongly associated with physical and sexual violence. Furthermore, hierarchical logistic regression analysis showed that unprotected sex was significantly associated with recent psychological violence after controlling for covariates. Findings suggest that recent psychological violence is more common than physical or sexual violence and it relates to sexual risk behaviors among Black women. Recent psychological violence may indicate psychosocial and sexual vulnerability for HIV and warrants particular attention among Black women.

  3. Obesity and sexual dysfunction in younger Danish men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ingelise; Heitman, B. L.; Wagner, Gorm

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Proportion of populations that are overweight and obese are on the rise and generally affecting more than 50% of the adult Western male population. It is, therefore, of interest to look at possible associations between obesity and sexual function in a homogeneous population. AIM......: To examine a possible association between sexual disorders (erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory disorders, and sexual desire disorders) and obesity among younger men born and living in Denmark. METHODS: A community-based cross-sectional study of sexual health among Danish younger men. Questionnaires were...... the younger obese nonsmokers than obese smokers. Premature ejaculation, retarded ejaculation, and sexual desire disorders were all unrelated to overweight or obesity. CONCLUSION: Obesity (BMI > or = 30 kg/m(2)) seems associated with ED among younger men aged 20-45 years. Health programs directed toward...

  4. The relationship between hydration status, male sexual dysfunction and depression in hemodialysis patients

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    Hassan K

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Kamal Hassan,1,2 Yotam Elimeleh,1 Mona Shehadeh,3 Hassan Fadi,4 Irina Rubinchik2 1Faculty of Medicine in the Galilee, Bar-Ilan University, Safed, Israel; 2Department of Nephrology and Hypertension, Galilee Medical Center, Nahariya, Israel; 3Biochemistry Laboratory, Galilee Medical Center, Nahariya, Israel; 4Internal Medicine Department E, Galilee Medical Center, Nahariya, Israel Background: Disturbances in sexual function are common among dialysis patients. Normal erections require a complex balance of physiological, psychological, emotional, hormonal, neurological and vascular factors. This study examined a possible association of overhydration (OH with male sexual dysfunction and depression in hemodialysis (HD patients. Patients and methods: This cross-sectional study assessed hydration status by whole-body bioimpedance spectroscopy in patients on maintenance HD for more than 12 months. Patients were categorized according to OH to extracellular water (ECW ratio: OH/ECW ratio >0.15 and OH/ECW ratio ≤0.15. Sexual function was assessed using the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF score. Psychological status was evaluated using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI score. Serum sex hormones were determined. Results: Of 39 stable participants on HD, 53.8% were overhydrated (OH/ECW ratio >0.15 and 46.2% not overhydrated (OH/ECW ratio ≤0.15. Of participants with OH/ECW ratio >0.15, 85.7% had mild to severe ED, and 71.4% had abnormal BDI scores, ranging from mild mood disturbance to severe depression. Compared to patients with OH/ECW ratio ≤0.15, BDI scores, serum estradiol and plasma hsCRP were higher (18.48±8.34 vs 10.61±5.46, p<0.001; 140.10±44.51 vs 126.10±32.26, p=0.034; and, 17.70±12.14 vs 9.76±8.79, p=0.013; respectively in those with OH/ECW ratio >0.15, while their IIEF score, serum total testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA were lower (12.81±7.31 vs 41.44±23.79, p<0.001; 8.97±5.43 vs 14.10±8.30, p=0.013; and

  5. Sexual dysfunction among married couples living in Kumasi metropolis, Ghana

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    Woode Eric

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sexuality and its manifestation constitute some of the most complex of human behaviour and its disorders are encountered in community. Sexual dysfunction is more prevalent in women than in men. While studies examining sexual dysfunction among males and females in Ghana exist, there are no studies relating sexual problems in males and females as dyadic units. This study therefore investigated the prevalence and type of sexual disorders among married couples. Method The study participants consisted of married couples between the ages of 19 and 66 living in the province of Kumasi, Ghana. Socio-demographic information and Golombok-Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction (GRISS questionnaires were administered to 200 couples who consented to take part in the study. All 28 questions of the GRISS are answered on a five-point (Likert type scale from "always", through "usually', "sometimes", and "hardly ever", to "never". Responses are summed up to give a total raw score ranging from 28-140. The total score and subscale scores are transformed using a standard nine point scale, with high scores indicating greater problems. Scores of five or more are considered to indicate SD. The study was conducted between July and September 2010. Results Out of a total of 200 married couples, 179 completed their questionnaires resulting in a response rate of 89.5%. The mean age of the participating couples as well as the mean duration of marriage was 34.8 ± 8.6 years and 7.8 ± 7.6 years respectively. The husbands (37.1 ± 8.6 were significantly older (p Conclusion The prevalence of sexual dysfunction in married couples is comparable to prevalence rates in the general male and female population and is further worsened by duration of marriage. This could impact significantly on a couple's self-esteem and overall quality of life.

  6. Social phobia and sexual problems: A comparison of social phobic, sexually dysfunctional and normal individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Valentina; Stravynski, Ariel

    2010-03-01

    This study sought to test the putative link between social phobia and sexual functioning. Three groups consisting of 106 social phobic, 164 sexually dysfunctional and 111 normal participants were assessed in terms of sexual functioning, social anxiety, social functioning and general psychopathology. Although social phobic men were less sexually active than normal men, they were as sexually satisfied. Social phobic women were alike their normal counterparts in all respects. Overall, social phobic individuals were not more prone to report sexual problems than normal individuals despite reporting the severest levels of social anxiety. Theoretically, our results are best understood as supporting an interpersonal conception of social phobia and a related socio-cultural perspective regarding sexual roles.

  7. What kind of sexual dysfunction is most common among overweight and obese women in reproductive age?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabiepoor, S; Khalkhali, H R; Sadeghi, E

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between body mass index (BMI) and sexual health and determine what kind of sexual dysfunction is most common among overweight and obese women in reproductive age from Iran. A cross-sectional descriptive design was adopted. The data of 198 women who referred to health centers during 2014-2015 in Iran were collected through convenient sampling. Data were collected using a demographic questionnaire, female sexual function and sexual satisfaction indexes. Participants' heights and weights were recorded in centimeters and kilogram. Data were analyzed applying descriptive statistics, one-way analysis of variance, regression logistic analysis and χ 2 . P-valuessexual dysfunction, and 69.7% had dissatisfaction and low satisfaction. According to our evaluations, orgasm dysfunction had the most frequency; on the other hand, desire dysfunction and pain dysfunction had the lowest frequency among overweight and obese women, respectively. Using logistic regression analysis, we have shown that BMI affected on sexual satisfaction, but there was not significant differences between BMI and sexual function. This article concludes that all women especially women with overweight and obesity should be counseled about health outcomes related to sexual activity. This article concludes that all women especially women with overweight and obesity should be counseled about health outcomes related to sexual activity.

  8. Stressful life events and psychological dysfunction in complex regional pain syndrome type I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertzen, JHB; de Bruijn-Kofman, AT; de Bruijn, HP; van de Wiel, HBM; Dijkstra, PU

    Objective: To determine to what extent stressful life events and psychological dysfunction play a role in the pathogenesis of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type I (CRPS). Design: A comparative study between a CRPS group and a control group. Stressful life events and psychological dysfunction

  9. Sildenafil in the Treatment of SSRI-Induced Sexual Dysfunction: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Damis, Marina; Patel, Yatin; Simpson, George M.

    1999-01-01

    Background: Sexual dysfunction is a well-documented side effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Commonly reported side effects include erectile impotence, anorgasmia, ejaculatory delay, pain, loss of sensation, and decreased pleasure. Early reports of the reversal of sexual dysfunction after using sildenafil in male and female patients receiving various types and dosages of SSRIs are promising and prompted this study. Our aim was to evaluate the effects of oral sildenafil ...

  10. [Physiology and physiopathology of sexuality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuzin, Béatrice

    2016-01-01

    From desire to orgasm, sexuality, in women and men, is underpinned by a complex organic, psychological and emotional function. Sexual dysfunction encompasses diverse aetiologies, including chronic diseases and iatrogenesis resulting from medication or surgery. The effects of a chronic disease can have an impact on all phases of the sexual response. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Sexual Contact in Childhood, Revictimization, and Lifetime Sexual and Psychological Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Aniruddha; Otis, Nicholas

    2016-07-01

    Using data from the 2010 to 2011 wave of the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project-a nationally representative probability sample of older U.S. adults-this study queried distinctive linkages of mild and of severe childhood sexual contact with lifetime sexual and psychological outcomes among women and men aged 60-99 years (N = 3283). In addition, we examined stratification of these associations by sexual revictimization (forced sex and/or harassment). Among women, sequelae of childhood contact seemed consistently negative for the mild rather than severe variant-but only in the co-presence of revictimization-a pattern that may have remained obscured in previous analysis of event effects. Men's results suggested lifelong eroticizing but not psychological effects of this early experience-with the co-presence of revictimization potentially enhancing rather than lowering their mental health. Overall, findings appeared to reflect gendered patterns of risk-with mild childhood contact potentially channeling women but not men into revictimization and finally to elevated sexuality and poor mental health in late life. Early sexual experiences should thus be conceptualized not as singular events, but as part of a lifelong career with regularities and rhythms that may influence their pathogenic potential.

  12. A multivariate twin study of female sexual dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burri, A.; Greven, C.U.; Leupin, M.; Spector, T.; Rahman, Q.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There is little work on the etiology of female sexual dysfunction (FSD), a highly contentious and heterogeneous disorder from classification and clinical perspectives. Clarifying causative mechanisms may enhance current psychiatric nosology. AIM: To elucidate the structure of genetic

  13. Tadalafil reversal of sexual dysfunction caused by serotonin enhancing medications in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Adam Keller; Weinstein, Wendy

    2006-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common side effect of many antidepressants, especially those that increase serotonin. Many strategies have been reported to assist patients in minimizing impairment, with variable degrees of success. One of the newer approaches is to augment with phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitors. Our report using the most recently released agent in this class, tadalafil is the first demonstrating potential benefit in women. We report here of three women who derived benefit from using 20 mg of tadalafil before anticipated sexual activity to reverse medication-induced sexual dysfunction. Tadalafil utility was maintained over time and was well tolerated.

  14. Which are the male factors associated with female sexual dysfunction (FSD)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maseroli, E; Fanni, E; Mannucci, E; Fambrini, M; Jannini, E A; Maggi, M; Vignozzi, L

    2016-09-01

    It has been generally assumed that partner's erectile dysfunction, premature, and delayed ejaculation play a significant role in determining female sexual dysfunction (FSD). This study aimed to evaluate the role of the male partner's sexual function, as perceived by women, in determining FSD. A consecutive series of 156 heterosexual women consulting our clinic for FSD was retrospectively studied. All patients underwent a structured interview and completed the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI). FSFI total score decreased as a function of partner's age, conflicts within the couple, relationship without cohabitation and the habit of engaging in intercourse to please the partner; FSFI total score increased as a function of frequency of intercourse, attempts to conceive and fertility-focused intercourse. FSFI total score showed a negative, stepwise correlation with partner's perceived hypoactive sexual desire (HSD) (r = -0.327; p dysfunction, premature and delayed ejaculation. In an age-adjusted model, partner's HSD was negatively related to FSFI total score (Wald = 9.196, p = 0.002), arousal (Wald = 7.893, p = 0.005), lubrication (Wald = 5.042, p = 0.025), orgasm (Wald = 9.293, p = 0.002), satisfaction (Wald = 12.764, p sexual pleasure, and with a higher frequency of masturbation, even after adjusting for age. In patients not reporting any reduction in libido, FSFI total score was significantly lower when their partner's libido was low (p = 0.041); the correlation disappeared if the patient also experienced HSD. In conclusion, the presence of erectile dysfunction, premature, and delayed ejaculation of the partner may not act as a primary contributing factor to FSD, as determined by FSFI scores; conversely, women's sexuality seems to be mostly impaired by the perceived reduction in their partner's sexual interest. © 2016 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  15. Childhood sexual abuse, selective attention for sexual cues and the effects of testosterone with or without Vardenafil on physiological sexual arousal in women with sexual dysfunction: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Made, F.; Bloemers, J.; van Ham, D.; El Yassem, W.; Kleiverda, G.; Everaerd, W.; Olivier, B.; Tuiten, A.

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Female sexual dysfunction (FSD) may be associated with reduced central sensitivity for sexual cues. A single dose of testosterone might induce an increase in sensitivity for sexual stimuli, which in turn allows a PDE5 inhibitor to be effective in boosting the physiological sexual

  16. Prevalence of sexual dysfunction during pregnancy Prevalência da disfunção sexual na gravidez

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Plácido Lima Leite

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aims to evaluate the sexual function and to determine the prevalence of sexual dysfunction among teenagers and adult women during pregnancy using the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI. METHODS: A cohort study was conducted with 271 healthy pregnant women presenting a stable relationship with their partners. These women contributed to the survey since the laboratory diagnosis of their present pregnancy. Anonymous questionnaires evaluated aspects of sexual activity and female sexual function. This last item was assessed through the FSFI questionnaire. RESULTS: The women sexual function showed a similar pattern during the first and second trimesters; however, it presented a significantly clear decrease in the third trimester. There was a significant difference in the scores of all FSFI domains when comparing the second and third trimesters. The sexual dysfunction among pregnant teenagers was rated 40.8% in the first trimester, 31.2% in the second and 63.2% in the third. For pregnant adults, the dysfunction was rated, respectively, 46.6%, 34.2% and 73.3%. CONCLUSION: The sexual function is affected during pregnancy with a significant decrease in all FSFI domains in the third trimester considering both pregnant teenagers and adults. Prevalence of sexual dysfunction is high during pregnancy and reaches higher levels in the third trimester in both age groups; however, teenagers presented better sexual function ratings.OBJETIVO: Avaliar a função sexual e determinar a prevalência da disfunção sexual em mulheres adolescentes e adultas durante a gravidez, usando o Índice da Função Sexual Feminina (FSFI. MÉTODOS: Realizou-se estudo de corte prospectivo com 271 gestantes saudáveis, envolvidas na pesquisa desde o primeiro diagnóstico da atual gravidez, que mantinham relacionamento estável com parceiro. Foram utilizados questionários anônimos e a função sexual das gestantes foi avaliada pelo índice da função sexual

  17. A new therapeutic approach for erectile dysfunction: Low intensity shockwaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Perdomo, Herney Andrés

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Erectile dysfunction is the inability to achieve or sustain a penile erection for vaginal penetration and satisfactory sexual performance. It is the second most frequent problem of sexual dysfunction in men, after premature ejaculation, with an approximate prevalence rate of 30%. Most cases of erectile dysfunction have an organic origin, mostly vascular diseases, but it is also associated with psychological, neurological, and hormonal factors, or with structural alterations of the penis. Therapy with 5-phosphodiesterase inhibitors has been clinically effective, but some patients do not respond to it. Lowintensity shock waves may improve penile vascularity and blood flow, leading to better erections, and improvement of the quality of sexual performance. In this review several studies are included that show the effectiveness of this treatment for erectile dysfunction.

  18. Factors Associated With Specific Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition Sexual Dysfunctions in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Study of Patients and Their Partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Susanna B; Hahn, Daniela E E; van Lankveld, Jacques J D M; Oldenburg, Hester S A; Broomans, Eva; Aaronson, Neil K

    2017-10-01

    Many women develop sexual problems after breast cancer (BC) treatment. Little is known about BC survivors with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) sexual dysfunction and their partners, and the factors associated with their sexual functioning. To evaluate (i) patient-related and clinical factors associated with (a) specific DSM-IV sexual dysfunctions and (b) level of sexual functioning and sexual distress as reported by BC survivors and (ii) the association between the sexual functioning of BC survivors and that of their partners. We analyzed baseline data from a study of the efficacy of online cognitive-behavioral therapy for sexual dysfunction in BC survivors. Women completed self-report questionnaires assessing sexual functioning, sexual distress, relationship intimacy, marital functioning, menopausal symptoms, body image, and psychological distress. Their partners completed questionnaires assessing sexual functioning. The study included 169 BC survivors and 67 partners. The most prevalent female sexual dysfunctions were hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD; 83%), sexual arousal disorder (40%), and dyspareunia (33%). Endocrine therapy was associated with HSDD (P = .003), and immunotherapy was associated with dyspareunia (P = .009). Older age was associated with lower sexual distress (P disorder (P = .004). An indication for erectile disorder was present in two thirds of partners. Lower overall partner sexual satisfaction was associated with lower overall BC survivor sexual functioning (P = .001), lower female arousal (P = .002), and lower female sexual satisfaction (P = .001). Poorer male erectile function was related to higher female sexual pain (P = .006). Partners of women who underwent breast reconstruction reported marginally significantly better orgasmic functioning (P = .012) and overall sexual functioning (P = .015) than partners of women who had undergone breast-conserving treatment. BC survivors

  19. Differences in Psychological Distress and Esteem Based on Sexual Identity Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepler, Dustin; Perrone-McGovern, Kristin

    2016-01-01

    A sample of 791 college students between the ages of 18 and 25 years were administered a series of measures to determine their sexual identity development status, global self-esteem, global psychological distress, sexual-esteem and sexual distress. As hypothesized, results indicated no significant difference in terms of psychological distress,…

  20. Characteristics of female patients with sexual dysfunction who also had a history of blunt perineal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munarriz, Ricardo; Talakoub, Lily; Somekh, Nir N; Lehrfeld, Todd; Chudnovsky, Aleksander; Flaherty, Elizabeth; Goldstein, Irwin

    2002-01-01

    Perineal trauma can occur in both genders, however, data supporting the relationship between sexual dysfunction and blunt perineal trauma in women is lacking. This study reviewed the patient characteristics of women with sexual dysfunction who also had a history of blunt perineal trauma. A neurogenic form of sexual dysfunction has been implicated, with primary complaints of orgasm disorder and abnormalities noted on genital sensory testing. Further research in this area is needed.

  1. Sexual dysfunctions in people with first-episode psychosis assessed according to a gender perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciocca, Giacomo; Usall, Judith; Dolz, Montse; Limoncin, Erika; Gravina, Giovanni L; Carosa, Eleonora; Sánchez, Bernardo; Barajas, Ana; Baños, Iris; Huerta, Elena; Farreny, Aida; Franchi, Camilla; Group, Genipe; Ochoa, Susana

    2015-01-01

    Patients with chronic mental disorders often can suffer from sexual dysfunction. Nevertheless, the sexual functioning of new patients with first-episode psychosis has been little explored. The aim of this study was to investigate gender differences in sexual functioning in people with first-episode psychosis. A group of 40 males and 37 females with first-episode psychosis took part in the research. We administered a psychiatric protocol composed of the PANSS, UKU and SCID-DSM-IV diagnosis. We found that the 42.5% of the male group had sexual dysfunctions while the percentage of the female group was 37.8%. The correlation between sexual dysfunctions and psychopathology did not reveal any association in males. However, in females, general psychopathology and positive symptoms are linked to the alteration of vaginal lubrication: (r=0.547; p=0.003) and (r=0.485; p=0.011), although orgasm alteration was also associated with general psychopathology (r=0.500; p=0.013). Moreover, we found a relation between the alteration of vaginal lubrication with depression(r=0.627; p<0.0001) and disorder of volition (r=0.600; p<0.001). These data suggest that the association between sexual dysfunctions and psychopathology regarded only women. Therefore, during the taking charge of patients it is fundamental to consider the gender-specific relationship between psychopathology and sexual problems.

  2. Sexual Dysfunction in Heroin Dependents: A Comparison between Methadone and Buprenorphine Maintenance Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Yee

    Full Text Available Methadone has long been regarded as an effective treatment for opioid dependence. However, many patients discontinue maintenance therapy because of its side effects, with one of the most common being sexual dysfunction. Buprenorphine is a proven alternative to methadone. This study aimed to investigate sexual dysfunction in opioid-dependent men on buprenorphine maintenance treatment (BMT and methadone maintenance treatment (MMT. The secondary aim was to investigate the correlation between sexual dysfunction and the quality of life in these patients.Two hundred thirty-eight men participated in this cross-sectional study. Four questionnaires were used, the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview, Opiate Treatment Index, Malay version of the International Index of Erectile Function 15 (Mal-IIEF-15, and World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF Scale. Multivariate analysis of covariance was used to examine the relationship between MMT and BMT and the Mal-IIEF 15 scores while controlling for all the possible confounders.The study population consisted of 171 patients (71.8% on MMT and 67 (28.2% on BMT. Patients in the MMT group who had a sexual partner scored significantly lower in the sexual desire domain (p < 0.012 and overall satisfaction (p = 0.043 domain compared with their counterparts in the BMT group. Similarly, patients in the MMT group without a sexual partner scored significantly lower in the orgasmic function domain (p = 0.008 compared with those in the BMT group without a partner. Intercourse satisfaction (p = 0.026 and overall satisfaction (p = 0.039 were significantly associated with the social relationships domain after adjusting for significantly correlated sociodemographic variables.Sexual functioning is critical for improving the quality of life in patients in an opioid rehabilitation program. Our study showed that buprenorphine causes less sexual dysfunction than methadone. Thus, clinicians may consider the former when

  3. Gynecomastia in subjects with sexual dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maseroli, E; Rastrelli, G; Corona, G; Boddi, V; Amato, A M L; Mannucci, E; Forti, G; Maggi, M

    2014-06-01

    To analyze possible relationships between gynecomastia and clinical and biochemical parameters in a large cohort of subjects with sexual dysfunction (SD). A consecutive series of 4,023 men attending our Outpatient Clinic for SD was retrospectively studied. After excluding Klinefelter's syndrome patients, the prevalence of gynecomastia was 3.1 %. Subjects with gynecomastia had significantly lower testosterone (T) levels; the association retained statistical significance after adjusting for age and life-style. However, only 33.3 % of subjects with gynecomastia were hypogonadal. Gynecomastia was associated with delayed puberty, history of testicular or hepatic diseases, as well as cannabis abuse. Patients with gynecomastia more frequently reported sexual complaints, such as severe erectile dysfunction [odds ratio (OR) = 2.19 (1.26-3.86), p = 0.006], lower sexual desire and intercourse frequency [OR = 1.23 (1.06-1.58) and OR = 1.84 (1.22-2.78), respectively; both p Gynecomastia was also positively associated with severe obesity, lower testis volume and LH, and negatively with prostate-specific antigen levels. The further adjustment for T did not affect these results, except for obesity. After introducing body mass index as a further covariate, all the associations retained statistical significance, except for delayed ejaculation and ANDROTEST score. When considering gynecomastia severity, we found a step-wise, T-independent, decrease and increase of testis volume and LH, respectively. Gynecomastia was also associated with the use of several drugs in almost 40 % of our patients. Gynecomastia is a rare condition in subjects with SD, and could indicate a testosterone deficiency that deserves further investigation.

  4. Future Targets for Female Sexual Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Melissa; Yoon, Hana; Goldstein, Irwin

    2016-08-01

    Female sexual function reflects a dynamic interplay of central and peripheral nervous, vascular, and endocrine systems. The primary challenge in the development of novel treatments for female sexual dysfunction is the identification and targeted modulation of excitatory sexual circuits using pharmacologic treatments that facilitate the synthesis, release, and/or receptor binding of neurochemicals, peptides, and hormones that promote female sexual function. To develop an evidence-based state-of-the-art consensus report that critically integrates current knowledge of the therapeutic potential for known molecular and cellular targets to facilitate the physiologic processes underlying female sexual function. State-of-the-art review representing the opinions of international experts developed in a consensus process during a 1-year period. Expert opinion was established by grading the evidence-based medical literature, intensive internal committee discussion, public presentation, and debate. Scientific investigation is urgently needed to expand knowledge and foster development of future treatments that maintain genital tissue integrity, enhance genital physiologic responsiveness, and optimize positive subjective appraisal of internal and external sexual cues. This article critically condenses the current knowledge of therapeutic manipulation of molecular and cellular targets within biological systems responsible for female sexual physiologic function. Future treatment targets include pharmacologic modulation of emotional learning circuits, restoration of normal tactile sensation, growth factor therapy, gene therapy, stem cell-based therapies, and regenerative medicine. Concurrent use of centrally and peripherally acting therapies could optimize treatment response. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A Preliminary Study of Sexual Dysfunction in Male Opioid-Dependants under Methadone Maintenance Treatment

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    Masoudeh Babakhanian

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sexual dysfunction is one of the prevalent problems of opiate-dependent patients. The current preliminarily study examines sexual dysfunction in a group of opiate-dependent patients before and after 6 months of MMT. Methods: The current study is a cross-sectional study. The numbers of 30 opiate-dependent patients were selected of Cheraghiyan clinic in Damghan, Iran. Demographics questionnaire and the International Index of Erectile Function were administered before and after treatment. Results: Erectile function showed an increase and intercourse satisfactions completely improved. Sexual desire and overall satisfaction increased, showing slight improvement while orgasmic function increased showing no improvement. Discussion: The findings revealed the prevalence of sexual dysfunction and improvement of some component in patients after treatment. Future studies are needed to explore the roles of other factors.

  6. Sexual Excitability and Dysfunctional Coping Determine Cybersex Addiction in Homosexual Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laier, Christian; Pekal, Jaro; Brand, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    Cybersex addiction (CA) has been mostly investigated in heterosexual males. Recent findings have demonstrated an association between CA severity and indicators of sexual excitability, and that coping by sexual behaviors mediated the relationship between sexual excitability and CA symptoms. The aim of this study was to test this mediation in a sample of homosexual males. Seventy-one homosexual males were surveyed online. Questionnaires assessed symptoms of CA, sensitivity to sexual excitation, pornography use motivation, problematic sexual behavior, psychological symptoms, and sexual behaviors in real life and online. Moreover, participants viewed pornographic videos and indicated their sexual arousal before and after the video presentation. Results showed strong correlations between CA symptoms and indicators of sexual arousal and sexual excitability, coping by sexual behaviors, and psychological symptoms. CA was not associated with offline sexual behaviors and weekly cybersex use time. Coping by sexual behaviors partially mediated the relationship between sexual excitability and CA. The results are comparable with those reported for heterosexual males and females in previous studies and are discussed against the background of theoretical assumptions of CA, which highlight the role of positive and negative reinforcement due to cybersex use.

  7. Sexual dysfunctions in men affected by autoimmune Addison's disease before and after short-term gluco- and mineralocorticoid replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granata, Antonio; Tirabassi, Giacomo; Pugni, Valeria; Arnaldi, Giorgio; Boscaro, Marco; Carani, Cesare; Balercia, Giancarlo

    2013-08-01

    There is evidence suggesting that autoimmune Addison's disease (AD) could be associated with sexual dysfunctions probably caused by gluco- and mineralocorticoid deficiency; however, no study has yet treated this subject in males. To evaluate male sexuality and psychological correlates in autoimmune AD before and after gluco- and mineralocorticoid replacement therapy. Twelve subjects with a first diagnosis of autoimmune AD were studied before (baseline) and 2 months after (recovery phase) initiating hormone replacement therapy. Erectile function (EF), orgasmic function (OF), sexual desire (SD), intercourse satisfaction (IS), overall satisfaction (OS), depression, and anxiety were studied using a number of questionnaires (International Index of Erectile Function, Beck Depression Inventory, and Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory); clinical, biochemical, and hormone data were included in the analysis. At baseline, low values were found for EF, OF, SD, IS, and OS and high values for depression and anxiety; all of these parameters improved significantly in the recovery phase compared with baseline. EF variation between the two phases correlated significantly and positively with the variation of serum cortisol, urinary free cortisol, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure and inversely with that of upright plasma renin activity. Multiple linear regression analysis using EF variation as dependent variable confirmed the relationship of the latter with variation of serum cortisol, urinary free cortisol, and upright plasma renin activity but not with variation of systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Our study showed that onset of autoimmune AD in males is associated with a number of sexual dysfunctions, all reversible after initiating replacement hormone therapy; cortisol and aldosterone deficiency seems to play an important role in the genesis of erectile dysfunction although the mechanism of their activity is not clear. © 2012 International Society

  8. Is love blind? Sexual behavior and psychological adjustment of adolescents with blindness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kef, S.; Bos, H.

    2006-01-01

    In the present study, we examined sexual knowledge, sexual behavior, and psychological adjustment of adolescents with blindness. The sample included 36 Dutch adolescents who are blind, 16 males and 20 females. Results of the interviews revealed no problems regarding sexual knowledge or psychological

  9. Sexual Self Schema as a Moderator of Sexual and Psychological Outcomes for Gynecologic Cancer Survivors

    OpenAIRE

    Carpenter, Kristen M.; Andersen, Barbara L.; Fowler, Jeffrey M.; Maxwell, G. Larry

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Gynecologic cancer patients are at high risk for emotional distress and sexual dysfunction. The present study tested sexual self schema as an individual difference variable that might be useful in identifying those at risk for unfavorable outcomes. First, we tested schema as a predictor of sexual outcomes,including bodychangestress. Second,we examined schema as a contributor to broader quality of life outcomes, specifically as a moderator of the relationship between sexual satisfacti...

  10. Sexual dysfunction among married couples living in Kumasi metropolis, Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Sexuality and its manifestation constitute some of the most complex of human behaviour and its disorders are encountered in community. Sexual dysfunction is more prevalent in women than in men. While studies examining sexual dysfunction among males and females in Ghana exist, there are no studies relating sexual problems in males and females as dyadic units. This study therefore investigated the prevalence and type of sexual disorders among married couples. Method The study participants consisted of married couples between the ages of 19 and 66 living in the province of Kumasi, Ghana. Socio-demographic information and Golombok-Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction (GRISS) questionnaires were administered to 200 couples who consented to take part in the study. All 28 questions of the GRISS are answered on a five-point (Likert type) scale from "always", through "usually', "sometimes", and "hardly ever", to "never". Responses are summed up to give a total raw score ranging from 28-140. The total score and subscale scores are transformed using a standard nine point scale, with high scores indicating greater problems. Scores of five or more are considered to indicate SD. The study was conducted between July and September 2010. Results Out of a total of 200 married couples, 179 completed their questionnaires resulting in a response rate of 89.5%. The mean age of the participating couples as well as the mean duration of marriage was 34.8 ± 8.6 years and 7.8 ± 7.6 years respectively. The husbands (37.1 ± 8.6) were significantly older (p vaginismus and anorgasmia were 69.3% and 74.9% respectively. The highest prevalence of SD subscales among the men was dissatisfaction with sexual act followed by infrequency, whereas the highest among the women was infrequency followed by anorgasmia. Dissatisfaction with sexual intercourse among men correlated positively with anorgasmia and wife's non-sensuality and infrequency of sex. Conclusion The prevalence of sexual

  11. Essentialist beliefs, sexual identity uncertainty, internalized homonegativity and psychological wellbeing in gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandini, James S; Blaszczynski, Alexander; Ross, Michael W; Costa, Daniel S J; Dar-Nimrod, Ilan

    2015-07-01

    The present study examined essentialist beliefs about sexual orientation and their implications for sexual identity uncertainty, internalized homonegativity and psychological wellbeing in a sample of gay men. A combination of targeted sampling and snowball strategies were used to recruit 639 gay identifying men for a cross-sectional online survey. Participants completed a questionnaire assessing sexual orientation beliefs, sexual identity uncertainty, internalized homonegativity, and psychological wellbeing outcomes. Structural equation modeling was used to test whether essentialist beliefs were associated with psychological wellbeing indirectly via their effect on sexual identity uncertainty and internalized homonegativity. A unique pattern of direct and indirect effects was observed in which facets of essentialism predicted sexual identity uncertainty, internalized homonegativity and psychological wellbeing. Of note, viewing sexual orientation as immutable/biologically based and as existing in discrete categories, were associated with less sexual identity uncertainty. On the other hand, these beliefs had divergent relationships with internalized homonegativity, with immutability/biological beliefs associated with lower, and discreteness beliefs associated with greater internalized homonegativity. Of interest, although sexual identity uncertainty was associated with poorer psychological wellbeing via its contribution to internalized homophobia, there was no direct relationship between identity uncertainty and psychological wellbeing. Findings indicate that essentializing sexual orientation has mixed implications for sexual identity uncertainty and internalized homonegativity and wellbeing in gay men. Those undertaking educational and clinical interventions with gay men should be aware of the benefits and of caveats of essentialist theories of homosexuality for this population. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Psychological Intimate Partner Violence and Sexual Risk Behavior: Examining the Role of Distinct PTSD Symptoms in the Partner Violence-sexual Risk Link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overstreet, Nicole M.; Willie, Tiara C.; Hellmuth, Julianne C.; Sullivan, Tami P.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Research has examined how physical and sexual intimate partner violence (IPV) victimization increases sexual risk behavior, yet research is lacking on 1) the effect of psychological IPV on sexual risk behavior and 2) factors through which psychological IPV may be linked to sexual risk behavior. METHODS The current study examined the relationship between psychological IPV and sexual risk behavior controlling for other forms of IPV (i.e., physical and sexual) in a sample of 186 HIV-negative community women currently experiencing IPV. Further, this study examined the potential mediating effects of four posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity clusters (i.e., re-experiencing, avoidance, numbing, and hyperarousal) on this relationship. FINDINGS Results revealed that greater severity of psychological IPV was uniquely and directly related to greater sexual risk behavior. Additionally, of the four PTSD symptom severity clusters, only avoidance symptom severity mediated the relationship between psychological IPV and sexual risk behavior. CONCLUSION Implications for addressing psychological IPV and PTSD to improve women’s sexual health outcomes are discussed. PMID:25498762

  13. Sexual orientation and sexual behavior among Latino and Asian Americans: implications for unfair treatment and psychological distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, David H; Ayala, George

    2010-09-01

    Research on the sexuality of Asians and Latinos in the United States has been sparse, and the studies that have been done suffer from a number of limitations. Using data from the National Latino and Asian American Study (2002-2003), this study examined self-identified sexual orientation and self-reported sexual behavior among Latinos (n = 2,554; age: M = 38.1, SE = 0.5) and Asians (n = 2,095; age: M = 41.5, SE = 0.8). This study also investigated implications for unfair treatment and psychological distress among sexual minorities identified in the sample. Results indicated heterogeneity in responses to items assessing sexual orientation and sexual behavior including differences in the adoption of lesbian, gay, or bisexual (LGB) identity by gender, ethnicity, nativity, and socioeconomic status. LGB sexual minorities reported higher levels of unfair treatment and psychological distress compared to their non-LGB-identified sexual minority counterparts, and unfair treatment was positively associated with psychological distress. Results highlight the need to consider multiple demographic factors in assessing sexuality, and also suggest that measures of both self-identified sexual orientation and sexual behavior should be collected. In addition, findings provide support for the deleterious influence of unfair treatment among Asians and Latinos in the United States.

  14. Sexual Dysfunction and Incidence of Depression in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavoreo, Iris; Gržinčić, Tihana; Preksavec, Marina; Madžar, Tomislav; Bašić Kes, Vanja

    2016-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is one of the most common diseases of the central nervous system and usually occurs at the age when people would be expected to be in the prime of their sexual lives. In everyday practice, sexual dysfunction is underestimated because clinicians mostly concentrate on the classic neurologic deficits and often overlook symptoms that can seriously affect the quality of life. Our study included 98 patients (42 men and 56 women, mean age 35±12 years) with relapse from our MS register, with established diagnosis of relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis according to McDonald criteria. Patients completed the questionnaires (Sexual Satisfaction Scale, SSS and Beck Depression Scale BDS), and underwent neurological assessment (Expanded Disability Status Scale, EDSS). All patients were in the group with EDSS 2 to 4 points (mobile patients). There was no statistically significant difference in BDS and SSS values according to EDSS score. Correlation coefficients were calculated (BDS and SSS) for men (p=0.42) and women (p=0.44), yielding positive correlation. There was no statistically significant difference in BDS and SSS values according to gender, disease duration or immunomodulatory therapy. In our group of patients, despite low EDSS score (fully ambulatory without aid, self sufficient patients) we found positive correlation between sexual dysfunction and depression, showing that even in such patients the quality of life can be decreased. In conclusion, sexual dysfunction and depression are mostly under-recognized by neurologists because they are not part of routine testing; therefore, some additional questionnaires should be used in the evaluation in MS patients, even those with low EDSS score, in order to improve their quality of life.

  15. Is infertility a risk factor for female sexual dysfunction? A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millheiser, Leah S; Helmer, Amy E; Quintero, Rodolfo B; Westphal, Lynn M; Milki, Amin A; Lathi, Ruth B

    2010-11-01

    To determine the impact of infertility on female sexual function. A case-control study. Academic infertility and gynecology practices. One hundred nineteen women with infertility and 99 healthy female controls without infertility between the ages of 18 and 45 years were included in this study. Anonymous survey and Female Sexual Function Index. Female Sexual Function Index scores, frequency of sexual intercourse and masturbation, and sex-life satisfaction. Twenty-five percent of our control group had Female Sexual Function Index scores that put them at risk for sexual dysfunction (masturbation. The patients with infertility retrospectively reported a sex-life satisfaction score that was similar to that of the controls before their diagnosis, whereas their current sex-life satisfaction scores were significantly lower than those of the controls. Women with a diagnosis of infertility were found to be at higher risk for sexual dysfunction on the basis of their Female Sexual Function Index scores compared with women without infertility. The interaction of sexual function and infertility is complex and deserves further study. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. The Relation between Anxiety, Depression and Sexual Dysfunction and the Level of Blood Glucose Control in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Attending Endocrine Clinic of Taleghani Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afarin Ahmadian

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes, as a common disease, is one of the major health problems in countries all over the world. There has been evidence of an increase in the prevalence rate of psychological disorders such as anxiety and depression and sexual dysfunction in people with diabetes compared to other people. The study aimed to investigate the relation between blood glucose control and anxiety, depression and sexual dysfunction. For this purpose, 141 patients with type 2 diabetes attending to Endocrine clinic of Taleghani Hospital in Tehran were randomly selected. In order to assess the prevalence rate of anxiety and depression, the HADS questionnaire was applied, and ARIZONA questionnaire was used to assess prevalence rate of sexual dysfunction. The status of blood glucose control was assessed based on the HbA1c scale as well. According to the results of the present research, 93.9% of the subjects in the uncontrolled blood glucose group suffered from either anxiety or depression, or both of them, and 6.1% in the control blood glucose group. 77.2% of patients in uncontrolled blood glucose group had severe sexual disorder; while, 22.8% of patients in controlled blood glucose group had this problem. Based on the obtained results of data analysis, there is a significant relationship between the status of blood glucose control based on the HbA1c scale and the prevalence rate of anxiety, depression and sexual dysfunction.

  17. Sexual activity, erectile dysfunction and their correlates among 1,566 older Chinese men in Southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Samuel Yeung Shan; Leung, Jason Chi Shun; Woo, Jean

    2009-01-01

    Few studies on sexuality and its correlates in adults have been conducted in Asia; most studies in Asia have focused instead on erectile dysfunction in men rather than sexuality or sexual activities. This study was conducted to evaluate the prevalence and factors associated with sexual activity and erectile dysfunction in elderly Chinese men aged 65 years and above. Sexual activity and sexual functions were assessed using the International Index of Erectile Function-5. Depressive symptoms were measured by the Chinese version of the Geriatric Depression Scale. Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) were measured by the International Prostatic Symptom Score. Cross-sectional data from a large prospective cohort study of Chinese elderly men were used in this study. A questionnaire that included demographic, lifestyle, and medical risk factors and physical examination were administered to 1566 Chinese men aged between 65 to 92 years in Hong Kong. Only 30.7% of men were sexually active in the previous 6 months in this sample and among those who were sexually active, 88% had some form of erectile dysfunction. Being sexually inactive in the previous 6 months was associated with being older (odds ratio [OR] = 1.80; confidence interval [CI]: 1.56-2.09), single (OR = 1.87; CI = 1.19-2.94) and the presence of peripheral arterial disease (OR = 2.43; CI: 1.25-4.71). In multiple multinomial logistic regression, having clinically relevant depressive symptoms (OR = 3.37; CI: 1.31-8.70) and having moderate to severe LUTS (OR = 1.63; CI: 1.01-2.64) were independently associated with increased risk of having erectile dysfunction. We showed that a large proportion of elderly men were not sexually active in Hong Kong. For those who were sexually active, most suffered from some degree of erectile dysfunction. Having clinically relevant depressive symptoms and LUTS were independently associated with increased risk of erectile dysfunction.

  18. Sexual dysfunction before and after coronary artery bypass graft surgery in males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal Mourad, MD

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: Sexual dysfunction is not uncommon following CABG surgery however, sexual counseling is still not being addressed adequately. Participation in the rehabilitation program is the responsibility of the cardiac surgeons, rehabilitation nurses and the patient's partner.

  19. Functional neuroanatomy in depressed patients with sexual dysfunction: blood oxygenation level dependent functional MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jong Chul

    2004-01-01

    To demonstrate the functional neuroanatomy associated with sexual arousal visually evoked in depressed males who have underlying sexual dysfunction using Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent-based fMRI. Ten healthy volunteers (age range 21-55: mean 32.5 years), and 10 depressed subjects (age range 23-51: mean 34.4 years, mean Beck Depression Inventory score of 39.6 ± 5.9, mean Hamilton Rating Scale Depression (HAMD)-17 score of 33.5 ± 6.0) with sexual arousal dysfunction viewed erotic and neutral video films during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with 1.5 T MR scanner (GE Signa Horizon). The fMRI data were obtained from 7 oblique planes using gradient-echo EPI (flip angle/TR/TE=90 .deg. /6000 ms/50 ms). The visual stimulation paradigm began with 60 sec of black screen, 150 sec of neutral stimulation with a documentary video film, 30 sec of black screen, 150 sec of sexual stimulation with an erotic video film followed by 30 sec of black screen. The brain activation maps and their quantification were analyzed by SPM99 program. There was a significant difference of brain activation between two groups during visual sexual stimulation. In depressed subjects, the level of activation during the visually evoked sexual arousal was significantly less than that of healthy volunteers, especially in the cerebrocortical areas of the hypothalamus, thalamus, caudate nucleus, and inferior and superior temporal gyri. On the other hand, the cerebral activation patterns during the neutral condition in both groups showed no significant differences (ρ < 0.01). This study is the first demonstration of the functional neuroanatomy of the brain associated with sexual dysfunction in depressed patients using fMRI. In order to validate our physiological neuroscience results, further studies that would include patients with other disorders and sexual dysfunction, and depressed patients without sexual dysfunction and their treatment response are needed

  20. Functional neuroanatomy in depressed patients with sexual dysfunction: blood oxygenation level dependent functional MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jong Chul [Chonnam National Univ. Hospital, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-06-15

    To demonstrate the functional neuroanatomy associated with sexual arousal visually evoked in depressed males who have underlying sexual dysfunction using Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent-based fMRI. Ten healthy volunteers (age range 21-55: mean 32.5 years), and 10 depressed subjects (age range 23-51: mean 34.4 years, mean Beck Depression Inventory score of 39.6 {+-} 5.9, mean Hamilton Rating Scale Depression (HAMD)-17 score of 33.5 {+-} 6.0) with sexual arousal dysfunction viewed erotic and neutral video films during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with 1.5 T MR scanner (GE Signa Horizon). The fMRI data were obtained from 7 oblique planes using gradient-echo EPI (flip angle/TR/TE=90 .deg. /6000 ms/50 ms). The visual stimulation paradigm began with 60 sec of black screen, 150 sec of neutral stimulation with a documentary video film, 30 sec of black screen, 150 sec of sexual stimulation with an erotic video film followed by 30 sec of black screen. The brain activation maps and their quantification were analyzed by SPM99 program. There was a significant difference of brain activation between two groups during visual sexual stimulation. In depressed subjects, the level of activation during the visually evoked sexual arousal was significantly less than that of healthy volunteers, especially in the cerebrocortical areas of the hypothalamus, thalamus, caudate nucleus, and inferior and superior temporal gyri. On the other hand, the cerebral activation patterns during the neutral condition in both groups showed no significant differences ({rho} < 0.01). This study is the first demonstration of the functional neuroanatomy of the brain associated with sexual dysfunction in depressed patients using fMRI. In order to validate our physiological neuroscience results, further studies that would include patients with other disorders and sexual dysfunction, and depressed patients without sexual dysfunction and their treatment response are needed.

  1. Clinical Assessment of Tribulus terrestris Extract in the Treatment of Female Sexual Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama, Carlos RB; Lasmar, Ricardo; Gama, Gustavo F; Abreu, Camila S; Nunes, Carlos P; Geller, Mauro; Oliveira, Lisa; Santos, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    This is a qualitative–quantitative study based on hospital records of female patients of reproductive age, presenting sexual dysfunction, and treated with 250 mg Tribulus terrestris extract (1 tablet thrice daily for 90 days). Safety monitoring included vital signs, physical examination, laboratory tests, and occurrence of adverse events. Efficacy analysis included results of the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) levels together with total and free testosterone, and the patient and physician assessments. There was a statistically significant improvement in total FSFI scores (P terrestris extract is safe and effective in the treatment of female sexual dysfunction. PMID:25574150

  2. Clinical Assessment of Tribulus terrestris Extract in the Treatment of Female Sexual Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama, Carlos Rb; Lasmar, Ricardo; Gama, Gustavo F; Abreu, Camila S; Nunes, Carlos P; Geller, Mauro; Oliveira, Lisa; Santos, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    This is a qualitative-quantitative study based on hospital records of female patients of reproductive age, presenting sexual dysfunction, and treated with 250 mg Tribulus terrestris extract (1 tablet thrice daily for 90 days). Safety monitoring included vital signs, physical examination, laboratory tests, and occurrence of adverse events. Efficacy analysis included results of the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) levels together with total and free testosterone, and the patient and physician assessments. There was a statistically significant improvement in total FSFI scores (P terrestris extract is safe and effective in the treatment of female sexual dysfunction.

  3. Sexual function in women in rural Tamil Nadu: disease, dysfunction, distress and norms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Shonima; Prasad, Jasmine; Jacob, K S; Kuruvilla, Anju

    2014-01-01

    We examined the nature, prevalence and explanatory models of sexual concerns and dysfunction among women in rural Tamil Nadu. Married women between 18 and 65 years of age, from randomly selected villages in Kaniyambadi block, Vellore district, Tamil Nadu, were chosen by stratified sampling technique. Sexual functioning was assessed using the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI). The modified Short Explanatory Model Interview (SEMI) was used to assess beliefs about sexual concerns and the General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12) was used to screen for common mental disorders. Sociodemographic variables and other risk factors were also assessed. Most of the women (277; 98.2%) contacted agreed to participate in the study. The prevalence of sexual dysfunction, based on the cut-off score on the FSFI, was 64.3%. However, only a minority of women considered it a problem (4.7%), expressed dissatisfaction (5.8%) or sought medical help (2.5%). The most common explanatory models offered for sexual problems included an unhappy marriage,stress and physical problems. Factors associated with lower FSFI included older age, illiteracy, as well as medical illness and sexual and marital factors such as menopause, poor quality of marital relationship, history of physical abuse and lack of privacy. The diagnosis of female sexual dysfunction needs to be nuanced and based on the broader personal and social context. Our findings argue that there is a need to use models that employ personal, local and contextual standards in assessing complex behaviours such as sexual function. Copyright 2014, NMJI.

  4. Sweet Bee Venom Pharmacopuncture May be Effective for Treating Sexual Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Lee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sexual dysfunction (SD is a health problem which occurs during any phase of the sexual response cycle that keeps the individual or couple from experiencing satisfaction from the sexual activity. SD covers a wide variety of symptoms like in men, erectile dysfunction and premature or delayed ejaculation, in women, spasms of the vagina and pain with sexual intercourse, in both sexes, sexual desire and response. And pharmacopuncture, i.e. injection of subclinical doses of drugs, mostly herb medicine, in acupoints, has been adopted with successful results. This case report showed the effect of bee venom on SD. A 51-year-old male patient with SD, who had a past history of taking Western medication to treat his SD and who had previously undergone surgery on his lower back due to a herniated disc, received treatments using pharmacopuncture of sweet bee venom (SBV at Gwanwon (CV4, Hoeeum (CV1, Sinsu (BL23, and Gihaesu (BL24 for 20 days. Objectively, the patient showed improvement on most items on the International Index for Erectile Dysfunction (IIEF like 28 to 29 out of perfect score 30 for erectile function, 10 to 10 out of perfect score 10 for orgasmic function, 6 to 8 out of perfect score 10 for sexual desire, 10 to 13 out of perfect score 15 for satisfaction with intercourse, and 6 to 8 out of perfect score 10 for overall satisfaction; subjectively, his words, the tone of his voice and the look of confidence in his eyes all indicated improvement. Among the variety of effects of SBV pharmacopuncture, urogenital problems such as SD may be health problems that pharmacopuncture can treat effectively.

  5. Blood Pressure, Sexual Activity, and Dysfunction in Women With Hypertension: Baseline Findings From the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foy, Capri G; Newman, Jill C; Berlowitz, Dan R; Russell, Laurie P; Kimmel, Paul L; Wadley, Virginia G; Thomas, Holly N; Lerner, Alan J; Riley, William T

    2016-09-01

    Sexual function, an important component of quality of life, is gaining increased research and clinical attention in older women with hypertension. To assess the association between systolic blood pressure (SBP) and other variables, and sexual activity and sexual dysfunction in hypertensive women. Baseline analysis of 635 women participants of a larger randomized clinical trial of 9361 men and women. Self-reported sexual activity (yes/no), and sexual function using the Female Sexual Function Inventory (FSFI). 452 participants (71.2%) reported having no sexual activity during the previous 4 weeks. The mean (SD) FSFI score for sexually active participants was 25.3 (6.0), and 52.6% of the sample reported a FSFI score ≤26.55 designating sexual dysfunction. In logistic regression models, SBP was not significantly associated with sexual activity (AOR = 1.002; P > .05). Older age (AOR = 0.95, P sexually active, as was living alone versus living with others (AOR = 0.56, P sexually active (AOR = 1.39; P sexually active participants, SBP was not associated with sexual dysfunction (AOR = 1.01; P > .05). Higher depressive symptoms from the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) was associated with higher odds of sexual dysfunction (AOR = 1.24, P sexually active in participants with chronic kidney disease (AOR = 0.33, P sexually active in a sample of middle-aged and older women with hypertension. Increased depressive symptoms and increased physical comorbidities were significantly associated with increased odds of sexual dysfunction. SBP was not significantly associated with sexual activity or sexual dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Does the Severity of Overactive Bladder Symptoms Correlate With Risk for Female Sexual Dysfunction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliato, Cássia Raquel Teatin; Melotti, Iane Glauce Ribeiro; Junior, Luiz Carlos Santos; Britto, Luiz Gustavo Oliveira; Riccetto, Cássio Luiz Zanettini

    2017-07-01

    Several studies have associated overactive bladder (OAB) with female sexual dysfunction (FSD); however, there are no reports using a quantitative approach to measure OAB severity and to relate OAB to the risk of FSD. To evaluate women with OAB and to correlate the severity of their urinary symptoms with their sexual function. This cross-sectional study included 267 women older than 18 years with untreated OAB. All subjects completed the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Overactive Bladder (ICIQ-OAB) and the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI). Linear regression was used to analyze the association between variables and the numeric FSFI score, and categorical FSFI scores were analyzed using logistic regression. Spearman rank correlation coefficient was used to assess the correlation between ICIQ-OAB results and the different FSFI domains. The significance level was 5%. Subjects' mean age was 50.2 ± 11.9 years. Most women were married, had at least three children, and were postmenopausal (54.3%). Mean FSFI total score was 19.2 ± 9.8. For menopausal status, 65.6% of premenopausal women had a risk for FSD vs 86.2% of postmenopausal women. Mean ICIQ-OAB score was 10 ± 3.17. Postmenopausal women had the following risk factors statistically associated with sexual dysfunction: age, ICIQ score, and marital status. For these women, greater OAB severity, especially those with urgency and/or urge incontinence, was associated with worse scores in the arousal, lubrication, orgasm, and sexual pain domains. However, there was no statistically significant association for premenopausal women. Health professionals have to pay attention to OAB in women because of the greater risk for FSD in these patients. The strength was using a quantitative approach to measure OAB severity in a larger population. Limitations include a convenience sample with no power calculation; exclusion of women who did not have sexual intercourse in the past month; unmeasured distress

  7. Sexual dysfunction after curietherapy and external radiotherapy of the prostate for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huyghe, E.; Bachaud, J.-M.; Achard, J.-L.; Bossi, A.; Droupy, S.

    2009-01-01

    Knowing the importance of sexuality items in the choice by the patient of the modality of treatment of localized prostate cancer, we aimed at reviewing and updating the effects of prostate radiotherapy and brachytherapy on sexual functions. A PubMed search was done using the keywords: prostate cancer, erectile dysfunction, radiotherapy, brachytherapy, ejaculation and orgasm. After both radiotherapy and brachytherapy, sexual troubles occur progressively, the onset of occurrence of erectile dysfunction being 12-18 months after both treatments. Even though the pathophysiological pathways by which radiotherapy and brachytherapy result in erectile dysfunction have not yet been fully clarified, arterial damage and exposure of neurovascular bundle to high levels of radiation seem to be two main causes of erectile dysfunction after radiotherapy and brachytherapy. The radiation dose received by the corpora cavernosa at the crurae of the penis may also be important in the etiology of erectile dysfunction. Another important factor following radiotherapy is the treatment modality. Not many data about ejaculation and orgasm after radiation treatments have been published yet. Recent data show that most of the population treated by brachytherapy conserves ejaculation and orgasm after treatment, even if a majority describe reduction of volume and deterioration of orgasm. Patients need to be correctly informed on the possible sequela of radiotherapy and brachytherapy on their sexual well-being while planning their treatment. Patients should also be informed about the possible treatment modalities for erectile dysfunction. (authors)

  8. Hypertension and sexual dysfunction | Ker | South African Family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Family Practice. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 54, No 2 (2012) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Hypertension and sexual dysfunction. JA Ker. Abstract.

  9. Sexual Enhancement Groups for Dysfunctional Women: An Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiblum, Sandra R.; Ersner-Hershfield, Robin

    1977-01-01

    Three groups of women with sexual dysfunction were evaluated pretreatment and posttreatment. Two groups did not involve partner participation, while the third group included partners on two occasions. Results for all groups were similar. The question of whether orgasm through coitus alone is a reasonable goal is raised and challenged. (Author)

  10. Prospective relationships between workplace sexual harassment and psychological distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, M B; Einarsen, S

    2012-04-01

    Exposure to workplace sexual harassment (SH) has been associated with impaired mental health, but longitudinal studies confirming the relationship are lacking. To examine gender differences in prospective associations between SH and psychological distress. Baseline questionnaire survey data were collected in 2005 in a representative sample of Norwegian employees. Follow-up data were collected in 2007. SH was measured with the Bergen Sexual Harassment Scale. Psychological distress was measured with the 25 item Hopkins Symptom Checklist (HSCL-25) with cases of psychological distress defined as having a mean score of Workplace measures against SH would be expected to lead to a reduction in mental disorders. The finding that psychological distress predicts SH among men may indicate either a vulnerability factor or a negative perception mechanism.

  11. Determinants of sexual dysfunction among clinically diagnosed diabetic patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease that can result in various medical, psychological and sexual dysfunctions (SD) if not properly managed. SD in men is a common under-appreciated complication of diabetes. This study assessed the prevalence and determinants of SD among diabetic patients in Tema, Greater Accra Region of Ghana. Method Sexual functioning was determined in 300 consecutive diabetic men (age range: 18-82 years) visiting the diabetic clinic of Tema General Hospital with the Golombok Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction (GRISS) questionnaire, between November, 2010 and March, 2011. In addition to the socio-demographic characteristics of the participants, the level of glycosylated haemoglobin, fasting blood sugar (FBS) and serum testosterone were assessed. All the men had a steady heterosexual relationship for at least 2 years before enrolment in the study. Results Out the 300 participants contacted, the response rate was 91.3% after 20 declined participation and 6 incomplete data were excluded All the respondents had at least basic education, 97.4% were married, 65.3% were known hypertensive, 3.3% smoked cigarettes, 27% took alcoholic beverages and 32.8% did some form of exercise. The 69.3% SD rate observed in this study appears to be related to infrequency (79.2%), non-sensuality (74.5%), dissatisfaction with sexual acts (71.9%), non-communication (70.8%) and impotence (67.9%). Other areas of sexual function, including premature ejaculation (56.6%) and avoidance (42.7%) were also substantially affected. However, severe SD was seen in only 4.7% of the studied population. The perceived "adequate", "desirable", "too short" and "too long intra-vaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT) are 5-10, 5-10, 1-2 and 15-30 minutes respectively. Testosterone correlates negatively with glycated haemoglobin (HBA1c), FBS, perceived desirable, too short IELT, and weight as well as waist circumference. Conclusion SD rate from this study is high but similar to

  12. Determinants of sexual dysfunction among clinically diagnosed diabetic patients

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    Sarpong Charity

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease that can result in various medical, psychological and sexual dysfunctions (SD if not properly managed. SD in men is a common under-appreciated complication of diabetes. This study assessed the prevalence and determinants of SD among diabetic patients in Tema, Greater Accra Region of Ghana. Method Sexual functioning was determined in 300 consecutive diabetic men (age range: 18-82 years visiting the diabetic clinic of Tema General Hospital with the Golombok Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction (GRISS questionnaire, between November, 2010 and March, 2011. In addition to the socio-demographic characteristics of the participants, the level of glycosylated haemoglobin, fasting blood sugar (FBS and serum testosterone were assessed. All the men had a steady heterosexual relationship for at least 2 years before enrolment in the study. Results Out the 300 participants contacted, the response rate was 91.3% after 20 declined participation and 6 incomplete data were excluded All the respondents had at least basic education, 97.4% were married, 65.3% were known hypertensive, 3.3% smoked cigarettes, 27% took alcoholic beverages and 32.8% did some form of exercise. The 69.3% SD rate observed in this study appears to be related to infrequency (79.2%, non-sensuality (74.5%, dissatisfaction with sexual acts (71.9%, non-communication (70.8% and impotence (67.9%. Other areas of sexual function, including premature ejaculation (56.6% and avoidance (42.7% were also substantially affected. However, severe SD was seen in only 4.7% of the studied population. The perceived "adequate", "desirable", "too short" and "too long intra-vaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT are 5-10, 5-10, 1-2 and 15-30 minutes respectively. Testosterone correlates negatively with glycated haemoglobin (HBA1c, FBS, perceived desirable, too short IELT, and weight as well as waist circumference. Conclusion SD rate from this study is high

  13. Clitoral therapy device for treatment of sexual dysfunction in irradiated cervical cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroder, MaryAnn; Mell, Loren K.; Hurteau, Jean A.; Collins, Yvonne C.; Rotmensch, Jacob; Waggoner, Steven E.; Yamada, S. Diane; Small, William; Mundt, Arno J.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the efficacy of the clitoral therapy device (Eros Therapy) in alleviating sexual dysfunction in irradiated cervical cancer patients. Methods and materials: Eligible patients had a history of cervical cancer treated with radiotherapy and self-reported sexual dysfunction of sexual arousal and/or orgasmic disorders. Patients used the noninvasive, nonpharmacologic clitoral therapy device using a hand-held, battery-powered vacuum to cause clitoral engorgement four times weekly for 3 months during foreplay and self-stimulation. Study instruments included the Female Sexual Function Index, Derogatis Interview for Sexual Functioning, and Dyadic Adjustment Scale. The outcome evaluation was performed at 3 months. Results: Between 2001 and 2002, 15 women were enrolled and 13 completed the study. The median patient age and radiotherapy-enrollment interval was 43.5 years and 2 years, respectively. At baseline, all patients reported symptoms of sexual arousal and/or orgasmic disorders, and some also had sexual desire and pain disorders. At 3 months, statistically significant improvements were seen in all domains tested, including sexual desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, sexual satisfaction, and reduced pain. The median Female Sexual Function Index total score increased from 17 to 29.4 (maximal score, 36; p <0.001). The median Derogatis Interview for Sexual Functioning total raw score increased from 46 to 95 (maximal score, 118; p <0.001). At baseline, the Derogatis Interview for Sexual Functioning total T-score corresponded to the bottom 10th percentile of normal sexual functioning. At 3 months, the total T-score placed the patients at the normalcy cutoff. Gynecologic examinations revealed improved mucosal color and moisture and vaginal elasticity and decreased bleeding and ulceration. Conclusion: Our results from this pilot study suggest that the clitoral therapy device may alleviate sexual dysfunction in irradiated

  14. Possibility of psychological correction of sexual anomalies in hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Babina S.V.; Dvoryanchikov N.V.

    2014-01-01

    The article examines the possibilities of psychological correction of sexual anomalies in the hospital. We reviewed modern Russian and foreign literature on the treatment of disorders of sexual preference and singled out the main directions of therapy of disorders of sexual preference. We presents a comparative analysis of three therapeutic approaches for the treatment of sexual anomalies (psychopharmacological treatment, cognitive-behavioral therapy, psychotherapy) to determine their effecti...

  15. Prevalence of Sexual Concerns and Sexual Dysfunction among Sexually Active and Inactive Men and Women with Screen-Detected Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerggaard, Mette; Charles, Morten; Kristensen, Ellids

    2015-01-01

    sexual distress. Around half of men and women were excluded from the SD analysis, mainly because of reporting lack of sexual intercourse during the last 4 weeks. Among those included, 54% of men and 12% of women were found to have SD. CONCLUSIONS: Sexual inactivity is highly prevalent among middle-aged......INTRODUCTION: Type 2 diabetes negatively impacts sexual health. Only limited information is available regarding sexual health among sexually inactive patients with type 2 diabetes. AIM: The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of sexual concerns among sexually active and sexually...... inactive men and women with type 2 diabetes and of sexual dysfunction (SD) among sexually active. METHODS: Data from the Anglo-Danish-Dutch Study of Intensive Treatment in People with Screen-Detected Diabetes in Primary Care-Denmark study was used. A total of 1,170 Danish patients with screen-detected type...

  16. Approach and Avoidance Sexual Goals in Couples with Provoked Vestibulodynia: Associations with Sexual, Relational, and Psychological Well-Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Natalie O; Muise, Amy; Bergeron, Sophie; Impett, Emily A; Boudreau, Gillian K

    2015-08-01

    Provoked vestibulodynia (PVD) is a prevalent vulvovaginal pain condition that is triggered primarily during sexual intercourse. PVD adversely impacts women's and their partners' sexual relationship and psychological well-being. Over 80% of women with PVD continue to have intercourse, possibly because of sexual goals that include wanting to pursue desirable outcomes (i.e., approach goals; such as a desire to maintain intimacy) and avoid negative outcomes (i.e., avoidance goals; such as avoiding a partner's disappointment). The aim of this study was to investigate associations between approach and avoidance sexual goals and women's pain, as well as the sexual, relational, and psychological well-being of affected couples. Women with PVD (N = 107) and their partners completed measures of sexual goals, sexual satisfaction, relationship satisfaction, and depression. Women also completed measures of pain during intercourse and sexual functioning. (1) Global Measure of Sexual Satisfaction Scale, (2) Dyadic Adjustment Scale-Revised or the Couple Satisfaction Index, (3) Beck Depression Inventory-II, (4) numerical rating scale of pain during intercourse, and (5) Female Sexual Function Index. When women reported higher avoidance sexual goals, they reported lower sexual and relationship satisfaction, and higher levels of depressive symptoms. In addition, when partners of women reported higher avoidance sexual goals, they reported lower relationship satisfaction. When women reported higher approach sexual goals, they also reported higher sexual and relationship satisfaction. Targeting approach and avoidance sexual goals could enhance the quality and efficacy of psychological couple interventions for women with PVD and their partners. © 2015 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  17. Psychological intimate partner violence and sexual risk behavior: examining the role of distinct posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms in the partner violence-sexual risk link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overstreet, Nicole M; Willie, Tiara C; Hellmuth, Julianne C; Sullivan, Tami P

    2015-01-01

    Research has examined how physical and sexual intimate partner violence (IPV) victimization increases sexual risk behavior, yet research is lacking on 1) the effect of psychological IPV on sexual risk behavior and 2) factors through which psychological IPV may be linked to sexual risk behavior. The current study examined the relationship between psychological IPV and sexual risk behavior controlling for other forms of IPV (i.e., physical and sexual) in a sample of 186 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-negative community women currently experiencing IPV. Further, this study examined the potential mediating effects of four posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity clusters (i.e., re-experiencing, avoidance, numbing, and hyperarousal) on this relationship. Results revealed that greater severity of psychological IPV was uniquely and directly related to greater sexual risk behavior. Additionally, of the four PTSD symptom severity clusters, only avoidance symptom severity mediated the relationship between psychological IPV and sexual risk behavior. Implications for addressing psychological IPV and PTSD to improve women's sexual health outcomes are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. SEXUAL DYSFUNCTION INDUCED BY ANTI-PSYCHOTICS AND ANTI-DEPRESSANTS IN DRUG NAIVE PATIENTS – A COMPARATIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mohanalakshmi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to determine and compare sexual dysfunction caused by anti-psychotics and anti-depressants in drug naïve patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS Patients diagnosed as drug naïve schizophrenic and depression as per DSM-5 criteria & age between 18-45 years were recruited and allocated into group A (n=30–receiving anti-psychotics & group B (n=30 receiving anti-depressants after informed consent by the patients. Sexual dysfunction was assessed by Arizona Sexual Experiences Scale (ASEX during the initial 2 months of therapy. RESULTS ASEX mean for patients receiving antipsychotics increased from the baseline of 7.97 to 17.23 and the ASEX mean for patients receiving antidepressants increased from baseline of 7.80 to 18.67 with p value of 0.249 which is not statistically significant. Among the antipsychotics haloperidol ASEX mean increased from 7.87 to 18.00 and risperidone mean increased from 8.07 to 16.47 with the p value of 0.335 which is not significant. More patients on haloperidol showed evidence of sexual dysfunction as assessed by ASEX scoring than risperidone though p value was not significant. Among the two antidepressants ASEX score mean for amitriptyline patients increased from 8.07 to 16.47, and that of fluoxetine from 7.53 to 16.47 with the p value of 0.018* statistically significant at α of 0.05 level. CONCLUSION This study shows presence of sexual dysfunction in patients receiving antipsychotics & antidepressants by 2 nd month of therapy though statistically not significant. Fluoxetine group patients developed statistically significant sexual dysfunction. Implications for future research about sexual dysfunction in all new treatments should be strongly taken into account because this side effect adds to the emotional stress and worsening of mental dysfunction.

  19. Factors associated with sexual dysfunction in Jordanian women and their sexual attitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Ruba M. Abu; AlHajeri Rabaa M; Khader, Yousef S; Ajlouni, Kamel M

    2009-01-01

    Female sexual dysfunction (FSD) is defined as disorders of libido, arousal, and orgasm, as well as sexual pain, that leads to personal distress or interpersonal difficulties. Social aspects of FSD have been understudied. The aim of this study was to explore the social aspects of FSD and sexual attitudes of Jordanian women. Six hundred thirteen married females were studied between October 2006 and August 2007 at the National Center for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Genetics (NCDEG), Amman, Jordan. Females were interviewed using a special questionnaire that was suitable to our culture and added to the Arabic translation of the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) Questionnaire. Older age was associated with a decreased total FSD index and its domain scores. Women with obesity were more likely to have impaired arousability and impaired capability of reaching orgasm. About 58.5% of women reported that they prepared themselves if they had sexual desire and 68.2% reported wearing special attire for this purpose. Only 37.2% of women could ask their husband for a special excitement. FSD is prevalent in Jordan. Its social aspects are understudied and need more research in the future. (author)

  20. Psychological Predictors of Sexual Intimate Partner Violence against Black and Hispanic Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brianna Preiser

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although various types of intimate partner violence (IPV tend to co-occur, risk factors of each type of IPV may differ. At the same time, most of the existing literature on risk factors of IPV among minorities has used a cross-sectional design and has focused on physical rather than sexual IPV. We conducted the current study to compare Black and Hispanic women for psychological predators of change in sexual IPV over time. Methods: Using data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (FFCWS, this study followed 561 Black and 475 Hispanic women with their male partners for four years. Independent variables included male partners’ depression, anxiety, problem alcohol use, and male-to-female physical and psychological IPV perpetration. The dependent variable was sexual IPV reported by female partners, measured at baseline, two years, and four years later. Covariates included age, income, marital status and educational level. We used a multi-group latent growth curve model (LGCM to explain intercept, linear, and quadratic slopes, which represent the baseline, and linear and curvilinear trajectories of male-to-female sexual IPV, where groups were defined based on ethnicity. Results: Psychological IPV was associated with sexual IPV at baseline among both ethnic groups. The male partner’s depression was a risk factor for an increase in sexual IPV over time among Black but not Hispanic women. Anxiety, problem alcohol use and physical IPV did not have an effect on the baseline or change in sexual IPV over time. Psychological IPV was not associated with an increase in sexual IPV over time in either ethnic groups. Conclusions: There is a need for screening of sexual IPV in the presence of psychological IPV among minority women. There is also a need for screening and treatment of male partners’ depression as a strategy to reduce sexual IPV among Black women.

  1. Psychological Predictors of Sexual Intimate Partner Violence against Black and Hispanic Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preiser, Brianna; Assari, Shervin

    2017-12-27

    Background: Although various types of intimate partner violence (IPV) tend to co-occur, risk factors of each type of IPV may differ. At the same time, most of the existing literature on risk factors of IPV among minorities has used a cross-sectional design and has focused on physical rather than sexual IPV. We conducted the current study to compare Black and Hispanic women for psychological predators of change in sexual IPV over time. Methods: Using data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (FFCWS), this study followed 561 Black and 475 Hispanic women with their male partners for four years. Independent variables included male partners' depression, anxiety, problem alcohol use, and male-to-female physical and psychological IPV perpetration. The dependent variable was sexual IPV reported by female partners, measured at baseline, two years, and four years later. Covariates included age, income, marital status and educational level. We used a multi-group latent growth curve model (LGCM) to explain intercept, linear, and quadratic slopes, which represent the baseline, and linear and curvilinear trajectories of male-to-female sexual IPV, where groups were defined based on ethnicity. Results: Psychological IPV was associated with sexual IPV at baseline among both ethnic groups. The male partner's depression was a risk factor for an increase in sexual IPV over time among Black but not Hispanic women. Anxiety, problem alcohol use and physical IPV did not have an effect on the baseline or change in sexual IPV over time. Psychological IPV was not associated with an increase in sexual IPV over time in either ethnic groups. Conclusions: There is a need for screening of sexual IPV in the presence of psychological IPV among minority women. There is also a need for screening and treatment of male partners' depression as a strategy to reduce sexual IPV among Black women.

  2. Cardiometabolic Risk and Female Sexuality-Part I. Risk Factors and Potential Pathophysiological Underpinnings for Female Vasculogenic Sexual Dysfunction Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maseroli, Elisa; Scavello, Irene; Vignozzi, Linda

    2018-05-02

    Erectile dysfunction is recognized as an opportunity for preventing cardiovascular (CV) events, and assessing the impairment of penile vascular flow by Doppler ultrasound is an important tool to ascertain CV risk. Conversely, the role of genital vascular impairment in the pathophysiology of female sexual dysfunction (FSD) remains contentious. To focus on the current scientific support for an association between CV risk factors and female sexual health in the 1st part of a 2-part review. A thorough literature search of peer-reviewed publications on the associations between CV risk factors and FSD and their underlying mechanisms was performed using the PubMed database. We present a summary of the evidence from clinical studies and discuss the possible mechanisms providing the pathophysiologic bases of vasculogenic FSD syndromes. The peripheral sexual response in women is a vascular-dependent event, and evidence suggests that cardiometabolic-related perturbations in endothelial function can determine vascular insufficiency in female genital tissues. Although epidemiologic and observational studies demonstrate that the prevalence of FSD is higher in women with diabetes mellitus, a cause-effect relation between these clinical conditions cannot be assumed. Evidence on the effect of obesity, metabolic syndrome, and polycystic ovary syndrome on sexual function in women is controversial. Data on the associations of dyslipidemia and hypertension with FSD are limited. Common cardiometabolic alterations could affect vascular function in the female genital tract. Based on limited data, there is an association between CV risk factors and female sexual health in women; however, this association appears milder than in men. Maseroli E, Scavello I, Vignozzi L. Cardiometabolic Risk and Female Sexuality-Part I. Risk Factors and Potential Pathophysiological Underpinnings for Female Vasculogenic Sexual Dysfunction Syndromes. Sex Med Rev 2018;X:XXX-XXX. Copyright © 2018 International

  3. Effect of Vortioxetine vs. Escitalopram on Sexual Functioning in Adults with Well-Treated Major Depressive Disorder Experiencing SSRI-Induced Sexual Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Paula L; Mahableshwarkar, Atul R; Chen, Yinzhong; Chrones, Lambros; Clayton, Anita H

    2015-10-01

    Sexual dysfunction is common with serotonergic antidepressants, including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), and does not resolve in most patients. Vortioxetine, an antidepressant with a multimodal mechanism of action, has shown low rates of sexual dysfunction in previous major depressive disorder (MDD) trials. This study compared the effects of vortioxetine and escitalopram on sexual functioning in adults with well-treated MDD experiencing treatment-emergent sexual dysfunction (TESD). Participants treated with, and responding to, citalopram, paroxetine, or sertraline were randomized to switch to either vortioxetine (10/20 mg; n = 225) or escitalopram (10/20 mg; n = 222) for 8 weeks. Sexual function was assessed using the Changes in Sexual Functioning Questionnaire Short Form (CSFQ-14), and antidepressant efficacy was assessed using the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), Clinical Global Impressions (CGI) scale, and Profile of Mood States brief form (POMS-brief). Safety and tolerability were also assessed. The primary endpoint was change from baseline in the CSFQ-14 total score after 8 weeks of treatment. The MADRS, CGI, and POMS-brief were used to assess antidepressant efficacy. Safety was assessed via adverse events, vital signs, electrocardiograms, laboratory values, weight, and physical examination findings. Vortioxetine showed significantly greater improvements in CSFQ-14 total score (8.8 ± 0.64, mean ± standard error) vs. escitalopram (6.6 ± 0.64; P = 0.013). Benefits vs. escitalopram were significant on four of five dimensions and all three phases of sexual functioning assessed by the CSFQ-14 (P escitalopram had similar clinical efficacy profiles in this study, with safety profiles similar to previous trials. Nausea (n = 9, 4.0%) was the most common treatment-emergent adverse event leading to discontinuation of vortioxetine. Switching

  4. Paraffin Granuloma Associated with Buried Glans Penis-Induced Sexual and Voiding Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chon, Wonhee; Koo, Ja Yun; Park, Min Jung; Choi, Kyung Un; Park, Hyun Jun; Park, Nam Cheol

    2017-08-01

    A paraffinoma is a type of inflammatory lipogranuloma that develops after the injection of an artificial mineral oil, such as paraffin or silicon, into the foreskin or the subcutaneous tissue of the penis for the purpose of penis enlargement, cosmetics, or prosthesis. The authors experienced a case of macro-paraffinoma associated with sexual dysfunction, voiding dysfunction, and pain caused by a buried glans penis after a paraffin injection for penis enlargement that had been performed 35 years previously. Herein, this case is presented with a literature review. Copyright © 2017 Korean Society for Sexual Medicine and Andrology.

  5. The influence of hormonal status and socio-cultural determinants on postmenopausal sexual dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdoğan Aslan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the hormonal and psycho-socio-cultural determinants that effect postmenopausal sexual dysfunction. Design: Case-control study. Setting: University hospital, Menopause clinics. Patients: 50 volunteers fit for inclusion criteria. Intervention: FSFI questionaire was applied to the participants after initial interview that preset questions evaluating psychosocio-cultural determinants were directed. Vaginal pH, total testosterone, and SHBG levels were measured in addition to routine menopause investigations. Results: FSFI scores were accordingly low in women who considered that they had a sexual dysfunction (50% and, in those who felt menopausal transition had a negative impact in their sexual relations (52% (p=0.00. While 6% of participants found sex after menopause as either shameful-unappropriate or unnecessary, other 17% stated that sex after menopause should continue as a duty of woman. 33% of the participants outlined that “motherhood” is the most important goal of their lives. Stepwise logistic regression analysis revealed a correlation between FSFI scores and FAI. Conclusion: FSD is prevalent in our country. Questioning the patient about the presence of sexual dysfunction may be sufficient to disclose the problem. FAI is a more reliable parameter in selecting candidates for androgen therapy.

  6. Exploring gay couples' experience with sexual dysfunction after radical prostatectomy: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Mary-Ellen; Irvine, Jane; Currie, Kristen L; Ritvo, Paul; Trachtenberg, Lianne; Louis, Alyssa; Trachtenberg, John; Jamnicky, Leah; Matthew, Andrew G

    2014-01-01

    This exploratory study examines the experience of three gay couples managing sexual dysfunction as a result of undergoing a radical prostatectomy. Semi-structured interviews were conducted as part of a larger study at an urban hospital in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Interview transcripts were transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. The authors clustered 18 subordinate themes under 3 superordinate themes: (a) acknowledging change in sexual experience (libido, erectile function, sexual activity, orgasmic function); (b) accommodating change in sexual experience (strategies: emphasizing intimacy, embracing plan B, focus on the other; barriers: side-effect concerns, loss of naturalness, communication breakdown, failure to initiate, trial and failure, partner confounds); and (c) accepting change in sexual experience (indicators: emphasizing health, age attributions, finding a new normal; barriers: uncertain outcomes, treatment regrets). Although gay couples and heterosexual couples share many similar challenges, we discovered that gay men have particular sexual roles and can engage in novel accommodation practices, such as open relationships, that have not been noted in heterosexual couples. All couples, regardless of their level of sexual functioning, highlighted the need for more extensive programming related to sexual rehabilitation. Equitable rehabilitative support is critical to assist homosexual couples manage distress associated with prostatectomy-related sexual dysfunction.

  7. Frequência de disfunção sexual em mulheres com doenças reumáticas Frequency of sexual dysfunction in women with rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarissa de Castro Ferreira

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Pesquisar a prevalência de disfunção sexual em mulheres com as seguintes doenças reumáticas: lúpus eritematoso sistêmico, artrite reumatoide, esclerose sistêmica, síndrome antifosfolípide e fibromialgia acompanhados no Ambulatório de Reumatologia do Hospital Universitário de Brasília e do Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade de São Paulo. MÉTODOS: Utilizou-se o índice de função sexual feminina (Female Sexual Function Index - FSfi, questionário que contém 19 itens que avaliam 6 domínios: desejo sexual, excitação sexual, lubrificação vaginal, orgasmo, satisfação sexual e dor. RESULTADOS: Foram avaliadas 163 pacientes. A média de idade foi de 40,4 anos. A prevalência de disfunção sexual foi de 18,4%, porém 24,2% das pacientes não apresentaram atividade sexual nas últimas 4 semanas. Entre os subgrupos, as pacientes com fibromialgia e esclerose sistêmica foram as com maior índice de disfunção sexual (33%. Se excluirmos as pacientes sem atividade sexual, a taxa de disfunção sobe para 24,2%. CONCLUSÃO: A prevalência de disfunção sexual encontrada neste estudo foi menor em relação à literatura. Entretanto, 24,2% das pacientes entrevistadas negaram atividade sexual nas últimas 4 semanas, o que pode ter contribuído para o baixo índice de disfunção sexual.OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of sexual dysfunction in women followed up at the Rheumatology Outpatient Clinic of the Hospital Universitário de Brasília and of the Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade de São Paulo with the following rheumatic diseases: systemic lupus erythematosus; rheumatoid arthritis; systemic sclerosis; antiphospholipid antibody syndrome; and fibromyalgia. METHODS: The Female Sexual Function Index (FSfi, obtained by applying a 19-item questionnaire that assesses six domains (sexual desire, arousal, vaginal lubrication, orgasm, sexual satisfaction and pain, was used. RESULTS: This study assessed 163 patients. The

  8. Psychosocial profile of male patients presenting with sexual dysfunction in a psychiatric outpatient department in Mumbai, India

    OpenAIRE

    Kalra, Gurvinder; Kamath, Ravindra; Subramanyam, Alka; Shah, Henal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Sexual dysfunction can occur due to biological problems, relationship problems, lack of proper sexual knowledge or a combination of these. India is often known as the land of Kamasutra. But as far as sexuality research is concerned, there is a paucity of relevant data from India. In view of this, we conducted a study to assess the psychosocial profile of males presenting with sexual dysfunction to psychiatry out-patient department of a tertiary medical hospital. Materials and Me...

  9. Effect of sildenafil citrate on women affected by sexual dysfunction referred to health clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaz Zeinalzadeh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Female sexual dysfunction is a serious, multifactorial problem which affects women’s quality of life. Objectives. This study aimed at assessing the effect of sildenafil citrate on sexual dysfunction among women of reproductive age. Materials and methods. The present randomized clinical trial was conducted on 84 married women between 18 and 40 years old who suffered from sexual dysfunction. The inclusion criteria of the study were being married and between 18–40 years old, obtaining scores ≥ 22 in FSFI, not having a history of hypothyroidism or hyperprolactinemia, and not suffering from dyspareunia or vaginismus. The intervention group was required to consume 50 mg sildenafil citrate 1 hour before sexual intercourse for 5 weeks, and the control group received placebo. FSFI was completed by both study groups before and 5 weeks after the treatment. The data were analyzed through SPSS (v. 18 and paired t-test and independent t-test. Results . Most of the women (67.2% were between 30 and 40 years old. The study results revealed a significant difference between the two groups regarding the mean scores of sexual desire (p = 0.011, sexual arousal (p = 0.001, lubrication (p = 0.026, orgasm and sexual satisfaction (p < 0.001, and the whole dimension (p < 0.001. Besides, total mean sexual function before and after for the intervention and control groups was 21.1 ± 3.28 vs. 17.22 ± 5.9 (p < 0.001. Conclusion . In this study, sildenafil citrate was effective in enhancing sexual desire, arousal, orgasm, and sexual satisfaction. Of course, more studies need to be conducted on this issue.

  10. Dynamic and morphologic evaluation of erectile dysfunction on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Penile erection is a complex phenomenon that involves coordinated interaction of the psychologic, hormonal, nervous, arterial, venous, and sinusoidal systems. Erectile dysfunction (ED) is the persistent inability to attain or maintain penile erection sufficient for sexual intercourse. This study aims to determine ...

  11. Endometriosis doubles the risk of sexual dysfunction: a cross-sectional study in a large amount of patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbanks, Flávia; Abdo, Carmita Helena; Baracat, Edmund C; Podgaec, Sergio

    2017-07-01

    Endometriosis affects several aspects of a woman's life, including sexual function, but which specific aspects of sexual function remains unclear. A cross-sectional study was performed involving 1001 women divided into two groups, according to the presence or absence of endometriosis. We assessed sexual function, anxiety and depression of patients and correlated these findings with symptoms, locations and types of endometriosis and the affected domains of sexual function. Eighteen completed the forms incorrectly, 294 women (29.9%) were excluded due to severe anxiety and depression. One hundred and six patients had symptoms that could have any relation to endometriosis, so they were also excluded. The final cohort was composed of 254 patients with endometriosis and 329 patients without the disease. Sexual function score was assessed using the female sexual quotient (FSQ); Beck inventories were used to assess anxiety and depression. Patients with endometriosis were affected in all phases of sexual response: desire, sexual arousal, genital-pelvic pain/ penetration and orgasm/ sexual satisfaction. In the overall assessment, 43.3% of patients with endometriosis had sexual dysfunction, while the population without endometriosis sexual dysfunction occurred in 17.6% of women. Patients with endometriosis have more than twice sexual dysfunctions as compared to women without the disease.

  12. Validation and cross-cultural adaptation of sexual dysfunction modified scale in multiple sclerosis for Brazilian population

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    Raquel Ataíde Peres da Silva

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS. These patients suffer from various comorbidities, including sexual dysfunction (SD. The lesions of MS may affect regions of the CNS along the pathway of sexual response. The Multiple Sclerosis Intimacy and Sexuality Questionnaire-19 (MSISQ-19 is a scale that assesses sexual dysfunction. Adapt and validate the MSISQ-19 to Brazilian patients with MS. 204 individuals were evaluated, 134 patients with MS and 70 healthy persons for the control group. It was determined reproducibility, validity, internal consistency and sensitivity of the MSISQ-19-BR. Among patients with MS, 54.3% of male and 71.7% of female presented some kind of SD. In the control group the results were 12.5% and 19.5%, respectively. The MSISQ-19-BR is reproducible, reliable and valid for the Brazilian population and may be used as a tool for assessing the impact of sexual dysfunction in patients with MS.

  13. The effects of sexism, psychological distress, and difficult sexual situations on U.S. women's sexual risk behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyung-Hee; Bowleg, Lisa; Neilands, Torsten B

    2011-10-01

    Women represent almost half of the people living with HIV worldwide. Although social discrimination has been recognized as a major obstacle to HIV prevention, few empirical studies have examined the effects of sexism on women's HIV sexual risk behaviors. We analyzed data collected from an ethnically diverse sample of 754 women attending family planning clinics in the San Francisco Bay Area. A majority of respondents reported lifetime experiences of sexism (e.g., 94% reported sexual harassment). Structural equation modeling results demonstrated that experiences of sexism and reports of recent unprotected sex with a primary or a secondary sexual partner were linked through psychological distress and difficult sexual situations. Our results suggest the need to develop HIV prevention strategies for women that address two mechanisms-psychological distress and difficult sexual situations-that link social discrimination to women's sexual risk for HIV.

  14. [Lower urinary tract symptoms and male sexual dysfunction: the multinational survey of the aging.male (MSAM-7)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosen, R.; Altwein, J.; Boyle, P.; Kirby, R.S.; Lukacs, B.; Meuleman, E.J.H.; O'Leary, M.; Puppo, P.; Chris, R.; Giuliano, F.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), which are often caused by benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH), and sexual dysfunction are common in older men, with an overall prevalence of > 50% in men aged > 50 years. Men with LUTS have been reported to experience sexual dysfunction, including

  15. Standards for Clinical Trials in Male and Female Sexual Dysfunction: I. Phase I to Phase IV Clinical Trial Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, William A; Gruenwald, Ilan; Jannini, Emmanuele A; Lev-Sagie, Ahinoam; Lowenstein, Lior; Pyke, Robert E; Reisman, Yakov; Revicki, Dennis A; Rubio-Aurioles, Eusebio

    2016-12-01

    This series of articles outlines standards for clinical trials of treatments for male and female sexual dysfunctions, with a focus on research design and patient-reported outcome assessment. These articles consist of revision, updating, and integration of articles on standards for clinical trials in male and female sexual dysfunction from the 2010 International Consultation on Sexual Medicine developed by the authors as part of the 2015 International Consultation on Sexual Medicine. We are guided in this effort by several principles. In contrast to previous versions of these guidelines, we merge discussion of standards for clinical trials in male and female sexual dysfunction in an integrated approach that emphasizes the common foundational practices that underlie clinical trials in the two settings. We present a common expected standard for clinical trial design in male and female sexual dysfunction, a common rationale for the design of phase I to IV clinical trials, and common considerations for selection of study population and study duration in male and female sexual dysfunction. We present a focused discussion of fundamental principles in patient- (and partner-) reported outcome assessment and complete this series of articles with specific discussions of selected aspects of clinical trials that are unique to male and to female sexual dysfunction. Our consideration of standards for clinical trials in male and female sexual dysfunction attempts to embody sensitivity to existing and new regulatory guidance and to address implications of the evolution of the diagnosis of sexual dysfunction that have been brought forward in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition. The first article in this series focuses on phase I to phase IV clinical trial design considerations. Subsequent articles in this series focus on the measurement of patient-reported outcomes, unique aspects of clinical trial design for men, and unique aspects of clinical

  16. [Patterns of dysfunctional parenting styles and psychological disturbances in offspring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumnig, Martin; Höfer, Stefan; Huber, Alexandra; Messner, Carmen; Renn, Daniela; Mestel, Robert; Klingelhöfer, Jürgen; Kopp, Martin; Doering, Stephan; Schüßler, Gerhard; Rumpold, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    Dysfunctional parenting styles represent a risk factor for the development of psychological disturbances. The present study investigated the differential validity of the German language Fragebogen zur Erfassung dysfunktionaler Erziehungsstile (FDEB; Measurement of Parental Styles, MOPS) and determined whether different forms of psychological disorders are associated with specific patterns of parenting styles. 145 inpatients, 108 outpatients and a control group of 633 representative individuals from the general population were investigated by adapting the FDEB. A comparison of dysfunctional parenting styles showed different distress levels within the diagnostic groups: Patients suffering from depression reported high levels of maternal indifference and over protectiveness together with an abusive rearing behavior on the part of both parents. Patients with anxiety disorders reported having overprotective mothers. Bulimic patients as well as those with personality disorders significantly exhibited stress in almost all areas. However, anorexic patients did not differ significantly from the control group, which appeared to be the least affected of all. The FDEB showed a satisfactory differential validity. There was evidence that specific patterns of dysfunctional parenting styles were associated with different diagnostic groups.

  17. Sexual behaviour and dysfunction and help-seeking patterns in adults aged 40-80 years in the urban population of Asian countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolosi, Alfredo; Glasser, Dale B; Kim, Sae C; Marumo, Ken; Laumann, Edward O

    2005-03-01

    To study sexual activity, the prevalence of sexual dysfunction and related help-seeking behaviour among middle-aged and elderly people in Asia. A random population survey was carried out in 2001-2002 among urban residents aged 40-80 years in China, Taiwan, South Korea, Japan, Thailand, Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia and The Philippines, with interviews based on a standardized questionnaire covering demographic details, health, relationships, and sexual behaviours, attitudes and beliefs. An intercept method of sampling was used in all countries except Japan, where questionnaires were mailed to a sample drawn from telephone directories. Sexual dysfunction was defined as persistent sexual problems. The questionnaire was completed by 6700 people (3350 men and 3350 women), giving a response rate of 27%. Across all countries, 82% of men and 64% of women had engaged in sexual intercourse during the year preceding the interview. Most of the respondents considered satisfactory sex an essential means of maintaining a relationship. More than 20% of men and 30% of women complained of having at least one sexual dysfunction, although there were marked variations among the countries. The sexual dysfunctions most frequently reported were early ejaculation (20%; 95% confidence interval, CI, 18-21) and erectile dysfunction (15%, 14-17) among men; and a lack of sexual interest (27%, 25-29), lubrication difficulties (24%, 22-25), and an inability to reach orgasm (23%, 22-25) among women. Of the 948 men and 992 women who were sexually active and reported sexual dysfunctions, 45% did sought no help or advice and only 21% sought medical care. Men and women in Asian countries continue to show sexual interest and activity into middle age and beyond. Although sexual dysfunction is prevalent in this age group, several sociocultural and economic factors appear to be preventing individuals from seeking medical help for these problems.

  18. Lower urinary tract symptoms and male sexual dysfunction: the multinational survey of the aging male (MSAM-7).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosen, R.; Altwein, J.; Boyle, P.; Kirby, R.S.; Lukacs, B.; Meuleman, E.J.H.; O'Leary, M.; Puppo, P.; Robertson, C.; Giuliano, F.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), which are often caused by benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH), and sexual dysfunction are common in older men, with an overall prevalence of >50% in men aged > or =50 years. Men with LUTS have been reported to experience sexual dysfunction, including

  19. Assessment of sexual dysfunction in patients with diabetes mellitus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Sexual dysfunction is a known complication of diabetes mellitus that negatively affects the life of the patient. Most times physicians do not consider it during consultation with diabetics. Its prevalence, types and pattern as well as risk factors have been reported elsewhere including some parts of Nigeria but these ...

  20. [Ineffective sexuality pattern in an adolescent: nursing approach in primary health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-García, Angel; Oter-Quintana, Cristina; Brito-Brito, Pedro Ruymán; Martín-Iglesias, Susana; Alcolea-Cosín, M Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Adolescent is a phase of continual physiological, psychological and social adaptation. It is during this time that young people tend to have their first sexual experiences. Sexual dysfunctions are characterized by important clinical changes in sexual desire and/or by psycho-physiological changes in the sexual response cycle. Premature ejaculation is one of the most frequent sexual dysfunction amongst men, with a higher prevalence in the younger population compared to other populations. The clinical case is presented of a 17 year-old male who experienced difficulties during his sexual relations. It is discussed whether his condition was a sexual dysfunction or ineffective sexual pattern. The care plan which was developed in nursing consultation was described for ineffective sexual pattern; the pending nursing treatment incorporated activities recommended by scientific evidence. Finally, the role of primary health care nursing professionals is pointed out in the detection and approach of sexual problems in adolescents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  1. COMT Val158Met Polymorphism, Executive Dysfunction, and Sexual Risk Behavior in the Context of HIV Infection and Methamphetamine Dependence

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    C. A. Bousman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Catechol-O-methyltransferease (COMT metabolizes prefrontal cortex dopamine (DA, a neurotransmitter involved in executive behavior; the Val158Met genotype has been linked to executive dysfunction, which might increase sexual risk behaviors favoring HIV transmission. Main and interaction effects of COMT genotype and executive functioning on sexual risk behavior were examined. 192 sexually active nonmonogamous men completed a sexual behavior questionnaire, executive functioning tests, and were genotyped using blood-derived DNA. Main effects for executive dysfunction but not COMT on number of sexual partners were observed. A COMT x executive dysfunction interaction was found for number of sexual partners and insertive anal sex, significant for carriers of the Met/Met and to a lesser extent Val/Met genotypes but not Val/Val carriers. In the context of HIV and methamphetamine dependence, dopaminergic overactivity in prefrontal cortex conferred by the Met/Met genotype appears to result in a liability for executive dysfunction and potentially associated risky sexual behavior.

  2. Psychological Treatment Trials for Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder: A Sexual Medicine Critique and Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyke, Robert E; Clayton, Anita H

    2015-12-01

    Publications claim efficacy for treatment of hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) in women with cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) and mindfulness meditation training (MMT). However, no review has evaluated the evidence for these therapies from the rigorous perspective of sexual medicine. The aim of this study was to evaluate the published controlled trials of CBT and MMT for disorders of sexual desire from the perspective of sexual medicine standards of control paradigms, risk/benefit ratios, and clinical significance. MEDLINE was reviewed from the last 10 years. Evaluated study quality via 10 metrics and efficacy as mean change, and proportion of responders and remitters. Three controlled trials support CBT and two controlled trials support MMT. The reports of the trials each lacked several scientific requirements: a hierarchy of endpoints with a planned primary endpoint, sufficient information on the intervention to reproduce it, randomization, adequate control, accepted measures of benefits and harms, compliance data, and/or outcomes of clinical relevance. Psychological treatments for HSDD are not yet supported by adequate clinical trials. The current scientific and regulatory standards for drug treatment trials should also be applicable to psychological treatment trials. © 2015 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  3. Sexual life and sexual wellness in individuals with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) and Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser Syndrome (MRKHS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliegner, Maike; Krupp, Kerstin; Brunner, Franziska; Rall, Katharina; Brucker, Sara Y; Briken, Peer; Richter-Appelt, Hertha

    2014-03-01

    Sexual wellness depends on a person's physical and psychological constitution. Complete Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome (CAIS) and Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser Syndrome (MRKHS) can compromise sexual well-being. To compare sexual well-being in CAIS and MRKHS using multiple measures: To assess sexual problems and perceived distress. To gain insight into participants' feelings of inadequacy in social and sexual situations, level of self-esteem and depression. To determine how these psychological factors relate to sexual (dys)function. To uncover what participants see as the source of their sexual problems. Data were collected using a paper-and-pencil questionnaire. Eleven individuals with CAIS and 49 with MRKHS with/without neovagina treatment were included. Rates of sexual dysfunctions, overall sexual function, feelings of inadequacy in social and sexual situations, self-esteem and depression scores were calculated. Categorizations were used to identify critical cases. Correlations between psychological variables and sexual function were computed. Sexually active subjects were compared with sexually not active participants. A qualitative content analysis was carried out to explore causes of sexual problems. An extended list of sexual problems based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed., text revision, by the American Psychiatric Association and related distress. Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI), German Questionnaire on Feelings of Inadequacy in Social and Sexual Situations (FUSS social scale, FUSS sexual scale), Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSE), Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) subscale depression. Open question on alleged causes of sexual problems. The results point to a far-reaching lack of sexual confidence and sexual satisfaction in CAIS. In MRKHS apprehension in sexual situations is a source of distress, but sexual problems seem to be more focused on issues of vaginal functioning. MRKHS women report being satisfied with their

  4. Psychological Symptoms in Sexually Abused Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Judith A.; Mannarino, Anthony P.

    1988-01-01

    The report examined psychological symptoms exhibited by 24 girls (ages 6-12) evaluated within six months of being sexually abused. Results showed a marked discrepancy between child and parent reports of symptoms with children not reporting as many symptoms of depression, anxiety, or low self-esteem as parents. (Author/DB)

  5. Describing a new syndrome in L5-S1 disc herniation: Sexual and sphincter dysfunction without pain and muscle weakness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nezih Akca

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Little seems to be known about the sexual dysfunction (SD in lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. Aims: Investigation of sexual and sphincter dysfunction in patient with lumbar disc hernitions. Settings and Design: A retrospective analysis. Materials and Methods: Sexual and sphincter dysfunction in patients admitted with lumbar disc herniations between September 2012-March 2014. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed using the Predictive Analytics SoftWare (PASW Statistics 18.0 for Windows (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, SPSS Inc., Chicago, Illinois. The statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. The Wilcoxon signed ranks test was used to evaluate the difference between patients. Results: Four patients with sexual and sphincter dysfunction were found, including two women and two men, aged between 20 and 52 years. All of them admitted without low back pain. In addition, on neurological examination, reflex and motor deficit were not found. However, almost all patients had perianal sensory deficit and sexual and sphincter dysfunction. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of three patients displayed a large extruded disc fragment at L5-S1 level on the left side. In fourth patient, there were not prominent disc herniations. There was not statistically significant difference between pre-operative and post-operative sexual function, anal-urethral sphincter function, and perianal sensation score. A syndrome in L5-S1 disc herniation with sexual and sphincter dysfunction without pain and muscle weakness was noted. We think that it is crucial for neurosurgeons to early realise that paralysis of the sphincter and sexual dysfunction are possible in patients with lumbar L5-S1 disc disease. Conclusion: A syndrome with perianal sensory deficit, paralysis of the sphincter, and sexual dysfunction may occur in patients with lumbar L5-S1 disc disease. The improvement of perianal sensory deficit after surgery was

  6. Weaker masturbatory erection may be a sign of early cardiovascular risk associated with erectile dysfunction in young men without sexual intercourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan-Ping; Chen, Bin; Yao, Feng-Juan; Chen, Sheng-Fu; Ouyang, Bin; Deng, Chun-Hua; Huang, Yi-Ran

    2014-06-01

    Although increasing evidences emphasize the importance of early cardiovascular evaluation in men with erectile dysfunction (ED) of unexplained aetiology, impaired masturbation-induced erections in young men are usually overlooked and habitually presumed to be psychological origin. To evaluate the young men presenting weaker masturbatory erection with no sexual intercourse (WME-NS) and verify if this cohort have early cardiovascular risks associated with ED. Male subjects aged 18-40 years with WME-NS were screened by analyzing detailed sexual intercourse and masturbatory history. The age-matched ED and non-ED population were identified by using International Index of Erectile Function-5 (IIEF-5). All subjects with acute and/or chronic diseases (including diagnosed hypertension and diabetes) and long-term pharmacotherapy were excluded. Nocturnal penile tumescence and rigidity (NPTR), systemic vascular parameters and biochemical indicators related to metabolism were assessed. Comparison analysis and logistic regression analysis were conducted among WME-NS, ED and non-ED population. In total, 78 WME-NS cases (mean 28.99 ± 5.92 years), 179 ED cases (mean 30.69 ± 5.21 years) and 43 non-ED cases (mean 28.65 ± 4.30 years) were screened for analysis. Compared with non-ED group, WME-NS group had higher prevalence of early ED risk factors including endothelial dysfunction, insulin resistance, high level of glycosylated serum protein and abnormal NPTR. Multivariable-adjusted logistic regression analysis showed endothelia dysfunction (odds ratio: 8.83 vs. 17.11, both P benefits by targeting these formulated strategies. © 2014 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  7. No difference in sexual dysfunction after transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) approach for inguinal hernia with fibrin sealant or tacks for mesh fixation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommergaard, H C; Burcharth, J; Andresen, K

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Postoperative sexual dysfunction in relation to laparoscopic groin hernia surgery may be related to methods of mesh fixation. However, this has not been investigated earlier. Moreover, results regarding sexual dysfunction in females have not been reported systematically. The aim...... of this study was to compare fibrin sealant versus tacks for fixation of mesh regarding sexual dysfunction in males and females. METHODS: Using the Danish Hernia Database, patients operated laparoscopically for groin hernia with a transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) procedure with fibrin sealant or tacks...... for mesh fixation were sent a questionnaire regarding sexual dysfunction. Sexually active patients without recurrence were evaluated in this study. RESULTS: Pain during sexual activity was present in 115 of 1019 (11.3 %) males and 17 of 147 (11.6 %) females. There was no difference between fibrin sealant...

  8. Objective assessment of sexual arousal in women with a history of hysterectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, C. P.; ter Kuile, M. M.; Laan, E.; Tuijnman, C. C.; Weijenborg, Ph Th M.; Trimbos, J. B.; Kenter, G. G.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The potential contribution of psychological and anatomical changes to sexual dysfunction following hysterectomy is not clear. Radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer causes surgical damage to the autonomic nerves which are responsible for the increased vaginal blood flow during sexual

  9. Comparison of sexual dysfunction in women with infertility and without infertility referred to Al-Zahra Hospital in 2013-2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Mirblouk

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the affected aspects in infertile women that have not been given sufficient attention is sexual function. Sexual function is a key factor in physical and marital health, and sexual dysfunction could significantly lower the quality of life. Aim of this study was to assess the comparison sexual dysfunction in women with infertility and without infertility, admitted to Al- Zahra Hospital. Objective: We decided to assess the prevalence of women sexual disorders in fertile and infertile subjects, admitted to Al-Zahra Hospital. Materials and Methods: 149 fertile and 147 infertile women who referred to infertility clinic of Al-Zahra Hospital during 2013-2014 were entered this crosssectional study and Female Sexual Function Index questionnaire (FSFI had been filled by all the cases. Most of women were married for 6-10 years (35.5% and mean marriage time in participants was 9.55±6.07 years. Data were analyzed using SPSS software Ver. 18 and χP 2 P test and logistic regression model has been used for analysis. Results: Results showed significant differences between desire (p=0.004, arousal (p=0.001, satisfaction (p=0.022 and total sexual dysfunction (p=0.011 in both groups but in lubrication (p=0.266, orgasm (p=0.61 and pain (p=0.793 difference were not significant. Conclusion: Some of sexual dysfunction indices are high in all infertile women. Our findings suggest that infertility impacts on women’s sexual function in desire, arousal, satisfaction and total sexual dysfunction. Health care professional should be sensitive to impact that diagnosis of infertility can have on women’s sexuality.

  10. Sexual Dysfunction Associated with Physical Disability: A Treatment Guide for the Rehabilitation Practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn-Gray, Beverly E.; Kern, Leslie H.

    1983-01-01

    Treatment guidelines are presented for rehabilitation personnel who work in the area of sexual dysfunction with the physically disabled. A step-by-step discussion of the intervention strategies that may be employed by rehabilitation staff who deal with sexual problems in disabled patients is presented. (Author/SEW)

  11. War related sexual violence and it's medical and psychological consequences as seen in Kitgum, Northern Uganda: A cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite the recent adoption of the UN resolution 1820 (2008) which calls for the cessation of war related sexual violence against civilians in conflict zones, Africa continues to see some of the worst cases of war related sexual violence including the mass sexual abuse of entire rural communities particularly in the Great Lakes region. In addition to calling for a complete halt to this abuse, there is a need for the systematic study of the reproductive, surgical and psychological effects of war related sexual violence in the African socio-cultural setting. This paper examines the specific long term health consequences of war related sexual violence among rural women living in two internally displaced person's camps in Kitgum district in war affected Northern Uganda who accessed the services of an Isis-Women's International Cross Cultural Exchange (Isis-WICCE) medical intervention. Methods The study employed a purposive cross-sectional study design where 813 respondents were subjected to a structured interview as part of a screening procedure for an emergency medical intervention to identify respondents who required psychological, gynaecological and surgical treatment. Results Over a quarter (28.6%) of the women (n = 573) reported having suffered at least one form of war related sexual violence. About three quarters of the respondents had 'at least one gynaecological complaint' (72.4%) and 'at least one surgical complaint' (75.6%), while 69.4% had significant psychological distress scores (scores greater than or equal to 6 on the WHO SRQ-20). The factors that were significantly associated with war related sexual violence were the age group of less than or equal to 44 years, being Catholic, having suffered other war related physical trauma, and having 'at least one gynaecological complaint'. The specific gynaecological complaints significantly associated with war related sexual violence were infertility, chronic lower abdominal pain, abnormal vaginal

  12. War related sexual violence and it's medical and psychological consequences as seen in Kitgum, Northern Uganda: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Were-Oguttu Juliet

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the recent adoption of the UN resolution 1820 (2008 which calls for the cessation of war related sexual violence against civilians in conflict zones, Africa continues to see some of the worst cases of war related sexual violence including the mass sexual abuse of entire rural communities particularly in the Great Lakes region. In addition to calling for a complete halt to this abuse, there is a need for the systematic study of the reproductive, surgical and psychological effects of war related sexual violence in the African socio-cultural setting. This paper examines the specific long term health consequences of war related sexual violence among rural women living in two internally displaced person's camps in Kitgum district in war affected Northern Uganda who accessed the services of an Isis-Women's International Cross Cultural Exchange (Isis-WICCE medical intervention. Methods The study employed a purposive cross-sectional study design where 813 respondents were subjected to a structured interview as part of a screening procedure for an emergency medical intervention to identify respondents who required psychological, gynaecological and surgical treatment. Results Over a quarter (28.6% of the women (n = 573 reported having suffered at least one form of war related sexual violence. About three quarters of the respondents had 'at least one gynaecological complaint' (72.4% and 'at least one surgical complaint' (75.6%, while 69.4% had significant psychological distress scores (scores greater than or equal to 6 on the WHO SRQ-20. The factors that were significantly associated with war related sexual violence were the age group of less than or equal to 44 years, being Catholic, having suffered other war related physical trauma, and having 'at least one gynaecological complaint'. The specific gynaecological complaints significantly associated with war related sexual violence were infertility, chronic lower abdominal pain

  13. Phenomenology of the psychological consequences of sexual abuse in children and adolescents, depending on various factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nutskova E.V.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to psychological consequences of sexual abuse in children and adolescents. It presents review of domestic and foreign research of psychological injury in minors. The article gives results of complex psychological and psychiatric examination of 183 juvenile victims of sexual abuse. Psychological effects of sexual abuse in children and adolescents are identified and described on the basis of age, gender, clinical characteristics of the mental state of the victim, as well as the type and duration of the abuse. Intensity and expressiveness of post-traumatic response as well as coverage of personality spheres increase with aging. The data on the gender specificity of the sexual abuse effects suggest that girls more demonstrate internal forms, while external manifestations dominate in boys. The type and duration of sexual abuse determine a wide range of possible psychological consequences. It is noted that the severity of the psychological effects of sexual abuse in victims with mental disorders associated with the trauma is higher than in victims qualified to be mentally sane or having a mental illness, non-associated with psychologically traumatic situations. Psychological consequences exhibited by mentally sane victims show a decrease in their quality of life.

  14. Female sexual dysfunction in women of reproductive age group in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Family Practice ... real physical, psychological, social, spiritual and cultural problem in Nigeria, yet greatly understudied. ... dysfunction is a significant problem that affects a substantial number of women in this environment.

  15. Perceived discrimination and sexual precursor behaviors in Mexican American preadolescent girls: The role of psychological distress, sexual attitudes, and marianismo beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Delida; Whittaker, Tiffany A; Hamilton, Emma; Zayas, Luis H

    2016-07-01

    This study explored the relation between perceived discrimination and sexual precursor behaviors among 205 Mexican American preadolescent middle school girls. In addition, this study examined whether psychological distress and sexual attitudes mediated and whether marianismo beliefs moderated this relation. A categorical confirmatory factor analysis (CCFA) of the Marianismo Beliefs Scale (MBS) was conducted to test the factor structure with a preadolescent Mexican American population (ages 11-14). A path analysis of analytic models was then performed to examine the hypothesized relations between perceived discrimination, psychological distress, sexual attitudes, marianismo beliefs, and sexual precursor behaviors. Results of the CCFA did not support the original 5-factor structure of the MBS for preadolescent Latina girls. However, a revised version of the MBS indicated an acceptable model fit, and findings from the path analysis indicated that perceived discrimination was both directly and indirectly linked to sexual precursor behaviors via psychological distress. Marianismo was not found to moderate the relation between perceived discrimination and sexual risk behaviors, however certain marianismo pillars were significantly negatively linked with sexual attitudes and precursor behaviors. This study underscores the importance of psychological distress in the perceived discrimination and sexual precursor link as well as the compensatory aspects of marianismo against sexual precursor behaviors in Mexican American preadolescent girls. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Effect of corticotropin-releasing factor receptor antagonist on psychologically suppressed masculine sexual behavior in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Yoshiji; Nagase, Keiko; Oyama, Nobuyuki; Akino, Hironobu; Yokoyama, Osamu

    2011-03-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) coordinates various responses of the body to stress, and CRF receptors are important targets of treatment for stress-related disorders. To investigate the effect of a nonselective CRF receptor antagonist, astressin, on suppression of masculine sexual behavior by psychological stress in rats. First, we investigated the influence of psychological stress, induced 2 hours per day for three consecutive days, on sexual behavior. Then, rats were divided into 4 groups: a control group, an astressin administration group (A), a psychological stress loading group (PS), and a psychological stress loading and astressin administration group (PS + A). The rats were exposed to sham or psychological stress for three consecutive days. After the last stress loading, the rats were injected with vehicle or astressin, and their sexual behavior was observed. We also measured serum levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). The effects of astressin on sexual behavior and serum levels of ACTH in rats affected by psychological stress were determined. Sexual behavior was reduced after psychological stress loading. The PS rats had significantly longer mount, intromission, and ejaculation latencies and lower ejaculation frequency than did the control, A, and PS + A rats. The intromission latency and ejaculation frequency in the PS + A rats did not achieve the level observed in the controls. There was no significant difference in these parameters between the control and A rats. Serum ACTH levels were significantly lower in PS + A rats than in PS rats. Psychologically suppressed masculine sexual behavior could be partially recovered with astressin administration in rats. These data provide a rationale for the further study of CRF receptor antagonists as novel agents for treating psychological sexual disorders. © 2010 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  17. Possible use of psychological corrective measures for people with abnormal sexual preferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babina S.V.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper studies the possibility of psychological corrective measures aimed at persons with abnormal sexual preferences. We reviewed domestic and foreign scientific publications described the treatment of sexual disorders and the basic directions of the therapy, and indicated its positive and negative aspects. We have studied progress notes and etiology of "personality disorders and behavior in adulthood" disease class, "disorders of sexual preference" disease subsection and analyzed the efficiency of the psychopharmacological treatment, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and psychotherapy for each violation of sexual preference. The most productive methods of therapeutic intervention are identified. This analysis allows making the most appropriate scheme of psychological correction and treatment for persons with abnormalities of sexual preference.

  18. Clinical Assessment of Extract in the Treatment of Female Sexual Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos R.B. Gama

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a qualitative—quantitative study based on hospital records of female patients of reproductive age, presenting sexual dysfunction, and treated with 250 mg Tribulus terrestris extract (1 tablet thrice daily for 90 days. Safety monitoring included vital signs, physical examination, laboratory tests, and occurrence of adverse events. Efficacy analysis included results of the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA levels together with total and free testosterone, and the patient and physician assessments. There was a statistically significant improvement in total FSFI scores ( P < 0.0001 post-treatment, with improvement among 106 (88.33% subjects. There was a statistically significant ( P < 0.0001 increase in the level of DHEA, while the levels of both serum testosterone ( P = 0.284 and free testosterone decreased ( P < 0.0001. Most adverse events recorded were related to the gastrointestinal tract. Physical examination showed no significant changes post-treatment. Based on the results, it is concluded that the T. terrestris extract is safe and effective in the treatment of female sexual dysfunction.

  19. Psychological complaints reported by sexually abused children during criminal investigations: Istanbul example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğangün, Burak; Gönültaş, Burak M; Uzun-Oğuz, Esin; Oral, Gökhan; Öztürk, Meral

    2016-06-01

    The present study aims at describing the psychological complaints reported, as a part of the criminal investigation process, by the victims of sexual abuse as a part of the criminal investigation process, without attempting at reaching a medical diagnosis; and it discusses the relation of these reports with variables such as victim's gender, age and relation to the offender, type and duration of abuse, and parental marital status of the victim. Data is obtained from the statements of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) victims under the age of 15, as taken by Istanbul Juvenile Justice Department between the years 2009 and 2012. The sample consists of 175 cases with a total of 202 victim statements. Through the use of content analysis, the main and sub-categories of themes of the statements were determined. By means of the evaluation of the psychological condition of victims, we evaluated them in two categories: psychological complaints including self-harm and risk taking behaviors and psychological complaints with no self-harm and risk taking behaviors. The statistical analyses yield significant relations between the psychological complaints and children's parental marital status. Analysis of initial statements of sexual abuse victims is important as it may greatly contribute to professionals diagnosing and treating psychological complaints of these victims. It is essential that victims of sexual abuse should receive immediate psychological support starting with the criminal investigation process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The influence of atypical antipsychotic drugs on sexual function

    OpenAIRE

    Just, Marek J

    2015-01-01

    Marek J Just Department of General and Endocrine Surgery, Piekary Medical Centre, Piekary Slaskie, Poland Abstract: Human sexuality is contingent upon many biological and psychological factors. Such factors include sexual drive (libido), physiological arousal (lubrication/erection), orgasm, and ejaculation, as well as maintaining normal menstrual cycle. The assessment of sexual dysfunction can be difficult due to the intimate nature of the problem and patients’ unwillingness to di...

  1. Psycho-biological correlates of free-floating anxiety symptoms in male patients with sexual dysfunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona, Giovanni; Mannucci, Edoardo; Petrone, Luisa; Ricca, Valdo; Balercia, Giancarlo; Giommi, Roberta; Forti, Gianni; Maggi, Mario

    2006-01-01

    Anxiety has a relevant impact on everyday life, including sexual life, and therefore is considered the final common pathway by which social, psychological, and biological stressors negatively affect sexual functioning. The aim of this study is to define the psycho-biological correlates of free-floating anxiety in a large sample of patients complaining of erectile dysfunction (ED)-based sexual problems. We studied a consecutive series of 882 ED patients using SIEDY, a 13-item structured interview, composed of 3 scales that identify and quantify organic, relational, and intrapsychic domains. MHQ-A scoring from Middlesex Hospital Questionnaire (MHQ) was used as a putative marker of free-floating anxiety symptoms (AS). Metabolic and hormonal parameters, nocturnal penile tumescence (NPT) test, and penile Doppler ultrasound (PDU) examination were also performed. MHQ-A score was significantly higher in patients complaining of difficulties in maintaining erection and in those reporting premature ejaculation (6.5 +/- 3.3 vs 5.8 +/- 3.3 and 6.6 +/- 3.3 vs 6.1 +/- 3.3, respectively; both P < .05). Moreover, ASs were significantly correlated to life stressors quantified by SIEDY scale 2 (relational component) and scale 3 (intrapsychic component) scores, as dissatisfaction at work or within the family or couple relationships. Among physical, biochemical, or instrumental parameters tested, only end-diastolic velocity at PDU was significantly (P < .05) related to ASs. In conclusion, in patients with ED-based sexual problems, ASs are correlated to many relational and life stressors. Conversely, organic problems are not necessarily associated with MHQ-A score.

  2. The Effects of Sexism, Psychological Distress, and Difficult Sexual Situations on U.S. Women’s Sexual Risk Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyung-Hee; Bowleg, Lisa; Neilands, Torsten B.

    2011-01-01

    Women represent almost half of the people living with HIV worldwide. Although social discrimination has been recognized as a major obstacle to HIV prevention, few empirical studies have examined the effects of sexism on women’s HIV sexual risk behaviors. We analyzed data collected from an ethnically diverse sample of 754 women attending family planning clinics in the San Francisco Bay Area. A majority of respondents reported lifetime experiences of sexism (e.g., 94% reported sexual harassment). Structural equation modeling results demonstrated that experiences of sexism and reports of recent unprotected sex with a primary or a secondary sexual partner were linked through psychological distress and difficult sexual situations. Our results suggest the need to develop HIV prevention strategies for women that address two mechanisms ---psychological distress and difficult sexual situations --- that link social discrimination to women’s sexual risk for HIV. PMID:22010804

  3. Comparison of Sexual Dysfunction Using the Female Sexual Function Index following Surgical Treatments for Uterine Fibroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Ryann Louie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Uterine fibroids are a common problem in women. Statistics showing 20–50% of fibroids produce symptoms and consequently patients seek surgical intervention to improve their quality of life. Treatments for fibroids are typically successful in controlling the fibroid disease, yet sexual function following invasive surgical treatments for fibroids can be jeopardized. The Sexual Function Index (FSFI is a valid instrument producing quantifiable reproducible results. In this paper three case reports are evaluated by the FSFI and compared between the following treatment groups: hysterectomy, myomectomy, and uterine embolization. Our goal is to illustrate how each of these treatment outcomes can result in sexual dysfunction and therefore decreased quality of life. Effects of invasive fibroid treatments on sexual functioning would be helpful in guiding patient’s ultimate decisions regarding treatment.

  4. Determinants of doctors' decisions to inquire about sexual dysfunction in Malaysian primary care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Seng Fah; Low, Wah Yun; Ismail, Shaiful Bahari; Trevena, Lyndal; Wilcock, Simon

    2013-12-01

    Perceptions of how receptive men are to sexual health inquiry may affect Malaysian primary care doctors' decisions to initiate such a discussion with their male patients. This paper quantifies the impact of doctors' perceptions of men's receptivity on male sexual health inquiry. Sexual health inquiry is one of the five areas in a study on determinants of offering preventive health checks to Malaysian men. This was a cross sectional survey among primary care doctors in Malaysia. The questionnaire was based on an empirical model defining the determinants of primary care doctors' intention to offer health checks. The questionnaire measured: (I) perceived receptivity of male patients to sexual health inquiry; (II) doctors' attitudes towards the importance of sexual health inquiries; (III) perceived competence and, (IV) perceived external barriers. The outcome variable was doctors' intention in asking about sexual dysfunction in three different contexts (minor complaints visits, follow-up visits and health checks visits). All items were measured on the Likert scale of 1 to 5 (strongly disagree/unlikely to strongly agree/likely) and internally validated. 198 doctors participated (response rate 70.4%). Female primary care doctors constituted 54.5%. 78% of respondents were unlikely to ask about sexual dysfunction in visits for minor complaints to their male patients, 43.6% in follow up visits and 28.2% in health checks visits. In ordinal regression analysis, positive perception of men's receptivity to sexual health inquiry significantly predicted the doctors' intention in asking sexual dysfunction in all three contexts; i.e., minor complaints visits (P=0.013), follow-up visits (Phealth checks visits (P=0.002). Perceived competence in sexual health inquiry predicted their intention in the follow-up visits (P=0.006) and health checks visits (Phealth checks only predicted their intention in the follow-up visits (P=0.010). Whilst sexual health inquiry should be initiated in an

  5. Hypoactive sexual desire disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Sonia L

    2012-08-01

    Hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) is the most prevalent female sexual dysfunction, with estimates of prevalence approximating 10%. By definition it is a deficiency of sexual desire that causes distress. HSDD has no single cause, but physiological, psychological and socio-cultural factors underpinning female sexual desire may all be important in its development. Medical therapeutic strategies to date have concentrated on modulation of hormone levels, particularly androgen administration, yet few products have been approved for the treatment of HSDD in developed countries. More recent medical targets have included agents with 5-hydroxytryptamine agonist activity. Psychological therapeutic approaches have been infrequently studied but concentrate on cognitive behavioural therapy. HSDD is an evolving diagnosis, the existence of which has been questioned by some critics. Whilst HSDD remains the subject of ongoing research, its title and definition are under debate as a new edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of the American Psychiatric Association approaches publication in 2012.

  6. Correlations between sexual dysfunction, depression, anxiety, and somatic symptoms among patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chiao-Fan; Juang, Yeong-Yuh; Wen, Jung-Kwang; Liu, Chia-Yih; Hung, Ching-I

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the degree of correlation between sexual dysfunction and depression, anxiety, and somatic symptoms among patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and to identify the dimension most predictive of sexual dysfunction. One-hundred and thirty-five outpatients with MDD were enrolled and were treated with open-label venlafaxine 75 mg daily for one month. The Arizona Sexual Experience Scale-Chinese Version (ASEX-CV), Depression and Somatic Symptoms Scale (DSSS), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) were administered at baseline and at one-month follow-up and the improvement percentage (IP) of each scale posttreatment was calculated. Multiple linear regression was used to determine the dimension most predictive of the total ASEX-CV score. Seventy subjects (20 men, 50 women) completed the one-month pharmacotherapy and the four scales. The depression subscale of the HADS was most strongly correlated with the ASEX-CV scale and was the only subscale to independently predict the total ASEX-CV score at the two points. However, the somatic subscale of the DSSS was not correlated with any ASEX-CV item. At the endpoint, depression, anxiety, and somatic symptoms were significantly improved (IP 48.5% to 26.0%); however, very little improvement was observed in the total ASEX-CV score (IP -1.6%). The severity of sexual dysfunction among patients with MDD was most correlated with the severity of the depressive dimension, but not the severity of the somatic dimension. Further studies are indicated to explore the relationships between sexual dysfunction, depression, anxiety, and somatic symptoms.

  7. Behavioral and Psychological Assessment of Child Sexual Abuse in Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Savita; Biswas, Parthasarathy

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the behavioral and psychological assessment of Child Sexual Abuse (CSA) in clinical practice. Following a brief introduction regarding definition and etiology of CSA and discussion on issues of behavioral/psychological consequences of CSA, the paper reviews the various approaches towards behavioral/psychological assessment in…

  8. Sexual and reproductive issues and inflammatory bowel disease: a neglected topic in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allocca, Mariangela; Gilardi, Daniela; Fiorino, Gionata; Furfaro, Federica; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent; Danese, Silvio

    2018-03-01

    There has been considerable literature on sexual issues in women with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but relatively little attention has been paid to these aspects in men. To review the available literature and to provide the best management of sexual and reproductive issues in male patients with IBD. The scientific literature on sexual and reproductive issues in men with IBD was reviewed. Several factors, including surgical and medication treatments, disease activity, lifestyle, and psychological factors, may play a role in the development of infertility and sexual dysfunction and may negatively impact pregnancy outcomes. Proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis increases the risk of erectile and ejaculatory dysfunction by up to 26%. A treatment with sildenafil can be effective. Sperm banking should be advised to young men with IBD before surgery. Both sulfasalazine and methotrexate may be responsible for reversible sexual dysfunction and infertility. Furthermore, sulfasalazine should be switched to mesalazine at least 4 months before conception because of a higher risk of congenital malformations in pregnancies fathered by men treated with this drug. Psychotropic drugs, frequently used in IBD, may cause sexual dysfunction up to 80%. Last but not the least, voluntary childlessness occurs frequently, mainly because of concerns about medication safety in pregnancy and fear of transmitting disease. Accurate counseling, and where necessary, psychological support can decrease any misperceptions and fears. Close collaboration between the gastroenterologist and the patient is recommended for the best management of these relevant, neglected aspects in men with IBD.

  9. Automatic Affective Appraisal of Sexual Penetration Stimuli in Women with Vaginismus or Dyspareunia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijding, Jorg; Borg, Charmaine; Weijmar-Schultz, Willibrord; de Jong, Peter J.

    Introduction. Current psychological views are that negative appraisals of sexual stimuli lie at the core of sexual dysfunctions. It is important to differentiate between deliberate appraisals and more automatic appraisals, as research has shown that the former are most relevant to controllable

  10. Sexual dysfunction and the underlying medical problems in post-menopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheila Nazarpour

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sexual dysfunction could be under the influence of some underlying medical problems. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between medical problems and sexual function in post-menopausal women. Methods: This is a community-based, descriptive-correlation study of 405 post-menopausal women residing in Chalus and Nowshahr cities, North of Iran, aged 40 to 65 years old from October 2013 to May 2014. A multistage, randomized sampling was conducted. The data was acquired through interviews using the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI questionnaire and a researcher-made questionnaire, and was analyzed using descriptive and analytical tests such as multiple linear regression and logistic regression models. Results: 51.4% of the subjects had medical conditions. Cardiovascular disorders were the most common diseases among the subjects. 61% of the women were suffering from female sexual dysfunction (FSD. Sexual dysfunction in patients with medical conditions was significantly higher (P= 0.037. Scores of arousal (P= 0.000, orgasm (P= 0.018, and satisfaction (P= 0.026, as well as the FSFI total score (P= 0.005, were significantly lower in subjects with cardiovascular disorders. Scores of desire (P= 0.001, arousal (P= 0.006, lubrication (P= 0.010, orgasm (P= 0.004, and satisfaction (P= 0.022, as well as the FSFI total score (P= 0.017, were significantly lower in subjects with diabetes. Scores of pain were significantly lower in subjects with musculoskeletal disorders (P= 0.041, they experienced more pain during intercourse. In domains of arousal (P= 0.030, satisfaction (P= 0.040, and pain (P= 0.044, the scores of those taking antihypertensive medications were significantly lower than the scores of the rest of the subjects. Scores of desire (P= 0.001, arousal (P= 0.006, orgasm (P= 0.006, and satisfaction (P= 0.048, as well as the FSFI total score (P= 0.006, were significantly lower in those taking antidiabetic drugs. And lastly

  11. The role of library in sexual dysfunction management among ageing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper looks at sexual dysfunction problems among ageing couples as it leads to family problems such as family disunity between couples, shying away from responsibilities, drunkenness, battering and the like ; then the library information provision role to solve such problems and how far library in our community has ...

  12. Investigating sexual problems, psychological distress and quality of life in female patients with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: A prospective case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffari, Mohsen; Lin, Chung-Ying; Broström, Anders; Mårtensson, Jan; Malm, Dan; Burri, Andrea; Fridlund, Bengt; Pakpour, Amir H

    2017-10-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TSCM) has detrimental effects on both physical and psychological health of sufferers. However, little is known whether TSCM also affects sexual functioning in female patients. The aim of this study was to investigate psychological distress (depression and anxiety), health-related quality of life, and sexual functioning in women with TSCM and compare them with women with acute myocardial infarction and with healthy controls. A three group prospective case-control design was used. Female patients with TSCM or acute myocardial infarction, as well as healthy controls (94 in each group), were recruited across eight Iranian university hospitals. Data were collected at baseline and after six and 18 months using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Short Form-12, the Female Sexual Function Index and the Female Sexual Distress Scale. Multilevel logistic regression was conducted. The TSCM group showed worst sexual functioning and the highest level of anxiety and depression at baseline ( pquality of life at baseline, which was lower in both groups compared with the healthy controls ( pquality of life showed a significant change over time, especially in the TSCM group, with health-related quality of life decreasing, while anxiety and depression were increasing. Compared with the acute myocardial infarction and healthy control groups, the TSCM group showed a higher prevalence of sexual problems (odds ratios = 3.10 and 2.28, respectively) across time. Moreover, sexual functioning was found to be a mediator between anxiety and health-related quality of life in the TSCM group. Depression, anxiety, health-related quality of life, and sexual dysfunction tend to increase over time in female patients with TSCM; thus, healthcare providers should pay attention to these problems and provide appropriate treatment where necessary.

  13. "Macho" Beliefs Moderate the Association Between Negative Sexual Episodes and Activation of Incompetence Schemas in Sexual Context, in Gay and Heterosexual Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Maria Manuela; Nobre, Pedro

    2017-04-01

    Despite the existence of conceptual models of sexual dysfunction based on cognitive theory, few studies have tested the role of vulnerability factors such as sexual beliefs as moderators of the activation of cognitive schemas in response to negative sexual events. To test the moderator role of dysfunctional sexual beliefs in the association between the frequency of negative sexual episodes and the activation of incompetence schemas in gay and heterosexual men. Five-hundred seventy-five men (287 gay, 288 heterosexual) who completed an online survey on cognitive-affective dimensions and sexual functioning were selected from a larger database. Hierarchical regression analyses were conducted to test the hypothesis that dysfunctional sexual beliefs moderate the association between the frequency of unsuccessful sexual episodes and the activation of incompetence schemas. Participants completed the Sexual Dysfunctional Beliefs Questionnaire and the Questionnaire of Cognitive Schemas Activated in Sexual Context. Findings indicated that men's ability for always being ready for sex, to satisfy the partner, and to maintain an erection until ending sexual activity constitute "macho" beliefs that moderate the activation of incompetence schemas when unsuccessful sexual events occur in gay and heterosexual men. In addition, activation of incompetence schemas in response to negative sexual events in gay men was moderated by the endorsement of conservative attitudes toward moderate sexuality. The main findings suggested that psychological interventions targeting dysfunctional sexual beliefs could help de-catastrophize the consequences of negative sexual events and facilitate sexual functioning. Despite being a web-based study, it represents the first attempt to test the moderator role of dysfunctional sexual beliefs in the association between the frequency of unsuccessful sexual episodes and the activation of incompetence schemas in gay and heterosexual men. Overall, findings

  14. [Impact of childhood sexual abuse on the sexual and affective relationships of adult women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Sílvia; Faro, Concepció; Lopetegui, Lourdes; Pujol-Ribera, Enriqueta; Monteagudo, Mònica; Cobo, Jesús; Fernández, María Isabel

    To analyse perceived sexual satisfaction, sexual dysfunction, satisfaction with affective relationships and confidence and communication in existing relationships, related to a past history of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) and type suffered, among women treated as part of the Catalonian Sexual and Reproductive Health Care Programme (PASSIR). Multicentric, descriptive, cross-sectional study. A total of 1,013 women over the age of 18 years, who underwent psychological therapy at any of the 24 PASSIR centres, were enrolled. A structured, anonymised, self-administered Sex History Questionnaire adapted from Wyatt (1985) & Dubé et al. (2005), and the Female Sexual Function Index (Rosen, 2000), were used. Statistical analysis was descriptive, bivariate and multivariate. Women who suffered childhood sexual abuse had a significantly higher prevalence of sexual dysfunction, with lower perceived sexual satisfaction. CSA with penetration or attempted penetration was associated with greater arousal difficulties and greater rejection. Women who experienced CSA were less confident and experienced greater communication difficulties with their partner. It is necessary to identify potential childhood sexual abuse among women who seek therapy due to relationship problems. It is also necessary to continue research into protective factors and therapeutic interventions to alleviate the consequences of CSA in adult life. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Gender nonconformity, sexual orientation, and psychological well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Gerulf; Savin-Williams, Ritch C

    2012-06-01

    Both a same-sex sexual orientation and gender nonconformity have been linked with poorer well-being; however, sexual orientation and gender nonconformity are also correlated. It is, therefore, critical to investigate their independent contributions to well-being. Based on survey responses of 230 female and 245 male high school seniors, the present study is one of the first to provide empirical data on this topic. Both childhood and adolescent gender nonconformity were negatively related to well-being. In the same analyses, neither sexual orientation nor biological sex was a significant predictor of well-being. These results suggest that gender-atypical traits may be more relevant for psychological health than a same-sex sexual orientation. Both environmental and biological influences may account for these findings.

  16. Internalized Stigma among Sexual Minority Adults: Insights from a Social Psychological Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herek, Gregory M.; Gillis, J. Roy; Cogan, Jeanine C.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a social psychological framework for understanding sexual stigma, and it reports data on sexual minority individuals' stigma-related experiences. The framework distinguishes between stigma's manifestations in society's institutions ("heterosexism") and among individuals. The latter include "enacted sexual stigma" (overt…

  17. Sexual and psychological aspects of health status of men who participated in the Chernobyl accident aftermath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leshchinskij, Valerij; Kirkeh, Luchiya; Andronik, Zinaida; Toma, Victoriya; Postovan, Alla

    2011-01-01

    The paper deals with results of a ten years medical follow-up of 188 men aged 21 to 55 years who participated in liquidation of Chernobyl accident consequences. Survey of patients included physical examination, echography of urogenital organs, semen and prostatic secretions analysis, bacterial inoculation of prostate secretion, hormone studies, sexological questionnaire. Sexual dysfunctions were diagnosed in 38 % of men. It was found that sexual dysfunction occur against the background of neurotic disorders that accompany vegetative dysfunctions.

  18. Psychological and sexual changes after the cessation of breast-feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, C; Abraham, S; Taylor, A; Llewellyn-Jones, D

    1994-11-01

    To characterize the effect of breast-feeding cessation on the mood and sexuality of women after the birth of their first child. Women in good physical and psychological health, who had been breast-feeding for 6-23 months and had responded to a request for subjects in a parents' magazine, collected data daily for 2 months before and 2 months after weaning. They were asked to rate 14 measures of psychological, physical, and sexual variables at the same time each day on 3- or 5-point scales. Nineteen women completed the study. Five of these subjects became pregnant before weaning and ceased breast-feeding when pregnancy was confirmed; their last menstrual period was 6 weeks before weaning. The non-pregnant women weaned their babies just before or during menstruation. After weaning, the nonpregnant women reported a significant decrease in fatigue, improvement in mood, and an increase in sexual activity, sexual feelings, and frequency of coitus. Significant changes in fatigue and mood occurred during the second week after weaning; in fatigue, sexual activity, and sexual intercourse during the third week; and in the frequency of sexual intercourse in the fourth week. THe results were not caused by the subjects' expectations about breast-feeding and sexuality or perineal comfort. The women who conceived did not show these changes; a gradual increase in fatigue and decline in sexuality was observed. In women who are not pregnant, the cessation of breast-feeding is associated with an improvement in mood, fatigue, and sexuality.

  19. The Treatment of Sexual Dysfunction in a University Health Service Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babineau, Raymond; Schwartz, Allan J.

    1977-01-01

    Experience of the authors indicates that solo therapists with adequate background in individual and couple therapy, who also have additional training/experience in sex therapy, can provide treatment for sexual dysfunction to student couples in a health service setting with encouraging results. (MB)

  20. Social support for female sexual dysfunction in fibromyalgia

    OpenAIRE

    Granero-Molina, José; Matarín Jimenez, Tamara María; Ramos Rodríguez, Carmen; Hernández-Padilla, José Manuel; Castro-Sánchez, Adelaida Maria; Fernández-Sola, Cayetano

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe and understand experiences related to social support for women with fibromyalgia who suffer from sexual dysfunction. An interpretive qualitative research methodology based on Gadamer’s philosophical hermeneutics was used. Data collection included a focus group and in-depth interviews with 13 women who averaged 44.8 years of age and 14.3 years since being diagnosed with fibromyalgia. Data were analyzed using Fleming’s method and two themes were identified: ...

  1. The impact of vulvar lichen sclerosus on sexual dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haefner, Hope K; Aldrich, Nely Z; Dalton, Vanessa K; Gagné, Hélène M; Marcus, Stephanie B; Patel, Divya A; Berger, Mitchell B

    2014-09-01

    Lichen sclerosus (LS) is a chronic inflammatory condition that is known to arise on the vulva. Many women with LS report vulvar pain, often affecting a patient's quality of life. In this study, the sexual function of LS patients, with and without pain, was compared to control populations. A case-control study to examine the relationship between LS and sexual dysfunction was conducted. A total of 335 women presenting to the gynecology clinic were included in the study: 197 women with biopsy confirmed LS were compared to two control groups (95 asymptomatic women were "healthy" controls and 43 women had vulvovaginal candidiasis) on self-reported current health complaints, medical and surgical history and current symptoms such as pain and itching, type and frequency of sexual activity, and satisfaction with sexual activity. Women with LS reported less frequent sexual activity than healthy controls (p=0.007) and Candida controls (p=0.04). Currently sexually active women with LS were significantly less likely to report vaginal intercourse (71.6%) than healthy controls (89.0%, p=0.003) or Candida controls (100%, p=0.0003), even though similar proportions of all three groups reported that vaginal intercourse was important. Satisfaction towards the quality of current sexual activity was significantly lower among women with LS compared with both the healthy and Candida control groups. 23.7% of women with LS reported that sexual activity was rarely or never satisfactory as compared with 0% of healthy controls (psexual activity and less satisfying sexual activity when compared with controls.

  2. Paraffin Granuloma Associated with Buried Glans Penis-Induced Sexual and Voiding Dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Chon, Wonhee; Koo, Ja Yun; Park, Min Jung; Choi, Kyung-Un; Park, Hyun Jun; Park, Nam Cheol

    2017-01-01

    A paraffinoma is a type of inflammatory lipogranuloma that develops after the injection of an artificial mineral oil, such as paraffin or silicon, into the foreskin or the subcutaneous tissue of the penis for the purpose of penis enlargement, cosmetics, or prosthesis. The authors experienced a case of macro-paraffinoma associated with sexual dysfunction, voiding dysfunction, and pain caused by a buried glans penis after a paraffin injection for penis enlargement that had been perform...

  3. Pelvic floor muscle problems mediate sexual problems in young adult rape victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postma, Riemke; Bicanic, Iva; van der Vaart, Huub; Laan, Ellen

    2013-08-01

    Prior studies have addressed sexual abuse and sexual function in adult women. No studies have focused on the effect of adolescence rape on sexual functioning. To investigate the effect of rape on sexual problems and on pelvic floor problems, as well as the mediating role of pelvic floor problems on sexual problems, in a homogenous group of victims of adolescence rape without a history of childhood sexual, physical, and/or emotional abuse. Sexual functioning and pelvic floor functioning were assessed using self-report questionnaires. In this cross-sectional study, a group of 89 young women aged 18-25 years who were victimized by rape in adolescence was compared with a group of 114 nonvictimized controls. The rape victims were treated for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) 3 years prior to participation in the study. Three years posttreatment, rape victims were 2.4 times more likely to have a sexual dysfunction (lubrication problems and pain) and 2.7 times more likely to have pelvic floor dysfunction (symptoms of provoked vulvodynia, general stress, lower urinary tract, and irritable bowel syndrome) than nonvictimized controls. The relationship between rape and sexual problems was partially mediated by the presence of pelvic floor problems. Rape victims and controls did not differ with regard to sexual activities. Rape victims suffer significantly more from sexual dysfunction and pelvic floor dysfunction when compared with nontraumatized controls, despite the provision of treatment for PTSD. Possibly, physical manifestations of PTSD have been left unaddressed in treatment. Future treatment protocols should consider incorporating (physical or psychological) treatment strategies for sexual dysfunction and/or pelvic floor dysfunction into trauma exposure treatments. © 2013 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  4. Physicians' response to sexual dysfunction presented by a younger vs. An older adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gewirtz-Meydan, Ateret; Ayalon, Liat

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study is to determine whether physicians have an age bias regarding sexual dysfunction presented by older vs. younger patients in terms of attributed diagnosis, etiology, proposed treatment and perceived prognosis. An on-line survey consisting of one of two, randomly administered, case vignettes, which differed only by the age of the patient (28 or 78). In both cases, the patient was described as suffering from occasional erectile dysfunction with a clear psychosocial indication. A total of 236 physicians responded to the survey. Overall, 110 physicians received an "old" vignette and 126 physicians received a "young" vignette. Even though both cases presented with a clear psychosocial etiology, the "older" vignette was more likely to be diagnosed with erectile dysfunction whereas the "younger" vignette was more likely to be diagnosed with performance anxiety. The "older" vignette's dysfunction was more likely to be attributed to hormonal changes, health problems and decreased sexual desire. Physicians were more likely to recommend testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) and PDE5 inhibitors (PDE5i; such as Sildenafil; Vardenafil; Tadalafil) as well as a referral to urology to the "older" vignette. In contrast, the "younger" vignette was more often referred to a sexologist and received a more positive prognosis than the older patient. This study demonstrates an age bias among physicians regarding sexuality in later life. Of particular note is the tendency to prescribe PDE5i to the older patient, despite the clear psychosocial indication presented in the case vignette. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Mood disorders and sexual functioning in women with functional hypothalamic amenorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundon, Carolyn M; Rellini, Alessandra H; Tonani, Silvia; Santamaria, Valentina; Nappi, Rosella

    2010-11-01

    To investigate the sexual function of women with functional hypothalamic amenorrhea (FHA) and to test the mediating effects of depression and anxiety on the sexual functioning of women with FHA. In this cross-sectional study, participants completed questionnaires on sexual function, depression, and anxiety. Tertiary care university hospital. Women with (n=41) and without (n=39) FHA recruited from a gynecologic endocrinology unit. None. The McCoy Female Sexuality Questionnaire assessed sexual function, and the Zung Scale measured depression and anxiety. Women with FHA experienced more sexual function problems and significantly higher depression and anxiety compared to women without menstrual dysfunction. In addition, depression offered a significant explanation for the sexual problems experienced by women with FHA. The psychologic symptoms that contribute to the onset of FHA partially mediate the relationship between FHA and sexual dysfunction. Copyright © 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Prevalence of and risk factors for sexual dysfunction in young Chinese women according to the Female Sexual Function Index: an internet-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Juan; Ruan, Xiangyan; Gu, Muqing; Bitzer, Johannes; Mueck, Alfred O

    2016-06-01

    Female sexual dysfunction (FSD) is a very common sexual health problem worldwide. The prevalence of FSD in Chinese women is, however, unknown. This is the first study to investigate a large number of young women throughout China via the internet, to determine the prevalence and types of FSD and to identify the risk factors for FSD. The primary endpoint was the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) score, with additional questions on contraception, sexual activity, relationship stability, pregnancy and other factors which may influence sexual function. The online questionnaire was completed by women from 31 of the 34 Chinese provinces. A total of 1618 completed questionnaires were received, and 1010 were included in the analyses after screening (62.4%). The mean age of the respondents was 25.1 ± 4.5 years. The mean total FSFI score was 24.99 ± 4.60. According to FSFI definitions (cut-off score 26.55), 60.2% of women were at risk of FSD. Based on domain scores, 52 were considered at high risk of dysfunction for pain (5.1%), 35 for orgasm (3.5%), 33 for desire (3.3%), 20 for arousal (2.0%), 6 for satisfaction (0.6%) and 2 for lubrication (0.2%). The prevalence of FSFI scores indicating risk of sexual dysfunction was about 60% in Chinese women. An unstable relationship, pressure to become pregnant, non-use of contraception, negative self-evaluation of appearance and increasing age were significantly associated with FSD in young Chinese women.

  7. How to recognize late-onset hypogonadism in men with sexual dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona, Giovanni; Rastrelli, Giulia; Vignozzi, Linda; Mannucci, Edoardo; Maggi, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) has been considered the most common form of male hypogonadism with a prevalence of approximately 1 in 100 men. Diagnosis of LOH should be made in symptomatic men with unequivocally low serum testosterone (T) levels. However, its clinical presentation is often insidious and difficult to recognize because it is characterized by nonspecific symptoms that make differential diagnosis with physiological ageing problematic. Sexual dysfunction is the most important determinant for medical consultation and the most specific symptom associated with low T. We therefore analysed a consecutive series of 1734 subjects who attended our unit for sexual dysfunction to investigate the associations between low T (different thresholds), sexual parameters, medical history data (delayed puberty, pituitary disease or cryptorchidism) and their physical exam results. Metabolic parameters, in particular waist circumference, display the greatest accuracy in detecting low T. We found that only the association of several symptoms and signs could significantly raise the clinical suspicion of low T. Structured inventories, which cluster together symptoms and signs of hypogonadism, can help clinicians suspect androgen deficiency. In particular, structured interviews, such as ANDROTEST, have been demonstrated to have a greater accuracy when compared to self reported questionnaires in detecting low T levels. PMID:22286862

  8. Hormonal causes of male sexual dysfunctions and their management (hyperprolactinemia, thyroid disorders, GH disorders, and DHEA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, Mario; Buvat, Jaques; Corona, Giovanni; Guay, André; Torres, Luiz Otavio

    2013-03-01

    Besides hypogonadism, other endocrine disorders have been associated with male sexual dysfunction (MSD). To review the role of the pituitary hormone prolactin (PRL), growth hormone (GH), thyroid hormones, and adrenal androgens in MSD. A systematic search of published evidence was performed using Medline (1969 to September 2011). Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine-Levels of Evidence (March 2009) was applied when possible. The most important evidence regarding the role played by PRL, GH, thyroid, and adrenal hormone was reviewed and discussed. Only severe hyperprolactinemia (>35 ng/mL or 735 mU/L), often related to a pituitary tumor, has a negative impact on sexual function, impairing sexual desire, testosterone production, and, through the latter, erectile function due to a dual effect: mass effect and PRL-induced suppression on gonadotropin secretion. The latter is PRL-level dependent. Emerging evidence indicates that hyperthyroidism is associated with an increased risk of premature ejaculation and might also be associated with erectile dysfunction (ED), whereas hypothyroidism mainly affects sexual desire and impairs the ejaculatory reflex. However, the real incidence of thyroid dysfunction in subjects with sexual problems needs to be evaluated. Prevalence of ED and decreased libido increase in acromegalic patients; however, it is still a matter of debate whether GH excess (acromegaly) may create effects due to a direct overproduction of GH/insulin-like growth factor 1 or because of the pituitary mass effects on gonadotropic cells, resulting in hypogonadism. Finally, although dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfate have been implicated in a broad range of biological derangements, controlled trials have shown that DHEA administration is not useful for improving male sexual function. While the association between hyperprolactinemia and hypoactive sexual desire is well defined, more studies are needed to completely understand the role of other hormones in

  9. Maternal and Paternal Psychological Control as Moderators of the Link between Peer Attitudes and Adolescents' Risky Sexual Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudekerk, Barbara A; Allen, Joseph P; Hafen, Christopher A; Hessel, Elenda T; Szwedo, David E; Spilker, Ann

    2014-05-01

    Maternal and paternal psychological control, peer attitudes, and the interaction of psychological control and peer attitudes at age 13 were examined as predictors of risky sexual behavior before age 16 in a community sample of 181 youth followed from age 13 to 16. Maternal psychological control moderated the link between peer attitudes and sexual behavior. Peer acceptance of early sex predicted greater risky sexual behaviors, but only for teens whose mothers engaged in high levels of psychological control. Paternal psychological control demonstrated the same moderating effect for girls; for boys, however, high levels of paternal control predicted risky sex regardless of peer attitudes. Results are consistent with the theory that peer influences do not replace parental influences with regard to adolescent sexual behavior; rather, parental practices continue to serve an important role either directly forecasting sexual behavior or moderating the link between peer attitudes and sexual behavior.

  10. Maternal and Paternal Psychological Control as Moderators of the Link between Peer Attitudes and Adolescents’ Risky Sexual Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudekerk, Barbara A.; Allen, Joseph P.; Hafen, Christopher A.; Hessel, Elenda T.; Szwedo, David E.; Spilker, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Maternal and paternal psychological control, peer attitudes, and the interaction of psychological control and peer attitudes at age 13 were examined as predictors of risky sexual behavior before age 16 in a community sample of 181 youth followed from age 13 to 16. Maternal psychological control moderated the link between peer attitudes and sexual behavior. Peer acceptance of early sex predicted greater risky sexual behaviors, but only for teens whose mothers engaged in high levels of psychological control. Paternal psychological control demonstrated the same moderating effect for girls; for boys, however, high levels of paternal control predicted risky sex regardless of peer attitudes. Results are consistent with the theory that peer influences do not replace parental influences with regard to adolescent sexual behavior; rather, parental practices continue to serve an important role either directly forecasting sexual behavior or moderating the link between peer attitudes and sexual behavior. PMID:25328265

  11. The effect of intravesical instillations with Hyaluronic Acid on sexual dysfunction in women with recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nightingale, Gemma; Shehab, Qasem; Kandiah, Chandrakumaran; Rush, Lorraine; Rowe-Jones, Clare; Phillips, Christian H

    2018-02-01

    To determine whether sexual dysfunction in women with recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTI) improved following treatment with intravesical Hyaluronic Acid (HA) instillations. Ethical approval was obtained for a prospective study to be performed. Patients referred for bladder instillations to treat RUTI, and who were sexually active, were recruited to the study. A selection of validated questionnaires (ICIQ-UI, ICIQ-VS, FSDS-R, ICIQ-FLUTS, O'Leary/Sant and PGI-I) were completed at baseline, three, six and 12 months after initiation of treatment with bladder instillations. Treatment consisted of weekly bladder instillations with a preparation containing HA for four weeks then monthly for two further treatments. Results were populated in SPSS for statistical analysis and statistical significance was powered for 22 patients. Thirty women were included in the study. FSDS-R was used to determine sexual dysfunction and showed that 57% patients with RUTI had significant sexual distress. There was a significant improvement in FSDS-R at three, six and 12 months when compared to baseline (Friedman two-way analysis p sexual dysfunction, and an improvement in bladder symptoms following treatment with HA. To our knowledge, this is the first study to prove an improvement in sexual dysfunction following intravesical treatment with HA which is sustained for up to 12 months. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Implications of discrimination based on sexuality, gender, and race/ethnicity for psychological distress among working-class sexual minorities: the United for Health Study, 2003-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, David H; Krieger, Nancy; Bennett, Gary G; Lindsey, Jane C; Stoddard, Anne M; Barbeau, Elizabeth M

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the distribution of demographic characteristics, the prevalence of discrimination based on sexuality, gender, and race, and relationships with psychological distress among 178 working-class sexual minorities (i.e., who identified as lesbian, gay, or bisexual (LGB) or had ever engaged in same-sex sexual behaviors) recruited to the United for Health Study (2003-2004). The results indicated considerable heterogeneity in responses to items assessing sexual orientation and sexual behavior, with a majority of sexual minority participants not identifying as LGB (74.2%). The authors found significant demographic differences in LGB identification by gender, race/ethnicity, nativity, and socioeconomic factors. In addition, LGB participants had higher levels of psychological distress than non-LGB-identified sexual minorities. Linear regression analyses revealed that reports of racial/ethnic discrimination and sexuality discrimination were associated with higher levels of psychological distress among sexual minority participants. The results underscore the need to collect multiple measures of sexuality in conducting research on racially diverse working-class communities; to consider demographic factors in collecting sexuality data; and to disaggregate information on sexuality by LGB identification. Findings also highlight the importance of addressing discrimination in ameliorating problematic mental health outcomes among working-class sexual minorities.

  13. Frecuencia de disfunción sexual en un grupo de pacientes diabéticas mexicanas Frequency of sexual dysfunction in a group of Mexican diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Edith Gaspar Ramón

    2013-03-01

    there is a higher frequency of sexual dysfunction in patients who suffer from Type 2 diabetes mellitus as compared with non diabetic patients. Methods: we performed a case study and a control to the "Marina Nacional" Family Medicine Unit in Mexico City. We selected 32 patients suffering from Type 2 diabetes mellitus aged 35 - 50 years who had history of more than two years´ evolution of the disease. The control group was composed of 32 patients of the same age that presented to the same medical unit complaining of other health problems different from chronic diseases. Both groups were applied the same standardized self-assessment questionnaire Arizona Sexual Experience Scale (ASEX. Later, the degree of metabolic control and the time of evolution of the disease with sexual dysfunction were correlated. Results: it was identified that the presence of sexual dysfunction in patients suffering from diabetes mellitus was higher than in non diabetic patients. We found no evidence of the association between sexual dysfunction and the time of evolution of diabetes or between sexual dysfunction and metabolic control. Conclusions: female sexual dysfunction was more frequent in diabetic women.

  14. Sexual Dysfunction Management and Expectations Assessment in Multiple Sclerosis-Female (SEA-MS-F): creation and validation of a specific questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisseriex, Hélène; Guinet-Lacoste, Amandine; Chevret-Méasson, Marie; Costa, Pierre; Sheikh Ismael, Samer; Rousseau, Alexandra; Amarenco, Gerard

    2014-12-01

    Until now, no questionnaire has been developed to study specific expectations concerning sexual dysfunction management and the availability of information on sexuality in the female population affected by multiple sclerosis (MS). Understanding and meeting the patient's expectations is an issue of considerable importance in the evaluation of medical care. We present the development and validation of a specific questionnaire designed for women with MS in order to assess their expectations in terms of sexual dysfunction management: the SEA-MS-F (Sexual Dysfunction Management and Expectations Assessment in Multiple Sclerosis-Female). This questionnaire was created and validated by an expert panel, using the Delphi method. The psychometric evaluation was obtained with a sample of 40 female MS patients. Cronbach's alpha index and principal component analysis were used to measure the questionnaire's internal consistency. A consensus on the questionnaire was reached with the Delphi method. The SEA-MS-F is fully compliant with the criteria for psychometric validation among female MS patients, and its internal consistency is excellent (Cronbach's alpha 0.948). The SEA-MS-F appears to be a useful tool that could be used either in routine medical situations or in prospective studies of MS in order to ascertain women's expectations concerning the management of their sexual dysfunction. © 2014 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  15. Major Depressive Disorder, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, and Generalized Anxiety Disorder: Do the Sexual Dysfunctions Differ?

    OpenAIRE

    Kendurkar, Arvind; Kaur, Brinder

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Major depressive disorder (MDD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) are known to have significant impact on sexual functioning. They have been studied individually. Therefore, this study was planned to compare the sexual dysfunction between MDD, OCD, and GAD with healthy subjects as controls.

  16. The influence of atypical antipsychotic drugs on sexual function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Just MJ

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Marek J Just Department of General and Endocrine Surgery, Piekary Medical Centre, Piekary Slaskie, Poland Abstract: Human sexuality is contingent upon many biological and psychological factors. Such factors include sexual drive (libido, physiological arousal (lubrication/erection, orgasm, and ejaculation, as well as maintaining normal menstrual cycle. The assessment of sexual dysfunction can be difficult due to the intimate nature of the problem and patients’ unwillingness to discuss it. Also, the problem of dysfunction is often overlooked by doctors. Atypical antipsychotic treatment is a key component of mental disorders’ treatment algorithms recommended by the National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence, the American Psychiatric Association, and the British Society for Psychopharmacology. The relationship between atypical antipsychotic drugs and sexual dysfunction is mediated in part by antipsychotic blockade of pituitary dopamine D2 receptors increasing prolactin secretion, although direct correlations have not been established between raised prolactin levels and clinical symptoms. Variety of mechanisms are likely to contribute to antipsychotic-related sexual dysfunction, including hyperprolactinemia, sedation, and antagonism of a number of neurotransmitter receptors (α-adrenergic, dopaminergic, histaminic, and muscarinic. Maintaining normal sexual function in people treated for mental disorders can affect their quality of life, mood, self-esteem, attitude toward taking medication, and compliance during therapy. Keywords: schizophrenia, galactorrhea, hyperprolactinemia, mood disorders, anorgasmia

  17. Phytochemicals and the breakthrough of traditional herbs in the management of sexual dysfunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adimoelja, A

    2000-01-01

    Traditional herbs have been a revolutionary breakthrough in the management of erectile dysfunction and have become known world-wide as an 'instant' treatment. The modern view of the management of erectile dysfunction subscribes to a single etiology, i.e. the mechanism of erection. A large number of pharmacological agents are orally consumed and vasoactive agents inserted intraurethrally or injected intrapenially to regain good erection. Modern phytochemicals have developed from traditional herbs. Phytochemicals focus their mechanism of healing action to the root cause, i.e. the inability to control the proper function of the whole body system. Hence phytochemicals manage erectile dysfunction in the frame of sexual dysfunction as a whole entity. Protodioscin is a phytochemical agent derived from Tribulus terrestris L plant, which has been clinically proven to improve sexual desire and enhance erection via the conversion of protodioscine to DHEA (De-Hydro-Epi-Androsterone). Preliminary observations suggest that Tribulus terrestris L grown on different soils does not consistently produce the active component Protodioscin. Further photochemical studies of many other herbal plants are needed to explain the inconsistent results found with other herbal plants, such as in diversities of Ginseng, Eurycoma longifolia, Pimpinella pruacen, Muara puama, Ginkgo biloba, Yohimbe etc.

  18. Psychological effects of sexual harassment, appraisal of harassment, and organizational climate among U.S. Army soldiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, L N; Martin, L

    1998-02-01

    This study examines the effects of three types of unwanted sexual experiences in the workplace on the psychological well-being of male and female U.S. Army soldiers, and the mediating or moderating roles of appraisal of sexual harassment, organizational climate, and the sociodemographic profile of victims. A survey was administered to 1,060 male soldiers and 305 female soldiers between May and July, 1995, at three Army posts in the United States. Unwanted sexual experiences were found to be significant predictors of psychological symptoms for male and female soldiers. Certain aspects of organizational climate and appraisal of sexual harassment were also significant predictors of psychological symptoms.

  19. Talking About Sex When Sex Is Painful: Dyadic Sexual Communication Is Associated With Women's Pain, and Couples' Sexual and Psychological Outcomes in Provoked Vestibulodynia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rancourt, Kate M; Rosen, Natalie O; Bergeron, Sophie; Nealis, Logan J

    2016-11-01

    Provoked vestibulodynia (PVD) is a recurrent vulvovaginal pain condition associated with psychological and sexual consequences for affected women and their partners, including lower quality of dyadic sexual communication compared to pain-free couples. Although greater sexual communication is associated with positive sexual and relational outcomes for both pain-free couples and couples experiencing painful sex, little is known about its role in women's pain and psychological outcomes, especially in a relational context. The present study examined associations between dyadic sexual communication and pain, sexual satisfaction, sexual functioning, and depressive symptoms in a sample of 107 couples in which the woman was diagnosed with PVD via a standardized gynecological assessment. Women completed a measure of pain intensity, and both members of the couple completed measures of their dyadic sexual communication, sexual satisfaction, sexual functioning, and depressive symptoms. Analyses were guided by the actor-partner interdependence model. Women and partners' own perceptions of greater dyadic sexual communication were associated with their own greater sexual satisfaction and sexual functioning, and lower depressive symptoms. Partners' perceptions of greater dyadic sexual communication were also associated with women's lower pain and greater sexual satisfaction. Results point to the importance of dyadic coping conceptualizations for both individual and interpersonal outcomes in PVD. Dyadic sexual communication may be a key treatment target for interventions aimed at improving the pain and psychological and sexual impairments of women with PVD and their partners.

  20. Sexual Dysfunction and Hyperprolactinemia in Male Psychotic Inpatients: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Johnsen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Sexual dysfunction (SD and hyperprolactinemia are frequently reported in patients with psychotic disorders and have the potential for severe complications but investigations in males are particularly scarce. The primary aims were to determine the prevalence of SD and hyperprolactinemia in male patients and to investigate whether associations exist between SD and prolactin levels. Methods. Cross-sectional data were obtained at discharge from the hospital or 6 weeks after admittance for patients acutely admitted for psychosis and treated with a second-generation antipsychotic drug. Results. Half the patients reported diminished sexual desire and more than a third reported erectile and ejaculatory dysfunctions with no differences among the drugs. More than half the sample was hyperprolactinemic. No association was found between prolactin levels and SD. Conclusion. High rates of SD and hyperprolactinemia were found in male patients and should be a treatment target. SD and hyperprolactinemia were not correlated.

  1. Disclosure and Psychological Well-Being of Sexually Abused Adolescents in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Kindy Yuk-Ip

    2015-01-01

    The role of disclosure on psychological well-being of adolescents with child sexual abuse experience was investigated in a subsample of 74 disclosers among 800 adolescents recruited in the community in Hong Kong. The results supported that CSA experiences have differential impact on adolescents' psychological well-being. Family characteristics of the disclosers accounted for only a small amount of the variance in an array of psychological well-being measures. CSA characteristics were robust predictors of disclosers' sexual eroticism and externalizing behavioral symptoms. Disclosers' cognitive appraisal of CSA experience and quality of parental attachment were strong predictors of their self-esteem and internalizing behavioral problems. After controlling for the aforementioned factors, negative disclosure experience still significantly predicted lower self-esteem, higher sexual anxiety, more internalizing behavior, and more severe post-traumatic stress disorder responses. Research to understand the factors that generate negative disclosure experiences is needed for developing effective intervention strategies to mitigate the negative consequences of disclosure.

  2. Is Pornography Use Associated with Sexual Difficulties and Dysfunctions among Younger Heterosexual Men?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landripet, Ivan; Štulhofer, Aleksandar

    2015-05-01

    Recent epidemiological studies reported high prevalence rates of erectile dysfunction (ED) among younger heterosexual men (≤40). It has been suggested that this "epidemic" of ED is related to increased pornography use. However, empirical evidence for such association is currently lacking. This study analyzes associations between pornography use and sexual health disturbances among younger heterosexual men using four large-scale online samples from three European countries. The analyses were carried out using a 2011 cross-sectional online study of Croatian, Norwegian, and Portuguese men (Study 1; N = 2,737) and a 2014 cross-sectional online study of Croatian men (Study 2; N = 1,211). Chi-square test and multivariate logistic regression were used to explore the associations between pornography use and sexual difficulties. In Study 1, erectile difficulties, inability to reach orgasm, and a lack of sexual desire were measured using the Global Study of Sexual Attitudes and Behavior indicators. In Study 2, ED was measured with the abridged International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5). Delayed ejaculation and a decrease of sexual desire were assessed with one-item indicators. In Study 1, only the relationship between pornography use and ED among Croatian men was statistically significant (χ(2) [2] = 18.76, P pornography, moderate but not high frequency of pornography use increased the odds of reporting ED (adjusted odds ratio = 0.53, P pornography use and male sexual dysfunctions were observed. We found little evidence of the association between pornography use and male sexual health disturbances. Contrary to raising public concerns, pornography does not seem to be a significant risk factor for younger men's desire, erectile, or orgasmic difficulties. © 2015 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  3. Adult Disclosure of Sexual Abuse: A Primary Cause of Psychological Distress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNulty, Craig; Wardle, Jane

    1994-01-01

    This paper surveys research evidence relating to the disclosure of childhood sexual abuse by adults and argues that, for some adults, the disclosure of sexual abuse may be a primary cause of psychological distress, resulting in the dissolution of social support systems and increasing the individual's vulnerability to psychiatric disorder.…

  4. Medical and Psychology Students' Knowledge and Attitudes regarding Aging and Sexuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Rachel J.; Zweig, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    The current study surveys medical and doctoral psychology students (N = 100) from an urban northeastern university regarding knowledge and attitudes toward elderly sexuality and aging using the Facts on Aging Quiz, the Aging Sexuality Knowledge and Attitudes Scale, and measures of interest in gerontology, academic/clinical exposure to aging and…

  5. Sexuality of men with fibromyalgia: what are the factors that cause sexual dysfunction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batmaz, Ibrahim; Sarıyıldız, Mustafa Akif; Dilek, Banu; Inanır, Ahmet; Demircan, Zeynep; Hatipoğlu, Namık; Atar, Murat; Cevik, Remzi

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of the present study is to compare male patients with the fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) with healthy individuals in terms of the sexual function. For the purposes of this study, 37 sexually active male FMS patients and 30 healthy controls were enrolled. The demographic data of the patients were recorded, and the widespread pain observed in FMS was graded with the help of the visual analogue scale (VAS 0-100 mm). Sexual function was assessed according to the international index of erectile function (IIEF) scoring system. The disease-related quality of life was measured with the help of the Short Form-36 quality of life questionnaire (SF-36 QoL). Levels of anxiety and depression observed in the patients were graded through the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Patients with FMS had significantly lower scores in each of the five domains of the IIEF in comparison with the healthy control group (p psychological status (p > 0.05). FMS leads to an impairment in the sexual function in male patients, which is especially strongly associated with the age, widespread pain and the quality of life.

  6. Possibility of psychological correction of sexual anomalies in hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babina S.V.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the possibilities of psychological correction of sexual anomalies in the hospital. We reviewed modern Russian and foreign literature on the treatment of disorders of sexual preference and singled out the main directions of therapy of disorders of sexual preference. We presents a comparative analysis of three therapeutic approaches for the treatment of sexual anomalies (psychopharmacological treatment, cognitive-behavioral therapy, psychotherapy to determine their effectiveness and assess the relevance of the role of the psychologist in conducting therapy. These approaches are discussed on the following criteria: therapy target, therapy aims, the extent and depth of changes, specific treatments. The positive and negative aspects of different treatments are indicated. The review allows the conclusion on correct organization of maximum effective treatment of sexual disorders and on the role of the psychologist in the creation and implementation of therapeutic schemes. We also replenished some of the gaps in Russian studies on treatment of sexual behavior disorders.

  7. Female Sexual Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Overview Persistent, recurrent problems with sexual response, desire, orgasm or pain — that distress you or strain your ... You have persistent or recurrent difficulty in achieving orgasm after sufficient sexual arousal and ongoing stimulation. Sexual ...

  8. Sexual and reproductive function in spinal cord injury and spinal surgery patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore H. Albright

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Sexual and reproductive health is important quality of life outcomes, which can have a major impact on patient satisfaction. Spinal pathology arising from trauma, deformity, and degenerative disease processes may be detrimental to sexual and reproductive function. Furthermore, spine surgery may impact sexual and reproductive function due to post-surgical mechanical, neurologic, and psychological factors. The aim of this paper is to provide a concise evidence-based review on the impact that spine surgery and pathology can have on sexual and reproductive function. A review of published literature regarding sexual and reproductive function in spinal injury and spinal surgery patients was performed. We have found that sexual and reproductive dysfunction can occur due to numerous etiological factors associated with spinal pathology. Numerous treatment options are available for those patients, depending on the degree of dysfunction. Spine surgeons and non-operative healthcare providers should be aware of the issues surrounding sexual and reproductive function as related to spine pathology and spine surgery. It is important for spine surgeons to educate their patients on the operative risks that spine surgery encompasses with regard to sexual dysfunction, although current data examining these topics largely consists of level IV data.

  9. The Effect of False Physiological Feedback on Sexual Arousal in Sexually Functional and Dysfunctional Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    functioning group 7 LIST OF TABLES Table 1. Zilbergeld’s (1999) Myths of Male Sexuality Table 2. Timeline of Information Collected During the Study...have some degree of calcification in their phallus to aid entry into the vagina . Protracted erections for the purpose of pleasure are extremely rare...or cultural taboos about sex that influenced their cognitive development. In addition, dysfunctional men tend to believe more myths about sex than

  10. Distress, sexual dysfunctions, and DSM: Dialogue at cross purposes?

    OpenAIRE

    Hendrickx, Lies; Gijs, Luk; Enzlin, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. A distress criterion was added to the diagnostic criteria of sexual dysfunctions in Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition DSM-IV; 1994). This decision was neither based on empirical evidence, nor on an open, academic, or public debate about its necessity. As a result, this decision has been disputed ever since the publication of DSM-IV. Aim. In this article, the necessity to include or exclude the distress criterion from the diagnostic criteria of...

  11. Sexual harassment on the job: psychological, social and economic repercussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, H L

    1984-09-01

    This article is an effort to shed new light on what has been commonly termed sexual harassment, to identify its forms and, most importantly, to explore its effect upon those who have been subjected to it. The author's hypothesis is that sexual harassment in the workplace is more a social phenomenon than a personal problem, and that it is the cause of lasting psychological, social and economic after-effects among its victims. Combatting sexual harassment is only part of the solution; we must look beyond its legal aspects to find ways of changing male-female occupational relationships, and we must provide support to victims of sexual harassment.

  12. Changes in sexual functioning in women after neuromodulation for voiding dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yih, Jessica M; Killinger, Kim A; Boura, Judith A; Peters, Kenneth M

    2013-10-01

    Sacral neuromodulation is a well-established treatment for urinary and bowel disorders with potential use for other disorders such as sexual dysfunction. To evaluate changes in sexual functioning in women undergoing neuromodulation for voiding symptoms. Patients enrolled in our prospective, observational neuromodulation database study were evaluated. Data were collected from medical records, and patient-completed Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) and Interstitial Cystitis Symptom-Problem Indices (ICSI-PI) at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 months post-implant. Patients rated overall change in sexual functioning on scaled global response assessments (GRA) at 3, 6, and 12 months post-implant. We grouped women by baseline FSFI scores: less (scoresexually functional (score≥26). Data were analyzed with Pearson's Chi-square or Fisher's Exact test and repeated measures. Changes in FSFI and ICSI-PI scores in women grouped by baseline FSFI scoresexually active at baseline, 10 became sexually active during follow-up. In the FSFI≥26 group there was slight but statistically significant decline in mean scores between baseline and 12 months (N=9; 27.4±1.1 to 24.5±3.4; P=0.0302); however one had become sexually inactive. A significant decrease was seen in the satisfaction domain. Many factors affect sexual functioning in women; however sexual function may improve along with urinary symptoms after neuromodulation. © 2013 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  13. Sport and male sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgrò, P; Di Luigi, L

    2017-09-01

    The relationships between sport and sexuality in males are of great social and clinical interest, because of sports and motor activities that highly promote social and sexual relationships. Even if few literature exist, two main questions should be taken into account: whether and how physical exercise and sport positively or negatively influence sexual health and behavior and/or whether and how sexual behavior may affect a sub-sequent sport performance. Physical exercise and sport per se can influence, positively or negatively, the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis function and, consequently, the individual's reproductive and/or sexual health. This depends on individual factors such as genetic and epigenetic ones and on different variables involved in the practice of sport activities (type of sport, intensity and duration of training, doping and drug use and abuse, nutrition, supplements, psychological stress, allostatic load, etc.). If well conducted, motor and sport activities could have beneficial effects on sexual health in males. Among different lifestyle changes, influencing sexual health, regular physical activity is fundamental to antagonize the onset of erectile dysfunction (ED). However, competitive sport can lead both reproductive and/or sexual tract damages and dysfunctions, transient (genital pain, hypoesthesia of the genitalia, hypogonadism, DE, altered sexual drive, etc.) or permanent (hypogonadism, DE, etc.), by acting directly (traumas of the external genitalia, saddle-related disorders in cyclists, etc.) or indirectly (exercise-related hypogonadism, drug abuse, doping, stress, etc.). Sexual activities shortly performed before a sport competition could differently influence sport performance. Due to the few existing data, it is advisable to avoid an absolute pre-competition sexual abstinence.

  14. Determinants of sexual dysfunction and interventions for patients with obstructive sleep apnoea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinke, E; Palm Johansen, P; Fridlund, B

    2016-01-01

    -analysis. RESULTS: Sexual function was affected similarly in both genders, but effective interventions were reported only for men. In some studies, OSA severity and medications contributed to greater sexual dysfunction. In women, menopausal status, hormone levels and SaO2 ... literature review was conducted using PubMed, CINAHL, Cochrane and TRIP, and articles published between January 2004 and December 2014 in English; original research; adults ≥ 18 years; and both experimental and non-experimental designs. The Effective Public Health Practice Project Quality Assessment Tool...

  15. A Comparison of Sexual Dysfunctions in Female Patients with Major Depressive Disorder and Panic Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Tonguç Demir Berkol; Süheyla Doðan Bulut; Esra Alataþ; Dicle Görkem; Esra Çavdar; Ýlker Özyýldýrým

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is assessment of sexual dysfunction in female patients with major depressive disorder and panic disorder and compare the two groups. Methods: Total 76 female patients with primary diagnosis of major depressive disorder ( 46 patients) and panic disorder ( 30 patients) according to DSM-IV, who is sexually active and not use psychotropic medication were inclued. Sociodemographic data aqcusition form and the Arizona Sexual Experiences Scale (ASEX) were adminis...

  16. Long-term impacts of vaginal birth with mediolateral episiotomy on sexual and pelvic dysfunction and perineal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Bülent; Gün, İsmet; Özdamar, Özkan; Yılmaz, Ali; Muhçu, Murat

    2017-02-01

    To investigate whether spontaneous vaginal birth with mediolateral episiotomy has any long-term impact on urinary and/or fecal incontinence, sexual dysfunction and perineal pain in primiparous women. This matched case-control study included 150 women between 25 and 35 years old who had a singleton childbirth at least five years previously. Patients were grouped as; women who had a spontaneous vaginal delivery with mediolateral episiotomy (Group 1), an elective cesarean delivery (Group 2), and who had no delivery (Group 3). Controls were matched for age and delivery time. Urinary/fecal incontinence were questioned and Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) questionnaire was completed. Total FSFI and domain scores were compared. Statistical evaluation was performed using One-way ANOVA test or χ 2 test. Statistical significance was defined as p sexual dysfunction. Mean total FSFI points in Group 1 were significantly lower than in Groups 2 and 3 (p = 0.001). There were significant differences in sexual desire between groups 1 and 3 (p = 0.005), in arousal and in orgasm between both groups 1 and 2 (p = 0.001 and p = 0.038, respectively) and groups 1 and 3 (p = 0.001 and p = 0.001, respectively). There was no significant difference between groups 2 and 3 in any parameters or total points. Vaginal delivery with mediolateral episiotomy is not associated with urinary and/or fecal incontinence and sexual dysfunction but associated with a decreased sexual functioning as well as sexual desire, arousal and orgasm within postpartum five years.

  17. An Overlooked Factor in Sexual Abuse: Psychological and Physical Force Examined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Scott A.

    1998-01-01

    Separate studies of sex offenders in treatment while serving prison sentences and placed on probation suggest that psychological force is more commonly used in sexual assault than physical force. Seven types of psychological force are described, and the conceptual validity of this schematic for use in treatment is evaluated. (Author/EMK)

  18. Prevalence of sexual dysfunction and its associated factors in women aged 40-65 years with 11 years or more of formal education: a population-based household survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana L. R. Valadares

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prevalence of sexual dysfunction and its associated factors in middle-aged women with 11 years or more of formal education. METHODS: A cross-sectional, population-based study was carried out using an anonymous, self-response questionnaire. A total of 315 Brazilian-born women, 40-65 years of age with 11 years or more of schooling, participated in the study. The instrument used in the evaluation was based on the Short Personal Experiences Questionnaire. Sexual dysfunction was calculated from the mean score of sexual responsiveness (pleasure in sexual activities, excitation and orgasm, frequency of sexual activities and libido. Sociodemographic and clinical factors were evaluated. Poisson multiple regression analysis was carried out and the prevalence ratios with respective 95% confidence intervals (95%CI were calculated. RESULTS: The prevalence of sexual dysfunction was 35.9% among our study population. Multiple regression analysis showed that sexual dysfunction was positively associated with older age (prevalence ratios=1.04; 95%CI:1.01-1.07 and with the presence of hot flashes (prevalence ratios=1.37; 95%CI:1.04-1.80. Having a sexual partner (PR=0.47; 95%CI:0.34-0.65 and feeling well or excellent (prevalence ratios= 0.68; 95%CI: 0.52-0.88 were factors associated with lower sexual dysfunction scores. CONCLUSIONS: Sexual dysfunction was present in more than one-third of women that were 40-65 years of age with 11 years or more of formal education. Within that age group, older age and hot flashes were associated with higher sexual dysfunction scores, whereas feeling well and having a sexual partner were associated with better sexuality.

  19. Paraffin Granuloma Associated with Buried Glans Penis-Induced Sexual and Voiding Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wonhee Chon

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A paraffinoma is a type of inflammatory lipogranuloma that develops after the injection of an artificial mineral oil, such as paraffin or silicon, into the foreskin or the subcutaneous tissue of the penis for the purpose of penis enlargement, cosmetics, or prosthesis. The authors experienced a case of macro-paraffinoma associated with sexual dysfunction, voiding dysfunction, and pain caused by a buried glans penis after a paraffin injection for penis enlargement that had been performed 35 years previously. Herein, this case is presented with a literature review.

  20. COPING AS A MEDIATOR OF INTERNALIZED HOMOPHOBIA AND PSYCHOLOGICAL DISTRESS AMONG YOUNG ADULT SEXUAL MINORITY WOMEN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaysen, Debra; Kulesza, Magdalena; Balsam, Kimberly F; Rhew, Isaac C; Blayney, Jessica A; Lehavot, Keren; Hughes, Tonda L

    2014-09-01

    Sexual minorities have higher rates of depression and anxiety than their heterosexual counterparts. This elevated risk of psychological distress has generally been hypothesized to be a result of the effects of discrimination including internalized negative beliefs about sexual minorities. However, little research has examined the role of various types of coping in mediating between internalized homophobia and mental health. We tested the direct relationship between internalized homophobia and psychological distress and evaluated general and sexual minority-specific coping strategies as potential mediators using structural equation modeling. Data are from a national sample of 1,099 young adult sexual minority women who were on average 20.86 ( SD = 2.12) years old, participating in a study on mental health and substance use. The model demonstrated acceptable fit, χ 2 (83) = 402.9, p homophobia and psychological distress, sexual minority-specific coping did not. Our findings support previous studies that have demonstrated the impact of internalized homophobia on psychological distress as well as the role of coping as a protective/risk factor in this relationship.

  1. A double-blind placebo-controlled trial of maca root as treatment for antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dording, Christina M; Schettler, Pamela J; Dalton, Elizabeth D; Parkin, Susannah R; Walker, Rosemary S W; Fehling, Kara B; Fava, Maurizio; Mischoulon, David

    2015-01-01

    Objective. We sought to demonstrate that maca root may be an effective treatment for antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction (AISD) in women. Method. We conducted a 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of maca root (3.0 g/day) in 45 female outpatients (mean age of 41.5 ± 12.5 years) with SSRI/SNRI-induced sexual dysfunction whose depression remitted. Endpoints were improvement in sexual functioning as per the Arizona Sexual Experience Scale (ASEX) and the Massachusetts General Hospital Sexual Function Questionnaire (MGH-SFQ). Results. 45 of 57 consented females were randomized, and 42 (30 premenopausal and 12 postmenopausal women) were eligible for a modified intent-to-treat analysis based on having had at least one postmedication visit. Remission rates by the end of treatment were higher for the maca than the placebo group, based on attainment of an ASEX total score ≤ 10 (9.5% for maca versus 4.8% for placebo), attaining an MGH-SFQ score ≤ 12 (30.0% for maca versus 20.0% for placebo) and reaching an MGH-SFQ score ≤ 8 (9.5% for maca versus 5.0% for placebo). Higher remission rates for the maca versus placebo group were associated with postmenopausal status. Maca was well tolerated. Conclusion. Maca root may alleviate SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction in postmenopausal women. This trial is registered with NCT00568126.

  2. A Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Trial of Maca Root as Treatment for Antidepressant-Induced Sexual Dysfunction in Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina M. Dording

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We sought to demonstrate that maca root may be an effective treatment for antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction (AISD in women. Method. We conducted a 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of maca root (3.0 g/day in 45 female outpatients (mean age of 41.5 ± 12.5 years with SSRI/SNRI-induced sexual dysfunction whose depression remitted. Endpoints were improvement in sexual functioning as per the Arizona Sexual Experience Scale (ASEX and the Massachusetts General Hospital Sexual Function Questionnaire (MGH-SFQ. Results. 45 of 57 consented females were randomized, and 42 (30 premenopausal and 12 postmenopausal women were eligible for a modified intent-to-treat analysis based on having had at least one postmedication visit. Remission rates by the end of treatment were higher for the maca than the placebo group, based on attainment of an ASEX total score ≤ 10 (9.5% for maca versus 4.8% for placebo, attaining an MGH-SFQ score ≤ 12 (30.0% for maca versus 20.0% for placebo and reaching an MGH-SFQ score ≤ 8 (9.5% for maca versus 5.0% for placebo. Higher remission rates for the maca versus placebo group were associated with postmenopausal status. Maca was well tolerated. Conclusion. Maca root may alleviate SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction in postmenopausal women. This trial is registered with NCT00568126.

  3. Psychobiological correlates of women's sexual interest as perceived by patients with erectile dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona, Giovanni; Bandini, Elisa; Fisher, Alessandra; Elisa, Maseroli; Boddi, Valentina; Balercia, Giancarlo; Sforza, Alessandra; Forti, Gianni; Mannucci, Edoardo; Maggi, Mario

    2010-06-01

    We have recently reported that the perceived loss of a partner's sexual desire is independently associated with an increased incidence of major cardiovascular events in patients with erectile dysfunction (ED). No study has ever evaluated the specific impact of men's perception of women's sexual desire on male sexual function and lifestyle attitudes in ED subjects. To evaluate the clinical correlates of the perception of a partner's sexual desire [hypoactive sexual desire (HSD)] in a consecutive series of subjects seeking medical care for ED. A consecutive series of 2,303 heterosexual male patients (mean age 58.1 ± 10.5) was studied. Patients were interviewed with the Structured Interview on Erectile Dysfunction (SIEDY) structured interview. They also completed the Middlesex Hospital Questionnaire, a brief questionnaire for the screening of the symptoms of mental disorders. Among the patients studied, 458 (19.9%) reported a mild loss of their partner's desire, 302 (13.1%) a moderate reduction of libido, while 118 (5.1%) complained of a complete absence of sexual interest on the part of their partner. After adjustment for confounding factors, the perceived women's HSD was associated with different sexual, lifestyle, and relational factors. In particular, more extra-marital affairs, a longer and more hostile couple relationship, as well as a stressful job and both alcohol and smoking abuse were all significantly associated with perceived women's HSD. In addition, the perceived women's moderate to severe HSD was significantly associated with severe ED and less frequent sexual intercourse. Finally, partner HSD was significantly associated with a stepwise increase of free-floating anxiety and depressive symptoms (adj. r = 0.081, P < 0.05 and 0.158, P < 0.0001, respectively). Perceived sexual interest (éros) on the part of the woman can be seen for men not only as a fun and enjoyable behavior, but also a safe strategy for improving a man's overall health and life

  4. Flexibility in Men's Sexual Practices in Response to Iatrogenic Erectile Dysfunction after Prostate Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary W. Dowsett, PhD

    2014-08-01

    Conclusions: Flexibility in sexual practice is possible for some men, both nonheterosexual and heterosexual, in the face of iatrogenic ED. Advising PCa patients of the possibilities of sexual strategies that include AI may help them in reestablishing a sex life that is not erection dependent. Dowsett GW, Lyons A, Duncan D, and Wassersug RJ. Flexibility in men's sexual practices in response to iatrogenic erectile dysfunction after prostate cancer treatment. Sex Med 2014;2:115–120.

  5. Marriage and Sexuality from a Psychiatric Point of View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Bozkurt

    Full Text Available Sexuality, taking on a shape in the interaction of psychological, social, and biological variables, may lose its functionality with the blockage of these components. Sexual dysfunction may be handled as if it is only a symptom being based on the decay of marital relationship in the content of therapy, and sexual dysfunction may be neglected by family and marriage therapists from time to time. Contrarily, sex therapists may show the tendency to handle the problem in aspect of only sexuality. In the relationships of all spouses, thought and emotional intimacy should not be neglected whatever sexual problem they may have. Factors determining happiness such as physical attractiveness, impressiveness, positive and negative attitudes, marriage age, children, socioeconomic conditions, common intentions, and hobbies, sexual life, have attracted the attention of investigators for long time. Most important element among these factors seems to be sexuality. In recent years, researchers have begun to consider interaction between sexuality and marriage much more. Marital life includes food, shelter, togetherness, satisfaction originated from positive marital relationships, sharing role to cause of sexual maturation, acceptance of social role, and responsibility, individual entrepreneurship, and supporting to creativity. Marriage, consisting of spouses completing each other in these fields, is the headstone of social development and maturation. It has been suggested that there is a role of sexual dysfunction in protecting the balance of marital relationships. According to this suggestion, these disorders may prevent any damage to self and conserve the border of ego. Moreover, we may suggest that sexual dysfunction breaks the marital relationship, removes the protective effect on marital balance if we consider the beneficial effects of sexuality in points of intimacy in thought and emotional fields. Sexuality can be only experienced with healthy personality

  6. Long-term anorectal, urinary and sexual dysfunction causing distress after radiotherapy for anal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sunesen, K G; Nørgaard, M; Lundby, L

    2015-01-01

    . For each symptom we assessed frequency and severity and the level of symptom-induced distress (no, little, moderate or great distress). RESULTS: Of 94 eligible patients, 84 (89%) returned the completed questionnaire at a median of 33 months after radiotherapy. Incontinence for solid stools, liquid stools...... function. CONCLUSION: Distressing long-term anorectal and sexual dysfunction was common after radiotherapy for anal cancer, and morbidity due to urinary dysfunction was moderate....

  7. In sickness and in wealth: psychological and sexual costs of income comparison in marriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Lamar; Dahl, Michael S; Nielsen, Jimmi

    2013-03-01

    As the percentage of wives outearning their husbands grows, the traditional social norm of the male breadwinner is challenged. The upward income comparison of the husband may cause psychological distress that affects partners' mental and physical health in ways that affect decisions on marriage, divorce, and careers. This article studies this impact through sexual and mental health problems. Using wage and prescription medication data from Denmark, we implement a regression discontinuity design to show that men outearned by their wives are more likely to use erectile dysfunction medication than their male breadwinner counterparts, even when this inequality is small. Breadwinner wives suffer increased insomnia/anxiety medication usage, with similar effects for men. We find no effects for unmarried couples or for men who earned less than their fiancée prior to marriage. Our results suggest that social norms play important roles in dictating how individuals respond to upward social comparisons.

  8. Using Statistics and Data Mining Approaches to Analyze Male Sexual Behaviors and Use of Erectile Dysfunction Drugs Based on Large Questionnaire Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Zhi; Li, Xiang; Liu, Haifeng; Zhang, Lei; Cao, Junyang; Xie, Guotong; Qin, Nan; Jiang, Hui; Lin, Haocheng

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of erectile dysfunction (ED) has been extensively studied worldwide. Erectile dysfunction drugs has shown great efficacy in preventing male erectile dysfunction. In order to help doctors know drug taken preference of patients and better prescribe, it is crucial to analyze who actually take erectile dysfunction drugs and the relation between sexual behaviors and drug use. Existing clinical studies usually used descriptive statistics and regression analysis based on small volume of data. In this paper, based on big volume of data (48,630 questionnaires), we use data mining approaches besides statistics and regression analysis to comprehensively analyze the relation between male sexual behaviors and use of erectile dysfunction drugs for unravelling the characteristic of patients who take erectile dysfunction drugs. We firstly analyze the impact of multiple sexual behavior factors on whether to use the erectile dysfunction drugs. Then, we explore to mine the Decision Rules for Stratification to discover patients who are more likely to take drugs. Based on the decision rules, the patients can be partitioned into four potential groups for use of erectile dysfunction: high potential group, intermediate potential-1 group, intermediate potential-2 group and low potential group. Experimental results show 1) the sexual behavior factors, erectile hardness and time length to prepare (how long to prepares for sexual behaviors ahead of time), have bigger impacts both in correlation analysis and potential drug taking patients discovering; 2) odds ratio between patients identified as low potential and high potential was 6.098 (95% confidence interval, 5.159-7.209) with statistically significant differences in taking drug potential detected between all potential groups.

  9. Psychological and behavioural factors associated with sexual risk behaviour among Slovak students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Dijk Jitse P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge about the prevalence of sexual risk behaviour (SRB in adolescence is needed to prevent unwanted health consequences. Studies on SRB among adolescents in Central Europe are rare and mostly rely on a single indicator for SRB. This study aims to assess the association of behavioural and psychological factors with three types of SRB in adolescents in Central Europe. Methods We obtained data on behavioural factors (having been drunk during previous month, smoking during previous week, early sexual initiation, psychological factors (self-esteem, well-being, extroversion, neuroticism, religiousness, and SRB (intercourse under risky conditions, multiple sexual partners, and inconsistent condom use in 832 Slovak university students (response 94.3%. Results Among those with sexual experience (62%, inconsistent condom use was the most prevalent risk behaviour (81% in females, 72% in males. With the exception of having been drunk in males, no factor was associated with inconsistent condom use. Regarding the other types of SRB, early sexual initiation was most strongly associated. In addition, other, mostly behavioural, factors were associated, in particular having been drunk. Conclusion Results suggest that behavioural factors are more closely related to SRB than psychological factors. Associations differ by type of SRB and gender but offer few clues to target risk groups for inconsistent condom use. Results show a high need for health-promotion programmes in early adolescence that target SRB in conjunction with other health risk behaviours such as alcohol abuse.

  10. High Triglycerides Predicts Arteriogenic Erectile Dysfunction and Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events in Subjects With Sexual Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona, Giovanni; Cipriani, Sarah; Rastrelli, Giulia; Sforza, Alessandra; Mannucci, Edoardo; Maggi, Mario

    2016-09-01

    The atherogenic role of triglycerides (TG) remains controversial. The aim of the present study is to analyze the contribution of TG in the pathogenesis of erectile dysfunction (ED) and to verify the value of elevated TG in predicting major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE). An unselected series of 3,990 men attending our outpatient clinic for sexual dysfunction was retrospectively studied. A subset of this sample (n = 1,687) was enrolled in a longitudinal study. Several clinical, biochemical, and instrumental (penile color Doppler ultrasound; PCDU) factors were evaluated. Among the patients studied, after adjustment for confounders, higher TG levels were associated with arteriogenic ED and a higher risk of clinical and biochemical hypogonadism. Conversely, no association between TG and other sexual dysfunctions was observed. When pathological PCDU parameters-including flaccid acceleration (<1.17 m/sec(2)) or dynamic peak systolic velocity (PSV <35 cm/sec)-were considered, the negative association between impaired penile flow and higher TG levels was confirmed, even when subjects taking lipid-lowering drugs or those with diabetes were excluded from the analysis (OR = 6.343 [1.243;32.362], P = .026 and 3.576 [1.104;11.578]; P = .34 for impaired acceleration and PSV, respectively). Similarly, when the same adjusted models were applied, TG levels were associated with a higher risk of hypogonadism, independently of the definition criteria (OR = 2.892 [1.643;5.410], P < .0001 and 4.853 [1.965;11.990]; P = .001 for total T <12 and 8 nM, respectively). In the longitudinal study, after adjusting for confounders, elevated TG levels (upper quartile: 162-1686 mg/dL) were independently associated with a higher incidence of MACE (HR = 2.469 [1.019;5.981]; P = .045), when compared to the rest of the sample. Our data suggest an association between elevated TG and arteriogenic ED and its cardiovascular (CV) risk stratification. Whether the use of TG lowering drugs

  11. A double-blind, randomized, pilot dose-finding study of maca root (L. meyenii) for the management of SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dording, Christina M; Fisher, Lauren; Papakostas, George; Farabaugh, Amy; Sonawalla, Shamsah; Fava, Maurizio; Mischoulon, David

    2008-01-01

    We sought to determine whether maca, a Peruvian plant, is effective for selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)-induced sexual dysfunction. We conducted a double-blind, randomized, parallel group dose-finding pilot study comparing a low-dose (1.5 g/day) to a high-dose (3.0 g/day) maca regimen in 20 remitted depressed outpatients (mean age 36+/-13 years; 17 women) with SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction. The Arizona Sexual Experience Scale (ASEX) and the Massachusetts General Hospital Sexual Function Questionnaire (MGH-SFQ) were used to measure sexual dysfunction. Ten subjects completed the study, and 16 subjects (9 on 3.0 g/day; 7 on 1.5 g/day) were eligible for intent-to-treat (ITT) analyses on the basis of having had at least one postbaseline visit. ITT subjects on 3.0 g/day maca had a significant improvement in ASEX (from 22.8+/-3.8 to 16.9+/-6.2; z=-2.20, P=0.028) and in MGH-SFQ scores (from 24.1+/-1.9 to 17.0+/-5.7; z=-2.39, P=0.017), but subjects on 1.5 g/day maca did not. Libido improved significantly (PMaca was well tolerated. Maca root may alleviate SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction, and there may be a dose-related effect. Maca may also have a beneficial effect on libido.

  12. Sexual dysfunction in multiple sclerosis: A 6-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisic-Tepavcevic, Darija; Pekmezovic, Tatjana; Trajkovic, Goran; Stojsavljevic, Nebojsa; Dujmovic, Irena; Mesaros, Sarlota; Drulovic, Jelena

    2015-11-15

    Sexual dysfunction (SD) is a common but often overlooked and undertreated symptom in multiple sclerosis (MS). The purpose of our longitudinal study was to explore the changes in the level of sexual functioning in MS cohort after a period of 3 and 6 years of follow-up, as well as to investigate the predictors of changes in SD during the period of observation. The study population comprise a cohort of 93 patients with MS (McDonald's criteria, 2001) who were assessed at three time points during the study (baseline, and at the 3- and 6-year follow-up). The presence and severity of SD was quantified by Szasz sexual functioning scale. Independent predictors of the ordinal-scaled measure of sexual problems were identified using a generalized linear mixed regression models. The number of reported SD symptoms increased markedly for both genders during the whole period of observation. Duration of follow-up, age, level of physical disability, depression and fatigue were identified as independent prognostic factors for deterioration of sexual functioning in patients with MS during the 6-year follow-up. Our study provides insight into dynamics of change in sexual function among patients with MS and predictors of change, over the period of 6 years. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Female sexual dysfunction (FSD): Prevalence and impact on quality of life (QoL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nappi, Rossella E; Cucinella, Laura; Martella, Silvia; Rossi, Margherita; Tiranini, Lara; Martini, Ellis

    2016-12-01

    Female sexual dysfunction (FSD) and quality of life (QOL) are both multidimensional and have a bidirectional relationship across the reproductive life span and beyond. Methodological difficulties exist in estimating the real prevalence of FSD because it is hard to determine the level of distress associated with sexual symptoms in a large-scale survey. Approximately 40-50% of all women report at least one sexual symptom, and some conditions associated with hormonal changes at menopause, such as vulvovaginal atrophy (VVA) and hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD), have a significant impact on sexual function and QOL. Sexual distress peaks at midlife, declines with age and is strongly partner-related. Many postmenopausal women are still sexually active, especially if they are in a stable partnership. Even though sexual functioning is impaired, a variety of psychosocial factors may maintain sexual satisfaction. That being so, health care providers (HCPs) should proactively address sexual symptoms at midlife and in older women, from a balanced perspective. Adequate counselling should be offered. Women with distressing symptoms may benefit from tailored hormonal and non-hormonal therapies, whereas women without distress related to their sexual experiences should not receive any specific treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The prevalence of sexual activity, and sexual dysfunction and behaviours in postmenopausal woman in Poland

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    Kamila B. Czajkowska

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite the aging of the population, there is limited data available about sexual life and behaviours among of postmenopausal and late postmenopausal women. Aim of the study was to assess the prevalence of sexual dysfunction, behaviours, and preferences in the Polish population in 2015. Material and methods: This observational survey study involved 538 women, of whom 220 were over 50 years old. The main focus was on the differences and changes between older age groups, mainly 50-59 years and over 60 years. Results : For 80.9% of the women above 50 years old, sex played at least a moderately important role in life. Sex was definitely important and very important for 40.45% of them. Most women over 50 years old (65.5% were sexually active. Regardless of age, the respondents were more likely to have sexual intercourse several times a month. Less than half of the women over 50 years old (42.7% realised their sexual fantasies. Women in the group of 50-59 years old statistically less often than younger women declared that the frequency of intercourse they had was too small. There was a statistical tendency showing that women up to 49 years old declared more sexual problems than older women. Women over 50 years old reported fewer problems in comparison to younger women, e.g. less often they claimed that sex is not pleasurable (p = 0.064. Conclusions : The prevalence of sexual activity declines with age, yet a substantial number of woman engage in vaginal intercourse, oral sex, and masturbation even past the seventh decade of life.

  15. Prevalence, psychological impact, and risk factors of erectile dysfunction in patients with Peyronie’s disease: a retrospective analysis of 309 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulis G

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Gianni Paulis,1,2 Gennaro Romano,3 Andrea Paulis4 1Department of Surgical Sciences, Andrology Center, Regina Apostolorum Hospital, Albano L., Italy; 2Department of Uro-Andrology, Peyronie’s Disease Care Center, Rome, Italy; 3Department of Urologic Oncology, Section of Avellino, Italian League Against Cancer, Avellino, Italy; 4Section of Psycho-Sexology, Peyronie’s Disease Care Center, Rome, Italy Abstract: Peyronie’s disease (PD is a chronic inflammatory disease involving the tunica albuginea of the penis. Erectile dysfunction (ED is a possible invalidating symptom of PD. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence, psychological impact, and risk factors of ED in patients with PD. The study was conducted by carrying out a retrospective analysis of the clinical records of 309 patients with PD who visited our andrology clinic. All patients underwent the following tests: body mass index, common blood tests and hormone assays, questionnaire for erectile function assessment, dynamic penile color Doppler ultrasonography, imaging of the penis at maximum erection with photographic poses according to Kelâmi, psychosexual impact evaluation with PD Questionnaire (symptom bother score, evaluation of depression symptoms with the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, and evaluation of the intensity of penile pain with the pain intensity numeric rating scale. ED was observed in 37.5% of the cases. We divided the cases into two groups: group A (PD + ED, 116 cases, and group B (PD without ED, 193 cases. After multivariate analysis, we concluded that the following comorbidities are independent risk factors for ED: dyslipidemia, obesity, chronic prostatitis, benign prostatic hyperplasia, and autoimmune diseases. A depressive disorder was observed in 62.4%, and it was more frequent in patients with PD + ED (91.37% versus 45.07% group B. Sexual bother was greater in group A compared with group B (9.7 versus 7.6. Intensities of depressive symptoms and

  16. Erectile dysfunction in fit and healthy young men: psychological or pathological?

    OpenAIRE

    Rastrelli, Giulia; Maggi, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Epidemiological studies consistently show that prevalence of erectile dysfunction (ED) increases with ageing. Nonetheless, complaints of ED even in younger men are becoming more and more frequent. Healthcare professionals working in Sexual Medicine but even those operating in different clinical contexts might be adequately prepared to answer this increasing requirement. ED in younger men is likely to be overlooked and dismissed without performing any medical assessment, even the most basic on...

  17. Sexual dysfunction in the peri- and postmenopause. Status of incidence, pharmacological treatment and possible risks. A secondary publication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Nina; Jensen, Pernille Tine; Giraldi, Annamaria Elena

    2006-01-01

    of randomized, controlled trials have been conducted and evidence suggests that systemic hormone therapy with estrogen, estrogen/progesterone, estrogen/testosterone and tibolone have a positive impact on sexual dysfunction during the peri- and postmenopause. Further, there is evidence that treatment with local...... not yet been fully investigated. A positive effect of sildenafil has been observed in a limited group of women; those with arousal problems but with no desire problems. The results suggest an intensified focus on new pharmaceutical products for the treatment of female sexual dysfunction...

  18. Culture and Sexuality: Cognitive-Emotional Determinants of Sexual Dissatisfaction Among Iranian and New Zealand Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolmanafi, Atefe; Nobre, Pedro; Winter, Sam; Tilley, P J Matt; Jahromi, Reza Ghorban

    2018-05-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that culture plays a fundamental role in individuals' beliefs, attitudes, and values toward sexuality, and influences their ability to enjoy sex. It follows that culture may influence sexual satisfaction or dissatisfaction. To examine and compare cognitive-emotional variables related to women's sexual dissatisfaction in Iran and New Zealand. In total, 196 Iranian women and 207 New Zealand women participated in the study, answering questionnaires evaluating dysfunctional sexual beliefs, automatic thoughts, emotional and sexual response during sexual activity, as well as sexual satisfaction. Sexual beliefs were measured by the Sexual Dysfunctional Beliefs Questionnaire, thoughts and emotional responses were measured by the Sexual Modes Questionnaire, and sexual satisfaction was measured by the Sexual Satisfaction Index. Findings indicated that in both Iranian and New Zealand women, failure and disengagement thoughts, lack of erotic thoughts, and emotions of fear during sexual activity were significant predictors of sexual dissatisfaction. Besides these common predictors, results also indicated that sexual conservatism and women's sexual passivity beliefs, sexual abuse thoughts, and fear during sexual activity were significant predictors of sexual dissatisfaction in Iranian women. Beliefs of sexual desire and pleasure as a sin; age-related beliefs; and emotions such as sadness, disillusion, and hurt were significant predictors of sexual dissatisfaction in New Zealand women. The present findings could facilitate a better understanding of cultural differences in the roles played by dysfunctional sexual beliefs, negative automatic thoughts, and negative emotions during sexual activity, and the value of these beliefs, thoughts, and emotions in predicting sexual dissatisfaction. The strength of this study is in providing an examination of the role of culturally bound beliefs in predicting sexual dissatisfaction in women from different

  19. How Does Paying Attention Improve Sexual Functioning in Women? A Review of Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Nikita; Brotto, Lori A

    2017-07-01

    Female sexual dysfunction (FSD), consisting of a constellation of distressing sexual symptoms, is highly prevalent worldwide. Given the central role played by psychological factors in the development of FSD, psychologically and in particular mindfulness-based interventions have arisen as potential treatment options for women. Although mindfulness-based interventions have been evaluated in samples of women with gynecologic cancer; a history of sexual abuse; multiple sclerosis; and spinal cord injury; and provoked vestibulodynia, the mechanisms by which mindfulness leads to improvements in sexual functioning are largely unstudied. To summarize the literature on mechanisms of mindfulness interventions in general and to hypothesize which mechanisms most likely apply to samples of women with FSD. Medline was searched with terms such as mindfulness, meditation, mediator, mode, moderator, mechanism, sex, and sexual dysfunction. Only studies that conducted a formal mediation or moderation analysis were included. We also conducted a broader review on mechanisms in other populations, with slightly modified inclusion criteria: the terms sex and sexual dysfunction were removed and only studies from 2012 to 2016 and studies that included an active mindfulness intervention were included. In general populations, trait mindfulness and decentering were the most common mechanisms identified for the efficacy of mindfulness. In four studies that examined mediators of improvement in samples with FSD, the following mediators were found to be significant: relationship satisfaction, genital self-image, interoceptive awareness, depressed mood, anxiety, and trait mindfulness, of which interoceptive awareness had the most supporting evidence. Clinicians and researchers can use the identified mediators of improvement (ie, interoceptive awareness, depression, and trait mindfulness) when making decisions about which patient might be more likely to benefit from a mindfulness-based approach to

  20. [Light therapy as a treatment for sexual dysfunctions--beyond a pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossini, Letizia; Caterini, Claudia; Koukouna, Despoina; Casolaro, Ilaria; Roggi, Monica; Di Volo, Silvia; Fargnoli, Francesco; Ponchietti, Roberto; Benbow, Jim; Fagiolini, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Seasonal trends were demonstrated in reproduction and sexual activity. Through the secretion ofmelatonin the pineal gland plays an important role in the neuroendocrine control of sexual function and reproductive physiology. We hypothesized that inhibition of the pineal gland activity through a light treatment may favorably affect sexual function. We recruited 24 subjects with a diagnosis of hypoactive sexual desire disorder and/or primary sexual arousal disorder. The subjects were randomly assigned to either active light treatment (ALT) or placebo light treatment (L-PBO). Participants were assessed during the first evaluation and after 2 weeks of treatment, using the Structured Clinical Interview for Sexual Disorders DSM-IV (SCID-S) and a self-administered rating scale of the level of sexual satisfaction (1 to 10). Repeated ANOVA measures were performed to compare the two groups of patients. Post-hoc analysis was performed by Holm-Sidak test for repeated comparisons. Results. At baseline the two groups were comparable. After 2 weeks the group treated with Light Therapy showed a significant improvement in sexual satisfaction, about 3 times higher than the group that received placebo, while no significant improvement was observed in the group L-PBO. Conclusions. Our results confirm a potentially beneficial effect of Light Therapy on primary sexual dysfunction. In the future, we propose to correlate clinical findings with testosterone levels pre/post treatment.

  1. Prevalence and degree of sexual dysfunction in a sample of women seeking bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Dale S; Vithiananthan, Siva; Leahey, Tricia M; Thomas, J Graham; Sax, Harry C; Pohl, Dieter; Ryder, Beth A; Roye, G Dean; Giovanni, Jeannine; Wing, Rena R

    2009-01-01

    Sexual functioning has been shown to be impaired in women who are obese, particularly those seeking bariatric surgery. However, most previous studies evaluating sexual function in these populations have not used validated measures. We used the validated Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) to assess the prevalence of female sexual dysfunction (FSD) in a sample of >100 women evaluated for bariatric surgery. The FSFI was administered to reportedly sexually active women during their preoperative evaluation. The scores for the individual FSFI domains (desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction, and pain) ranging from 0 (or 1.2) to 6 were summed to produce a FSFI total score (range 2-36). A FSFI total cutoff score of sexual arousal disorder and healthy controls. Of the 102 women, 61 (59.8%) had FSFI total scores of sexual arousal disorder group (all P values sexual function impairment, with 60% of participants reporting FSD. These findings highlight the need to initiate routine assessment of sexual functioning in this population and examine whether the weight loss after bariatric surgery contributes to a reversal of FSD.

  2. Evaluation of sleep disorder and its effect on sexual dysfunction in patients with Fibromyalgia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koca, Tuba Tülay; Karaca Acet, Günseli; Tanrıkut, Emrullah; Talu, Burcu

    2016-12-01

    Sexual problems are commonly seen in women with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). The objective of this study was to reveal the relationship between the severity of symptoms, sleep disorder, and sexual dysfunction in women with FMS. A total of 140 sexually active women with FMS aged 17-67 years who presented to our physical medicine and rehabilitation outpatient clinic between January 2016 and June 2016 were enrolled in the study. The patients' age, height, body weight, body mass index (BMI), and general pain score [visual analogue scale, (VAS)] for the last 1 week were recorded. The patients were given three different sets of questionnaires: the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), and Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI). The mean age of the patients was 40.3±8.5 years; the mean BMI was 27.1±4.4 kg/m 2 , VAS (last 1 week) was 6.9±2 cm, the mean PSQI was 24.8±10.8 (one patient with PSQI ≤5), FIQ was 65.9±19.2, and FSFI was 19.0±6.9. No significant relationship was observed between the mean PSQI and BMI values (p=0.401), whereas a significant relationship was found between the mean values of VAS, FIQ, and FSFI (p=0.03; p=0.034; p<0.001, respectively). In Pearson's correlation analysis, a positive correlation was noted between PSQI and VAS (r=0.324; p<0.001) and FIQ values (r=0.271; p=0.001). A significant relationship was found between the FIQ and VAS values (p<0.001). P less than 0.005 was considered statistically significant. Sleep disorder is regarded as the underlying cause for many signs and symptoms in FMS. Sexual dysfunction may develop in women with FMS, based on the severity of the disease and poor sleep quality. We found that sleep dysfunction was significantly related with the severity of disease, pain, and sexual disfunction. We also found a positive correlation between VAS and PSQI.

  3. Urinary symptoms and sexual dysfunction among Italian men: The results of the #Controllati survey

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    Vincenzo Mirone

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Prevention may improve the quality of life and sexual and reproductive health. To improve prevention require a comprehensive research approach that examines the frequency and risk factors for urologic conditions. In June 2016 the Italian Urologic Society coordinated a preventive initiative : the 1st Week of Male Urologic Prevention ”#Controllati”. Material and methods: During the 1st Week of Male Urologic Prevention “#Controllati”, men aged 18 years or more were invited to attend participating urologic centers for a free of charge visit for counseling about urologic or andrologic conditions. Each participating man underwent a physical examination. Further he was asked about his a medical history and about his urologic symptoms, sexual activity and possible related problems. Results: Data were collected in 81 centers: 2380 men answered the questionnaire. A total of 1226 subjects participating in the study reported one or more urinary symptom [51.5% (IC 95% 48.9%-54.5%]. The risk of any urinary symptoms increased with age: in comparison with men aged < = 30 years or less the risk of any urinary symptoms was 2.31, 2.92, 5.12, 7.82 and 17.02 respectively in the class age 31-40, 41-50, 51-60, 61-70 and > = 71. Overweight/obese men were at increased risk of any urinary symptoms [OR1.35 (95% CI 1.12-1.64]. 27.2% (IC 95% overall 25.2% -29.3% of the subjects had at least a sexual disorder (erectile dysfunction, premature ejaculation, hypoactive sexual desire. The erectile dysfunction and hypoactive sexual desire increased with age, but premature ejaculation tended to be higher among younger aged men aged 40 years or more. Current any urinary symptoms [OR 1.85 (CI 1.40-2.43], hypertension [OR 1.66 (95% CI 1.21-2.26 and diabetes (OR 2.37 (95% CI 1.45-3.88] increased the risk of erectile dysfunction. Conclusions: This large survey gives a picture of the burden of the more frequent urologic conditions offering useful information in order

  4. Reversal of SSRI-induced female sexual dysfunction by adjunctive bupropion in menstruating women: a double-blind, placebo-controlled and randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarinejad, Mohammad R

    2011-03-01

    A significant number of patients undergoing treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) report sexual dysfunction. SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction adversely affects quality of life and patient adherence to and compliance with treatment regimens. This trial examined the efficacy and safety of adjunctive bupropion in the treatment of SSRI-induced female sexual dysfunction. Sexual function was assessed by using the sexual function domains of the Female Sexual Function Index (primary efficacy outcome measure) and the Clinical Global Impression Scale adapted for sexual function (secondary efficacy outcome measure). End point treatment satisfaction was assessed using a Visual Analog Scale. A total of 218 women (25-45 years old) with SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction were randomized to receive 12 weeks of double-blind fixed dosed treatment with bupropion sustained release 150 mg b.i.d. (n = 109) or placebo (n = 109). The mean (SD) for Female Sexual Function Index total score was higher in the bupropion sustained release group (25.9 (5.12), 95% confidence interval (CI) 22.2-29.4) than in the placebo group (17.2 (4.9), 95% CI 15.8-20.1) (p = 0.001). Mean (SD) Clinical Global Impression Scale score for the bupropion group (2.4 (0.6), 95% CI 2.0-3.6) was significantly lower than that for the placebo group (4.2 (0.8), 95% CI 3.4-5.4) (p = 0.001). At the end of the trial the mean (SD) scores for desire (4.1 (0.7), 95% CI 3.5-4.8) (p = 0.001), arousal (4.4 (0.6), 95% CI 3.7-4.8) (p = 0.01), lubrication (4.4 (0.4), 95% CI 3.3-4.8) (p = 0.001), orgasm (4.4 (0.5), 95% CI 3.7-4.7) (p = 0.001), and satisfaction (4.2 (0.7), 95% CI 3.4-4.8) (p = 0.001) were significantly higher in the bupropion group. The highest improvement was observed in sexual desire, followed by lubrication. Compared with baseline, desire and lubrication domains increased by 86.4% (95% CI 64.9-102.2%, p = 0.001) and 69.2% (95% CI 44.7-82.6%, p = 0.001) in the bupropion group. Adjunctive treatment

  5. Environmental Dysfunctions, Childhood Maltreatment and Women's Intimate Partner Violence Victimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascio, Maria Lo; Guarnaccia, Cinzia; Infurna, Maria Rita; Mancuso, Laura; Parroco, Anna Maria; Giannone, Francesca

    2017-06-01

    Childhood maltreatment is considered a crucial explanatory variable for intimate partner violence (IPV) in adulthood. However, a developmental multifactorial model for the etiology of IPV is not shared by researchers yet. This study has investigated the role of a wide range of childhood maltreatments and family and social dysfunctions in predicting IPV; furthermore, it tests a model where childhood maltreatment mediates the relationship between environmental dysfunctions and IPV. The sample included 78 women: IPV (38) and non-IPV (40). The Italian version of the Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse (CECA) Interview was used to assess the presence of adverse childhood experiences. The Revised Conflict Tactics Scale (CTS-2) and the IPV History Interview were used to assess IPV in the last year and lifetime, respectively. The results of a multivariate logistic regression model have indicated that only sexual (odds ratio [OR] = 4.24) and psychological (OR = 3.45) abuse significantly predicted IPV; with regard to association between IPV and environmental dysfunctions, only poor social support (OR = 8.91) significantly predicted IPV. The results of a mediation model have shown that childhood psychological and sexual abuse, in association with each other, partially mediate the relationship between poor social support and IPV. The findings from this study pinpoint poor social support as an important predictor of IPV so far neglected in the literature on the developmental antecedents of IPV. They also support the theoretical assumption according to which dysfunctional environmental variables and types of childhood maltreatment interacting with each other may influence development outcomes.

  6. Bidirectional Associations Between Adolescents' Sexual Behaviors and Psychological Well-Being

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nogueira Avelar e Silva, Raquel; van de Bongardt, Daphne; Baams, Laura; Raat, Hein

    Purpose: Assessing bidirectional longitudinal associations between early sexual behaviors (≤16.0 years) and psychological well-being (global self-esteem, physical self-esteem, depression) among 716 adolescents, and the direct and buffering effect of parent-adolescent relationship quality. Methods:

  7. Fresh onion juice enhanced copulatory behavior in male rats with and without paroxetine-induced sexual dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allouh, Mohammed Z; Daradka, Haytham M; Al Barbarawi, Mohammed M; Mustafa, Ayman G

    2014-02-01

    Onion (Allium cepa) is one of the most commonly cultivated species of the family Liliaceae, and has long been used in dietary and therapeutic applications. Treatment with fresh onion juice has been reported to promote testosterone production in male rats. Testosterone is the male sex hormone responsible for enhancing sexual libido and potency. This study aimed to investigate the effects of onion juice on copulatory behavior of sexually potent male rats and in male rats with paroxetine-induced sexual dysfunction. Sexually experienced male rats were divided into seven groups: a control group, three onion juice-treated groups, a paroxetine-treated group, and two groups treated with paroxetine plus different doses of onion juice. At the end of the treatments, sexual behavior parameters and testosterone levels were measured and compared among the groups. Administration of onion juice significantly reduced mount frequency and latency and increased the copulatory efficacy of potent male rats. In addition, administration of onion juice attenuated the prolonged ejaculatory latency period induced by paroxetine and increased the percentage of ejaculating rats. Serum testosterone levels increased significantly by onion juice administration. However, a significant reduction in testosterone because of paroxetine therapy was observed. This reduction was restored to normal levels by administration of onion juice. This study conclusively demonstrates that fresh onion juice improves copulatory behavior in sexually potent male rats and in those with paroxetine-induced sexual dysfunction by increasing serum testosterone levels.

  8. The Role of Big Five Personality Factors and Defense Mechanisms in Predicting Quality of Life in Sexually Dysfunctional Female Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. salary

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Sexual dysfunction can lead to behavioral problems and reduction in a person's quality of life. In 50 % of patients with personality disorders, there is also sexual dysfunction. Psychoanalysis approach attributes the cause of sexual dysfunction to a kind of fundamental anxiety as well as the use of immature mechanisms in these patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of big five personality traits and defensive mechanisms in predicting these patients' quality of life. Statistical sample of this research included 80 women attending sexual health and family clinics of Shahed University using accessible sampling during 2010 and 2011. These subjects were given the Neo Personality Inventory Traits, Defensive Mechanisms, and the World Health organization Quality of Life Questionnaires to answer. The findings showed that personality traits could predict the quality of life in woman with sexual dysfunction. Moreover, among those five personality traits, neuroticism (:./24 P=./04 and conscientiousness(:./31 P=./03 were able to predict the quality of life while predictability rate of both factors was 37% of variance on the whole (p=0/05. Based on regression analysis, there was a significant relationship between the quality of life and defensive mechanisms so that using more mature defensive mechanisms (:./37 P=./006 and immature defensive mechanisms (:-./31 P= ./02 could significantly predict quality of life (p=0/0001. Also, neurotic defensive mechanisms were not significant predictors of these women' quality of life. (;./04 P=./78.

  9. Sexual dysfunction is more than twice as frequent in Danish female predialysis patients compared to age- and gender-matched healthy controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, Lotte; Eidemak, Inge; Harrison, Adrian Paul

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study aimed to compare sexual dysfunction in Danish female predialysis patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 4-5 with age-matched healthy women in Denmark. METHODS: Twenty-seven adult female predialysis patients (CKD stage 4-5 ~ creatinine clearance ≤ 30 ml/min) without.......1, respectively, p = 0.180). CONCLUSION: Sexual dysfunction was found to be more than two times as frequent in Danish female predialysis patients with CKD stage 4-5 compared to age- and gender-matched healthy controls, and this result emphasizes the need for attention towards sexual function in the treatment...... diagnosed depression and 54 randomly assigned healthy female controls completed the questionnaires Female Sexual Function Index, Female Sexual Distress Scale, and the Major Depression Inventory. RESULTS: Predialysis patients reported lower Female Sexual Function Index scores compared to the controls (14...

  10. Effect of spinal anterior root stimulation and sacral deafferentation on bladder and sexual dysfunction in spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaer, Hamed; Rasmussen, Mikkel Mylius

    2018-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a highly devastating injury with a variety of complications; among them are neurogenic bladder, bowel, and sexual dysfunction. We aimed to evaluate the effect of sacral anterior root stimulation with sacral deafferentation (SARS-SDAF) on neurogenic bladder and sexual d...

  11. A Longitudinal Study of Predictors of Sexual Dysfunction in Men on Active Surveillance for Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane M. Pearce, MD

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: Men on AS experienced a gradual decline in sexual function during the first 24 months of enrollment. Older age, PSA × time, and diabetes were all independent predictors of diminished sexual function over time. Anxiety, AUA‐SI, the number of cores and the number of biopsies were not predictors of reduced sexual function in men in AS. Pearce SM, Wang CHE, Victorson DE, Helfand BT, Novakovic KR, Brendler CB, and Albaugh JA. A longitudinal study of predictors of sexual dysfunction in men on active surveillance for prostate cancer. Sex Med 2015;3:156–164.

  12. Sexuality, substance use, and susceptibility to victimization: risk for rape and sexual coercion in a prospective study of college women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messman-Moore, Terri L; Coates, Aubrey A; Gaffey, Kathryn J; Johnson, Carrie F

    2008-12-01

    An 8-month prospective study examined behavioral, personality, and psychological variables thought to increase vulnerability for college women's experience of rape and verbal sexual coercion. Participants were 276 college women who completed self-report surveys. During 1 academic year, 9.5% of women were raped and 11.7% reported verbal sexual coercion. Elevated levels of sexual concerns, dysfunctional sexual behavior, and impaired self-reference were associated with both verbal sexual coercion and rape. Alcohol and marijuana use increased risk only for rape, whereas self-criticism and depression increased risk only for verbal coercion. Findings suggest that multiple aspects of sexuality, such as shame regarding sexuality and using sex to meet nonsexual needs, may increase risk for both types of sexual victimization. Results support conclusions that rape and verbal sexual coercion have both shared and unique risk factors. Implications for future research and intervention programs are discussed.

  13. Sexual concerns and practices after ICD implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kikkenborg Berg, Selina; Elleman-Jensen, Line; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe

    2013-01-01

    given about sexual activity, (b) the areas of patient concerns related to sexual function and the ICD, and (c) changes in sexual behavior.Methods:A randomized controlled trial including 196 patients (1:1) was designed, including 12 weeks of exercise training and 1 year of psycho-educational follow......Background:Studies show that patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) frequently experience sexual dysfunction. These experiences are often linked to exercise intolerance, side-effects of medication, and psychological problems.Objective:To describe (a) the level of information......-up focusing on modifiable factors associated with poor outcomes, including sexual functioning. The Sex After ICD Survey was administered 6 months after the randomization as part of the planned explorative outcomes. 141 patients responded.Results:The analyses showed that 37 of the 69 (55.2%) patients...

  14. How Does Sexual Minority Stigma "Get under the Skin"? A Psychological Mediation Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzenbuehler, Mark L.

    2009-01-01

    Sexual minorities are at increased risk for multiple mental health burdens compared with heterosexuals. The field has identified 2 distinct determinants of this risk, including group-specific minority stressors and general psychological processes that are common across sexual orientations. The goal of the present article is to develop a…

  15. Sexual dysfunction in diabetic women: prevalence and differences in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazzilli R

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Rossella Mazzilli, Norina Imbrogno, Jlenia Elia, Michele Delfino, Olimpia Bitterman, Angela Napoli, Fernando Mazzilli Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Unit of Diabetology and Endocrinology, University of Rome Sapienza, Rome, Italy Background: The aim of this work was to evaluate the impact of diabetes on female sexuality and to highlight any differences between sexuality in the context of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM. Methods: The subjects selected were 49 women with type 1 DM, 24 women with type 2 DM, and 45 healthy women as controls. Each participant was given the nine-item Female Sexual Function Index questionnaire to complete. The metabolic profile was evaluated by body mass index and glycosylated hemoglobin assay. Results: The prevalence of sexual dysfunction (total score ≤30 was significantly higher in the type 1 DM group (25/49, 51%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 18–31 than in the control group (4/45, 9%; 95% CI 3–5; P=0.00006; there were no significant variations in the type 2 DM group (4/24, 17%; 95% CI 3–4 versus the control group (P=0.630, not statistically significant. The mean total score was significantly lower in the type 1 DM group (30.2±6.9 versus the control group (36.5±4.9; P=0.0003, but there was no significant difference between the type 2 DM group and the control group (P=0.773. With regard to specific questionnaire items, the mean values for arousal, lubrication, dyspareunia, and orgasm were significantly lower only in the type 1 DM group versus the control group. The mean values for desire were reduced in type 1 and type 2 DM groups versus control group. Conclusion: Type 1 DM is associated with sexual dysfunction. This may be due to classic neurovascular complications or to the negative impact of the disease on psychosocial factors. Larger and ideally longitudinal studies are necessary to better understand the relationship between DM and sexual dysfunction. Keywords

  16. [Role of physical, psychological and sexual abuse in functional digestive disorders. A case-controls trial.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remes-Troche, J M; Cid-Juárez, S; Campos-Ramos, I; Ramos-de la Medina, A; Galmiche, A; Schmulson-Wasserman, M; Roesch-Dietlen, F

    2008-01-01

    Abuse has been considered a significant factor on the development of functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID), especially for severe and treatment-refractory patients. The aim of our study was to evaluate the presence of all FGID according to Rome II criteria, in a group of women with history of physical, psychological and/or sexual abuse. A cross sectional study was performed in 96 women (37 +/- 12 years of age) with history of physical, psychological and/or sexual abuse (cases); and 96 open population women (36 +/- 14 years of age) (controls). The following evaluations were administered: Rome II questionnaire, a self-administered instrument to evaluate history of physical (beating), psychological(insults, public humiliation) and/or sexual abuse (rape, coercion), and HAD questionnaire. Among 96 women with history of abuse,91 (95%) reported to have suffered psychological abuse, 72 (75%) physical abuse, and 24 (25%)sexual abuse. Women with history of abuse had a higher prevalence of rumination (6% vs. 0%, p= 0.02), functional heartburn (26% vs. 13%, p =0.04), aerofagia (17% vs. 5%, p = 0.019), irritable bowel syndrome (38% vs. 18%, p = 0.002), fecalin continence (16% vs. 4%, p = 0.01), elevator anisyndrome (5% vs. 0%, p = 0.05), and proctalgia fugax (29% vs. 15%, p = 0.02) compared to controls. There was a positive correlation between anxiety (r = 0.5, p = 0.001) and depression scores(r = 0.45, p = 0.001), and the number of FGID. We demonstrated a high prevalence of FGID among women with history of physical,psychological, and/or sexual abuse. In this association,concomitant anxiety and depression play a significant role.

  17. Association of psychological factors, patients’ knowledge, and management among patients with erectile dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huri HZ

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hasniza Zaman Huri,1,2 Nurul Diyana Mat Sanusi,1 Azad Hassan Abdul Razack,3 Raymond Mark1 1Department of Pharmacy, 2Clinical Investigation Center, University of Malaya Medical Centre, 3Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Background: Erectile dysfunction (ED is one of the most common health problems in men. ED can significantly affect a man’s psychological well-being and overall health. Purpose: To investigate the association of psychological factors, patients’ knowledge, and management among ED patients. Patients and methods: A total of 93 patients with an age range from 31 to 81 years who have undergone treatment for ED were included in this study. Results: It was found that the feeling of blame (P=0.001, guilt (P=0.001, anger or bitterness (P=0.001, depression (P=0.001, feeling like a failure (P=0.001, and the feeling of letting down a partner during intercourse (P=0.001 were significantly associated with ED. Age was also found to be significantly associated with patients’ psychological scale (P=0.004. In addition, the majority of patients in this study practice the right method of administration of ED therapy. However, no significant correlation was found between patients’ knowledge of ED therapy and demographic characteristics. Conclusion: This study concluded that ED does affect psychological well-being of people. In addition, patient’s knowledge about ED and its management is also crucial in ensuring that the patient achieves optimal therapeutic outcomes from ED therapy. Keywords: erectile dysfunction, psychological factors, patients’ knowledge, management

  18. The impact of ejaculatory dysfunction upon the sufferer and his partner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdo, Carmita Helena Najjar

    2016-08-01

    Ejaculatory function cannot be evaluated outside the dyadic process and without taking into account the men's and women's cognition of the condition and how their subjective perception impacts on the evaluation of the relationship and sexual quality. Although the distress of the sufferer and his partner has been a motivating factor in leading men with ejaculatory dysfunction to seek medical help, few objective or prospective evaluations of the effects on the couple have been reported. Specialized literature has been dealing with ejaculatory disorders in a heterogeneous manner. Comparatively, there are far more studies on premature ejaculation (PE) than on delayed ejaculation (DE) and even fewer studies on other male orgasm disorders. Therefore, the review focuses on the literature of the two most studied ejaculatory disorders. The matter presented in this article can also be considered for other ejaculatory disorders, since all of them relate to a failure of control, changing the intravaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT), with consequences for men and their partners. There are multiple psychological explanations as to why a man develops PE or DE. Unfortunately, none of the theories evolve from evidence-based studies. The common final pathway of these factors is the irrational fear of ejaculating intravaginally. These sexual disorders may also cause personal distress for the sexual partner and decreased sexual satisfaction for the couple. An association between pre-existing anxiety disorders and sexual performance anxiety has been found in men and couples with ejaculatory dysfunction. This could reflect a process in which pre-existing anxiety triggers sexual dysfunction, causing performance anxiety and leading to a vicious cycle: anxiety, sexual dysfunction, more anxiety. Men with DE are similar to men with other sexual dysfunctions. They show the same elevated level of sexual dissatisfaction and they also show lower levels of coital frequency. To a lower extent

  19. Erectile dysfunction drug receipt, risky sexual behavior and sexually transmitted diseases in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Robert L; McGinnis, Kathleen A; Samet, Jeffrey H; Fiellin, David A; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C; Rodriquez-Barradas, Maria C; Kraemer, Kevin L; Gibert, Cynthia L; Braithwaite, R Scott; Goulet, Joseph L; Mattocks, Kristin; Crystal, Stephen; Gordon, Adam J; Oursler, Krisann K; Justice, Amy C

    2010-02-01

    Health care providers may be concerned that prescribing erectile dysfunction drugs (EDD) will contribute to risky sexual behavior. To identify characteristics of men who received EDD prescriptions, determine whether EDD receipt is associated with risky sexual behavior and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), and determine whether these relationships vary for certain sub-groups. Cross-sectional study. Two thousand seven hundred and eighty-seven sexually-active, HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected men recruited from eight Veterans Health Affairs outpatient clinics. Data were obtained from participant surveys, electronic medical records, and administrative pharmacy data. EDD receipt was defined as two or more prescriptions for an EDD, risky sex as having unprotected sex with a partner of serodiscordant or unknown HIV status, and STDs, according to self-report. Overall, 28% of men received EDD in the previous year. Eleven percent of men reported unprotected sex with a serodiscordant/unknown partner in the past year (HIV-infected 15%, HIV-uninfected 6%, P sexual behavior (11% vs. 10%, p = 0.9) and STDs (7% vs 7%, p = 0.7). In multivariate analyses, EDD receipt was not significantly associated with risky sexual behavior or STDs in the entire sample or in subgroups of substance users or men who had sex with men. EDD receipt was common but not associated with risky sexual behavior or STDs in this sample of HIV-infected and uninfected men. However, risky sexual behaviors persist in a minority of HIV-infected men, indicating ongoing need for prevention interventions.

  20. Sexual dysfunction among reproductive-aged Chinese married women in Hong Kong: prevalence, risk factors, and associated consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huiping; Fan, Susan; Yip, Paul S F

    2015-03-01

    Although female sexual dysfunction (FSD) is a serious public health issue endangering women's well-being, systematic research on FSD among reproductive-aged Chinese women in Hong Kong is quite scarce. This study aims to estimate the prevalence, risk factors, and associated consequences of FSD among reproductive-aged Chinese married women in Hong Kong. This study was based on a community-based survey across Hong Kong conducted by the Family Planning Association of Hong Kong in 2012 with 1,518 married women aged 21-49 years. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition classification was adopted to assess FSD. It was found that 25.6% of the married women surveyed reported at least one form of sexual dysfunction and that the prevalence of six domains of sexual dysfunction was as follows: 10.6% for lack of interest in sex, 10.5% for not finding sex pleasurable, 9.3% for lubrication difficulties, 8.8% for inability to achieve orgasm, 8.8% for orgasm delay, and 8.4% for physical pain during sex. Multivariate analyses showed that low education and income, average or poor health, lower frequency of sex, abortion history, traditional attitudes toward sex, and marital dissatisfaction are all significant risk factors for different components of FSD. It was also been found that four domains of FSD (the exceptions being orgasm delay and physical pain during sex) have severe consequences for married women's life satisfaction and sexual satisfaction. The prevalence of FSD is lower among reproductive-aged Chinese married women in Hong Kong than among women in the United States and some Asian countries. The risk factors associated with FSD include sociodemographic factors, physical health, sexual experience and attitudes, and relationship factors. FSD has significant consequences for married women's life quality. These findings have great implications for FSD prevention and relevant service delivery. © 2014 International Society for Sexual

  1. Identification of Psychological Dysfunctions and Eating Disorders in Obese Women Seeking Weight Loss: Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maude Panchaud Cornut

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study is to analyse associations between eating behaviour and psychological dysfunctions in treatment-seeking obese patients and identify parameters for the development of diagnostic tools with regard to eating and psychological disorders. Design and Methods. Cross-sectional data were analysed from 138 obese women. Bulimic Investigatory Test of Edinburgh and Eating Disorder Inventory-2 assessed eating behaviours. Beck Depression Inventory II, Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, form Y, Rathus Assertiveness Schedule, and Marks and Mathews Fear Questionnaire assessed psychological profile. Results. 61% of patients showed moderate or major depressive symptoms and 77% showed symptoms of anxiety. Half of the participants presented with a low degree of assertiveness. No correlation was found between psychological profile and age or anthropometric measurements. The prevalence and severity of depression, anxiety, and assertiveness increased with the degree of eating disorders. The feeling of ineffectiveness explained a large degree of score variance. It explained 30 to 50% of the variability of assertiveness, phobias, anxiety, and depression. Conclusion. Psychological dysfunctions had a high prevalence and their severity is correlated with degree of eating disorders. The feeling of ineffectiveness constitutes the major predictor of the psychological profile and could open new ways to develop screening tools.

  2. Neural Correlates of Antidepressant-Related Sexual Dysfunction: A Placebo-Controlled fMRI Study on Healthy Males Under Subchronic Paroxetine and Bupropion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abler, Birgit; Seeringer, Angela; Hartmann, Antonie; Grön, Georg; Metzger, Coraline; Walter, Martin; Stingl, Julia

    2011-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common side effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) like paroxetine in the treatment of depression, imposing a considerable risk on medication adherence and hence therapeutic success. Bupropion, a norepinephrine and dopamine reuptake inhibitor, is recommended as an alternative treatment without adverse effects concerning sexual arousal and libido. We investigated the neural bases of paroxetine-related subjective sexual dysfunction when compared with bupropion and placebo. We scanned 18 healthy, heterosexual males in a randomized, double-blind, within-subject design while watching video clips of erotic and nonerotic content under steady-state conditions after taking 20 mg of paroxetine, 150 mg of bupropion, and placebo for 7 days each. Under paroxetine, ratings of subjective sexual dysfunction increased compared with placebo or bupropion. Activation along the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), including subgenual, pregenual, and midcingulate cortices, in the ventral striatum and midbrain was decreased when compared with placebo. In contrast, bupropion let subjective ratings and ACC activations unchanged and increased activity of brain regions including posterior midcingulate cortex, mediodorsal thalamus, and extended amygdala relative to placebo and paroxetine. Brain regions that have been related to the processing of motivational (ventral striatum), emotional, and autonomic components of erotic stimulation (anterior cingulate) in previous studies showed reduced responsiveness under paroxetine in our study. Drug effects on these regions may be part of the mechanism underlying SSRI-related sexual dysfunction. Increased activation under bupropion may point to an opposite effect that may relate to the lack of impaired sexual functioning. PMID:21544071

  3. Acceptance of vulvovaginal pain in women with provoked vestibulodynia and their partners: associations with pain, psychological, and sexual adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerner, Katelynn E; Rosen, Natalie O

    2015-06-01

    Provoked vestibulodynia (PVD) is a common vulvovaginal pain condition associated with negative psychological and sexual consequences for affected women and their sexual partners. Greater pain acceptance has been found to be associated with better functional and psychological outcomes in individuals with chronic pain, and acceptance-based strategies are being increasingly incorporated into treatment protocols. The present study is a novel investigation of pain acceptance in PVD couples. The aim was to examine the associations between acceptance of vulvovaginal pain and women's pain during intercourse, as well as the psychological and sexual adjustment of both women with PVD and their partners. Sixty-one couples (M(age) for women = 27.95 years, SD = 5.87; M(age) for men = 30.48 years, SD = 6.70) in which the woman was diagnosed with PVD completed the Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire, in reference to women's vulvovaginal pain. Women also rated their pain during intercourse, and couples completed measures of anxiety, depression, sexual function, and sexual satisfaction. Dependent measures were (i) women's self-reported pain during intercourse on a numerical rating scale; (ii) State-Trait Anxiety Inventory trait subscale; (iii) Beck Depression Inventory-II; (iv) Derogatis Interview for Sexual Functioning; and (v) Global Measure of Sexual Satisfaction Scale. Women's greater pain acceptance was associated with their lower self-reported pain during intercourse, controlling for partner's pain acceptance. Greater pain acceptance among women was associated with their own lower anxiety and depression, greater sexual functioning, as well as their own and their partner's greater sexual satisfaction, controlling for the partner's pain acceptance. Additionally, greater pain acceptance among male partners was associated with their own lower depression. Findings suggest that psychological interventions for PVD should target increasing couples' vulvovaginal pain acceptance in

  4. Comparison of Sexual Dysfunctions among Employed Women and Housewives Attending’s to Tabriz Counseling Crescent Center Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Esmaili

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available foundations of healthy family life combined with felicity. Suppress the innate and God-given needs, has undesirable consequences on intimacy and vitality of family members. Therefore, the aim of this study is evaluating and comparing sexual dysfunction of employed women and housewives. Finding the issue that whether there are differences between both groups, and if there is, which of these measures it includes. It is what the study is conducted to achieve. Materials and Methods: The method of this study is descriptive-comparative, that in which 50 person from employed women were select and compared with 50 housewives based on the examination of female sexual function index (FSFI. MANOVA analyses were used for analysis data. Results: The results of the analysis showed that measures of FSFI such as the desire, orgasm and sexual satisfaction have a significant difference with housewife's group. Conclusion: On the basis of findings, it could be said that unlike employed women, housewives suffered from sexual dysfunctions and these disorders can lead to marital dissatisfaction in the life.

  5. Androgens and Psychosocial Factors Related to Sexual Dysfunctions in Premenopausal Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wåhlin-Jacobsen, Sarah; Kristensen, Ellids; Pedersen, Anette Tønnes

    2017-01-01

    a questionnaire on psychosocial factors and had blood sampled at days 6 to 10 in their menstrual cycle. Logistic regression models were built to test the association among hormone levels, psychosocial factors, and sexual end points. Main Outcome Measures Five different sexual end points were measured using...... duration longer than 2 years and mild depressive symptoms increased the risk of having all the sexual end points, including FSD in general and HSDD in particular in multivariate analyses. Conclusion In this large cross-sectional study, low sexual desire was significantly associated with levels of free...... testosterone and androstenedione, but FSD in general and HSDD in particular were not associated with androgen levels. Length of relationship and depression were associated with FSD including HSDD. Wåhlin-Jacobsen S, Kristensen E, Tønnes Pedersen A, et al. Androgens and Psychosocial Factors Related to Sexual Dysfunctions...

  6. "I'll look it up on the Web first": Barriers and overcoming barriers to consult for sexual dysfunction among young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akre, Christina; Michaud, Pierre-André; Suris, Joan-Carles

    2010-06-12

    Our aim was to identify the barriers young men face to consult a health professional when they encounter sexual dysfunctions and where they turn to, if so, for answers. We conducted an exploratory qualitative research including 12 young men aged 16-20 years old seen in two focus groups. Discussions were triggered through vignettes about sexual dysfunction. Young men preferred not to talk about sexual dysfunction problems with anyone and to solve them alone as it is considered an intimate and embarrassing subject which can negatively impact their masculinity. Confidentiality appeared to be the most important criterion in disclosing an intimate subject to a health professional. Participants raised the problem of males' accessibility to services and lack of reason to consult. Two criteria to address the problem were if it was long-lasting or considered as physical. The Internet was unanimously considered as an initial solution to solve a problem, which could guide them to a face-to-face consultation if necessary. Results suggest that Internet-based tools should be developed to become an easy access door to sexual health services for young men. Wherever they consult and for whatever problem, sexual health must be on the agenda.

  7. Aspectos diagnósticos e terapêuticos das disfunções sexuais femininas Diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of female sexual dysfunctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmita Helena Najjar Abdo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo apresenta o desenvolvimento do conceito de normal e patológico em sexualidade, com base nos estudos populacionais de Kinsey, bem como a evolução do conceito de ciclo de resposta sexual, desde Masters e Johnson até Basson. Trata das classificações das disfunções sexuais, as quais têm como base o ciclo de resposta sexual. Os aspectos diagnósticos das disfunções sexuais femininas ressaltam a primazia da observação clínica minuciosa, enfatizando que o diagnóstico deve considerar o tempo de evolução do quadro, as condições do(a parceiro(a e as características do estímulo sexual (quanto ao foco, à duração e à intensidade. Além disso, a distinção entre disfunção primária ou secundária, generalizada ou situacional, bem como idade e experiência sexual da mulher, são parâmetros diagnósticos. Os aspectos terapêuticos referem a importância de uma equipe multidisciplinar, capaz de oferecer à mulher acompanhamento psicoterápico e medicamentoso (com antidepressivos, ansiolíticos, hormônios, entre outros, além de suporte psicoeducacional. Ressalta-se a necessidade de se avaliar caso a caso para a instituição de terapêutica individualizada. Embora os quadros de disfunções sexuais da mulher já sejam bem conhecidos, os recursos disponíveis para esse tratamento ainda são restritos. Novas pesquisas deverão contribuir para mudar essa realidade e fazer frente aos progressos terapêuticos relativos às disfunções sexuais masculinas.This article discusses the development of the concepts of normal and pathological in sexuality from the perspective of the population studies by Kinsey, as well as the development of the concept of sexual response cycle, from Masters and Johnson to Basson. The article deals with the classification of sexual dysfunctions, based on the sexual response cycle. Aspects of the diagnosis of female sexual dysfunctions reveal the importance of a detailed clinical observation

  8. Sexual Function and Health-Related Quality of Life in Long-Term Rectal Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Virginia; Grant, Marcia; Wendel, Christopher S; McMullen, Carmit K; Bulkley, Joanna E; Herrinton, Lisa J; Hornbrook, Mark C; Krouse, Robert S

    2016-07-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a treatment sequela in survivors of rectal cancer (RC). Differences in health-related quality of life (HRQOL) can occur based on ostomy status (permanent ostomy vs anastomosis). To describe alterations in sexual function and HRQOL based on ostomy status in long-term (≥5 years) survivors of RC. Survivors of RC with an ostomy (n = 181) or anastomosis (n = 394) were surveyed using validated HRQOL and functional status tools. We compared sexuality outcomes between the ostomy and anastomosis groups and reported differences adjusted for clinical and demographic characteristics. Qualitative data from one open-ended question on survivors' greatest challenges since their surgery were analyzed to explore sexuality, symptoms, and relationships. Whether sexually active, satisfaction with sexual activity, and select sexual dysfunction items from the Modified City of Hope Quality of Life-Colorectal. Survivors with a permanent ostomy were more likely to have been sexually inactive after surgery if it occurred before 2000 and experience dissatisfaction with appearance, interference with personal relationships and intimacy, and lower overall HRQOL. Female survivors of RC with an ostomy were more likely to have problems with vaginal strictures and vaginal pain after surgery that persisted at the time of the survey (≥5 years later). Radiation treatment, tumor stage, soilage of garments in bed, and higher Charlson-Deyo comorbidity scores were negatively associated with outcomes. Six qualitative themes emerged: loss of and decreased sexual activity, psychological issues with sexual activity, physical issues with sexual activity, partner rejection, ostomy interference with sexual activity, and positive experiences with sexuality. Sexual dysfunction is a common long-term sequela of RC treatment, with more problems observed in survivors with a permanent ostomy. This warrants widespread implementation of targeted interventions to manage sexual dysfunction and

  9. Perceived causes and consequences of sexual changes after cancer for women and men: a mixed method study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ussher, Jane M; Perz, Janette; Gilbert, Emilee

    2015-04-11

    Previous research on cancer and sexuality has focused on physical aspects of sexual dysfunction, neglecting the subjective meaning and consequences of sexual changes. This has led to calls for research on cancer and sexuality to adopt an "integrative" approach, and to examine the ways in which individuals interpret sexual changes, and the subjective consequences of sexual changes. This study examined the nature and subjective experience and consequences of changes to sexual well-being after cancer, using a combination of quantitative and qualitative analysis. Six hundred and fifty seven people with cancer (535 women, 122 men), across a range of reproductive and non-reproductive cancer types completed a survey and 44 (23 women, 21 men) took part in an in-depth interview. Sexual frequency, sexual satisfaction and engagement in a range of penetrative and non-penetrative sexual activities were reported to have reduced after cancer, for both women and men, across reproductive and non-reproductive cancer types. Perceived causes of such changes were physical consequences of cancer treatment, psychological factors, body image concerns and relationship factors. Sex specific difficulties (vaginal dryness and erectile dysfunction) were the most commonly reported explanation for both women and men, followed by tiredness and feeling unattractive for women, and surgery and getting older for men. Psychological and relationship factors were also identified as consequence of changes to sexuality. This included disappointment at loss of sexual intimacy, frustration and anger, sadness, feelings of inadequacy and changes to sense of masculinity of femininity, as well as increased confidence and self-comfort; and relationship strain, relationship ending and difficulties forming a new relationship. Conversely, a number of participants reported increased confidence, re-prioritisation of sex, sexual re-negotiation, as well as a strengthened relationship, after cancer. The findings of this

  10. Current approach to sexual disfunctions in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulkadir Tepeler

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Even though sexual problems and sexual dysfunction are commonly observed in the society, a significant majority of the problems are not reported to the doctors, and due to this fact, remain unaddressed. In our country, the studies about sexual dysfunction are limited in number but in recent years there has been an increase in these studies. The ratio of sexual dysfunction is higher in women than the ratio in men (43%; 31%. However, there are few treatment modality about women sexual dysfunction. Most commonly observed sexual dysfunctions in women are loss of sexual interest/desire, sexual arousal dysfunctions, orgasm dysfunctions, dyspareunia, vaginismus and sexual anxiety. In DSM-IV-TR, sexual dysfunction is treated by taking stress and interfamily relation problems into consideration. According to WHO’s definition, sexual health refers the combination of physical, emotional, intellectual and social sexual existense with the techniques that would increase personality communication and love. Sexual problems damage this combination, and cause pyschological and social problems. J Clin Exp Invest 2010; 1(3: 235-240

  11. Prevention of Risky Sexual Behaviour through the Formation of Psychological Readiness to Parenthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krysko A.A.,

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In the world there are tendencies of early entering into sexual relations and simultaneous withdrawal of the age of marriage, an increase in the number of early pregnancies and abortions among minors. Existing programs for the prevention of risky sexual behavior are ineffective, since they are one-time, narrowly focused. The author presents the results of an experiment on the prevention of risky sexual behavior in adolescents based on the formation of their ideas of parenting and child-parent relations, and through the prism of this topic, allowing to build an image of reproductive behavior in the present and future. The program is designed taking into account the psychology of modern adolescents, in accordance with the principles of awareness and responsibility, is based on a restorative approach and resource approach to the formation of psychological readiness for parenthood M.E. Lantsburg. The program for the development of psychological preparedness for parenting in adolescents has two targets: the nearest: preventing adolescent pregnancy and reducing its negative consequences in the event of an early pregnancy, and strategic - preparing for the planning and birth of the coveted child in the future. The results prove that the adolescents' views about the family depend both on the experiences they experienced in their own childhood and on the trends in the social and political space discussed in this topic. The study showed that adolescents' views on sexual relations, family and parenthood can be purposefully influenced through a program based on the knowledge of age-related psychology, resource and recovery approaches and using interactive methods of teaching relevant to this age group.

  12. Conflicts Within the Family and Within the Couple as Contextual Factors in the Determinism of Male Sexual Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddi, Valentina; Fanni, Egidia; Castellini, Giovanni; Fisher, Alessandra Daphne; Corona, Giovanni; Maggi, Mario

    2015-12-01

    The deterioration of a couple's relationship has been previously associated with impairment in male sexual function. Besides a couple's dystonic relationship, other stressors can unfavorably influence dyadic intimacy. A largely neglected etiopathogenetic factor affecting couple sexuality is the frustration caused by conflicts within the family. To evaluate the possible associations between male sexual dysfunction (SD) and conflictual relationships within the couple or the family. A consecutive series of 3,975 men, attending the Outpatient Clinic for SD for the first time, was retrospectively studied. Conflicts within the family and within the couple were assessed using two standard questions: "Are there any conflicts at home," and "Do you have a difficult relationship with your partner?" respectively, rating 0 = normal relationships, 1 = occasional quarrels, and 2 = frequent quarrels or always. Several clinical, biochemical, and psychological (Middlesex Hospital Questionnaire) parameters were studied. Among the 3,975 patients studied, we observed a high prevalence of conflicts within the family and within the couple (32% vs. 21.2%). When compared with the rest of the sample, subjects reporting both type of conflicts showed a higher prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities. Hence, all data were adjusted for this parameter and for age. Family and couple conflicts were significantly associated with free floating anxiety, depression symptoms, and with a higher risk of subjective (self-reported) and objective (peak systolic velocity at the penile color Doppler ultrasound conflicts. This study indicates that the presence of often unexplored issues, like conflicts within the family or within the couple, can represent an important contextual factor in the determinism of male SD. © 2015 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  13. Methylmercury Exposure Induces Sexual Dysfunction in Male and Female Drosophila Melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Ved; Srikumar, Syian; Aamer, Sarah; Pandareesh, Mirazkar D; Chauhan, Abha

    2017-09-24

    Mercury, an environmental health hazard, is a neurotoxic heavy metal. In this study, the effect of methylmercury (MeHg) exposure was analyzed on sexual behavior in Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly), because neurons play a vital role in sexual functions. The virgin male and female flies were fed a diet mixed with different concentrations of MeHg (28.25, 56.5, 113, 226, and 339 µM) for four days, and the effect of MeHg on copulation of these flies was studied. While male and female control flies (no MeHg) and flies fed with lower concentrations of MeHg (28.25, 56.5 µM) copulated in a normal manner, male and female flies exposed to higher concentrations of MeHg (113, 226, and 339 µM) did not copulate. When male flies exposed to higher concentrations of MeHg were allowed to copulate with control female flies, only male flies fed with 113 µM MeHg were able to copulate. On the other hand, when female flies exposed to higher concentrations of MeHg were allowed to copulate with control male flies, none of the flies could copulate. After introduction of male and female flies in the copulation chamber, duration of wing flapping by male flies decreased in a MeHg-concentration-dependent manner from 101 ± 24 seconds (control) to 100.7 ± 18, 96 ±12, 59 ± 44, 31 ± 15, and 3.7 ± 2.7 seconds at 28.25, 56.5, 113, 226, and 339 µM MeHg, respectively. On the other hand, grooming in male and female flies increased in a MeHg-concentration-dependent manner. These findings suggest that MeHg exposure causes sexual dysfunction in male and female Drosophila melanogaster . Further studies showed that MeHg exposure increased oxidative stress and decreased triglyceride levels in a concentration-dependent manner in both male and female flies, suggesting that MeHg-induced oxidative stress and decreased triglyceride levels may partly contribute to sexual dysfunction in fruit flies.

  14. Erectile dysfunction is a strong predictor of poor quality of life in men with Type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavige, L S; Jayaratne, S D; Kathriarachchi, S T; Sivayogan, S; Ranasinghe, P; Levy, J C

    2014-06-01

    To identify predictors of poor quality of life among men with diabetes from a comprehensive set of sexual, clinical, socio-economic and lifestyle variables. This was a cross-sectional observational-study of 253 men with Type 2 diabetes, randomly selected from a clinic in Colombo, Sri Lanka. Erectile dysfunction was assessed using the five-item International Index of Erectile Function and quality of life was assessed using the Sri Lankan version of the 36-item short form health survey questionnaire and the disease-specific Psychological Impact of Erectile Dysfunction scale. The presence of premature ejaculation, reduced libido, socio-demographic and lifestyle data was obtained using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Significant predictors of quality of life were identified by stepwise multivariate linear regression models for short form-36 subscales, summary scales and two scales of Psychological Impact of Erectile Dysfunction. Significant predictors on the physical summary scale of the 36-item short form were erectile dysfunction (β = 7.93, 95% CI 3.70-12.17, P 27.5 kg/m(2) (β = 9.12, 95% CI 1.38-17.44, P strong predictor of poor generic and disease-specific quality of life among other sexual and clinical variables in men with diabetes. © 2014 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2014 Diabetes UK.

  15. Sexual Orientation Differences as Deficits: Science and Stigma in the History of American Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herek, Gregory M

    2010-11-01

    This article briefly describes how psychology, psychiatry, and the mental health professions (here collectively referred to as Psychology) treated sexual orientation differences as deficits for much of the 20th century, as well as some of the negative consequences that practice had for sexual minorities. The 1970s witnessed a remarkable turnaround when the American Psychiatric Association removed homosexuality from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders and the American Psychological Association called for psychologists to work to remove the stigma historically associated with homosexuality. This history illustrates not only how cultural institutions play a central role in legitimating stigma, but also how they can recognize their own complicity in this process and work effectively to undo its harmful effects. It is argued that Psychology still has an important role to play in challenging the differences-as-deficits model in contemporary policy debates. © The Author(s) 2010.

  16. [Difficulties in psychology and sexual behavior].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    After an introduction by S. Kepes (Fertilite Orthogenie 4(4): 174-177,1972) the participants and audience discussed general topics such as the physician-patient relationship, unconscious motives, attitudes of male partners and physicians, and treatment of minors. Resistance by male partners toward contraception was considered due to fear of inadequacy in the face of female sexuality or to adherence to a double moral standard for wives. A gynecologist claimed that high school students are more likely to request contraception and use it effectively than they were 5 years ago; a midwife said that less privileged adolescents frequently become pregnant. Opinions were expressed that it is inappropriate to consider contraception from a psychological viewpoint, since it is part of a revolution toward a better life; that some psychological difficulties come from the doctor having preferences for certain methods; that the pill does not cause frigidity but is often blamed for preexisting problems; that the press frightens women away from taking the pill; that physicians should prescribe contraception to minors without seeking parental consent (unlawful in France).

  17. The Neuropsychology of Adolescent Sexual Offending: Testing an Executive Dysfunction Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Hugo B; Joyal, Christian C; Alexander, Apryl A; Fix, Rebecca L; Burkhart, Barry R

    2016-12-01

    Although executive dysfunctions are commonly hypothesized to contribute to sexual deviance or aggression, evidence of this relationship is scarce and its specificity is unproven, especially among adolescents. The objective of this study was to compare the executive functioning (EF) of adolescents with sexual offense convictions (ASOC) to that of non-sex-delinquents (NSD). A secondary goal was to assess the relationship among specific sexual offense characteristics (i.e., victim age), history of childhood sexual abuse (CSA), and EF. It was hypothesized that as a group, ASOC would present similar EF profiles as NSD. It was further hypothesized that ASOC with child victims would present significantly higher rates of CSA and more severe impairment of EF than ASOC with peer-aged or older victims and NSD. A total of 183 male adolescents (127 ASOC and 56 NSD) were interviewed to collect demographic information, sexual development history, history of CSA, an assessment of living conditions, and history of delinquency and sexual offending. Participants were administered the Delis-Kaplan Executive Functioning System and the Hare Psychopathy Checklist-Youth Version. In accord with the first hypothesis, ASOC and NSD presented similar EF scores, well below normative values. Thus, EF deficits may not characterize the profiles of adolescents with sexual behavior problems. Contrarily to our second hypothesis, however, offending against children and or experiencing CSA were not associated with poorer EF performance. On the contrary, ASOC with child victims obtained significantly higher scores on measures of higher order EF than both ASOC with peer-aged or older victims and NSD. Implications of these results and future directions are discussed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Psychological assessment through performance-based techniques and self-reports: a case study of a sexually abused girl at preschool age.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Khalily, Muhammad Tahir

    2011-05-01

    We investigated the implicit psychological and behavioral consequences of sexual abuse in an adolescent girl who suffered child sexual abuse at preschool age in this case report. We report the manifestations of this abuse on her personality and psychological functioning using a structured clinical interview and a comprehensive psychological battery including the Beck Anxiety Inventory, the Beck Depression Inventory, the Standard Progressive Matrices, Rorschach Ink Blots, and the Schema Mode Inventory. These investigations were useful in formulating both a diagnosis and a management plan. The girl fulfilled diagnostic criteria for a major depressive episode and borderline personality disorder. This combination of psychological testing may be useful in establishing an accurate multiaxial diagnosis and for understanding the behavioral and psychological sequelae of child sexual abuse in similar cases. The study further suggests that schema-focused therapy is a useful therapeutic tool for individuals who have suffered child sexual abuse at an early age and who have borderline personality disorder.

  19. Sexual dysfunction among Ghanaian men presenting with various medical conditions

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    Quaye Lawrence

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several medical conditions can affect and disrupt human sexuality. The alteration of sexuality in these medical conditions often hinder effective communication and empathy between the patients and their sexual partners because of cultural attitudes, social norms and negative feelings such as anxiety and guilt. Validated and standardized sexual inventories might therefore help resolve this problem. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to obtain data on the prevalence of male sexual dysfunction (SD among Ghanaians with various medical conditions residing in Kumasi. Methods The Golombok Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction (GRISS was administered to 150 Ghanaian men with various medical conditions between 19 and 66 years old (mean ± standard deviation: 40.01 ± 12.32 years domiciled in the Kumasi metropolis. Results Out of the total 150 questionnaires administered, 105 (70.0% men returned the questionnaires. Questionnaires from 3 men were incomplete, leaving 102 complete and evaluable questionnaires, indicating a 68.0% response rate. Of the remaining 102 men, 88.2% were married, 70.6% had attained higher education, 88.2% were non-smokers. Whereas 54.9% were engaged in exercise, 61.8% indulged in alcoholic beverages. The prevalence of the various medical conditions include: diabetes (18%, hypertension (24.5%, migraine (11.8%, ulcer (7.8%, surgery (6.9%, STD (3.9 and others (26.5%. The prevalence of SD among the respondents in the study was 59.8%. The highest prevalence of SD was seen among ulcer patients (100%, followed by patients who have undergone surgery (75%, diabetes (70%, hypertension (50%, STD (50% and the lowest was seen among migraine patients (41.7%. Conclusions SD rate is high among Ghanaian men with medical conditions (about 60% and vary according to the condition and age.

  20. Female Sexual Dysfunction in the Late Postpartum Period Among Women with Previous Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargin, Mehmet Akif; Yassa, Murat; Taymur, Bilge Dogan; Taymur, Bulent; Akca, Gizem; Tug, Niyazi

    2017-04-01

    To compare the status of female sexual dysfunction (FSD) between women with a history of previous gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and those with follow-up of a healthy pregnancy, using the female sexual function index (FSFI) questionnaire. Cross-sectional study. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Fatih Sultan Mehmet Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey, from September to December 2015. Healthy sexually active adult parous females were included. Participants were asked to complete the validated Turkish versions of the FSFI and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) questionnaires. Student's t-test was used for two-group comparisons of normally distributed variables and quantitative data. Mann-Whitney U-test was used for two-group comparisons of non-normally distributed variables. Pearson's chi-squared test, the Fisher-FreemanHalton test, Fisher's exact test, and Yates' continuity correction test were used for comparison of qualitative data. The mean FSFI scores of the 179 participants was 23.50 ±3.94. FSFI scores and scores of desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction, and pain were not statistically significantly different (p>0.05), according to a history of GDM and types of FSD (none, mild, severe). HADS scores and anxiety and depression types did not statistically significantly differ according to the history of GDM (p>0.05). An association could not be found in FSFI scores between participants with both the history of previous GDM and with healthy pregnancy; subclinical sexual dysfunction may be observed in the late postpartum period among women with a history of previous GDM. This may adversely affect their sexual health.

  1. Physiotherapy for pelvic pain and female sexual dysfunction: an untapped resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghmans, Bary

    2018-05-01

    Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) in women is a complex syndrome. Pain sensation and intensity often do not correspond with the identified lesion location but are felt elsewhere, leading to muskuloskeletal and myofascial disorders and sexual dysfunction (SD). Although physical aspects are prevalent, they are often underdiagnosed and undertreated due to lack of understanding regarding its origin and distribution. Frequently, patients experience pelvic pain as psychological distress resulting in physical complaints, leading clinicians to prescribe medication or surgical intervention to correct or alleviate these symptoms, often with insufficient results. Because pelvic floor muscle disorders contribute significantly to CPP and SD, there is rationale for physiotherapy. However, physiotherapy is a widely underused and untapped resource, which has its place in the multidisciplinary approach to these health problems. Computer-aided and manual searches and methodological quality assessment were carried out for meta-analyses, systematic reviews, and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published between 1990 and 2017 investigating classification, assessment, and (physiotherapeutic) treatment of pelvic pain and/or female SD defined by the keywords below. Expert opinions were sought via interviews. Due to a lack of sufficient relevant medical information, referral data, and test results, focused physiotherapy is difficult to administer adequately. However, recent quality studies indicate significant clinical effects of physiotherapy for CPP and female SD, and experts advocate a multidisciplinary approach that includes physiotherapy. Because of its holistic approach, physiotherapy can contribute significantly to the multidisciplinary assessment and treatment of CPP and female SD.

  2. Developing an affirmative position statement on sexual and gender diversity for psychology professionals in South Africa

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    Cornelius J. Victor

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Against the background of the dominance of patriarchy and heteronormativity in Africa and the resultant stigma, discrimination and victimisation of sexually and gender-diverse people, this article reports on the development of an affirmative position statement by the Psychological Society of South Africa (PsySSA for psychology professionals working with sexually and gender-diverse people. The position statement is an attempt to contribute positively to the de-stigmatisation, amongst psychology professionals, of all people with diverse sexual and gender identities. Objective. In documenting and reflecting on the process of developing the statement — a first on the African continent — the article aims to contribute to the potential resources available to others in their work on similar projects around the world. Design. Although initially intended to be relevant to the African continent, the position statement is appropriate to the South African context specifically, but developed in consultation with a range of stakeholders, also from other African countries. Results. Concerns expressed during stakeholder consultations, and thus taken into account in the development of the statement, include relevance to other African countries, negotiating the politics of representation and language, the importance of including gender and biological variance in addition to sexuality, and the need to be sensitive to how Western influence is constructed in some African contexts. Conclusion. Other national psychology organisations stand to benefit by ‘lessons learned’ during this country-specific process with global implications, especially with respect to broadening the lens from lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI to sexual and gender diversity, as well as an acknowledgement of the multiple and fluid developmental pathways around sexuality and gender, in general.

  3. Opioids Increase Sexual Dysfunction in Patients With Non-Cancer Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajo, Raquel; Segura, Ana; Inda, María M; Planelles, Beatriz; Martínez, Luz; Ferrández, Guillermina; Sánchez, Angel; César Margarit; Peiró, Ana-María

    2016-09-01

    Long-term opioid therapy has been found to have a strong impact on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis that can be manifested clinically by sexual dysfunction (SD). This event is rarely reported and thus unnoticed and undertreated. To analyze the presence of SD in a large group of patients receiving long-term opioids. A descriptive, cross-sectional pilot study of sexual health was conducted for 2 years in 750 consecutive ambulatory patients with chronic non-cancer pain (CNP) receiving opioids for at least 12 months. Cases that reported SD and matched controls were included. Standardized questionnaires and medical record reviews were used to assess rates of pain at diagnosis, daily morphine equivalent doses, and opioid adverse effects. Sexual function was determined by the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI; scores = 2-36) and the International Index of Erectile Function erectile function domain (IIEF-EF; scores = 1-30). Thirty-three percent of 33% of 750 patients with CNP recorded SD based on their spontaneous notification at the pain unit. Men reported SD significantly more frequently than women (33% vs 25%, respectively, P sexually active life (69% vs 34%, respectively, P = .00) significantly more often. FSFI scores were significantly influenced by sexual activity in lubrication and arousal. IIEF scores were significantly determined by age in satisfaction with sexual intercourse and overall satisfaction. The morphine equivalent dose was significant higher in men than in women (38%; median = 70 mg/d, interquartile range = 43.1-170, 115.5 ± 110.3 mg/d vs median = 60 mg/d, interquartile range = 30-100.6, 76.67 ± 63.79 mg/d, P = .016) at the same mean intensity of pain (P = .54), which correlated to FSFI scores (r = -0.313, P = .01). SD is prevalent in patients with CNP and higher in men who received a significantly higher mean opioid dose at the same intensity pain level than women. The morphine equivalent dose was correlated to SD intensity

  4. Effects of Cardiac Rehabilitation on Sexual Dysfunction of Post Myocardial Infarction Patients

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    Jamshid Najafian

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The common sexual complains in patients with coronary heart disease and post myocardial infarction are decrease in libido, impotence, and premature or delay ejaculation. Cardiac rehabilitation could decrease many of the psychological features of myocardial infarction and also increase exercise capacity of patients. Rehabilitation may also improve sexual disturbances in these patients directly or indirectly. This study is a clinical trial that evaluate the effect of rehabilitation on sexual problem of post MI patients. Materials & Methods: 60 patients took part in this study. All of them were men aged between 35 and 65. All patients had myocardial infarction one month ago. 30 patients were referred for cardiac rehabilitation (Case, and 30 people were patients who were not recommended to take part in rehabilitation because their physician did not believe on rehabilitation. Questioner for anxiety, depression, impotency, libido and premature ejaculation were evaluated by before and after study period. The cardiac rehabilitation composed of 24 sessions. Each session consisted of one hour of aerobic exercise (10 min warm up, 10 min cool down and 40 min isotonic exercise. Results: After cardiac rehabilitation the scores for anxiety, depression, premature ejaculation and impotency were decreased and the scores of libido were increased. In both case and control groups, the changes were significant by paired t test P<0.05. The differences between case and control were significant for depression, libido and impotency by independent t test. Conclusion: Cardiac rehabilitation could improve sexual problems in post myocardial infarction patients directly and indirectly by effect on psychological characteristics.